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Sample records for chinese school children

  1. Prevalence and association between obesity and metabolic syndrome among Chinese elementary school children: a school-based survey

    OpenAIRE

    Liu AiLing; Lin Rong; Liu WeiJia; Du Lin; Chen Qing

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background China has experienced an increase in the prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity over the last decades. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome among Chinese school children and determine if there is a significant association between childhood obesity and metabolic syndrome. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1844 children (938 males and 906 females) in six elementary schools at Guangzhou city from April...

  2. A Model of Reading Comprehension in Chinese Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Pui-sze; Ho, Connie Suk-han; Chan, David Wai-ock; Chung, Kevin Kien-hoa; Wong, Yau-kai

    2013-01-01

    The relationships of reading-related skills (rapid naming, morphological awareness, syntactic skills, discourse skills, and verbal working memory) and word reading to reading comprehension were examined among 248 Chinese fourth graders in Hong Kong. Multiple regression analysis results showed that syntactic skills (word order knowledge,…

  3. The relation among sleep duration, homework burden, and sleep hygiene in chinese school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wan-Qi; Spruyt, Karen; Chen, Wen-Juan; Jiang, Yan-Rui; Schonfeld, David; Adams, Ryan; Tseng, Chia-Huei; Shen, Xiao-Ming; Jiang, Fan

    2014-09-01

    Insufficient sleep in school-aged children is common in modern society, with homework burden being a potential risk factor. The aim of this article is to explore the effect of sleep hygiene on the association between homework and sleep duration. Children filled out the Chinese version of the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale, and parents filled out a sociodemographic questionnaire. The final sample included 363 boys and 371 girls with a mean age of 10.82 ± 0.38 years. Children with more homework went to bed later and slept less. Better sleep hygiene was associated with earlier bedtimes and longer sleep duration. Findings suggest that homework burden had a larger effect on sleep duration than sleep hygiene. Fifth-grade children in Shanghai have an excessive homework burden, which overwrites the benefit of sleep hygiene on sleep duration. PMID:24188543

  4. Prevalence of Dietary Supplement Use in Healthy Pre-School Chinese Children in Australia and China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing use of dietary supplements in many countries including China. This study aimed to document the prevalence of dietary supplements use and characteristics of Chinese pre-school children using dietary supplements in Australia and China. A survey was carried out in Perth, Western Australia of 237 mothers with children under five years old and 2079 in Chengdu and Wuhan, China. A total of 22.6% and 32.4% of the Chinese children were taking dietary supplements in Australia and China, respectively. In China, the most commonly used dietary supplements were calcium (58.5% and zinc (40.4%, while in Australia, the most frequently used types were multi-vitamins/minerals (46.2% and fish oil (42.3%. In Australia, “not working”, “never breastfeed”, “higher education level of the mother” and “older age of the child” were associated with dietary supplement use in children. In China, being unwell and “having higher household income” were significantly related to dietary supplement usage. Because of the unknown effects of many supplements on growth and development and the potential for adverse drug interactions, parents should exercise caution when giving their infants or young children dietary supplements. Wherever possible it is preferable to achieve nutrient intakes from a varied diet rather than from supplements.

  5. Early Childhood Behavioral Inhibition and Social and School Adjustment in Chinese Children: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinyin; Chen, Huichang; Li, Dan; Wang, Li

    2009-01-01

    This study examined relations between early behavioral inhibition and social and school outcomes in Chinese children (N = 200). Data on behavioral inhibition were collected from a sample of 2-year-olds in China. Follow-up data on social behaviors, peer relationships, and school performance were collected from multiple sources at 7 years of age.…

  6. Hong Kong Chinese school children with elevated urine melamine levels: A prospective follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Winnie CW

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2008, the outbreak of kidney stones in children fed by melamine-tainted milk products in Mainland China has caused major public concern of food safety. We identified Hong Kong school children with elevated urine melamine level from a community-based school survey in 2007-08 and reviewed their clinical status in 2009. Methods In 2007-08, 2119 school children participated in a primary and secondary school survey in Hong Kong using a cluster sampling method. Urine aliquots from 502 subjects were assayed for melamine level. High urine melamine level was defined as urine melamine/creatinine ratio >7.1 ?g/mmol. Subjects with high urine melamine level were invited for clinical evaluation in 2009 including urinalysis and ultrasound imaging of the urinary system. Results The age range of this subcohort was 6 - 20 years with 67% girls (335 female and 167 male subjects. The spot urine melamine/creatinine ratio of the 502 urine aliquots ranged from undetectable to 1467 ?g/mmol (median 0.8 ?g/mmol. Of these, 213 subjects had undetectable level (42%. We invited 47 (9% subjects with high urine melamine level for re-evaluation and one subject declined. The median duration of follow-up was 23.5 months (interquartile range: 19.8 - 30.6 months. None of the 46 subjects (28% boys, mean age 13.9 ± 2.9 years had any abnormality detected on ultrasound study of the urinary system. All subjects had stable renal function with a median urine albumin-creatinine ratio of 0.70 mg/mmol (interquartile range: 0.00 - 2.55 mg/mmol. Conclusions Hong Kong Chinese school children with high urine melamine levels appeared to have benign clinical course in the short term although a long term follow-up study is advisable in those with persistently high urine melamine level.

  7. The Relationship between IQ, Homework, Aspirations and Academic Achievement for Chinese, Vietnamese, and Anglo-Celtic Australian School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandy, Justine; Nettelbeck, Ted

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the relationships among Intelligence Quotient, study time, educational and occupational aspirations, and academic achievement. Focuses on Australian school children (n=160) from Chinese, Vietnamese, and Anglo-Celtic backgrounds. Presents the results in detail, stating that parental involvement may contribute to high achievement when…

  8. Efficacy of Chinese Eye Exercises on Reducing Accommodative Lag in School-Aged Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Ming; Kang, Meng-Tian; Peng, Xiao-xia; Li, Si-Yuan; Wang, Yang; Li, Lei; Yu, Jing; Qiu, Li-Xin; Sun, Yun-Yun; Liu, Luo-Ru; Li, He; Sun, Xin; Millodot, Michel; Wang, Ningli

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of Chinese eye exercises on reducing accommodative lag in children by a randomized, double-blinded controlled trial. Methods A total of 190 children aged 10 to 14 years with emmetropia to moderate myopia were included. They were randomly allocated to three groups: standard Chinese eye exercises group (trained for eye exercises by doctors of traditional Chinese medicine); sham point eye exercises group (instructed to massage on non-acupoints); and eyes closed group (asked to close their eyes without massage). Primary outcome was change in accommodative lag immediately after intervention. Secondary outcomes included changes in corrected near and distant visual acuity, and visual discomfort score. Results Children in the standard Chinese eye exercises group had significantly greater alleviation of accommodative lag (-0.10D) than those in sham point eye exercises group (-0.03D) and eyes closed group (0.07D) (P = 0.04). The proportion of children with alleviation of accommodative lag was significantly higher in the standard Chinese eye exercises group (54.0%) than in the sham point eye exercises group (32.8%) and the eyes closed group (34.9%) (P = 0.03). No significant differences were found in secondary outcomes. Conclusion Chinese eye exercises as performed daily in primary and middle schools in China have statistically but probably clinically insignificant effect in reducing accommodative lag of school-aged children in the short-term. Considering the higher amounts of near work load of Chinese children, the efficacy of eye exercises may be insufficient in preventing myopia progression in the long-term. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01756287 PMID:25742161

  9. Prevalence and association between obesity and metabolic syndrome among Chinese elementary school children: a school-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu AiLing

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background China has experienced an increase in the prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity over the last decades. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome among Chinese school children and determine if there is a significant association between childhood obesity and metabolic syndrome. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1844 children (938 males and 906 females in six elementary schools at Guangzhou city from April to June 2009. The body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, Tanner stage, lipids, insulin and glucose levels were determined. Criteria analogous to ATPIII were used for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children. Results Among 1844 children aged 7-14 years, 205 (11.1% were overweight, and 133 (7.2% were obese. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 6.6% overall, 33.1% in obese, 20.5% in overweight and 2.3% in normal weight children. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that BMI (3rd quartile(OR 3.28; 95%CI 0.35-30.56, BMI (4th quartile(OR 17.98; 95%CI 1.75-184.34, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR (2nd quartile (OR2.36; 95% CI 0.46-12.09, HOMA-IR (3rd quartile (OR 2.46; 95% CI 0.48-12.66, HOMA-IR (4th quartile (OR3.87; 95% CI 0.72-20.71 were significantly associated with metabolic syndrome. Conclusions The current epidemic of obesity with subsequent increasing cardiovascular risk factors has constituted a threat to the health of school children in China. HOMA-IR and BMI were strong predictors of metabolic syndrome in children. Therefore, rigorous obesity prevention programs should be implemented among them.

  10. Syntactic Skills in Sentence Reading Comprehension among Chinese Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chik, Pakey Pui-man; Ho, Connie Suk-han; Yeung, Pui-sze; Chan, David Wai-ock; Chung, Kevin Kien-hoa; Luan, Hui; Lo, Lap-yan; Lau, Wendy Suet-yee

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the role of syntactic skills for reading comprehension in Chinese. Two hundred and seventy-two Chinese children were tested on their phonological processing, orthographic, morphological, syntactic, and literacy skills at Grades 1 and 2. Hierarchical multiple regression results showed that syntactic skills, in terms of…

  11. Chinese Children's Songs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Irene, Comp.

    Singing can be an enjoyable and effective way to motivate children to learn a second language. This booklet consists of contemporary and folk songs that are related to Chinese festivals, transportation, the family, seasons, Christmas and other topics. Each page gives the music to a song with the words in Chinese and in English. The songs are…

  12. Helping Chinese Children Become More Creative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pingting; Szente, Judit

    2014-01-01

    This article provides information about children's creativity in the People's Republic of China. More specifically, it introduces the Chinese cultural and social background along with the school and family environments as they relate to young children's creativity. The article also provides some suggestions for schools and families…

  13. Hong Kong Chinese school children with elevated urine melamine levels: A prospective follow up study

    OpenAIRE

    Cw, Chu Winnie; Kh, Liu Eric; Wong Chun; Hm, Chan Michael; Ho Chung; Choi Kai-Chow; Ps, Kong Alice; Cy, Chow Viola; Tf, Lau Joseph; Cn, Chan Juliana

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In 2008, the outbreak of kidney stones in children fed by melamine-tainted milk products in Mainland China has caused major public concern of food safety. We identified Hong Kong school children with elevated urine melamine level from a community-based school survey in 2007-08 and reviewed their clinical status in 2009. Methods In 2007-08, 2119 school children participated in a primary and secondary school survey in Hong Kong using a cluster sampling method. Urine aliquots...

  14. Parents-school relationships. the case of Chinese children in French Immersion in Vancouver, BC

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Brooke

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between minority language parents and schools. The research was conducted through semi-structured interviews with the parents to collect their thoughts and preferences in regards to their experiences and involvement at their children’s schools as well as their perspective on the inclusion of their culture and language as a part of the school program. The themes which emerge from the data include the language barrier, logistics, the role of parents and te...

  15. Homework schedule: an important factor associated with shorter sleep duration among Chinese school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenghui; Yang, Qian; Chen, Zhe; Jin, Xingming; Jiang, Fan; Shen, Xiaoming

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to examine the hypothesis that homework schedule has adverse impacts on Chinese children's sleep-wake habits and sleep duration. A random sample of 19,299 children aged 5.08 to 11.99 years old participated in a large, cross-sectional survey. A parent-administered questionnaire was completed to quantify children's homework schedule and sleep behaviors. Generally, it was demonstrated that more homework schedule was significantly associated with later bedtime, later wake time, and shorter sleep duration. Among all sleep variables, bedtime and sleep duration during weekdays appeared to be most affected by homework schedule, especially homework schedule during weekdays. PMID:24256420

  16. Factor Structure of a Multidimensional Gender Identity Scale in a Sample of Chinese Elementary School Children

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Lu; Xie, Dong; Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure of a scale based on the four-dimensional gender identity model (Egan and Perry, 2001) in 726 Chinese elementary school students. Exploratory factor analyses suggested a three-factor model, two of which corresponded to “Felt Pressure” and “Intergroup Bias” in the original model. The third factor “Gender Compatibility” appeared to be a combination of “Gender Typicality” and “Gender Contentment” in the original model. Follow-up confirm...

  17. Chinese School, Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    270 x 200 mm. View showing a large class of Chinese pupils seated at tables in the open air in front of the unidentifed school buildings. These young girls appear to be engaged in some sort of sewing activity. Probably taken in the 1880s.

  18. Mathematics Teaching in Hong Kong Pre-Schools: Mirroring the Chinese Cultural Aspiration towards Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sharon Sui Ngan

    2014-01-01

    Chinese pre-school children perform well in learning mathematics compared with English-speaking children. This study investigates the scenes behind Chinese preschool children's mathematics performance using teacher questionnaires and interviews. Results indicated that the Chinese number system appeared to afford advantages to Chinese children

  19. Tips for Teachers to Help Bilingual Chinese Immigrant Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Xu, Yili

    2012-01-01

    Teachers of young children in Chinese immigrant families need to help children become proficient in English (ESL) while affirming the children's bilingual abilities. Pictures, gestures, pantomimes, and props as well as specific input of school-related words help bilingual young children learn English. Teachers read storybooks in English while…

  20. Mandarin Chinese Immersion Program for Preschool Children in an Urban Private School in California: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    This study enlisted language immersion practitioners in highlighting and exploring the issues and challenges that accompany language immersion education. Comprehensive focused personal interviews of preschool Mandarin Chinese language immersion educators in a private school provided the basis of the study. The research literature reviewed…

  1. Association between bisphenol A exposure and body mass index in Chinese school children: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Wang He-xing; Zhou Ying; Tang Chuan-xi; Wu Jin-gui; Chen Yue; Jiang Qing-wu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There is increasing evidence suggesting that Bisphenol A (BPA), one of the highest volume chemicals produced worldwide, can interfere with the body’s natural weight control mechanisms to promote obesity. However, epidemiological studies for this are limited, especially for children. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the association between BPA exposure and body mass index (BMI) in school children. Three primary and three middle schools were ran...

  2. Mathematics achievement of Chinese, Japanese, and American children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    American kindergarten children lag behind Japanese children in their understanding of mathematics; by fifth grade they are surpassed by both Japanese and Chinese children. Efforts to isolate bases for these differences involved testing children on other achievement and cognitive tasks, interviewing mothers and teachers, and observing children in their classrooms. Cognitive abilities of children in the three countries are similar, but large differences exist in the children's life in school, the attitudes and beliefs of their mothers, and the involvement of both parents and children in schoolwork

  3. Risk Factors for Obesity and High Blood Pressure in Chinese American Children: Maternal Acculturation and Children’s Food Choices

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jyu-lin; Weiss, Sandra; Heyman, Melvin B.; Lustig, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore risk factors associated with overweight and high blood pressure in Chinese American children. Students and their parents were recruited from Chinese language schools in the San Francisco Bay Area. Data were collected on 67 children and their mothers, and included children’s weight, height, waist and hip circumferences, blood pressure, level of physical activity, dietary intake, usual food choice, knowledge about nutrition and physical activity, and ...

  4. Bilingual Lexical Skills of School-Age Children with Chinese and Korean Heritage Languages in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Gisela; Chen, Jennifer; Kim, HyeYoung; Chan, Phoenix-Shan; Jeung, Changmo

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the bilingual lexical skills of 175 US school-age children (5 to 18 years old) with Cantonese, Mandarin, or Korean as their heritage language (HL), and English as their dominant language. Primary study goals were to identify potential patterns of development in bilingual lexical skills over the elementary to…

  5. Association between bisphenol A exposure and body mass index in Chinese school children: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang He-xing

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence suggesting that Bisphenol A (BPA, one of the highest volume chemicals produced worldwide, can interfere with the body’s natural weight control mechanisms to promote obesity. However, epidemiological studies for this are limited, especially for children. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate the association between BPA exposure and body mass index (BMI in school children. Three primary and three middle schools were randomly selected from 26 primary and 30 middle candidate schools in Changning District of Shanghai City in China. According to the BMI-based criteria by age and sex for screening of overweight or obese children, we randomly chose 20 obese, 10 overweight, and 30 normal weight children aged 8-15 years of age from each selected school. First morning urine was collected and total urine BPA concentrations were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of urine BPA concentrations and daily intake estimates with BMI. Results BPA was detected in 84.9% of urine samples with a geometric mean of 0.45 ng/mL. The daily intake estimates ranged from 0.03 ?g/day to 1.96 ?g/day with a geometric mean of 0.37 ?g/day. The average urine BPA concentrations and daily intake estimates were similar for boys and girls, but significantly higher in older children than younger ones, and showed an increasing trend with BMI. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that urine BPA concentrations were significantly associated with increasing BMI values in all subjects after adjustment for age and sex and the results were similar before and after corrected by urine specific gravity. When stratified by age or sex, the associations remained significant in females and in those 8-11 years of age before corrected by specific gravity. Similar results were shown for the association between BMI and daily intake estimates. Conclusions There is a possibility that BPA exposure increases BMI in school children. Given the cross-sectional nature of this study, longitudinal studies are warranted to confirm BPA exposure as a contributor to increased BMI in children.

  6. Transgender Children in Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Hellen, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This article is intended to provide evidence to suggest that information for teachers regarding transgender children does not represent an adequate picture of transgendered children in schools and that primary schools need to be made more aware of how to deal with transgender children, even if these children do not make themselves known to staff. It will argue that this is probably a contributing factor in transgender children’s underachievement in school. The implications of this resear...

  7. Psychometric Evaluation of a Chinese Version of the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) in School Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Malcolm; Norman, Cameron D.; Chang, Hsiao-Mei

    2012-01-01

    The eight-item eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) is a previously validated scale developed to assess consumers' combined knowledge, comfort, and perceived skills at finding, evaluating, and applying electronic health information to health problems. In the present study, a Chinese version of the eHEALS was developed and its psychometric properties…

  8. The Role of Visual and Auditory Temporal Processing for Chinese Children with Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin K. H.; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Wong, Simpson W. L.; Cheung, Him; Penney, Trevor B.; Ho, Connie S. -H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined temporal processing in relation to Chinese reading acquisition and impairment. The performances of 26 Chinese primary school children with developmental dyslexia on tasks of visual and auditory temporal order judgement, rapid naming, visual-orthographic knowledge, morphological, and phonological awareness were compared with…

  9. Shyness and School Adjustment among Chinese Preschool Children: Examining the Moderating Effect of Gender and Teacher-Child Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, YunPeng; Wu, JianFen; Chen, YingMin; Han, Lei; Han, PiGuo; Wang, Peng; Gao, Fengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The current study examined the moderating effects of gender and teacher-child relationship on the association between shyness and school adjustment (school liking and avoidance, cooperative and independent participation). The sample consisted of 524 preschool students from 3 cities of Shandong province in northern China. Mothers…

  10. Chinese Translation Errors in English/Chinese Bilingual Children's Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiaoya; Chen, Xiaoning

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the Chinese translation errors in 31 English/Chinese bilingual children's picture books. While bilingual children's books make definite contributions to language acquisition, few studies have examined the quality of these books, and even fewer have specifically focused on English/Chinese bilingual books.…

  11. Spirulina can increase total-body vitamin A stores of Chinese school-age children as determined by a paired isotope dilution technique

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lei; Zhao, Xianfeng; Wang, Jie; Muzhingi, Tawanda; Suter, Paolo M.; Tang, Guangwen; Yin, Shi-an

    2012-01-01

    Spirulina is an alga rich in high-quality protein and carotenoids. It is unclear whether spirulina can improve the total-body vitamin A stores of school-age children in China with a high prevalence of vitamin A malnutrition. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of spirulina in improving the total-body vitamin A stores of school-age children in rural areas of China when they consumed spirulina in their daily meals. A total of 228 children (6–11 years) were recruited and randomly ...

  12. Social Capital in Promoting the Psychosocial Adjustment of Chinese Migrant Children: Interaction across Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiaobing; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; He, Xuesong

    2011-01-01

    Drawing upon a sample of 772 migrant children and their parents in Shanghai, China, this study investigated how the interactions of social capital embedded in a range of social contexts (i.e., family, school, peer, and community) influenced the psychosocial adjustment of Chinese migrant children. Results of multiple-group structural equation…

  13. Children's Understanding of Television Advertising: A Revisit in the Chinese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kara; McNeal, James U.

    2004-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey of 1,758 elementary school children (6-14 years old) from December 2001, to March 2002, in 3 Chinese cities with different levels of television advertising. The authors used D. R. John's (1999) model of consumer socialization as the theoretical framework for their study. More than half of the children whom the…

  14. Temperament, Harsh and Indulgent Parenting, and Chinese Children's Proactive and Reactive Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiyuan; Farver, Jo Ann M.; Zhang, Zengxiu

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the additive and interactive effects of temperament and harsh and indulgent parenting on Chinese children's proactive and reactive aggression. Participants were 401 children (M [subscript age] = 9.29 years, 203 girls) and their parents who were recruited from 2 elementary schools in Shanghai, People's Republic of China. The…

  15. Bidirectional Relations between Temperament and Parenting Styles in Chinese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erica H; Zhou, Qing; Eisenberg, Nancy; Wang, Yun

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined bidirectional relations between child temperament and parenting styles in a sample (n = 425) of Chinese children during elementary school period (age range = 6 to 9 years at Wave 1). Using two waves (3.8 years apart) of longitudinal data, we tested two hypotheses: (1) whether child temperament (effortful control and anger/frustration) at Wave 1 predicts parenting styles (authoritative and authoritarian parenting) at Wave 2, controlling for Wave 1 parenting; and (2) whether parenting styles at Wave 1 predict Wave 2 temperament, controlling for Wave 1 temperament. We found support for bidirectional relations between temperament and authoritarian parenting, such that higher effortful control and lower anger/frustration were associated with higher authoritarian parenting across time and in both directions. There were no significant cross-time associations between children's temperament and authoritative parenting. These findings extend the previous tests of transactional relations between child temperament and parenting in Chinese children and are consistent with the cultural values toward effortful control and control of anger/frustration in Chinese society. PMID:23482684

  16. Linguistic influence on mathematical development is specific rather than pervasive: revisiting the Chinese Number Advantage in Chinese and English children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Winifred; Dowker, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The relative linguistic transparency of the Asian counting system has been used to explain Asian students’ relative superiority in cross-cultural comparisons of mathematics achievement. To test the validity and extent of linguistic transparency in accounting for mathematical abilities, this study tested Chinese and British primary school children. Children in Hong Kong can learn mathematics using languages with both regular (Chinese) and irregular (English) counting systems, depending on their schools’ medium of instruction. This makes it possible to compare groups with varying levels of exposure to the regular and irregular number systems within the same educational system, curriculum, and cultural environment. The study included three groups of first/second graders and third/fourth graders with varying degrees of experience to the Chinese language and counting systems: no experience (UK; n = 49); spoke Chinese at home and learnt to count in English at school (HK-E; n = 43); spoke Chinese at home and learnt to count in Chinese at school (HK-C; n = 47). They were compared on counting, numerical abilities and place value representation. The present study also measured nonverbal reasoning, attitude toward mathematics, involvement of parents, and extra-curricular mathematics lessons to explore alternative explanations of children’s numeric ability. Results indicated that students in HK-C were better at counting backward and on the numeric skills test than those in HK-E, who were in turn better than the UK students. However, there was no statistical difference in counting forward, place value understanding, and a measure of arithmetic. Our findings add to existent literature suggesting that linguistic transparency does not have an all-pervasive influence on cross-national differences in arithmetic performance.

  17. Speech Perception Deficits by Chinese Children with Phonological Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenli; Shu, Hua; Yang, Yufang

    2009-01-01

    Findings concerning the relation between dyslexia and speech perception deficits are inconsistent in the literature. This study examined the relation in Chinese children using a more homogeneous sample--children with phonological dyslexia. Two experimental tasks were administered to a group of Chinese children with phonological dyslexia, a group…

  18. Linguistic influence on mathematical development is specific rather than pervasive: revisiting the Chinese Number Advantage in Chinese and English children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Winifred; Dowker, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The relative linguistic transparency of the Asian counting system has been used to explain Asian students' relative superiority in cross-cultural comparisons of mathematics achievement. To test the validity and extent of linguistic transparency in accounting for mathematical abilities, this study tested Chinese and British primary school children. Children in Hong Kong can learn mathematics using languages with both regular (Chinese) and irregular (English) counting systems, depending on their schools' medium of instruction. This makes it possible to compare groups with varying levels of exposure to the regular and irregular number systems within the same educational system, curriculum, and cultural environment. The study included three groups of first/second graders and third/fourth graders with varying degrees of experience to the Chinese language and counting systems: no experience (UK; n = 49); spoke Chinese at home and learnt to count in English at school (HK-E; n = 43); spoke Chinese at home and learnt to count in Chinese at school (HK-C; n = 47). They were compared on counting, numerical abilities and place value representation. The present study also measured nonverbal reasoning, attitude toward mathematics, involvement of parents, and extra-curricular mathematics lessons to explore alternative explanations of children's numeric ability. Results indicated that students in HK-C were better at counting backward and on the numeric skills test than those in HK-E, who were in turn better than the UK students. However, there was no statistical difference in counting forward, place value understanding, and a measure of arithmetic. Our findings add to existent literature suggesting that linguistic transparency does not have an all-pervasive influence on cross-national differences in arithmetic performance. PMID:25767456

  19. Spirulina can increase total-body vitamin A stores of Chinese school-age children determined by a paired isotope dilution technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirulina is an alga rich in high-quality protein and carotenoids. It is unclear whether spirulina can improve the total-body vitamin A stores of school-age children in China with a high prevalence of vitamin A malnutrition. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of spirulina in improving the total-body ...

  20. The Chinese High School Student's Stress in the School and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 466 Chinese high school students, we examined the relationships between Chinese high school students' stress in the school and their academic achievements. Regression mixture modelling identified two different classes of the effects of Chinese high school students' stress on their academic achievements. One class contained 87% of…

  1. School-age children development

    Science.gov (United States)

    School-age child development describes the expected physical, emotional, and mental abilities of children ages 6 - 12. ... PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT School-age children usually have smooth and ... However, their coordination (especially eye-hand), endurance, ...

  2. Children's Views on Child Abuse and Neglect: Findings from an Exploratory Study with Chinese Children in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yuk-chung; Lam, Gladys L. T.; Shae, Wan-Chaw

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This research study explored children's views on issues about child abuse in Hong Kong and examined their implications on child protection work and research in Chinese societies. Method: Six primary schools were recruited from different districts of Hong Kong. Five vignettes of child maltreatment in the form of flash movies were…

  3. Scaffolding Interactions with Preschool Children: Comparisons between Chinese Mothers and Teachers across Different Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin; Rao, Nirmala

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how Chinese adults adjusted their scaffolding in interactions with children during problem-solving tasks. Fifty-seven 5-year-olds (from low and high socioeconomic status [SES] backgrounds) completed a playlike task (puzzle) and a school-like task (worksheet) with their mothers and teachers, respectively. Adult-child…

  4. Parental schooling & children's health.

    OpenAIRE

    Zill, N.

    1996-01-01

    Nearly one in every four children in the United States is born to a mother who has not finished high school, and more than one in eight is reared by such a mother during the critical preschool period. Large-scale studies show that the health and welfare of children are linked to the education level of their parents, with parent education often being a stronger predictor of child well-being than family income, single parenthood, or family size. Higher parent education levels make it more likel...

  5. Why Attend School? Chinese Immigrant and European American Preschoolers' Views and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Yamamoto, Yoko; Luo, Lily; Batchelor, Andrea K.; Bresnahan, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    The developing views of the purposes of school learning (PSLs) and related achievement among immigrant Chinese preschoolers and their European American (EA) age-mates were examined. Both culture and socioeconomic status (SES) were considered simultaneously, an often neglected research approach to studying Asian children. One hundred and fifty…

  6. To have or to learn? The effects of materialism on British and Chinese children's learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Lisbeth; Dittmar, Helga; Banerjee, Robin

    2014-05-01

    This article presents a systematic attempt to examine the associations of materialism with learning in 9- to 11-year-old children in 2 countries of similar economic development but different cultural heritage. Using cross-sectional, longitudinal, and experimental methods, we test a theoretically driven model of associations among materialism, learning motivations, and learning outcomes. Convergent findings suggest that a materialist orientation in elementary school children lowers intrinsic learning motivations, fosters extrinsic learning motivations, and leads to poorer learning outcomes. Materialism was linked directly to lower exam performance, and this link was mediated by lower mastery and heightened performance goals, with patterns not differing between British and Hong Kong Chinese children (Study 1). A follow-up showed that initial materialism predicted worse exam grades 1 year later, suggesting a detrimental long-term effect on Chinese children's school performance (Study 2). We then tested relationships between materialism and learning experimentally, by priming a momentary (state) orientation toward materialism. Writing about material possessions and money affected Chinese children's learning motivations, so that they endorsed lower mastery and higher performance goals (Study 3). A video-diary materialism prime had significant effects on actual learning behaviors, leading British children to (a) choose a performance-oriented learning task over a mastery-oriented task and (b) give up on the task more quickly (Study 4). This research has important implications for personality psychology, educational policy, and future research. PMID:24749823

  7. School Adaptation of Roma Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerganov, Encho; Varbanova, Silvia; Kyuchukov, Hristo

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the degree of school adaptation among Roma children who were included in a program for the desegregation of Roma schools in Bulgaria. More specifically, the program requires Roma children to attend mixed classes with Bulgarian students and Roma teacher assistants to work with them. The Bulgarian version of the Questionnaire on…

  8. Disordered Sleep and Myopia Risk among Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongqiang; Morgan, Ian G.; Chen, Qianyun; Jin, Ling; He, Mingguang; Congdon, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Disordered sleep and myopia are increasingly prevalent among Chinese children. Similar pathways may be involved in regulation of both sleep cycles and eye growth. We therefore sought to examine the association between disordered sleep and myopia in this group. Methods Urban primary school children participating in a clinical trial on myopia and outdoor activity underwent automated cycloplegic refraction with subjective refinement. Parents answered questions about children's sleep duration, sleep disorders (Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire [CSHQ]), near work and time spent outdoors. Results Among 1970 children, 1902 (96.5%, mean [standard deviation SD] age 9.80 [0.44] years, 53.1% boys) completed refraction and questionnaires. Myopia 41). In logistic regression models by eye, odds of myopia < = -0.50D increased with worse CSHQ score (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.01 per point, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] [1.001, 1.02], P = 0.014) and more night-time sleep (OR 1.02, 95% CI [1.01, 1.04, P = 0.002], while male sex (OR 0.82, 95% CI [0.70, 0.95], P = 0.008) and time outdoors (OR = 0.97, 95% CI [0.95, 0.99], P = 0.011) were associated with less myopia. The association between sleep duration and myopia was not significant (p = 0.199) for total (night + midday) sleep. Conclusions Myopia and disordered sleep were both common in this cohort, but we did not find consistent evidence for an association between the two. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00848900 PMID:25811755

  9. Chinese Engineering Students' Cross-Cultural Adaptation in Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinquan

    2010-01-01

    This study explores cross-cultural adaptation experience of Chinese engineering students in the U.S. I interact with 10 Chinese doctoral students in engineering from a public research university through in-depth interviews to describe (1) their perceptions of and responses to key challenges they encountered in graduate school, (2) their…

  10. Variations on the bilingual advantage? Links of Chinese and English proficiency to Chinese American children's self-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Stephen H.; Zhou, Qing; Uchikoshi, Yuuko; Bunge, Silvia A.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined whether bilingualism-related advantages in self-regulation could be observed: (a) among Chinese American immigrant children with varying levels of Chinese and English proficiencies, and (b) across different domains of self-regulation in laboratory, home, and classroom contexts. A socioeconomically diverse sample of first- and second-generation Chinese American immigrant children between ages 7 and 10 (n = 223) was administered assessments of Chinese and English lang...

  11. Chinese Parenting Styles and Children's Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juan; Prochner, Larry

    2004-01-01

    Self-regulated learning is an important aspect of student learning and academic achievement. Certain parenting styles help children develop self-regulated learning and encourage them to exert control over their own learning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Chinese parenting style and children's involvement in…

  12. Raising Children in Chinese Immigrant Families: Evidence from the Research Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Children of Chinese culture are raised differently from children of other cultural groups. There is research evidence which contends that, regardless of where they live, the child-rearing practices within Chinese immigrant families are still influenced by Chinese traditional culture. Some studies also point out that Chinese immigrant parents…

  13. Relations of parenting style to Chinese children’s effortful control, ego resilience, and maladjustment

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Chang, Lei; Ma, Yue; Huang, Xiaorui

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the relations of authoritative parenting and corporal punishment to Chinese first and second graders’ effortful control (EC), impulsivity, ego resilience, and maladjustment, as well as mediating relations. A parent and teacher reported on children’s EC, impulsivity, and ego resilience; parents reported on children’s internalizing symptoms and their own parenting, and teachers and peers reported on children’s externalizing symptoms. Authoritative...

  14. Responding to Chinese-American Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Florence

    This guide is designed to help teachers gain an insight into the background and culture of Chinese American students. Three articles describing the Chinatown community in San Francisco focus on problems which are characteristic of Chinese American communities throughout the United States. The appendices that follow provide statistics about…

  15. Early Differentiation between Drawing and Writing in Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Rebecca; Yin, Li

    2011-01-01

    Children under 3 1/2 years of age or so are often thought to produce the same types of scribbles for writing and drawing. We tested this idea by asking Chinese 2- to 6-year-olds to write and draw four targets. In Study 1, Chinese adults judged the status of the productions as writings or drawings. The adults performed significantly above the level…

  16. The visual magnocellular-dorsal dysfunction in Chinese children with developmental dyslexia impedes Chinese character recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Qian, Yi; Bi, Hong-Yan; Coltheart, Max

    2014-01-01

    The visual magnocellular-dorsal (M-D) deficit theory of developmental dyslexia (DD) is still highly debated. Many researchers have made great efforts to investigate the relationship between M-D dysfunction and reading disability. Given that visual analysis plays an important role in Chinese reading, the present study tried to examine how the M-D dysfunction affected Chinese character recognition in Chinese children with DD. Sixteen DD children with M-D deficit, fifteen DD children with normal M-D function and twenty-seven age-matched typically developing children participated in this study. A global/local decision task was adopted, in which we manipulated the spatial frequency of target characters to separate an M-D condition from an unfiltered condition. Results of reaction times and error rates showed that in the M-D condition both M-D normal dyslexics and controls exhibited a significant global precedence effect, with faster responses and lower error rates in global decision than in local decision. In contrast, this global advantage was absent for the M-D impaired dyslexics. Accordingly, we propose that the M-D impairment present in some but not all dyslexics might influence global recognition of Chinese characters in this subgroup of children with DD, which might be implicated in their difficulties in learning to read. PMID:25412386

  17. Characteristics of Chinese Primary School Students’ EFL Learning Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Jieqiong Wu

    2014-01-01

    It is beneficial for teachers’ effective teaching to be aware of the characteristics of students’ learning strategies. This paper employed “Questionnaire of Primary School Students’ EFL Learning Strategies” of high reliability and validity and examined Chinese primary school students’ EFL learning strategies. 700 students participated in the investigation. Results indicated that the general situation with respect to participants’ EFL learning strategi...

  18. School of migrant children, an ethnography in an unregistered migrant school in Beijing

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Wen

    2012-01-01

    This thesis discusses about the challenge of education for migrant children in the rapidly urbanized Chinese society. An ethnographic research was conducted in one of the unregistered migrant schools in Beijing. Through a triangulation of research methods of participatory observation, semi-structured and life history interview, as well as photography, the research, from emic perspectives, analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of the migrant schools in education provision to migrant childr...

  19. Adiponectin and Leptin Metabolic Biomarkers in Chinese Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Mi; Mercedes Nancy Munkonda; Ming Li; Mei-Xian Zhang; Xiao-Yuan Zhao; Katherine Cianflone; Ponce Cedric Wamba Fouejeu

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate leptin and adiponectin as biomarkers of metabolic syndrome (MS) risk factors even in nonobese children/adolescents. Methods. Serum leptin, adiponectin, leptin:adiponectin ratio, lipids, glucose, and insulin concentrations as well as body size parameters and pubertal development were evaluated in a large population of Chinese children/adolescents (n = 3505, 6–18 years, 1722 girls and 1783 boys). Results. Leptin concentration increased while adiponectin decreased with o...

  20. Is there a "Chinese school" of IR?

    OpenAIRE

    Noesselt, Nele

    2012-01-01

    Research on Chinese International Relations (IR) theory has produced a variety of discourses, including post-positivist analyses, contributions by area specialists and China watchers, and articles by Chinese IR scholars. These strands, however, hardly overlap or communicate with each other. To close the gap between the self-reflection of the core (Western IR) (Waever/Tickner 2009: 3) and the periphery's revolt against [Western] IR paradigms (ibid.), it is necessary to view China (and other no...

  1. Links between Chinese Mothers' Parental Beliefs and Responses to Children's Expression of Negative Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu Mui

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated relations between parental beliefs and mothers' reported responses to their children's negative emotions. Altogether 189 Chinese mothers of children aged six to eight years were interviewed in group sessions using structured questionnaires. It was found that Chinese mothers endorsed Guan, the Chinese parental beliefs. They…

  2. Learning to be Chinese: The Cultural Politics of Chinese Ethnic Schooling and Diaspora Construction in Contemporary Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eun-ju

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I examine the particular diaspora construction of the overseas Chinese in South Korea focusing on their educational practice, and looking at how it relates to and reflects their identities and subjectivities. The Chinese in Korea, or Korean huaqiaos, have no parallel in that they still retain Chinese (Taiwanese) nationality despite their over one hundred years of settlement in Korea, and in that most opt for full-time Chinese ethnic schooling with exclusively Taiwanese-a...

  3. The Association of Weight Status with Physical Fitness among Chinese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the association of weight status with physical fitness among Chinese children. Methods. A total of 6929 children aged 6–12 years were selected from 15 primary schools of 5 provincial capital cities in eastern China. The height and fasting body weight were measured. The age-, sex-specific BMI WHO criteria was used to define underweight, overweight and obesity. Physical fitness parameters including standing broad jump, 50?m sprint, and 50?m?8 shuttle run were tested. Results. The prevalence of underweight, overweight, and obesity was 3.1%, 14.9%, and 7.8%, respectively. Boys performed better than girls, and the older children performed better than their younger counterparts for all physical fitness tests. No significant difference in all three physical fitness tests were found between children with underweight and with normal weight, and they both performed better than their counterparts with overweight and obese in all three physical fitness tests. The likelihood of achieving good performance was much lower among overweight and obese children in comparison with their counterparts with normal weight (OR=0.13–0.54. Conclusions. An inverse association of obesity with cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle explosive strength, and speed was identified among Chinese children.

  4. Cultural Differences in Chinese American and European American Children's Drawing Skills over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsinger, Carol S.; Jose, Paul E.; Krieg, Dana Balsink; Luo, Zupei

    2011-01-01

    Parents and early childhood teachers in Chinese societies and the United States have had dissimilar views about appropriate art instruction for young children. The Chinese view is that creativity will emerge after children have been taught essential drawing skills. The American view has been that children's drawing skills emerge naturally and that…

  5. Working memory and sentence comprehension of Hong Kong Chinese children with specific language impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Elaine; Man, David W K

    2006-09-01

    Children with Specific Language Impairment present with delayed language development, but do not have a history of hearing impairment, mental deficiency, or associated social or behavioral problems. Non-word repetition was suggested as an index to reflect the capacity of phonological working memory. There is a paucity of such studies among Hong Kong Chinese children. This preliminary study aimed to examine the relationship between phonological working memory and Specific Language Impairment, through the processes of non-word repetition and sentence comprehension, of children with Specific Language Impairment and pre-school children with normal language development. Both groups of children were screened by a standardized language test. A list of Cantonese (the commonest dialect used in Hong Kong) multisyllabic nonsense utterances and a set of 18 sentences were developed for this study. t-tests and Pearson correlation were used to study the relationship between non-word repetition, working memory and specific language impairment. Twenty-three pre-school children with Specific Language Impairment (mean age = 68.30 months; SD = 6.90) and another 23 pre-school children (mean age = 67.30 months; SD = 6.16) participated in the study. Significant difference performance was found between the Specific Language Impairment group and normal language group in the multisyllabic nonsense utterances repetition task and the sentence comprehension task. Length effect was noted in Specific Language Impairment group children, which is consistent with the findings of other literature. In addition, correlations were also observed between the number of nonsense utterances repeated and the number of elements comprehended. Cantonese multisyllabic nonsense utterances might be worth further developing as a screening tool for the early detection of children with Specific Language Impairment. PMID:16900051

  6. The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly’s Creative Push on Early Chinese Publishing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly, as an early Chinese popular literature important school, is a participant of early Chinese publishing industry who promoted early Chinese publishing industry development through creativities on publishing from four aspects such as publishing content creativity, graphic design creativity, marketing creativity and cross-media industry creativity.

  7. The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly’s Creative Push on Early Chinese Publishing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Li

    2012-01-01

    The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly, as an early Chinese popular literature important school, is a participant of early Chinese publishing industry who promoted early Chinese publishing industry development through creativities on publishing from four aspects such as publishing content creativity, graphic design creativity, marketing creativity and cross-media industry creativity.

  8. International Note: Between-Domain Relations of Chinese High School Students' Academic Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangyang, Liu

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the between-domain relations of Chinese high school students' academic achievements. In a sample of 1870 Chinese 10th grade students, the results indicated that Chinese high school students' academic achievements were correlated across nine subjects. In line with the previous Western findings, the findings suggested that…

  9. MIXTECAN CHILDREN AT SCHOOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SWADESH, EVANGELINA ARANA

    SINCE ONLY ONE FOURTH OF THE POPULATION SPOKE SPANISH, THE LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION, EDUCATION BEFORE 1955 WAS ESSENTIALLY PRECLUDED FOR 150,000 MIXTECAN INDIANS LIVING IN SOUTHERN OAXACA, MEXICO. IN 1955, 7 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS WERE ESTABLISHED BY THE NATIONAL INDIAN INSTITUTE, WITH TEACHERS FROM THE LOCAL POPULATION AND INSTRUCTION IN MIXTECO, THE…

  10. Evaluating Physical and Perceptual Responses to Exergames in Chinese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick W. C. Lau

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to examine whether exergames could help children reach the recommendations for PA and cardiorespiratory fitness regarding exercise intensity. Differences in perceived physical exertion, EE, VO2, and HR between normal weight (NW and overweight (OW children participating in exergames were also examined. Methods: Twenty-one children (age: 10.45 ± 0.88 were assessed for EE, VO2 and HR during rest, in a maximal treadmill test, and while playing different exergames. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE (category range: 0 to 10 were also measured during exergaming. Three types of exergames were examined: running, table tennis, and dancing. These games were either performed on a Chinese game console, I-Dong, or another well-developed Western game console (Sony PlayStation 3 or Nintendo Wii. Results: Exergaming resulted in EE (kcal/min from 2.05–5.14, VO2 (mL/kg/min from 9.98–25.54, and HR (beats per minute from 98.05–149.66. Children reported RPE ranging from 1.29 to 5.29. The Chinese exergame, I-Dong Running, was the only game in which children reached a moderate intensity and met the recommended minimum VO2reserve (50% for cardiorespiratory fitness. Conclusion: Exergames could provide alternative opportunities to enhance children’s physical activity. They could be used as light-to-moderate PA, and with exergames, children can even reach the recommended intensity for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory fitness.

  11. Chinese high school students' academic stress and depressive symptoms: gender and school climate as moderators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2012-10-01

    In a sample of 368 Chinese high school students, the present study examined the different effects of Chinese high school students' academic stress on their depressive symptoms and the moderating effects of gender and students' perceptions of school climate on the relationships between their academic stress and depressive symptoms. Regression mixture model identified two different kinds of subgroups in the effects of students' academic stress on their depressive symptoms. One subgroup contained 90% of the students. In this subgroup, the students' perceptions of academic stress from lack of achievement positively predicted their depressive symptoms. For the other 10% of the students, academic stress did not significantly predict their depressive symptoms. Next, multinomial regression analysis revealed that girls or students who had high levels of achievement orientation were more likely to be in the first subgroup. The findings suggested that gender and students' perceptions of school climate could moderate the relationships between Chinese high school students' academic stress and their depressive symptoms. PMID:22190389

  12. Characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine use in children with asthma: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T-P; Liu, P-H; Lien, A S-Y; Yang, S-L; Chang, H-H; Yen, H-R

    2013-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease accounting for severe morbidity and mortality in children. To determine the characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) used to treat pediatric asthma, we conducted a nationwide population-based study by analyzing a cohort of one million randomly sampled patients from the beneficiaries of the National Health Insurance Program in Taiwan from 2002 to 2010. Children under 18 years of age with newly diagnosed asthma (ICD-9-CM code: 493, N = 45 833) were enrolled, and 57.95% (N = 26 585) of them had used TCM. The number of TCM users was significantly more than that of non-TCM users in school-age children. The most commonly prescribed TCM formula is Ding-chuan-tang, or Xing-ren (Semen Armeniacae Amarum) for the single herb. Our study is the first to reveal characteristics and prescription patterns of the use of TCM in children with asthma. Further research is needed to elucidate the efficacy and safety of these Chinese herbal products. PMID:24117783

  13. Governor's Schools: An Alternative for Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Daniel L.; Stephenson, Scott; Jolly, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss Governor's Schools as an alternative for gifted students. When the word school is used, people typically think about traditional schooling. But Governor's Schools are different in the type of schooling provided and the type of students served--they educate predominantly gifted children, teach a wide array of…

  14. Maternal Recollections of Schooling and Children's School Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kyle; Dilworth-Bart, Janean; Hane, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Parents are the primary managers of children's development during their early years and greatly influence how children are primed for school. Therefore, understanding children's school preparation should involve appreciation for the unique developmental histories and perspectives that parents bring to the relationship with the child, with the…

  15. Children's Agency during Transition to Formal Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huf, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Children's transition to school is a key issue in early years of education. Research in this field points to the counterintuitive possibility that the transition to school may actually lead to a reduction rather than a facilitation of children's agency. The paper presents findings of a longitudinal comparative ethnography on children's transition…

  16. Brand Perceptions among School Children

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Edura Wan Rashid; Azura Omar; Kamaruzaman Jusoff

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the perception of children towards brand consciousness by using drawings and open-ended questions. A total of 20 primary school were requested to draw what they think about two statements given related to a person with branded materials and a person without branded materials. After drawing, respondents were personally interviewed regarding belongings of branded goods with cheerfulness, friendship, behaviour characters and desire for belongings. Results from the anal...

  17. Habitual Snoring in school-aged children: environmental and biological predictors

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Shenghu; Yan Chonghuai; Jin Xinming; Li Shenghui; Jiang Fan; Shen Xiaoming

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Habitual snoring, a prominent symptom of sleep-disordered breathing, is an important indicator for a number of health problems in children. Compared to adults, large epidemiological studies on childhood habitual snoring and associated predisposing factors are extremely scarce. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of habitual snoring among Chinese school-aged children. Methods A random sample of 20,152 children aged 5.08 to 11.99 years old...

  18. Unhealthy Behaviours of School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria LAZA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the study was to ascertain nutritional customs of pupils in grade schools.Material and Method: Anonymous questionnaires were done to a sample of 380 children, aged 10 to 14, in 20 fourth-to eight grade classes from 2 schools in Cluj-Napoca: one from down-town, the other one from a poorer neighbourhood.Results: Almost half of students revealed to have an irregular diet. In the last month, some of them did not have enough food or money to buy it (much of them come from the poorer neighbourhood. In this latest school, a triple percent of children have a vegetable diet (no meat, in fact. The obsession to lose weight and the irregular diet has conducted to lose appetite in over 30% of girls. About 60% take vitamins or nutritional supplements. Social status as well as the irregular diet is reflected in general status: over one third feel sad, alone, useless or cry without any reason. Some of the pupils which have problems with daily food supply, think the life is hard and do not worth to live it.Conclusions: There is a wide diversity in nutritional customs of children. Some of them are due to inappropriate nutritional knowledge or a wrong perception of being on fashion as well as to social status. Although the economic conditions are difficult to change, we consider that nutrition education should still be a part of health teaching.

  19. Brand Perceptions among School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Edura Wan Rashid

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to explore the perception of children towards brand consciousness by using drawings and open-ended questions. A total of 20 primary school were requested to draw what they think about two statements given related to a person with branded materials and a person without branded materials. After drawing, respondents were personally interviewed regarding belongings of branded goods with cheerfulness, friendship, behaviour characters and desire for belongings. Results from the analysis of the drawings and interviews indicate that that there are significant differences in the children perception of someone with or without branded materials. Based on these findings, one hypothesis was proposed about perception of children with regard the knowledge of brand awareness.

  20. Implementing Children's Human Rights Education in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covell, Katherine; Howe, R. Brian; McNeil, Justin K.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluations of a children's rights education initiative in schools in Hampshire, England--consistent with previous research findings--demonstrate the effectiveness of a framework of rights for school policy, practice, and teaching, for promoting rights-respecting attitudes and behaviors among children, and for improving the school ethos. The value…

  1. Seizure Management for School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    As many as 325,000 school-age children, ages 5-14, have epilepsy in the U.S. Thankfully, with medication, surgery, a special diet or vagus nerve stimulation, most go to school and fully participate in school activities. Children who continue to have seizures, however, may run into problems. Many of these problems can be overcome or prevented…

  2. Why Do Young Children Dislike School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    1990-01-01

    The mismatch between young children's learning style and a highly structured school program sometimes causes children to react negatively to school environments. This article contrasts the home learning environment with the school environment and identifies four things parents, teachers, and administrators can do to foster more positive attitudes…

  3. Trajectories of Chinese Students' Sense of School Belonging and Academic Achievement over the High School Transition Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    The present study identified the different patterns of Chinese students' academic achievement trajectories over the high school transition period and examined the relationships between students' sense of school belonging trajectories and the different patterns of academic achievement trajectories. In a sample of 567 Chinese high school students, a…

  4. Variations on the bilingual advantage? Links of Chinese and English proficiency to Chinese American children's self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Stephen H; Zhou, Qing; Uchikoshi, Yuuko; Bunge, Silvia A

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined whether bilingualism-related advantages in self-regulation could be observed: (a) among Chinese American immigrant children with varying levels of Chinese and English proficiencies, and (b) across different domains of self-regulation in laboratory, home, and classroom contexts. A socioeconomically diverse sample of first- and second-generation Chinese American immigrant children between ages 7 and 10 (n = 223) was administered assessments of Chinese and English language proficiencies and a multi-method, multi-informant battery of self-regulation measures. Multiple regression analyses suggested that controlling for covariates (child age, gender, and SES), children's bilingualism-related advantages were limited to higher performance only on computerized tasks of cognitive flexibility, and only among children with higher degrees of fluency in both Chinese and English. By contrast, proficiencies in one language (either Chinese or English) were uniquely and positively associated with other domains of self-regulation, including parent and teacher-reported effortful control. These results suggest that the bilingual advantage for self-regulation may be observed as a continuous variable among immigrant children with varying levels of bilingual fluency; however, this advantage may not extend across all domains and contexts of self-regulation. PMID:25324795

  5. Children's Participation in Development for School Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridmore, Pat

    2000-01-01

    Provides a rationale for the participation of children in development for school health. Addresses why participation should be promoted and how children can participate. Explores ways to assess children's participation by presenting case studies from Nepal, Zambia, and Botswana. Offers strategies for developing children's participation and for…

  6. School Integration of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiduc, Lavinia

    2009-01-01

    We consider that children with autism are invisible in contemporary Romanian society; there is even a lack of statistical data regarding children with autism in Romania. In this paper we emphasize how important it is for the education of children with autism to integrate in the school community. First we present the characteristics of children

  7. The Comparison of Chinese Kites Art Deco Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing WU

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Chinese kite art not only has a long history because of the long tradition of folk culture, but also has its merits because of the colorful local cultures. Kite's decorative arts are in close contact with history of various periods, cultures of all regions and various nations. It also has inextricably link with music, dance, drama, folklore, religion. In the long course of historical development of society?distinctive decorative art of kite gradually has formed all over the country. The main features of kite art schools will be compared in this article.
    Keywords: kite; decoration; art schools; comparison

  8. Dropout of Children from schools in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Wagle, Dhirendra

    2012-01-01

    Nepal, a developing country of the south-asian region has bigger problem of children not completing the full cycle of basic education. In other words, large number of children dropout of schools, especially in the primary and secondary level of schooling. Especially, the situation is worse for those of the backward and socially disadvantaged populations and of the rural and the remote areas. Being in this frame, this study focused on the reasons of dropout of children from schools and the pos...

  9. An Experimental Study of the Vocabulary of Written Chinese among Primary III Children in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Che Kan

    The depth and range of the corpus of written Chinese symbols used by 9-year-old Hong Kong children were studied in order to compile a minimum written Chinese vocabulary list. Error patterns of children were also analyzed. After presenting some characteristics of the language and reviewing previous studies, the methodology was described. The sample…

  10. "What Makes You Shy?": Understanding Situational Elicitors of Shyness in Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiyuan; Farver, Jo Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on two exploratory studies of situations that elicit shyness in Mainland Chinese children. In Study 1 (N = 100; M[subscript age] = 10.42) interviews with Chinese children identified three kinds of shyness-eliciting situations: social novelty; negative social evaluation; and public attention. In Study 2 (N = 162, M[subscript age]…

  11. Chinese Children's Statistical Learning of Orthographic Regularities: Positional Constraints and Character Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiuli; McBride, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how Chinese children acquire the untaught positional constraints of stroke patterns that are embedded in left-right structured and top-bottom structured characters. Using an orthographic regularity pattern elicitation paradigm, 536 Hong Kong Chinese children at different levels of reading (kindergarten, 2nd, and 5th grades)…

  12. Contribution of Discourse and Morphosyntax Skills to Reading Comprehension in Chinese Dyslexic and Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chik, Pakey Pui-man; Ho, Connie Suk-han; Yeung, Pui-sze; Wong, Yau-kai; Chan, David Wai-ock; Chung, Kevin Kien-hoa; Lo, Lap-yan

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying important skills for reading comprehension in Chinese dyslexic children and their typically developing counterparts matched on age (CA controls) or reading level (RL controls). The children were assessed on Chinese reading comprehension, cognitive, and reading-related skills. Results showed that the dyslexic…

  13. An Instrument for Investigating Chinese Language Learning Environments in Singapore Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Siew Lian; Wong, Angela F. L.; Chen, Der-Thanq

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how a new classroom environment instrument, the "Chinese Language Classroom Environment Inventory (CLCEI)", was developed to investigate the nature of Chinese language classroom learning environments in Singapore secondary schools. The CLCEI is a bilingual instrument (English and Chinese Language) with 48 items written in both…

  14. Similarity of Deleterious Effects of Divorce on Chinese and American Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Xin, Tao

    2001-01-01

    Reviews and contrasts the effects of divorce on Chinese children's adjustment to American children of divorce. Results indicate that the deleterious effects of divorce on children's academic and social functioning appear to be similar to that experienced by American children. (Contains 23 references.) (GCP)

  15. School integration of children with autism

    OpenAIRE

    Lavinia Haiduc

    2009-01-01

    We consider that children with autism are invisible in contemporary Romanian society; there is even a lack of statistical data regarding children with autism in Romania. In this paper we emphasize how important it is for the education of children with autism to integrate in the school community. First we present the characteristics of children with autism, then we argue about how important it is for these children to integrate in the general education system and finally we present a model tha...

  16. Children's collaborative encounters in pre-school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svinth, Lone

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration is often described as a situation whereby two or more children work together towards a common goal. When viewed from a socio-cultural learning perspective, a broader understanding of collaboration is suggested. This article investigates the forms and pathways of children’s collaboration and how the institutional demands influence children’s collaborative encounters. The study is based on video recordings of paedagogical activities (workshops and circle times) in two Danish pre-schools over a period of 11 months. Although institutional demands challenge children’s initiatives, it is found that children build friendships, assist, inspire, and imitate one another in their collaborative encounters in paedagogical activities. In order to better support children’s learning and engaged participation in paedagogical activities, an increased attention to the institutional demands on children’s collaborative encounters in early childhood education is suggested.

  17. Does school breakfast benefit children's educational performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, L; Ani, C C; Grantham-mcgregor, S

    1997-09-01

    This article reviews several research studies on the impact of the lack of breakfast among students. Recent data reveal that about 20% of Nigerian children were wasted or had weight-for-height measurements under the 5th percentile of the US National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) standard. In Ghana, 41% of children were underweight or had a weight-for-age under -2 standard deviations of the NCHS standards. In Tanzania, about 34% of children were underweight. Many more students in Africa are attending school, but many are leaving primary school early or failing secondary school examinations. It is argued that poor nutritional status affects children's ability to learn. Research reveals several hypotheses about how breakfast affects children's cognition, behavior, and school performance. Children may not attend school at all due to the inability to purchase food to eat at school, or insufficient food resources at home to provide sufficient energy to walk long distances to school. In four studies, two in the USA and the others in Peru and Jamaica, findings reveal that when undernourished children missed breakfast, they performed worse in tests of cognition. Adequately nourished children's performance was unaffected by missing breakfast. A study in four Jamaican schools found that children had more creative ideas when they received a breakfast for 2 weeks than when they did not receive breakfast. Two Swedish studies found that children with a high-calorie breakfast improved in cognition compared to those receiving a low-calorie breakfast. One study found that children in well-equipped classrooms paid more attention in class after having breakfast. Children in overcrowded classes and poorly equipped schools were less likely to pay attention after breakfast. Long-term effects are less well studied, but findings clearly support the benefits of breakfast. PMID:12321238

  18. Families with School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kathleen; Schneider, Barbara; Butler, Donnell

    2011-01-01

    Most working parents face a common dilemma--how to care for their children when they are not in school but the parents are at work. In this article Kathleen Christensen, Barbara Schneider, and Donnell Butler describe the predictable and unpredictable scheduling demands school-age children place on working couples and single working parents. The…

  19. Sex Differences in the Reciprocal Relationships between Mild and Severe Corporal Punishment and Children's Internalizing Problem Behavior in a Chinese Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiaopei; Wang, Meifang

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the sex differences in the reciprocal relations between parental corporal punishment and child internalizing problem behavior in China. Four hundred fifty-four Chinese elementary school-age children completed measures of their parental corporal punishment toward them and their own internalizing problem behavior at…

  20. Contribution of discourse and morphosyntax skills to reading comprehension in Chinese dyslexic and typically developing children

    OpenAIRE

    Chik, Pakey Pui-man; Ho, Connie Suk-han; Yeung, Pui-sze; Wong, Yau-kai; Chan, David Wai-ock; Chung, Kevin Kien-hoa; Lo, Lap-yan

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying important skills for reading comprehension in Chinese dyslexic children and their typically developing counterparts matched on age (CA controls) or reading level (RL controls). The children were assessed on Chinese reading comprehension, cognitive, and reading-related skills. Results showed that the dyslexic children performed significantly less well than the CA controls but similarly to RL controls in most measures. Results of multiple regression analyses show...

  1. Children, everyday numbers and school numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clélia Maria Ignatius Nogueira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Relationship made by school children between “daily” numbers, or rather, numbers deployed outside the school, and numbers worked out in school under various circumstances, or rather, orally and in writing, is investigated. Analysis has been undertaken with ten six-year-old children by means of a clinical and critical method. Research results show that children interact with the environment and recognized the figures, name them, conjecture on their written mode and give coherent meaning to the figures. Analysis also demonstrates that children use numbers outside the school. They understand and exemplify the number’s different meanings in an out-class context. Since the children do not give a weighty meaning to “school” numbers, pedagogical activity with numbers fails to put into practice the recommendations of the official policy.

  2. Socioeconomic correlates of iodine status among school children in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wah-Yun Low; Siti Norazah Zulkifli; Rajeswari Karuppiah

    2002-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is recognized as a public health problem. This paper assesses iodine status by socioeconomic factors in school children in Sarawak, East Malaysia. Kuching, Bau and Simunjan districts were chosen based on advice from the Sarawak's Medical and Health Authority. 803 school children, aged eight years, were selected from 19 schools via proportionate systematic sampling. About half the proportion of the school children were from Kuching, 24% from Simunjan and 22% from Bau. Almost all were equally distributed by sex. By mother's race, almost half were Malays, followed by Bidayuh, Iban, Chinese and other races. Mean urinary iodine concentration was 3.36 microg/ 100ml, mean creatinine level was 111.10 mg/100ml and mean creatinine/iodine ratio was 39.45 microg/ gram. Four female children (0.5%) were found to have enlarged thyroid. Urinary iodine levels were significantly different by district, mother's race and household income. It was highest in Kuching, among children with Malay mothers, and with household incomes more than RM500 per month. Conversely, it was lowest in Bau, among children of Iban/Dayak and Chinese mothers, and incomes of RM500 or less per month. Based on the WHO/UNICEF/ICCIDD classification, the Sarawak school children in the present study fall into the moderate IDD category. The low prevalence of goitre is a positive finding indicating that iodine deficiency is corrected over time. PMID:12862416

  3. Morphometry of the corpus callosum in Chinese children: relationship with gender and academic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corpus callosum has been widely studied, but no study has demonstrated whether its size and shape have any relationship with language and calculation performance. To examine the morphometry of the corpus callosum of normal Chinese children and its relationship with gender and academic performance. One hundred primary school children (63 boys, 37 girls; age 6.5-10 years) were randomly selected and the standardized academic performance for each was ascertained. On the mid-sagittal section of a brain MRI, the length, height and total area of the corpus callosum and its thickness at different sites were measured. These were correlated with sex and academic performance. Apart from the normal average dimension of the different parts of the corpus callosum, thickness at the body-splenium junction in the average-to-good performance group was significantly greater than the below-average performance group in Chinese language (P=0.005), English language (P=0.02) and mathematics (P=0.01). The remainder of the callosal thickness showed no significant relationship with academic performance. There was no significant sex difference in the thickness of any part of the corpus callosum. These findings raise the suggestion that language and mathematics proficiency may be related to the morphometry of the fibre connections in the posterior parietal lobes. (orig.)

  4. Achievement Motivation among Chinese and Australian School Students: Assessing Differences of Kind and Differences of Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Hau, Kit-Tai

    2010-01-01

    The present study explored motivation and engagement among Chinese and Australian school students. Based on a sample of 528 Hong Kong Chinese 12-13 year olds and an archive sample of 6,366 Australian 12-13 year olds, achievement motivation was assessed using the Motivation and Engagement Scale-High School (MES-HS). Confirmatory factor analysis and…

  5. International School Children's Health Needs: School Nurses' Views in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Annika; Clausson, Eva; Janlov, Ann-Christin

    2012-01-01

    Rapid globalization and the integration of national economies have contributed to the sharp rise in enrollment in international schools. How does this global nomadism affect international school children and their individual health needs? This study attempts to find an answer by interviewing 10 school nurses, with varying degrees of experience in…

  6. Parental job loss and children's school performance

    OpenAIRE

    Rege, Mari; Telle, Kjetil; Votruba, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Abstract:Using Norwegian register data we estimate how children’s school performance is affected by their parents’ exposure to plant closure. Fathers’ exposure leads to a substantial decline in children’s graduation-year grade point average, but only in municipalities with mediocre-performing job markets. The negative effect does not appear to be driven by a reduction in father’s income and employment, an increase in parental divorce, or the trauma of relocating. In contrast, mother...

  7. Post-Institutionalized Chinese and Eastern European Children: Heterogeneity in the Development of Emotion Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camras, Linda A.; Perlman, Susan B.; Fries, Alison B. Wismer; Pollak, Seth D.

    2006-01-01

    Post-institutionalized Chinese and Eastern European children participated in two emotion understanding tasks. In one task, children selected facial expressions corresponding to four emotion labels (happy, sad, angry, scared). The second task required children to match facial expressions to stories describing situations for these emotions. While…

  8. Negotiating and Creating Intercultural Relations: Chinese Immigrant Children in New Zealand Early Childhood Education Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Karen; Dalli, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    A multiple-case study investigation of the experiences of eight Chinese immigrant children in New Zealand early childhood centres suggested that the immigrant children's learning experiences in their first centre can be understood as a process of negotiating and creating intercultural relations. The children's use of family cultural tools, such as…

  9. Discourse-Level Reading Comprehension in Chinese Children: What Is the Role of Syntactic Awareness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiuhong; Tong, Xiuli; Shu, Hua; Chan, Shingfong; McBride-Chang, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between syntactic awareness and discourse-level reading comprehension in 136 Hong Kong Chinese children. These children, aged 11, from a longitudinal study, were administered a set of cognitive and linguistic measures. Partial correlational analyses showed that children's performances in two…

  10. Scaffolding Preschool Children's Problem Solving: A Comparison between Chinese Mothers and Teachers across Multiple Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin; Rao, Nirmala

    2012-01-01

    This study compared Chinese mothers' and teachers' scaffolding of preschool children in different problem solving tasks. Participants were 57 children (including 29 girls) from seven kindergartens in Beijing, their mothers and teachers. Mothers varied in educational levels while all teachers were professionally qualified. Children solved four…

  11. Investigating acculturation, diet, and physical activity among Chinese-American children aged 9-13 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acculturation among those of Chinese descent may be related to changes in diet and physical activity. Research to understand the acculturative process early in life is important; however, there is no qualitative research directly with Chinese-American children. This study, currently in progress, a...

  12. Adapting a measure of acculturation for Chinese-American children aged 9-13 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acculturation among those of Chinese descent may be related to changes in health behaviors and disease risks. Research with Chinese children to understand their acculturative processes early in life is important; however, there is no known instrument to measure acculturation for this population. Thi...

  13. Corporal Punishment and Physical Maltreatment against Children: A Community Study on Chinese Parents in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Catherine So-kum

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine rates and associated factors of parent-to-child corporal punishment and physical maltreatment in Hong Kong Chinese families. Method: Cross-sectional and randomized household interviews were conducted with 1,662 Chinese parents to collect information on demographic characteristics of parents and children,…

  14. Work Force Development: The Chinese Commercial High School in Taiwan as a Vehicle for Economic Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas C.

    Taiwan's commercial high schools are 3-year institutions that students enter after successfully passing a rigorous vocational, technical, or commercial school admission examination. Although commercial high schools date from the early days of Japanese occupation in 1895, the modern-day Chinese commercial high school did not come into being until…

  15. A tale of two writing systems: double dissociation and metalinguistic transfer between chinese and english word reading among Hong Kong children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiuli; Tong, Xiuhong; McBride-Chang, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the rate of school-aged Chinese-English language learners at risk for reading difficulties in either Chinese or English only, or both, among second and fifth graders in Hong Kong. In addition, we examined the metalinguistic skills that distinguished those who were poor in reading Chinese from those who were poor in reading English. The prevalence of poor English readers among children identified to be poor in Chinese word recognition across the five participating schools was approximately 42% at Grade 2 and 57% at Grade 5. Across grades, children who were poor readers of both languages tended to have difficulties in phonological and morphological awareness. Poor readers of English only were found to manifest significantly poorer phonological awareness, compared to those who were poor readers of Chinese only; their average tone awareness score was also lower relative to normally developing controls. Apart from indicating possible dissociations between Chinese first language (L1) word reading and English second language (L2) word reading, these findings suggested that the degree to which different metalinguistic skills are important for reading in different writing systems may depend on the linguistic features of the particular writing system. PMID:23784785

  16. Effort-Reward Imbalance at School and Depressive Symptoms in Chinese Adolescents: The Role of Family Socioeconomic Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiang Guo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a major mental health problem during adolescence. This study, using a sample of Chinese adolescents, examined the separate and combined effects of perceived school-related stress and of family socioeconomic status (SES on the prevalence of depressive symptoms. A total of 1774 Chinese students from Grades 7–12 were recruited into our questionnaire survey. School-related stress was measured by the Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire-School Version, family SES was assessed by a standardized question, and depressive symptoms were evaluated by the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children. Multivariate logistic regression was applied, adjusting for age, gender, grade, smoking, alcohol drinking and physical activity. It was found that high school-related stress and low family SES were associated with elevated odds of depressive symptoms, respectively. The effect of school-related stress was particularly strong in low SES group. In adolescents with both high stress at school and low SES, the odds ratio was 9.18 (95% confidence interval = 6.53–12.89 compared to the reference group (low stress at school and high SES. A significant synergistic interaction effect was observed (synergy index = 2.28, 95% confidence interval = 1.56–3.32. The findings indicated that perceived school-related stress, in terms of effort-reward imbalance, was related to depressive symptoms in this sample of Chinese adolescents. The strong interaction with family SES suggests that health promoting efforts in school settings should be targeted specifically at these socially deprived groups.

  17. Effort-reward imbalance at school and depressive symptoms in Chinese adolescents: the role of family socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongxiang; Yang, Wenjie; Cao, Ying; Li, Jian; Siegrist, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Depression is a major mental health problem during adolescence. This study, using a sample of Chinese adolescents, examined the separate and combined effects of perceived school-related stress and of family socioeconomic status (SES) on the prevalence of depressive symptoms. A total of 1774 Chinese students from Grades 7-12 were recruited into our questionnaire survey. School-related stress was measured by the Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire-School Version, family SES was assessed by a standardized question, and depressive symptoms were evaluated by the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children. Multivariate logistic regression was applied, adjusting for age, gender, grade, smoking, alcohol drinking and physical activity. It was found that high school-related stress and low family SES were associated with elevated odds of depressive symptoms, respectively. The effect of school-related stress was particularly strong in low SES group. In adolescents with both high stress at school and low SES, the odds ratio was 9.18 (95% confidence interval = 6.53-12.89) compared to the reference group (low stress at school and high SES). A significant synergistic interaction effect was observed (synergy index = 2.28, 95% confidence interval = 1.56-3.32). The findings indicated that perceived school-related stress, in terms of effort-reward imbalance, was related to depressive symptoms in this sample of Chinese adolescents. The strong interaction with family SES suggests that health promoting efforts in school settings should be targeted specifically at these socially deprived groups. PMID:24919130

  18. Children and Celiac Disease: Going Back to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Celiac Disease: Going Back to School Children and Celiac Disease: Going Back to School Going back to school ... excitement and anticipation. For parents of children with celiac disease, it can also be a time of anxiety. ...

  19. School children's reasoning about school rules

    OpenAIRE

    Thornberg, Robert

    2008-01-01

    School rules are usually associated with classroom management and school discipline. However, rules also define ways of thinking about oneself and the world. Rules are guidelines for actions and for the evaluation of actions in terms of good and bad, or right and wrong, and therefore a part of moral or values education in school. This study is a part of a larger ethnographic study on values education in the everyday life of school. Here the focus is on school rules and students' reasoning abo...

  20. Psychological Development in School-Aged Children

    OpenAIRE

    Nassirian, A.

    2000-01-01

    The medical schools nowadays are less concerned with psychological of the children as with their somatic development. Although the former is more important than the latter. To diagnose psychological disturbances and treat them properly, it is inevitable to be familiar with the normal psychology of human. This article gives an overview of the psychological problems of the school-aged children, since this age is one of the most sensitive stages of the life, disturbances of which can cause major...

  1. Children's endowment, schooling, and work in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Dendir, Seife

    2013-01-01

    I investigate the relationship between children's endowment and parental investment using a rich dataset on a cohort of children from Ethiopia, who were surveyed at ages eight, twelve and fifteen. Children's endowment is measured by scores on tests of cognitive skills/ability. A child's enrollment in school, participation in work and work hours are employed as measures of parental investment in human capital. The results provide strong evidence of reinforcing parental investment - higher abil...

  2. Made in France? Chinese Student Return Migration from French Business Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Chinese migration to France is not a new phenomenon; however, France has seen rapid growth of migration from China in the past decade. Among the increasingly diverse migratory flow, a prominent group is Chinese students. As in many European countries, more and more Chinese students are now studying in France, at universities, grandes écoles and language schools etc… There is limited research focusing on this group of migrants. Therefore, this paper will analyse the circular migration of Ch...

  3. Pyrosequencing analysis of the salivary microbiota of healthy Chinese children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Wang, Yuezhu; Li, Lanjuan; Xiang, Charlie

    2013-02-01

    Describing the biogeography of bacterial communities within the human body is critical for establishing healthy baselines from which to detect differences associated with diseases. Little is known, however, about the baseline of normal salivary microbiota from healthy Chinese children and adults. With parallel barcoded 454 pyrosequencing, the bacterial diversity and richness of saliva were thoroughly investigated from ten healthy Chinese children and adults. The overall taxonomic distribution of our metagenomic data demonstrated that the diversity of salivary microbiota from children was more complex than adults, while the composition and richness of salivary microbiota were similar in children and adults, especially for predominant bacteria. A large number of bacterial phylotypes were shared by healthy children and adults, indicating the existence of a core salivary microbiome. In children and adults, the vast majority of sequences in salivary microbiota belonged to Streptococcus, Prevotella, Neisseria, Haemophilus, Porphyromonas, Gemella, Rothia, Granulicatella, Fusobacterium, Actinomyces, Veillonella, and Aggregatibacter, which constituted the major components of normal salivary microbiota. With the exception of Actinomyces, the other seven non-predominant bacteria including Moraxella, Leptotrichia, Peptostreptococcus, Eubacterium, and members of Neisseriaceae, Flavobacteriaceae, and SR1 showed significant differences between children and adults (p < 0.05). We first established the framework of normal salivary microbiota from healthy Chinese children and adults. Our data represent a critical step for determining the diversity of healthy microbiota in Chinese children and adults, and our data established a platform for additional large-scale studies focusing on the interactions between health and diseases in the future. PMID:22968328

  4. Social games with pre-school children

    OpenAIRE

    Tomaz?in, Maja

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the thesis Social games with pre-school children is to present social games as one of the work methods for relational learning. The theoretical part defines the social development of pre-school children and focuses on social skills that begin to emerge in the preschool period and of course social games. The purpose of social games is active learning, meaning they provide concrete situations, through which children actively learn as well as use social skills and express their views ...

  5. Shyness-sensitivity and social, school, and psychological adjustment in rural migrant and urban children in china.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinyin; Wang, Li; Wang, Zhengyan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine relations between shyness-sensitivity and social competence, school performance, and psychological well-being in Chinese children with rural and urban backgrounds. Participants were students in rural migrant children schools and city schools in China (Ns = 411 and 518, respectively; M age = 10 years). Data were obtained from peer evaluations, teacher ratings, self-reports, and school records. It was found that shyness was associated with social and school problems and depression in urban children. However, shyness was generally associated with indexes of adjustment such as leadership, teacher-rated competence, and academic achievement in rural migrant children. The results indicate the role of context in defining the functional meaning of social behavior in children's adjustment. PMID:19765014

  6. Differential Importance of Language Components in Determining Secondary School Students' Chinese Reading Literacy Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Che Kan; Ho, Man Koon; Chang, Jianfang; Hau, Kit Tai

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined pedagogic components of Chinese reading literacy in a representative sample of 1164 Grades 7, 9 and 11 Chinese students (mean age of 15 years) from 11 secondary schools in Hong Kong with each student tested for about 2.5 hours. Multiple group confirmatory factor analyses showed that across the three grade levels, the…

  7. Serving Hispanic School-Aged Children in after School Programming: Implications for School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joy Pastan

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. school-age population has been experiencing dramatic demographic changes over the past two decades. Hispanic students constitute the fastest growing student group today, and this growth is expected to continue such that there will be more Hispanic school-aged children than non-Hispanic school-aged children in 2050. Unfortunately, Hispanic…

  8. Anthropometric study of Mexican primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado-León, L R; Avila-Chaurand, R; González-Muñoz, E L

    2001-08-01

    This paper presents the results of an anthropometric survey conducted on male and female Mexican primary school children age 6-11 years in the metropolitan area of the city of Guadalajara. A set of 50 body dimensions was taken based on international standards. The sample consisted of 4758 children (boys and girls). The anthropometric measurements were compared to those of American, Cuban and Mexican children. The results indicate that the body dimensions of Mexican children from this study are different from those of American, Cuban, and other Mexican children, probably due to ethnic differences and the time lapse between the different studies. It is considered that the 50 parameters are necessary for the design of school furniture, fittings and equipment in order to minimize musculoskeletal, visual, and circulatory problems resulting from using those badly designed elements. PMID:11461035

  9. Space Science in Chinese Schools: Solar Eclipse 22nd July 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, John; Huang, Qian; ShongYi, Liu; Li, Li Su; Machell, James; Marley, Scott; Pickwick, Alan; Vlastuin, Marcel; Waley, Vlad; Zhang, Yie Niu

    2009-01-01

    In China, "Space Science" and "Our Place in the Universe" form part of the geography syllabus. Such cultural challenges are part of the everyday intellectual gymnastics necessary to sustain European-Chinese school collaborations. Belle Vue Girls' School in Bradford has an ongoing collaboration with Chang Zheng Secondary School (CZMS) in Shanghai…

  10. Impact of Immersion Teaching on English Sociopragmatic Awareness of Chinese Kindergarten Children: A Polite Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Yan, Rong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of an early partial immersion program as compared to a non-immersion program on English sociopragmatic awareness among Chinese kindergarten children six years of age. Of the 128 children who participated in the experiment involving the use of politeness perception tasks, half received three years…

  11. Neighborhood characteristics, parenting styles, and children's behavioral problems in Chinese American immigrant families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erica H; Zhou, Qing; Ly, Jennifer; Main, Alexandra; Tao, Annie; Chen, Stephen H

    2014-04-01

    Using data from a socioeconomically diverse sample of Chinese American children (n = 258, aged 6-9 years) in immigrant families, we examined the concurrent relations among neighborhood economic disadvantage and concentration of Asian residents, parenting styles, and Chinese American children's externalizing and internalizing problems. Neighborhood characteristics were measured with 2000 U.S. Census tract-level data, parents (mostly mothers) rated their own parenting styles, and parents and teachers rated children's behavioral problems. Path analysis was conducted to test two hypotheses: (a) parenting styles mediate the relations between neighborhood characteristics and children's behavioral problems, and (b) children's behavioral problems mediate the relations between neighborhood and parenting styles. We found that neighborhood Asian concentration was positively associated with authoritarian parenting, which in turn was associated with Chinese American children's higher externalizing and internalizing problems (by parents' reports). In addition, neighborhood economic disadvantage was positively related to children's externalizing problems (by parents' reports), which in turn predicted lower authoritative parenting. The current results suggest the need to consider multiple pathways in the relations among neighborhood, family, and child adjustment, and they have implications for the prevention and intervention of behavioral problems in Chinese American children. PMID:24041263

  12. Interparental Conflict Styles and Parenting Behaviors: Associations with Overt and Relational Aggression among Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Putallaz, Martha; Su, Yanjie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined how interparental conflict styles related to Chinese children's overt and relational aggression directly and indirectly through parenting behaviors. Mothers (n = 670) and fathers (n = 570) reported their overt and covert interparental conflict styles and different parenting behaviors. Children's (n = 671) aggression was…

  13. Intensity Classification Accuracy of Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activities in Chinese Children and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zheng; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Many ActiGraph accelerometer cutoff points and equations have been developed to classify children and youth's physical activity (PA) into different intensity levels. Using a sample from the Chinese City Children and Youth Physical Activity Study, this study was to develop new ActiGraph cutoff points for moderate-to-vigorous physical…

  14. Factors Influencing Whether Children Walk to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jason G.; Jerrett, Michael; Mcconnell, Rob; Berhane, Kiros; Dunton, Genevieve; Shankardass, Ketan; Reynolds, Kim; Chang, Roger; Wolch, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated multiple levels of influence simultaneously on whether children walk to school. A large cohort of 4,338 subjects from ten communities was used to identify the determinants of walking through (1) a one-level logistic regression model for individual-level variables and (2) a two-level mixed regression model for individual and school-level variables. Walking rates were positively associated with home-to-school proximity, greater age, and living in neighborhoods characterized by lower traffic density. Greater land use mix around the home was, however, associated with lower rates of walking. Rates of walking to school were also higher amongst recipients of the Free and Reduced Price Meals Program and attendees of schools with higher percentage of English language learners. Designing schools in the same neighborhood as residential districts should be an essential urban planning strategy to reduce walking distance to school. Policy interventions are needed to encourage children from higher socioeconomic status families to participate in active travel to school and to develop walking infrastructures and other measures that protect disadvantaged children. PMID:23707968

  15. Habitual Snoring in school-aged children: environmental and biological predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shenghu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Habitual snoring, a prominent symptom of sleep-disordered breathing, is an important indicator for a number of health problems in children. Compared to adults, large epidemiological studies on childhood habitual snoring and associated predisposing factors are extremely scarce. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of habitual snoring among Chinese school-aged children. Methods A random sample of 20,152 children aged 5.08 to 11.99 years old participated in a cross-sectional survey, which was conducted in eight cities of China. Parent-administrated questionnaires were used to collect information on children's snoring frequency and the possible correlates. Results The prevalence of habitual snoring was 12.0% (14.5% for boys vs. 9.5% for girls in our sampled children. Following factors were associated with an increased risk for habitual snoring: lower family income (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.46, lower father's education (OR = 1.38 and 1.14 for middle school or under and high school of educational level, respectively, breastfeeding duration Conclusion The prevalence of habitual snoring in Chinese children was similar to that observed in other countries. The potential predisposing factors covered socioeconomic characteristics, environmental exposures, chronic health problems, and family susceptibility. Compared to socioeconomic status and family susceptibility, environmental exposures and chronic health problems had greater impact, indicating childhood habitual snoring could be partly prevented by health promotion and environmental intervention.

  16. Concurrent Correlates of Chinese Word Recognition in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Boby Ho-Hong; Nunes, Terezinha

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relative contributions of phonological, semantic radical, and morphological awareness to Chinese word recognition in deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. Measures of word recognition, general intelligence, phonological, semantic radical, and morphological awareness were administered to 32 DHH and 35 hearing children in Hong Kong. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that tone, semantic radical, and morphological awareness made independent contributions to word recognition in DHH children after the effects of age and intelligence were statistically controlled for. Semantic radical and morphological awareness was found to explain significantly more variance than tone awareness in predicting word recognition in DHH children. This study has replicated previous evidence regarding the importance of semantic radical and morphological awareness in Chinese word recognition in hearing children and extended its significance to DHH children. PMID:25749634

  17. Effects of air pollution on children's respiratory health in three Chinese cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Z.; Chapman, R.S.; Tian, Q.; Chen, Y.; Lioy, P.J.; Zhang, J.

    2000-04-01

    During the winter of 1988--1989, parents of 2,789 elementary-school students completed standardized questionnaires. The students were 5--14 y of age and were from three urban districts and one suburban district of three large Chinese cities. The 4-y average ambient levels of total suspended particles in the three cities differed greatly during the period 1985--1988: Lanzhou, 1,067 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; urban Wuhan, 406 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; Guangzhou, 296 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; and suburban Wuhan, 191 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The authors constructed unconditional logistic-regression models to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for prevalences of several respiratory symptoms and illnesses, adjusted for district, use of coal in the home, and parental smoking status. There was a positive and significant association between total suspended particle levels and the adjusted odds ratios for couch, phlegm, hospitalization for diseases, and pneumonia. This association was derived from only the 1,784 urban children and, therefore, the authors were unable to extrapolate it to the suburban children. The results also indicated that parental smoking status was associated with cough and phlegm, and use of coal in the home was associated only with cough prevalence.

  18. Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse in China: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Communication Practices of Parents of Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, JingQi; Dunne, Michael P.; Han, Ping

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Active involvement by parents may contribute substantially to the success of school-based programs to prevent child sexual abuse (CSA). In China, little is known about parental understanding of CSA. This study investigated Chinese parents' knowledge, attitudes, and communication practices with their children about CSA. Method: Six…

  19. Understanding the school 'climate': secondary school children and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This interdisciplinary study analyzes the production, circulation and reception of messages on climate change in secondary schools in France. The objective is to understand how political and educational policy initiatives influence the ways in which schools contribute to creating youngsters' perceptions and opinions about climate change. In order to study the conditions of production and reception of information about climate change, a survey was conducted in four French secondary schools, in the 'Bas Rhin' and 'Nord' departments, and local political actors in each department were interviewed. The cross disciplinary analytical and methodological approach uses the tools of sociological inquiry, information science, and political science: questionnaires and interviews were conducted with members of the educational and governmental communities of each school and department, semiotic and discursive analyses of corpuses of documents were carried out, in order to characterize documents used by students and teachers at school or in more informal contexts; the nature and extent of the relations between the political contexts and school directives and programs were also discussed. This interdisciplinary approach, combining sociological, communicational, and political methods, was chosen in response to the hypothesis that three types of variables (social, communicational and political) contribute to the structuring and production of messages about climate change in schools. This report offers a contextualized overview of activities developed within the four secondary schools to help sensitize children to the risks associated with climate change. A study of the networks of individuals (teachers, staff, members of associations, etc.) created in and around the school environment is presented. The degree of involvement of these actors in climate change programs is analyzed, as it is related to their motives and objectives, to the school discipline taught, and to the position held in the school under study. A critical description of the nature and content of communicated messages, activities and projects follows. Individual and collective initiatives which foster an interdisciplinary approach to climate change education are identified, as are the various obstacles to this approach, including organizational obstacles and the longstanding traditions of the French educational system which tend to hinder pedagogical innovation. Lastly, the reception of these projects and activities by school children in the second year of secondary school is analyzed. The results of this analysis are somewhat, but not always, encouraging. School children interviewed do not clearly understand the scientific phenomena surrounding climate change, and have difficulty considering this issue within its wider socio-political context. School children's interest in climate change and environmental science is largely dependent upon a perceived link with their own centers of interest or hobbies. School children express nonetheless the need for more and better adult mediation on the question of climate change, even though they see environmentally conscious behavior as contrary to the modern lifestyle of comfort that society offers them. Certain school projects and activities which had a particular impact on school children are discussed, in order to suggest criteria for evaluating the effectiveness (or non-effectiveness) of climate change projects in school. This study can be considered to be a tool for reflection and for the evaluation of the potential impact of climate change programs and messages produced for youngsters in school today

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphisms predisposing to asthma in children of Mauritian Indian and Chinese Han ethnicity

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    K., Ramphul; J., Lv; L., Hua; Q.H., Liu; D.Z., Fang; R.X., Ji; Y.X., Bao.

    2014-05-02

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Our objective was to investigate the distributions of six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) MS4A2 E237G, MS4A2 C-109T, ADRB2 R16G, IL4RA I75V, IL4 C-590T, and IL13 C1923T in Mauritian Indian and Chinese Han children with asthma. This case-control association study enrolled 382 unrelated Mauriti [...] an Indian children, 193 with asthma and 189 healthy controls, and 384 unrelated Chinese Han children, 192 with asthma and 192 healthy controls. The SNP loci were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism for the Chinese Han samples and TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR for the Mauritian Indian samples. In the Mauritian Indian children, there was a significant difference in the distribution of IL13 C1923T between the asthma and control groups (P=0.033). The frequency of IL13 C1923T T/T in the Mauritian Indian asthma group was significantly higher than in the control group [odds ratio (OR)=2.119, 95% confidence interval=1.048-4.285]. The Chinese Han children with asthma had significantly higher frequencies of MS4A2 C-109T T/T (OR=1.961, P=0.001) and ADRB2 R16G A/A (OR=2.575, P=0.000) than the control group. The IL13 C1923T locus predisposed to asthma in Mauritian Indian children, which represents an ethnic difference from the Chinese Han population. The MS4A2 C-109T T/T and ADRB2 R16G A/A genotypes were associated with asthma in the Chinese Han children.

  1. Longitudinal Predictors of Spelling and Reading Comprehension in Chinese as an L1 and English as an L2 in Hong Kong Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; McBride-Chang, Catherine; Wong, Anita; Shu, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Predictors of age 10 spelling and reading comprehension skills in both Chinese and English from vocabulary knowledge, phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN), and word reading at age 8 were tested in this longitudinal study of 141 Hong Kong Chinese children learning to read English as a second language. The correlation between…

  2. Children of imigrants in primary school

    OpenAIRE

    Kolednik, Urs?ka

    2012-01-01

    As a consequence of enlarged migration flows it is more and more common for children of different ethnical, religious and cultural backgrounds to meet in schools. All students must have equal conditions to learn, progress and achieve the best possible results. This thesis includes a theoretical and an empirical part. The theoretical part is divided in seven content sections dealing with various aspects of the education problem of migrant children. Theoretical part focuses on the national g...

  3. Discovering conifers with pre-school children

    OpenAIRE

    Zaletelj, Stanko

    2012-01-01

    This diploma paper includes theoretical, empirical and practical part. The theoretical part is about science in the pre-school period and about the planning of activities including natural sciences. What follows are the division of plants, characteristic and the propagation of conifers. In this part are also presentations and descriptions of some tree species. The empirical part points out the children’s answers to the questions about the conifers and there is also the course of the ...

  4. Children's Literature and the Child's Adjustment to School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalongo, Mary Renck; Renck, Melissa Ann

    1987-01-01

    Argues that quality children's literature depicting positive and negative aspects of school can be an important resource in helping children adjust to new experiences in the classroom. Contains a list of American books dealing with the school experience.(FL)

  5. Children's need for favorable acoustics in schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peggy B.

    2003-10-01

    Children continue to improve their understanding of speech in noise and reverberation throughout childhood and adolescence. They do not typically achieve adult performance levels until their late teenage years. As a result, schools that are designed to be acoustically adequate for adult understanding may be insufficient for full understanding by young children. In addition, children with hearing loss, those with attention problems, and those learning in a non-native language require even more favorable signal-to-noise ratios. This tutorial will review the literature gathered by the ANSl/ASA working group on classroom acoustics that shaped the recommendations of the working group. Special topics will include speech perception data from typically developing infants and children, from children with hearing loss, and from adults and children listening in a non-native language. In addition, the tutorial will overview recommendations contained within ANSI standard 12.60-2002: Acoustical Performance Criteria, Design Requirements, and Guidelines for Schools. The discussion will also include issues related to designing quiet classrooms and working with local schools and professionals.

  6. Validation of sleep-related breathing disorder scale in Hong Kong Chinese snoring children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Amy; Chan, Chung-Hong; Ng, Daniel K

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate the previously-validated Taiwan Chinese version of Sleep-Related Breathing Disorder scale (SRBD scale) in Hong Kong Chinese snoring children. SRBD scale is an instrument used for prediction of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. (OSA) The Chinese version of SRBD scale were previously translated and validated in Taiwan. The same questionnaire were administered in a group of 102 snoring children (mean age: 10.7 and 65 boys) from a sleep laboratory in Hong Kong before their sleep studies. The SRBD scores were then validated against the results from sleep studies. By using the definition of apnea-hypopnea index larger than 1.5 as OSA, 28 children (27.5%) had polysomnography-confirmed OSA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio of the previously validated cut-off of SRBD score > 0.33 for OSA were 0.5, 0.55, 1.12, and 0.90, respectively. The area under ROC curve was only 0.58, indicates suboptimal performance of SRBD score in predicting OSA. In summary, our study concluded that the previously reported Chinese SRBD scale is not accurate in identifying presence of OSA in Hong Kong Chinese snoring children. PMID:22290785

  7. Sleep Patterns, Sleep Disturbances, and Associated Factors Among Chinese Urban Kindergarten Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijun; Wang, Guanghai; Geng, Li; Luo, Junna; Li, Ningxiu; Owens, Judith

    2014-11-14

    This study aimed to characterize sleep patterns and disturbances among Chinese urban kindergarten children and examine potentially associated factors. Caregivers of 513 children (47.96% male) aged 3-6 years (mean age = 4.46, SD = 0.9) completed the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Almost 80% (78.8%) of the children scored above the original CSHQ cutoff point for global sleep disturbance. Regression analysis indicated that child's age, and the presence of emotional problems, hyperactivity and peer problems, cosleeping, and interparental inconsistency of attitudes toward child rearing accounted for significant variance in the CSHQ total score (R(2) = 22%). These findings indicate that there is an apparently high prevalence of sleep disturbances in Chinese urban kindergarten children; and sleep disturbances are associated with both child-related and parenting practice variables. PMID:25396279

  8. Age estimation in northern Chinese children by measurement of open apices in tooth roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu-Cheng; Yan, Chun-Xia; Lin, Xing-Wei; Zhou, Hong; Li, Ju-Ping; Pan, Feng; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Wei, Lai; Tang, Zheng; Chen, Teng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of Cameriere's methods on dental age estimation in the northern Chinese population. A sample of orthopantomographs of 785 healthy children (397 girls and 388 boys) aged between 5 and 15 years was collected. The seven left permanent mandibular teeth were evaluated with Cameriere's method. The sample was split into a training set to develop a Chinese-specific prediction formula and a test set to validate this novel developed formula. Following the training dataset study, the variables gender (g), x 3 (canine teeth), x 4 (first premolar), x 7 (second molar), N 0, and the first-order interaction between s and N 0 contributed significantly to the fit, yielding the following linear regression formula: Age = 10.202 + 0.826 g?-?4.068x 3?-?1.536x 4?-?1.959x 7 + 0.536 N 0?-?0.219 s?[Symbol: see text]?N 0, where g is a variable, 1 for boys and 0 for girls. The equation explained 91.2 % (R (2)?=?0.912) of the total deviance. By analyzing the test dataset, the accuracy of the European formula and Chinese formula was determined by the difference between the estimated dental age (DA) and chronological age (CA). The European formula verified on the collected Chinese children underestimated chronological age with a mean difference of around -0.23 year, while the Chinese formula underestimated the chronological age with a mean difference of -0.04 year. Significant differences in mean differences in years (DA?-?CA) and absolute difference (AD) between the Chinese-specific prediction formula and Cameriere's European formula were observed. In conclusion, a Chinese-specific prediction formula based on a large Chinese reference sample could ameliorate the age prediction accuracy in the age group of children. PMID:25030187

  9. Changing the school environment to increase physical activity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine; Foster, Randal C; McCrady, Shelly K; Manohar, Chinmay U; Jensen, Teresa B; Mitre, Naim G; Hill, James O; Levine, James A

    2008-08-01

    We examined the hypothesis that elementary school-age children will be more physically active while attending school in a novel, activity-permissive school environment compared to their traditional school environment. Twenty-four children were monitored with a single-triaxial accelerometer worn on the thigh. The students attended school in three different environments: traditional school with chairs and desks, an activity-permissive environment, and finally their traditional school with desks which encouraged standing. Data from the school children were compared with another group of age-matched children (n = 16) whose physical activity was monitored during summer vacation. When children attended school in their traditional environment, they moved an average (mean +/- s.d.) of 71 +/- 0.4 m/s(2). When the children attended school in the activity-permissive environment, they moved an average of 115 +/- 3 m/s(2). The children moved 71 +/- 0.7 m/s(2) while attending the traditional school with standing desks. Children moved significantly more while attending school in the activity-permissive environment compared to the amount that they moved in either of the traditional school environments (P move more in an activity-permissive environment. Strategies to increase the activity of school children may involve re-designing the school itself. PMID:18535550

  10. Parenting School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources, encouragement, supervision, chauffeuring, and, at times, direct participation. Last Updated 10/10/2014 Source Caring for Your School-Age Child: Ages 5 to 12 (Copyright © 2004 American Academy ...

  11. The Disadvantage of Homelessness in Children's Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Debra M.; Dornbusch, Sanford M.

    This paper presents findings of a study that investigated the extent to which homeless children in the United States receive the "free and appropriate education" to which they are entitled. Data were collected through several surveys conducted in two San Francisco Bay Area counties: (1) surveys of parents in homeless shelters with 313 school-age…

  12. Gender Stereotyping and Affective Attitudes towards Science in Chinese Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingxin; Hu, Weiping; Jiannong, Shi; Adey, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This study explores explicit and implicit gender-science stereotypes and affective attitudes towards science in a sample of Chinese secondary school students. The results showed that (1) gender-science stereotyping was more and more apparent as the specialization of science subjects progresses through secondary school, becoming stronger from the…

  13. Families with school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kathleen; Schneider, Barbara; Butler, Donnell

    2011-01-01

    Most working parents face a common dilemma--how to care for their children when they are not in school but the parents are at work. In this article Kathleen Christensen, Barbara Schneider, and Donnell Butler describe the predictable and unpredictable scheduling demands school-age children place on working couples and single working parents. The authors assess the potential capacity of schools to help meet the needs of working families through changes in school schedules and after-school programs and conclude that the flexibility parents need to balance family-work responsibilities probably cannot be found in the school setting. They argue that workplaces are better able than schools to offer the flexibility that working parents need to attend to basic needs of their children, as well as to engage in activities that enhance their children's academic performance and emotional and social well-being. Two types of flexible work practices seem especially well suited to parents who work: flextime arrangements that allow parents to coordinate their work schedules with their children's school schedules, and policies that allow workers to take short periods of time off--a few hours or a day or two-to attend a parent-teacher conference, for example, or care for a child who has suddenly fallen ill. Many companies that have instituted such policies have benefited through employees' greater job satisfaction and employee retention. Yet despite these measured benefits to employers, workplaces often fall short of being family friendly. Many employers do not offer such policies or offer them only to employees at certain levels or in certain types of jobs. Flexible work practices are almost nonexistent for low-income workers, who are least able to afford alternative child care and may need flexibility the most. Moreover the authors find that even employees in firms with flexible practices such as telecommuting may be reluctant to take advantage of them, because the workplace culture explicitly or implicitly stigmatizes or penalizes employees for choosing these work arrangements. The authors conclude by making a case for creating a workplace culture that supports flexibility. Such a culture, they argue, would enable working parents to better meet the responsibilities of their jobs as they care for and build strong relationships with their children. PMID:22013629

  14. [Eating habits of school children. School meals in Swedish primary schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlund, G

    1991-01-01

    Since the mid 1940's cooked lunches have been served in Swedish schools. Several investigations executed in recent years show that many school-children skimp increasingly on their school lunches the older they become. A study of some 1,900 senior school pupils in Sweden revealed that about 47 per cent ate very little or nothing at all; this was particularly true of girls and working class children. For one pupil in four the total food intake seemed inadequate since both breakfast and dinner were manifestly insufficient. The article suggests improvements of school meal routines, suggestions which can be realized without major expenditure. PMID:2027739

  15. A Study of Pre-School Children's School Readiness Related to Scientific Thinking Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgul Polat UNUTKAN

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare school readiness of children who had pre-school experiences and children without such experiences on the basis of scientific thinking skills. This comparison is held in terms of variables of age, gender, and socio economic status. The questions of the study in relation to the purpose of the study are as follows: Ø Does pre-school education variable influence primary school readiness of pre-school children in terms of scientific thinking skills? Ø Does age variable influence primary school readiness of pre-school children in terms of scientific thinking skills? Ø Does gender variable influence primary school readiness of pre-school children in terms of scientific thinking skills? Ø Does socio-economical status variable influence primary school readiness of pre-school children in terms of scientific thinking skills?

  16. Whole body measurements in Bavarian school children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On behalf of the Bavarian State Ministry for State Development and Environmental Affairs measurements were conducted using the whole body counters at the Institute for Radiation Hygiene (of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection), and the Institute for Radiation Biology (of the GSF Research Centre for Environment and Health). Between September 1988 and July 1990 about 1600 school children from all over Bavaria were investigated for incorporated radiocesium. The aim of these measurements was to evaluate the whole body activity due to regionally differing soil contaminations in Bavaria following the accident in the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl and to assess the effective dose from an intake of radionuclides for the pupils by comparing the results of their WBC measurements with those of reference groups of children which underwent WBC examinations at regular intervals at both institutes since the middle of the year 1986. The results of the WBC measurements of those pupils who had not eaten mushrooms in the days before the measurement are in good agreement with the results of comparative measurements in children living in the regions of Munich and Frankfurt-am-Main. Based on these results an effective dose of 0,2 mSv for the Munich region children and of 0,1 mSv for Nothern Bavarian children can be derived. For children living in the highest contaminated region of Bavaria, i.e. the counties adjacent to the Alps, no comparable reference group results are available, but the amount of incorporated radiocesium is only twice that for pupils in the Munich region. The mean value for the specific activity of radiocesium in South Bavarian school children who consumed mushrooms was found to be twice the value of pupils who did not. This is also true for that group of children whose parents had bought allegedly low contaminated foodstuffs. Other effecs of nutrition habits on the specific whole body activity could not be found. (orig.)

  17. Association of the Resistin Gene Promoter Region Polymorphism with Kawasaki Disease in Chinese Children

    OpenAIRE

    Qijian Yi; Qian Liu; Fang Gao; Bo He; Ruixi Liu

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The ?420?C > G polymorphism located in the resistin gene (RETN) promoter has recently been suggested to play a potential role in proinflammatory conditions and cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the association of the RETN promoter polymorphism with Kawasaki disease (KD) and its clinical parameters in Chinese children. Methods. We compared patients with complete KD to incomplete KD children. Genotyping of the RETN promoter polymorphism was performed using MassARRA...

  18. Parental Expressivity and Parenting Styles in Chinese Families: Prospective and Unique Relations to Children’s Psychological Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Stephen H.; Zhou, Qing; Eisenberg, Nancy; Valiente, Carlos; Wang, Yun

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objectives Parents from different cultures differ in how frequently they express emotions. However, the generalizability of the relations between parental expressivity and child adjustment in non-Western cultures has not been extensively studied. The goal of the present study was to investigate prospective relations between parental expressivity within the family (positive, negative dominant, and negative submissive expressivity) and Chinese children’s psychological adjustment, above and beyond parenting styles. Design The study used two waves (3.8 years apart) of longitudinal data from a sample (n= 425) of children in Beijing (mean ages = 7.7 years at T1 and 11.6 years at T2). Parental expressivity and parenting styles were self-reported. To reduce the potential measurement overlap, items that tap parental expression of emotions toward the child were removed from the parenting style measure. Children’s adjustment was measured with parents’, teachers’, and peers’ or children’s reports. Results Consistent with findings with European American samples, parental negative dominant expressivity uniquely and positively predicted Chinese children’s externalizing problems controlling for prior externalizing problems, parenting styles, and family SES. Neither parental expressivity nor parenting styles uniquely predicted social competence. Conclusions Despite previously reported cultural differences in the mean levels of parental expressivity, some of the socialization functions of parental expressivity found in Western countries can be generalized to Chinese families. Although parental expressivity and parenting styles are related constructs, their unique relations to child’s adjustment suggest that they should be examined as distinct processes. PMID:23226715

  19. Category Label Effects on Chinese Children's Inductive Inferences: Modulation by Perceptual Detail and Category Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Changquan; Lu, Xiaoying; Zhang, Li; Li, Hong; Deak, Gedeon O.

    2012-01-01

    Inductive generalization of novel properties to same-category or similar-looking objects was studied in Chinese preschool children. The effects of category labels on generalizations were investigated by comparing basic-level labels, superordinate-level labels, and a control phrase applied to three kinds of stimulus materials: colored photographs…

  20. An Exploration of Nonresident Parents' Financial Provision and Children's Self-Esteem in a Chinese Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Yuk-king

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between the making of financial provision by nonresident parents and children's self-esteem in a Chinese context. It is found that the relationship depends much on the dynamics of the nonresident parents' participation in other areas of family relationships, such as parental conflict. As this is an exploratory…

  1. Bidirectional Longitudinal Relations between Father-Child Relationships and Chinese Children's Social Competence during Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Using a two-year and three-wave cross-lagged design with a sample of 118 Chinese preschoolers, the present study examined bidirectional longitudinal relations between father-child relationships and children's social competence. The results of structural equation modeling showed bidirectional effects between father-child conflict and social…

  2. Study protocol: can a school gardening intervention improve children’s diets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Meaghan S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current academic literature suggests there is a potential for using gardening as a tool to improve children’s fruit and vegetable intake. This study is two parallel randomised controlled trials (RCT devised to evaluate the school gardening programme of the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS Campaign for School Gardening, to determine if it has an effect on children’s fruit and vegetable intake. Method/Design Trial One will consist of 26 schools; these schools will be randomised into two groups, one to receive the intensive intervention as “Partner Schools” and the other to receive the less intensive intervention as “Associate Schools”. Trial Two will consist of 32 schools; these schools will be randomised into either the less intensive intervention “Associate Schools” or a comparison group with delayed intervention. Baseline data collection will be collected using a 24-hour food diary (CADET to collect data on dietary intake and a questionnaire exploring children’s knowledge and attitudes towards fruit and vegetables. A process measures questionnaire will be used to assess each school’s gardening activities. Discussion The results from these trials will provide information on the impact of the RHS Campaign for School Gardening on children’s fruit and vegetable intake. The evaluation will provide valuable information for designing future research in primary school children’s diets and school based interventions. Trial registration ISRCTN11396528

  3. School performance and school behavior of children affected by AIDS in China

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Xiaoming; Lv, Yunfei; Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Guoxiang; Lin, Xiuyun; Hong, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Stanton, Bonita

    2009-01-01

    It is generally recognized that the AIDS epidemic will have a negative effect on the orphans’ school education. However, few studies have been carried out to examine the school performance and school behavior of AIDS orphans and vulnerable children (children living with HIV-infected parents). Using both self-report and teacher evaluation data of 1625 children from rural central China, we examined the impact of parental HIV/AIDS on children's school performances (academic marks, educational ...

  4. A Study of Pre-School Children's School Readiness Related to Scientific Thinking Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Unutkan, Ozgul Polat

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare school readiness of children who had pre-school experiences and children without such experiences on the basis of scientific thinking skills. This comparison is held in terms of variables of age, gender, and socio economic status. The questions of the study in relation to the purpose of the study are as follows: Ø Does pre-school education variable influence primary school readiness of pre-school children in terms of scientific thinking skills? ...

  5. Children’s Eating Behavior: The Importance of Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, Katherine B.; Sanchez, Betty; Teneralli, Rachel; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND To enhance the impact of school nutrition programs on children’s health, more information is needed on the associations between healthy and unhealthy food offerings during school lunch periods and children’s eating behavior. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contributions of food offerings and participation in school lunch programs on children’s overall (both in- and out-of-school) eating behavior. METHODS A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in which 2039 students in 12 elementary and 10 middle schools reported their eating behavior and the frequencies with which they purchased meals and à la carte items in the school cafeteria. Food service managers from each school provided information on the availability of foods and beverages during school lunch periods. Multilevel regression analyses were conducted to identify school- and student-level predictors of children’s eating behavior. RESULTS The availability of nutritious foods during school lunch periods was associated with healthier eating behavior among students. However, this effect was observed only among children who infrequently purchased à la carte food items, and not among those who were frequent purchasers. CONCLUSION Increased availability of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products as components of school meals may be an effective strategy to promote healthy eating behaviors among children. Improving the nutrition standards for foods offered in competition with federally reimbursable school meals may enhance the positive effects of school meal programs on student eating behavior. PMID:21668883

  6. EFFECTS OF AIR POLLUTION ON CHILDREN'S RESPIRATORY HEALTH IN THREE CHINESE CITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the winter of 1988-1989, parents of 2,789 elementary school students completed standardized questionnaires. The students were 5-14 years of age and were from three urban districts and one suburban district of three large Chinese cities. The 4-y average ambient levels of ...

  7. Parental Expressivity and Parenting Styles in Chinese Families: Prospective and Unique Relations to Children's Psychological Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Stephen H; Zhou, Qing; Eisenberg, Nancy; Valiente, Carlos; Wang, Yun

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Parents from different cultures differ in how frequently they express emotions. However, the generalizability of the relations between parental expressivity and child adjustment in non-Western cultures has not been extensively studied. The goal of the present study was to investigate prospective relations between parental expressivity within the family (positive, negative dominant, and negative submissive expressivity) and Chinese children's psychological adjustment, above and beyond parenting styles. DESIGN: The study used two waves (3.8 years apart) of longitudinal data from a sample (n= 425) of children in Beijing (mean ages = 7.7 years at T1 and 11.6 years at T2). Parental expressivity and parenting styles were self-reported. To reduce the potential measurement overlap, items that tap parental expression of emotions toward the child were removed from the parenting style measure. Children's adjustment was measured with parents', teachers', and peers' or children's reports. RESULTS: Consistent with findings with European American samples, parental negative dominant expressivity uniquely and positively predicted Chinese children's externalizing problems controlling for prior externalizing problems, parenting styles, and family SES. Neither parental expressivity nor parenting styles uniquely predicted social competence. CONCLUSIONS: Despite previously reported cultural differences in the mean levels of parental expressivity, some of the socialization functions of parental expressivity found in Western countries can be generalized to Chinese families. Although parental expressivity and parenting styles are related constructs, their unique relations to child's adjustment suggest that they should be examined as distinct processes. PMID:23226715

  8. Likeable children, uneasy children: Growing up Muslim in small-town Danish schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Sally Dean

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on fieldwork in small-town schools with children of Muslim background whose families came to Denmark as United Nation refugees, the chapter explores how pedagogical ideologies of school-based peer sociability inflect children’s experiences of ‘being Muslim.’ Danish provincial schools, with their permanent classes, emphasis on class-based sociability, and particular understandings of what constitutes religion, represent a particular context for children’s school experiences. An analysis of two contrasting cases reveals that participation in peer sociability in and beyond school tends to erase a child’s personal religiosity, whereas not participating conjures up images of really religious families.

  9. Children's Experiences of the First Year of Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsdottir, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a study with first grade children and their views on the primary school curriculum, as well as their influence on decision-making in school. The study was conducted with 20 six- and seven-year-old children in one primary school in Reykjavik, Iceland. The data gathered includes varied research methods such as group…

  10. Children Facing School: Sally Brown and Peppermint Patty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, William

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes the comic strip "Peanuts" characters Sally Brown and Peppermint Patty as they illustrate children's difficulties in school and their emotional responses to school. Explores how Sally illustrates the conflict between the creative impulses of childhood with school demands, while Patty illustrates the extent to which many children can be…

  11. Children's Strategies for Making Friends when Starting School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danby, Susan; Thompson, Catherine; Theobald, Maryanne; Thorpe, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Starting school is a critical and potentially stressful time for many young children, and having supportive relationships with parents, teachers and peers and friends offer better outcomes for school adjustment and social relationships. This paper explores matters of friendship when young children are starting school, and how they initiate…

  12. School Readiness for Gifted Children: Considering the Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porath, Marion

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses issues relevant to gifted children's readiness for school. It raises a number of questions that challenge thinking about what is meant by school readiness. Gifted children can often be ready for school entrance before the age traditionally considered appropriate. Their complex developmental profiles challenge accepted notions…

  13. How Can Schools Support Children with a Parent in Prison?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Julia; Leeson, Caroline; Carter Dillon, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Children who experience the imprisonment of a parent or close relative are more likely to have poorer outcomes including lower school attainment and an increased risk of truancy, school exclusion and socio-emotional difficulties. This paper reports on a research project, undertaken in 2011, into support provision in schools for children who…

  14. Children Who Won't Go to School (Separation Anxiety)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children Who Won't Go To School (Separation Anxiety) Quick Links Facts for Families Facts for Families - ... and behaviors are common among children with separation anxiety disorder. The potential long-term effects (anxiety and ...

  15. The cultural bounds of maternal accommodation: how Chinese and American mothers communicate with deaf and hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin-Meadow, S; Saltzman, J

    2000-07-01

    Children with special needs typically require family accommodation to those needs. We explore here the extent to which cultural forces shape the accommodations mothers make when communicating with young deaf children. Sixteen mother-child dyads (8 Chinese, 8 American) were videotaped at home. In each culture, 4 mothers interacted with their deaf children, and 4 interacted with their hearing children. None of the deaf children knew sign language, nor spoke at age level. We found that mothers adjusted their communicative behaviors to their deaf children, but in every case, those adjustments were calibrated to cultural norms. American mothers, for example, increased their use of gesture with deaf children but stopped far short of the Chinese range--despite the obvious potential benefits of gesturing to children who cannot hear. These findings provide the first cross-cultural demonstration that children are, first and foremost, inculcated into their cultures and, only within that framework, then treated as special cases. PMID:11273390

  16. Analysis of a Typical Chinese High School Biology Textbook Using the AAAS Textbook Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ye; Cobern, William W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a typical Chinese high school biology textbook using the textbook standards of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The data were composed of three chapters selected from the textbook. Each chapter was analyzed and rated using the AAAS textbook standards. Pearson correlations…

  17. Homework Involvement and Functions: Perceptions of Hong Kong Chinese Primary School Students and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vicky C. W.; Chan, Raymond M. C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of Chinese students and parents in Hong Kong on homework involvement, assignment type and homework functions. The relationships of homework perceptions to student and parent attributes are also assessed. The sample includes 1393 pairs of students and their parents from 36 primary schools in Hong Kong. Findings…

  18. Chinese Senior High School EFL Students' Metacognitive Awareness and Reading-Strategy Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lawrence Jun; Wu, Aijiao

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a study that assesses metacognitive awareness and reading-strategy use of Chinese senior high school students who are learning English as a foreign language (EFL). A total of 270 students responded to a 28-item survey of reading strategies (SORS). The strategies were classified into 3 categories: global,…

  19. Chinese Immigrant High School Students' Cultural Interactions, Acculturation, Family Obligations, Language Use, and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Christine J.; Okubo, Yuki; Ma, Pei-Wen Winnie; Shea, Munyi; Ou, Dongshu; Pituc, Stephanie T.

    2008-01-01

    When immigrant youth come to the United States, they must learn to interact with dominant and cultural groups as part of the adjustment process. The current study investigated whether the association between Chinese immigrant high school students' (N = 286) English fluency, academic and career/college help-seeking, multidimensional acculturation,…

  20. Chinese Junior High School Students' Perceptions of Geographic Fieldwork: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Daihu; Wang, Ziying; Xu, Di; Wang, Chuanbing; Deng, Zhengzheng

    2013-01-01

    After nearly ten years of implementation of the first junior high school geography standards, Chinese geography educators have been increasingly incorporating fieldwork into their geography teaching. This study examined student perceptions of fieldwork from an international perspective by reviewing student fieldwork reports and administering a…

  1. Community-Based Chinese Schools in Southern California: A Survey of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the author examines the results of questionnaire given to 92 teachers in community-based Chinese schools (CCSs) in Southern California. Information was sought from the teachers on their academic background and aspirations, the reasons for them to choose to teach in the CCSs, and their views on the quality of the education provided…

  2. Effort-Reward Imbalance at School and Depressive Symptoms in Chinese Adolescents: The Role of Family Socioeconomic Status

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxiang Guo; Wenjie Yang; Ying Cao; Jian Li; Johannes Siegrist

    2014-01-01

    Depression is a major mental health problem during adolescence. This study, using a sample of Chinese adolescents, examined the separate and combined effects of perceived school-related stress and of family socioeconomic status (SES) on the prevalence of depressive symptoms. A total of 1774 Chinese students from Grades 7–12 were recruited into our questionnaire survey. School-related stress was measured by the Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire-School Version, family SES was assessed by ...

  3. Health status and school achievement of children from Head Start and Free School Lunch Programs.

    OpenAIRE

    Gietzen, D.; Vermeersch, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    School health records of 332 children through the eighth grade were examined in a retrospective comparative analysis of physical health status and school achievement of children from Head Start and Free School Lunch Programs. The objective was to determine if nutrition early in the lives of children as a part of a comprehensive health and education program such as Head Start produces greater or different benefits for disadvantaged children than nutrition intervention later through free lunche...

  4. Children’s Active Commuting to School: Current Knowledge and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten K. Davison, PhD

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionDriven largely by international declines in rates of walking and bicycling to school and the noted health benefits of physical activity for children, research on children’s active commuting to school has expanded rapidly during the past 5 years. We summarize research on predictors and health consequences of active commuting to school and outline and evaluate programs specific to children’s walking and bicycling to school.MethodsLiterature on children’s active commuting to school published before June 2007 was compiled by searching PubMed, PsycINFO, and the National Transportation Library databases; conducting Internet searches on program-based activities; and reviewing relevant transportation journals published during the last 4 years. ResultsChildren who walk or bicycle to school have higher daily levels of physical activity and better cardiovascular fitness than do children who do not actively commute to school. A wide range of predictors of children’s active commuting behaviors was identified, including demographic factors, individual and family factors, school factors (including the immediate area surrounding schools, and social and physical environmental factors. Safe Routes to School and the Walking School Bus are 2 public health efforts that promote walking and bicycling to school. Although evaluations of these programs are limited, evidence exists that these activities are viewed positively by key stakeholders and have positive effects on children’s active commuting to school.ConclusionFuture efforts to promote walking and bicycling to school will be facilitated by building on current research, combining the strengths of scientific rigor with the predesign and postdesign provided by intervention activities, and disseminating results broadly and rapidly.

  5. Children and Adolescents with HIV Disease: Implications for School Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobia, Debra C.; Carney, Jamie S.; Waggoner, Irene M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes policies and procedures initiated in the school environment concerning students with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Discusses interventions for school personnel, parents, and students. Assessment and counseling children and adolescents with HIV are also discussed. (MKA)

  6. ICT and participation in school and outside school activities for children and youths with physical disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lidstro?m, Helene

    2011-01-01

    The general aim was to investigate the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and participation in computer activities in school and outside school among children and youth with physical disabilities (age 8-19 years), in comparison to children and youth in general. In particular the aim was to gain knowledge about the use of and satisfaction with computer-based assistive technology devices (ATDs) in school and outside school among children with physical disabilities. Study I...

  7. We are all the same, but... : Kenyan and Swedish school children's views on children's rights

    OpenAIRE

    Thelander, Nina

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents a study on how school children in Kenya and Sweden express their views on children’s rights, in particular rights related to participation, non-discrimination, and education. The overall purpose was to explore the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, its claim to be universal and its relevance for children in various school and life contexts. Group interviews were conducted with 58 children, aged 12-15 years, from four schools, two schools from each cou...

  8. School performance and school behavior of children affected by AIDS in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Xiaoming; Lv, Yunfei; Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Guoxiang; Lin, Xiuyun; Hong, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Stanton, Bonita

    2009-09-01

    It is generally recognized that the AIDS epidemic will have a negative effect on the orphans' school education. However, few studies have been carried out to examine the school performance and school behavior of AIDS orphans and vulnerable children (children living with HIV-infected parents). Using both self-report and teacher evaluation data of 1625 children from rural central China, we examined the impact of parental HIV/AIDS on children's school performances (academic marks, educational expectation, and student leadership) and school behaviors (e.g., aggression, shy/anxious and assertive social skills). Results indicate that AIDS orphans and vulnerable children had disadvantages in school performances in comparison to their peers from the same community who did not experience AIDS-related death and illness in their family (comparison children). AIDS orphans had the lowest academic marks based on the reports of both children and teachers. Educational expectation was significantly lower among AIDS orphans and vulnerable children than comparison children from teacher's perspective. AIDS orphans were significantly more likely to demonstrate aggressive, impulsive and anxious behaviors than non-orphans. Moreover, orphans have more learning difficulties. Vulnerable children were also at a disadvantage on most measures. The data suggest that a greater attention is needed to the school performance and behavior of children affected by AIDS. The findings also indicate that AIDS relief and assistance program for children should go beyond the school attendance and make efforts to improve their school performance and education aspiration. PMID:20107622

  9. Chinese and Korean immigrants’ early life deprivation: An important factor for child feeding practices and children’s body weight in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Cheah, Charissa S. L.; Hook, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the associations between Chinese and Korean immigrant parents’ early life material and food deprivation and their concern about their child’s diet or weight, preferences for heavier children, and weight-promoting diet and child weight, alongside the moderating role of parents’ acculturation toward American culture. In 2010, Chinese and Korean immigrant parents of children ages 3–8 years in the United States (N = 130) completed interviews which asked about their per...

  10. School Personnel Responses to Children Exposed to Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenemore, Thomas; Lynch, John; Mann, Kimberly; Steinhaus, Patricia; Thompson, Theodore

    2010-01-01

    Authors explored the experiences of school personnel in their responses to children's exposure to violence. Thirty-one school personnel, including administrators, teachers, counselors, school social workers, and psychologists, were interviewed to obtain data on their experiences related to violence exposure in their schools and the surrounding…

  11. Voices of Children, Parents and Teachers: How Children Cope with Stress during School Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mun

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how children's perceptions of stress factors and coping strategies are constructed over time. Children were interviewed before and after they made the transition from preschool to primary school. This study also explores teachers' and parental strategies in helping children to cope with stress at school. The sample…

  12. School lunch program for health promotion among children in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Nobuko; Miyoshi, Miki

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, the present school lunch program has been implemented under the "School Lunch Act" enacted in 1954. The main purpose of the school lunch program is to promote healthy development of the minds and bodies of school children. Later, "The School Lunch Act" was revised in 2008 and its aim was changed to "promoting Shokuiku". As of May 2009, approximately 10 million school children participate in the school lunch program. This program itself is an educational activity. School children are responsible for serving lunch and clearing the dishes. They could also learn proper manners, by having meals together with classmates. Furthermore, understanding of balanced diet and food culture can be enhanced through learning the menu of each meal. Recently, as eating disorders and obesity increase among adults and school children, there is rising concern on development of lifestyle-related diseases. Under this circumstance, the Basic Law on Shokuiku was enacted in 2005. Besides, in order to enhance Shokuiku to school children, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology established the Diet and Nutrition Teacher System in April 2007. It is reported that, in those schools with Diet and Nutrition Teachers, a positive impact has been observed in terms of awareness and interest in diet among teachers and guardians. It is also reported that proportion of children skipping breakfast has decreased, and quality of life has been improved. In this way, the Japanese school lunch program system is essential for fostering healthy mind and bodies for the next generation. PMID:22374573

  13. Spiritual Beliefs among Chinese Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lili, Tian; Shenghua, Jin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the characteristics of the spiritual beliefs among junior high school students. Method: 431 junior high school students are measured by Students' Basic Information Questionnaire (SBIQ) and Middle School Students' Spiritual Beliefs Questionnaire (MSSSBQ). Results: (1) The overall characteristics of the spiritual beliefs among…

  14. Parent Emotional Expressiveness and Children's Self-Regulation: Associations with Abused Children's School Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskett, Mary E.; Stelter, Rebecca; Proffit, Katie; Nice, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Identifying factors associated with school functioning of abused children is important in prevention of long-term negative outcomes associated with school failure. The purpose of this study was to examine the degree to which parent emotional expressiveness and children's self-regulation predicted early school behavior of abused…

  15. 34 CFR 200.64 - Factors for determining equitable participation of private school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...determining equitable participation of private school children. 200.64...Educational Agencies Participation of Eligible Children in Private Schools § 200.64...determining equitable participation of private school children. (a)...

  16. 77 FR 72832 - Applications for New Awards; Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ...matching. 3. Other: Participation by Private School Children and Teachers. An...for the equitable participation of private school children and their teachers...9501 of the ESEA, Participation by Private School Children and...

  17. 76 FR 3120 - Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ...matching. 3. Other: Participation by Private School Children and Teachers. An...for the equitable participation of private school children and their teachers...See section 9501, Participation by Private School Children and Teachers,...

  18. 34 CFR 200.62 - Responsibilities for providing services to private school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...Educational Agencies Participation of Eligible Children in Private Schools § 200.62...participating private school children participate on...equitable to the participation of teachers and families of public school children receiving...

  19. Promoting social-emotional learning in Chinese schools: A feasibility study of PATHS implementation in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ming Kam

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a pilot study of a reduced version of the PATHS Curriculum, a Usdeveloped evidence-based SEL program, among schools in Hong Kong SAR (China. Three hundred and sixteen 12th grade students in three elementary schools participated in the study. A limited number of first grade PATHS lessons were adapted and translated into Chinese. Twelve teachers learned and adopted these lessons in their teaching. Students in these classrooms learned about different emotions and practiced self-control. The intervention lasted four months. After the intervention, students showed improvement in emotion understanding, emotion regulation and prosocial behavior. No change was observed in the level of children's problem behaviors. Over 65% of the teachers reported a high degree of satisfaction and willingness to adopt the intervention. The effects of the intervention varied among schools, with variations in the level of intervention and principal support, but not in the quality of implementation. Discussion is focused on the factors that could shape the adoption and implementation of SEL programs, especially the role of the difference in school systems between Hong Kong and the United States.

  20. [Dietary habits of school children: breakfast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranzetti, P; Manca, L; Spano, A; Fanciulli, G

    1989-01-01

    An investigation on the dietary habits of 944 secondary school children from Alghero, with reference to breakfast consumption and composition, has shown that the percentage of students who eat nothing for breakfast is higher than that reported by other authors. Furthermore it has been noted that consumption decreases among grown up students. Milk and coffee is the most common type of nutriment and also bread and biscuits are well represented. Other types of food, such as jam, yogurt or butter, are instead rarely consumed. Therefore the average caloric intake is of about 400 Kcal. PMID:2757814

  1. Starting School at a Disadvantage: The School Readiness of Poor Children. The Social Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Julia B.

    2012-01-01

    Poor children in the United States start school at a disadvantage in terms of their early skills, behaviors, and health. Fewer than half (48 percent) of poor children are ready for school at age five, compared to 75 percent of children from families with moderate and high income, a 27 percentage point gap. This paper examines the reasons why poor…

  2. The Comparison of Chinese Kites Art Deco Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Chinese kite art not only has a long history because of the long tradition of folk culture, but also has its merits because of the colorful local cultures. Kite's decorative arts are in close contact with history of various periods, cultures of all regions and various nations. It also has inextricably link with music, dance, drama, folklore, religion. In the long course of historical development of society?distinctive decorative art of kite gradually has formed all over the country. The mai...

  3. The Association of Hypertension with Obesity and Metabolic Abnormalities among Chinese Children

    OpenAIRE

    Hongwei Guo; Guifa Xu; Lin Du; Tingyu Li; Jun Ma; Ying Li; Hongyun Fang; Songming Du; Qian Zhang; Xiaoqi Hu; Haiquan Xu; Ailing Liu

    2011-01-01

    A total of 8898 Chinese children (4580 boys and 4318 girls) aged 7–13 years in 6 cities of east China were recruited. Data on height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, serum lipid profiles, glucose, and insulin were collected. The overall prevalence of hypertension was 11.1%. Overweight and obese children had a higher risk of developing hypertension than their counterparts (29.1%, 17.4%, and 7.8%, resp.) (P = 0.0001). The means levels of triglycerides, glucose, insulin, and HOMA-...

  4. Cross-sectional study on differences in pain perception and behavioral distress during venipuncture between Italian and Chinese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Bisogni

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Venipuncture is perhaps the scariest aspect of hospitalization for children as it causes pain and high levels of behavioral distress. Pain is a complex experience which is also influenced by social factors such as cultural attitudes, beliefs and traditions. Studies focusing on ethnic/cultural differences in pain perception and behavioral distress show controversial results, in particular with regards to children. The aim of this paper is to evaluate differences in pain perception and behavioral manifestations between Italian and Chinese children undergoing a venipuncture, through a cross-sectional study. Behavioral distress and self-reported pain were measured in Chinese and Italian outpatient children during a standardized blood-drawing procedure, using the Observational Scale of Behavioral Distress (OSBD and pain scales. We observed 332 children: 93 Chinese and 239 Italian. Chinese children scored higher than Italians on pain scales ? mean scores 5.3 (95%CI 4.78-5.81 vs. 3.2 (95%CI 2.86-3.53 ? but lower mean OSBD scores ? mean 4.1 (95%CI 3.04-5.15 vs. 8.1 (95%CI 7.06-9.14. Our data suggest that Chinese children experience higher levels of pain than their Italian peers, although they show more self-control in their behavioral reaction to pain when experiencing venipuncture.

  5. Getting Ready: The 2010-2011 Maryland School Readiness Report. Children Entering School Ready to Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report was developed in partnership with Ready At Five. It lays out the critical importance of children starting school fully prepared to succeed in kindergarten. Most importantly, the report shares what everyone has learned from the 2010-2011 Maryland Model for School Readiness (MMSR) data about the school readiness of Maryland's children:…

  6. Genetic and biochemical findings in Chinese children with Leigh syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Yan; Wu, Tong-Fei; Liu, Yu-Peng; Wang, Qiao; Song, Jin-Qing; Li, Xi-Yuan; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Zhang, Wei-Na; Zhao, Meng; Hu, Lin-Yan; Yang, Yan-Ling; Zou, Li-Ping

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated the genetic and enzymological features of Leigh syndrome due to respiratory chain complex deficiency in Chinese patients. The clinical features of 75 patients were recorded. Mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities were determined via spectrophotometry. Mitochondrial gene sequence analysis was performed in 23 patients. Five core pedigrees were investigated via restriction fragment length polymorphism and gene sequencing. Psychomotor retardation (55%), motor regression (20%), weakness (29%), and epilepsy (25%) were the most frequent manifestations. Sixty-four patients (85.3%) had isolated respiratory complex deficiencies: complex I was seen in 28 patients (37.3%); complex II, seven (9.3%); complex III, six (8%); complex IV, ten (13.3%); and complex V, 13 patients (17.3%). Eleven patients (14.7%) had combined complex deficiencies. Mitochondrial DNA mutations were detected in 10 patients. Eight point mutations were found in mitochondrial structural genes: m.4833A>G in ND2, m.10191T>C in ND3, m.12338T>C and m.13513G>A in ND5, m.14502T>C and m.14487T>C in ND6, m.8108A>G in COXII, and m.8993T>G in ATPase6. Three mutations were found in tRNA genes: m.4395A>G in tRNA-Gln, m.10454T>C in tRNA-Arg, and m.5587T>C in tRNA-Ala. One patient and their mother both had the m.12338T>C and m.8993T>C mutations. In conclusion, mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I deficiency and structural gene mutations frequently occur in Chinese Leigh syndrome patients. PMID:23953430

  7. How Drawing Is Taught in Chinese Infant Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Richard; Zhang, Zhi

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of drawing for children are wide-ranging but are likely to be mediated by the art curriculum and other governmental guidance to teachers relevant to drawing/art. Furthermore, such statutory regulations vary between cultures, and therefore curricula represent an important influence on the cultural differences found in children's…

  8. Expectations of Malaysian Mothers for the Schooling of Their Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Linda J.; And Others

    A Rand study develops a model concerning mothers in Peninsular Malaysia's three major ethnic groups (Malay, Chinese, Indian), investigating relationships between their early life experiences and their expectations for education levels of their children. The model examines three of the women's early life experiences that are governed by their…

  9. Creativity, Emotional Intelligence, and School Performance in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansenne, Michel; Legrand, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that both creativity and emotional intelligence (EI) were related to children school performance. In this study, we investigated the incremental validity of EI over creativity in an elementary school setting. Seventy-three children aged from 9 to 12 years old were recruited to participate in the study. Verbal and…

  10. Exploring the school attendance of children with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Piccin Zanni

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The childhood epilepsy is a chronic disease that can have an impact in various spheres of life of the child, including academic performance and school attendance. This study aimed to describe and compare the school attendance of children with epilepsy who attend mainstream and special schools. Participants were 56 children aged between 7 and 14 years who attended regular or special schools located in two Brazilian cities of medium size. To collect the information we used two instruments: Data sheet of identification and characterization of the child and Data sheet to record the attendance school. The results showed that children in special schools had higher rates of absenteeism compared to students in regular schools. Additionally, we observed that these children use more drugs and have implications on health more severe than children in regular schools. Thus, it is the childhood epilepsy as a disease complex that brings substantial effects on various areas of children’s lives by reinforcing the need for studies that might expand the knowledge to and the experiences associated with the education of these children.

  11. New School Blues: Helping Children Adjust After a Family Move.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marilyn

    2001-01-01

    Presents suggestions for parents to help their children make the adjustment to a new school, focusing on: understanding how moving affects children, teens, and in-betweens; meeting the school counselor or psychologist; looking for warning signs (e.g., prolonged anxiety, depression, or interrupted sleeping); and providing reassurance. A sidebar…

  12. The Effect of Preschool on Children's School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic Umek, Ljubica; Kranjc, Simona; Fekonja, Urska; Bajc, Katja

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of preschool on children's school readiness in connection with their intellectual abilities, language competence and parents' education. The sample included 219 children from 68 to 83 months old attending the first year of primary school, differentiated by whether or not they had attended…

  13. Latent Structure of Motor Abilities in Pre-School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatroslav, Horvat

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical and practical knowledge which have so far been acquired through work with pre-school children pointed to the conclusion that the structures of the latent dimensions of the motor abilities differ greatly from such a structure, in pre-school children and adults alike. Establishing the latent structure of the motor abilities in…

  14. Chinese City Children and Youth Physical Activity Study: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peijie

    2013-01-01

    Childhood obesity and its repercussions will be one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century. Promoting physical activity and preventing the decline of children's fitness and the increase of childhood obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease therefore need to be a high priority. So far, besides a few large-scale…

  15. 76 FR 22785 - Direct Certification and Certification of Homeless, Migrant and Runaway Children for Free School...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ...no later than School Year 2011-2012...to facilitate participation of children in the school meals programs...based on SNAP participation increased certifications for free school meals by an estimated 190,000 children in School...

  16. Investigation of Pre-School Children’s Perception of Teacher in Their Drawings

    OpenAIRE

    O?uz Serdar Kesicioglu; Umit Deniz

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate pre-school children’s perception of teacher in their drawings. The research group consists of 226 students in pre-school education institutions within city centers of Ankara and Giresun Provinces. Teacher drawings that children drew by instruction were analyzed with the Draw a Scientist Test—DAST which was developed by Chambers (1983) and consists of 13 categories and six sub-categories. In drawings of children included in this stud...

  17. Neighborhood Characteristics, Parental Practices and Children’s Math Achievement in Elementary School

    OpenAIRE

    Greenman, Emily; Bodovski, Katerina; Reed, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationships among neighborhood characteristics, education-related parental practices, and children’s academic achievement during a critical but under-studied stage of children’s educational trajectories – the elementary school years. Using a large, nationally representative database of American elementary school students – the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study – Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS–K) – and contextual data from the 2000 U.S. Census, we examin...

  18. Corneal Curvature Radius and Associated Factors in Chinese Children: The Shandong Children Eye Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue Ying; Jiang, Wen Jun; Teng, Zhao E.; Wu, Jian Feng; Hu, Yuan Yuan; Lu, Tai Liang; Wu, Hui; Sun, Wei; Wang, Xing Rong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the distribution of the (CCR) and its associated factors in children. Methods Using a random cluster sampling method, the school-based, cross-sectional Shandong Children Eye Study included children aged 4 to 18 years from the rural county of Guanxian and the city of Weihai in the province of Shandong in East China. CCR was measured by ocular biometry. Results CCR measurements were available for 5913 (92.9%) out of 6364 eligible children. Mean age was 10.0±3.3 years, and mean CCR was 7.84±0.27 mm (range: 6.98 to 9.35 mm). In multivariate linear regression analysis, longer CCR (i.e. flatter cornea) was significantly associated with the systemic parameters of male sex (P<0001;standardized regression coefficient beta: -0.08;regression coefficient B:-0.04; 95% Confidence Interval (CI):-0.05,-0.03), younger age (P<0.001;beta:-0.37;B:-0.03;95%CI:-0.04,-0.03), taller body height (P = 0.002;beta:0.06;B:0.001;95%CI:0.000,0.001), lower level of education of the father (P = 0.001;beta:-0.04;B:-0.01;95%CI:-0.02,-0.01) and maternal myopia (P<0.001;beta:-0.07;B:-0.04;95%CI:-0.06,-0.03), and with the ocular parameters of longer ocular axial length (P<0.001;beta:0.59;B:0.13;95%CI:0.12,0.14), larger horizontal corneal diameter (P<0.001;beta:0.19;B:0.13;95%CI:0.11,0.14), and smaller amount of cylindrical refractive error (P = 0.001;beta:-0.09;B:-0.05;95%CI:-0.06,-0.04). Conclusions Longer CCR (i.e., flatter corneas) (mean:7.84±0.27mm) was correlated with male sex, younger age, taller body height, lower paternal educational level, maternal myopia, longer axial length, larger corneas (i.e., longer horizontal corneal diameter), and smaller amount of cylindrical refractive error. These findings may be of interest for elucidation of the process of emmetropization and myopization and for corneal refractive surgery. PMID:25658095

  19. Active transport among Czech school-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pavelka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Active transport is a very important factor for increasing the level of physical activity in children, which is significant for both their health and positive physical behaviour in adult age. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to establish the proportion of Czech children aged 11 to 15 who select active transport to and from school and, at the same time, describe socio-economic and socio-demographic factors influencing active transport to and from school among children. METHODS: To establish the socio-demographic factors affecting active transport, data of a national representative sample of 11 to 15 year-old elementary school children in the Czech Republic (n = 4,425. Research data collection was performed within an international research study called Health Behaviour in School Aged Children in June 2010. Statistical processing of the results was made using a logistic regression analysis in the statistical programme IBM SPSS v 20. RESULTS: Active transport to and from school is opted for in the Czech Republic by approximately 2/3 of children aged 11 to 15. Differences between genders are not statistically significant; most children opting for active transport are aged 11 (69%. An important factor increasing the probability of active transport as much as 16 times is whether a child's place of residence is in the same municipality as the school. Other factors influencing this choice include BMI, time spent using a computer or a privateroom in a family. A significant factor determining active transport by children is safety; safe road crossing, opportunity to leave a bicycle safely at school, no fear of being assaulted on the way or provision of school lockers where children can leave their items. CONCLUSIONS: Active transport plays an important role in increasing the overall level of physical activity in children. Promotion of active transport should focus on children who spend more time using a computer; attention should also be drawn to safety associated with active transport to and from school.

  20. Children of Incarcerated Parents: Implications for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsch, Priscilla; Rochlen, Aaron B.

    2009-01-01

    The recent increase in prison populations has given rise to an unprecedented number of children in the school system with incarcerated parents. To cope with stressors before, during, or after parents' incarceration, children can exhibit a range of problematic and maladaptive behaviors. This article explores the negative behaviors these children

  1. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among School Age Palestinian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Vivian

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to assess the prevalence of PTSD among Palestinian school-age children. Variables that distinguish PTSD and non-PTSD children were examined, including child characteristics, socioeconomic status, family environment, and parental style of influence. Method: Participants were 1,000 children aged 12 to 16 years.…

  2. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  3. Blood Pressure Screening in School-aged Children in Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Mohkam; Abdollah Karimi; Narges Eslami; Alireza Khatami; Fatemeh Fallah; Saiid Maham; Farzaneh Jadali; Fatemeh Abdollah Gorji

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Hypertension is one of the most common diseases in the world and a major risk factor for cardiovascular, renal, and neurologic diseases. It seems that hypertension and overweight in children are a growing epidemic. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of hypertension in school-aged children in Tehran.Materials and Methods. In a cross-sectional study, blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were performed on school-aged children in Tehran from 2008 to 20...

  4. Self discipline and obesity in Bangkok school children

    OpenAIRE

    Srisorrachatr Suwat; Temcharoen Paradee; Ratanopas Wasoontara; Sirikulchayanonta Chutima

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Childhood obesity has become an important public health problem in Thailand. This study aimed to determine the relationship between self discipline and obesity in Bangkok school children. Methods A case control study was conducted. 140 cases (obese children) and 140 controls (normal weight children) were randomly chosen from grades 4-6 students in 4 Bangkok public schools. Questionnaire responses regarding general characteristics and child self-discipline were obtained fro...

  5. Anthropometry and body composition of school children in Bahrain

    OpenAIRE

    Gharib Nadia; Rasheed Parveen

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives : This study was conducted because of the lack of a comprehensive nationwide assessment of data on the anthropometric status and related health problems in Bahraini school children aged 6 to 18 years. Subjects and Methods :A cross-sectional survey was conducted on the anthropometric status of school children enrolled in the primary, intermediate and secondary government schools in all populated regions of Bahrain. The sample size included 2594 students (1326 girls a...

  6. THE STUDY OF PHYSICAL FITNESS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan M. Jadhav

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In Maharashtra it surprisingly evident that, although the syllabi of Physical Education for Secondary Schools in the state is in vogue (prepared by Maharashtra State Bureau of Textbook Production and Curriculum Research, Pune, there is no research-based standard test battery available so far to assess the real status of physical fitness of the school children. Therefore, researcher had undertaken this study entitled, “Normative study of physical fitness components for secondary school children in Maharashtra state.”

  7. Sick Schools 2009: America's Continuing Environmental Health Crisis for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    Everybody knows that healthy school buildings contribute to student learning, reduce health and operating costs, and ultimately, increase school quality and competitiveness. However, 55 million of the nation's children attend public and private K-12 schools where poor air quality, hazardous chemicals and other unhealthy conditions make students…

  8. Family Background, School Characteristics, and Children's Cognitive Achievement in Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Peter; Randrianarisoa, Jean Claude; Sahn, David E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses linked household, school, and test score data from Madagascar to investigate the relation of household characteristics and school factors to the cognitive skills of children ages 8-10 and 14-16. In contrast to most achievement test studies in developing countries, the study uses representative rather than school-based samples of…

  9. Diagnostics of children's school readiness in scientific studies abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarenko V.V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problem of children's school readiness as it is represented in contemporary studies of foreign scholars. It displays a variety of approaches to estimation of school readiness as well as the ways of measuring the levels of child development as relating to school readiness, namely those of them which are in common practice in education.

  10. Early Intervention and Prevention for Children Excluded from Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotopoulos, Christos; Kerfoot, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In the last 10 years, the problem of school exclusion in England has reached a crisis point. Figures on permanent exclusions from primary, secondary and special schools in England show that for 1996/97, 12 700 children were excluded. Among these, 12% were pupils permanently excluded from primary schools. When the present Labour Government came to…

  11. Text Comprehension in Chinese Children: Relative Contribution of Verbal Working Memory, Pseudoword Reading, Rapid Automated Naming, and Onset-Rime Phonological Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Che Kan; Tse, Shek Kam; Loh, Ka Yee; Hau, Kit Tai

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the role of verbal working memory (memory span, tongue twister), 2-character Chinese pseudoword reading, rapid automatized naming (letters, numbers), and phonological segmentation (deletion of rimes and onsets) in inferential text comprehension in Chinese in 518 Chinese children in Hong Kong in Grades 3 to 5. It was…

  12. Perceived School and Neighborhood Safety, Neighborhood Violence and Academic Achievement in Urban School Children

    OpenAIRE

    Aj, Milam; Cdm, Furr-holden; Pj, Leaf

    2010-01-01

    Community and school violence continue to be a major public health problem, especially among urban children and adolescents. Little research has focused on the effect of school safety and neighborhood violence on academic performance. This study examines the effect of the school and neighborhood climate on academic achievement among a population of 3rd-5th grade students in an urban public school system. Community and school safety were assessed using the School Climate Survey, an annual city...

  13. Second language learning difficulties in Chinese children with dyslexia: what are the reading-related cognitive skills that contribute to English and Chinese word reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin Kien Hoa; Ho, Connie Suk-Han

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relations between reading-related cognitive skills and word reading development of Chinese children with dyslexia in their Chinese language (L1) and in English (L2). A total of 84 bilingual children-28 with dyslexia, 28 chronological age (CA) controls, and 28 reading-level (RL) controls-participated and were administered measures of word reading, rapid naming, visual-orthographic skills, and phonological and morphological awareness in both L1 and L2. Children with dyslexia showed weaker performance than CA controls in both languages and had more difficulties in phonological awareness in English but not in Chinese. In addition, reading-related cognitive skills in Chinese contributed significantly to the ability to read English words, suggesting cross-linguistic transfer from L1 to L2. Results found evidence for different phonological units of awareness related to the characteristics of the different languages being learned, supporting the psycholinguistic grain size and linguistic coding differences hypotheses. PMID:19897734

  14. A Survey of Postgraduates’ State of Language Learning at Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Social Science

    OpenAIRE

    Yingjie Wang

    2014-01-01

    Learning English has become a nationwide endeavor in China nowadays, and a great number of researches have been conducted to analyze the state of language learning mainly among undergraduates. This survey was done to investigate the postgraduates’ state of language learning at Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Social Science in order to stand a better position to improve their language learning. The survey shows that postgraduates have strong motivations (intrinsic and extrinsic) to...

  15. Predictors of Prosocial Behavior among Chinese High School Students in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Siu, Andrew M. H.; Shek, Daniel T. L.; Lai, Frank H. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the correlates and predictors of prosocial behavior among Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong. A sample of 518 high school students responded to a questionnaire containing measures of antisocial and prosocial behavior, prosocial norms, pragmatic values, moral reasoning, and empathy. Preliminary analyses showed that there were gender differences in some of the measures. While correlation analyses showed that parental education, prosocial norms, pragmatic values, moral reasonin...

  16. A Survey of Attitudes toward Mediation among Chinese High School EFL Teachers and Their Classroom Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Xiongyong Cheng

    2012-01-01

    This paper raises concerns about Chinese high school EFL teachers’ attitudes toward mediation and their classroom constraints. From the data gathered in the survey of 152 EFL teachers, the findings indicate that most teachers fail to mediate students’ learning due to situational constraints that they encounter though they hold positive attitudes toward mediation. Statistically, teachers with higher educational qualifications have more positive attitudes toward the mediator role th...

  17. Predicting internalizing problems in Chinese children: the unique and interactive effects of parenting and child temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhtadie, Luma; Zhou, Qing; Eisenberg, Nancy; Wang, Yun

    2013-08-01

    The additive and interactive relations of parenting styles (authoritative and authoritarian parenting) and child temperament (anger/frustration, sadness, and effortful control) to children's internalizing problems were examined in a 3.8-year longitudinal study of 425 Chinese children (aged 6-9 years) from Beijing. At Wave 1, parents self-reported on their parenting styles, and parents and teachers rated child temperament. At Wave 2, parents, teachers, and children rated children's internalizing problems. Structural equation modeling indicated that the main effect of authoritative parenting and the interactions of Authoritarian Parenting × Effortful Control and Authoritative Parenting × Anger/Frustration (parents' reports only) prospectively and uniquely predicted internalizing problems. The above results did not vary by child sex and remained significant after controlling for co-occurring externalizing problems. These findings suggest that (a) children with low effortful control may be particularly susceptible to the adverse effect of authoritarian parenting and (b) the benefit of authoritative parenting may be especially important for children with high anger/frustration. PMID:23880383

  18. A Tale of Two Writing Systems: Double Dissociation and Metalinguistic Transfer between Chinese and English Word Reading among Hong Kong Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiuli; Tong, Xiuhong; McBride-Chang, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the rate of school-aged Chinese-English language learners at risk for reading difficulties in either Chinese or English only, or both, among second and fifth graders in Hong Kong. In addition, we examined the metalinguistic skills that distinguished those who were poor in reading Chinese from those who were poor in reading…

  19. Pattern of Ocular Morbidity in School Children in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpal Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available School eye health services is one of the important aspect of school health services in which children can be screened for various systemic and eye diseases such as refractive error, squint, amblyopia, cataract ,vitamin deficiency etc . The basic aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and pattern of visual impairment amongst school children of central India and to recognize avoidable causes of ocular morbidity. School surveys were conducted in various government schools of rural, urban and semi urban areas of Bhopal between Nov-2004 to Dec-07. A total of 20,800 school children between age group 5 to 16 years had under gone the complete ocular examination. Prevalence of Ocular morbidity was found in 14.5%. Refractive error was found to be the most common cause of ocular morbidity (47.91% followed by vitamin A deficiency (13.66% and strabismus (2.08%.

  20. The association between socioeconomic status and traditional chinese medicine use among children in Taiwan

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    Shih Chun-Chuan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM utilization is common in Asian countries. Limited studies are available on the socioeconomic status (SES associated with TCM use among the pediatric population. We report on the association between SES and TCM use among children and adolescents in Taiwan. Methods A National Health Interview Survey was conducted in Taiwan in 2001 that included 5,971 children and adolescents. We assessed the children's SES using the head of household's education, occupation and income. This information was used to calculate pediatric SES scores, which in turn were divided into quartiles. Children and adolescents who visited TCM in the past month were defined as TCM users. Results Compared to children in the second SES quartile, children in the fourth SES quartile had a higher average number of TCM visits (0.12 vs. 0.06 visits, p = 0.027 and higher TCM use prevalence (5.0% vs. 3.6%, p = 0.024 within the past month. The adjusted odds ratio (OR for TCM use was higher for children in the fourth SES quartile than for those in the first SES quartile (OR 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-2.17. The corresponding OR was 2.17 for girls (95% CI 1.24-3.78. The highest-SES girls (aged 10-18 years were most likely to visit TCM practices (OR 2.47; 95% CI 1.25-4.90. Conclusions Children and adolescents with high SES were more likely to use TCM and especially girls aged 10-18 years. Our findings point to the high use of complementary and alternative medicine among children and adolescents.

  1. Children's experiences of democracy, participation, and trust in school

    OpenAIRE

    Thornberg, Robert; Elvstrand, Helene

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate children's views and experiences of democracy and pupil participation in relation to everyday school life, and to let their voices be heard on these issues. The data for this paper was derived from two ethnographic research projects conducted in three elementary schools in Sweden. In the classes investigated at two of the three schools, the adults are those who make decisions about school and classroom rules. Pupils are seldom given any opportunity to c...

  2. Elite Schools, Postcolonial Chineseness and Hegemonic Masculinities in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Daniel P. S.

    2015-01-01

    The educational reproduction of elite masculinity in postcolonial societies has not been properly studied. This is partly because the postcolonial masculinities of non-western elites are accomplished through the cultivation of naturalized practices signifying the body politic of the nation-state. In Singapore, same-sex elite schools of colonial…

  3. The Place of Physics in Chinese Middle Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Mi Zi

    1988-01-01

    Describes the history and structure of physics education in secondary schools in China. Discusses the selection of course content. Cites the historical failure of the cultural revolution for the present bias of theoretical over practical physics. Discusses the China-U.S. physics examination and application project. (CW)

  4. Temporal trends and recent correlates in sedentary behaviours in Chinese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibley Michael J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sedentary behaviours (television, video and computer are related to health outcomes independent of physical activity. Few studies have examined trends and correlates of sedentary behaviours among youth in developing nations. The current study is to examine temporal trends in sedentary behaviours and recent correlates of screen use in Chinese children during a period of economic transition. Methods Secondary analysis of China Health and Nutrition Surveys. Cross-sectional data on sedentary behaviours including screen use among children aged 6-18 years from four surveys in 1997 (n = 2,469, 2000 (n = 1,838, 2004 (n = 1,382 and 2006 (n = 1,128. Temporal trends in screen use by socio-demographic characteristics were examined. The correlates of spending more than 2 hours per day on screen time in the most recent survey data (2006, n = 986 were analysed using survey logistic regression analysis. Results Daily screen time significantly increased in each subgroup by age, sex and urban/rural residence, with the largest increase for urban boys aged 13-18 years from 0.5 hours to 1.7 hours, and for rural boys aged 6-12 years from 0.7 hours to 1.7 hours (p Conclusion This study confirms sedentary behaviour has increased over the last decade in Chinese children. Efforts to ensure Chinese youth meet screen time guidelines include limiting access to screen technologies and encouraging parents to monitor their own screen time and to set limits on their child's screen time.

  5. Pre- and Postnatal Risk Factors in Relation to Allergic Rhinitis in School-Aged Children in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Youjin; Jiang, Yanrui; Li, Shenghui; Shen, Xiaoming; Liu, Jinfen; Jiang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between prenatal and postnatal risk factors and the prevalence of allergic rhinitis (AR) in Chinese children of specific ages. Study Design This study was a cross-sectional survey. Students from 8 metropolitan cities in China were studied in November and December, 2005. There were 20,803 elementary-school Chinese children (49.6% boys, mean age, 9.19 years) enrolled. Questions from the standard questionnaire of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Children were completed to enable us to examine the pattern of current AR. The potential confounders and pre-and postnatal risk factors were analyzed using logistic regression. Results The overall prevalence of AR was found in this study to be 9.8%. After adjusting for several likely confounders, there was a higher likelihood of AR in school-aged children who were not exclusively breastfed in the first 4 months of their lives (odds ratio [OR]: 1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.16–1.41), children who were born post-term (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.12–1.60), children delivered by cesarean section (OR: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.00–1.19), or children born to mothers who experienced depressive symptoms during the pre- and postnatal periods (OR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.15–1.42). Conclusions AR in school-aged children was found to be associated with pre- and postnatal events. These findings indicate that strategies to reduce exposure to risk factors during pre- and postnatal periods for childhood allergies might be warranted. PMID:25647669

  6. The Effects of School Lunch Participation, Socioeconomic and Psychological Variables on Food Consumption of School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, David W.; Price, Dorothy Z.

    Estimates were made of the effects of school lunch participation and various socioeconomic, anthropometric, and psychological variables on the consumption of 20 food items by 8- to 12-year-old children. The study sample consisted of 845 school children in the State of Washington, stratified by ethnic group and by poverty level so that it contained…

  7. A Study of Pre-School Children's School Readiness Related to Scientific Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unutkan, Ozgul Polat

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare school readiness of children who had pre-school experiences and children without such experiences on the basis of scientific thinking skills. This comparison is held in terms of variables of age, gender, and socio economic status. The questions of the study in relation to the purpose of the study are as…

  8. Dynamic Visual Perception and Reading Development in Chinese School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Cheng-Lai, Alice; Zeng, Biao; Stein, John F.; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    The development of reading skills may depend to a certain extent on the development of basic visual perception. The magnocellular theory of developmental dyslexia assumes that deficits in the magnocellular pathway, indicated by less sensitivity in perceiving dynamic sensory stimuli, are responsible for a proportion of reading difficulties…

  9. Dynamic visual perception and reading development in Chinese school children.

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, X.; Cheng-lai, A.; Zeng, B.; Stein, Jf; Zhou, X.

    2011-01-01

    The development of reading skills may depend to a certain extent on the development of basic visual perception. The magnocellular theory of developmental dyslexia assumes that deficits in the magnocellular pathway, indicated by less sensitivity in perceiving dynamic sensory stimuli, are responsible for a proportion of reading difficulties experienced by dyslexics. Using a task that measures coherent motion detection threshold, this study examined the relationship between dynamic visual percep...

  10. Cellular telephone use among primary school children in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: There is some concern about potential health risks of cellular telephone use to children. We assessed data on how many children own a cellular telephone and on how often they use it in a population-based sample. Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study among children in their fourth elementary school year, with a median-age of 10 years. The study was carried out in Mainz (Germany), a city with about 200,000 inhabitants. The study base comprised all 37 primary schools in Mainz and near surroundings. Altogether, 1933 children from 34 primary schools took part in the survey (participation rate of 87.8%). Results: Roughly a third of all children (n = 671, 34.7%) reported to own a cellular telephone. Overall, 119 (6.2%) children used a cellular telephone for making calls at least once a day, 123 (6.4%) used it several times a week and 876 (45.3%) children used it only once in a while. The remaining 805 (41.6%) children had never used a cellular telephone. The probability of owning a cellular telephone among children was associated with older age, being male, having no siblings, giving full particulars to height and weight, more time spent watching TV and playing computer games, being picked up by their parents from school by car (instead of walking or cycling) and going to bed late. The proportion of cellular telephone owners was somewhat higher in classes with more children from socially disadvantaged families. Conclusions: Our study shows that both ownConclusions: Our study shows that both ownership of a cellular telephone as well as the regular use of it are already quite frequent among children in the fourth grade of primary school. With regard to potential long-term effects, we recommend follow-up studies with children

  11. Children's body mass index, participation in school meals, and observed energy intake at school meals

    OpenAIRE

    Mackelprang Alyssa J; Royer Julie A; Guinn Caroline H; Hardin James W; Baxter Suzanne; Devlin Christina M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Data from a dietary-reporting validation study with fourth-grade children were analyzed to investigate a possible relationship of body mass index (BMI) with daily participation in school meals and observed energy intake at school meals, and whether the relationships differed by breakfast location (classroom; cafeteria). Methods Data were collected in 17, 17, and 8 schools during three school years. For the three years, six, six, and seven of the schools had breakfast in th...

  12. Elementary and Middle School Children's Comprehension of Euclidean Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, F. Richard

    1976-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of middle school children to perform Euclidean transformations mentally. The results indicated that the tasks were more difficult than Piagetian theory would indicate. (SD)

  13. Children stories about primary schools: sceneries and (autobiographic research challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Conceição Passeggi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with 4-10 year-old children stories and analyses how they portrait their experiences at school. It is the outcome of an inter-institutional research project performed at schools in Natal, São Paulo, Recife, Niterói and Boa Vista. To collect data, we opted for conversations of children in groups of five, who would share a conversation with a little alien whose planet lacked schools. The analyses revealed consensus and tensions between scholar cultu - re and childhood cultures, which affect the way children play and learn, make friends or not, remain children or not. When narrating, the child redefines his/her experience and contributes to seize the primary school as a place where he/she becomes (or not a citizen.

  14. Factors Influencing Obesity on School-Aged Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soepardi Soedibyo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available School-aged children of 6-12 year old in big cities have less physical activities and relax life style. Fast food and soft drink consumed contain high calorie and protein of protein and carbohydrate sources. Obesity has impact on children’s growth and development especially on psychosocial aspect. The factors that play a role in supporting the obesity occurrence in children include socio-economic condition, behavior and life style and diet. A cross sectional descriptive –analytic study was conducted on elementary school students in Jakarta, to identify factors that play roles on obesity of school-aged children. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:43-54Keywords: childhood obesity, weight shape index, body mass index

  15. Predisposing, Reinforcing and Enabling Predictors of Middle School Children's After-School Physical Activity Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kristi M.; Ogletree, Roberta J.; Fetro, Joyce V.; Brown, Stephen L.; Partridge, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Children's participation in after-school physical activity can attenuate the overweight and obesity rates among rural, low socioeconomic status (SES) children. Children's individual determination, as well as social and environmental factors, can influence their behaviors. Purpose: The purposes of this study were to determine if a difference…

  16. Registered Indian Children's School Success and Intergenerational Effects of Residential Schooling in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Sacha Senécal; Evelyne Bougie

    2010-01-01

    Using the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this study investigates factors associated with school success (as perceived by parents) among off-reserve Registered Indian children aged 6 to 14 in Canada. Holding other factors constant, Registered Indian children were more likely to be doing well at school if they were living in households with high income, were living in adequately maintained dwellings, or spoke an Aboriginal language at home. Boys and older children, on the other hand, were less...

  17. "Boring and Stressful" or "Ideal" Learning Spaces? Pupils' Constructions of Teaching and Learning in Chinese Supplementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Louise; Francis, Becky; Mau, Ada

    2009-01-01

    Chinese supplementary schools have been accused of having "old-fashioned" and ineffective teaching methods, with most teaching being undertaken by "unqualified" volunteer parent teachers. But how do pupils themselves interpret and experience the complementary school setting and to what extent do they feel it affects their learning? Drawing on…

  18. School-Based Extracurricular Activities, Personality, Self-Concept, and College Career Development Skills in Chinese Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiah, Yung-Jong; Huang, Ying; Chang, Frances; Chang, Chuan-Feng; Yeh, Lun-Chang

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we examined in Chinese society the association of school-based extracurricular activities (SBEAs) in both high school and college with students' career development skills in college, as well as with various personality characteristics and self-concept. Each of 281 college students administered the Lai Personality Inventory,…

  19. EXAMINATION OF TELEVISION VIEWING HABITS OF SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz ARSLAN

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Television has powerful effects on children. Howewer TV gives positive messages to children it also can cause children to be inactive and prevent their creative play activities. In this study, it was aimed at to determine the television viewing habits of school age children between 6?12 years old. That Cross-sectional type study has been conducted on 100 students who were selected with stratified randomised sampling method according to sex, age and class among 492 students who were taken education from first step of the Ankara-Cigiltepe Primary Education School. Mean age of school age children who were involved in study was 9.1±1.5. It was detemined that 43% of children (n=43 were watching TV more than 3 hours a day, 54% of them were watching TV to relieve their boredom and 48% of them were watching TV because they like watching. When the spare time activities of children were examined it was determined that they were spending their time by playing and making sportive activities with the highest rate (n=95, 26.1%, and television viewing was in the third order (n=61, 17.3%. In this study, it was determined that most of the children were watching TV under the offered time, children whose mother were not working were watching TV for longer time, and TV watching time of the children were increasing with increasing age. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(6.000: 391-401

  20. Smokeless tobacco use among Native American school children.

    OpenAIRE

    Bruerd, B.

    1990-01-01

    Seven published and two unpublished surveys of Native American school children's use of smokeless tobacco (ST) are reviewed. The surveys represent school children in the States of South Dakota, Montana, Nebraska, Washington, Arizona, New Mexico, and Alaska. This review describes and discusses the survey methods, prevalence, duration, and intensity of ST use, and ST health effects documented in these studies. Prevalence of regular ST use ranges from 18 percent in kindergartners through 6th gra...

  1. An after-school exercise program improves fitness, and body composition in elementary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Carrel, Aaron L.; Logue, Julie; Deininger, Heidi; Clark, R. Randall; Curtis, Vanessa; Montague, Paul; Baldwin, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Reduced cardiovascular fitness (CVF) is a risk factor for obesity and cardiovascular disease. It has previously shown that a school-based fitness curriculum can improve CVF, and other health indicators in middle school aged children. Whether an afterschool program improves CVF and other health markers in elementary-school children is unresolved. The objective of this study was therefore to determine whether an on-site afterschool-based fitness program improves body composition, cardiovascular...

  2. Overweight and School Performance Among Primary School Children: The PIAMA Birth Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Veldwijk, J.; Fries, M. C. E.; Bemelmans, W. J. E.; Haveman-nies, A.; Smit, H. A.; Koppelman, G. H.; Wijga, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between overweight and school performance among primary school children prospectively and including a broad range of potential confounding factors. In addition it was investigated what factors mediate this association. For this purpose, data of 2,159 12-year-old children who participated in the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA) birth cohort study were used. Two indicators of school performance were parental reported...

  3. Chinese students' great expectations : prospective pre-school teachers on the move

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ThØgersen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The article focuses on Chinese students' hopes and expectations before leaving to study abroad. The national political environment for their decision to go abroad is shaped by an official narrative of China's transition to a more creative and innovative economy. Students draw on this narrative to interpret their own educational histories and prior experiences, while at the same time making use of imaginaries of 'Western' education to redefine themselves as independent individuals in an increasingly globalised and individualised world. Through a case study of prospective pre-school teachers preparing to study abroad, the article shows how personal, professional and even national goals are closely interwoven. Students expect education abroad to be a personally transformative experience, but rather than defining their goals of individual freedom and creativity in opposition to the authoritarian political system, they think of themselves as having a role in the transformation of Chinese attitudes to education andparent-child relations.

  4. An Investigation of School Violence through Turkish Children's Drawings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtal, Filiz; Artut, Kazim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates Turkish children's perception of violence in school as represented through drawings and narratives. In all, 66 students (12 to 13 years old) from the middle socioeconomic class participated. To elicit children's perception of violence, they were asked to draw a picture of a violent incident they had heard, experienced, or…

  5. Peer Acceptance of Highly Gifted Children in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The variables associated with peer acceptance and rejection have been the subject of considerable investigation over the past few years, therefore, the present study was designed to answer three questions: (1) How socially accepted are highly gifted children in the elementary-school classroom? (2) What is the intellectual level of the children

  6. Primary School Children's Self-Efficacy for Music Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Laura; Williamon, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy for Musical Learning questionnaire was adapted and tested with 404 primary school children, producing a robust Cronbach alpha (0.87) and confirming a single underlying factor through exploratory factor analysis. Test-retest scores showed the measure's stability over a 9-month period. Data were collected on children's prior music…

  7. Parents, Teachers and Children's School Outcomes: A Taiwanese Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chih-Lun; Marjoribanks, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    The study examined relationships among family social status, perceptions of family and school learning environments, and measures of children's academic achievement, educational aspirations and self-concept. Data were collected from 261 (128 boys, 133 girls) 11-year-old Taiwanese children. The findings from structural equation modelling suggest…

  8. Exploratory Talk, Argumentation and Reasoning in Mexican Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Drummond, Sylvia; Zapata, Margarita Peon

    2004-01-01

    The study analyses the effects of training primary school children in the use of a linguistic tool called "Exploratory Talk" (ET) on their capacity for argumentation. ET allows for reasoned confrontation and negotiation of points of view, making the reasoning visible in the talk. Eighty-eight Mexican children from the 5th and 6th grades of primary…

  9. Parental Choice of Schooling, Learning Processes and Inter-Ethnic Friendship Patterns: The Case of Malay Students in Chinese Primary Schools in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sua, Tan Yao; Ngah, Kamarudin; Darit, Sezali Md.

    2013-01-01

    This study surveys 200 Malay students enrolled in three Chinese primary schools in relation to three issues, i.e., parental choice of schooling, learning processes and inter-ethnic friendship patterns. The three issues are explored through a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Parental expectations for their…

  10. Children Entering School Ready to Learn: 2010-2011 Maryland Model for School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The report shares what everyone has learned from the 2010-2011 Maryland Model for School Readiness (MMSR) data about the school readiness of Maryland's children: statewide, by subgroups, and for each of Maryland's 24 local jurisdictions. Some of the highlights are: (1) The percentage of Maryland kindergarteners fully ready to start school

  11. Parent-School Relationships and Children's Academic and Social Outcomes in Public School Pre-Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Douglas R.; Son, Seung-Hee; File, Nancy; San Juan, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Two dimensions of parent-school relationships, parental school involvement and parents' perceptions of teacher responsiveness to child/parent, were examined in state-funded pre-kindergarten classrooms in a large urban school district. Children's social and academic outcomes were individually assessed in the fall and spring. Hierarchical Linear…

  12. Assessing the School Readiness of Children in Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Al-hassan, Suha M.; Lansford, Jennifer E.

    2009-01-01

    In 2003, Jordan initiated a period of education reform, one component of which was an effort to improve readiness for first grade by opening public kindergartens. This study had three goals: (a) To describe the school readiness of Jordanian children; (b) To compare the first grade readiness of children who had and had not attended kindergarten; and (c) To compare the 2004 and 2007 readiness of children in areas that instituted kindergartens during that time period. Trained observers directly ...

  13. Ear screening in primary school children in Lusaka, Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Fro?schl, U.; Mwamba, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hearing screening programs for school-aged children are common in the more developed countries, but not in the developing world. Hearing loss is referred to as the silent, overlooked epidemic in developing countries. The 2008 Zambian Ministry of Education statistical bulletin showed that there were a total of 168,866 children with special education needs from grade 1-9. 27,000 children were listed with hearing defects and 70,229 listed as having learning difficulties. Most teache...

  14. The Development of Associate Learning in School Age Children

    OpenAIRE

    Harel, Brian T.; Pietrzak, Robert H.; Snyder, Peter J.; Thomas, Elizabeth; Mayes, Linda C.; Maruff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Associate learning is fundamental to the acquisition of knowledge and plays a critical role in the everyday functioning of the developing child, though the developmental course is still unclear. This study investigated the development of visual associate learning in 125 school age children using the Continuous Paired Associate Learning task. As hypothesized, younger children made more errors than older children across all memory loads and evidenced decreased learning efficiency as memory load...

  15. An Interdisciplinary Course to Prepare School Professionals to Collaborate with Families of Exceptional Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sarah Kit-Yee

    2005-01-01

    To help children succeed in schools, professionals must work with the family system since "the family is the child's first teacher" and the benefits of involving families in educating children are evident in research findings. School professionals include teachers, school social workers, school psychologists, school counselors, and school nurses.…

  16. Blood Pressure Screening in School-aged Children in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Mohkam

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hypertension is one of the most common diseases in the world and a major risk factor for cardiovascular, renal, and neurologic diseases. It seems that hypertension and overweight in children are a growing epidemic. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of hypertension in school-aged children in Tehran.Materials and Methods. In a cross-sectional study, blood pressure and anthropometric measurements were performed on school-aged children in Tehran from 2008 to 2009. Children aged 7 to 11 years from 5 public schools in Tehran were included. Blood pressure, weight, and height measurement were performed at the school. At each screening, 3 seated blood pressure, weight, and height measurements were made and at least after 3 minutes of rest and choosing proper cuff, blood pressure was measured by a pediatric nephrologist and a pediatric assistant.Results. A total of 425 school-aged children were included. Twenty-four percent of the primary school children had hypertension and 12% were shown to be overweight. Hypertension was more common in students of the north of Tehran in comparison to other geographic parts of Tehran. There was a significant difference in the prevalence of hypertension between girl students of north of Tehran and girls of the other parts of Tehran.Conclusions. We concluded that hypertension is a common problem in school-aged children. Our study re-emphasized the need for prevention and control of high blood pressure in children to manage the global diseases burden due to hypertension.

  17. Chinese female nursing students’ coping strategies, self-esteem and related factors in different years of school

    OpenAIRE

    Chunping Ni; Daiwei Lo; Xiwen Liu; Jinfeng Ma; Shasha Xu; Lu Li,

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent research has emphasized the importance of coping. There is virtually nothing known about coping strategies and their relationship with self-esteem, individual and environmental factors among Chinese female nursing students. This study was to identify different coping strategies, the relationship between coping and self-esteem and influencing individual factors among Chinese female students in different years of nursing school. Method: The study used a cross-sectional design...

  18. Comparative study on body shape satisfaction and body weight control between Korean and Chinese female high school students

    OpenAIRE

    Ro, Yoona; Hyun, Whajin

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare body shape satisfaction, body image perception, weight control status, and dietary habits of Korean and Chinese female high school students in order to provide information for proper body image perception of adolescents. 221 students in Yongin, a city in Korea, and 227 students in Weihai, a city in China, were surveyed using questionnaires. Body shape satisfaction was significantly higher in Chinese students (P < 0.001) compared to Korean students. 76.2% of...

  19. Arts Enrichment and School Readiness for Children at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Eleanor D.; Benedett, Barbara; Armistead, M. Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Arts enrichment provides varied channels for acquiring school readiness skills and may offer important educational opportunities for students from diverse backgrounds and with diverse needs. Study 1 examined achievement within an arts enrichment preschool that served low-income children. Results indicated that students practiced school readiness…

  20. Multiple Predictors of Asian American Children's School Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung Seek; Lee, Joohi

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: A structural equation model (SEM) and multiple indicators and multiple causes (MIMIC) model were used to test family factors, parent psychological well-being, parent-child home activity, and parent school involvement in relation to children's school achievement. Data for this study were drawn from the Early Childhood…

  1. Vision: Its Assessment in School-Age Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, James W.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1980 vision examinations were given to 2,200 children and young adults from schools for the deaf in the states of Arkansas, Missouri, Louisiana, and Texas. The data indicated a need for increased emphasis on the evaluation of vision function in schools for the deaf. (Author/SW)

  2. Obesity and Other Predictors of Absenteeism in Philadelphia School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Elizabeth B.; Daskalakis, Constantine; Andrel, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Limited data indicate that obese children are absent from school more than their normal-weight peers. We analyzed administrative data from a large urban school district to investigate the association of obesity and student sociodemographic characteristics with absenteeism. Methods: We analyzed 291,040 records, representing 165,056…

  3. Sleep Disorders in Children: Collaboration for School-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, D. Erik

    2011-01-01

    The effects of sleep disturbance on children are wide ranging and include alterations in behavior, mood, cognition, and academic performance. Screening and intervention for pediatric sleep disorders within the schools are not widely implemented, and the concept of integrating school personnel into the multidisciplinary sleep team has yet to be…

  4. Prevalence of intolerance to food additives among Danish school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, G.; Madsen, C.

    1993-01-01

    The prevalence of intolerance to food additives was assessed in a group of unselected school children aged 5-16 years. A study group of 271 children was selected on the basis of the results of a questionnaire on atopic disease answered by 4,274 (86%) school children in the municipality of Viborg, Denmark. The children in the study group followed an elimination diet for two weeks before they were challenged with a mixture of food preservatives, colourings and flavours. The challenge was open and the additives were prepared as a fizzy lemonade. If the open challenge was positive, a double-blind placebo controlled challenge with gelatine capsules was performed. The study included 281 children, 10 were excluded, and the remaining 271 children were given the open challenge (98 healthy controls and 173 with atopic symptoms). The open challenge was negative in all 98 healthy control children who had not reported any atopic symptoms. Of the 173 children reporting present or previous atopic disease 17 had a positive open challenge. Of these 17 children 1 experienced gastrointestinal symptoms, 13 reacted with aggravation of atopic eczema, and 3 with urticaria. Twelve of these 17 children went through the double-blind challenge which was positive in 6 cases. Five of these 6 children had positive reactions to synthetic colourings and 1 to citric acid. No serious reactions were seen. Based upon calculations of the results from this study and an earlier multi-center study in children referred to hospital clinics, the prevalence of intolerance to food additives in school children is estimated to be 1-2%.

  5. Overweight and school performance among primary school children: the PIAMA birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldwijk, Jorien; Fries, Marieke C E; Bemelmans, Wanda J E; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; Smit, Henriëtte A; Koppelman, Gerard H; Wijga, Alet H

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between overweight and school performance among primary school children prospectively and including a broad range of potential confounding factors. In addition it was investigated what factors mediate this association. For this purpose, data of 2,159 12-year-old children who participated in the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy (PIAMA) birth cohort study were used. Two indicators of school performance were parental reported when children were 12 years of age and included (i): the score on a standardized achievement test that Dutch children have to complete at the end of their primary education (Cito)-test and (ii): the teacher's advice regarding a child's potential performance level in secondary education. Children's height and weight were measured by a trained research assistant at the age of 8 and by their parents at the age of 12. Overweight was defined using age and gender specific cut-off points. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to assess the association between overweight and school performance. Besides, both confounder and mediation analyses were conducted. Results showed lower Cito-test scores and lower teacher's school-level advice among overweight children. These associations were no longer significant when adjusting for parental educational level, skipping breakfast, and screen time. This study found no independent association between overweight and school performance among primary school children. Results showed strong confounding by parental educational level. PMID:22030985

  6. SCHOOL AND OUT-OF-SCHOOL PHYSICAL ACTIVITY OF CHILDREN IN RURAL AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podstawski Robert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The aim of the study was to assess the level of school and out-of-school physical activity of children living in rural area at the early stage of their education. Material : The research was conducted in 2009 at primary school in ?wi?tajno (a village. The study group consisted of 42 girls and 44 boys from the 1 st, 2 nd and 3 rd grade of primary school, aged 7-10. The children were chosen by means of a purposeful selection and surveyed by a questionnaire consisting of five open-ended and five closed-ended questions. Results : The research showed that the children living in the rural area at the early stage of their education eagerly participated in the classes of physical education held at school. The most popular physical activities among the children included: games and plays with the ball and other equipment, running, gymnastics (among girls and matches and competitions (among boys. The outdoor physical activities in which the children were involved outside of school were spontaneous and unorganized including mainly cycling, roller-skating, skating or skiing. Conclusions : A marginal percentage of children participated in out-of-school sports trainings or other physical education-oriented classes (e.g. swimming lessons. A relatively high percentage of children devoted a great deal of their free time to watching television, DVDs or playing on the computer.

  7. Play as main road in children’s transition to school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig

    2013-01-01

    This chapter deals with children’s transition to school and play. First part focuses on transition and shows a number of problem, which in short can be described as lack of continuity between preschool and school. The answer to this problem is to create transition strategies and activities. Besides a number of transition activities the author argues for play as pivot for successful transition and more specific dialogical reading followed by play. Thus play is not seen as children’s own free-flow play, but as an educational activity in which the preschool teacher has an active role.

  8. The Oxford School of children’s fantasy literature: medieval afterlives and the production of culture

    OpenAIRE

    Cecire, Maria Sachiko; Larrington, Carolyne; Purkiss, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This thesis names the Oxford School of children’s fantasy literature as arising from the educational milieu of the University of Oxford’s English School during the mid-twentieth century. It argues that J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis lay the foundations for the children’s fantasy genre by introducing an English curriculum at Oxford in 1931 (first examined 1933) that required extensive study in medieval literature, and by modelling the use of medieval source material in their own popular c...

  9. Stronger vection in junior high school children than in adults.

    OpenAIRE

    NobuShirai; TomokoImura; TakeharuSeno

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that even elementary school-aged children (7 and 11 years old) experience visually induced perception of illusory self-motion (vection) (Lepecq et al., 1995, Perception, 24, 435–449) and that children of a similar age (mean age = 9.2 years) experience more rapid and stronger vection than do adults (Shirai et al., 2012, Perception, 41, 1399–1402). These findings imply that although elementary school-aged children experience vection, this ability is subject to fu...

  10. School reentry for children with cancer: perceptions of nurses, school personnel, and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jean Burley; Kaffenberger, Carol; Goldberg, Patricia; Kyeung Mi Oh; Hudspeth, Robin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this interdisciplinary descriptive study was to examine the perceptions of nurses, school personnel, and parents about school reentry for children with cancer and to determine whether activities and services performed supported school reentry. The study also investigated parents' perception of the impact of cancer on their child's academic performance, cognitive ability, and school attendance. Results of the study showed that few activities and services were performed to facilitate children's school reentry by either nurses or school personnel. Parents reported no significant differences in their children's cognitive ability or academic performance. School attendance was significantly lower after diagnosis and therapy. Conclusions were that communication among nurses, school personnel, and parents was a major barrier to providing effective services to students and their parents. Nurses were unsure of how to help parents navigate the school bureaucracy, school personnel felt they needed more information, and parents felt that their children were not receiving all the school reentry services needed. Individuals in this study recommended that a liaison position be created to coordinate services. PMID:19202115

  11. Awareness of dengue fever among school children: a comparison between private and government schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Kalra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue is the mosquito born viral disease spreading its tentacles all over the world. Dengue constitutes for major cause of deaths in children. According to WHO, globally it was estimated that approximately 70-100 million people were infected every year. Therefore, the study has been conducted with the aim to assess knowledge regarding dengue fever among school children. Methodology: Total of 500 children were selected from 9th and 10th class of private and government schools using total enumerative sampling technique. Data was collected using questionnaire method. After assessing knowledge classes were taken by investigators focusing on prevention of dengue fever. Results: Finding of study revealed that among Private schools excellent knowledge was found in 06 (01.2% children, good in 123 (24.6% children, average 112 (22.4% children and poor in 02 (00.41 whereas in Government schools none of students had excellent knowledge, 76(15.2% children were having good knowledge, 178(35.6% children were having average knowledge & 03 (00.6 children were having poor knowledge. The mean knowledge scores were higher in students of Private schools i.e. 31.45 ± 6.41 as compared to students of Government schools i.e. 28.17 ± 5.39 at t=6.19 (p=0.00. Conclusion: It is concluded that majority of school students of private and government schools were having average knowledge regarding prevention of dengue fever. Therefore, there is need for further information, education and communication programs regarding prevention of dengue fever and this can be achieved by organizing health education campaigns in community involving schools.

  12. The attitude of school children towards the functional foods

    OpenAIRE

    Raztresen, Gabrijela

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to examine closely the extent to which students know the concept of functional foods and their attitude towards them. We also tried to find out if there were any differences between children, that live in urban environment and visit schools in cities and children, that live in rural environment and visit schools in villages in understanding that term. We got the data from questionnaire that was answered by 122 students of sixth class in two schools, one in urban and...

  13. Children of Somali Refugees in Australian Schools: Self-Descriptions of School-Related Skills and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Agnes E.; Lawrence, Jeanette A.; Karantzas, Kellie; Brooker, Abi; Lin, Ying Han; Champness, Vivienne; Albert, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    We examined self-descriptions of children of Somali refugee families in Australian primary schools, focusing on how children's school-related skills and needs relate to the interpretive frames of mainstream and ethnic cultures. Three groups of Grade 5 and 6 children (Somali, Disadvantaged, Advantaged) made choices among school-related skills, and…

  14. School Children's Happiness Inventory: The Validity and Reliability Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bülent Baki Telef

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to carry out the validity and the reliability study of the School Children’s Happiness Inventory. 358 Elementary school students, 195 (55% of which were female and 163 (45% male, participated in the research. The School Children’s Happiness Inventory, Depression Scale for Children and Scale of Positive and Negative Experience were used as data collection instruments in the research. For the validity study of the inventory, structure validity and criterion dependent validity were checked. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was calculated to identify reliability. At the end of the exploratory factor analysis carried out in order to determine the factor structure of the inventory, the inventory was composed of two factors, as is present in its original form. According to the confirmatory factor analysis, the fit indexes of the scale were determined to be at the acceptable level. At the end of the criterion dependent validity study, it was seen that there was a negatively significant relationship between the School Children’s Happiness Inventory and depression and negative experiences, and a positively significant relationship between the inventory and the positive experiences. At the end of the reliability study, it was seen that Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of the inventory was quite high. As a result of this validity and reliability study, it can be said that the inventory is a valid and reliable assessment instrument for evaluating the happiness of schoolchildren.

  15. School Day Physical Activity Patterns of Pima Indian Children in Two Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tyler G.; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Darst, Paul W.; Pangrazi, Robert P.

    2007-01-01

    This study provides baseline data on Pima children's school day physical activity participation from two Pima communities. Specifically, the authors were interested in how Pima children's SSC (school step counts) physical activity compared with children who attend public schools in large metropolitan areas. Findings suggest that Pima children

  16. Immigrants’ children’s transition to secondary school in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Barban, Nicola; White, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Choosing a secondary school represents an important step in the lives of students in Italy, in that it has a strong bearing on their ultimate educational achievement and labor force trajectory. In this paper, we analyze the effect of generational status and length of residence on the transition to secondary school among immigrants living in Italy. Using data from the ITAGEN2 follow-up, we analyze scholastic results from the middle school final exam and the choice of secondary school among the...

  17. 'Wishing for Dragon Children': Ironies and Contradictions in China's Education Reform and the Chinese Diaspora's Disappointments with Australian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianguo; Singh, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper argues that the re-traditionalisation of 'wishing for dragon children' creates difficulties for China's current education reforms and informs the disquiet expressed by Chinese-Australians about Australian education. We develop this argument around three key propositions. First, we explore Confucianism and the civil service examination…

  18. Orthogonal versus Linear Models of Acculturation among Immigrant Chinese Canadians: A Comparison of Mothers, Fathers, and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigan, Catherine L.; Su, Tina F.

    2004-01-01

    A multidimensional model of acculturation was examined among 96 immigrant Chinese families living in Canada. All parents were foreign-born, as were 75% of children (average age 12). Each family member completed measures of cultural orientation (behavioural practices), identity, and cultural values. An orthogonal model of acculturation (e.g., host…

  19. Acculturation, weight status, and eating habits among Chinese-American preschool children and their primary caregivers: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated acculturation, eating habits, and weight status among 53 Chinese-American children and their primary caregivers. Caregivers’ mean acculturation score was 2.1, indicating low acculturation. Caregivers’ mean body mass index (BMI) was 23.3; 21% were overweight (BMI is greater ...

  20. Associations between Maternal Physical Discipline and Peer Victimization among Hong Kong Chinese Children: The Moderating Role of Child Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Mylien T.; Schwartz, David; Chang, Lei; Kelly, Brynn M.; Tom, Shelley R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relation between maternal physical discipline and victimization by peers, as moderated by child aggression. The sample consisted of 211 Hong Kong Chinese children (98 boys, 113 girls; average age of 11.9). Physical discipline was assessed with a questionnaire completed by mothers, and victimization by peers and aggression…

  1. The Use of Literacy Bags Promotes Parental Involvement in Chinese Children's Literacy Learning in the English Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, SuHua

    2013-01-01

    This study employed an ethnographic methodology to explore the use of "literacy bags" (LBs) to promote parental involvement in Chinese children's literacy learning in the English language. It was conducted with a first-grade class consisting of 18 students and their parents in Taiwan. Data resources were obtained from teaching questionnaires,…

  2. Young Chinese Children's Anger and Distress: Emotion Category and Intensity Identified by the Time Course of Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Qiu, Peihua; Park, Ka Young; Xu, Qinmei; Potegal, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A hierarchical cluster analysis of the time course of the videotaped reactions of 75 Chinese 2-4-year olds to mothers' toy-removal identified Distress, Low Anger, and High Anger behavior clusters. Anger often begins at low intensity; some children then escalate. The face-validity of Low and High Anger-cluster classifications was supported in…

  3. A National Survey of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior of Chinese City Children and Youth Using Accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Peijie; Zhuang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to objectively assess levels of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) of Chinese city children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old using accelerometers and to examine their differences by gender, age, grade, and weight status. Method: The PA and SB of 2,163 students in 4th grade through 11th grade…

  4. Stakeholder Views on the Roles, Challenges, and Future Prospects of Korean and Chinese Heritage Language-Community Language Schools in Phoenix: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Byeong-keun; Liu, Na

    2011-01-01

    This study examines stakeholders' perspectives on Korean and Chinese heritage language and community language (HL-CL) schools and education in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area, Arizona. It investigates and compares the roles, major challenges, and future prospects of Korean and Chinese HL-CL schools as viewed by principals, teachers, and parents. To…

  5. School Readiness among Low-Income, Latino Children Attending Family Childcare versus Centre-Based Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Arya; Winsler, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Latino children often struggle in school. Early childhood education programmes are seen as critical for fostering children's school readiness. Latino families often choose family childcare (FCC) over centre-based childcare (CBC), yet little is known about the school readiness of Latino children attending FCC. We compared school readiness over the…

  6. Mothers' School-Related Identities and Possible Selves for Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kyle; Dilworth-Bart, Janean

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we explored how mothers' school-related identities influence their current expectations of school identities for their children using a possible selves framework. Forty-seven mothers of preschool-aged children participated in semi-structured interviews about their school-related histories and children's school preparation.…

  7. Parental perceptions, feeding practices, feeding styles, and level of acculturation of Chinese Americans in relation to their school-age child's weight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Hsiao-Liang; Contento, Isobel

    2014-09-01

    Parents influence their child's eating behavior and attitudes directly as food providers and indirectly through their parental feeding styles and feeding concerns and practices. Chinese American parents' practices are likely influenced by culture. The objective of this study was to explore the relationships between parental perceptions, feeding practices, feeding styles, level of parental acculturation (LPA), and child weight status via a self-administered questionnaire. This survey study involved a convenience sample of 712 individuals who were parents of 5- to 10-year old children attending Chinese language after-school programs. The prevalence of overweight was 11.5% and obesity was 11.1%. LPA was not directly predictive of child overweight in multiple regression but from categorical data, Chinese American parents tended to use indulgent (33.2%) and authoritarian (27.9%) feeding styles, with the former increasing with acculturation and the latter decreasing. Indulgent parents had more than expected overweight and obese children, and authoritarian and authoritative parents, fewer. LPA was negatively predictive of pressure to eat healthy foods (p?children having healthy weights and therefore healthy lives. PMID:24816322

  8. Neighborhood Characteristics, Parental Practices and Children’s Math Achievement in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Emily; Bodovski, Katerina; Reed, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationships among neighborhood characteristics, education-related parental practices, and children’s academic achievement during a critical but under-studied stage of children’s educational trajectories – the elementary school years. Using a large, nationally representative database of American elementary school students – the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study – Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS–K) – and contextual data from the 2000 U.S. Census, we examine parental practices and neighborhood characteristics at the beginning of children’s school careers (grades K-1) and their associations with math achievement through the end of the 5th grade. Findings Net of family-level characteristics, higher levels of early education- oriented parental practices were associated with higher mathematics achievement at the end of 5th grade, while neighborhood disadvantage was associated with lower 5th grade math achievement. Families residing in high poverty, high unemployment, low-education neighborhoods employed fewer education- oriented practices with their kindergarten- first grade children, but the positive effect of such parental practices on children’s mathematics achievement was stronger for children who live in disadvantaged neighborhoods. PMID:25125713

  9. Effects of a 12-week, school-based obesity management program on obese primary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Han Gyu Kim; Goh-woon Lim; Hae Soon Kim; Young Mi Hong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose:This study was designed to determine the effects of a school-based obesity-management program on obese primary school children. Methods:A total of 995 children (6&#8211;12 years old) in a primary school were screened in March 2008, and of those, 101 obese students (44 boys and 57 girls, body mass index (BMI) ?#249;5 percentile) were enrolled for a study group. The school- based, obesity management program, which includes physical exercise and nutritional education,...

  10. School Readiness: What Does It Mean for Indigenous Children, Families, Schools and Communities? Issues Paper No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockett, Sue; Perry, Bob; Kearney, Emma

    2010-01-01

    At the state and local level, many school systems, districts and early childhood networks have developed approaches and programs to support children's transition to school. These programs often address school readiness. There are many definitions of school readiness. Some refer to the skills and attributes of individual children, defining it as…

  11. Can Future Uncertainty Keep Children Out of School?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LilleØr, Helene Bie

    2008-01-01

    There is little doubt in the literature, that poverty and liquidity constraints can drive children out of school and into child labour in developing countries. But are there other important explanations for low primary school enrolment rates? The child labour and schooling literature often ignores that uncertainty about future returns results in a need for risk diversification, that children function as old-age security providers when there are no available pension systems, that the human capital investment decision of one child is likely to be influenced by that of his/her siblings, and that rural parents face a choice of investing in either specific or general human capital of their children. In this paper, I investigate the effects of future income uncertainty on the joint human capital investment decision of children in a household. I develop and calibrate a simple illustrative human capital portfolio model and show that existing levels of uncertainty can indeed result in less than full school enrolment within a household, even in a world of perfect credit markets. The paper thus offers an alternative explanation for why it might be optimal for rural parents not to send all of their children to school.

  12. Eating behaviour patterns in Chinese children aged 12-18 months and association with relative weight - factorial validation of the Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Ying-Ting

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eating behaviours have been suggested relating to obesity development. The Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ is a parent-report measure constructed to assess multiple dimensions of eating behavior for children. This study aimed to test the validity of the Chinese version of Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ in Chinese children aged 12-18 months. We examined factor structure and the reliability of the Chinese version of the CEBQ, the associations between children's eating behaviours and children's weight (BMI SDS were assessed. Methods 219 questionnaires were filled out by the caregivers, approached in community health care centers in two cities in China. BMI of each child was calculated and converted to BMI SDS. Factor validation (Principal Component Analysis, exploratory factor analysis on all CEBQ items was performed and gender difference in eating behaviours was examined. Correlations between eating behaviours and the child's BMI SDS were analyzed by linear regression analysis controlling for gender, parental combined weight, and education. Results The factor analysis revealed a seven-factor solution, with factor 'food responsiveness' (FR split into two. 'Satiety responsiveness' (SR and 'Enjoyment of food' (EF factors were not detected. Interestingly, boys scored higher than girls in the FR scales, whereas girls had a higher score in 'food fussiness' (FF scale. Conclusions We conclude that although a valuable psychometric instrument, CEBQ might be affected by age and cultural differences. Therefore, adjusting it in order to fit the Chinese population was suggested. We did not find an association between eating behaviours and children's BMI SDS, when it was controlled for gender and parental weight.

  13. Quality education through Child-Friendly Schools: resource allocation for the protection of children’s rights

    OpenAIRE

    Orkodashvili, Mariam

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the idea and purpose of Child-Friendly Schools (CFSs) initiated by the UNICEF. It analyses the implications of CFSs in terms of improving children’s health and nutrition, promoting gender equality, protecting children’s rights, re-defining education quality and creating positive psycho-emotional environment at schools. Experience is now showing that a framework of rights-based, child-friendly schools can be a powerful tool for both helping to fulfill the rights of ...

  14. The value of (pre)school playgrounds for children’s physical activity level: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Broekhuizen, Karen; Scholten, Anne-marie; Vries, Sanne I.

    2014-01-01

    The (pre)school environment is an important setting to improve children’s health. Especially, the (pre)school playground provides a major opportunity to intervene. This review presents an overview of the existing evidence on the value of both school and preschool playgrounds on children’s health in terms of physical activity, cognitive and social outcomes. In addition, we aimed to identify which playground characteristics are the strongest correlates of beneficial effects and for which su...

  15. Children's body mass index, participation in school meals, and observed energy intake at school meals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackelprang Alyssa J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data from a dietary-reporting validation study with fourth-grade children were analyzed to investigate a possible relationship of body mass index (BMI with daily participation in school meals and observed energy intake at school meals, and whether the relationships differed by breakfast location (classroom; cafeteria. Methods Data were collected in 17, 17, and 8 schools during three school years. For the three years, six, six, and seven of the schools had breakfast in the classroom; all other schools had breakfast in the cafeteria. Information about 180 days of school breakfast and school lunch participation during fourth grade for each of 1,571 children (90% Black; 53% girls was available in electronic administrative records from the school district. Children were weighed and measured, and BMI was calculated. Each of a subset of 465 children (95% Black; 49% girls was observed eating school breakfast and school lunch on the same day. Mixed-effects regression was conducted with BMI as the dependent variable and school as the random effect; independent variables were breakfast participation, lunch participation, combined participation (breakfast and lunch on the same day, average observed energy intake for breakfast, average observed energy intake for lunch, sex, age, breakfast location, and school year. Analyses were repeated for BMI category (underweight/healthy weight; overweight; obese; severely obese using pooled ordered logistic regression models that excluded sex and age. Results Breakfast participation, lunch participation, and combined participation were not significantly associated with BMI or BMI category irrespective of whether the model included observed energy intake at school meals. Observed energy intake at school meals was significantly and positively associated with BMI and BMI category. For the total sample and subset, breakfast location was significantly associated with BMI; average BMI was larger for children with breakfast in the classroom than in the cafeteria. Significantly more kilocalories were observed eaten at breakfast in the classroom than in the cafeteria. Conclusions For fourth-grade children, results provide evidence of a positive relationship between BMI and observed energy intake at school meals, and between BMI and school breakfast in the classroom; however, BMI and participation in school meals were not significantly associated.

  16. The Pyramid Club Elementary School-Based Intervention: Testing the Circle Time Technique to Elicit Children’s Service Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Madeleine Ohl; Pauline Fox; Kathryn Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Children’s views of the social-emotional health services they use are important to service evaluation and development. However, often it is parental or clinician feedback that is gathered. In the current study Circle Time groups were run to identify children’s satisfaction with the Pyramid Club School-based intervention and to test the salience of this technique in eliciting children’s views. Children evaluated Clubs positively, reported no adverse effects and suggested ways to develop ...

  17. A school-based comprehensive lifestyle intervention among chinese kids against obesity (CLICK-Obesity: rationale, design and methodology of a randomized controlled trial in Nanjing city, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Fei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of childhood obesity among adolescents has been rapidly rising in Mainland China in recent decades, especially in urban and rich areas. There is an urgent need to develop effective interventions to prevent childhood obesity. Limited data regarding adolescent overweight prevention in China are available. Thus, we developed a school-based intervention with the aim of reducing excess body weight in children. This report described the study design. Methods/design We designed a cluster randomized controlled trial in 8 randomly selected urban primary schools between May 2010 and December 2013. Each school was randomly assigned to either the intervention or control group (four schools in each group. Participants were the 4th graders in each participating school. The multi-component program was implemented within the intervention group, while students in the control group followed their usual health and physical education curriculum with no additional intervention program. The intervention consisted of four components: a classroom curriculum, (including physical education and healthy diet education, b school environment support, c family involvement, and d fun programs/events. The primary study outcome was body composition, and secondary outcomes were behaviour and behavioural determinants. Discussion The intervention was designed with due consideration of Chinese cultural and familial tradition, social convention, and current primary education and exam system in Mainland China. We did our best to gain good support from educational authorities, school administrators, teachers and parents, and to integrate intervention components into schools’ regular academic programs. The results of and lesson learned from this study will help guide future school-based childhood obesity prevention programs in Mainland China. Trial registration Registration number: ChiCTR-ERC-11001819

  18. How Home Gets to School: Parental Control Strategies Predict Children's School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Aimee Kleisner; MacPhee, David

    2011-01-01

    At-risk families' control style (autonomy support and coercive control) was examined in relation to children's school readiness; children's social skills and mastery motivation were hypothesized mediating variables. In two different, low-income samples from diverse ethnic backgrounds, one preschool sample recruited from Head Start (N = 199) and a…

  19. Children Entering School Ready to Learn: 2009-2010 Maryland Model for School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Each year, Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) informs policymakers and practitioners of what children know and are able to do when they start formal education in kindergarten. This report provides a profile of children's skill levels as they enter school based on the evaluation of their teachers. It includes valuable trend data about…

  20. The Development of Empathy in Chinese and American Children Between Three and Six Years of Age: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borke, Helene

    A series of social interaction situations representing the four emotions of happy, afraid, sad, and angry were administered to 288 American children and 288 Chinese children. Twenty-four girls and 24 boys, half from middle class families and half from disadvantaged families, were tested at six-month intervals between 3 and 6 years of age. Children

  1. Self discipline and obesity in Bangkok school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisorrachatr Suwat

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood obesity has become an important public health problem in Thailand. This study aimed to determine the relationship between self discipline and obesity in Bangkok school children. Methods A case control study was conducted. 140 cases (obese children and 140 controls (normal weight children were randomly chosen from grades 4-6 students in 4 Bangkok public schools. Questionnaire responses regarding general characteristics and child self-discipline were obtained from children and their parents. Results Self discipline in eating habits, money management and time management were reported at significantly lower levels among the obese group (p Conclusions It was recommended that parents and teachers participate in child self-discipline guidance, particularly with regard to eating habits, money management and time management in a supportive environment that both facilitates prevention of obesity and simultaneously develops a child's personal control.

  2. Bullied Children: Parent and School Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Alice Sterling; Zdunowski-Sjoblom, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Family interviews were conducted with 28 7-12-year-old children who had experienced various forms of bullying and relational aggression by their peers, as well as with their parent and with an older sibling. Interviews explored possible supportive strategies of older siblings, parents, and teachers. All bullied children reported negative feelings…

  3. Action Schools! BC: A Socioecological Approach to Modifying Chronic Disease Risk Factors in Elementary School Children

    OpenAIRE

    Patti-jean Naylor, Phd; Macdonald, Heather M.; Katharine E Reed, Msc; Heather A Mckay, Phd

    2006-01-01

    Background Childhood physical inactivity and obesity are serious public health threats. Socioecological approaches to addressing these threats have been proposed. The school is a critical environment for promoting children’s health and provides the opportunity to explore the impact of a socioecological approach. Context Thirty percent of children in British Columbia, Canada, are overweight or obese, and 50% of youths are not physically active enough to yield health benefits. Methods...

  4. Young children learning new languages out of school.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsch, Claudine

    2006-01-01

    Luxembourg is a trilingual country where residents communicate in Luxembourgish, French and German concurrently. Children therefore study these languages at primary school. In this paper I explore how six eight-year-old Luxembourgish children use and learn German, French and English in formal and informal settings over a period of one year. Their eagerness to learn and use German and English contrasted with their cautious and formal approach to the learning of French. My findings demonstrate ...

  5. Nutritional rickets and osteomalacia in school children and adolescents.

    OpenAIRE

    Al-jurayyan, Nasir A.; El-desouki, Mahmoud E.; Al-herbish, Abdullah S.; Al-mazyad, Abdullah S.; Al-qhtani, Maha M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To review experiences of nutritional rickets and osteomalacia in school children and adolescents at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. METHODS Records of children and adolescents aged 6-18 years, seen at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, during the period January 1994 through to December 1999, who were diagnosed to have rickets or osteomalacia were reviewed. The diagnosis was based on clinical, biochemical and ...

  6. 34 CFR 200.87 - Responsibilities for participation of children in private schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Responsibilities for participation of children in private schools. 200.87 Section 200.87 Education... § 200.87 Responsibilities for participation of children in private schools. An SEA and its operating...

  7. Can Children with Severe Learning Difficulties Be Educated in Ordinary Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittler, Peter; Farrell, Peter

    1987-01-01

    The paper summarizes the research literature on educating children with severe learning difficulties in ordinary schools, describes individual integration schemes, and presents an organizational model for integrating British children with severe learning difficulties into ordinary schools. (Author/JDD)

  8. VOCABULARY PROBLEMS OF THE LIGHTLY MENTALLY RETARDED SCHOOL AGED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna KOSTIC

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The main research objectives are the problems in the vocabulary of school aged, lightly mentally retarded children. Results of the research indicate which are the most important factors that have impact of the vocabulary and language competence of these persons. The research variables are: sex, IQ, chronological age and school age. Comics-like stories were used as an examination instrument in this research. Their interpretation is helpful in determining the vocabulary level of every single examine. At the end of the research some suggestions are presented, whose goal is to enrich children's vocabulary.

  9. Prevalence of Parasomnia in School aged Children in Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Naserbakht; Mitra Hakim Shooshtari; Maryam Rasoulain; Mohammad Salehi; Mirfarhad Ghalebandi; Mohammad Hosien Salarifar

    2011-01-01

    "nObjectives: Parasomnias can create sleep disruption; in this article we assessed parasomnias in school-aged children in Tehran. "nMethods: In spring 2005, a total of 6000 sleep questionnaires were distributed to school-aged children in 5 districts of Tehran (Iran). A modified Pediatrics sleep questionnaire with 34 questions was used. "nResults: Parasomnias varied from 0.5% to 5.7% among the subjects as follows: 2.7% sleep talking, 0.5% sleepwalking, 5.7% bruxism, 2.3% enuresis, and nightmar...

  10. Emotional intelligence and academic achievement of school children.

    OpenAIRE

    Satish Kumar Kalhotra

    2012-01-01

    In this research paper researcher tried to find out whether there is a relationship between emotional intelligence and academic achievement of school children who have not yet reached the adolescent age. The sample for the study consisted of 240 children (120 boys and 120 girls) of class 5th having age range 10-11 years from various schools of Jammu city (East). High and low achiever (60 boys and 60 girls in each) were differentiated based on their percentage in the last two consecutive exam...

  11. Diabetes Risk Factors in Middle Income Pakistani School Children

    OpenAIRE

    Zafar Iqbal Hydrie, M.; Abdul Basit; Naeema Badruddin; Yakoob Ahmedani, M.

    2004-01-01

    To assess the risk factors for diabetes such as dietary habits, physical fitness score, physical activity, body mass index (BMI) and family history of diabetes amongst school children. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 103 children (ages 8-12 years), from middle-income families from two schools of Karachi. Data of physical fitness score was taken by a physical fitness test and BMI was calculated by measuring weight and height. Dietary records were taken by 24 hours self reported diet r...

  12. A Controlled Evaluation of a School-Based Obesity Prevention in Turkish School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toruner, Ebru Kilicarslan; Savaser, Sevim

    2010-01-01

    This research was conducted to assess the effect of a weight management program in Turkish school children with overweight and obesity. Forty one students formed the intervention group while 40 students formed the control group in two elementary schools. Students in intervention group were given seven training sessions in a period of 2.5 months.…

  13. School Mobility and School-Age Children's Social Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupere, Veronique; Archambault, Isabelle; Leventhal, Tama; Dion, Eric; Anderson, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how nonpromotional school changes, a potentially major event for children, were associated with 3 forms of social maladjustment: isolation/withdrawal, affiliation with maladjusted peers, and aggression toward peers. Given that school mobility frequently co-occurs with family transitions, the moderating role of these transitions…

  14. Measuring health-related quality of life in children with cancer living in mainland China: feasibility, reliability and validity of the Chinese mandarin version of PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales and 3.0 Cancer Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL is widely used instrument to measure pediatric health-related quality of life (HRQOL for children aged 2 to 18 years. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the feasibility, reliability and validity of the Chinese mandarin version of the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales and 3.0 Cancer Module in a group of Chinese children with cancer. Methods The PedsQL 4.0 Genetic Core Scales and the PedsQL 3.0 Cancer Module were administered to children with cancer (aged 5-18 years and parents of such children (aged 2-18 years. For comparison, a survey on a demographically group-matched sample of the general population with children (aged 5-18 and parents of children (aged 2-18 years was conducted with the PedsQL 4.0 Genetic Core Scales. Result The minimal mean percentage of missing item responses (except the School Functioning scale supported the feasibility of the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales and 3.0 Cancer Module for Chinese children with cancer. Most of the scales showed satisfactory reliability with Cronbach's ? of exceeding 0.70, and all scales demonstrated sufficient test-retest reliability. Assessing the clinical validity of the questionnaires, statistically significant difference was found between healthy children and children with cancer, and between children on-treatment versus off-treatment ?12 months. Positive significant correlations were observed between the scores of the PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scale and the PedsQL 3.0 Cancer Module. Exploratory factor analysis demonstrated sufficient factorial validity. Moderate to good agreement was found between child self- and parent proxy-reports. Conclusion The findings support the feasibility, reliability and validity of the Chinese Mandarin version of PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales and 3.0 Cancer Module in children with cancer living in mainland China.

  15. Memory performance in Brazilian school-age children

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luciana, Brooking; Emmy, Uehara; Helenice, Charchat-Fichman; J., Landeira-Fernandez.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate different memory systems among children of different school ages. Ninety children who attend schools within the Rio de Janeiro municipality school system, ages 6 to 10 years, were studied. The study excluded children with learning disabilities. All [...] children underwent a neuropsychological evaluation. A two-way analysis of variance revealed significant gender differences in the free delay episodic memory. Age differences were found for the free delay episodic memory and recognition on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) as well as the recall of the Rey Figure. Semantic memory correlated with Semantic Verbal Fluency. Working Memory as measured by Digit Span subtest of the WISC correlated with the first list learning of the RAVLT. Overall, study results indicated a lower performance among 6-year-old children and gender differences in children 8 and 10 years of age. Data are consistent with the literature and show a distinction in the evolution of different memory systems throughout life.

  16. The Shanghai Art School: Relocating Chinese Art Teaching from The Private Studios To The Public Education System, 1913-1937

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Zheng

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the role of modern art educational institutions that emerged in the early 20th century China in transforming Chinese artists and their art, by comparing the manner of art teaching and other artistic activities in the traditional literati master’s private studio and those found in the Shanghai Art School, an early and important art school in Republican China. The research draws upon a wide range of primary sources as well as secondary documents. It shows that when teach...

  17. Influence of mothers on school adjustment of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunishi, I; Honda, M; Kamiyama, Y; Ito, H

    1993-01-01

    In school children on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), school adjustment is regarded as an important indicator for comprehensive medical care. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of mothers on school adjustment of CAPD children. The children tended to indicate school maladjustment with school absenteeism and poor relationships with friends. The mothers were characterized by poor independence, poor achievement orientation, strong emotional reliance, and lack of social self-confidence, indicating emotional instability. The family environment, including the mother's psychological condition, was strongly associated with the children's maladjustment to school. The results suggested the necessity of comprehensive medical care for these children and their mothers. PMID:8369356

  18. Adapting and Designing Spaces: Children and their Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Kenkmann

    2011-01-01

    In schools, children experience their environment on three different levels: firstly, they constantly make spatial decisions by positioning themselves in relation to others and organising their immediate environment; secondly, they can potentially contribute to shaping the classroom spaces; and, thirdly, they are confronted with the designed school as a whole. It is argued here that our experiences of spaces are related to our memories, which provide us with a framework of references that all...

  19. VOCABULARY PROBLEMS OF THE LIGHTLY MENTALLY RETARDED SCHOOL AGED CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Kostic, Vesna

    2000-01-01

    The main research objectives are the problems in the vocabulary of school aged, lightly mentally retarded children. Results of the research indicate which are the most important factors that have impact of the vocabulary and language competence of these persons. The research variables are: sex, IQ, chronological age and school age. Comics-like stories were used as an examination instrument in this research. Their interpretation is helpful in determining the vocabulary level of every single ex...

  20. Children's Physical Activity during Recess and Outside of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beighle, Aaron; Morgan, Charles F.; Le Masurier, Guy; Pangrazi, Robert P.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine children's physical activity during recess and outside of school. Third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade students (N = 270; 121 boys, age = 9.5 plus or minus 0.9 years; 150 girls, age = 9.6 plus or minus 0.9 years) wore sealed pedometers during a 15-minute recess period and outside of school for 4 consecutive…

  1. Modernization Discourse, Academic Advocacy, and Vested Interests: The Promotion of English-Medium Instruction in Chinese Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangwei

    2010-01-01

    Like many other developing countries around the world, China is witnessing a growing prominence of English in its school system. One immensely popular form of English provision in the country is Chinese-English bilingual education for majority-language students, which involves the varying use of English as a medium of instruction in the teaching…

  2. Negotiating Discourses of Gender, Ethnicity and Schooling: Ways of Being Malay, Chinese and Indian Schoolgirls in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    This article uses the notion of resistance as an analytical tool, emphasizing its sociopolitical significance and multidimensionality, to understand the complex link between ways of being Malay, Chinese and Indian schoolgirls, schooling and the wider Malaysian society. The macro and micro dynamics of the Malaysian ethnoscape, namely the ethnic…

  3. The Effect of Study Abroad on the Development of Intercultural Sensitivity among Mainland Chinese High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chenfang

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examined the effect of year-long study abroad program on the development of intercultural sensitivity among the Mainland Chinese high school students. The sample consisted of 50 study abroad participants and 50 students on home campus. The instrument Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) was employed to assess the…

  4. Retooling Chinese Primary School Teachers to Use Technology Creatively to Promote Innovation and Problem Solving Skills in Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kar-Tin; Chalmers, Christina; Vinesh, Chandra; Yeh, Andy; Nason, Rod

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the initial phase of a Professional Learning Program (PLP) undertaken by 100 primary school teachers in China that aimed to facilitate the development of adaptive expertise in using technology to facilitate innovative science teaching and learning such as that envisaged by the Chinese Ministry of Education's (2010-2020)…

  5. A Comparative Study of Effect of New and Old Science Curriculum on Chinese Junior High School Students' Abstract Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiping; Chen, Ming

    2008-01-01

    "Teenagers' abstract thinking ability test" was designed in accordance with the structure and performance of teenagers' ability to think abstractly. 138 Chinese junior high school students who learned New curriculum and old curriculum separately were measured. A comparison between the two kinds of students shows that abstract thinking ability of…

  6. Employing Microsoft Live@edu Cloud Platform to Assist in Teaching Chinese Reading for Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ru-Chu; Cho, Chia-Liang; Tsai, Chih-Cheng; Lou, Shi-Jer

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate junior high school students' learning attitudes and learning effectiveness through administering Microsoft Live@edu to assist in teaching Chinese reading. Quasi-experimental approach was used and a total of 63 eighth grade students were divided into the experimental group (N = 32) and control group (N = 31).…

  7. Obesity among school children in a province of southern Thailand and its association with socioeconomic status

    OpenAIRE

    Hirata, Mari; Kuropakornpong, Valaya; Funahara, Yoshinori; Kamae, Isao; Sato, Shigeaki

    1998-01-01

    The association of nutrition status of children aged 7–12 years (n=663) with socioeconomic factors in a province of southern Thailand in 1995 was investigated. Three type of schools were surveyed: a school with a higher educational standard (elite school) in the municipality of the province, a school with many children from low-income families (low-income school) in the same municipality, and five ordinary schools in rural areas of the province (district schools). The proportions of obese c...

  8. A study of some factors concerned in the schooling of visually handicapped children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, J; Gould, E

    1976-01-01

    Sixty children integrated into the fully-sighted school system and 34 children attending partially-sighted schools were assessed. All were using low vision aids. It was found that there was little difference in acuity, parental or school support, but the integrated children tended to be more intelligent and came from a higher socioeconomic group. More children could avoid special schools if given appropriate services at an early age and assessment should be by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:949829

  9. Chinese Children’s Literature in the Cultural Revolution (1966–1976)

    OpenAIRE

    Bi, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    In China’s Cultural Revolution (1966–1976), childhood was portrayed as a battlefield in which opposing classes strived to fulfil the political impetus of training their heirs. In order to represent the new socialist morality, the few stories produced for children had to shift their focus to the space of the adult world, where there were more activities of “revolution” and “class struggle”. Consequently in these stories, the child protagonists talked and behaved like adult politica...

  10. Longitudinal Analysis of Chinese High School Student's Stress in School and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    In previous research, few studies have examined the effects of adolescents' stress in school on the change rates of their academic achievement. In the present study, we seek to examine the longitudinal relationships between adolescents' stress in school and the change rates of their academic achievement. The results indicated that for those whose…

  11. Getting southern Sudanese children to school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibeso Luswata

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The Government of Southern Sudan’s Go to School Initiative,supported by UNICEF, which seeks to get 1.6 millionchildren back in school by the end of 2007, incorporateskey elements of the INEE Minimum Standards for Educationin Emergencies, Chronic Crises and Early Reconstruction.

  12. Getting southern Sudanese children to school

    OpenAIRE

    Sibeso Luswata

    2006-01-01

    The Government of Southern Sudan’s Go to School Initiative,supported by UNICEF, which seeks to get 1.6 millionchildren back in school by the end of 2007, incorporateskey elements of the INEE Minimum Standards for Educationin Emergencies, Chronic Crises and Early Reconstruction.

  13. School-based health center providers' treatment of overweight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Heather; Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; Schmiege, Sarah; Dandreaux, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study was to determine self-reported treatment practices of school-based health center (SBHC) providers when caring for overweight/obese children. Providers (N=33) from SBHCs in 6 states (AZ, CO, NM, MI, NY, and NC) completed a baseline survey before being trained on obesity recommendations. SBHC providers reported patient/parent barriers to be more significant to treatment than clinician/setting barriers (p<0.0001). Most providers (97%) indicated childhood overweight needs treatment, yet only 36% said they initiate treatment in children who do not want to control their weight. SBHC providers also did not commonly refer overweight/obese children to specialists. PMID:24947663

  14. The development of associate learning in school age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Brian T; Pietrzak, Robert H; Snyder, Peter J; Thomas, Elizabeth; Mayes, Linda C; Maruff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Associate learning is fundamental to the acquisition of knowledge and plays a critical role in the everyday functioning of the developing child, though the developmental course is still unclear. This study investigated the development of visual associate learning in 125 school age children using the Continuous Paired Associate Learning task. As hypothesized, younger children made more errors than older children across all memory loads and evidenced decreased learning efficiency as memory load increased. Results suggest that age-related differences in performance largely reflect continued development of executive function in the context of relatively developed memory processes. PMID:25014755

  15. The Development of Associate Learning in School Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Brian T.; Pietrzak, Robert H.; Snyder, Peter J.; Thomas, Elizabeth; Mayes, Linda C.; Maruff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Associate learning is fundamental to the acquisition of knowledge and plays a critical role in the everyday functioning of the developing child, though the developmental course is still unclear. This study investigated the development of visual associate learning in 125 school age children using the Continuous Paired Associate Learning task. As hypothesized, younger children made more errors than older children across all memory loads and evidenced decreased learning efficiency as memory load increased. Results suggest that age-related differences in performance largely reflect continued development of executive function in the context of relatively developed memory processes. PMID:25014755

  16. Formation of concept of decimal system in Mexican school children

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    L. Quintanar Rojas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with initial formation of concept of decimal system in second year of education at primary school in Mexico (City of Puebla. Our research is based on Activity Theory conception of teaching-learning process and of gradual introduction of scientific concepts in school age. The method has been designed and worked out with the help of actions in which logic, symbolic, spatial and mathematical aspects were implemented. All actions were introduced within divided activity of children in group guided by adult. A pretest-posttest design was used with an experimental group of Mexican school children. The results showed that children have developed the significant skills necessary for understanding the concept of decimal number system. They were also able to apply this concept for new kind if activity al the end of school year. Such new activity was solving of mathematic problems, which was not included in official school program. We consider that proposed method can be an approximation for solution of common difficulties which arise at primary school concerning teaching of mathematics.

  17. Ophthalmic Morbidity in School Children in Hilly Areas of Uttarakhand

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    Surekha Kishore

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: School children constitute about one fourth of population of India. Early detection and treatment of various eye diseases helps in avoiding many complications. The magnitude of blindness is 3-4 times greater in developing countries. Very few studies have been conducted in Uttarakhand revealing the ophthalmic morbidity in school children or general population. Hilly areas especially the remote ones face various problems like, poor transportation facilities, distant health facilities, use of traditional methods for treatment, faith healing, customs and belief system, lack of information.  Moreover   water supply, poor personal hygiene and other factors also add up to these problems. Aim: To study the ophthalmic morbidities in school children in 3 schools of Thatyur block. Methodology: It was a cross sectional study. Result: A total of 705 students were enrolled. Permission from school authorities was seeked before the start of study. Schools were visited twice in a week current and preliminary information was taken from the students & teacher regarding education, occupation, income etc. General examination and ophthalmic examination was done with day & torch light along with refraction, with the help of standard Snellen’s chart. Each eye was examined separately. A vision of 6/6 was considered as normal. Near vision was tested with new vision Snellen’s chart at 12-14 inches away from eye.

  18. Mental health of indigenous school children in Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety and depressive disorders occur in all stages of life and are the most common childhood disorders. However, only recently has attention been paid to mental health problems in indigenous children and studies of anxiety and depressive disorders in these children are still scarce. This study compares the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in Aymara and non-Aymara children. Among the Aymara children, the study examines the relations between these symptoms and the degree of involvement with Aymara culture. Methods We recruited 748 children aged 9 to 15 years from nine schools serving low socioeconomic classes in the city of Arica, in northern Chile. The children were equally divided between boys and girls and 37% of the children were Aymara. To evaluate anxiety and depressive symptoms we used the Stress in Children (SiC) instrument and the Children Depression Inventory-Short version (CDI-S), and used an instrument we developed to assess level of involvement in the Aymara culture. Results There was no significant difference between Aymara and non-Aymara children on any of the instrument scales. Dividing the Aymara children into high-involvement (n?=?89) and low-involvement (n?=?186) groups, the low-involvement group had significantly higher scores on the Hopelessness subscale of the CDI-S (p?=?0.02) and scores of marginally higher significance in overall Anxiety on the SiC (p?=?0.06). Conclusions Although Aymara children have migrated from the high Andean plateau to the city, this migration has not resulted in a greater presence of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Greater involvement with the Aymara culture may be a protective factor against anxiety and depressive symptoms in Aymara children. This point to an additional benefit of maintaining cultural traditions within this population. PMID:24438210

  19. Nutrition knowledge, attitude, and behavior of Taiwanese elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei; Yang, Hsiao-Chi; Hang, Chi-Ming; Pan, Wen-Harn

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand nutrition knowledge, attitude, and behavior in Taiwanese elementary school children, and the relationship of these various components. The results indicated that children's knowledge was fair in nutrition basics, but poor in 'the physiological function of nutrients', 'relationships between diet/nutrients and disease', and 'the daily serving requirement for different food groups'. Children in general valued the importance of nutrition, but they did not concern the health benefit of foods in food selections. Their dietary quality was not satisfactory, and the diet of most children did not meet the recommended serving requirements for milk, vegetable, fruit, and cereals and grains groups. Positive relationships were found among nutrition knowledge, attitude, caring- about-nutrition behavior and dietary quality score. The restraint or disinhibited eating behavior of 4th to 6th graders was not serious, but a large number of children already performed some self-controlling practices to avoid obesity, but not frequently. One fourth of the students skipped meals, especially breakfast, and one quarter of 4th to 6th graders prepared their own breakfast; which may have some impact on children's diet quality. A gap was found between nutrition knowledge, attitude and eating behavior, especially vegetable and fruit consumption, indicating that the attitude toward eating for health was not strong in this age group. Future nutrition education for school children should not only include food serving requirements of food groups, but also apply appropriate theories to improve the motivation for healthy eating. PMID:17723993

  20. Fungal infection risk groups among school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El?bieta Ejdas

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between ocurrence of fungi in children and living environment (city - countryside, sex, age, diet, undergone diseases therapy with antibiotics and exposure to hospital environment, and to indicate children potentially vulnerable to fungal infections. The material was consisted of swabs collected from the oral cavily, the throat and the nose of healthy children, aged 6-9 and 10-15, from both urban and rural environmens. Candida albicans, the basic aetiological factor in thc majority of mycoses recorded in humans, unquestionably prevailed in the group of the 13 speciec of yeast-like fungi and yeasts isolated. Records of C. glabrata and C. krusei increasing numbers of whose strains show resistance to basic antimycoties, as well as relatively frequent records of Trichosporon beigelii, Saccharomycopsis capsularis and Saccharomyces sp., fungi whose expansiveness and enzymatic activity have been growing, may be considered disconcerting. Vulnerability to fungal infection increases following anti-bacterial antibiotic therapy in the majority of subjects regardless season or age. This is particularly true primarily of the most stable ontocoenosis of the throat. Younger children, on the other hand, are the most vulnerable foUowing infection of the respiratory system. Fungi are likely to colonise the nose in this case. Children living in the countryside who had been ll immediately prior to the collection of the material constitute the highest risk group of the occurrence of fungi in any of the ontocoenoses studied. A greater number of positive inoculations were recorded in these children in comparison to the children from the city. It may be indicative of a more extensive spectrum of natural reservoirs of fungi and the vectors of their transmission in rural areas than those in the city, lower health hygiene and lower immunity or of a more common carriage of fungi among rural children.

  1. Poly-helminth infection in east guatemalan school children

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    Sorensen William

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Soil transmitted helminths (STH remain a global public health concern in spite of occasional dosing campaigns. Aims: To determine baseline prevalence and intensity of STH infection in east Guatemalan school children, and describe the associated epidemiology of anemia, stunting, and wasting in this population. Setting and design: Ten schools in Izabal province (eastern Guatemala were identified, and 1,001 school children were selected for this study. Half of the schools were used as clinical testing sites (blood and stool. Materials and Methods: Anthropometric measures were collected from all children. Over 300 children were tested for anemia and 229 for helminth infection. Ova and parasite specimens were examined via Direct, Kato Katz, and McMaster techniques. Hemoglobin was measured from venipuncture following the hemacue system. Statistical analysis: Correlation between infection intensities and growth indicators were examined. Chi Square or t tests were used for bivariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression was performed on significant variables from bivariate techniques. Results: Over two-thirds of school children were positive for infection by any STH. Prevalence of Hookworm was 30%; Ascaris, 52%; and Trichuris, 39%, most as low-intensity infection. Over half of the children were co-infected. In bivariate analysis, anemia was significantly associated with polyparasitism. Conclusions: For a Guatemalan child who experiences a unit decrease in hemoglobin, one expects to see a 24% increase in the odds of being infected with STH, controlling for age, sex, lake proximity, and growth characteristics. Infection with more than one STH, despite low intensity, led to a significant decrease in hemoglobin.

  2. Attention and Memory in School-Age Children Surviving the Terrorist Attack in Beslan, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimin, Sara; Moscardino, Ughetta; Capello, Fabia; Axia, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of terrorism on children's cognitive functioning and school learning. The primary purpose of this study was to report on cognitive functioning among school-age children 20 months after a terrorist attack against their school. Participants included 203 directly and indirectly exposed children from Beslan and 100…

  3. Family and neighborhood disadvantage, home environment, and children's school readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Lieny; Buettner, Cynthia K; Hur, Eunhye

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations between family socioeconomic risk, neighborhood disadvantage, and children's school readiness. A sample of 420 children from 48 early childcare programs yielded multi-informant data. The average age was 55.3 months (SD = 6.4), with 38% of children being Black, non-Hispanic, Hispanic, or other minority race (American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian, and Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander). One third (32.4%) of the parents had annual incomes less than $30,000. We used multilevel structural equation modeling to test direct and indirect associations among family socioeconomic risk and neighborhood disadvantage and children's cognitive and social-emotional development through home learning environment and parental depression. Children with a greater number of family socioeconomic risks and a higher level of neighborhood disadvantage demonstrated lower scores on cognitive skills. The degree of family socioeconomic risk was indirectly associated with children's cognitive ability through parents' cognitive stimulation at home. Parents who had more family socioeconomic risks and neighborhood disadvantage reported more depressive symptoms, which, in turn, suggested children's greater probability of having social-emotional problems. In other words, home learning environments explained associations between family socioeconomic disadvantage and children's cognitive skills, while parental depression explained associations between family/neighborhood disadvantages and children's social-emotional problems. Results suggest the importance of intervention or prevention strategies for parents to improve cognitive stimulation at home and to reduce depressive symptoms. PMID:25150370

  4. The Chinese in Houston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodell, Thomas M.

    There are between seven and eight thousand Chinese Americans living in Houston, but there has never been a predominantly Chinese neighborhood in the city. This lack of geographical focus has prevented the development of easily identifiable aspects of ethnic concentration, such as a Chinese school or a Chinese business district. Apart from the…

  5. ASSESSMENT OF BODY MASS INDEX AND HEALTH RELATED FITNESS AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    ANIL RAMACHANDRAN; NISHAN SINGH DEOL; MANMEET GILL

    2009-01-01

    The present study on body mass index and health related physical fitness of school children was undertaken with the view of portraying the health related fitness profile of school children in Kannur district of Kerala. Data on body mass index and health related fitness according to ICHPER.SD Asia Youth Health Related Fitness test was collected from 1000 school children from different schools of Kannur district, Kerala. The study had sub samples of 250 boys and 250 girls from schools belonging...

  6. Effects of Divorce on Children, Traits of Resiliency and School Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Betty J.

    Gaining an awareness of the needs of children of divorce and how children achieve resilience should help students become well-adjusted and productive. This paper explores ways in which school systems and school counselors can meet the needs of these children. It portrays the effects of divorce on children by drawing on the literature, observations…

  7. Psychiatric Disorder or Impairing Psychology in Children Who Have Been Excluded from School: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whear, Rebecca; Marlow, Ruth; Boddy, Kate; Ukoumunne, Obioha C.; Parker, Claire; Ford, Tamsin; Thompson-Coon, Jo; Stein, Ken

    2014-01-01

    When children with special educational needs are excluded from school, it should raise the concern that these children are not receiving adequate help and support. This systematic review aims to identify the prevalence of psychiatric disorder or impairing psychopathology among children who are excluded from school compared to children who are not…

  8. Interparental Conflict and Children’s School Adjustment: The Explanatory Role of Children’s Internal Representations of Interparental and Parent–Child Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Sturge-apple, Melissa L.; Davies, Patrick T.; Winter, Marcia A.; Cummings, E. Mark; Schermerhorn, Alice

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how children’s insecure internal representations of interparental and parent–child relationships served as explanatory mechanisms in multiple pathways linking interparental conflict and parent emotional unavailability with the emotional and classroom engagement difficulties the children had in their adjustment to school. With their parents, 229 kindergarten children (127 girls and 102 boys, mean age = 6.0 years, SD = .50, at Wave 1) participated in this multimethod, 3-...

  9. Providing Guidance for School Personnel Making Decisions in the Service of School Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jillian; MacMath, Sheryl

    2006-01-01

    Due to improved medical procedures, more and more children with congenital heart disease are entering the school system. In order to help both school and health professionals involved in the education of children, we provide a brief review of the literature, review real-life dilemmas that school personnel face on a daily basis, and interpret the…

  10. Korean Immigrant Mothers' Perspectives: The Meanings of a Korean Heritage Language School for Their Children's American Early Schooling Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhee

    2011-01-01

    This study examines what a Korean heritage language school means to Korean immigrant families and their children, considering Korean immigrant mothers' perspectives on American early schooling. As part of an ethnographic research project on Korean-American children's peer culture in a heritage school, seven mothers, two guardians (grandmothers),…

  11. Hand Washing Practices among School Children in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Steiner-Asiedu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of diarrhoeal diseases and other communicable diseases among children due to poor personal hygiene and sanitation remains a concern on the public health agenda in most countries. To address the problem efficiently, an understanding of the knowledge and practices among target populations is needed to plan and design behavioural interventions. It is against this background that the present study was carried out to determine the hand washing practices among children in private and public school in the Metropolis in the Greater-Accra region of Ghana, with both private and public schools. A total of 295 school children were randomly recruited into the study. The study was cross-sectional in design and used qualitative and quantitative methods to collect data. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on sociodemographics. A check list was used during the observation of hand washing practices and an interview guide was used for the focus group discussions. The results showed that, most school children observed did not practice proper hand washing with soap, both in school and at home due to the unavailability and inaccessibility of hand washing facilities such as soap, towel and clean running water. However, majority (90.2% of those who used the school toilet practiced hand washing with soap after defecation. Private schools were found to be 63% (p = 0.02 less likely to wash their hands after using the toilet, 51% (p = 0.03 less likely to wash their hands before eating and 77% (p<0.001 less likely to wash their hands with soap after eating compared to their public school counterparts. Parents reported the presence of hand washing facilities at home but structured observations during home visits proved otherwise. The need to extend the hand washing campaigns to private schools cannot be overemphasised. It will be useful for the Ghana Education Service to collaborate with all stakeholders; such as Ghana Health Services, National Community on Water and Sanitation Programme, health workers, and the Parents Teacher Associations (PTAs.This union will foster stronger linkages that will pave the way for educating and monitoring the school children for effective hand washing practices.

  12. ATTITUDES OF HEALTHY CHILDREN PARENTS TOWARDS HANDICAPPED CHILDREN AT THE PRE-SCHOOL AGE

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    Ruzica KERAMICIEVA

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1970-ties, in the USA and Western and Eastern Europe, the model of segregated education has been abandoned, and nowadays the handicapped children attend regular schools all together with other healthy pupils. This , so called Integrative Pedagogy, proceeds from the mental hygiene aspects according to which the restrictive environment in special schools has not been a favorable one for the development of those children.The integrational process of these children in preschool institutions and schools has rather been difficult due to a number of reasons. As one of them, already mentioned and found in literature , has been the negative attitude of non-handicapped children parents towards those handicapped in their development.The problem of this research is to check and test the attitude of healthy children parents towards handicapped children at preschool age. This research shall also tend to analyze the origin of the such attitudes i. e. , whether they have been a result of an insufficient information and ignorance of the obstacles during development, or been produced by imitation of the environment, or due to an empathy, or even because of the fear that “ such a thing better never enter their home”, etc.We sincerely believe that, revealing the above parents’ attitudes and their origin, would certainly bring finding ways of their successful socialization and making the integrational process of handicapped children with their normal mates in preschool institutions easier.

  13. Context Matters: Improving Schooling for Native Hawaiian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantle-Bromley, Corinne; Wilson, Carol A.; Foster, Ann M.; Maaka, Margaret J.

    2003-01-01

    This case study examines an initiative at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa's College of Education with the mission of improving schooling for children, mostly Native Hawaiian, of the Wai'anae Coast of O'ahu. The study reports how the initiative recruits, supports, and prepares new teachers for the particularities of this specific location as…

  14. Epidemiologic survey of eye in Cangzhou school children

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    Li-Dong Yang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the common ocular diseases in school children age of 6 to 14 years old in Cangzhou, Hebei, China and find the relative risk factors. METHODS:From March 2011 to October 2012, 20 schools including 1 and 6 grade school children were randomly selected as survey venues by Cangzhou Eye Hosipital. Then, 3 150 people as the selected residents were enrolled, which was figured out through the random cluster sampling procedure. Every participant completed questionnaire, and a series of examination. SPSS 16.0 was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS:Totally 3 150 residents finally took part in this study.(1There were 2672 eyes suffered lower vision CONCLUSION:The rate of low vision in school children is higher, among these the rate of myopia is the highest. All these result suggested: Family and community should pay sufficient attention to conduct children's eye health and prepare a balanced behaviour, to prevent the occurrence of ophthalmopathy.

  15. Preschool Predictors of Narrative Writing Skills in Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Roberts, Joanne E.; Nelson, Lauren; Zeisel, Susan; Kasambira Fannin, Danai

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the preschool predictors of elementary school narrative writing skills. The sample included 65 typically developing African American children, ranging in age from 5.0 to 5.5 years, and was 44.6% male. Targeted preschool predictors included measures of phonological processing, core language abilities, prereading skills, and…

  16. Child Maltreatment among School Children in the Kurdistan Province, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Rob; Sheikhattari, Payam; Assasi, Nazilla; Eftekhar, Hassan; Zamani, Qasem; Maleki, Bahram; Kiabayan, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the determinants of three types of child maltreatment: physical maltreatment, mental maltreatment, and child neglect among school children in the Kurdistan Province of Iran. The analysis examines the impact of socioeconomic, familial, demographic, and household dynamic factors on the three child maltreatment…

  17. Self-Regulation and Academic Achievement in Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Megan M.; Cameron, Claire E.

    2011-01-01

    Self-regulation is a key construct in children's healthy and adaptive development. In this chapter, the authors situate self-regulation in a theoretical context that describes its underlying components that are most important for early school success: flexible attention, working memory, and inhibitory control. The authors review evidence that…

  18. Obesity in School Children with Intellectual Disabilities in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaun, Laureline; Berthouze-Aranda, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of obesity in school children with intellectual disabilities and to determine the most appropriate indicators of obesity measurement. Materials and Methods: The weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percentage as measured by…

  19. Developmentally Appropriate Soccer Activities for Elementary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Ronald; Carr, David

    2006-01-01

    The sport of soccer has seen significant growth across multiple levels for the past two decades. Nowhere has this growth been more dramatic than at the youth level. It is estimated that well over 20 million children have some involvement with the game each year. As a result of this growth in community youth soccer, elementary school students are…

  20. Phonological Working Memory of Children in Two German Special Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselhorn, Marcus; Mahler, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    In two studies, 10-year-olds from 2 German special schools as well as typically developing children of the same chronological age (CA controls) or the same mental age (MA controls) were compared on several aspects of working memory functions (i.e., size and input quality of the phonological store, speed and automatic activation of the subvocal…

  1. Prevalence of Parasomnia in School aged Children in Tehran

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    Morteza Naserbakht

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available "nObjectives: Parasomnias can create sleep disruption; in this article we assessed parasomnias in school-aged children in Tehran. "nMethods: In spring 2005, a total of 6000 sleep questionnaires were distributed to school-aged children in 5 districts of Tehran (Iran. A modified Pediatrics sleep questionnaire with 34 questions was used. "nResults: Parasomnias varied from 0.5% to 5.7% among the subjects as follows: 2.7% sleep talking, 0.5% sleepwalking, 5.7% bruxism, 2.3% enuresis, and nightmare 4%. A group of children showed parasomnias occasionally- this was 13.1% for sleep talking, 1.4% for sleepwalking, 10.6% for bruxism, 3.1% for enuresis and 18.4% for nightmares. "nConclusion: A high proportion of children starting school suffer from sleep problems. In many cases this is a temporary, developmentally related phenomenon, but in 6% of the children the disorder is more serious and may be connected with various stress factors and further behavioral disturbances.

  2. Happy (Chinese) New Year!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Georgia G.

    1979-01-01

    Suggestions are made for a classroom celebration of Chinese New Year, including discussion of the Chinese calendar and customs, a short list of appropriate children's stories, and food ideas, including a recipe for fortune cookies. (SJL)

  3. Actinomyces spp. in supragingival plaque of ethnic Chinese preschool children with and without active dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G; Yip, H K; Samaranayake, L P; Luo, G; Lo, E C M; Teo, C S

    2003-01-01

    Very limited molecular epidemiological data are available on the role of Actinomyces spp. in the pathogenesis of caries in the primary dentition. Therefore, we investigated their distribution in supragingival plaque of ethnic Chinese preschool children from Singapore and Hong Kong, either with or without active caries. Plaque samples were taken from intact interproximal enamel areas using dental floss. Bacterial genomic DNA of each sample was extracted and variable regions of 16S ribosomal DNA amplified and labelled with digoxigenin. Oligonucleotide probes specific for Actinomyces bovis, Actinomyces gerencseriae, Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces meyeri, Actinomyces odontolyticus, catalase-negative Actinomyces naeslundii (genospecies 1 and 2) and catalase-positive Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 2 (previously Actinomyces viscosus serotype II) were used to detect these species using Southern hybridization with a Minislot and Miniblotter system. A. odontolyticus, A. gerencseriae and A. meyeri were detected with similar frequency in both Singapore and Hong Kong samples or in those with and without active caries. However, the prevalence of A. naeslundii was significantly different in the two locales (p<0.05). A. odontolyticus (88.7%), A. gerencseriae (56.6%) and A. naeslundii (50.9%) were detected in a majority of the samples and the positive hybridization signals of A. gerencseriae in the caries-active group were stronger than from the caries-free group. A. bovis and A. israelii were undetectable in any of the samples. These data imply that A. odontolyticus, A. naeslundii and A. gerencseriae may play an important role in supragingival plaque formation on primary teeth in ethnic Chinese, with others such as A. meyeri contributing. PMID:12925831

  4. Feeding of school children in a London borough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, A E; Harris, M C; Getreuer, A

    1977-03-19

    A survey of 12 schools in a London borough showed that the protein and energy content of the average school meal was below the standard set by the Department of Health and Social Security for all age groups. Failure to meet the standards resulted from inadequate food purchases, poor menu planning and portion control, and several management problems. A 24-hour recall questionnaire showed that 5% of the pupils were "poorly" fed. These pupils were, however, no worse off than their "adequately" fed peers with regard to absences from school or academic attainment measured by reading quotient, but there was some slight difference in height and weight. The percentage of children having no breakfast increased from 4% in the infant schools to 21% in the senior schools. Two per cent of the senior pupils regularly ate no lunch. PMID:851715

  5. A Survey of Attitudes toward Mediation among Chinese High School EFL Teachers and Their Classroom Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongyong Cheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper raises concerns about Chinese high school EFL teachers’ attitudes toward mediation and their classroom constraints. From the data gathered in the survey of 152 EFL teachers, the findings indicate that most teachers fail to mediate students’ learning due to situational constraints that they encounter though they hold positive attitudes toward mediation. Statistically, teachers with higher educational qualifications have more positive attitudes toward the mediator role than those with lower qualifications. Most of them view the lack of advice from relevant experts and of training on the implementation of mediation as the most influential of all the constraints. It is thus proposed that EFL teachers re-orient their roles from traditional instructor to mediator with the help of re-education programs.

  6. Action Schools! BC: A Socioecological Approach to Modifying Chronic Disease Risk Factors in Elementary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti-Jean Naylor, PhD

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Childhood physical inactivity and obesity are serious public health threats. Socioecological approaches to addressing these threats have been proposed. The school is a critical environment for promoting children’s health and provides the opportunity to explore the impact of a socioecological approach. Context Thirty percent of children in British Columbia, Canada, are overweight or obese, and 50% of youths are not physically active enough to yield health benefits. Methods Action Schools! BC, a socioecological model, was developed to create 1 an elementary school environment where students are provided with more opportunities to make healthy choices and 2 a supportive community and provincial environment to facilitate change at the school and individual levels. Consequences The environment in British Columbia for school- and provincial-level action on health behaviors improved. Focus group and project tracking results indicated that the Action Schools! BC model enhanced the conceptual use of knowledge and was an influencing factor. Political will and public interest were also cited as influential factors. Interpretation The Action Schools! BC model required substantial and demanding changes in the approach of the researchers, policy makers, and support team toward health promotion. Despite challenges, Action Schools! BC provides a good example of how to enhance knowledge exchange and multilevel intersectoral action in chronic disease prevention.

  7. The Impact of Pre-School on Young Children's Cognitive Attainments at Entry to Reception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, Pam; Elliot, Karen; Sylva, Kathy; Melhuish, Edward; Siraj-Blatchford, Iram; Taggart, Brenda

    2004-01-01

    This article explores the impact of pre-school experience on young children's cognitive attainments at entry to primary school and analyses data collected as part of a wider longitudinal study, the Effective Provision of Pre-school Education (EPPE) project, which followed a large sample of young children attending 141 pre-school centres drawn from…

  8. Weaving Multiple Literacies: Somali Children and Their Teachers in the Context of School Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masny, Diana; Ghahremani-Ghajar, Sue-san

    1999-01-01

    An ethnographic case study of Somali children in Canadian schools examines the relationship between literacies, school, and community cultures by exploring literacy events as they unfold for Somali children in an elementary school. Field notes and interviews involving Somali and school-community members are analyzed based on the view that…

  9. [Influence of pedagogy on vigilance in school age children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaczyk-Martin, C; Nuttens, M C; Hautekeete, M; Salomez, J L; Lequien, P

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between vigilance and pedagogy was studied in 3 middle classes of primary school (children aged between 8 and 9 yrs). Three different types of pedagogy, belonging to 3 major pedagogic currents were evaluated: the pedagogy of Maria Montessori, the traditional one and the so-called "open" pedagogy. The vigilance of children was tested with the psychometric test of Zazzo. The rate of performance of the test was significantly different according to the nature of pedagogy after adjustment of the only 2 confusing factors between the 3 schools: the age of the children and the degree of the mother. This difference was in favor of the pedagogy of Maria Montessori compared with the 2 others. It was observed on the results to the tests but also on learning. PMID:2170913

  10. Treatment of 140 cerebral palsied children with a combined method based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and western medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xue-juan; Zheng, Kun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe and evaluate a method that is effective and practical for treatment of cerebral palsied (CP) children in China. Method: The patient’s age and disease type and individual specific conditions were considered in choosing therapy methods accordingly: Chinese herbs, acupuncture, auricular seed pressure, point finger pressing, massage, orthopedic hand manipulation, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, language therapy, etc. Meanwhile we created a new CP treatment model that ...

  11. 34 CFR 300.130 - Definition of parentally-placed private school children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...Disabilities Enrolled by Their Parents in Private Schools § 300.130 Definition...Parentally-placed private school children with disabilities...disabilities enrolled by their parents in private, including religious, schools or facilities that...

  12. Executive Dysfunction in School-Age Children With ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambek, Rikke; Tannock, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The study examined executive function deficits (EFD) in school-age children (7 to 14 years) with ADHD. Method: A clinical sample of children diagnosed with ADHD (n = 49) was compared to a population sample (n = 196) on eight executive function (EF) measures. Then, the prevalence of EFD in clinical and non-clinical children was examined at the individual level according to three methods previously applied to define EFD, and a fourth method was included to control for the effect of age on performance. Results: Children with ADHD were significantly more impaired on measures of EF than children without ADHD at the group level. However, only about 50% of children with ADHD were found to have EFD at the individual level, and results appeared relatively robust across methods applied to define EFD. Conclusion: As a group, children with ADHD displayed more problems on neuropsychological measures of EF than non-clinical children; at the individual level, there appeared to be heterogeneity in EF impairment. (J. of Att. Dis. 2010; XX(X) 1-XX).

  13. Variant rs9939609 in the FTO gene is associated with body mass index among Chinese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ailing

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fat-mass and obesity-associated (FTO gene is a gene located in chromosome region 16q12.2. Genetic variants in FTO are associated with the obesity phenotype in European and Hispanic populations. However, this association still remains controversial in Asian population. We aimed to test the association of FTO genetic variants with obesity and obesity-related metabolic traits among children living in Beijing, China. Methods We genotyped FTO variants rs9939609 in 670 children (332 girls and 338 boys aged 8-11 years living in Beijing, and analyzed its association with obesity and obesity-related metabolic traits. Overweight and obesity were defined by age- and sex-specific BMI reference for Chinese children. Obesity-related metabolic traits included fasting plasma glucose, lipid profiles, leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin and blood pressures. Results The frequency of rs9939609 A allele was 12.2%, which was 21.9% for the heterozygote and 1.2% for the homozygote of the A allele. The obesity prevalence among the carriers of AA/AT genotypes was significantly higher than that among those with TT genotype (36.4% vs. 22.6%, P = 0.004. Compared to the carrier of TT genotype, the likelihood of obesity was 1.79 (95% confidence interval (95% CI 1.20-2.67, P = 0.004 for the carrier of AA/AT genotype, after adjustment of sex, age and puberty stages. The BMI Z-score of children with AA/AT genotype were significantly higher than that of their counterparts with the TT genotype (1.1 ± 0.1 vs. 0.8 ± 0.1, P = 0.02. The concentration of triglyceride was 1.03 ± 0.52 mmol/L among TT carrier and 1.13 ± 0.68 mmol/L among AA/AT carrier (P = 0.045. While, the concentrations of adiponectin were 18.0 ± 0.4 ?g/ml among carriers of TT and 16.2 ± 0.7 ?g/ml among subjects with AA/AT genotype (P = 0.03. The level of glucose marginally increased in the AA/AT genotype subjects (4.67 ± 0.40 mmol/L vs. 4.60 ± 0.35 mmol/L, P = 0.08. The evidence of association was reduced after adjustment for BMI (P = 0.38 for triglyceride, P = 0.20 for adiponectin and glucose. There was weak evidence of association between rs9939609 and other obesity-related metabolic traits including total cholesterol (3.92 ± 0.03 mmol/L vs. 4.02 ± 0.05 mmol/L, P = 0.10, insulin (2.69 ± 1.77 ng/ml vs. 3.12 ± 2.91 ng/ml, P = 0.14, and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR 0.56 ± 0.03 vs. 0.66 ± 0.05, P = 0.10. Conclusions Genetic variation in the FTO gene associates with obesity in Chinese children.

  14. Academic Activities after School That Help Secondary School Children’s Cognitive Development through Hermeneutic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Suppiah Nachiappan; Veeramani Marimuthu; Hari Krishnan Andi; Veeran, Velayudhan P. K.

    2012-01-01

    This research is an effort to look into academic activities after school that help secondary school students in cognition development through Hermeneutic analyse for students of Pantai Remis Secondary School, Perak. This research is also to show that Hermeneutic understanding method can be applied effectively to identify academic activities after school that help secondary school students in their cognition development. This research involved 20 secondary school students from Form 1 to Form 3...

  15. Meta-analysis of Zn, Cu and Fe in the hair of Chinese children with recurrent respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Song; Zhang, Aihua; Huang, Songming

    2014-10-01

    Trace elements play an important role in maintaining the normal metabolic and immune function. The onset of recurrent respiratory tract infection (RRI) is associated with the immune function, genetic factors and nutritional status. However, the association between the levels of trace elements and RRI remains inconclusive. We aimed to investigate the alterations of hair levels of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) in Chinese children with RRI by performing a meta-analysis. A predefined electronic databases search was performed to identify eligible studies for the analysis of hair Zn, Cu or Fe levels in Chinese children with RRI. Thirteen studies were included. RRI patients displayed significantly lower levels of hair Zn (13 studies, random effects SMD: - 1.215, 95% CI: - 1.704 to - 0.725, p < 0.0001), Cu (11 studies, random effects SMD: - 0.384, 95% CI: - 0.717 to - 0.052, p = 0.023) and Fe (12 studies, random effects SMD: - 0.569, 95% CI: - 0.827 to - 0.312, p < 0.0001) compared with controls. No evidence of publication bias was observed. Sensitivity analysis did not change the results significantly. In conclusion, the deficiency of Zn, Cu and Fe may be contributing factors for the susceptibility of RRI in Chinese children. However, more studies in different ethnicities should be performed in the future. PMID:24874085

  16. Central nervous system tumors in chinese children under the age of 3: a population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Anthony Pak-Yin; Shing, Matthew Ming-Kong; Yuen, Hui-Leung; Li, Chak-Ho; Ling, Siu-Cheung; Luk, Chung-Wing; Ha, Shau-Yin; Li, Chi-Kong; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2015-03-01

    The management of central nervous system tumors in children below the age of 3 years represents a special challenge to pediatric oncologists with distinctive epidemiology, treatment considerations, and prognosis. Population-based epidemiological data on this particular patient group is lacking in Chinese. We reviewed the population-based pediatric tumor registry in Hong Kong between 1999 and 2011. Eighty-one children with primary central nervous system tumors from 0 to 3 years of age were identified (annual incidence: 4.16 cases per 100,000). Forty-one (50.6%) were male and the mean duration of follow-up was 94 months (±8.1). Primary tumors were infratentorial in 43 (53.1%). The tumor types in decreasing frequency were astrocytoma (n=17), medulloblastoma (n=16), ependymoma (n=13), choroid plexus tumor (n=7), primitive neuroectodermal tumor (n=7), atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (n=6), germ cell tumor (GCT, n=5), craniopharyngioma (n=4), and ganglioglioma (n=3). Three patients presented antenatally. Treatment included surgery in 82.7%, chemotherapy in 50.6%, and radiotherapy in 25.9%. There were 29 deaths (35.8%) and 19 relapses (23.5%) during the review period with the 1-year overall survival (OS), 5-year OS, 1-year event-free survival (EFS), and 5-year EFS being 79.4% (±4.6), 63.5% (±5.9), 68.9% (±5.3), and 52.5% (±5.9), respectively. Significantly better OS and EFS were observed in patients who received gross total resection, but those with high-grade tumors, antenatal diagnosis, or atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor/primitive neuroectodermal tumor had worse outcome. Survival did not differ with age. Comparison with statistics from other studies revealed higher rates of embryonal tumor, GCT, and craniopharyngioma in Hong Kong Chinese. Disease outcome appeared to be better in our cohort comparing to previous reports probably due to the higher proportion of GCT locally. PMID:24608077

  17. An Explorative Analysis of Children’s Dropouts from Rural Schools of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mehar AKRAM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present an explorative analysis about the causes of children’s high proportion of drop-outs from rural schools of Pakistan. For this purpose, simple random sampling technique was used by taking a sample size of 120 respondents from six villages of the rural areas of district Jhang, Pakistan in 2010. The major objectives of the said research were to investigate the socio-economic hurdles of the drop-outs of children from schools, to find out the attitude of parents towards the drop-outs, and finally to suggest the measures for solving the problems regarding drop-outs of rural children from schools. Initially, the pre-testing was done on ten respondents before starting the actual research. As a result of the said research, it was found that there are certain factors, e.g. uneducated parents, teachers’ behavior, low mental ability, bad habits, bad peer group and scarcity of educated people in the community, which not only affects the performance of the children but also ends it in the form of their drop out from school.

  18. School playground facilities as a determinant of children's daily activity:a cross-sectional study of Danish primary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Glen; Bugge, Anna; Hermansen, Bianca; Svensson, Jesper; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous work has suggested that the number of permanent play facilities in school playgrounds and school-based policies on physical activity can influence physical activity in children. However, few comparable studies have used objective measures of physical activity or have had little adjustment for multiple confounders. Methods Physical activity was measured by accelerometry over 5 recess periods and 3 full school days in 441 children from 16 primary schools in Dunedin, New Ze...

  19. Teaching Elementary School Children about Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Decar, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Presents ideas for teaching elementary school students about Korea by introducing them to the country's folktales, clothing, art, music, and food. Includes a folktale adapted as a play and suggestions for teaching about traditional costumes, folk dances, music, and masks, as well as Korean mealtime and table manners. (GEA)

  20. Snoring, intermittent hypoxia and academic performance in primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urschitz, Michael S; Guenther, Anke; Eggebrecht, Esther; Wolff, Judith; Urschitz-Duprat, Pilar M; Schlaud, Martin; Poets, Christian F

    2003-08-15

    Sleep-disordered breathing is associated with impaired attention and neurocognitive deficits. We assessed the association of snoring and intermittent hypoxia with poor academic performance in third grade school children (1,144 children). Snoring frequency and intermittent hypoxia were investigated using parental questionnaire and nocturnal home pulse oximetry. Intermittent hypoxia was specified as desaturation events of 90% or less pulse oximeter saturation. Poor academic performance was defined as grade 4-6 on a six-point scale (i.e., approximately the lowest quintile grades) in mathematics, science, reading, spelling, and/or handwriting in the most recent school report. Snoring "always" was significantly associated with poor academic performance in mathematics (odds ratio; 95% confidence interval: 3.6; 1.3-10.1), science (4.3; 1.3-14.6), and spelling (3.5; 1.2-10.3). Snoring "frequently" was also significantly associated with poor academic performance in mathematics (2.4; 1.3-4.7) and spelling (2.0; 1.04-3.8). A significant relationship between snoring and poor academic performance was also found in children without intermittent hypoxia, whereas intermittent hypoxia did not show an independent association with poor academic performance. Thus, habitual snoring (i.e., snoring frequently or always) was associated with poor academic performance in these primary school children. PMID:12773324

  1. LIFESTYLE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS IN EARLY SCHOOL-AGE CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podstawski Robert

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: the aim of the study was determining relation between selected health behaviour aspects and level of physical fitness in 1 st - 3 rd grade pupils at primary school in Malbork (Pomorskie province. Materials and Methods: the research was conducted in 2009 among 153 children aged 7-10 years. The research group consisted of 80 girls and 73 boys. The diagnostic survey method with use of a questionnaire technique and a set of indirect motor trials was applied. Results: the research has shown that the health behaviours of young Polish children do not differ from their peers in other countries. The largest percentage of early school-age children in Malbork achieved the average level of physical fitness (57.0%, while the percentage of students with low (22.0% and high (21.0% level was similar. Conclusions: the connection between pro-health attitudes of early school-age children (i.e., leisure activities, own health condition, nutrition and the use of drugs and the level of their physical fitness was not ascertained.

  2. Micronutrient levels and nutritional status of school children living in Northwest Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Amare Bemnet; Moges Beyene; Fantahun Bereket; Tafess Ketema; Woldeyohannes Desalegn; Yismaw Gizachew; Ayane Tilahun; Yabutani Tomoki; Mulu Andargachew; Ota Fusao; Kassu Afework

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Several micronutrients are essential for adequate growth of children. However, little information is available on multiple micronutrient status of school children in Ethiopia. The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between multiple micronutrient levels and nutritional status among school children. Method In this cross-sectional study, anthropometric data, blood and stool samples were collected from 100 children at Meseret Elementary School in Gondar to...

  3. The Implications of Early Attentional Regulation for School Success among Low-Income Children

    OpenAIRE

    Razza, Rachel A.; Martin, Anne; Brooks-gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal associations between attentional regulation in preschool and children’s school success in later elementary school within an at-risk sample (N = 2,595). Specifically, two facets of attention (focused attention and lack of impulsivity) at age 5 were explored as independent predictors of children’s achievement and behavioral competence at age 9. Overall, the pattern of results indicates specificity between the facets of attention and school success, such ...

  4. Prevalence of sleep problems and habits in a sample of Saudi primary school children

    OpenAIRE

    BaHammam Ahmed; AlFaris Eiad; Shaikh Shaffi; Saeed Abdulaziz

    2006-01-01

    Background: Sleep problems in children vary not only with age, but also with ethnic and sociocultural background. No research has been conducted to assess sleep problems in Saudi elementary school children. This study surveyed parents (or guardians) about their elementary school children?s sleep to assess the prevalence of certain sleep problems. Methods: The study population comprised boys and girls attending regular public elementary schools in all grades and was conducted during spr...

  5. Staging an educated self : Linguistic displays of schooling among rural Zambian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Nana

    2013-01-01

    This article explores local meanings of schooling as displayed by 7-12 year old children in a rural Zambian community. Applying linguisticanthropological analyses of their peer interactions, the author discusses symbolic reworkings of schooling and ‘educatedness’ among children frequently labeled as ‘slow’ or ‘backwards’ in the classroom setting. The discussion includes the apparent disparities between the tangible and symbolic roles of school in the context of these children’s lifeworlds and future horizons.

  6. [Seatbelts on school buses: are they safe for our children?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Kobi; Goldman, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    In Israel, 280,000 pupils travel daily to school and back home by means of school transportation. In an effort to increase school transportation safety, the installation of lap belts in school transportation vehicles is required since September 1, 2006. In Israel, laws are often passed with good intentions, but frequently without exploring the potential outcomes. Traffic regulation 364a states that "lap belts or other seatbelts" are required in all vehicles used for school transportation. The objective of this study is to review the world-wide literature regarding seatbelts on school buses with an emphasis to identify the risks associated with lap restraints. Over 50 studies, articles and position papers referring to the efficacy of seatbelts, with an emphasis on school transportation, were reviewed. According to the literature, this new traffic regulation could produce more devastating outcomes than previously. Seatbelts were designed to prevent passenger injuries during a motor vehicle crash. Researchers have not proven efficacy of seatbelts in school buses. Lap-only belts have shown to increase the risk of severe injury among children, even in mild crashes. Since young children are not adequately developed to take the force of a lap-only restraint, these belts have been associated with internal injuries, lumbar fracture-dislocations, abdominal contusions and head injuries. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in the USA has reported that lap belts are not effective in preventing injury among children traveling by bus. Children have a two to three fold risk of severe injury when using lap only restraints. On the contrary, lap-shoulder belts may reduce the risk of abdominal injuries by up to 50% relative to lap-only belts. In conclusion, policy makers aimed to implement regulations which will reduce injuries and fatalities. However, neglecting to carry out an in-depth professional review has brought about a regulation requiring lap belts in school buses; a decision which, according to international research studies, can potentially increase the injury risks among pupils. PMID:18935762

  7. Snoring in primary school children and domestic environment: A Perth school based study

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Andy H; Rumchev Krassi; Spickett Jeffery; Zhang Guicheng; Stick Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The home is the predominant environment for exposure to many environmental irritants such as air pollutants and allergens. Exposure to common indoor irritants including volatile organic compounds, formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide, may increase the risk of snoring for children. The aim of this study was to investigate domestic environmental factors associated with snoring in children. Methods A school-based respiratory survey was administered during March and April of 2002...

  8. Snoring in primary school children and domestic environment: A Perth school based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Andy H

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The home is the predominant environment for exposure to many environmental irritants such as air pollutants and allergens. Exposure to common indoor irritants including volatile organic compounds, formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide, may increase the risk of snoring for children. The aim of this study was to investigate domestic environmental factors associated with snoring in children. Methods A school-based respiratory survey was administered during March and April of 2002. Nine hundred and ninety six children from four primary schools within the Perth metropolitan area were recruited for the study. A sub-group of 88 children aged 4–6 years were further selected from this sample for domestic air pollutant assessment. Results The prevalences of infrequent snoring and habitual snoring in primary school children were 24.9% and 15.2% respectively. Passive smoking was found to be a significant risk factor for habitual snoring (odds ratio (OR = 1.77; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.20–2.61, while having pets at home appeared to be protective against habitual snoring (OR = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.37–0.92. Domestic pollutant assessments showed that the prevalence of snoring was significantly associated with exposure to nitrogen dioxide during winter. Relative to the low exposure category (3, the adjusted ORs of snoring by children with medium (30 – 60 ?g/m3 and high exposures (> 60 ?g/m3 to NO2 were 2.5 (95% CI: 0.7–8.7 and 4.5 (95% CI: 1.4–14.3 respectively. The corresponding linear dose-response trend was also significant (P = 0.011. Conclusion Snoring is common in primary school children. Domestic environments may play a significant role in the increased prevalence of snoring. Exposure to nitrogen dioxide in domestic environment is associated with snoring in children.

  9. Children's Perception Of Parenting Styles In Relation To Schooling Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Menon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A parenting style is a psychological construct representing standard strategies that parents use in their child rearing. Parents create their own style from a combination of factors, and these may evolve over time as the children develop their own personalities and move through life's stages. A total sample of 210 children in the age group of 8-10 years were chosen for the study which was equally divided among 3 different schools i.e. Municipal, Private, & Aided with the help of purposive sampling. Aself- structured questionnaire was prepared on children's perception on parenting styles with 10 hypothetical statements. The tool was validated and the reliability of the tool was found Father: r = 0.979, Mother: r= 0.983. The data was quantitatively analyzed. The findings indicate that the schooling background doesn't affect the parenting styles. Most of the parents use authoritative parenting styles, want their children to be responsive and mature, they develop a sense of independence in their children, but still have limits and consequences.

  10. Mental Adaptation Problems of Children in a Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Dogan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was carried out on explanatory purposes to determine psychological compliance state of the children between age group 6-14, receiving education in a primary school province and how common some psychological infancy problems are. METHODS: The samples of the research consist of mothers and teachers of 255 children between age group 6-14, receiving education in a primary school in Sivas province. ?Personal Information Form? and ?Psychological Compliance Measurement? were used in the collection of data. RESULTS: According to the evaluation of teachers it was found out that while %27.5 of the children has psychological compliance problems. According to the evaluation of mothers, it was obtained that only 24.7% of the children has psychological compliance problems. The average compliance points were found higher in boys than girls, in younger age group than older age group, in group having physical disorders than not having any physical disorders. In the research a meaningful difference was not found when the average psychological compliance points and other variables were compared. When infancy psychological compliance problems evaluated, in 2.3% of the children stammer, in 3.1% habit-spasm disorder, in 7% finger sucking, in 1.9% encopresis, in 9% enuresis, and in 19.6 educational failures were determined. When the state of being problematical in behaviors and neurotic compared with the gender, it was traced that behavioral problems were higher in boys (59.5% than girls (40.5% and the neurotic problems were higher in girls (56. 3% than boys (56.3%. CONCLUSION: Consequently, it was recognized that improvement of the services for the psychological care of the children in the society and primary schools is crucially needed. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(1.000: 47-52

  11. Girls versus boys? Factors associated with children's schooling in rural Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Nina, Bruvik Westberg

    2012-01-01

    The decision on whether to send children to school or not is essentially one made by the household. Recent research has increasingly focused on how intra-household bargaining affects the school participation decision, and with special focus on the mother’s position relative to the father. In this thesis I have sought to identify factors affecting children’s schooling, with special focus on child’s gender, parents’ role and preferences and how the school participation outcome may be re...

  12. Gender differences in brain development in Chinese children and adolescents: a structural MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Jin, Zhen; Chen, Kewei; Peng, Danling; Yao, Li

    2008-03-01

    Using optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM), this study systematically investigated gender differences in brain development through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 158 Chinese normal children and adolescents aged 7.26 to 22.80 years (mean age 15.03+/-4.70 years, 78 boys and 80 girls). Gender groups were matched for measures of age, handedness, education level. The customized brain templates, including T I-weighted image and gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM)/cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) prior probability maps, were created from all participants. Results showed that the total intracranial volume (TIV), global absolute GM and global WM volume in girls were significantly smaller than those in boys. The hippocampus grew faster in girls than that in boys, but the amygdala grew faster in boys than that in girls. The rate of regional GM decreases with age was steeper in the left superior parietal lobule, bilateral inferior parietal lobule, left precuneus, and bilateral supramarginal gyrus in boys compared to girls, which was possibly related to better spatial processing ability in boys. Regional GM volumes were greater in bilateral superior temporal gyrus, bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle frontal gyrus in girls. Regional WM volumes were greater in the left temporal lobe, right inferior parietal and bilateral middle frontal gyrus in girls. The gender differences in the temporal and frontal lobe maybe be related to better language ability in girls. These findings may aid in understanding the differences in cognitive function between boys and girls.

  13. HOXA1 gene is not potentially related to ventricular septal defect in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangyan; Wang, Binbin; Chen, Xuehong; Li, Hang; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Longfei; Ma, Xu; Gao, Bingren

    2013-02-01

    The HOXA1 gene plays a fundamental role in embryonic morphogenesis. Recent studies in humans and mice have indicated that HOXA1 plays a previously unrecognized role in cardiovascular system development. Congenital heart disease (CHD), particularly ventricular septal defect (VSD), might be a clinically isolated manifestation of HOXA1 mutations. The purpose of the present study was to identify potential pathological mutations in the HOXA1 gene in Chinese children with VSD and to gain insight into the etiology of CHD. A total of 340 nonsyndromic VSD patients and 200 normal subjects were sampled. Two exons and the nearby introns of the human HOXA1 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were purified and directly sequenced. However, no nonsynonymous mutations in the coding regions of the HOXA1 gene were observed: Only two novel synonymous mutations (c.C210T p.His70His, and c.T861A p.Arg287Arg) were found in two patients. Two previously reported single and multiple histidine-deletion variants were identified in both normal and VSD patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the role of the HOXA1 gene in CHD. Although our results did not show any pathogenic HOXA1 mutation, our results suggest that VSD might not be a clinically isolated manifestation of HOXA1 mutations. PMID:22777240

  14. Pedagogical correlates of reading comprehension in English and Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westwood, P.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This study conducted in Hong Kong used multiple regression procedures to investigate the relationship between primary school children’s reading test scores and the frequency with which fortytwo instructional practices were used by their literacy teachers. Analyses were conducted separately for reading in English language and in Chinese (Modern Standard Written Chinese. Subjects comprised4,329 Cantonese-speaking students (2,157 girls; 2,172 boys aged approximately 9+ years, and their 256 teachers (129 teachers of English; 127 teachers of Chinese. Results suggest that no single instructional practice was highly correlated with students’ reading achievement in English or Chinese, and in fact some practices demonstrated a negative association. However, certain practices, particularly related to the use and nature of resource materials and to assessment strategies, did demonstrate a positive association with reading performance. Similarities and differences between Chinese and English data are discussed.

  15. Factor structure of functional state of primary school age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidenko O.V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The examination of primary school children to determine the ranking of significant factors that determine the structure of their functional state depending on the level of physical health. It is shown that the main factor in the structure of the functional state of younger schoolchildren in low-and lower-middle level of physical fitness is selected morpho-functional status, which characterizes the functions of the body at rest. For children with average or above average level of physical fitness is a leading factor in physical fitness of schoolchildren.

  16. Children's Perception Of Parenting Styles In Relation To Schooling Background

    OpenAIRE

    Asha Menon

    2013-01-01

    A parenting style is a psychological construct representing standard strategies that parents use in their child rearing. Parents create their own style from a combination of factors, and these may evolve over time as the children develop their own personalities and move through life's stages. A total sample of 210 children in the age group of 8-10 years were chosen for the study which was equally divided among 3 different schools i.e. Municipal, Private, & Aided with the help of purposive sam...

  17. The Effect of a Computerized Visual Perception and Visual-Motor Integration Training Program on Improving Chinese Handwriting of Children with Handwriting Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, K. W.; Li-Tsang, C. W .P.; Weiss, T. P. L.; Rosenblum, S.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a computerized visual perception and visual-motor integration training program to enhance Chinese handwriting performance among children with learning difficulties, particularly those with handwriting problems. Participants were 26 primary-one children who were assessed by educational psychologists and…

  18. Language Immersion Programs for Young Children? Yes . . . but Proceed with Caution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Anne K.

    2010-01-01

    A dual immersion program in Chinese and English at the 3e International School in Beijing is helping children become fluent in both languages, even though many students spoke neither language when they entered the school. Children enter the program as young as two years old. Studies indicate that bilingual children have higher levels of cognitive…

  19. Chinese American Immigrant Parents' Emotional Expression in the Family: Relations With Parents' Cultural Orientations and Children's Emotion-Related Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Stephen H; Zhou, Qing; Main, Alexandra; Lee, Erica H

    2014-08-18

    The present study examined 2 measures of Chinese American immigrant parents' emotional expression in the family context: self-reported emotional expressivity and observed emotional expression during a parent-child interaction task. Path analyses were conducted to examine the concurrent associations between measures of emotional expression and (a) parents' American and Chinese cultural orientations in language proficiency, media use, and social affiliation domains, and (b) parents' and teachers' ratings of children's emotion-related regulation. Results suggested that cultural orientations were primarily associated with parents' self-reported expressivity (rather than observed emotional expression), such that higher American orientations were generally associated with higher expressivity. Although parents' self-reported expressivity was only related to their own reports of children's regulation, parents' observed emotional expression was related to both parents' and teachers' reports of children's regulation. These results suggest that self-reported expressivity and observed emotional expression reflect different constructs and have differential relations to parents' cultural orientations and children's regulation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25133412

  20. Is the Earth Flat or Round? Primary School Children’s Understandings of the Planet Earth: The Case of Turkish Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ozsoy, Sibel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore primary school children’s understandings about the shape of the Earth. The sample is consisted of 124 first-graders from five primary schools located in an urbancity of Turkey. The data of the study were collected through children’s drawings and semi-structured interviews. Results obtained from the drawings showed that only one third of the participants havedrawn scientifically acceptable images of the earth. However, the subsequent semi-structured ...

  1. Nutritional anaemia and malaria in pre-school and school age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anumudu C

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : The most common cause of anemia is a deficiency of iron; but it may also be caused by deficiencies of folates, vitamin B12 and protein. Some anemias are not caused by nutritional factors, but by congenital factors and parasitic diseases such as malaria. This study attempted to estimate the prevalence of anemia among pre-school and school- aged children in two rural areas of Odogbolu Local government area, and to determine whether its cause was nutritional or could be attributed to malaria. Methods : A total of 177 children between the ages of 2 and 11 years were included in the study. Children were examined for malaria parasites by microscopy. The World Health Organization (WHO age-adjusted cut-off for hemoglobin and hematocrit were used to classify anemia. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for serum ferritin was compared with standard methods of determining iron deficiency. Under- nutrition (stunting, wasting and underweight was classified according to the National Centre for Health Statistics standards. Values below - 2SD were defined as mild-moderate under-nutrition, and those below -3SD as severe malnutrition. Results : Most of the children were anemic, 87.1%, having PCV values below the 32% cut-off and 95% with hemoglobin levels lower than the 11g/dl, although parasite prevalence and density were low. Malnutrition was patent; 36% of the children were stunted, 18.3% wasted and 44.2% underweight. Serum ferritin was more sensitive than PCV in detecting anemic children. Although anemia was higher in boys and preschoolers compared to girls and school aged children, the difference was significant only in preschoolers (P = .004. Anaemia was also significantly higher in Irawo village school than in Iloti (P = .0001 Conclusion : The anemia detected in this population may be due more to under-nutrition than to malaria.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Quinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ogutu, James O.; Gu, Jiarui; Ding, Fengshu; You, Yuhong; Huo, Yan; Zhao, Hong; Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Wenli; Chen, Xiaobei; Fu, Yingmei; Zhang, Fengmin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare quinolone resistance and gyrA mutations in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese adults who used quinolone in the preceding month and children without any known history of quinolone administration. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 61 isolates from children and 79 isolates from adults were determined. The mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions in gyrA gene were detected by PCR and DNA sequencing. Fluoroquinolone resistance and types of gyrA mutations in isolates from children and adults were compared and statistically analyzed. No significant differences were detected in the resistance rates of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin between children and adults among isolates of the two species (all P > 0.05). The double mutation Ser83?Leu + Asp87?Asn in the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates occurred in 73.7% isolates from the children and 67.9% from the adults, respectively (P = 0.5444). Children with no known history of quinolone administration were found to carry fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The occurrence of ciprofloxacin resistance and the major types of gyrA mutations in the isolates from the children were similar to those from adults. The results indicate that precautions should be taken on environmental issues resulting from widespread transmission of quinolone resistance. PMID:25756041

  3. The prevalence of mental retardation among third grade elementary school children in the Suwon area, Korea.

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Shin Young; Yu, Hyun Hee; Lee, Il Yung

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of mental retardation (MR) in Korea. The study population comprised 1,757 third-grade elementary school children residing in a single school district in Suwon, Korea. We conducted the total population survey for 1,537 children who attended one of 5 schools in the district. For the remaining 220 children who did not attend a school in the school district, we found children with MR via inspection of the register list of the disabled. A to...

  4. Including Children with Selective Mutism in Mainstream Schools and Kindergartens: Problems and Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omdal, Heidi

    2008-01-01

    There is little research on inclusion of children with selective mutism in school/kindergarten. Moreover, few studies have tried to understand selectively mute children's interactions in the natural surroundings of their home and school/kindergarten. Five children meeting the DSM-IV criteria for selective mutism were video-observed in social…

  5. Vulnerable Children, Communities and Schools: Lessons from Three HIV/AIDS Affected Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Nancy; O'Gara, Chloe

    2007-01-01

    The growing number of children made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS threatens the achievement of Education for All (EFA) and Millennium Development goals. Policy recommendations assign schools key roles in meeting the needs of vulnerable children, but there is a dearth of evidence about how vulnerable children and schools interact in AIDS affected…

  6. Effective Group Work for Elementary School-Age Children Whose Parents Are Divorcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucia-Waack, Janice; Gerrity, Deborah

    2001-01-01

    Parental divorce is the issue of most concern for elementary school children. This article describes interventions for children-of-divorce groups for elementary school children. Suggests guidelines related to goal setting; securing agency and parental consent; leadership planning; recruitment, screening, and selection of members; group member…

  7. Dependency on Elementary School Caregivers: The Role of Parental Intrusiveness and Children's Separation Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jeffrey J.; Kiff, Cara; Jacobs, Jeffrey; Ifekwunigwe, Muriel; Piacentini, John C.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical model of children's dependency on teachers and other caregivers in elementary school was tested and supported in this study. Based on attachment theory and social-cognitive theory, parental intrusiveness and children's separation anxiety were hypothesized to heighten dependent behaviors with school caregivers. Families of children in…

  8. Young Children's Measurement Knowledge: Understandings about Comparison at the Commencement of Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents data gathered during a three-year study that explored the experiences with measurement that children have in prior-to-school and out-of-school contexts, and the ways in which children are able to represent these experiences. In this present investigation, examples of the children's responses to an open-ended drawing task,…

  9. The Relationship between Self-Concept, Intrinsic Motivation, Self-Determination and Academic Achievement among Chinese Primary School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Nooraini Othman; Kong Bee Leng

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between self-concept, intrinsic motivation andself-determination with academic achievement among the respondents. The sample of the study was 200 studentsin standard 5 and standard 6 from a Chinese primary school in Johor, Malaysia. Data was collected using aself-developed set of questionnaire. The reliability of the instrument was tested using Cronbach’s Alpha and theresult was 0.941. The data was analyzed using Statistical Pack...

  10. Tracing Cultures behind the Struggling Experience of a Chinese High School Student Writing Application Letters in English

    OpenAIRE

    Liqiu Wei; Ji Liu

    2012-01-01

    By examining the affect, behavior and cognition (the ABCs) involved in the writing process of a Chinese high school student composing application essays in English (a foreign language) as a case study by means of ethnographic approach and under the notion of small culture, this study aims to illustrate how different cultural forces interact with one another and how they come to play in the shaping of rhetorical differences between learner's native language (L1/NL )and second or foreign langua...

  11. Dalit children's experiences and perspectives regarding school participation in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Budhathoki, Suraj

    2013-01-01

    The caste based discrimination has been a matter of great discussion in societal and governmental level in Nepal. Several scholars have discussed this matter focusing on how people have been discriminated in the ground of caste in society, and other social and governmental institutions. There are also some contributions focusing in particular on how dalit people have been excluded from education. It has been noticed, however, that children perspectives and voices about their schooling experie...

  12. Children's School Placement in Germany: Does Kindergarten Attendance Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Spiess, C. Katharina; Bu?chel, Felix; Wagner, Gert G.

    2003-01-01

    The positive effects of early childhood programs on children's school success have been demonstrated in the literature. However, most studies were completed in the U.S.A., where early childhood programs vary widely, based on differing auspice, regulation, cost, and other factors. In European countries, early childhood programs are generally far more homogenous. This is particularly true for Germany where most programs are communitybased Kindergartens operated under similar structural conditio...

  13. Children's School Placement in Germany : Does Kindergarten Attendance Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Spieß, Christa Katharina; Bu?chel, Felix; Wagner, Gert G.

    2003-01-01

    The positive effects of early childhood programs on children's school success have been demonstrated in the literature. However, most studies were completed in the U.S.A., where early childhood programs vary widely, based on differing auspice, regulation, cost, and other factors. In European countries, early childhood programs are generally far more homogenous. This is particularly true for Germany where most programs are communitybased Kindergartens operated under similar structural conditio...

  14. Optimizing Population Screening of Bullying in School-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillancourt, Tracy; Trinh, Vi; McDougall, Patricia; Duku, Eric; Cunningham, Lesley; Cunningham, Charles; Hymel, Shelley; Short, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    A two-part screening procedure was used to assess school-age children's experience with bullying. In the first part 16,799 students (8,195 girls, 8,604 boys) in grades 4 to 12 were provided with a definition of bullying and then asked about their experiences using two general questions from the Olweus Bully/Victim Questionnaire (1996). In the…

  15. Memorial consequences of testing school-aged children

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, Elizabeth J.; Fazio, Lisa K.; Goswick, Anna E.

    2012-01-01

    A large literature shows that retrieval practice is a powerful tool for enhancing learning and memory in undergraduates (Roediger & Karpicke, 2006a). Much less work has examined the memorial consequences of testing school-aged children. Our focus is on multiple-choice tests, which are potentially problematic since they minimise retrieval practice and also expose students to errors (the multiple-choice lures). To examine this issue, second graders took a multiple-choice general knowledge test ...

  16. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    OpenAIRE

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related and interpersonal-related impulsivity, as observed by teachers, parents, and the students themselves, are distinct, moderately correlated behavioral t...

  17. Program for increasing reading fluency of primary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Kanic?, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Reading fluency is a crucial component of reading as its elements form preconditions for reading comprehension. In this thesis we researched the reading of 4th grade children with specific focus on the reading fluency. We prepared a program for increasing reading fluency focusing on reading technique and speed. The program was applied on six 4th grade students of the Središ?e ob Dravi primary school. The program included 9 sessions, with parent involvement in homework each other week. T...

  18. DISTAL RADIAL EPIPHYSEAL FRACTURES IN SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Martina Costanzo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal radial epiphyseal fractures represent about 6% of fracture in school aged children and happen mostly in boys. Several therapeutic solutions have been proposed; both conservative and surgical approaches showed good results. The aim of the present study was to evaluate clinically and radiographically patients affected by distal radial epiphyseal fractures treated with Kirschner wires and cast immobilization in order to verify its validity.

  19. Video games and problem solving effectiveness of primary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Jakos?, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    The purpose is to find out whether video games can have positive effects on children and whether we can use those effects for educational purposes at school. The thesis contains theories of the leading authors of developmental psychology in the field of cognitive development as well as an insight into the processes of learning and using problem solving skills. In the second half of the theoretical part, the essential information on video games, their effects researched until now and the means...

  20. Can morbidity associated with untreated asthma in primary school children be reduced?: a controlled intervention study.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, R.; Williams, J.; Britton, J.; Tattersfield, A.

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether an intervention programme based on existing school and community resources can reduce school absence and improve participation in games lessons and sport in children with unrecognised or undertreated asthma. DESIGN--Parallel group controlled intervention study. SETTING--102 primary schools in Nottingham: 49 were randomised to receive the intervention and 53 to be control schools. SUBJECTS--All children aged 5 to 10 years with parent reported absence from school...

  1. Local school children curious about CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    Imagine the scene: about 20-30 schoolchildren aged 8-11 and about 1.25 m tall; a couple of adults, let’s say on average 1.75 m tall, and then one high-energy physics experiment 15 m tall. This is what you could have seen on 2, 6 and 9 February in the CMS cavern, as two local schools participated in the “Be a scientist!” programme.   "I think they've got it..." Two classes from the primary school in the village of Cessy, where CMS is located, took part in the visits on 2 and 9 February, and all 36 pupils from CM2 (Year 6) at the Ecole des Bois in nearby Ornex took part in the visit on 6 February. “They asked so many questions,” says Sandrine Saison Marsollier, CERN’s educational officer for the local community, who accompanied some of the classes to CMS. “Most of them had practical questions about what they saw, for example how big and how heavy the experiment is, and which bit goes where. But some ...

  2. Pre-school Children’s Food Habits and Meal Situation : Factors Influencing the Dietary Intake at Pre-school in a Swedish Municipality

    OpenAIRE

    Sepp, Hanna

    2002-01-01

    A pre-school-based dietary survey, using seven-day records, focus group interviews and semi-structured interviews, was carried out in a suburban area of Stockholm. The overall objective was to investigate the individual food and nutrient intake of pre-school children at all meals during the day, as well as factors that might influence children’s intake. The average energy and nutrient intake per day for the whole week was satisfactory for the 109 pre-school children, but the temporal distr...

  3. Sensitivity to the Positional Information of Morphemes inside Chinese Compound Words and Its Relationship with Word Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Duo; Chung, Kevin Kien Hoa; Zhang, Yimin; Lu, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate developmental differences in lexical processing and sensitivity to the positional information of constituent morphemes with reference to Chinese word-reading ability. One hundred mainland Chinese children (50 second graders and 50 third graders) and 22 high school students were tested with a…

  4. Colour contribution to children's wayfinding in school environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvac?o?lu, Elif; Olguntürk, Nilgün

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the contribution of colour to children's wayfinding ability in school environments and to examine the differences between colours in terms of their remembrance and usability in route learning process. The experiment was conducted with three different sample groups for each of three experiment sets differentiated by their colour arrangement. The participants totalled 100 primary school children aged seven and eight years old. The study was conducted in four phases. In the first phase, the participants were tested for familiarity with the experiment site and also for colour vision deficiencies by using Ishihara's tests for colour-blindness. In the second phase, they were escorted on the experiment route by the tester one by one, from one starting point to one end point and were asked to lead the tester to the end point by the same route. In the third phase, they were asked to describe verbally the route. In the final phase, they were asked to remember the specific colours at their correct locations. It was found that colour has a significant effect on children's wayfinding performances in school environments. However, there were no differences between different colours in terms of their remembrances in route finding tasks. In addition, the correct identifications of specific colours and landmarks were dependent on their specific locations. Contrary to the literature, gender differences were not found to be significant in the accuracy of route learning performances.

  5. International School Educators and Their Children: Implications for Educator-Parents, Colleagues and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilber, Ettie

    2005-01-01

    What is the impact of the international school experience on the children of educators who live and study in close proximity with their parents and parents' colleagues? In this study, educators, who are teachers, counselors, specialists and administrators, describe their impressions of the benefits and challenges of this unique expatriate family…

  6. Recommendations for Working with African American Parents of Primary School Children in Low-Resourced Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sejal; West-Olatunji, Cirecie; Sanders, Tiffany; Goodman, Rachael

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a strength-based discussion of the relationship between parenting values of low-income African Americans and the academic performance of their school-aged children. Using resilience theory as a framework (Seccombe, 2002), the authors suggest that African American parents in low-resourced communities have…

  7. Dental fluorosis severity in a group of school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susy Yukie Fujibayashi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: This study aimed to assess the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in a group of school children in the city of Campo do Tenente (Parana, Brazil in order to compare the mean fluoride concentration in public water supply and discuss the effective values for fluoridation of water supply, as well as, the need of control of fluoride concentration within the water consumed by population. Material and methods: Firstly, 362 children enrolled in regular public schools, at elementary level, were examined by a single researcher, previously calibrated for Dean’s index application. From these, 90 children were affected by some degree of fluorosis, but only 40 returned the signed free and clarified consent form for participating in the research. Results: It was found that 42.5% of the children presented mild fluorosis and 32.5% moderate fluorosis. Moreover, it was observed that the average fluoride concentration in public water supply, in 2004, was 1.7 ppm of fluoride. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the need of a closer supervision of the city situation, by the inclusion of fluoridation external control and constant monitoring of the oral health status of the population.

  8. Children's Eating Behavior: The Importance of Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, Katherine B.; Sanchez, Betty; Teneralli, Rachel; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To enhance the impact of school nutrition programs on children's health, more information is needed on the associations between healthy and unhealthy food offerings during school lunch periods and children's eating behavior. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contributions of food offerings and participation in school lunch…

  9. From Interdependence, to Dependence and Independence: Home and School Learning for Traveller Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Investigated interactions between Travellers (historically known as Gypsies or Tinkers) and school policy toward such children in Europe. Reviews the mismatch between Traveller cultures and their schooling experience. Notes that schools ignore and devalue the children's home learning of interdependence and independence and offer only learned…

  10. Sending Children to School "Back Home": Multiple Moralities of Punjabi Sikh Parents in Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Kaveri

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how Punjabi Sikh parents in Britain try to produce "good children" through moral reasoning about their schooling. Parents compare schooling in Britain with India and sometimes wonder about sending their children to school "back home", in the hope of immersing them in Indian culture, traditions and…

  11. Non-Overweight and Overweight Children's Physical Activity during School Recess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgers, Nicola D.; Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Welk, Gregory J.; Siahpush, Mohammad; Huberty, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Little research has investigated children's physical activity levels during school recess and the contribution of recess to school day physical activity levels by weight status. The aims of this study were to examine non-overweight and overweight children's physical activity levels during school recess, and examine the…

  12. Parents' perceptions of curricular issues affecting children's weight in elementary schools. — Measures of the Food Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to examine Ohio parents' perceptions of the role of elementary schools in preventing childhood overweight. In the United States, overweight is the most widespread health threat facing children and adolescents. Schools may be a useful point of intervention in addressing the escalating prevalence of childhood overweight because children spend over half their day at school.

  13. Who's Left Behind? Immigrant Children in High and Low LEP Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia; Deterding, Nicole; Clewell, Beatriz Chu

    2005-01-01

    Using data collected in the 1999-2000 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), this report studies the characteristics of schools serving immigrant children at the time of NCLB's passage. As SASS lacks a measure of immigration status among school children, this analysis uses English language proficiency level (or LEP status) as a proxy for immigrant…

  14. DETERMINING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate E. Reed

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available At least 50% of children have one or more cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factor. We aimed to 1 determine the prevalence of CVD risk factors in a sample of Canadian children, and 2 create a Healthy Heart Score that could be used in a school setting, to identify children with a greater number and severity of CVD risk factors. Children (n = 242, 122M, 120F, aged 9-11 years were assessed for cardiovascular fitness, physical activity, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, and body mass index (BMI. Biological values were converted to age and sex specific percentiles and allocated a score. Healthy Heart Scores could range between 5 and 18, with lower scores suggesting a healthier cardiovascular profile. Seventy-seven children volunteered for blood samples in order to assess the relationship between the Healthy Heart Score and (total cholesterol (TC, high and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL, LDL and triglycerides (TG. Fifty eight percent of children had elevated scores for at least 1 risk factor. The group mean Healthy Heart Score was 8 (2.2. The mean score was significantly higher in boys (9 (2.2 compared with girls (8 (2.1, p < 0.01. A high score was significantly associated with a low serum HDL, a high TC:HDL and a high TG concentration. Our results support other studies showing a high prevalence of CVD risk factors in children. Our method of allocation of risk score, according to percentile, allows for creation of an age and sex specific CVD risk profile in children, which takes into account the severity of the elevated risk factor

  15. Evaluation of children in six blind schools of Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hornby Stella

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: 1.To determine the anatomical site and underlying causes of severe visual impairment and blindness in children in special education in Andhra Pradesh, India. 2. To compare the causes of blindness in two different regions in the state. 3. To evaluate improvement with correction of refractive error and low-vision devices (LVDs Methods: Children in 6 schools for the blind and in 3 integrated education programmes were examined by one ophthalmologist, and were refracted and assessed for LVDs by an optometrist. The major anatomical site and underlying aetiology of severe visual impairment and blindness (SVI/BL; <6/60 in the better eye were recorded using the standardised WHO reporting form. Results: Two hundred and ninety one students under 16 years were examined, and after refraction, 267 (91.7% were classified as being severely visually impaired or blind. The most common anatomical sites of SVI/BL were retina in 31.1% children; cornea in 24.3%; and whole globe in 20.2%. The aetiology was unknown in 38.2%, hereditary in 34.8% and childhood causes in 24%. 114 children (39.2% had functional low vision (i.e. visual acuity <6/18 to light perception with navigational vision. In this group, 36 children improved with spectacles and 16 benefited by LVDs. 41 children (15.4% were able to read N10 point though they were studying Braille. Conclusion: Overall 37.4% of children had "avoidable" causes of blindness. The major avoidable causes were vitamin-A deficiency and cataract. Vitamin-A deficiency and congenital anomalies were more common in the dry plateau areas of the state. One in seven children could read normal print with optical support.

  16. Cognitive functioning of educationaly deprived pre-school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biro Mikloš

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The research has included 96 Roma elementary-school pupils from the first grade, 7 years and 6 months old on average, and 78 pre-school children, (6 years and 1 month old on average, out of which number there were 37 Roma pupils and 41 non-Roma pupils. The cognitive functioning has been tested with a battery consisted of 5 tests, which was based on the (adapted Wechsler’s scales and the linguistic competence test. The results have shown a significant lagging of Roma children behind the control group and test norms. The Analyses of Covariance have pointed to a significant influence of the father’s educational background on the test score, but the difference between groups remained notable even when that variable was kept under control. However, the Item Analyses revealed a number of items that turned out to be evidently "unfair" toward Roma children, and their elimination contributed to the annulling of differences among groups in the Analyses of Covariance for a particular number of tests. The data has been interpreted by the authors as a proof of necessity and possibility to adapt tests for the needs of testing the educationally neglected children. The fact that the greatest differences have been noticed in the tests saturated with the factors of visual-motor coordination and memory has been justified by the authors with the Roma children’s lack of experience of manipulation with toys and possible attention deficit as a consequence of absence of stimulative environment.

  17. Significance of after-school programming for immigrant children during middle childhood: opportunities for school social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joy Pastan

    2014-07-01

    School social workers and other school personnel can find meeting the educational and social needs of immigrant children a challenge, particularly if these children are also experiencing poverty and other educational barriers, including limited English language proficiency. Quality after-school programming has been associated with a variety of positive effects such as increased educational attainment and positive social and emotional development and could, therefore, prove significant in the lives of immigrant children. Yet, immigrant children participate less. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways in which school social workers can increase enrollment in after-school programming among immigrant children, six to 12 years of age, by becoming both advocates for children and families and leaders in developing and maintaining these services. School social workers are poised to play a number of roles related to practice, administration, research, and policy. Because this particular age group of children begins to look beyond the family for guidance and support, middle childhood is an opportune time for school social workers to work toward involving children in positive after-school experiences. PMID:25076648

  18. The Impacts of Obesity and Metabolic Abnormality on Carotid Intima-Media Thickness and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children from an Inland Chinese City

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Yue Wang; Xiang-Hua Zhang; Chao Hua Yao; Hong-Hui Zhu; Liang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese inland, where low child obesity and overweight rates were reported in earlier studies, has recently experienced rapid economy changes. This may impact children’s health. In the present study, we investigated the obesity rate, metabolic health status, and their impacts on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) among children from Yueyang, an inland city of China. We found that the obesity rate was about 5% for both 7- and 11-year olds. ...

  19. Prevalence of headache in children of a school from Curitiba, Brazil, comparing data obtained from children and parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIUK SÉRGIO

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed prevalence, frequency and cause of headache among 460 children ranging from 10 to 14 years-old from a Brazilian school. A questionnaire was handed both to children and parents to know if there would be differences among children and parental reports. The lifetime prevalence of headache was 93.5% (children reports and 93.3% (parental reports. The last year prevalence was 90% (children and 89.8% (parents. Headache episodes were frequent in 17.6% (children and 18.5% (parents. The most often reported cause was "flu" (39.1% by children, and 46.7% by parents. This study demonstrated that the prevalence of headache in children is high; moreover, there were noted few differences between data obtained from children and parents. So, we could say that when the objective of a epidemiologic study is to determine the prevalence of headache in children, both children and parental reports may be used.

  20. Modern diagnostic method of microelementosis of school age children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Human and animal pathology stipulated by deficiency of vitally important (or 'essential') microelements or their excess, has got its combined name microelementosis [1]. In connection with high biological activity of microelements in organism in different physiologic and pathologic status the quantitative determination of several metals in biomedium of organism is of great importance in the study of microelement metabolism. However, objective and representative data on estimation of school children's provision with microelements are practically absent. The objective of the study was to investigate contents of microelements connected with deficiency of biometals participating in hemopoiesis (Cu, Zn, Co, Mn) in biomedium of the organism of school children in Zarafshan region of the Republic of Uzbekistan. We have applied the method of neutron-activation analysis for determination of microelements (Fe, Zn, Cu, Co, Mn) in hair, whole blood, blood serum, urine, saliva, food-stuff samples and in more than 20 elements of other biomedia, as per designed method in Nuclear Physics Institute, Republic of Uzbekistan [4]. The study was carried out on 245 practically healthy children aged 7-17, 131 boys and 33 girls living in four different areas of Samarkand region. According to the designed method the determination of Mn, Cu was done as follows: samples together with standards were packed in polyethylene container and underwent irradiation in vertical channel of the reactor by neutron flow 5x1013 neutron cm-2 sec-1, (for 15 seconds). The measurement of direct activity was conducted in 2 hours for determining of Cu and Mn. For determining of iron, cobalt, zinc the irradiation test measurement was done within 15 hours one month after irradiation by the corresponding radionuclides. In all measurement of element contents different standards were applied: Intralaboratory data was received by fixing a certain number of elements on ashless filter paper and comparison standard sample IAEA NN and NN-1 (hair homogenate) as well as comparative method. Accuracy of analysis results of the applied method made up from 7 to 30% depended on concentration and nuclear-physical characteristics. Results and Discussion: Obtained results showed that microelemental contents in hairs and other liquids in children of school age somehow differed from that of in adults. So, contents of iron in children's hair are significantly higher (three times - 81.38±8.55 mkg/g). In erythrocytes of 22 examined sound children the contents of the iron equaled to 2964±52 mg/l, in saliva - 584 351.7 mg/l. In the study of Zn contents in blood of healthy children it was equal to 59 mkg/g, in formed elements of blood it was equal to 32.3 mkg/g which was much less than similar index in adults [3]. According to our data the contents of Zn in blood made up 39.25±4.30 mkg/g which was significantly low compared with similar index in adults (according to V.V.Nasolodin, 1987 the contents of zinc in plasma varies from 86 to 106 mkg/g). In 20 examined children the contents of Zn in erythrocytes equaled to 32.3±1.5 mkg/g. The contents of Zn in saliva of sound children of school age was 518.0±54.17 mkg/g and in urine 386±18.24 mkg/g. In practically sound school children of Zarafshan valley the contents of Zn in hair made up 182.9±6.6 mkg/g. It was established that the contents of Zn in sound school children of Zarafshan valley is in middle position amongst similar data referred in scientific articles [2]. The contents of Cu in hairs of practically sound school children in Zarafshan valley was 9.24±0.84 mkg/g which was low (two times) compared with adults. We found out that the contents of Cu in hairs of healthy school children in Zarafshan valley was lower compared with the data presented by other authors [2] and other regions respectively. A low content of Cu in hairs probably depends on the food-stuff ingredients and peculiarities of the natural condition in biogeochemical area. The obtained results have shown that practically sound school children in Zarafshan valley th

  1. Execution of Educational Mechanical Production Programs for School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Nobuhide; Itoh, Goroh; Shibata, Takayuki

    The authors are conducting experience-based engineering educational programs for elementary and junior high school students with the aim to provide a chance for them to experience mechanical production. As part of this endeavor, we planned and conducted a program called “Fabrication of Original Magnet Plates by Casting” for elementary school students. This program included a course for leading nature laws and logical thinking method. Prior to the program, a preliminary program was applied to school teachers to get comments and to modify for the program accordingly. The children responded excellently to the production process which realizes their ideas, but it was found that the course on natural laws and logical methods need to be improved to draw their interest and attention. We will continue to plan more effective programs, deepening ties with the local community.

  2. DETERMINING HABITUAL DEMOGRAPHIC COORDINATES AND HEALTH FOR PRIMARY SCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma G.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An important aspect is social learning involves acquisition of knowledge, skills, abilities, habits over from friends, colleagues, social group they belong to.Purpose and research hypothesisSmall school activities is more effective if concrete terms of reference that would bring back to memory certain knowledge that to suggest solutions to solve and give him the opportunity to correct by comparing statements reality, this is why the main method of conducting educational process is observation.Working methodResearch group consisted of children of school age (7-12 years. Demographic information about the subjects covered: health, family composition and housing.Research resultsThe vast majority of children had good health, with no differences between the control group and the experimental group (p = 0.428. Regarding housing conditions, over half (57.1% in the control group and 51.4% in control group live in two rooms, no child lives in a studio and two children in the experimental group live at home with yard. In both groups, two children did not provide information regarding their housing situation. Of children included in the study, a very high percentage (82.9% in the control group and 68.6% in the experimental group is single copies: only six children in the control group and 10 in the control group have brothers or sisters. Under these conditions, more than half of the children have their own room (65.7% in the control group and 57.1% in the experimental group, the rest sharing a room with a brother or sister, or parents (in the case of two children experimental group.ConclusionsWe conclude that in terms of demographic variables (health status, family composition, housing, there are no differences between children in the two groups. Optimal integration in a social environment is based not only on the correct development of intellectual faculties, namely, the possibility of natural evolution on the moral values, scientific and so on, but necessarily and physical, to achieve a healthy body, fortified , harmoniously structured, able to cope with any social tasks.

  3. Injuries during physical activity in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundblad, Gunilla; Saartok, Tönu; Engström, Lars-Magnus; Renström, Per

    2005-10-01

    During the spring of 2001, 1975 children, from grades 3, 6 and 9 participated in a nationwide, multidisciplinary collaboration study. The students came from randomly selected classes throughout Sweden, representing different geographical and socio-economic areas. The aim of this study was to collect and evaluate self-reported injuries and associated factors during various physical activities as recalled retrospectively for 3 months by the students. Every sixth student (n=299 or 16%) reported 306 injuries. Twice as many girls than boys were injured during physical education class. Ninth-grade students reported relatively more injuries during organized sports than during physical education class and leisure activities. There were no age or gender differences in incidence rate during leisure activities. Most injuries were minor, as 70% were back in physical activity within a week. Half of the students (50%) reported that they previously had injured the same body part. Primary care of the injured student was, with the exception of a family member, most often carried out by the physical education teacher or coach, which accentuates the importance of continuous sports medicine first aid education for this group. PMID:16181255

  4. School and everydaylife - Children in Mongolia : Children and Schools in Mongolia in transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ulla Ambrosius; NØrgaard, E.

    2002-01-01

    This article comprises the results from a research project carried out in Mongolia from 1994-1999. The study focuses on the changes of children's everydaylife as part of the democratisation and modernisation processes. The data consists of interveiws, classroomobservation and diaries from75 children living in different parts of Mongolia. The project is part of the Danish support to the Mongolian education sector .

  5. Correlation of an interleukin-4 gene polymorphism with susceptibility to severe enterovirus 71 infection in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Li, Ji-An; Han, Zhen-Liang; Liu, Pei-Pei; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Long; Chen, Zong-Bo

    2015-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has caused many outbreaks of diseases among children worldwide since it was first reported in 1974, but its mechanism of pathogenesis remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the possible association of the IL-4 -589C/T gene polymorphism with severity of EV71 infection in Chinese children. The IL-4 -589C/T gene polymorphism was detected in EV71-infected subjects (n = 185), including those with mild cases (n = 102) and severe cases (n = 83) as well as healthy controls (n = 234), using an improved multiplex ligation detection reaction (iMLDR) technique. The plasma levels of IL-4 and IFN-? were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The presence of the CC genotype (p = 0.022) and the C allele (OR, 2.1; 95 % CI, 1.3-3.6; p = 0.004) was significantly higher in severe cases. Furthermore, the CC genotype and C allele were also more frequently found in cases of EV71 encephalitis (p EV71 disease in Chinese children. PMID:25666199

  6. Promoter methylation of fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 gene is associated with obesity and dyslipidaemia in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Shen, Yue; Zhang, Mei-Xian; Yan, Yinkun; Hou, Dongqing; Meng, Linghui; Liu, Junting; Cheng, Hong; Mi, Jie

    2015-05-01

    Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2) is an obesity-related gene, but the mechanisms by which FAIM2 is involved in obesity are not understood. Epigenetic alterations are important factors in the development of obesity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential associations of FAIM2 promoter methylation with obesity and components of dyslipidaemia in Chinese children. We studied FAIM2 promoter methylation in 59 obese and 39 lean children using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform. The methylation levels at 8 CpG sites in the FAIM2 promoter were significantly different between the obese and lean subjects, especially the methylation level at CpG site 500 (p?=?0.01). The methylation levels at several of the examined CpG sites were significantly associated with dyslipidaemia and its components after adjusting for age, gender and body mass index (BMI). The methylation levels at two CpG sites (sites -362 and -360 and site -164) were highly significantly associated with high level of triglycerides (p?=?0.00002 and 0.0009, respectively). This study provides the first evidence that the methylation levels of the FAIM2 promoter are significantly associated with obesity and are independently associated with dyslipidaemia and its components in Chinese children. PMID:25696115

  7. Nutrition and education: a randomized trial of the effects of breakfast in rural primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C A; Walker, S P; Chang, S M; Grantham-McGregor, S M

    1998-10-01

    Hunger during school may prevent children in developing countries from benefiting from education. Although many countries have implemented school feeding programs, few programs have been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial of giving breakfast to undernourished and adequately nourished children. The undernourished group comprised 407 children in grades 2-5 in 16 rural Jamaican schools (weights-for-age -1 SD). Both groups were stratified by class and school, then randomly assigned to breakfast or control groups. After the initial measurements, breakfast was provided every school day for 1 school year. Children in the control group were given one-quarter of an orange and the same amount of attention as children in the breakfast group. All children had their heights and weights measured and were given the Wide Range Achievement Test before and after the intervention. School attendance was taken from the schools' registers. Compared with the control group, height, weight, and attendance improved significantly in the breakfast group. Both groups made poor progress in Wide Range Achievement Test scores. Younger children in the breakfast group improved in arithmetic. There was no effect of nutritional group on the response to breakfast. In conclusion, the provision of a school breakfast produced small benefits in children's nutritional status, school attendance, and achievement. Greater improvements may occur in more undernourished populations; however, the massive problem of poor achievement levels requires integrated programs including health and educational inputs as well as school meals. PMID:9771865

  8. Effect of pet ownership on respiratory responses to air pollution in Chinese children: The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhengmin (Min); Dong, Guang-Hui; Ren, Wan-Hui; Simckes, Maayan; Wang, Jing; Zelicoff, Alan; Trevathan, Edwin

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies examining pet ownership as a risk factor for respiratory conditions have yielded inconsistent results. Little is known about whether or not pet ownership modifies the relationship between air pollutants and respiratory symptoms and asthma in children. In order to evaluate the interaction between pet and air pollution on respiratory health in children, we recruited 30,149 children, aged 2-12 years, from 25 districts of seven cities in northeast China. Parents of the children completed questionnaires that characterized the children's histories of respiratory symptoms and illnesses and associated risk factors. Average ambient annual exposures to particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ?10 ?m (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) were estimated from monitoring stations in each of the 25 study districts. The results showed that among children without pets at home, there were statistically significant associations between both recent exacerbations of asthma among physician-diagnosed asthmatics and respiratory symptoms and all pollutants examined. Odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 1.12 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00-1.26] to 1.41 (95% CI, 1.24-1.61) per 31 ?g m-3 for PM10, whereas, among children with pets at home, there were no effects or small effects for either asthma or the symptoms. The interactions between dog ownership and PM10, SO2, NO2, and O3 were statistically significant, such that children with a dog at home had lower reporting of both current asthma and current wheeze. In conclusion, this study suggests that pet ownership decreased the effects of air pollution on respiratory symptoms and asthma among Chinese children.

  9. Dialogic Practice in Primary Schools: How Primary Head Teachers Plan to Embed Philosophy for Children into the Whole School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Sue; Thomas-Williams, Junnine

    2012-01-01

    The Philosophy for Children in Schools Project is an ongoing research project to explore the impact of philosophy for children (P4C) on classroom practice. This paper reports on the responses of head teachers, teachers and local educational authority (LA) officers in South Wales, UK, to the initial training programme in Philosophy for Children

  10. Academic Activities after School That Help Secondary School Children’s Cognitive Development through Hermeneutic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suppiah Nachiappan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This research is an effort to look into academic activities after school that help secondary school students in cognition development through Hermeneutic analyse for students of Pantai Remis Secondary School, Perak. This research is also to show that Hermeneutic understanding method can be applied effectively to identify academic activities after school that help secondary school students in their cognition development. This research involved 20 secondary school students from Form 1 to Form 3. They were asked to write a reflective essay about academic activities that they did after school hours. Their reflective essays were made a research text that will be using Hermeneutic analyse to find out academic activities that help their cognition development. This research shows that if a student can do positive activities after school such as doing revision, going for tuition, attending classes, doing homework, studying at home, doing module paper, involving school work, carrying out exercises, attending extra classes, involving in ritual study, going to class and attending study with teacher, involving in preparation class, doing mathematic exercises, reading, doing notes, going to library to study, reading geography, reading notes from internet, watching Astro channel that shows education programmes and reading books, thus they can help their cognition development and become excellent students in academic.

  11. Development of Non-Verbal Intellectual Capacity in School-Age Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, D. W.; Ketelaar, M.; Gorter, J. W.; van Schie, P. E.; Becher, J. G.; Lindeman, E.; Jongmans, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are at greater risk for a limited intellectual development than typically developing children. Little information is available which children with CP are most at risk. This study aimed to describe the development of non-verbal intellectual capacity of school-age children with CP and to examine the…

  12. Parent Participation at School: A Research Study on the Perspectives of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyverman, Veerle; Vettenburg, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    The present article discusses the attitude of children towards parent participation at school. To this end, a quantitative study was conducted among 250 10-year-old children in Flanders. The analysis shows that children tend to rather like parent participation, and that this attitude is related to the extent to which parents participate. Children

  13. Gifted Children's Health Locus of Control: Implications for School Health Curriculum and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J. Terry

    1993-01-01

    Examines 178 gifted Texas children to determine differences in their health locus of control. Results provide evidence that gifted children, in general, may be less prone to adolescent health-risk behaviors than nongifted children. Findings suggest revision in both school health curricula and instructional practices for gifted children. (GLR)

  14. Reciprocal associations between interpersonal and values dimensions of school climate and peer victimization in elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbeater, Bonnie; Sukhawathanakul, Paweena; Smith, David; Bowen, François

    2015-01-01

    We examine longitudinal relations among children's and parents' reports of peer victimization and their perceptions of school climate dimensions reflecting school interpersonal relationships (relationships among children and their teachers and peers, and of parents and principals) and values (fairness and equity of access to resources). Children were in Grades 3 and 4 at Time 1 (Mage = 9.32, SDage = .74; 49% boys). Bidirectional influences of school climate and reports of peer victimization were investigated in path models across grade (Time 1 to Time 2) and within a grade (Time 2 to Time 3). Child and parent reports of school climate dimensions showed considerable stability. Hypothesized reciprocal relationships between each of the school climate dimensions and peer victimization were significant. Child-reported frequency of parent involvement in school activities was associated with lower levels of peer victimization within a school year. Parent perceptions of involvement in school activities and the schools' connection with the community were unrelated to the children's reports of peer victimization. Children's negative cognitions or "worldviews" coupled with peer victimization may fuel problems with school connectedness, safety, and help seeking. Findings shed light on possible pathways for reducing peer victimization by leveraging specific aspects of the social climate within schools. PMID:24617984

  15. Nutritional Status of Newly Enrolled Primary School Children in Jos-Plateau, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Okolo Angela; Okolo Seline; Akor Francis

    2010-01-01

    Nutritional assessment of newly enrolled school children is needful to identify children with poor nutritional status. Poor nutrition as evidenced by poor growth and small stature could affect development, intellectual performance and intellectual achievement. Poor nutrition in school aged children is also likely to negatively affect their participation in normal school activities. Seven hundred and sixty four apparently healthy newly enrolled pupils were randomly selected using a multi stage...

  16. Discriminant Validity of a Community-Level Measure of Children's Readiness for School

    OpenAIRE

    Murphey, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Discriminant validity of a measure of children's readiness for school was assessed by testing whether it distinguished between groups of children hypothesized to differ, on the basis of demographic characteristics, in their school readiness. The volunteer sample consisted of 3,370 kindergartners in Vermont public schools. Previous group care experience, identified learning-related disabilities, and a community-level measure of poverty were used as independent measures in analyses of children'...

  17. Ready or Not: Predicting High and Low School Readiness Among Teen Parents’ Children*

    OpenAIRE

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Dennis, Jeff A.

    2011-01-01

    Past research has documented compromised development for teenage mothers’ children compared to others, but less is known about predictors of school readiness among these children or among teenage fathers’ children. Our multidimensional measures of high and low school readiness incorporated math, reading, and behavior scores and parent-reported health. Using parent interviews and direct assessments from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort, we predicted high and low school r...

  18. Prevalence of Stunting, Underweight and Obesity in School Aged Children in Uyo, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ekanem, U. S.; Ikpeme, E. E.; Opara, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    There is a paucity of data on the prevalence and trends of the risk factors associated with diet related chronic diseases in school-aged children in Nigeria. Using international reference standards, we determined the prevalence of underweight, stunting and obesity in school aged children in both privately owned and public schools in a fast growing state capital in the South-south region of Nigeria in a cross sectional prevalence survey. The height and weight measurements of 985 children aged ...

  19. Sugar consumption pattern of 13-year-old school children in Belgaum city, Karnataka

    OpenAIRE

    Hegde P; Ashok Kumar B; Ankola A

    2005-01-01

    To determine the sugar consumption pattern of the school children in Belgaum city and to organize for a diet-counseling program. Easy availability of sugar containing food and high consumption of these sweets if continued unabated, the dental caries among children would become a major public health problem. In this instance, Dietary counseling can be just appropriate to inhibit the carious process. 342 school children aged 13 years, from four schools in Belgaum city participated in the study....

  20. The Everyday Practice of School Bullying : Children's participation in peer group activities and school-based anti-bullying initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Svahn, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    This thesis explores the everyday practice of school bullying by examining children's participation in peer group activities as well as in school-based anti-bullying activities within an educational setting. The empirical material is drawn from a long-term (1 year) ethnographic study conducted among preadolescent children in a 5th grade class in a Swedish elementary school. An ethnomethodological approach is used in analysis of ethnographically based fieldnotes, and in detailed analysis of vi...

  1. Low anemia prevalence in school-aged children in Bangalore, South India: possible effect of school health initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Muthayya, S.; Thankachan, P.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Andersson, M.; Eilander, A.; Misquith, D.; Hurrell, R. F.; Kurpad, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Anemia is a serious public health problem in Indian school children. Since 2003, simple health intervention programs such as antihelminthic treatment and vitamin A supplementation have been implemented in primary schools in the Bangalore region, Karnataka, India. This study examines the prevalence of anemia in school children who are beneficiaries of this program. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Bangalore district, South India. Subjects: A total of 2030 boys and girls, age...

  2. Biochemical Risk Factors for Stone Formation in Healthy School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maasumeh Mohkam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of urolithiasis in childhood is increasing. The wide geographic variation in the incidence of lithiasis in childhood is related to climatic, dietary, and socioeconomic factors. Many children with stone disease have a metabolic abnormality. In Southeast Asia, urinary calculi are endemic and are related to dietary factors. The main aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of renal stone, urine metabolic abnormality, control of blood pressure and demographic character in elementary school children of Qom. A cross sectional study was performed on 110 primary school children (56 girls and 54 boys aged 7 to 11 years old. Demographic data such as age, height, weight were gathered, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, Urine analysis and culture, urinary levels of calcium, creatinine, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, uric acid, cystine, citrate, oxalate, protein and sonographic findings were evaluated. The mean (±SD of age was 8.85±1.51 years. Only one child had renal stone (1%, but the prevalence of abnormal renal sonography was 7%. The most prevalent urine metabolic abnormalities were hypercalciuria (23% and hypocitraturia (100%. 11.2% of children had positive urine culture that all were female. The prevalence of high blood pressure was 7.1% for girls and 11.1% for boys. The prevalence of renal stone in children in this study was 1%, which means the accurate judgment about the prevalence of renal stone in Qom city needs more comprehensive studies. Similar to other studies in Iran this study shows that the prevalence of hypercalciuria is significantly higher comparing to other countries, it may be associated with excessive intake of sodium.

  3. Adverse health effects of experiencing food insecurity among Greenlandic school children

    OpenAIRE

    Birgit Niclasen; Max Petzold; Schnohr, Christina W.

    2013-01-01

    Background. In vulnerable populations, food security in children has been found to be associated with negative health effects. Still, little is known about whether the negative health effects can be retrieved in children at the population level. Objective. To examine food insecurity reported by Greenlandic school children as a predictor for perceived health, physical symptoms and medicine use. Design. The study is based on the Greenlandic part of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children s...

  4. Rumination syndrome in children and adolescents: a school survey assessing prevalence and symptomatology

    OpenAIRE

    Rajindrajith Shaman; Devanarayana Niranga; Crispus Perera Bonaventure

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Rumination syndrome (RS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGD) increasingly recognized in children and adolescents. The epidemiology of this condition in school aged children is poorly understood. The main objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of rumination and other related associations in a cohort of Sri Lankan children. Methods Children aged 10-16?years were randomly selected from 8 schools in 4 provinces in Sri Lanka. RS was diagnosed using R...

  5. Relationship between Blood Pressure and Passive Smoking in Elementary School Children

    OpenAIRE

    Forough Hashemi; Abolhassan Seyedzadeh; Akram Soleimani

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Many diseases form their basis during childhood. One example is the changes in vascular structure and function, leading to atherosclerosis. In this study, we have assessed the impact of exposure to cigarette smoke on blood pressure of elementary school children in Kermanshah.Methods: 80 elementary school children exposed to cigarette smoke and 80 not exposed to smoke were studied in fall 2010. Information regarding the smoking status of parents and the children’s health were obta...

  6. English as a Third Language - The teaching of English to bilingual children in Danish primary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Hodal, Trine

    2005-01-01

    In this report I wish to investigate whether or not bilingual children in Denmark are faced with specific challenges in the Danish primary school when learning English as a third language. My focus is bilingual children whose parents primarily speak a different mother tongue than Danish, which means that the children have learned Danish in institutional settings such as kindergarten and school. I am interested in looking into what specific challenges these children and especially their teache...

  7. Family–school connections and internalizing problems among children living with asthma in urban, low-income neighborhoods

    OpenAIRE

    Murdock, Karla Klein; Robinson, Elizabeth M.; Adams, Sue K.; Berz, Jennifer; Rollock, Michael J. D.

    2009-01-01

    Children with asthma living in urban environments are at risk for experiencing internalizing problems and difficulties at school due to social context and health-related stressors. Parent confidence and participation in the school and children’s attitudes about school were explored in association with children’s depressed mood and school anxiety. Forty-five parent–child dyads were recruited from urban community health centers. most participants were members of ethnic minority groups. Hi...

  8. International school-based interventions for preventing obesity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to review international (excluding the United States) school-based interventions for preventing obesity in children published between 1999 and 2005. A total of 21 such interventions were found from Australia (1), Austria (1), Canada (1), Chile (1), France (1), Germany (3), Greece (1), New Zealand (1), Norway (1), Singapore (1) and the United Kingdom (9). The grade range of these interventions was from pre-school to high school with the majority (17) from elementary schools. Nine of these interventions targeted nutrition behaviours followed by seven aiming to modify both physical activity and nutrition behaviours. Only five interventions in international settings were based on any explicit behavioural theory which is different than the interventions developed in the United States. Majority of the interventions (9) were one academic year long. It can be speculated that if the interventions are behavioural theory-based, then the intervention length can be shortened. All interventions that documented parental involvement successfully influenced obesity indices. Most interventions (16) focused on individual-level behaviour change approaches. Most published interventions (16) used experimental designs with at least 1-year follow-up. Recommendations from international settings for enhancing the effectiveness of school-based childhood obesity interventions are presented. PMID:17300280

  9. Physical trauma experience among school children in periurban Blantyre, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muula Adamson S

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical trauma is an important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in Africa. There are however, few community-based reports on the subject on the continent. The present study was conducted to explore school children's experience of physical trauma in a disadvantaged periurban area of Blantyre, in Malawi. Methods A cross sectional questionnaire study was carried out among school children in Ndirande-Blantyre, Malawi in 2004. Data were obtained to describe the following aspects of trauma experience: being a victim or observer of motor vehicular accidents involving pedestrians; history of falls from heights; and knowledge about road safety. Sex differences were determined for some of the variables in order to gain insights as to whether there is a difference in trauma experience between boys and girls. Results A total of 217 school children, 99 (45.6% boys and 118 (54.4% girls participated in the study. Eight of them reported to have ever been hit by a motor vehicle, 87 (40.1% had witnessed a road accident where a pedestrian had been hit and 83 (38.2% had witnessed a pedestrian they knew having been hit by a motor vehicle. Of those that reported to have ever been hit by motor vehicle, 2 (25% reported that they had been hospitalized as a result of injury. With regard to falling from heights, 86 reported to have ever fallen from tree, 44 of these (51.2% were injured from the fall and 14 (16.3% were hospitalized as a result of injury sustained from the fall. Girls were more likely to fall from trees and getting injured as compared to males (p = 0.04 for both situations. Just under half (41.9% of the study participants were able to report the correct procedure of crossing the road despite the fact that the majority (80% reported having been taught road safety at home or school. Conclusion Many school children in Blantyre, Malawi have been exposed to trauma either involving themselves or someone they observed. Prevention, including education, supervision and management of trauma must receive the necessary attention they deserve in terms of resources, surveillance and impact mitigation.

  10. Which Fourth-Grade Children Participate in School Breakfast and Do Their Parents Know It?

    OpenAIRE

    Guinn, Caroline H.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Thompson, William O.; Frye, Francesca H. A.; Kopec, Candace T.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore fourth-graders' school breakfast participation by gender and race (black, white) and examine the extent to which parents' responses to “Does this child usually eat school breakfast?” reflected their children's participation.

  11. Services in School for Children with Special Needs: What Parents Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Services In School For Children With Special Needs: What Parents Need To Know Quick Links Facts for ... special needs are usually entitled to receive additional services or accommodations through the public schools. Federal law ...

  12. An Intervention to Promote Social Emotional School Readiness in Foster Children: Preliminary Outcomes From a Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Pears, Katherine C.; Fisher, Philip A.; Bronz, Kimberly D.

    2007-01-01

    Foster children are at great risk for poor school outcomes. Given that school readiness is a powerful predictor of later school success, the promotion of school readiness skills in foster children is an opportunity for preventive intervention. Results are presented from a preliminary evaluation of a program designed to improve school readiness in foster children. Twenty-four foster children were randomly assigned to the intervention or comparison conditions. The intervention consisted of ther...

  13. Schooling for Some: Child Labor and School Enrollment of Black and White Children in the Early Twentieth-Century South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Pamela Barnhouse; James, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Data from North Carolina and South Carolina in 1910 indicate that racially segregated labor markets and racially unequal school systems affected school enrollment of African-American and white children. Research focusing on the textile industry suggests that school enrollment expansion was constrained by limited availability of educational…

  14. [Smoking among school children from the Wielkopolska region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiukow, Anna; Pioterek, Alina; Mojs, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    Smoking defines as a gate open for development other addictions in a group of adolescents. The aim of the study was the estimation the phenomena of smoking among children and adolescents as well as the knowledge concerning the negative effects of it in Big Poland area in every type of school. In the study participated 1533 pupils from every kind of schools. The questionnaire own concept was used in the study. It estimated the frequency of smoking and knowledge concerning the effects of smoking in respondents. The results underwent the statistical analysis. The results show that 88.78% children and adolescents state that they do not have any problems with smoking. 37% non-smoking pupils state they started smoking in the past. The most important reason for smoking was the influence of social environment - at school or in a place of living. The age structure shows the pupils start to smoke between 13-15 yrs of age. 56.4%. The knowledge about negative effects of smoking is on media level, in most case true. Pupils try to stop smoking often but the trials are not as effective as they expect. The result show there is the necessity of making some efforts toward more effective educational activities and preparation some specialist support in addiction treatment. PMID:18409301

  15. Daily stressors in school-age children: a multilevel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Milagros; Alarcón, Rafael; Blanca, María J; Fernández-Baena, F Javier; Rosel, Jesús F; Trianes, María Victoria

    2013-09-01

    This study uses hierarchical or multilevel modeling to identify variables that contribute to daily stressors in a population of schoolchildren. Four hierarchical levels with several predictive variables were considered: student (age, sex, social adaptation of the student, number of life events and chronic stressors experienced, and educational level of the father and mother), class (number of students per class), school (type of school), and province (number of inhabitants per province). Participants were 6,078 students from primary years 3-6 in the region of Andalusia (Spain). After conducting a multilevel regression analysis, the final fitted model was a random intercept and random slope model (at the school level) for the variable age, with the fixed factors being the variables social adaptation, life events and chronic stressors, and the educational level of the father and mother. This model yielded a specific profile of daily stressors in childhood: children with the highest levels of daily stressors are younger, present aggressive or inhibited behavior, have experienced more life events and chronic stressors, and have parents who did not complete their primary education. The results provide relevant information for the design of psychoeducational interventions in relation to children's daily stressors. PMID:23937104

  16. Identifying Sources of Children’s Consumption of Junk Food in Boston After-School Programs, April–May 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S. Bryn; Cradock, Angie L.; Giles, Catherine M.; Lee, Rebekka M.; Davison, Kirsten K.; Gortmaker, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about how the nutrition environment in after-school settings may affect children’s dietary intake. We measured the nutritional quality of after-school snacks provided by programs participating in the National School Lunch Program or the Child and Adult Care Food Program and compared them with snacks brought from home or purchased elsewhere (nonprogram snacks). We quantified the effect of nonprogram snacks on the dietary intake of children who also received program-provided snacks during after-school time. Our study objective was to determine how different sources of snacks affect children’s snack consumption in after-school settings. Methods We recorded snacks served to and brought in by 298 children in 18 after-school programs in Boston, Massachusetts, on 5 program days in April and May 2011. We measured children’s snack consumption on 2 program days using a validated observation protocol. We then calculated within-child change-in-change models to estimate the effect of nonprogram snacks on children’s dietary intake after school. Results Nonprogram snacks contained more sugary beverages and candy than program-provided snacks. Having a nonprogram snack was associated with significantly higher consumption of total calories (+114.7 kcal, P sweetened beverages (+0.5 oz, P = .01), desserts (+0.3 servings, P calories than on days when they consumed only program-provided snacks. Policy strategies limiting nonprogram snacks or setting nutritional standards for them in after-school settings should be explored further as a way to promote child health. PMID:25412028

  17. GENDER-BASED DIFFERENCES IN SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN’S DIVERGENT THINKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Roue

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether the shortage of females in science and engineering is linked to possible gender-based differences in school-aged children’s divergent thinking. Divergent thinking is a direct measure of creativity and an important characteristic in science and engineering. A survey instrument designed to measure divergent thinking was administered to 8th and 11th graders in a mid-western United States school district. Results showed that there were no difference between girls and boys on the three measures of divergent thinking: fluency, flexibility, and originality. These results indicate little reason as to why participation in science and engineering is male dominated, and support the notion that additional exposure to science and engineering through divergent-thinking activities will provide girls with the self-knowledge that they are capable of solving open-ended problems and engineering tasks.

  18. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in children: what do pre-school teachers know about it?

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Lordelo; Fabio Maron; Barros, Daniela G.; Barroso, Danilo V.; Jose de Bessa Jr; Ubirajara Barroso Jr

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the basic knowledge of pre-school teachers who deal with children between the ages of 4 and 7 years, who present signs of lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a survey with 50 teachers from 9 private schools working with pre-school children. The criteria for selection were if teachers were certified or non-certified elementary school teachers - NCEST and the amount of professional experience. RESULTS: Thirty-three teachers consider...

  19. Gypsy, Roma and Traveller Children in Schools: Understandings of Community and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Martin; Bhopal, Kalwant

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines understandings of community and safety for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller (GRT) groups in schools in a metropolitan borough. One school in particular was identified as being the "Gypsy school" and was attended by the majority of GRT children in the borough. The school was recognised as a model of "good practice" reflecting its…

  20. Schooling Poor Minority Children: New Segregation in the Post-"Brown" Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bireda, Martha R.

    2011-01-01

    "Schooling Poor Minority Children: New Segregation in the Post-Brown Era" explores the "redesign of school segregation" and explains why resegregation of schools in the post-"Brown" era is so destructive for poor minority students. The book provides an answer to why schools that serve predominately poor minority students remain "low performing" or…