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Inquiry based learning in physical education  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The present project is a case study founded on the decreasing motivation and engagement in physical education. The project suggests inquiry based learning (IBL) as an educational methodology. This may help to turn the trend as IBL has shown to engage and motivate students at different educational levels and within different subjects. In this pilot research project performed at a physical education teacher education program, qualitative methods were chosen to investigate students’ motivation and engagement within an IBL-unit in physical education and to accentuate challenges, advantages and disadvantages within the IBL-methodology in relation to students’ motivation. Instructed in guided inquiry, 32 students of physical education in a teacher training college worked with inquiry based learning in physical education over a four week period. During the IBL-unit, qualitative data such as the students’ reflections and discussions (audio recorded), performance of practical exercises (video recorded) and the students’ written considerations were collected. Together with a focus group interview with six of the students, held at the end of the unit, all data were transcribed, coded and analysed in relation to the IBL and the motivation theory. The analysis revealed that the students found the method very motivating and engaging, but they also accentuated the difficulties experienced in the beginning of the inquiry work due to the degrees of freedom in the work. Besides, the students emphasised the learning potential of the method. Future qualitative studies are to focus on the learning potential of the IBL method: What did they learn and how?

Østergaard, Lars Domino

2014-01-01

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Inquiry-Based Learning in China: Lesson Learned for School Science Practices  

Science.gov (United States)

Inquiry-based learning is widely considered for science education in this era. This study aims to explore inquiry-based learning in teacher preparation program and the findings will help us to understanding what inquiry-based classroom is and how inquiry-based learning are. Data were collected by qualitative methods; classroom observation,…

Nuangchalerm, Prasart

2014-01-01

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Inquiry based learning with a virtual microscope  

Science.gov (United States)

As part of newly funded initiative, the Wolfson OpenScience Laboratory, we are linking a tool for inquiry based learning, nQuire (http://www.nquire.org.uk) with the virtual microscope for Earth science (http://www.virtualmicroscope.co.uk) to allow students to undertake projects and gain from inquiry based study thin sections of rocks without the need for a laboratory with expensive petrological microscopes. The Virtual Microscope (VM) was developed for undergraduate teaching of petrology and geoscience, allowing students to explore rock hand specimens and thin sections in a browser window. The system is based on HTML5 application and allows students to scan and zoom the rocks in a browser window, view in ppl and xpl conditions, and rotate specific areas to view birefringence and pleochroism. Importantly the VM allows students to gain access to rare specimens such as Moon rocks that might be too precious to suffer loss or damage. Experimentation with such specimens can inspire the learners' interest in science and allows them to investigate relevant science questions. Yet it is challenging for learners to engage in scientific processes, as they may lack scientific investigation skills or have problems in planning their activities; for teachers, managing inquiry activities is a demanding task (Quintana et al., 2004). To facilitate the realization of inquiry activities, the VM is being integrated with the nQuire tool. nQuire is a web tool that guides and supports students through the inquiry process (Mulholland et al., 2011). Learners are encouraged to construct their own personally relevant hypothesis, pose scientific questions, and plan the method to answer them. Then, the system enables users to collect and analyze data, and share their conclusions. Teachers can monitor their students' progress through inquiries, and give them access to new parts of inquiries as they advance. By means of the integration of nQuire and the VM, inquiries that involve collecting data through a microscope can be created and supported. To illustrate the possibilities of these tools, we have designed two inquiries that engage learners in the study of Moon rock samples under the microscope, starting from general questions such as comparison of Moon rocks or determining the origin of meteorites. One is aimed at undergraduate Geology students; the second has been conceived for the general public. Science teachers can reuse these inquiries, adapt them as they need, or create completely new inquiries using nQuire's authoring tool. We will report progress and demonstrate the combination of these two on-line tools to create an open educational resource allowing educators to design and run science inquiries for Earth and planetary science in a range of settings from schools to universities. Quintana, C., Reiser, B. J., Davis, E. A., Krajcik, J., Fretz, E., Duncan, R. G., Kyza, E., et al. (2004). A scaffolding design framework for software to support science inquiry. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 13(3), 337-386. Mulholland, P., Anastopoulou, S., Collins, T., FeiBt, M., Gaved, M., Kerawalla, L., Paxton, M., et al. (2011). nQuire: Technological support for personal inquiry learning. IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies. First published online, December 5, 2011, http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/TLT.2011.32.

Kelley, S. P.; Sharples, M.; Tindle, A.; Villasclaras-Fernández, E.

2012-12-01

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Inquiry-Based Learning: Inflammation as a Model to Teach Molecular Techniques for Assessing Gene Expression  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This laboratory module simulates the process used by working scientists to ask and answer a question of biological interest. Instructors facilitate acquisition of knowledge using a comprehensive, inquiry-based approach in which students learn theory, hypothesis development, experimental design, and data interpretation and presentation. Using inflammation in macrophages as a model system, students perform a series of molecular biology techniques to address the biological question: “Does stim...

Gunn, Kathryn E.; Christine Seitz McCauslin; Jennifer Staiger; Pirone, Dana M.

2013-01-01

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Learning Outcomes of Project-Based and Inquiry-Based Learning Activities  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Problem statement: Organization of science learning activities is appnecessary to rely on various methods of organization of learning and to be appropriate to learners. Organization of project-based learning activities and inquiry-based learning activities are teaching methods which can help students understand scientific knowledge. It would be more efficient. This study aimed to compare learning achievement, science process skills and analytical thinking of fifth grade students who learned by using organization of project-based and inquiry-based learning activities. Approach: The sample used in the study consisted of 88 fifth grade students, 2 selected classrooms at Muang Nakhon Ratchasima School, under the Office of Nakhon Ratchasima Educational Service Area Zone 1 in the first semester of the academic year 2008, obtained cluster random sampling technique. Students were divided into 2 groups, 44 students each. The research instruments used in the study were lesson plans for organization of project-based and inquiry-based learning activities, 8 plans each; a 30-item 4-choice science learning achievement test with discriminating powers ranging 0.28-0.46 and a reliability of 0.86; a 20-item 4-choice science process skill test with difficulties (P ranging 0.36-0.68, discriminating powers ranging 0.38-0.72 and a reliability of 0.82 and a 20-item 4-choice analytical thinking test with difficulties (P ranging 0.44-0.67, discriminating powers ranging 0.32-0.81 and a reliability 0.76. Hotelling T2 was employed for testing hypotheses. Results: The plans for organization of project-based and inquiry-based learning activities in the science learning had efficiencies 89.05/78.79 of project-based learning and 87.58/78.64 of inquiry-based learning in respectively. The plans for organization of project-based and inquiry-based learning activities had effectiveness indices 0.6774 of project-based learning and 0.6781of inquiry-based learning in respectively. Students who learned using the plans for organization of project-based learning activities and those who learned using the plans for organization of inquiry-based learning activities did not have different learning achievement, science process skills and analytical thinking (p>0.05. Conclusion: In conclusion, the plans for organization of project-based and inquiry-based learning activities were appropriately efficient and effective. The students in 2 groups did not show different learning achievement, science process skills and analytical thinking. Therefore, science teachers could implement both of these teaching methods in organization of activities as appropriate for learners to achieve in the future.

Mookdaporn Panasan

2010-01-01

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NGSS and Inquiry-Based Learning with The GLOBE Program  

Science.gov (United States)

The GLOBE Program (www.globe.gov) engages K-12 students through scientific discovery to learn about the Earth as a system and provides a curricular example for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). A key component of GLOBE is its inquiry-based, hands-on activities, which align with the eight practices found in Dimension 1 of the Standards. GLOBE teachers currently address the crosscutting concepts from Dimension 2 in the Standards by engaging students in data analysis and application through GLOBE Investigations, such as GPS, hydrology and atmosphere. Hands-on activities align to the disciplinary core ideas of Dimension 3 of the Standards through the implementation of protocols in air, water, soil, land cover, and seasons in over 25,000 schools in more than 110 countries worldwide. Integration of technology, engineering, and the application of science have played a central role in The GLOBE Program since its inception in 1995. The GLOBE Program provides a venue for students to report their own scientific investigations to scientists, teachers, and other students through student research reports, as well as a variety of student conference opportunities. This presentation will provide samples of how The GLOBE Program and GLOBE teachers encourage inquiry-based learning for student achievement of the NGSS through the review of student reports. These reports serve as artifacts illustrating the scientific practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas students engage in while participating in GLOBE. This review will illustrate the extent to which GLOBE protocols and activities support NGSS, indicate gaps or mismatches in scope and sequence, provide recommendations for new materials development, and demonstrate a process that can be repeated by other science education programs to review their own current alignment to NGSS.

Wegner, K.; Bydlowski, D.; Seavey, M.; Andersen, T.; Mackaro, J.; Malmberg, J.; Randolph, J. G.; Tessendorf, S. A.

2012-12-01

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The Role of Leadership in Fostering Inquiry-Based Learning and Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

In this chapter, the author first address the concepts of inquiry and leadership presented in the National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996). Then presents examples of leaders who foster inquiry-based learning and teaching within the context

Emily van Zee

2009-02-21

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Developing inquiry-based teaching and learning in Family Maths programme facilitators  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The inquiry-based Family Maths professional development programme, offered by the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, attempts not only to support the transformative education practices targeted by the South African National Department of Education, but also to extend them beyond the school walls to the community at large. This study investigates the extent to which this programme develops facilitators’ ability to implement inquiry-based learning. The research undertaken uses both quali...

Pam Austin; Paul Webb

2011-01-01

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A Practical Guide and a Constructivist Rationale for Inquiry Based Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This article focuses on the practical issues in implementing instructional approaches based on constructivist views of learning. The authors do not view this as a procedural guide, but rather believe that the design of these inquiry based learning (IBL) approaches must be guided by the view of learning represented in constructivist frameworks.…

Duffy, Thomas M.; Raymer, Pamela L.

2010-01-01

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Inquiry-Based Learning in Higher Education: Principal Forms, Educational Objectives, and Disciplinary Variations  

Science.gov (United States)

Learning through inquiry is a widely advocated pedagogical approach. However, there is currently little systematic knowledge about the practice of inquiry-based learning (IBL) in higher education. This study examined descriptions of learning tasks that were put forward as examples of IBL by 224 university teachers from various disciplines in three…

Aditomo, Anindito; Goodyear, Peter; Bliuc, Ana-Maria; Ellis, Robert A.

2013-01-01

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Inquiry-based learning and information literacy development: a CETL approach  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The Centre for Inquiry-based Learning in the Arts and Social Sciences (CILASS) is a Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) based at the University of Sheffield. CETL funding was awarded by HEFCE to the University in April 2005 for a period of five years, in recognition of existing excellence in inquiry-based learning (IBL) in the Faculties of Arts, Social Sciences and Law. CILASS is committed to supporting further development and innovation in IBL both locally within the Univ...

Pamela McKinney; Philippa Levy

2006-01-01

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Inquiry-Based Learning and Undergraduates' Professional Identity Development: Assessment of a Field Research-Based Course  

Science.gov (United States)

Innovative strategies in inquiry-based learning are recognized as improving the quality of higher education learning, but there is a need to explore whether and how these strategies promote the development of professional identity among undergraduates. In this article we describe an inquiry-based course, situated in a European context, which is…

Gilardi, Silvia; Lozza, Edoardo

2009-01-01

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Inquiry-Based Learning: Inflammation as a Model to Teach Molecular Techniques for Assessing Gene Expression  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This laboratory module simulates the process used by working scientists to ask and answer a question of biological interest. Instructors facilitate acquisition of knowledge using a comprehensive, inquiry-based approach in which students learn theory, hypothesis development, experimental design, and data interpretation and presentation. Using inflammation in macrophages as a model system, students perform a series of molecular biology techniques to address the biological question: “Does stimulus ‘X’ induce inflammation?” To ask this question, macrophage cells are treated with putative inflammatory mediators and then assayed for evidence of inflammatory response. Students become familiar with their assigned mediator and the relationship between their mediator and inflammation by conducting literature searches, then using this information to generate hypotheses which address the effect of their mediator on induction of inflammation. The cellular and molecular approaches used to test their hypotheses include transfection and luciferase reporter assay, immunoblot, fluorescence microscopy, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and quantitative PCR. Quantitative and qualitative reasoning skills are developed through data analysis and demonstrated by successful completion of post-lab worksheets and the generation and oral presentation of a scientific poster. Learning objective assessment relies on four instruments: pre-lab quizzes, post-lab worksheets, poster presentation, and posttest. Within three cohorts (n = 85 more than 95% of our students successfully achieved the learning objectives.

Kathryn E. Gunn

2013-08-01

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Life-Cycle Analysis and Inquiry-Based Learning in Chemistry Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this design research is to improve the quality of environmental literacy and sustainability education in chemistry teaching through combining a socio-scientific issue, life-cycle analysis (LCA), with inquiry-based learning (IBL). This first phase of the cyclic design research involved 20 inservice trained chemistry teachers from…

Juntunen, Marianne; Aksela, Maija

2013-01-01

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Classroom Management and Inquiry-Based Learning: Finding the Balance  

Science.gov (United States)

Inquiry practices often involve more student-centered activities where students interact more intensively with materials and with other students during investigations. In addition to monitoring the learning taking place, teachers in an inquiry classroom h

Tan, Aik-Ling; Poon, Chew-Leng; Tan, Doris

2009-07-01

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Blended learning in dentistry: 3-D resources for inquiry-based learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Motivation is an important factor for inquiry-based learning, so creative design of learning resources and materials is critical to enhance students’ motivation and hence their cognition. Modern dentistry is moving towards “electronic patient records” for both clinical treatment and teaching. Study models have long been an essential part of dental records. Traditional plaster casts are, however, among the last type of clinical record in the dental field to be converted into digital media as virtual models. Advantages of virtual models include: simpler storage; reduced risk of damage, disappearance, or misplacement; simpler and effective measuring; and easy transferal to colleagues. In order to support student engagement with the rapidly changing world of digital dentistry, and in order to stimulate the students’ motivation and depth of inquiry, this project aims to introduce virtual models into a Bachelor and Dental Surgery (BDS curriculum. Under a “blended” e-learning philosophy, students are first introduced to the new software then 3-D models are incorporated into inquiry-based problems as stimulus materials. Face-to-face tutorials blend virtual model access via interactive whiteboards (IWBs. Students’ perceptions of virtual models including motivation and cognition as well as the virtual models’ functionality were rated after a workshop introducing virtual models and plaster models in parallel. Initial student feedback indicates that the 3-D models have been generally well accepted, which confirmed the functionality of the programme and the positive perception of virtual models for enhancing students’ learning motivation. Further investigation will be carried out to assess the impact of virtual models on students’ learning outcomes.

Susan Bridges

2012-06-01

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Integrating Inquiry-Based Learning, Student Feedback, and Lecture in a Science Course  

Science.gov (United States)

Undergraduate science instructors are concerned that the traditional lecture centered approach may not be the most effective. This article describes an effort to integrate alternative teaching methods into a small, upper-division course that had previously been taught as a lecture course, and thus impart a current understanding of biogeography to the students. A course on biogeography with a focus on global climate change and natural resource use was chosen as the forum for a combination of conventional methods and interactive inquiry-based learning methods. Inquiry-based learning was incorporated through an in-class student modeling exercise. Evaluation methods focused on tasks that a student continuing in a scientific career would face, rather than on examinations. Throughout the course, student feedback was used to improve the structure of assignments and the way class time was used. Good student performance and student evaluations indicated successful integration of alternative methods with the traditional lecture.

Haskett, Jonathan

2001-01-01

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Working with teachers on inquiry based learning (IBL) and mathematics and science tasks  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper reports on teachers’ experiences from and their evaluation of a teacher professional development event arranged in connection with the European PRIMAS project. Inquiry-based learning (IBL) and analysis of ‘appropriate’ mathematics and science tasks were the focus of this professional development programme, as these are said to increase students’ interest of and attainment levels in mathematics and science education. The data are anchored in observations and feedback/evaluat...

Lyngved, Ragnhild; Pepin, Birgit; Sikko, Svein Arne

2012-01-01

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Primary four students’ development of reading ability through inquiry-based learning projects  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper is part of a bigger study that investigates a collaborative instructional approach involving three kinds of teachers (Information Technology, General Studies, and Chinese) and the school librarian in guiding primary 4 (P4) students through two phases of inquiry-based learning (IBL) projects, each lasting for 2-3 months in 2006-2007. This collaborative approach in guiding students through the IBL projects has proven to be effective. Not only did the participating students signifi...

Fung, Hf; Chow, K.; Ng, Hwr; Loh, Eky; Chu, Skw; Tse, Sk

2008-01-01

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Enhancing Students' Scientific and Quantitative Literacies through an Inquiry-Based Learning Project on Climate Change  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Promoting sustainability and dealing with complex environmental problems like climate change demand a citizenry with considerable scientific and quantitative literacy. In particular, students in the STEM disciplines of (biophysical science, technology, engineering, and mathematics need to develop interdisciplinary skills that help them understand the social dynamics of environmental problems and solutions. To this end, this study examines how participation in a semester-long inquiry-based learning project that involves sociological research on climate change beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors enhances the scientific and quantitative literacies of STEM students. The results suggest that participation in a sociological inquiry-based learning project helps STEM students to (a improve their knowledge of scientific and statistical principles and processes, (b hone their scientific research skills, and (c gain respect for sociology specifically and social science more generally. While the inquiry-based learning project described here deals with climate change, educators can adapt it to deal with other environmental social science research topics (e.g., water use, energy conservation, food security, sustainability.

Aaron M McCright

2012-12-01

 
 
 
 
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Design and Implementation of Inquiry-Based, Technology-Rich Learning Activities in a Large-Enrollment Blended Learning Course  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

We propose that the key to creating an effective learning experience in a blended environment with over 100 students is to strategically embed learning activities into the curriculum. Inquiry-based, technology-rich learning activities give students many of the same benefits of community as experienced in a small, traditional class. Technology-based learning activities during in-class meetings assisted in the development of community within student teams. Out-of-class technology-based learning...

Charlevoix, Donna J.; Strey, Sara T.; Mills, Catrin M.

2009-01-01

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Assessing the Effectiveness of Inquiry-based Learning Techniques Implemented in Large Classroom Settings  

Science.gov (United States)

Geoscience and education faculty at The University of Akron jointly developed a series of inquiry-based learning modules aimed at both non-major and major student populations enrolled in introductory geology courses. These courses typically serve 2500 students per year in four to six classes of 40-160 students each per section. Twelve modules were developed that contained common topics and assessments appropriate to Earth Science, Environmental Geology and Physical Geology classes. All modules were designed to meet four primary learning objectives agreed upon by Department of Geology faculty. These major objectives include: 1) Improvement of student understanding of the scientific method; 2) Incorporation of problem solving strategies involving analysis, synthesis, and interpretation; 3) Development of the ability to distinguish between inferences, data and observations; and 4) Obtaining an understanding of basic processes that operate on Earth. Additional objectives that may be addressed by selected modules include: 1) The societal relevance of science; 2) Use and interpretation of quantitative data to better understand the Earth; 3) Development of the students' ability to communicate scientific results; 4) Distinguishing differences between science, religion and pseudo-science; 5) Evaluation of scientific information found in the mass media; and 6) Building interpersonal relationships through in-class group work. Student pre- and post-instruction progress was evaluated by administering a test of logical thinking, an attitude toward science survey, and formative evaluations. Scores from the logical thinking instrument were used to form balanced four-person working groups based on the students' incoming cognitive level. Groups were required to complete a series of activities and/or exercises that targeted different cognitive domains based upon Bloom's taxonomy (knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation of information). Daily assessments of knowledge-level learning included evaluations of student responses to pre- and post-instruction conceptual test questions, short group exercises and content-oriented exam questions. Higher level thinking skills were assessed when students completed exercises that required the completion of Venn diagrams, concept maps and/or evaluation rubrics both during class periods and on exams. Initial results indicate that these techniques improved student attendance significantly and improved overall retention in the course by 8-14% over traditional lecture formats. Student scores on multiple choice exam questions were slightly higher (1-3%) for students taught in the active learning environment and short answer questions showed larger gains (7%) over students' scores in a more traditional class structure.

Steer, D. N.; McConnell, D. A.; Owens, K.

2001-12-01

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Inquiry-based learning and information literacy development: a CETL approach  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The Centre for Inquiry-based Learning in the Arts and Social Sciences (CILASS is a Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL based at the University of Sheffield. CETL funding was awarded by HEFCE to the University in April 2005 for a period of five years, in recognition of existing excellence in inquiry-based learning (IBL in the Faculties of Arts, Social Sciences and Law. CILASS is committed to supporting further development and innovation in IBL both locally within the University and more widely across higher education (HE nationally and internationally. In particular, CILASS promotes approaches to IBL that involve students in collaborative discipline-based and inter-disciplinary inquiries, develop their information literacy capabilities, and use information and communications technologies imaginatively to enhance the learning experience.In order to provide suitable spaces for students and staff undertaking IBL, CILASS is establishing new learning and teaching spaces within its hub in the University’s new Information Commons (Centre for Learning Resources, which is scheduled to open in 2006-7. These spaces are being purpose-built to support collaborative IBL in an information- and technology-rich environment, and will offer flexibility in terms of configuring space differently for different learning activities combined with access to a range of advanced learning technologies. Additional funding for capital investment awarded to CILASS in January 2006 will allow for the creation of a further CILASS learning and teaching ‘collaboratory’ in a central satellite location within the University.This paper focuses in particular on the strategic approach being taken by CILASS to promoting the development of information literacy within the context of IBL.

Pamela McKinney

2006-05-01

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Hidden in Plain Sight: Pre-Service Teachers’ Orientations Toward Inquiry-Based Learning in History  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In order to implement models of reform-based history education in the classroom there is a fundamental need to address preservice and practicing teachers’ understanding of learning and teaching history, mindful of the role inquiry must play in the process. The project described in this paper employed a comparative case design to explore how prospective social studies educators perceived inquiry-based instruction and the extent to which it aligned with relevant history education for middle and secondary students. Results suggest that the process undertaken by the independent inquiry group may have an implicit impact on shaping how preservice teachers understand inquiry. Yet these preservice teachers included more inquiry-based activities in lesson plan products analyzed as part of this project. After the implementation of both means of learning about historical inquiry, many remained conflicted about what the ideal model of inquiry represents for student learning and at what ability level students are capable of engaging in inquiry in social studies.

Anthony Michael Pellegrino

2013-11-01

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The Impact of the Use of Inquiry-based Learning as a Teaching Methodology on the Development of Critical Thinking.  

Science.gov (United States)

Inquiry-based learning (IBL), a flexible holistic adaptation of problem-based learning, was implemented in a nursing curriculum. Comparison of critical thinking test scores for 228 students in their first and 257 in their last semester showed that those with the lowest scores initially benefitted most from IBL; middle and high level scorers did…

Magnussen, Lois; Ishida, Dianne; Itano, Joanne

2000-01-01

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Laboratory projects using inquiry-based learning: an application to a practical inorganic course  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper reports how laboratory projects (LP coupled to inquiry-based learning (IBL were implemented in a practical inorganic chemistry course. Several coordination compounds have been successfully synthesised by students according to the proposed topics by the LP-IBL junction, and the chemistry of a number of metals has been studied. Qualitative data were collected from written reports, oral presentations, lab-notebook reviews and personal discussions with the students through an experimental course with undergraduate second-year students at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia during the last 5 years. Positive skills production was observed by combining LP and IBL. Conceptual, practical, interpretational, constructional (questions, explanations, hypotheses, communicational, environmental and application abilities were revealed by the students throughout the experimental course.

José G. Carriazo

2011-01-01

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An Inquiry-Based Learning Model for an Exercise Physiology Laboratory Course  

Science.gov (United States)

We developed an inquiry-based learning model to better stimulate undergraduate studentsÃÂ cognitive development of exercise physiology laboratory concepts. The course core is the two independent research projects that students, working in small groups, complete during the last 9 wk of the semester. Student groups develop their own research question and hypothesis, design the experiment, collect and analyze the data, and report their findings to the rest of the class using presentation software. To help with success of the research projects, students are taken through a series of guided-inquiry laboratory activities during the initial 6 wk of the semester to develop laboratory skills and an understanding of the scientific process. Observations of student behaviors reflected a high level of enthusiasm and engagement in laboratory activities. Surveys, journal entries, and interviews indicated that students felt empowered by having ownership in their projects, which may be the key reason for the success of this model.

PhD Fred W. Kolkhorst (San Diego State University Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences); PhD Cheryl L. Mason (San Diego State University School of Teacher Education); Dr. Dana M. DiPasquale (San Diego State University Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences); PhD Patricia Patterson (San Diego State University Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences); PhD Michael J. Buono (San Diego State University Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences)

2001-06-01

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An Open Educational Resource Supports a Diversity of Inquiry-Based Learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available There have been numerous calls for research that demonstrates how open education resources (OERs are actually being used. This case study sought to shed light on the users of a well-visited set of modular music-education materials published at Connexions. Respondents to a voluntary survey included teachers, students, self-directed learners, music ensemble participants, and casual learners. Most reported accessing individual modules on their own initiative, as part of a specific, immediate inquiry, rather than responding to institutional directives or following entire online courses. This was supported by computer-log records, which showed that most visitors to a module arrived from an Internet search for terms specific to that module. The study suggests that, for teachers and students as well as self-directed learners, one function of OERs is as a resource for just-in-time, inquiry-based learning.

Catherine Anne Schmidt-Jones

2012-01-01

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A Model of Approaches to Learning and Academic Achievement of Students from an Inquiry Based Bachelor of Health Sciences Program  

Science.gov (United States)

The Biggs' Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ) was used to test competing models of students' approaches to learning in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 125) from an inquiry based Bachelor of Health Sciences program. In addition to an internal consistency and test-retest reliability analysis of the SPQ, confirmatory factor analysis was used…

Donnon, Tyrone; Hecker, Kent

2008-01-01

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Inquiry-Based Learning Using Everyday Objects: Hands-On Instructional Strategies That Promote Active Learning in Grades 3-8.  

Science.gov (United States)

This book explores the concept of using everyday objects as a process initiated both by students and teachers, encouraging growth in student observation, inquisitiveness, and reflection in learning. After "Introduction: Welcome to Inquiry-Based Learning using Everyday Objects (Object-Based Inquiry), there are nine chapters in two parts. Part 1,…

Alvarado, Amy Edmonds; Herr, Patricia R.

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The APS Physiology of Exercise Inquiry-based, Learning Cycle Unit for Middle School Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This unit covers aspects of cardiovascular and respiratory physiology that are important in exercise and fitness. It is designed to provide middle school students with a basic understanding of how the heart and the lungs work together when someone exercises. The unit can be used as an integrative review of these topics, or selected activities from the unit could be used to introduce some of the topics. The original module was designed by a team of high school teachers and research physiologists. This version has been modified by another teacher/physiologist team, experienced in middle school life science education. However, the unit does assume a basic knowledge of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The unit utilizes the Learning Cycle approach (Karplus & Thier, 1967; Lawson, 1988), where various modules can be used to engage students in thinking about the topic(s); offer them opportunities to explore via hands-on and inquiry approach activities; to explain their findings and how they relate to the concepts included in the unit; to elaborate on the concepts; and to assist teachers to evaluate students' understanding of the unit concepts. The modules are designed to teach middle school students general physiological principles that are suitable for science or health classes. Although the curriculum is based on the life sciences, the activities could also be appropriate in general science, with an integrative unit, or when use of an inquiry-based approach is desirable. This activity has been designed within the guidelines of the National Science Education Standards (NSES) in both content and pedagogy for students in grades 5-8.

PhD Barbara E. Goodman (University of South Dakota School of Medicine Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences)

1999-06-01

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The AIA Solar Learning Center: Taking Inquiry-based EPO Online  

Science.gov (United States)

The observations of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO-AIA) are expected to be groundbreaking within the field of heliophysics. To properly promote and explain the data produced by AIA, it is important that an innovative EPO effort be put forth. This has led to the development of "The AIA Solar Learning Center” (SLC), an inquiry-based educational website geared towards teaching about AIA and the Sun in general. The goal of the SLC is to provide K-12 students, teachers, parents, and homeschoolers with information and education about the Sun, primarily through hands-on activity modules that explain different aspects of our nearest star and the methods of observing it. While each module ultimately aims to impart information about the Sun or some related physical process, the activities also range across a host of different disciplines, including geology, chemistry, history, music, and art. In order to make the content applicable and accessible, activities are tailored to multiple difficulty levels, catering to different age groups. There is also a strong push towards facilitating teachers; activities are designed to fulfill specific teaching standards, and a host of additional teaching material is provided, including lesson plans and powerpoint presentations. Ultimately, the SLC aims to make science and the Sun inviting and accessible. The "Meet the Scientists” page will provide pictures and personal bios of participating scientists. Students will have the opportunity to interactively ask solar-related questions. There is even a host of lighter fare, such as a solar music playlist and links to relevant Facebook pages.

Wills-Davey, Meredith; Attrill, G. D. R.; Engell, A.

2009-05-01

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Enhanced Learning of Biotechnology Students by an Inquiry-Based Cellulase Laboratory  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored the effectiveness of an inquiry-based cellulase laboratory unit in promoting inquiry in undergraduate students in biotechnology. The following tools were used to assess the students' achievements and attitude: conceptual understanding test, concept mapping, students' documents, CLES questionnaire, students' self reflection, and…

Ketpichainarong, Watcharee; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

2010-01-01

34

Inquiry-Based Learning in Remote Sensing: A Space Balloon Educational Experiment  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching remote sensing in higher education has been traditionally restricted in lecture and computer-aided laboratory activities. This paper presents and evaluates an engaging inquiry-based educational experiment. The experiment was incorporated in an introductory remote sensing undergraduate course to bridge the gap between theory and…

Mountrakis, Giorgos; Triantakonstantis, Dimitrios

2012-01-01

35

Design of Social Learning Environment as Inquiry-Based on Cloud Technology for Enhancing the Critical Thinking Skill and Collaborative Learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In the age of social learning environment, the cloud online technology Besides, it was required to facilitate the students’ learning in the 21st century. The objective of this study was to design the social learning environment as inquirybased on cloud technology for enhancing the critical thinking skills and collaborative learning by using technique in evaluating as well as accrediting the tentative model developed by the experts in order to synthesize into conceptual framework of design. Then, the obtained data were explained, interpreted, and concluded. According to research findings, found that the model of social learning environment inquirybased on cloud technology, was appropriate and practical for being applied in real practice in ?the Highest? level. It was supported by learning management for enhancing the critical thinking skills, collaborative learning, and higher education learning context which were appropriate in ?the Highest? level. The appropriateness of details in tentative model in the step and instructional activity, was in ?the Highest? level. The major factors of the model of social learning environment inquiry-based on cloud technology, were online technology base, learning theories base context base, critical thinking base and inquirybased learning on cloud technology.

Apichaya Meepian

2013-06-01

36

An Inquiry-Based Linear Algebra Class  

Science.gov (United States)

Linear algebra is a standard undergraduate mathematics course. This paper presents an overview of the design and implementation of an inquiry-based teaching material for the linear algebra course which emphasizes discovery learning, analytical thinking and individual creativity. The inquiry-based teaching material is designed to fit the needs of a…

Wang, Haohao; Posey, Lisa

2011-01-01

37

The Computational Science Education Reference Desk: A tool for increasing inquiry based learning in the science classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

The Computational Science Reference Desk is an online tool designed to provide educators in math, physics, astronomy, biology, chemistry, and engineering with information on how to use computational science to enhance inquiry based learning in the undergraduate and pre college classroom. The Reference Desk features a showcase of original content exploration activities, including lesson plans and background materials; a catalog of websites which contain models, lesson plans, software, and instructional resources; and a forum to allow educators to communicate their ideas. Many of the recent advances in astronomy rely on the use of computer simulation, and tools are being developed by CSERD to allow students to experiment with some of the models that have guided scientific discovery. One of these models allows students to study how scientists use spectral information to determine the makeup of the interstellar medium by modeling the interstellar extinction curve using spherical grains of silicate, amorphous carbon, or graphite. Students can directly compare their model to the average interstellar extinction curve, and experiment with how small changes in their model alter the shape of the interstellar extinction curve. A simpler model allows students to visualize spatial relationships between the Earth, Moon, and Sun to understand the cause of the phases of the moon. A report on the usefulness of these models in two classes, the Computational Astrophysics workshop at The Shodor Education Foundation and the Conceptual Astronomy class at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, will be presented.

Joiner, D. A.; Stevenson, D. E.; Panoff, R. M.

2000-12-01

38

St. Lucian Elementary School Teachers’ Applicability Beliefs and Beliefs about Science Teaching and Learning: Relevance to Their Level of Inquiry-Based Instructional Practices in Science  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper examines the hypothesis that St. Lucian primary school teachers’ science teaching and learning beliefs and their applicability beliefs are stronger predictors of their science teaching strategies than their teacher education experiences. Quantitative procedures were used where the level of each belief construct as well as their underlying constructs was measured in each teacher in the population and a determination made as to their favourability towards inquiry-based instruction (IBI. The levels of a sample of these teachers’ IBI practices were also determined using an observational rating scale. Multiple regression analyses were used to determine the extent to which teachers‘ beliefs serve as predictors of their IBI practices. The results showed that teachers’ applicability beliefs were barely moderately favourable to their practice of IBI, while their beliefs about science teaching and learning were favourable. Their inquiry-based practices were found to be at the unsatisfactory developing inquiry level. While their science teaching and learning beliefs were found to be significant and moderately positive predictors of their inquiry-based instructional practices, their applicability beliefs seemingly functioned as a moderating variable that limited the effect of teachers’ favourable science teaching and learning beliefs on their instructional practices. These findings are significant in that they show the detrimental effect school-based factors can have on teachers’ instructional practices in science.

David F. Samuel

2013-06-01

39

Effect of Robotics-Enhanced Inquiry-Based Learning in Elementary Science Education in South Korea  

Science.gov (United States)

Much research has been conducted in educational robotics, a new instructional technology, for K-12 education. However, there are arguments on the effect of robotics and limited empirical evidence to investigate the impact of robotics in science learning. Also most robotics studies were carried in an informal educational setting. This study…

Park, Jungho

2015-01-01

40

Overtly Teaching Critical Thinking and Inquiry-Based Learning: A Comparison of Two Undergraduate Biotechnology Classes  

Science.gov (United States)

Some researchers have argued that science classrooms must move away from rote and passive applications of memorized concepts to the use of critical thinking skills as a primary component in facilitating learning. Yet few studies have examined the effect of overtly teaching for critical thinking on subsequent skill development. The purpose of this…

Friedel, Curtis; Irani, Tracy; Rudd, Rick; Gallo, Maria; Eckhardt, Erin; Ricketts, John

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
41

Structured Inquiry-Based Learning: Drosophila GAL4 Enhancer Trap Characterization in an Undergraduate Laboratory Course  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

We have developed and tested two linked but separable structured inquiry exercises using a set of Drosophila melanogaster GAL4 enhancer trap strains for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory methods course at Bucknell University. In the first, students learn to perform inverse PCR to identify the genomic location of the GAL4 insertion, using FlyBase to identify flanking sequences and the primary literature to synthesize current knowledge regarding the nearest gene. In the second, we cross e...

Dunne, Christopher R.; Cillo, Anthony R.; Glick, Danielle R.; John, Katherine; Johnson, Cody; Kanwal, Jaspinder; Malik, Brian T.; Mammano, Kristina; Petrovic, Stefan; Pfister, William; Rascoe, Alexander S.; Schrom, Diane; Shapiro, Scott; Simkins, Jeffrey W.; Strauss, David

2014-01-01

42

Structured inquiry-based learning: Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap characterization in an undergraduate laboratory course.  

Science.gov (United States)

We have developed and tested two linked but separable structured inquiry exercises using a set of Drosophila melanogaster GAL4 enhancer trap strains for an upper-level undergraduate laboratory methods course at Bucknell University. In the first, students learn to perform inverse PCR to identify the genomic location of the GAL4 insertion, using FlyBase to identify flanking sequences and the primary literature to synthesize current knowledge regarding the nearest gene. In the second, we cross each GAL4 strain to a UAS-CD8-GFP reporter strain, and students perform whole mount CNS dissection, immunohistochemistry, confocal imaging, and analysis of developmental expression patterns. We have found these exercises to be very effective in teaching the uses and limitations of PCR and antibody-based techniques as well as critical reading of the primary literature and scientific writing. Students appreciate the opportunity to apply what they learn by generating novel data of use to the wider research community. PMID:25549104

Dunne, Christopher R; Cillo, Anthony R; Glick, Danielle R; John, Katherine; Johnson, Cody; Kanwal, Jaspinder; Malik, Brian T; Mammano, Kristina; Petrovic, Stefan; Pfister, William; Rascoe, Alexander S; Schrom, Diane; Shapiro, Scott; Simkins, Jeffrey W; Strauss, David; Talai, Rene; Tomtishen, John P; Vargas, Josephine; Veloz, Tony; Vogler, Thomas O; Clenshaw, Michael E; Gordon-Hamm, Devin T; Lee, Kathryn L; Marin, Elizabeth C

2014-12-01

43

Impact Of Collaborative Groups Versus Individuals In Undergraduate Inquiry-Based Astronomy Laboratory Learning Exercises  

Science.gov (United States)

A mixed-method quasi-experimental study was designed to determine how 130 undergraduates in an introductory astronomy survey course laboratory changed their understanding of scientific inquiry working as individuals in relative isolation compared to working in small, collaborative learning groups when using specially designed astronomy curricula based on a backwards faded scaffolding approach (Slater, Slater, & Lyons, 2010). The results of this two-group comparison study were determined by examining the change in responses from the pretest to the posttest administration of the Views of Scientific Inquiry (VOSI) survey (Schwartz, Lederman, & Lederman, 2008), the increase in scores on laboratory exercises, and analysis of field notes from the instructor. Analysis suggests that all students increased their understanding of scientific inquiry and astronomy when using the specially designed course materials regardless if the students were working in groups or individually in the learning laboratories. However, qualitative analysis yields further insight that there exists a qualitative difference in the complexity of research questions students working in groups elect to pursue over those students working independently.

Sibbernsen, Kendra J.

2014-12-01

44

A Design Model of Distributed Scaffolding for Inquiry-Based Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This study presents a series of three experiments that focus on how distributed scaffolding influences learners' conceptual understanding and reasoning from combined levels of triangulation, at the interactive level (discourses within a focus group) and the collective level (class). Three inquiry lessons on plate tectonics (LPT) were designed, implemented and redesigned to explore how students responded to the scaffoldings provided. The results show that the goal-oriented version (LPT3) was significantly more effective at helping students develop an understanding of plate tectonics and evidence-based reasoning than the teacher-led (LPT1) and deconstructed (LPT2) versions (? 2 = 11.56, p teaching time. In other words, it appears to be effective and efficient, most likely due to synergies between teacher facilitation and lesson scaffolds. The empirical results clarify the functions of the design model proposed for distributed scaffolding: navigating inquiry, structuring tasks, supporting communication, and fostering reflection. Future studies should more closely evaluate the scaffolding system as a whole and synergies between different types of scaffolds for advancing learning.

Hsu, Ying-Shao; Lai, Ting-Ling; Hsu, Wei-Hsiu

2014-09-01

45

Student-oriented learning: an inquiry-based developmental biology lecture course.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this junior-level undergraduate course, developmental life cycles exhibited by various organisms are reviewed, with special attention--where relevant--to the human embryo. Morphological features and processes are described and recent insights into the molecular biology of gene expression are discussed. Ways are studied in which model systems, including marine invertebrates, amphibia, fruit flies and other laboratory species are employed to elucidate general principles which apply to fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and organogenesis. Special attention is given to insights into those topics which will soon be researched with data from the Human Genome Project. The learning experience is divided into three parts: Part I is a in which the Socratic (inquiry) method is employed by the instructor (GMM) to organize a review of classical developmental phenomena; Part II represents an in which students study the details related to the surveys included in Part I as they have been reported in research journals; Part III focuses on a class project--the preparation of a spiral bound on a topic of relevance to human developmental biology (e.g.,Textbook of Embryonal Stem Cells). Student response to the use of the Socratic method increases as the course progresses and represents the most successful aspect of the course. PMID:12705660

Malacinski, George M

2003-01-01

46

Learning to Become a More Effective Research or Inquiry-based Project Mentor  

Science.gov (United States)

How effective of a mentor are you? Have you thought much about this question? Have you participated in training to become a better mentor? For many academics, the typical three answers are "pretty good, I think ... why wouldn't I be?!"; "I am right now while reading this;" "Uh, no." The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed a program called Research Mentor Training to help train scientists in myriad STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. Most of the field testing to date has focused on graduate students, post-docs, academic staff, and faculty mentoring undergraduate students who are participating in summer research experiences. The materials have proven quite effective in other areas as well, with only modest modifications. For example, several faculty cohorts concentrating on mentoring graduate students and post-docs have completed the training. In addition, the materials are used to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. The preferred venue for the mentor training program is a seminar meeting one hour per week for 8 to 9 weeks, plus readings and outside activities, including mentoring a student. However, the structure is flexible, and some meaningful learning can occur in a single 90-minute interactive workshop like the one presented at the 2009 ASP annual meeting, "Science Education and Outreach: Forging a Path to the Future." All of the materials, including case studies, facilitator notes and guidelines, plus reading lists, are available online for no charge (http://researchmentortraining.org). Users can select pre-built curricula, or they can customize a package using a "shopping cart" interface.

Hooper, E. J.; Pfund, C.; Mathieu, R.; Branchaw, J.

2010-08-01

47

Challenges and opportunities for the implementation of inquiry-based learning in day-to-day teaching  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In this paper, we analyse the conditions and constraints which might favour, or on the contrary hinder, a large-scale implementation of inquiry-based mathematics and science education (IBMSE), on the basis of our work within the PRIMAS project in 12 European countries. As a complement to the approach through the analysis of teachers’ beliefs and practices (see Engeln et al. 2013), we tackle this issue from a systemic institutional perspective. Indeed, in our approach, we consider teachers a...

Dorier, Jean-luc; Garci?a, Francisco Javier

2013-01-01

48

Investigating the impact of a LEGO(TM)-based, engineering-oriented curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines  

Science.gov (United States)

This mixed method study examined the impact of a LEGO-based, engineering-oriented curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines. This study takes a social constructivist theoretical stance that science learning involves learning scientific concepts and their relations to each other. From this perspective, students are active participants, and they construct their conceptual understanding through the guidance of their teacher. With the goal of better understanding the use of engineering education materials in classrooms the National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council in the book "Engineering in K-12 Education" conducted an in-depth review of the potential benefits of including engineering in K--12 schools as (a) improved learning and achievement in science and mathematics, (b) increased awareness of engineering and the work of engineers, (c) understanding of and the ability to engage in engineering design, (d) interest in pursuing engineering as a career, and (e) increased technological literacy (Katehi, Pearson, & Feder, 2009). However, they also noted a lack of reliable data and rigorous research to support these assertions. Data sources included identical written tests and interviews, classroom observations and videos, teacher interviews, and classroom artifacts. To investigate the impact of the design-based simple machines curriculum compared to the scientific inquiry-based simple machines curriculum on student learning outcomes, I compared the control and the experimental groups' scores on the tests and interviews by using ANCOVA. To analyze and characterize the classroom observation videotapes, I used Jordan and Henderson's (1995) method and divide them into episodes. My analyses revealed that the design-based Design a People Mover: Simple Machines unit was, if not better, as successful as the inquiry-based FOSS Levers and Pulleys unit in terms of students' content learning. I also found that students in the engineering group outperformed students in the control group in regards to their ability to answer open-ended questions when interviewed. Implications for students' science content learning and teachers' professional development are discussed.

Marulcu, Ismail

49

Perceived Benefits and Attitudes of Student Teachers to Web-Quest as a Motivating, Creative and Inquiry-Based Learning Tool in Education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study discussed how the Department of Teacher Education, University of Ibadan utilized Web-Quest as a motivating and creative tool to teach a compulsory and large pre-service teachers’ Course (TEE 304 The study also investigated the attitude and perception of pre-service teachers to the use of Web-Quest. The results showed that the sample perceived Web-Quest as a useful creative, motivating pedagogical tool for learning. Student teachers perceived Web-Quest as interesting and highly beneficial to their learning. Gender was also a factor in the utilization of Web-Quest. Furthermore, students’ age and gender had positive influence on their attitude to Web-Quest. The student teachers saw Web-Quest as an Inquiry-based pedagogical tool and learning strategy that enhanced team spirit, high level thinking, collaboration and that it saved costs and time.

Samuel Ayobami Aina

2013-09-01

50

The Effects of Inquiry-Based Integrated Information Literacy Instruction: Four-Year Trends  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of four-year integrated information literacy instruction via a framework of inquiry-based learning on elementary students’ memory and comprehension. Moderating factors of students’ academic achievement was another focus of this study. The subjects were 72 students who have participated in this study since they entered an elementary school in Chiayi district. This elementary school adopted the integrated information literacy instruction,...

Lin Ching Chen; Ren-De Yan; Tsai-Wei Huang

2014-01-01

51

The Effect of Interactive Whiteboard Supported Inquiry-Based Learning on Achievement and Motivation in Physics and Views of Prospective Teachers Toward the Instruction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this study, the effects of interactive whiteboard supported inquiry- based learning approach on the academic achievement and motivation in modern physics teaching have been investigated and the views of prospective teachers toward the teaching supported by interactive whiteboard have been defined. In this study, patterned in the form of quasi-empirical model and supported with pre- and post-test control groups, data were collected by academic achievement tests, motivation scales and semi-structured interview forms. While traditional method was used to deliver lectures to the control group, interactive white board was used to deliver experimental group lectures enriched with activities such as simulations, videos and animations. Thus, it has been taken advantages of technology support in the processes of orienting and asking questions, identification of problems, hypothesis generation, testing and planning. In addition to these, the processes of measuring, drawing a graphs, controlling the variables and data interpretation have also been supported by simulations in lectures. As a result of applications, it has been achieved that the teaching materials used in experimental group significantly increased the students’ motivations and academic achievements. Moreover, it also has been obtained that prospective teachers had positive opinions; such as funny (amusing lecture environment, increasing the participation, concretization of the abstract concepts, facilitating the learning and providing permanence on applications in this study.

U?ur Sar?, Gamze

2013-12-01

52

The Role of Computer Simulation in an Inquiry-Based Learning Environment: Reconstructing Geological Events as Geologists  

Science.gov (United States)

Several researchers have investigated the effects of computer simulations on students' learning. However, few have focused on how simulations with authentic contexts influences students' inquiry skills. Therefore, for the purposes of this study, we developed a computer simulation (FossilSim) embedded in an authentic inquiry lesson. FossilSim…

Lin, Li-Fen; Hsu, Ying-Shao; Yeh, Yi-Fen

2012-01-01

53

An inquiry-based laboratory on friction  

CERN Document Server

Sliding friction is usually introduced in high school, but rarely through activities in laboratory. A qualitative introduction to friction is presented by proposing exploration of different kind of materials in order to suggest which aspects can be relevant and which interaction is involved. Different quantitative experiments are proposed for studying Leonardo's laws for friction. The learning path was tested with two high school classes during an instruction trip at department. Students were engaged in the inquiry-based introductory activity and seemed to realize with care the measurements. However, the analysis of their reports shows some learning difficulties.

Montalbano, Vera

2013-01-01

54

Conceptualising inquiry based education in mathematics  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The terms inquiry-based learning (IBL) and inquiry-based education (IBE) have appeared with increasing frequency in educational policy and curriculum documents related to mathematics and science education over the past decade, indicating a major educational trend. We go back to the origin of inquiry as a pedagogical concept in the work of Dewey (e.g. 1916, 1938) to analyse and discuss its migration to science and mathematics education. For conceptualizing inquiry-based mathematics education (IBME) it is important to analyse how this concept resonates with already well-established theoretical frameworks in mathematics education. Six such frameworks are analysed from the perspective of inquiry: the problem-solving tradition, the Theory of Didactical Situations, the Realistic Mathematics Education programme, the mathematical modelling perspective, the Anthropological Theory of Didactics, and the dialogical and critical approach to mathematics education. In an appendix these frameworks are illustrated with paradigmatic examples of teaching activities with inquiry elements. The paper is rounded off with a list of ten concerns for the development and implementation of IBME.

BlomhØj, Morten; Artigue, Michéle

2013-01-01

55

Engaging Nature of Science to Preservice Teachers through Inquiry-Based Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Inquiry-based classroom is widely distributed in the school science based on its useful and effective instruction. Science teachers are key elements allowing students to have scientific inquiry. If teachers understand and imply inquiry-based learning into science classroom, students will learn science as scientific inquiry and understand nature of…

Nuangchalerm, Prasart

2013-01-01

56

Design of Social Learning Environment as Inquiry-Based on Cloud Technology for Enhancing the Critical Thinking Skill and Collaborative Learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In the age of social learning environment, the cloud online technology Besides, it was required to facilitate the students’ learning in the 21st century. The objective of this study was to design the social learning environment as inquirybased on cloud technology for enhancing the critical thinking skills and collaborative learning by using technique in evaluating as well as accrediting the tentative model developed by the experts in order to synthesize into conceptual framework of design. ...

Apichaya Meepian; Panita Wannapiroon

2013-01-01

57

Successful Implementation of Inquiry-Based Physiology Laboratories in Undergraduate Major and Nonmajor Courses  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent evidence has demonstrated that inquiry-based physiology laboratories improve students' critical- and analytical-thinking skills. We implemented inquiry-based learning into three physiology courses: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (majors), Human Physiology (majors), and Human Anatomy and Physiology (nonmajors). The aims of our curricular…

Casotti, G.; Rieser-Danner, L.; Knabb, M. T.

2008-01-01

58

Coaching to Build Support for Inquiry-Based Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

Coaching, as a means to support inquiry-based teaching, starts by changing the culture from within (school, teacher, and student) rather than from external mandates. Recognizing that teacher empowerment is the first step toward increasing student achievement, coaches support teachers as they relinquish non-productive, traditional practices. Through sustained collegial interactions within a strong support system provided by coaches, teachers are more willing to leave their comfort zone on a path of continuous improvement toward inquiry-based teaching and learning. This article describes how one school district in Massachusetts implemented this approach with success.

Patrice Holt

2007-01-01

59

Developing Reading Comprehension through Collaborative Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study explores the development and promotion of reading comprehension in primary school students, in the context of the implementation of an educational programme called "Learning Together" (LT). The programme, which centred on collaborative learning activities, was designed to promote oral and written communication in…

Rojas-Drummond, Sylvia; Mazón, Nancy; Littleton, Karen; Vélez, Maricela

2014-01-01

60

A Comprehensive Survey of Multiagent Reinforcement Learning:  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Multiagent systems are rapidly finding applications in a variety of domains, including robotics, distributed control, telecommunications, and economics. The complexity ofmany tasks arising in these domains makes them difficult to solve with preprogrammed agent behaviors. The agents must, instead, discover a solution on their own, using learning. A significant part of the research on multiagent learning concerns reinforcement learning techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive survey of m...

Busoniu, L.; Babuska, R.; Schutter, B.

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

Blended Learning: A Ubiquitous Learning Environment for Reading Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Learning environments have turned to a hot discussion among language scholars. Very popular nowadays, blended learning is not a new concept. It enjoys the advantages of face-to-face classrooms and virtual learning. This study is an attempt to discover whether conventional or blended learning environments can better enhance the reading comprehension for EFL learners. 107 Iranian students majoring in English at Abadeh Islamic Azad University and Zand Institute of Higher Education in Shiraz were...

Fatemeh Behjat; Mortaza Yamini; Mohammad Sadegh Bagheri

2012-01-01

62

Using Comparative Genomics for Inquiry-Based Learning to Dissect Virulence of "Escherichia coli" O157:H7 and "Yersinia pestis"  

Science.gov (United States)

Genomics and bioinformatics are topics of increasing interest in undergraduate biological science curricula. Many existing exercises focus on gene annotation and analysis of a single genome. In this paper, we present two educational modules designed to enable students to learn and apply fundamental concepts in comparative genomics using examples…

Baumler, David J.; Banta, Lois M.; Hung, Kai F.; Schwarz, Jodi A.; Cabot, Eric L.; Glasner, Jeremy D.; Perna, Nicole T.

2012-01-01

63

DLESE Teaching Boxes and Beyond: A promising prototype for structuring web services to support concept- and inquiry-based STEM learning and interdisciplinary partnerships.  

Science.gov (United States)

An exciting pilot program took place this summer, pioneering the development of Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) Teaching Boxes with the Univ. of CA. Berkeley Museum of Paleontology, SF State Univ., USGS and 7 middle/high school teachers from the San Francisco area. This session will share the DLESE Teaching Box concept, explain the pilot program, and explore the tremendous opportunities for expanding this notion to embrace interdisciplinary approaches to learning about the Earth in the undergraduate science and pre-service teaching arenas. A Teaching Box is a metaphor for an online assembly of interrelated learning concepts, digital resources, and cohesive narration that bridges the gap between discrete resources and understanding. Within a Teaching Box, an instructor or student can pick a topic and see the concepts that build an understanding of that topic, explore online resources that support learning of those concepts, and benefit from the narration (the glue) that weaves concepts, activities, and background information together into a complete teaching/learning story. In this session, we will demonstrate the emerging Teaching Box prototypes and explore how this platform may promote STEM learning by utilizing DLESE tools and services in ways that begin to blur traditional disciplinary boundaries, overcome limitations of discipline-specific vocabularies, and foster collaboration. We will show ways in which new DLESE Web Services could support learning in this highly contextualized environment. We will see glimpses of how learners and educators will be able to modify or create their own Teaching Boxes specific to a unit of study or course, and perhaps share them with the Earth Science Education community. We will see ways to stay abreast of current Earth events, emerging research, and real-time data and incorporate such dynamic information into one learning environment. Services will be described and demonstrated in the context of Teaching Boxes: - DLESE Web Services provide a programmatic interface that allows the Teaching Box (or any web page) to have the same DLESE search, bookmarking features, and data management that are found at the DLESE web site. - DLESE Smart Links are hyperlinks that can be created by anyone and implemented as easily as defining a specific query. Clicking a Smart Link displays a list of resources that corresponds to the specific query. We'll talk about how this service can help to bridge the gap between vocabularies and disciplines and the interesting possibilities it presents for contextualizing searches and building custom topical menus. - The Really Simple Syndication (RSS) service delivers online information immediately, and allows end-users to subscribe to receive regular news, events, and data on a given Teaching Box topic. This opens the door to event-based learning. - Strand Maps, developed by the AAAS, are diagrams of interconnected learning concepts across a range of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines. The University of Colorado and its project partners are developing the Strand Map Service (SMS) to provide an interactive interface to interrelated learning goals, content knowledge, (including student misconceptions) and educational resources in the National Science Digital Library and DLESE.

Davis, L.; Weatherley, J.; Bhushan, S.; Khan, H.; de La Chica, S.; Deardorff, R.

2004-12-01

64

Is adolescence a critical period for learning formal thinking skills? A case study investigating the development of formal thinking skills in a short-term inquiry-based intervention program  

Science.gov (United States)

Current domestic and international comparative studies of student achievement in science are demonstrating that the U.S. needs to improve science education if it wants to remain competitive in the global economy. One of the causes of the poor performance of U.S. science education is the lack of students who have developed the formal thinking skills that are necessary to obtain scientific literacy. Previous studies have demonstrated that formal thinking skills can be taught to adolescents, however only 25% of incoming college freshman have these necessary skills. There is some evidence that adolescence (girls aged 11-13, boys aged 12-14) is a critical period where students must learn formal thinking skills, similar to the critical period that exists for young children learning languages. It is not known whether it is more difficult for students to learn formal thinking skills either prior to or following adolescence. The purpose of this quantitative case study is to determine whether adolescence is a critical period for students to learn formal thinking skills. The study also investigates whether a formal thinking skills focused program can improve students' intelligence. In this study 32 students who had not developed any formal thinking skills, ranging in age from 10-16, underwent an intensive four-week, inquiry-based, formal thinking skill intervention program that focused on two formal thinking skills: (1) the ability to control and exclude variables; and (2) the ability to manipulate ratios and proportionalities. The students undergoing the training were matched with control students by age, gender, formal thinking skill ability, and intelligence. The control group attended their traditional science course during the intervention periods. The results of the study showed that the intervention program was successful in developing students' formal thinking skills. The pre-adolescents (males, age 10-11, females, age 10) were unable to learn formal thinking skills. The data indicated that there is not a significant difference between adolescents and post-adolescents (up to 16-years-old) ability to learn formal thinking skills. Both groups (adolescent and post-adolescent) showed improvement in their formal thinking skill ability after the intervention. The intervention also demonstrated evidence of improving students' intelligence scores.

Towne, Forrest S.

65

The Integration of the Big6 Information Literacy and Reading Strategies Instruction in a Fourth Grade Inquiry-Based Learning Course, “Our Aquarium”  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study investigated the student performance in an inquiry learning course which integrated information literacy and reading strategies in a fourth-grade science class. The curriculum design was based on the Big6 model, which includes the stages of task definition, information seeking strategies, location & access, use of information, synthesis, and evaluation. The study duration was one semester. The data was gathered through participant observations, interviews, surveys, tests, and from ...

Lin Ching Chen; Hsin-Ying Hsieh

2013-01-01

66

Preservice Elementary Teachers' Adaptation of Science Curriculum Materials for Inquiry-Based Elementary Science  

Science.gov (United States)

Curriculum materials are important resources with which teachers make pedagogical decisions about the design of science learning environments. To become well-started beginning elementary teachers capable of engaging their students in inquiry-based science, preservice elementary teachers need to learn to use science curriculum materials…

Forbes, Cory T.

2011-01-01

67

Inquiry Based Teaching in Turkey: A Content Analysis of Research Reports  

Science.gov (United States)

Inquiry-based learning [IBL] enhances students' critical thinking abilities and help students to act as a scientist through using scientific method while learning. Specifically, inquiry as a teaching approach has been defined in many ways, the most important one is referred to nature of constructing knowledge while the individuals possess a…

Kizilaslan, Aydin; Sozbilir, Mustafa; Yasar, M. Diyaddin

2012-01-01

68

Blended Learning: A Ubiquitous Learning Environment for Reading Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Learning environments have turned to a hot discussion among language scholars. Very popular nowadays, blended learning is not a new concept. It enjoys the advantages of face-to-face classrooms and virtual learning. This study is an attempt to discover whether conventional or blended learning environments can better enhance the reading comprehension for EFL learners. 107 Iranian students majoring in English at Abadeh Islamic Azad University and Zand Institute of Higher Education in Shiraz were selected. A reading comprehension test was administered as the pretest. Then, the participants were put in control and experimental groups. For the treatment, the experimental group received the instruction in the classroom and had assignments through virtual environments whereas the control group had the instruction and assignments in conventional mode. A post-test of reading comprehension was administered, and the participants' performances in both tests were compared. The results indicated blending traditional classroom instruction with technology can help learners outperform in their reading comprehension.

Fatemeh Behjat

2012-01-01

69

Computational approach to inquiry based science education  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The paper sets out the context for the EU Seventh Framework ‘Pathway to Inquiry Based Science Education’ (IBSE) project. After the context has been outlined, the paper is organised into the following sections: 1. National situation with regard to Science Education in Ireland. 2. Inquiry approaches promoted by Pathway. 3. Adopting IBSE into the Science Education Curriculum. 4. ICT in IBSE. 5. Reflection on IBSE.

Farren, Margaret; Crotty, Yvonne; Owen, Martin; Mctiernan, William

2012-01-01

70

Life-Cycle Thinking in Inquiry-Based Sustainability Education – Effects on Students’ Attitudes towards Chemistry and Environmental Literacy  

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The aim of the present study is to improve the quality of students’ environmental literacy and sustainability education in chemistry teaching by combining the socio-scientific issue of life-cycle thinking with inquiry-based learning approaches. This case study presents results from an inquiry-based life-cycle thinking project: an interdisciplinary teaching model designed by chemistry teachers. The strength of the project is that upper-secondary students (N=105) are allowed to investigate th...

Marianne Juntunen; Maija Aksela

2013-01-01

71

Successful implementation of inquiry-based physiology laboratories in undergraduate major and nonmajor courses  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent evidence has demonstrated that inquiry-based physiology laboratories improve students' critical- and analytical-thinking skills. We implemented inquiry-based learning into three physiology courses: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (majors), Human Physiology (majors), and Human Anatomy and Physiology (nonmajors). The aims of our curricular modifications were to improve the teaching of physiological concepts, teach students the scientific approach, and promote creative and critical thinking. We assessed our modifications using formative (laboratory exams, oral presentations, and laboratory reports) and summative evaluations (surveys, laboratory notebook, and an end of semester project). Students appreciated the freedom offered by the new curriculum and the opportunity to engage in the inquiry process. Results from both forms of evaluation showed a marked improvement due to the curricular revisions. Our analyses indicate an increased confidence in students' ability to formulate questions and hypotheses, design experiments, collect and analyze data, and make conclusions. Thus, we have successfully incorporated inquiry-based laboratories in both major and nonmajor courses.

G Casotti (West Chester University of Pennsylvania Biology); L Rieser-Danner (West Chester University of Pennsylvania Psychology); Dr. Maureen Knabb (West Chester University)

2008-12-01

72

Students' Alternative Conceptions about Electricity and Effect of Inquiry-Based Teaching Strategies  

Science.gov (United States)

This study attempted to investigate the alternative conceptions that a group of 12 Lebanese students in a grade 9 class hold about electricity. It also attempted to evaluate learning outcomes of implementing in that class an inquiry-based module for the acquisition of conceptual understanding of basic concepts in electricity. Fourteen mostly…

Afra, Nada Chatila; Osta, Iman; Zoubeir, Wassim

2009-01-01

73

Inquiry-Based Approach to a Carbohydrate Analysis Experiment  

Science.gov (United States)

The analysis of an unknown carbohydrate in an inquiry-based learning format has proven to be a valuable and interesting undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment. Students are given a list of carbohydrates and a list of references for carbohydrate analysis. The references contain a variety of well-characterized wet chemistry and instrumental techniques for carbohydrate identification, but the students must develop an appropriate sequential protocol for unknown identification. The students are required to provide a list of chemicals and procedures and a flow chart for identification before the lab. During the 3-hour laboratory period, they utilize their accumulated information and knowledge to classify and identify their unknown. Advantages of the inquiry-based format are (i) students must be well prepared in advance to be successful in the laboratory, (ii) students feel a sense of accomplishment in both designing and carrying out a successful experiment, and (iii) the carbohydrate background information digested by the students significantly decreases the amount of lecture time required for this topic.

Senkbeil, Edward G.

1999-01-01

74

The relationship between inquiry-based science instruction and student achievement  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching science through inquiry has become a focus of recent educational reform in Mississippi and other states. Based on the Constructivist learning theory, inquiry instruction can take many forms, but generally follows the scientific method by requiring students to learn concepts through experimentation and real-world, hands-on experiences. This dissertation examines the relationship between the amounts of time spent using inquiry-based science instruction and student achievement as measured by the Mississippi State Science Assessment. The study also identifies teacher perceptions of inquiry and the amount of professional development received by participants on using inquiry-based instructional techniques. Finally, this study identifies factors that hinder the use of inquiry. Using a 24-question written survey, the researcher collected quantitative data from 204 science teachers in grades K-8 in four southern Mississippi school districts. Participants rated their average amount of time spent using inquiry-based science instruction in their classrooms. These results were then compared to each school's average test score on the 2009-2010 Mississippi State Science Assessment using a Spearman rho correlation. A significant positive relationship was found between amounts of time spent using inquiry-based science instruction and student achievement. The participants also indicated their perceptions of inquiry, amount of professional development, and deterrents to inquiry usage on a five-point Likert scale survey. Overall, participants held a favorable opinion of inquiry-based instruction and felt that it was important for their students' success. Over half of participants had not attended professional development on inquiry-based instruction. A majority indicated a desire for professional development. The most commonly identified factor hindering the use of inquiry was a lack of materials and resources. Many participants also indicated that time constraints prevented more frequent use of inquiry in their classrooms.

Suarez, Michael Louis

75

Perceptual learning: toward a comprehensive theory.  

Science.gov (United States)

Visual perceptual learning (VPL) is long-term performance increase resulting from visual perceptual experience. Task-relevant VPL of a feature results from training of a task on the feature relevant to the task. Task-irrelevant VPL arises as a result of exposure to the feature irrelevant to the trained task. At least two serious problems exist. First, there is the controversy over which stage of information processing is changed in association with task-relevant VPL. Second, no model has ever explained both task-relevant and task-irrelevant VPL. Here we propose a dual plasticity model in which feature-based plasticity is a change in a representation of the learned feature, and task-based plasticity is a change in processing of the trained task. Although the two types of plasticity underlie task-relevant VPL, only feature-based plasticity underlies task-irrelevant VPL. This model provides a new comprehensive framework in which apparently contradictory results could be explained. PMID:25251494

Watanabe, Takeo; Sasaki, Yuka

2015-01-01

76

An Inquiry-based Astronomy Summer School in West Africa  

Science.gov (United States)

In October 2013 over 75 undergraduate science students and teachers from Nigeria and Ghana attended the week-long West African International Summer School for Young Astronomers. The school was organized by a collaboration of astronomers from the University of Toronto, the University of Nigeria, and the Nigerian National Space Research and Development Agency. We designed and led activities that taught astronomy content, promoted students' self-identity as scientists, and encouraged students to think critically and figure out solutions themselves. I will describe the inquiry-based and active learning techniques used in the school, share results from the qualitative and quantitative evaluations of student performance, and describe future plans for holding the school in 2015, supporting our alumni, and building a sustainable partnership between North American and Nigerian universities.

Strubbe, Linda; Okere, Bonaventure; Chibueze, James; Lepo, Kelly; White, Heidi; Zhang, Jielai; Okoh, Daniel; Reid, Mike; Hunter, Lisa

2015-01-01

77

Teacher Educators' Conceptualisations and Practices towards Inquiry Based Science Teaching: a renew research framework.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Currently European teachers have to develop inquiry based science teaching [IBST] in order to enhance pupils' learning and motivation towards scientific objects. Such teaching approaches are learning-focused, and appear more complex than content-centred methods. This paper focuses on 8 proficient science teachers who are involved both within professional networks and with part time in service teacher education about IBST. It aims to identify their conceptualisations and practices, and particu...

Grangeat, Michel

2011-01-01

78

Doing Good Science in Middle School: A Practical Guide to Inquiry-Based Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

Just as middle schoolers are "wired" to learn in active, hands-on ways, this book is wired to help you spark a vital connection to these students to keep them tuned-in to science. Doing Good Science in Middle School combines practical insights about adolescent learners with what master teachers know about how to shift from passive, textbook-centered instruction to inquiry-based investigations. Chapters cover the psychology of the middle school learner; why inquiry and collaboration are the cornerstones of good science; integrating science, literacy, math, and technology; classroom management and safety; plus additional resources and sample forms. But at the book's core are 10 must-do activities. All are developmentally appropriate, inquiry- and Standards-based lessons of use to teachers at all experience levels (including preservice). Doing Good Science is a truly comprehensive practitioner's guide. It brings you ideas for presenting curriculum, strategies for reaching all students, and a research basis for justifying your practices in the classroom--all through a combination of humor and true stories from experienced educators who make a solid case for inquiry in real-world middle school.

Cleveland, Jackie; Jorgenson, Olaf; Vanosdall, Rick

2004-01-01

79

Inquiry-Based Instruction: Does School Environmental Context Matter?  

Science.gov (United States)

In a larger study on teachers' beliefs about science teaching, one component looks at how school environmental context factors influence inquiry-based science instruction. Research shows that three broad categories of school environmental factors (human, sociocultural, design) impact inquiry-based teaching in some way. A mixed-method, sequential,…

Pea, Celestine H.

2012-01-01

80

Guided-Inquiry Based Laboratory Instruction: Investigation of Critical Thinking Skills, Problem Solving Skills, and Implementing Student Roles in Chemistry  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent initiatives in the laboratory curriculum have encouraged an inquiry-based approach to learning and teaching in the laboratory. It has been argued that laboratory instruction should not just be hands-on, but it should portray the essence of inquiry through the process of experiential learning and reflective engagement in collaboration with…

Gupta, Tanya

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
81

An examination of the evidence that teachers use to assess student learning and make decisions about their teaching practices: Connecting teacher and student learning through inquiry-based professional development  

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Despite numerous recommendations in the literature on professional development, educational research that uses measures of student learning as criteria for determining the effectiveness of professional development is rare. Yet, teachers and schools are required by state and national legislation to document specific connections between professional development for teachers and improvements in student learning. This study addresses this gap by using qualitative methodology to examine the eviden...

Seybold, Joy Ann

2004-01-01

82

Inquiry-based training improves teaching effectiveness of biology teaching assistants  

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Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) are used extensively as undergraduate science lab instructors at universities, yet they often have having minimal instructional training and little is known about effective training methods. This blind randomized control trial study assessed the impact of two training regimens on GTA teaching effectiveness. GTAs teaching undergraduate biology labs (n = 52) completed five hours of training in either inquiry-based learning pedagogy or general instructional ?...

Hughes, P. William; Ellefson, Michelle R.

2013-01-01

83

Inquiry Based Science Education og den sociokulturelt forankrede dialog i naturfagsundervisningen.  

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Through study, investigation and discussion of the concept Best Practice in science education (Ellebæk & Østergaard, 2009) it was shown, that the dialogue in the teaching sequences was an important factor for the children’s understanding, engagement and interest for the science subjects and phenomena. In this article we will discuss dialogue in the light of sociocultural learning theories, and relate it to Inquiry Based Science Education (IBSE), as the pedagogical and didactical method, w...

Østergaard, Lars Domino

2012-01-01

84

How does participation in inquiry-based activities influence gifted students' higher order thinking?  

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Inquiry-based learning is considered a useful technique to strengthen the critical thinking skills of students. The National Science Standards emphasize its use and the complexities and challenge it provides are well suited for meeting the needs of the gifted. While many studies have documented the effectiveness of this type of instruction, there is a lack of research on growth in higher-order thinking through participation in science inquiry. This study investigated such growth among a small...

Reger, Barbara H.

2006-01-01

85

Learning Styles, Personality Types and Reading Comprehension Performance  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study aims at reviewing the relationship between learning styles, personality and reading comprehension performance. In the last two decades, ample studies have been done to examine the relationship between learning styles, learner’s personality and performance in academic settings. The reviewed studies substantiate that there is a relationship between personality types and/or traits of the learners, the way they establish their learning styles and their academic success in school and university both at an undergraduate and postgraduate level. Therefore, learners depending on the type of their personality resort to different learning styles or preferences which-in turn- affect their learning performance. However, there are no studies – either theoretical or empirical – examining exclusively the role of personality and learning styles on reading comprehension performance. Moreover, the findings with regard to the bulk of research on the relationship between personality and success in reading comprehension- are not that congruent. Accordingly - due to the scarcity of the research on showing the relationship between personality, learning styles and achievement in reading comprehension, and also incongruity of the research results on personality and reading comprehension performance - the current study proposes that further research on the above areas would be of the great need.

Nabiollah Sadeghi

2012-03-01

86

Engaging Non-Science Majors Through Citizen Science Projects In Inquiry-Based Introductory Geoscience Laboratory Courses  

Science.gov (United States)

Although inquiry-based/problem-based methods have been successfully incorporated in undergraduate lecture classes, a survey of commonly used laboratory manuals indicates that few non-major geoscience laboratory classes use these strategies. The Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences faculty members have developed a successful introductory Environmental Geology Laboratory course for undergraduate non-majors that challenges traditional teaching methodology as illustrated in most laboratory manuals. The Environmental Geology lab activities employ active learning methods to engage and challenge students. Crucial to establishing an open learning environment is capturing the attention of non-science majors from the moment they enter the classroom. We use catastrophic ‘gloom and doom’ current events to pique the imagination with images, news stories, and videos. Once our students are hooked, we can further the learning process with use of other teaching methods: an inquiry-based approach that requires students take control of their own learning, a cooperative learning approach that requires the participation of all team members in peer learning, and a problem/case study learning approach that primarily relies on activities distilled from current events. The final outcome is focused on creating innovative methods to communicate the findings to the general public. With the general public being the audience for their communiqué, students are less intimated, more focused, and more involved in solving the problem. During lab sessions, teams of students actively engage in mastering course content and develop essential communication skills while exploring real-world scenarios. These activities allow students to use scientific reasoning and concepts to develop solutions for scenarios such as volcanic eruptions, coastal erosion/sea level rise, flooding or landslide hazards, and then creatively communicate their solutions to the public. For example, during a two-week section on Earthquakes, teams study the effects of seismic motion on sediments underlying the Charleston, South Carolina region. Students discover areas where the greatest damage occurred during the 1886 earthquake via a walking tour of Charleston. Extracting information from historical and topographic maps, and aerial and satellite imagery provides students with the necessary information to produce an earthquake hazard map of the area. Applying the creativity and knowledge base of the multidisciplinary students generates a startling array of innovative methods for communicating their results: brochures, storybooks, computer-animated hazard maps, Facebook pages, YouTube videos - even Virtual Reality avatars! When allowed to use their imaginations and resourcefulness, these students have no bounds! Not only does the application of inquiry-based problem solving methodology in conjunction with cooperative learning enhance comprehension of the material, but by allowing undergraduate students to develop methods of communicating their knowledge to the public through an interesting variety of medium, students remain focused, engaged, and even excited about learning science that otherwise intimidated them.

Humphreys, R. R.; Hall, C.; Colgan, M. W.; Rhodes, E.

2010-12-01

87

Pre-Nursing Students Perceptions of Traditional and Inquiry Based Chemistry Laboratories  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper describes a process that attempted to meet the needs of undergraduate students in a pre-nursing chemistry class. The laboratory was taught in traditional verification style and students were surveyed to assess their perceptions of the educational goals of the laboratory. A literature review resulted in an inquiry based method and analysis of the needs of nurses resulted in more application based activities. This new inquiry format was implemented the next semester, the students were surveyed at the end of the semester and results were compared to the previous method. Student and instructor response to the change in format was positive. Students in the traditional format placed goals concerning technique above critical thinking and felt the lab was easy to understand and carry out. Students in the inquiry based lab felt they learned more critical thinking skills and enjoyed the independence of designing experiments and answering their own questions.

Rogers, Jessica

88

Comprehensive Healthcare module: medical and pharmacy students’ shared learning experiences  

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Introduction: The Comprehensive Healthcare (CHC) module was developed to introduce pre-clinical medical and pharmacy students to the concept of comprehensive healthcare. This study aims to explore their shared learning experiences within this module. Methodology: During this module, medical and pharmacy students conducted visits to patients’ homes and to related community-based organisations in small groups. They were required to write a reflective journal on their experiences regarding wor...

Chai-Eng Tan; Aida Jaffar; Seng-Fah Tong; Majmin Sheikh Hamzah; Nabishah Mohamad

2014-01-01

89

Investigation of Inquiry-based Science Pedagogy among Middle Level Science Teachers: A Qualitative Study  

Science.gov (United States)

This study implemented a qualitative approach to examine the phenomenon of "inquiry-based science pedagogy or inquiry instruction" as it has been experienced by individuals. Data was collected through online open-ended surveys, focus groups, and teacher reported self-reflections to answer the research questions: 1) How do middle level science teachers conceptualize "inquiry-based instruction?" 2) What are preferred instructional strategies for implementation in middle level science classrooms? And 3) How do middle level science teachers perceive the connection between science instruction and student learning? The participants within this research study represent 33 percent of teachers in grades 5 through 9 within six school districts in northeastern Pennsylvania. Of the 12 consent forms originally obtained, 10 teachers completed all three phases of the data collection, including the online survey, participation in focus groups, and teacher self-reflection. 60 percent of the participants taught only science, and 40 percent taught all content areas. Of the ten participants, 50 percent were certified teachers of science and 50 percent were certified as teachers of elementary education. 70 percent of the research participants reflected having obtained a master's, with 60 percent of these degrees being received in areas of education, and 10 percent in the area of science. The research participants have a total of 85 collective years of experience as professional educators, with the average years of experience being 8.5 years. Analysis of data revealed three themes related to research question #1) How do middle-level science teachers conceptualize inquiry-based instruction? and sub-question #1) How do middle-level science teachers characterize effective instruction? The themes that capture the essence of teachers' formulation of inquiry-based instruction that emerged in this study were student centered, problem solving, and hands-on . Analysis of data revealed one theme related to research question #2) What are preferred instructional strategies for implementation in middle level science classrooms? and topical sub-question #2) How do middle level science teachers structure instruction. The theme that emerged was needs of students. Analysis of the data revealed one theme related to research question #3) How do middle level science teachers perceive the relationship between science instruction and student learning? and topical sub-question #3) How do middle level science teachers view their role in relation to student learning? This theme is meaning making. Analysis of the data related to meaning making revealed two sub-themes of application and relationships. It is clear that middle level science teachers have a vision for inquiry-based science instruction, but implementation is inhibited by a variety of factors including curricular programming that is very broad and lacks depth, the scheduling of time and resources for science, and the absence of a clear model of inquiry-based instruction. In addition, only one participant referenced students investigating their own authentic questions and no participants reflected on the importance of students using evidence in their explanations of scientific phenomenon. Additionally, participants continually reflected on the needs of their students informing instructional practices, and it is wondered if there is a clear understanding among middle level teachers of how students learn science. Real world applications were recognized as important within science learning and the researcher questions whether teachers of science have adequate opportunities to explore real world application of science concepts throughout their careers in order to foster connections within the classroom. These findings support the need for strong, job-embedded professional development, the cultivation of learning communities dedicated to the investigation and implementation of inquiry-based science, the focusing of curricular programming to allow for in depth investigation of scientific concep

Weiland, Sunny Minelli

90

An Inquiry-Based Density Laboratory for Teaching Experimental Error  

Science.gov (United States)

An inquiry-based laboratory exercise is described in which introductory chemistry students measure the density of water five times using either a beaker, a graduated cylinder, or a volumetric pipet. Students are also assigned to use one of two analytical balances, one of which is purposefully miscalibrated by 5%. Each group collects data using…

Prilliman, Stephen G.

2012-01-01

91

Integrating Writing Frames into Inquiry-Based Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents a discussion of writing frames as a method of fostering scientific writing skills in the inquiry-based science classroom. Writing frames are described as templates that contain leads, cues, clues, and insights that collectively work together and provide a skeleton outline to scaffold writing tasks. The uses and benefits of…

Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

2010-01-01

92

Digging into Inquiry-Based Earth Science Research  

Science.gov (United States)

To help eighth-grade students experience the excitement of Earth science research, the authors developed an inquiry-based project in which students evaluated and cataloged their campus geology and soils. Following class discussions of rock-weathering and soil-forming processes, students worked in groups to excavate multiple soil pits in the school…

Schultz, Bryan; Yates, Crystal; Schultz, Jayne M.

2008-01-01

93

An inquiry-based laboratory on friction  

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Sliding friction is usually introduced in high school, but rarely through activities in laboratory. A qualitative introduction to friction is presented by proposing exploration of different kind of materials in order to suggest which aspects can be relevant and which interaction is involved. Different quantitative experiments are proposed for studying Leonardo's laws for friction. The learning path was tested with two high school classes during an instruction trip at departm...

Montalbano, Vera

2013-01-01

94

PDI: Discussion and Writing in the Inquiry Based Elementary Science Classroom: Critical partners in the development of scientific reasoning and conceptual understanding, New Orleans, Louisiana; March 18, 2009  

Science.gov (United States)

This Professional Development Institute focuses on the development and use of literacy skills in science to foster upper elementary (3rd-5th grade) students' scientific reasoning as they move from direct experience to conceptual understanding. To set the stage and establish a model of classroom based guided inquiry, participants will first engage in a brief science investigation. This will be followed by an in-depth exploration of the roles of oral and written language in deepening scientific reasoning. Using classroom videos, transcripts of student discussions, student writing, and mini-case studies, we will identify a range of instructional strategies that: structure and guide serious accountable talk among students; foster careful use of notebooks for recording and concluding; and provide opportunities for students to apply their understanding through different genres of writing. We will also focus on the relationship between talking and writing and the important back and forth that takes place as students clarify and deepen their understanding of science ideas. Participants also will have the opportunity to explore the relationship between literacy and science teaching and learning and the important connections that can and should be made in the classroom. Much is being made of the connection between science and literacy in many educational arenas. Publishers are producing science readers by the dozen. Science journals and science notebooks are more and more common. Teachers and other educational leaders are emphasizing the connection in the hopes of keeping science off the back burner. Others see science as a way to motivate students to build their literacy skills and improve test scores. This institute stems from the growing literature on the role of discussion and writing in interpreting, analyzing and synthesizing the ideas and experiences of scientific investigations. There is little doubt that direct experience with science phenomena is critical to student science learning, but it does not in itself lead to the development of conclusions and new theories. For this to take place students need to reflect on their experience, examine and analyze their data, debate and discuss their ideas, write down their conclusions, and communicate them to others. In other words they need to use language - literacy. How they use language and what teachers do to support this is the focus of this institute. This institute is intended for science educators interested in exploring how discussion and writing permeate effective inquiry based instruction at the upper elementary level (3-5th grade). In large and small highly interactive groups, participants will have the opportunity to learn from the resources provided by the institute leaders as well as from one another. The presenters of the workshop reflect a critical partnership between literacy and science educators. Three of the presenters of this institute are science educators with many years of experience in developing inquiry based curricula, working with both pre-service and in-service teachers on inquiry based science teaching and learning. One of the presenters is an expert in comprehensive literacy and has many years experience providing professional development to teachers. In 2003, the Center for Science Education at EDC received an NSF grant to develop professional development materials to enhance the use of language in the inquiry based classroom with a particular focus on science discussions; student writing in notebooks and in other contexts; and the explicit connection between the teaching and learning of literacy and that of science. This institute is based on this work.

1900-01-01

95

Inquiry-Based Instruction and High Stakes Testing  

Science.gov (United States)

Science education is a key to economic success for a country in terms of promoting advances in national industry and technology and maximizing competitive advantage in a global marketplace. The December 2010 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) ranked the United States 23rd of 65 countries in science. That dismal standing in science proficiency impedes the ability of American school graduates to compete in the global market place. Furthermore, the implementation of high stakes testing in science mandated by the 2007 No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act has created an additional need for educators to find effective science pedagogy. Research has shown that inquiry-based science instruction is one of the predominant science instructional methods. Inquiry-based instruction is a multifaceted teaching method with its theoretical foundation in constructivism. A correlational survey research design was used to determine the relationship between levels of inquiry-based science instruction and student performance on a standardized state science test. A self-report survey, using a Likert-type scale, was completed by 26 fifth grade teachers. Participants' responses were analyzed and grouped as high, medium, or low level inquiry instruction. The unit of analysis for the achievement variable was the student scale score average from the state science test. Spearman's Rho correlation data showed a positive relationship between the level of inquiry-based instruction and student achievement on the state assessment. The findings can assist teachers and administrators by providing additional research on the benefits of the inquiry-based instructional method. Implications for positive social change include increases in student proficiency and decision-making skills related to science policy issues which can help make them more competitive in the global marketplace.

Cothern, Rebecca L.

96

The Cooperative Learning Effects on English Reading Comprehension and Learning Motivation of EFL Freshmen  

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This experimental study aims to investigate the effects of using cooperative learning to enhance the English reading comprehension and learning motivation of EFL freshmen by comparing the cooperative learning instruction and traditional lecture instruction. This experiment was implemented in a Freshman English Reading course, a two credit course, with two hours of instruction per week, over a full semester. Seventy-eight EFL freshmen taking Freshman English Reading courses participated in ...

Ching-Ying Pan; Hui-Yi Wu

2013-01-01

97

E-Learning and Comprehensive School and Kindergarten Development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The content of this article includes experiences and results of a comprehensive development project for schools and kindergartens in Denmark. The project includes all pedagogical professionals within the organization and contains a professional development sequence based on - among other things e-learning where pedagogical professionals collaboratively develop their common and individual practices. The article takes a look at both the challenges and potentials that have surfaced using e-learning as part of the framework for both professional and organizational development. In addition, the article proposes how the experience gathered from this existing project can be used as springboard to design new professional development projects where e-learning becomes an important element of competency development for pedagogical professionals in schools and kindergartens closely related to practice.

Line Hansen

2012-08-01

98

Developing an Explicit-Reflective Inquiry-Based Professional Development Workshop and Examining the Effects on Nature of Scientific Knowledge  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Improving understanding of nature of science and scientific knowledge for individuals has been seen one of the essential objectives for science education for years. Teachers have a critical role in the process of learning nature of science by students. For this reason, we have turned our attentions toward improving science teachers? views about nature of science and scientific knowledge. This study focused specifically on introducing the explicit-reflective inquiry-based professional develo...

Bayir, Eylem; Ko?seog?lu, Fitnat

2010-01-01

99

Teaching Neuroscience to Science Teachers: Facilitating the Translation of Inquiry-Based Teaching Instruction to the Classroom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In science education, inquiry-based approaches to teaching and learning provide a framework for students to building critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. Teacher professional development has been an ongoing focus for promoting such educational reforms. However, despite a strong consensus regarding best practices for professional development, relatively little systematic research has documented classroom changes consequent to these experiences. This paper reports on the impact of sust...

Roehrig, G. H.; Michlin, M.; Schmitt, L.; Macnabb, C.; Dubinsky, J. M.

2012-01-01

100

Overcoming the difficulties of inquiry-based teaching through the use of coaching  

Science.gov (United States)

This research examines the use of coaching as a professional development approach to enhance the introduction of inquiry-based teaching methods. Previous professional development efforts are well documented in the science education literature, and implementation rates are generally low, despite a wide-spread belief that inquiry-based teaching methods are beneficial to student learning. Difficulties that are often found include a lack of time, tension from high-stakes testing, a lack of content knowledge, a lack of inquiry knowledge, a scarcity of inquiry resources, and a conflict between the teacher's learning style and the inherent style of inquiry. These barriers lead to slow, poorly understood progress in adopting inquiry methods, and a shortage of concrete suggestions on how best to proceed. To examine how teacher-coach pairs overcome these difficulties, a multiple-case study was planned that uncovered specific steps taken by creating a richly detailed narrative of how this science curriculum is implemented. This narrative was closely affiliated with a certain specific context of underperforming high schools in a major American city, but the results may generalize to other similar contexts as well. Additionally, the findings from these case studies may serve to validate other analogous findings from the literature.

Kraus, Rudolf

 
 
 
 
101

Factors that Affect Elementary Teachers' Ability to Conduct Inquiry-Based Science Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

Science education reform, including the recently released Next Generation Science Standards, places a clear emphasis on student learning through inquiry-based science instruction. Inquiry enables students to construct meaning and understanding based on their own experience and connected to prior knowledge. The factors that enhance and detract from suburban third, fourth and fifth grade teachers' ability to conduct inquirybased science investigations were examined through a qualitative case study. The availability of supplies and materials through science kits, student engagement in science, and teacher's enjoyment in teaching science were factors that enhanced teachers' ability to conduct inquiry. The teachers in this study believe in the importance of science instruction and carried out guided inquiries in their classrooms. Time required to implement the Common Core Learning Standards, new accountability policies; lack of preservice preparation and lack of professional development were factors that detracted from teachers' ability to conduct inquiry. In order to provide students and teachers with the time that is needed for inquiry-based science instruction, New York State is urged to mandate time for science instruction in the elementary curriculum. New York State must require that science content and methods courses be part of the curriculum in colleges and universities that grant degrees in elementary education. School districts must help their teachers by providing professional development that embeds science content with science and engineering practices so that teachers can help their students to build explanatory models, engage in argumentation, compare competing ideas and reach consensus. Keywords: Science education, inquiry, science instruction, accountability, STEM..

Loesing, Mary L.

102

Comprehensive Healthcare module: medical and pharmacy students’ shared learning experiences  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: The Comprehensive Healthcare (CHC module was developed to introduce pre-clinical medical and pharmacy students to the concept of comprehensive healthcare. This study aims to explore their shared learning experiences within this module. Methodology: During this module, medical and pharmacy students conducted visits to patients’ homes and to related community-based organisations in small groups. They were required to write a reflective journal on their experiences regarding working with other professions as part of their module assessment. Highly scored reflective journals written by students from the 2011/2012 academic session were selected for analysis. Their shared learning experiences were identified via thematic analysis. We also analysed students’ feedback regarding the module. Results: Analysis of 25 selected reflective journals revealed several important themes: ‘Understanding of impact of illness and its relation to holistic care’, ‘Awareness of the role of various healthcare professions’ and ‘Generic or soft skills for inter-professional collaboration’. Although the primary objective of the module was to expose students to comprehensive healthcare, the students learnt skills required for future collaborative practice from their experiences. Discussion: The CHC module provided early clinical exposure to community-based health issues and incorporated some elements of inter-professional education. The students learnt about the roles of other healthcare professions and acquired soft skills required for future collaborative practice during this module.

Chai-Eng Tan

2014-10-01

103

Comprehensive Assessment and Evaluation of Students with Learning Disabilities: A Paper Prepared by the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

The National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD) strongly supports comprehensive assessment and evaluation of students with learning disabilities by a multidisciplinary team for the identification and diagnosis of students with learning disabilities. Comprehensive assessment of individual students requires the use of multiple data…

Learning Disability Quarterly, 2011

2011-01-01

104

An Inquiry-Based Biochemistry Laboratory Structure Emphasizing Competency in the Scientific Process: A Guided Approach with an Electronic Notebook Format  

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The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students…

Hall, Mona L.; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

2014-01-01

105

What to Teach and How to Teach It: Elementary Teachers' Views on Teaching Inquiry-Based, Interdisciplinary Science and Social Studies in Urban Settings  

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Inquiry-based and interdisciplinary teaching practices exemplify constructivist approaches to education capable of facilitating authentic student learning; however, their implementation has proven particularly challenging within certain contexts in the United States. This qualitative study considers one such context via an investigation of…

Santau, Alexandra O.; Ritter, Jason K.

2013-01-01

106

Incorporating Amphibian Malformations into Inquiry-Based Learning  

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Amphibians, a class of vertebrates consisting of frogs and toads, salamanders, and caecilians, are excellent organisms for middle school science students to study because of their ecological significance. Because they exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide through their skin, amphibians absorb any chemicals or substances present in their immediate…

Talley, Brooke L.

2007-01-01

107

Improving Teacher Education through Inquiry-Based Learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Preservice educators face daunting challenges throughout their professional development, but no challenge is greater than that of contextualizing their instruction within multicultural environments. Addressing the increasing diversity and ever-changing cultures within student populations is often skimmed over within teacher education curriculums; yet, its importance to the success of preservice teachers cannot be understated. Investigators developed two specific projects which led...

Evan Ortlieb

2011-01-01

108

Developing an Explicit-Reflective Inquiry-Based Professional Development Workshop and Examining the Effects on Nature of Scientific Knowledge  

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Full Text Available Improving understanding of nature of science and scientific knowledge for individuals has been seen one of the essential objectives for science education for years. Teachers have a critical role in the process of learning nature of science by students. For this reason, we have turned our attentions toward improving science teachers? views about nature of science and scientific knowledge. This study focused specifically on introducing the explicit-reflective inquiry-based professional development workshop designed by the researchers. Second aim of this study is to examine the impact of explicit-reflective inquiry-based professional development workshop on preservice chemistry teachers? understandings of nature of scientific knowledge. Participants of this study were 20 preservice chemistry teachers at Gazi University. In order to exposing the changes in understandings of nature of scientific knowledge, Turkish version of The Nature of Scientific Knowledge Scale (NSKS and interviews were used in a pre/post format. The result of the Paired Samples T-Test, used to investigate the effect on the understandings about scientific knowledge, indicated that understandings of preservice chemistry teachers had a significant progress. The quantitative analysis of the scores which the participants got from each of six categories in NSKS were put forward significant differences in term of only creative and developmental categories. Also, in the qualitative analysis of the transcripts of interviews came out similar results. It seems that our explicit inquiry-based professional development workshop moved participants towards more adequate understandings about nature of scientific knowledge.

Eylem BAYIR

2010-12-01

109

Aligning the Hidden Curriculum of Management Education With PRME : An Inquiry-Based Framework  

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This article argues that mainstreaming responsible management education in line with the Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) requires close attention to the hidden curriculum (HC), that is, the implicit dimensions of educational experiences. Altering formal curricular goals and content alone is not enough to improve students’ sense of social responsibility. Business schools are conceptualized in this article as multilevel learning environments comprising various message sites where students undergo moral learning and socialization processes. Using perspectives from HC research combined with transformative learning and communities of practice theory, the article offers an inquiry-based framework for PRME implementation that takes these moral learning and socialization processes into account. It provides suggestions for how to address the hidden curriculum both in the diagnostic phase of assessing a school’s PRME needs and in the implementation phase where PRME is integrated into business school learning environments. The concept of meta-messages is introduced to account for how students apprehend the HC at business schools.

Blasco, Maribel

2012-01-01

110

Guided-inquiry based laboratory instruction: Investigation of critical thinking skills, problem solving skills, and implementing student roles in chemistry  

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Recent initiatives in the laboratory curriculum have encouraged an inquiry-based approach to learning and teaching in the laboratory. It has been argued that laboratory instruction should not just be hands-on, but it should portray the essence of inquiry through the process of experiential learning and reflective engagement in collaboration with peers and in facilitation by the instructor. A student-centered active learning approach may be an effective way to enhance student understanding of concepts in the laboratory. The dissertation research work explores the impact of laboratory instruction and its relevance for college-level chemistry. Each chapter is different from the preceding chapter in terms of the purpose of the study and the research questions asked. However, the overarching idea is to address the importance of guided-inquiry based laboratory instruction in chemistry and its relevance in helping students to make connections with the chemistry content and in imparting skills to students. Such skills include problem solving, collaborative group work and critical thinking. The first research study (Chapter 2) concerns the impact of first year co-requisite general chemistry laboratory instruction on the problem-solving skills of students. The second research study (Chapter 3) examines the impact of implementing student roles also known as Student-Led Instructor Facilitated Guided-Inquiry based Laboratories, SLIFGIL) by modifying the Science Writing Heuristic approach of laboratory instruction. In the third research study (Chapter 4), critical thinking skills of first semester general chemistry laboratory students were compared to advanced (third or fourth year) chemistry laboratory students based on the analysis of their laboratory reports.

Gupta, Tanya

111

The effects of inquiry-based science on the social and communicative skills of students with low-incidence disabilities  

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This research utilized inquiry based science as a vehicle to implement and maintain social skills training for secondary students, ages 14 to 20, with low-incidence disabilities in a self-contained classroom. This three year action research study examined the effects of an inquiry based science curriculum on the level and quantity of social skills used by students with one or more of the following challenges: significant learning disability (functioning more than two grade levels below grade level), emotional/social disability, mental retardation, Autism, and/or varying degrees of brain damage. Through the use of video recording, the students in the study were analyzed based on the level of social interaction and the amount of socialization that took place during inquiry based science. The skills sought were based on the social and communication skills earmarked in the students' weekly social skills training class and their Individualized Education Plans (IEP). Based on previous research in social skills training it has been determined that where social skills training is lacking are in the areas of transfer and maintenance of skills. Due to the natural social behavior that must take place in inquiry based science this group of students were found to exhibit gains in (1) quantity of social interactions on topic; (2) developing higher levels of social interactions (sharing, taking other's suggestions, listening and responding appropriately, etc.); and (3) maintenance of social skills taught outside of formal social skills training. These gains were seen overall in the amount of student involvement during inquiry based science verses teacher involvement. Such increases are depicted through students' verbal exchanges, excerpts from field notes, and student reflections. The findings of this research is expected to guide special educators, administrators and directors of curriculum as to how to better create curriculum for this specific population where social skills training is utilized and maintained in all aspects of the academic day, thus helping this population of student achieve more independence and appropriate interactions in their live as citizens of society.

D'Angelo, Heather Hopkins

112

Teachers’ Transformation to Inquiry-Based Instructional Practice  

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Full Text Available This collective case study examines secondary science teachers’ responses to a professional development program designed to assist in the transformation of inquiry belief structures and inquiry instructional practices. These teachers were participants in a year-long professional development institute that focused on increasing the quantity and quality of inquiry in secondary science classrooms. This multi-case design examines multiple data sources in order to answer the following research question: How do the beliefs and practices of teachers regarding inquiry-based instruction evolve over the year of intervention? Participants were selected using the data from an inquiry observational protocol to represent a variety of abilities and beliefs regarding inquiry instructional practice. The results provide insights into teachers’ belief structures and classroom structure related to inquiry instruction. Further, we detail the role of the professional development experience in facilitating transformation of classroom practice. Implications for how professional development programs are developed and led are provided.

Julie B. Smart

2013-02-01

113

Facilitating Elementary Science Teachers' Implementation of Inquiry-Based Science Teaching  

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Preservice science teachers generally feel that the implementation of inquiry-based science teaching is very difficult to manage. This research project aimed at facilitating the implementation of inquiry-based science teaching through the use of several classroom strategies. The evaluation of 15 classroom strategies from 80 preservice elementary…

Qablan, Ahmad M.; DeBaz, Theodora

2015-01-01

114

Inquiry-based instruction in secondary science classrooms: A survey of teacher practice  

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The purpose of this quantitative investigation was to describe the extent to which secondary science teachers, who were certified through Connecticut's BEST portfolio assessment process between 1997 and 2004 and had taught secondary science during the past academic year, reported practicing the indicators of inquiry-based instruction in the classroom and the factors that they perceived facilitated, obstructed, or informed that practice. Indicators of inquiry-based instruction were derived from the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) 5E model (Bybee, 1997). The method for data collection was a researcher-developed, self-report, questionnaire entitled "Inquiry-based Instruction in Secondary Science Classrooms: A Survey", which was developed and disseminated using a slightly modified Dillman (2000) approach. Almost all of the study participants reported practicing the 5Es (engage, explore, explain, elaborate, and evaluate) of inquiry-based instruction in their secondary science classrooms. Time, resources, the need to cover material for mandatory assessments, the science topics or concepts being taught, and professional development on inquiry-based instruction were reported to be important considerations in participants' decisions to practice inquiry-based instruction in their science classrooms. A majority of the secondary science teachers participating in this study indicated they had the time, access to resources and the professional development opportunities they needed to practice inquiry-based instruction in their secondary classrooms. Study participants ranked having the time to teach in an inquiry-based fashion and the need to cover material for mandated testing as the biggest obstacles to their practice of inquiry-based instruction in the secondary classroom. Classroom experience and collegial exchange informed the inquiry-based instruction practice of the secondary science teachers who participated in this study. Recommendations for further research, practice, and policy were made based upon the results of this study.

Gejda, Linda Muggeo

115

Integrating Inquiry-Based Science and Education Methods Courses in a "Science Semester" for Future Elementary Teachers  

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In this NSF-funded project we will adapt problem-based learning (PBL) and other inquiry-based approaches to create an integrated science and education methods curriculum ("science semester") for elementary teacher education majors. Our goal is to foster integrated understandings of science and pedagogy that future elementary teachers need to effectively use inquiry-based approaches in their classrooms. This project responds to calls to improve science education for all students by making preservice teachers' experiences in undergraduate science courses more consistent with reforms at the K-12 level. The involved faculty teach three science courses (biology, earth science, physical science) and an elementary science education methods course that are degree requirements for elementary teacher education majors. Presently, students take the courses in variable sequences and at widely scattered times. Too many students fail to appreciate the value of science courses to their future careers as teachers, and when they reach the methods course in the junior year they often retain little of the science content studied earlier. These episodic encounters with science make it difficult for students to learn the content, and to translate their understandings of science into effective, inquiry-based teaching strategies. To encourage integrated understandings of science concepts and pedagogy we will coordinate the science and methods courses in a junior-year science semester. Traditional subject matter boundaries will be crossed to stress shared themes that teachers must understand to teach standards-based elementary science. We will adapt exemplary approaches that support both learning science and learning how to teach science. Students will work collaboratively on multidisciplinary PBL activities that place science concepts in authentic contexts and build learning skills. "Lecture" meetings will be large group active learning sessions that help students understand difficult concepts, make connections between class activities, and launch and wrap-up PBL problems. Labs will include activities from elementary science kits as launching points for in-depth investigations that demonstrate the continuity of science concepts and pedagogies across age levels. In the methods course, students will critically explore the theory and practice of elementary science teaching, drawing on their shared experiences of inquiry learning in the science courses. Field placements in elementary classrooms will allow students to ground their studies of science and pedagogy in actual practice.

Madsen, J.; Fifield, S.; Allen, D.; Brickhouse, N.; Dagher, Z.; Ford, D.; Shipman, H.

2001-05-01

116

The Effects of Cooperative Learning on Improving English Pronunciation and Comprehension of Medical Students  

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Introduction: Acquisition of intelligible English pronunciation and comprehension of medical texts has been considered as an important need for medical students. This can be improved by employing different methods and taking into consideration various learning styles of students. This study is an attempt to reveal the effect of cooperative learning on enhancing pronunciation and reading comprehension in students of medicine in Yasuj University of Medical Sciences. Methods: All 60 students...

Zeinab Sanaee Moghadam; Saeed Zarein-Dolab; Amrollah Roozbehi

2013-01-01

117

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Special Niche for Faculty at Comprehensive Universities?  

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We investigated the involvement of faculty members at comprehensive universities in scholarship of teaching and learning publishing activities in four disciplines. Compared to their publishing rates in research-oriented journals, comprehensive university faculty members were more involved in publishing articles and serving on editorial boards for…

Henderson, Bruce B.; Buchanan, Heidi E.

2007-01-01

118

The Role of Morphological Awareness in Reading Comprehension among Typical and Learning Disabled Native Arabic Speakers  

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This work examines the role of morphological awareness in contrast to phonological processing in reading comprehension amongst two groups of native Arabic children: a group with learning disabilities (LD) and a mainstream group who were matched to the LD group in age or reading level. Measures of reading comprehension fluency, phonological skills,…

Mahfoudhi, Abdessatar; Elbeheri, Gad; Al-Rashidi, Mousa; Everatt, John

2010-01-01

119

The Effects of Captions on Deaf Students' Content Comprehension, Cognitive Load, and Motivation in Online Learning  

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The authors examined the effects of captions on deaf students' content comprehension, cognitive load, and motivation in online learning. The participants in the study were 62 deaf adult students who had limited reading comprehension skills and used sign language as a first language. Participants were randomly assigned to either the control group…

Yoon, Joong-O.; Kim, Minjeong

2011-01-01

120

Strategy Instruction in Reading Comprehension: An Intervention Study for Students with Learning Disabilities  

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Teaching reading strategies and guiding students towards self-regulated reading routines are promising approaches to fostering reading comprehension in students with learning disabilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate in a sample of 73 fifth to eighth graders with learning disabilities (IQ higher than 85 and reading skills below…

Antoniou, Faye; Souvignier, Elmar

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
121

Implementation of Inquiry-Based Tutorials in AN Introductory Physics Course: the Role of the Graduate Teaching Assistant.  

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This study determined if the training provided physics teaching assistants was sufficient to accomplish the objectives of inquiry-based tutorials for an introductory physics course. Qualitative research methods were used: (1) to determine if the Physics by Inquiry method was modeled; (2) to describe the process from the teaching assistant perspective; (3) to determine TA opinions on training methods; (4) to develop a frame of reference to better understand the role of TA's as instructional support staff. The study determined that the teaching assistants verbalized appropriate instructional actions, but were observed to use a predominantly didactic teaching style. TA's held a variety of perceptions and beliefs about inquiry -based learning and how science is learned. They felt comfortable in the role of tutorial instructor. They were satisfied with the training methods provided and had few suggestions to change or improve training for future tutorial instructors. A concurrent theme of teacher action dependent on teacher beliefs was sustained throughout the study. The TA's actions, as tutorial instructors, reflected their educational beliefs, student background and learning experiences. TA's performance as tutorial instructors depended on what they think and believe about learning science. Practical implications exist for training teaching assistants to be tutorial instructors. Some recommendations may be appropriate for TA's required to use instructional methods that they have not experienced as students. Interview prospective teaching assistants to determine educational experience and beliefs. Employ inexperienced teaching assistants whose perspectives match the proposed instructional role and who might be more receptive to modeling. Incorporate training into staff meetings. Provide time for TA's to experience the instructional model with simulation or role play as students and as instructors, accompanied by conference discussion. Use strategies known to enhance adult learning and that are sensitive to the variability of adult learners. Educate for critical reflection; incorporate a system of peer coaching. Include a teaching assistant training component in group process and group management.

Thoresen, Carol Wiggins

1994-01-01

122

ACTIVE STRATEGIES DURING INQUIRY-BASED SCIENCE TEACHER EDUCATION TO IMPROVE LONG-TERM TEACHER SELF-EFFICACY  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Teacher development aimed at increasing the use of inquiry based methods in schools is an important way to reach science learning goals. To this end, the EC has promoted inquiry based science teaching (IBST) within the Seventh Framework Program (FP7). One dimension, typically absent from the FP7 products, is the personal capacity belief of self- efficacy which has been shown to be important to personal behavioral change. The purpose of this research was to develop and test a model of teacher professional development (TPD) which adds specific elements for altering teacher self-efficacies to existing FP7 IBST products. This model was tested for its usefulness in increasing participant self-efficacy as evidenced by short and long term quantitative measures as well as by evaluation of long terminquiry lessons. Workshops to promote IBST were conducted in five different countries. Each workshop included strategies for increasing participant’s self-efficacies. Pre and post assessments showed consistently improved personal self-efficacy scores in all of the workshops. In addition, and unlike other long-term studies of teachers, these self-efficacy scores did not significantly diminish over six months. The promotion of self-efficacy in TPD provides a consistent way of evaluating the impact of IBST workshops through the use of changes in self-efficacy.

Evans, Robert Harry

2012-01-01

123

Girls on Ice: An Inquiry-Based Wilderness Science Education Program  

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We developed a wilderness science education program for high school girls. The program offers opportunities for students to explore and learn about mountain glaciers and the alpine landscape through scientific field studies with geologists and glaciologists. Our purpose is to give students a feeling for the natural processes that create the alpine world and provide an environment that fosters the critical thinking necessary to all scientific inquiry. The program is currently being offered through the North Cascades Institute, a non-profit organization offering outdoor education programs for the general public. We lead eight girls for a weeklong expedition to the remote USGS South Cascade Glacier Research Station in Washington's North Cascades. For four days, we explore the glacier and the nearby alpine valleys. We encourage the girls to observe and think like scientists through making observations and inferences. They develop their own experiments to test ideas about glacier dynamics and geomorphology. In addition to scientific exploration, we engage the students in discussions about the philosophy of science and its role in our everyday lives. Our program exemplifies the success of hands-on, inquiry-based teaching in small groups for science education in the outdoors. The wilderness setting and single gender field team inspires young women's interest in science and provides a challenging environment that increases their physical and intellectual self-confidence.

Pettit, E. C.; Koppes, M. N.

2001-12-01

124

Inquiry Based Science Education og den sociokulturelt forankrede dialog i naturfagsundervisningen.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Through study, investigation and discussion of the concept Best Practice in science education (Ellebæk & Østergaard, 2009) it was shown, that the dialogue in the teaching sequences was an important factor for the children’s understanding, engagement and interest for the science subjects and phenomena. In this article we will discuss dialogue in the light of sociocultural learning theories, and relate it to Inquiry Based Science Education (IBSE), as the pedagogical and didactical method, which are promoted most strongly these years (e.g. in the inter-European Pollen and Fibonacci projects). The method is central in the action research project NatSats, where focus is on chidren’s hypothesizing and the way teacher’s use dialogue in their teaching or guiding of children in kindergarten and primary school. Results from the project indicate that an open and interrogative dialogue based on the student’s premises is able to support hypothesizing, which initiates explorative and investigative challenges for the students.

Østergaard, Lars Domino

2012-01-01

125

R-WISE: A Learning Environment for Teaching Reading Comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

R-WISE (Reading and Writing in a Supportive Environment), a computerized package for teaching critical literacy, is described, focusing on its use in developing reading comprehension. The program eases demands on short-term memory, highlights strategically important aspects of comprehending text, guides internalization and self-initiation of…

Carlson, Patricia A.; Larralde, Veronica

1995-01-01

126

South Mississippi public elementary school teachers' implementation of and attitudes toward inquiry-based science  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study was designed to examine the relationship between the dependent variables of K-5 elementary teachers' attitudes toward inquiry-based science, implementation of National Science Education Standards concerning inquiry-based science, and the number of inquiry-based lessons taught with the predictor variables of gender, school district teaching, ethnic group, educational level, experience, grade level teaching, and number of science courses taken. Four hundred thirty teachers of grades K through 5 from seven school districts in south Mississippi were surveyed using the Revised Science Attitude Scale (Bitner, 1994), Inquiry Beliefs and Practices survey (Jeanpierre, 2006), and a demographic questionnaire. A total of 814 teachers were invited to participate in the study. Multiple linear regression techniques were used to test the hypotheses of this study at a .05 level. Results indicate that number of courses taken is a predictor for all subscales of attitude toward inquiry-based science. Grade level teaching was a significant predictor for two subscales of attitude and gender along with school district were predictors for one subscale for attitude. Results also indicate that school district, ethnic group, and grade level teaching are significant predictors of the complex skills subscale for implementation of inquiry-based lessons. The predictors of gender, school district, and number of courses taken were found to be significant concerning the number of inquiry-based lessons taught. Positive correlations were found between the four subscales for attitude, the two subscales for inquiry beliefs and practices, and the number of inquiry-based lessons taught. Conclusions, implications, and recommendations for future research are included.

Sumrall, Thomas Franklin

127

Multimedia Glosses and Their Effect on L2 Text Comprehension and Vocabulary Learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study investigates the effects that different types of multimedia glosses, namely textual, pictorial, and textual + pictorial, have on text comprehension and vocabulary learning when the goal is exclusively comprehension of a computerized text. This study is based on the theoretical framework of attention, which maintains that attention is critical in the acquisition process of an L2 (Robinson, 1995; Schmidt, 1995, 2001; Tomlin and Villa, 1994. Ninety-four participants read a text under one of four gloss conditions while asked to think aloud. This study investigated whether any of the conditions promoted noticing and whether this noticing led to better comprehension of the text and learning of the target vocabulary words. Reading comprehension, recognition, and production measures were utilized in a pre-post test design. Results of quantitative and qualitative analyses of the data gathered showed first that all multimedia gloss groups noticed and recognized significantly more of the target words than the control group. Second, no significant differences were found among any of the groups in production of the target vocabulary items. Finally, regarding comprehension, results showed that the combination gloss group significantly outperformed all other groups. These results confirm that the multimedia glosses under investigation have a different effect on comprehension and vocabulary learning respectively.

Iñigo Yanguas

2009-06-01

128

Reading comprehension and learning evaluation among undergraduates / Compreensão em leitura e avaliação da aprendizagem em universitários  

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Full Text Available This research meant to explore the relation among reading comprehension, academic performance and learning assessment in specific contents. The sample was composed of by 270 freshman students from administration, law and psychology courses, from daytime and evening period in a private university in São Paulo. The instruments used were 2 texts prepared in accordance to Cloze's technique and a questionnaire focusing the most used characterization types in higher education assessment. The students' participation was voluntary and the data collect happened in a collective session form. The results showed clearly a correlation, statistically significant, among reading comprehension, academic performance and learning assessment was conclusive.

Katya Luciane de Oliveira

2005-01-01

129

Constructing inquiry: One school's journey to develop an inquiry-based school for teachers and students  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines the two way relationship between an inquiry-based professional development model and teacher enactors. The two year study follows a group of teachers enacting the emergent Supporting Knowledge Integration for Inquiry Practice (SKIIP) professional development model. This study seeks to: (a) identify activity structures in the model that interact with teachers' underlying assumptions regarding professional development and inquiry learning; (b) explain key decision points during implementation in terms of these underlying assumptions; and (c) examine the impact of key activity structures on individual teachers' stated belief structures regarding inquiry learning. Linn's knowledge integration framework facilitates description and analysis of teacher development. Three sets of tensions emerge as themes that describe and constrain participants' interaction with and learning through the model. These are: learning from the group vs. learning on one's own; choosing and evaluating evidence based on impressions vs. specific criteria; and acquiring new knowledge vs. maintaining feelings of autonomy and efficacy. In each of these tensions, existing group goals and operating assumptions initially fell at one end of the tension, while the professional development goals and forms fell at the other. Changes to the model occurred as participants reacted to and negotiated these points of tension. As the group engaged in and modified the SKIIP model, they had repeated opportunities to articulate goals and to make connections between goals and model activity structures. Over time, decisions to modify the model took into consideration an increasingly complex set of underlying assumptions and goals. Teachers identified and sought to balance these tensions. This led to more complex and nuanced decision making, which reflected growing capacity to consider multiple goals in choosing activity structures to enact. The study identifies key activity structures that scaffolded this process for teachers, and which ultimately promoted knowledge integration at both the group and individual levels. This study is an "extreme case" which examines implementation of the SKIIP model under very favorable conditions. Lessons learned regarding appropriate levels of model responsiveness, likely areas of conflict between model form and teacher underlying assumptions, and activity structures that scaffold knowledge integration provide a starting point for future, larger scale implementation.

Sisk-Hilton, Stephanie Lee

130

The Development of an Inquiry-based Curriculum Specifically for the Introductory Algebra-based Physics Course  

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We discuss an inquiry-based curriculum that has been developed specifically for the introductory algebra-based physics course, taking into account the needs, backgrounds, learning styles and career goals of the students in that class. The course is designed to be taught in a laboratory-based environment, however parts of the materials can be used in other settings. As instructors we found ourselves drawing on materials developed for the calculus-based course and for other populations (materials developed for pre-service teachers, for example), parts of which were appropriate, but not a complete curriculum as we would like to teach it, developed specifically for students in the introductory algebra-based physics course. So we have modified and adapted parts of existing materials and integrated them with our own new units and our own format, creating a course aimed specifically at these students.

Thacker, B; Eligon, A M; Diaz, Abel; Eligon, Ann Marie; Thacker, Beth

2007-01-01

131

Critical Factors in Reading Comprehension Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities: A Research Synthesis  

Science.gov (United States)

This review examined the effectiveness of critical factors in instruction for improving the reading comprehension of middle school students with learning disabilities. Five critical factors were identified: (i) type of instructional methods, (ii) self-monitoring, (iii) components of reading incorporated, (iv) fidelity of instruction (scripted vs.…

Kim, Woori; Linan-Thompson, Sylvia; Misquitta, Radhika

2012-01-01

132

Effects of Attributional Retraining on Strategy-Based Reading Comprehension in Learning-Disabled Students.  

Science.gov (United States)

Seventy-five learning-disabled students (10 to 14 years old) received instructions about summarization strategies and about personal causality that were designed to improve reading comprehension. Changes in antecedent attributions about personal causality were not usually altered by this program-specific attributional training, although…

Borkowski, John G.; And Others

1988-01-01

133

The Relationship between Visual Metaphor Comprehension and Recognition of Similarities in Children with Learning Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous studies have shown metaphoric comprehension deficits in children with learning disabilities. To understand metaphoric language, children must have enough semantic knowledge about the metaphorical terms and the ability to recognize similarity between two different domains. In the current study visual and verbal metaphor understanding was…

Mashal, Nira; Kasirer, Anat

2012-01-01

134

An Investigation into Carers' Perceptions of the Verbal Comprehension Ability of Adults with Severe Learning Disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

A study investigated care staff (n=12) perceptions of the language comprehension levels of adults with learning disabilities. Differences between estimates and actual scores increased with sentence difficulty. At the highest level of difficulty, staff consistently over estimated the clients' ability, while both under and over estimation occurred…

Banat, D.; Summers, S.; Pring, T.

2002-01-01

135

Deriving Empirically-Based Design Guidelines for Advanced Learning Technologies that Foster Disciplinary Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

Planning, conducting, and reporting leading-edge research requires professionals who are capable of highly skilled reading. This study reports the development of an empirically informed computer-based learning environment designed to foster the acquisition of reading comprehension strategies that mediate expertise in the social sciences. Empirical…

Poitras, Eric; Trevors, Gregory

2012-01-01

136

Effects of a Computer-Assisted Concept Mapping Learning Strategy on EFL College Students' English Reading Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of a computer-assisted concept mapping learning strategy on EFL college learners' English reading comprehension. The research questions were: (1) what was the influence of the computer-assisted concept mapping learning strategy on different learners' English reading comprehension? (2) did…

Liu, Pei-Lin; Chen, Chiu-Jung; Chang, Yu-Ju

2010-01-01

137

Applying Comprehensible Input and Culture Input Methodology to Inspire College Students’ Learning Motivation  

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Full Text Available Motivation is a non-intellectual and key factor to the success or failure of English learning. The stronger motivation one has, the better English proficiency he/she will get. There is no exception of college students, who need to build up motivation to learn English better and consistently. This thesis proposes two teaching methodologies based on Krashen’s Input theory and theories of cross-culture communication, which are comprehensible input and culture input methodologies, aiming to assist college students to establish strong and consistent motivation in English learning.

Yang Liu

2013-11-01

138

Self Regulated Learning strategies as Predictors of Reading Comprehension among Students of English as a Foreign Language  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This cross-sectional study investigates the self regulated learning strategies used as predictors of reading comprehension. Participants of the study were 248 EFL university students: 112 males and 136 females enrolled in the Faculty of Arts, Foreign Languages Department. The primary aims of the study were: (1 to examine whether there were positive relationships between the use of self regulated learning strategies and reading comprehension; (2 whether there were significant differences between males and females in use of self regulated learning strategies and reading comprehension; (3 and finally to gauge predictors of reading comprehension themselves through self regulated learning strategies towards learning English language. Students were asked to answer questions based on a 5-point Likert-scale self regulated learning Questionnaire and they were asked to read three different passages and answer the questions that followed each passage. The results of MANOVA also revealed that there were differences between males and females in the use of self regulated learning strategies in favour of females. However, there were differences between males and females in the reading comprehension test to the advantage of males. The results of MANOVA analysis revealed that there were differences between students across their different academic levels in self regulated learning strategies. There were also differences between students across different academic levels, in the reading comprehension test. The results of multiple regression reported that some of the self-regulated learning strategies were predictors of reading comprehension.

AbdulRahman Awad Al Asmari

2012-02-01

139

How does participation in inquiry-based activities influence gifted students' higher order thinking?  

Science.gov (United States)

Inquiry-based learning is considered a useful technique to strengthen the critical thinking skills of students. The National Science Standards emphasize its use and the complexities and challenge it provides are well suited for meeting the needs of the gifted. While many studies have documented the effectiveness of this type of instruction, there is a lack of research on growth in higher-order thinking through participation in science inquiry. This study investigated such growth among a small group of gifted fifth-grade students. In this study a group of fifth-grade gifted science students completed a series of three forensics inquiry lessons, and documented questions, ideas and reflections as they constructed evidence to solve a crime. From this class of students, one small group was purposely selected to serve as the focus of the study. Using qualitative techniques, the questions and statements students made as they interacted in the activity were analyzed. Videotaped comments and student logs were coded for emerging patterns and also examined for evidence of increased levels of higher-order thinking based on a rubric that was designed using the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. Evidence from this study showed marked increase in and deeper levels of higher-order thinking for two of the students. The other boy and girl showed progress using the inquiry activities, but it was not as evident. The social dynamics of the group seemed to hinder one girl's participation during some of the activities. The social interactions played a role in strengthening the exchange of ideas and thinking skills for the others. The teacher had a tremendous influence over the production of higher-level statements by modeling that level of thinking as she questioned the students. Through her practice of answering a question with a question, she gradually solicited more analytical thinking from her students.

Reger, Barbara H.

140

User/Tutor Optimal Learning Path in E-Learning Using Comprehensive Neuro-Fuzzy Approach  

Science.gov (United States)

Internet evolution has affected all industrial, commercial, and especially learning activities in the new context of e-learning. Due to cost, time, or flexibility e-learning has been adopted by participators as an alternative training method. By development of computer-based devices and new methods of teaching, e-learning has emerged. The…

Fazlollahtabar, Hamed; Mahdavi, Iraj

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

Inquiry based Teacher Professional development from a multidisciplinary perspective: The NEOGEO Lake Erie Earth Science Field Trip  

Science.gov (United States)

State and national educational standards stress the need to incorporate inquiry-based approaches into the K- 12 science curriculum. However, many teachers either lack training in these pedagogical techniques or science content mastery. Both of these are needed to confidently approach science teaching in the less structured framework associated with a real world exploration of the natural environment. To overcome these barriers to implementation, we have developed an intensive, field-based professional development workshop which explores the connections between the bedrock geology, glacial geomorphology, ecology, and geography of the Lake Erie Islands and the shore of its western basin. This workshop is part of a series of three workshops that form the professional development activities of our NSF funded Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) project, the Northeast Ohio Geoscience Education Outreach (NEOGEO) Program which seeks to improve the quality of Earth Science education at the middle and high school levels in Northeast Ohio. During the workshop students explored the ecology and geomorphology of a series of coastal wetlands, collecting instrumental data and field observations to evaluate water quality and the forces that created these surface features. Exceptional exposure of glacial scours and striations at Kelleys Island and along the Marblehead Peninsula allowed the participants to reconstruct evolving ice flow paths to see how recent geological history shaped the landscape. Finally, stratigraphic observations in a local quarry enabled the students to understand why the observed glacial features varied as a function of bedrock type. Response to the workshop was overwhelming positive with participants commenting positively on quality and quantity of the material presented and the manner in which inquiry based teaching was modeled. End of term projects which included the conceptualization of a teaching plan to incorporate the approaches learned during the workshop demonstrated effective transference of the knowledge. NEOGEO graduate fellows are available during the academic year to help the workshop participants implement their teaching plans.

Ortiz, J. D.; Munro-Stasiuk, M. J.; Hart, B. I.; Mokaren, D. M.; Arnold, B.; Chermansky, J. V.; Vlack, Y. A.

2006-12-01

142

The Effects of the Use of Renzulli Learning on Student Achievement in Reading Comprehension, Reading Fluency, Social Studies, and Science  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Renzulli Learning is an on-line educational profile and educational learning system designed to match student interests, learning styles, and expression styles with a vast array of educational activities and resources designed to enrich and engage students’ learning process. In this experimental study, quantitative procedures were used to investigate the use of Renzulli Learning on oral reading fluency, reading comprehension, science achievement, social studies achievement of 383 elementary...

Field, Gara B.

2009-01-01

143

The Effective Presentation of Inquiry-Based Classroom Experiments Using Teaching Strategies that Employ Video and Demonstration Methods  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was conducted in the light of the philosophical framework of inquiry-based science education. The research involved the presentation of experiments on basic science concepts that have been tested for validity through inquiry-based processes. The experiments were formulated firstly to determine what differences there would be in student…

Sever, Songul; Oguz-Unver, Ayse; Yurumezoglu, Kemal

2013-01-01

144

Inquiry-based Investigation in Biology Laboratories: Does Neem Provide Bioprotection against Bean Beetles?  

Science.gov (United States)

We developed an inquiry-based biology laboratory exercise in which undergraduate students designed experiments addressing whether material from the neem tree ("Azadirachta indica") altered bean beetle ("Callosobruchus maculatus") movements and oviposition. Students were introduced to the bean beetle life cycle, experimental…

Pearce, Amy R.; Sale, Amanda Lovelace; Srivatsan, Malathi; Beck, Christopher W.; Blumer, Lawrence S.; Grippo, Anne A.

2013-01-01

145

Digital Daisy: An Inquiry-Based Approach to Investigating Floral Morphology and Dissection  

Science.gov (United States)

Many topics in the secondary science classroom can be difficult to introduce to students in a manner that fully engages them, especially when presented using traditional teaching methods. However, with a little innovation and an emphasis on inquiry, even dry subjects can be presented in an appealing way. The authors developed an inquiry-based

McIntosh, Amy V.; Richter, Stephen C.

2007-01-01

146

Investigation of Inquiry-Based Science Pedagogy among Middle Level Science Teachers: A Qualitative Study  

Science.gov (United States)

This study implemented a qualitative approach to examine the phenomenon of "inquiry-based science pedagogy or inquiry instruction" as it has been experienced by individuals. Data was collected through online open-ended surveys, focus groups, and teacher reported self-reflections to answer the research questions: 1) How do middle level science…

Weiland, Sunny Minelli

2012-01-01

147

Teaching Literature and Writing in the Inquiry Classroom: Inquiry Based Thematic Units.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper proceeds through an interdisciplinary unit of inquiry-based instruction, using the Vietnam War combat novel or memoir as a coming of age narrative, the classic thematic structure of the "bildungsroman." The paper discusses several key inquiry activities and asks readers to focus on two other key inquiry activities to help illustrate how…

Johannessen, Larry R.

148

Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes  

Science.gov (United States)

This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

2013-01-01

149

Inquiry-Based Instruction with Archived, Online Data: An Intervention Study with Preservice Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

This mixed methods study described preservice teachers' conceptions of tides and explored the efficacy of integrating online data into inquiry-based instruction. Data sources included a multiple-choice assessment and in-depth interviews. A total of 79 participants in secondary, middle, and early childhood teacher education programs completed the…

Ucar, Sedat; Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Krissek, Lawrence

2011-01-01

150

An Epistemological Analysis of the Application of an Online Inquiry-Based Program in Tourism Education  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper was designed to investigate the application of an online inquiry-based program to European tourism from an epistemological perspective. Fifty tourism students (n = 50) participated in this study and their epistemological beliefs were measured with the Epistemological Belief Scale. A set of pre-, post-, and delayed tests were utilised to…

Hsu, Liwei

2014-01-01

151

Impact of Inquiry-Based Professional Development on Core Conceptions and Teaching Practices: A Case Study  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching science through inquiry-based, student-centered instructional methods has been consistently emphasized by science education reform documents such as the National Research Council's (NRC) "National Science Education Standards" (NSES), and practically all states have adopted inquiry standards. In order for science education reforms to…

Kazempour, Mahsa

2009-01-01

152

Inquiry-Based Lessons that Integrate Technology: Their Development and Evaluation in Elementary Mathematics Teacher Education  

Science.gov (United States)

Technology-enhanced mathematics tasks were introduced to elementary pre-service candidates (n = 84) and in-service teachers (n = 38), who then, either in partners or small groups, created and taught inquiry-based lessons incorporating technology, with individual reflections. The lessons were coded using the following criteria: (a) The students…

Wentworth, Nancy; Monroe, Eula E.

2011-01-01

153

Inquiry-based Investigations into Pond Water Microorganisms  

Science.gov (United States)

These lessons are part of a unit investigating the abundant life found in pond water and is used to develop scientific, technological, and critical thinking skills in biology students. The nature of the activities focuses on exploration, invention, and application and provides students with attitudes of discovery and curiosity into their natural, physical world. Much attention is given to scientific process skills and higher-order thinking as students learn problem-solving, graph construction, graphical analysis, and application.

Marie Doucet (Lake Charles Boston High School REV)

1994-07-30

154

Effectiveness of Learning Strategies over Reading Comprehension, Writing Skills and Learners’ Attitudes towards Turkish Course  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study, which attempts to determine the effectiveness of learning strategies on reading comprehension, writing skills and learners’ attitudes towards theirTurkish course, was carried out by the controlled pre/posttest model of the experimental model. The study subjects were 5-A and 5-B groups attending Ahmet Olcay Primary School throughout 2004-2005 academic year in the fall semester. There were 22 students in the experimental group, 21 students in the control group, totally 43 students participated in this study. Data collection process was achieved through an academic achievement test, developed by the researcher, course materials, structured observation forms and the “Attitude Scale Regarding Turkish Course” developed by Acat (2000. According to the findings of the study: reading comprehension skills, writing skills and attitudes towards the Turkish course were developed via learning strategies.

?. Dilek BELET

2007-01-01

155

Comprehension of infrequent subject-verb agreement forms: evidence from French-learning children.  

Science.gov (United States)

Two comprehension experiments were conducted to investigate whether young French-learning children (N = 76) are able to use a single number cue in subject-verb agreement contexts and match a visually dynamic scene with a corresponding verbal stimulus. Results from both preferential looking and pointing demonstrated significant comprehension in 30-month-olds with no preference for either singular or plural. These results challenge previous claims made on the basis of English and Spanish that comprehension of subject-verb agreement expressed as a bound morpheme is late, around 5 years of age (V. A. Johnson, J. G. de Villiers, & H. N. Seymour, 2005; A.-T. Pérez-Leroux, 2005). Properties of the adult input were also analyzed. Possible implications for theories of syntactic acquisition are discussed. PMID:21077869

Legendre, Géraldine; Barrière, Isabelle; Goyet, Louise; Nazzi, Thierry

2010-01-01

156

Engineering Your Own Superbug: A Useful Assignment to Evaluate Real Learning Comprehension in Microbiology Classes †  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The learning comprehension of students in microbiology classes is not easy to evaluate, particularly when the student population is diverse in terms of backgrounds, majors, levels of training and preparedness, and the students’ expectations and enthusiasm for the class. It is difficult to design a one-size-fits-all exam that best suits a mixed student population; and most traditional assignments/case studies focusing on particular microbes or topics might not readily assess students’ over...

Yun-Chi Chen

2013-01-01

157

Engineering Your Own Superbug: A Useful Assignment to Evaluate Real Learning Comprehension in Microbiology Classes  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The learning comprehension of students in microbiology classes is not easy to evaluate, particularly when the student population is diverse in terms of backgrounds, majors, levels of training and preparedness, and the students’ expectations and enthusiasm for the class. It is difficult to design a one-size-fits-all exam that best suits a mixed student population; and most traditional assignments/case studies focusing on particular microbes or topics might not readily assess students’ over...

Yun-Chi Chen

2013-01-01

158

Engineering Your Own Superbug: A Useful Assignment to Evaluate Real Learning Comprehension in Microbiology Classes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The learning comprehension of students in microbiology classes is not easy to evaluate, particularly when the student population is diverse in terms of backgrounds, majors, levels of training and preparedness, and the students’ expectations and enthusiasm for the class. It is difficult to design a one-size-fits-all exam that best suits a mixed student population; and most traditional assignments/case studies focusing on particular microbes or topics might not readily assess students’ overall understanding and learning comprehension. It is important to develop an assessment method that not only can engage students in active learning and deliberate practice but can also promote their imaginative and creative potential. The word “superbugs” often appears in the media and refers to some deadly or drug-resistant microbes. These superbugs possess special phenotypic and functional attributes that constitute their “superness.” It is predicted that more new surprising superbugs will emerge in the future and students should be challenged now with some mindstimulating ideas and exercises in their microbiology class. To develop a supplementary tool to evaluate students’ comprehension and to prepare them for the predicted superbugs unknown to us, a writing project entitled “Constructing Your Own Superbug” was designed to achieve these goals.

Yun-Chi Chen

2013-08-01

159

A cross-cultural, multilevel study of inquiry-based instruction effects on conceptual understanding and motivation in physics  

Science.gov (United States)

Student achievement and motivation to learn physics is highly valued in many industrialized countries including the United States and Japan. Science education curricula in these countries emphasize the importance and encourage classroom teachers to use an inquiry approach. This dissertation investigated high school students' motivational orientations and their understanding of physics concepts in a context of inquiry-based instruction. The goals were to explore the patterns of instructional effects on motivation and learning in each country and to examine cultural differences and similarities. Participants consisted of 108 students (55 females, 53 males) and 9 physics teachers in the United States and 616 students (203 females and 413 males) and 11 physics teachers in Japan. Students were administered (a) Force Concept Inventory measuring physics conceptual understanding and (b) Attitudes about Science Questionnaire measuring student motivational orientations. Teachers were given a survey regarding their use of inquiry teaching practices and background information. Additionally, three teachers in each country were interviewed and observed in their classrooms. For the data analysis, two-level hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) methods were used to examine individual student differences (i.e., learning, motivation, and gender) within each classroom (i.e., inquiry-based teaching, teaching experience, and class size) in the U.S. and Japan, separately. Descriptive statistical analyses were also conducted. The results indicated that there was a cultural similarity in that current teaching practices had minimal influence on conceptual understanding as well as motivation of high school students between the U.S. and Japan. In contrast, cultural differences were observed in classroom structures and instructional approaches. Furthermore, this study revealed gender inequity in Japanese students' conceptual understanding and self-efficacy. Limitations of the study, as well as implications for high school physics teachers are discussed. Future research in this line could explore students' use of cognitive strategies to overcome misconceptions in Western and Eastern cultures. Also, exploring the best practices in changing student misconceptions and promoting motivation across cultures would enrich our understanding and current teaching practices.

Negishi, Meiko

160

Contributions of Metacognitive and Self-Regulated Learning Theories to Investigations of Calibration of Comprehension  

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Full Text Available In this paper we examine the contributions of metacognitive and self-regulated learning theories to research on students' calibration of comprehension. Historically, cognitive psychologists have studied calibration of comprehension within a purely metacognitive framework, with an emphasis on the role of text and task factors but little consideration of factors of self. There has been a recent trend, however, towards incorporating a social cognitive perspective to the study of calibration of comprehension, with factors of self such as motivation and affect being examined more often. Among the factors of self that have been examined, self-efficacy has played a major role as it may be all but impossible to disentangle its influence on students' calibration of comprehension. Other variables of self that have been examined include ability, familiarity, ego and goal-orientation, goal setting, personality traits and susceptibility to social and cultural influences. Broadening the context in which calibration of comprehension is assessed allows a more complete examination of the rich set of interrelated processes that affect students' performance.

Stephanie STOLP

2009-10-01

 
 
 
 
161

A Comprehensive Approach of E-learning Design for Effective Learning Transfer  

Science.gov (United States)

Literature indicates that there is limited research on the national and organizational level decision processes to develop and deliver e-learning programs. In this paper, existing e-learning literature is analyzed in terms of national level factors (national culture, readiness for new technology, and infrastructure), organizational level factors…

Lim, Doo Hun

2012-01-01

162

Self Regulated Learning strategies as Predictors of Reading Comprehension among Students of English as a Foreign Language  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This cross-sectional study investigates the self regulated learning strategies used as predictors of reading comprehension. Participants of the study were 248 EFL university students: 112 males and 136 females enrolled in the Faculty of Arts, Foreign Languages Department. The primary aims of the study were: (1) to examine whether there were positive relationships between the use of self regulated learning strategies and reading comprehension; (2) whether there were significant differences bet...

AbdulRahman Awad Al Asmari; Nasrah Mahmoud Ismail

2012-01-01

163

THE PSYCHOLOGICAL NATURE OF TEXT COMPREHENSION IN TERMS OF TEXT LEARNING PROCESSES  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Texts are important tools for learning. Thus, the attempt to make textsmore understandable is a reflection of a purpose-function relatednecessity for learning from text. On the other hand, the idea ofdevelopment and recovery of informative texts via corrective teachingmaterials is frequently explored by contemporary researchers. Thus, it isevident that more advanced proficiency is needed for the illustratedaspect of the structure of texts in the learning process and to make theefforts to prepare educational materials at more scientific ground.Therefore, in this study textual organization and a general theory oflearning from texts are outlined and later language processing in workingmemory and related phenomena about learning from texts andindividual differences including information about texts development,texts comprehension, and inferences from texts are discussed. The reasonfor this is the idea that working memory is responsible for not onlyrecalling the stored information but also for storing the results of partialprocesses such as successive processes like language comprehension asexplained in the related literature for modern memory theories. Theother reason is the generalizations about the interaction between theprocesses of physical representation and pattern of a text manifested inaccordance with these ideas. Additionally, not only the differentprocedures used to develop informative texts, at the same time,differences of these procedures including a learner’s view of world andprocess styles and measurement of text comprehension and the complexrelations among them are the current and available information in theliterature. As a result, due to the nature of factors, which affect alearner’s level of recalling and his understanding from text, this studyaims to discuss this assumptions.

Ferhat ENSAR

2013-01-01

164

The Relationship among Extraversion Tendency, Vocabulary Learning Strategies, and Reading Comprehension of EFL Undergraduates in Kerman Province  

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Full Text Available This article aims mainly to explore the relationship among the degree of extraversion tendency, vocabulary learning strategies, and reading comprehension of EFL undergraduate students in Kerman Province. For this study, there are five different categories of vocabulary learning strategies as determination, memory, social, cognitive, and metacognitive. In order to investigate the current variables, 164 EFL undergraduate students in Kerman Province were chosen based on one-step cluster sampling. The data were collected by using Schmitt’s vocabulary learning strategies questionnaire (VLSQ adopted from Bennett (2006, Eysenck personality inventory, revised version (EPQ-R, and TOEFL reading comprehension test. Then, they were analyzed by Pearson Product Moment Correlation. The findings showed that: a overall strategy use and four categories (out of 5 of vocabulary learning strategies were not significantly correlated with reading comprehension, b there was a significant and positive correlation between extroversion tendency and four categories of (out of 5 vocabulary learning strategies as well as overall strategy use, and c there was no significant relationship between reading comprehension and degree of extroversion tendency.
Key words: Vocabulary Learning Strategy; Reading Comprehension; Extroversion Tendency; Language Learning Strategy

Mohammad Hosseini Naveh

2011-10-01

165

Inquiry-based laboratory investigations and student performance on standardized tests in biological science  

Science.gov (United States)

Achievement data from the 3rd International Mathematics and Sciences Study and Program for International Student Assessment in science have indicated that Black students from economically disadvantaged families underachieve at alarming rates in comparison to White and economically advantaged peer groups. The study site was a predominately Black, urban school district experiencing underachievement. The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationship between students' use of inquiry-based laboratory investigations and their performance on the Biology End of Course Test, as well as to examine the relationship while partialling out the effects of student gender. Constructivist theory formed the theoretical foundation of the study. Students' perceived levels of experience with inquiry-based laboratory investigations were measured using the Laboratory Program Variable Inventory (LPVI) survey. LPVI scores of 256 students were correlated with test scores and were examined by student gender. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a small direct correlation between students' experience in inquiry-based laboratory investigation classes and standardized test scores on the Biology EOCT. A partial correlational analysis indicated that the correlation remained after controlling for gender. This study may prompt a change from teacher-centered to student-centered pedagogy at the local site in order to increase academic achievement for all students. The results of this study may also influence administrators and policy makers to initiate local, state, or nationwide curricular development. A change in curriculum may promote social change as students become more competent, and more able, to succeed in life beyond secondary school.

Patke, Usha

166

At the Elbows of Scientists: Shaping Science Teachers' Conceptions and Enactment of Inquiry-Based Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

This study stemmed from concerns among researchers that reform efforts grounded in promoting inquiry as the basis for teaching science have not achieved the desired changes in American science classrooms. Many science teachers assume that they are employing inquiry-based strategies when they use cookbook investigations with highly structured step-by-step instructions. Additionally, most science teachers equate hands-on activities with classroom inquiry and, as such, repeatedly use prepackaged, disconnected activities to break the monotony of direct instruction. Despite participation in numerous professional development activities, many science teachers continue to hold misconceptions about inquiry that influence the way they design and enact instruction. To date, there is very limited research exploring the role of inquiry-based professional development in facilitating desired changes in science teachers' conceptions of inquiry. This qualitative study of five high school science teachers explores the ways in which authentic inquiry experiences with a team of scientists in Panama shaped their conceptions and reported enactments of inquiry-based instruction. Our findings suggest that professional development experiences engaging science teachers in authentic research with scientists have the potential to change teachers' naïve conceptions of inquiry, provided that necessary supports are provided for reflection and lesson design.

McLaughlin, Cheryl A.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

2014-12-01

167

At the Elbows of Scientists: Shaping Science Teachers' Conceptions and Enactment of Inquiry-Based Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

This study stemmed from concerns among researchers that reform efforts grounded in promoting inquiry as the basis for teaching science have not achieved the desired changes in American science classrooms. Many science teachers assume that they are employing inquiry-based strategies when they use cookbook investigations with highly structured step-by-step instructions. Additionally, most science teachers equate hands-on activities with classroom inquiry and, as such, repeatedly use prepackaged, disconnected activities to break the monotony of direct instruction. Despite participation in numerous professional development activities, many science teachers continue to hold misconceptions about inquiry that influence the way they design and enact instruction. To date, there is very limited research exploring the role of inquiry-based professional development in facilitating desired changes in science teachers' conceptions of inquiry. This qualitative study of five high school science teachers explores the ways in which authentic inquiry experiences with a team of scientists in Panama shaped their conceptions and reported enactments of inquiry-based instruction. Our findings suggest that professional development experiences engaging science teachers in authentic research with scientists have the potential to change teachers' naïve conceptions of inquiry, provided that necessary supports are provided for reflection and lesson design.

McLaughlin, Cheryl A.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

2014-04-01

168

An inquiry-based biochemistry laboratory structure emphasizing competency in the scientific process: a guided approach with an electronic notebook format.  

Science.gov (United States)

The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students through their laboratory work at a steady pace that encourages them to focus on quality observations, careful data collection and thought processes surrounding the chemistry involved. It motivates students to work in a collaborative manner with frequent opportunities for feedback, reflection, and modification of their ideas. Each laboratory activity has four stages to keep the students' efforts on track: pre-lab work, an in-lab discussion, in-lab work, and a post-lab assignment. Students are guided at each stage by an instructor created template that directs their learning while giving them the opportunity and flexibility to explore new information, ideas, and questions. These templates are easily transferred into an electronic journal (termed the E-notebook) and form the basic structural framework of the final lab reports the students submit electronically, via a learning management system. The guided-inquiry based approach presented here uses a single laboratory activity for undergraduate Introductory Biochemistry as an example. After implementation of this guided learning approach student surveys reported a higher level of course satisfaction and there was a statistically significant improvement in the quality of the student work. Therefore we firmly believe the described format to be highly effective in promoting student learning and engagement. PMID:24376181

L Hall, Mona; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

2014-01-01

169

The Effect of the Use of Assistive Technology on English Reading Comprehension of Students with Learning Differences  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to find the effect of the use of assistive technology (CD ROM Interactive Liquid Books, the Interactive White Board, and Interactive Signed Stories) on English reading comprehension of students with learning differences, specifically with deaf and learning disabled students. The research questions that provided the…

Caraballo, Gladys

2012-01-01

170

Learn AppleScript The Comprehensive Guide to Scripting and Automation on MAC OS X  

CERN Document Server

AppleScript is an English-like, easy-to-understand scripting language built into every Mac. AppleScript can automate hundreds of AppleScriptable applications, performing tasks both large and small, complex and simple. Learn AppleScript: The Comprehensive Guide to Scripting and Automation on Mac OS X, Third Edition has been completely updated for Mac OS X Snow Leopard. It's all here, with an emphasis on practical information that will help you solve any automation problem-from the most mundane repetitive tasks to highly integrated workflows of complex systems. * Friendly enough for beginners, d

Rosenthal, Hanaan

2009-01-01

171

The imaging technique as learning support for educationally disadvantaged learners in the secondary school, to improve reading comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Reading comprehension is one of the basic learning skills that need to be learned in an early school years. The English language is generally introduced as early as Grade 2 level in township primary schools. Township learners are at most exposed to English as the language of learning and teaching (LoLt) for three years (Grade 5-7) before entering secondary school. Most township primary school learners enter secondary school with poor English language development and poor language proficiency....

Ngwenya, Mandiza Dinah

2003-01-01

172

Making sense of shared sense-making in an inquiry-based science classroom: Toward a sociocultural theory of mind  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite considerable exploration of inquiry and reflection in the literatures of science education and teacher education/teacher professional development over the past century, few theoretical or analytical tools exist to characterize these processes within a naturalistic classroom context. In addition, little is known regarding possible developmental trajectories for inquiry or reflection---for teachers or students---as these processes develop within a classroom context over time. In the dissertation, I use a sociocultural lens to explore these issues with an eye to the ways in which teachers and students develop shared sense-making, rather than from the more traditional perspective of individual teacher activity or student learning. The study includes both theoretical and empirical components. Theoretically, I explore the elaborations of sociocultural theory needed to characterize teacher-student shared sense-making as it develops within a classroom context, and, in particular, the role of inquiry and reflection in that sense-making. I develop a sociocultural model of shared sense-making that attempts to represent the dialectic between the individual and the social, through an elaboration of existing sociocultural and psychological constructs, including Vygotsky's zone of proximal development and theory of mind. Using this model as an interpretive framework, I develop a case study that explores teacher-student shared sense-making within a middle-school science classroom across a year of scaffolded introduction to inquiry-based science instruction. The empirical study serves not only as a test case for the theoretical model, but also informs our understanding regarding possible developmental trajectories and important mechanisms supporting and constraining shared sense-making within inquiry-based science classrooms. Theoretical and empirical findings provide support for the idea that perspectival shifts---that is, shifts of point-of-view that alter relationships and proximities of elements within the interaction space---play an important role in shared sense-making. Findings further suggest that the mutually constitutive interaction of inquiry and reflection plays a key role in flexible shared sense-making. Finally, findings lend support to the idea of a dialectical relationship between human models of shared sense-making and human systems of shared sense-making; that is, the ways in which human minds are coordinated is a work in progress, shaping and shaped by human culture.

Ladewski, Barbara G.

173

Machine Learning and Data Mining for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Monitoring  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) is gaining renewed attention in light of growing worldwide interest in mitigating risks of nuclear weapons proliferation and testing. Since the International Monitoring System (IMS) installed the first suite of sensors in the late 1990's, the IMS network has steadily progressed, providing valuable support for event diagnostics. This progress was highlighted at the recent International Scientific Studies (ISS) Conference in Vienna in June 2009, where scientists and domain experts met with policy makers to assess the current status of the CTBT Verification System. A strategic theme within the ISS Conference centered on exploring opportunities for further enhancing the detection and localization accuracy of low magnitude events by drawing upon modern tools and techniques for machine learning and large-scale data analysis. Several promising approaches for data exploitation were presented at the Conference. These are summarized in a companion report. In this paper, we introduce essential concepts in machine learning and assess techniques which could provide both incremental and comprehensive value for event discrimination by increasing the accuracy of the final data product, refining On-Site-Inspection (OSI) conclusions, and potentially reducing the cost of future network operations.

Russell, S; Vaidya, S

2009-07-30

174

Compreensão em leitura e avaliação da aprendizagem em universitários Reading comprehension and learning evaluation among undergraduates  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Este estudo teve por objetivo explorar a relação entre a compreensão em leitura, o desempenho acadêmico e a avaliação da aprendizagem em disciplinas específicas. A amostra foi composta por 270 alunos ingressantes dos cursos de administração, direito e psicologia, dos períodos diurno e noturno, de uma universidade particular do interior paulista. Os instrumentos utilizados foram 2 textos preparados segundo a técnica de Cloze e um questionário visando a caracterização dos tipos mais freqüentes de avaliação utilizados no ensino superior. A participação dos estudantes foi voluntária e a coleta de dados ocorreu de forma coletiva em uma única sessão. Os resultados evidenciaram que há correlação estatisticamente significativa entre a compreensão em leitura, o desempenho acadêmico e o tipo de avaliação da aprendizagem utilizado.This research meant to explore the relation among reading comprehension, academic performance and learning assessment in specific contents. The sample was composed of by 270 freshman students from administration, law and psychology courses, from daytime and evening period in a private university in São Paulo. The instruments used were 2 texts prepared in accordance to Cloze's technique and a questionnaire focusing the most used characterization types in higher education assessment. The students' participation was voluntary and the data collect happened in a collective session form. The results showed clearly a correlation, statistically significant, among reading comprehension, academic performance and learning assessment was conclusive.

Katya Luciane de Oliveira

2005-04-01

175

Image Segmentation using a Refined Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimizer for Maximum Tsallis Entropy Thresholding  

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Full Text Available Thresholding is one of the most important techniques for performing image segmentation. In this paper to compute optimum thresholds for Maximum Tsallis entropy thresholding (MTET model, a new hybrid algorithm is proposed by integrating the Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimizer (CPSO with the Powell’s Conjugate Gradient (PCG method. Here the CPSO will act as the main optimizer for searching the near-optimal thresholds while the PCG method will be used to fine tune the best solutions obtained by the CPSO in every iteration. This new multilevel thresholding technique is called the refined Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimizer (RCPSO algorithm for MTET. Experimental results over multiple images with different range of complexities validate the efficiency of the proposed technique with regard to segmentation accuracy, speed, and robustness in comparison with other techniques reported in the literature. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposedRCPSO algorithm can search for multiple thresholds which are very close to the optimal ones examined by the exhaustive search method.

L. Jubair Ahmed

2013-08-01

176

Comprehensive, Mixed-Methods Assessment of a Blended Learning Model for Geospatial Literacy Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

Geospatial literacy -- the ability to conceptualize, capture, analyze and communicate spatial phenomena -- represents an important competency for 21st Century learners in a period of 'Geospatial Revolution'. Though relevant to in-course learning, these skills are often taught externally, placing time and resource pressures on the service providers - commonly libraries - that are relied upon to provide instruction. The emergence of online and blended modes of instruction has presented a potential means of increasing the cost-effectiveness of such activities, by simultaneously reducing instructional costs, expanding the audience for these resources, and addressing student preferences for asynchronous learning and '24-7' access. During 2011 and 2012, McMaster University Library coordinated the development, implementation and assessment of blended learning modules for geospatial literacy instruction in first-year undergraduate Social Science courses. In this paper, we present the results of a comprehensive mixed-methods approach to assess the efficacy of implementing blended learning modules to replace traditional (face-to-face), library-led, first-year undergraduate geospatial literacy instruction. Focus groups, personal interviews and an online survey were used to assess modules across dimensions of: student use, satisfaction and accessibility requirements (via Universal Instructional Design [UID] principles); instructor and teaching staff perception of pedagogical efficacy and instructional effectiveness; and, administrator cost-benefit assessment of development and implementation. Results showed that both instructors and students identified significant value in using the online modules in a blended-learning setting. Reaffirming assumptions of students' '24/7' learning preferences, over 80% of students reported using the modules on a repeat basis. Students were more likely to use the modules to better understand course content than simply to increase their grade in the course, which demonstrates applicability of the modules beyond a strict surface-learning approach. Instructors felt that giving students access to these modules increased flexibility in how in-class time was used, reduced student anxiety in busy lab sessions, and increased the effectiveness of face-to-face instruction and summative assessments. Though instructors perceived little to no change in grades as a result of the migration to blended-learning instruction, students overwhelmingly perceived a positive impact on their learning, as over 75% felt that the modules improved their geospatial literacy skills and general understanding in the course. Cost-benefit analyses proved challenging, as administrators struggled to estimate the true costs of both traditional instruction and module development. Recommendations for future module modification exposed the competing expectations of generalizing content to increase applicability and cost-effectiveness, versus tailoring modules to specific course content.

Brodeur, J. J.; Maclachlan, J. C.; Bagg, J.; Chiappetta-Swanson, C.; Vine, M. M.; Vajoczki, S.

2013-12-01

177

Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands- on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College  

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Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands-on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College T. C. Kenna, S. Pfirman, B. J. Mailloux, M. Stute, R. Kelsey, and P. Bower By adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program (SEA semester) to the typical college format of classes, we are improving the technical and quantitative skills of undergraduate women and minorities in environmental science and improving their critical thinking and problem-solving by exposing our students to open-ended real-world environmental issues. Our approach uses the Hudson River Estuary as a natural laboratory. In a series of hands-on inquiry-based activities, students use advanced equipment to collect data and samples. Each class session introduces new analytical and data analysis techniques. All classes have the connecting theme of the river. Working with real data is open-ended. Our major findings as indicated by surveys as well as journaling throughout the semester are that the field- based experience significantly contributed to student learning and engagement. Journaling responses indicated that nearly all students discussed the importance and excitement of an authentic research experience. Some students were frustrated with data irregularities, uncertainty in methods and data, and the general challenge of a curriculum with inherent ambiguity. The majority were satisfied with the aims of the course to provide an integrative experience. All students demonstrated transfer of learned skills. This project has had a significant impact on our undergraduate female students: several students have pursued senior thesis projects stemming from grant activities, stating that the field activities were the highlight of their semester. Some students love the experience and want more. Others decide that they want to pursue a different career. All learn how science is conducted and have a better foundation to understand concepts such as sampling, uncertainty, and variability, which are important to many fields. Many of the hands-on curricular activities have been adapted and used with a variety of student, teacher, and faculty groups. Faculty participants in our River Summer program (www.riversummer.org) see earth system science in a way that would be hard to replicate without the hands-on experience. Faculty participants are encouraged to adapt our activities to their own classroom. We are in the process of assembling many of our hands-on field-based activities as fully exportable curricular elements to further increase impacts.

Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Mailloux, B. J.; Martin, S.; Kelsey, R.; Bower, P.

2008-12-01

178

The Relationship between Iranian EFL Instructors’ Understanding of Learning Styles and Their Students’ Success in Reading Comprehension  

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Full Text Available Many variables reasonably influence teachers’ education. One of these considering variables is being aware of the students’ learning styles. Dörnyei (2005 maintains that individual differences correlate strongly with L2 achievements. Keefe (1979 believes that learning styles might be thought of as cognitive, affective, and physiological traits that are relatively stable indicators of how learners perceive, interact with, and respond to the learning environment. The present study investigated the relationship between Iranian EFL instructors’ understanding of learning styles and their students’ success in reading comprehension tests. To achieve this goal, the researchers randomly selected 240 Iranian EFL instructors at tertiary level with more than three years of experience in teaching reading comprehension courses. The Teacher’s View over Students’ Learning Preferences Inventory (TVSLPI as well as a test of language proficiency (MELAB was employed as the study’s instruments. The findings revealed a significant relationship (p?0.05 between the Iranian EFL instructors’ recognition of learning styles and their students’ success in reading comprehension test. Besides, the results of interviews showed that Iranian instructors have approximately similar attitudes toward teaching reading comprehension in Iranian contexts.

Marzieh Khademi

2013-03-01

179

Machine learning for radioxenon event classification for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A method of weapon detection for the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) consists of monitoring the amount of radioxenon in the atmosphere by measuring and sampling the activity concentration of {sup 131m}Xe, {sup 133}Xe, {sup 133m}Xe, and {sup 135}Xe by radionuclide monitoring. Several explosion samples were simulated based on real data since the measured data of this type is quite rare. These data sets consisted of different circumstances of a nuclear explosion, and are used as training data sets to establish an effective classification model employing state-of-the-art technologies in machine learning. A study was conducted involving classic induction algorithms in machine learning including Naive Bayes, Neural Networks, Decision Trees, k-Nearest Neighbors, and Support Vector Machines, that revealed that they can successfully be used in this practical application. In particular, our studies show that many induction algorithms in machine learning outperform a simple linear discriminator when a signal is found in a high radioxenon background environment.

Stocki, Trevor J., E-mail: trevor_stocki@hc-sc.gc.c [Radiation Protection Bureau, 775 Brookfield Road, A.L. 6302D1, Ottawa, ON, K1A 1C1 (Canada); Li, Guichong; Japkowicz, Nathalie [School of Information Technology and Engineering, University of Ottawa, 800 King Edward Avenue, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Ungar, R. Kurt [Radiation Protection Bureau, 775 Brookfield Road, A.L. 6302D1, Ottawa, ON, K1A 1C1 (Canada)

2010-01-15

180

Machine learning for radioxenon event classification for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A method of weapon detection for the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) consists of monitoring the amount of radioxenon in the atmosphere by measuring and sampling the activity concentration of 131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe by radionuclide monitoring. Several explosion samples were simulated based on real data since the measured data of this type is quite rare. These data sets consisted of different circumstances of a nuclear explosion, and are used as training data sets to establish an effective classification model employing state-of-the-art technologies in machine learning. A study was conducted involving classic induction algorithms in machine learning including Naive Bayes, Neural Networks, Decision Trees, k-Nearest Neighbors, and Support Vector Machines, that revealed that they can successfully be used in this practical application. In particular, our studies show that many induction algorithms in machine learning outperform a simple linear discriminator when a signal is found in a high radioxenon background environment.

 
 
 
 
181

On the Relationship between Self-regulated Learning Components and L2 Vocabulary Knowledge and Reading Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In the past two decades, self-regulation has been the center of heated debate in educational psychology. The present study attempted to investigate the relationship between Iranian EFL learners' self-regulated learning components and vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension .To fulfill this objective, a 60-item vocabulary and reading comprehension TOEFL test was administered to a sample of 250 male and female college students majoring in English Teaching, English Language Translation, a...

Abbas Ali Zarei; Gamar Hatami

2012-01-01

182

Teacher-student interaction: The overlooked dimension of inquiry-based professional development  

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This study explores the teacher-student interactional dimension of inquiry-based science instruction. In it, microethnographic and grounded theory analyses are conducted in order to assess the impact of a professional development program designed to enhance in-service elementary teachers' interactional views (i.e., their understandings of inquiry-based social roles and relationships) and discursive practices (i.e., teachers' abilities to interact with student engaged in classroom inquiries) through a combination of expert instruction, immersion in scientific inquiry, and collaborative analysis of video-recorded classroom discourse. A sociolinguistic theoretical perspective on language use is adopted, viewing classroom discourse as comprising multiple linguistic signs (questions, responses, personal pronouns, hedges, backchannels, reactive tokens, directives, figures of speech, parallel repetitions) that convey not only semantic meanings (the literal information being exchanged) but also pragmatic meanings (information about teachers and students' social roles and relationships). A grounded theory analysis of the professional development activities uncovered a gradual shift in teachers' interactional views from a cognitive, monofunctional and decontextualized perspective to a social, multifunctional and contextualized conception of inquiry-based discourse. Furthermore, teachers developed increased levels of pragmatic awareness, being able to recognize the authoritative interactional functions served by discursive moves such as display questions, cued elicitation, convergent questioning, verbal cloze, affirmation, explicit evaluations of students' responses, verbatim repetitions, IRE triplets, IR couplets, second-person pronouns, "I/you" contrastive pairs, and direct or impolite directives. A comparative microethnographic analysis of teachers' classroom practices revealed that after participating in the program teachers demonstrated an improved ability to share authority and to transfer expert interactional rights to students by strategically adopting (1) questioning behaviors that were relatively more student-centered, divergent, reflective, and sincere; (2) reactive behaviors that were more neutral and informative; (3) directive behaviors that were more polite, indirect and inclusive; and, (4) poetic behaviors that fostered more involvement. Such ability allowed teachers to establish more symmetric and involved social relationships with students engaged in classroom inquiries. The above changes in teachers' interactional views and discursive practices are taken as evidence of the effectiveness of an explicit, reflective, authentic and contextualized approach to inquiry-based professional development.

de Oliveira, Alandeom Wanderlei

183

Developing a Student Centered Inquiry Based Teaching Approach at Elementary Level Science in Pakistan-A Three Years Implementation Cycle  

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Full Text Available National Curriculum, 2006 is one of the significant measures to improve the quality of education in Pakistan. For General Science, grades IV-VIII, “Student-Centered and Inquiry-Based (SCIB learning” are a key concept of it. However the system for teachers’ in-service training in the country at the Federal and the Provincial levels is pathetic and many of the teachers do not have chances to be equipped for the new ways of teaching science based on the new curriculum. To address this issue and help Pakistan in this significant task of national importance, the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA undertaken the challenge of coping with the problem and help Pakistan through a technical cooperation project aiming at establishing a training model that ensures teachers to deliver SCIB science lessons. The purpose of this paper is to describe the SCIB project design and the basic policy of a three years implementation cycle that will support in development and sustainability of science curriculum reforms efforts in Pakistan. The process and achievements of the project outlines the development of teaching plans, master trainers training, teacher training, school cluster and baseline survey of schools and organization of forums at the Federal and the Provincial levels. The paper covers an analysis of some issues related to SCIB teaching model development in the perspectives of ground reality and the lesson learned from implementing such innovative projects in past. The concept of Teaching through Easily Available Material (TEAM and SCIB teaching approach being practiced in Pakistan may be valuable for the developing countries of the region.

Alyas Qadeer Tahir

2011-07-01

184

The Effects of the Use of Renzulli Learning on Student Achievement in Reading Comprehension, Reading Fluency, Social Studies, and Science  

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Full Text Available Renzulli Learning is an on-line educational profile and educational learning system designed to match student interests, learning styles, and expression styles with a vast array of educational activities and resources designed to enrich and engage students’ learning process. In this experimental study, quantitative procedures were used to investigate the use of Renzulli Learning on oral reading fluency, reading comprehension, science achievement, social studies achievement of 383 elementary and middle schools students. The research took place in two schools, an urban middle school in Georgia where half of all students are considered to be at risk due to poverty or other factors, and a suburban elementary school in southern California. Students in grades 3 5 (n = 185 and grades 6 8 (n = 198 were randomly assigned to use Renzulli Learning for 2-3 hours each week for a 16-week period. Students in the treatment groups were compared to students who did not have the opportunity to use Renzulli Learning in control classes in the same schools. A two-way repeated-measures ANOVA was used to explore differences between treatment and control students. After 16 weeks, students who participated in Renzulli Learning demonstrated significantly higher growth in reading comprehension (p < .001, significantly higher growth in oral reading fluency (p = .016, and significantly higher growth in social studies achievement (p = .013 than those students who did not participate in Renzulli Learning.

Gara B Field

2009-03-01

185

Assessing All Dimensions of Learning  

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At its most basic level, service learning integrates community service activities with intentional learning components to enhance students' understanding of subject content and to meet identified community needs. Although service learning is similar to other active learning pedagogies--such as project-based, problem-based, inquiry-based, and…

Furco, Andrew

2010-01-01

186

An exploratory study of the impact of an inquiry-based professional development course on the beliefs and instructional practices of urban inservice teachers  

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Five urban teachers completed a total of 50 contact hours of professional development in which they: participated in authentic, inquiry-based experiences facilitated by a scientist; learned new science content related to the nature of science and scientific inquiry; developed inquiry-based lesson plans to implement in their classrooms; and developed science-specific strategies to mentor novice and experienced teachers. The focus of this research was to determine changes in their: beliefs and instructional practices; understanding of scientific literacy; and efficacy toward mentoring other teachers. A collective case study methodology was used in which participants completed questionnaires and were observed and interviewed, prior to and at the completion of the course. They were also asked to complete reflective journal questions during the course. While the teachers' beliefs did not change as measured by the Teacher's Pedagogical Philosophy Interview (TPPI) (teacher-centered beliefs for "Teacher Actions" and "Teacher and Content"; conceptual/student-centered for "Student Actions" and "Philosophy of Teaching"), their teacher-centered behaviors changed to conceptual/student-centered as measured by the Secondary Science Teachers Analysis Matrix (STAM). Their responses to the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES) generally correlated with their post-STAM results. Participants gained a better understanding of the creative aspect of the nature of science as measured by the Modified Nature of Scientific Knowledge Scale (MNSKS) instrument, while two novice teachers improved their personal science teaching efficacy after participation in the course as measured by the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (STEBI). Four of the five teachers felt better prepared to mentor others to use inquiry-based instruction. In contrast to these positive trends, their outcome expectancy beliefs (STEBI subscale) were generally lower than their perceived personal teaching efficacy before and after the course, which could be an indicator of the environment in urban schools where there is often little support or equipment for innovative practices in science. Generally there was a shift from traditional to constructivist instructional practices as measured by the STAM, while results varied for teacher beliefs and efficacy regarding science instruction as measured by the TPPI, CLES, and STEBI and teachers' understanding of the nature of science as measured by the MNSKS.

Suters, Leslie Ann

187

Prospective Teachers' Comprehension Levels of Special Relativity Theory and the Effect of Writing for Learning on Achievement  

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In the present study, the comprehension levels of special relativity theory in prospective teachers who take the Introduction to Modern Physics lesson in the faculty of education science teaching department and the effect of writing for learning on their achievement is researched. In the research, a control group pre-test post-test…

Yildiz, Ali

2012-01-01

188

Effects of Interactive versus Simultaneous Display of Multimedia Glosses on L2 Reading Comprehension and Incidental Vocabulary Learning  

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This study examines the effects of interactive versus simultaneous display of visual and verbal multimedia information on incidental vocabulary learning and reading comprehension of learners of English with lower proficiency levels. In the interactive display condition, learners were allowed to select the type of multimedia information whereas the…

Türk, Emine; Erçetin, Gülcan

2014-01-01

189

Cognitive Strategy Instruction for Improving Expository Text Comprehension of Students with Learning Disabilities: The Quality of Evidence  

Science.gov (United States)

Educators have widely used cognitive strategy instruction to address reading comprehension deficits evidenced by students with learning disabilities. However, no one has yet conducted a review of the quality of this literature. This review applies the quality indicators advocated by Gersten et al. (2005) and Horner et al. (2005) to evaluate the…

Jitendra, Asha K.; Burgess, Clare; Gajria, Meenakshi

2011-01-01

190

Cross-Cultural Comparison of Second Language Learning: The Development of Comprehension of English Structures by Japanese and German Children.  

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Presents study of Japanese- and German-speaking children who were tested on the Sentence Comprehension Test to investigate understanding of various English grammatical structures. Concludes that learning of English as a second language in a natural milieu seems to pass through stages similar to those exhibited by monolingual English children.…

Morsbach, Gisela

1981-01-01

191

Moving Authentic Soil Research into High School Classrooms: Student Engagement and Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Inquiry-based teaching helps students develop a deep, applied understanding of human-environmental connections, but most high school curricula do not use inquiry-based methods. Soil science topics, which are also generally lacking from curricula, can provide hands-on model systems for learning inquiry skills. We report on the implementation of a…

Moebius-Clune, Bianca N.; Elsevier, Irka H.; Crawford, Barbara A.; Trautmann, Nancy M.; Schindelbeck, Robert R.; van Es, Harold M.

2011-01-01

192

Should professional development include analyzing and coaching ways of speaking during inquiry-based science instruction in elementary classrooms?  

Science.gov (United States)

In this commentary, I first consider what Oliveira defines inquiry-based science instruction to be. Next I discuss what the discourse practices are that he is advocating. Then I examine what he presents as evidence of changes in two teachers' discourse practices due to a summer institute and how their pragmatic awareness seems to have been enhanced through institute activities. Finally I ponder whether, when, how, and why professional development should include a focus on ways of speaking during inquiry-based science instruction.

van Zee, Emily H.

2009-12-01

193

Designing an Intelligent Mobile Learning Tool for Grammar Learning (i-MoL  

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Full Text Available English is the most important second language in most non-English speaking countries, including Malaysia. A good English proficiency comes from good grasp of grammar. To conquer the problems of low English proficiency among Malaysians, it is important to identify the key motivators that could facilitate the process of grammar learning. In this digital age, technology can play a very important role and mobile technology could be one of it. Thus, this study aims at designing a mobile learning tool, namely the Intelligent Mobile Learning Tool for Grammar Learning (i-MoL to act as the “on-the-go” grammar learning support via mobile phones. i-MoL helps reinforce grammar learning through mobile phone with game-like applications, inquiry-based activities and flashcard-like information. The intelligent part of i-MoL lies in its ability to map the mobile-based grammar learning content to individual’s preferred learning styles based on Felder-Silverman Learning Style Model (FSLSM. The instructional system design through the ADDIE model was used in this study as a systematic approach in designing a novel and comprehensive mobile learning tool for grammar learning. In terms of implications, this study provides insights on how mobile technologies can be utilized to meet the mobility demand among language learners today.

Munir Shuib

2015-01-01

194

Inquiry-based course in physics and chemistry for preservice K-8 teachers  

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Full Text Available We describe an inquiry-based course in physics and chemistry for preservice K-8 teachers developed at California State University Fullerton. The course is one of three developed primarily to enhance the science content understanding of prospective teachers. The course incorporates a number of innovative instructional strategies and is somewhat unusual for its interdisciplinary focus. We describe the course structure in detail, providing examples of course materials and assessment strategies. Finally, we provide research data illustrating both the need for the course and the effectiveness of the course in developing student understanding of selected topics. Student responses to various questions reflect a lack of understanding of many relatively simple physical science concepts, and a level of performance that is usually lower than that in comparable courses serving a general education audience. Additional data suggest that course activities improve student understanding of selected topics, often dramatically.

Michael E. Loverude

2011-05-01

195

Seeing the Superiority of Self-monitoring Learning Strategies over Teacher-monitoring Learning in Adult 'Reading Comprehension'  

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Full Text Available

This study aims to see the superiority of SMLS on Learners' Receptive skill among the students of Payame-noor and Azad Universities in three different departments and the evaluation that teachers can apply to raise SML among adult learners. It is believed that since the publication of Malcolm Knowles' book in 1975, SML had been applied for adult education for ages. To administer this, SML of reading comprehension was introduced to learners in order to keep an eye on their own learning. To this end, metacognitive strategies rather than cognitive have been more highlighted. To answer, a proficiency test was administered to a total of 382 EFL learners, out of which 200 participants whose scores ranged from 65-80 out of 100 were chosen as the upper-intermediate level as an experimental and control group which were administered the same syllabus and assessment procedures. TOEFL reading test was the instrument of the study. Finally, the data was analyzed through SPSS, using Ttest. Results showed that a significant difference between mean score of TML and SML exist, and the superiority of SML became more highlighted when learners did better after treatment.

Asghar Bastami Bandpay

2012-11-01

196

Enhancing Students' Scientific and Quantitative Literacies through an Inquiry-Based Learning Project on Climate Change  

Science.gov (United States)

Promoting sustainability and dealing with complex environmental problems like climate change demand a citizenry with considerable scientific and quantitative literacy. In particular, students in the STEM disciplines of (biophysical) science, technology, engineering, and mathematics need to develop interdisciplinary skills that help them understand…

McCright, Aaron M.

2012-01-01

197

Connecting Indigenous Stories with Geology: Inquiry-Based Learning in a Middle Years Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

One way to integrate indigenous perspectives in junior science is through links between indigenous stories of the local area and science concepts. Using local indigenous stories about landforms, a teacher of Year 8 students designed a unit on geology that catered for the diverse student population in his class. This paper reports on the…

Larkin, Damian; King, Donna; Kidman, Gillian

2012-01-01

198

A Practical Approach to Inquiry-Based Learning in Linear Algebra  

Science.gov (United States)

Linear algebra has become one of the most useful fields of mathematics since last decade, yet students still have trouble seeing the connection between some of the abstract concepts and real-world applications. In this article, we propose the use of thought-provoking questions in lesson designs to allow two-way communications between instructors…

Chang, J.-M.

2011-01-01

199

Using a conceptual flow, inquiry based learning, and language development to yield enduring understanding in science  

Science.gov (United States)

This project was designed to incorporate three curriculum development strategies that have been created to increase student achievement in various content areas. Conceptual flow design, the 5E Instructional Model, and English language development strategies were used to create a seventh grade Genetics Unit. The unit was evaluated by three external experts and carried out in two seventh grade classrooms in an effort to assess its effectiveness. Based on the evaluators' feedback, the initial conceptual flow and lessons were found to be inconsistent and confusing. Overall, the organization of this unit seemed to support student achievement. The conceptual flow and the lesson layout of the unit were revised based on the evaluation data. All revisions and the established protocols will serve as models for further science curriculum development in the Norwalk-La Mirada Unified School District.

Gunderson, Angelica E.

200

The Impact of Collaborative Groups versus Individuals in Undergraduate Inquiry-Based Astronomy Laboratory Learning Exercises  

Science.gov (United States)

One of the long-standing general undergraduate education requirements common to many colleges and universities is a science course with a laboratory experience component. One of the objectives frequently included in the description of most of these courses is that a student will understand the nature and processes of scientific inquiry. However,…

Sibbernsen, Kendra J.

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

Machine learning update for compliance verification of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: A possible method of explosion detection for the Comprehensive nuclear- Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) consists of monitoring the amount of radioxenon in the atmosphere by measuring and sampling the activity concentration of Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe-133m, and Xe-135. Several samples were simulated under different circumstances of nuclear detonation, and are used as training datasets to establish an optimal classification model employing state-of-the-art technologies in machine learning (ML). We conducted a preliminary study involving ML algorithms including Naive Bayes, Neural Networks, Decision Trees, k-Nearest Neighbours, and Support Vector Machines. In addition to confirming that ML technology is appropriate for this problem, the study suggested that it can help guide our quest for more accurate simulated data sets, which benefit the entire CTBT community. By using these algorithms, we discovered undesirable artifacts of our initial synthetic explosion data set that needed to be rectified. Our preliminary ML study compelled us to improve the dataset by using a more realistic set of fission yields and by including atmospheric dispersion effects. The fission yields were corrected for amount of time in the explosion cavity and we assume a 10 % release rate each 24 hours. The radioxenon from the explosion site was atmospherically transported (through simulations) to CTBT stations to determine an amount of radioxenon that would be measured by the stations. This was done f measured by the stations. This was done for real atmospheric data. This new synthetic data set and the results of the machine learning algorithm obtained on it will be discussed. (author)

202

Lessons Learned from the First Decade of Adaptive Management in Comprehensive Everglades Restoration  

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Full Text Available Although few successful examples of large-scale adaptive management applications are available to ecosystem restoration scientists and managers, examining where and how the components of an adaptive management program have been successfully implemented yields insight into what approaches have and have not worked. We document five key lessons learned during the decade-long development and implementation of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP Collaborative Adaptive Management Program that might be useful to other adaptive management practitioners. First, legislative and regulatory authorities that require the development of an adaptive management program are necessary to maintain funding and support to set up and implement adaptive management. Second, integration of adaptive management activities into existing institutional processes, and development of technical guidance, helps to ensure that adaptive management activities are understood and roles and responsibilities are clearly articulated so that adaptive management activities are implemented successfully. Third, a strong applied science framework is critical for establishing a prerestoration ecosystem reference condition and understanding of how the system works, as well as for providing a conduit for incorporating new scientific information into the decision-making process. Fourth, clear identification of uncertainties that pose risks to meeting restoration goals helps with the development of hypothesis-driven strategies to inform restoration planning and implementation. Tools such as management options matrices can provide a coherent way to link hypotheses to specific monitoring efforts and options to adjust implementation if performance goals are not achieved. Fifth, independent external peer review of an adaptive management program provides important feedback critical to maintaining and improving adaptive management implementation for ecosystem restoration. These lessons learned have helped shape the CERP Adaptive Management Program and are applicable to other natural resource management and restoration efforts; they can be used to help guide development and implementation of adaptive management programs facing similar challenges.

Andrew J. LoSchiavo

2013-12-01

203

A comprehensive stroke center patient registry: advantages, limitations, and lessons learned  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: The use of medical data registry allows insitutions to effectively manage information for many different investigations related to the registry, as well as evaluate patient's trends over time, with the ultimate goal of recognizing trends that may improve outcomes in a particular patient population.Methods: The purpose of this article is to illustrate our experience with a stroke patient registry at a comprehensive stroke center and highlight advantages, disadvantages, and lessons learned in the process of designing, implementing, and maintaining a stroke registry. We detail the process of stroke registry methodology, common data element (CDE definitions, the generation of manuscripts from a registry, and the limitations.Advantages: The largest advantage of a registry is the ability to prospectively add patients, while allowing investigators to go back and collect information retrospectively if needed. The continuous addition of new patients increases the sample size of studies from year to year, and it also allows reflection on clinical practices from previous years and the ability to investigate trends in patient management over time.Limitations: The greatest limitation in this registry pertains to our single-entry technique where multiple sites of data entry and transfer may generate errors within the registry.Lessons Learned: To reduce the potential for errors and maximize the accuracy and efficiency of the registry, we invest significant time in training competent registry users and project leaders. With effective training and transition of leadership positions, which are continuous and evolving processes, we have attempted to optimize our clinical research registry for knowledge gain and quality improvement at our center.

James E Siegler

2013-05-01

204

Fifth Graders' Enumeration of Cubes in 3D Arrays: Conceptual Progress in an Inquiry-Based Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

Utilizes the psychological and sociocultural components of a constructivist paradigm to provide a detailed analysis of how the cognitive constructions students make as they enumerate 3D arrays of cubes develop and change in an inquiry-based, problem-centered mathematics classroom. Describes the classroom work of three pairs of 5th-grade students…

Battista, Michael T.

1999-01-01

205

An Evaluation of Local Teacher Support Strategies for the Implementation of Inquiry-Based Science Education in French Primary Schools  

Science.gov (United States)

This article presents the results of an evaluation of local teacher support strategies for implementing inquiry-based science education (IBSE) in French primary schools. The research objective was to determine which aspects of the French model of IBSE are implemented in class, and the efficiency of each teacher support strategy. Data were…

Delclaux, Monique; Saltiel, Edith

2013-01-01

206

Terrestrial Slugs as a Model Organism for Inquiry-Based Experimentation in a Majors General Biology Laboratory  

Science.gov (United States)

Many biology educators at the undergraduate level are revamping their laboratory curricula to incorporate inquiry-based research experiences so that students can directly participate in the process of science and improve their scientific reasoning skills. Slugs are an ideal organism for use in such a student-directed, hypothesis-driven experience.…

Peters, Brenda J.; Blair, Amy C.

2013-01-01

207

Constructivist Learning of Anatomy: Gaining Knowledge by Creating Anatomical Casts  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes a method to promote inquiry based learning in the anatomy curriculum. The article describes a method requiring students to build casts of the bronchial tree and coronary arteries while faculty asked leading questions related to the material.

Heidi L. Lujan (Wayne State Univ Sch Med Dept of Physiology); Stephen E DiCarlo (Northeastern Ohio University College of Medicine Department of Physiology)

2011-03-01

208

Grapheme learning and grapheme-color synesthesia: Toward a comprehensive model of grapheme-color association  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Recent progress in grapheme-color synesthesia research has revealed that certain regularities, as well as individual differences, figure into grapheme-color associations. Although several factors are known to regulate grapheme-color associations, the impact of factors, including their interrelationships, on synesthesia remains unclear. We investigated determinants of synesthetic color for graphemes (characters, letters of Hiragana, a phonetic script in the Japanese language, and the English alphabet. Results revealed that grapheme ordinality was the strongest predictor of synesthetic colors for Hiragana characters, followed by character sound, and visual shape. Ordinality and visual shapes also significantly predicted synesthetic colors for English alphabet letters, however, sounds did not. The relative impact of grapheme properties on grapheme-color associations and the differences between these two writing systems are accounted for by considering the way graphemes are processed in the brain and introduced during an individual's development. A new model is proposed which takes into account the developmental process of grapheme learning. The model provides comprehensive explanation of synesthetic grapheme-color association determination processes, including the differences across writing systems.

MichikoAsano

2013-11-01

209

On the Relationship between Self-regulated Learning Components and L2 Vocabulary Knowledge and Reading Comprehension  

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Full Text Available In the past two decades, self-regulation has been the center of heated debate in educational psychology. The present study attempted to investigate the relationship between Iranian EFL learners' self-regulated learning components and vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension .To fulfill this objective, a 60-item vocabulary and reading comprehension TOEFL test was administered to a sample of 250 male and female college students majoring in English Teaching, English Language Translation, and English Literature. The Persian version of “Self- regulation Trait Questionnaire” was administered to the same participants. Pearson correlation procedure was used to analyze data. Results indicated that the correlation between self-regulated learning components: planning, self -checking, effort and self-efficacy gave mixed results. That is to say, two of the correlation coefficients, self –checking and effort were significant while the other two, planning and self-efficacy, were non-significant.

Abbas Ali Zarei

2012-09-01

210

Machine learning for compliance verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: A possible method of weapon detection for the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty consists of monitoring the amount of radioxenon in the atmosphere by measuring and sampling the activity concentration of Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe-133m, and Xe-135 by radionuclide monitoring. Several samples were obtained under different circumstances of nuclear weapon detonation, and are used as training datasets to establish an optimal classification model employing state-of-the-art technologies in machine learning (ML). We conducted a preliminary study involving ML algorithms including naive Bayes, neural networks, decision trees, k-nearest neighbours, and support vector machines, that revealed that any noise, uncorrelated features, and interactions in extracted weapon signals will cause difficulties for induction algorithms. We developed a novel feature selection approach that addresses these issues. The method is based on the Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization procedure, and can be used to rebuild the whole feature space such that the resulting features are orthonormal to each other (they do not interact with each other, and each resulting feature is sufficiently correlated with the target. This approach was shown to boost performance in 16 out of 36 experiments where no feature selection was applied (in four cases, by more than 10 %), to change nothing in 11 cases and to degrade performance in 9 cases (in only three of these cases, more than 2 % degradation occurred, but never than 2 % degradation occurred, but never more than 4.2 %). This method was also shown to obtain an improvement of 4.59 % in accuracy over 10 state-of-the-art feature selection methods and no feature selection, on our most challenging data set. (author)

211

A comparison of inquiry-based teaching through concept maps and traditional teaching in biology  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to investigate affective outcomes and academic achievement for students enrolled in high school biology when instruction included concept-mapping. The research design was quasi-experimental and allowed for a comparison between an experimental group who constructed concept maps and a control group who received traditional biology instruction. The subjects were 140 ninth-grade students, distributed into six intact biology classes, three honors and three general biology classes. Chapter tests and a textbook generated 9-week comprehensive posttest were used to measure achievement. ANCOVA analysis on the comprehensive posttest indicated no significant overall effect of concept mapping on biology achievement across the whole quarter when controlling for the quarter pretest. Chi-square analyses were performed to measure students' attitude toward biology class and activities. The experimental group indicated higher than expected tendency to be positive about the instructional methods, however, the control group indicated fewer than expected positive responses. T-tests were conducted to determine the differences between the experimental and control groups on chapter tests with or without concept mapping. The group with concept mapping scored significantly better than those with traditional methods. Honors class comparisons indicated a significant difference between groups at plevel on the chapter pretest. There was also a significant difference on the chapter test after intervention, but this time at plevel. Although the general class comparisons indicated no significant difference on the chapter pretest, the experimental group scored significantly better than the control group on the chapter test following intervention. This suggests that average ability students benefit from concept mapping more than traditional instruction. In narrative self-evaluations, only a small percentage of participants overall listed concept mapping as the review activity that helped them learn most. Recommendations for practitioners and future research were provided related to the use of concept mapping.

Gulati, Sangeeta

2005-11-01

212

Study on an inquiry-based teaching case in genomics curriculum: identifying virulence factors of Escherichia coli by using comparative genomics.  

Science.gov (United States)

Genomics is the core subject of various "omics" and it also becomes a topic of increasing interest in undergraduate curricula of biological sciences. However, the study on teaching methodology of genomics courses was very limited so far. Here we report an application of inquiry-based teaching in genomics courses by using virulence factors of Escherichia coli as an example of comparative genomics study. Specially, students first built a multiple-genome alignment of different E. coli strains to investigate the gene conservation using the Mauve tool; then putative virulence factor genes were identified by using BLAST tool to obtain gene annotations. The teaching process was divided into five modules: situation, resources, task, process and evaluation. Learning-assessment results revealed that students had acquired the knowledge and skills of genomics, and their learning interest and ability of self-study were also motivated. Moreover, the special teaching case can be applied to other related courses, such as microbiology, bioinformatics, molecular biology and food safety detection technology. PMID:25665648

Jidong, Zhou; Yudong, Li

2015-02-20

213

An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Module to Promote Understanding of the Scientific Method and Bacterial Conjugation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Students are engaged and improve their critical thinking skills in laboratory courses when they have the opportunity to design and conduct inquiry-based experiments that generate novel results. A discovery-driven project for a microbiology, genetics, or multidisciplinary research laboratory course was developed to familiarize students with the scientific method. In this multi-lab module, students determine whether their chosen stress conditions induce conjugation and/or cell death of the model BSL-1 Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Through consultation of the primary literature, students identify conditions or chemicals that can elicit DNA damage, the SOS response, and/or cellular stress.  In groups, students discuss their selected conditions, develop their hypotheses and experimental plans, and formulate their positive and negative controls. Students then subject the B. subtilis donor cells to the stress conditions, mix donors with recipients to allow mating, and plate serial dilutions of the mixtures on selective plates to measure how the treatments affect conjugation frequency and donor cell viability.  Finally, students analyze and discuss their collective data in light of their controls. The goals of this module are to encourage students to be actively involved in the scientific process while contributing to our understanding of the conditions that stimulate horizontal gene transfer in bacteria.

Melanie B. Berkmen

2014-08-01

214

A College-Level Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activity on Transiting Planets  

CERN Document Server

We have designed an inquiry-based laboratory activity on transiting extrasolar planets for an introductory college-level astronomy class. The activity was designed with the intent of simultaneously teaching science process skills and factual content about transits and light curves. In the activity, groups of two to four students each formulate a specific science question and design and carry out an investigation using a table-top model of a star and orbiting planet. Each group then presents their findings to other students in their class. In a final presentation, the instructors integrate students' findings with a summary of how measured light curves indicate properties of planetary systems. The activity debuted at Hartnell College in November 2009 and has also been adapted for a lecture-based astronomy course at U.C. Santa Cruz. We present the results of student surveys before and after the astronomy course at Hartnell and discuss how well our activity promotes students' confidence and identity as scientists...

McConnell, Nicholas J; Strubbe, Linda E; Moth, Pimol; Montgomery, Ryan M; Raschke, Lynne M; Hunter, Lisa; Goza, Barbara

2010-01-01

215

The Teaching of Inquiry-based Science in Elementary Classrooms: A Bi-national Comparative Reflection of US and Lithuanian Practices  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper offers a comparative reflection on how two nations, the U.S. and Lithuania, are implementing inquiry-based science in elementary classrooms. The qualitative study explored how fourth grade teachers in Southern California and in Lithuania employed effective inquiry-based strategies in their classrooms. A teacher’s use of questioning strategies to guide critical thinking and the role of inquiry-based pedagogy plays in promoting student engagement were commonalities in both countries. “Exercise moments”, resource conservation, and “voyeuristic investigations” were noted in Lithuanian inquiry practices while pacing guides and standards coverage were prevalent issues in US inquiry practices.

Bobbi Hansen

2013-05-01

216

The Development of Reading Comprehension Skills in Children Learning English as a Second Language  

Science.gov (United States)

Reading comprehension is a multi-dimensional process that includes the reader, the text, and factors associated with the activity of reading. Most research and theories of comprehension are based primarily on research conducted with monolingual English speakers (L1). The present study was designed to investigate the cognitive and linguistic…

Lipka, Orly; Siegel, Linda S.

2012-01-01

217

The Effectiveness of Using an Explicit Language Learning Strategy-Based Instruction in Developing Secondary School Students' EFL Listening Comprehension Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study aimed at exploring the effectiveness of using explicit language learning strategy-based instruction in developing secondary school students' EFL listening comprehension skills. It was hypothesized that using explicit strategy-based instruction would develop students' EFL listening comprehension skill and its sub-skills. The…

Amin, Iman Abdul-Reheem; Amin, Magdy Mohammad; Aly, Mahsoub Abdul-Sadeq

2011-01-01

218

Impact of backwards faded scaffolding approach to inquiry-based astronomy laboratory experiences on undergraduate non-science majors' views of scientific inquiry  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored the impact of a novel inquiry-based astronomy laboratory curriculum designed using the Backwards Faded Scaffolding inquiry teaching framework on non-science majoring undergraduate students' views of the nature of scientific inquiry (NOSI). The study focused on two aspects of NOSI: The Distinction between Data and Evidence (DvE), and The Multiple Methods of Science (MMS). Participants were 220 predominately non-science majoring undergraduate students at a small, doctoral granting, research-extensive university in the Rocky Mountain region of the United States. The student participants were enrolled in an introductory astronomy survey course with an associated laboratory section and were selected in two samples over consecutive fall and spring semesters. The participants also included four of the graduate student instructors who taught the laboratory courses using the intervention curriculum. In the first stage, student participant views of NOSI were measured using the VOSI-4 research instrument before and after the intervention curriculum was administered. The responses were quantified, and the distributions of pre and posttest scores of both samples were separately analyzed to determine if there was a significant improvement in understanding of either of the two aspects of NOSI. The results from both samples were compared to evaluate the consistency of the results. In the second stage, the quantitative results were used to strategically design a qualitative investigation, in which the four lab instructors were interviewed about their observations of how the student participants interacted with the intervention curriculum as compared to traditional lab activities, as well as their suggestions as to how the curriculum may or may not have contributed to the results of the first stage. These interviews were summarized and analyzed for common themes as to how the intervention curriculum influenced the students' understandings of the two aspect of NOSI. According to the results of a Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, there was a significant shift in the distributions of both samples toward a more informed understanding of DvE after the intervention curriculum was administered, while there was no significant change in either direction for understanding of MMS. The results of the instructor interview analysis suggested that the intervention curriculum provided multiple opportunities for students to evaluate and determine the relevance of data in the context of producing evidence-based conclusions directly related to specific research questions, thereby supporting the development of more informed views of DvE. These results also suggested that students might not have realized that they were exclusively engaged in non-experimental type inquiries, as various research methods were not explicitly addressed. The intervention curriculum used a consistently phased stepwise format, which may also have led the students to accommodate their astronomy inquiry experiences within persistent misconceptions of "The Scientific Method" as the only valid means of constructing scientific knowledge, thereby leading to no change in understanding of MMS. The results of the study suggest that a scaffolded, inquiry-based, introductory astronomy laboratory curriculum purposefully designed and scaffolded to enhance students' understandings could be effective in enhancing undergraduate non-science majoring students' views of certain aspects of NOSI. Through scaffolding inquiry experiences that deliver multiple opportunities to engage in authentic scientific inquiries, the novel curriculum provides a valuable resource for the astronomy education community to engage students in learning experiences that reflect the contemporary views of constructivist inquiry-based learning, which focuses on the interpretation of data to create evidence in light of specific questions, as well as opportunities to engage in authentic scientific discourse. As such it can enable astronomy educators in the undergraduate teaching community to support student

Lyons, Daniel J.

219

Neural Network Processing of Natural Language: II. Towards a Unified Model of Corticostriatal Function in Learning Sentence Comprehension and Non-Linguistic Sequencing  

Science.gov (United States)

A central issue in cognitive neuroscience today concerns how distributed neural networks in the brain that are used in language learning and processing can be involved in non-linguistic cognitive sequence learning. This issue is informed by a wealth of functional neurophysiology studies of sentence comprehension, along with a number of recent…

Dominey, Peter Ford; Inui, Toshio; Hoen, Michel

2009-01-01

220

The Effects of Cooperative Learning on Improving College Students’ Reading Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In cooperative learning students work with their peers to accomplish a shared goal through interdependence, interaction and team work among all group members rather than working alone. This article discusses three main methods of cooperative learning and how to implement cooperative learning in college English reading class. During the process some key elements should be taken into consideration, including classroom atmosphere, the design of tasks and the teacher’s role.

Wenjing Zuo

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
221

Polymer Science Learning Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The Polymer Science Learning Center (PSLC) is an interactive web site in polymer education that offers an innovative, inquiry-based, multi-faceted learning environment for pre-kindergarten through adult explorers. The site offers links to educational resources, activities, demonstrations and events. The "Macrogalleria" houses virtual learning shops that are filled with free polymer information for beginners and experienced researchers. A section for children is also available. Keywords: polyvinylchloride, polystyrene, ABS, teflon.

2010-07-02

222

Comprehensive Framework for Evaluating e-Learning Systems: Using BSC Framework  

Science.gov (United States)

The development of information and communication technology (ICT) is changing the way in which people work, communicate and learn. Recently developing and implementing e-learning solutions have increased dramatically. According to heavily investing in this area, it is essential to evaluate its different aspects and understand measures, which…

Momeni, Mansor; Jamporazmey, Mona; Mehrafrouz, Mohsen; Bahadori, Fatemeh

2013-01-01

223

Aligning Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory with a Comprehensive Agricultural Education Model  

Science.gov (United States)

Experiential learning has been a foundational tenant of agricultural education since its inception. However, the theory of experiential education has received limited attention in the permanent agricultural education literature base. As such, this philosophical manuscript examined Kolb's experiential learning process further, and considered the…

Baker, Marshall A.; Robinson, J. Shane; Kolb, David A.

2012-01-01

224

Assessing the Change Process in Comprehensive High Schools Implementing Professional Learning Communities  

Science.gov (United States)

Professional learning communities (PLC) have been identified as scaffolds that can facilitate, support, and sustain systemic change focused on improving student achievement. PLCs represent the application of the theoretical constructs of the learning organization within the framework of schools and school systems. Little is known about the change…

Shaner, Robert G.

2009-01-01

225

Adaptive and Maladaptive Strategy Use in Computer-Assisted Language Learning Activities for Listening Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

College students of English as a foreign language (EFL) in Chile participated in an online mini course designed to improve their listening comprehension. There were four experimental conditions: A) one in which participants listened to fast dialogues; B) one in which participants listened to slow dialogues; C) one in which participants were given…

McBride, Cara

2008-01-01

226

Corals on Acid: An Inquiry-based Activity Leading Students to a Better Understanding of Ocean Acidification Impacts  

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Full Text Available The objective of this inquiry-based lesson is for students to gain an understanding of how increasing ocean acidity can affect the calcification of marine organisms. During this activity, students: (1 design an experiment to quantify the CaCO3 concentration of two invertebrate skeletal samples, one that has been soaked in normal seawater and another in a low pH solution, and (2 use critical thinking and discussion to evaluate possible explanations for the difference in the skeletal CaCO3 compositions. Our lesson focuses on exploring the activity before ocean acidification is introduced to provide a common conceptual framework to engage students.

Casey L. Boleman

2013-12-01

227

A comprehensive stroke center patient registry: advantages, limitations, and lessons learned  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Introduction: The use of medical data registry allows insitutions to effectively manage information for many different investigations related to the registry, as well as evaluate patient's trends over time, with the ultimate goal of recognizing trends that may improve outcomes in a particular patient population.Methods: The purpose of this article is to illustrate our experience with a stroke patient registry at a comprehensive stroke center and highlight advantages, disadvantages, and lesson...

Siegler, James E.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Dorsey, Adrianne M.; Monlezun, Dominique J.; George, Alex J.; Amir Shaban; Jeremy Bockholt, H.; Albright, Karen C.; Sheryl Martin-Schild

2013-01-01

228

Seeing the Superiority of Self-monitoring Learning Strategies over Teacher-monitoring Learning in Adult 'Reading Comprehension'  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study aims to see the superiority of SMLS on Learners' Receptive skill among the students of Payame-noor and Azad Universities in three different departments and the evaluation that teachers can apply to raise SML among adult learners. It is believed that since the publication of Malcolm Knowles' book in 1975, SML had been applied for adult education for ages. To administer this, SML of reading comprehension was introduced to learners in order to keep an eye on their own learnin...

Asghar Bastami Bandpay

2012-01-01

229

The Comparison of Language Learning Strategies and Reading Comprehension of Iranian EFL Students Taking Web-based and Face-to-face Instruction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigated language learning strategies used by EFL web-based learners and face-to-face learners. It also examined the difference between pre-test and post-test reading comprehension scores of EFL students who were exposed to web-based and face-to-face instruction. The participants of the study were 200 Iranian EFL university students. They were randomly assigned into two groups, 100 students in one group taking web-based instruction and 100 students in the other group taking face-to-face instruction. The students took a 50-item translated version of Strategy Inventory for Language Learning and a test of reading comprehension. This scale and the reading comprehension test were given as the pre-test and post-test to all students. During the treatment, summarization-strategy training was used to promote the learning process. The result of an independent samples t-tests revealed that there was no significant difference between the two groups of learners regarding their preferences for language learning strategies. Moreover, the result of a paired samples t-test indicated that there was significant difference between pre-test and post-test reading comprehension scores of EFL students who were exposed to face-to-face instruction. However, there was no significant difference between pre-test and post-test reading comprehension scores of EFL students who were exposed to web-based instruction.

Behzad Ghonsooly

2014-06-01

230

Individual Learning Pathways and Flexible Learning Opportunities - Implications for Lifelong Career Management Skills and Comprehensive Guidance Systems  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Introduction: Over the last decade lifelong guidance has been given increasing attention at both European and national levels. It is recognised as a crucial dimension of lifelong learning, promoting both social and economic goals: in particular, improving the effi ciency and effectiveness of education, training and the labour market through its contribution to reducing drop-out, preventing skill mismatches and boosting productivity. Two EU Resolutions of the Education Council (20041; 20082...

Vuorinen, Raimo

2012-01-01

231

The Astronomical Roots of Sapling Learning: Building a Comprehensive Online Homework System for Astro 101  

Science.gov (United States)

I discuss the method of creating a library of questions for Astro 101 within the Sapling Learning homework system, as well as the philosophy behind the types of homework questions (and feedback) that are being written. The system's features were built around meeting five basic goals: flexibility, engaging content, peer instruction, immediate instructional feedback, and exploration.

Urban, A.

2014-07-01

232

Building a Comprehensive Online Homework System for Astro 101 within Sapling Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

What does an effective homework system for Astro 101 look like? We discuss the method of creating a library of questions for Astro 101 as well as the philosophy behind the types of homework questions (and feedback) that are written within the Sapling Learning homework system. We also discuss which topics may require deeper investigations and how they can be addressed using interactive simulations.

Urban, Andrea

2014-01-01

233

Effective, Sustained Inquiry-Based Instruction Promotes Higher Science Proficiency Among All Groups: A 5-Year Analysis  

Science.gov (United States)

Student's performance in science classrooms has continued to languish throughout the USA. Even though proficiency rates on national tests such as National Assessment of Educational Progress are higher for Caucasian students than African-Americans and Hispanics, all groups lack achieving desired proficiency rates. Further, the Next Generation Science Standards detail a new higher benchmark for all students. This study analyzes a professional development (PD) project, entitled Inquiry in Motion, designed to (a) facilitate teacher transformation toward greater quantity and quality of inquiry-based instruction, (b) improve student achievement in science practices and science concepts, and (c) begin to narrow the achievement gap among various groups. This 5-year PD study included 11 schools, 74 middle school teachers, and 9,981 students from diverse, high minority populations. Findings from the quasi-experimental study show statistically significant gains for all student groups (aggregate, males, females, Caucasians, African-Americans, and Hispanics) on all three science Measure of Academic Progress tests (composite, science practices, and science concepts) when compared to students of non-participating teachers. In addition to an increase in overall performance for all groups, a narrowing of the achievement gap of minority students relative to Caucasian students was seen. When combined with other studies, this study affirms that, when facilitated effectively, inquiry-based instruction may benefit all students, for all demographic groups measured.

Marshall, Jeff C.; Alston, Daniel M.

2014-11-01

234

Exploring Preservice Elementary Teachers' Understanding of the Essential Features of Inquiry-Based Science Teaching Using Evidence-Based Reflection  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored preservice elementary teachers' and their mentors' understanding of the essential features of inquiry-based teaching through the use of evidence-based reflection. The web-based video analysis tool (VAT) system was used to support preservice teachers' and mentors' evidence-based reflection during field experiences. Major data sources included VAT reflections and individual interviews. Data analysis indicated that the preservice teachers had been involved in various activities designed to support their understanding of inquiry features in a science methods class; they did not implement all of the features in their actual teaching. Both preservice teachers and mentors had difficulty connecting appropriate inquiry features to each teaching episode, which indicates their lack of understanding of inquiry. Both the preservice teachers and mentors had different levels of understanding for each feature. That is, they tended to understand certain features better than others. They interpreted each feature of inquiry-based science teaching too broadly. They also either had a teacher-centered view or tended to focus on issues unrelated to science teaching.

Seung, Eulsun; Park, Soonhye; Jung, Jinhong

2014-08-01

235

Innovations in Inquiry-Based Laboratory Exercises for Non-Majors Astronomy Courses: Connecting Undergraduates with the Enterprise of Science  

Science.gov (United States)

Connecting Undergraduates to the Enterprise of Science (CUES) is an NSF-funded program which aims to help instructors towards inquiry based laboratory experiences for students. While many science instructors want to move away from the traditional cookbook laboratories, there are many challenges to executing such a change. The CUES program provides an opportunity for instructors to incorporate inquiry, using "minijournals". The basic idea behind the minijournal format is to present students with a simulated journal article about an experiment or investigation. The article outlines the question, methods used, and conclusions and suggests further scientific questions that might be of interest. The students are expected to devise their own experiments or investigations to answer said questions, and to produce their own paper/article describing it. In this way, the students will be engaged in inquiry-based science labs which encompass doing, thinking, and communicating, while the minijournal allows the instructor to contain lines of inquiry within the limits posed by existing resources. Here we present both the rationale for and concept of using minijournals and specific examples of such laboratory exercises we are currently employing in our introductory (non-science majors) astronomy laboratory. In addition, we explore the difficulties implementing such a technique, when the potential astronomy experiments available to students may be limited.

Speck, Angela; Ruzhitskaya, L.; Weaver, J. C.

2009-01-01

236

Aprendizaje y comprensión. Una mirada desde las humanidades / Learning and comprehension. A glance from the humanities  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish [...] Abstract in english The learning has been one of the categories more studied by Psychology and the Didactics. It reflects the importance that has in the formation and development of the personality. The most recent and significant contributions in that field refer the existing bonds between the learning processes and c [...] omprehension. By the importance of the subject, in the article it is persecuted like objective to reflect around the existing relations between the mentioned processes. The made study is based on the analysis of the referred subject from the systematization of basic postulates of humanistic and social sciences, such as: Psychology, the Linguistics, the Semiotics, the Hermeneutics and the Didactics.

Karel, Pérez Ariza; José Emilio, Hernández Sánchez.

2014-12-01

237

Mental imagery, learning styles, and text comprehension : studies in educational and cognitive psychology  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The present dissertation offers a theoretical integration of the orientation to studying tradition (e.g. Entwistle, 1988, Ramsden, 1988) and theories of reading cognition (Kintsch, 1994, Sadoski & Paivio, 2001) and describes two studies based on this integrative conceptualization of the determinants of text understanding. One study of 78 Hungarian elementary/middle school students explored choice of learning approach, reported mental images while reading, and perceived connections between un...

Vita?lis, Emese ´eva

2004-01-01

238

Leitura compreensiva e utilização de estratégias de aprendizagem em alunos de Psicologia / Reading comprehension and learning strategies in Psychology students  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este estudo objetivou comparar o nível de compreensão em leitura percebido por alunos de Psicologia, as estratégias de aprendizagem utilizadas na superação dos problemas encontrados, bem como verificar a real dificuldade de compreensão dos alunos para responder ao teste de Cloze . Participaram 178 u [...] niversitários, sendo 113 do 1º ano e 65 do 4º ano. O procedimento foi aplicado numa única sessão e consistiu de (a) leitura de um texto científico da área, (b) questões sobre as dificuldades percebidas e sobre as estratégias utilizadas para a sua superação e (c) aplicação de um teste de cloze em texto similar ao primeiro, visando à avaliação da compreensão em leitura. Observou-se diferença estatisticamente significativa no nível de compreensão em leitura com superioridade dos alunos do 4º ano em relação aos do 1º ano. Contudo os alunos do 4º ano perceberam-se com maior dificuldade na compreensão do primeiro texto, embora a diferença entre as turmas não tenha sido significativa. Os tipos de dificuldades de compreensão apontadas e as estratégias utilizadas pelos alunos apresentaram diferenças qualitativas entre as turmas. Abstract in english This study has aimed the comparison of reading comprehension levels and learning strategies used for overcoming eventual problems among Psychology students; as well as it verified the students’ real comprehension difficulties to answer the cloze test. 178 university students (113 from the 1st year a [...] nd 65 from the 4th year) participated in this study. The procedure was applied in one single session and consisted by : (a) reading of the area scientific text; (b) questions about the realized difficulties and the used strategies to overcome the problem; and (c) the Cloze testing application , using a text similar to the first one, in order to evaluate reading comprehension. A significant statistical difference has been observed about the reading comprehension level , as the 4th year students have presented a better performance, compared to the students from the 1st year. The 4th year students acknowledged a greater difficulty in understanding the first text, although the difference between the two groups was not significant. The difficulty kinds and the strategies used by the students pointed out, qualitative differences between these groups.

Acácia Aparecida Angeli dos, Santos; Claudette Maria Medeiros, Vendramini; Adriana Cristina Boulhoça, Suehiro; Ligia Angeli Dias dos, Santos.

2006-03-01

239

Is Attribution Retraining Necessary? Use of Self-Regulation Procedures for Enhancing the Reading Comprehension Strategies of Children with Learning Disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated the need to include explicit attributional retraining in a program designed to teach self-regulation reading comprehension strategies to 60 Spanish children (grades 5-6) with learning disabilities. Regardless of attributional retraining, children improved on measures of cognitive strategies, but their gains were very low on…

Miranda, Ana; Villaescusa, Maria Isabel; Vidal-Abarca, Eduardo

1997-01-01

240

The Effect of Activity with E-Book on Vocabulary and Story Comprehension: A Comparison between Kindergarteners at Risk of Learning Disabilities and Typically Developing Kindergarteners  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effectiveness of e-book activity for vocabulary acquisition and story comprehension among kindergarteners at risk for learning disabilities (LD) as opposed to typically developing (TD) children. Participants included 136 children aged between five and seven (M = 71.2; SD = 5.64, in months),…

Shamir, Adina; Korat, Ofra; Shlafer, Inessa

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
241

Learning from Mistakes --- A Comprehensive Study on Real World Concurrency Bug Characteristics  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The reality of multi-core hardware has made concurrent programs pervasive. Unfortunately, writing correct concurrent programs is difficult. Addressing this challenge requires advances in multiple directions, including concurrency bug detection, concurrent program testing, concurrent programming model design, etc. Designing effective techniques in all these directions will significantly benefit from a deep understanding of real world concurrency bug characteristics. This paper provides the first (to the best of our knowledge) comprehensive real world concurrency bug characteristic study. Specifically, we have carefully examined concurrency bug patterns, manifestation, and fix strategies of 105 randomly selected real world concurrency bugs from 4 representative server and client opensource applications (MySQL, Apache, Mozilla and OpenOffice). Our study reveals several interesting findings and provides useful guidance for concurrency bug detection, testing, and concurrent programming language design. Some of our findings are as follows: (1) Around one third of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs are caused by violation to programmers order intentions, which may not be easily expressed via synchronization primitives like locks and transactional memories; (2) Around 34% of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs involve multiple variables, which are not well addressed by existing bug detection tools; (3) About 92% of the examined concurrency bugs can be reliably triggered by enforcing certain orders among no more than 4 memory accesses. This indicates that testing concurrent programs can target at exploring possible orders among every small groups of memory accesses, instead of among all memory accesses; (4) About 73% of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs were not fixed by simply adding or changing locks, and many of the fixes were not correct at the first try, indicating the difficulty of reasoning concurrent execution by programmers.

242

Voices of Youth: Podcasting as a Means for Inquiry-Based Community Engagement  

Science.gov (United States)

A youth community informatics (YCI) research project intersected an inquiry learning model with the making of audiovisual podcasts to foster personal growth and community engagement in a group of Mexican American youth enrolled in an afterschool program. Specifically, the article describes the cycle of inquiry together with the development of a…

Bruce, Bertram; Lin, Ching-Chiu

2009-01-01

243

Inquiry-Based Arson Investigation for General Chemistry Using GC-MS  

Science.gov (United States)

We have developed a two-week guided-inquiry laboratory in which first-semester general chemistry students investigate a suspected arson using gas chromatography--mass spectrometry and paper chromatography. In the process of evaluating evidence from the crime scene, students develop and test hypotheses and learn the fundamentals of chromatography,…

Maurer, Marta K.; Bukowski, Michael R.; Menachery, Mary D.; Zatorsky, Adam R.

2010-01-01

244

Teacher STEM Perception and Preparation: Inquiry-Based STEM Professional Development for Elementary Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Student foundational knowledge of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is formed in their elementary education. Paradoxically, many elementary teachers have constrained background knowledge, confidence, and efficacy for teaching STEM that may hamper student STEM learning. The association between teacher preparation to teach…

Nadelson, Louis S.; Callahan, Janet; Pyke, Patricia; Hay, Anne; Dance, Matthew; Pfiester, Joshua

2013-01-01

245

The Heat Is on: An Inquiry-Based Investigation for Specific Heat  

Science.gov (United States)

A substantial number of upper-level science students and practicing physical science teachers demonstrate confusion about thermal equilibrium, heat transfer, heat capacity, and specific heat capacity. The traditional method of instruction, which involves learning the related definitions and equations, using equations to solve heat transfer…

Herrington, Deborah G.

2011-01-01

246

Transitioning to Inquiry-Based Teaching: Exploring Science Teachers' Professional Development Experiences  

Science.gov (United States)

The literature on professional development is replete with studies that utilize survey, interview, and classroom observation data, primarily collected post professional development experience, to explore teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and actions; however, we lack a clear understanding of teachers' learning process and reflections during…

Kazempour, Mahsa; Amirshokoohi, Aidin

2014-01-01

247

Virtual reality as a comprehensive learning tool; Realidad virtual como una herramienta de aprendizaje integral  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This article presents some of the experiences with developing systems based on non-immersive virtual reality (VR). It discusses the factors that make VR a tool for creating content and learning contexts so that instruction is more efficient. VR systems enable risk-free training even when activities involve high risks, such as procedures for maintenance of medium voltage power lines. In addition, these systems have been designed to record student progress, among other things. [Spanish] Se presentan aqui algunas experiencias en el desarrollo de sistemas basados en realidad virtual (RV) no inmersiva. Se discute acerca de los factores que hacen de la RV una herramienta para crear contenido y con textos de aprendizaje, de tal modo que la instruccion pueda ser mas eficiente. Los sistemas de RV permiten el entrenamiento sin riesgos, aun cuando las actividades involucradas sean de alto riesgo, como es el caso de los procedimientos de mantenimiento a lineas energizadas de media tension. Por otro lado, estos sistemas tambien han sido habilitados para registrar el progreso de los estudiantes, entre otras cosas.

Perez Ramirez, Miguel [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Ontiveros Hernandez, Norma Josefina [Instituto Tecnologico de Zacatepec, Zacatepec, Morelos (Mexico)

2011-07-01

248

Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Development of Concept Questions and Inquiry-Based Activities in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer: An Example for Equilibrium vs. Steady-State  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines the use of inquiry-based instruction to promote the understanding of critical concepts in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Significant research shows that students frequently enter our courses with tightly held misconceptions about the physical world that are not effectively addressed through traditional instruction. Students'…

Vigeant, Margot; Prince, Michael; Nottis, Katharyn

2011-01-01

249

Adsorption of Arsenic by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: A Versatile, Inquiry-Based Laboratory for a High School or College Science Course  

Science.gov (United States)

There has been much interest in magnetite (Fe[subscript 3]O[subscript 4]) due to its utility in adsorbing high concentrations of arsenic in contaminated water. The magnetic properties of the material allow for simple dispersion and removal from an aqueous system. An inquiry-based laboratory has been developed that illustrates these unique…

VanDorn, Daniel; Ravalli, Matthew T.; Small, Mary Margaret; Hillery, Barbara; Andreescu, Silvana

2011-01-01

250

A comprehensive information technology system to support physician learning at the point of care.  

Science.gov (United States)

MayoExpert is a multifaceted information system integrated with the electronic medical record (EMR) across Mayo Clinic's multisite health system. It was developed as a technology-based solution to manage information, standardize clinical practice, and promote and document learning in clinical contexts. Features include urgent test result notifications; models illustrating expert-approved care processes; concise, expert-approved answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs); a directory of topic-specific experts; and a portfolio for provider licensure and credentialing. The authors evaluate MayoExpert's reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance. Evaluation data sources included usage statistics, user surveys, and pilot studies.As of October 2013, MayoExpert was available at 94 clinical sites in 12 states and contained 1,368 clinical topics, answers to 7,640 FAQs, and 92 care process models. In 2012, MayoExpert was accessed at least once by 2,578/3,643 (71%) staff physicians, 900/1,374 (66%) midlevel providers, and 1,728/2,291 (75%) residents and fellows. In a 2013 survey of MayoExpert users with 536 respondents, all features were highly rated (? 67% favorable). More providers reported using MayoExpert to answer questions before/after than during patient visits (68% versus 36%). During November 2012 to April 2013, MayoExpert sent 1,660 notifications of new-onset atrial fibrillation and 1,590 notifications of prolonged QT. MayoExpert has become part of routine clinical and educational operations, and its care process models now define Mayo Clinic best practices. MayoExpert's infrastructure and content will continue to expand with improved templates and content organization, new care process models, additional notifications, better EMR integration, and improved support for credentialing activities. PMID:25374037

Cook, David A; Sorensen, Kristi J; Nishimura, Rick A; Ommen, Steve R; Lloyd, Farrell J

2015-01-01

251

An Augmented Reality-Based Mobile Learning System to Improve Students' Learning Achievements and Motivations in Natural Science Inquiry Activities  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, an augmented reality-based mobile learning system is proposed for conducting inquiry-based learning activities. An experiment has been conducted to examine the effectiveness of the proposed approach in terms of learning achievements and motivations. The subjects were 57 fourth graders from two classes taught by the same teacher in…

Chiang, Tosti H. C.; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

2014-01-01

252

The HSP, the QCN, and the Dragon: Developing inquiry-based QCN instructional modules in Taiwan  

Science.gov (United States)

High Scope Program (HSP) is a long-term project funded by NSC in Taiwan since 2006. It is designed to elevate the quality of science education by means of incorporating emerging science and technology into the traditional curricula in senior high schools. Quake-Catcher Network (QCN), a distributed computing project initiated by Stanford University and UC Riverside, encourages the volunteers to install the low-cost, novel sensors at home and school to build a seismic network. To meet both needs, we have developed a model curriculum that introduces QCN, earthquake science, and cloud computing into high school classrooms. Through professional development workshops, Taiwan cloud-based earthquake science learning platform, and QCN club on Facebook, we have worked closely with Lan-Yang Girl's Senior High School teachers' team to design workable teaching plans through a practical operation of seismic monitoring at home or school. However, some obstacles to learning appear including QCN installation/maintain problems, high self-noise of the sensor, difficulty of introducing earthquake sciences for high school teachers. The challenges of QCN outreach in Taiwan bring out our future plans: (1) development of easy, frequently updated, physics-based QCN-experiments for high school teachers, and (2) design of an interactive learning platform with social networking function for students.

Chen, K. H.; Liang, W.; Chang, C.; Yen, E.; Lin, C.; Lin, G.

2012-12-01

253

The Use of the Cognitive Behavior Survey To Assess Nursing Student Learning.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nursing students (n=29) were tested at entry and exit in a program using inquiry-based learning, an adaptation of problem-based learning. Students continued to use memorization despite its surface learning quality. A combination of memorization, conceptualization, and reflection may be best for understanding as well as retention. (SK)

Magnussen, Lois

2001-01-01

254

Teaching Statistics in Biology: Using Inquiry-based Learning to Strengthen Understanding of Statistical Analysis in Biology Laboratory Courses  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

There is an increasing need for students in the biological sciences to build a strong foundation in quantitative approaches to data analyses. Although most science, engineering, and math field majors are required to take at least one statistics course, statistical analysis is poorly integrated into undergraduate biology course work, particularly at the lower-division level. Elements of statistics were incorporated into an introductory biology course, including a review of statistics concepts ...

Metz, Anneke M.

2008-01-01

255

Deep Reading, Cost/Benefit, and the Construction of Meaning: Enhancing Reading Comprehension and Deep Learning in Sociology Courses  

Science.gov (United States)

Reading comprehension skill is often assumed by sociology instructors, yet many college students seem to have marginal reading comprehension skills, which may explain why fewer than half of them are actually doing the reading. Sanctions that force students to either read or to pay a price are based on a rational choice model of behavior--a…

Roberts, Judith C.; Roberts, Keith A.

2008-01-01

256

Correlação entre tempo, erro, velocidade e compreensão de leitura em escolares com distúrbio de aprendizagem / Correlation between time, error, speed and reading comprehension in students with learning disorders  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: Correlacionar as variáveis: erros, tempo, velocidade e compreensão de leitura de escolares com distúrbios de aprendizagem e escolares sem dificuldade de aprendizagem. MÉTODOS: Participaram deste estudo 40 escolares de 8 a 12 anos de idade, de ambos os gêneros, de 2ª a 4ª série do Ensino Fu [...] ndamental Municipal, divididos em GI: composto por 20 escolares sem dificuldade de aprendizagem e GII: composto por 20 escolares com distúrbio de aprendizagem. Foram utilizados textos selecionados a partir da indicação de professores da 2ª à 4ª série da Rede Municipal de Ensino, para a realização de leitura oral. A compreensão foi realizada por meio de quatro perguntas apresentadas após a leitura do texto, às quais os escolares deveriam responder oralmente. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença entre GI e GII no número de erros, velocidade e compreensão de leitura e tempo total de leitura. A correlação entre tempo total de leitura e erros cometidos durante a leitura foi positiva, e entre as variáveis tempo total de leitura e velocidade de leitura foi negativa. Para o grupo GII, houve diferença com correlação negativa entre as variáveis tempo total de leitura e velocidade de leitura. CONCLUSÃO: Para os escolares com distúrbio de aprendizagem, o desempenho nas variáveis que foram correlacionadas encontra-se alterado interferindo no desenvolvimento em leitura e, consequentemente, na compreensão do texto lido. Abstract in english PURPOSE: To correlate the variables error, time, speed and reading comprehension of students with learning disorders and students without learning disorders. METHODS: The participants of this study were 40 students, aged from 8 to 12 years old, of both genders, from 2nd to 4th grades of municipal el [...] ementary education, divided into GI: comprising 20 students without learning disorders, and GII: comprising 20 students with learning disorders. As procedure we used a selection of texts indicated by teachers of 2nd to 4th grades of municipal schools, for an oral reading task. Reading comprehension of the texts was assessed through four questions presented sequentially after reading, which students should answer orally. RESULTS: Differences were found between GI and GII regarding the number of errors, reading speed and comprehension, and total reading time. There was a positive correlation between the variables total time of reading and errors during reading, and a negative correlation between the variables total time of reading and reading speed. GII obtained differences with negative correlation between the variables total time of reading and reading speed. CONCLUSION: For students with learning disorders, the performance in the variables correlated is altered, interfering in their reading development and, consequently, in their comprehension of the read text.

Cláudia da, Silva; Simone Aparecida, Capellini.

2011-12-01

257

Correlação entre tempo, erro, velocidade e compreensão de leitura em escolares com distúrbio de aprendizagem Correlation between time, error, speed and reading comprehension in students with learning disorders  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Correlacionar as variáveis: erros, tempo, velocidade e compreensão de leitura de escolares com distúrbios de aprendizagem e escolares sem dificuldade de aprendizagem. MÉTODOS: Participaram deste estudo 40 escolares de 8 a 12 anos de idade, de ambos os gêneros, de 2ª a 4ª série do Ensino Fundamental Municipal, divididos em GI: composto por 20 escolares sem dificuldade de aprendizagem e GII: composto por 20 escolares com distúrbio de aprendizagem. Foram utilizados textos selecionados a partir da indicação de professores da 2ª à 4ª série da Rede Municipal de Ensino, para a realização de leitura oral. A compreensão foi realizada por meio de quatro perguntas apresentadas após a leitura do texto, às quais os escolares deveriam responder oralmente. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença entre GI e GII no número de erros, velocidade e compreensão de leitura e tempo total de leitura. A correlação entre tempo total de leitura e erros cometidos durante a leitura foi positiva, e entre as variáveis tempo total de leitura e velocidade de leitura foi negativa. Para o grupo GII, houve diferença com correlação negativa entre as variáveis tempo total de leitura e velocidade de leitura. CONCLUSÃO: Para os escolares com distúrbio de aprendizagem, o desempenho nas variáveis que foram correlacionadas encontra-se alterado interferindo no desenvolvimento em leitura e, consequentemente, na compreensão do texto lido.PURPOSE: To correlate the variables error, time, speed and reading comprehension of students with learning disorders and students without learning disorders. METHODS: The participants of this study were 40 students, aged from 8 to 12 years old, of both genders, from 2nd to 4th grades of municipal elementary education, divided into GI: comprising 20 students without learning disorders, and GII: comprising 20 students with learning disorders. As procedure we used a selection of texts indicated by teachers of 2nd to 4th grades of municipal schools, for an oral reading task. Reading comprehension of the texts was assessed through four questions presented sequentially after reading, which students should answer orally. RESULTS: Differences were found between GI and GII regarding the number of errors, reading speed and comprehension, and total reading time. There was a positive correlation between the variables total time of reading and errors during reading, and a negative correlation between the variables total time of reading and reading speed. GII obtained differences with negative correlation between the variables total time of reading and reading speed. CONCLUSION: For students with learning disorders, the performance in the variables correlated is altered, interfering in their reading development and, consequently, in their comprehension of the read text.

Cláudia da Silva

2011-12-01

258

"I am a scientist": How setting conditions that enhance focused concentration positively relate to student motivation and achievement outcomes in inquiry-based science  

Science.gov (United States)

This research investigated how student social interactions within two approaches to an inquiry-based science curriculum could be related to student motivation and achievement outcomes. This qualitative case study consisted of two cases, Off-Campus and On-Campus, and used ethnographic techniques of participant observation. Research participants included eight eighth grade girls, aged thirteen to fourteen years old. Data sources included formal and informal participant interviews, participant journal reflections, curriculum artifacts including quizzes, worksheets, and student-generated research posters, digital video and audio recordings, photographs, and researcher field notes. Data were transcribed verbatim and coded, then collapsed into emergent themes using NVIVO 9. The results of this research illustrate how setting conditions that promote focused concentration and communicative interactions can be positively related to student motivation and achievement outcomes in inquiry-based science. Participants in the Off-Campus case experienced more frequent states of focused concentration and out performed their peers in the On-Campus case on forty-six percent of classroom assignments. Off-Campus participants also designed and implemented a more cognitively complex research project, provided more in-depth analyses of their research results, and expanded their perceptions of what it means to act like a scientist to a greater extent than participants in the On-Campus case. These results can be understood in relation to Flow Theory. Student interactions that promoted the criteria necessary for initiating flow, which included having clearly defined goals, receiving immediate feedback, and maintaining a balance between challenges and skills, fostered enhanced student motivation and achievement outcomes. This research also illustrates the positive gains in motivation and achievement outcomes that emerge from student experiences with extended time in isolated areas referred to as "hot spots." Implications for science teaching and future research include shifting the current focus in inquiry-based science from a continuum that progresses from teacher-directed to open inquiry experiences to a continuum that also deliberately includes and promotes the necessary criteria for establishing flow. Attending to Flow Theory and incorporating student experiences with flow into inquiry-based science lessons will enhance student motivation and achievement outcomes in science and bolster the success of inquiry-based science.

Ellwood, Robin B.

259

Using Representational Tools to Learn about Complex Systems: A Tale of Two Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Orchestrating inquiry-based science learning in the classroom is a complex undertaking. It requires fitting the culture of the classroom with the teacher's teaching and inquiry practices. To understand the interactions between these variables in relation to student learning, we conducted an investigation in two different classroom settings to…

Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.; Liu, Lei; Gray, Steven; Jordan, Rebecca

2015-01-01

260

Inquiry: A Districtwide Approach to Staff and Student Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Now that federal and state initiatives require school districts to provide job-embedded professional development, the next step is making it happen. This book helps districts define, develop, and implement a systematic inquiry-based process with a laser-like focus on both adult and student learning. This book's inquiry model challenges educators…

Dana, Nancy Fichtman; Thomas, Carol; Boynton, Sylvia

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Closing the science achievement gap for ninth grade English learners through standards- and inquiry-based science instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

In light of the need to close the achievement gap among our culturally and linguistically diverse students, more specifically the Hispanics and the Hispanic English Learners (ELs), the effects of teacher professional development (2 year PD vs. 1 Year PD vs. no PD) on the implementation of a standards-aligned and inquiry-based science curriculum program---the Integrated Coordinated Science for the 21st Century published by It's About Time, Inc. (ICS-IAT)---on the LAUSD ninth graders science scores were examined. Participants included 8,937 9th grade students (7,356 Hispanics). The primary outcome measurement was scaled scores from the California Standard Test (CST) in Integrated Coordinated Science (CST_ICS1). Correlations between California English Language Development Test (CELDT) component subscores (reading, listening and speaking) and CST scores were also examined. Results indicated that the science scores of the students of teachers who participated in two year PD were significantly higher compared to the scores of students of the one year PD group and the control group. The results show that all ethnic groups benefited from two years of teacher PD, except the African American group. Among Hispanics, students classified as IFEP, RFEP and EO gained from the teachers having two years of professional development. But the target population, ELs did not benefit from two years of teacher PD. The correlations between the CELDT and CST_ELA were much higher than the CELDT and CST_ICS1 correlations. This finding validates Abedi's claim (2004) that EL students are disadvantaged because of their language handicap on tests that have a greater language load. Two year PD participation significantly enhanced the accessibility of science to the ninth graders. The essential features in the PD were classroom simulation of all the activities identified in the storyboard with the actual and correct use of needed equipment and materials; creation and presentation of sample or model Chapter Challenges; practice on the use of the storyboard; facilitation of activity debriefs using a debrief template; and the use and practice of identified strategies and scaffoldings targeting ELs. Three innovations developed by the LAUSD-ICS Leadership Team also were introduced in the PD sessions. They are the storyboard, "cartoon analysis" and debrief template.

Estrada, Myrna Hipol

262

Does a Creative Learning Medium Matter? Impact of Low Cost Android Tablets on Elementary Students’ English Comprehension, Perceived Performance and Memory Retention  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Android tablet is a relatively newer and cheaper portal electronic device that can be used as a creative learning tool in elementary school setting compared with laptop. However, the effect of Android tablet on students’ learning performance has been rarely studied. Before encouraging schools to implant Android tablet in teaching process, it should be ensured that tablet should at least do no harm on students’ academic performance. This research aims to investigate the impact of an innovative medium—a low cost Android tablet versus paper—on elementary students’ reading comprehension, perceived comprehension performance, and memory retention, and discuss about the implication of the finding and future directions. Method: In Study 1, 18 fourth-graders and 36 sixth-graders read 2 grade-appropriate passages on either a tablet or paper and completed related comprehension tests, then assessed their perceived performance. In Study 2, 16 first-graders attempted to memorize 25 pictures displayed on tablets while another 12 first-graders attempted to memorize 25 pictures displayed on paper. After 1 minute filler activity, participants were shown 50 pictures and asked to identify those they had attempted to memorize. Results: In Study 1, results showed that fourth-graders comprehended better when reading on paper, whereas sixth-graders scored similarly on both media. An interaction effect between “medium” and “gender” was found in the perceived performance of fourth-graders, with boys reporting higher perceived performance when using tablets. In Study 2, first-graders experienced better memory retention when they viewed pictures on paper. Conclusion: The introduction of Android tablets in the classroom did not have a significant negative impact on sixth-graders’ reading comprehension. However, some caution is required when introducing tablets to first-graders and fourth-graders because of the negative effect found in this study. It should also be noted that the use of tablets may enhance the confidence of grade 4 boys during comprehension tasks, but the confidence of grade 4 girls engaged in the same activities may be deteriorated.

Ibrahim El-Mouelhy

2013-12-01

263

Comprehensive School Reform Models: A Study Guide for Comparing CSR Models (and How Well They Meet Minnesota's Learning Standards).  

Science.gov (United States)

A growing number of schools are exploring the prospect of applying for funding to implement a Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) model. But the process of selecting a CSR model can be complicated because it frequently involves self-study and a review of models to determine which models best meet the needs of the school. This study guide is intended…

St. John, Edward P.; Loescher, Siri; Jacob, Stacy; Cekic, Osman; Kupersmith, Leigh; Musoba, Glenda Droogsma

264

Measures of Reading Comprehension: Do They Measure Different Skills for Children Learning English as a Second Language?  

Science.gov (United States)

The validity of two measures of English reading comprehension was examined across three different groups of English language learners (ELLs; 64 Portuguese, 66 Spanish and 65 Cantonese). All three groups were achieving within the average range in second grade. An exploratory principal components analysis of reading skills was carried out to…

Grant, Amy; Gottardo, Alexandra; Geva, Esther

2012-01-01

265

The Effect of Multimedia Learning Environments on Well-Structured and Ill-Structured Problem-Solving Skills.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigates the effects on various learning outcomes of an inquiry-based multimedia learning environment called Astronomy Village: Investigating the Universe. Students were pre-/post-tested on their conceptual understanding, well-structured problem solving abilities, and ill-structured problem solving abilities. The results of the…

Hong, Namsoo S.; McGee, Steven; Howard, Bruce C.

266

Imitation improves language comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

Humans imitate each other during social interaction. This imitative behavior streamlines social interaction and aids in learning to replicate actions. However, the effect of imitation on action comprehension is unclear. This study investigated whether vocal imitation of an unfamiliar accent improved spoken-language comprehension. Following a pretraining accent comprehension test, participants were assigned to one of six groups. The baseline group received no training, but participants in the other five groups listened to accented sentences, listened to and repeated accented sentences in their own accent, listened to and transcribed accented sentences, listened to and imitated accented sentences, or listened to and imitated accented sentences without being able to hear their own vocalizations. Posttraining measures showed that accent comprehension was most improved for participants who imitated the speaker's accent. These results show that imitation may aid in streamlining interaction by improving spoken-language comprehension under adverse listening conditions. PMID:21135202

Adank, Patti; Hagoort, Peter; Bekkering, Harold

2010-12-01

267

Spectrum of physics comprehension  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The paper presents the results of research on the relationship between self-assessed comprehension of physics lectures and final grades of junior high school students (aged 13-15), high school students (aged 16-18) and physics students at the Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland (aged 21). Students' declared level of comprehension was measured during a physics lecture on a prearranged scale of 1-10 with the use of a personal response system designed for the purpose of this experiment. Through the use of this tool, we obtained about 2000 computer records of students' declared comprehension of a 45 min lecture, which we named ‘the spectrum of comprehension’. In this paper, we present and analyse the correlation between students' declared comprehension of the content presented in the lecture and their final learning results. (paper)

268

Spectrum of physics comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

The paper presents the results of research on the relationship between self-assessed comprehension of physics lectures and final grades of junior high school students (aged 13-15), high school students (aged 16-18) and physics students at the Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland (aged 21). Students' declared level of comprehension was measured during a physics lecture on a prearranged scale of 1-10 with the use of a personal response system designed for the purpose of this experiment. Through the use of this tool, we obtained about 2000 computer records of students' declared comprehension of a 45 min lecture, which we named ‘the spectrum of comprehension’. In this paper, we present and analyse the correlation between students' declared comprehension of the content presented in the lecture and their final learning results.

Blasiak, W.; Godlewska, M.; Rosiek, R.; Wcislo, D.

2012-05-01

269

One Piece of the Whole: Teacher Evaluation as Part of a Comprehensive System for Teaching and Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

As a major policy focus, teacher evaluation is currently the primary tool promoted to improve teaching quality. But evaluation alone is not enough. What will most transform teaching quality--and the profession--is the creation of a larger system that supports teaching and learning through on-the-job evaluation and professional development, and…

Darling-Hammond, Linda

2014-01-01

270

Comprehensive Nuclear Security Strategies for Nuclear Power Plants in Japan Based on the Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Accident and IAEA Recommendations  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

After the Fukushima accident, Japan has improved and strengthened not only safety design but also nuclear security strategies for nuclear power plants (NPPs) to achieve our former prime minister’s statement, “The importance of preparing for unanticipated risks” [1]. In regard to nuclear security for NPPs, the Fukushima accident revealed to us that, in addition to earthquakes and tsunamis, terrorist attacks could also trigger similar severe accidents if adequate nuclear security measures for the NNPs were not prepared. To accomplish our goal, comprehensive nuclear strategies have been carefully developed base on the lessons learned from the Fukushima accident and the following key concepts from IAEA recommendation document: “safety and security harmonization (effective integration)”, “defense in depth”, “risk-based approach”, and “mitigation and minimization of radiological consequence”. (author)

271

Open Distance Learning at Southern Switzerland Universities - A comprehensive and multilingual approach involving universities, teachers, students, and administration  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The new universities of Italian speaking part of Switzerland are developing with high priority a multilingual open distance learning environment. Within the framework of the Virtual Campus Switzerland Programme we started three projects in order to set up a virtual campus with strong local roots and with closed relationships to other universities of Switzerland and of the close foreign countries. The main objective of these activities is to expand the offer of modular courses, to make them av...

Flueckiger, Federico; Mazza, Riccardo

2001-01-01

272

Testing Listening Comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses practical considerations in developing tests of listening comprehension in second language learning with a particular emphasis on the choice of listening passages and assessment tasks. The listening construct is defined as the process of receiving, attending to, and assigning meaning to aural stimuli. Questions should be…

Thompson, Irene

1995-01-01

273

Desempenho no jogo, estratégias de aprendizagem e compreensão na leitura / Achievement in a game, learning strategies and reading comprehension  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Considerando a escassez de instrumentos nacionais de avaliação psicoeducacional e a importância das estratégias de aprendizagem na escolarização formal, este estudo objetivou: a) analisar o potencial do jogo Bingo Melhor Estudante, adaptado para avaliar as percepções das características de um bom es [...] tudante, entre 29 alunos de 4ª série do ensino fundamental de uma escola pública; b) verificar as relações entre o desempenho dos participantes no jogo, num teste de compreensão em leitura e numa escala de estratégias de aprendizagem. Os dados foram coletados mediante o jogo, o teste de compreensão de leitura e a escala e, analisados qualitativa e quantitativamente. O jogo parece útil para a avaliação das percepções das características de um bom estudante. Correlações significativas foram encontradas entre o desempenho no jogo, na escala e no Cloze. Os dados são discutidos à luz da Psicologia Cognitiva baseada na Teoria do Processamento da Informação. Abstract in english Considering the lack of national instruments of psychoeducational evaluation and the importance of learning strategies during formal education, this study had the following objectives: a) to analyze the potential of Bingo The Best Student, an adapted game, to evaluate pupils’ perceptions of the char [...] acteristics of a good student, among 29 fourth grade students of a public school, and b) to examine relationships between participants’ achievement in the game, in a Cloze test, and in a learning strategies scale. Data was collected through a game session, an administration of both a Cloze test and a learning strategy scale. Results were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. It seems that the adapted game is useful to evaluate pupils’ perceptions of characteristics of a good student. Significant correlations were found between participants’ achievement in the game, in the scale and in cloze. Data is discussed within the cognitive psychology based on information processing theory framework.

Maria Aparecida Mezzalira, Gomes; Evely, Boruchovitch.

2005-12-01

274

Real Science, Real Learning: Bridging the Gap Between Scientists, Educators and Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Today as never before, America needs its citizens to be literate in science and technology. Not only must we only inspire a new generation of scientists and engineers and technologists, we must foster a society capable of meeting complex, 21st-century challenges. Unfortunately, the need for creative, flexible thinkers is growing at a time when our young students are lagging in science interest and performance. Over the past 17 years, the JASON Project has worked to link real science and scientists to the classroom. This link provide viable pipeline to creating the next generation scientists and researchers. Ultimately, JASON's mission is to improve the way science is taught by enabling students to learn directly from leading scientists. Through partnerships with agencies such as NOAA and NASA, JASON creates multimedia classroom products based on current scientific research. Broadcasts of science expeditions, hosted by leading researchers, are coupled with classroom materials that include interactive computer-based simulations, video- on-demand, inquiry-based experiments and activities, and print materials for students and teachers. A "gated" Web site hosts online resources and provides a secure platform to network with scientists and other classrooms in a nationwide community of learners. Each curriculum is organized around a specific theme for a comprehensive learning experience. It may be taught as a complete package, or individual components can be selected to teach specific, standards-based concepts. Such thematic units include: Disappearing Wetlands, Mysteries of Earth and Mars, and Monster Storms. All JASON curriculum units are grounded in "inquiry-based learning." The highly interactive curriculum will enable students to access current, real-world scientific research and employ the scientific method through reflection, investigation, identification of problems, sharing of data, and forming and testing hypotheses. JASON specializes in effectively applying technology in science education by designing animated interactive visualizations that promote student understanding of complex scientific concepts and systems (Rieber, 1990, 1996). JASON's experience in utilizing the power of simulation technology has been widely recognized for its effectiveness in exciting and engaging students in science learning by independent evaluations of JASON's multimedia science curriculum (Ba et al., 2001; Goldenberg et al., 2003). The data collected indicates that JASON's science products have had a positive impact on students' science learning, have positively influenced their perceptions of scientists and of becoming scientists, and have helped diverse students grasp a deeper understanding of complex scientific content, concepts and technologies.

Lewis, Y.

2006-05-01

275

Listen, Listen, Listen and Listen: Building a Comprehension Corpus and Making It Comprehensible  

Science.gov (United States)

Listening comprehension input is necessary for language learning and acculturation. One approach to developing listening comprehension skills is through exposure to massive amounts of naturally occurring spoken language input. But exposure to this input is not enough; learners also need to make the comprehension corpus meaningful to their learning

Mordaunt, Owen G.; Olson, Daniel W.

2010-01-01

276

Inquiry Learning with Senior Secondary Students: Yes It Can Be Done  

Science.gov (United States)

This workshop will model for classroom teachers, one way to plan, teach, resource and assess inquiry-based learning which encompasses the guiding principles of a newly gazetted curriculum. The vision of the New Zealand curriculum is to produce "...young people who will be confident, connected, actively involved lifelong learners" (p. 8). This is…

Stotter, Jill; Gillon, Kirsty

2010-01-01

277

Developing Inquiry-Guided Learning in a Research University in the United Kingdom  

Science.gov (United States)

A number of universities in the United Kingdom (UK) have launched institution-wide initiatives recently to embed inquiry and research more firmly into the student experience. Among these, the Centre for Inquiry-based Learning in the Arts and Social Sciences (CILASS) led a five-year development program at The University of Sheffield (TUOS) between…

Levy, Philippa

2012-01-01

278

Metadiscourse Awareness and ESAP Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study examined the effect of explicit instruction about linguistic hedging on the English for Specific Academic Purposes (ESAP) reading comprehension performance of English Language Learning (ELL) university students through an awareness raising task. A reading comprehension test was developed and validated as the pre-test and…

Jalififar, A. R.; Shooshtari, Z. G.

2011-01-01

279

Jogos pedagógicos e responsividade: ludicidade, compreensão leitora e aprendizagem / Educational games and responsiveness: playfulness, reading comprehension and learning  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este artigo, embasado em pressupostos teóricos da teoria bakhtiniana, tem o objetivo de analisar as características das atitudes responsivas de alunos de duas turmas de 1ª ano do Ensino Médio de uma escola pública em Fortaleza, durante a interação com textos em um jogo educativo voltado para o ensin [...] o de leitura em Língua Portuguesa. A análise é feita a partir de dados colhidos em um experimento-piloto que tinha como objetivo analisar a influência do uso de um Objeto de Aprendizagem (OA) no desenvolvimento de estratégias de leitura. Durante a tarefa de ler, verificou-se que o OA, devido à forma como propõe a tarefa e ao uso de tecnologia interativa para a aprendizagem, desenvolveu, nos alunos-usuários do jogo, atitudes responsivas ativas durante a complementação de significados do texto. Abstract in english This article, based on theoretical assumptions of the Bakhtinian theory aims to analyze the characteristics of responsive attitudes of students from two high school classes at a public school in Fortaleza. The research took place during interaction with texts in an educational game for teaching read [...] ing in Portuguese. The analysis is based on data collected in a pilot experiment that aimed to analyze the influence of using a Learning Object (LO) in the development of reading strategies. During the task of reading, it was verified that the LO, due to the way the task is proposed and the use of interactive technology for learning, developed, in the student-users of the game, active responsive attitudes during the complementation of meanings of the text.

Nukácia Meyre Silva, Araújo; Fernanda Rodrigues, Ribeiro; Suellen Fernandes dos, Santos.

2012-06-01

280

Some Key Issues in Creating Inquiry-Based Instructional Practices that Aim at the Understanding of Simple Electric Circuits  

Science.gov (United States)

Many students in secondary schools consider the sciences difficult and unattractive. This applies to physics in particular, a subject in which students attempt to learn and understand numerous theoretical concepts, often without much success. A case in point is the understanding of the concepts current, voltage and resistance in simple electric…

Kock, Zeger-Jan; Taconis, Ruurd; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Gravemeijer, Koeno

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
281

Atenção integral à saúde de adolescentes em situação de trabalho: lições aprendidas Comprehensive health services for working adolescents: lessons learned  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta a experiência do Programa de Saúde do Trabalhador Adolescente (PSTA do Núcleo de Estudos da Saúde do Adolescente da Uerj. Na área assistencial, a equipe multidisciplinar do Núcleo vem desenvolvendo um modelo de atenção integral aos adolescentes trabalhadores, buscando analisar as questões ligadas ao nexo causal entre os agravos à saúde e o processo produtivo em que estão envolvidos. No que se refere à extensão, os profissionais, em associação com alguns adolescentes trabalhadores, vêm desenvolvendo uma metodologia de educação em saúde resgatando a discussão sobre o potencial produtivo de maneira abrangente, abordando temas que vão além da questão do trabalho. Devido ao conhecimento adquirido, a equipe, em parceria com a OIT, recebeu a incumbência de elaborar materiais pedagógicos para a formação e capacitação de recursos humanos sobre saúde e segurança no trabalho infanto-juvenil. Conclui-se que, diante das políticas públicas para a eliminação do trabalho infantil e proteção do trabalhador adolescente, já em vigência em nível nacional, a experiência relatada aponta para a necessidade da criação de programas semelhantes para a garantia dos direitos desta população.This article presents the collected experiences of the Health Program for Adolescent Workers (PSTA at the Center for the Study of Adolescent Health at the State University of Rio de Janeiro. In terms of health services, the multidisciplinary team has developed a model of comprehensive health care for adolescent workers that seeks to analyze the causal links between health problems and the work conditions in which these young people are usually involved. In terms of health outreach, the health professionals have been working with a group of adolescent workers to develop a specific health education methodology. This methodology seeks to promote a broad discussion of the meaning of work in a empowering way that transcends the question of work. Based on this innovative experience, the staff was invited by the ILO to develop materials to train other professionals in the topics of health and occupational safety for adolescent workers. Given the current policies in effect in Brazil to eradicate child labor and protect adolescent workers, the experience of this initiative suggests the need for health programs to guarantee the rights of adolescent workers to occupational health and safety.

Carmen Ildes Rodrigues Fróes Asmus

2005-12-01

282

The Future Of Nontraditional Occupations For Women: A Comprehensive Review Of The Literature And Implications For Workplace Learning And Performance  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The United States entrance into World War II in 1941 has been credited with beginning a large movement of women into the workforce and the commencement of governmental support for women working in nontraditional occupations. However, the beginning of the support for women in the workforce can be traced back to the 1920 federal mandate to create the Women’s Bureau within the United States Department of Labor. The United States Department of Labor Women’s Bureau is the only federal agency mandated to represent the needs of wage-earning women in the public policy process. The workingwomen tradition has continued into modern day and the number of workingwomen continues to increase steadily, however, the number of women entering nontraditional occupations has declined to 4.9 percent from 7.1 percent in 1983. There has been an effort to increase the number of women in nontraditional occupations in order to increase high skill/high wage employment to provide women with the opportunity for self-sufficiency. Women predominately are employed as clerical workers, childcare providers, sales clerks, and in other low skill/low wage employment, which does not lead to self-sufficiency. Workingwomen largely remain in nonprofessional occupations (73%, where NTO gains have been minimal. This study provided the preliminary exploratory of the literature to establish best practice guidelines to encourage women to enter non-traditional occupations (NTO. The major factor identified from literature is career self-efficacy. Career self-efficacy can be increased through: performance accomplishments, vicarious learning, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal. The results of this study reveal that women have perceived challenges to nontraditional occupations, which are rather easily overcome but have been a hindrance to their pursuing nontraditional employment. Challenges include sex-role socialization, discrimination and harassment, transportation and childcare issues, the nontraditional workplace may be hazardous which requires special equipment or gear, extreme weather conditions, and the potential job related injuries. This study has indicated and established a positive correlation for the use of best practice guidelines in career counseling and development in regard to career decision-making. Career development and career counseling for NTO’s requires a set of guidelines. The guidelines for NTO’s should include best practice within the industry or field. Best practice guidelines ensure a common, consistent approach to successfully achieve the highest and best possible outcome. Formal training and education for NTO’s have a prescribed set of best practice guidelines. The best practices guidelines for career counseling and career development programs for women entering NTO’s include: (1 focusing on performance accomplishments, (2 participating in observational learning, (3 attending to emotional arousal, and (4 receiving verbal persuasion and encouragement.

Kenneth Zula

2014-05-01

283

La comprensión lectora de textos científicos en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje / Reading comprehension of scientific texts in the teaching-learning process  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish El desarrollo de habilidades lectoras y el conocimiento de elementos teóricos para la comprensión de los textos científicos es una necesidad en la formación de todo profesional. Para que los futuros egresados puedan comprender esta tipología textual es necesario que cada docente, desde las diferente [...] s asignaturas del currículo escolar, le ofrezcan las herramientas necesarias para interactuar con estos. Por tal motivo este trabajo tiene como objetivo realizar una revisión bibliográfica de los aspectos esenciales acerca de la comprensión lectora y en particular de los textos científicos, sustentada en las concepciones vigotskianas, así como en categorías de la Lingüística Textual que posibilitan la interpretación y procesamiento de la información en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje. Abstract in english The development of literacy skills and knowledge of theoretical elements for the understanding of scientific texts is a need in any professional training. In order that future graduates can understand this textual typology it is necessary that each teacher, from the different subjects of the school [...] curriculum, offers the necessary tools to interact with these texts. For this reason this work is intended to carry out a literature review of the essential aspects of reading comprehension and in particular of scientific texts, supported in the vigotskians conceptions and categories of Textual Linguistics that make possible the interpretation and processing of information in the teaching-learning process.

Elena María, Muñoz Calvo; Lilia María, Muñoz Muñoz; Mercedes Caridad, García González; Luis Alberto, Granado Labrada.

2013-12-01

284

Aprendizaje cooperativo en estrategias de comprensión de la lectura: Experiencia en un curso introductorio de Ingeniería / Cooperative learning and reading comprehension strategies: Experience in an introductory engineering course  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Venezuela | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish RESUMEN Se estudió el efecto de un programa cooperativo de aprendizaje de estrategias cognitivas sobre el desempeño en la comprensión de la lectura en una muestra de 52 estudiantes de un curso introductorio de la carrera de ingeniería. El grupo experimental (n = 26) recibió instrucción en un entorno [...] académico de aprendizaje que siempre era de naturaleza cooperativa. El grupo control (n = 26) recibió los mismos contenidos del programa pero en un entorno que no enfatizaba el trabajo sistemáticamente cooperativo entre los estudiantes. El nivel de comprensión lectora se estimó a través de un pre-test y un post-test en una tarea de ejecución individual en lectura y se evaluó el progreso del aprendizaje durante el desarrollo de la experiencia a través de tres tareas cooperativas de ejecución en díadas. Los datos se analizaron a través de la prueba "t" de Student y ANOVA. Los resultados indican que ambos grupos aumentaron su capacidad para comprender textos después de someterse al programa de estrategias, pero el grupo experimental, que trabajó sistemáticamente en forma cooperativa, obtuvo mejores resultados que el grupo de control, encontrándose diferencias estadísticamente significativas entre la ejecución de ambos grupos en cada una de las tareas y en el post-test. Los resultados sugieren la conveniencia de la regulación de los procesos sociales para organizar grupos cooperativos que formen parte de un programa de enseñanza en estrategias cognitivas cuya finalidad sea mejorar la capacidad de comprensión de la lectura en estudiantes que aspiran ingresar a la educación superior Abstract in english ABSTRACT The effect of a cooperative learning program aimed at improving reading comprehension strategies in a sample of 52 students of an engineering introductory course was studied. The experimental group (n = 26) always received instruction in an academic learning environment, cooperative in natu [...] re. The control group (n = 26) received instruction on the same contents but cooperative work was not regularly emphasized. Individual measures of reading comprehension levels before and after the treatment were obtained. Three additional cooperative tasks were assigned to pairs of students in both groups to evaluate progress during training. Data were analyzed by means of a "t" test and ANOVA. Results indicate that at the end of the program students in both groups had improved their capacity to comprehend texts. However, the experimental group -the one that had worked systematically in a cooperative manner- obtained better results than the control group. Differences in performance between groups in each of the three tasks, as well as in the post-test, are statistically significant. Results suggest the need to promote cooperative groups when the purpose is to teach cognitive strategies to improve reading comprehension in pre-university students

Carlos Enrique, Zerpa.

2002-05-01

285

Necesidades de aprendizaje del especialista de Medicina General Integral sobre la drogodependencia / Learning requirements of the comprehensive general physician about drug dependency  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Las necesidades de aprendizaje o capacitación resultan de contrastar un desempeño ideal o propuesto con el real, bien sea para un individuo o un grupo determinado. Constituyen el punto de partida para la búsqueda de una solución pedagógica, capacitante, a fin de contribuir a la transformación cualit [...] ativa de los servicios de salud, y su oportuna identificación una trascendental herramienta de la Educación Permanente. Objetivo: identificar las necesidades de aprendizaje que, sobre la drogodependencia, tienen los médicos que laboran en los Equipos de Atención Primaria de Salud del municipio Playa. Método: se realizó la identificación de necesidades de aprendizaje mediante un cuestionario escrito, que se aplicó de forma colectiva y anónima a 18 especialistas de MGI seleccionados al azar, que laboran en tres policlínicas del extremo este del municipio Playa. Resultados: se puntualizaron las deficiencias e insuficiencias de los conocimientos y habilidades profesionales sobre el fenómeno de la drogodependencia. Conclusiones: a pesar de que la Atención a la drogodependencia constituye, en el primer nivel de atención, uno de los Programas priorizados, en lo que a Salud Mental se refiere, la mayoría de los especialistas exhibió dificultades en el manejo integral de estos pacientes, persiste un comportamiento cuyo riesgo es, habitualmente, poco explorado, y su evaluación adolece, en ocasiones, de elementos de obligatoria indagación y conocimiento, lo que afecta su calidad y su adecuado seguimiento. Abstract in english The learning or training requirements result from comparing the ideal or proposed performance with the real one of either an individual or a group. They are the starting point to look for an enabling pedagogic solution that contributes to the qualitative transformation of health services and their t [...] imely identification represents a fundamental tool of the continuing education. Objective: to identify the learning requirements of the primary health care team physicians in Playa municipality in terms of drug dependence. Methods: learning requirements were detected through a written questionnaire anonymously and collectively administered to 18 randomly selected family physicians, who worked in three polyclinics of Playa municipality. Results: lack of adequate professional knowledge and skills to deal with drug dependence was shown. Conclusions: in spite of the fact that care to drug dependence is one of the priority mental health programs within the primary health care system, most of the Comprehensive General Medicine specialists did have difficulties in managing these patients, their risky behaviour is persistent and regularly poorly explored, and their evaluation sometimes lacks elements of compulsory inquiry and knowledge, thus affecting the quality of such evaluation and the suitable follow-up of these patients.

Víctor Tadeo, Pérez Martínez.

2012-06-01

286

An Alternative to Language Learner Dependence on L2 Caption-Reading Input for Comprehension of Sitcoms in a Multimedia Learning Environment  

Science.gov (United States)

Most second/foreign language (L2) learners have difficulty understanding listening input because of its implicit and ephemeral nature, and they typically have better reading comprehension than listening comprehension skills. This study examines the effects of using an interactive advance-organizer activity on the DVD video comprehension of L2…

Li, C.-H.

2014-01-01

287

Necesidades de aprendizaje de los especialistas de Medicina General Integral sobre los trastornos del espectro autista / Learning needs on Autism Spectrum Disorders of Specialists in General Comprehensive Medicine  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Introducción: las necesidades de aprendizaje resultan de contrastar un desempeño ideal o propuesto con el real, bien sea para un individuo o un grupo determinado. Constituyen el punto de partida para la búsqueda de una solución pedagógica, capacitante, a fin de contribuir a la transformación cualita [...] tiva de los servicios de salud, y su oportuna identificación una trascendental herramienta de la educación permanente. Objetivo: identificar las necesidades de aprendizaje que sobre los trastornos del espectro autista, tienen los médicos que laboran en los Equipos de Atención Primaria de Salud, del municipio Playa. Método: se aplicó un cuestionario con carácter anónimo, en forma de examen escrito, a 20 especialistas de MGI seleccionados al azar, que laboran en tres policlínicas del extremo Este, del municipio Playa. Resultados: se puntualizaron las deficiencias e insuficiencias de los conocimientos y habilidades profesionales sobre los trastorno del espectro autista, fundamentalmente en lo que respecta a su detección temprana, diagnóstico precoz y escalas de evaluación psicoevolutiva. Conclusiones: a pesar de que los principales problemas de salud de nuestros niños y adolescentes constituyen, en el primer nivel de atención, programas priorizados, sobre todo los que a salud mental infanto-juvenil se refieren, la mayoría de los especialistas exhibió dificultades en el tratamiento integral de estos pacientes, persistiendo el espectro autista como un desorden habitualmente mal explorado y tardíamente diagnosticado, cuya evaluación adolece, en ocasiones, de elementos de obligatoria indagación y conocimiento, lo que afecta el adecuado seguimiento de los menores y su calidad de vida. Abstract in english Introduction: the needs of learning come out when contrasting an ideal or proposed performance with actual one, either for an individual or a particular group. These needs constitute the starting point for finding a pedagogical, qualifying path to contribute to the qualitative transformation of heal [...] th care solutions, and timely identification transcendental lifelong learning tool. Objective: to identify the learning needs on the autism spectrum disorders of doctors working in primary Health care teams in Playa municipality. Methods: an anonymous questionnaire was applied, in form of a written exam, to 20 specialists of General Comprehensive Medicine randomly selected, who work in three polyclinics at east of Playa municipality. Results: the shortcomings and inadequacies of professional knowledge and skills on the autism spectrum are essentially pointed out in regard to early detection, early diagnosis and psycho-evolutionary scales of assessment. Conclusions: although the major health problems of our children and adolescents are included in priority programs of the first level of health care, especially those regarding child and adolescent mental health, difficulties in the comprehensive treatment of these patients were exhibited by most specialists. Autism spectrum keeps on being a usually poorly explored and belatedly diagnosed disorder, whose evaluation sometimes suffers mandatory inquiry elements and knowledge, which affects the proper tracking of children and their quality of life.

Víctor Tadeo, Pérez Martínez; Oscar Antonio, Alfonso Montero.

2013-09-01

288

Mars Rover Model Celebration: Developing Inquiry Based Lesson Plans to Teach Planetary Science In Elementary And Middle School  

Science.gov (United States)

The recent NASA Mars Rover missions capture the imagination of children, as NASA missions have done for decades. The University of Houston is in the process of developing a prototype of a flexible program that offers children an in-depth educational experience culminating in the design and construction of their own model rover. The existing prototype program is called the Mars Rover Model Celebration. It focuses on students, teachers and parents in grades 3-8. Students will design and build a model of a Mars rover to carry out a student selected science mission on the surface of Mars. The model will be a mock-up, constructed at a minimal cost from art supplies. The students will build the models as part of a project on Mars. The students will be given design criteria for a rover and will do basic research on Mars that will determine the objectives and features of their rover. This project may be used either informally as an after school club or youth group activity or formally as part of a class studying general science, earth science, solar system astronomy or robotics, or as a multi-disciplinary unit for a gifted and talented program. The project's unique strength lies in engaging students in the process of spacecraft design and interesting them in aerospace engineering careers. The project is aimed at elementary and secondary education. Not only will these students learn about scientific fields relevant to the mission (space science, physics, geology, robotics, and more), they will gain an appreciation for how this knowledge is used to tackle complex problems. The low cost of the event makes it an ideal enrichment vehicle for low income schools. It provides activities that provide professional development to educators, curricular support resources using NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) content, and provides family opportunities for involvement in K-12 student learning. This paper will describe the development of a detailed set of new 5E lesson plans to support this project as a classroom activity. The challenge of developing interactive learning activities for planetary science will be explored. These lesson plans incorporate state of the art interactive pedagogy and current NASA Planetary Science materials.

Bering, E. A.; Slagle, E.; Nieser, K.; Carlson, C.; Kapral, A.; Dominey, W.; Ramsey, J.; Konstantinidis, I.; James, J.; Sweaney, S.; Mendez, R.

2012-12-01

289

Genetically modified food in perspective: an inquiry-based curriculum to help middle school students make sense of tradeoffs  

Science.gov (United States)

To understand how students learn about science controversy, this study examines students' reasoning about tradeoffs in the context of a technology-enhanced curriculum about genetically modified food. The curriculum was designed and refined based on the Scaffolded Knowledge Integration Framework to help students sort and integrate their initial ideas and those presented in the curriculum. Pre-test and post-test scores from 190 students show that students made significant (p genetically modified food controversy. Analyses of students' final papers, in which they took and defended a position on what type of agricultural practice should be used in their geographical region, showed that students were able to provide evidence both for and against their positions, but were less explicit about how they weighed these tradeoffs. These results provide important insights into students' thinking and have implications for curricular design.

Seethaler, Sherry; Linn, Marcia

290

"Systems Education Experiences: Transforming high school science education through unique partnerships, inquiry based modules, and ocean systems studies"  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent advances in experimental practice, accompanying computational techniques and systems thinking, have advanced biological inquiry. However, current scientific practices do not typically resemble the science taught in schools. As a result, students are missing out on significant opportunities to develop the critical thinking that is needed both in science and many professions. As a potential solution to this ongoing problem in science education, we are using current scientific practices to create classroom activities, packaged in easy-to-use curriculum modules, which promote conceptual development of standards based instructional outcomes. By bringing together students, teachers, researchers, engineers, and programmers we bring needed systems thinking and engaging inquiry experiences to schools throughout Washington State and the nation. Teachers are trained and continuously supported as they learn needed content and methods to bring this new science into their classrooms. Current research on ocean acidification, changing biogeochemical cycles, and the complexity and interdisciplinary nature of ocean systems studies have been translated through our newest curriculum module. Developing this module presented a significant challenge due to the urgency and importance of instilling understanding in high school students as they prepare to make decisions on the highly charged political, economic, and scientific issues of climate change and ocean acidification. Challenges have been overcome through partnerships and through infusing the habits of sustainability, high level thinking, systems modeling, scientific design, and communication. The Next Generation Standards have opened the door for nationwide dissemination of the module as we embark enabling students to think, understand, and contribute to scientific research.

Ludwig, C.; Orellana, M. V.; Baliga, N. S.

2012-12-01

291

Comparison of U.S. and Chinese High-School Physics Teaching and the Need for Active Learning at the College Level  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines the extent to which inquiry-based teaching is practiced in Chinese high-school physics in comparison with US high schools. Data were collected through lesson observations and the administration of a teacher survey (N = 19). Results show that both US and Chinese teachers are well aware of the importance of the elements that are associated with inquiry-based teaching. However, in practice, little inquiry-based teaching was observed in either of the countries by different reasons. US physics lessons often lacked rigorous content development to help students understand physics concepts, while many of the Chinese lessons failed to include opportunities for students to present and test their own thoughts. It is advocated that the implementation of active learning strategies at the college level physics would help the situation in both of the countries.

Tosa, Sachiko; Qian, Lingbo

292

Comprehensive Care  

Science.gov (United States)

... most people with MS, the neurologist functions as the leader of the team. As a specialist in diseases of the ... Most of Your Doctor Visits Learn More The National MS Society is Here to Help Need More ...

293

Open-ended Laboratory Investigations in a High School Physics Course: The difficulties and rewards of implementing inquiry-based learning in a physics lab  

Science.gov (United States)

often closed-ended. The outcomes are known in advance and students replicate procedures recommended by the teacher. Over the years, I have come to appreciate the great opportunities created by allowing students investigative freedom in physics laboratories. I have realized that a laboratory environment in which students are free to conduct investigations using procedures of their own design can provide them with varied and rich opportunities for discovery. This paper describes what open-ended laboratory investigations have added to my high school physics classes. I will provide several examples of open-ended laboratories and discuss the benefits they conferred on students and teacher alike.

Szott, Aaron

2014-01-01

294

Relationship of college student characteristics and inquiry-based geometrical optics instruction to knowledge of image formation with light-ray tracing  

Science.gov (United States)

This study is premised on the fact that student conceptions of optics appear to be unrelated to student characteristics of gender, age, years since high school graduation, or previous academic experiences. This study investigated the relationships between student characteristics and student performance on image formation test items and the changes in student conceptions of optics after an introductory inquiry-based physics course. Data was collected from 39 college students who were involved in an inquiry-based physics course teaching topics of geometrical optics. Student data concerning characteristics and previous experiences with optics and mathematics were collected. Assessment of student understanding of optics knowledge for pinholes, plane mirrors, refraction, and convex lenses was collected with, the Test of Image Formation with Light-Ray Tracing instrument. Total scale and subscale scores representing the optics instrument content were derived from student pretest and posttest responses. The types of knowledge, needed to answer each optics item correctly, were categorized as situational, conceptual, procedural, and strategic knowledge. These types of knowledge were associated with student correct and incorrect responses to each item to explain the existences and changes in student scientific and naive conceptions. Correlation and stepwise multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify the student characteristics and academic experiences that significantly predicted scores on the subscales of the test. The results showed that student experience with calculus was a significant predictor of student performance on the total scale as well as on the refraction subscale of the Test of Image Formation with Light-Ray Tracing. A combination of student age and previous academic experience with precalculus was a significant predictor of student performance on the pretest pinhole subscale. Student characteristic of years since high school graduation significantly predicted the gain in student scores on pinhole and plane-mirror items from the pretest to the posttest with those students who were most recent graduates from high school doing better. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance of the Test of Image Formation with Light-Ray Tracing pinhole scale and individual item changes from the pretest to the posttest resulted in statistically significant mean differences between total scores as well as between various individual pinhole items. There were no significant changes for individual plane-mirror items from pretest to posttest. Results revealed that there is a perceivable relationship between student optics-content knowledge and the types of knowledge required by items. At the pretest, the greatest selection of wrong responses related to the items requiring situational type of knowledge and the fewest selection of wrong responses was relate to the items requiring procedural type of knowledge. Student selection of wrong options for each item revealed the following naive optics conceptions: pinholes do not create reversed images (pretest), size and sharpness of pinhole images are related to the focus of a pinhole camera (pretest and posttest); propagation of light rays are interpreted as being radial rather than directional (pretest and posttest); no conception of image formation and observation for parallel mirrors (pretest and posttest), the place of an image depends on the position of the observer (pretest and posttest), a plane mirror reflects the images of the objects placed at one side of the mirror and the observers who were positioned at the other side of the mirror can see them (pretest and posttest); applying the law of reflection to plane mirrors without considering the variations in angles of incidence and reflection (pretest and posttest), and image observation is confused with the image formation in mirrors placed perpendicular to one another (pretest and posttest). Future research should focus on the acquisition, development, and identification of reliable measures of optics concepts, processe

Isik, Hakan

295

Lessons learned from the first US/Russian Federation joint tabletop exercise to prepare for conducting on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A U.S./Russian Federation Joint Tabletop Exercise took place in Snezhinsk, Russia, from 19 to 24 October 1998 whose objectives were to examine the functioning of an Inspection Team (IT) in a given scenario, to evaluate the strategies and techniques employed by the IT, to identify ambiguous interpretations of treaty provisions that needed clarification, and to confirm the overall utility of tabletop exercises to assist in developing an effective Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime. To achieve these objectives, the United States and Russian Federation (RF) agreed that two exercises would be conducted. The first would be developed by the RF, who would act as controller and as the inspected State Party (ISP), while the United States would play the role of the IT. The roles would be reversed in the second exercise; the United States would develop the scenario and play the ISP, while the RF would play the IT. A joint control team, comprised of members of both the U.S. and RF control teams, agreed on a number of ground rules for the two exercises and established a joint Evaluation Team to evaluate both of the exercises against the stated objectives. To meet time limitations, the scope of this joint exercise needed to be limited. The joint control team decided that each of the two exercises would not go beyond the first 25 days of an on-site inspection (OSI) and that the focus would be on examining the decision-making of the IT as it utilized the various technologies to clarify whether a nuclear test explosion had taken place. Hence, issues such as logistics, restricted access, and activities prior to Point of Entry (POE) would be played only to the extent needed to provide for a realistic context for the exercises' focus on inspection procedures, sensor deployments, and data interpretation. Each of the exercises began at the POE and proceeded with several iterations of negotiations between the IT and ISP, instrument deployments, and data evaluation by the IT. By the end of each of the exercises, each IT had located the site of the underground nuclear explosion (UNE). While this validated the methods employed by each of the ITS, the Evaluation Team noted that each IT employed different search strategies and that each strategy had both advantages and disadvantages. The exercises also highlighted ambiguities in interpretation of certain treaty provisions related to overflights and seismic monitoring. Likewise, a substantial number of lessons were learned relating to radionuclide monitoring and the impact of logistical constraints on successful OSI execution. These lessons are discussed more fully in the body of this report. Notwithstanding the overall positive assessment by the U.S. and RF participants, as well as by the Evaluation Team, that the exercise had met its objectives, there were a variety of areas identified that could be improved in subsequent OSI exercises. Some of these included reexamination of the methods used to convey visual observation data in an exercise; the amount of time compression employed; and the need for better verification of agreements pertaining to the structure, format, and other rules of the exercise. This report summarizes the lessons learned pertaining to both the technical and operational aspects of an OSI as well as to those pertaining to the planning and execution of an OSI exercise. It concludes with comments from the Evaluation Team and proposed next steps for future U.S./RF interactions on CTBT OSIs.

Filarowski, C; Kreek, S; Smith, A; Sweeney, J; Wild, J; Gough, R; Rockett, P; MacLeod, G; Hawkins, W; Wohletz, K; Knowles, S

1999-03-24

296

Help with Teaching Reading Comprehension: Comprehension Instructional Frameworks  

Science.gov (United States)

This article presents five instructional frameworks demonstrated by research as being effective in teaching reading comprehension: (1) The Scaffolded Reading Experience (SRE); (2) Questioning the Author (QtA); (3) Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR); (4) Peer-Assisted Learning Strategies (PALS); and (5) Concept-Oriented Reading Instruction…

Liang, Lauren Aimonette; Dole, Janice A.

2006-01-01

297

Identificación de necesidades de aprendizaje en profesores del Programa de Formación del Médico Integral Comunitario / Identification of the learning needs in professors of the Training Program for the Comprehensive Community Physician  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Objetivo: identificar las necesidades de aprendizaje sobre los contenidos de la asignatura Morfofisiología Humana I que tienen los especialistas de Medicina General Integral que se desempeñan como profesores en el Programa de Formación del Médico Integral Comunitario en el Estado de Táchira durante [...] el curso 2005-2006. Métodos: se encuestaron 58 profesores y 19 asesores de ciencias básicas en el Programa de Formación del Médico Integral Comunitario. Resultados: mostraron que el claustro en su mayoría tiene menos de 40 años, predominó el sexo femenino y todos los profesores son especialistas en Medicina General Integral. Conclusiones: se detectaron necesidades de aprendizaje relacionadas con la autopreparación y en la vinculación de los contenidos con los problemas de salud de la comunidad, fundamentalmente en los temasde Célula y Tejidos básicos. Los profesores reconocen la utilidad del sistema de preparación para impartir la asignatura, pero en su totalidad expresaron la necesidad de que sean utilizadas otras figuras del posgrado en su preparación Abstract in english Objective: to identify the learning needs on the contents of the subject Human Morphophysiology I of the specialists in General Comprehensive Medicine working as professors in the Training Program for the Comprehensive Community Physician in the State of Táchira during the course 2005-2006. Methods: [...] 58 basic sciences professors and 19 advisers of the Training Program for the Comprehensive Community Physician were interviewed. Results: most of the professors were under 40. Females prevailed and all the professors were specialists in General Comprehensive Medicine. Conclusions: learning needs were detected in connection with self-training and with the link of the contents with the health problems of the community, mainly in the topics of cells and basic tissues. The professors recognized the usefulness of the training system to teach the subject, but all of them expressed the necessity to use other posgraduate figures in their training

Orlando, Tomé López; Minerva, Nogueira Sotolongo.

2007-12-01

298

Managing Inquiry-Based Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Though it may seem that classroom management comes naturally to some teachers, upon closer examination you'll probably discover that preparation and adaptation are more important than any innate ability when it comes to successful classroom management. An

Wolfgang, Christie N.

2009-07-01

299

Using the Context, Input, Process, and Product Evaluation Model (CIPP) as a Comprehensive Framework to Guide the Planning, Implementation, and Assessment of Service-Learning Programs  

Science.gov (United States)

Planning, implementing, and assessing a service-learning project can be a complex task because service-learning projects often involve multiple constituencies and aim to meet both the needs of service providers and community partners. In this article, Stufflebeam's Context, Input, Process, and Product (CIPP) evaluation model is recommended as a…

Zhang, Guili; Zeller, Nancy; Griffith, Robin; Metcalf, Debbie; Williams, Jennifer; Shea, Christine; Misulis, Katherine

2011-01-01

300

Research on teaching and learning processes in Earth Sciences education, particularly centred on the awareness on natural risks and hazards  

Science.gov (United States)

This research, main subject of a PhD now in progress, aims to promote the teaching - learning of Earth Sciences in schools of all levels of educations, with the interesting opportunity to experience innovative and effective practices in our local contest, sharing them between all the teachers as a community of practice and all schools as an open laboratory. Based on experiences already acted in other branches of science, we have made a work notebook freely downloadable from the internet, containing an archive of teaching tools, kits, interactive lessons, easy or complex, common and new, developing contents in a vertical approach, which are now shared and used by nearly all the teachers of our Region. The most important is that each teacher, if request, is initially supported in the practices, then trained and, finally, able to carry out the activity on his own. All the materials and kits necessary for carrying out the various activities are freely available at the regional Science Centre and ready to be used, with clear instructions for the use. Traditional educational scientific instruments, trolleys and trays with all the necessary materials, but mostly models and kits, organised in structured paths, sometime a bit naive but highly effective and able to interest, intrigue and involve, are proposed to students of all ages, sometimes in a peer-to-peer exchange of knowledge. Topics are linked to the curricula of Earth Science, such as minerals and rocks, air and water, plate tectonics, volcanoes and Earthquakes, but a special attention has been paid to the topic of natural hazards and risks: dealing with natural hazard and risks, so common in our Country, requires that local communities, starting from schools, become more and more aware of the natural phenomena, beneficial or catastrophic as they are, but always making a direct impact on the quality of life. For example, students can experience how and why landslides and floods occur, by varying on hands-on models natural and physical parameters, the usage of the landscape in known territories and the human impact of the local community , and identify appropriate solutions. The effort is now directed to transform the traditional hands-on methods used to manage instruments and laboratories, in an innovative inquiry-based approach. A quantitative monitoring is now in place to check the results of comprehension, learning and acquiring skills and sensitivity in many classes, even comparing results obtained by traditional practices and by inquiry-based approach. All these data and all the materials are available to all interested parties, thanks to already existing networks, as Unicamearth, ANISN- National Associations of Science Teachers, and IGEO, International Geoscience Education Org- promoter of IESO.

Occhipinti, Susanna

2013-04-01

 
 
 
 
301

The effects of an inquiry-based earth science course on the spatial thinking of pre-service elementary teacher education students  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the effectiveness of two geography courses at improving student spatial thinking skills. Spatial thinking is an important cognitive skill in the sciences and everyday life. A taxonomy of spatial thinking was constructed by Gersmehl (2008) in geography education which included core modes assessed in this study: comparison, region, transition, analogy, pattern, and association. Two additional modes related to space over time, change and movement, were also assessed. The central research question in this study is: What are the effects of a pre-service teacher education earth science content course (Geography 1900) that is conceptually designed and inquiry-based on the spatial thinking of university students compared to the Geography 1020 course that follows a lecture format with an atlas study component? The six sub-questions to this central question were: (1) What spatial thinking modes are embedded in the Geography 1900 course based on the Gersmehl (2008) classification of modes of spatial thinking? (2) What modes of spatial thinking do pre-service elementary education students exhibit prior to instruction in Geography 1900 and 1020? (3) What changes occur in spatial thinking and spatial skills as a result of enrolling in and completing a conceptually based, inquiry course (Geography 1900) that has embedded clearly identifiable spatial tasks based on Gersmehl's classification? (4) What are the effects of Geography 1900 on the modes of spatial thinking that students apply at the completion of the course? (5) What modes of spatial thinking do students transfer from the classroom to the outdoors as they move about campus? (6) Are there differences in spatial thinking between the Geography 1900 population and the Geography 1020 comparison sample of students that received a different course treatment? The research used a mixed methods approach with both quantitative and qualitative information. Statistically significant changes were observed in the use of spatial constructs and concepts by students in each of the course treatments that were compared. Students were also observed to apply spatial modes outside the classroom that represented the spatial thinking within the new context of the university environment as they observed and described the landscape.

Weakley, Kevin Douglas

302

A Review of Adventure Learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Adventure learning (AL is an approach for the design of digitally-enhanced teaching and learning environments driven by a framework of guidelines grounded on experiential and inquiry-based education. The purpose of this paper is to review the adventure learning literature and to describe the status quo of the practice by identifying the current knowledge, misconceptions, and future opportunities in adventure learning. Specifically, the authors present an integrative analysis of the adventure learning literature, identify knowledge gaps, present future research directions, and discuss research methods and approaches that may improve the AL approach.The authors engaged in a systematic search strategy to identify adventure learning studies then applied a set of criteria to decide whether to include or exclude each study. Results from the systematic review were combined, analyzed, and critiqued inductively using the constant comparative method and weaved together using the qualitative metasynthesis approach.Results indicate the appeal and promise of the adventure learning approach. Nevertheless, the authors recommend further investigation of the approach. Along with studies that investigate learning outcomes, aspects of the AL approach that are engaging, and the nature of expert-learner collaboration, future adventure learning projects that focus on higher education and are (a small and (b diverse can yield significant knowledge into adventure learning. Research and design in this area will benefit by taking an activity theory and design-based research perspective.

George Veletsianos

2009-12-01

303

Learning in Nature  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper traces the evolution of a theory of learning in nature in order to explain how people learn in natural settings. The intellectual roots of the theory in informal learning, cognition, affective development, experiential and meaningful learning are described and the synthesis into a comprehensive theory of learning in nature are…

Brody, Michael

2005-01-01

304

The Development of Comprehension and Reading-Related Skills in Children Learning English as an Additional Language and Their Monolingual, English-Speaking Peers  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: A significant number of pupils in UK schools learn English as an additional language (EAL). Relative differences between the educational attainment of this group and monolingual, English-speaking pupils call for an exploration of the literacy needs of EAL learners. Aims: This study explores the developmental progression of reading and…

Burgoyne, K.; Whiteley, H. E.; Hutchinson, J. M.

2011-01-01

305

Learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

"A comprehensive introduction to psychology, this work will find a home in a broad range of library collections. Each topical entry includes notes on the type of psychology and field of study covered, a list of key concepts related to the essay, and an annotated list of sources for further study. Entries on mental disorders include sidebars with the characteristic criteria for that diagnosis. High school students, undergraduates, and others will find a wealth of information in this useful set...

Odum, Amy Laurie

2003-01-01

306

Propuesta metodológica para la investigación comprensiva: interacciones comunicativas en un entorno virtual de aprendizaje / A methodological proposal for comprehensive research: Communicative interactions in a virtual learning environment / Proposta metodológica para a investigação compreensiva: interações comunicativas num meio virtual de aprendizagem  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: Spanish Abstract in portuguese Para compreender as interações comunicativas que surgem nas relações dos estudantes num Meio Virtual de Aprendizagem, desenvolveu-se o projeto "interações comunicativas num Meio Virtual de Aprendizagem" emoldurado na investigação compreensiva, a qual faz referência ao entrelaçado de decisões e atuaç [...] ões, de ordem epistemológico e metodológico, que permitem aceder compreensivamente ao sentido das práticas de vida. Partindo do enfoque etnometodológico se apresenta a obtenção dos dados, a rota de análise e os aspectos éticos. A investigação se realizou na Universidade de Medellín com estudantes da matéria eletiva "TIC" sob metodología blended em 2009-1. Abstract in spanish Para comprender las interacciones comunicativas que surgen en las relaciones de los estudiantes en un entorno virtual de aprendizaje, se desarrolló el proyecto "Interacciones comunicativas en un entorno virtual de aprendizaje" enmarcado en la investigación comprensiva, la cual hace referencia al ent [...] ramado de decisiones y actuaciones, de orden epistemológico y metodológico, que permiten acceder comprensivamente al sentido de las prácticas de vida. Partiendo del enfoque etnometodológico se presenta la obtención de los datos, la ruta de análisis y los aspectos éticos. La investigación se realizó en la Universidad de Medellín con estudiantes de la asignatura electiva "TIC" bajo metodología blended en 2009-1. Abstract in english To understand the communicative interactions that come up in the relationships of students in a virtual learning environment, the project "Communicative interactions in a virtual learning environment" was developed within a comprehensive research framework that refers to the structure of epistemolog [...] ical and methodological decisions and acts that allows a person to comprehensively access to the sense of life practices. Departing from an etnomethodological focus, the data obtaining, the analysis route and the ethical aspects are introduced. The research was made at Universidad de Medellín with students of the elective subject "TIC" under the blended method in the first semester of 2009-1.

Claudia, Vásquez Lopera; Sandra, Arango Vásquez.

2011-07-01

307

Stagecast Creator™ and Webct™: An integrated use of computer programming and a virtual learning environment for developing modelling skills  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper reports on an effort to use Stagecast Creator™ as a means for developing modelling skills among undergraduate students taking an introductory course in science that took place in a virtual learning environment (WebCT™). An inquiry-based curriculum was implemented, which guided students working in small groups to collect and study moon observations and construct a series of successive models of the moon phases using Stagecast Creator™. Students' reflective journals and reports...

Nicolaou, Christiana Th; Constantinou, Constantinos

2005-01-01

308

Comprehensive Clinical Audits of Diagnostic Radiology Practices: A Tool for Quality Improvement. Quality Assurance Audit for Diagnostic Radiology Improvement and Learning (QUAADRIL)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Interest in quality assurance processes and quality improvement in diagnostic radiology is being driven by a number of factors. These include the high cost and complexity of radiological equipment, acknowledgement of the possibility of increasing doses to patients, and the importance of radiological diagnosis to patient management within the health care environment. To acknowledge these interests, clinical audits have been introduced and, in Europe, mandated under a European Directive (Council Directive 97/47/EURATOM). Comprehensive clinical audits focus on clinical management and infrastructure, patient related and technical procedures, and education and research. This publication includes a structured set of standards appropriate for diagnostic radiology, an audit guide to their clinical review, and data collection sheets for the rapid production of reports in audit situations. It will be a useful guide for diagnostic radiology facilities wishing to improve their service to patients through timely diagnosis with minimal radiation dose.

309

Lessons learned from the first U.S./Russian Federation joint tabletop exercise to prepare for conducting on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A U.S./Russian Federation Joint Tabletop Exercise took place in Snezhinsk, Russia, from 19 to 24 October 1998, whose objectives were the following: (1) To simulate the actions of the Inspection Team (IT), including interactions with the inspected State Party (ISP), in order to examine different ways the United States and Russian Federation (RF) approach inspections and develop appropriate recommendations for the international community. (2) To identify ambiguities and contradictions in the interpretation of Treaty and Protocol provisions that might become apparent in the course of an inspection and that need clarification in connection with the development of Operational Manuals and on-site inspection (OSI) infrastructure. (3) To confirm the efficacy of using bilateral tabletop exercises to assist in developing an effective Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime. (4) To identify strong and weak points in the preparation and implementation methods of such exercises for the purpose of further improving possible future exercises.

Filarowski, C; Gough, R; Hawkins, W; Knowles, S; Kreek, S; MacLeod, G; Rockett, P; Smith, A; Sweeney, J; Wild, J; Wohletz, K

1999-03-24

310

Reflection of light: a teaching and learning activity with primary school children  

Science.gov (United States)

Light and its properties is a subject that strongly attracts children from very early ages. Inquiry-based science teaching although addressed in the curricula of various countries and suggested by some international organizations, continues to have a very low expression in the teaching practices of the majority of primary school teachers and preschool educators. In this sense, we have organized several continuing training courses in order to encourage these education professionals to promote this approach to science teaching in the classroom, with the children. As part of this training process, teachers and educators put into practice, with their students, the didactic knowledge they have developed, in order to become aware of the virtues of an inquiry-based approach to children's learning. Through the implementation of the "Reflection of Light" activity, in this article, we intend to analyze the process of teaching and learning promoted in a 3rd grade class by one of the teachers participating in the training courses. The analysis of the process reveals that the teacher in training carried out a successful didactic integration of the inquiry-based science teaching approach recommended for children. In turn, the children also developed a good understanding of the contents of the activity explored in the classroom.

Varela, Paulo; Abreu, Cátia; Costa, Manuel F. M.

2014-08-01

311

Genetically Modified Food in Perspective: An Inquiry-Based Curriculum to Help Middle School Students Make Sense of Tradeoffs. Research Report  

Science.gov (United States)

To understand how students learn about science controversy, this study examines students' reasoning about tradeoffs in the context of a technology-enhanced curriculum about genetically modified food. The curriculum was designed and refined based on the Scaffolded Knowledge Integration Framework to help students sort and integrate their initial…

Seethaler, Sherry; Linn, Marcia

2004-01-01

312

Students' Conceptions of Sound Waves Resulting from the Enactment of a New Technology-Enhanced Inquiry-Based Curriculum on Urban Bird Communication  

Science.gov (United States)

The emerging field of urban ecology has the potential to engage urban youth in the practices of scientists by studying a locally relevant environmental problem. To this end, we are developing curriculum modules designed to engage students in learning science through the use of emerging information technology. In this paper, we describe the impact…

Houle, Meredith E.; Barnett, G. Michael

2008-01-01

313

The Importance of Metacognitive Reading Strategy Awareness in Reading Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Metacognitive reading strategy awareness plays a significant role in reading comprehension and educational process. In spite of its importance, metacognitive strategy has long been the ignored skill in English language teaching, research, learning, and assessment. This lack of good metacognitive reading strategy skill is exacerbated by the central role of reading comprehension in education success. One solution to the problem of poor reading comprehension is the learning of metacognitive reading strategy skills. Metacognitive reading strategy ability needs to be focused in language learning and teaching. The present study is an attempt to find out whether "meta-cognitive reading strategy awareness" enhances EFL students’ reading comprehension. Furthermore, it attempts to detect the relationship between metacognitive reading strategy awareness and reading comprehension. This paper focuses on the four main issues. First, it discusses the definition of metacognitive reading strategy, the significance of metacognitive reading strategy. Second, it reviews the process of metacognitive reading strategy. Third, definition of reading comprehension and different models of reading comprehension are reviewed. Fourth, the relationship between metacognitive reading strategy and reading comprehension will be discussed. Findings based on the review of the literature along with analysis of the data are of great significance and can be advantageous to improve EFL learners' metacognitive reading comprehension skill. Metacognitive reading comprehension skill has a positive effect on learning a second language and learners can gain the skills they need for effective communication in English.

Mohammad Reza Ahmadi

2013-09-01

314

Inducing comprehension in the bilateral poor reader.  

Science.gov (United States)

The comprehension effects of changes in the spatial configuration of prose were examined with reading disabled children who differed in laterality preference. Specifically, 24 learning disabled boys were presented with prose materials in a standard, phrased, and backward (right to left) fashion. Measures of comprehension showed that text in the phrased and backward conditions differentially facilitated comprehension for the more bilateral subjects but had little effect on more right lateralized subjects. The results were discussed in terms of the instructional implications of alterations in the visual-spatial arrangement of prose materials for bilateral readers. PMID:3654093

Rattan, G; Dean, R S; Lowrie, R E

1987-09-01

315

ESL Yemeni Learners’ Perceptions and Perspectives on the Importance of Learning Stress and Intonation as Supra-Segmental Features of Speech and Sound Attributes to the Process of Comprehension: A Survey Study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Purposes: To obtain Yemeni learners’ of English language perceptions and perspectives on the importance of teaching/ learning stress and intonation as supra-segmental features of speech and sound-attributes to the process of comprehension and to identify the reasons of neglecting/ avoiding the use of stress and intonation when attempting to communicate in English. Methods: The participants of this survey-study are 140 students who were enrolled in the University of IBB, Yemen as bachelor level students, in the departments of English, faculties of Arts and Education (first year: 10 Arts, 10 Education, Second year: 20 Arts, 20 Education, third year: 20 Arts, 20 Education, and fourth year: 20 Arts, 20 Education. In all levels, there was a balanced number of gender. A researcher-made questionnaire consisting of 23 items was given to the 140 participants to achieve the above objectives of the study. Results: Descriptive statistics (frequency and percentages of the 17th version of SPSS was used to analyse the collected data. The statistical results indicated the following: 1 more than 50% of the participating students have negative attitudes towards the use of super-segmental features, 2 less than 50% have incompetent level and/or limited knowledge of the functions of suprasegmental features of speech, 3 the application of these features is limited to the classroom activities, 4 the reasons behind neglecting such features by order are: educational system, students, teachers and social situation, 5 social and personal reasons are the most discouraging factors for not applying such features of speech, and 6 frequent evaluation, labs, teachers and classmates, and society members are the proposed encouraging factors by order. Conclusions: Accentual function is not the only function of stress and intonation that relate them phonologically to the learned/acquired language. Instead, this phonological relationship is extended to semantic, morphological and syntactic functions. Because of this, it is concluded that most of the participating students are incompetent, uninterested, yet not encouraged to use such supra-segmental features of speech. Learning environment that would support the proper learning and use of these features must be considered by policy-makers and required by English language teachers.

Ahmed M. S. Alduais

2013-07-01

316

Evaluating the Learning in Learning Objects  

Science.gov (United States)

A comprehensive review of the literature on the evaluation of learning objects revealed a number of problem areas, including emphasizing technology ahead of learning, an absence of reliability and validity estimates, over-reliance on informal descriptive data, a tendency to embrace general impressions of learning objects rather than focusing on…

Kay, Robin H.; Knaack, Liesel

2007-01-01

317

Stagecast creator tm and webct tm: An integrated use of computer programming and a virtual learning environment for developing modelling skills  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper reports on an effort to use Stagecast CreatorTM as a means for developing modelling skills among undergraduate students taking an introductory course in science that took place in a virtual learning environment (WebCTTM). An inquiry-based curriculum was implemented, which guided students working in small groups to collect and study moon observations and construct a series of successive models of the moon phases using Stagecast CreatorTM. Students' reflective journals and reports of...

Nicolaou, Christiana; Constantinou, Constantinos

2005-01-01

318

Constraint Programming for Context Comprehension  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

A close similarity is demonstrated between context comprehension, such as discourse analysis, and constraint programming. The constraint store takes the role of a growing knowledge base learned throughout the discourse, and a suitable con- straint solver does the job of incorporating new pieces of knowledge. The language of Constraint Handling Rules, CHR, is suggested for defining constraint solvers that reflect “world knowledge” for the given domain, and driver algorithms may be ex- pressed in Prolog or additional rules of CHR. It is argued that this way of doing context comprehension is an instance of abductive reasoning. The approach fits with possible worlds semantics that allows both standard first-order and non-monotonic semantics.

Christiansen, Henning

2014-01-01

319

Conversational Implicature in English Listening Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Some English learners find it hard to understand a sentence when they are given a piece of listening material although they have a good master of vocabulary and grammatical rules. In order to improve the ability of listening comprehension, it’s necessary for English learners to introduce some basic Pragmatics theories. Grice’s Conversational Implicature Theory is one of the most important contents of Pragmatics. The theory focuses its attention on the phenomenon of conveying more than what is said. Therefore, the English listeners can and should master the theory of Grice’s Conversational Implicature, learn how to infer implicature to guide their learning and lead in such theories in listening comprehension. This thesis attempts to examin the relationship between them and state the roles played by the conversational implicature in listening comprehension.

Haiyan Wang

2011-09-01

320

Kernel adaptive filtering a comprehensive introduction  

CERN Document Server

Online learning from a signal processing perspective There is increased interest in kernel learning algorithms in neural networks and a growing need for nonlinear adaptive algorithms in advanced signal processing, communications, and controls. Kernel Adaptive Filtering is the first book to present a comprehensive, unifying introduction to online learning algorithms in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces. Based on research being conducted in the Computational Neuro-Engineering Laboratory at the University of Florida and in the Cognitive Systems Laboratory at McMaster University, O

Liu, Weifeng; Haykin, Simon

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
321

Web Based Application for Reading Comprehension Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The use of the web in languages learning has been developed at very high speed these last years. Thus, we are witnessing many research and development projects set in universities and distance learning programs. However, the interest in research related to writing competence remains relatively low. Our proposed research examines the use of the web for studying English as a second foreign language at an Algerian university. One focus is on pedagogy: therefore, a major part of our research is on developing, evaluating, and analyzing writing comprehension activities, and then composing activities into a curriculum. The article starts with the presentation of language skills and reading comprehension. It then presents our approach of the use of the web for learning English as a second language. Finally a learner evaluation methodology is presented. The article ends with the conclusion and future trends.

Samir Zidat

2011-05-01

322

Translating advances in reading comprehension research to educational practice  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The authors review five major findings in reading comprehension and their implications for educational practice. First, research suggests that comprehension skills are separable from decodingprocesses and important at early ages, suggesting that comprehension skills should be targeted early, even before the child learns to read. Second, there is an important distinction between readingprocesses and products, as well as their causal relationship: processes lead to certain products. Hence, inst...

Mcnamara, Danielle S.; Kendeou, Panayiota

2011-01-01

323

Explicit Code and Comprehension Instruction for English Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

Explicit code and comprehension instruction is important for English learners (ELs), and several key findings from research on young ELs learning to read initially in English can offer guidelines for developing effective code-based instruction for these children. The authors of this column address comprehension instruction for ELs, suggesting…

Manyak, Patrick C.; Bauer, Eurydice B.

2008-01-01

324

Comprehension of Discourse Markers and Reading Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available According to many research findings, the presence of discourse markers (DMs enhances readers’ comprehension of the texts they read. However, there is a paucity of research on the relationship between knowledge of DMs and reading comprehension (RC and the present study explores the relationship between them. Knowledge of DMs is measured through examining the subjects’ recognition of DMs. To carry out the research, 86 Iranian sophomores majoring in English took a test of DMs alongside a RC test. The correlation between their scores on the two tests was calculated using the software SPSS. The analysis revealed that there is high correlation between the students’ knowledge of DMs (i.e., their correct recognition of discourse markers and their reading comprehension (rxy = .71. Moreover, high correlation carries a strong regression power and scores on a test of DMs could be a good indicator of the test takers’ reading ability.

Mohamad Khatib

2011-08-01

325

Comprehension Processes in Reading.  

Science.gov (United States)

Focusing on the process of reading comprehension, this book contains chapters on some central topics relevant to understanding the processes associated with comprehending text. The articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "Comprehension Processes: Introduction" (K. Rayner); (2) "The Role of Meaning in Word Recognition" (D. A. Balota); (3)…

Balota, D. A., Ed.; And Others

326

Comprehensive Involutive Systems  

CERN Document Server

In this paper, we consider parametric ideals and introduce a notion of comprehensive involutive system. This notion plays the same role in theory of involutive bases as the notion of comprehensive Groebner system in theory of Groebner bases. Given a parametric ideal, the space of parameters is decomposed into a finite set of cells. Each cell yields the corresponding involutive basis of the ideal for the values of parameters in that cell. Using the Gerdt-Blinkov algorithm for computing involutive bases and also the Montes algorithm for computing comprehensive Groebner systems, we present an algorithm for construction of comprehensive involutive systems. The proposed algorithm has been implemented in Maple, and we provide an illustrative example showing the step-by-step construction of comprehensive involutive system by our algorithm.

Gerdt, Vladimir

2012-01-01

327

Listening Comprehension: Textual, Contextual, Cognitive, and Affective Considerations.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated the following areas: (1) the possible effects of a written textual advance organizer or contextual visual aid on foreign language (Spanish) listening comprehension; (2) variations or interactions by learning modality preference of the learner; and (3) effects attributable to either learner learning modality or foreign…

Dixon, Richard

328

Improving text comprehension: scaffolding adolescents into strategic reading.  

Science.gov (United States)

Understanding and learning from academic texts involves purposeful, strategic reading. Adolescent readers, particularly poor readers, benefit from explicit instruction in text comprehension strategies, such as text preview, summarization, and comprehension monitoring, as part of a comprehensive reading program. However, strategies are difficult to teach within subject area lessons where content instruction must take primacy. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have the expertise and service delivery options to support middle and high school students in learning to use comprehension strategies in their academic reading and learning. This article presents the research evidence on what strategies to teach and how best to teach them, including the use of explicit instruction, spoken interactions around text, cognitive modeling, peer learning, classroom connections, and disciplinary literacy. The article focuses on how to move comprehension strategies from being teaching tools of the SLP to becoming learning tools of the student. SLPs can provide the instruction and support needed for students to learn and apply of this important component of academic reading. PMID:25633141

Ukrainetz, Teresa A

2015-02-01

329

Early comprehension of the Spanish plural.  

Science.gov (United States)

Understanding how linguistic cues map to the environment is crucial for early language comprehension and may provide a way for bootstrapping and learning words. Research has suggested that learning how plural syntax maps to the perceptual environment may show a trajectory in which children first learn surrounding cues (verbs, modifiers) before a full mastery of the noun morpheme alone. The Spanish plural system of simple codas, dominated by one allomorph -s, and with redundant agreement markers, may facilitate early understanding of how plural linguistic cues map to novel referents. Two-year-old Mexican children correctly identified multiple novel object referents when multiple verbal cues in a phrase indicated plurality as well as in instances when the noun morphology in novel nouns was the only indicator of plurality. These results demonstrate Spanish-speaking children's ability to use plural noun inflectional morphology to infer novel word referents which may have implications for their word learning. PMID:24560441

Arias-Trejo, Natalia; Cantrell, Lisa M; Smith, Linda B; Alva Canto, Elda A

2014-11-01

330

Propuesta de ejercicios interactivos para la autoevaluación del aprendizaje en la asignatura Medicina General Integral / A proposal of interactive exercises for the self-assessment of learning in the subject Comprehensive General Medicine  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Antecedentes: en los exámenes teóricos realizados en Medicina es frecuente la utilización de las preguntas de ensayo, y en menor medida, las empleadas en el instrumento de evaluación teórico estatal, las que exigen del entrenamiento previo del estudiante, aún insuficiente. Métodos: en la Universidad [...] de Ciencias Médicas de Villa Clara, de enero a junio del 2012, se realizó un estudio para diseñar un sistema de ejercicios interactivos para la autoevaluación de los contenidos de la asignatura Medicina General Integral de sexto año. Resultados: la metodología utilizada permitió el conocimiento sobre el estado de la problemática planteada, por lo que se confeccionaron ejercicios con el programa Hot Potatoes versión 5, a partir del diseño de diferentes preguntas teniendo en cuenta los objetivos de la asignatura. El material cuenta con 29 ejercicios. Conclusiones: con el sistema de ejercicios el estudiante puede construir su aprendizaje mediante el esfuerzo y su implicación activa en el proceso, y entrenarse en los diferentes tipos de preguntas que se emplean en el instrumento de evaluación teórica estatal. Abstract in english Background: the theoretical examinations conducted in medicine undergraduate studies often include the use of essay questions, and to a lesser extent, of those used in the state theoretical assessment instrument, requiring the student's previous training, which is still insufficient. Methods: a stud [...] y was conducted at the Medical University of Villa Clara, from January to June 2012, in order to design a system of interactive exercises for the self-assessment of the contents in the subject Comprehensive General Medicine, in sixth year. Results: the methodology used allowed the understanding of the problem studied; thus, exercises were devised with the program Hot Potatoes, version 5, through the design of different questions taking into account the objectives of the subject. The material has 29 exercises. Conclusions: with the system of exercises, the students can build their learning through their effort and active involvement in the process, training themselves in the different types of questions used in the state theoretical assessment instrument.

José Carlos, Casas Blanco; Regla Lisbel, López Guerra; Mabel, Rodríguez Hernández.

2013-08-01

331

Calibration of Comprehension: Research and Implications for Education and Instruction.  

Science.gov (United States)

The ability to accurately evaluate one's understanding of text information is critical for optimum learning to take place. One widely used paradigm for examining the accuracy of individuals' self-assessed comprehension has been termed calibration of comprehension. In this paradigm, students read a passage and are asked to make predictions about their future performance on a comprehension test. Calibration of comprehension is the relation between students' confidence and performance or between predicted and actual performance. In the present paper we review research on calibration of comprehension, examining a number of variables that have been found to influence calibration ability. In the first three sections of our paper we focus on the effects of individual, task, and text variables on students' calibration of comprehension. In the final section, we discuss implications of research on calibration for education and instruction. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9769183

Lin; Zabrucky

1998-10-01

332

KidSmart© in Formal and Semi-formal Practices: Playful Learning Opportunities?  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This paper reports on a study exploring the outcomes from young children’s play with digital technology in formal and semi-formal learning practices. The study is part of a bigger project being conducted by IBM KidSmart Early Learning Program, Denmark, the Danish Agency of Culture, 13 kindergartens in Varde municipality, Denmark, Varde Library, Denmark, and Aalborg University, Denmark. The project is concerned with preparing young children to enter the digital world and to bridge the digital divide. In doing so, there is a specific interest in how digital technology can foster integration, language and concept development through an inquiry-based mode of play, learning, and interaction. This study applies a human-centred design approach to learning and play in order to investigate affordances and constraints that emerge from younger children’s engagement with digital technology, particularly focusing on the aspects of agency and playfulness.

Petersson, Eva; Borum, Nanna

2014-01-01

333

Focusing on the Processes of Science Using Inquiry-oriented Astronomy Labs for Learning Astronomy  

Science.gov (United States)

The U.S. National Science Education Standards provide guidelines for teaching science through inquiry, where students actively develop their understanding of science by combining scientific knowledge with reasoning and thinking skills. Inquiry activities include reading scientific literature, generating hypotheses, designing and carrying out investigations, interpreting data, and formulating conclusions. Inquiry-based instruction emphasizes questions, evidence, and explanation, the essential features of inquiry. We present two projects designed to develop learning materials for laboratory experiences in an undergraduate astronomy course. First, we engage students in inquiry-based learning by using "mini-journal” articles that follow the format of a scientific journal article, including a title, authors, abstract, introduction, methods, results, discussion and citations to peer-reviewed literature. The mini-journal provides a scaffold and serves as a springboard for students to develop and carry out their own follow-up investigation. They then present their findings in the form of their own mini-journal. This mini-journal format more directly reflects and encourages scientific practice. We use this technique in both introductory and upper level courses. The second project develops 3D virtual reality environments to help students interact with scientific constructs, and the use of collaborative learning tools to motivate student activity, deepen understanding and support knowledge building.

Speck, Angela; Ruzhitskaya, L.; Whittington, A.; Witzig, S.

2010-01-01

334

Exploring the Effects of the Computational Experiment Approach to the Epistemic Beliefs, the Motivation, the Use of Modeling Indicators and Conceptual Understanding in Three Different Computational Learning Environments  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Contemporary teaching and learning approaches expect students -at any level of education- to be active producers of knowledge. This leads to the need for creation of instructional strategies, learning environments and tasks that can offer students opportunities for active learning. Research argues that one of the most meaningful and engaging forms of active learning is modelling, that is using computational environments to build representational and epistemological models of the phenomena that are being studied, following the essential features of inquiry based science and mathematics education. The aim of the article is to investigate the impact of the computational experiment approach on: a students’ learning performance, b the use of modelling indicators c the motives and d the scientific epistemic beliefs. K-12 students in a Greek school participated in the experiment and the methodology of the computational experiment was implemented using three software tools, namely: the Modellus software, the Interactive Physics (IP software and the Easy Java Simulator Software (EJS, in order to study the concept of the simple harmonic motion (equations of motion, dynamics and energy consideration. All applications were developed using the essential features of inquiry based science education in the framework of the computational approach methodology and the model was considered as the fundamental instruction unit. The findings suggest that the inquiry based computational experiment using Easy Java Simulator(EJS is more effective in enhancing the conceptual understanding of students as well as the use of modelling indicators, and these results may have implications for the effectiveness of the computational experiment methodology when it is combined with the EJS Tools.

Sarantos Psycharis

2013-01-01

335

Banter: An Alternative Strategy in Creating a Learning Community  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this qualitative study we investigated the role of bantering in creating a learning community for science education. The curriculum was centered on a technology-integrated Project Based Approach (PBA. We examined the pattern of in-service teachers’ interaction with such a learning environment and perceptions of their future instructional practices that result from collaborative reflection on the use of Banter throughout the semester. The findings suggest that exposure to bantering interaction not only helped the in-service teachers to make decisions about the scientific issues they will face in the future but also helped to construct a more inquiry based understanding of the issues in science teaching. Methodological limits and possibilities were explored through the use of data analysis software such as Inspiration and NVivo.

Sumita Bhattacharyya

2013-03-01

336

Semantic Webbing, Semantic-Pictorial Webbing and Standard Basal Teaching Techniques: A Comparison of Three Strategies To Enhance Learning and Memory of a Reading Comprehension Task in the Fourth Grade Classroom.  

Science.gov (United States)

A study analyzed the relative effectiveness of three teaching strategies for enhancing vocabulary and reading comprehension. Sixty-eight students in three fourth-grade classrooms in a suburban southwestern public school were presented with a vocabulary lesson on weather from the reading text according to one of the following strategies: (1) basal…

McCarthy-Tucker, Sherri

337

A Study on Reading Comprehension Skills of Primary School 5th Grade Students--Learning Basic Reading and Writing Skills through Phonics-Based Sentence Method or Decoding Method  

Science.gov (United States)

This research aims at investigating the influence of two methods implemented in primary reading and writing teaching programs--phonics-based sentence method and decoding (analysis) method--on primary school 5th grade students' reading comprehension achievement. Also, the study considers the relationship between socio-economic status and reading…

Kusdemir Kayiran, Bilge; Karabay, Aysegul

2012-01-01

338

Translating advances in reading comprehension research to educational practice  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The authors review five major findings in reading comprehension and their implications for educational practice. First, research suggests that comprehension skills are separable from decodingprocesses and important at early ages, suggesting that comprehension skills should be targeted early, even before the child learns to read. Second, there is an important distinction between readingprocesses and products, as well as their causal relationship: processes lead to certain products. Hence, instructional approaches and strategies focusing on processes are needed to improve students’reading performance (i.e., product. Third, inferences are a crucial component of skilled comprehension. Hence, children need scaffolding and remediation to learn to generate inferences, even when they know little about the text topic. Fourth, comprehension depends on a complex interaction between the reader, the characteristics of the text, and the instructional task, highlighting the need for careful selection of instructional materials for individual students and specific groups of students. Finally, educators may benefit from heightened awareness of the limitations and inadequacies of standardized reading comprehension assessments, as well as the multidimensionality of comprehension to better understand their students’ particular strengths and weaknesses.

Danielle S. McNAMARA

2011-11-01

339

Lesson Study-Building Communities of Learning Among Pre-Service Science Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Lesson Study is a widely used pedagogical approach that has been used for decades in its country of origin, Japan. It is a teacher-led form of professional development that involves the collaborative efforts of teachers in co-planning and observing the teaching of a lesson within a unit for evidence that the teaching practices used help the learning process (Lewis, 2002a). The purpose of this research was to investigate if Lesson Study enables pre-service teachers to improve their own teaching in the area of science inquiry-based approaches. Also explored are the self-efficacy beliefs of one group of science pre-service teachers related to their experiences in Lesson Study. The research investigated four questions: 1) Does Lesson Study influence teacher preparation for inquiry-based instruction? 2) Does Lesson Study improve teacher efficacy? 3) Does Lesson Study impact teachers' aspiration to collaborate with colleagues? 4) What are the attitudes and perceptions of pre-service teachers to the Lesson Study idea in Science? The 12 participants completed two pre- and post-study surveys: STEBI- B, Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (Enochs & Riggs, 1990) and ASTQ, Attitude towards Science Teaching. Data sources included student teaching lesson observations, lesson debriefing notes and focus group interviews. Results from the STEBI-B show that all participants measured an increase in efficacy throughout the study. This study added to the body of research on teaching learning communities, professional development programs and teacher empowerment.

Hamzeh, Fouada

340

Development and Evaluation of a Large-Enrollment, Active-Learning Physics Curriculum  

Science.gov (United States)

We report on the development and evaluation of Learning Physics (LEP), a new curriculum adapted from Physics and Everyday Thinking (PET). PET is an inquiry-based, hands-on, conceptual physics curriculum that was developed for small enrollment discussion/lab settings. The Learning Physics (LEP) curriculum maintains the same research-based learning principles as PET but is suitable for classes taught in a larger lecture hall setting. LEP incorporates both videos of experiments and hands-on activities that students can perform on small desks typical of lecture settings. LEP also incorporates assignments where students submit written work and evaluate each other using a web-based system. This paper describes the curriculum, and presents LEP students' content performance and views about science. Outcomes are compared to students in courses using PET.

Price, Edward; Goldberg, Fred; Robinson, Stephen J.; Harlow, Danielle; Mckean, Michael; Keene, Steven

2014-02-01

 
 
 
 
341

Priming Ditransitive Structures in Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

Many studies have shown evidence for syntactic priming during language production (e.g., Bock, 1986). It is often assumed that comprehension and production share similar mechanisms and that priming also occurs during comprehension (e.g., Pickering & Garrod, 2004). Research investigating priming during comprehension (e.g., Branigan et al., 2005 and…

Arai, Manabu; van Gompel, Roger P. G.; Scheepers, Cristoph

2007-01-01

342

Learning design Rashomon II: exploring one lesson through multiple tools  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available An increasing number of tools are available to support the learning design process at different levels and from different perspectives. However, this variety can make it difficult for researchers and teachers to assess the tool that is best suited to their objectives and contexts as learning designers. Several of the tools are presented elsewhere in this issue. In this article, the aforementioned tools are used as lenses to view the same learning design narrative – an inquiry-based learning lesson on healthy eating aimed at secondary-school students – from different perspectives, in a manner inspired by the plot structure of Kurosawa's film “Rashomon”. In modelling the lesson on five tools, we uncovered similarities and differences in relation to the challenges posed by modelling a particular learning scenario, the ease of implementation of the computer-interpretable products’ output by the tools and their different target audiences and pedagogical specialities. This comparative analysis thus illustrates some of the current underlying issues and challenges in the field of Learning Design.

Luis P. Prieto

2013-08-01

343

Rethinking Comprehension and Strategy Use in Second Language Listening Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

In second language classrooms, listening is gaining recognition as an active element in the processes of learning and using a second language. Currently, however, much of the teaching of listening prioritises comprehension without sufficient emphasis on the skills and strategies that enhance learners' understanding of spoken language. This paper…

Ling, Bernadette; Kettle, Margaret

2011-01-01

344

The Influence of Interest on Reading Comprehension in EFL Students  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study explored the influence of interest on reading comprehension in English as a Foreign Language Students (EFL). Another of this study's concerns was whether individual interest, which is optimal for learning but difficult to control in classroom settings, might be increased by use of situational and topic interest, which are less…

Eidswick, John

2009-01-01

345

Using the DASH Method to Measure Reading Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

Vocabulary knowledge has been recognized by researchers as a critical component of reading comprehension, not only as a means to facilitate first language acquisition but also as an integral element in the learning of English as a second or foreign language. To reduce the effect of insufficient vocabulary knowledge during reading, a compensatory…

Shieh, Wenyuh; Freiermuth, Mark R.

2010-01-01

346

NEW PRACTICE IN ENGLISH READING COMPREHENSION IN ALGERIA  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present article is divided into two interrelated sections. The first section starts with the presentation of language skills and reading comprehension. The second section is destined to the description and analysis of an experimental study that we conducted in our Computer Science Department with student of fifth year preparing the engineering degree. Reading comprehension was measured by performance on a set of comprehension abilities. The findings of the experiment reveal by the ANOVA’s (ANalyse Of VAriance method that from practical side, a true integration of computer/web in English language pedagogy can foster the learners’ affective aspect of learning and incite the teacher to be an active of educational change. The paper concludes with some suggestions and recommendations necessary for the implementation of web/computer-based language learning in Algerian universities.

Samir Zidat

2011-01-01

347

Comprehension of a novel accent by young and older listeners.  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors investigated perceptual learning of a novel accent in young and older listeners through measuring speech reception thresholds (SRTs) using speech materials spoken in a novel-unfamiliar-accent. Younger and older listeners adapted to this accent, but older listeners showed poorer comprehension of the accent. Furthermore, perceptual learning differed across groups: The older listeners stopped learning after the first block, whereas younger listeners showed further improvement with longer exposure. Among the older participants, hearing acuity predicted the SRT as well as the effect of the novel accent on SRT. Finally, a measure of executive function predicted the impact of accent on SRT. PMID:20853978

Adank, Patti; Janse, Esther

2010-09-01

348

Teaching Listening Comprehension Skills: A Test-orientated Approach  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Attributed to a “receptive skill” in the communicative process, listening comprehension would be the most arduous task of all four language skills. It is likely that EFL (English as a foreign language students encounter various predicaments, of e.g. grasping main ideas of the dialogues in contexts, and in turn suffer from learning anxiety. The issue of how to assist the students in improving their listening competency is worth attention. This article is, therefore, intended for illustrating a test-orientated approach to teaching listening comprehension skills to EFL students through an analysis of sample questions about listening comprehension (i.e. Choosing the Right Picture, Short Questions, and Short Conversations on GEPT tests at the elementary level and through provision of tips (i.e. Skim, Scan, Listen, Guess/Infer, Choose & Write and Check on how to answer the questions effectively. Implications for teaching listening comprehension are also made at the end of the paper.

Shao-Wen Su

2012-05-01

349

Reading Comprehension in Face-to-Face and Web-Based Modalities: Graduate Students' Use of Reading and Language Learning Strategies in EFL / Comprensión de lectura en las modalidades presencial y en la web: lectura y Estrategias de Aprendizaje del Lenguaje usadas por estudiantes de posgrados aprendices de inglés como lengua extranjera  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish Pocos estudios en Colombia han explorado y comparado los procesos de comprensión de lectura en inglés de los estudiantes, en diferentes modalidades de instrucción. En este artículo se presentan algunos hallazgos de un estudio en el cual dos grupos de estudiantes de posgrado de la Facultad de Derecho [...] participaron en un curso de competencia lectora en inglés, ofrecido en dos modalidades diferentes: presencial y virtual. Ambos cursos fueron servidos por un profesor de inglés de la Escuela de Idiomas de la Universidad de Antioquia. Los datos recogidos de las observaciones de clase, de las entrevistas a profundidad, de los cuestionarios, de los exámenes, del diario del profesor y los datos grabados en la plataforma permitieron comprender el uso de estrategias de lectura y de aprendizaje en ambas modalidades. Los hallazgos muestran que los estudiantes aplicaron las estrategias de lectura enseñadas explícitamente en el curso y algunas estrategias de aprendizaje para las cuales no hubo instrucción explícita. Abstract in english Few studies in Colombia have explored and compared students' reading comprehension processes in EFL, in different modalities of instruction. This article reports on some findings of a larger study in which two groups of graduate Law students took a reading comprehension course in English, delivered [...] in two different modalities of instruction: face-to-face and web-based. Both courses were served by an English teacher from the School of Languages at Universidad de Antioquia. The data gathered from class observations, in-depth interviews, questionnaires, tests, the teacher's journal and data records in the platform provided insights about the students' use of reading and language learning strategies in both modalities. Findings suggest that students applied the reading strategies explicitly taught during the courses and some language learning strategies for which they did not receive any instruction.

Fabio Alberto, Arismendi Gómez; Doris, Colorado López; Luisa Fernanda, Grajales Marin.

2011-07-01

350

On the Role of Strategy Use and Strategy Instruction in Listening Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper provides a review of ideas and research regarding the role of strategy use and strategy instruction in listening comprehension. Firstly, it provides a brief explanation of different models of listening comprehension. Secondly, it sketches out different categories of learning and listening strategies. Thirdly models of strategy instruction and different attitudes towards it are reviewed. Finally, empirical studies carried out to examine the role of strategy use and strategy instruction on listening comprehension is presented.

Amir Hossein Rahimi

2012-05-01

351

Psychodermatology: a comprehensive review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Psychodermatology is an interesting domain of dermatology that overlaps with psychiatry. This arena in dermatology has received limited diligence, partly due to lack of training in this realm. We present here a comprehensive review of salient features and treatment updates in primary psychiatric dermatoses and have also discussed the role of psyche in psychophysiological cutaneous disorders. Secondary psychiatric morbidity is relatively common among patients visiting the dermatologists but often overlooked and uncared for. Dermatologist should be able to initiate basic pharmacotherapy, should be knowledgeable about various non-pharmacological treatments and know the right time to refer the patient to the psychiatrist. Awareness and pertinent treatment of psychodermatological disorders among dermatologists will lead to a more holistic treatment approach and better prognosis in this unique group of patients. PMID:23442456

Yadav, Savita; Narang, Tarun; Kumaran, M Sendhil

2013-01-01

352

The Role of First Language Literacy and Second Language Proficiency in Second Language Reading Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the interrelationships of first language (L1) literacy, second language (L2) proficiency, and L2 reading comprehension with 246 Chinese college students learning English. L1 literacy and L2 proficiency were measured with college admission exams in Chinese and English. L2 reading comprehension was measured with the reading…

Jiang, Xiangying

2011-01-01

353

Can Intra-lingual Subtitling Enhance English Majors' Listening Comprehension of Literary Texts?  

Science.gov (United States)

Subtitling or captioning the dialogues of English movies can be very helpful to EFL learners in the Arab world. The present study reviews the importance of subtitling for language learning in general and listening comprehension in particular. A comparison is made between different levels of listening comprehension and different genres of English…

Abdellah, Antar Solhy

2008-01-01

354

How language production shapes language form and comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Language production processes can provide insight into how language comprehension works and language typology—why languages tend to have certain characteristics more often than others. Drawing on work in memory retrieval, motor planning, and serial order in action planning, the Production-Distribution-Comprehension (PDC account links work in the fields of language production, typology, and comprehension: 1 faced with substantial computational burdens of planning and producing utterances, language producers implicitly follow three biases in utterance planning that promote word order choices that reduce these burdens, thereby improving production fluency. 2 These choices, repeated over many utterances and individuals, shape the distributions of utterance forms in language. The claim that language form stems in large degree from producers’ attempts to mitigate utterance planning difficulty is contrasted with alternative accounts in which form is driven by language use more broadly, language acquisition processes, or producers’ attempts to create language forms that are easily understood by comprehenders. 3 Language perceivers implicitly learn the statistical regularities in their linguistic input, and they use this prior experience to guide comprehension of subsequent language. In particular, they learn to predict the sequential structure of linguistic signals, based on the statistics of previously-encountered input. Thus key aspects of comprehension behavior are tied to lexico-syntactic statistics in the language, which in turn derive from utterance planning biases promoting production of comparatively easy utterance forms over more difficult ones. This approach contrasts with classic theories in which comprehension behaviors are attributed to innate design features of the language comprehension system and associated working memory. The PDC instead links basic features of comprehension to a different source: production processes that shape language form.

MaryellenCMacDonald

2013-04-01

355

How we learn : Learning and non-learning in school and beyond  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

How We Learn, deals with the fundamental issues of the processes of learning, critically assessing different types of learning and obstacles to learning. It also considers a broad range of other important questions in relation to learning such as: modern research into learning and brain functions, self-perception, motivation and competence development, teaching, intelligence and learning style, learning in relation to gender and life age. The book provides a comprehensive introduction to both traditional learning theory and the newest international research into learning processes, while at the same time being an innovative contribution to a new and more holistic understanding of learning including discussion on school-based learning, net-based learning, workplace learning and educational politics. How We Learn examines all the key factors that help to create a holistic understanding of what learning actually is and why and how learning and non-learning take place. It is also however a refreshing and thought-provoking piece of scholarly work as it adds new research material, new understandings and new points of view.

Illeris, Knud

2007-01-01

356

Construction Mechanism of Digital Lifelong Learning Platform  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Through researching construction principle, system framework and operation mechanism of digital lifelong learning platform, constructing such a platform needs include the following functions: first, digital lifelong learning platform is able to provide convenient, flexible and personalized learning environment for the learners; second, it achieve the lifelong learning overpass of vertical join and horizontal communication for all types of education; third, it provides learners with learning information stored, credit recognition and conversion, learning credit management, and obtains mutual recognition of learning outcomes convergence “Credit Bank”; it can provide technological support for comprehensively promoting continuing education and lifelong education system and building the learning society.

Jie Yu

2014-06-01

357

Lessons learned from the first U.S./Russian Federation joint tabletop exercise to prepare for conducting on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty; TOPICAL  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A U.S./Russian Federation Joint Tabletop Exercise took place in Snezhinsk, Russia, from 19 to 24 October 1998, whose objectives were the following: (1) To simulate the actions of the Inspection Team (IT), including interactions with the inspected State Party (ISP), in order to examine different ways the United States and Russian Federation (RF) approach inspections and develop appropriate recommendations for the international community. (2) To identify ambiguities and contradictions in the interpretation of Treaty and Protocol provisions that might become apparent in the course of an inspection and that need clarification in connection with the development of Operational Manuals and on-site inspection (OSI) infrastructure. (3) To confirm the efficacy of using bilateral tabletop exercises to assist in developing an effective Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime. (4) To identify strong and weak points in the preparation and implementation methods of such exercises for the purpose of further improving possible future exercises

358

Metacognition in Taiwan: students' calibration of comprehension and performance.  

Science.gov (United States)

Researchers have increasingly investigated the role played by metacognition in students' learning and performance. Metacognition is comprised of metacognitive knowledge and metacognitive experiences, and both components of metacognition are viewed as being important to learning and performance in academic settings. Metacognitive experiences involve, in part, students' awareness of progress on cognitive tasks. Such awareness is critical to learning, for students may fail to spend additional time reviewing or studying material if they believe they have understood the material adequately. In the present study we examined Taiwanese students' ability to assess their comprehension of passages following reading as well as their ability to predict the number of questions they would be able to answer about passage content. Following an actual test on the material, students were asked to assess how many questions they felt they answered correctly about a passage (postdiction). Students were able to predict comprehension and test performance at better than chance levels and were more accurate at postdiction than prediction. Students with better performance, as measured by comprehension test scores, were better at both prediction and postdiction of comprehension performance. However, students' self-assessments of general calibration ability did not relate to their test performance. The metacomprehension skills of Taiwanese students were quite similar to those previously found for western students, but also diverged in some respects. PMID:22029559

Zabrucky, Karen M; Agler, Lin-Miao L; Moore, DeWayne

2009-08-01

359

Surface and deep structures in graphics comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

Comprehension of graphics can be considered as a process of schema-mediated structure mapping from external graphics on internal mental models. Two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that graphics possess a perceptible surface structure as well as a semantic deep structure both of which affect mental model construction. The same content was presented to different groups of learners by graphics from different perspectives with different surface structures but the same deep structure. Deep structures were complementary: major features of the learning content in one experiment became minor features in the other experiment, and vice versa. Text was held constant. Participants were asked to read, understand, and memorize the learning material. Furthermore, they were either instructed to process the material from the perspective supported by the graphic or from an alternative perspective, or they received no further instruction. After learning, they were asked to recall the learning content from different perspectives by completing graphs of different formats as accurately as possible. Learners' recall was more accurate if the format of recall was the same as the learning format which indicates surface structure influences. However, participants also showed more accurate recall when they remembered the content from a perspective emphasizing the deep structure, regardless of the graphics format presented before. This included better recall of what they had not seen than of what they really had seen before. That is, deep structure effects overrode surface effects. Depending on context conditions, stimulation of additional cognitive processing by instruction had partially positive and partially negative effects. PMID:25465898

Schnotz, Wolfgang; Baadte, Christiane

2014-12-01

360

Assessing Learning, Quality and Engagement in Learning Objects: The Learning Object Evaluation Scale for Students (LOES-S)  

Science.gov (United States)

Learning objects are interactive web-based tools that support the learning of specific concepts by enhancing, amplifying, and/or guiding the cognitive processes of learners. Research on the impact, effectiveness, and usefulness of learning objects is limited, partially because comprehensive, theoretically based, reliable, and valid evaluation…

Kay, Robin H.; Knaack, Liesel

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
361

Learning curve? Which one?  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Learning curves have been studied for a long time. These studies provided strong support to the hypothesis that, as organizations produce more of a product, unit costs of production decrease at a decreasing rate (see Argote, 1999 for a comprehensive review of learning curve studies). But the organiz [...] ational mechanisms that lead to these results are still underexplored. We know some drivers of learning curves (ADLER; CLARK, 1991; LAPRE et al., 2000), but we still lack a more detailed view of the organizational processes behind those curves. Through an ethnographic study, I bring a comprehensive account of the first year of operations of a new automotive plant, describing what was taking place on in the assembly area during the most relevant shifts of the learning curve. The emphasis is then on how learning occurs in that setting. My analysis suggests that the overall learning curve is in fact the result of an integration process that puts together several individual ongoing learning curves in different areas throughout the organization. In the end, I propose a model to understand the evolution of these learning processes and their supporting organizational mechanisms.

Paulo, Prochno.

2004-12-01

362

Learning Curve? Which One?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Learning curves have been studied for a long time. These studies provided strong support to the hypothesis that, as organizations produce more of a product, unit costs of production decrease at a decreasing rate (see Argote, 1999 for a comprehensive review of learning curve studies. But the organizational mechanisms that lead to these results are still underexplored. We know some drivers of learning curves (ADLER; CLARK, 1991; LAPRE et al., 2000, but we still lack a more detailed view of the organizational processes behind those curves. Through an ethnographic study, I bring a comprehensive account of the first year of operations of a new automotive plant, describing what was taking place on in the assembly area during the most relevant shifts of the learning curve. The emphasis is then on how learning occurs in that setting. My analysis suggests that the overall learning curve is in fact the result of an integration process that puts together several individual ongoing learning curves in different areas throughout the organization. In the end, I propose a model to understand the evolution of these learning processes and their supporting organizational mechanisms.

Paulo Prochno

2004-07-01

363

Comprehensive facilities plan  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

NONE

1997-09-01

364

The 2001 Comprehensive Review  

CERN Multimedia

A new approach for CERN to monitor the LHC-experiments' technical and scientific progress was introduced last year: The Comprehensive Reviews. A significant fraction of the full LHCC committee is mobilized during two days to review the complete project status. This event took place for ATLAS during 2-3 of July this year. With a rather exhaustive program we presented our status in 39 talks. It was a demanding and close to impossible task for the referees to comprehend the ATLAS status by listening to this massive amount of information, but from the ATLAS point-of-view we judged it important that the referees were exposed to both the progress and the remaining problem areas. The referees were satisfied with our status; probably more so this year than last year. They judged the main critical issues to be: The schedules of the barrel toroid, the end-cap TRT, the LAr barrel and end-cap A, and the MDTs. The procurement of radiation hard electronics was also thought to be a critical issue. They were informed of ...

Åkesson, T

365

Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

The three papers in this volume concerning artificial intelligence and language comprehension were commissioned by the National Institute of Education to further the understanding of the cognitive processes that enable people to comprehend what they read. The first paper, "Artificial Intelligence and Language Comprehension," by Terry Winograd,…

National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Basic Skills Group. Learning Div.

366

Now We Get It! Boosting Comprehension with Collaborative Strategic Reading  

CERN Document Server

A proven method for teaching reading skills in mixed-ability classrooms Collaborative Strategic Reading is an innovative new approach to teaching reading that weaves together two instructional programs: cooperative learning and reading comprehension strategy instruction. In small groups, students work through the four main steps-Preview, "Click and Clunk," Get the Gist, and Wrap Up-helping each other improve comprehension and increase reading fluency. This book offers a hands-on guide to implementing CSR in grades 4 through 12. It includes sample dialogues for teachers to use during instruct

Klingner, Janette K; Boardman, Alison; Swanson, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

367

Variables Predicting Foreign Language Reading Comprehension and Vocabulary Acquisition in a Linear Hypermedia Environment  

Science.gov (United States)

Factors predicting vocabulary learning and reading comprehension of advanced language learners of English in a linear multimedia text were investigated in the current study. Predictor variables of interest were multimedia type, reading proficiency, learning styles, topic interest and background knowledge about the topic. The outcome variables of…

Akbulut, Yavuz

2007-01-01

368

The Effects of Controlled Language Processing on Listening Comprehension and Recall  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study seeks to determine the possible interactions between listening proficiency and the state of strategic self-awareness; second, and more importantly, to investigate the effects of learned strategies on listening comprehension and recall; and finally to describe the most common real-time listening comprehension problems faced by EFL learners and to compare the differences between learners with different listening abilities. After ten training sessions, an assessment was made to see whether or not well-learned strategies could provide students with ample opportunity to practice the comprehension and recall processes. The analyses of the data revealed the causes of ineffective low-level processing and provided insights to solve the problems of parsing. Moreover, the study reveals that explicit instruction of cognitive and metacognitive strategies is needed if a syllabus wishes to help learners improve their listening comprehension and become more-proficient at directing their own learning and development as L2 listeners.

Mohsen Jannejad

2012-07-01

369

BBC Learning: Online Courses  

Science.gov (United States)

The BBC Learning Web site (last mentioned in the May 5, 1995 Scout Report), is now providing a series of short online learning courses for persons hoping to gain a helpful introduction to a number of topics. Current courses include Becoming Webwise; How to be a Gardener; and several on history, including Victorian Britain. Particularly helpful are the short courses in German, French, Italian, and Spanish. All of the different language courses are accompanies by audio and video clips so that users will have more a comprehensive and holistic understanding of the language in context. For those looking for an introduction to a number of subjects, these learning tools will prove quite valuable.

370

Passageless comprehension on the Nelson-Denny reading test: well above chance for university students.  

Science.gov (United States)

The comprehension section of the Nelson-Denny Reading Test (NDRT) is widely used to assess the reading comprehension skills of adolescents and adults in the United States. In this study, the authors explored the content validity of the NDRT Comprehension Test (Forms G and H) by asking university students (with and without at-risk status for learning disorders) to answer the multiple-choice comprehension questions without reading the passages. Overall accuracy rates were well above chance for both NDRT forms and both groups of students. These results raise serious questions about the validity of the NDRT and its use in the identification of reading disabilities. PMID:19933897

Coleman, Chris; Lindstrom, Jennifer; Nelson, Jason; Lindstrom, William; Gregg, K Noël

2010-01-01

371

A New Comprehensive Final Exam  

Science.gov (United States)

Instructors aspire for students to master all the material covered. The final exam should assess the breadth and depth of their learning and be a significant basis for the final grade. I insist on a comprehensive final because I want students to review early material in light of later topics. I believe that this helps students create connections, integrate understanding, and retain knowledge for the long term. For non-science majors, reviewing and retaining the large amount of astronomy material is daunting. I experimented with a final exam format that calmed their fears and encouraged thorough review. It is only practical for a class of about twenty students or less. I provided a number of challenging conceptual and problem solving questions (at least as many as there were students), crafted to interconnect and span the entire range of topics. The order of the questions reflected the sequence in which the topics had been discussed. Students received these questions in ample time to prepare prior to the final. A student could bring up to 5 standard sheets of notes to the final. At the final, each student picked a number out of a hat. This was the question they had to answer in a 5-minute presentation. They were allowed 15 minutes for a final preparation during which they could use their 5 pages of notes. The presentations were given in order, 1- 20. Written comments on at least 10 other talks, explaining what was missed or correcting a mistake were required. They were graded both on their talk and on their comments. This format required students to be prepared for any question and encouraged interaction and communication while studying. Knowing the questions beforehand provided a guide to their studying as well as allayed their fears about what could be asked. The students also received guidance to what constituted a good answer, namely accuracy (correct scientific argument, appropriate facts, no irrelevant material), thoroughness (answered the complete questions, covered relevant material) and the quality of the presentation (polished, professional, use of demonstrations, graphs, pictures etc. and time appropriately to present a clear answer). I will describe this first attempt.

Bhavsar, Suketu P.

2015-01-01

372

Adaptation of Learning Spaces: Supporting Ubiquitous Learning in Higher Distance Education  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Ubiquitous learning is supported by ubiquitous computing and represents the next step in the field of e-learning. The goal is, that learning environments will be accessed increasingly in various contexts and situations. From this chal-lenge, new questions arise concerning the adaptation of learning spaces to different contexts of use, so that they continue to enable and support learning processes. As a basic work in this direction, this paper introduces a first notion of a comprehensive defin...

Bomsdorf, Birgit

2005-01-01

373

Learning from Mistakes --- A Comprehensive Study on Real World Concurrency Bug Characteristics. In the proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Architecture Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems (ASPLOS'08), March 2008  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The reality of multi-core hardware has made concurrent programs pervasive. Unfortunately, writing correct concurrent programs is difcult. Addressing this challenge requires advances in multiple directions, including concurrency bug detection, concurrent program testing, concurrent programming model design, etc. Designing effective techniques in all these directions will signicantly benet from a deep understanding of real world concurrency bug characteristics. This paper provides the rst (to the best of our knowledge) comprehensive real world concurrency bug characteristic study. Specifically, we have carefully examined concurrency bug patterns, manifestation, and x strategies of 105 randomly selected real world concurrency bugs from 4 representative server and client opensource applications (MySQL, Apache, Mozilla and OpenOfce). Our study reveals several interesting ndings and provides useful guidance for concurrency bug detection, testing, and concurrent programming language design. Some of our ndings are as follows: (1) Around one third of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs are caused by violation to programmers' order intentions, which may not be easily expressed via synchronization primitives like locks and transactional memories; (2) Around 34% of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs involve multiple variables, which are not well addressed by existing bug detection tools; (3) About 92% of the examined concurrency bugs can be reliably triggered by enforcing certain orders among no more than 4 memory accesses. This indicates that testing concurrent programs can target at exploring possible orders among every small groups of memory accesses, instead of among all memory accesses; (4) About 73% of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs were not xed by simply adding or changing locks, and many of the xes were not correct at the rst try, indicating the difculty of reasoning concurrent execution by programmers.

Yuanyuan Zhou

2008-03-01

374

The Learning Assistant Model for Science Teacher Recruitment and Preparation  

Science.gov (United States)

There is a shortage of high quality physical science teachers in the United States. In 2001, less than 50% of teachers who taught physics held a major or minor in physics or physics education (Neuschatz & McFarling, 2003). Studies point to content knowledge as one of the two factors that is positively correlated with teacher quality. However, those directly responsible for the science content preparation of teachers, specifically science research faculty, are rarely involved in focused efforts to improve teacher quality or to create alternative paths for becoming a teacher. What role should science research faculty play in the recruitment and preparation of science teachers? How might teacher recruitment and preparation be conceived so that science research faculty members' participation in these efforts is not at odds with the traditional scientific research foci of science research departments? To address this issue, we have coupled our teacher recruitment and preparation efforts with our efforts for transforming our large-enrollment, undergraduate science courses. This is achieved through the undergraduate Learning Assistant (LA) program, where talented mathematics and science majors are hired to assist in transforming large enrollment courses to student-centered, collaborative environments. These LAs are the target of our teacher recruitment efforts. Science research faculty, in collaboration with faculty from the school of education have established a community that supports LAs in making decisions to explore K12 teaching as a career option. Fifteen percent of the LAs who have participated in this program have entered teaching credential programs and now plan to become K12 teachers. An added effect of this program is that research faculty have developed skills and knowledge regarding inquiry-based and student-centered pedagogy and theories of student learning. The Learning Assistant program has led to increased subject matter knowledge among learning assistants, increased interest in K-12 teaching as a career, and increased appreciation and understanding of student-centered and inquiry-based learning. Data to support these claims will be presented. Neuschatz, M. & McFarling, M. (2003). Broadning the Base: High School Physics Education at the Turn of a New Century, AIP Report No. R-439.

Otero, Valerie

2006-04-01

375

Anxiety in EFL Listening Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The anxiety for EFL learners that accompanies the listening comprehension (LC task is difficult to detect, but potentially one of the most debilitating, because in order to interact verbally the listener must first understand what is being said. With the instructional emphasis on input processing, LC anxiety merits closer examination. By elaborating the definition and process of listening comprehension, this paper analyzes the anxiety in listening comprehension in detail and discusses the pedagogical implications that might help instructors address LC anxiety in their foreign language (FL classroom.

Fang Xu

2011-12-01

376

Introducing Hands-on, Experiential Learning Experiences in an Urban Environmental Science Program at a Minority Serving Institution  

Science.gov (United States)

STEM education at New Jersey City University increasingly focuses on experiential, student-centered learning. The Department of Geoscience/Geography plays a significant role in developing and implementing a new Urban Environmental Science Program. The program aims at graduating highly skilled, demographically diverse students (14 % African-American and 18% Hispanic) to be employed in high-growth Earth and Environmental Science career paths, both at a technical (e.g. B.S.) as well as an educational (K-12 grade) (e.g. B.A) level. The core program, including the Earth and Environmental Science curricula is guided by partners (e.g. USDA-NRCS). The program is highly interdisciplinary and 'hands-on', focusing upon the high-tech practical skills and knowledge demanded of science professionals in the 21st century. The focus of the curriculum is on improving environmental quality in northern NJ, centering upon our urban community in Jersey City and Hudson County. Our Department is moving towards a more earth system science approach to learning. Most of our courses (e.g., Earth Surface Processes, Sedimentology/Stratigraphy, Earth Materials, Essential Methods, Historical Geology) have hands-on laboratory and/or field components. Although some of our other courses do not have formal laboratory components, research modules of many such courses (Geochemistry, Urban Environmental Issues and Policy and Environmental Geology) involve strong field or laboratory studies. The department has a wide range of analytical and laboratory capacities including a portable XRF, bench-top XRD and ICP-MS. In spring 2013, Dr. Duzgoren-Aydin was awarded $277K in Higher Education Equipment Leasing Fund monies from the University in order to establish an Environmental Teaching and Research Laboratory. The addition of these funds will make it possible for the department to increase its instrumentation capacity by adding a mercury analyzer, Ion Chromatography and C-N-S analyzer, as well as updating several laboratory facilities. Furthermore, authors have applied to the NSF-TUES grant program to purchase a particle size analyzer. Currently, the grant is pending. We have defined 4 curricular goals to enhance student learning by providing hands-on, inquiry-based learning and research experiences. 1- Develop technical/analytical knowledge and skills by using advanced analytical instrumentation; 2- Improve quantitative reasoning skills to assess the quality of data; 3- Have comprehensive educational training to improve problem solving skills; and 4- use their quantitative reasoning (Goal # 2) and problem solving skills (Goal #3) to evaluate real-world geological and environmental problems. We also give special emphasis to expected measurable outcomes for individual courses. An external evaluator will assess the effectiveness of integrating advance instrumentation into the Earth and Environmental Science curricula. We will work closely with the evaluator to ensure successful implementation of the learning objectives. Examples from the impacted courses will be presented.

Duzgoren-Aydin, N. S.; Freile, D.

2013-12-01

377

Impact of selected PALMS learning strategies in ninth grade science classrooms to reach NCLB science standards  

Science.gov (United States)

In the past 50 years there have been concerns about the teaching and learning of science in American schools. Furthermore, recent assessments have indicated that American students in 4th, 8th, and 12th grade levels are not performing better than their counterparts in other industrialized countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate if a change in instructional methods would improve test scores and meet the standards of the No Child Left Behind Act that requires that 95%-100% of students being tested should be proficient in the subject matter by 2014. The study used learner-centered learning strategies of PALMS (Partnerships Advancing the Learning of Mathematics and Science) inquiry-based learning, cooperative learning, and brain-based learning to instruct a group of students. PALMS was an initiative of the Massachusetts Department of Education in the effort to improve student performance in the state. The sample consisted of 161 ninth grade students enrolled in 8 physical science classes. Eighty-six students were instructed by the learner-centered learning strategies of inquiry-based learning, cooperative learning, and brain-based learning, while 75 students were instructed by the teacher-centered traditional method of instruction, which consists of lectures and direct instruction. The students who received PALMS learner-centered instruction were the treatment group while the students who received teacher-centered instruction were the control group. Analysis of the data by one way ANOVA showed that there was a significant difference between the test scores (average combined scores of selected chapters of the textbook and the district's six weeks test) of students who were instructed by learner-centered instructional methods and those who were instructed by the teacher-centered instructional methods. The learner-centered group scored higher than the teacher-centered group, although they did not improve their test scores when compared to their baseline scores before the study. Neither the treatment nor the control group had 95% of the students scoring at proficiency level. Further implications of the results are discussed.

Omotunde, Mojisola Bolanle

378

UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The University of California Comprehensive Davis Cancer Center (UCDCCC) was founded in 1991 and received its NCI designation in 2002. In 2012, it attained comprehensive status. The Center is part of the UC Davis Health System. Center members include scientists and physicians drawn from UC Davis School of Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, College of Biological Sciences, College of Engineering, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

379

Agrammatic comprehension : an electrophysiological approach  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This dissertation focuses on syntactic comprehension problems in patients with Broca's aphasia from an electrophysiological perspective. The central objective of this dissertation was to further explore what syntax-related event-related brain potential (ERP) effects can reveal about the nature of the deficit that underlies syntactic comprehension problems in patients with Broca's aphasia. Chapter two to four describe experiments in which event-related brain potentials were recorded while subj...

Wassenaar, M. E. D.

2005-01-01

380

Computer Assisted Language Learning. Routledge Studies in Computer Assisted Language Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is an approach to language teaching and learning in which computer technology is used as an aid to the presentation, reinforcement and assessment of material to be learned, usually including a substantial interactive element. This books provides an up-to date and comprehensive overview of…

Pennington, Martha

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
381

The Impact of Listening Strategy on Listening Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Successful FL learners are characterized by knowing how to use language learning strategies effectively. This article reports a study of the effect of strategy training on listening comprehension. In the study, 56 intermediate foreign language learners at Shandong Economic College were either participants in a strategies-based instructional treatment or were comparison students receiving the regular listening course. Data were obtained and analyzed through the performance of a set of three li...

Yan. Zhang

2012-01-01

382

Impact of Psycholinguistic strategy- Reading Comprehension at Secondary Level  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study is an attempt to discuss the Impact of Psycholinguistic strategy in Reading Comprehension at Secondary Level. Reading is the process of decoding a set of written symbols that have been assigned linguistic meaning for the purpose of communicating ideas. Children for the purpose of communicating ideas. Children typically come to the reading task with a foundation for learning to read. They have attained a substantial amount of oral language and they have accumulated a store house of ...

Sv, Ulagammai; Parimala Fathima, M.; Mohan, S.

2013-01-01

383

The Application of Constructivism: Activities for Enlivening Comprehensive English Class  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The Comprehensive English Course (CEC) plays a vital role in English language learning for college students in China. However, students’ motivation for this course is low due to the fact that they are bored with the instructivist-based teaching environment. This paper first reviews the theories of Constructivism, and then demonstrates how to apply constructivist-based pedagogy in an instructivist-based environment by illustrating the constructivist-based activities: free writing, formati...

Jing Shi

2013-01-01

384

Learning Networks, Networked Learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Learning Networks are on-line social networks through which users share knowledge with each other and jointly develop new knowledge. This way, Learning Networks may enrich the experience of formal, school-based learning and form a viable setting for professional development. Although networked learning enjoys an increasing interest, many questions remain on how exactly learning in such networked contexts can contribute to successful education and training. Put differently, how should networke...

Sloep, Peter; Berlanga, Adriana

2011-01-01

385

Brain mapping in cognitive disorders: a multidisciplinary approach to learning the tools and applications of functional neuroimaging  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background With rapid advances in functional imaging methods, human studies that feature functional neuroimaging techniques are increasing exponentially and have opened a vast arena of new possibilities for understanding brain function and improving the care of patients with cognitive disorders in the clinical setting. There is a growing need for medical centers to offer clinically relevant functional neuroimaging courses that emphasize the multifaceted and multidisciplinary nature of this field. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a functional neuroimaging course focusing on cognitive disorders that might serve as a model for other medical centers. We identify key components of an active learning course design that impact student learning gains in methods and issues pertaining to functional neuroimaging that deserve consideration when optimizing the medical neuroimaging curriculum. Methods Learning gains associated with the course were assessed using polychoric correlation analysis of responses to the SALG (Student Assessment of Learning Gains instrument. Results Student gains in the functional neuroimaging of cognition as assessed by the SALG instrument were strongly associated with several aspects of the course design. Conclusion Our implementation of a multidisciplinary and active learning functional neuroimaging course produced positive learning outcomes. Inquiry-based learning activities and an online learning environment contributed positively to reported gains. This functional neuroimaging course design may serve as a useful model for other medical centers.

Kelley Daniel J

2007-10-01

386

Tracing learning about astronomy during an ICT supported inquiry  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

nquiry-based science education (IBSE) has been argued to prepare students for the modern world by opening up opportunities to query the natural and man-made world. Information communication technology (ICT) that allows more than collection of data and information but offers opportunities to collaborate, discuss and share information is claimed to aid this process. However evidence to support such great expectations is still inconclusive. Assessment tools and the insights they may lend into students’ learning vary greatly and there is a danger they fail to persuade of the potential inquiry-based learning has to offer. In this presentation we examine the cases of two year 8 classes (14 year old students) who engaged in science inquiry in their science and English lessons and collaborated with a New Zealand class to explore the topic of astronomy. To gain insight into the students’ developing ideas in astronomy we adopted a multilevel– multifaceted approach. Evidence of learning was collected at three different levels: immediate, close and proximal. We will highlight the insights we gained into students’ developing science inquiry skills and knowledge and explain how the different proximities of the assessment strategies used assisted this task.

Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Østergaard, Lars Domino

2012-01-01

387

How an active-learning class influences physics self-efficacy in pre-service teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

Education majors in an inquiry-based physics content course were asked to reflect on the ways the course affected their self-efficacy for completing physics tasks, such as creating a circuit. Responses were coded according to the contributor of the influence and whether that influence was positive or negative. The group learning structure, hands-on activities in the class, and the constructed repertoire of science knowledge, processes, and activities, were all reported to be positive influences on self-efficacy, whereas the influence of the instructor was mixed. Overall, students' responses indicated both a desire for more guidance and lecture and an appreciation for their ability to construct their own understanding through the class activities.

Gaffney, Jon D. H.; Housley Gaffney, Amy L.; Usher, Ellen L.; Mamaril, Natasha A.

2013-01-01

388

The Impact of Differentiated Instructional Materials on English Language Learner (ELL) Students' Comprehension of Science Laboratory Tasks  

Science.gov (United States)

Through a qualitative research design, this article investigates the impacts of differentiated laboratory instructional materials on English language learners' (ELLs) laboratory task comprehension. The factors affecting ELLs' science learning experiences are further explored. Data analysis reveals a greater degree of laboratory task comprehension

Manavathu, Marian; Zhou, George

2012-01-01

389

A Comprehensive Literature Review of Comprehension Strategies in Core Content Areas for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.  

Science.gov (United States)

Understanding text can increase access to educational, vocational, and recreational activities for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, limited research has been conducted investigating instructional practices to remediate or compensate for these comprehension challenges. The current comprehensive literature review expanded previous reviews and evaluated research quality using Reichow (Evidence-based practices and treatments for children with autism, pp 25-39. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4419-6975-0_2 , 2011) criteria for identifying evidence-based practices. Three questions guided the review: (a) Which approaches to comprehension instruction have been investigated for students with ASD?; (b) Have there been a sufficient number of acceptable studies using a particular strategy to qualify as an evidence-based practice for teaching comprehension across the content areas?; and (c) What can educators learn from the analysis of high quality studies? Of the 23 studies included in the review, only 13 achieved high or adequate ratings. Results of the review suggest that both response-prompting procedures (e.g., model-lead-test, time delay, system of least prompts,) and visual supports (e.g., procedural facilitators) can increase comprehension skills in content areas of ELA, math, and science. Authors conclude with a discussion of (a) research-based examples of how to use effective approaches, (b) implications for practitioners, and (c) limitations and future research. PMID:25331325

Knight, Victoria F; Sartini, Emily

2014-10-21

390

Mobile-Assisted Language Learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The main characteristics of mobile learning (m-learning are recognized as the potential for learning process to be personalized, spontaneous, informal and ubiquitous. Although learning through mobile phones may take longer time compared to computers, the learners feel a greater sense of freedom of time and place, so that they can take the advantage of spare time to learn a second language when and wherethey are. Mobile-Assisted Language Learning (MALL deals with the use of mobile technology in language learning. In contrast to classroom learning, in MALL there is no need for the learners to sit in a classroom or at a computer to get learning materials. In fact, MALL can be considered an ideal solution to language learning barriers in terms of time and place. In this paper by looking at some applications of m-learning as well as some examples across various aspects of it, we observe the advantages and disadvantages derived from using mobile technologies for students as well as professionals. Here, it has been tried to demonstrate the benefits of using mobilephones in learning English as a second language. Areas of mobile-based language learning discussed in this paper are vocabulary, listening, grammar, phonetics, and reading comprehension.

Tayebeh Mosavi Miangah

2012-02-01

391

M programming a comprehensive guide  

CERN Document Server

M Programming: A Comprehensive Guide is a complete update to ABCs of MUMPS. While ABCs of MUMPS was an introduction for novice and intermediate M programmers, M Programming: A Comprehensive Guide has a new section containing advanced material. This new section addresses features such as transaction processing, networking, structured system variables, and interfaces to other standards. Five new chapters have been added, covering an overview of M for readers familiar with other languages; M and the Windows environment; interaction between M and the underlying system; transaction processing; inte

Walters, Richard

1997-01-01

392

The Role of Dimensions of Lexical Repertoire in Reading Comprehension and Incidental Vocabulary Acquisition  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study was carried out in order to investigate the relationship between dimensions of lexical repertoire, i.e., depth and breadth of lexical knowledge and Iranian EFL learners' incidental vocabulary learning and reading comprehension. The participants of the study were 30 English major students of MA. They were selected from 68 students, based on their performance on Nelson proficiency test. Word Association Test was used to measure students' depth of vocabulary knowledge, Vocabulary Levels Test was administered to examine students' breadth of vocabulary knowledge, MSRT reading test was used to measure their reading comprehension, and Vocabulary Knowledge Scale test was given to test their incidental vocabulary learning. The results of Pearson correlations indicated that there is a significant relationship between both depth and breadth of vocabulary knowledge and EFL learners' incidental vocabulary learning as well as their reading comprehension.

Shaban Barimani Varandi

2013-11-01

393

Indagación desde los conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas en salud reproductiva femenina: algunos aportes desde la investigación / Inquiry based on knowledge, attitudes & practices in women's reproductive health: some insights from research  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Spain | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish La morbilidad materna es una de las primeras causas de alteración del bienestar de la mujer en el mundo en vías de desarrollo, por lo cual la salud reproductiva de la mujer sigue siendo una prioridad investigativa en la mayoría de estas sociedades. Sin embargo, es notable la hegemonía de la investig [...] ación clínica biomédica en esta área que ha dejado ver la ausencia y la necesidad de estudios que den cuenta del fenómeno desde una perspectiva integral. Los estudios de "conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas" (CAP) son una alternativa conceptual para acercase a la complejidad del fenómeno en el área de la salud reproductiva. La propuesta de los estudios tipo CAP plantea un acercamiento integral para entender los comportamientos con respecto a la salud de las personas a través de sus tres elementos; y sus resultados han sido base fundamental de los diagnósticos para la creación, ejecución y evaluación de programas sanitarios. Por lo anterior, este artículo se propone mostrar y discutir algunas evidencias relacionadas con la utilidad de este tipo de trabajos en el área de la salud reproductiva de las mujeres. Abstract in english Maternal morbidity is one of the first causes of women's welfare alteration in the less-developed countries; therefore, their reproductive health has been a research priority in most of these societies. However, the dominance of the clinical/biomedical research on this topic has been notable, and sh [...] own the gap and need for studies reporting this phenomenon from an integral perspective. The Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) studies are an alternative design to approaching this complex situation. The KAP proposal offers a comprehensive approach to understanding the behaviors related to people's health through its three main components, and its results have been cornerstone for the situation diagnoses, leading to the creation, execution and evaluation of sanitary programs. Hence, the objective of this paper is to show and to discuss some evidences related to the utility of this approach in women's reproductive health.

C., Laza Vásquez; G., Sánchez Vanegas.

2012-04-01

394

On the Role of Strategy Use and Strategy Instruction in Listening Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper provides a review of ideas and research regarding the role of strategy use and strategy instruction in listening comprehension. Firstly, it provides a brief explanation of different models of listening comprehension. Secondly, it sketches out different categories of learning and listening strategies. Thirdly models of strategy instruction and different attitudes towards it are reviewed. Finally, empirical studies carried out to examine the role of strategy use and strategy instruct...

Amir Hossein Rahimi

2012-01-01

395

The relationship between syntactic knowledge and reading comprehension in EFL learners  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Via a variety of measurements, 64 Hungarian native speakers in the 12th grade learning English as a foreign language in Slovakia were tested in a cross-sectional correlational study in order to determine the relationship between the ability to process complex syntax and foreign language reading comprehension. The test instruments involved a standardized reading comprehension test in English, and a test of syntactic knowledge in both Hungarian and English, in addition to a backg...

Morvay, Gabriella

2012-01-01

396

The Effect of Advance Organizers on Enhancing the Reading Comprehension of Iranian EFL Learners  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Reading English in Iran is regarded as a very important skill in academic world, where English is learned as a foreign language (EFL).  Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to examine the influence of Advance Organizers (AO) on enhancing reading comprehension of students of English as a foreign language to check if there is any correspondence between activating background knowledge and listening- while- reading tasks as two AOs for enhancing reading comprehension.To carry out th...

Rezvan Davaei; Mohammad Reza Talebinezhad

2012-01-01

397

An Action Research on Improvement of Reading Comprehension of CET4  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This action research is aiming at improvement of reading comprehension of College English teaching and learning, which is a major time-consuming course with low efficiency in colleges and universities in China. The research subjects were 134 first-year college students of science, engineering and liberal arts, who were from either developed provinces or developing ones. The reading materials used for this research were from passages of reading comprehension of CET4 of each year. This action r...

Jian-ping Luo

2013-01-01

398

What do we expect, as teachers, when selecting a text for our students: comprehension or readability?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper analyzes the role that a group of college teachers of physics assigns to the comprehension of instructions and of concepts. Based on a text fragment, used to trigger answers, we discuss the "forms" that are attributed to the comprehension of this fragment. These results are compared with those obtained by the selection that this same group of teachers does about the factors that rule when favoring the teaching and learning of Newton’s laws

María Silvia Stipcich; Marta Massa

1999-01-01

399

Enhancing the Italian Learners’ Comprehension Competence in Turkish Proverbs and Idioms  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Problem Statement: Foreign language learners who do not naturally come from the tradition of the language they are learning have naturally difficulties in comprehending Turkish proverbs and idioms. Comprehension problems of the Italian learners of Turkish can be various.Purpose of Study: This study aims at presenting some suggested teaching methods for Turkish proverbs and idioms through some semantically identical Italian proverbs and idioms in order to solve the comprehension problems of It...

Nalan K?z?ltan

2012-01-01

400

A comparative study of listening and reading comprehension in children of different age-groups  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Listening and reading comprehension form an important part of the educational needs of the child. Learning and development are dynamic processes and educators must take cognisance of the continually changing needs of the environment. The relationship between and development of listening and reading comprehension is complex and interlinked. Theoretical and developmental strategies need to be explored to help us understand assessment and teaching procedures. This study aimed to compare...

Palmer, Monica

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
401

Helping Students Develop Listening Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Listening practice is often neglected or handled inappropriately in the teachinglearning process. This poses problem because listening is an integral part of conversations. Oral skills without equally welldeveloped listening abilities are of little practical value. In this article, I will take a look at issues related to the area of listening that may be considered when guiding students toward developing listening comprehension.

Cárdenas Beltrán Melba Libia

2000-01-01

402

USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center  

Science.gov (United States)

Founded in 1971, the University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center (USC Norris) received its NCI designation in 1973. The Center is committed to investigating the complex origins and progression of cancer, developing treatment and prevention strategies, and searching for cures.

403

Children's Comprehension of Live Theatre.  

Science.gov (United States)

Two studies investigate the way in which children make sense of a play and the visual, aural, and psychological components of theatre which contribute to this comprehension. In the first study, 32 fifth graders saw "Don Quixote of La Mancha." In the second study, 45 third graders saw "Monkey, Monkey" (about the Chinese Monkey King). The day after…

Klein, Jeanne; Fitch, Marguerite

404

Neuroimaging Evidence of Comprehension Monitoring  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to synthesize the emerging neuroimaging literature that reveals how the brain responds when readers and listeners encounter texts that demand monitoring of their ongoing comprehension processes. Much of this research has been undertaken by cognitive scientists who do not frame their work in metacognitive terms, and therefore it is less likely to be familiar to psychologists who study metacognition in educational contexts. The important role of metacognition in the development and use of academic skills is widely recognized. Metacognition is typically defined as the awareness and control of one's own cognitive processes. In the domain of reading, the most important metacognitive skill is comprehension monitoring, the evaluation and regulation of comprehension. Readers who monitor their understanding realize when they have encountered difficulty making sense of the text, and they apply error correction procedures to attempt to resolve the difficulty. Metacognition depends on executive control skills that continue to develop into early adulthood, in parallel with the maturation of the executive control regions of the prefrontal cortex. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and event-related potentials (ERP have been used for some time to study neural correlates of basic reading processes such as word identification, but it is only within recent years that researchers have turned to the higher-level processes of text comprehension. The article describes illustrative studies that reveal changes in neural activity when adults apply lexical, syntactic, or semantic standards to evaluate their understanding.

Linda Baker

2014-04-01

405

A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

2013-01-01

406

Pragmatic Comprehension Development through Telecollaboration  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Pragmatic comprehension can be ideally developed through contact with target language speakers. This contact can be provided in English as Foreign Language contexts through telecollaboration. To test the actual effect of telecollaboration on the development of pragmatic comprehension, 30 Iranian undergraduates of English as a Foreign Language participated in an experimental study. The participants were divided into two groups of 15 students: control group which merely received pragmatic instructions and experimental group which had the opportunity to interact with target language speakers through internet-mediated communication tools besides receiving pragmatic instructions. The data were collected through a multiple choice pragmatic comprehension test, following a semester-long intervention. The comparison of the performance of the two groups assessed through the independent-samples t-test showed the significant positive effect of telecollaboration on the development of pragmatic comprehension. Pedagogical implications of the findings suggested organizing telecollaborative partnership environments to link English as Foreign Language students with university students in native English speaking countries.

Vahid Rafieyan

2014-01-01

407

When All Children Comprehend: Increasing the External Validity of Narrative Comprehension Development Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Narratives, also called stories, can be found in conversations, children’s play interactions, reading material, and television programs. From infancy to adulthood, narrative comprehension processes interpret events and inform our understanding of physical and social environments. These processes have been extensively studied to ascertain the multifaceted nature of narrative comprehension. From this research we know that three overlapping processes (i.e., knowledge integration, goal structure understanding, and causal inference generation proposed by the constructionist paradigm are necessary for narrative comprehension, narrative comprehension has a predictive relationship with children’s later reading performance, and comprehension processes are generalizable to other contexts. Much of the previous research has emphasized internal and predictive validity; thus, limiting the generalizability of previous findings. We are concerned these limitations may be excluding underrepresented populations from benefits and implications identified by early comprehension processes research. This review identifies gaps in extant literature regarding external validity and argues for increased emphasis on externally valid research. We highlight limited research on narrative comprehension processes in children from low-income and minority populations, and argue for changes in comprehension assessments. Specifically, we argue both on- and off-line assessments should be used across various narrative types (e.g., picture books, televised narratives with traditionally underserved and underrepresented populations. We propose increasing the generalizability narrative comprehension processes research can inform persistent reading achievement gaps, and have practical implications for how children learn from narratives.

DanielleD.Brown

2014-03-01

408

E-Learning Security Models  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The article looks into methods and models that are useful when analyzing the risks and vulnerabilities of complex e-learning systems in an emergency management context. Definitions of vulnerability and emergency response capabilities, such as "VLE/PLE attack surface", are suggested.The article provides insight into some of the issues related to analysis of risks and vulnerabilities of e-learning systems, but more research is needed to address this difficult and comprehensive task.

Vladimir I. Zuev

2012-06-01

409

Effect of allergy medication on children's reading comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

The impact of a very common over-the-counter antihistamine, chlorpheniramine, was measured in respect to the reading comprehension of 12 normal school-age children (5 boys and 7 girls) who had a history of allergic rhinitis. Each subject served as his/her own control, and a double-blind design was employed. Each child's parent was given two bottles of cherry syrup and told to administer the syrup in Bottle A for 3 days and then that in Bottle B for 3 days according to directions on the bottle. Parents and children did not know which bottle contained the medication. One of the two forms of a standardized reading comprehension test was administered at the end of each 3-day period in the allergist's office by a trained test administrator. Students were randomly assigned to the two conditions and to the form of the test administered. The mean reading comprehension scores of the drug and placebo drugs were 59 and 60, respectively, which were not significantly different. This study would indicate that common across-the-counter antihistamines should not adversely affect typical school activities such as reading comprehension if used appropriately. Even if some drowsiness or inattention may occur, children's cognitive functions are not affected sufficiently to disrupt learning. PMID:2258042

McLoughlin, J A; Nall, M; Berla, E

1990-01-01

410

Kenya comprehensive school health policy: lessons from a pilot program  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The study assessed the implementation of Kenya comprehensive school health pilot intervention program. This pilot program has informed the Kenya Comprehensive School Health Policy which is a critical document in the achievement of Millennium Development Goals relating to child health, gender equality, universal education and environmental sustainability. The study was based on focus group discussions, field observations and in-depth interviews with government officers who implemented the pilot program. The findings were categorized into implementation process, what is working well, what is not working well and lessons learned. During the course of the study, it was noted that involvement of all stakeholders enhances program ownership and sustainability but if they are not well coordinated or where supportive supervision and monitoring is not carried out, then some components of the comprehensive school health program may not be sustainable. We learnt that comprehensive school health program increases students’ enrolment, attendance and retention, factors that are very important in a country’s human resources development. The study has shown that although the formulation of a policy may be participatory and bottom-top, the implementation requires allocation of enough resources and coordination to bridge the gap between policy formulation and implementation.

Job Wasonga

2014-02-01

411

Botanical literacy: What and how should students learn about plants?  

Science.gov (United States)

Botanists benefit from a scientifically literate society and an interested and botanically literate student population, and we have opportunities to promote literacy in our classes. Unfortunately, scientific illiteracy exists, in part, because students are technologically advanced but lack intellectual curiosity and rigor. Botanical illiteracy results from several interacting factors, including a lack of interest in plants and infrequent exposure to plant science before students reach college. If scientific or botanical literacy is a goal, we must understand what literacy means and how we can help students reach that goal. A model of biological literacy recognizes four levels; students enter courses at the lowest level possessing misconceptions about concepts; however, misconceptions can be used to our advantage, especially by using concept inventories. Inquiry-based instruction is advocated for all science courses, and learning theory supports inquiry. Seven principles of learning inform recommendations about how botanists should teach, including using themes and "thinking botanically" to illustrate all biological concepts. Overall, consideration of the botanical content taught is less critical than the methods used to teach that content. If botanists emphasize thinking and process skills with an understanding of concepts, we will prepare scientifically literate students and citizens and benefit from our efforts. PMID:21622295

Uno, Gordon E

2009-10-01

412

NASA's Kepler Mission: Lessons Learned from Teacher Professional Development Workshops  

Science.gov (United States)

NASA's Kepler Mission conducts teacher professional development workshops on the search for exoplanets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. Each is supported by a Kepler team scientist, two Education and Public Outreach staff and local hosts. Activities combine a science content lecture and discussion, making models, kinesthetic activities, and interpretation of transit data. The emphasis is on inquiry-based instruction and supports science education standards in grades 7-12. Participants' kit includes an orrery, optical sensor and software to demonstrate transit detection. The workshop plan, teaching strategies, and lessons learned from evaluation will be discussed. Future events are planned. The Kepler Mission teacher professional development workshops are designed using the best practices and principals from the National Science Education Standards and similar documents. Sharing the outcome of our plans, strategies and formative evaluation results can be of use to other Education and Public Outreach practitioners who plan similar events. In sharing our experiences, we hope to assist others, and to learn from them as well. Supported by NASA Grants to the E. DeVore, SETI Institute NAG2-6066 Kepler Education and Public Outreach and NNX08BA74G, IYA Kepler Mission Pre-launch Workshops.

Devore, E.; Harman, P.; Koch, D.; Gould, A.

2010-08-01

413

Teacher Professional Development: Lessons Learned from Six Kepler Mission Workshops  

Science.gov (United States)

NASA's Kepler Mission conducted teacher professional development workshops on the search for exoplanets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. During late 2008 and into 2009, six workshops were conducted surrounding the launch of the Kepler Mission. These were a part of the Kepler Mission's outreach honoring the International Year of Astronomy. Each workshop was supported by a Kepler team scientist, two Education & Public Outreach staff and local hosts. Activities combined a science content lecture and discussion, making models, kinesthetic activities, and interpretation of transit data. The emphasis was on inquiry-based instruction and supported science education standards in grades 7-12. Participants’ kit included an orrery, optical sensor and software to demonstrate transit detection. The workshop plan, teaching strategies, and lessons learned from evaluation will be discussed. The Kepler Mission teacher professional development workshops were designed using the best practices and principals from the National Science Education Standards and similar documents. Sharing the outcome of our plans, strategies and evaluation results can be of use to other Education and Public Outreach practitioners who plan similar events. In sharing our experiences, we hope to assist others, and to learn from them as well. Future events are planned. Supported by NASA Grants to the SETI Institute: NAG2-6066 Kepler Education and Public Outreach and NNX08BA74G, IYA Kepler Mission Pre-launch Workshops.

DeVore, Edna; Harman, P.; Gould, A.; Koch, D.

2010-01-01

414

Enhancing learning and comprehension through strengthening visual literacy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Living in an image-rich world, as we currently do, does not mean that individuals naturally possess visual literacy skills. This article explores the concept of ‘visual literacy’, and the skills needed to develop visual literacy and visual intelligence. Developing visual literacy in educational environments is important because it can contribute to individual empowerment, and it is therefore necessary to take pedagogical advantage of visual literacy’s place across the disciplines. Doing this means tapping into experiences, expertise and interest in visual communication and building a new paradigm that takes visual education seriously.

Cheryl Le Roux

2011-08-01

415

Helping Students Develop Listening Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Listening practice is often neglected or handled inappropriately in the teachinglearning process. This poses problem because listening is an integral part of conversations. Oral skills without equally welldeveloped listening abilities are of little practical value. In this article, I will take a look at issues related to the area of listening that may be considered when guiding students toward developing listening comprehension.

Cárdenas Beltrán Melba Libia

2000-08-01

416

Surface Information Loss in Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Shortly after a sentence has been comprehended, information about its exact surface form (e.g., its word order) becomes less available. The present research demonstrated this phenomenon during the comprehension of nonverbal stimuli (picture stories). In Experiment 1, significantly more surface (left/right orientation) information was lost after comprehending several picture stories than just one; in Experiment 2, more was lost after comprehending an entire picture story than half of one. In E...

Ann Gernsbacher, Morton

1985-01-01

417

A comprehensive radiology information system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

DECrad version II was recently tested by members of the Radiology Information System Consortium (RISC) and was found to meet the specifications prepared by the consortium. It is a comprehensive tailorable system that can be interfaced to practically any HIS. This paper provides an overall view of the major functions of the system which include registration, scheduling, tracking, film library management, reporting, statistics, and teaching modules. The evolution of the specification and user experiences is reported

418

Self-Directed Learning in Adulthood: A Literature Review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-directed learning (SDL) is among the most productive areas of research in adult education. Malcolm S. Knowles is credited with a comprehensive synthesis of adult teaching and adult learning principles. Andragogy, the art and science of helping adults learn, lies at the heart of Knowles' work. Lucy M. Guglielmino theorized regarding the…

Owen, T. Ross

419

The Impact of Listening Strategy on Listening Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Successful FL learners are characterized by knowing how to use language learning strategies effectively. This article reports a study of the effect of strategy training on listening comprehension. In the study, 56 intermediate foreign language learners at Shandong Economic College were either participants in a strategies-based instructional treatment or were comparison students receiving the regular listening course. Data were obtained and analyzed through the performance of a set of three listening tasks on a pre-post basis by both groups. The subsample of twelve students also provided verbal report data to show their cognitive insights into strategy use and the instruction itself. It was found that the increased use of listening strategy contributed positively to listening comprehension, which led to the implication that formal strategy training should have a role in the foreign language listening classroom.

Yan Zhang

2012-03-01

420

Comprehensive Training of Engineering Students through Continuing Education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper addresses a priority for student training in general and particularly for future engineers. Although this issue has been frequently addressed in recent years, proposals are still insufficient for engineering students. This paper is aimed at theoretically and empirically demonstrating the potential of continuing education as one of the key areas that engineering schools have for the comprehensive training of students. Preliminary results of a research project commissioned by the School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Electrica-FIME of Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Mexico, are presented to respond to the need to improve the learning process of students with a comprehensive approach. The research justification and some of the results obtained in the exploratory pha