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Does Artificial Tutoring Foster Inquiry Based Learning?  

Science.gov (United States)

This contribution looks at the Intelligent Tutoring Interface for Technology Enhanced Learning, which integrates multistage-learning and inquiry-based learning in an adaptive e-learning system. Based on a common pedagogical ontology, adaptive e-learning systems can be enabled to recommend learning objects and activities, which follow inquiry-based…

Schmoelz, Alexander; Swertz, Christian; Forstner, Alexandra; Barberi, Alessandro

2014-01-01

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WESPOT: Inquiry based learning meets learning analytics  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

weSPOT, a project supported by the European Commission, addresses several challenges to building personal knowledge, specifically in the area of science. It focuses on inquiry-based learning, in which the learner takes the role of a self-motivated explorer, and provides support for building these skills. The main problem areas weSPOT tackles are the general lack of inquiry skills in students from ages 12 to 25, the dearth of technological support to bolster students’ curiosity, linking ...

Specht, Marcus; Bedek, Michael; Duval, Erik; Held, Peter; Okada, Alexandra; Stefanov, Krassen; Parodi, Elisabetta; Kikis-papadakis, K.; Strahovnik

2013-01-01

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My Journey with Inquiry-Based Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

The author chronicles his experiments with inquiry-based learning (IBL) as he applied lessons from the literature and assessed the results. He describes a difficult journey with the result that, with the help of the literature, supportive colleagues and patient, creative students, he learned how to design courses that invite undergraduates to…

Gonzalez, Joseph J.

2013-01-01

4

Inquiry based learning with a virtual microscope  

Science.gov (United States)

As part of newly funded initiative, the Wolfson OpenScience Laboratory, we are linking a tool for inquiry based learning, nQuire (http://www.nquire.org.uk) with the virtual microscope for Earth science (http://www.virtualmicroscope.co.uk) to allow students to undertake projects and gain from inquiry based study thin sections of rocks without the need for a laboratory with expensive petrological microscopes. The Virtual Microscope (VM) was developed for undergraduate teaching of petrology and geoscience, allowing students to explore rock hand specimens and thin sections in a browser window. The system is based on HTML5 application and allows students to scan and zoom the rocks in a browser window, view in ppl and xpl conditions, and rotate specific areas to view birefringence and pleochroism. Importantly the VM allows students to gain access to rare specimens such as Moon rocks that might be too precious to suffer loss or damage. Experimentation with such specimens can inspire the learners' interest in science and allows them to investigate relevant science questions. Yet it is challenging for learners to engage in scientific processes, as they may lack scientific investigation skills or have problems in planning their activities; for teachers, managing inquiry activities is a demanding task (Quintana et al., 2004). To facilitate the realization of inquiry activities, the VM is being integrated with the nQuire tool. nQuire is a web tool that guides and supports students through the inquiry process (Mulholland et al., 2011). Learners are encouraged to construct their own personally relevant hypothesis, pose scientific questions, and plan the method to answer them. Then, the system enables users to collect and analyze data, and share their conclusions. Teachers can monitor their students' progress through inquiries, and give them access to new parts of inquiries as they advance. By means of the integration of nQuire and the VM, inquiries that involve collecting data through a microscope can be created and supported. To illustrate the possibilities of these tools, we have designed two inquiries that engage learners in the study of Moon rock samples under the microscope, starting from general questions such as comparison of Moon rocks or determining the origin of meteorites. One is aimed at undergraduate Geology students; the second has been conceived for the general public. Science teachers can reuse these inquiries, adapt them as they need, or create completely new inquiries using nQuire's authoring tool. We will report progress and demonstrate the combination of these two on-line tools to create an open educational resource allowing educators to design and run science inquiries for Earth and planetary science in a range of settings from schools to universities. Quintana, C., Reiser, B. J., Davis, E. A., Krajcik, J., Fretz, E., Duncan, R. G., Kyza, E., et al. (2004). A scaffolding design framework for software to support science inquiry. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 13(3), 337-386. Mulholland, P., Anastopoulou, S., Collins, T., FeiBt, M., Gaved, M., Kerawalla, L., Paxton, M., et al. (2011). nQuire: Technological support for personal inquiry learning. IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies. First published online, December 5, 2011, http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/TLT.2011.32.

Kelley, S. P.; Sharples, M.; Tindle, A.; Villasclaras-Fernández, E.

2012-12-01

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Learning Outcomes of Project-Based and Inquiry-Based Learning Activities  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Problem statement: Organization of science learning activities is appnecessary to rely on various methods of organization of learning and to be appropriate to learners. Organization of project-based learning activities and inquiry-based learning activities are teaching methods which can help students understand scientific knowledge. It would be more efficient. This study aimed to compare learning achievement, science process skills and analytical thinking of fifth grade students who learned by using organization of project-based and inquiry-based learning activities. Approach: The sample used in the study consisted of 88 fifth grade students, 2 selected classrooms at Muang Nakhon Ratchasima School, under the Office of Nakhon Ratchasima Educational Service Area Zone 1 in the first semester of the academic year 2008, obtained cluster random sampling technique. Students were divided into 2 groups, 44 students each. The research instruments used in the study were lesson plans for organization of project-based and inquiry-based learning activities, 8 plans each; a 30-item 4-choice science learning achievement test with discriminating powers ranging 0.28-0.46 and a reliability of 0.86; a 20-item 4-choice science process skill test with difficulties (P ranging 0.36-0.68, discriminating powers ranging 0.38-0.72 and a reliability of 0.82 and a 20-item 4-choice analytical thinking test with difficulties (P ranging 0.44-0.67, discriminating powers ranging 0.32-0.81 and a reliability 0.76. Hotelling T2 was employed for testing hypotheses. Results: The plans for organization of project-based and inquiry-based learning activities in the science learning had efficiencies 89.05/78.79 of project-based learning and 87.58/78.64 of inquiry-based learning in respectively. The plans for organization of project-based and inquiry-based learning activities had effectiveness indices 0.6774 of project-based learning and 0.6781of inquiry-based learning in respectively. Students who learned using the plans for organization of project-based learning activities and those who learned using the plans for organization of inquiry-based learning activities did not have different learning achievement, science process skills and analytical thinking (p>0.05. Conclusion: In conclusion, the plans for organization of project-based and inquiry-based learning activities were appropriately efficient and effective. The students in 2 groups did not show different learning achievement, science process skills and analytical thinking. Therefore, science teachers could implement both of these teaching methods in organization of activities as appropriate for learners to achieve in the future.

Mookdaporn Panasan

2010-01-01

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Learning Outcomes of Project-Based and Inquiry-Based Learning Activities  

Science.gov (United States)

Problem statement: Organization of science learning activities is necessary to rely on various methods of organization of learning and to be appropriate to learners. Organization of project-based learning activities and inquiry-based learning activities are teaching methods which can help students understand scientific knowledge. It would be more…

Panasan, Mookdaporn; Nuangchalerm, Prasart

2010-01-01

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Cognitive Development, Analytical Thinking, and Learning Satisfaction of Second Grade Students learned through Inquiry-based Learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Science teaching needs to be able students having knowledge and understanding. Also, students have to develop their thinking skills it should help students meet real science through inquiry-based pedagogical process. This study aims to (i investigate effective teaching criterion through inquiry-based teaching at 80/80, (ii find out effectiveness index of inquiry-based teaching, (iii compare analytical thinking between before and after students had learned by inquiry-based learning activities, and (iv study learning satisfaction of second grade students after they had learned through inquiry method. Participants of the study were 10 second grade students, sampled by purposive sampling technique. Research instruments comprised of 8-lesson plan, 20-item achievement test, 20-item analytical thinking test, and 15-item questionnaire on learning satisfaction. Data were gathered and analyzed by Wilcoxon Matched Pairs Singed–Ranks Test. Results revealed that inquiry-based learning activities had effective criterion at 84.46/82.50; effectiveness index of inquiry-based learning activities was 0.5200; post test score of achievement test higher than those pre test score at .05 statistical significance level; and students had learning satisfaction on inquiry-based learning activities at highest level. It can be concluded that inquiry-based learning activities promoted students in terms of both cognitive, analytical thinking, and learning satisfaction. It should be suggested in for pedagogical preparation and incorporate it into science curriculum.

Prasart Nuangchalerm

2009-09-01

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Working Environment with Social and Personal Open Tools for inquiry based learning: Pedagogic and Diagnostic Frameworks  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract: The weSPOT project aims at propagating scientific inquiry as the approach for science learning and teaching in combination with today’s curricula and teaching practices The project focuses on inquiry-based learning with a theoretically sound and technology supported personal inquiry approach and it contains three main development aspects: (a) define a reference model for inquiry-based learning skills, (b) create a diagnostic instrument for measuring inquiry skills, and (c) impleme...

Protopsaltis, A.; Seitlinger, P.; Chaimala, Fotini; Firssova, Olga; Hetzner, Sonja; Kikis-papadakis, K.; Boytchev, Pavel

2013-01-01

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Learning Outcomes of Project-Based and Inquiry-Based Learning Activities  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Problem statement: Organization of science learning activities is appnecessary to rely on various methods of organization of learning and to be appropriate to learners. Organization of project-based learning activities and inquiry-based learning activities are teaching methods which can help students understand scientific knowledge. It would be more efficient. This study aimed to compare learning achievement, science process skills and analytical thinking of fifth grade students who le...

Mookdaporn Panasan; Prasart Nuangchalerm

2010-01-01

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Inquiry based learning: why buying a car with a tree included? Enhancing science and mathematic learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

International reports reveal a deficient situation in relation to science and mathematics learning, which can be considered as an obstacle for the education of literate and informed citizens and the qualification and the preparation of future scientists and engineers. This situation may be partly attributed to the way science and mathematics are taught at school. Research on effective teaching approaches shows that inquiry based learning (IBL) improves students’ engagement and motivation fo...

Ariza, Marta R.; Quesada, Antonio; Abril, Ana M.; Garci?a, F. Javier

2012-01-01

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An Exploration of Students' Strategy Use in Inquiry-Based Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning  

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The aim of this study is to investigate students' use of cognitive learning strategies in inquiry-based computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). A process-oriented interview framework on cognitive activity, self-regulation and motivation, and a coding category for analysing cognitive learning strategies and cognitive self-regulation was…

Salovaara, Hanna

2005-01-01

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Supporting Students’ Interest through Inquiry-Based Learning in the Context of Fuel Cells  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The main aim of this research is to understand how inquiry-based learning in the context of fuel cells support the interest of 14 to 15-year-old male and female junior high school students. In total, 18 student groups (N=159 were involved in the case study in which a learning material with inquiry-based laboratory work in the context of fuel cells, designed based on previous research, was used. According to the survey conducted as a part of this research, the majority of youth liked inquiry-based chemistry experiments. The tangible stages of the work, i.e. compiling the miniature fuel cell car and operating it in practice, interested the youth the most. Boys were significantly more interested than girls in the applications of fuel cells related to the studied subject. Girls were interested in hydrogen energy economy, and that the issue is topical at the moment. Girls were also significantly more interested in the stages of inquiry-based learning – reporting the results and answering the questions that required reasoning. It seems that the model of inquiry-based learning used here and the learning materials give good opportunities for increasing the interests in chemistry among girls and boys alike, and thus provide a solution for the biggest challenge in chemistry education – increasing the youth’s interest in chemistry.

Maija Aksela

2012-12-01

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The Effects of Inquiry-Based Computer Simulation with Cooperative Learning on Scientific Thinking and Conceptual Understanding of Gas Laws  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of inquiry-based computer simulation with heterogeneous-ability cooperative learning (HACL) and inquiry-based computer simulation with friendship cooperative learning (FCL) on (a) scientific reasoning (SR) and (b) conceptual understanding (CU) among Form Four students in Malaysian Smart…

Abdullah, Sopiah; Shariff, Adilah

2008-01-01

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When Collaborative Learning Meets Nature: Collaborative Learning as a Meaningful Learning Tool in the Ecology Inquiry Based Project  

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This research suggests utilizing collaborative learning among high school students for better performance on ecology inquiry-based projects. A case study of nine 12th grade students who participated in collaborative learning sessions in the open field and in class is examined. The results show that the students concentrated on discussing the…

Rozenszayn, Ronit; Assaraf, Orit Ben-Zvi

2011-01-01

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Use of Genomic Databases for Inquiry-Based Learning about Influenza  

Science.gov (United States)

The genome projects of the past decades have created extensive databases of biological information with applications in both research and education. We describe an inquiry-based exercise that uses one such database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information Influenza Virus Resource, to advance learning about influenza. This database…

Ledley, Fred; Ndung'u, Eric

2011-01-01

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Inquiry-Based Learning Case Studies for Computing and Computing Forensic Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss the use of specifically-developed, inquiry-based learning materials for Computing and Forensic Computing students. Small applications have been developed which require investigation in order to de-bug code, analyse data issues and discover "illegal" behaviour. The applications are based…

Campbell, Jackie

2012-01-01

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Working with teachers on inquiry based learning (IBL) and mathematics and science tasks  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper reports on teachers’ experiences from and their evaluation of a teacher professional development event arranged in connection with the European PRIMAS project. Inquiry-based learning (IBL) and analysis of ‘appropriate’ mathematics and science tasks were the focus of this professional development programme, as these are said to increase students’ interest of and attainment levels in mathematics and science education. The data are anchored in observations and feedback/evaluat...

Lyngved, Ragnhild; Pepin, Birgit; Sikko, Svein Arne

2012-01-01

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Enhancing Students' Scientific and Quantitative Literacies through an Inquiry-Based Learning Project on Climate Change  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Promoting sustainability and dealing with complex environmental problems like climate change demand a citizenry with considerable scientific and quantitative literacy. In particular, students in the STEM disciplines of (biophysical science, technology, engineering, and mathematics need to develop interdisciplinary skills that help them understand the social dynamics of environmental problems and solutions. To this end, this study examines how participation in a semester-long inquiry-based learning project that involves sociological research on climate change beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors enhances the scientific and quantitative literacies of STEM students. The results suggest that participation in a sociological inquiry-based learning project helps STEM students to (a improve their knowledge of scientific and statistical principles and processes, (b hone their scientific research skills, and (c gain respect for sociology specifically and social science more generally. While the inquiry-based learning project described here deals with climate change, educators can adapt it to deal with other environmental social science research topics (e.g., water use, energy conservation, food security, sustainability.

Aaron M McCright

2012-12-01

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Design and Implementation of Inquiry-Based, Technology-Rich Learning Activities in a Large-Enrollment Blended Learning Course  

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Full Text Available We propose that the key to creating an effective learning experience in a blended environment with over 100 students is to strategically embed learning activities into the curriculum. Inquiry-based, technology-rich learning activities give students many of the same benefits of community as experienced in a small, traditional class. Technology-based learning activities during in-class meetings assisted in the development of community within student teams. Out-of-class technology-based learning activities leveraged multimedia online resources and provided the means for inquiry-based student learning. Students reported positive experiences with the learning activities. Content knowledge was equivalent to courses without comparable learning activities; however, students developed better application skills, relating theoretical concepts to real-life events.

Donna J. Charlevoix

2009-11-01

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Hidden in Plain Sight: Pre-Service Teachers’ Orientations Toward Inquiry-Based Learning in History  

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Full Text Available In order to implement models of reform-based history education in the classroom there is a fundamental need to address preservice and practicing teachers’ understanding of learning and teaching history, mindful of the role inquiry must play in the process. The project described in this paper employed a comparative case design to explore how prospective social studies educators perceived inquiry-based instruction and the extent to which it aligned with relevant history education for middle and secondary students. Results suggest that the process undertaken by the independent inquiry group may have an implicit impact on shaping how preservice teachers understand inquiry. Yet these preservice teachers included more inquiry-based activities in lesson plan products analyzed as part of this project. After the implementation of both means of learning about historical inquiry, many remained conflicted about what the ideal model of inquiry represents for student learning and at what ability level students are capable of engaging in inquiry in social studies.

Anthony Michael Pellegrino

2013-11-01

 
 
 
 
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Linking Teacher Beliefs, Practices and Student Inquiry-Based Learning in a CSCL Environment: A Tale of Two Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

The links uncovered by research connecting teacher beliefs to classroom practice and student inquiry-based learning are tenuous. This study aims at examining (a) "how" teacher beliefs influenced practices; and (b) "how" the influence on practices, in turn, impacted student inquiry learning in a CSCL environment. Through a fine-grained comparative…

Song, Yangjie; Looi, Chee-Kit

2012-01-01

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Laboratory projects using inquiry-based learning: an application to a practical inorganic course  

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Full Text Available This paper reports how laboratory projects (LP coupled to inquiry-based learning (IBL were implemented in a practical inorganic chemistry course. Several coordination compounds have been successfully synthesised by students according to the proposed topics by the LP-IBL junction, and the chemistry of a number of metals has been studied. Qualitative data were collected from written reports, oral presentations, lab-notebook reviews and personal discussions with the students through an experimental course with undergraduate second-year students at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia during the last 5 years. Positive skills production was observed by combining LP and IBL. Conceptual, practical, interpretational, constructional (questions, explanations, hypotheses, communicational, environmental and application abilities were revealed by the students throughout the experimental course.

José G. Carriazo

2011-01-01

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Laboratory projects using inquiry-based learning: an application to a practical inorganic course  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english This paper reports how laboratory projects (LP) coupled to inquiry-based learning (IBL) were implemented in a practical inorganic chemistry course. Several coordination compounds have been successfully synthesised by students according to the proposed topics by the LP-IBL junction, and the chemistry [...] of a number of metals has been studied. Qualitative data were collected from written reports, oral presentations, lab-notebook reviews and personal discussions with the students through an experimental course with undergraduate second-year students at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia during the last 5 years. Positive skills production was observed by combining LP and IBL. Conceptual, practical, interpretational, constructional (questions, explanations, hypotheses), communicational, environmental and application abilities were revealed by the students throughout the experimental course.

José G., Carriazo.

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An Inquiry-Based Learning Model for an Exercise Physiology Laboratory Course  

Science.gov (United States)

We developed an inquiry-based learning model to better stimulate undergraduate studentsÃÂ cognitive development of exercise physiology laboratory concepts. The course core is the two independent research projects that students, working in small groups, complete during the last 9 wk of the semester. Student groups develop their own research question and hypothesis, design the experiment, collect and analyze the data, and report their findings to the rest of the class using presentation software. To help with success of the research projects, students are taken through a series of guided-inquiry laboratory activities during the initial 6 wk of the semester to develop laboratory skills and an understanding of the scientific process. Observations of student behaviors reflected a high level of enthusiasm and engagement in laboratory activities. Surveys, journal entries, and interviews indicated that students felt empowered by having ownership in their projects, which may be the key reason for the success of this model.

PhD Fred W. Kolkhorst (San Diego State University Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences); PhD Cheryl L. Mason (San Diego State University School of Teacher Education); Dr. Dana M. DiPasquale (San Diego State University Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences); PhD Patricia Patterson (San Diego State University Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences); PhD Michael J. Buono (San Diego State University Dept. of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences)

2001-06-01

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Addressing challenges in nursing education through a clinical instruction model based on a hybrid, inquiry-based learning framework.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes an innovative hybrid, inquiry-based learning clinical instruction model used in accelerated baccalaureate nursing programs at three university nursing schools in the Washington DC metropolitan area. The authors describe student and faculty roles and offer examples of grading criteria. Nurse faculty and students from the three schools of nursing regard the clinical instruction model as a valuable teaching-learning approach that strengthens the relationship between theory and practice, prepares students to think critically and act effectively, and grooms students and faculty for a lifetime of learning in a changing world. PMID:19244801

Holaday, Stephanie D; Buckley, Kathleen M

2008-01-01

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The impact of collaborative groups versus individuals in undergraduate inquiry-based astronomy laboratory learning exercises  

Science.gov (United States)

One of the long-standing general undergraduate education requirements common to many colleges and universities is a science course with a laboratory experience component. One of the objectives frequently included in the description of most of these courses is that a student will understand the nature and processes of scientific inquiry. However, recent research has shown that learners in traditional undergraduate science laboratory environments are not developing a sufficiently meaningful understanding of scientific inquiry. Recently, astronomy laboratory activities have been developed that intentionally scaffold a student from guided activities to open inquiry ones and preliminary results show that these laboratories are successful for supporting students to understand the nature of scientific inquiry (Slater, S., Slater, T. F., & Shaner, 2008). This mixed-method quasi-experimental study was designed to determine how students in an undergraduate astronomy laboratory increase their understanding of inquiry working in relative isolation compared to working in small collaborative learning groups. The introductory astronomy laboratory students in the study generally increased their understanding of scientific inquiry over the course of the semester and this held true similarly for students working in groups and students working individually in the laboratories. This was determined by the examining the change in responses from the pretest to the posttest administration of the Views of Scientific Inquiry (VOSI) survey, the increase in scores on laboratory exercises, and observations from the instructor. Because the study was successful in determining that individuals in the astronomy laboratory do as well at understanding inquiry as those who complete their exercises in small groups, it would be appropriate to offer these inquiry-based exercises in an online format.

Sibbernsen, Kendra J.

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Inquiry-Based Learning in an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Neotectonics Course  

Science.gov (United States)

Integrating student-conducted research into the curriculum can provide students with many educational benefits. Documented benefits include, among others, increased communication skills, the ability to work as part of a research team, and enhanced self-confidence in individual problem-solving skills (e.g., Kardash, J. Ed. Psych., 2000; Seymour, et al., Science Education, 2004). As part of a larger departmental goal of integrating student- conducted research into all levels of the Pomona College Geology Department curriculum (e.g., Reinen, et al., CUR-Q, 2006), I have recently developed an intermediate-level Neotectonics course with a strong component of inquiry-based learning. This course was offered for the first time during the spring semester 2007, and will continue to be offered each year. In a series of guided inquiries throughout the course, students investigate recent seismicity and tectonic geomorphology in Southern California. With each subsequent assignment, student contributions to the research direction increases (e.g., data used, area studied, question addressed, methods used), culminating in team proposals and research projects investigating specific student-generated questions of regional tectonics. Students collect data for these investigations from several sources: (1) databases available online (e.g., IRIS, Harvard earthquake catalog), (2) desktop experiments (e.g., the "earthquake machine"), (3) topographic maps, and (4) field observations. The objective of this paper is to present initial results from this teaching experiment and examples of the projects which have been executed, including the preparation students received to be able to use the available data. Discussion and suggestions (particularly about effective means of conducting a rigorous long-term assessment) are strongly encouraged.

Reinen, L. A.

2007-12-01

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Enhanced Learning of Biotechnology Students by an Inquiry-Based Cellulase Laboratory  

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This study explored the effectiveness of an inquiry-based cellulase laboratory unit in promoting inquiry in undergraduate students in biotechnology. The following tools were used to assess the students' achievements and attitude: conceptual understanding test, concept mapping, students' documents, CLES questionnaire, students' self reflection, and…

Ketpichainarong, Watcharee; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Ruenwongsa, Pintip

2010-01-01

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The effect of guided inquiry-based instruction in secondary science for students with learning disabilities  

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Students with learning disabilities (SWLDs) need to attain academic rigor to graduate from high school and college, as well as achieve success in life. Constructivist theories suggest that guided inquiry may provide the impetus for their success, yet little research has been done to support this premise. This study was designed to fill that gap. This quasi-experimental study compared didactic and guided inquiry-based teaching of science concepts to secondary SWLDs in SDC science classes. The study examined 38 students in four classes at two diverse, urban high schools. Participants were taught two science concepts using both teaching methods and posttested after each using paper-and-pencil tests and performance tasks. Data were compared to determine increases in conceptual understanding by teaching method, order of teaching method, and exposure one or both teaching methods. A survey examined participants' perceived self-efficacy under each method. Also, qualitative comparison of the two test formats examined appropriate use with SWLDs. Results showed significantly higher scores after the guided inquiry method on concept of volume, suggesting that guided inquiry does improve conceptual understanding over didactic instruction in some cases. Didactic teaching followed by guided inquiry resulted in higher scores than the reverse order, indicating that SWLDs may require direct instruction in basic facts and procedures related to a topic prior to engaging in guided inquiry. Also application of both teaching methods resulted in significantly higher scores than a single method on the concept of density, suggesting that SWLDs may require more in depth instruction found using both methods. No differences in perceived self-efficacy were shown. Qualitative analysis both assessments and participants' behaviors during testing support the use of performance tasks over paper-and-pencil tests with SWLDs. Implications for education include the use of guided inquiry to increase SWLDs conceptual understanding and process skills, while improving motivation and participation through hands-on learning. In addition, teachers may use performance tasks to better assess students' thought process, problem solving skills, and conceptual understanding. However, constructivist teaching methods require extra training, pedagogical skills, subject matter knowledge, physical resources, and support from all stakeholders.

Eliot, Michael H.

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An Inquiry-Based Mobile Learning Approach to Enhancing Social Science Learning Effectiveness  

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This study presents a mobile exploration activity that guides elementary students to learn during a social science activity with digital support from mobile devices and wireless communications. The students are situated in both the real world and the virtual world to extend their learning experiences. The learning activities between the field and…

Shih, Ju-Ling; Chuang, Chien-Wen; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

2010-01-01

31

Working with Mathematics and Science Teachers on inquiry based learning ( IBL) Approaches: Teacher Beliefs  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper reports on mathematics and science teachers’ beliefs about the use of inquiry-based teaching strategies. Two different surveys were conducted: one with 24 teachers who were to become future instructional leaders; and one with 75 teachers as part of an international baseline study. We found that teachers in Norway would like to use more IBL strategies in their day-to-day teaching. They were also asking for more, and more relevant, professional development courses. Textbooks were n...

Sikko, Svein Arne; Lyngved, Ragnhild; Pepin, Birgit

2012-01-01

32

Investigating the Impact of a LEGO(TM)-Based, Engineering-Oriented Curriculum Compared to an Inquiry-Based Curriculum on Fifth Graders' Content Learning of Simple Machines  

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This mixed method study examined the impact of a LEGO-based, engineering-oriented curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines. This study takes a social constructivist theoretical stance that science learning involves learning scientific concepts and their relations to each other. From…

Marulcu, Ismail

2010-01-01

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Training Teachers to Use Technology and Inquiry-based Learning Practices in the Geosciences through an Industry-University Partnership  

Science.gov (United States)

Teacher professional development centered about the Geosciences is necessary in order to train K-12 teachers about this science field and to effectively educate K-12 students about Earth processes. The partnership of industries, universities, and K-12 schools is a collaborative pathway to support these efforts by providing teachers access to technology, inquiry-based learning, and authentic field experiences within the Geosciences context. This research presents the results of Project SMARTER (Science and Mathematics Advancement and Reform utilizing Technology and Enhanced Resources), a co-lead industry-university partnership and teacher professional development workshop program that focused on technology and inquiry-based learning in the Geosciences. The workshop included fifteen teachers from five distressed counties in Mississippi as defined by the Appalachian Regional Commission. Three (one science, once math, one technology) 7-12 grade teachers were selected from each school district and worked together during activities as a team to foster a cooperative learning experience. The two week workshop trained teachers on the use of a variety of technologies including: Vernier Probes and software, TI-calculators and presenter, Mimio Boards, GPS receivers, Google Earth, Excel, PowerPoint, projectors, and the use of historic geologic datasets. Furthermore, teachers were trained on proper field collection techniques, the use of Hach Kits and field probes, and the interpretation of geologic data. Each daily program incorporated the use of technology-rich and inquiry-based activities into one of the five Earth spheres: atmosphere, lithosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and anthrosphere. Results from the pre-post technology attitude survey showed that participating teachers significantly (p < 0.05) increased their confidence level in using technology. Furthermore, all participants self-reflected that the workshop both increased their interest in the Geosciences and their plans to integrate technology in future classroom activities. Qualitative responses from daily feedback forms and journal entries indicated that participating teachers were enthusiastic about inquiry-, technology-, and field-based learning activities and were willing to incorporate cross-discipline lesson plans. Evaluation of final lesson plans developed by the teachers during the workshop combined with follow-up classroom visits illustrated that the teachers appropriately developed classroom lessons to incorporate inquiry and technology and that they successfully implemented these lesson plans in their own classroom as a direct result of participating in workshop activities.

McNeal, K.; Buell, R.; Eiland, L.

2009-12-01

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Design of Social Learning Environment as Inquiry-Based on Cloud Technology for Enhancing the Critical Thinking Skill and Collaborative Learning  

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Full Text Available In the age of social learning environment, the cloud online technology Besides, it was required to facilitate the students’ learning in the 21st century. The objective of this study was to design the social learning environment as inquirybased on cloud technology for enhancing the critical thinking skills and collaborative learning by using technique in evaluating as well as accrediting the tentative model developed by the experts in order to synthesize into conceptual framework of design. Then, the obtained data were explained, interpreted, and concluded. According to research findings, found that the model of social learning environment inquirybased on cloud technology, was appropriate and practical for being applied in real practice in ?the Highest? level. It was supported by learning management for enhancing the critical thinking skills, collaborative learning, and higher education learning context which were appropriate in ?the Highest? level. The appropriateness of details in tentative model in the step and instructional activity, was in ?the Highest? level. The major factors of the model of social learning environment inquiry-based on cloud technology, were online technology base, learning theories base context base, critical thinking base and inquiry – based learning on cloud technology.

Apichaya Meepian

2013-06-01

35

IT-Adventures: A Program to Spark IT Interest in High School Students Using Inquiry-Based Learning with Cyber Defense, Game Design, and Robotics  

Science.gov (United States)

The IT-Adventures program is dedicated to increasing interest in and awareness of information technology among high school students using inquiry-based learning focused on three content areas: cyber defense, game design programming, and robotics. The program combines secondary, post-secondary, and industry partnerships in educational programming,…

Rursch, Julie A.; Luse, Andy; Jacobson, Doug

2010-01-01

36

An Inquiry-Based Linear Algebra Class  

Science.gov (United States)

Linear algebra is a standard undergraduate mathematics course. This paper presents an overview of the design and implementation of an inquiry-based teaching material for the linear algebra course which emphasizes discovery learning, analytical thinking and individual creativity. The inquiry-based teaching material is designed to fit the needs of a…

Wang, Haohao; Posey, Lisa

2011-01-01

37

Open inquiry-based learning experiences: a case study in the context of energy exchange by thermal radiation  

Science.gov (United States)

An open inquiry (OI)-based teaching/learning experience, regarding a scientific investigation of the process of energy exchange by thermal radiation, is presented. A sample of upper secondary school physics teachers carried out this experience at the University of Palermo, Italy, in the framework of ESTABLISH, a FP7 European Project aimed at promoting and developing inquiry-based science education. The teachers had the opportunity to personally experience an OI-based learning activity, with the aim of exploring the pedagogical potentialities of this teaching approach to promote both the understanding of difficult concepts and a deeper view of scientific practices. The teachers were firstly engaged in discussions concerning real-life problematic situations, and then stimulated to design and carry out their own laboratory activities, aimed at investigating the process of energy exchange by thermal radiation. A scientific study on the energy exchange between a powered resistor and its surrounding environment, during the heating and cooling processes, was designed and performed. Here we report the phases of this experiment by following the teachers' perspective. A structured interview conducted both before and after the OI experience allowed us to analyze and point out the teachers' feedback from a pedagogical point of view. The advantages and limits of an OI-based approach to promote the development of more student-centred inquiry-oriented teaching strategies are finally discussed.

Pizzolato, Nicola; Fazio, Claudio; Rosario Battaglia, Onofrio

2014-01-01

38

Kindergarten Teachers' Perceptions of an Inquiry-Based Science Teaching and Learning Professional Development Intervention  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Scholars and education reformers alike have re-ignited the importance of teaching science in the elementary grades of the public schools of America by disputing the traditional belief that K-4 learners are too young to learn and function within the nature of science learning and experimentation. The consideration rests on the findings…

Furtado, Leena

2010-01-01

39

Investigating instructional practices and student learning during the enactment of an inquiry-based chemistry unit  

Science.gov (United States)

The interplay between instructional practices and student learning during inquiry instruction was examined in four seventh grade urban science classrooms. The chemistry unit incorporates features of project-based science inquiry and aligns with content learning goals specified in national standards. Unit materials support teachers in employing instructional practices that are meant to promote learning as students engage in inquiry activities. This study characterized instructional practices that were evident as teachers used the materials and connected these practices to student learning of a challenging chemistry content learning goal. To examine teachers' practices, classroom lessons were documented on videotape and an observation scheme was employed. Observations focused on teachers' efforts in building and sustaining lesson coherence, contextualizing instruction, providing opportunities for student sense-making, supporting student sense-making, creating a classroom climate for learning, and enacting lessons with congruency to the unit materials. Data sources for examining student learning included selected items from pretests and posttests that focused on students' understandings of the learning goal. Structured interviews with a subset of students at three time points as they progressed through the unit provided another source of data for investigating students' developing understanding of the chemistry content. Exploratory data analysis was used to explore how learning was shaped through teachers' instructional practices. The exploratory analysis process involved examining the overall impact of classroom instruction on achievement scores, exploring differences in instructional practices among teachers that might account for differences in student achievement, and exploring connections between teaching and learning around a single lesson. Findings showed that learning was enhanced when teachers guided students in accomplishing inquiry tasks and in making sense of their inquiry experiences. Simply telling students science knowledge and providing explanatory rules for differentiating key science ideas appeared less effective for helping students learn. One implication from this study is that inquiry teachers may need to use explicitness during instruction, such as making science ideas clear and giving direct guidance about how to engage in tasks, to support the learning of students who have limited prior content knowledge and inquiry experience. This work demonstrates how aligned unit materials can benefit teachers, students, and researchers.

Harris, Christopher Joseph

40

Grounding Inquiry-based Teaching and Learning Methods in Physics Experiences for Prospective Elementary Teachers  

Science.gov (United States)

In teaching inquiry classes in physics, I ask students to reflect on their learning in journals. One of the journal questions deals with student expectations of transfer of the inquiry techniques used in our class into their own classrooms when they become teachers themselves. I report on students' answers to this question over a five-year period, which gives insight into how much or how little the students think the techniques are worth to themselves as both students and prospective teachers.

Aubrecht Ii., Gordon J.

2010-01-18

 
 
 
 
41

Sweet Science for ALL! Supporting Inquiry-Based Learning through M&Ms Investigation for English Language Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes a series of inquiry-based lessons that provide English language learners (ELLs) with opportunities to experience science and engineering practices with conceptual understanding as well as to develop their language proficiency in elementary classrooms. The four-lesson sequence models how various types of instructional…

Song, Youngjin; Higgins, Teresa; Harding-DeKam, Jenni

2014-01-01

42

Investigating the impact of a LEGO(TM)-based, engineering-oriented curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines  

Science.gov (United States)

This mixed method study examined the impact of a LEGO-based, engineering-oriented curriculum compared to an inquiry-based curriculum on fifth graders' content learning of simple machines. This study takes a social constructivist theoretical stance that science learning involves learning scientific concepts and their relations to each other. From this perspective, students are active participants, and they construct their conceptual understanding through the guidance of their teacher. With the goal of better understanding the use of engineering education materials in classrooms the National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council in the book "Engineering in K-12 Education" conducted an in-depth review of the potential benefits of including engineering in K--12 schools as (a) improved learning and achievement in science and mathematics, (b) increased awareness of engineering and the work of engineers, (c) understanding of and the ability to engage in engineering design, (d) interest in pursuing engineering as a career, and (e) increased technological literacy (Katehi, Pearson, & Feder, 2009). However, they also noted a lack of reliable data and rigorous research to support these assertions. Data sources included identical written tests and interviews, classroom observations and videos, teacher interviews, and classroom artifacts. To investigate the impact of the design-based simple machines curriculum compared to the scientific inquiry-based simple machines curriculum on student learning outcomes, I compared the control and the experimental groups' scores on the tests and interviews by using ANCOVA. To analyze and characterize the classroom observation videotapes, I used Jordan and Henderson's (1995) method and divide them into episodes. My analyses revealed that the design-based Design a People Mover: Simple Machines unit was, if not better, as successful as the inquiry-based FOSS Levers and Pulleys unit in terms of students' content learning. I also found that students in the engineering group outperformed students in the control group in regards to their ability to answer open-ended questions when interviewed. Implications for students' science content learning and teachers' professional development are discussed.

Marulcu, Ismail

43

Exercise in Inquiry: Critical Thinking in an Inquiry-Based Exercise Physiology Laboratory Course.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes an inquiry-based teaching method implemented in an undergraduate exercise physiology laboratory course. Indicates students' strong, positive feelings about the inquiry-based teaching method and shows that inquiry-based learning results in a higher order of learning not typically observed in traditional style classes. This teaching method…

DiPasquale, Dana M.; Mason, Cheryl L.; Kolkhorst, Fred W.

2003-01-01

44

A Modified Moore Approach to Teaching Mathematical Statistics: An Inquiry Based Learning Technique to Teaching Mathematical Statistics  

Science.gov (United States)

The author of this paper submits the thesis that learning requires doing; only through inquiry is learning achieved, and hence this paper proposes a programme of use of a modified Moore method in a Probability and Mathematical Statistics (PAMS) course sequence to teach students PAMS. Furthermore, the author of this paper opines that set theory…

McLoughlin, M. Padraig M. M.

2008-01-01

45

An inquiry-based laboratory on friction  

CERN Multimedia

Sliding friction is usually introduced in high school, but rarely through activities in laboratory. A qualitative introduction to friction is presented by proposing exploration of different kind of materials in order to suggest which aspects can be relevant and which interaction is involved. Different quantitative experiments are proposed for studying Leonardo's laws for friction. The learning path was tested with two high school classes during an instruction trip at department. Students were engaged in the inquiry-based introductory activity and seemed to realize with care the measurements. However, the analysis of their reports shows some learning difficulties.

Montalbano, Vera

2013-01-01

46

Conceptualising inquiry based education in mathematics  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The terms inquiry-based learning (IBL) and inquiry-based education (IBE) have appeared with increasing frequency in educational policy and curriculum documents related to mathematics and science education over the past decade, indicating a major educational trend. We go back to the origin of inquiry as a pedagogical concept in the work of Dewey (e.g. 1916, 1938) to analyse and discuss its migration to science and mathematics education. For conceptualizing inquiry-based mathematics education (IBME) it is important to analyse how this concept resonates with already well-established theoretical frameworks in mathematics education. Six such frameworks are analysed from the perspective of inquiry: the problem-solving tradition, the Theory of Didactical Situations, the Realistic Mathematics Education programme, the mathematical modelling perspective, the Anthropological Theory of Didactics, and the dialogical and critical approach to mathematics education. In an appendix these frameworks are illustrated with paradigmatic examples of teaching activities with inquiry elements. The paper is rounded off with a list of ten concerns for the development and implementation of IBME.

Blomhøj, Morten; Artigue, Michéle

2013-01-01

47

Using Handheld Computers and Probeware in Inquiry-Based Science Education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Handheld computer technologies and probeware have the potential to support inquiry-based science projects in K-12 education. Teacher training is important for effective integration of inquiry-based learning to provide students with rich and authentic learning experiences. This article describes the implementation and results of a project designed to train teachers to use an inquiry-based approach to science education with the help of emerging handheld technologies. The project included training of elementary and middle school teachers on methods of inquiry-based science, integrating handhelds and probes, and development of inquiry-based science lessons. It was intended that the teacher participants model development and implementation of inquiry-based science lessons using handheld computer technologies.

Selma Vonderwell

2005-09-01

48

Shifting to an Inquiry-Based Experience  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching science with an inquiry-based approach can seem like an impossible challenge. However, it is achievable. One way to begin is by converting a cookbook-style lab (from the internet or a textbook) into an inquiry-based science experience. To convert a cookbook lab into an inquiry-based science experience, the authors propose the following…

Corder, Gregory; Slykhuis, Julie

2011-01-01

49

Successful Implementation of Inquiry-Based Physiology Laboratories in Undergraduate Major and Nonmajor Courses  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent evidence has demonstrated that inquiry-based physiology laboratories improve students' critical- and analytical-thinking skills. We implemented inquiry-based learning into three physiology courses: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (majors), Human Physiology (majors), and Human Anatomy and Physiology (nonmajors). The aims of our curricular…

Casotti, G.; Rieser-Danner, L.; Knabb, M. T.

2008-01-01

50

A Comprehensive Survey of Multiagent Reinforcement Learning:  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Multiagent systems are rapidly finding applications in a variety of domains, including robotics, distributed control, telecommunications, and economics. The complexity ofmany tasks arising in these domains makes them difficult to solve with preprogrammed agent behaviors. The agents must, instead, discover a solution on their own, using learning. A significant part of the research on multiagent learning concerns reinforcement learning techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive survey of m...

Busoniu, L.; Babuska, R.; Schutter, B.

2008-01-01

51

Using Comparative Genomics for Inquiry-Based Learning to Dissect Virulence of "Escherichia coli" O157:H7 and "Yersinia pestis"  

Science.gov (United States)

Genomics and bioinformatics are topics of increasing interest in undergraduate biological science curricula. Many existing exercises focus on gene annotation and analysis of a single genome. In this paper, we present two educational modules designed to enable students to learn and apply fundamental concepts in comparative genomics using examples…

Baumler, David J.; Banta, Lois M.; Hung, Kai F.; Schwarz, Jodi A.; Cabot, Eric L.; Glasner, Jeremy D.; Perna, Nicole T.

2012-01-01

52

Perceived Benefits and Attitudes of Student Teachers to Web-Quest as a Motivating, Creative and Inquiry-Based Learning Tool in Education  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study discussed how the Department of Teacher Education, University of Ibadan utilized Web-Quest as a motivating and creative tool to teach a compulsory and large pre-service teachers’ Course (TEE 304) The study also investigated the attitude and perception of pre-service teachers to the use of Web-Quest. The results showed that the sample perceived Web-Quest as a useful creative, motivating pedagogical tool for learning. Student teachers perceived Web-Quest as interesting and highl...

2013-01-01

53

The Integration of the Big6 Information Literacy and Reading Strategies Instruction in a Fourth Grade Inquiry-Based Learning Course, “Our Aquarium”  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigated the student performance in an inquiry learning course which integrated information literacy and reading strategies in a fourth-grade science class. The curriculum design was based on the Big6 model, which includes the stages of task definition, information seeking strategies, location & access, use of information, synthesis, and evaluation. The study duration was one semester. The data was gathered through participant observations, interviews, surveys, tests, and from documents generated in the course implementation. The results showed that the integration of information literacy and reading strategies instruction was feasible. The students performed well in information seeking strategies, locating & accessing information, using and synthesizing information. In contrast, their abilities in task definition and evaluation needed further improvement. Also, while the students did acquire various reading strategies during the inquiry process, they needed more exercises to internalize the skills. The performance on the acquisition of subject knowledge was also improved through the inquiry learning. The participating instructors considered that the collaboration between teachers of different subject matters was the key to a successful integrated instruction [Article content in Chinese

Lin Ching Chen

2013-06-01

54

An Inquiry-Based Exercise for Demonstrating Prey Preference in Snakes  

Science.gov (United States)

The recent promotion of inquiry-based learning techniques (Uno, 1990) is well suited to the use of animals in the classroom. Working with living organisms directly engages students and stimulates them to actively participate in the learning process. Students develop a greater appreciation for living things, the natural world, and their impact on…

Place, Aaron J.; Abramson, Charles I.

2006-01-01

55

Blended Learning: A Ubiquitous Learning Environment for Reading Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Learning environments have turned to a hot discussion among language scholars. Very popular nowadays, blended learning is not a new concept. It enjoys the advantages of face-to-face classrooms and virtual learning. This study is an attempt to discover whether conventional or blended learning environments can better enhance the reading comprehension for EFL learners. 107 Iranian students majoring in English at Abadeh Islamic Azad University and Zand Institute of Higher Education in Shiraz were selected. A reading comprehension test was administered as the pretest. Then, the participants were put in control and experimental groups. For the treatment, the experimental group received the instruction in the classroom and had assignments through virtual environments whereas the control group had the instruction and assignments in conventional mode. A post-test of reading comprehension was administered, and the participants' performances in both tests were compared. The results indicated blending traditional classroom instruction with technology can help learners outperform in their reading comprehension.

Fatemeh Behjat

2012-01-01

56

Co-constructing inquiry-based science with teachers: Essential research for lasting reform  

Science.gov (United States)

In this article we assert a potential research agenda for the teaching and learning of science as inquiry as part of the JRST series on reform in science education. Drawing on the theoretical frameworks of cognitive and sociocultural constructivism, cultural models of meaning, the dialogic function of language, and transformational models of teacher education, we propose that more research is needed in the areas of teachers' beliefs, knowledge, and practices of inquiry-based science, as well as, student learning. Because the efficacy of reform efforts rest largely with teachers, their voices need to be included in the design and implementation of inquiry-based curriculum. As we review the literature and pose future research questions, we propose that particular attention be paid to research on inquiry in diverse classrooms, and to modes of inquiry-based instruction that are designed by teachers.

Keys, Carolyn W.; Bryan, Lynn A.

2001-08-01

57

Life-cycle thinking in inquiry-based sustainability education - effects on students’ attitudes towards chemistry and environmental literacy  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The aim of the present study is to improve the quality of students’ environmental literacy and sustainability education in chemistry teaching by combining the socio-scientific issue of life-cycle thinking with inquiry-based learning approaches. This case study presents results from an inquiry-based life-cycle thinking project: an interdisciplinary teaching model designed by chemistry teachers. The strength of the project is that upper-secondary students (N=105) are allowed to investigate th...

Juntunen, Marianne; Aksela, Maija

2013-01-01

58

Assessing the effectiveness of an inquiry-based science education professional development  

Science.gov (United States)

Both inquiry-based science teaching and online learning opportunities have grown in popularity with recent pressures in the educational field. Despite such interest in both topics, there is both conflicting research and limited research in the effectiveness of inquiry-based teaching methods and online learning respectively. This study focused on the Neighborhood Academic Initiative STEM (NAI-STEM) professional development program that concentrated on inquiry science learning using an online platform. The attendees participated in both synchronous and asynchronous online sessions that facilitated their implementation of an inquiry-based curriculum to urban high school students around the University of Southern California area. The effectiveness of this professional development was assessed using Kirkpatrick's Four Levels of Evaluation model (1996), utilizing tools such as pre- and post-surveys, teacher observations and interviews, and student pre- and post-assessment scores. Results suggest that inquiry-based teaching is effective in increasing student science academic achievement, but further studies should be conducted to test the generalizability of this professional development design.

Gomez, Mark C.

59

Assessing the Reading Comprehension of Adults with Learning Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: This study's aim was to begin the process of measuring the reading comprehension of adults with mild and borderline learning disabilities, in order to generate information to help clinicians and other professionals to make written material for adults with learning disabilities more comprehensible. Methods: The Test for the Reception of…

Jones, F. W.; Long, K.; Finlay, W. M. L.

2006-01-01

60

Beverage-Agarose Gel Electrophoresis: An Inquiry-based Laboratory Exercise with Virtual Adaptation1  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A wide range of literature and experience has shown that teaching methods that promote active learning, such as inquiry-based approaches, are more effective than those that rely on passive learning. Gel electrophoresis, one of the most common laboratory techniques in molecular biology, has a wide range of applications in the life sciences. As such, we chose it as a platform to expose high school and undergraduate students to the active process of scientific inquiry in general, while specifica...

Cunningham, Steven C.; Mcnear, Brad; Pearlman, Rebecca S.; Kern, Scott E.

2006-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

Reading Comprehension, Learning Styles, and Seventh Grade Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Reading is a basic life skill. Unfortunately, in 2007, only 29% of all eighth graders were able to comprehend at or above a proficient reading comprehension level. Sensory learning styles (kinesthetic, tactile, auditory, and visual) affect the way that students prefer to learn and the areas in which they will have difficulty learning. This study…

Williams, Judy

2010-01-01

62

An Inquiry-Based Approach to Teaching Photosynthesis & Cellular Respiration  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent studies of American science education have highlighted the need for more inquiry-based lessons. For example, when the National Research Counsel evaluated the Advanced Placement (AP) Biology program, it pointed out, "AP laboratory exercises tend to be "cookbook" rather than inquiry based. This criticism is particularly apt for the lab…

O'Connell, Dan

2008-01-01

63

Inquiry-Based Examination of Chemical Disruption of Bacterial Biofilms  

Science.gov (United States)

Inquiry-based instruction in the sciences has been demonstrated as a successful educational strategy to use for both high school and college science classrooms. As participants in the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) Program, we were tasked with creating novel inquiry-based activities for high school classrooms. As a way to…

Redelman, Carly V.; Hawkins, Misty A. W.; Drumwright, Franklin R.; Ransdell, Beverly; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

2012-01-01

64

Life-Cycle Thinking in Inquiry-Based Sustainability Education – Effects on Students’ Attitudes towards Chemistry and Environmental Literacy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to improve the quality of students’ environmental literacy and sustainability education in chemistry teaching by combining the socio-scientific issue of life-cycle thinking with inquiry-based learning approaches. This case study presents results from an inquiry-based life-cycle thinking project: an interdisciplinary teaching model designed by chemistry teachers. The strength of the project is that upper-secondary students (N=105 are allowed to investigate the life cycle of an optional product based on their own interest. Studentcentred teaching methods are suggested to promote the students’ interest in studying. The research question was: How does an inquiry-based life-cycle thinking project in chemistry education affect students’ chemistry attitudes and environmental literacy? The research methods used included surveys and semi-structured interviews. The study shows that the project positively affected students’ attitudes towards chemistry learning: they valued the independent and collaborative learning setting. The changes in the students’ environmental literacy were evident in their new realisations: they emphasised the importance of environmental protection and recycling, but perceived that changing their own behaviour is still difficult. The inquiry-based teaching of life-cycle thinking can be seen as an effective approach to more motivating and sustainable chemistry education. Further research should address the kinds of knowledge outcomes that this type of inquiry-based life-cycle teaching creates in students. Furthermore, other useful approaches to teaching sustainable development in chemistry lessons should be shared.

Marianne Juntunen

2013-01-01

65

A neuropsychological perspective on measuring sign language learning and comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In this paper we present a tentative neuropsychological explanation on sign-language comprehension. A spatial probability interface is applied to study levels of comprehension with regard to British Sign Language (BSL) sequences. The results of this study not only support the validity of the spatial probability interface as a means of expressing learning and comprehension, but also refer to gender differences. These differences are discussed in the light of present neuropsychological theory.

Eling Hsiao; Moore, David R.; James Ohene-Djan; Saduf Naqvi; Rainer Spiegel

2007-01-01

66

A neuropsychological perspective on measuring sign language learning and comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this paper we present a tentative neuropsychological explanation on sign-language comprehension. A spatial probability interface is applied to study levels of comprehension with regard to British Sign Language (BSL sequences. The results of this study not only support the validity of the spatial probability interface as a means of expressing learning and comprehension, but also refer to gender differences. These differences are discussed in the light of present neuropsychological theory.

Rainer Spiegel

2007-01-01

67

The Role of Women in the Utilization of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Historically women have been excluded from the domain of science since antiquity. Women were viewed as lacking the attributes necessary to carry out rational thought. However, women such as American astronomer Maria Mitchell in the 19th century during her tenure as Professor of Astronomy at Vasser College in the United States may have been the first scientist to utilize inquiry-based science instruction. During the 20th century an elementary teacher named Vivian Coulter was one of the first teachers at an elementary school in the Midwestern United States to utilize the learning cycle which is a form of structured inquiry-based science instruction. This led to a partnership with the University of Oklahoma that has led the learning cycle to be disseminated to many school districts in the Midwestern United States.

William D. Simpson

2012-02-01

68

Inquiry-based science education in secondary school informatics – challenges and rewards  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The paper presents an application of the inquiry-based science education (IBSE) approach in the context of informatics, specialized classes, in the process of studying Java language by 11 graders. The experiment under consideration presents classes, performed in parallel in two mathematics high schools in Sofia, Bulgaria, in two consequence years. The levels of IBSE as well as meta-levels of inquiry skills developed by students in process of learning are described. Next, the context of the...

Nikolova, Nikolina; Stefanova, Eliza

2013-01-01

69

Engaging Non-Science Majors Through Citizen Science Projects In Inquiry-Based Introductory Geoscience Laboratory Courses  

Science.gov (United States)

Although inquiry-based/problem-based methods have been successfully incorporated in undergraduate lecture classes, a survey of commonly used laboratory manuals indicates that few non-major geoscience laboratory classes use these strategies. The Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences faculty members have developed a successful introductory Environmental Geology Laboratory course for undergraduate non-majors that challenges traditional teaching methodology as illustrated in most laboratory manuals. The Environmental Geology lab activities employ active learning methods to engage and challenge students. Crucial to establishing an open learning environment is capturing the attention of non-science majors from the moment they enter the classroom. We use catastrophic ‘gloom and doom’ current events to pique the imagination with images, news stories, and videos. Once our students are hooked, we can further the learning process with use of other teaching methods: an inquiry-based approach that requires students take control of their own learning, a cooperative learning approach that requires the participation of all team members in peer learning, and a problem/case study learning approach that primarily relies on activities distilled from current events. The final outcome is focused on creating innovative methods to communicate the findings to the general public. With the general public being the audience for their communiqué, students are less intimated, more focused, and more involved in solving the problem. During lab sessions, teams of students actively engage in mastering course content and develop essential communication skills while exploring real-world scenarios. These activities allow students to use scientific reasoning and concepts to develop solutions for scenarios such as volcanic eruptions, coastal erosion/sea level rise, flooding or landslide hazards, and then creatively communicate their solutions to the public. For example, during a two-week section on Earthquakes, teams study the effects of seismic motion on sediments underlying the Charleston, South Carolina region. Students discover areas where the greatest damage occurred during the 1886 earthquake via a walking tour of Charleston. Extracting information from historical and topographic maps, and aerial and satellite imagery provides students with the necessary information to produce an earthquake hazard map of the area. Applying the creativity and knowledge base of the multidisciplinary students generates a startling array of innovative methods for communicating their results: brochures, storybooks, computer-animated hazard maps, Facebook pages, YouTube videos - even Virtual Reality avatars! When allowed to use their imaginations and resourcefulness, these students have no bounds! Not only does the application of inquiry-based problem solving methodology in conjunction with cooperative learning enhance comprehension of the material, but by allowing undergraduate students to develop methods of communicating their knowledge to the public through an interesting variety of medium, students remain focused, engaged, and even excited about learning science that otherwise intimidated them.

Humphreys, R. R.; Hall, C.; Colgan, M. W.; Rhodes, E.

2010-12-01

70

Development and Evaluation of an Online, Inquiry-Based Food Safety Education Program for Secondary Teachers and Their Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Secondary science teachers who integrate food safety (FS) into curricula can provide FS knowledge and skills to youth while reinforcing science skills and concepts. National science education standards and the Biological Science Curriculum Study 5E Inquiry-based Learning Model were used to design an online training, Food Safety FIRST. The training…

Beffa-Negrini, Patricia A.; Cohen, Nancy L.; Laus, Mary Jane; McLandsborough, Lynne A.

2007-01-01

71

Effects of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction on Science Achievement and Interest in Science: Evidence from Qatar  

Science.gov (United States)

The author sought to investigate the effects of inquiry-based science instruction on science achievement and interest in science of 5,120 adolescents from 85 schools in Qatar. Results of hierarchical linear modeling analyses revealed the substantial positive effects of science teaching and learning with a focus on model or applications and…

Areepattamannil, Shaljan

2012-01-01

72

Inscriptional Practices in Two Inquiry-Based Classrooms: A Case Study of Seventh Graders' Use of Data Tables and Graphs  

Science.gov (United States)

This case study characterizes the inscriptional practices demonstrated by seventh graders, particularly their use of data tables and graphs, in an inquiry-based learning environment. Using a naturalistic approach, we collected multiple sources of data during an 8-month instructional unit that emphasized water quality and relevant concepts. The…

Wu, Hsin-Kai; Krajcik, Joseph S.

2006-01-01

73

Inscriptional Practices in Inquiry-Based Classrooms: How Do Seventh Graders Construct and Interpret Data Tables and Graphs?  

Science.gov (United States)

This study characterizes the inscriptional practices demonstrated by 7th graders, particularly their use of data tables and graphs, in an inquiry-based learning environment. Drawing on a naturalistic approach, we examined two seventh grade classes during an eight-month instructional unit that emphasized water quality and relevant concepts. We…

Wu, Hsin-Kai; Krajcik, Joseph S.

74

E-Learning and Comprehensive School and Kindergarten Development  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The content of this article includes experiences and results of a comprehensive development project for schools and kindergartens in Denmark. The project includes all pedagogical professionals within the organization and contains a professional development sequence based on - among other things e-learning where pedagogical professionals collaboratively develop their common and individual practices. The article takes a look at both the challenges and potentials that have surfaced using e-learn...

Line Hansen; Ole Hansen; Pia Guttorm Andersen

2012-01-01

75

New teaching and learning method in chemistry at comprehensive school  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The results of the international and national researches in science subjects draw attention to the problems in organizing the teaching and learning process. Therefore it is necessity to search for new methodological solutions. In the learning process, by choosing methodological approaches, it would be necessary to rouse students' cognitive interest, to consolidate students' fragmentary knowledge by using graphical information organizers. Based on the results of the researches the new teaching and learning method (TETRA-method was developed where the tetrahedral spatial mind model was used to implement the method. The action of the model is oriented to the discovery and understanding of various thematic interconnections and phenomena. TETRA-method was used as an alternative methodological solution for the learning chemistry at comprehensive school. The results of approbation indicate that during chemistry lessons students showed greater students' interest and activation of the learning.

Mozeika Daina

2010-03-01

76

Implementing inquiry-based kits within a professional development school model  

Science.gov (United States)

Implementation of guided inquiry teaching for the first time carries inherent problems for science teachers. Reform efforts on inquiry-based science teaching are often unsustainable and are not sensitive to teachers' needs and abilities as professionals. Professional development schools are meant to provide a research-based partnership between a public school and a university. These collaborations can provide support for the professional development of teachers. This dissertation reports a study focused on the implementation of inquiry-based science kits within the support of one of these collaborations. The researcher describes the difficulties and successful adaptations experienced by science teachers and how a coteaching model provided support. These types of data are needed in order to develop a bottom-up, sustainable process that will allow teachers to implement inquiry-based science. A qualitative methodology with "researcher as participant" was used in this study of two science teachers during 2002--2003. These two teachers were supported by a coteaching model, which included preservice teachers for each teacher as well as a supervising professor. Data were collected from the researcher's direct observations of coteachers' practice. Data were also collected from interviews and reflective pieces from the coteachers. Triangulation of the data on each teacher's case supported the validity of the findings. Case reports were prepared from these data for each classroom teacher. These case reports were used and cross-case analysis was conducted to search for major themes and findings in the study. Major findings described the hurdles teachers encounter, examples of adaptations observed in the teachers' cases and the supportive interactions with their coteachers while implementing the inquiry-based kits. In addition, the data were used to make recommendations for future training and use of the kits and the coteaching model. Results from this study showed that the kit's guided structure of inquiry and the collaboration both affected the inservice teachers in the following ways: The coteaching model supported behavioral and material management issues caused by the implementation of the kits; collaboration with preservice teachers created a "smaller-class-size" effect, which allowed teachers to attend to a smaller number of students for cooperative learning and assessment, and the elementary inservice teachers learned pedagogical strategies and science content from collaborating with secondary preservice teachers in kit use and from the kits' curriculum. Results were used as a self-study for future training and support for implementation of inquiry-based kits.

Jones, Mark Thomas

77

An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Design for Microbial Ecology  

Science.gov (United States)

There is a collective need to increase the use of inquiry-based instruction at the college level. This paper provides of an example of how inquiry was successfully used in the laboratory component of an undergraduate course in microbial ecology. Students were offered a collection of field and laboratory methods to choose from, and they developed a…

Tessier, Jack T.; Penniman, Clayton A.

2006-01-01

78

Discovering Biofilms: Inquiry-Based Activities for the Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

In nature, bacteria exist in and adapt to different environments by forming microbial communities called "biofilms." We propose simple, inquiry-based laboratory exercises utilizing a biofilm formation assay, which allows controlled biofilm growth. Students will be able to qualitatively assess biofilm growth via staining. Recently, we developed a…

Redelman, Carly V.; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

2012-01-01

79

Investigating Toothpastes through Inquiry-Based Practical Work  

Science.gov (United States)

This authentic inquiry-based chemistry experiment provides high school students with an opportunity to investigate the effect of toothpastes on the rate of tooth decay. Students need to design and carry out a fair test to compare the effects of different brands of toothpaste. The author has developed rubrics for assessing students' planning skills…

Cheung, Derek

2005-01-01

80

PDI: Discussion and Writing in the Inquiry Based Elementary Science Classroom: Critical partners in the development of scientific reasoning and conceptual understanding, New Orleans, Louisiana; March 18, 2009  

Science.gov (United States)

This Professional Development Institute focuses on the development and use of literacy skills in science to foster upper elementary (3rd-5th grade) students' scientific reasoning as they move from direct experience to conceptual understanding. To set the stage and establish a model of classroom based guided inquiry, participants will first engage in a brief science investigation. This will be followed by an in-depth exploration of the roles of oral and written language in deepening scientific reasoning. Using classroom videos, transcripts of student discussions, student writing, and mini-case studies, we will identify a range of instructional strategies that: structure and guide serious accountable talk among students; foster careful use of notebooks for recording and concluding; and provide opportunities for students to apply their understanding through different genres of writing. We will also focus on the relationship between talking and writing and the important back and forth that takes place as students clarify and deepen their understanding of science ideas. Participants also will have the opportunity to explore the relationship between literacy and science teaching and learning and the important connections that can and should be made in the classroom. Much is being made of the connection between science and literacy in many educational arenas. Publishers are producing science readers by the dozen. Science journals and science notebooks are more and more common. Teachers and other educational leaders are emphasizing the connection in the hopes of keeping science off the back burner. Others see science as a way to motivate students to build their literacy skills and improve test scores. This institute stems from the growing literature on the role of discussion and writing in interpreting, analyzing and synthesizing the ideas and experiences of scientific investigations. There is little doubt that direct experience with science phenomena is critical to student science learning, but it does not in itself lead to the development of conclusions and new theories. For this to take place students need to reflect on their experience, examine and analyze their data, debate and discuss their ideas, write down their conclusions, and communicate them to others. In other words they need to use language - literacy. How they use language and what teachers do to support this is the focus of this institute. This institute is intended for science educators interested in exploring how discussion and writing permeate effective inquiry based instruction at the upper elementary level (3-5th grade). In large and small highly interactive groups, participants will have the opportunity to learn from the resources provided by the institute leaders as well as from one another. The presenters of the workshop reflect a critical partnership between literacy and science educators. Three of the presenters of this institute are science educators with many years of experience in developing inquiry based curricula, working with both pre-service and in-service teachers on inquiry based science teaching and learning. One of the presenters is an expert in comprehensive literacy and has many years experience providing professional development to teachers. In 2003, the Center for Science Education at EDC received an NSF grant to develop professional development materials to enhance the use of language in the inquiry based classroom with a particular focus on science discussions; student writing in notebooks and in other contexts; and the explicit connection between the teaching and learning of literacy and that of science. This institute is based on this work.

1900-01-01

 
 
 
 
81

E-Learning and Comprehensive School and Kindergarten Development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The content of this article includes experiences and results of a comprehensive development project for schools and kindergartens in Denmark. The project includes all pedagogical professionals within the organization and contains a professional development sequence based on - among other things e-learning where pedagogical professionals collaboratively develop their common and individual practices. The article takes a look at both the challenges and potentials that have surfaced using e-learning as part of the framework for both professional and organizational development. In addition, the article proposes how the experience gathered from this existing project can be used as springboard to design new professional development projects where e-learning becomes an important element of competency development for pedagogical professionals in schools and kindergartens closely related to practice.

Line Hansen

2012-08-01

82

E-Learning and Comprehensive School and Kindergarten Development  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The content of this article includes experiences and results of a comprehensive development project for schools and kindergartens in Denmark. The project includes all pedagogical professionals within the organization and contains a professional development sequence based on among other things e-learning where pedagogical professionals collaboratively develop their common and individual practices. The article takes a look at both the challenges and potentials that have surfaced using e-learning as part of the framework for both professional and organizational development. In addition, the article proposes how the experience gathered from this existing project can be used as springboard to design new professional development projects where e-learning becomes an important element of competency development for pedagogical professionals in schools and kindergartens closely related to practice.

Hansen, Line Skov; Hansen, Ole

2012-01-01

83

Sustaining inquiry-based teaching methods in the middle school science classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

This dissertation used a combination of case study and phenomenological research methods to investigate how individual teachers of middle school science in the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI) program sustain their use of inquiry-based methods of teaching and learning. While the overall context for the cases was the AMSTI program, each of the four teacher participants in this study had a unique, individual context as well. The researcher collected data through a series of interviews, multiple-day observations, and curricular materials. The interview data was analyzed to develop a textural, structural, and composite description of the phenomenon. The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP) was used along with the Assesing Inquiry Potential (AIP) questionnaire to determine the level of inquiry-based instruction occuring in the participants classrooms. Analysis of the RTOP data and AIP data indicated all of the participants utilized inquiry-based methods in their classrooms during their observed lessons. The AIP data also indicated the level of inquiry in the AMSTI curricular materials utilized by the participants during the observations was structured inquiry. The findings from the interview data suggested the ability of the participants to sustain their use of structured inquiry was influenced by their experiences with, beliefs about, and understandings of inquiry. This study contributed to the literature by supporting existing studies regarding the influence of teachers' experiences, beliefs, and understandings of inquiry on their classroom practices. The inquiry approach stressed in current reforms in science education targets content knowledge, skills, and processes needed in a future scientifically literate citizenry.

Murphy, Amy Fowler

84

Teaching science as inquiry in US and in Japan: A cross-cultural comparison of science teachers' understanding of, and attitudes toward inquiry-based teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

Since the publication of the National Science Education Standards in 1996, learning science through inquiry has been regarded as the heart of science education. However, the TIMSS 1999 Video Study showed that inquiry-based teaching has been taking place less in the United States than in Japan. This study examined similarities and differences in how Japanese and American middle-school science teachers think and feel about inquiry-based teaching. Teachers' attitudes toward the use of inquiry in science teaching were measured through a survey instrument (N=191). Teachers' understanding of inquiry-based teaching was examined through interviews and classroom observations in the United States (N=9) and Japan (N=15). The results show that in spite of the variations in teachers' definitions of inquiry-based teaching, teachers in both countries strongly agree with the idea of inquiry-based teaching. However, little inquiry-based teaching was observed in either of the countries for different reasons. The data indicate that Japanese teachers did not generally help students construct their own understanding of scientific concepts in spite of well-planned lesson structures and activity set-ups. On the other hand, the observational data indicate that American teachers often lacked meaningful science content in spite of their high level of pedagogical knowledge. The need for addressing the importance of scientific concepts in teacher preparation programs in higher education institutions in the US is advocated. To the Japanese science education community, the need for teachers' acquisition of instructional strategies for inquiry-based teaching is strongly addressed.

Tosa, Sachiko

85

Inquiry based science education providing authentic experiences for the classroom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The European Science and Technology in Action: Building Links with Industry, School and Home (ESTABLISH) is a four year (2010-2013) project funded by the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme for Science in Society. This project involves promotion and dissemination of inquiry-based teaching methods on a large scale in Europe, by provision of teacher education using materials and resources that include authentic problems informed by industry

Mcloughlin, Eilish; Finlayson, Odilla; Brady, Sarah

2012-01-01

86

"Kindergarten, can I have your eyes and ears?" politeness and teacher directive choices in inquiry-based science classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explores elementary teachers' social understandings and employment of directives and politeness while facilitating inquiry science lessons prior and subsequent to their participation in a summer institute in which they were introduced to the scholarly literature on regulative discourse (directives used by teachers to regulate student behavior). A grounded theory analysis of the institute professional development activities revealed that teachers developed an increased awareness of the authoritative functions served by impolite or direct directives (i.e., pragmatic awareness). Furthermore, a comparative microethnographic analysis of participants' inquiry-based classroom practices revealed that after the institute teachers demonstrated an increased ability to share authority with students by strategically making directive choices that were more polite, indirect, inclusive, involvement-focused and creative. Such ability led to a reduced emphasis on teacher regulation of student compliance with classroom behavioral norms and an increased focus on the discursive organization of the inquiry-based science learning/teaching process. Despite teachers' increased pragmatic awareness, teacher-student linguistic relationships did not become entirely symmetrical subsequent to their participation in the summer institute (i.e., teacher authority was not completely relinquished or lost). Based on such findings, it is argued that teachers need to develop higher levels of pragmatic awareness to become effectively prepared to engage in language-mediated teacher-student interaction in the context of inquiry-based science classroom discourse.

Oliveira, Alandeom Wanderlei

2009-12-01

87

Developing an Explicit-Reflective Inquiry-Based Professional Development Workshop and Examining the Effects on Nature of Scientific Knowledge  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Improving understanding of nature of science and scientific knowledge for individuals has been seen one of the essential objectives for science education for years. Teachers have a critical role in the process of learning nature of science by students. For this reason, we have turned our attentions toward improving science teachers? views about nature of science and scientific knowledge. This study focused specifically on introducing the explicit-reflective inquiry-based professional development workshop designed by the researchers. Second aim of this study is to examine the impact of explicit-reflective inquiry-based professional development workshop on preservice chemistry teachers? understandings of nature of scientific knowledge. Participants of this study were 20 preservice chemistry teachers at Gazi University. In order to exposing the changes in understandings of nature of scientific knowledge, Turkish version of The Nature of Scientific Knowledge Scale (NSKS and interviews were used in a pre/post format. The result of the Paired Samples T-Test, used to investigate the effect on the understandings about scientific knowledge, indicated that understandings of preservice chemistry teachers had a significant progress. The quantitative analysis of the scores which the participants got from each of six categories in NSKS were put forward significant differences in term of only creative and developmental categories. Also, in the qualitative analysis of the transcripts of interviews came out similar results. It seems that our explicit inquiry-based professional development workshop moved participants towards more adequate understandings about nature of scientific knowledge.

Eylem BAYIR

2010-12-01

88

Effect of a Comprehensive Service-Learning Program on College Students' Civic Responsibility.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines the effect of a comprehensive service learning program on students' level of civic responsibility. Finds that students involved in comprehensive service learning show an increase in civic responsibility when compared to students involved in community service that is not part of their academic course work and students not involved in…

Myers-Lipton, Scott J.

1998-01-01

89

The Impact of Two Types of Vocabulary Preparation on Listening Comprehension, Vocabulary Learning, and Vocabulary Learning Strategy Use  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Considering previous studies of the impact of vocabulary preparation before listening comprehension, this research investigated the impact of oral and written pushed output as two types of vocabulary preparation on listening comprehension, active and passive vocabulary learning, and vocabulary learning strategy use. Forty-one female adult Iranian EFL students at intermediate level participated in this study. As a treatment, they received two lists of new words which were learned separately...

Mandana Hazrat; Gholamreza Hessamy

2013-01-01

90

Aligning the Hidden Curriculum of Management Education With PRME : An Inquiry-Based Framework  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This article argues that mainstreaming responsible management education in line with the Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) requires close attention to the hidden curriculum (HC), that is, the implicit dimensions of educational experiences. Altering formal curricular goals and content alone is not enough to improve studentsâ?? sense of social responsibility. Business schools are conceptualized in this article as multilevel learning environments comprising various message sites where students undergo moral learning and socialization processes. Using perspectives from HC research combined with transformative learning and communities of practice theory, the article offers an inquiry-based framework for PRME implementation that takes these moral learning and socialization processes into account. It provides suggestions for how to address the hidden curriculum both in the diagnostic phase of assessing a schoolâ??s PRME needs and in the implementation phase where PRME is integrated into business school learning environments. The concept of meta-messages is introduced to account for how students apprehend the HC at business schools.

Blasco, Maribel

2012-01-01

91

Scaffolded Inquiry-Based Instruction with Technology: A Signature Pedagogy for STEM Education  

Science.gov (United States)

Inquiry-based instruction has become a hallmark of science education and increasingly of integrated content areas, including science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Because inquiry-based instruction very clearly contains surface, deep, and implicit structures as well as engages students to think and act like scientists,…

Crippen, Kent J.; Archambault, Leanna

2012-01-01

92

Conducting Science Inquiry in Primary Classrooms: Case Studies of Two Preservice Teachers' Inquiry-Based Practices  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the impact of an intervention designed to promote inquiry-based instruction among early childhood/elementary preservice teachers in Earth science. Preservice teachers participated in training sessions and community-based internships to deepen Earth science content knowledge and develop inquiry-based practices. Analyses of Earth…

Leonard, Jacqueline; Boakes, Norma; Moore, Cara M.

2009-01-01

93

Enhancing Hispanic Minority Undergraduates’ Botany Laboratory Experiences: Implementation of an Inquiry-based Plant Tissue Culture Module Exercise  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Early involvement of students in hands-on research experiences are known to demystify research and promote the pursuit of careers in science. But in large enrolment departments such opportunities for undergraduates to participate in research are rare. To counteract such lack of opportunities, inquiry-based laboratory module in plant tissue culture was implemented in an undergraduate botany course impacting approximately 140 Hispanic minority students per year. In this module, spread throughout the semester, the students used African violet to gain experience in plant tissue culture techniques. The objective was for the students to learn how to take part of the plant from in vivo to in vitro culture. This required the establishment of aseptic techniques and the use of different media components to multiply plants under in vitro conditions. In depth assessment of gain-of content knowledge and gain-of confidence revealed that our inquiry-based approach allowed the students to learn while increasing their self-perception of scientific methodology. In three semesters, the students reported a 2.5-fold overall increase in the post-module assessment for content knowledge compared to pre-module assessment. Similarly, approximately 85% of the students reported that they gained self-confidence in many aspects pertaining to conducting future research such as the use of primary literature, the design and performance of novel scientific experiments, and the formulation of a testable hypothesis. Though this lab module was solely in plant tissue culture, the inquiry-based nature of the exercise developed students’ research skills and built confidence which is important in increasing retention of students in sciences.

Dimuth Siritunga

2012-07-01

94

Ocean Science in a K-12 setting: Promoting Inquiry Based Science though Graduate Student and Teacher Collaboration  

Science.gov (United States)

The University of South Florida, College of Marine Science Oceans: GK-12 Teaching Fellowship Program is successfully enriching science learning via the oceans. Funded by the National Science Foundation, the program provides a unique opportunity among scientists and K-12 teachers to interact with the intention of bringing ocean science concepts and research to the classroom environment enhance the experience of learning and doing science, and to promote `citizen scientists' for the 21st century. The success of the program relies heavily on the extensive summer training program where graduate students develop teaching skills, create inquiry based science activities for a summer Oceanography Camp for Girls program and build a relationship with their mentor teacher. For the last year and a half, two graduate students from the College of Marine Science have worked in cooperation with teachers from the Pinellas county School District, Southside Fundamental Middle School. Successful lesson plans brought into a 6th grade Earth Science classroom include Weather and climate: Global warming, The Geologic timescale: It's all about time, Density: Layering liquids, and Erosion processes: What moves water and sediment. The school and students have benefited greatly from the program experiencing hands-on inquiry based science and the establishment of an after school science club providing opportunities for students to work on their science fair projects and pursuit other science interests. Students are provided scoring rubrics and their progress is creatively assessed through KWL worksheets, concept maps, surveys, oral one on one and classroom discussions and writing samples. The year culminated with a series of hands on lessons at the nearby beach, where students demonstrated their mastery of skills through practical application. Benefits to the graduate student include improved communication of current science research to a diverse audience, a better understanding of the perspective of teachers and their content knowledge, and experience working with children and youth. The GK-12 teacher mentor benefits include a resource of inquiry based ocean science activities and increased knowledge of current scientific ocean research. The K-12 students gain an opportunity to be engage with young passionate scientists, learn about current ocean science research, and experience inquiry based science activities relating to concepts already being taught in their classroom. This program benefits all involved including the graduate students, the teachers, the K-12 students and the community.

Lodico, J. M.; Greely, T.; Lodge, A.; Pyrtle, A.; Ivey, S.; Madeiros, A.; Saleem, S.

2005-12-01

95

The Impact of Two Types of Vocabulary Preparation on Listening Comprehension, Vocabulary Learning, and Vocabulary Learning Strategy Use  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Considering previous studies of the impact of vocabulary preparation before listening comprehension, this research investigated the impact of oral and written pushed output as two types of vocabulary preparation on listening comprehension, active and passive vocabulary learning, and vocabulary learning strategy use. Forty-one female adult Iranian EFL students at intermediate level participated in this study. As a treatment, they received two lists of new words which were learned separately through oral and written pushed output. This was followed by tests of active and passive vocabulary and listening comprehension. They also completed a vocabulary learning questionnaire before and after the treatment to detect any changes due to the treatment. We reached three pairs of scores for each participant including two active and two passive vocabulary test scores and two listening test scores for words treated through oral and written pushed output, separately. Statistical analyses indicated that vocabulary learning through oral pushed output was more effective in promoting listening comprehension and active vocabulary learning than vocabulary learning through written pushed output. Generally, vocabulary leaning through pushed output had a positive significant effect on vocabulary leaning strategy use. However, regarding passive vocabulary learning, the two types of treatment did not make any significant difference. 

Mandana Hazrat

2013-08-01

96

The Role of Morphological Awareness in Reading Comprehension among Typical and Learning Disabled Native Arabic Speakers  

Science.gov (United States)

This work examines the role of morphological awareness in contrast to phonological processing in reading comprehension amongst two groups of native Arabic children: a group with learning disabilities (LD) and a mainstream group who were matched to the LD group in age or reading level. Measures of reading comprehension fluency, phonological skills,…

Mahfoudhi, Abdessatar; Elbeheri, Gad; Al-Rashidi, Mousa; Everatt, John

2010-01-01

97

Empowering Rural Appalachian Youth Through Integrated Inquiry-based Earth Science  

Science.gov (United States)

Science education must be relevant and inspiring to keep students engaged and receptive to learning. Reports suggest that science education reform can be advanced by involving students in active research (NSF 1996). Through a 2-year Geoscience Education award from the National Science Foundation, a program called IDGE (Integrated Design for Geoscience Education) has targeted low-income, under-represented, and minority high school students in rural Appalachia in inquiry-based projects, international collaboration, and an international environmental expedition incorporating the GLOBE program protocols. This program targeted Upward Bound students at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia. The Upward Bound is a federally-supported program targeting low-income, under-represented, and minority students for inclusion in a summer academic- enrichment program. IDGE builds on the mission of Upward Bound by encouraging underprivileged students to investigate science and scientific careers. This outreach has proven to be successful in enhancing positive attitudes and understanding about science and increasing the number of students considering science careers. IDGE has found that students must be challenged to observe the world around them and to consider how their decisions affect the future of our planet, thus making geoscience relevant and interesting to the students. By making the geoscience course inquiry-based and incorporating field research that is relevant to local environmental issues, it becomes possible for students to bridge the gap between science in theory and science in practice while remaining engaged. Participants were able to broaden environmental connections through an ecological expedition experience to Costa Rica, serving as an opportunity to broaden the vision of students as members of an international community of learners and scientists through their experiences with a diverse natural environment. This trip, in coordination with the inclusion of scientific instruments such as GPS and probeware, fostered additional student interest in earth science. IDGE has shown to have a lasting effect on the participating students who learn from the experience that science is a dynamic field in need of creative minds who want to make discoveries. Through relevant inquiry, the quality of geoscience instruction is inspiring a new generation of geoscientists. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under award 0735596. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Science Foundation.

Cartwright, T. J.; Hogsett, M.

2009-05-01

98

Symbols Can Improve the Reading Comprehension of Adults with Learning Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: This study aimed to test the hypothesis that adding symbols to written text can improve its comprehensibility for adults with learning disabilities. Methods: Nineteen adults with mild or borderline learning disabilities attempted to read four short passages of text, two of which had Widgit Rebus symbols added to them. Following each…

Jones, F. W.; Long, K.; Finlay, W. M. L.

2007-01-01

99

Effect of a Comprehensive Service-Learning Program on College Students' Level of Modern Racism.  

Science.gov (United States)

A study investigated effects of a comprehensive 2-year service-learning program on 25 college students' level of modern (symbolic) racism. A nonequivalent control group experiment was conducted at a large state university in the West. Results support the hypothesis that students involved in service-learning show larger reductions in modern racism…

Myers-Lipton, Scott J.

1996-01-01

100

The relationship between visual metaphor comprehension and recognition of similarities in children with learning disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous studies have shown metaphoric comprehension deficits in children with learning disabilities. To understand metaphoric language, children must have enough semantic knowledge about the metaphorical terms and the ability to recognize similarity between two different domains. In the current study visual and verbal metaphor understanding was assessed in 20 children with learning disabilities (LD) and 20 typically developed (TD) children. Results showed that LD children scored significantly lower than TD children in the comprehension of conventional metaphors, and idioms. However, visual and novel metaphor comprehension, which does not rely on prior knowledge, did not differ between the two groups. Furthermore, our results suggest that higher analogical thinking facilitates visual metaphor comprehension in the LD group. In the TD group, metaphor comprehension correlates with higher semantic knowledge. PMID:22699248

Mashal, Nira; Kasirer, Anat

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
101

Implementation of Inquiry-Based Tutorials in AN Introductory Physics Course: the Role of the Graduate Teaching Assistant.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study determined if the training provided physics teaching assistants was sufficient to accomplish the objectives of inquiry-based tutorials for an introductory physics course. Qualitative research methods were used: (1) to determine if the Physics by Inquiry method was modeled; (2) to describe the process from the teaching assistant perspective; (3) to determine TA opinions on training methods; (4) to develop a frame of reference to better understand the role of TA's as instructional support staff. The study determined that the teaching assistants verbalized appropriate instructional actions, but were observed to use a predominantly didactic teaching style. TA's held a variety of perceptions and beliefs about inquiry -based learning and how science is learned. They felt comfortable in the role of tutorial instructor. They were satisfied with the training methods provided and had few suggestions to change or improve training for future tutorial instructors. A concurrent theme of teacher action dependent on teacher beliefs was sustained throughout the study. The TA's actions, as tutorial instructors, reflected their educational beliefs, student background and learning experiences. TA's performance as tutorial instructors depended on what they think and believe about learning science. Practical implications exist for training teaching assistants to be tutorial instructors. Some recommendations may be appropriate for TA's required to use instructional methods that they have not experienced as students. Interview prospective teaching assistants to determine educational experience and beliefs. Employ inexperienced teaching assistants whose perspectives match the proposed instructional role and who might be more receptive to modeling. Incorporate training into staff meetings. Provide time for TA's to experience the instructional model with simulation or role play as students and as instructors, accompanied by conference discussion. Use strategies known to enhance adult learning and that are sensitive to the variability of adult learners. Educate for critical reflection; incorporate a system of peer coaching. Include a teaching assistant training component in group process and group management.

Thoresen, Carol Wiggins

1994-01-01

102

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERCEPTUAL LEARNING STYLE PREFERENCES AND LISTENING COMPREHENSION STRATEGIES OF IRANIAN INTERMEDIATE EFL LEARNERS  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This article aims to identify the learning styles and listening comprehension strategies of students, to check whether there are significant in the learning style and strategy preferences between high and low proficient listeners, and investigate whether there is any relationship between students’ learning style and listening strategy preferences. To achieve this purpose, a language proficiency test was administered to ninety language learners majoring in English Language Translation and ul...

2012-01-01

103

Comprehension of Architectural Construction through Multimedia Active Learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study presents an investigation about the use of multimedia procedures applied to architectural construction teaching. We have applied current technological resources, aiming to rationalize and optimize the active learning process. The experience presented to students is very simple and yet very effective. It has consisted in a simulation of an actual building situation, so that they may participate more actively in their learning experience. Conclusions are extremely positive because...

Ángeles Mas; Vicente Blasco; Carlos Lerma; Quiteria Angulo

2013-01-01

104

New Teachers in an Urban Comprehensive School: Learning in Partnership.  

Science.gov (United States)

The studies in this collection result from a case study of one London (England) comprehensive school's response to the school-based training of teachers that was instituted in England between 1992 and 1996. School-based time is now two-thirds of all teacher training, and the training context has become a crucial factor in the initial training and…

Heilbronn, Ruth, Ed.; Jones, Crispin, Ed.

105

ACTIVE STRATEGIES DURING INQUIRY-BASED SCIENCE TEACHER EDUCATION TO IMPROVE LONG-TERM TEACHER SELF-EFFICACY  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Teacher development aimed at increasing the use of inquiry based methods in schools is an important way to reach science learning goals. To this end, the EC has promoted inquiry based science teaching (IBST) within the Seventh Framework Program (FP7). One dimension, typically absent from the FP7 products, is the personal capacity belief of self- efficacy which has been shown to be important to personal behavioral change. The purpose of this research was to develop and test a model of teacher professional development (TPD) which adds specific elements for altering teacher self-efficacies to existing FP7 IBST products. This model was tested for its usefulness in increasing participant self-efficacy as evidenced by short and long term quantitative measures as well as by evaluation of long terminquiry lessons. Workshops to promote IBST were conducted in five different countries. Each workshop included strategies for increasing participantâ??s self-efficacies. Pre and post assessments showed consistently improved personal self-efficacy scores in all of the workshops. In addition, and unlike other long-term studies of teachers, these self-efficacy scores did not significantly diminish over six months. The promotion of self-efficacy in TPD provides a consistent way of evaluating the impact of IBST workshops through the use of changes in self-efficacy.

Evans, Robert Harry

2012-01-01

106

Achieving science, math and reading literacy for all: The role of inquiry-based science instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

With the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, educators and policy makers have been seeking effective strategies to improve students' science, mathematics and reading achievement. One of the primary teaching strategies recommended by reform-oriented organizations, such as the National Research Council (1996), is to utilize inquiry-based science instruction. In this study, I examined the effects of inquiry-based science instruction and traditional science instruction on student achievement across science, mathematics and reading. I also compared the effects of inquiry-based science instruction and traditional science instruction on student achievement. Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999---a large, national data sample---a series of structural equation modeling analyses were performed. Results indicated that inquiry-based science instruction was associated with significant, positive gains not only in science achievement, but also in mathematics and reading achievement. The positive relationship between inquiry instruction and student achievement was found above and beyond the contributions of traditional science instruction, which generally showed no significant relationship to student achievement. Findings support the theoretical position that inquiry-based science instruction can have robust benefits across the curriculum. This study contributes to the dialogue on effective instructional methods to achieve science, mathematics and reading literacy for all. Overall, this study provides cautious support for the idea that student achievement can be promoted by supporting and encouraging teachers to implement inquiry-based science instruction.

Hung, Man

107

Challenging the Non-Science Majors with Inquiry-based Laboratory Environmental Geoscience Courses  

Science.gov (United States)

Although there is proven rationale for teaching inquiry-based/problem-based lessons in the undergraduate classroom, very few non-major geoscience course implement these instructional strategies in their laboratory sections. The College of Charleston Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences has developed an introductory Environmental Geology Laboratory course for undergraduate non-majors, which corrects this traditional methodology. The Environmental Geology lab activities employ an inquiry-based approach, in which the students take control of their own learning; a cooperative learning approach, in which each member of a team is responsible not only for learning what is taught but also for helping their peers learn; and a problem/case study-based learning approach, in which activities are abstracted from a real-life scenario. In these lab sessions, students actively engage in mastering course content and develop essential skills while exploring real-world scenarios through case studies. For example, during the two-week section on Earthquakes, teams of students study the effects of seismic motion on various types of sediments found underlying the Charleston, South Carolina region. Students discover areas where the greatest damage occurred during the 1886 7.4 MM earthquake through a walking tour of downtown Charleston. Extracting information from historical and topographic maps, as well as aerial and satellite imagery provides students with the necessary information to produce an earthquake hazard-zone map of the Charleston Peninsula. These types of exercises and laboratory activities allow the students to utilize scientific reasoning and application of scientific concepts to develop solutions to environmental scenarios, such as volcanic eruptions, coastal, flooding, or landslide hazards, and groundwater contamination. The newly implemented labs began in Fall of 2008 and have been undergoing adaptations throughout the Spring and Fall of 2009. Qualitative data will be gathered and analyzed to show the effectiveness of moving beyond traditional laboratory teaching methods to methods that require and promote deeper learning and retaining of content. Qualitative data will be based upon the engagement of the students, the deeper level of questioning, the engagement of the faculty, among others. The data will be acquired through the use of personal responses and end of course surveys. For the Spring 2009 semester, the department will develop a more quantitative means of assessment by integrating a pre- and post-survey for this course as well as the traditionally-taught introductory course. Acquisition of knowledge and depth of knowledge by the students from both types of courses will be obtained and compared for assessing effectiveness of this teaching strategy in a laboratory setting. This data will encourage the faculty teaching Environmental Geology Labs as well as the standard introductory labs to redesign the remaining lab courses. In addition, the method used here may serve as a model for laboratory courses in other disciplines.

Humphreys, R. R.; Hall, C.; Colgan, M. W.

2009-12-01

108

Investigating elementary education and physical therapy majors' perceptions of an inquiry-based physics content course  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigates why physical therapy assistant majors engage and perform better than elementary education majors in an inquiry-based conceptual physics course at Mid-Atlantic Community College. The students from each major are demographically similar, both courses are similar in depth and structure, and each course supports the students' program. However, there is an observed difference in the levels of engagement with the curriculum and performance on writing-based assessments between the two groups. To explore possible explanations for the difference, I examine students' affinity for science, their beliefs about the nature of science and scientific knowledge in the classroom, and their perception of the usefulness of science to their program. During semi-structured interviews, students from both majors displayed nearly identical weak affinities for science, epistemological beliefs, and uncertainty about the usefulness of the class. However, the physical therapy majors' ability to see the relevance of the physics course experience to their program enhanced their interest and motivation. In contrast, the elementary education students do not see connections between the course and their program, and do not see a purpose for their learning of physics content. To improve the program, I propose a two-pronged approach - designing a faded-scaffolded-inquiry approach for both classes, and developing a field-based/seminar class for the elementary education majors. The scaffolded inquiry will help both groups develop better orientations toward lab activities, and the structured observations and reflection will help the elementary group connect the material to their program.

Hilton, John Martin

109

Inquiry Based Science Education og den sociokulturelt forankrede dialog i naturfagsundervisningen.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Through study, investigation and discussion of the concept Best Practice in science education (Ellebæk & Ã?stergaard, 2009) it was shown, that the dialogue in the teaching sequences was an important factor for the childrenâ??s understanding, engagement and interest for the science subjects and phenomena. In this article we will discuss dialogue in the light of sociocultural learning theories, and relate it to Inquiry Based Science Education (IBSE), as the pedagogical and didactical method, which are promoted most strongly these years (e.g. in the inter-European Pollen and Fibonacci projects). The method is central in the action research project NatSats, where focus is on chidrenâ??s hypothesizing and the way teacherâ??s use dialogue in their teaching or guiding of children in kindergarten and primary school. Results from the project indicate that an open and interrogative dialogue based on the studentâ??s premises is able to support hypothesizing, which initiates explorative and investigative challenges for the students.

Ã?stergaard, Lars Domino

2012-01-01

110

Gender Differences in L2 Comprehension and Vocabulary Learning in the Video-based CALL Program  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study examined whether there were significant differences between males and females in comprehension, vocabulary acquisition and vocabulary retention in the video-based computer assisted language learning (CALL) program. In total, 74 male and 43 female university students taking Freshman English course in Taiwan joined this study. A quantitative analysis of video comprehension tests, vocabulary immediate tests, and vocabulary retention tests was conducted. Two types of videotexts ranked ...

Lu-Fang Lin

2011-01-01

111

Using Self-Regulated Learning Strategies in Enhancing Language Proficiency with a Focus on Reading Comprehension  

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Full Text Available Self-regulated learning strategies have recently received a remarkable attention by researchers. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between self-regulated learning strategies and students’ language proficiency as well as their reading comprehension. To do so, 115 Iranian EFL university students were selected. First, a TOEFL test was given to the participants so as to determine their language proficiency and reading comprehension. Then, they were asked to fill out Self-Regulated Learning Strategies Questionnaire (Al Asmari & Mahmoud Ismail, 2012. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation were conducted. The results revealed that there is a significant relationship between the students’ use of self-regulated learning strategies and their language proficiency. Also, a significant relationship between the students’ use of self-regulated learning strategies and their reading comprehension was found. Finally, the pedagogical message of this study is that teachers and students should incorporate self-regulated learning strategies into their teaching and learning process.

Gholam-Reza Abbasian

2014-05-01

112

Reading comprehension and learning evaluation among undergraduates / Compreensão em leitura e avaliação da aprendizagem em universitários  

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Full Text Available This research meant to explore the relation among reading comprehension, academic performance and learning assessment in specific contents. The sample was composed of by 270 freshman students from administration, law and psychology courses, from daytime and evening period in a private university in São Paulo. The instruments used were 2 texts prepared in accordance to Cloze's technique and a questionnaire focusing the most used characterization types in higher education assessment. The students' participation was voluntary and the data collect happened in a collective session form. The results showed clearly a correlation, statistically significant, among reading comprehension, academic performance and learning assessment was conclusive.

Katya Luciane de Oliveira

2005-01-01

113

The Effects of Hypertext Gloss on Comprehension and Vocabulary Retention under Incidental and Intentional Learning Conditions  

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Full Text Available The present study investigated comprehension, immediate and delayed vocabulary retention under incidental and intentional learning conditions via computer mediated hypertext gloss. One hundred and eighty four (N= 184 intermediate students of English as a foreign language at an English school participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to either the incidental or the intentional conditions, and received differential treatments. The participants read the same enhanced electronic text with permanently highlighted target vocabularies in the intentional condition, and temporarily highlighted target ones in the incidental condition. The target items were hyperlinked to the same textual enhancements. The results presented the strong and the weak points of the two learning conditions with regards to immediate and delayed retention; as the intentional modality enhanced immediate gain and the incidental one facilitated retention. Consequently, it is recommended that both methods of vocabulary learning can be implemented jointly in a virtual Learning environment in order to improve comprehension and vocabulary retention.

Zeinab Zandieh

2012-05-01

114

Determinants of Benin elementary school science teachers' orientation toward inquiry-based instructional practices  

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The Republic of Benin (West Africa) undertook a nationwide curriculum reform that put an emphasis on inquiry-based instructional practices. Little, if any, research has been conducted to explore factors that could be related to teachers' orientation toward inquiry instructional practices. The purpose of this research study was to investigate factors and concerns that determine Benin elementary school teachers' orientation toward the use of inquiry-based instruction in the teaching of science. The study followed a naturalistic inquiry methodology combining a correlational ex post facto design and an observational case-study design. The theory of Planned Behavior was the conceptual framework used to design the study. Two hundred (N = 200) elementary school teachers and three (n = 3) case study participants were purposively selected. Data was gathered via the Revised Science Attitude Scale (Thompson & Shrigley, 1986), the Science Teachers' Ideological Preference Scale (Jones & Harty, 1978), open-ended questions, interviews, and classroom observations using audiorecorders, videorecorders, and the researcher-contextualized version of the Observational System for the Analysis of Classroom Instruction (Hough, 1966). Qualitative and quantitative data provided a deeper understanding of participants' responses. Quantitative measures indicated that Benin elementary school teachers have positive attitudes toward school science, significant positive orientation toward both inquiry-based instruction and traditional non inquiry-based instruction, and higher orientation toward inquiry-based instruction than traditional non inquiry-based instruction. Attitude toward handling materials for investigations was found to significantly contribute to the prediction of participants' inquiry orientation. Qualitative analyses of participants' responses indicated that the expectations of educational leaders, individual motivation to comply with the program, a perceived control of the performance of inquiry-based activities, students' inquiry outcome expectancy or likelihood of occurrence in the classroom, the pedagogical structure of the program, and the student-centeredness of the program were potential motivational factors that could explain participants' orientation toward inquiry-based instruction. Four major concerns---lack of materials for teaching, lack of training in the process and strategy of inquiry, overloaded curriculum content, students' linguistic difficulties---were perceived obstacles in implementing inquiry-based instruction. Implications for transformative curriculum practices are discussed.

Gado, Issaou

115

The Effects of Summarization Instruction on Text Comprehension of Students with Learning Disabilities.  

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This study, with 30 students with learning disabilities (grades 6-9) and 15 nondisabled students, found that instruction in a 5-rule summarization strategy significantly increased reading comprehension of expository prose. Strategy use was maintained over time, and students were reported to generalize its use. (Author/DB)

Gajria, Meenakshi; Salvia, John

1992-01-01

116

The Effect of Cooperative Learning Techniques on College Students' Reading Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated the impact of Student Team Achievement Divisions (STAD) and Group Investigation (GI), which are two techniques of Cooperative Learning, on students' reading comprehension achievement of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). After administering an English Language Proficiency test (Fowler and Coe, 1976), 90 homogeneous…

Jalilifar, Alireza

2010-01-01

117

Increasing the Social Studies Reading Comprehension of Middle School Students with Learning Disabilities  

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This action research project sets out to identify which component of multi-text instruction is most effective in increasing the reading comprehension level of middle school students with learning disabilities. The research is going to be conducted over a two-week time period during the Spring 2009 with three male middle school students with…

Bryski, Crystal

2009-01-01

118

The Role of Background Knowledge in Text Comprehension for Children Learning English as an Additional Language  

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Children learning English as an additional language (EAL) often experience difficulties with reading comprehension relative to their monolingual peers. While low levels of vocabulary appear to be one factor underlying these difficulties, other factors such as a relative lack of appropriate background knowledge may also contribute. Sixteen children…

Burgoyne, Kelly; Whiteley, Helen E.; Hutchinson, Jane M.

2013-01-01

119

An Investigation into Carers' Perceptions of the Verbal Comprehension Ability of Adults with Severe Learning Disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

A study investigated care staff (n=12) perceptions of the language comprehension levels of adults with learning disabilities. Differences between estimates and actual scores increased with sentence difficulty. At the highest level of difficulty, staff consistently over estimated the clients' ability, while both under and over estimation occurred…

Banat, D.; Summers, S.; Pring, T.

2002-01-01

120

The Relationship between Visual Metaphor Comprehension and Recognition of Similarities in Children with Learning Disabilities  

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Previous studies have shown metaphoric comprehension deficits in children with learning disabilities. To understand metaphoric language, children must have enough semantic knowledge about the metaphorical terms and the ability to recognize similarity between two different domains. In the current study visual and verbal metaphor understanding was…

Mashal, Nira; Kasirer, Anat

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
121

Applying Comprehensible Input and Culture Input Methodology to Inspire College Students’ Learning Motivation  

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Full Text Available Motivation is a non-intellectual and key factor to the success or failure of English learning. The stronger motivation one has, the better English proficiency he/she will get. There is no exception of college students, who need to build up motivation to learn English better and consistently. This thesis proposes two teaching methodologies based on Krashen’s Input theory and theories of cross-culture communication, which are comprehensible input and culture input methodologies, aiming to assist college students to establish strong and consistent motivation in English learning.

Yang Liu

2013-11-01

122

User/Tutor Optimal Learning Path in E-Learning Using Comprehensive Neuro-Fuzzy Approach  

Science.gov (United States)

Internet evolution has affected all industrial, commercial, and especially learning activities in the new context of e-learning. Due to cost, time, or flexibility e-learning has been adopted by participators as an alternative training method. By development of computer-based devices and new methods of teaching, e-learning has emerged. The…

Fazlollahtabar, Hamed; Mahdavi, Iraj

2009-01-01

123

A phenomenological study of assessment methods in the inquiry-based science classroom: How do educators decide?  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the experiences of science educators as they select and develop assessment methods for inquiry learning. Balancing preparations for standardized tests and authentic inquiry assessment experiences can be challenging for science educators. The review of literature revealed that current research focused on instructional methods and assessment, students' assessment experiences, and teachers' instructional methods experiences. There remains a gap in current literature regarding the experiences of science educators as they select and develop assessment methods for inquiry learning. This study filled the gap by providing a description of the experiences of science educators as they select and develop assessments for inquiry learning. The participants in this study were 16 fifth through eighth grade science teachers who participate in the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI) in northwest Alabama. A phenomenological research method was chosen in order to describe the experiences of AMSTI science teachers as they select and develop assessments for inquiry learning. Data were collected through interviews and focus group discussions. The data analysis used a modified Stevick-Colaizzi-Keen framework. The results showed AMSTI science teachers use a variety of assessment resources and methods, feel pressures to meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), and implement varying degrees of change in their assessment process due to No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Contributing a positive social change, this study's findings supplied science teachers with descriptions of successful inquiry classrooms and creative assessments that correspond to inquiry-based learning methods.

Tash, Gina G.

124

Self Regulated Learning strategies as Predictors of Reading Comprehension among Students of English as a Foreign Language  

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Full Text Available This cross-sectional study investigates the self regulated learning strategies used as predictors of reading comprehension. Participants of the study were 248 EFL university students: 112 males and 136 females enrolled in the Faculty of Arts, Foreign Languages Department. The primary aims of the study were: (1 to examine whether there were positive relationships between the use of self regulated learning strategies and reading comprehension; (2 whether there were significant differences between males and females in use of self regulated learning strategies and reading comprehension; (3 and finally to gauge predictors of reading comprehension themselves through self regulated learning strategies towards learning English language. Students were asked to answer questions based on a 5-point Likert-scale self regulated learning Questionnaire and they were asked to read three different passages and answer the questions that followed each passage. The results of MANOVA also revealed that there were differences between males and females in the use of self regulated learning strategies in favour of females. However, there were differences between males and females in the reading comprehension test to the advantage of males. The results of MANOVA analysis revealed that there were differences between students across their different academic levels in self regulated learning strategies. There were also differences between students across different academic levels, in the reading comprehension test. The results of multiple regression reported that some of the self-regulated learning strategies were predictors of reading comprehension.

AbdulRahman Awad Al Asmari

2012-02-01

125

The Intersection of Inquiry-Based Science and Language: Preparing Teachers for ELL Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

As teacher educators, we are tasked with preparing prospective teachers to enter a field that has undergone significant changes in student population and policy since we were K-12 teachers. With the emphasis placed on connections, mathematics integration, and communication by the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS) (Achieve in Next generation science standards, 2012), more research is needed on how teachers can accomplish this integration (Bunch in Rev Res Educ 37:298-341, 2013; Lee et al. in Educ Res 42(4):223-233, 2013). Science teacher educators, in response to the NGSS, recognize that it is necessary for pre-service and in-service teachers to know more about how instructional strategies in language and science can complement one another. Our purpose in this study was to explore a model of integration that can be used in classrooms. To do this, we examined the change in science content knowledge and academic vocabulary for English language learners (ELLs) as they engaged in inquiry-based science experience utilizing the 5R Instructional Model. Two units, erosion and wind turbines, were developed using the 5R Instructional Model and taught during two different years in a summer school program for ELLs. We analyzed data from interviews to assess change in conceptual understanding and science academic vocabulary over the 60 h of instruction. The statistics show a clear trend of growth supporting our claim that ELLs did construct more sophisticated understanding of the topics and use more language to communicate their knowledge. As science teacher educators seek ways to prepare elementary teachers to help preK-12 students to learn science and develop the language of science, the 5R Instructional Model is one pathway.

Weinburgh, Molly; Silva, Cecilia; Smith, Kathy Horak; Groulx, Judy; Nettles, Jenesta

2014-05-01

126

Learning and comprehension of BASIC and natural language computer programming by novices  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This study examined the effectiveness of teaching novices to program in Natural Language as a prerequisite for learning BASIC, and the learning and comprehension processes for Natural Language and BASIC computer-programming languages. Three groups of computer-naive subjects participated in five self-paced learning sessions; in each sessions, subjects solved a series of programming problems with immediate feedback. Twenty-four subjects learned to solve BASIC programming problems (BASIC group) for all five sessions, 23 subjects learned to solve corresponding Natural Language programming problems for all five sessions (Natural Language group), and 23 subjects learned to solve Natural Language programming problems for three sessions and then transferred to BASIC for the two sessions (Transfer group). At the end of the fifth session, all subjects completed a post-test which required the subjects to use their programming knowledge in a new way. Results indicated that the Natural Language trained subjects had complete transfer to BASIC, as indicated by no overall difference in comprehension time or accuracy for final BASIC sessions (i.e., sessions four and five) for the Transfer and BASIC groups. In addition, there was an interaction between group and session on accuracy, in which the Transfer group increased its accuracy at a faster rate than the BASIC group.

Dyck, J.L.

1987-01-01

127

Learning English, Learning Science  

Science.gov (United States)

Using science notebooks effectively in the classroom can encourage students who are learning English to keep up and keep interested. English language proficiency might head the list of content areas that schools can teach properly and effectively through science. Amaral, Garrison, and Klentschy (2002) reported that a successful inquiry-based…

Nelson, Virginia

2010-01-01

128

Effects of Inquiry-Based Agriscience Instruction on Student Scientific Reasoning  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inquiry-based agriscience instruction on student scientific reasoning. Scientific reasoning is defined as the use of the scientific method, inductive, and deductive reasoning to develop and test hypothesis. Developing scientific reasoning skills can provide learners with a connection to the…

Thoron, Andrew C.; Myers, Brian E.

2012-01-01

129

Inquiry-based Investigation in Biology Laboratories: Does Neem Provide Bioprotection against Bean Beetles?  

Science.gov (United States)

We developed an inquiry-based biology laboratory exercise in which undergraduate students designed experiments addressing whether material from the neem tree ("Azadirachta indica") altered bean beetle ("Callosobruchus maculatus") movements and oviposition. Students were introduced to the bean beetle life cycle, experimental…

Pearce, Amy R.; Sale, Amanda Lovelace; Srivatsan, Malathi; Beck, Christopher W.; Blumer, Lawrence S.; Grippo, Anne A.

2013-01-01

130

AP Investigative labs: An inquiry-base Approach Lab 4: Diffusion and Osmosis  

Science.gov (United States)

This inquiry-based investigation allows students to use artificial cells to study the relationship of surface area and volume, create models of living cells to explore osmosis and diffusion, and observe osmosis in living cells. Students will develop the skills to design experiments to measure water potential in plant cells and gauge the rate of osmosis in model cells.

The College Board The College Board (The College Board;)

2012-10-23

131

Negotiating Accountability during Student Teaching: The Influence of an Inquiry-Based Student Teaching Seminar  

Science.gov (United States)

Drawing on the work of Russian literary critic, Mikhail Bakhtin, this article explores how an inquiry-based social studies student teaching seminar helped three preservice teachers negotiate the pressures of standards-based reforms during student teaching. The author first examines how initial perceptions of standardization and high-stakes testing…

Cuenca, Alexander

2014-01-01

132

The Role of Investigations in Promoting Inquiry-Based Science Education in Ireland  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper describes recent developments in Ireland to promote a greater interest in science among students in the 12-15 age group by means of practical work involving Inquiry Based Science Education (IBSE). The tasks, know as Investigations, are a component of the assessment of the subject Science which is studied as part of the Junior…

Kennedy, Declan

2014-01-01

133

Improving Elementary American Indian Students' Math Achievement with Inquiry-Based Mathematics and Games  

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Project Inquiry-Based Mathematics was a National Science Foundation Math-Science Partnership implemented in a Great Plains city school district with a significant K-12 Native American population. One goal of the project was to reduce the achievement gap between Native American and non-Native students enrolled in district. This gap reduction was to…

Stone, Jamalee; Hamann, Edmund

2012-01-01

134

An Epistemological Analysis of the Application of an Online Inquiry-Based Program in Tourism Education  

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This paper was designed to investigate the application of an online inquiry-based program to European tourism from an epistemological perspective. Fifty tourism students (n = 50) participated in this study and their epistemological beliefs were measured with the Epistemological Belief Scale. A set of pre-, post-, and delayed tests were utilised to…

Hsu, Liwei

2014-01-01

135

Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes  

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This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

2013-01-01

136

Effectiveness of Learning Strategies over Reading Comprehension, Writing Skills and Learners’ Attitudes towards Turkish Course  

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Full Text Available This study, which attempts to determine the effectiveness of learning strategies on reading comprehension, writing skills and learners’ attitudes towards theirTurkish course, was carried out by the controlled pre/posttest model of the experimental model. The study subjects were 5-A and 5-B groups attending Ahmet Olcay Primary School throughout 2004-2005 academic year in the fall semester. There were 22 students in the experimental group, 21 students in the control group, totally 43 students participated in this study. Data collection process was achieved through an academic achievement test, developed by the researcher, course materials, structured observation forms and the “Attitude Scale Regarding Turkish Course” developed by Acat (2000. According to the findings of the study: reading comprehension skills, writing skills and attitudes towards the Turkish course were developed via learning strategies.

?. Dilek BELET

2007-01-01

137

The Effects of Hypertext Gloss on Comprehension and Vocabulary Retention under Incidental and Intentional Learning Conditions  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The present study investigated comprehension, immediate and delayed vocabulary retention under incidental and intentional learning conditions via computer mediated hypertext gloss. One hundred and eighty four (N= 184) intermediate students of English as a foreign language at an English school participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to either the incidental or the intentional conditions, and received differential treatments. The participants read the same enhanced elect...

Zeinab Zandieh; Manoochehr Jafarigohar

2012-01-01

138

Engineering Your Own Superbug: A Useful Assignment to Evaluate Real Learning Comprehension in Microbiology Classes  

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Full Text Available The learning comprehension of students in microbiology classes is not easy to evaluate, particularly when the student population is diverse in terms of backgrounds, majors, levels of training and preparedness, and the students’ expectations and enthusiasm for the class. It is difficult to design a one-size-fits-all exam that best suits a mixed student population; and most traditional assignments/case studies focusing on particular microbes or topics might not readily assess students’ overall understanding and learning comprehension. It is important to develop an assessment method that not only can engage students in active learning and deliberate practice but can also promote their imaginative and creative potential. The word “superbugs” often appears in the media and refers to some deadly or drug-resistant microbes. These superbugs possess special phenotypic and functional attributes that constitute their “superness.” It is predicted that more new surprising superbugs will emerge in the future and students should be challenged now with some mindstimulating ideas and exercises in their microbiology class. To develop a supplementary tool to evaluate students’ comprehension and to prepare them for the predicted superbugs unknown to us, a writing project entitled “Constructing Your Own Superbug” was designed to achieve these goals.

Yun-Chi Chen

2013-12-01

139

Contributions of Metacognitive and Self-Regulated Learning Theories to Investigations of Calibration of Comprehension  

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Full Text Available In this paper we examine the contributions of metacognitive and self-regulated learning theories to research on students' calibration of comprehension. Historically, cognitive psychologists have studied calibration of comprehension within a purely metacognitive framework, with an emphasis on the role of text and task factors but little consideration of factors of self. There has been a recent trend, however, towards incorporating a social cognitive perspective to the study of calibration of comprehension, with factors of self such as motivation and affect being examined more often. Among the factors of self that have been examined, self-efficacy has played a major role as it may be all but impossible to disentangle its influence on students' calibration of comprehension. Other variables of self that have been examined include ability, familiarity, ego and goal-orientation, goal setting, personality traits and susceptibility to social and cultural influences. Broadening the context in which calibration of comprehension is assessed allows a more complete examination of the rich set of interrelated processes that affect students' performance.

Stephanie STOLP

2009-10-01

140

A cross-cultural, multilevel study of inquiry-based instruction effects on conceptual understanding and motivation in physics  

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Student achievement and motivation to learn physics is highly valued in many industrialized countries including the United States and Japan. Science education curricula in these countries emphasize the importance and encourage classroom teachers to use an inquiry approach. This dissertation investigated high school students' motivational orientations and their understanding of physics concepts in a context of inquiry-based instruction. The goals were to explore the patterns of instructional effects on motivation and learning in each country and to examine cultural differences and similarities. Participants consisted of 108 students (55 females, 53 males) and 9 physics teachers in the United States and 616 students (203 females and 413 males) and 11 physics teachers in Japan. Students were administered (a) Force Concept Inventory measuring physics conceptual understanding and (b) Attitudes about Science Questionnaire measuring student motivational orientations. Teachers were given a survey regarding their use of inquiry teaching practices and background information. Additionally, three teachers in each country were interviewed and observed in their classrooms. For the data analysis, two-level hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) methods were used to examine individual student differences (i.e., learning, motivation, and gender) within each classroom (i.e., inquiry-based teaching, teaching experience, and class size) in the U.S. and Japan, separately. Descriptive statistical analyses were also conducted. The results indicated that there was a cultural similarity in that current teaching practices had minimal influence on conceptual understanding as well as motivation of high school students between the U.S. and Japan. In contrast, cultural differences were observed in classroom structures and instructional approaches. Furthermore, this study revealed gender inequity in Japanese students' conceptual understanding and self-efficacy. Limitations of the study, as well as implications for high school physics teachers are discussed. Future research in this line could explore students' use of cognitive strategies to overcome misconceptions in Western and Eastern cultures. Also, exploring the best practices in changing student misconceptions and promoting motivation across cultures would enrich our understanding and current teaching practices.

Negishi, Meiko

 
 
 
 
141

Developing students' understanding of evolution in an inquiry-based versus a traditional science classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Research studies over the past 30 years have found that individuals have a limited understanding of the theory of evolution and the mechanisms involved in species change. One possible avenue of improvement has been the use of alternative instructional methods, such as inquiry-based activities and teaching about nature of science. Using recommendations from research, this study integrated nature of science, evolution, and inquiry-based instruction to discern its impact on student understanding of evolution. An instructional unit was developed with a community college instructor and carried out in two introductory biology classes with a total of 38 participants. One class was taught using inquiry-based methods, with an integrated approach to nature of science and evolution, while the other was not. Data collection included student and instructor interviews, surveys, pre and post assessments, classroom observations, and student work products. The number of students holding accurate conceptions of the nature of science in the inquiry class was higher for all the reported categories on the posttest. Despite less direct exposure to evolution concepts in lecture, the inquiry class had higher means on two separate posttests for evolution. The traditional class performed better on the pretests yet the inquiry class had higher posttest scores on both measures. Students in the inquiry class held a positive view of the inquiry-based methods and they cited them as a reason for their understanding of evolution. Individuals indicated that the integration of nature of science and evolution allowed them to grasp the concepts of evolution better than if evolution was taught alone. A creationist student became more accepting of evolution and also improved her understanding of evolution. Another student interviewed four years after the intervention remembered only the inquiry-based unit and was able to still use examples from class to explain natural selection. The instructor had a positive view of many of the instructional interventions and integrated them into her course after the study. Four years after the study she has continued to use inquiry-based methods. A number of implications for evolution instruction and future research areas are explored.

Humphrey, Robert James, Jr.

142

THE PSYCHOLOGICAL NATURE OF TEXT COMPREHENSION IN TERMS OF TEXT LEARNING PROCESSES  

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Full Text Available Texts are important tools for learning. Thus, the attempt to make textsmore understandable is a reflection of a purpose-function relatednecessity for learning from text. On the other hand, the idea ofdevelopment and recovery of informative texts via corrective teachingmaterials is frequently explored by contemporary researchers. Thus, it isevident that more advanced proficiency is needed for the illustratedaspect of the structure of texts in the learning process and to make theefforts to prepare educational materials at more scientific ground.Therefore, in this study textual organization and a general theory oflearning from texts are outlined and later language processing in workingmemory and related phenomena about learning from texts andindividual differences including information about texts development,texts comprehension, and inferences from texts are discussed. The reasonfor this is the idea that working memory is responsible for not onlyrecalling the stored information but also for storing the results of partialprocesses such as successive processes like language comprehension asexplained in the related literature for modern memory theories. Theother reason is the generalizations about the interaction between theprocesses of physical representation and pattern of a text manifested inaccordance with these ideas. Additionally, not only the differentprocedures used to develop informative texts, at the same time,differences of these procedures including a learner’s view of world andprocess styles and measurement of text comprehension and the complexrelations among them are the current and available information in theliterature. As a result, due to the nature of factors, which affect alearner’s level of recalling and his understanding from text, this studyaims to discuss this assumptions.

Ferhat ENSAR

2013-01-01

143

The Relationship among Extraversion Tendency, Vocabulary Learning Strategies, and Reading Comprehension of EFL Undergraduates in Kerman Province  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This article aims mainly to explore the relationship among the degree of extraversion tendency, vocabulary learning strategies, and reading comprehension of EFL undergraduate students in Kerman Province. For this study, there are five different categories of vocabulary learning strategies as determination, memory, social, cognitive, and metacognitive. In order to investigate the current variables, 164 EFL undergraduate students in Kerman Province were chosen based on one-step cluster sampling. The data were collected by using Schmitt’s vocabulary learning strategies questionnaire (VLSQ adopted from Bennett (2006, Eysenck personality inventory, revised version (EPQ-R, and TOEFL reading comprehension test. Then, they were analyzed by Pearson Product Moment Correlation. The findings showed that: a overall strategy use and four categories (out of 5 of vocabulary learning strategies were not significantly correlated with reading comprehension, b there was a significant and positive correlation between extroversion tendency and four categories of (out of 5 vocabulary learning strategies as well as overall strategy use, and c there was no significant relationship between reading comprehension and degree of extroversion tendency.
Key words: Vocabulary Learning Strategy; Reading Comprehension; Extroversion Tendency; Language Learning Strategy

Mohammad Hosseini Naveh

2011-10-01

144

Favorite Demonstration: Demonstrating Inquiry-Based Teaching Competencies in the Life Sciences: Part 1  

Science.gov (United States)

Research shows that many students hold misconceptions related to plant functions (Hershey 2004). Some of these students will become teachers with little content understanding to identify their students' misconceptions about plants (Amir and Tamir 1994). The literature on teaching about plants doesn't help; it contains frequent errors, misconceptions, and overgeneralizations, providing few reliable resources to inform teaching practices (Hershey 2004). It is within this context that the National Research Council (NRC) encourages science teachers, including those in the life sciences, to adopt inquiry-based teaching practices (1996; 2000; 2001). However, this effort is hampered by teachers' limited background knowledge about plants and a lack of appropriate inquiry-based instructional resources that focus on concepts related to plant functions. This article describes a series of activities that address each of these issues.

Thompson, Stephen

2007-09-01

145

AP Investigative labs: An inquiry-base Approach Lab 7: Cell Division: Mitosis and Meiosis  

Science.gov (United States)

In this inquiry-based investigation, students will explore the storage and transmission of genetic information by studying the events in the cell cycle and seeing how these events are controlled. By observing various cell structures, students will be able to explain how DNA is transmitted to the next generation via mitosis; and understand how meiosis and crossing over leads to increased genetic diversity which is necessary for evolution.

The College Board The College Board (The College Board;)

2012-10-23

146

AP Investigative labs: An inquiry-base Approach Lab 11: Transpiration  

Science.gov (United States)

In this inquiry-based investigation, students calculate leaf surface area and the average number of stomata per square millimeter in a particular kind of plant. From these observations, students will be able to formulate questions about the process of transpiration and design an experiment based on previous knowledge of osmosis, diffusion, and active transport; the movement of molecules and ions across cell membranes; the physical and chemical properties of water; photosynthesis; and the exchange of matter between biological systems and the environment.

The College Board The College Board (The College Board;)

2012-10-24

147

The Role of Women in the Utilization of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Historically women have been excluded from the domain of science since antiquity. Women were viewed as lacking the attributes necessary to carry out rational thought. However, women such as American astronomer Maria Mitchell in the 19th century during her tenure as Professor of Astronomy at Vasser College in the United States may have been the first scientist to utilize inquiry-based science instruction. During the 20th century an elementary teacher named Vivian Coulter was one of the first t...

Simpson, William D.

2012-01-01

148

At the Elbows of Scientists: Shaping Science Teachers' Conceptions and Enactment of Inquiry-Based Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

This study stemmed from concerns among researchers that reform efforts grounded in promoting inquiry as the basis for teaching science have not achieved the desired changes in American science classrooms. Many science teachers assume that they are employing inquiry-based strategies when they use cookbook investigations with highly structured step-by-step instructions. Additionally, most science teachers equate hands-on activities with classroom inquiry and, as such, repeatedly use prepackaged, disconnected activities to break the monotony of direct instruction. Despite participation in numerous professional development activities, many science teachers continue to hold misconceptions about inquiry that influence the way they design and enact instruction. To date, there is very limited research exploring the role of inquiry-based professional development in facilitating desired changes in science teachers' conceptions of inquiry. This qualitative study of five high school science teachers explores the ways in which authentic inquiry experiences with a team of scientists in Panama shaped their conceptions and reported enactments of inquiry-based instruction. Our findings suggest that professional development experiences engaging science teachers in authentic research with scientists have the potential to change teachers' naïve conceptions of inquiry, provided that necessary supports are provided for reflection and lesson design.

McLaughlin, Cheryl A.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

2014-04-01

149

Using inquiry-based instructional strategies in third-grade science  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the study was to determine if the use of inquiry-based instructional strategies as compared to traditional instructional strategies would increase third-grade students' achievement in science, based on the pretest/posttest of the school system and the Georgia Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT). Inquiry-based instruction, presented students with a question, an observation, a data set, or a hypothesis for problem solving such as scientists use when working in real-world situations. This descriptive research employed a quantitative strategy using a pretest/posttest control group design. The research compared the science academic achievement levels of one Grade 3 class [N=14] exposed to a teacher's inquiry-based instructional strategies as compared to one Grade 3 class [ N=18] exposed to a teacher's traditional instructional strategies. The study compared the science academic performance levels of third-grade students as measured by pretest/posttest mean scores from the school system-based assessment and the Georgia CRCT. Four research hypotheses were examined. Based on the overall findings from this study, both the experimental group and the control group significantly increased their mean scores from the pretests to the posttests. The amount of gain from the pretest to the posttest was significantly greater for the experimental group than the control group for pretest/posttest 1 [t(12) = 8.79, p students improved from the pretests to the posttests.

Harris, Fanicia D.

150

An inquiry-based biochemistry laboratory structure emphasizing competency in the scientific process: a guided approach with an electronic notebook format.  

Science.gov (United States)

The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students through their laboratory work at a steady pace that encourages them to focus on quality observations, careful data collection and thought processes surrounding the chemistry involved. It motivates students to work in a collaborative manner with frequent opportunities for feedback, reflection, and modification of their ideas. Each laboratory activity has four stages to keep the students' efforts on track: pre-lab work, an in-lab discussion, in-lab work, and a post-lab assignment. Students are guided at each stage by an instructor created template that directs their learning while giving them the opportunity and flexibility to explore new information, ideas, and questions. These templates are easily transferred into an electronic journal (termed the E-notebook) and form the basic structural framework of the final lab reports the students submit electronically, via a learning management system. The guided-inquiry based approach presented here uses a single laboratory activity for undergraduate Introductory Biochemistry as an example. After implementation of this guided learning approach student surveys reported a higher level of course satisfaction and there was a statistically significant improvement in the quality of the student work. Therefore we firmly believe the described format to be highly effective in promoting student learning and engagement. PMID:24376181

L Hall, Mona; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

2014-01-01

151

Enhancing Students Motivation towards School Science with an Inquiry - Based Site Visit Teaching Sequence: A Design - Based Research Approach  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

An inquiry-based site visit teaching sequence for school science was designed in co-operation with researchers and science teachers, according to the principles of Design Based Research (DBR). Out-of-school industry site visits were central in the design. Theory-based conjectures arising from the literature on motivation, interest and inquiry-based science teaching (IBST) were embodied in the design solution, and these embodied conjectures were studied in order to uncover the aspects of the d...

Loukomies, Anni

2013-01-01

152

Comprehensive, Mixed-Methods Assessment of a Blended Learning Model for Geospatial Literacy Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

Geospatial literacy -- the ability to conceptualize, capture, analyze and communicate spatial phenomena -- represents an important competency for 21st Century learners in a period of 'Geospatial Revolution'. Though relevant to in-course learning, these skills are often taught externally, placing time and resource pressures on the service providers - commonly libraries - that are relied upon to provide instruction. The emergence of online and blended modes of instruction has presented a potential means of increasing the cost-effectiveness of such activities, by simultaneously reducing instructional costs, expanding the audience for these resources, and addressing student preferences for asynchronous learning and '24-7' access. During 2011 and 2012, McMaster University Library coordinated the development, implementation and assessment of blended learning modules for geospatial literacy instruction in first-year undergraduate Social Science courses. In this paper, we present the results of a comprehensive mixed-methods approach to assess the efficacy of implementing blended learning modules to replace traditional (face-to-face), library-led, first-year undergraduate geospatial literacy instruction. Focus groups, personal interviews and an online survey were used to assess modules across dimensions of: student use, satisfaction and accessibility requirements (via Universal Instructional Design [UID] principles); instructor and teaching staff perception of pedagogical efficacy and instructional effectiveness; and, administrator cost-benefit assessment of development and implementation. Results showed that both instructors and students identified significant value in using the online modules in a blended-learning setting. Reaffirming assumptions of students' '24/7' learning preferences, over 80% of students reported using the modules on a repeat basis. Students were more likely to use the modules to better understand course content than simply to increase their grade in the course, which demonstrates applicability of the modules beyond a strict surface-learning approach. Instructors felt that giving students access to these modules increased flexibility in how in-class time was used, reduced student anxiety in busy lab sessions, and increased the effectiveness of face-to-face instruction and summative assessments. Though instructors perceived little to no change in grades as a result of the migration to blended-learning instruction, students overwhelmingly perceived a positive impact on their learning, as over 75% felt that the modules improved their geospatial literacy skills and general understanding in the course. Cost-benefit analyses proved challenging, as administrators struggled to estimate the true costs of both traditional instruction and module development. Recommendations for future module modification exposed the competing expectations of generalizing content to increase applicability and cost-effectiveness, versus tailoring modules to specific course content.

Brodeur, J. J.; Maclachlan, J. C.; Bagg, J.; Chiappetta-Swanson, C.; Vine, M. M.; Vajoczki, S.

2013-12-01

153

Machine Learning and Data Mining for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Monitoring  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) is gaining renewed attention in light of growing worldwide interest in mitigating risks of nuclear weapons proliferation and testing. Since the International Monitoring System (IMS) installed the first suite of sensors in the late 1990's, the IMS network has steadily progressed, providing valuable support for event diagnostics. This progress was highlighted at the recent International Scientific Studies (ISS) Conference in Vienna in June 2009, where scientists and domain experts met with policy makers to assess the current status of the CTBT Verification System. A strategic theme within the ISS Conference centered on exploring opportunities for further enhancing the detection and localization accuracy of low magnitude events by drawing upon modern tools and techniques for machine learning and large-scale data analysis. Several promising approaches for data exploitation were presented at the Conference. These are summarized in a companion report. In this paper, we introduce essential concepts in machine learning and assess techniques which could provide both incremental and comprehensive value for event discrimination by increasing the accuracy of the final data product, refining On-Site-Inspection (OSI) conclusions, and potentially reducing the cost of future network operations.

Russell, S; Vaidya, S

2009-07-30

154

The Relationship between Iranian EFL Instructors’ Understanding of Learning Styles and Their Students’ Success in Reading Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Many variables reasonably influence teachers’ education. One of these considering variables is being aware of the students’ learning styles. Dörnyei (2005 maintains that individual differences correlate strongly with L2 achievements. Keefe (1979 believes that learning styles might be thought of as cognitive, affective, and physiological traits that are relatively stable indicators of how learners perceive, interact with, and respond to the learning environment. The present study investigated the relationship between Iranian EFL instructors’ understanding of learning styles and their students’ success in reading comprehension tests. To achieve this goal, the researchers randomly selected 240 Iranian EFL instructors at tertiary level with more than three years of experience in teaching reading comprehension courses. The Teacher’s View over Students’ Learning Preferences Inventory (TVSLPI as well as a test of language proficiency (MELAB was employed as the study’s instruments. The findings revealed a significant relationship (p?0.05 between the Iranian EFL instructors’ recognition of learning styles and their students’ success in reading comprehension test. Besides, the results of interviews showed that Iranian instructors have approximately similar attitudes toward teaching reading comprehension in Iranian contexts.

Marzieh Khademi

2013-03-01

155

Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands- on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College  

Science.gov (United States)

Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands-on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College T. C. Kenna, S. Pfirman, B. J. Mailloux, M. Stute, R. Kelsey, and P. Bower By adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program (SEA semester) to the typical college format of classes, we are improving the technical and quantitative skills of undergraduate women and minorities in environmental science and improving their critical thinking and problem-solving by exposing our students to open-ended real-world environmental issues. Our approach uses the Hudson River Estuary as a natural laboratory. In a series of hands-on inquiry-based activities, students use advanced equipment to collect data and samples. Each class session introduces new analytical and data analysis techniques. All classes have the connecting theme of the river. Working with real data is open-ended. Our major findings as indicated by surveys as well as journaling throughout the semester are that the field- based experience significantly contributed to student learning and engagement. Journaling responses indicated that nearly all students discussed the importance and excitement of an authentic research experience. Some students were frustrated with data irregularities, uncertainty in methods and data, and the general challenge of a curriculum with inherent ambiguity. The majority were satisfied with the aims of the course to provide an integrative experience. All students demonstrated transfer of learned skills. This project has had a significant impact on our undergraduate female students: several students have pursued senior thesis projects stemming from grant activities, stating that the field activities were the highlight of their semester. Some students love the experience and want more. Others decide that they want to pursue a different career. All learn how science is conducted and have a better foundation to understand concepts such as sampling, uncertainty, and variability, which are important to many fields. Many of the hands-on curricular activities have been adapted and used with a variety of student, teacher, and faculty groups. Faculty participants in our River Summer program (www.riversummer.org) see earth system science in a way that would be hard to replicate without the hands-on experience. Faculty participants are encouraged to adapt our activities to their own classroom. We are in the process of assembling many of our hands-on field-based activities as fully exportable curricular elements to further increase impacts.

Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Mailloux, B. J.; Martin, S.; Kelsey, R.; Bower, P.

2008-12-01

156

Machine learning for radioxenon event classification for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A method of weapon detection for the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) consists of monitoring the amount of radioxenon in the atmosphere by measuring and sampling the activity concentration of 131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe by radionuclide monitoring. Several explosion samples were simulated based on real data since the measured data of this type is quite rare. These data sets consisted of different circumstances of a nuclear explosion, and are used as training data sets to establish an effective classification model employing state-of-the-art technologies in machine learning. A study was conducted involving classic induction algorithms in machine learning including Naive Bayes, Neural Networks, Decision Trees, k-Nearest Neighbors, and Support Vector Machines, that revealed that they can successfully be used in this practical application. In particular, our studies show that many induction algorithms in machine learning outperform a simple linear discriminator when a signal is found in a high radioxenon background environment.

2010-01-01

157

Assessing All Dimensions of Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

At its most basic level, service learning integrates community service activities with intentional learning components to enhance students' understanding of subject content and to meet identified community needs. Although service learning is similar to other active learning pedagogies--such as project-based, problem-based, inquiry-based, and…

Furco, Andrew

2010-01-01

158

On the Relationship between Self-regulated Learning Components and L2 Vocabulary Knowledge and Reading Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In the past two decades, self-regulation has been the center of heated debate in educational psychology. The present study attempted to investigate the relationship between Iranian EFL learners' self-regulated learning components and vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension .To fulfill this objective, a 60-item vocabulary and reading comprehension TOEFL test was administered to a sample of 250 male and female college students majoring in English Teaching, English Language Translation, a...

Abbas Ali Zarei; Gamar Hatami

2012-01-01

159

From heuristic optimization to dictionary learning: a review and comprehensive comparison of image denoising algorithms.  

Science.gov (United States)

Image denoising is a well explored topic in the field of image processing. In the past several decades, the progress made in image denoising has benefited from the improved modeling of natural images. In this paper, we introduce a new taxonomy based on image representations for a better understanding of state-of-the-art image denoising techniques. Within each category, several representative algorithms are selected for evaluation and comparison. The experimental results are discussed and analyzed to determine the overall advantages and disadvantages of each category. In general, the nonlocal methods within each category produce better denoising results than local ones. In addition, methods based on overcomplete representations using learned dictionaries perform better than others. The comprehensive study in this paper would serve as a good reference and stimulate new research ideas in image denoising. PMID:24002014

Shao, Ling; Yan, Ruomei; Li, Xuelong; Liu, Yan

2014-07-01

160

The Relationship among Extraversion Tendency, Vocabulary Learning Strategies, and Reading Comprehension of EFL Undergraduates in Kerman Province  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This article aims mainly to explore the relationship among the degree of extraversion tendency, vocabulary learning strategies, and reading comprehension of EFL undergraduate students in Kerman Province. For this study, there are five different categories of vocabulary learning strategies as determination, memory, social, cognitive, and metacognitive. In order to investigate the current variables, 164 EFL undergraduate students in Kerman Province were chosen based on one-step cluster sampling...

Mohammad Hosseini Naveh; Reza Kafipour; Rahmatollah Soltani

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Is Single or Dual Channel with Different English Proficiencies Better for English Listening Comprehension, Cognitive Load and Attitude in Ubiquitous Learning Environment?  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of English proficiency (low vs. high) and material presentation mode (single channel vs. dual channel) on English listening comprehension, cognitive load and learning attitude in a ubiquitous learning environment. An experimental learning activity was implemented using PDA as a learning…

Chang, Chi-Cheng; Tseng, Kuo-Hung; Tseng, Ju-Shih

2011-01-01

162

Inquiry-Based Science Education Competencies of Primary School Teachers: A literature study and critical review of the American National Science Education Standards  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Inquiry-based science education is an important innovation. Researchers and teachers consider it to be stimulating for pupils’ application of research skills, construction of meaning and acquiring scientific knowledge. However, there is ambiguity as to what competencies are required to teach inquiry-based science. Our purpose is to develop a profile of professional competence, required for effective inquiry-based science teaching in primary schools in the Netherlands. This article reviews l...

Alake-tuenter, E.; Biemans, H. J. A.; Tobi, H.; Wals, A. E. J.; Oosterheert, I.; Mulder, M.

2012-01-01

163

The Teaching of Inquiry-based Science in Elementary Classrooms: A Bi-national Comparative Reflection of US and Lithuanian Practices  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper offers a comparative reflection on how two nations, the U.S. and Lithuania, are implementing inquiry-based science in elementary classrooms. The qualitative study explored how fourth grade teachers in Southern California and in Lithuania employed effective inquiry-based strategies in their classrooms. A teacher’s use of questioning strategies to guide critical thinking and the role of inquiry-based pedagogy plays in promoting student engagement were commonalities in both count...

Bobbi Hansen; Sandy Buczynski

2013-01-01

164

"Lunar Phases Project" as a Foundation for the Development of Innovative Inquiry Based ASTRO 101 Activities Utilizing Existing Concept Inventories as Assessment Tools  

Science.gov (United States)

The cause and process of the lunar phases are difficult concepts for undergraduates and non-science majors to grasp. At Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) we have combined an inquiry-based instructional method (Mental Model Building) which can be more effective increasing students' conceptual understanding of the lunar phase cycle, together with the students' own observations. Undergraduate and non-science major students completed a hands-on project designed to integrate real observations, application of the scientific method, and Mental Model Building to connect the students' own observations to the Earth-Sun-Moon orientations responsible for their findings. Students' learning was assessed by administering the Lunar Phases Concept Inventory (developed by Rebecca S. Lindell and James P. Olsen, Southern Illinois University) before and after students completed the project, with positive results. We describe the methodology and activities utilized in our Lunar Phases Project, and propose their expansion to a variety of astronomical topics for undergraduate non-science majors and pre-service teachers. We emphasize developing and implementing new instructional strategies through the expansion of the Mental Model Building and similar pedagogical methodologies to develop innovative inquiry-based projects and activities in a variety of astronomical topics for undergraduate non-science majors and pre-service teachers. In order to meaningfully assess the new curriculum tools, we recommend utilizing already existing research-validated concept inventories specific to the astronomy content in the curriculum tools. These inventories can be analyzed to determine the conceptual learning gains achieved by the participating students and with further analysis can be used to refine portions of the activity under study.

Mon, M. J.; Meyer, A. O.

2012-08-01

165

Effects of Interactive versus Simultaneous Display of Multimedia Glosses on L2 Reading Comprehension and Incidental Vocabulary Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines the effects of interactive versus simultaneous display of visual and verbal multimedia information on incidental vocabulary learning and reading comprehension of learners of English with lower proficiency levels. In the interactive display condition, learners were allowed to select the type of multimedia information whereas the…

Türk, Emine; Erçetin, Gülcan

2014-01-01

166

Cognitive Strategy Instruction for Improving Expository Text Comprehension of Students with Learning Disabilities: The Quality of Evidence  

Science.gov (United States)

Educators have widely used cognitive strategy instruction to address reading comprehension deficits evidenced by students with learning disabilities. However, no one has yet conducted a review of the quality of this literature. This review applies the quality indicators advocated by Gersten et al. (2005) and Horner et al. (2005) to evaluate the…

Jitendra, Asha K.; Burgess, Clare; Gajria, Meenakshi

2011-01-01

167

Effects of Multimedia Annotations on Incidental Vocabulary Learning and Reading Comprehension of Advanced Learners of English as a Foreign Language  

Science.gov (United States)

The study investigates immediate and delayed effects of different hypermedia glosses on incidental vocabulary learning and reading comprehension of advanced foreign language learners. Sixty-nine freshman TEFL students studying at a Turkish university were randomly assigned to three types of annotations: (a) definitions of words, (b) definitions…

Akbulut, Yavuz

2007-01-01

168

The Compensatory Effectiveness of Optical Character Recognition/Speech Synthesis on Reading Comprehension of Postsecondary Students with Learning Disabilities.  

Science.gov (United States)

Thirty-seven college students with learning disabilities were given a reading comprehension task under the following conditions: (1) using an optical character recognition/speech synthesis system; (2) having the text read aloud by a human reader; or (3) reading silently without assistance. Findings indicated that the greater the disability, the…

Higgins, Eleanor L.; Raskind, Marshall H.

1997-01-01

169

Use of Story-Mapping to Increase the Story-Grammar Text Comprehension of Elementary Students with Learning Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the use of story-mapping to improve the reading comprehension of six third- and fourth-grade students with specific learning disabilities who exhibited reading deficits. Also of interest was whether the effects would maintain once the intervention was discontinued. Using a descriptive, three-phased, single-subject design, the…

Boulineau, Tori; Fore, Cecil, III; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Burke, Mack D.

2004-01-01

170

Examing the Effect of a Learning-centered Reading Instruction on Iranian Students’ Reading Comprehension: An Action Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study intended to explore the the effect of a learning-centered reading instruction on improving undergraduate students' reading comprehension ability in university context of Iran. Based on a pedagogical framework driven from Hutchinson and Waters’ learning-centered approach, some useful techniques were applied to develop a specific English reading instruction. The participants, within the age range of 18-22, included 50 students who were an intact experimental group. Following a pretest, treatment (15 weeks, 2 sessions per week, and a posttest, the obtained data was analyzed using t-test to examine the effect of the independent variable, namely, method of instruction. The results of the analysis showed that the teaching intervention had a significant effect on students' reading comprehension. The findings are discussed in relation to effective reading comprehension instruction through the use of necessary techniques in English teaching contexts.

Seyyed Hossein Kashef

2012-08-01

171

Moving Authentic Soil Research into High School Classrooms: Student Engagement and Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Inquiry-based teaching helps students develop a deep, applied understanding of human-environmental connections, but most high school curricula do not use inquiry-based methods. Soil science topics, which are also generally lacking from curricula, can provide hands-on model systems for learning inquiry skills. We report on the implementation of a…

Moebius-Clune, Bianca N.; Elsevier, Irka H.; Crawford, Barbara A.; Trautmann, Nancy M.; Schindelbeck, Robert R.; van Es, Harold M.

2011-01-01

172

A Review of Adventure Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Adventure learning (AL) is an approach for the design of digitally-enhanced teaching and learning environments driven by a framework of guidelines grounded on experiential and inquiry-based education. The purpose of this paper is to review the adventure learning literature and to describe the status quo of the practice by identifying the current…

Veletsianos, George; Kleanthous, Irene

2009-01-01

173

From Inquiry-Based Learning to Student Research in an Undergraduate Mathematics Program  

Science.gov (United States)

As an extension to various sponsored summer undergraduate research programs, academic year research for undergraduate students is becoming popular. Mathematics faculty around the country are getting involved with this type of research and administrators are encouraging this effort. Since 2007, we have been conducting academic year research at…

Das, Kumer

2013-01-01

174

Enhancing Students' Scientific and Quantitative Literacies through an Inquiry-Based Learning Project on Climate Change  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Promoting sustainability and dealing with complex environmental problems like climate change demand a citizenry with considerable scientific and quantitative literacy. In particular, students in the STEM disciplines of (biophysical) science, technology, engineering, an...

2012-01-01

175

Investigating Rocks and Sand: Addressing Multiple Learning Styles through an Inquiry-Based Approach  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors demonstrate how to tailor curriculum to support the varied interests, abilities, and talents of the children in a kindergarten class. Through words and photographs, they describe an in-depth study of rocks and sand, a topic of great interest to the children. The teachers posed open-ended questions that fostered high-level discussions.…

Ogu, Uchenna; Schmidt, Suzie Reynard

2009-01-01

176

Using a conceptual flow, inquiry based learning, and language development to yield enduring understanding in science  

Science.gov (United States)

This project was designed to incorporate three curriculum development strategies that have been created to increase student achievement in various content areas. Conceptual flow design, the 5E Instructional Model, and English language development strategies were used to create a seventh grade Genetics Unit. The unit was evaluated by three external experts and carried out in two seventh grade classrooms in an effort to assess its effectiveness. Based on the evaluators' feedback, the initial conceptual flow and lessons were found to be inconsistent and confusing. Overall, the organization of this unit seemed to support student achievement. The conceptual flow and the lesson layout of the unit were revised based on the evaluation data. All revisions and the established protocols will serve as models for further science curriculum development in the Norwalk-La Mirada Unified School District.

Gunderson, Angelica E.

177

The Impact of Collaborative Groups versus Individuals in Undergraduate Inquiry-Based Astronomy Laboratory Learning Exercises  

Science.gov (United States)

One of the long-standing general undergraduate education requirements common to many colleges and universities is a science course with a laboratory experience component. One of the objectives frequently included in the description of most of these courses is that a student will understand the nature and processes of scientific inquiry. However,…

Sibbernsen, Kendra J.

2010-01-01

178

Machine learning update for compliance verification of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: A possible method of explosion detection for the Comprehensive nuclear- Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) consists of monitoring the amount of radioxenon in the atmosphere by measuring and sampling the activity concentration of Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe-133m, and Xe-135. Several samples were simulated under different circumstances of nuclear detonation, and are used as training datasets to establish an optimal classification model employing state-of-the-art technologies in machine learning (ML). We conducted a preliminary study involving ML algorithms including Naive Bayes, Neural Networks, Decision Trees, k-Nearest Neighbours, and Support Vector Machines. In addition to confirming that ML technology is appropriate for this problem, the study suggested that it can help guide our quest for more accurate simulated data sets, which benefit the entire CTBT community. By using these algorithms, we discovered undesirable artifacts of our initial synthetic explosion data set that needed to be rectified. Our preliminary ML study compelled us to improve the dataset by using a more realistic set of fission yields and by including atmospheric dispersion effects. The fission yields were corrected for amount of time in the explosion cavity and we assume a 10 % release rate each 24 hours. The radioxenon from the explosion site was atmospherically transported (through simulations) to CTBT stations to determine an amount of radioxenon that would be measured by the stations. This was done for real atmospheric data. This new synthetic data set and the results of the machine learning algorithm obtained on it will be discussed. (author)

2008-04-13

179

Inquiry-based course in physics and chemistry for preservice K-8 teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We describe an inquiry-based course in physics and chemistry for preservice K-8 teachers developed at California State University Fullerton. The course is one of three developed primarily to enhance the science content understanding of prospective teachers. The course incorporates a number of innovative instructional strategies and is somewhat unusual for its interdisciplinary focus. We describe the course structure in detail, providing examples of course materials and assessment strategies. Finally, we provide research data illustrating both the need for the course and the effectiveness of the course in developing student understanding of selected topics. Student responses to various questions reflect a lack of understanding of many relatively simple physical science concepts, and a level of performance that is usually lower than that in comparable courses serving a general education audience. Additional data suggest that course activities improve student understanding of selected topics, often dramatically.

Michael E. Loverude

2011-05-01

180

Inquiry-Based Laboratory Course Improves StudentsÃÂ Ability to Design Experiments and Interpret Data  

Science.gov (United States)

We redesigned our intermediate-level organismal physiology laboratory course to center on student-designed experiments in plant and human physiology. Our primary goals were to improve the ability of students to design experiments and analyze data. We assessed these abilities at the beginning and end of the semester by giving students an evaluation tool consisting of an experimental scenario, data, and four questions of increasing complexity. The laboratory lecture group improved more than the lecture-only group for the most challenging question. This evidence suggests that our inquiry-based curriculum is achieving its primary goals. The evaluation tool that we developed may be useful to others interested in measuring experimental analysis abilities in their students.

Marcella J. Myers (College of St. Catherine Department of Biology); Dr. Ann B. Burgess (University of Wisconsin)

2003-03-01

 
 
 
 
181

Inquiry-based science education : - har naturfagsundervisningen i Danmark brug for det?  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Inquiry-based science education (IBSE) er en internationalt afprøvet naturfagsdidaktisk metode der har til formål at øge elevernes interesse for og udbytte af naturfag. I artiklen redegøres der for metoden, der kan betegnes som en elevstyret problem- og undersøgelsesbaseret naturfagsundervisningsmetode, og resultater fra relevante internationale IBSE-inspirerede projekter sammenholdes med dansk undervisningspraksis. Specielt fremhæves elevernes aktive hypotesedannelse, italesættelse af egne idéer samt en større grad af selvstændighed i elevernes praktiske arbejde som noget nyt i den beskrevne metode, samtidig med at faserne i elevarbejdet er mere klart defineret og adskilt i metoden. Sluttelig beskrives erfaringer fra et igangværende udviklingsarbejde hvor der arbejdes efter IBSE-metoden.

Ã?stergaard, Lars Domino; Sillasen, Martin Krabbe

2010-01-01

182

Grapheme learning and grapheme-color synesthesia: Toward a comprehensive model of grapheme-color association  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Recent progress in grapheme-color synesthesia research has revealed that certain regularities, as well as individual differences, figure into grapheme-color associations. Although several factors are known to regulate grapheme-color associations, the impact of factors, including their interrelationships, on synesthesia remains unclear. We investigated determinants of synesthetic color for graphemes (characters, letters of Hiragana, a phonetic script in the Japanese language, and the English alphabet. Results revealed that grapheme ordinality was the strongest predictor of synesthetic colors for Hiragana characters, followed by character sound, and visual shape. Ordinality and visual shapes also significantly predicted synesthetic colors for English alphabet letters, however, sounds did not. The relative impact of grapheme properties on grapheme-color associations and the differences between these two writing systems are accounted for by considering the way graphemes are processed in the brain and introduced during an individual's development. A new model is proposed which takes into account the developmental process of grapheme learning. The model provides comprehensive explanation of synesthetic grapheme-color association determination processes, including the differences across writing systems.

MichikoAsano

2013-11-01

183

Listening comprehension and recall abilities in adolescents with language-learning disabilities and without disabilities for social studies lectures.  

Science.gov (United States)

Listening comprehension and recall abilities for social studies lectures were examined and compared in 20 adolescent males with language-learning disabilities (LLD) and 29 without disabilities (WD). Subjects viewed two social studies lectures with comparison and causation expository discourse structures and verbally responded to literal and inferential comprehension questions. Regardless of lecture type or question type, the group with LLD performed significantly more poorly than did the group WD. Both groups responded accurately to significantly more inferential questions for the causation lecture over the comparison lecture. Neither group demonstrated a significant difference with respect to their response accuracy for the literal questions across lecture types. PMID:9421765

Ward-Lonergan, J M; Liles, B Z; Anderson, A M

1998-01-01

184

Preservice Elementary Teachers' Perceptions of Their Understanding of Inquiry and Inquiry-Based Science Pedagogy: Influence of an Elementary Science Education Methods Course and a Science Field Experience  

Science.gov (United States)

Literature indicates that the "National Science Education Standards" ("NSES") teaching standards and inquiry-based teaching strategies for science are not uniformly incorporated into the elementary science methods (eSEM) courses across the U.S. and that field experiences might not provide appropriate models of the inquiry-based science pedagogy…

Varma, Tina; Volkmann, Mark; Hanuscin, Deborah

2009-01-01

185

Inquiry-Based Science Education Competencies of Primary School Teachers: A Literature Study and Critical Review of the American National Science Education Standards  

Science.gov (United States)

Inquiry-based science education is an important innovation. Researchers and teachers consider it to be stimulating for pupils' application of research skills, construction of meaning and acquiring scientific knowledge. However, there is ambiguity as to what competencies are required to teach inquiry-based science. Our purpose is to develop a…

Alake-Tuenter, Ester; Biemans, Harm J. A.; Tobi, Hilde; Wals, Arjen E. J.; Oosterheert, Ida; Mulder, Martin

2012-01-01

186

The Influence of an Extensive Inquiry-Based Field Experience on Pre-Service Elementary Student Teachers' Science Teaching Beliefs  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the effects of an extensive inquiry-based field experience on pre service elementary teachers' personal agency beliefs, a composite measure of context beliefs and capability beliefs related to teaching science. The research combined quantitative and qualitative approaches and included an experimental group that utilized the…

Bhattacharyya, Sumita; Volk, Trudi; Lumpe, Andrew

2009-01-01

187

Exploring the Development of Preservice Science Teachers' Views on the Nature of Science in Inquiry-Based Laboratory Instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of the inquiry-based and explicit-reflective laboratory instruction on preservice science teachers' (PSTs) conceptions of the nature of science (NOS) aspects. This study was carried out during the Laboratory Application in Science II course. All 52 preservice elementary science teachers enrolled in the course consented to participate in the study; 37 were female and 15 were male, with a mean age of 22.8 years. All had the same science major background, and all of them were juniors. The course provided meaningful and practical inquiry-based experiences, as well as explicit and reflective instruction about NOS. Each week, a specific NOS aspect was targeted related to the inquiry-based laboratory investigation. The design of the study was qualitative and exploratory in nature. At the beginning of the study, the Views of Nature of Science Questionnaire Version B open-ended questionnaire was applied to explore PSTs' NOS views. At the end of the semester, the same questionnaire was conducted to determine the impact of the explicit-reflective and inquiry-based laboratory instruction. The results showed that many PSTs improved their views of NOS in each element, although to different degrees.

Ozgelen, Sinan; Yilmaz-Tuzun, Ozgul; Hanuscin, Deborah L.

2013-08-01

188

Red Seaweed Enzyme-Catalyzed Bromination of Bromophenol Red: An Inquiry-Based Kinetics Laboratory Experiment for Undergraduates  

Science.gov (United States)

Haloperoxidase enzymes are of interest for basic and applied bioscientists because of their increasing importance in pharmaceutical industry and environmental cleanups. In a guided inquiry-based laboratory experiment for life-science, agricultural science, and health science undergraduates, the bromoperoxidase from a red seaweed was used to…

Jittam, Piyachat; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Promptmas, Chamras; Sriwattanarothai, Namkang; Archavarungson, Nattinee; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

2009-01-01

189

A Psychometric Approach to the Development of a 5E Lesson Plan Scoring Instrument for Inquiry-Based Teaching  

Science.gov (United States)

This research centers on the psychometric examination of the structure of an instrument, known as the 5E Lesson Plan (5E ILPv2) rubric for inquiry-based teaching. The instrument is intended to measure an individual's skill in developing written 5E lesson plans for inquiry teaching. In stage one of the instrument's development, an exploratory…

Goldston, M. Jenice; Dantzler, John; Day, Jeanelle; Webb, Brenda

2013-01-01

190

Employing Inquiry-Based Computer Simulations and Embedded Scientist Videos To Teach Challenging Climate Change and Nature of Science Concepts  

Science.gov (United States)

Design based research was utilized to investigate how students use a greenhouse effect simulation in order to derive best learning practices. During this process, students recognized the authentic scientific process involving computer simulations. The simulation used is embedded within an inquiry-based technology-mediated science curriculum known as Web-based Inquiry Science Environment (WISE). For this research, students from a suburban, diverse, middle school setting use the simulations as part of a two week-long class unit on climate change. A pilot study was conducted during phase one of the research that informed phase two, which encompasses the dissertation. During the pilot study, as students worked through the simulation, evidence of shifts in student motivation, understanding of science content, and ideas about the nature of science became present using a combination of student interviews, focus groups, and students' conversations. Outcomes of the pilot study included improvements to the pedagogical approach. Allowing students to do 'Extreme Testing' (e.g., making the world as hot or cold as possible) and increasing the time for free exploration of the simulation are improvements made as a result of the findings of the pilot study. In the dissertation (phase two of the research design) these findings were implemented in a new curriculum scaled for 85 new students from the same school during the next school year. The modifications included new components implementing simulations as an assessment tool for all students and embedded modeling tools. All students were asked to build pre and post models, however due to technological constraints these were not an effective tool. A non-video group of 44 students was established and another group of 41 video students had a WISE curriculum which included twelve minutes of scientists' conversational videos referencing explicit aspects on the nature of science, specifically the use of models and simulations in science. The students in the video group had marked improvement compared to the non-video group on questions regarding modeling as a tool for representing objects and processes of science modeling aspects as evident by multiple data sources. The findings from the dissertation have potential impacts on improving Nature of Science (NOS) concepts around modeling by efficiently embedding short authentic scientific videos that can be easily used by many educators. Compared to published assessments by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), due to the curriculum interventions both groups scored higher than the average United States middle school student on many NOS and climate content constructs.

Cohen, E.

2013-12-01

191

The Development of Reading Comprehension Skills in Children Learning English as a Second Language  

Science.gov (United States)

Reading comprehension is a multi-dimensional process that includes the reader, the text, and factors associated with the activity of reading. Most research and theories of comprehension are based primarily on research conducted with monolingual English speakers (L1). The present study was designed to investigate the cognitive and linguistic…

Lipka, Orly; Siegel, Linda S.

2012-01-01

192

A College-Level Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activity on Transiting Planets  

CERN Multimedia

We have designed an inquiry-based laboratory activity on transiting extrasolar planets for an introductory college-level astronomy class. The activity was designed with the intent of simultaneously teaching science process skills and factual content about transits and light curves. In the activity, groups of two to four students each formulate a specific science question and design and carry out an investigation using a table-top model of a star and orbiting planet. Each group then presents their findings to other students in their class. In a final presentation, the instructors integrate students' findings with a summary of how measured light curves indicate properties of planetary systems. The activity debuted at Hartnell College in November 2009 and has also been adapted for a lecture-based astronomy course at U.C. Santa Cruz. We present the results of student surveys before and after the astronomy course at Hartnell and discuss how well our activity promotes students' confidence and identity as scientists...

McConnell, Nicholas J; Strubbe, Linda E; Moth, Pimol; Montgomery, Ryan M; Raschke, Lynne M; Hunter, Lisa; Goza, Barbara

2010-01-01

193

The Teaching of Inquiry-based Science in Elementary Classrooms: A Bi-national Comparative Reflection of US and Lithuanian Practices  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper offers a comparative reflection on how two nations, the U.S. and Lithuania, are implementing inquiry-based science in elementary classrooms. The qualitative study explored how fourth grade teachers in Southern California and in Lithuania employed effective inquiry-based strategies in their classrooms. A teacher’s use of questioning strategies to guide critical thinking and the role of inquiry-based pedagogy plays in promoting student engagement were commonalities in both countries. “Exercise moments”, resource conservation, and “voyeuristic investigations” were noted in Lithuanian inquiry practices while pacing guides and standards coverage were prevalent issues in US inquiry practices.

Sandy Buczynski

2013-05-01

194

The Effectiveness of Using an Explicit Language Learning Strategy-Based Instruction in Developing Secondary School Students' EFL Listening Comprehension Skills  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study aimed at exploring the effectiveness of using explicit language learning strategy-based instruction in developing secondary school students' EFL listening comprehension skills. It was hypothesized that using explicit strategy-based instruction would develop students' EFL listening comprehension skill and its sub-skills. The…

Amin, Iman Abdul-Reheem; Amin, Magdy Mohammad; Aly, Mahsoub Abdul-Sadeq

2011-01-01

195

Team learning and innovation in nursing teams: Results of a comprehensive research project  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background/Objective: Noncompliance to implementation of innovations is a problem in nursing teams. In literature, team learning is proposed as a facilitator for change. Still, studies reporting the effects of team learning activities on the implementation of innovations in nursing teams are scarce. To address this gap in literature, this study explored the influence of team learning on the implementation of two innovations. Methods: A literature and three empirical studies were performed to address the research questions of this project. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted between 2008-2011 with a sample of 1111 nurses, representing 79 nursing teams from The Netherlands and Belgium. Results: The results of the literature review revealed research on team learning and innovation in nursing is limited. Team learning included processes to gather, process, and store information from different innovations within the nursing team. The prevalence of team-learning activities was contributed or hindered by individual and contextual factors. Principal component analyses of a 26-item team learning activities scale revealed a five-factor model, explaining 78% of the variance. Team-composition explained 33% of team learning. Analyses on the influence of contextual factors yielded three models that explained 76%, 81% and 83% of the variance in team learning. Positive relationships were detected between team learning activities handling production-oriented information and implementation-effectiveness of an incremental innovation. In addition, team learning activities regarding development-oriented information positively affected the implementation of a radical innovation. Conclusions: Nursing teams undertake different team learning activities to process different types of information that cross over within the nursing team. The way the nursing team is composed had a minor effect on the prevalence of team learning activities in nursing teams. Contextual factors had a major effect on the prevalence of team learning activities. Team learning activities related to the production of nursing care had a positive effect on the implementation of an incremental innovation. Team learning activities related with the development of nursing care of the team positively affected the implementation of a radical innovation. Implications for practice and policy: Throughout team learning nursing teams can enhance their implementation-effectiveness on innovations and increase patient safety and the quality of provided nursing managers and nursing teams can develop effective team learning processes that enable nursing teams to improve implementation-effectiveness of different types of innovations.

Olaf Timmermans

2012-07-01

196

Every Cell Counts: An Inquiry-Based Approach to Address a Novel Research Question in an Undergraduate Neuroscience Lab  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A science-based curriculum that encourages hands-on experiences, skill development, and promotes student engagement are critical components in both successful undergraduate psychology and neuroscience programs. This lab explored an inquiry-based research project focused on microscopy skills, critical thinking, and independent research design. This lesson used a novel research question (How many serotonergic cells are located in the dorsal raphe nucleus?) to engage students in research and met...

Birkett, Melissa A.

2009-01-01

197

Enhancing Hispanic Minority Undergraduates’ Botany Laboratory Experiences: Implementation of an Inquiry-based Plant Tissue Culture Module Exercise  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Early involvement of students in hands-on research experiences are known to demystify research and promote the pursuit of careers in science. But in large enrolment departments such opportunities for undergraduates to participate in research are rare. To counteract such lack of opportunities, inquiry-based laboratory module in plant tissue culture was implemented in an undergraduate botany course impacting approximately 140 Hispanic minority students per year. In this module, spread ...

Dimuth Siritunga; Vivian Navas; Nanette Diffoot

2012-01-01

198

Impact of backwards faded scaffolding approach to inquiry-based astronomy laboratory experiences on undergraduate non-science majors' views of scientific inquiry  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored the impact of a novel inquiry-based astronomy laboratory curriculum designed using the Backwards Faded Scaffolding inquiry teaching framework on non-science majoring undergraduate students' views of the nature of scientific inquiry (NOSI). The study focused on two aspects of NOSI: The Distinction between Data and Evidence (DvE), and The Multiple Methods of Science (MMS). Participants were 220 predominately non-science majoring undergraduate students at a small, doctoral granting, research-extensive university in the Rocky Mountain region of the United States. The student participants were enrolled in an introductory astronomy survey course with an associated laboratory section and were selected in two samples over consecutive fall and spring semesters. The participants also included four of the graduate student instructors who taught the laboratory courses using the intervention curriculum. In the first stage, student participant views of NOSI were measured using the VOSI-4 research instrument before and after the intervention curriculum was administered. The responses were quantified, and the distributions of pre and posttest scores of both samples were separately analyzed to determine if there was a significant improvement in understanding of either of the two aspects of NOSI. The results from both samples were compared to evaluate the consistency of the results. In the second stage, the quantitative results were used to strategically design a qualitative investigation, in which the four lab instructors were interviewed about their observations of how the student participants interacted with the intervention curriculum as compared to traditional lab activities, as well as their suggestions as to how the curriculum may or may not have contributed to the results of the first stage. These interviews were summarized and analyzed for common themes as to how the intervention curriculum influenced the students' understandings of the two aspect of NOSI. According to the results of a Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, there was a significant shift in the distributions of both samples toward a more informed understanding of DvE after the intervention curriculum was administered, while there was no significant change in either direction for understanding of MMS. The results of the instructor interview analysis suggested that the intervention curriculum provided multiple opportunities for students to evaluate and determine the relevance of data in the context of producing evidence-based conclusions directly related to specific research questions, thereby supporting the development of more informed views of DvE. These results also suggested that students might not have realized that they were exclusively engaged in non-experimental type inquiries, as various research methods were not explicitly addressed. The intervention curriculum used a consistently phased stepwise format, which may also have led the students to accommodate their astronomy inquiry experiences within persistent misconceptions of "The Scientific Method" as the only valid means of constructing scientific knowledge, thereby leading to no change in understanding of MMS. The results of the study suggest that a scaffolded, inquiry-based, introductory astronomy laboratory curriculum purposefully designed and scaffolded to enhance students' understandings could be effective in enhancing undergraduate non-science majoring students' views of certain aspects of NOSI. Through scaffolding inquiry experiences that deliver multiple opportunities to engage in authentic scientific inquiries, the novel curriculum provides a valuable resource for the astronomy education community to engage students in learning experiences that reflect the contemporary views of constructivist inquiry-based learning, which focuses on the interpretation of data to create evidence in light of specific questions, as well as opportunities to engage in authentic scientific discourse. As such it can enable astronomy educators in the undergraduate teaching community to support student

Lyons, Daniel J.

199

The Effects of Cooperative Learning on Improving College Students’ Reading Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In cooperative learning students work with their peers to accomplish a shared goal through interdependence, interaction and team work among all group members rather than working alone. This article discusses three main methods of cooperative learning and how to implement cooperative learning in college English reading class. During the process some key elements should be taken into consideration, including classroom atmosphere, the design of tasks and the teacher’s role.

Wenjing Zuo

2011-08-01

200

The Effects of Cooperative Learning on Improving College Students’ Reading Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In cooperative learning students work with their peers to accomplish a shared goal through interdependence, interaction and team work among all group members rather than working alone. This article discusses three main methods of cooperative learning and how to implement cooperative learning in college English reading class. During the process some key elements should be taken into consideration, including classroom atmosphere, the design of tasks and the teacher’s role.

Wenjing Zuo

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

Polymer Science Learning Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The Polymer Science Learning Center (PSLC) is an interactive web site in polymer education that offers an innovative, inquiry-based, multi-faceted learning environment for pre-kindergarten through adult explorers. The site offers links to educational resources, activities, demonstrations and events. The "Macrogalleria" houses virtual learning shops that are filled with free polymer information for beginners and experienced researchers. A section for children is also available. Keywords: polyvinylchloride, polystyrene, ABS, teflon.

2010-07-02

202

Neural Network Processing of Natural Language: II. Towards a Unified Model of Corticostriatal Function in Learning Sentence Comprehension and Non-Linguistic Sequencing  

Science.gov (United States)

A central issue in cognitive neuroscience today concerns how distributed neural networks in the brain that are used in language learning and processing can be involved in non-linguistic cognitive sequence learning. This issue is informed by a wealth of functional neurophysiology studies of sentence comprehension, along with a number of recent…

Dominey, Peter Ford; Inui, Toshio; Hoen, Michel

2009-01-01

203

The Evaluation of Argument Mapping as a Learning Tool: Comparing the Effects of Map Reading versus Text Reading on Comprehension and Recall of Arguments  

Science.gov (United States)

The current study compared the effects on comprehension and memory of learning via text versus learning via argument map. Argument mapping is a method of diagrammatic representation of arguments designed to simplify the reading of an argument structure and allow for easy assimilation of core propositions and relations. In the current study, 400…

Dwyer, Christopher P.; Hogan, Michael J.; Stewart, Ian

2010-01-01

204

The Effect of Multimedia Glosses on Online Computerized L2 Text Comprehension and Vocabulary Learning of Iranian EFL Learners  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of different types of multimedia glosses, namely text, picture, and text plus picture on online computerized L2 text comprehension and vocabulary learning of junior high school students. About 60 female Iranian junior high school students were selected from a population pool of 102 volunteers based on their performance on a standard English proficiency test (Nelson. Afterwards, they were randomly assigned to 4 groups of 15, three gloss groups, subsequently exposed to the research treatment and one control group. Taking advantage of the results of the pilot study, some words of the computerized written texts were glossed and hyperlinked by a computer software program. When the students clicked on hyperlinked words, a new page appeared and showed the word with a definition in English (textual gloss group, a picture (pictorial gloss group, or a combination of both definition and picture (textual plus pictorial gloss group. Participants in each experimental group read the texts under one of the three mentioned conditions. Statistical analyses of the results reveal that 1 all multimedia gloss groups comprehended computerized L2 texts significantly better than the control group, 2 A significant difference between the multimedia gloss groups and the control group in the production of the target vocabulary items was found. 3 The mix gloss group insignificantly outperformed the textual and pictorial gloss groups in computerized L2 text comprehension, and 4 regarding vocabulary learning, the mix gloss group significantly outperformed the other two gloss groups. Hence, the findings of this study indicate that utilizing computers and multimedia glosses can be influential in language teaching in general and online L2 text comprehension as well as incidental vocabulary learning in particular.

Nasrin Shams

2011-05-01

205

Quest to Learn: Developing the School for Digital Kids  

Science.gov (United States)

Quest to Learn, an innovative school for grades 6 to 12 in New York City, grew out of the idea that gaming and game design offer a promising new paradigm for curriculum and learning. The designers of Quest to Learn developed an approach to learning that draws from what games do best: drop kids into inquiry-based, complex problem spaces that are…

Salen, Katie; Torres, Robert; Wolozin, Loretta; Rufo-Tepper, Rebecca; Shapiro, Arana

2011-01-01

206

The Robust Learning Model (RLM): A Comprehensive Approach to a New Online University  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper outlines the components of the Robust Learning Model (RLM) as a conceptual framework for creating a new online university offering numerous degree programs at all degree levels. The RLM is a multi-factorial model based on the basic belief that successful learning outcomes depend on multiple factors employed together in a holistic…

Neumann, Yoram; Neumann, Edith F.

2010-01-01

207

Lessons Learned from Comprehensive Deployments of Multiagent CSCL Applications I-MINDS and ClassroomWiki  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent years have seen a surge in the use of intelligent computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) tools for improving student learning in traditional classrooms. However, adopting such a CSCL tool in a classroom still requires the teacher to develop (or decide on which to adopt) the CSCL tool and the CSCL script, design the relevant…

Khandaker, N.; Soh, Leen-Kiat; Miller, L. D.; Eck, A.; Jiang, Hong

2011-01-01

208

Aligning Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory with a Comprehensive Agricultural Education Model  

Science.gov (United States)

Experiential learning has been a foundational tenant of agricultural education since its inception. However, the theory of experiential education has received limited attention in the permanent agricultural education literature base. As such, this philosophical manuscript examined Kolb's experiential learning process further, and considered the…

Baker, Marshall A.; Robinson, J. Shane; Kolb, David A.

2012-01-01

209

A Mind of Their Own: Using Inquiry-based Teaching to Build Critical Thinking Skills and Intellectual Engagement in an Undergraduate Neuroanatomy Course.  

Science.gov (United States)

A changing undergraduate demographic and the need to help students develop advanced critical thinking skills in neuroanatomy courses has prompted many faculty to consider new teaching methods including clinical case studies. This study compared primarily conventional and inquiry-based clinical case (IBCC) teaching methods to determine which would produce greater gains in critical thinking and content knowledge. Results showed students in the conventional neuroanatomy course gained less than 3 national percentile ranks while IBCC students gained over 7.5 within one academic term using the valid and reliable California Critical Thinking Skills Test. In addition to 2.5 times greater gains in critical thinking, IBCC teaching methods also produced 12% greater final exam performance and 11% higher grades using common grade performance benchmarks. Classroom observations also indicated that IBCC students were more intellectually engaged and participated to a greater extent in classroom discussions. Through the results of this study, it is hoped that faculty who teach neuroanatomy and desire greater critical thinking and content student learning outcomes will consider using the IBCC method. PMID:24693256

Greenwald, Ralf R; Quitadamo, Ian J

2014-01-01

210

Adaptive and Maladaptive Strategy Use in Computer-Assisted Language Learning Activities for Listening Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

College students of English as a foreign language (EFL) in Chile participated in an online mini course designed to improve their listening comprehension. There were four experimental conditions: A) one in which participants listened to fast dialogues; B) one in which participants listened to slow dialogues; C) one in which participants were given…

McBride, Cara

2008-01-01

211

The Effects of Segmentation and Personalization on Superficial and Comprehensive Strategy Instruction in Multimedia Learning Environments  

Science.gov (United States)

Short, cause-and-effect instructional multimedia tutorials that provide learner control of instructional pace (segmentation) and verbal representations of content in a conversational tone (personalization) have been demonstrated to benefit problem solving transfer. How might a more comprehensive multimedia instructional environment focused on…

Doolittle, Peter

2010-01-01

212

The Effects of Achievement Goals and Self-Regulated Learning Behaviors on Reading Comprehension in Technology-Enhanced Learning Environments  

Science.gov (United States)

Studies examining students' achievement goals, cognitive engagement strategies and performance have found that achievement goals tend to predict classes of cognitive strategy use which predict performance on measures of learning. These studies have led to deeper theoretical understanding, but their reliance on self-report data limit the…

Bernacki, Matthew L.; Byrnes, James P.; Cromley, Jennifer G.

2012-01-01

213

Seeing the Superiority of Self-monitoring Learning Strategies over Teacher-monitoring Learning in Adult 'Reading Comprehension'  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study aims to see the superiority of SMLS on Learners' Receptive skill among the students of Payame-noor and Azad Universities in three different departments and the evaluation that teachers can apply to raise SML among adult learners. It is believed that since the publication of Malcolm Knowles' book in 1975, SML had been applied for adult education for ages. To administer this, SML of reading comprehension was introduced to learners in order to keep an eye on their own learnin...

Asghar Bastami Bandpay

2012-01-01

214

Reading comprehension and reading development for learning in children from unstimulating environment caused by poverty  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A review of foreign and home research results has shown a significant connection between a level of literacy and a level of education, employment prospects and consequently socio-economic status of an individual and a family. Home environment, life habits related to literacy (reading culture) and level of parents' education have a direct impact on a child's development of literacy. Reading efficiency is an important element of literacy and relates to reading comprehension and reading for lear...

2012-01-01

215

Increasing health worker capacity through distance learning: a comprehensive review of programmes in Tanzania  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanzania, like many developing countries, faces a crisis in human resources for health. The government has looked for ways to increase the number and skills of health workers, including using distance learning in their training. In 2008, the authors reviewed and assessed the country's current distance learning programmes for health care workers, as well as those in countries with similar human resource challenges, to determine the feasibility of distance learning to meet the need of an increased and more skilled health workforce. Methods Data were collected from 25 distance learning programmes at health training institutions, universities, and non-governmental organizations throughout the country from May to August 2008. Methods included internet research; desk review; telephone, email and mail-in surveys; on-site observations; interviews with programme managers, instructors, students, information technology specialists, preceptors, health care workers and Ministry of Health and Social Welfare representatives; and a focus group with national HIV/AIDS care and treatment organizations. Results Challenges include lack of guidelines for administrators, instructors and preceptors of distance learning programmes regarding roles and responsibilities; absence of competencies for clinical components of curricula; and technological constraints such as lack of access to computers and to the internet. Insufficient funding resulted in personnel shortages, lack of appropriate training for personnel, and lack of materials for students. Nonetheless, current and prospective students expressed overwhelming enthusiasm for scale-up of distance learning because of the unique financial and social benefits offered by these programs. Participants were retained as employees in their health care facilities, and remained in their communities and supported their families while advancing their careers. Space in health training institutions was freed up for new students entering in-residence pre-service training. Conclusions A blended print-based distance learning model is most feasible at the national level due to current resource and infrastructure constraints. With an increase in staffing; improvement of infrastructure, coordination and curricula; and decentralization to the zonal or district level, distance learning can be an effective method to increase both the skills and the numbers of qualified health care workers capable of meeting the health care needs of the Tanzanian population.

Kisimbo Daniel

2010-12-01

216

Using inquiry-based instruction to meet the standards of No Child Left Behind for middle school earth science  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the effectiveness of a specific instructional strategy employed to improve performance on the end-of-the-year Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) as mandated by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. A growing body of evidence suggests that the perceived pressure to produce adequate aggregated scores on the CRCT causes teachers to neglect other relevant aspects of teaching and attend less to individualized instruction. Rooted in constructivist theory, inquiry-based programs provide a o developmental plan of instruction that affords the opportunity for each student to understand their academic needs and strengths. However, the utility of inquiry-based instruction is largely unknown due to the lack of evaluation studies. To address this problem, this quantitative evaluation measured the impact of the Audet and Jordan inquiry-based instructional model on CRCT test scores of 102 students in a sixth-grade science classroom in one north Georgia school. A series of binomial tests of proportions tested differences between CRCT scores of the program participants and those of a matched control sample selected from other district schools that did not adopt the program. The study found no significant differences on CRCT test scores between the treatment and control groups. The study also found no significant performance differences among genders in the sample using inquiry instruction. This implies that the utility of inquiry education might exist outside the domain of test scores. This study can contribute to social change by informing a reevaluation of the instructional strategies that ideally will serve NCLB high-stakes assessment mandates, while also affording students the individual-level skills needed to become productive members of society.

Harris, Michael W.

217

Building a Comprehensive Online Homework System for Astro 101 within Sapling Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

What does an effective homework system for Astro 101 look like? We discuss the method of creating a library of questions for Astro 101 as well as the philosophy behind the types of homework questions (and feedback) that are written within the Sapling Learning homework system. We also discuss which topics may require deeper investigations and how they can be addressed using interactive simulations.

Urban, Andrea

2014-01-01

218

The Astronomical Roots of Sapling Learning: Building a Comprehensive Online Homework System for Astro 101  

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I discuss the method of creating a library of questions for Astro 101 within the Sapling Learning homework system, as well as the philosophy behind the types of homework questions (and feedback) that are being written. The system's features were built around meeting five basic goals: flexibility, engaging content, peer instruction, immediate instructional feedback, and exploration.

Urban, A.

2014-07-01

219

The Comparison of Language Learning Strategies and Reading Comprehension of Iranian EFL Students Taking Web-based and Face-to-face Instruction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigated language learning strategies used by EFL web-based learners and face-to-face learners. It also examined the difference between pre-test and post-test reading comprehension scores of EFL students who were exposed to web-based and face-to-face instruction. The participants of the study were 200 Iranian EFL university students. They were randomly assigned into two groups, 100 students in one group taking web-based instruction and 100 students in the other group taking face-to-face instruction. The students took a 50-item translated version of Strategy Inventory for Language Learning and a test of reading comprehension. This scale and the reading comprehension test were given as the pre-test and post-test to all students. During the treatment, summarization-strategy training was used to promote the learning process. The result of an independent samples t-tests revealed that there was no significant difference between the two groups of learners regarding their preferences for language learning strategies. Moreover, the result of a paired samples t-test indicated that there was significant difference between pre-test and post-test reading comprehension scores of EFL students who were exposed to face-to-face instruction. However, there was no significant difference between pre-test and post-test reading comprehension scores of EFL students who were exposed to web-based instruction.

Behzad Ghonsooly

2014-06-01

220

The I-Cleen Project (Inquiring on CLimate & ENergy). Research Meets Education in AN Inquiry-Based Approach to Earth System Science in Italian Classrooms  

Science.gov (United States)

Italian citizens' perception of the seriousness of the issue of climate change is one of the lowest in Europe (Eurobarometer survey, 2008), running next to last among the 28 EU Nations. This has recently driven many national science institutions to take action in order to connect society with the complexities and consequences of climate change. These connection initiatives have encountered a certain deal of opposition in Italian schools. A fact most likely due both to a further weakening of the use of inquiry-based educational practices adopted by teachers and to their reluctance to cooperate on a professional level, which hinders the diffusion of educational practices. I-CLEEN (Inquiring on CLimate and Energy, www.icleen.museum) is a service that offers a new type of link between schools and the complexity of climate change. The project took off in 2008 thanks to the Trento Science Museum (former Tridentine Museum of Natural Science), one of the major Italian science museums that includes both research and science education and dissemination departments. The main aim is to create, using the tools of professional cooperation, a free repository of educational resources that can support teachers in preparing inquiry-based lessons on climate change and earth system science topics, making the task less of a burden. I-CLEEN is inspired by many models, which include: the ARISE (Andrill Research Immersion for Science Educators), the OER (Open Educational Resources) models and those of other projects that have developed similar information gateways such as LRE (Learning Resource Exchange) and DLESE (Digital Library on Earth Science Education). One of the strategies devised by I-CLEEN is to rely upon an editorial team made up of a highly selected group of teachers that interacts with the researchers of the museum and of other Earth system science research centres like the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV). Resource selection, production, revision and publication processes follow a specific procedure that was laid out in a selection policy document according to the guidelines established by the established standards. Thanks to this, all educational resources have a common layout and scientific relevance guaranteed by researcher review that both further facilitate users in taking them up. All the parts that make up the project and their respective activities are fully dealt with using an open source web platform called LifeRay. This platform and the metadata structure made it possible to publish I-CLEEN resources in international project repositories, such as Scientix. The role of the service is thus twofold, gathering local educational practices and linking them to leading international excellences in this field I-CLEEN won the first prize at the 2010 e-learning award and has also been evaluated to determine both the effectiveness of the service among teachers and also the user-friendliness of the Graphic User Interface of the project website. This contribution illustrates several aspects of the I-CLEEN, the results of the two evaluation activities and those coming from the analysis of the project website access data.

Cattadori, M.; Editorial Staff of the I-CLEN Project

2011-12-01

 
 
 
 
221

Effects of Text-to-Speech Software on the Reading Rate and Comprehension Skills of High School Students with Specific Learning Disabilities  

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The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a text-to-speech software program known as "Read Please" on the reading rate and reading comprehension accuracy of two high school students with specific learning disabilities (SLD) in reading. A single-subject A-B-A-B "withdrawal" research design (Alberto & Troutman, 2009) was used to…

Moorman, Amanda; Boon, Richard T.; Keller-Bell, Yolanda; Stagliano, Christina; Jeffs, Tara

2010-01-01

222

Locus of Control & Motivation Strategies for Learning Questionnaire: Predictors of Student Success on the ATI Comprehensive Predictor Exam & NCLEX-RN Examination  

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The two purposes of this study were to determine whether locus of control (LOC) was predictive of how a student would perform on the ATI Comprehensive Predictor Exam and the NCLEX-RN, and if the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) provided information that would help determine predictors of success on these two exams. The study…

Carpenter, Jane H.

2011-01-01

223

The Effects of Input Enhancement on Grammar Learning and Comprehension: A Modified Replication of Lee (2007) with Eye-Movement Data  

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In his 2007 study "Effects of Textual Enhancement and Topic Familiarity on Korean EFL Students' Reading Comprehension and Learning of Passive Form," Lee demonstrated that learners were better able to correct written sentences that contained incorrect English passive forms after exposure to texts flooded with enhanced (versus…

Winke, Paula M.

2013-01-01

224

Learning from Mistakes --- A Comprehensive Study on Real World Concurrency Bug Characteristics  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The reality of multi-core hardware has made concurrent programs pervasive. Unfortunately, writing correct concurrent programs is difficult. Addressing this challenge requires advances in multiple directions, including concurrency bug detection, concurrent program testing, concurrent programming model design, etc. Designing effective techniques in all these directions will significantly benefit from a deep understanding of real world concurrency bug characteristics. This paper provides the first (to the best of our knowledge) comprehensive real world concurrency bug characteristic study. Specifically, we have carefully examined concurrency bug patterns, manifestation, and fix strategies of 105 randomly selected real world concurrency bugs from 4 representative server and client opensource applications (MySQL, Apache, Mozilla and OpenOffice). Our study reveals several interesting findings and provides useful guidance for concurrency bug detection, testing, and concurrent programming language design. Some of our findings are as follows: (1) Around one third of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs are caused by violation to programmers order intentions, which may not be easily expressed via synchronization primitives like locks and transactional memories; (2) Around 34% of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs involve multiple variables, which are not well addressed by existing bug detection tools; (3) About 92% of the examined concurrency bugs can be reliably triggered by enforcing certain orders among no more than 4 memory accesses. This indicates that testing concurrent programs can target at exploring possible orders among every small groups of memory accesses, instead of among all memory accesses; (4) About 73% of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs were not fixed by simply adding or changing locks, and many of the fixes were not correct at the first try, indicating the difficulty of reasoning concurrent execution by programmers.

2008-03-01

225

The Effect of Inquiry-Based Science Teaching on Elementary School Students' Science Process Skills and Science Attitudes  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine Turkish elementary school students’ level of success on science process skills and science attitudes and if there were statistically significant differences in their success degree and science attitudes depending to their grade level and teaching method. The total 241 students comprised of 122 males, 119 females. For this purpose, a pretest-post test control group and experimental group design was used. The data were collected through using Basic Science Process Skill Test and Integrated Science Process Skill Test and Science Attitude Scale. Study was conducted during the two semesters. Results of the study showed that use of inquiry based teaching methods significantly enhances students’ science process skills and attitudes.

R. Ergul

2011-05-01

226

Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Development of Concept Questions and Inquiry-Based Activities in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer: An Example for Equilibrium vs. Steady-State  

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This study examines the use of inquiry-based instruction to promote the understanding of critical concepts in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Significant research shows that students frequently enter our courses with tightly held misconceptions about the physical world that are not effectively addressed through traditional instruction. Students'…

Vigeant, Margot; Prince, Michael; Nottis, Katharyn

2011-01-01

227

Adsorption of Arsenic by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: A Versatile, Inquiry-Based Laboratory for a High School or College Science Course  

Science.gov (United States)

There has been much interest in magnetite (Fe[subscript 3]O[subscript 4]) due to its utility in adsorbing high concentrations of arsenic in contaminated water. The magnetic properties of the material allow for simple dispersion and removal from an aqueous system. An inquiry-based laboratory has been developed that illustrates these unique…

VanDorn, Daniel; Ravalli, Matthew T.; Small, Mary Margaret; Hillery, Barbara; Andreescu, Silvana

2011-01-01

228

Sharing the Environment: Cultural Exchange through Inquiry-Based Environmental Education in Trinidad and Tobago (T & T) and the United States  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the effects of Sharing the Environment (STE), a situated professional development pilot program that uses an inquiry-based approach to teaching Environmental Education (EE) to elementary students in the US and Trinidad. Inquiry is difficult to incorporate in both cultures because proficient performance on national tests is a…

McHenry, Nadine; Alvare, Bretton; Bowes, Kathleen; Childs, Ashley

2013-01-01

229

Supplementing a Traditional Math Curriculum With an Inquiry-Based Program: A Pilot of Math Out of the Box. Research Report. ETS RR-09-17  

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This study examined math achievement of elementary school students when Math Out of the Box (MTB), an inquiry-based math program, was used to supplement curriculum. The sample consisted of 767 New Jersey students in the third, fourth, and fifth grades, with approximately one third using MTB. Math achievement was measured by an assessment…

Rock, JoAnn L.; Courtney, Rosalea; Handwerk, Philip G.

2009-01-01

230

Neural network processing of natural language: II. Towards a unified model of corticostriatal function in learning sentence comprehension and non-linguistic sequencing.  

Science.gov (United States)

A central issue in cognitive neuroscience today concerns how distributed neural networks in the brain that are used in language learning and processing can be involved in non-linguistic cognitive sequence learning. This issue is informed by a wealth of functional neurophysiology studies of sentence comprehension, along with a number of recent studies that examined the brain processes involved in learning non-linguistic sequences, or artificial grammar learning (AGL). The current research attempts to reconcile these data with several current neurophysiologically based models of sentence processing, through the specification of a neural network model whose architecture is constrained by the known cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) neuroanatomy of the human language system. The challenge is to develop simulation models that take into account constraints both from neuranatomical connectivity, and from functional imaging data, and that can actually learn and perform the same kind of language and artificial syntax tasks. In our proposed model, structural cues encoded in a recurrent cortical network in BA47 activate a CSTC circuit to modulate the flow of lexical semantic information from BA45 to an integrated representation of meaning at the sentence level in BA44/6. During language acquisition, corticostriatal plasticity is employed to allow closed class structure to drive thematic role assignment. From the AGL perspective, repetitive internal structure in the AGL strings is encoded in BA47, and activates the CSTC circuit to predict the next element in the sequence. Simulation results from Caplan's [Caplan, D., Baker, C., & Dehaut, F. (1985). Syntactic determinants of sentence comprehension in aphasia. Cognition, 21, 117-175] test of syntactic comprehension, and from Gomez and Schvaneveldts' [Gomez, R. L., & Schvaneveldt, R. W. (1994). What is learned from artificial grammars?. Transfer tests of simple association. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 20, 396-410] artificial grammar learning experiments are presented. These results are discussed in the context of a brain architecture for learning grammatical structure for multiple natural languages, and non-linguistic sequences. PMID:18835637

Dominey, Peter Ford; Inui, Toshio; Hoen, Michel

2009-01-01

231

Impact of National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) use and score interpretation on states' inquiry-based science education policies and practices: A descriptive study  

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This study examined the influence of use and interpretation of National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) science results on science education policies and practices in the United States, in the context of teaching and learning through inquiry and the assessment of student inquiry achievement. State assessment directors, NAEP coordinators, and science education specialists nationwide were invited to participate in the study by responding to a Web-based self-administered survey instrument. Sixty-seven percent of the population responded, providing both quantitative and qualitative data through selected-response and open-ended survey items, respectively. The findings of this study revealed that: (a) not all states interpret NAEP science results as an indicator of students' abilities to undertake inquiry investigations or understand the nature of inquiry---in fact, states view their own science assessments as more indicative of expectations regarding inquiry achievement; (b) most states have made changes to science curricular frameworks and assessments since the last NAEP science administration in 2000, so that more emphasis is placed on inquiry-based instruction and assessment of inquiry achievement---however, NAEP results have had a minor influence on these changes; (c) fewer states have made changes in legislation, policies, and professional development that reflect greater emphasis on inquiry, and those that did felt that NAEP results had no significant impact; (d) NAEP's influence has changed since the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001, but it remains minor since NAEP is still perceived as a "low stakes" test; (e) state officials believe NAEP's influence will increase significantly after the results of NAEP science 2005 are released and interpreted and as NCLB accountability provisions in science take hold in 2007--2008. The implications of the study's findings are discussed in reference to the theoretical and practical knowledge-bases concerning the consequences of assessment; the interpretation and use of future NAEP results to inform state science education systems; and NAEP validity studies and revisions to the NAEP assessment framework that may ensue. Limitations of the study's findings and directions for future research are also addressed.

Conley, David M.

232

Computer-Based and Paper-Based Reading Comprehension in Adolescents with Typical Language Development and Language-Learning Disabilities  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: With the global expansion of technology, our reading platform has shifted from traditional text to hypertext, yet little consideration has been given to how this shift might help or hinder students' reading comprehension. The purpose of this study was to compare reading comprehension of computer-based and paper-based texts in adolescents…

Srivastava, Pradyumn; Gray, Shelley

2012-01-01

233

The Effects of Integrated Information Literacy in Science Curriculum on First-Grade Students’ Memory and Comprehension Using the Super3 Model  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of integrated information literacy in first-grade science curriculum on students’ science learning. In this quasi-experimental study, two first-grade classrooms from a public elementary school were randomly assigned into the experimental group and control group. The former accepted an inquiry-based science curriculum infused information literacy using the Super3 model, while the latter accepted the traditional lecture-oriented instruction. The instructional unit in both experimental and control groups was taught by the same science teacher and lasted around three weeks, seven periods of time per week. Two tests were designed to test student’s memory of factual information and comprehension of scientific concepts. Results from the analyses of covariance showed that the experimental group significantly outperformed their counterparts on two measures of science learning. It is suggested that integrated information literacy instruction could have a positive impact on first-graders’ subject content learning and lay a foundation for young children to be lifelong learners.

Lin Ching Chen

2011-09-01

234

Aural Pragmatic Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Overall comprehension is closely related not only to the knowledge of words and syntax, but also the pragmatic concerns of the discourse. This study is an attempt to explore the basic constructs of aural pragmatic comprehension in second language (L2 learning. Taking pragmatic comprehension as the recognition of speech acts and conversational implicatures, this study compares pragmatic comprehension levels and the performances in oral and written production using a hierarchical regression analysis. The results indicate a significant relationship between writing performance and pragmatic comprehension (p<0.01 and a positive relationship, though not statistically significant, between oral performance and aural pragmatic comprehension, all of which propose an intimate link between linguistic production and pragmatic gain. Additionally, writing appears to be a source of both bottom-up and top down processing that indicates interactive processing of comprehension.

Nuray ALAGÖZLÜ

2009-10-01

235

Nomeação rápida, leitura e compreensão em escolares com dificuldades de aprendizagem / Rapid naming, reading and comprehension in students with learning difficulties  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: Comparar e correlacionar o desempenho em nomeação rápida, leitura e compreensão de escolares com dificuldades de aprendizagem. MÉTODOS: Participaram deste estudo 32 escolares da 4ª série do ensino fundamental, de ambos os gêneros, com faixa etária entre 11 anos e 4 meses e 12 anos e 7 mese [...] s. Foram realizadas a primeira e a segunda tomada de leitura oral de um texto, selecionado a partir da indicação dos professores da 4ª série; a primeira e a segunda tomada de compreensão por meio de quatro perguntas apresentadas sequencialmente ao texto, em que os escolares deveriam responder oralmente; e a prova de nomeação rápida do Teste de Desempenho Cognitivo-Linguístico, versão individual. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença entre a primeira e a segunda compreensão e entre nomeação rápida, primeira e segunda leitura. Houve forte correlação entre compreensão e leitura, sugerindo que o desempenho na primeira tomada de leitura influenciou de forma significativa o desempenho na segunda tomada de leitura; o mesmo ocorreu para a compreensão. CONCLUSÃO: A defasagem na realização das atividades de nomeação, leitura e compreensão na primeira avaliação ocasionou falhas no mecanismo de conversão fonema-grafema que podem ser suficientes para desencadear dificuldades na aprendizagem da leitura. Abstract in english PURPOSE: To compare and correlate the performance of students with learning difficulties in rapid naming, reading and comprehension. METHODS: Participants were 32 students from 4th grade of elementary school of both genders, with ages between 11 years and 4 months and 12 years and 7 months. The firs [...] t and second oral reading of a text selected based on the indication of 4th grade teachers were conducted, as well as the first and second reading comprehension task composed by four questions presented right after the reading, to which students should answered orally, and the rapid naming task from the Test of Cognitive-Linguistic Performance, individual version. RESULTS: Differences were found between the first and the second comprehension scores, and between rapid naming, first and second reading. There was a strong correlation between comprehension and reading, suggesting that the performance in the first reading significantly influenced the performance in the second reading, which also occurred for comprehension. CONCLUSION: The delay in the activities of naming, reading and comprehension in the first evaluation provoked failures in the phoneme-grapheme conversion that may be enough to cause learning difficulties in reading.

Cláudia da, Silva; Vera Lúcia Orlandi, Cunha; Fábio Henrique, Pinheiro; Simone Aparecida, Capellini.

236

Constructivist Learning of Anatomy: Gaining Knowledge by Creating Anatomical Casts  

Science.gov (United States)

Educators are encouraged to provide inquiry-based, collaborative, and problem solving activities that enhance learning and promote curiosity, skepticism, objectivity, and the use of scientific reasoning. Making anatomical casts or models by injecting solidifying substances into organs is an example of a constructivist activity for achieving these…

Hermiz, David J.; O'Sullivan, Daniel J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

2011-01-01

237

Marine Debris Clean-Ups as Meaningful Science Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

This seven to eight week hands-on Marine Debris Clean-up Project used a service project to provide an introduction of marine science ecology, watershed interrelationships, the scientific method, and environmental stewardship to 8th grade middle school students. It utilized inquiry based learning to introduce marine debris sources and impacts to…

Stepath, Carl M.; Bacon, Joseph Scott

2010-01-01

238

What Can a Micronucleus Teach? Learning about Environmental Mutagenesis  

Science.gov (United States)

The micronucleus test is widely employed in environmental health research. It can also be an excellent tool for learning important concepts in environmental health. In this article we present an inquiry-based laboratory exercise where students explore several theoretical and practical aspects of environmental mutagenesis employing the micronucleus…

Linde, Ana R.; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

2009-01-01

239

Engaged in Learning: Teaching English, 6-12.  

Science.gov (United States)

This book provides a guide for English language arts teachers in grades 6-12, demonstrating how students learn and how beliefs inform behavior. It promotes a student-centered and inquiry-based teaching philosophy. Seven chapters focus on: (1) "Education Begins with Philosophy" (e.g., belief shapes perception, curriculum in traditional and…

Strickland, Kathleen; Strickland, James

240

The Role of Vocabulary in Reading Comprehension: The Case of Secondary School Students Learning English in Singapore  

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The crucial role of vocabulary knowledge in reading comprehension has been well recognized in first language (L1) situations and this has appeared to be true of second language (L2) settings as well. However, in relation to a sociocultural context such as Singapore, where English is designated as an L1 in the school curriculum but the majority of…

Jun Zhang, Lawrence; Bin Anual, Suaini

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
241

Student learning of key concepts and skills in inquiry science: A longitudinal study of 4th and 6th grade students  

Science.gov (United States)

This study arose out of the need to measure the validity of the hands-on, inquiry-based approach to science learning, as articulated in the National Science Education Standards. It addressed the question of whether the use of hands-on, inquiry-based curriculum promotes improved student understanding of science content and problem-solving and scientific reasoning skills. It measured 4th and 6th grade student learning in five skills (comparing, graphing, investigating, measuring, predicting) and five concepts (objects in the sky, properties, variables, units of measure, life cycle). Data were collected in 1997 and 1999 from two elementary schools in one suburban Pittsburgh school district, where hands-on curriculum units were implemented starting in 1997. A performance-based assessment instrument was devised. Findings were compared by school and by year and showed significant improvement in student learning over the two years. Students improved significantly in the skills of comparing and measuring and in the concepts of objects in the sky, variables, and the life cycle. Additionally, in the repeated measures group, significant improvement was also indicated in the skill of graphing and the concepts of properties and units of measure. No significant differences were found in the skills of investigating and predicting. Student scores in the school with somewhat lower socio-economic status increased more significantly. The study supports the key principles that guided the development of the National Science Education Standards and comprehensive science education programs aligned with them. The results support including the elements of systemic reform, i.e., hands-on curriculum materials, ongoing professional development, centralized materials support, assessment, and community involvement, in all schools.

Davison, Reeny De Vos

242

Bridging the Two Cultures: A Comprehensive Interdisciplinary Approach to Teaching and Learning Science in a Societal Context  

Science.gov (United States)

Twentieth-century novelist and physicist C.P. Snow famously stated that solving the world's complex problems requires collaboration between humanists and scientists. We agree with Snow and illustrate one integrated educational approach that bridges the two cultures of science and religion to transform the learning and teaching of science.

Eisen, Arri; Laderman, Gary

2005-09-01

243

One Piece of the Whole: Teacher Evaluation as Part of a Comprehensive System for Teaching and Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

As a major policy focus, teacher evaluation is currently the primary tool promoted to improve teaching quality. But evaluation alone is not enough. What will most transform teaching quality--and the profession--is the creation of a larger system that supports teaching and learning through on-the-job evaluation and professional development, and…

Darling-Hammond, Linda

2014-01-01

244

Análisis de ambientes virtuales de aprendizaje desde una propuesta semiótico integral / Analysis of Virtual Learning Environments from a Comprehensive Semiotic Perspective  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Mexico | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Si bien existe una amplia variedad de perspectivas y modelos dedicadas al estudio de la educación online, la mayoría se centra en el análisis de los aspectos verbales, pero muy pocos consideran la relación con recursos de otra naturaleza, como las imágenes y la hipermedialidad. En un artículo anteri [...] or, partimos de una propuesta de análisis semiótico integral de ambientes virtuales de aprendizaje, que hemos desarrollado recientemente y probado para el estudio de diferentes cursos de formación online no intervenidos. En este trabajo, recurrimos a dicha propuesta para analizar entornos de aprendizaje en red en el marco de cursos intervenidos. Una de las observaciones principales de este tipo de análisis es que los aspectos organizativos de los cursos tienen que ver con la manera en que se construyen las disposiciones de entrada para un proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje. Abstract in english Although there is a wide variety of perspectives and models for the study of online education, most of these focus on the analysis of the verbal aspects of such learning, while very few consider the relationship between speech and elements of a different nature, such as images and hypermediality. In [...] a previous article we presented a proposal for a comprehensive semiotic analysis of virtual learning environments that more recently has been developed and tested for the study of different online training courses without instructional intervention. In this paper we use this same proposal to analyze online learning environments in the framework of courses with instructional intervention. One of the main observations in relation to this type of analyses is that the organizational aspects of the courses are found to be related to the way in which the input elements for the teaching and learning process are constructed.

Gloria, Álvarez Cadavid; Guadalupe, Alvarez.

245

La comprensión del discurso especializado escrito en ámbitos técnico-profesionales: ¿Aprendiendo a partir del texto? / Specialized written discourse comprehension in technical-professional domains: ¿Learning from text?  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish En esta investigación nos aproximamos al procesamiento cognitivo del discurso especializado escrito en tres áreas técnico-profesionales: marítima, industrial y comercial. Nos interesa indagar en la incidencia de algunas variables del texto escrito en la comprensión del discurso especializado por par [...] te de un grupo de 234 sujetos de último año de educación secundaria profesional en la región de Valparaíso, Chile. De manera más específica, exploramos algunas relaciones entre el proceso de comprensión del discurso y un conjunto de textos escritos con contenidos disciplinares especializados, jerarquizados en virtud de ciertas estructuras textuales específicas y de determinadas configuraciones de haces de rasgos lingüísticos co-ocurrentes sistemáticamente y característicos de lo que llamamos Dimensión Foco Informacional (Parodi 2005a). Para ello, se diseñaron y aplicaron seis pruebas de comprensión a la muestra ya indicada. Los resultados indican que existe evidencia empírica significativa para sostener que ciertas estructuras lingüísticas que apunten a una prosa más densamente informacional inciden en el tipo y nivel de comprensión. Al mismo tiempo, se detecta que los rendimientos alcanzados en el manejo de inferencias globales y de aplicación de conocimientos muestran serios problemas en este grupo de alumnos. Abstract in english In this article we approach the cognitive processing of specialized written discourse in three areas of technical-professional education: maritime, industrial, commerce. We search into the influence of some text variables in reading specialized comprehension by a group of 234 students attending last [...] year of secondary professional high schools, in Valparaíso, Chile. More specifically, we explore some relationships between the process of discourse comprehension and a group of written texts with specialized contents, hierarchically organized according to specific text structures and to dimensions of communicative linguistic features co-occurring systematically in the texts, identified upon of what we called Dimension Informational Focus (Parodi 2005a). To accomplish this, we designed and administered six comprehension texts to the group of students previously mentioned. Results show that there is enough empirical evidence to claim that some linguistic structures that identify informationally dense prose affect the kind and level of comprehension. At the same time, for the students under study, very low level achievement in comprehension was detected and global and transfer inferences shows to be the most problematic processes involved in reading, comprehending and learning from these texts.

Giovanni, Parodi.

246

La comprensión del discurso especializado escrito en ámbitos técnico-profesionales: ¿Aprendiendo a partir del texto? Specialized written discourse comprehension in technical-professional domains: ¿Learning from text?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available En esta investigación nos aproximamos al procesamiento cognitivo del discurso especializado escrito en tres áreas técnico-profesionales: marítima, industrial y comercial. Nos interesa indagar en la incidencia de algunas variables del texto escrito en la comprensión del discurso especializado por parte de un grupo de 234 sujetos de último año de educación secundaria profesional en la región de Valparaíso, Chile. De manera más específica, exploramos algunas relaciones entre el proceso de comprensión del discurso y un conjunto de textos escritos con contenidos disciplinares especializados, jerarquizados en virtud de ciertas estructuras textuales específicas y de determinadas configuraciones de haces de rasgos lingüísticos co-ocurrentes sistemáticamente y característicos de lo que llamamos Dimensión Foco Informacional (Parodi 2005a. Para ello, se diseñaron y aplicaron seis pruebas de comprensión a la muestra ya indicada. Los resultados indican que existe evidencia empírica significativa para sostener que ciertas estructuras lingüísticas que apunten a una prosa más densamente informacional inciden en el tipo y nivel de comprensión. Al mismo tiempo, se detecta que los rendimientos alcanzados en el manejo de inferencias globales y de aplicación de conocimientos muestran serios problemas en este grupo de alumnos.In this article we approach the cognitive processing of specialized written discourse in three areas of technical-professional education: maritime, industrial, commerce. We search into the influence of some text variables in reading specialized comprehension by a group of 234 students attending last year of secondary professional high schools, in Valparaíso, Chile. More specifically, we explore some relationships between the process of discourse comprehension and a group of written texts with specialized contents, hierarchically organized according to specific text structures and to dimensions of communicative linguistic features co-occurring systematically in the texts, identified upon of what we called Dimension Informational Focus (Parodi 2005a. To accomplish this, we designed and administered six comprehension texts to the group of students previously mentioned. Results show that there is enough empirical evidence to claim that some linguistic structures that identify informationally dense prose affect the kind and level of comprehension. At the same time, for the students under study, very low level achievement in comprehension was detected and global and transfer inferences shows to be the most problematic processes involved in reading, comprehending and learning from these texts.

Giovanni Parodi

2005-01-01

247

Open Distance Learning at Southern Switzerland Universities - A comprehensive and multilingual approach involving universities, teachers, students, and administration  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The new universities of Italian speaking part of Switzerland are developing with high priority a multilingual open distance learning environment. Within the framework of the Virtual Campus Switzerland Programme we started three projects in order to set up a virtual campus with strong local roots and with closed relationships to other universities of Switzerland and of the close foreign countries. The main objective of these activities is to expand the offer of modular courses, to make them av...

Flueckiger, Federico; Mazza, Riccardo

2001-01-01

248

Comprehensive Nuclear Security Strategies for Nuclear Power Plants in Japan Based on the Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Accident and IAEA Recommendations  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

After the Fukushima accident, Japan has improved and strengthened not only safety design but also nuclear security strategies for nuclear power plants (NPPs) to achieve our former prime minister’s statement, “The importance of preparing for unanticipated risks” [1]. In regard to nuclear security for NPPs, the Fukushima accident revealed to us that, in addition to earthquakes and tsunamis, terrorist attacks could also trigger similar severe accidents if adequate nuclear security measures for the NNPs were not prepared. To accomplish our goal, comprehensive nuclear strategies have been carefully developed base on the lessons learned from the Fukushima accident and the following key concepts from IAEA recommendation document: “safety and security harmonization (effective integration)”, “defense in depth”, “risk-based approach”, and “mitigation and minimization of radiological consequence”. (author)

2014-03-01

249

Spectrum of physics comprehension  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The paper presents the results of research on the relationship between self-assessed comprehension of physics lectures and final grades of junior high school students (aged 13-15), high school students (aged 16-18) and physics students at the Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland (aged 21). Students' declared level of comprehension was measured during a physics lecture on a prearranged scale of 1-10 with the use of a personal response system designed for the purpose of this experiment. Through the use of this tool, we obtained about 2000 computer records of students' declared comprehension of a 45 min lecture, which we named ‘the spectrum of comprehension’. In this paper, we present and analyse the correlation between students' declared comprehension of the content presented in the lecture and their final learning results. (paper)

2012-05-07

250

Spectrum of physics comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

The paper presents the results of research on the relationship between self-assessed comprehension of physics lectures and final grades of junior high school students (aged 13-15), high school students (aged 16-18) and physics students at the Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland (aged 21). Students' declared level of comprehension was measured during a physics lecture on a prearranged scale of 1-10 with the use of a personal response system designed for the purpose of this experiment. Through the use of this tool, we obtained about 2000 computer records of students' declared comprehension of a 45 min lecture, which we named ‘the spectrum of comprehension’. In this paper, we present and analyse the correlation between students' declared comprehension of the content presented in the lecture and their final learning results.

Blasiak, W.; Godlewska, M.; Rosiek, R.; Wcislo, D.

2012-05-01

251

Real Science, Real Learning: Bridging the Gap Between Scientists, Educators and Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Today as never before, America needs its citizens to be literate in science and technology. Not only must we only inspire a new generation of scientists and engineers and technologists, we must foster a society capable of meeting complex, 21st-century challenges. Unfortunately, the need for creative, flexible thinkers is growing at a time when our young students are lagging in science interest and performance. Over the past 17 years, the JASON Project has worked to link real science and scientists to the classroom. This link provide viable pipeline to creating the next generation scientists and researchers. Ultimately, JASON's mission is to improve the way science is taught by enabling students to learn directly from leading scientists. Through partnerships with agencies such as NOAA and NASA, JASON creates multimedia classroom products based on current scientific research. Broadcasts of science expeditions, hosted by leading researchers, are coupled with classroom materials that include interactive computer-based simulations, video- on-demand, inquiry-based experiments and activities, and print materials for students and teachers. A "gated" Web site hosts online resources and provides a secure platform to network with scientists and other classrooms in a nationwide community of learners. Each curriculum is organized around a specific theme for a comprehensive learning experience. It may be taught as a complete package, or individual components can be selected to teach specific, standards-based concepts. Such thematic units include: Disappearing Wetlands, Mysteries of Earth and Mars, and Monster Storms. All JASON curriculum units are grounded in "inquiry-based learning." The highly interactive curriculum will enable students to access current, real-world scientific research and employ the scientific method through reflection, investigation, identification of problems, sharing of data, and forming and testing hypotheses. JASON specializes in effectively applying technology in science education by designing animated interactive visualizations that promote student understanding of complex scientific concepts and systems (Rieber, 1990, 1996). JASON's experience in utilizing the power of simulation technology has been widely recognized for its effectiveness in exciting and engaging students in science learning by independent evaluations of JASON's multimedia science curriculum (Ba et al., 2001; Goldenberg et al., 2003). The data collected indicates that JASON's science products have had a positive impact on students' science learning, have positively influenced their perceptions of scientists and of becoming scientists, and have helped diverse students grasp a deeper understanding of complex scientific content, concepts and technologies.

Lewis, Y.

2006-05-01

252

Jogos pedagógicos e responsividade: ludicidade, compreensão leitora e aprendizagem / Educational games and responsiveness: playfulness, reading comprehension and learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Este artigo, embasado em pressupostos teóricos da teoria bakhtiniana, tem o objetivo de analisar as características das atitudes responsivas de alunos de duas turmas de 1ª ano do Ensino Médio de uma escola pública em Fortaleza, durante a interação com textos em um jogo educativo voltado para o ensino de leitura em Língua Portuguesa. A análise é feita a partir de dados colhidos em um experimento-piloto que tinha como objetivo analisar a influência do uso de um Objeto de Aprendizagem (OA no desenvolvimento de estratégias de leitura.Durante a tarefa de ler, verificou-se que o OA, devido à forma como propõe a tarefa e ao uso de tecnologia interativa para a aprendizagem, desenvolveu, nos alunos-usuários do jogo, atitudes responsivas ativas durante a complementação de significados do texto.This article, based on theoretical assumptions of the Bakhtinian theory aims to analyze the characteristics of responsive attitudes of students from two high school classes at a public school in Fortaleza. The research took place during interaction with texts in an educational game for teaching reading in Portuguese. The analysis is based on data collected in a pilot experiment that aimed to analyze the influence of using a Learning Object (LO in the development of reading strategies. During the task of reading, it was verified that the LO, due to the way the task is proposed and the use of interactive technology for learning, developed, in the student-users of the game, active responsive attitudes during the complementation of meanings of the text.

Nukácia Meyre Silva Araújo

2012-06-01

253

Jogos pedagógicos e responsividade: ludicidade, compreensão leitora e aprendizagem / Educational games and responsiveness: playfulness, reading comprehension and learning  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este artigo, embasado em pressupostos teóricos da teoria bakhtiniana, tem o objetivo de analisar as características das atitudes responsivas de alunos de duas turmas de 1ª ano do Ensino Médio de uma escola pública em Fortaleza, durante a interação com textos em um jogo educativo voltado para o ensin [...] o de leitura em Língua Portuguesa. A análise é feita a partir de dados colhidos em um experimento-piloto que tinha como objetivo analisar a influência do uso de um Objeto de Aprendizagem (OA) no desenvolvimento de estratégias de leitura. Durante a tarefa de ler, verificou-se que o OA, devido à forma como propõe a tarefa e ao uso de tecnologia interativa para a aprendizagem, desenvolveu, nos alunos-usuários do jogo, atitudes responsivas ativas durante a complementação de significados do texto. Abstract in english This article, based on theoretical assumptions of the Bakhtinian theory aims to analyze the characteristics of responsive attitudes of students from two high school classes at a public school in Fortaleza. The research took place during interaction with texts in an educational game for teaching read [...] ing in Portuguese. The analysis is based on data collected in a pilot experiment that aimed to analyze the influence of using a Learning Object (LO) in the development of reading strategies. During the task of reading, it was verified that the LO, due to the way the task is proposed and the use of interactive technology for learning, developed, in the student-users of the game, active responsive attitudes during the complementation of meanings of the text.

Nukácia Meyre Silva, Araújo; Fernanda Rodrigues, Ribeiro; Suellen Fernandes dos, Santos.

254

The Inquiry Nature of Primary Schools and Students' Self-Directed Learning Knowledge  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-directed learning (SDL) is viewed as a desirable outcome of schooling, yet scant information is available to educational leaders and teachers on how to implement an inquiry-based curriculum or to support effectively students' development as self-directed learners. To understand better the relationship between the inquiry nature of primary…

Van Deur, Penny; Murray-Harvey, Rosalind

2005-01-01

255

Questions in science textbooks : do they prompt students' inquiry and problem-based learning?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an inquiry-based learning approach that fosters the development of students’ autonomy as learners, and enables them to develop life-long learning competences. Problems and their underlying questions are building blocks of PBL approaches. Thus, questioning in science classes and textbooks can foster the development of students’ inquiry and problem-solving competences. As teachers’ teaching practices seem to depend on textbooks, this study compares the way ...

2012-01-01

256

Using high-resolution satellite imagery to engage students in classroom experiences which meld research, the nature of science, and inquiry-based instruction  

Science.gov (United States)

Recognizing the need to bridge the gap between scientific research and the classroom, we have developed an exciting activity which engages students in grades 5-12 using high-resolution satellite imagery to observe Weddell seal populations in Antarctica. Going beyond the scope of the textbook, students experience the challenge researchers face in counting and monitoring animal populations in the field. The activity is presented in a non-expert, non-technical exercise enriched for students, with background information, tutorials, and satellite imagery included. Teachers instruct their class in how to use satellite imagery analysis techniques to collect data on seal populations in the McMurdo Sound region of the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Students participate in this inquiry-based, open-ended exercise to evaluate changes in the seal population within and between seasons. The activity meets the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS) through inquiry-based, real-world application and supports seven Performance Expectations (PE) for grade 5-12. In addition, it offers students a glimpse into the work of a field biologist, promoting interest in entering the STEM career pipeline. As every new Antarctica season unfolds, new imagery will be uploaded to the website allowing each year of students to add their counts to a growing long-term dataset for the classroom. The activity files provide 1) a tutorial in how to use the images to count the populations, 2) background information about Weddell seals in the McMurdo Sound region of the Ross Sea for the students and the teachers, and 3) collections of satellite imagery for spatial and temporal analysis of population fluctuations. Teachers can find all activity files to conduct the activity, including student instructions, on the Polar Geospatial Center's website (http://z.umn.edu/seals). Satellite image, Big Razorback Island, Antarctica Weddell seals,Tent Island, Antarctica

Pennycook, J.; LaRue, M.; Herried, B.; Morin, P. J.

2013-12-01

257

Atenção integral à saúde de adolescentes em situação de trabalho: lições aprendidas / Comprehensive health services for working adolescents: lessons learned  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este artigo apresenta a experiência do Programa de Saúde do Trabalhador Adolescente (PSTA) do Núcleo de Estudos da Saúde do Adolescente da Uerj. Na área assistencial, a equipe multidisciplinar do Núcleo vem desenvolvendo um modelo de atenção integral aos adolescentes trabalhadores, buscando analisar [...] as questões ligadas ao nexo causal entre os agravos à saúde e o processo produtivo em que estão envolvidos. No que se refere à extensão, os profissionais, em associação com alguns adolescentes trabalhadores, vêm desenvolvendo uma metodologia de educação em saúde resgatando a discussão sobre o potencial produtivo de maneira abrangente, abordando temas que vão além da questão do trabalho. Devido ao conhecimento adquirido, a equipe, em parceria com a OIT, recebeu a incumbência de elaborar materiais pedagógicos para a formação e capacitação de recursos humanos sobre saúde e segurança no trabalho infanto-juvenil. Conclui-se que, diante das políticas públicas para a eliminação do trabalho infantil e proteção do trabalhador adolescente, já em vigência em nível nacional, a experiência relatada aponta para a necessidade da criação de programas semelhantes para a garantia dos direitos desta população. Abstract in english This article presents the collected experiences of the Health Program for Adolescent Workers (PSTA) at the Center for the Study of Adolescent Health at the State University of Rio de Janeiro. In terms of health services, the multidisciplinary team has developed a model of comprehensive health care f [...] or adolescent workers that seeks to analyze the causal links between health problems and the work conditions in which these young people are usually involved. In terms of health outreach, the health professionals have been working with a group of adolescent workers to develop a specific health education methodology. This methodology seeks to promote a broad discussion of the meaning of work in a empowering way that transcends the question of work. Based on this innovative experience, the staff was invited by the ILO to develop materials to train other professionals in the topics of health and occupational safety for adolescent workers. Given the current policies in effect in Brazil to eradicate child labor and protect adolescent workers, the experience of this initiative suggests the need for health programs to guarantee the rights of adolescent workers to occupational health and safety.

Carmen Ildes Rodrigues Fróes, Asmus; Carmen Maria, Raymundo; Suyanna Linhales, Barker; Carla Cristina Coelho Augusto, Pepe; Maria Helena, Ruzany.

258

Atenção integral à saúde de adolescentes em situação de trabalho: lições aprendidas / Comprehensive health services for working adolescents: lessons learned  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Public Health | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este artigo apresenta a experiência do Programa de Saúde do Trabalhador Adolescente (PSTA) do Núcleo de Estudos da Saúde do Adolescente da Uerj. Na área assistencial, a equipe multidisciplinar do Núcleo vem desenvolvendo um modelo de atenção integral aos adolescentes trabalhadores, buscando analisar [...] as questões ligadas ao nexo causal entre os agravos à saúde e o processo produtivo em que estão envolvidos. No que se refere à extensão, os profissionais, em associação com alguns adolescentes trabalhadores, vêm desenvolvendo uma metodologia de educação em saúde resgatando a discussão sobre o potencial produtivo de maneira abrangente, abordando temas que vão além da questão do trabalho. Devido ao conhecimento adquirido, a equipe, em parceria com a OIT, recebeu a incumbência de elaborar materiais pedagógicos para a formação e capacitação de recursos humanos sobre saúde e segurança no trabalho infanto-juvenil. Conclui-se que, diante das políticas públicas para a eliminação do trabalho infantil e proteção do trabalhador adolescente, já em vigência em nível nacional, a experiência relatada aponta para a necessidade da criação de programas semelhantes para a garantia dos direitos desta população. Abstract in english This article presents the collected experiences of the Health Program for Adolescent Workers (PSTA) at the Center for the Study of Adolescent Health at the State University of Rio de Janeiro. In terms of health services, the multidisciplinary team has developed a model of comprehensive health care f [...] or adolescent workers that seeks to analyze the causal links between health problems and the work conditions in which these young people are usually involved. In terms of health outreach, the health professionals have been working with a group of adolescent workers to develop a specific health education methodology. This methodology seeks to promote a broad discussion of the meaning of work in a empowering way that transcends the question of work. Based on this innovative experience, the staff was invited by the ILO to develop materials to train other professionals in the topics of health and occupational safety for adolescent workers. Given the current policies in effect in Brazil to eradicate child labor and protect adolescent workers, the experience of this initiative suggests the need for health programs to guarantee the rights of adolescent workers to occupational health and safety.

Carmen Ildes Rodrigues Fróes, Asmus; Carmen Maria, Raymundo; Suyanna Linhales, Barker; Carla Cristina Coelho Augusto, Pepe; Maria Helena, Ruzany.

259

Listen, Listen, Listen and Listen: Building a Comprehension Corpus and Making It Comprehensible  

Science.gov (United States)

Listening comprehension input is necessary for language learning and acculturation. One approach to developing listening comprehension skills is through exposure to massive amounts of naturally occurring spoken language input. But exposure to this input is not enough; learners also need to make the comprehension corpus meaningful to their learning…

Mordaunt, Owen G.; Olson, Daniel W.

2010-01-01

260

Peer Tutoring of Comprehension Strategies.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discusses a study in which four low-achieving 12-year-old readers were trained to tutor similar age low-achieving readers in reading comprehension strategies. States that both tutors and students learned to use the strategies effectively and that both groups made substantial gains in comprehension. (GEA)

Pickens, Judith; McNaughton, Stuart

1988-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Metadiscourse Awareness and ESAP Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study examined the effect of explicit instruction about linguistic hedging on the English for Specific Academic Purposes (ESAP) reading comprehension performance of English Language Learning (ELL) university students through an awareness raising task. A reading comprehension test was developed and validated as the pre-test and…

Jalififar, A. R.; Shooshtari, Z. G.

2011-01-01

262

Genetically modified food in perspective: an inquiry-based curriculum to help middle school students make sense of tradeoffs  

Science.gov (United States)

To understand how students learn about science controversy, this study examines students' reasoning about tradeoffs in the context of a technology-enhanced curriculum about genetically modified food. The curriculum was designed and refined based on the Scaffolded Knowledge Integration Framework to help students sort and integrate their initial ideas and those presented in the curriculum. Pre-test and post-test scores from 190 students show that students made significant (p genetically modified food controversy. Analyses of students' final papers, in which they took and defended a position on what type of agricultural practice should be used in their geographical region, showed that students were able to provide evidence both for and against their positions, but were less explicit about how they weighed these tradeoffs. These results provide important insights into students' thinking and have implications for curricular design.

Seethaler, Sherry; Linn, Marcia

263

From Words to Concepts: Focusing on Word Knowledge When Teaching for Conceptual Understanding Within an Inquiry-Based Science Setting  

Science.gov (United States)

This qualitative video study explores how two elementary school teachers taught for conceptual understanding throughout different phases of science inquiry. The teachers implemented teaching materials with a focus on learning science key concepts through the development of word knowledge. A framework for word knowledge was applied to examine the students' level of word knowledge manifested in their talk. In this framework, highly developed knowledge of a word is conceptual knowledge. This includes understanding how the word is situated within a network of other words and ideas. The results suggest that students' level of word knowledge develops toward conceptual knowledge when the students are required to apply the key concepts in their talk throughout all phases of inquiry. When the students become familiar with the key concepts through the initial inquiry activities, the students use the concepts as tools for furthering their conceptual understanding when they discuss their ideas and findings. However, conceptual understanding is not promoted when teachers do the talking for the students, rephrasing their responses into the correct answer or neglecting to address the students' everyday perceptions of scientific phenomena.

Haug, Berit S.; Ødegaard, Marianne

2014-03-01

264

"Systems Education Experiences: Transforming high school science education through unique partnerships, inquiry based modules, and ocean systems studies"  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent advances in experimental practice, accompanying computational techniques and systems thinking, have advanced biological inquiry. However, current scientific practices do not typically resemble the science taught in schools. As a result, students are missing out on significant opportunities to develop the critical thinking that is needed both in science and many professions. As a potential solution to this ongoing problem in science education, we are using current scientific practices to create classroom activities, packaged in easy-to-use curriculum modules, which promote conceptual development of standards based instructional outcomes. By bringing together students, teachers, researchers, engineers, and programmers we bring needed systems thinking and engaging inquiry experiences to schools throughout Washington State and the nation. Teachers are trained and continuously supported as they learn needed content and methods to bring this new science into their classrooms. Current research on ocean acidification, changing biogeochemical cycles, and the complexity and interdisciplinary nature of ocean systems studies have been translated through our newest curriculum module. Developing this module presented a significant challenge due to the urgency and importance of instilling understanding in high school students as they prepare to make decisions on the highly charged political, economic, and scientific issues of climate change and ocean acidification. Challenges have been overcome through partnerships and through infusing the habits of sustainability, high level thinking, systems modeling, scientific design, and communication. The Next Generation Standards have opened the door for nationwide dissemination of the module as we embark enabling students to think, understand, and contribute to scientific research.

Ludwig, C.; Orellana, M. V.; Baliga, N. S.

2012-12-01

265

Lessons learned from the first US/Russian Federation joint tabletop exercise to prepare for conducting on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A U.S./Russian Federation Joint Tabletop Exercise took place in Snezhinsk, Russia, from 19 to 24 October 1998 whose objectives were to examine the functioning of an Inspection Team (IT) in a given scenario, to evaluate the strategies and techniques employed by the IT, to identify ambiguous interpretations of treaty provisions that needed clarification, and to confirm the overall utility of tabletop exercises to assist in developing an effective Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime. To achieve these objectives, the United States and Russian Federation (RF) agreed that two exercises would be conducted. The first would be developed by the RF, who would act as controller and as the inspected State Party (ISP), while the United States would play the role of the IT. The roles would be reversed in the second exercise; the United States would develop the scenario and play the ISP, while the RF would play the IT. A joint control team, comprised of members of both the U.S. and RF control teams, agreed on a number of ground rules for the two exercises and established a joint Evaluation Team to evaluate both of the exercises against the stated objectives. To meet time limitations, the scope of this joint exercise needed to be limited. The joint control team decided that each of the two exercises would not go beyond the first 25 days of an on-site inspection (OSI) and that the focus would be on examining the decision-making of the IT as it utilized the various technologies to clarify whether a nuclear test explosion had taken place. Hence, issues such as logistics, restricted access, and activities prior to Point of Entry (POE) would be played only to the extent needed to provide for a realistic context for the exercises' focus on inspection procedures, sensor deployments, and data interpretation. Each of the exercises began at the POE and proceeded with several iterations of negotiations between the IT and ISP, instrument deployments, and data evaluation by the IT. By the end of each of the exercises, each IT had located the site of the underground nuclear explosion (UNE). While this validated the methods employed by each of the ITS, the Evaluation Team noted that each IT employed different search strategies and that each strategy had both advantages and disadvantages. The exercises also highlighted ambiguities in interpretation of certain treaty provisions related to overflights and seismic monitoring. Likewise, a substantial number of lessons were learned relating to radionuclide monitoring and the impact of logistical constraints on successful OSI execution. These lessons are discussed more fully in the body of this report. Notwithstanding the overall positive assessment by the U.S. and RF participants, as well as by the Evaluation Team, that the exercise had met its objectives, there were a variety of areas identified that could be improved in subsequent OSI exercises. Some of these included reexamination of the methods used to convey visual observation data in an exercise; the amount of time compression employed; and the need for better verification of agreements pertaining to the structure, format, and other rules of the exercise. This report summarizes the lessons learned pertaining to both the technical and operational aspects of an OSI as well as to those pertaining to the planning and execution of an OSI exercise. It concludes with comments from the Evaluation Team and proposed next steps for future U.S./RF interactions on CTBT OSIs.

Filarowski, C; Kreek, S; Smith, A; Sweeney, J; Wild, J; Gough, R; Rockett, P; MacLeod, G; Hawkins, W; Wohletz, K; Knowles, S

1999-03-24

266

Impact on Scientific Inquiry of a Backwards-Faded Scaffolding Approach to Inquiry-based Space Science for Non-Science Majoring Undergraduates  

Science.gov (United States)

Exploring the impact of a novel inquiry-based earth and space science laboratory curriculum designed using the Backwards Faded Scaffolding inquiry teaching framework on non-science majoring undergraduate students' views of the nature of scientific inquiry (NOSI), this study focused on two aspects of NOSI: The Distinction between Data and Evidence (DvE), and The Multiple Methods of Science (MMS). In the first stage, student participant views of NOSI were measured using the VOSI-4 research instrument before and after the intervention. In the second stage, the quantitative results were used to strategically design a qualitative investigation, in which the four lab instructors were interviewed about their observations of how the student participants interacted with the intervention curriculum as compared to traditional lab activities, as well as their suggestions as to how the curriculum may or may not have contributed to the results of the first stage. These interviews were summarized and analyzed for common themes as to how the intervention curriculum influenced the students' understandings of the two aspect of NOSI. According to the results of a Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, there was a significant shift in the distributions of both samples toward a more informed understanding of DvE after the intervention curriculum was administered, while there was no significant change in either direction for understanding of MMS. The results of the instructor interview analysis suggested that the intervention curriculum provided multiple opportunities for students to evaluate and determine the relevance of data in the context of producing evidence-based conclusions directly related to specific research questions, thereby supporting the development of more informed views of DvE.

Lyons, D. J.; Slater, S. J.; Slater, T. F.

2011-12-01

267

Kindergarten students' explanations during science learning  

Science.gov (United States)

The study examines kindergarten students' explanations during science learning. The data on children's explanations are drawn from videotaped and transcribed discourse collected from four public kindergarten science classrooms engaged in a life science inquiry unit on the life cycle of the monarch butterfly. The inquiry unit was implemented as part of a larger intervention conducted as part of the Scientific Literacy Project or SLP (Mantzicopoulos, Patrick & Samarapungavan, 2005). The children's explanation data were coded and analyzed using quantitative content analysis procedures. The coding procedures involved initial "top down" explanation categories derived from the existing theoretical and empirical literature on scientific explanation and the nature of students' explanations, followed by an inductive or "bottom up" analysis, that evaluated and refined the categorization scheme as needed. The analyses provide important descriptive data on the nature and frequency of children's explanations generated in classroom discourse during the inquiry unit. The study also examines how teacher discourse strategies during classroom science discourse are related to children's explanations. Teacher discourse strategies were coded and analyzed following the same procedures as the children's explanations as noted above. The results suggest that, a) kindergarten students have the capability of generating a variety of explanations during inquiry-based science learning; b) teachers use a variety of classroom discourse strategies to support children's explanations during inquiry-based science learning; and c) The conceptual discourse (e.g., asking for or modeling explanations, asking for clarifications) to non-conceptual discourse (e.g., classroom management discourse) is related to the ratio of explanatory to non-explanatory discourse produced by children during inquiry-based science learning.

Harris, Karleah

268

Reading Comprehension Strategies  

Science.gov (United States)

This resource guide from the Middle School Portal 2 project, written specifically for teachers, provides links to exemplary resources including background information, lessons, career information, and related national science education standards. Do your middle school students not complete reading assignments or not comprehend them when they do? Is student motivation an issue you struggle with? Do you feel that your students need assistance comprehending the textbook? Students are faced with increasingly difficult text and many situations in which they must learn content by reading. This cross-curricular emphasis on reading comprehension is not just an effort to teach to the high-stakes tests that are so ubiquitous in our education system today. Instead, it is a way to teach students how to interact with text. This Wiki page can be used to help teachers prepare students for a lifetime of reading, comprehension, and reflection.

Fries-Gaither, Jessica

2009-07-01

269

Effectiveness of Workshop Style Teaching in Students' Learning of Introductory Electricity and Magnetism  

Science.gov (United States)

We have developed an interactive workshop-style course for our introductory calculus-based physics sequence at Trinity University. Lecture is limited to approximately 15 min. at the beginning of class, and the remainder of the 50-min. class is devoted to inquiry-based activities and problem solving. So far, lab is done separately and we have not incorporated the lab component into the workshop model. We use the Brief Electricity and Magnetism Assessment (BEMA) to compare learning gains between the workshop and traditional lecture-based course for the Spring 2012 semester. Both the workshop and lecture courses shared the same inquiry-based lab component that involved pre-labs, prediction-observation and post-lab activities. Our BEMA results indicate statistically significant improvement in overall learning gains compared to the traditional course. We compare our workshop BEMA scores both to traditional lecture scores here at Trinity and to those from other institutions.

Mehta, Nirav; Cheng, Kelvin

2012-10-01

270

Lessons learned from the first U.S./Russian Federation joint tabletop exercise to prepare for conducting on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A U.S./Russian Federation Joint Tabletop Exercise took place in Snezhinsk, Russia, from 19 to 24 October 1998, whose objectives were the following: (1) To simulate the actions of the Inspection Team (IT), including interactions with the inspected State Party (ISP), in order to examine different ways the United States and Russian Federation (RF) approach inspections and develop appropriate recommendations for the international community. (2) To identify ambiguities and contradictions in the interpretation of Treaty and Protocol provisions that might become apparent in the course of an inspection and that need clarification in connection with the development of Operational Manuals and on-site inspection (OSI) infrastructure. (3) To confirm the efficacy of using bilateral tabletop exercises to assist in developing an effective Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime. (4) To identify strong and weak points in the preparation and implementation methods of such exercises for the purpose of further improving possible future exercises.

Filarowski, C; Gough, R; Hawkins, W; Knowles, S; Kreek, S; MacLeod, G; Rockett, P; Smith, A; Sweeney, J; Wild, J; Wohletz, K

1999-03-24

271

The Many Faces of Inductive Teaching and Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Science courses are traditionally taught deductively. The instructor first teaches students relevant theory and mathematical models, then moves on to textbook exercises, and eventually--maybe--gets to real-world applications. Often the only motivation students have to learn the material, beyond grades, is the vague promise that it will be important later in the curriculum or in their careers. Failure to connect course content to the real world has repeatedly been shown to contribute to students leaving the sciences (Seymour and Hewitt 1997; Kardash and Wallace 2001). This study examines the effectiveness and implementation of different inductive teaching methods, including inquiry-based learning, problem-based learning, project-based learning, case-based teaching, discovery learning, and just-in-time teaching.

Prince, Michael; Felder, Richard

2007-03-01

272

Genetically Modified Food in Perspective: An Inquiry-Based Curriculum to Help Middle School Students Make Sense of Tradeoffs. Research Report  

Science.gov (United States)

To understand how students learn about science controversy, this study examines students' reasoning about tradeoffs in the context of a technology-enhanced curriculum about genetically modified food. The curriculum was designed and refined based on the Scaffolded Knowledge Integration Framework to help students sort and integrate their initial…

Seethaler, Sherry; Linn, Marcia

2004-01-01

273

ESL Yemeni Learners’ Perceptions and Perspectives on the Importance of Learning Stress and Intonation as Supra-Segmental Features of Speech and Sound Attributes to the Process of Comprehension: A Survey Study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Purposes: To obtain Yemeni learners’ of English language perceptions and perspectives on the importance of teaching/ learning stress and intonation as supra-segmental features of speech and sound-attributes to the process of comprehension and to identify the reasons of neglecting/ avoiding the use of stress and intonation when attempting to communicate in English. Methods: The participants of this survey-study are 140 students who were enrolled in the University of IBB, Yemen as bachelor level students, in the departments of English, faculties of Arts and Education (first year: 10 Arts, 10 Education, Second year: 20 Arts, 20 Education, third year: 20 Arts, 20 Education, and fourth year: 20 Arts, 20 Education. In all levels, there was a balanced number of gender. A researcher-made questionnaire consisting of 23 items was given to the 140 participants to achieve the above objectives of the study. Results: Descriptive statistics (frequency and percentages of the 17th version of SPSS was used to analyse the collected data. The statistical results indicated the following: 1 more than 50% of the participating students have negative attitudes towards the use of super-segmental features, 2 less than 50% have incompetent level and/or limited knowledge of the functions of suprasegmental features of speech, 3 the application of these features is limited to the classroom activities, 4 the reasons behind neglecting such features by order are: educational system, students, teachers and social situation, 5 social and personal reasons are the most discouraging factors for not applying such features of speech, and 6 frequent evaluation, labs, teachers and classmates, and society members are the proposed encouraging factors by order. Conclusions: Accentual function is not the only function of stress and intonation that relate them phonologically to the learned/acquired language. Instead, this phonological relationship is extended to semantic, morphological and syntactic functions. Because of this, it is concluded that most of the participating students are incompetent, uninterested, yet not encouraged to use such supra-segmental features of speech. Learning environment that would support the proper learning and use of these features must be considered by policy-makers and required by English language teachers.

Ahmed M. S. Alduais

2013-07-01

274

Sergei Prokofiev's Children's Pieces, Op. 65: a comprehensive approach to learning about a composer and his works: biography, style, form and analysis.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article is written for the benefit of piano teachers and students, but can be of benefit to any music teacher or student. It is a case study using Prokofiev's lesser known pedagogical work for the piano, which serves as an example of information gathering to apply toward a more effective method of instruction, which requires the teacher and student to exhaustively examine both composer and music in order to exact a more artistic, accurate performance. Much of the interpretation is based on Prokofiev's own thoughts as expressed in his personal memoirs and from his most distinguished music critics, many of whom were his peers during his lifetime, while some is taken from common sources, which are readily available to teacher and student. It is my belief that it is possible to divine extraordinary interpretations, information and outcomes from common sources. As the student and teacher gather information, it can be used to determine what should be included in a performance based not only on the composer's explicit directions, but also on implicit information that could lead to an inspired, original interpretation. It is written with the belief that music is more than the dots and lines on the page and that teaching and learning must be approached with that in mind. It is hoped that once teacher and student have completed this case study, the method will transfer to all future musical endeavors. PMID:24455468

Klein, Peter Daniel

2014-01-13

275

The Importance of Metacognitive Reading Strategy Awareness in Reading Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Metacognitive reading strategy awareness plays a significant role in reading comprehension and educational process. In spite of its importance, metacognitive strategy has long been the ignored skill in English language teaching, research, learning, and assessment. This lack of good metacognitive reading strategy skill is exacerbated by the central role of reading comprehension in education success. One solution to the problem of poor reading comprehension is the learning of metacognitive reading strategy skills. Metacognitive reading strategy ability needs to be focused in language learning and teaching. The present study is an attempt to find out whether "meta-cognitive reading strategy awareness" enhances EFL students’ reading comprehension. Furthermore, it attempts to detect the relationship between metacognitive reading strategy awareness and reading comprehension. This paper focuses on the four main issues. First, it discusses the definition of metacognitive reading strategy, the significance of metacognitive reading strategy. Second, it reviews the process of metacognitive reading strategy. Third, definition of reading comprehension and different models of reading comprehension are reviewed. Fourth, the relationship between metacognitive reading strategy and reading comprehension will be discussed. Findings based on the review of the literature along with analysis of the data are of great significance and can be advantageous to improve EFL learners' metacognitive reading comprehension skill. Metacognitive reading comprehension skill has a positive effect on learning a second language and learners can gain the skills they need for effective communication in English.

Mohammad Reza Ahmadi

2013-09-01

276

Web-Based CALL to Listening Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated effectiveness of Web-based CALL on listening comprehension. Both students' academic performance and attitudes were examined. T-tests were used to analyze the results of students' academic performance. Descriptive statistics interpreted students' attitudes toward this learning. Students' participation was also recorded.…

Chen, Li-Mei; Zhang, Ruiming

2010-01-01

277

Computing a Comprehensible Model for Spam Filtering  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper, we describe the application of the Desicion Tree Boosting (DTB) learning model to spam email filtering.This classification task implies the learning in a high dimensional feature space. So, it is an example of how the DTB algorithm performs in such feature space problems. In [1], it has been shown that hypotheses computed by the DTB model are more comprehensible that the ones computed by another ensemble methods. Hence, this paper tries to show that the DTB algorithm maintains the same comprehensibility of hypothesis in high dimensional feature space problems while achieving the performance of other ensemble methods. Four traditional evaluation measures (precision, recall, F1 and accuracy) have been considered for performance comparison between DTB and others models usually applied to spam email filtering. The size of the hypothesis computed by a DTB is smaller and more comprehensible than the hypothesis computed by Adaboost and Naïve Bayes.

Ruiz-Sepúlveda, Amparo; Triviño-Rodriguez, José L.; Morales-Bueno, Rafael

278

Conversational Implicature in English Listening Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Some English learners find it hard to understand a sentence when they are given a piece of listening material although they have a good master of vocabulary and grammatical rules. In order to improve the ability of listening comprehension, it’s necessary for English learners to introduce some basic Pragmatics theories. Grice’s Conversational Implicature Theory is one of the most important contents of Pragmatics. The theory focuses its attention on the phenomenon of conveying more than what is said. Therefore, the English listeners can and should master the theory of Grice’s Conversational Implicature, learn how to infer implicature to guide their learning and lead in such theories in listening comprehension. This thesis attempts to examin the relationship between them and state the roles played by the conversational implicature in listening comprehension.

Haiyan Wang

2011-09-01

279

Web Based Application for Reading Comprehension Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The use of the web in languages learning has been developed at very high speed these last years. Thus, we are witnessing many research and development projects set in universities and distance learning programs. However, the interest in research related to writing competence remains relatively low. Our proposed research examines the use of the web for studying English as a second foreign language at an Algerian university. One focus is on pedagogy: therefore, a major part of our research is on developing, evaluating, and analyzing writing comprehension activities, and then composing activities into a curriculum. The article starts with the presentation of language skills and reading comprehension. It then presents our approach of the use of the web for learning English as a second language. Finally a learner evaluation methodology is presented. The article ends with the conclusion and future trends.

Samir Zidat

2011-05-01

280

Estranged Labor Learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This article is in praise of the labor of reading profound and rich texts, in this case the essay on 'estranged labor' by Karl Marx. Comparing in detail what Marx wrote on estranged labor with current social practices of learning and education leads us to comprehensive ideas about learning - including the  social practices of alienated learning. We then emphasize the importance of distribution in the institutionalized production of alienated learning. And we end this article wit...

Jean Lave; Ray McDermott

2002-01-01

 
 
 
 
281

Mining Student Behavior Patterns in Reading Comprehension Tasks  

Science.gov (United States)

Reading comprehension is critical in life-long learning as well as in the workplace. In this paper, we describe how multidimensional k-means clustering combined with Bloom's Taxonomy can be used to determine positive and negative cognitive skill sets with respect to reading comprehension tasks. This information could be used to inform environments…

Peckham, Terry; McCalla, Gord

2012-01-01

282

Genetic and Environmental Influences on Reading and Listening Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

We report preliminary behaviour genetic analyses of reading and listening comprehension from The Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center. Although the twin sample with these new measures is still of limited size, we find substantial, and significant, genetic influences on individual differences in both reading and listening comprehension

Keenan, Janice M.; Betjemann, Rebecca S.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; DeFries, John C.; Olson, Richard K.

2006-01-01

283

Comprehension of Discourse Markers and Reading Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available According to many research findings, the presence of discourse markers (DMs enhances readers’ comprehension of the texts they read. However, there is a paucity of research on the relationship between knowledge of DMs and reading comprehension (RC and the present study explores the relationship between them. Knowledge of DMs is measured through examining the subjects’ recognition of DMs. To carry out the research, 86 Iranian sophomores majoring in English took a test of DMs alongside a RC test. The correlation between their scores on the two tests was calculated using the software SPSS. The analysis revealed that there is high correlation between the students’ knowledge of DMs (i.e., their correct recognition of discourse markers and their reading comprehension (rxy = .71. Moreover, high correlation carries a strong regression power and scores on a test of DMs could be a good indicator of the test takers’ reading ability.

Mohamad Khatib

2011-08-01

284

Propuesta de ejercicios interactivos para la autoevaluación del aprendizaje en la asignatura Medicina General Integral / A proposal of interactive exercises for the self-assessment of learning in the subject Comprehensive General Medicine  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Antecedentes: en los exámenes teóricos realizados en Medicina es frecuente la utilización de las preguntas de ensayo, y en menor medida, las empleadas en el instrumento de evaluación teórico estatal, las que exigen del entrenamiento previo del estudiante, aún insuficiente. Métodos: en la Universidad [...] de Ciencias Médicas de Villa Clara, de enero a junio del 2012, se realizó un estudio para diseñar un sistema de ejercicios interactivos para la autoevaluación de los contenidos de la asignatura Medicina General Integral de sexto año. Resultados: la metodología utilizada permitió el conocimiento sobre el estado de la problemática planteada, por lo que se confeccionaron ejercicios con el programa Hot Potatoes versión 5, a partir del diseño de diferentes preguntas teniendo en cuenta los objetivos de la asignatura. El material cuenta con 29 ejercicios. Conclusiones: con el sistema de ejercicios el estudiante puede construir su aprendizaje mediante el esfuerzo y su implicación activa en el proceso, y entrenarse en los diferentes tipos de preguntas que se emplean en el instrumento de evaluación teórica estatal. Abstract in english Background: the theoretical examinations conducted in medicine undergraduate studies often include the use of essay questions, and to a lesser extent, of those used in the state theoretical assessment instrument, requiring the student's previous training, which is still insufficient. Methods: a stud [...] y was conducted at the Medical University of Villa Clara, from January to June 2012, in order to design a system of interactive exercises for the self-assessment of the contents in the subject Comprehensive General Medicine, in sixth year. Results: the methodology used allowed the understanding of the problem studied; thus, exercises were devised with the program Hot Potatoes, version 5, through the design of different questions taking into account the objectives of the subject. The material has 29 exercises. Conclusions: with the system of exercises, the students can build their learning through their effort and active involvement in the process, training themselves in the different types of questions used in the state theoretical assessment instrument.

José Carlos, Casas Blanco; Regla Lisbel, López Guerra; Mabel, Rodríguez Hernández.

285

Learning by doing: construction and manipulation of a skeletal muscle model during lecture  

Science.gov (United States)

Active learning, ÃÂlearning by doing,ÃÂ enhances student performance on examinations and improves student retention of course content. Active learning also provides inquiry-based, collaborative, and problem-solving activities that promote curiosity, skepticism, objectivity, and the use of scientific reasoning. To incorporate active learning into our undergraduate anatomy and physiology course of 70 nursing students, students constructed working physical models of skeletal muscle during the scheduled class time. Our goals were to actively engage students in the process of building and testing their own mental models from the information they were acquiring. During the process, the focus was on the student acquiring knowledge, thinking about the information, testing assumptions, solving problems, and appreciating the joy, excitement, and love for learning. We conclude that the construction of physical models during class is a valuable educational experience.

David Rodenbaugh (Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine); Heidi L. Lujan (Wayne State Univ Sch Med Dept of Physiology); Stephen E. DiCarlo (Wayne State University School of Medicine Physiology)

2012-12-01

286

Cognitive Conceptions of Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Although cognitive psychology currently represents the mainstream of psychological and educational thinking, it is only recently that much concern has been shown for learning as such - that is, concern for the factors and/or variables that influence changes in human performance, knowledge structures, and/or conceptions. This article examines current thinking about learning within the framework of cognitive psychology and how a new, cognitive conception of learning can guide future research on both learning and instruction. Similarities and difference between behavioral and cognitive conceptions of learning are discussed, along with issues such as the active (rather than passive) nature of learning, the concern for understanding (i.e., comprehension), the role of prior knowledge, the cumulative nature of most forms of human learning, and the role played by cognitve analyses of performance. Several cognitive theories of learning are presented as examples of how cognitive psychology has influenced research on learning.

Shuell, Thomas J.

2006-12-07

287

Focusing on the Processes of Science Using Inquiry-oriented Astronomy Labs for Learning Astronomy  

Science.gov (United States)

The U.S. National Science Education Standards provide guidelines for teaching science through inquiry, where students actively develop their understanding of science by combining scientific knowledge with reasoning and thinking skills. Inquiry activities include reading scientific literature, generating hypotheses, designing and carrying out investigations, interpreting data, and formulating conclusions. Inquiry-based instruction emphasizes questions, evidence, and explanation, the essential features of inquiry. We present two projects designed to develop learning materials for laboratory experiences in an undergraduate astronomy course. First, we engage students in inquiry-based learning by using "mini-journal” articles that follow the format of a scientific journal article, including a title, authors, abstract, introduction, methods, results, discussion and citations to peer-reviewed literature. The mini-journal provides a scaffold and serves as a springboard for students to develop and carry out their own follow-up investigation. They then present their findings in the form of their own mini-journal. This mini-journal format more directly reflects and encourages scientific practice. We use this technique in both introductory and upper level courses. The second project develops 3D virtual reality environments to help students interact with scientific constructs, and the use of collaborative learning tools to motivate student activity, deepen understanding and support knowledge building.

Speck, Angela; Ruzhitskaya, L.; Whittington, A.; Witzig, S.

2010-01-01

288

Comprehensive and Functional Plans.  

Science.gov (United States)

The report is a review and analysis of the existing comprehensive and function plans within Dona Ana, Sierra, and Socorro Counties. The appropriateness and implementation feasibility of the plans are examined for compatibility with goals and objectives of...

L. W. Spitler

1973-01-01

289

Improving Science Reading Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

Lend your struggling readers a helping hand with strategies that will enhance their comprehension of science reading materials. This article offers a few easy-to-implement strategies that teachers can use before, during, and after reading.

Johnson, Jill C.; Martin-Hansen, Lisa

2005-03-01

290

Is Adolescence a Critical Period for Learning Formal Thinking Skills? A Case Study Investigating the Development of Formal Thinking Skills in a Short-Term Inquiry-Based Intervention Program  

Science.gov (United States)

Current domestic and international comparative studies of student achievement in science are demonstrating that the U.S. needs to improve science education if it wants to remain competitive in the global economy. One of the causes of the poor performance of U.S. science education is the lack of students who have developed the formal thinking…

Towne, Forrest S.

2009-01-01

291

Estranged Labor Learning  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

This article is in praise of the labor of reading profound and rich texts, in this case the essay on 'estranged labor' by Karl Marx. Comparing in detail what Marx wrote on estranged labor with current social practices of learning and education leads us to comprehensive ideas about learning - including the  social practices of alienated learning. We then emphasize the importance of distribution in the institutionalized production of alienated learning. And we end this article with critical reflections on the importance of alienation for the relationship between teaching and learning in the social practice of scholars.

Ray McDermott

2002-06-01

292

Science Education on the Internet: Conference for Developers of OnLine Curricula ''Learning Strategies for Science Education Websites''; FINAL  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Internet-based science education programs are coming of age. Educators now look seriously to the Internet as a source of accessible classroom materials, and they are finding many high-quality online science programs. Beyond providing solid curriculum, these programs have many advantages. They provide materials that are far more current than what textbooks offer and are more accessible to disadvantaged and rural population. Students can engage in inquiry-based learning online through interactive and virtual activities, accessing databases, tracking nature occurrences in real time, joining online science communities and conversing with scientists

2000-01-01

293

Interactive Theoretical Model of Text Processing Reflected in Reading Comprehension: An Experimental Study  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Basing on the interactive model of comprehension and learning, this study investigated the teaching of text structure among EFL Iranian students and its effects on their reading comprehension. It was designed with the assumption that readers who already have the knowledge of the organizational patterns of text will be aware of text structure and will use it as a strategy to comprehension. Therefore the use of text structure, or the structure strategy, will enhance their comprehension and l...

Azadeh Elmianvari; Reza Kheirabadi

2013-01-01

294

Using Technology to Engage Preservice Elementary Teachers in Learning about Scientific Inquiry  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Elementary teachers are often required to teach inquiry in their classrooms despite having had little exposure to inquiry learning themselves. In a capstone undergraduate science course preservice elementary teachers experience scientific inquiry through the completion of group projects, activities, readings and discussion, in order to develop a sense of how inquiry learning takes place. At the same time, they learn science content necessary for teacher licensure. The course exposes students to different pathways of scientific discovery and to the use of the computer both as a tool for conducting inquiry-based investigations and as a means of collecting and sharing student opinions. The students involved have many misconceptions about science and it is often difficult for them to distinguish science from pseudoscience. Computer simulations are used to help students understand that difference. In addition, a classroom response system using “clickers” is used to poll studentopinions on controversial issues and to stimulate discussion.

James R. MacArthur

2011-01-01

295

Graphics and Listening Comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

Examines the effectiveness of graphics as lecture comprehension supports for low-proficiency English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) listeners. The study compared the performance of Asian students in Canada listening to an audiotape while viewing an organizational graphic with that of a control group. Findings indicate that the graphics enhanced…

Ruhe, Valerie

1996-01-01

296

The Comprehensive Health Assessment.  

Science.gov (United States)

This report contains information from a fall 1991 health occupations assessment of 1,021 health-related employers in Eastern Iowa and the Illinois Quad Cities area. Twelve chapters present comprehensive results of all surveys; results of 10 labor market survey instruments developed for chiropractic offices, dentists' offices, emergency medical…

Eastern Iowa Community Coll. District, Davenport.

297

Professional development that works: Impacting elementary science teachers' learning and practice during the implementation of an inquiry-oriented science curriculum  

Science.gov (United States)

One of the most important factors for developing science literacy for all students is teacher knowledge of science content and pedagogy. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of professional development on teacher learning, changes in teacher behavior, and student learning. The goal was to develop a deeper understanding of how the Elementary Science Teaching and Learning (ESTL) program affected teacher learning and changed teacher behavior in the classroom. This study also provided insight into the effect of the ESTL program on student learning during the first year of the professional development. This mixed method case study was used to examine the link between participation in the ESTL program, teacher learning, changes in teacher classroom behavior, and student learning. Qualitative observations and videotaped sessions provided rich description of the professional development and implementation of inquiry-oriented strategies in participant's classrooms. Artifacts and interviews provided evidence of teacher learning and changes in teacher behaviors. Quantitative data included self-report survey data examining changes in teacher behavior and the measurement of student learning used both science district assessment scores and CSAP writing scores. Key findings include: (1) teacher learning was reported in the areas of questioning and scope and sequence of the curriculum occurred; (2) statistically significant changes teacher behavior were reported and were noted in teacher interviews; (3) participation in the ESTL program did not positively impact student learning; (4) unanticipated findings include the role of camaraderie in professional development and the role of additional training in teacher's confidence in both their own teaching and in helping others; and, (5) teacher's perceptions identified the role of inquiry-based science curriculum as providing the rich experiences necessary for improved student writing. Overall participation in the ESTL program increased the implementation of inquiry-oriented strategies and it strengthened teacher inquiry-based science teaching in the classroom even though no increases were found in student test scores.

Schlang, Jodi A.

298

Learning Effectiveness of the NASA Digital Learning Network  

Science.gov (United States)

Student participation in actual investigations which develop inquiry and intellectual skills has long been regarded as an essential component of science instructions (Schwab, 1962; White, 1999). Such investigations give students an opportunity to appreciate the spirit of science and promote an understanding of the nature of science. However, classroom research conducted over the past 20 years describes science teaching as primarily teacher centered. Typical instruction consists of whole class, noninteractive activities in which individual seatwork has constituted the bulk of classroom interactions (Tobin and Gallagher, 1997). Students typically learn science from textbooks and lectures. Their main motivation is to do reasonably well on tests and examinations (Layman, 1999). During the past five years, infrastructure constraints have reduced to the point that many schools systems can now afford low cost, high quality video conferencing equipment (International Society for Technology in Education, 2003). This study investigates the use of interactive video conferencing vs. face to face interaction with hands-on, inquiry based activities. Some basic questions to be addressed are: How does the delivery method impact the students understanding of the goals of the experiment? Are students explanation of the strategies of experimentation different based on the method of instruction that was provided. Do students engaged in a workshop with the instructor in the room vs. an instructor over video conferencing have different perception of the understanding of the subject materials?

Hix, Billy

2005-01-01

299

Auditory Learning. Dimensions in Early Learning Series.  

Science.gov (United States)

The monograph discusses the psycho-physiological operations for processing of auditory information, the structure and function of the ear, the development of auditory processes from fetal responses through discrimination, language comprehension, auditory memory, and auditory processes related to written language. Disorders of auditory learning…

Zigmond, Naomi K.; Cicci, Regina

300

Comprehension Monitoring and Reading Comprehension in Bilingual Students  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored comprehension monitoring, use of reading strategies and reading comprehension of bilingual students at different levels of perceived proficiency in Italian. The participants were bilingual fifth to eighth-grade elementary school students from four Italian schools in Rijeka, Croatia. Students' reading comprehension was assessed.…

Kolic-Vehovec, Svjetlana; Bajsanski, Igor

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

How we learn : Learning and non-learning in school and beyond  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

How We Learn, deals with the fundamental issues of the processes of learning, critically assessing different types of learning and obstacles to learning. It also considers a broad range of other important questions in relation to learning such as: modern research into learning and brain functions, self-perception, motivation and competence development, teaching, intelligence and learning style, learning in relation to gender and life age. The book provides a comprehensive introduction to both traditional learning theory and the newest international research into learning processes, while at the same time being an innovative contribution to a new and more holistic understanding of learning including discussion on school-based learning, net-based learning, workplace learning and educational politics. How We Learn examines all the key factors that help to create a holistic understanding of what learning actually is and why and how learning and non-learning take place. It is also however a refreshing and thought-provoking piece of scholarly work as it adds new research material, new understandings and new points of view.

Illeris, Knud

2007-01-01

302

Science Education on the Internet: Conference for Developers of OnLine Curricula ''Learning Strategies for Science Education Websites''  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Internet-based science education programs are coming of age. Educators now look seriously to the Internet as a source of accessible classroom materials, and they are finding many high-quality online science programs. Beyond providing solid curriculum, these programs have many advantages. They provide materials that are far more current than what textbooks offer and are more accessible to disadvantaged and rural population. Students can engage in inquiry-based learning online through interactive and virtual activities, accessing databases, tracking nature occurrences in real time, joining online science communities and conversing with scientists.

Gesteland,Raymond F.; Dart, Dorothy S.; Logan,Jennifer; Stark, Louisa

2000-09-01

303

Language Comprehension as Structure Building.  

Science.gov (United States)

This research investigated language comprehension, and in particular, the general, cognitive processes and mechanisms that underlie language comprehension. These general, processes and mechanisms were investigated using a simple framework Gernsbacher (199...

M. A. Gernsbacher

1991-01-01

304

Does Metacognitive Instruction Improve Listening Comprehension??  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Listening comprehension is an active and complex process, and is a major concern for Chinese English learners. Based on previous theory and practice of teaching English listening, this paper reports a case study of three English language learners in a Chinese university. It is found that metacognitive instruction proves to be more effective in intermediate to more advanced level students than in less-skilled students. It is also found that the effectiveness of metacognitive teaching is also much related to learning motivation. 

Xuehua An

2013-04-01

305

Construction Mechanism of Digital Lifelong Learning Platform  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Through researching construction principle, system framework and operation mechanism of digital lifelong learning platform, constructing such a platform needs include the following functions: first, digital lifelong learning platform is able to provide convenient, flexible and personalized learning environment for the learners; second, it achieve the lifelong learning overpass of vertical join and horizontal communication for all types of education; third, it provides learners with learning information stored, credit recognition and conversion, learning credit management, and obtains mutual recognition of learning outcomes convergence “Credit Bank”; it can provide technological support for comprehensively promoting continuing education and lifelong education system and building the learning society.

Jie Yu

2014-06-01

306

Learning to Learn  

Science.gov (United States)

Everyone learns in a different way--for some, learning comes naturally, but for others it can be a real struggle. Many negative experiences of education are a result of individuals not knowing how they learn most effectively, or believing that they do not have the capacity to learn well. Addressing the issues of how individuals learn can help…

Roberts, Dominic

2010-01-01

307

A comprehensive French grammar  

CERN Multimedia

Characterized by clear and accessible explanations, numerous examples and sample sentences, a new section on register and tone, and useful appendices covering topics including age and time, A Comprehensive French Grammar, Sixth Edition is an indispensable tool for advanced students of French language and literature.A revised edition of this established, bestselling French grammarIncludes a new section on register and medium and offers expanded treatment of French punctuationFeatures numerous examples and sample sentences, and useful appendices covering topics including age, time, and dimension

Price, Glanville

2013-01-01

308

Working memory and learning  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study presents the findings of a 3-wave, latent variable longitudinal study, exploring variations of working memory in children and its contributions to key domains of learning. A sample of 119 Luxembourgish children, learning German and French as secondary languages, were followed from kindergarten to second grade and completed multiple assessments of working memory, short-term memory, phonological awareness, fluid intelligence, vocabulary, language comprehension, for...

Engel Abreu, Pascale

2010-01-01

309

Reading Comprehension in Face-to-Face and Web-Based Modalities: Graduate Students' Use of Reading and Language Learning Strategies in EFL / Comprensión de lectura en las modalidades presencial y en la web: lectura y Estrategias de Aprendizaje del Lenguaje usadas por estudiantes de posgrados aprendices de inglés como lengua extranjera  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish Pocos estudios en Colombia han explorado y comparado los procesos de comprensión de lectura en inglés de los estudiantes, en diferentes modalidades de instrucción. En este artículo se presentan algunos hallazgos de un estudio en el cual dos grupos de estudiantes de posgrado de la Facultad de Derecho [...] participaron en un curso de competencia lectora en inglés, ofrecido en dos modalidades diferentes: presencial y virtual. Ambos cursos fueron servidos por un profesor de inglés de la Escuela de Idiomas de la Universidad de Antioquia. Los datos recogidos de las observaciones de clase, de las entrevistas a profundidad, de los cuestionarios, de los exámenes, del diario del profesor y los datos grabados en la plataforma permitieron comprender el uso de estrategias de lectura y de aprendizaje en ambas modalidades. Los hallazgos muestran que los estudiantes aplicaron las estrategias de lectura enseñadas explícitamente en el curso y algunas estrategias de aprendizaje para las cuales no hubo instrucción explícita. Abstract in english Few studies in Colombia have explored and compared students' reading comprehension processes in EFL, in different modalities of instruction. This article reports on some findings of a larger study in which two groups of graduate Law students took a reading comprehension course in English, delivered [...] in two different modalities of instruction: face-to-face and web-based. Both courses were served by an English teacher from the School of Languages at Universidad de Antioquia. The data gathered from class observations, in-depth interviews, questionnaires, tests, the teacher's journal and data records in the platform provided insights about the students' use of reading and language learning strategies in both modalities. Findings suggest that students applied the reading strategies explicitly taught during the courses and some language learning strategies for which they did not receive any instruction.

Fabio Alberto, Arismendi Gómez; Doris, Colorado López; Luisa Fernanda, Grajales Marin.

310

Listening Comprehension and Anxiety in the Arabic Language Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Anxiety plays an important role in foreign language (FL) students' classroom performance. This study presents the results of the first empirical examination of the effect of general FL learning anxiety on students' achievement in an Arabic course and of listening anxiety on students' listening comprehension. The data came from 2 measures of…

Elkhafaifi, Hussein

2005-01-01

311

Comprehensive Support Services Program Demonstration Project. ESEA IV-C.  

Science.gov (United States)

Described is the development and operation of Ithaca (New York) City School District's Comprehensive Support Services Program (CSSP), a diagnostic prescriptive approach to coordinating services for children with learning problems. Listed are program activities (such as providing training opportunities for the total teaching staff) and program…

Ithaca Public Schools, NY.

312

Learning Curve? Which One?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Learning curves have been studied for a long time. These studies provided strong support to the hypothesis that, as organizations produce more of a product, unit costs of production decrease at a decreasing rate (see Argote, 1999 for a comprehensive review of learning curve studies. But the organizational mechanisms that lead to these results are still underexplored. We know some drivers of learning curves (ADLER; CLARK, 1991; LAPRE et al., 2000, but we still lack a more detailed view of the organizational processes behind those curves. Through an ethnographic study, I bring a comprehensive account of the first year of operations of a new automotive plant, describing what was taking place on in the assembly area during the most relevant shifts of the learning curve. The emphasis is then on how learning occurs in that setting. My analysis suggests that the overall learning curve is in fact the result of an integration process that puts together several individual ongoing learning curves in different areas throughout the organization. In the end, I propose a model to understand the evolution of these learning processes and their supporting organizational mechanisms.

Paulo Prochno

2004-07-01

313

Lessons learned from the first U.S./Russian Federation joint tabletop exercise to prepare for conducting on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty; TOPICAL  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A U.S./Russian Federation Joint Tabletop Exercise took place in Snezhinsk, Russia, from 19 to 24 October 1998, whose objectives were the following: (1) To simulate the actions of the Inspection Team (IT), including interactions with the inspected State Party (ISP), in order to examine different ways the United States and Russian Federation (RF) approach inspections and develop appropriate recommendations for the international community. (2) To identify ambiguities and contradictions in the interpretation of Treaty and Protocol provisions that might become apparent in the course of an inspection and that need clarification in connection with the development of Operational Manuals and on-site inspection (OSI) infrastructure. (3) To confirm the efficacy of using bilateral tabletop exercises to assist in developing an effective Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime. (4) To identify strong and weak points in the preparation and implementation methods of such exercises for the purpose of further improving possible future exercises

1998-10-24

314

Kindergarten students' cognitive engagement in science learning  

Science.gov (United States)

The study is based on a secondary analysis of data from the 3rd year of the Scientific Literacy Project (SLP), a federally funded research project that examines how kindergarten students learn science in inquiry settings (Mantzicopoulos, Patrick, & Samarapungavan, 2005). Videotapes of classroom lessons implemented as part of the Year 3 intervention were analyzed to identify kindergarten students' patterns of cognitive engagement during inquiry-based science learning, as well as to identify patterns of teacher discourse that promoted students' cognitive engagement. The data for the current study were drawn from videotapes and transcriptions of classroom discourse in 3 intervention classrooms that participated in the SLP. Three teachers and 55 kindergarten students participated in the study. Twelve categories of kindergarten students' cognitive engagement and eleven categories of teacher discourse were identified. The initial 12 student and 11 teacher discourse categories were further grouped into two superordinate categories (Higher Order and Basic) respectively. Chi Square analyses indicated that there was a statistically significant association between student and teacher superordinate discourse (alpha = .05). MANOVA analyses indicated that there was no significant difference on overall rates of kindergarten students' cognitive engagement by class (alpha = .05).

Tsai, Meng-Fang

315

THE IMPACT OF COMPUTER-VIDEO PROJECTOR ON EFL LEARNERS’ LISTENING COMPREHENSION  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Listening comprehension is considered as an active process in which individuals change words to thought to create meaning from the passage. “Listening comprehension has a long history, from analog phonograph readings, through the audio tape era, and into the digital realm” (Jones, 2008). With the appearance of new technologies and their influences on our life aspects, including education, language teaching and learning has entered a new area. Assisted Computer Language Learning (CALL) and...

2012-01-01

316

How Children Block Learning from Ignorant Speakers  

Science.gov (United States)

Preschool children typically do not learn words from ignorant or unreliable speakers. Here, we examined the mechanism by which these learning failures occur by modifying the comprehension test procedure that measures word learning. Following lexical training by a knowledgeable or ignorant speaker, 48 preschool-aged children were asked either a…

Sabbagh, Mark A.; Shafman, Dana

2009-01-01

317

Important Constructs in Literacy Learning across Disciplines  

Science.gov (United States)

Currently students who struggle with language and literacy learning are classified with various labels in different states--language learning disabilities, dyslexia, specific language impairment, and specific learning disability--in spite of having similar diagnostic profiles. Drawing on the research on comprehension of written language, we…

Foorman, Barbara R.; Arndt, Elissa J.; Crawford, Elizabeth C.

2011-01-01

318

Teaching Listening Comprehension Skills: A Test-orientated Approach  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Attributed to a “receptive skill” in the communicative process, listening comprehension would be the most arduous task of all four language skills. It is likely that EFL (English as a foreign language students encounter various predicaments, of e.g. grasping main ideas of the dialogues in contexts, and in turn suffer from learning anxiety. The issue of how to assist the students in improving their listening competency is worth attention. This article is, therefore, intended for illustrating a test-orientated approach to teaching listening comprehension skills to EFL students through an analysis of sample questions about listening comprehension (i.e. Choosing the Right Picture, Short Questions, and Short Conversations on GEPT tests at the elementary level and through provision of tips (i.e. Skim, Scan, Listen, Guess/Infer, Choose & Write and Check on how to answer the questions effectively. Implications for teaching listening comprehension are also made at the end of the paper.

Chung-Hsiang Liu

2012-05-01

319

Deepening ESP Reading Comprehension through Visualization  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Teaching through visualization or in Tomlinson's (1998 terms "the ability to build mental pictures or images while reading" is known as an efficient strategy in language learning. Thus, this research was done to investigate the role of this strategy on ESP reading comprehension ability of Iranian students whose syllabus mostly focuses on this skill. To do so, two homogeneous groups of thirty served as the experimental and the control groups. Before treatment, pretest was performed in both groups. The participants in the experimental group were taught through visualization and the ones in the control group were taught through the conventional method common in Iranian ESP setting by the same teacher. At the end of the treatment which took twenty-four sessions of two hours during twelve weeks, a test of 30-item multiple choice in ESP reading comprehension was administered to both groups. Finally, drawing on t-test at the 0.05 level of significance, the researchers compared the participants' performances to study such an effect. The findings revealed the significant advantage of using visualization in promoting ESP reading comprehension ability of university students.

Hossein Davari

2011-01-01

320

Textual Glosses, Text Types, and Reading Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Studies conducted in the field of second language (L2 learning have revealed that the impact of gloss types on reading comprehension is an issue of debate. The present study investigated this issue across narrative and expository texts. The glosses applied in this study included single gloss in participants’ first language (SL1G, single gloss in participants’ second language (SL2G, and multiple-choice gloss (MCG in participants’ L2. A total of 108 undergraduate students majoring in English Literature and Translation at the University of Kashan in Iran read the texts under three conditions: SL1G, SL2G, and MCG. After reading, participants answered a multiple-choice (MC reading comprehension test. To control the participants’ reading proficiency, an MC cloze test was given to them a week later. One-Way ANOVA and follow-up post hoc Tukey’s HSD tests (p<.05 showed that the most facilitative gloss type for the participants’ reading comprehension of the narrative and expository texts were SL1G and SL2G respectively. When surveyed, participants showed their preference for marginal glosses in L2.

Reza Biria

2011-10-01

 
 
 
 
321

Content Area Vocabulary Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Students' vocabulary knowledge is a significant predictor of their overall comprehension. The Common Core State Standards are raising the expectations for word learning and there are now 4 distinct standards related to vocabulary as well as expectations in other standards, including content areas. To address these expectations, teachers need…

Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

2014-01-01

322

Project Based Learning Online  

Science.gov (United States)

This is the home site for PBL-Online.org, which provides comprehensive resources on the Project Based Learning model of instruction. Registered teacher-users have access to free templates for creating project-based activities, including assessment planning, project mapping, checklists, rubrics, and standards. Projects are stored in a database that may be searched by author, keyword, grade level, or topic. Background information on the Project Based Learning method and related research are also provided, along with strategies for implementation in the K-12 classroom. This web site was developed by the Buck Institute for Education specifically for use with the Project Based Learning Handbook, available for online purchase.

2009-11-20

323

Can Intra-lingual Subtitling Enhance English Majors' Listening Comprehension of Literary Texts?  

Science.gov (United States)

Subtitling or captioning the dialogues of English movies can be very helpful to EFL learners in the Arab world. The present study reviews the importance of subtitling for language learning in general and listening comprehension in particular. A comparison is made between different levels of listening comprehension and different genres of English…

Abdellah, Antar Solhy

2008-01-01

324

The Role of First Language Literacy and Second Language Proficiency in Second Language Reading Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the interrelationships of first language (L1) literacy, second language (L2) proficiency, and L2 reading comprehension with 246 Chinese college students learning English. L1 literacy and L2 proficiency were measured with college admission exams in Chinese and English. L2 reading comprehension was measured with the reading…

Jiang, Xiangying

2011-01-01

325

Improving Preschoolers' Comprehension of Sex Abuse Prevention Concepts through Video Repetition.  

Science.gov (United States)

Determined whether having preschoolers review video segments they did not initially comprehend would increase their comprehension of sex abuse prevention concepts. States that children who viewed repetition of program segment learned more than children who viewed the segment once. Concludes that this method of enhancing children's comprehension of…

Pinon, Marites F.; Hulsey, Timothy L.; Woodland, Amy

1999-01-01

326

An Examination of the Effects of Argument Mapping on Students' Memory and Comprehension Performance  

Science.gov (United States)

Argument mapping (AM) is a method of visually diagramming arguments to allow for easy comprehension of core statements and relations. A series of three experiments compared argument map reading and construction with hierarchical outlining, text summarisation, and text reading as learning methods by examining subsequent memory and comprehension…

Dwyer, Christopher P.; Hogan, Michael J.; Stewart, Ian

2013-01-01

327

On the Role of Strategy Use and Strategy Instruction in Listening Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper provides a review of ideas and research regarding the role of strategy use and strategy instruction in listening comprehension. Firstly, it provides a brief explanation of different models of listening comprehension. Secondly, it sketches out different categories of learning and listening strategies. Thirdly models of strategy instruction and different attitudes towards it are reviewed. Finally, empirical studies carried out to examine the role of strategy use and strategy instruction on listening comprehension is presented.

Amir Hossein Rahimi

2012-05-01

328

The Impact of First Language Intonational Clue Selection on Second Language Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Comprehension is closely related not only to the knowledge of words and syntax, but also the pragmatic concerns of the discourse. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of the intonational clues selection of Iranian teenagers' and young adults’ Persian listening comprehension ability on their English learning as a second language. According to Buck (2003), in listening comprehension the input in the form of sounds and intonational clues often conveys additional infor...

Leila Barati; Reza Biria

2011-01-01

329

How language production shapes language form and comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Language production processes can provide insight into how language comprehension works and language typology—why languages tend to have certain characteristics more often than others. Drawing on work in memory retrieval, motor planning, and serial order in action planning, the Production-Distribution-Comprehension (PDC account links work in the fields of language production, typology, and comprehension: 1 faced with substantial computational burdens of planning and producing utterances, language producers implicitly follow three biases in utterance planning that promote word order choices that reduce these burdens, thereby improving production fluency. 2 These choices, repeated over many utterances and individuals, shape the distributions of utterance forms in language. The claim that language form stems in large degree from producers’ attempts to mitigate utterance planning difficulty is contrasted with alternative accounts in which form is driven by language use more broadly, language acquisition processes, or producers’ attempts to create language forms that are easily understood by comprehenders. 3 Language perceivers implicitly learn the statistical regularities in their linguistic input, and they use this prior experience to guide comprehension of subsequent language. In particular, they learn to predict the sequential structure of linguistic signals, based on the statistics of previously-encountered input. Thus key aspects of comprehension behavior are tied to lexico-syntactic statistics in the language, which in turn derive from utterance planning biases promoting production of comparatively easy utterance forms over more difficult ones. This approach contrasts with classic theories in which comprehension behaviors are attributed to innate design features of the language comprehension system and associated working memory. The PDC instead links basic features of comprehension to a different source: production processes that shape language form.

MaryellenCMacDonald

2013-04-01

330

Anxiety in EFL Listening Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The anxiety for EFL learners that accompanies the listening comprehension (LC) task is difficult to detect, but potentially one of the most debilitating, because in order to interact verbally the listener must first understand what is being said. With the instructional emphasis on input processing, LC anxiety merits closer examination. By elaborating the definition and process of listening comprehension, this paper analyzes the anxiety in listening comprehension in detail and discusses the pe...

Fang Xu

2011-01-01

331

Beyond Reading Comprehension: The Effect of Adding a Dynamic Assessment Component on EFL Reading Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Dynamic assessment (DA stresses the need for unifying assessment and instruction. This paper presents an interactionist model of DA to assessment in reading comprehension of 30 Iranian male students who were selected based on available sampling procedure. Data collection procedures before and after implementation of DA were done through administration of multiple-choice reading comprehension test. The results of students’ performance before and after implementation of DA were calculated through t-test. The results indicate significant improvement in student performance after implementation. Finally, the null hypothesis is rejected and it is concluded that incorporation of DA as a supplement procedure to standard testing has positive effective on both test performance and learning of students.

Manssour Tavakoli

2011-05-01

332

The 2001 Comprehensive Review  

CERN Multimedia

A new approach for CERN to monitor the LHC-experiments' technical and scientific progress was introduced last year: The Comprehensive Reviews. A significant fraction of the full LHCC committee is mobilized during two days to review the complete project status. This event took place for ATLAS during 2-3 of July this year. With a rather exhaustive program we presented our status in 39 talks. It was a demanding and close to impossible task for the referees to comprehend the ATLAS status by listening to this massive amount of information, but from the ATLAS point-of-view we judged it important that the referees were exposed to both the progress and the remaining problem areas. The referees were satisfied with our status; probably more so this year than last year. They judged the main critical issues to be: The schedules of the barrel toroid, the end-cap TRT, the LAr barrel and end-cap A, and the MDTs. The procurement of radiation hard electronics was also thought to be a critical issue. They were informed of ...

Åkesson, T

333

Learning from Mistakes --- A Comprehensive Study on Real World Concurrency Bug Characteristics. In the proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Architecture Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems (ASPLOS'08), March 2008  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The reality of multi-core hardware has made concurrent programs pervasive. Unfortunately, writing correct concurrent programs is difcult. Addressing this challenge requires advances in multiple directions, including concurrency bug detection, concurrent program testing, concurrent programming model design, etc. Designing effective techniques in all these directions will signicantly benet from a deep understanding of real world concurrency bug characteristics. This paper provides the rst (to the best of our knowledge) comprehensive real world concurrency bug characteristic study. Specifically, we have carefully examined concurrency bug patterns, manifestation, and x strategies of 105 randomly selected real world concurrency bugs from 4 representative server and client opensource applications (MySQL, Apache, Mozilla and OpenOfce). Our study reveals several interesting ndings and provides useful guidance for concurrency bug detection, testing, and concurrent programming language design. Some of our ndings are as follows: (1) Around one third of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs are caused by violation to programmers' order intentions, which may not be easily expressed via synchronization primitives like locks and transactional memories; (2) Around 34% of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs involve multiple variables, which are not well addressed by existing bug detection tools; (3) About 92% of the examined concurrency bugs can be reliably triggered by enforcing certain orders among no more than 4 memory accesses. This indicates that testing concurrent programs can target at exploring possible orders among every small groups of memory accesses, instead of among all memory accesses; (4) About 73% of the examined non-deadlock concurrency bugs were not xed by simply adding or changing locks, and many of the xes were not correct at the rst try, indicating the difculty of reasoning concurrent execution by programmers.

Yuanyuan Zhou

2008-03-01

334

Multimedia comprehension skill predicts differential outcomes of web-based and lecture courses.  

Science.gov (United States)

College students (134 women and 55 men) participated in introductory psychology courses that were offered largely online (on the World Wide Web) or in a lecture format. Student comprehension skills were inferred from their scores on a multimedia comprehension battery. The learning of content knowledge was affected interactively by comprehension skill level and course format. Differences between format increased with comprehension skill such that the Web-based course advantage became greater as comprehension skill increased. This same pattern was not seen when self-reports of comprehension ability were used as the predictor. Furthermore, comprehension skill did not predict course satisfaction. Generally, students of all skill levels preferred the lecture courses. PMID:12075693

Maki, William S; Maki, Ruth H

2002-06-01

335

Reading comprehension in Parkinson's disease.  

Science.gov (United States)

PURPOSE Although individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) self-report reading problems and experience difficulties in cognitive-linguistic functions that support discourse-level reading, prior research has primarily focused on sentence-level processing and auditory comprehension. Accordingly, the authors investigated the presence and nature of reading comprehension in PD, hypothesizing that (a) individuals with PD would display impaired accuracy and/or speed on reading comprehension tests and (b) reading performances would be correlated with cognitive test results. METHOD Eleven adults with PD and 9 age- and education-matched control participants completed tests that evaluated reading comprehension; general language and cognitive abilities; and aspects of attention, memory, and executive functioning. RESULT The PD group obtained significantly lower scores on several, but not all, reading comprehension, language, and cognitive measures. Memory, language, and disease severity were significantly correlated with reading comprehension for the PD group. CONCLUSION Individuals in the early stages of PD without dementia or broad cognitive deficits can display reading comprehension difficulties, particularly for high- versus basic-level reading tasks. These reading difficulties are most closely related to memory, high-level language, and PD symptom severity status. The findings warrant additional research to delineate further the types and nature of reading comprehension impairments experienced by individuals with PD. PMID:24686432

Murray, Laura L; Rutledge, Stefanie

2014-05-01

336

Expectation-Based Syntactic Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper investigates the role of resource allocation as a source of processing difficulty in human sentence comprehension. The paper proposes a simple information-theoretic characterization of processing difficulty as the work incurred by resource reallocation during parallel, incremental, probabilistic disambiguation in sentence comprehension

Levy, Roger

2008-01-01

337

Variables Predicting Foreign Language Reading Comprehension and Vocabulary Acquisition in a Linear Hypermedia Environment  

Science.gov (United States)

Factors predicting vocabulary learning and reading comprehension of advanced language learners of English in a linear multimedia text were investigated in the current study. Predictor variables of interest were multimedia type, reading proficiency, learning styles, topic interest and background knowledge about the topic. The outcome variables of…

Akbulut, Yavuz

2007-01-01

338

Introducing Hands-on, Experiential Learning Experiences in an Urban Environmental Science Program at a Minority Serving Institution  

Science.gov (United States)

STEM education at New Jersey City University increasingly focuses on experiential, student-centered learning. The Department of Geoscience/Geography plays a significant role in developing and implementing a new Urban Environmental Science Program. The program aims at graduating highly skilled, demographically diverse students (14 % African-American and 18% Hispanic) to be employed in high-growth Earth and Environmental Science career paths, both at a technical (e.g. B.S.) as well as an educational (K-12 grade) (e.g. B.A) level. The core program, including the Earth and Environmental Science curricula is guided by partners (e.g. USDA-NRCS). The program is highly interdisciplinary and 'hands-on', focusing upon the high-tech practical skills and knowledge demanded of science professionals in the 21st century. The focus of the curriculum is on improving environmental quality in northern NJ, centering upon our urban community in Jersey City and Hudson County. Our Department is moving towards a more earth system science approach to learning. Most of our courses (e.g., Earth Surface Processes, Sedimentology/Stratigraphy, Earth Materials, Essential Methods, Historical Geology) have hands-on laboratory and/or field components. Although some of our other courses do not have formal laboratory components, research modules of many such courses (Geochemistry, Urban Environmental Issues and Policy and Environmental Geology) involve strong field or laboratory studies. The department has a wide range of analytical and laboratory capacities including a portable XRF, bench-top XRD and ICP-MS. In spring 2013, Dr. Duzgoren-Aydin was awarded $277K in Higher Education Equipment Leasing Fund monies from the University in order to establish an Environmental Teaching and Research Laboratory. The addition of these funds will make it possible for the department to increase its instrumentation capacity by adding a mercury analyzer, Ion Chromatography and C-N-S analyzer, as well as updating several laboratory facilities. Furthermore, authors have applied to the NSF-TUES grant program to purchase a particle size analyzer. Currently, the grant is pending. We have defined 4 curricular goals to enhance student learning by providing hands-on, inquiry-based learning and research experiences. 1- Develop technical/analytical knowledge and skills by using advanced analytical instrumentation; 2- Improve quantitative reasoning skills to assess the quality of data; 3- Have comprehensive educational training to improve problem solving skills; and 4- use their quantitative reasoning (Goal # 2) and problem solving skills (Goal #3) to evaluate real-world geological and environmental problems. We also give special emphasis to expected measurable outcomes for individual courses. An external evaluator will assess the effectiveness of integrating advance instrumentation into the Earth and Environmental Science curricula. We will work closely with the evaluator to ensure successful implementation of the learning objectives. Examples from the impacted courses will be presented.

Duzgoren-Aydin, N. S.; Freile, D.

2013-12-01

339

Reading through Interaction: From Individualistic Reading Comprehension to Collaboreading  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Group work and interaction play significant roles in the learning process and much of the evidence comes from studies of foreign language learners’ interaction with native speakers. This study aimed at finding out whether interaction among learners also facilitates reading comprehension. For this purpose, a number of Iranian EFL students at Abadeh and Shiraz Islamic Azad Universities were selected and divided into two groups. While in the first group individualistic reading was encouraged, the second group read together and had interaction and collaboration in understanding the texts. The results revealed that collaboreading improves the learners’ comprehension better than individualistic reading.

Fatemeh Behjat

2011-03-01

340

Comprehension in "hyperlexic" readers.  

Science.gov (United States)

Mentally retarded children who can read aloud written words better than one would expect from their Mental Age are often called hyperlexic. The reading comprehension thought to be impaired in such children was investigated in four experiments. Mentally retarded advanced decoders, including autistic and nonautistic children, were compared with younger nonretarded children matched for Mental Age and Reading Age. Experiment 1 established that mildly mentally retarded readers could match sentences to pictures as well as could be expected from their verbal ability. This was the same whether they read the sentences or heard them. Experiment 2 demonstrated that only the more able retarded subjects, but not the less able ones, used sentence context in a normal way in order to pronounce homographs. Experiments 3 and 4 showed that these same more able children could extract meaning at both sentence and story level, and their performance was indistinguishable from that of normal controls. Hence, it is doubtful whether these advanced decoders should be called hyperlexic. In contrast, the readers of relatively low verbal ability performed much worse than their normal controls. Although they could be induced under certain conditions to read sentence-by-sentence rather than word-by-word, they did not do so spontaneously. Furthermore, they did not make use of already existing general knowledge in order to answer questions about the stories they had read. The ability to comprehend in terms of large units of meaning seems to be specifically impaired in these low verbal ability fluent readers. We suggest that it is this impairment that marks true hyperlexia. Since there were no differences between autistic and nonautistic readers on any of our tasks, we conclude that hyperlexia is not an autism-specific phenomenon. PMID:3806010

Snowling, M; Frith, U

1986-12-01

 
 
 
 
341

Computer Assisted Language Learning. Routledge Studies in Computer Assisted Language Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is an approach to language teaching and learning in which computer technology is used as an aid to the presentation, reinforcement and assessment of material to be learned, usually including a substantial interactive element. This books provides an up-to date and comprehensive overview of…

Pennington, Martha

2011-01-01

342

The Effects of Controlled Language Processing on Listening Comprehension and Recall  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study seeks to determine the possible interactions between listening proficiency and the state of strategic self-awareness; second, and more importantly, to investigate the effects of learned strategies on listening comprehension and recall; and finally to describe the most common real-time listening comprehension problems faced by EFL learners and to compare the differences between learners with different listening abilities. After ten training sessions, an assessment was made to see whether or not well-learned strategies could provide students with ample opportunity to practice the comprehension and recall processes. The analyses of the data revealed the causes of ineffective low-level processing and provided insights to solve the problems of parsing. Moreover, the study reveals that explicit instruction of cognitive and metacognitive strategies is needed if a syllabus wishes to help learners improve their listening comprehension and become more-proficient at directing their own learning and development as L2 listeners.

Mohsen Jannejad

2012-07-01

343

Science teachersâ?? individual and social learning related to IBSE in the frames of a large-scale, long-term, collaborative TPD project  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

It is acknowledged internationally that teachersâ?? Professional Development (TPD) is crucial for reforming science teaching. The Danish QUEST project (â??Qualifying in-service Education of Science Teachersâ?) is designed using widely agreed criteria for effective TPD: content focus, active learning, coherence, duration, collaborative activities and collective participation, and organised on principles of situated learning in Professional Learning Communities (PLCs). QUEST-activities follow a rhythm of full day seminars, where teachers are introduced to research-based material followed by a period of collaborative inquiries locally. A major theme in the first year has been Inquiry Based Science Education (IBSE) recommended as a focus to improve science education internationally. The research presented focuses on the participating teachersâ?? intertwined levels of individual and social learning. Data from repeated surveys and case studies reveal a positive attitude towards trying IBSE in the own classroom, however with the main part of the reflections focused on studentsâ?? hands-on experiences and fewer including students manipulating science ideas, like posing hypotheses. Teachersâ?? reflections indicate that many are positive toward IBSE-seminars based on trying activities directly applicable in the classroom. Other teachersâ?? reflections, and case-studies, indicate a potentially more sustainable development, where they collaboratively re-design former teaching using the IBSE thinking - and by doing so gaining experiences to support their design of inquiry based learning experiences for students also in new content areas. Case studies support that the PLCs are developing a new focus on student learning, but 25 % of the teachers report little change in collaboration locally with case studies identifying challenges related to disseminating IBSE to colleagues. Factors supporting or hampering local sustainable development are discussed under the headlines 1) QUEST rhythm, 2) Research knowledge meeting practitioner knowledgeand 3) Individual and collaborative agency.

Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Sillasen, Martin

344

Brain mapping in cognitive disorders: a multidisciplinary approach to learning the tools and applications of functional neuroimaging  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background With rapid advances in functional imaging methods, human studies that feature functional neuroimaging techniques are increasing exponentially and have opened a vast arena of new possibilities for understanding brain function and improving the care of patients with cognitive disorders in the clinical setting. There is a growing need for medical centers to offer clinically relevant functional neuroimaging courses that emphasize the multifaceted and multidisciplinary nature of this field. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a functional neuroimaging course focusing on cognitive disorders that might serve as a model for other medical centers. We identify key components of an active learning course design that impact student learning gains in methods and issues pertaining to functional neuroimaging that deserve consideration when optimizing the medical neuroimaging curriculum. Methods Learning gains associated with the course were assessed using polychoric correlation analysis of responses to the SALG (Student Assessment of Learning Gains instrument. Results Student gains in the functional neuroimaging of cognition as assessed by the SALG instrument were strongly associated with several aspects of the course design. Conclusion Our implementation of a multidisciplinary and active learning functional neuroimaging course produced positive learning outcomes. Inquiry-based learning activities and an online learning environment contributed positively to reported gains. This functional neuroimaging course design may serve as a useful model for other medical centers.

Kelley Daniel J

2007-10-01

345

Organizational Learning: Observations Toward a Theory.  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this research was an exploratory one. Close observations of a team faced with a complex and prolonged task in a management simulation exercise resulted in comprehensive discussions of how organizations learn. Each of these discussions lac...

V. E. Cangelosi W. R. Dill

1964-01-01

346

Anxiety in EFL Listening Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The anxiety for EFL learners that accompanies the listening comprehension (LC task is difficult to detect, but potentially one of the most debilitating, because in order to interact verbally the listener must first understand what is being said. With the instructional emphasis on input processing, LC anxiety merits closer examination. By elaborating the definition and process of listening comprehension, this paper analyzes the anxiety in listening comprehension in detail and discusses the pedagogical implications that might help instructors address LC anxiety in their foreign language (FL classroom.

Fang Xu

2011-12-01

347

Teaching and Learning Scientific Literacy and Citizenship in Partnership with Schools and Science Museums  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The purpose of this paper is to bring together research on learning and teaching in science â?? especially for scientific literacy and citizenship â?? with new insights into museum didactics in order to inform innovative ways of creating museum exhibits and visits and develop new ways of linking formal and informal learning environments. Knowledge from different domains that have evolved substantially over the past few decades is brought together with the intention of setting up some relatively concrete guidelines for arranging visits to science museums. First we examine new understandings of science learning in relation to the questions of why young people should learn science and what kind of science they should learn. We touch upon issues of scientific literacy and citizenship, dialogical processes, the nature of science, and inquiry-based teaching among others. Secondly, we relate our reflections on teaching and learning in science to their implications for science museums and centres. As an overall conclusion museum exhibits and activities need to include both the content and processes relevant to the given science, thus including opportunities for discovery and understanding of both aspects of science. Furthermore, we describe some design principles in accordance with our reflections and conclusions; e.g. critical issues-based exhibits, the five-step process of reflection, and immersion and multisensory interactions. Finally, we discuss how to get full benefit of museum visits for pupils and we put forward some guidelines, in relation to a concrete exhibit, for designing experiences at science museums and centres.

Dolin, Jens; Evans, Robert Harry

348

Adventure Learning @ Greenland  

Science.gov (United States)

Teaching the general public and K-12 communities about scientific research has taken on greater importance as climate change increasingly impacts the world we live in. Science researchers and the educational community have a widening responsibility to produce and deliver curriculum and content that is timely, scientifically sound and engaging. To address this challenge, in the summer of 2012 the Adventure Learning @ Greenland (AL@GL) project, a United States' National Science Foundation (NSF) funded initiative, used hands-on and web-based climate science experiences for high school students to promote climate and science literacy. This presentation will report on an innovative approach to education and outreach for environmental science research known as Adventure Learning (AL). The purpose of AL@GL was to engage high school students in the US, and in Greenland, in atmospheric research that is being conducted in the Arctic to enhance climate and science literacy. Climate and science literacy was explored via three fundamental concepts: radiation, the greenhouse effect, and climate vs. weather. Over the course of the project, students in each location engaged in activities and conducted experiments through the use of scientific instrumentation. Students were taught science research principles associated with an atmospheric observatory at Summit Station, Greenland with the objective of connecting climate science in the Arctic to student's local environments. Summit Station is located on the Greenland Ice Sheet [72°N, 38°W, 3200 m] and was the primary location of interest. Approximately 35 students at multiple locations in Idaho, USA, and Greenland participated in the hybrid learning environments as part of this project. The AL@GL project engaged students in an inquiry-based curriculum with content that highlighted a cutting-edge geophysical research initiative at Summit: the Integrated Characterization of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric state, and Precipitation at Summit (ICECAPS) project (Shupe et al. 2012; http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/arctic/observatories/summit/). ICECAPS is an atmospheric observatory focused on obtaining high temporal resolution measurements of clouds from ground-based remote sensors including radar, lidar, infrared spectra and others. ICECAPS also launches radiosondes twice daily. This large suite of complementary observations are providing an important baseline understanding of cloud and atmospheric conditions over the central Greenland ice sheet and are supporting Arctic climate research on cloud processes and climate model validation. ICECAPS measures parameters that are associated with those identified in student misconceptions, for example, different types of atmospheric radiation, the effect of greenhouse gases, and climate versus weather (see also Haller et al., 2011). Thus, ICECAPS research and the AL@GL project combined to create a learning environment and educational activities that sought to increase climate literacy in high school students as well as communicate important atmospheric research to a broader audience.

Miller, B. G.; Cox, C. J.; Hougham, J.; Walden, V. P.; Eitel, K.; Albano, A.

2013-12-01

349

Impact of Psycholinguistic strategy- Reading Comprehension at Secondary Level  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study is an attempt to discuss the Impact of Psycholinguistic strategy in Reading Comprehension at Secondary Level. Reading is the process of decoding a set of written symbols that have been assigned linguistic meaning for the purpose of communicating ideas. Children for the purpose of communicating ideas. Children typically come to the reading task with a foundation for learning to read. They have attained a substantial amount of oral language and they have accumulated a store house of personal background experience. Areader then is a user of language who contently seeks sense from what he reads. If the learner is asked to read the text, the learner should comprehend the meaning completely. For this the teachers should give proper guidelines and training to get comprehension skills thro some psycholinguistic strategies. The teacher should be very effective in helping struggling learner to successfully master reading comprehension skills.

SV.Ulagammai

2013-07-01

350

Teaching Listening Comprehension Skills: A Test-orientated Approach  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Attributed to a “receptive skill” in the communicative process, listening comprehension would be the most arduous task of all four language skills. It is likely that EFL (English as a foreign language) students encounter various predicaments, of e.g. grasping main ideas of the dialogues in contexts, and in turn suffer from learning anxiety. The issue of how to assist the students in improving their listening competency is worth attention. This article is, therefore, intended for i...

Shao-Wen Su; Chung-Hsiang Liu

2012-01-01

351

The Impact of Listening Strategy on Listening Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Successful FL learners are characterized by knowing how to use language learning strategies effectively. This article reports a study of the effect of strategy training on listening comprehension. In the study, 56 intermediate foreign language learners at Shandong Economic College were either participants in a strategies-based instructional treatment or were comparison students receiving the regular listening course. Data were obtained and analyzed through the performance of a set of three li...

Yan Zhang

2012-01-01

352

Idiom Taxonomies and Idiom Comprehension: Implications for English Teachers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Idioms are an important part of a language, as they are used to express ideas in a more concise and effective way. Idioms have a considerable role in a foreign language as in the mother tongue. Therefore, their learning and teaching in L2 are worthy of attention and research. This paper intends to define idioms, introduce their different taxonomies, discuss L2 idiom processing and comprehension, and use the information to endow English teachers with some pedagogical implications.

Noorolhoda Saberian

2012-01-01

353

Idiom Taxonomies and Idiom Comprehension: Implications for English Teachers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Idioms are an important part of a language, as they are used to express ideas in a more concise and effective way. Idioms have a considerable role in a foreign language as in the mother tongue. Therefore, their learning and teaching in L2 are worthy of attention and research. This paper intends to define idioms, introduce their different taxonomies, discuss L2 idiom processing and comprehension, and use the information to endow English teachers with some pedagogical implications.

Noorolhoda Saberian; Zahra Fotovatnia

2011-01-01

354

Idiom Taxonomies and Idiom Comprehension: Implications for English Teachers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Idioms are an important part of a language, as they are used to express ideas in a more concise and effective way. Idioms have a considerable role in a foreign language as in the mother tongue. Therefore, their learning and teaching in L2 are worthy of attention and research. This paper intends to define idioms, introduce their different taxonomies, discuss L2 idiom processing and comprehension, and use the information to endow English teachers with some pedagogical implications.

Noorolhoda Saberian; Zahra Fotovatnia

2012-01-01

355

The Application of Constructivism: Activities for Enlivening Comprehensive English Class  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The Comprehensive English Course (CEC) plays a vital role in English language learning for college students in China. However, students’ motivation for this course is low due to the fact that they are bored with the instructivist-based teaching environment. This paper first reviews the theories of Constructivism, and then demonstrates how to apply constructivist-based pedagogy in an instructivist-based environment by illustrating the constructivist-based activities: free writing, f...

Jing Shi

2012-01-01

356

The Application of Constructivism: Activities for Enlivening Comprehensive English Class  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The Comprehensive English Course (CEC) plays a vital role in English language learning for college students in China. However, students’ motivation for this course is low due to the fact that they are bored with the instructivist-based teaching environment. This paper first reviews the theories of Constructivism, and then demonstrates how to apply constructivist-based pedagogy in an instructivist-based environment by illustrating the constructivist-based activities: free writing, formati...

Jing Shi

2013-01-01

357

Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center  

Science.gov (United States)

The University of California, Irvine (UCI) Cancer Center was established in 1989 as a university-based cancer center. In 1994, it became an NCI-designated cancer center, and it achieved comprehensive cancer center status in 1997. Soon after, it was renamed in honor of the Chao family as the Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center (CFCCC), operating fully integrated research, prevention, diagnostic, treatment, and rehabilitation programs.

358

Listening Comprehension for Tenth Grade Students in Tabaria High School for Gir  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The paper analyzes listening comprehension of English language skills for tenth grade students at Tabaria high school in the city of Irbid in Jordan. The paper answers the following questions: 1. What are the factors that determine students' interest in learning English? 2. How frequently listening educational instruments are used to improve the listening skills for student? 3. What are the common difficulties that face the respondents in the questionnaire implemented in this paper in terms of listening comprehension? Thus, the paper aims to find the factors influencing English listening comprehension and the strategies to be taken that might improve students’ listening comprehension. The paper indicates that the current problems face students in developing listening comprehension skills are speed speech, limited knowledge of vocabulary, and limited knowledge of the subject in question. Further studies could be conducted to gauge the issue of listening comprehension at the university level-among university students-and the use of listening educational instruments.

Abeer H Malkawi

2010-11-01

359

Interactive Theoretical Model of Text Processing Reflected in Reading Comprehension: An Experimental Study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Basing on the interactive model of comprehension and learning, this study investigated the teaching of text structure among EFL Iranian students and its effects on their reading comprehension. It was designed with the assumption that readers who already have the knowledge of the organizational patterns of text will be aware of text structure and will use it as a strategy to comprehension. Therefore the use of text structure, or the structure strategy, will enhance their comprehension and learning from text. Fifty six students of intermediate level, divided into two groups of control and experimental, participated in this study. Students attempted a pre and a post reading comprehension tests before and after the training procedure which involved an extra treatment on rhetorical structures for the experimental group. The performance of these two groups was compared using t-test. Study results revealed that experimental students who employed text structure had significantly higher performance on the multiple choice reading comprehension questions than those who did not receive any training on text structure. This indicates that the knowledge of text structure may have facilitated their comprehension and learning from text. Therefore, the explicit teaching of expository text structure knowledge and the effective use of structure strategy could be inserted in the instructional program of second/foreign language learners. 

Azadeh Elmianvari

2013-03-01

360

Memory mechanisms supporting syntactic comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

Efforts to characterize the memory system that supports sentence comprehension have historically drawn extensively on short-term memory as a source of mechanisms that might apply to sentences. The focus of these efforts has changed significantly in the past decade. As a result of changes in models of short-term working memory (ST-WM) and developments in models of sentence comprehension, the effort to relate entire components of an ST-WM system, such as those in the model developed by Baddeley (Nature Reviews Neuroscience 4: 829-839, 2003) to sentence comprehension has largely been replaced by an effort to relate more specific mechanisms found in modern models of ST-WM to memory processes that support one aspect of sentence comprehension--the assignment of syntactic structure (parsing) and its use in determining sentence meaning (interpretation) during sentence comprehension. In this article, we present the historical background to recent studies of the memory mechanisms that support parsing and interpretation and review recent research into this relation. We argue that the results of this research do not converge on a set of mechanisms derived from ST-WM that apply to parsing and interpretation. We argue that the memory mechanisms supporting parsing and interpretation have features that characterize another memory system that has been postulated to account for skilled performance-long-term working memory. We propose a model of the relation of different aspects of parsing and interpretation to ST-WM and long-term working memory. PMID:23319178

Caplan, David; Waters, Gloria

2013-04-01

 
 
 
 
361

PD trivia: Making learning fun.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nurses are educators. It is the aim of every educator that his or her teaching should translate into learning. Effective teaching is especially of importance in assuring that patients learn to perform their own peritoneal dialysis (PD). In facilitating an environment where learning can occur, making learning fun is the objective. It is with this mandate that PD Trivia was created. PD Trivia is an interactive game created to facilitate and reinforce learning. PD Trivia consists of 100 essential questions to making PD a success at home. Evaluations at the peritoneal dialysis clinic have revealed excellent quantitative and qualitative results of this simple but comprehensive teaching tool for effective learning of PD. PMID:17061697

Kennedy, Liana

2006-01-01

362

Indagación desde los conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas en salud reproductiva femenina: algunos aportes desde la investigación / Inquiry based on knowledge, attitudes & practices in women's reproductive health: some insights from research  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Spain | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish La morbilidad materna es una de las primeras causas de alteración del bienestar de la mujer en el mundo en vías de desarrollo, por lo cual la salud reproductiva de la mujer sigue siendo una prioridad investigativa en la mayoría de estas sociedades. Sin embargo, es notable la hegemonía de la investig [...] ación clínica biomédica en esta área que ha dejado ver la ausencia y la necesidad de estudios que den cuenta del fenómeno desde una perspectiva integral. Los estudios de "conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas" (CAP) son una alternativa conceptual para acercase a la complejidad del fenómeno en el área de la salud reproductiva. La propuesta de los estudios tipo CAP plantea un acercamiento integral para entender los comportamientos con respecto a la salud de las personas a través de sus tres elementos; y sus resultados han sido base fundamental de los diagnósticos para la creación, ejecución y evaluación de programas sanitarios. Por lo anterior, este artículo se propone mostrar y discutir algunas evidencias relacionadas con la utilidad de este tipo de trabajos en el área de la salud reproductiva de las mujeres. Abstract in english Maternal morbidity is one of the first causes of women's welfare alteration in the less-developed countries; therefore, their reproductive health has been a research priority in most of these societies. However, the dominance of the clinical/biomedical research on this topic has been notable, and sh [...] own the gap and need for studies reporting this phenomenon from an integral perspective. The Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) studies are an alternative design to approaching this complex situation. The KAP proposal offers a comprehensive approach to understanding the behaviors related to people's health through its three main components, and its results have been cornerstone for the situation diagnoses, leading to the creation, execution and evaluation of sanitary programs. Hence, the objective of this paper is to show and to discuss some evidences related to the utility of this approach in women's reproductive health.

C., Laza Vásquez; G., Sánchez Vanegas.

363

The Application of Constructivism: Activities for Enlivening Comprehensive English Class  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The Comprehensive English Course (CEC plays a vital role in English language learning for college students in China. However, students’ motivation for this course is low due to the fact that they are bored with the instructivist-based teaching environment. This paper first reviews the theories of Constructivism, and then demonstrates how to apply constructivist-based pedagogy in an instructivist-based environment by illustrating the constructivist-based activities: free writing, formative assessment, data-driven learning and sentence auction. This pedagogic proposal is not just suitable for the CEC in China, but also useful for the course where the four skills of the English language are practiced while constructivist-based teaching methods are not in use. Hopefully this proposal can contribute significantly to the undeniable need to educate students to be more informed, curious, and critical in English language teaching and learning.

Jing Shi

2013-02-01

364

Teaching Reading in the 21st Century: A Glimpse at How Special Education Teachers Promote Reading Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, we conducted 124 observations of 41 special education teachers teaching reading to their third- through fifth-grade students with learning disabilities to determine the extent to which and in what ways they promoted students' reading comprehension. In 42 lessons, we did not observe any comprehension instruction. In 30 lessons, the…

Klingner, Janette K.; Urbach, Jennifer; Golos, Deborah; Brownell, Mary; Menon, Shailaja

2010-01-01

365

Beyond Talking about Books: Implications of the Reading Comprehension Instruction and Pedagogical Beliefs of a Special Educator Perceived as Effective  

Science.gov (United States)

This investigation extends the study of the reading comprehension practices used with students with learning disabilities (LD) via a case study, exploring the beliefs and practices in reading comprehension of "Wendy," a cross-categorical special educator nominated as effective in her work with sixth-grade students. Wendy's practices serve as a…

Feiker Hollenbeck, Amy R.

2013-01-01

366

Accommodating Remedial Readers in the General Education Setting: Is Listening-while-Reading Sufficient to Improve Factual and Inferential Comprehension?  

Science.gov (United States)

Word reading accommodations are commonly applied in the general education setting in an attempt to improve student comprehension and learning of curriculum content. This study examined the effects of listening-while-reading (LWR) and silent reading (SR) using text-to-speech assistive technology on the comprehension of 25 middle-school remedial…

Schmitt, Ara J.; Hale, Andrea D.; McCallum, Elizabeth; Mauck, Brittany

2011-01-01

367

Improving Student Learning When Budgets Are Tight  

Science.gov (United States)

How do you stay focused on increasing student learning when budget cuts threaten everything you are striving for? This book offers a comprehensive framework to enhance student achievement in good times and in bad. School reform expert Allan R. Odden outlines a school improvement action plan focused sharply on student learning and then shows how to…

Odden, Allan R.

2012-01-01

368

Modern Standard Arabic: Aural Comprehension Course. Volume XX: Comprehension Drills.  

Science.gov (United States)

The last of 20 volumes of lessons designed for use in a full-time, intensive training program in Arabic is presented. The 128 lessons in this volume contain various types of comprehension drills. Lessons 14-128 are completely in Arabic. (AMH)

Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

369

M programming a comprehensive guide  

CERN Document Server

M Programming: A Comprehensive Guide is a complete update to ABCs of MUMPS. While ABCs of MUMPS was an introduction for novice and intermediate M programmers, M Programming: A Comprehensive Guide has a new section containing advanced material. This new section addresses features such as transaction processing, networking, structured system variables, and interfaces to other standards. Five new chapters have been added, covering an overview of M for readers familiar with other languages; M and the Windows environment; interaction between M and the underlying system; transaction processing; inte

Walters, Richard

1997-01-01

370

Relationship between Attitude toward Target Language Culture Instruction and Pragmatic Comprehension Development  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Familiarity with the cultural features of the target language society and interest in learning those cultural features are the key factors to determine language learners’ level of pragmatic comprehension. To investigate this issue, this study attempted to assess the relationship between attitude toward incorporating target language culture into classroom instruction and the development of pragmatic comprehension. The data were collected through the administration of a Likert scale attitude questionnaire and two pragmatic comprehension tests one used as pre-test and the other used as post-test to 32 intermediate level language learners at a language academy in Malaysia. The findings suggested that a positive attitude toward learning target language culture leads to a higher level of pragmatic comprehension. Therefore, it was recommended to furnish foreign language course books as well as foreign language classroom instruction with cultural information.

Vahid Rafieyan

2013-07-01

371

A Model for Collaborative Learning in Undergraduate Climate Change Courses  

Science.gov (United States)

Like several colleges and universities across the nation, the University of California, San Diego, has introduced climate change topics into many existing and new undergraduate courses. I have administered a program in this area at UCSD and have also developed and taught a new lower-division UCSD course entitled "Climate Change and Society", a general education course for non-majors. This class covers the basics of climate change, such as the science that explains it, the causes of climate change, climate change impacts, and mitigation strategies. The teaching methods for this course stress interdisciplinary approaches. I find that inquiry-based and collaborative modes of learning are particularly effective when applied to science-based climate, environmental and sustainability topics. Undergraduate education is often dominated by a competitive and individualistic approach to learning. In this approach, individual success is frequently perceived as contingent on others being less successful. Such a model is at odds with commonly stated goals of teaching climate change and sustainability, which are to equip students to contribute to the debate on global environmental change and societal adaptation strategies; and to help students become better informed citizens and decision makers. I present classroom-tested strategies for developing collaborative forms of learning in climate change and environmental courses, including team projects, group presentations and group assessment exercises. I show how critical thinking skills and long-term retention of information can benefit in the collaborative mode of learning. I find that a collaborative learning model is especially appropriate to general education courses in which the enrolled student body represents a wide diversity of majors, class level and expertise. I also connect collaborative coursework in interdisciplinary environmental topics directly to applications in the field, where so much "real-world" achievement in research, education, government and business is effectively accomplished in collaborative teams.

Teranes, J. L.

2008-12-01

372

Enhancing learning and comprehension through strengthening visual literacy  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Living in an image-rich world, as we currently do, does not mean that individuals naturally possess visual literacy skills. This article explores the concept of ‘visual literacy’, and the skills needed to develop visual literacy and visual intelligence. Developing visual literacy in educational environments is important because it can contribute to individual empowerment, and it is therefore necessary to take pedagogical advantage of visual literacy’s place across the...

Cheryl Le Roux

2011-01-01

373

Didactic strategies for comprehension and learning of structural concepts  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In previous papers we have established the convenience of formulating educational strategies at the university level for both disciplines: Civil Engineering and Architecture, which involves academic topics of mutual interest by means of shared practices. As a particular matter of this approach, the application of physical experimental models is considered of special usefulness, in order to understand in better ways the performance of materials and structural systems. Several st...

Moreno, Carlos; Abad, Antonio; Gerdingh, Juan G.; Garcia M, Carlos; Gonzalez C, Oscar

2010-01-01

374

Science Teacher Efficacy and Extrinsic Factors Toward Professional Development Using Video Games in a Design-Based Research Model: The Next Generation of STEM Learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Designed-based research principles guided the study of 51 secondary-science teachers in the second year of a 3-year professional development project. The project entailed the creation of student-centered, inquiry-based, science, video games. A professional development model appropriate for infusing innovative technologies into standards-based curricula was employed to determine how science teacher's attitudes and efficacy where impacted while designing science-based video games. The study's mixed-method design ascertained teacher efficacy on five factors (General computer use, Science Learning, Inquiry Teaching and Learning, Synchronous chat/text, and Playing Video Games) related to technology and gaming using a web-based survey). Qualitative data in the form of online blog posts was gathered during the project to assist in the triangulation and assessment of teacher efficacy. Data analyses consisted of an Analysis of Variance and serial coding of teacher reflective responses. Results indicated participants who used computers daily have higher efficacy while using inquiry-based teaching methods and science teaching and learning. Additional emergent findings revealed possible motivating factors for efficacy. This professional development project was focused on inquiry as a pedagogical strategy, standard-based science learning as means to develop content knowledge, and creating video games as technological knowledge. The project was consistent with the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK) framework where overlapping circles of the three components indicates development of an integrated understanding of the suggested relationships. Findings provide suggestions for development of standards-based science education software, its integration into the curriculum and, strategies for implementing technology into teaching practices.

Annetta, Leonard A.; Frazier, Wendy M.; Folta, Elizabeth; Holmes, Shawn; Lamb, Richard; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

2013-02-01

375

Establishment of a Learning Management System  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A web-based learning management system (LMS) has been established to address the need of customized education and training of Nuclear Training Center (NTC) of KAERI. The LMS is designed to deal with various learning types (e.g. on-line, off-line and blended) and a practically comprehensive learning activity cycle (e.g. course preparation, registration, learning, and postlearning) as well as to be user-friendly. A test with an example course scenario on the established system has shown its satisfactory performance. This paper discusses details of the established webbased learning management system in terms of development approach and functions of the LMS

2006-05-25

376

Self-Directed Learning in Adulthood: A Literature Review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Self-directed learning (SDL) is among the most productive areas of research in adult education. Malcolm S. Knowles is credited with a comprehensive synthesis of adult teaching and adult learning principles. Andragogy, the art and science of helping adults learn, lies at the heart of Knowles' work. Lucy M. Guglielmino theorized regarding the…

Owen, T. Ross

377

E-Learning for Depth in the Semantic Web  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper, we describe concept parsing algorithms, a novel semantic analysis methodology at the core of a new pedagogy that focuses learners attention on deep comprehension of the conceptual content of learned material. Two new e-learning tools are described in some detail: interactive concept discovery learning and meaning equivalence…

Shafrir, Uri; Etkind, Masha

2006-01-01

378

The Effects of Controlled Language Processing on Listening Comprehension and Recall  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study seeks to determine the possible interactions between listening proficiency and the state of strategic self-awareness; second, and more importantly, to investigate the effects of learned strategies on listening comprehension and recall; and finally to describe the most common real-time listening comprehension problems faced by EFL learners and to compare the differences between learners with different listening abilities. After ten training sessions, an assessment was made ...

Mohsen Jannejad; Hossein Shokouhi; Somayeh Biparva Haghighi

2012-01-01

379

On the Role of Strategy Use and Strategy Instruction in Listening Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper provides a review of ideas and research regarding the role of strategy use and strategy instruction in listening comprehension. Firstly, it provides a brief explanation of different models of listening comprehension. Secondly, it sketches out different categories of learning and listening strategies. Thirdly models of strategy instruction and different attitudes towards it are reviewed. Finally, empirical studies carried out to examine the role of strategy use and strategy instruct...

Amir Hossein Rahimi

2012-01-01

380

The relationship between syntactic knowledge and reading comprehension in EFL learners  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Via a variety of measurements, 64 Hungarian native speakers in the 12th grade learning English as a foreign language in Slovakia were tested in a cross-sectional correlational study in order to determine the relationship between the ability to process complex syntax and foreign language reading comprehension. The test instruments involved a standardized reading comprehension test in English, and a test of syntactic knowledge in both Hungarian and English, in addition to a backg...

Morvay, Gabriella

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
381

Neuroimaging Evidence of Comprehension Monitoring  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to synthesize the emerging neuroimaging literature that reveals how the brain responds when readers and listeners encounter texts that demand monitoring of their ongoing comprehension processes. Much of this research has been undertaken by cognitive scientists who do not frame their work in metacognitive terms, and therefore it is less likely to be familiar to psychologists who study metacognition in educational contexts. The important role of metacognition in the development and use of academic skills is widely recognized. Metacognition is typically defined as the awareness and control of one's own cognitive processes. In the domain of reading, the most important metacognitive skill is comprehension monitoring, the evaluation and regulation of comprehension. Readers who monitor their understanding realize when they have encountered difficulty making sense of the text, and they apply error correction procedures to attempt to resolve the difficulty. Metacognition depends on executive control skills that continue to develop into early adulthood, in parallel with the maturation of the executive control regions of the prefrontal cortex. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and event-related potentials (ERP have been used for some time to study neural correlates of basic reading processes such as word identification, but it is only within recent years that researchers have turned to the higher-level processes of text comprehension. The article describes illustrative studies that reveal changes in neural activity when adults apply lexical, syntactic, or semantic standards to evaluate their understanding.

Linda Baker

2014-04-01

382

Helping Students Develop Listening Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Listening practice is often neglected or handled inappropriately in the teachinglearning process. This poses problem because listening is an integral part of conversations. Oral skills without equally welldeveloped listening abilities are of little practical value. In this article, I will take a look at issues related to the area of listening that may be considered when guiding students toward developing listening comprehension.

Cárdenas Beltrán Melba Libia

2000-01-01

383

Testing Foreign Language Listening Comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

The development and validation of a test of listening comprehension for English as a second language at the Dutch National Institute for Educational Measurement (Cito) is described. The test uses two distinct item formats: true-false items and modified cloze items with two options. Both item formats were found to measure foreign language listening…

de Jong, John H. A. L.

384

A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

2013-01-01

385

A Comprehensive Middle School Bibliography.  

Science.gov (United States)

This extensive bibliography of middle childhood education is intended to help educators and education agencies improve junior high school education. Section 1 of the bibliography is a comprehensive list of relevant materials. Section 2 is a selected bibliography used as reference materials by the West Virginia Board of Education in developing "A…

Benish, Jean, Comp.

386

Metacomprehension during Rare Word Comprehension  

Science.gov (United States)

To examine metacomprehension during comprehension, undergraduates (n = 133) were asked to provide descriptions of how they determined the meaning of four rare words presented in short passages. Content analysis of these written descriptions revealed task-specific metacomprehension reflecting lexical, textbase, and situation model processes.…

Mcginnis, Debra; Saunders, Nikola N.; Burns, Ryan J.

2007-01-01

387

Pragmatic Comprehension Development through Telecollaboration  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Pragmatic comprehension can be ideally developed through contact with target language speakers. This contact can be provided in English as Foreign Language contexts through telecollaboration. To test the actual effect of telecollaboration on the development of pragmatic comprehension, 30 Iranian undergraduates of English as a Foreign Language participated in an experimental study. The participants were divided into two groups of 15 students: control group which merely received pragmatic instructions and experimental group which had the opportunity to interact with target language speakers through internet-mediated communication tools besides receiving pragmatic instructions. The data were collected through a multiple choice pragmatic comprehension test, following a semester-long intervention. The comparison of the performance of the two groups assessed through the independent-samples t-test showed the significant positive effect of telecollaboration on the development of pragmatic comprehension. Pedagogical implications of the findings suggested organizing telecollaborative partnership environments to link English as Foreign Language students with university students in native English speaking countries.

Vahid Rafieyan

2014-01-01

388

Distance Learning Aviation Course 1  

Science.gov (United States)

DLAC1, a distance learning course on forecasting fog and low stratus for aviation operations, is designed to give forecasters a comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms, synoptic patterns, and mesoscale features involved in fog/stratus generation and dissipation, as well as the latest forecast tools used to predict these challenging events.

Spangler, Tim

2006-12-09

389

Investigating inquiry beliefs and nature of science (NOS) conceptions of science teachers as revealed through online learning  

Science.gov (United States)

Creating a scientifically literate society appears to be the major goal of recent science education reform efforts (Abd-El-Khalick, Boujaoude, Dushl, Lederman, Hofstein, Niaz, Tregust, & Tuan, 2004). Recent national reports in the U.S, such as Shaping the Future, New Expectations for Undergraduate Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology (NSF,1996), Inquiry in Science and In Classroom, Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 2001), Pursuing excellence: Comparison of international eight-grade mathematics and science achievement from a U.S. perspective (NCES, 2001), and Standards for Science Teacher Preparation (NSTA 2003) appear to agree on one thing: the vision of creating a scientifically literate society. It appears from science education literature that the two important components of being a scientifically literate individual are developing an understanding of nature of science and ability to conduct scientific inquiries. Unfortunately, even though teaching science through inquiry has been recommended in national reports since the 1950's, it has yet to find its way into many science classrooms (Blanchard, 2006; Yerrick, 2000). Science education literature identfies several factors for this including: (1) lack of content knowledge (Anderson, 2002; Lee, Hart Cuevas, & Enders, 2004; Loucks-Horsely, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, 1998; Moscovici, 1999; Smith & Naele, 1989; Smith, 1989); (2) high stake tests (Aydeniz, 2006); (3) teachers' conflicting beliefs with inquiry-based science education reform (Blanchard, 2006; Wallace & Kang, 2004); and, (4) lack of collaboration and forums for communication (Anderson, 2002; Davis, 2003; Loucks-Horsely, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, 1998; Wallace & Kang, 2004). In addition to the factors stated above this study suggest that some of the issues and problems that have impeded inquiry instruction to become the primary approach to teaching science in many science classrooms might be related to teachers NOS conceptions. Developing desired understanding of nature of science conceptions and having an adequate experience with inquiry learning is especially important for science teachers because science education literature suggests that the development of teachers' nature of science conceptions is influenced by their experiences with inquiry science (Akerson et. al. 2000) and implementation of science lessons reflect teachers' NOS conceptions (Abd-EL-Khalick & Boujaoude, 1997; Matson & Parsons, 1998; Rosenthal, 1993; Trowbridge, Bybee & Powell, 2000; Turner & Sullenger, 1999). Furthermore, the impediments to successful integration of inquiry based science instruction from teachers' perspective are particularly important, as they are the implementers of inquiry based science education reform. The purpose of this study is to understand the relationship between the teachers' NOS conceptions and their inquiry beliefs and practices in their classrooms and how this relationship impedes or contributes to the implementation of inquiry based science education reform efforts. The participants of this study were in-service teachers who were accepted into the online Masters Program in science education program at a southern university. Three online courses offered in the summer semester of 2005 constituted the research setting of this study: (1) Special Problems in the Teaching of Secondary School Science: Nature of Science & Science Teaching, (2) Curriculum in Science Education, and (3) Colloquium. Multiple data sources were used for data triangulation (Miles & Huberman, 1984; Yin, 1994) in order to understand the relationship between participants' NOS views and their conceptions and beliefs about inquiry-based science teaching. The study revealed that the relationship between the teachers' NOS conceptions and their inquiry beliefs and practices is far from being simple and linear. Data suggests that the teachers' sophistication of NOS conceptions influence their perception of inquiry science instruction in variety of wa

Atar, Hakan Yavuz

390

From Non-Formal Education to Lifelong Learning: Bridging Schools with Youth Activity.  

Science.gov (United States)

New, more comprehensive forms of cooperation are needed between schools and sources of nonformal education in the community. Institutions should work together to promote a new culture of learning and enhanced learning environments. (SK)

Sahlberg, Pasi

2001-01-01

391

Comprehensive, technology-based clinical education: the "virtual practicum".  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses the application of technology to promote more comprehensive clinical education in the biopsychosocial aspects of primary care. Comprehensive refers to the inclusion, in addition to scientific and technical knowledge, of knowledge that is less easily characterized, quantified, and taught: empathy, intuition, the demonstration of artistry. Clinical education will be increasingly facilitated by the proliferation of computers capable of displaying combinations of text, graphics, video, and sound; broadband networks capable of delivering these multiple media to the home or office; and new methods for using these technologies for education and training. However, current models for technology-based learning are limiting, lagging behind the rapid technological evolution driving our entry into the Information Age. Some recent educational models (Schon's reflection-in-action and reflective practicums [1], Boisot's E-space [2], Kolb's learning cycle [3]) provide for a more comprehensive and complete view of health professional education. This article describes these models in depth and proposes a new model for technology-based clinical training, the "Virtual Practicum," based on them. The Virtual Practicum is illustrated with a new interactive CD-ROM program, dealing with primary care of patients with HIV/AIDS. The concepts presented here are generally useful in thinking about clinical education, regardless of the means used. PMID:9617648

Henderson, J V

1998-01-01

392

Building a Comprehensive System to Support All Students Getting to High School Graduation and beyond. Forum Brief  

Science.gov (United States)

If the U.S. is to increase the number of college graduates and boost our national competitiveness, we must redouble our efforts to ensure all students graduate from high school prepared for postsecondary learning and careers. This means creating comprehensive education systems that provide learning options that enable a range of pathways to…

American Youth Policy Forum, 2012

2012-01-01

393

An Action Research Plan for Developing and Implementing The Students’ Listening Comprehension Skills  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This is a proposal for an action research plan designed to find out how to improve students’ listening comprehension skills, enhance their performance and help to promote better learning. This plan is focused on the minority students who major in English in our University. Listening comprehension is one of the most difficult courses for them. As their teacher, the author would like to conduct an action research in her classroom teaching in order to make some changes in her teaching, to assist the students to become active listeners, and to improve their overall listening comprehension skills.

Chunpin Luo

2008-06-01

394

Learning about Accelerated Learning.  

Science.gov (United States)

When accelerated learning programs succeed, they do so in part because they invoke and integrate skills and basic information, theoretical understanding, and natural knowledge. The trainer must blend these elements appropriately. (JOW)

Caine, Geoffrey; Caine, Renate Nummela

1989-01-01

395

When All Children Comprehend: Increasing the External Validity of Narrative Comprehension Development Research  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Narratives, also called stories, can be found in conversations, children’s play interactions, reading material, and television programs. From infancy to adulthood, narrative comprehension processes interpret events and inform our understanding of physical and social environments. These processes have been extensively studied to ascertain the multifaceted nature of narrative comprehension. From this research we know that three overlapping processes (i.e., knowledge integration, goal structure understanding, and causal inference generation proposed by the constructionist paradigm are necessary for narrative comprehension, narrative comprehension has a predictive relationship with children’s later reading performance, and comprehension processes are generalizable to other contexts. Much of the previous research has emphasized internal and predictive validity; thus, limiting the generalizability of previous findings. We are concerned these limitations may be excluding underrepresented populations from benefits and implications identified by early comprehension processes research. This review identifies gaps in extant literature regarding external validity and argues for increased emphasis on externally valid research. We highlight limited research on narrative comprehension processes in children from low-income and minority populations, and argue for changes in comprehension assessments. Specifically, we argue both on- and off-line assessments should be used across various narrative types (e.g., picture books, televised narratives with traditionally underserved and underrepresented populations. We propose increasing the generalizability narrative comprehension processes research can inform persistent reading achievement gaps, and have practical implications for how children learn from narratives.

DanielleD.Brown

2014-03-01

396

Comprehensive numerical modelling of tokamaks  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

We outline a plan for the development of a comprehensive numerical model of tokamaks. The model would consist of a suite of independent, communicating packages describing the various aspects of tokamak performance (core and edge transport coefficients and profiles, heating, fueling, magnetic configuration, etc.) as well as extensive diagnostics. These codes, which may run on different computers, would be flexibly linked by a user-friendly shell which would allow run-time specification of packages and generation of pre- and post-processing functions, including workstation-based visualization of output. One package in particular, the calculation of core transport coefficients via gyrokinetic particle simulation, will become practical on the scale required for comprehensive modelling only with the advent of teraFLOP computers. Incremental effort at LLNL would be focused on gyrokinetic simulation and development of the shell.

Cohen, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.; Dubois, P.F.

1991-01-03

397

Comprehensive numerical modelling of tokamaks  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

We outline a plan for the development of a comprehensive numerical model of tokamaks. The model would consist of a suite of independent, communicating packages describing the various aspects of tokamak performance (core and edge transport coefficients and profiles, heating, fueling, magnetic configuration, etc.) as well as extensive diagnostics. These codes, which may run on different computers, would be flexibly linked by a user-friendly shell which would allow run-time specification of packages and generation of pre- and post-processing functions, including workstation-based visualization of output. One package in particular, the calculation of core transport coefficients via gyrokinetic particle simulation, will become practical on the scale required for comprehensive modelling only with the advent of teraFLOP computers. Incremental effort at LLNL would be focused on gyrokinetic simulation and development of the shell

1991-01-01

398

On comprehensive global garbage Detection  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The experience gained with centralised garbage collection (GC) techniques has left a legacy of assumptions, expectations and tradeoffs, which may lead one to overlook some Global Garbage Detection (GGD) approaches. We argue that it is not necessary to give up on comprehensiveness in order to achieve a high degree of concurrency and scalability, although this may be at a price which is not palatable in a centralised system. For instance, much higher detection latency or space overhead, at leas...

Cahill, Vinny

1995-01-01

399

Helping Students Develop Listening Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Listening practice is often neglected or handled inappropriately in the teachinglearning process. This poses problem because listening is an integral part of conversations. Oral skills without equally welldeveloped listening abilities are of little practical value. In this article, I will take a look at issues related to the area of listening that may be considered when guiding students toward developing listening comprehension.

Cárdenas Beltrán Melba Libia

2000-08-01

400

Facilitating Textually Assisted Listening Comprehension  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The impact of written texts, as a form of visual support, on foreign language learners’ listening comprehension has received special attention in recent years. This study investigated the role of written texts as a form of support in comprehending audio materials. The main objective was to examine the effect of texts on audio-based listening. A linguistically homogeneous groups of second language learners listened to audio texts under different conditions of (1) texts before listening to au...

Samad Sajjadi; Majid Ahmadi; Hooshang Yazdani; Ataollah Maleki

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
401

Cardiac rehabilitation: a comprehensive review  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a commonly used treatment for men and women with cardiovascular disease. To date, no single study has conclusively demonstrated a comprehensive benefit of CR. Numerous individual studies, however, have demonstrated beneficial effects such as improved risk-factor profile, slower disease progression, decreased morbidity, and decreased mortality. This paper will review the evidence for the use of CR and discuss the implications and limitations of...

Lear Scott A; Ignaszewski Andrew

2001-01-01

402

A comprehensive outlook of Sannipata  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Nomenclature of the disease on the basis of vitiation of the body humors is stressed in ayurveda. Sannipatika, i.e., ‘conglomeration of vitiated tridosa’ is the final stage of process of manifestation of disease. In this specific state of pathogenesis, the disease becomes more advance and mostly irreversible. A detailed scientific study of Sannipatika-avastha has been documented in classics. Comprehensive analysis of sannipata-state and its ways of presentation is the main theme of the cu...

2011-01-01

403

Comprehensive sexuality education : recognizing the realities of young people’s lives  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This issue of Exchange is about learning about sex and this article describes the advantages of comprehensive sexuality education over abstinence-until-marriage education. Today’s generation of youth is the largest ever. While adolescence is a time for growth and learning, youth increasingly confront multiple threats to their health and well-being such as violence, early pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV. At the same time, youth are our greatest hope for the future a...

Castagnaro, K.

2007-01-01

404

Re-Exploring Game-Assisted Learning Research: The Perspective of Learning Theoretical Bases  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous literature reviews or meta-analysis based studies on game-assisted learning have provided important results, but few studies have considered the importance of learning theory, and coverage of papers after 2007 is scant. This study presents a systematic review of the literature using a meta-analysis approach to provide a more comprehensive…

Wu, Wen-Hsiung; Chiou, Wen-Bin; Kao, Hao-Yun; Hu, Chung-Hsing Alex; Huang, Sih-Han

2012-01-01

405

Neuronal basis of speech comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

Verbal communication does not rely only on the simple perception of auditory signals. It is rather a parallel and integrative processing of linguistic and non-linguistic information, involving temporal and frontal areas in particular. This review describes the inherent complexity of auditory speech comprehension from a functional-neuroanatomical perspective. The review is divided into two parts. In the first part, structural and functional asymmetry of language relevant structures will be discus. The second part of the review will discuss recent neuroimaging studies, which coherently demonstrate that speech comprehension processes rely on a hierarchical network involving the temporal, parietal, and frontal lobes. Further, the results support the dual-stream model for speech comprehension, with a dorsal stream for auditory-motor integration, and a ventral stream for extracting meaning but also the processing of sentences and narratives. Specific patterns of functional asymmetry between the left and right hemisphere can also be demonstrated. The review article concludes with a discussion on interactions between the dorsal and ventral streams, particularly the involvement of motor related areas in speech perception processes, and outlines some remaining unresolved issues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Human Auditory Neuroimaging. PMID:24113115

Specht, Karsten

2014-01-01

406

Comprehensive Training of Engineering Students through Continuing Education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper addresses a priority for student training in general and particularly for future engineers. Although this issue has been frequently addressed in recent years, proposals are still insufficient for engineering students. This paper is aimed at theoretically and empirically demonstrating the potential of continuing education as one of the key areas that engineering schools have for the comprehensive training of students. Preliminary results of a research project commissioned by the School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Electrica-FIME of Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Mexico, are presented to respond to the need to improve the learning process of students with a comprehensive approach. The research justification and some of the results obtained in the exploratory phase are also described.

Miguel Reynoso Flores

2014-01-01

407

The Impact of Listening Strategy on Listening Comprehension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Successful FL learners are characterized by knowing how to use language learning strategies effectively. This article reports a study of the effect of strategy training on listening comprehension. In the study, 56 intermediate foreign language learners at Shandong Economic College were either participants in a strategies-based instructional treatment or were comparison students receiving the regular listening course. Data were obtained and analyzed through the performance of a set of three listening tasks on a pre-post basis by both groups. The subsample of twelve students also provided verbal report data to show their cognitive insights into strategy use and the instruction itself. It was found that the increased use of listening strategy contributed positively to listening comprehension, which led to the implication that formal strategy training should have a role in the foreign language listening classroom.

Yan Zhang

2012-03-01

408

Learning Sequences  

CERN Document Server

We describe the algorithms used by the ALEKS computer learning system for manipulating combinatorial descriptions of human learners' states of knowledge, generating all states that are possible according to a description of a learning space in terms of a partial order, and using Bayesian statistics to determine the most likely state of a student. As we describe, a representation of a knowledge space using learning sequences (basic words of an antimatroid) allows more general learning spaces to be implemented with similar algorithmic complexity. We show how to define a learning space from a set of learning sequences, find a set of learning sequences that concisely represents a given learning space, generate all states of a learning space represented in this way, and integrate this state generation procedure into a knowledge assessment algorithm. We also describe some related theoretical results concerning projections of learning spaces, decomposition and dimension of learning spaces, and algebraic representati...

Eppstein, David

2008-01-01

409

77 FR 3242 - Comprehensive Centers Program  

Science.gov (United States)

...Implementing accelerated learning strategies such as dual-credit and...scaling up of new teaching and learning strategies, approaches, processes...promising and proven personalized learning strategies, practices, and...

2012-01-23

410

La evaluación de la comprensión en el aprendizaje: El empleo de las TIC en el análisis de estructuras de conocimiento / The assessment of comprehension in learning: ICT in the knowledge structures' analysis / Avallando a compreensão de aprendizagem: A utilização das TIC na análise de estruturas de conhecimento  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: Spanish Abstract in portuguese As avaliações quantitativas, sumativas, tendem a prestar muita pouca atenção à organização do conhecimento avaliado. Contudo, a organização é tão ou mais importante do que a quantidade de informação recordada, quando se descreve a aprendizagem feito e especialmente a sua utilização. Por outro lado, [...] as avaliações tradicionais geralmente envolvem mecanismos de resposta muito indiretos relacionados com a aprendizagem, tais como o descarte de opções ou a repetição de textos memorizados. A utilização das TIC pode ir além dos dados fragmentarios e analisar estruturas de conhecimento completas. Específicamente, a ferramenta informática List--Link, permite a avaliação a partir da relação entre dois listas de conceitos: uma contendo conceitos gerais (geralmente de extensão moderada) e uma outra que contém os conceitos mais específicos que podem estar relacionados com aqueles. O processamento destes dados permite não só trazer a estrutura de conhecimento, mas também permite o feedback necessário na optimização dela. Abstract in spanish Las evaluaciones de carácter cuantitativo-sumativo acostumbran a prestar muy poca atención a la organización del conocimiento evaluado. Sin embargo, dicha organización es tanto o más importante que la cantidad de información recordada a la hora de describir el aprendizaje realizado y, especialmente, [...] el uso que del mismo se puede realizar. Por otro lado, las evaluaciones tradicionales suelen implicar mecanismos de respuesta muy indirectamente relacionadas con el aprendizaje, como el descarte de opciones o la repetición de textos memorizados. El empleo de las TIC permite ir más allá de los datos fragmentarios y analizar estructuras de conocimiento completas. En concreto, la herramienta informática List-Link, plantea su evaluación a partir de la relación entre dos listas de conceptos: una que contiene conceptos generales (habitualmente de moderada extensión) y otra que contiene conceptos más específicos que pueden relacionarse con los anteriores. El procesamiento de estos datos no sólo permite hacer emerger la estructura de conocimiento, sino que también permite proporcionar feedback preciso de la manera de optimizarla. Abstract in english Quantitative-summative assessment usually devotes not much attention to the organisation of knowledge, though it is a dimension as or more important than the amount of retrieved information for describing the accomplished learning and, particularly, the possible use of it. These traditional systems [...] of assessment commonly involve response procedures that are only indirectly related with a comprehensive learning, such as discarding options in multiple response exams or repeating memorized texts. ICT provides means for reaching beyond fragmentary data and analyse full knowledge structures. Specifically, the computer project ListLink assesses knowledge through the links established between two lists of concepts: A short list of general concepts and a larger list of more specific ones. Once processed this data makes existing knowledge structures emerge and also provides precise feedback in order to optimise them.

Antoni, Castelló; Ramon, Cladellas.

411

On the importance of listening comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract The simple view of reading highlights the importance of two primary components which account for individual differences in reading comprehension across development: word recognition (i.e., decoding) and listening comprehension. While assessments and interventions for decoding have been the focus of pedagogy in the past several decades, the importance of listening comprehension has received less attention. This paper reviews evidence showing that listening comprehension becomes the dominating influence on reading comprehension starting even in the elementary grades. It also highlights a growing number of children who fail to develop adequate reading comprehension skills, primarily due to deficient listening comprehension skills (i.e., poor comprehenders). Finally we discuss key language influences on listening comprehension for consideration during assessment and treatment of reading disabilities. PMID:24833426

Hogan, Tiffany P; Adlof, Suzanne M; Alonzo, Crystle N

2014-06-01

412

Children's Comprehension of Narrative Picture Books.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper explains the creation and validation of the Narrative Comprehension of Picture Books task (NC task), an assessment of young childrens comprehension of wordless picture books. Study 1 explored developmental improvements in the task, as well as r...

A. H. Paris S. G. Paris

2001-01-01

413

The Effect of Learning Styles on Learning Strategy Use by EFL Learners  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Problem statement: Strategies play a significant role in assisting learners with developing language competence. During the past few years, numbers of studies demonstrated the importance of learning strategies in language learning. Approach: Positive relationship between strategy use and reading comprehension was presented and the differences of strategy use between successful and less successful learners were highly discussed in much research. Successful learners use learning s...

Weng Pei-Shi

2012-01-01

414

Applying Reporting of Comprehensive Income in China  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper discusses the characteristics of comprehensive income and how to apply reporting of comprehensive incomein China. Through a detailed analysis, we summarize the situation of current performance reporting type, and give some advices on how to apply comprehensive income reporting in China, to provide investors and creditors morecomprehensive and relevant performance information. There are two steps advised to be applied in China to update thecurrent income reporting to comprehensive income reporting.

Xiaoyan Liu

2009-10-01

415

Assessing Narrative Comprehension in Young Children.  

Science.gov (United States)

Explains the creation and validation of the Narrative Comprehension of Picture Books task (NC task), an assessment of young children's comprehension of wordless picture books. Creates and tests assessment materials and procedures that can be used with young children, whether or not they can decode print. Discusses how narrative comprehension is…

Paris, Alison H.; Paris, Scott G.

2003-01-01

416

Predictive mechanisms in idiom comprehension.  

Science.gov (United States)

Prediction is pervasive in human cognition and plays a central role in language comprehension. At an electrophysiological level, this cognitive function contributes substantially in determining the amplitude of the N400. In fact, the amplitude of the N400 to words within a sentence has been shown to depend on how predictable those words are: The more predictable a word, the smaller the N400 elicited. However, predictive processing can be based on different sources of information that allow anticipation of upcoming constituents and integration in context. In this study, we investigated the ERPs elicited during the comprehension of idioms, that is, prefabricated multiword strings stored in semantic memory. When a reader recognizes a string of words as an idiom before the idiom ends, she or he can develop expectations concerning the incoming idiomatic constituents. We hypothesized that the expectations driven by the activation of an idiom might differ from those driven by discourse-based constraints. To this aim, we compared the ERP waveforms elicited by idioms and two literal control conditions. The results showed that, in both cases, the literal conditions exhibited a more negative potential than the idiomatic condition. Our analyses suggest that before idiom recognition the effect is due to modulation of the N400 amplitude, whereas after idiom recognition a P300 for the idiomatic sentence has a fundamental role in the composition of the effect. These results suggest that two distinct predictive mechanisms are at work during language comprehension, based respectively on probabilistic information and on categorical template matching. PMID:19580384

Vespignani, Francesco; Canal, Paolo; Molinaro, Nicola; Fonda, Sergio; Cacciari, Cristina

2010-08-01

417

Comprehensive management of project changes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The goal of this research was to examine how project changes can be prevented, and how to reduce their negative impact. Theoretical research examined risk management, project control and change management. Based on the study a “Comprehensive Change Management Model” was developed and verified after conducting empirical research in Slovenian enterprises. The research confirmed that risk management identifies possible changes and reduces their impact; project control ensures the timely detection of changes and an efficient response, while formal change management ensures the effective implementation of changes. The combined functioning of all three areas ensures effective project execution.

Aljaž Stare

2010-06-01

418

Cardiac rehabilitation: a comprehensive review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac rehabilitation (CR is a commonly used treatment for men and women with cardiovascular disease. To date, no single study has conclusively demonstrated a comprehensive benefit of CR. Numerous individual studies, however, have demonstrated beneficial effects such as improved risk-factor profile, slower disease progression, decreased morbidity, and decreased mortality. This paper will review the evidence for the use of CR and discuss the implications and limitations of these studies. The safety, relevance to special populations, challenges, and future directions of CR will also be reviewed.

Lear Scott A

2001-09-01

419

Student learning of measurement and sound: Examining the impact of teacher professional development  

Science.gov (United States)

The current trends in science education emphasize students' engagement in scientific inquiry and deemphasize memorization of factual knowledge. In response to these trends, reform-based curricula often characterize students engaging in science investigations by listing the detailed steps of scientific practices. Unfortunately, if curricula stress procedures more than conceptual connections, students' understanding of science may be distorted. To ensure the effectiveness of science education reform, this study was designed to bring attention to the differences between the procedures for carrying out investigations and the conceptual knowledge involved in doing the investigations. This study explored teachers' use of a hands-on science curriculum and its impact on student learning using multiple assessments. The relationships between student learning of conceptual or procedural knowledge and teachers' talk about conceptual or procedural knowledge in their classrooms were investigated. Three teachers and their third-grade students participated in this study during the teaching of the measurement and sound units from a inquiry-based curriculum. One teacher had participated in an enhanced prof