Sample records for cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker candidates for parkinsonian disorders



    Full Text Available The parkinsonian disorders are a large group of neurodegenerative diseases including idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD and atypical parkinsonian disorders, such as multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and dementia with Lewy bodies. The etiology of these disorders is not known although it is considered to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. One of the greatest obstacles for developing efficacious disease-modifying treatment strategies is the lack of biomarkers. Reliable biomarkers are needed for early and accurate diagnosis, to measure disease progression and response to therapy. In this review several of the most promising cerebrospinal biomarker candidates are discussed. Alpha synuclein seems to be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of synucleinopathies and its levels can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid and in plasma. In a similar way, tau protein accumulation seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of tauopathies. Urate, a potent antioxidant, seems to be associated to the risk of developing PD and with its progression. Neurofilament light chain levels are increased in atypical parkinsonian disorders compared with PD and healthy controls. The new "omics" techniques are potent tools offering new insights in the patho-etiology of these disorders. Some of the difficulties encountered in developing biomarkers are discussed together with future perspectives.

  2. Usability of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in a tertiary memory clinic

    Brandt, C.; Bahl, J.C.; Heegaard, N.H.;


    AIM: Assays for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau, phospho-tau protein and beta-amyloid 1-42 have been available for some years. The aim of the study was to assess the usability of these biomarkers in a mixed population of tertiary dementia referral patients in a university-based memory...

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study

    Brouillette, Ashley M.; Gülin Öz; Gomez, Christopher M.


    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, an...

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers mirror rate of cognitive decline.

    Rolstad, Sindre; Berg, Anne Ingeborg; Bjerke, Maria; Johansson, Boo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wallin, Anders


    The ability to predict future decline in cognitive systems using the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers 42 amino acid form of amyloid-β (Aβ42) and total tau (T-tau) is not fully understood. In a clinical sample ranging from cognitively healthy to dementia (n = 326), linear regression models were performed in order to investigate the ability of CSF biomarkers to predict cognitive decline in all cognitive domains from baseline to 2-year follow-up. Gender, age, and years of education were included as covariates. In patients with subjective cognitive impairment, T-tau had a small impact on executive functions (r2 = 0.07). T-tau had a small to moderate influence (r2 = 0.06-0.11) on all cognitive functions with the exception of visuospatial functions in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In patients with dementia, the impact of T-tau was large (r2 = 0.29) on semantic memory. Aβ42 had a small effect (r2 = 0.07) on speed and executive functions in MCI. In patients with dementia, Aβ42 had a moderate influence (r2 = 0.13-0.24) on semantic and verbal working memory/fluency. Our results speak in favor of the notion that CSF biomarkers reflect the rate of cognitive decline across the continuum of cognitive impairment from healthy to dementia. CSF predicted subsequent decline in more cognitive domains among MCI cases, but the impact was most pronounced in patients with dementia. PMID:23313924

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Dementia Patients with Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Yan-feng Li; Fang-fang Ge; Yong Zhang; Hui You; Zhen-xin Zhang


    Objective To study the changes of biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Methods Levels of amyloid proteinβ (Aβ42, Aβ40) and phosphorylated Tau-protein (P-tau) in CSF and ratio of Aβ42/Aβ40 were tested in 5 cases with CAA dementia and 20 cases with Alzheimer's disease collected at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from December 2001 to March 2011. Results The levels of Aβ42, Aβ40, and P-tau in CSF and ratio of Aβ42/Aβ40 were (660.4±265.2) ng/L, (7111.0±1033.4) ng/L, (71.8±51.5) ng/L, and 0.077±0.033, respectively in CAA dementia and (663.6±365.6) ng/L, (5115.0±2931.1) ng/L, (47.7±38.8) ng/L, and 0.192±0.140, respectively in Alzheimer's disease patients. There were no statistically significant differences between CAA dementia and Alzheimer's disease in terms of these CSF biomarkers (allP>0.05). Conclusion Measurements of CSF biomarkers may not be helpful in differential diagnosis of CAA and Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Molecular biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients.

    Fitzner, Brit; Hecker, Michael; Zettl, Uwe Klaus


    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system, usually occurring in young adults and leading to disability. Despite the progress in technology and intensive research work of the last years, diagnosing MS can still be challenging. A heterogenic and complex pathophysiology with various types of disease courses makes MS unique for each patient. There is an urgent need to identify markers facilitating rapid and accurate diagnosis and prognostic assessments with regard to optimal therapy for each MS patient. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an outstanding source of specific markers related to MS pathology. Molecules reflecting specific pathological processes, such as inflammation, cellular damage, and loss of blood-brain-barrier integrity, are detectable in CSF. Clinically used biomarkers of CSF are oligoclonal bands, IgG-index, measles-rubella-zoster-reaction, anti-aquaporin 4 antibodies, and antibodies against John Cunningham virus. Many other potential biomarkers have been proposed in recent years. In this review we examine the current scientific knowledge on CSF molecular markers that could guide diagnosis and discrimination of different MS forms, support treatment decisions, or be helpful in monitoring and predicting disease progression, therapy response, and complications such as opportunistic infections. PMID:26071103

  7. Cystatin C in cerebrospinal fluid as a biomarker of ALS.

    Tsuji-Akimoto, Sachiko; Yabe, Ichiro; Niino, Masaaki; Kikuchi, Seiji; Sasaki, Hidenao


    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is diagnosed on the basis of progressive symptoms in both the upper and lower motor neurons. Because there are no specific biomarkers for ALS, it is difficult to diagnose this disease in its early stages. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained from 14 patients in the early stages of ALS, from 13 with polyneuropathy, and from 16 with other neurological disorders. The concentration of cystatin C in the CSF was measured using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. The concentration of cystatin C in the CSF was significantly lower in ALS patients than in the control subjects who were patients with polyneuropathy or other neurological diseases (patients with ALS, polyneuropathy, and other diseases exhibited 5.5 +/- 0.3, 6.7 +/- 0.4, and 6.9 +/- 0.3 mg/L cystatin C, respectively; ALS patients vs. control subjects: p = 0.014 and ALS patients vs. polyneuropathy patients: p = 0.024). Cystatin C may be a useful biomarker of ALS and can be used to distinguish between ALS and polyneuropathy. PMID:19444952

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study.

    Brouillette, Ashley M; Öz, Gülin; Gomez, Christopher M


    Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C), compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C. PMID:26265793

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of central catecholamine deficiency in Parkinson’s disease and other synucleinopathies

    Goldstein, David S.; Holmes, Courtney; Sharabi, Yehonatan


    Central catecholamine deficiency characterizes α-synucleinopathies such as Parkinson’s disease. We hypothesized that cerebrospinal fluid levels of neuronal metabolites of catecholamines provide neurochemical biomarkers of these disorders. To test this hypothesis we measured cerebrospinal fluid levels of catechols including dopamine, norepinephrine and their main respective neuronal metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglycol in Parkinson’s disease and two other synucleino...

  10. Longitudinal Stability of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Levels : Fulfilled Requirement for Pharmacodynamic Markers in Alzheimer's Disease

    Le Bastard, Nathalie; Aerts, Laetitia; Sleegers, Kristel; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan


    The current treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is purely symptomatic, but medications interfering with underlying pathophysiological processes are being developed. To evaluate a possible disease-modifying effect, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers with a direct link to the underlying pathophys

  11. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Familial Forms of Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    Rostgaard, Nina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik;


    important when developing new therapies. Today, the core protein biomarkers amyloid-β42, total tau and phosphorylated tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are used to diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD), because these biomarkers have shown to reflect the underlying amyloid and tau pathology. However, the...

  12. The Alzheimer's Association external quality control program for cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    Mattsson, Niklas; Andreasson, Ulf; Persson, Staffan;


    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid β (Aβ)-42, total-tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) demonstrate good diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements between studies, and between and within laboratories. The...

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis : CSF Biomarkers of SIV Encephalitis.

    Bissel, Stephanie J; Kofler, Julia; Nyaundi, Julia; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Wiley, Clayton A


    Antiretroviral therapy has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients but also increased prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. We previously identified YKL40 as a potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker of lentiviral central nervous system (CNS) disease in HIV-infected patients and in the macaque model of HIV encephalitis. The aim of this study was to define the specificity and sensitivity along with the predictive value of YKL40 as a biomarker of encephalitis and to assess its relationship to CSF viral load. CSF YKL40 and SIV RNA concentrations were analyzed over the course of infection in 19 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques and statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship to encephalitis. Using these relationships, CSF alterations of 31 neuroimmune markers were studied pre-infection, during acute and asymptomatic infection, at the onset of encephalitis, and at necropsy. YKL40 CSF concentrations above 1122 ng/ml were found to be a specific and sensitive biomarker for the presence of encephalitis and were highly correlated with CSF viral load. Macaques that developed encephalitis had evidence of chronic CNS immune activation during early, asymptomatic, and end stages of infection. At the onset of encephalitis, CSF demonstrated a rise of neuroimmune markers associated with macrophage recruitment, activation and interferon response. CSF YKL40 concentration and viral load are valuable biomarkers to define the onset of encephalitis. Chronic CNS immune activation precedes the development of encephalitis while some responses suggest protection from CNS lentiviral disease. PMID:27059917

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid P-tau(181P) : biomarker for improved differential dementia diagnosis

    Struyfs, Hanne; Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Goossens, Joery; Fransen, Erik; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter P.; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan


    The goal of this study is to investigate the value of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau(181p)) in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker panel for differential dementia diagnosis in autopsy confirmed AD and non-AD patients. The study population consisted of 140 aut

  15. Identification of microRNAs in the cerebrospinal fluid as biomarker for the diagnosis of glioma

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Schlegel, Uwe; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Zöllner, Hannah; Schmiegel, Wolf; Hahn, Stephan; Schroers, Roland


    Malignant gliomas are the most common and lethal primary intracranial tumors. To date, no reliable biomarkers for the detection and risk stratification of gliomas have been identified. Recently, we demonstrated significant levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) to be present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with primary CNS lymphoma. Because of the involvement of miRNA in carcinogenesis, miRNAs in CSF may serve as unique biomarkers for minimally invasive diagnosis of glioma. The objec...

  16. Cognitive impairment and major depressive disorder in HIV infection and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    Sergio Monteiro de Almeida


    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment and major depressive disorder (MDD are common HIV-1 central nervous system (CNS complications. Their frequencies in AIDS patients are 36% and 45%, respectively. The diagnoses of HIV cognitive impairment are made by clinical criteria, no single laboratory test or biomarker establishes the diagnosis. Factors of indirect neuronal injury related with the pathophysiology of the HIV infection in the CNS, are the factors studied as biomarkers. In the present no biomarker is established to the diagnosis of HIV cognitive impairment, much still needs to be done. We review in this paper some biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid that could be valuable to the diagnosis of HIV cognitive impairment. Diagnosing depression in the context of HIV can be challenging, to identify a biomarker that could help in the diagnosis would be very important, although MDD risks and neurobiology are still poorly understood.

  17. Approach to Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Biomarker Discovery and Evaluation in HIV Infection

    Price, Richard W.; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena S.; Smith, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gisslen, Magnus


    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previouslydefined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease - a systematic review

    Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Binzer, Michael; Stenager, Egon;


    markører for oxidativt stress er relateret til sygdommens sværhedsgrad. Antioxidanten urat har derudover en prognostisk værdi i forhold til sygdommens sværhedsgrad. Forhøjede niveauer af amyloid- og tau-proteiner korrelerer med kognitiv svækkelse og har måske en prognostisk værdi i forhold til kognitiv...... PD. Dette systematiske review inkluderer studier i biomarkører i spinalvæsken, som fokuserer på forskellige sygdomsmekanismer: Oxidativt stress, neuroinflammation, lysosomal dysfunktion og proteiner involveret i PD og andre neurodegenerative lidelser. Der fokuseres på fire kliniske domæner...

  19. [Advances in Biomarkers of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood].

    Huang, Wen; Li, Shang-xun; Li, Xue-jian; Xu, Hong-yun


    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is defined as a mild brain trauma resulting in a short loss of consciousness and alteration of mental status. It may also occasionally develop persistent and progressive symptoms. It has been confirmed that MTBI causes changes of anatomic structures in central nervous system and biomarkers in the body fluid. However, there is no sufficient research on relevance among threshold for the brain injury, individual vulnerability and duration of disturbance of consciousness. Furthermore, there are no reliable diagnostic methods to establish whether a blow to the head is sufficient to cause the brain injury. This review provides references for biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid and blood associated with TBI. It also provides application status and potential prospects for further assessment and diagnosis of MTBI. PMID:27141807

  20. Are Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers Useful in Predicting the Prognosis of Multiple Sclerosis Patients?

    Salvatore Monaco


    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the prototypical inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS. Although many advances have been made in the comprehension of its pathogenesis, the etiology is still unknown. The complexity of MS reflects in the extreme variability of the clinical manifestations and clinical course both between and within patients, in addition to immunopathological mechanisms and response to treatment. Several prognostic factors have been suggested in large scale studies, but predictions in individual cases are difficult to make. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers, such as 14-3-3, tau, and cystatin C are promising sources of prognostic information with a good potential of quantitative measure, sensitivity, and reliability. However, none has shown sufficient reproducibility to be applied in clinical practice. Here we review the current literature addressing the above mentioned biomarkers as MS severity predictors at an early stage.

  1. A Decade of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease in Belgium.

    Somers, Charisse; Struyfs, Hanne; Goossens, Joery; Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Luyckx, Jill; De Roeck, Naomi; De Roeck, Ellen; De Vil, Bart; Cras, Patrick; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter-Paul; Bjerke, Maria; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan


    During the past ten years, over 5,000 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were analyzed at the Reference Center for Biological Markers of Dementia (BIODEM), UAntwerp, for core Alzheimer's disease (AD) CSF biomarkers: amyloid-β peptide of 42 amino acids (Aβ1-42), total tau protein (T-tau), and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau181P). CSF biomarker analyses were performed using single-analyte ELISA kits. In-house validated cutoff values were applied: Aβ1-42 tau >296.5 pg/mL, P-tau181P >56.5 pg/mL. A CSF biomarker profile was considered to be suggestive for AD if the CSF Aβ1-42 concentration was below the cutoff, in combination with T-tau and/or P-tau181P values above the cutoff (IWG2 criteria for AD). Biomarker analyses were requested for following clinical indications: 1) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of clinical AD, 2) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of doubt between AD and a non-AD dementia, 3) neurochemical diagnosis of prodromal AD in case of mild cognitive impairment, 4) neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of psychiatric symptoms (like depression, psychosis), or 5) other clinical indications. During these ten years, the number of yearly referred samples increased by 238% and clinical indications for referral showed a shift from neurochemical confirmation of AD in case of clinical AD to differential dementia diagnosis in case of doubt between AD and a non-AD dementia. Four percent of the patients also had a postmortem neuropathological examination. Together, these biomarker data were the basis for several research papers, and significantly contributed to the validation of these biomarkers in autopsy-confirmed subjects. PMID:27567807

  2. Amyloid beta protein and tau in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma as biomarkers for dementia: a review of recent literature.

    Frankfort, S.V.; Tulner, L.R.; Campen, J.P. van; Verbeek, M.M.; Jansen, R.W.; Beijnen, J.H.


    This review addresses recent developments in amyloid beta (Abeta), total tau (t-tau), and phosporylated tau (p-tau) protein analysis, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma as biomarkers for dementia. Recent research focused on the protection of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) into de

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid chitinase-3-like 2 and chitotriosidase are potential prognostic biomarkers in early multiple sclerosis

    Møllgaard, M; Vinter, Matilda Degn; Sellebjerg, F;


    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The role of chitinases and chitinase-like proteins in multiple sclerosis (MS) is currently unknown; however, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) predict prognosis in early MS. Whether this applies to other chitinases and chitinase-like proteins is......) and cognitive impairment by the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (P = 0.0357, linear regression) at follow-up. In a multivariate analysis of MS risk, CHI3L2 performed better than CHI3L1. CONCLUSIONS: CHI3L2 and chitotriosidase are promising biomarkers in patients with a first demyelinating episode......, immunoglobulin G index and leukocyte count were investigated. Long-term MS risk and disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale, Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite components) were examined in a retrospective cohort of 78 patients with ON as the first demyelinating episode (mean follow-up 14 years). The...

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid proteomics and protein biomarkers in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: Current status and future perspectives.

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; Feneberg, Emily; Otto, Markus


    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises a spectrum of rare neurodegenerative diseases with an estimated prevalence of 15-22 cases per 100,000 persons including the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD), FTD with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). The pathogenesis of the diseases is still unclear and clinical diagnosis of FTLD is hampered by overlapping symptoms within the FTLD subtypes and with other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Intracellular protein aggregates in the brain are a major hallmark of FTLD and implicate alterations in protein metabolism or function in the disease's pathogenesis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which surrounds the brain can be used to study changes in neurodegenerative diseases and to identify disease-related mechanisms or neurochemical biomarkers for diagnosis. In the present review, we will give an overview of the current literature on proteomic studies in CSF of FTLD patients. Reports of targeted and unbiased proteomic approaches are included and the results are discussed in regard of their informative value about disease pathology and the suitability to be used as diagnostic biomarkers. Finally, we will give some future perspectives on CSF proteomics and a list of candidate biomarkers which might be interesting for validation in further studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology. PMID:25526887

  5. Osteopontin in cerebrospinal fluid as diagnostic biomarker for central nervous system lymphoma.

    Strehlow, Felicitas; Bauer, Sandra; Martus, Peter; Weller, Michael; Roth, Patrick; Schlegel, Uwe; Seidel, Sabine; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Korfel, Agnieszka; Kreher, Stephan


    Central nervous system lymphoma (CNSL) is diagnostically challenging. The identification of reliable and easy to measure biomarkers is desirable to facilitate diagnosis. Here, we evaluated the value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) osteopontin (OPN) as a diagnostic biomarker for CNSL. OPN concentrations in CSF from 37 patients with CNSL (29 with primary CNSL and 8 with secondary CNS involvement of systemic lymphoma) and 36 controls [6 patients with inflammatory CNS disease other than multiple sclerosis (MS), 8 with MS, 9 with glioblastoma (GBM) and 13 healthy controls] were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Non-parametric tests and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed for determination of diagnostic accuracy. Median CSF OPN level in all CNSL patients was 620 ng/mL and higher than in patients with inflammatory CNS disease (356 ng/mL); P curve was 0.865 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.745-0.985] for differentiating CNSL and patients with inflammatory CNS disease; 0.956 (95 % CI 0.898-1.000) for CNSL and MS patients; 0.988 (95 % CI 0.964-1.000) for CNSL and GBM patients, and 0.915 (95 % CI 0.834-0.996) for CNSL patients and healthy controls. In multivariate analysis, high CSF OPN level was associated with shorter progression-free (HR 1.61, 95 % CI 1.13-2.31; P = .009) and overall survival (HR 1.52, 95 % CI 1.04-2.21; P = .029). CSF OPN is a potential biomarker in CNSL. PMID:27294357

  6. Peptide fingerprinting of Alzheimer's disease in cerebrospinal fluid: identification and prospective evaluation of new synaptic biomarkers.

    Holger Jahn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Today, dementias are diagnosed late in the course of disease. Future treatments have to start earlier in the disease process to avoid disability requiring new diagnostic tools. The objective of this study is to develop a new method for the differential diagnosis and identification of new biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD using capillary-electrophoresis coupled to mass-spectrometry (CE-MS and to assess the potential of early diagnosis of AD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 159 out-patients of a memory-clinic at a University Hospital suffering from neurodegenerative disorders and 17 cognitively-healthy controls was used to create differential peptide pattern for dementias and prospective blinded-comparison of sensitivity and specificity for AD diagnosis against the Criterion standard in a naturalistic prospective sample of patients. Sensitivity and specificity of the new method compared to standard diagnostic procedures and identification of new putative biomarkers for AD was the main outcome measure. CE-MS was used to reliably detect 1104 low-molecular-weight peptides in CSF. Training-sets of patients with clinically secured sporadic Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and cognitively healthy controls allowed establishing discriminative biomarker pattern for diagnosis of AD. This pattern was already detectable in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. The AD-pattern was tested in a prospective sample of patients (n = 100 and AD was diagnosed with a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 83%. Using CSF measurements of beta-amyloid1-42, total-tau, and phospho(181-tau, AD-diagnosis had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 67% in the same sample. Sequence analysis of the discriminating biomarkers identified fragments of synaptic proteins like proSAAS, apolipoprotein J, neurosecretory protein VGF, phospholemman, and chromogranin A. CONCLUSIONS: The method may allow early differential

  7. Cognitive Performance and Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Neurodegeneration: A Study of Patients with Bipolar Disorder and Healthy Controls

    Sindre Rolstad; Joel Jakobsson; Carl Sellgren; Carl-Johan Ekman; Kaj Blennow; Henrik Zetterberg; Erik Pålsson; Mikael Landén


    The purpose of the present study was to investigate if cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of neurodegeneration are associated with cognition in bipolar disorder and healthy controls, respectively. CSF concentrations of total and phosphorylated tau, amyloid beta (Aβ)1-42, ratios of Aβ42/40 and Aβ42/38, soluble amyloid precursor protein α and β, and neurofilament light chain protein were analyzed in relation to neuropsychological performance in 82 euthymic bipolar disorder patients and 71 hea...

  8. Cytoskeletal proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid as biomarker of multiple sclerosis.

    Madeddu, Roberto; Farace, Cristiano; Tolu, Paola; Solinas, Giuliana; Asara, Yolande; Sotgiu, Maria Alessandra; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Prados, Jose Carlos; Sotgiu, Stefano; Montella, Andrea


    The axonal cytoskeleton is a finely organized system, essential for maintaining the integrity of the axon. Axonal degeneration is implicated in the pathogenesis of unremitting disability of multiple sclerosis (MS). Purpose of this study is to evaluate levels of cytoskeletal proteins such as neurofilament light protein (NFL), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and β-tubulin (β-Tub) isoforms II and III in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients and their correlation with MS clinical indices. CSF levels of cytoskeletal proteins were determined in 51 patients: 33 with MS and 18 with other neurological diseases (OND). NFL, GFAP and β-Tub II proteins were significantly higher (p 0.05) was found between MS and OND with regard to β-Tub III. Interestingly, levels of β-Tub III and NFL were higher in progressive than in remitting MS forms; on the contrary, higher levels of β-Tub II and GFAP were found in remitting MS forms. However, with the exception of β-Tub III, all proteins tend to decrease their CSF levels concomitantly with the increasing disability (EDSS) score. Overall, our results might indicate β-Tub II as a potential candidate for diagnostic and β-Tub III as a possible prognostic biomarker of MS. Therefore, further analyses are legitimated and desirable. PMID:22362332

  9. Identification and validation of novel cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for staging early Alzheimer's disease.

    Richard J Perrin

    Full Text Available Ideally, disease modifying therapies for Alzheimer disease (AD will be applied during the 'preclinical' stage (pathology present with cognition intact before severe neuronal damage occurs, or upon recognizing very mild cognitive impairment. Developing and judiciously administering such therapies will require biomarker panels to identify early AD pathology, classify disease stage, monitor pathological progression, and predict cognitive decline. To discover such biomarkers, we measured AD-associated changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF proteome.CSF samples from individuals with mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] 1 (n = 24 and cognitively normal controls (CDR 0 (n = 24 were subjected to two-dimensional difference-in-gel electrophoresis. Within 119 differentially-abundant gel features, mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS identified 47 proteins. For validation, eleven proteins were re-evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Six of these assays (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I, transthyretin, cystatin C distinguished CDR 1 and CDR 0 groups and were subsequently applied (with tau, p-tau181 and Aβ42 ELISAs to a larger independent cohort (n = 292 that included individuals with very mild dementia (CDR 0.5. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses using stepwise logistic regression yielded optimal biomarker combinations to distinguish CDR 0 from CDR>0 (tau, YKL-40, NrCAM and CDR 1 from CDR<1 (tau, chromogranin A, carnosinase I with areas under the curve of 0.90 (0.85-0.94 95% confidence interval [CI] and 0.88 (0.81-0.94 CI, respectively.Four novel CSF biomarkers for AD (NrCAM, YKL-40, chromogranin A, carnosinase I can improve the diagnostic accuracy of Aβ42 and tau. Together, these six markers describe six clinicopathological stages from cognitive normalcy to mild dementia, including stages defined by increased risk of cognitive decline. Such a panel might improve clinical trial efficiency by guiding

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum biomarkers of cerebral malaria mortality in Ghanaian children

    Wiredu Edwin K


    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum can cause a diffuse encephalopathy known as cerebral malaria (CM, a major contributor to malaria associated mortality. Despite treatment, mortality due to CM can be as high as 30% while 10% of survivors of the disease may experience short- and long-term neurological complications. The pathogenesis of CM and other forms of severe malaria is multi-factorial and appear to involve cytokine and chemokine homeostasis, inflammation and vascular injury/repair. Identification of prognostic markers that can predict CM severity will enable development of better intervention. Methods Postmortem serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were obtained within 2–4 hours of death in Ghanaian children dying of CM, severe malarial anemia (SMA, and non-malarial (NM causes. Serum and CSF levels of 36 different biomarkers (IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12 (p70, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, Eotaxin, FGF basic protein, CRP, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IP-10, MCP-1 (MCAF, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, SDF-1α, CXCL11 (I-TAC, Fas-ligand [Fas-L], soluble Fas [sFas], sTNF-R1 (p55, sTNF-R2 (p75, MMP-9, TGF-β1, PDGF bb and VEGF were measured and the results compared between the 3 groups. Results After Bonferroni adjustment for other biomarkers, IP-10 was the only serum biomarker independently associated with CM mortality when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Eight CSF biomarkers (IL-1ra, IL-8, IP-10, PDGFbb, MIP-1β, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 were significantly elevated in CM mortality group when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Additionally, CSF IP-10/PDGFbb median ratio was statistically significantly higher in the CM group compared to SMA and NM groups. Conclusion The parasite-induced local cerebral dysregulation in the production of IP-10, 1L-8, MIP-1β, PDGFbb, IL-1ra, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 may be involved in CM neuropathology, and their immunoassay may have potential utility in predicting

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker and brain biopsy findings in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Okko T Pyykkö

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The significance of amyloid precursor protein (APP and neuroinflammation in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH and Alzheimer's disease (AD is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of soluble APP (sAPP and amyloid beta (Aβ isoforms, proinflammatory cytokines, and biomarkers of neuronal damage in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in relation to brain biopsy Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau (HPτ findings. METHODS: The study population comprised 102 patients with possible NPH with cortical brain biopsies, ventricular and lumbar CSF samples, and DNA available. The final clinical diagnoses were: 53 iNPH (91% shunt-responders, 26 AD (10 mixed iNPH+AD, and 23 others. Biopsy samples were immunostained against Aβ and HPτ. CSF levels of AD-related biomarkers (Aβ42, p-tau, total tau, non-AD-related Aβ isoforms (Aβ38, Aβ40, sAPP isoforms (sAPPα, sAPPβ, proinflammatory cytokines (several interleukins (IL, interferon-gamma, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and biomarkers of neuronal damage (neurofilament light and myelin basic protein were measured. All patients were genotyped for APOE. RESULTS: Lumbar CSF levels of sAPPα were lower (p<0.05 in patients with shunt-responsive iNPH compared to non-iNPH patients. sAPPβ showed a similar trend (p = 0.06. CSF sAPP isoform levels showed no association to Aβ or HPτ in the brain biopsy. Quantified Aβ load in the brain biopsy showed a negative correlation with CSF levels of Aβ42 in ventricular (r = -0.295, p = 0.003 and lumbar (r = -0.356, p = 0.01 samples, while the levels of Aβ38 and Aβ40 showed no correlation. CSF levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of neuronal damage did not associate to the brain biopsy findings, diagnosis, or shunt response. Higher lumbar/ventricular CSF IL-8 ratios (p<0.001 were seen in lumbar samples collected after ventriculostomy compared to the samples collected before the procedure

  12. Cognitive performance and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration: a study of patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls.

    Sindre Rolstad

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate if cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers of neurodegeneration are associated with cognition in bipolar disorder and healthy controls, respectively. CSF concentrations of total and phosphorylated tau, amyloid beta (Aβ1-42, ratios of Aβ42/40 and Aβ42/38, soluble amyloid precursor protein α and β, and neurofilament light chain protein were analyzed in relation to neuropsychological performance in 82 euthymic bipolar disorder patients and 71 healthy controls. Linear regression models were applied to account for performance in five cognitive domains using the CSF biomarkers. In patients, the CSF biomarkers explained a significant proportion of the variance (15-36%, p=.002 - <.0005 in all cognitive domains independently of age, medication, disease status, and bipolar subtype I or II. However, the CSF biomarkers specifically mirroring Alzheimer-type brain changes, i.e., P-tau and Aβ1-42, did not contribute significantly. In healthy controls, CSF biomarkers did not explain the variance in cognitive performance. Selected CSF biomarkers of neurodegenerative processes accounted for cognitive performance in persons with bipolar disorder, but not for healthy controls. Specifically, the ratios of Aβ42/40 and Aβ42/38 were consistently associated with altered cognitive performance.

  13. Cognitive performance and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration: a study of patients with bipolar disorder and healthy controls.

    Rolstad, Sindre; Jakobsson, Joel; Sellgren, Carl; Ekman, Carl-Johan; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Pålsson, Erik; Landén, Mikael


    The purpose of the present study was to investigate if cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of neurodegeneration are associated with cognition in bipolar disorder and healthy controls, respectively. CSF concentrations of total and phosphorylated tau, amyloid beta (Aβ)1-42, ratios of Aβ42/40 and Aβ42/38, soluble amyloid precursor protein α and β, and neurofilament light chain protein were analyzed in relation to neuropsychological performance in 82 euthymic bipolar disorder patients and 71 healthy controls. Linear regression models were applied to account for performance in five cognitive domains using the CSF biomarkers. In patients, the CSF biomarkers explained a significant proportion of the variance (15-36%, p=.002 - bipolar subtype I or II. However, the CSF biomarkers specifically mirroring Alzheimer-type brain changes, i.e., P-tau and Aβ1-42, did not contribute significantly. In healthy controls, CSF biomarkers did not explain the variance in cognitive performance. Selected CSF biomarkers of neurodegenerative processes accounted for cognitive performance in persons with bipolar disorder, but not for healthy controls. Specifically, the ratios of Aβ42/40 and Aβ42/38 were consistently associated with altered cognitive performance. PMID:25954806

  14. Protein profiling of cerebrospinal fluid

    Simonsen, Anja H


    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) perfuses the brain and spinal cord. CSF contains proteins and peptides important for brain physiology and potentially also relevant for brain pathology. Hence, CSF is the perfect source to search for new biomarkers to improve diagnosis of neurological diseases as well...... as to monitor the performance of disease-modifying drugs. This chapter presents methods for SELDI-TOF profiling of CSF as well as useful advice regarding pre-analytical factors to be considered....

  15. Investigation of autoantibody profiles for cerebrospinal fluid biomarker discovery in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Beyer, Natascha Helena; Lueking, Angelika; Kowald, Axel; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup; Heegaard, Niels Henrik Helweg

    Using the UNIarray® marker technology platform, cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin G reactivities of 15 controls and 17 RRMS patients against human recombinant proteins were investigated. Patient cerebrospinal fluids were oligoclonal band positive and reactivities were compared to that of sex- an...

  16. Strength and weaknesses of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease and possible detection of overlaps with frailty process.

    Stefani, Alessandro; Olivola, Enrica; Stampanoni Bassi, Mario; Pisani, Valerio; Imbriani, Paola; Pisani, Antonio; Pierantozzi, Mariangela


    With the increase of human lifespan and refinement of diagnostic techniques dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular, have become a multi-decade process with a complex pathogenesis. The prognosis of AD patients, especially in late stages, may be strongly influenced by factors that go far beyond the well-recognized cascades (tau deposition, amyloid plaques). In this context, AD and Frailty, a multidimensional process of the elderly, inevitably overlap. Not surprisingly, the routine biomarkers collectable in the cerebrospinal fluid, while highly relevant in allowing specific diagnoses, becoming limiting when used to define severity and rate of progression of cognitive impairment. In reviewing merits and pitfalls of routine cerebrospinal fluid profile for AD, this manuscript will examine the state-of-the-art related to a parallel field, the extrapyramidal disorders. For synucleinopathies, we will discuss the possibility to detect factors directly involved in earliest disease pathology (alpha-synuclein, tau-proteins) together with indexes of disease progression (i.e. dopamine-metabolite ratio and loss of blood-brain barrier integrity). This approach might guarantee the capability of monitoring putative disease-modifying strategies. However, we will show the likelihood that nonconventional approaches already proposed for Frail subjects (such as exercise-mediated neuro-protection) might prove to be a useful aid for an ageing brain already impaired by AD alterations. A crucial test for these hypotheses would be to apply this sort of interventional, and not merely pharmacological, therapy to homogeneous patient cohorts. PMID:23574170

  17. Nerve growth factor expression in astrocytoma and cerebrospinal fluid: a new biomarker for prognosis of astrocytoma

    LI Qiao-yu; FENG Yun; XU Wen-lin; YANG Yong; ZHANG Yan; ZHANG Zhi-jian; GONG Ai-hua; YUAN Zhi-cheng; LU Pei-song; ZHAN Li-ping; WANG Peng


    Background Recent studies have discovered that nuclear translocation of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor fragments function differently from the traditional model. This study aimed to uncover the nuclear expression of NGF in astrocytoma and its biological significance.Methods Ninety-four paraffin-embedded astrocytoma specimens were subjected to immunohistochemical (IHC) and hemotoxylin & eosin (HE) staining. Preoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens and intraoperative snap-frozen astrocytoma tissues were assayed for NGF expression by ELISA and Western blotting. The outcome of patients who contributed samples was tracked. Each ten tissue samples from patients with traumatic brain injury who had received decompression surgery and CSF samples from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia but with no history of nervous system disease were taken as control.Results NGF-positive immunoreactive products were distributed in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of astrocytoma, but were only located in the cytoplasm of traumatic brain injury (TBI) tissue. NGF nuclear-positive rate (NPR) of grades Ⅲ-Ⅳ astrocytomas (70.0%) was higher than that of grades Ⅰ-Ⅱ astrocytoma (28.6%, P<0.05). NGF-NP expression positively correlated with the NGF concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (r=0.755, P<0.01). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated that the median survival time was 25 months for NGF-NP astrocytoma grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ patients and 42 months in NGF nuclear negative (NGF-NN) astrocytoma grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ patients (P<0.05). In astrocytoma Ⅲ-Ⅳ patients, the median survival was 7 months for NGF-NP patients and 24 months for NGF-NN patients (P<0.01). Two types of NGF with molecular weights of 13 and 36 kDa were present in astrocytoma, but only the 36 kDa NGF was found in the CSF. NGF expression elevated as the malignancy increased.Conclusions NGF-NP expression and NGF level in CSF were significant prognostic factors in astrocytoma patients.Because of the easy

  18. MicroRNA-29a Is a Candidate Biomarker for Alzheimer's Disease in Cell-Free Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    Müller, Mareike; Jäkel, Lieke; Bruinsma, Ilona B; Claassen, Jurgen A; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M


    The identification of reliable biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains challenging. Recently, abnormal levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) miR-27a, miR-29a, miR-29b, and miR-125b in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD patients were reported. We aimed to confirm the biomarker potential of these miRNAs for AD diagnosis. Additionally, we examined the influence of blood contamination on CSF miRNA levels as potential confounding factor. We studied expression levels of the four miRNAs by quantitative PCR in CSF samples of AD patients and non-demented controls, and in blood-spiked CSF. Levels of miR-29a, but not of the other three miRNAs, were increased by a factor of 2.2 in CSF of AD patients. Spiking of small amounts of blood into CSF revealed that miR-27a and miR-29a, but not miR-125b levels were strongly influenced by the number of blood cells in the sample. In conclusion, miR-29a may be a candidate biomarker for AD, but only when used in cell-free CSF. PMID:25895659

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for prognosis of long-term cognitive treatment outcomes in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Nakajima, Madoka; Miyajima, Masakazu; Ogino, Ikuko; Akiba, Chihiro; Sugano, Hidenori; Hara, Takeshi; Fusegi, Keiko; Karagiozov, Kostadin; Arai, Hajime


    The prognosis of cognitive improvement after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) remains uncertain, with no reports on CSF biomarkers related to long-term cognitive prognosis. We performed a preliminary study of CSF biomarker protein levels for cognitive outcome prognostication of two-year outcomes after shunt treated iNPH in 36 patients (13 women) with a median age of 75years (IQR 69-78). CSF biomarkers included soluble amyloid precursor proteins (sAPP, sAPPα, sAPPβ), amyloid β (Aβ)1-38, Aβ1-42 and phosphorylated tau (p-tau), lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS)/β-trace, and cystatin C. The results clearly showed that p-tau levels (sensitivity of 71.4%, specificity of 77.8%, cut-off value of 22.0pg/mL), Aβ1-38/Aβ1-42 ratio (77.8%, 81%, 3.58), and the Aβ1-42/p-tau ratio (76%, 72.7%, 14.6) in preoperative CSF have the potential to determine postoperative prognosis. Improved cognition may be associated with the improvement in CSF circulation after LPS, which likely induces cystatin C and L-PGDS and switches synthesis from Aβ1-42 to Aβ1-38. PMID:26169158

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Japanese Encephalitis [v2; ref status: indexed,

    Nabonita Sengupta


    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis (JE is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. Acute encephalitis syndrome (AES is a group of central nervous system (CNS disorders caused by a wide range of viruses, bacteria, fungi, chemicals and toxins. It is important to distinguish between various forms of infectious encephalitis with similar clinical manifestations in order to ensure specific and accurate diagnosis and development of subsequent therapeutic strategies. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is in direct contact with the CNS and hence it is considered to be an excellent source for identifying biomarkers for various neurological disorders. With the recent advancement in proteomic methodologies, the field of biomarker research has received a remarkable boost.  The present study identifies potential biomarkers for JE using a proteomics based approach. The CSF proteomes from ten patients each with JE and Non-JE acute encephalitis were analyzed by 2D gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP, fibrinogen gamma chain, fibrinogen beta chain, complement C4-B, complement C3 and cytoplasmic actin were found to be significantly elevated in case of JE indicating severe disruption of the blood brain barrier and DBP can be suggested to be an important diagnostic marker.

  1. The proteomic toolbox for studying cerebrospinal fluid

    Gool, A.J. van; Hendrickson, R.C.


    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can be considered the most promising biosample for the discovery and analysis of biomarkers in neuroscience, an area of great medical need. CSF is a body fluid that surrounds the brain and provides a rich pool of biochemical markers, both proteomic and metabolomic, that ref

  2. MGMT promoter methylation in serum and cerebrospinal fluid as a tumor-specific biomarker of glioma



    O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation is a conventional technique to predict the prognosis or individualized treatment of glioma in tumor tissue following surgery or biopsy. However, the technique cannot be applied in those glioma patients with concomitant neurological dysfunctions or advanced age. The present study aimed to find a new minimally invasive and efficient alternative method for the detection of MGMT promoter methylation. The expression of MGMT promoter methylation was assessed in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and compared to the corresponding tumor tissue from glioma patients. The 89 patients in the study [32 World Health Organization (WHO) grade II, 19 WHO grade III and 38 WHO grade IV) were pathologically-diagnosed glioma and received radiation therapy following sample collection. The resected glioma tumor tissue (89), corresponding serum (89) and CSF (78) samples were collected for the detection of MGMT promoter methylation using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting MGMT promoter methylation in CSF and serum were compared. Among the tumor tissue samples, 51/89 (57.3%) showed MGMT promoter methylation. The specificity of the detection in the CSF and serum samples reached 100%. The sensitivity of MGMT promoter methylation detection in CSF and serum were 26/40 (65.0%) and 19/51 (37.3%), respectively (P<0.05). In the WHO II, III and IV subgroups, the sensitivities of MGMT promoter methylation detection using CSF were 8/12 (66.7%), 11/18 (61.1%) and 7/10 (70.0%), respectively, which were significantly higher than the sensitivities using serum (7/21, 33.3%; 7/19, 36.8%; and 5/11, 45.5%, respectively P<0.05). Among patients with residual postoperative tumors, the sensitivities of detecting MGMT promoter methylation using CSF and serum were 18/25 (72.0%) and 10/24 (41.7%), respectively, both of which were significantly higher than the corresponding values

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Calbindin D Concentration as a Biomarker of Cerebellar Disease Progression in Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    Bagel, Jessica; Sampson, Maureen; Farhat, Nicole; Ding, Wenge; Swain, Gary; Prociuk, Maria; O’Donnell, Patricia; Drobatz, Kenneth; Gurda, Brittney; Wassif, Christopher; Remaley, Alan; Porter, Forbes; Vite, Charles


    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) 1 disease is a rare, inherited, neurodegenerative disease. Clear evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) in animal models resulted in the initiation of a phase I/IIa clinical trial in 2013 and a phase IIb/III trial in 2015. With clinical trials ongoing, validation of a biomarker to track disease progression and serve as a supporting outcome measure of therapeutic efficacy has become compulsory. In this study, we evaluated calcium-binding protein calbindin D-28K (calbindin) concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a biomarker of NPC1 disease. In the naturally occurring feline model, CSF calbindin was significantly elevated at 3 weeks of age, prior to the onset of cerebellar dysfunction, and steadily increased to >10-fold over normal at end-stage disease. Biweekly intrathecal administration of HPβCD initiated prior to the onset of neurologic dysfunction completely normalized CSF calbindin in NPC1 cats at all time points analyzed when followed up to 78 weeks of age. Initiation of HPβCD after the onset of clinical signs (16 weeks of age) resulted in a delayed reduction of calbindin levels in the CSF. Evaluation of CSF from patients with NPC1 revealed that calbindin concentrations were significantly elevated compared with CSF samples collected from unaffected patients. Off-label treatment of patients with NPC1 with miglustat, an inhibitor of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, significantly decreased CSF calbindin compared with pretreatment concentrations. These data suggest that the CSF calbindin concentration is a sensitive biomarker of NPC1 disease that could be instrumental as an outcome measure of therapeutic efficacy in ongoing clinical trials. PMID:27307499

  4. Identification of a novel panel of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease

    Simonsen, A.H.; McGuire, J.; Podust, V.N.; Davies, H.; Minthon, L.; Skoog, I.; Andreasen, N.; Wallin, A.; Waldemar, G.; Blennow, K.


    healthy control individuals with high sensitivity (97%) and specificity (98%). The panel of five markers was tested on a blinded independent data set of 30 AD samples and 28 controls giving 100% sensitivity and 97% specificity. This novel panel of biomarkers could potentially be used to improve the...... samples from AD patients (n=95) and population-based healthy controls (n=72) were analyzed by SELDI-TOF-MS in order to discover and characterize novel candidate biomarker combinations that differentiate AD patients from normal aging in this explorative study. Thirty candidate biomarkers (ROC AUC>0.7) were...... discovered that could differentiate patients with AD from healthy controls. Protein sequence determination and positive identification of 15 biomarkers revealed potential associations between the identified markers and AD pathogenesis. A multi-marker combination of five peaks could distinguish AD from...

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases-From pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    Blennow, Kaj; Biscetti, Leonardo; Eusebi, Paolo; Parnetti, Lucilla


    This review provides an update on the role, development, and validation of CSF biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease and PD. Some recent developments on novel biomarkers are also discussed. We also give an overview of methodological/technical factors still hampering the global validation and standardization of CSF Alzheimer's disease and PD biomarkers. CSF biomarkers have the potential to improve the diagnostic accuracy at the early stages not only for Alzheimer's disease but also for PD. This step is essential in view of the availability of disease-modifying treatments. Our vision for the future is that analyzing biomarker panels on a minute amount of CSF could provide important information on the whole spectrum of the molecular pathogenic events characterizing these neurodegenerative disorders. CSF core biomarkers have already been included in the diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease, and they are also under consideration as tools to monitor the effects of disease-modifying drugs. With respect to PD, their potential for improving diagnostic accuracy in early diagnosis is under intense research, resembling the same path followed for Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27145480

  6. Protein biomarkers in Parkinson's disease: Focus on cerebrospinal fluid markers and synaptic proteins.

    Halbgebauer, Steffen; Öckl, Patrick; Wirth, Katharina; Steinacker, Petra; Otto, Markus


    Despite extensive research, to date, no validated biomarkers for PD have been found. This review seeks to summarize studies approaching the detection of biomarker candidates for PD and introduce promising ones in more detail, with special attention to synaptic proteins. To this end, we performed a PubMed search and included studies using proteomic tools (2-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis and/or mass spectrometry) for the comparison of samples from PD and control patients. We found 27 studies reporting more than 500 differentially expressed proteins in which a total of 28 were detected in 2 and 17 in 3 or more independent studies, including posttranslationally modified proteins. In addition, of these 500 proteins, 25 were found to be brain specific, and 14 were enriched in synapses. Special attention was given to the applicability of the biomarker regarding sampling procedures, that is, using CSF/serum material for diagnosis. Furthermore, presynaptic proteins involved in vesicle membrane fusion seem to be interesting candidates for future analyses. Nonetheless, even though such promising biomarker candidates for PD exist, validation of these biomarkers in large-scale clinical studies is necessary to evaluate the diagnostic potential. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27134134

  7. Recommendations to standardize preanalytical confounding factors in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    del Campo, Marta; Mollenhauer, Brit; Bertolotto, Antonio; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Hampel, Harald; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Kruse, Niels; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Lehmann, Sylvain; Molinuevo, Jose L; Parnetti, Lucilla; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Sáez-Valero, Javier; Saka, Esen; Urbani, Andrea; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Verbeek, Marcel; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Teunissen, Charlotte


    due to the high variability found between centers in the concentrations of both AD CSF biomarkers (Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau) and PD CSF biomarker (α-synuclein). Such a variability has been partially attributed to different preanalytical procedures between laboratories, thus highlighting...... the need to establish standardized operating procedures. Here, we merge two previous consensus guidelines for preanalytical confounding factors in order to achieve one exhaustive guideline updated with new evidence for Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein. The proposed standardized...

  8. Peptide Fingerprinting of Alzheimer's Disease in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Identification and Prospective Evaluation of New Synaptic Biomarkers

    Holger Jahn; Stefan Wittke; Petra Zürbig; Raedler, Thomas J; Sönke Arlt; Markus Kellmann; William Mullen; Martin Eichenlaub; Harald Mischak; Klaus Wiedemann


    Background: Today, dementias are diagnosed late in the course of disease. Future treatments have to start earlier in the disease process to avoid disability requiring new diagnostic tools. The objective of this study is to develop a new method for the differential diagnosis and identification of new biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) using capillary-electrophoresis coupled to mass-spectrometry (CE-MS) and to assess the potential of early diagnosis of AD. Methods and Findings: Cerebro...

  9. Autoantibody profiling on human proteome microarray for biomarker discovery in cerebrospinal fluid and sera of neuropsychiatric lupus.

    Chaojun Hu

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE may be potential biomarkers for prediction, diagnosis, or prognosis of NPSLE. We used a human proteome microarray with~17,000 unique full-length human proteins to investigate autoantibodies associated with NPSLE. Twenty-nine CSF specimens from 12 NPSLE, 7 non-NPSLE, and 10 control (non-systemic lupus erythematosuspatients were screened for NPSLE-associated autoantibodies with proteome microarrays. A focused autoantigen microarray of candidate NPSLE autoantigens was applied to profile a larger cohort of CSF with patient-matched sera. We identified 137 autoantigens associated with NPSLE. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that these autoantigens were enriched for functions involved in neurological diseases (score = 43.Anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA was found in the CSF of NPSLE and non-NPSLE patients. The positive rates of 4 autoantibodies in CSF specimens were significantly different between the SLE (i.e., NPSLE and non-NPSLE and control groups: anti-ribosomal protein RPLP0, anti-RPLP1, anti-RPLP2, and anti-TROVE2 (also known as anti-Ro/SS-A. The positive rate for anti-SS-A associated with NPSLE was higher than that for non-NPSLE (31.11% cf. 10.71%; P = 0.045.Further analysis showed that anti-SS-A in CSF specimens was related to neuropsychiatric syndromes of the central nervous system in SLE (P = 0.009. Analysis with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient indicated that the titers of anti-RPLP2 and anti-SS-A in paired CSF and serum specimens significantly correlated. Human proteome microarrays offer a powerful platform to discover novel autoantibodies in CSF samples. Anti-SS-A autoantibodies may be potential CSF markers for NPSLE.

  10. iTRAQ and multiple reaction monitoring as proteomic tools for biomarker search in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Parkinson's disease dementia.

    Lehnert, Stefan; Jesse, Sarah; Rist, Wolfgang; Steinacker, Petra; Soininen, Hilkka; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Tumani, Hayrettin; Lenter, Martin; Oeckl, Patrick; Ferger, Boris; Hengerer, Bastian; Otto, Markus


    About 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) in the course of the disease. Until now, diagnosis is based on clinical and neuropsychological examinations, since so far there is no laboratory marker. In this study we aimed to find a neurochemical marker which would allow a risk assessment for the development of a dementia in PD patients. For this purpose, we adopted a gel-free proteomic approach (iTRAQ-method) to identify biomarker-candidates in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with PD, PDD and non-demented controls (NDC). Validation of these candidates was then carried out by multiple-reaction-monitoring (MRM) optimised for CSF. Using the iTRAQ-approach, we were able to identify 16 differentially regulated proteins. Fourteen out of these 16 proteins could then be followed-up simultaneously in our optimised MRM-measurement protocol. However only Tyrosine-kinase-non-receptor-type 13 and Netrin-G1 differed significantly between PDD and NDC cohorts. In addition, a significant difference was found for Golgin-160 and Apolipoprotein B-100 between PD and NDC. Apart from possible pathophysiological considerations, we propose that Tyrosine-kinase non-receptor-type 13 and Netrin G1 are biomarker candidates for the development of a Parkinson's disease dementia. Furthermore we suggest that iTRAQ and MRM are valuable tools for the discovery of biomarker in cerebrospinal fluid. However further validation studies need to be done with larger patient cohorts and other proteins need to be checked as well. PMID:22327139

  11. Cardiac biomarkers in blood, and pericardial and cerebrospinal fluids of forensic autopsy cases: A reassessment with special regard to postmortem interval.

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Michiue, Tomomi; Ikeda, Sayuko; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi


    Previous studies suggested possible application of postmortem biochemistry of myocardial biomarkers to the investigation of sudden cardiac death; however, differences from clinical findings should be considered in autopsy materials. The present study involved a comprehensive investigation of cardiac troponin T and I (cTnT and cTnI), and creatine kinase MB (CK-MB) in cardiac and peripheral external iliac venous blood, pericardial fluid (PCF) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for reassessment, with special regard to the estimated postmortem interval in relation to the cause of death, reviewing a large number of forensic autopsy cases (n=1923). These cardiac biomarkers showed cause-of-death- and postmortem-time-dependent differences: blood and PCF levels of each marker were higher in hyperthermia (heatstroke), bathwater drowning and chronic congestive heart disease in cases of postmortem interval (PMI) PMI of <48h. CSF cTnI and CK-MB showed similar findings. There was no difference between myocardial infarction and other causes of death to be discriminated, including asphyxiation, drowning and fire fatality. These findings are similar to clinical observations in critical ill patients, suggesting that elevated cardiac biomarkers cannot be a specific finding for death from acute ischemic heart disease, but indicate the severity of myocardial injury in postmortem investigation. PMID:26052007

  12. The soluble transcobalamin receptor (sCD320) is present in cerebrospinal fluid and correlates to dementia-related biomarkers tau proteins and amyloid-beta

    Abuyaman, Omar; Nexo, Ebba


    in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and show its correlations to dementia-related biomarkers tau proteins and amyloid-beta. METHODS: We collected 223 cerebrospinal fluid samples and corresponding plasma samples (n = 46). We measured CSF and plasma sCD320, holoTC and total TC employing in-house ELISA methods...... and CSF phospho-tau (181P) (p-tau), total tau (t-tau) and amyloid-beta 1-42 (Aβ) (n = 177) employing commercial ELISA kits (Innogenetics Company). Size exclusion chromatography was performed on a Superdex 200 column. RESULTS: The median sCD320 concentration in CSF (14 pmol/L) is around five times.......01). Interestingly, sCD320 correlates to p-tau and t-tau (Rs = 0.599, 0.569 (n = 173, 176) respectively, p < 0.001) and to Aβ (Rs = 0.265, p < 0.001 (n = 177)). CONCLUSION: We document for the first time the occurrence of sCD320 in human CSF. We report that the concentration of sCD320 correlates to the dementia...

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure and Glaucoma

    Jonas, Jost B; Ningli Wang


    Eyes with normal-pressure glaucoma and those with high-pressure glaucoma can show a similar optic nerve head appearance, while eyes with vascular optic neuropathies show a markedly different optic disc appearance. Factors in addition to intraocular pressure (IOP) may thus play a role in the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Clinical and experimental studies showed that (1) physiologic associations between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, systemic arterial blood pressure, IOP a...

  14. Simulation of cerebrospinal fluid transport

    Otáhal, Jakub; Štěpáník, Z.; Kaczmarská, A.; Maršík, František; Brož, Z.; Otáhal, S.


    Roč. 38, 11-12 (2007), s. 802-809. ISSN 0965-9978 Grant ostatní: GA UK(CZ) 112/2005; GA UK(CZ) 114/2005; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/03/0958 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : cerebrospinal fluid * pulsation * mathematical modeling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.529, year: 2007

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid approach on neuro-oncology

    Helio Rodrigues Gomes


    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS involvement is a major complication of haematological and solid tumors with an incidence that ranges from 10% in solid malignances up to 25% in specific leukaemia or lymphoma subtypes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF patterns are unspecific. Though CSF cytology has a high specificity (up to 95%, its sensitivity is generally less than 50% and no diagnostic gold standard marker is available, yet. New technologies such as flow cytometry, molecular genetics and newer biomarkers may improve diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, leading to the CNS involvement diagnosis, and consequently, to an effective prophylaxis and successful treatment.

  16. Amyloid-β peptides and tau protein as biomarkers in cerebrospinal and interstitial fluid following traumatic brain injury: A review of experimental and clinical studies

    Parmenion P. Tsitsopoulos


    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI survivors frequently suffer from life-long deficits in cognitive functions and a reduced quality of life. Axonal injury, observed in most severe TBI patients, results in accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Post-injury enzymatic cleavage of APP can generate amyloid-β (Aβ peptides, a hallmark finding in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. At autopsy, brains of AD and a subset of TBI victims display some similarities including accumulation of Aβ peptides and neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Most epidemiological evidence suggests a link between TBI and AD, implying that TBI has neurodegenerative sequelae. Aβ peptides and tau may be used as biomarkers in interstitial fluid (ISF using cerebral microdialysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF following clinical TBI. In the present review, the available clinical and experimental literature on Aβ peptides and tau as potential biomarkers following TBI is comprehensively analyzed. Elevated CSF and ISF tau protein levels have been observed following severe TBI and suggested to correlate with clinical outcome. Although Aβ peptides are produced by normal neuronal metabolism, high levels of long and/or fibrillary Aβ peptides may be neurotoxic. Increased CSF and/or ISF Aβ levels post-injury may be related to neuronal activity and/or the presence of axonal injury. The heterogeneity of animal models, clinical cohorts, analytical techniques and the complexity of TBI in available studies make the clinical value of tau and Aβ as biomarkers uncertain at present. Additionally, the link between early post-injury changes in tau and Aβ peptides and the future risk of developing AD remains unclear. Future studies using e.g. rapid biomarker sampling combined with enhanced analytical techniques and/or novel pharmacological tools could provide additional information on the importance of Aβ peptides and tau protein in both the acute pathophysiology and long

  17. Intracranial flow of cerebrospinal fluid

    This paper reports cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the third ventricle, aqueduct, fourth ventricle, basal cisterns, and subarachnoid spaces at the cervical-medullary junction evaluated in 25 patients and 10 normal volunteers. Information was acquired on 1.5-T magnet with a cardiac-gated, single-section, gradient-echo technique and displayed via closed-loop cine imaging. Qualitative assessment of flow patterns via magnitude reconstruction was correlated with quantitative data generated via phase reconstruction. Normal patterns of CSF flow were established. Pathologic changes involving these pathways altered the flow patterns, either causing increased turbulence and flow of CSF or decreasing the expected flow

  18. Amyloid-β-Secondary Structure Distribution in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Blood Measured by an Immuno-Infrared-Sensor: A Biomarker Candidate for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Nabers, Andreas; Ollesch, Julian; Schartner, Jonas; Kötting, Carsten; Genius, Just; Hafermann, Henning; Klafki, Hans; Gerwert, Klaus; Wiltfang, Jens


    The misfolding of the Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide into β-sheet enriched conformations was proposed as an early event in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Here, the Aβ peptide secondary structure distribution in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma of 141 patients was measured with an immuno-infrared-sensor. The sensor detected the amide I band, which reflects the overall secondary structure distribution of all Aβ peptides extracted from the body fluid. We observed a significant downshift of the amide I band frequency of Aβ peptides in Dementia Alzheimer type (DAT) patients, which indicated an overall shift to β-sheet. The secondary structure distribution of all Aβ peptides provides a better marker for DAT detection than a single Aβ misfold or the concentration of a specific oligomer. The discrimination between DAT and disease control patients according to the amide I frequency was in excellent agreement with the clinical diagnosis (accuracy 90% for CSF and 84% for blood). The amide I band maximum above or below the decisive marker frequency appears as a novel spectral biomarker candidate of AD. Additionally, a preliminary proof-of-concept study indicated an amide I band shift below the marker band already in patients with mild cognitive impairment due to AD. The presented immuno-IR-sensor method represents a promising, simple, robust, and label-free diagnostic tool for CSF and blood analysis. PMID:26828829

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid endorphins in schizophrenia

    Opioid-receptor-active material, endorphins, has been measured in cerebrospinal fluid samples obtained from schizophrenics. A chromatographic procedure isolated the Fraction I endorphin which was quantitated in a receptorassay. At least two cerebrospinal fluid samples were obtained from each patient, at day 0 with no medication and at days 30 and 60 after medication with fluphenazine under standardized conditions. Three series of patients were included: acute schizophrenics (n=11); re-entry schizophrenics (n=7) who have previously been treated with neuroleptics but were readmitted to hospital usually as a consequence of stopped medication, and chronic schizophrenics (n=9) who had been without neuroleptics for at least 2 weeks prior to day 0. At day 0, 6/9 acute cases, 4/6 of re-entry and 2/9 chronic cases had endorphin levels above the range of healthy volunteers. The levels in chronic cases were significantly lower than those in acute cases. Treatment with neuroleptics significantly lowered the endorphin levels in acute cases. These results confirm and extend previous observations. (author)

  20. The interaction between sleep-disordered breathing and ApoE genotype on cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease in cognitively normal elderly

    Osorio, Ricardo S.; Ayappa, Indu; Mantua, Janna; Gumb, Tyler; Varga, Andrew; Mooney, Anne M.; Burschtin, Omar E.; Taxin, Zachary; During, Emmanuel; Spector, Nicole; Biagioni, Milton; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Lau, Hiuyan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Lu, Shou-En; Mosconi, Lisa; Glodzik, Lidia; Rapoport, David M.; de Leon, Mony J.


    Background Previous studies have suggested a link between Sleep Disordered Breathing (SDB) and dementia risk. In the present study, we analyzed the relationship between SDB severity, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers, and the ApoE alleles. Methods 95 cognitively normal elderly participants were analyzed for SDB severity, CSF measures of phosphorylated-tau (P-Tau), total-tau (T-Tau), and amyloid beta 42 (Aβ42), as well as ApoE allele status. Findings In ApoE3+ subjects, significant differences were found between sleep groups for P-Tau (F[df2]=4.3, p=0.017), and T-Tau (F[df2]=3.3, p=0.043). Additionally, among ApoE3+ subjects, the apnea/hypopnea with 4% O2-desaturation index (AHI4%) was positively correlated with P-Tau (r=0.30, p=0.023), T-Tau (r=0.31, p=0.021), and Aβ42 (r=0.31, p=0.021). In ApoE2+ subjects, AHI4% was correlated with lower levels of CSF Aβ42 (r=−0.71, p=0.004), similarly to ApoE4+ subjects where there was also a trend towards lower CSF Aβ42 levels Interpretation Our observations suggest that there is an association between SDB and CSF AD- biomarkers in cognitively normal elderly. Existing therapies for SDB such as CPAP could delay the onset to mild cognitive impairment or dementia in normal elderly. PMID:24439479

  1. Interaction between sleep-disordered breathing and apolipoprotein E genotype on cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease in cognitively normal elderly individuals.

    Osorio, Ricardo S; Ayappa, Indu; Mantua, Janna; Gumb, Tyler; Varga, Andrew; Mooney, Anne M; Burschtin, Omar E; Taxin, Zachary; During, Emmanuel; Spector, Nicole; Biagioni, Milton; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Lau, Hiuyan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Lu, Shou-En; Mosconi, Lisa; Glodzik, Lidia; Rapoport, David M; de Leon, Mony J


    Previous studies have suggested a link between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and dementia risk. In the present study, we analyzed the relationship between SDB severity, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease-biomarkers, and the ApoE alleles. A total of 95 cognitively normal elderly participants were analyzed for SDB severity, CSF measures of phosphorylated-tau (p-tau), total-tau (t-tau), and amyloid beta 42 (Aβ-42), as well as ApoE allele status. In ApoE3+ subjects, significant differences were found between sleep groups for p-tau (F[df2] = 4.3, p = 0.017), and t-tau (F[df2] = 3.3, p = 0.043). Additionally, among ApoE3+ subjects, the apnea and/or hypopnea with 4% O2-desaturation index was positively correlated with p-tau (r = 0.30, p = 0.023), t-tau (r = 0.31, p = 0.021), and Aβ-42 (r = 0.31, p = 0.021). In ApoE2+ subjects, the apnea and/or hypopnea with 4% O2-desaturation index was correlated with lower levels of CSF Aβ-42 (r = -0.71, p = 0.004), similarly to ApoE4+ subjects where there was also a trend toward lower CSF Aβ-42 levels. Our observations suggest that there is an association between SDB and CSF Alzheimer's disease-biomarkers in cognitively normal elderly individuals. Existing therapies for SDB such as continuous positive airway pressure could delay the onset to mild cognitive impairment or dementia in normal elderly individuals. PMID:24439479

  2. Development of protein biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis using selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS

    Jia Yan


    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS. It involves damage to the myelin sheath surrounding axons and to the axons themselves. MS most often presents with a series of relapses and remissions but then evolves over a variable period of time into a slowly progressive form of neurological dysfunction termed secondary progressive MS (SPMS. The reasons for this change in clinical presentation are unclear. The absence of a diagnostic marker means that there is a lag time of several years before the diagnosis of SPMS can be established. At the same time, understanding the mechanisms that underlie SPMS is critical to the development of rational therapies for this untreatable stage of the disease. Results Using high performance liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC; we have established a highly specific and sensitive selected reaction monitoring (SRM assay. Our multiplexed SRM assay has facilitated the simultaneous detection of surrogate peptides originating from 26 proteins present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Protein levels in CSF were generally ~200-fold lower than that in human sera. A limit of detection (LOD was determined to be as low as one femtomol. We processed and analysed CSF samples from a total of 22 patients with SPMS, 7 patients with SPMS treated with lamotrigine, 12 patients with non-inflammatory neurological disorders (NIND and 10 healthy controls (HC for the levels of these 26 selected potential protein biomarkers. Our SRM data found one protein showing significant difference between SPMS and HC, three proteins differing between SPMS and NIND, two proteins between NIND and HC, and 11 protein biomarkers showing significant difference between a lamotrigine-treated and untreated SPMS group. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed that these 26 proteins were correlated, and could be represented by four principal components. Overall, we established an

  3. Minocycline effects on the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis rats

    Stoop, M.P.; Rosenling, T.; Attali, A.; Meesters, R.J.; Stingl, C.; Dekker, L.J.; Aken, H. van; Suidgeest, E.; Hintzen, R.Q.; Tuinstra, T.; Gool, A.J. van; Luider, T.M.; Bischoff, R.


    To identify response biomarkers for pharmaceutical treatment of multiple sclerosis, we induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats and treated symptomatic animals with minocycline. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected 14 days after EAE induction at the peak of neurolo

  4. Minocycline Effects on the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Rats

    Stoop, Marcel P.; Rosenling, Therese; Attali, Amos; Meesters, Roland J. W.; Stingl, Christoph; Dekker, Lennard J.; van Aken, Hans; Suidgeest, Ernst; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; Tuinstra, Tinka; van Gool, Alain; Luider, Theo M.; Bischoff, Rainer


    To identify response biomarkers for pharmaceutical treatment of multiple sclerosis, we induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats and treated symptomatic animals with minocycline. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected 14 days after EAE induction at the peak of neurolo

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid tau and phosphorylated tau protein are elevated in corticobasal syndrome

    Aerts, M.B.; Esselink, R.A.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Verbeek, M.M.


    Differentiating corticobasal syndrome (CBS) from progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) can be difficult. To investigate the additional value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in the diagnostic differentiation of parkinsonism, we analyzed the CSF concentra

  6. MRI and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for predicting progression to Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment: a diagnostic accuracy study

    Richard, Edo; Ben A. Schmand; Eikelenboom, Piet; van Gool, Willem A.; ,


    Objectives To assess the incremental value of MRI and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis after a short memory test for predicting progression to Alzheimer's disease from a pragmatic clinical perspective. Design Diagnostic accuracy study in a multicentre prospective cohort study. Setting Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative participants with complete data on neuropsychological assessment, MRI of the brain and CSF analysis. Participants Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; n=181) ...

  7. MRI and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for predicting progression to Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment: a diagnostic accuracy study

    E. Richard; Schmand, B.A.; Eikelenboom, P.; Gool, van, A.C.M.


    OBJECTIVES: To assess the incremental value of MRI and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis after a short memory test for predicting progression to Alzheimer's disease from a pragmatic clinical perspective. DESIGN: Diagnostic accuracy study in a multicentre prospective cohort study. SETTING: Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative participants with complete data on neuropsychological assessment, MRI of the brain and CSF analysis. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; n=1...

  8. Reduced cerebrospinal fluid ethanolamine concentration in major depressive disorder

    Shintaro Ogawa; Kotaro Hattori; Daimei Sasayama; Yuki Yokota; Ryo Matsumura; Junko Matsuo; Miho Ota; Hiroaki Hori; Toshiya Teraishi; Sumiko Yoshida; Takamasa Noda; Yoshiaki Ohashi; Hajime Sato; Teruhiko Higuchi; Nobutaka Motohashi


    Amino acids play key roles in the function of the central nervous system, and their alterations are implicated in psychiatric disorders. In the search for a biomarker for major depressive disorder (MDD), we used high-performance liquid chromatography to measure amino acids and related molecules in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 52 patients with MDD (42 depressed and 10 remitted; DSM-IV) and 54 matched controls. Significant differences were found in four amino acid concentrations between the...

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteomics of Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    M.P. Stoop (Marcel)


    textabstractMultiple sclerosis (MScl) is a highly heterogeneous disease of the central nervous system, and its pathology is characterized by a combination of factors such as inflammation, demyelination and axonal damage [1, 2]. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a relatively interesting body fluid in whic

  10. Substance P in human cerebrospinal fluid

    Using a combined method of reversed-phase, high-pressure liquid chromatography and RIA, the author was able to isolate the neuropephide substance P from human cerebrospinal fluid and to make a quantitative measurement. The rp-HPLC-RIA method was found to be superior to other methods. (MBC)

  11. Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function.

    Yao, Xue; Yan, Licheng; Yao, Lin; Guan, Weijun; Zeng, Fanxu; Cao, Fuyuan; Zhang, Yanshu


    Previous studies show that chronic acrylamide exposure leads to central and peripheral neu-ropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. In this study, we examined the permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and its ability to secrete transthyretin and transport leptin of rats exposed to acrylamide for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days. Transthyretin levels in cerebrospinal fluid began to decline on day 7 after acrylamide exposure. The sodium fluorescein level in cerebrospinal fluid was increased on day 14 after exposure. Evans blue concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was increased and the cerebrospinal fluid/serum leptin ratio was decreased on days 21 and 28 after exposure. In comparison, the cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratio was increased on day 28 after exposure. Our findings show that acrylamide exposure damages the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and impairs secretory and transport functions. These changes may underlie acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25206854


    Whedon, James M; Glassey, Donald


    We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste pro...

  13. Spectrophotometry for cerebrospinal fluid pigment analysis

    Petzold, A.; Sharpe, L. T.; Keir, G


    The use of spectrophotometry for the analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is reviewed. The clinically relevant CSF pigments--oxyhemoglobin and bilirubin--are introduced and discussed with regard to clinical differential diagnosis and potentially confounding variables (the four T's: traumatic tap, timing, total protein, and total bilirubin). The practical laboratory aspects of spectrophotometry and automated techniques are presented in the context of analytical and clinical specificity an...

  14. Tick borne encephalitis without cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis

    Stupica, Daša; Strle, Franc; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana; Logar, Mateja; Pečavar, Blaž; Bajrović, Fajko F.


    Background Tick borne encephalitis is the most frequent vector-transmitted infectious disease of the central nervous system in Europe and Asia. The disease caused by European subtype of tick borne encephalitis virus has typically a biphasic clinical course with the second phase presenting as meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or meningoencephalomyelitis. Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis is considered a condition sine qua non for the diagnosis of neurologic involvement in tick borne encephalitis,...

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau proteins as predictors of Alzheimer’s disease in subjects with mild cognitive impairment

    Šimić, Goran; Boban, Marina; Patrick R Hof


    Major efforts are under way to define reliable biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease. Highly significant increases of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins in cerebrospinal fluid have been recently reported in Alzheimer’s disease patients compared to controls by several independent groups, including ours. These findings support the notion that cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau proteins may be very useful biomarkers in the early identification of Alzheimer’s disease in patients with mild cognit...

  16. Quantitative Proteomics of Vestibular Schwannoma Cerebrospinal Fluid: A Pilot Study.

    Kazemizadeh Gol, Mohammad Abraham; Lund, Troy C; Levine, Samuel C; Adams, Meredith E


    This pilot study aimed to identify candidate proteins for future study that are differentially expressed in vestibular schwannoma (VS) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and to compare such proteins with those previously identified in perilymph and specimen secretions. CSF was collected intraoperatively prior to removal of untreated sporadic VS (3 translabyrinthine, 3 middle cranial fossa approaches) and compared with reference CSF samples. After proteolytic digestion and iTRAQ labeling, tandem mass spectrometry with ProteinPilot was used to identify candidate proteins. Of the 237 proteins detected, 13 were dysregulated in ≥3 of the 6 VS patients versus controls, and 13 were dysregulated (12 up, 1 down) in samples from patients with class D versus class B hearing. Four perilymph proteins of interest were dysregulated in ≥1 VS CSF samples. Thus, 26 candidate VS CSF biomarkers were identified that should be considered in future VS biomarker and tumor pathophysiology investigations. PMID:26932958

  17. Extracranial repair of cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea

    Persky, M.S.; Rothstein, S.G.; Breda, S.D.; Cohen, N.L.; Cooper, P.; Ransohoff, J. (New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (USA))


    Forty-eight patients with cerebrospinal fluid leaks comprise this retrospective study. There were 39 traumatic and 9 spontaneous leaks. Nine patients were initially managed with bed rest and spinal drainage, but 3 patients in this group ultimately required surgical intervention for repair of their persistent leaks. Thirty-nine patients had surgery as initial therapy, with 33 extracranial repairs, 2 intracranial repairs, and 4 combined approaches. The extracranial approach was used in 36 of 42 patients, with an initial success rate of 86%.

  18. Extracranial repair of cerebrospinal fluid otorhinorrhea

    Forty-eight patients with cerebrospinal fluid leaks comprise this retrospective study. There were 39 traumatic and 9 spontaneous leaks. Nine patients were initially managed with bed rest and spinal drainage, but 3 patients in this group ultimately required surgical intervention for repair of their persistent leaks. Thirty-nine patients had surgery as initial therapy, with 33 extracranial repairs, 2 intracranial repairs, and 4 combined approaches. The extracranial approach was used in 36 of 42 patients, with an initial success rate of 86%

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid stasis and its clinical significance.

    Whedon, James M; Glassey, Donald


    We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste products of cellular metabolism, and transports hormones, neurotransmitters, releasing factors, and other neuropeptides throughout the CNS. Physiologic impedance or cessation of CSF flow may occur commonly in the absence of degenerative changes or pathology and may compromise the normal physiologic functions of the CSF. CSF appears to be particularly prone to stasis within the spinal canal. CSF stasis may be associated with adverse mechanical cord tension, vertebral subluxation syndrome, reduced cranial rhythmic impulse, and restricted respiratory function. Increased sympathetic tone, facilitated spinal segments, dural tension, and decreased CSF flow have been described as closely related aspects of an overall pattern of structural and energetic dysfunction in the axial skeleton and CNS. Therapies directed at affecting CSF flow include osteopathic care (especially cranial manipulation), craniosacral therapy, chiropractic adjustment of the spine and cranium, Network Care (formerly Network Chiropractic), massage therapy (including lymphatic drainage techniques), yoga, therapeutic breath-work, and cerebrospinal fluid technique. Further investigation into the nature and causation of CSF stasis, its potential effects upon human health, and effective therapies for its correction is warranted. PMID:19472865

  20. Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function

    Yao, Xue; Yan, Licheng; Yao, Lin; GUAN, Weijun; Zeng, Fanxu; Cao, Fuyuan; Zhang, Yanshu


    Previous studies show that chronic acrylamide exposure leads to central and peripheral neu-ropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. In this study, we examined the permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and its ability to secrete transthyretin and transport leptin of rats exposed to acrylamide for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days. Transthyretin levels in cerebrospinal fluid began to decline on day 7 after acrylamide exposure. The sodium fluorescein level in cerebrospin...

  1. Imhotep and the discovery of cerebrospinal fluid.

    Blomstedt, Patric


    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  2. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.


    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  3. Imhotep and the Discovery of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Patric Blomstedt


    Full Text Available Herbowski (2013 suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned.

  4. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David


    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases. PMID:16287170

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites and suicide.

    Jokinen, Jussi; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter


    Prospective studies of the serotonergic system and suicide report that low 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and a history of attempted suicide predict suicide risk. Low CSF homovanillic acid (HVA) is reported to be associated with past and future lethality of suicide attempts but not with suicide. The interrelationships between monoamine metabolites, violent method, suicide intent and lethality of suicidal behaviour are complex. We hypothesized that CSF 5-HIAA and HVA levels are related to suicide intent, violence and lethality of suicidal behaviour. Fifteen male suicide attempters admitted to a psychiatric ward at the Karolinska University Hospital and eight healthy male volunteers were submitted to lumbar puncture and CSF 5-HIAA and HVA were assayed. Suicide intent with the Beck Suicide Intent Scale (SIS), lethality and violence of suicidal behaviour were assessed. All patients were followed up for causes of death. Six suicides and one fatal accident were identified with death certificates. Mean CSF 5-HIAA but not CSF HVA differed between suicides and survivors. Violent suicides had higher suicide intent and CSF 5-HIAA than non-violent suicides. In violent suicides, CSF 5-HIAA levels were negatively correlated with SIS. Greater suicide intent may be associated with greater aggressive intent and predicts a violent suicide method. PMID:19034712

  6. Malignancy markers in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    Koskiniemi, M


    The specificity and sensitivity of malignancy marker determinations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are often insufficient. Even at the subclinical stage of the disease the marker should be present. The effect of therapy should be monitored and relapses noted. Thus high standards of methodology are required. There are many substances that may indicate a malignant process in the central nervous system. However, there are many pitfalls in their determination. Malignant cells may occur in CSF via processes involving leptomeningeal structures such as metastases and leukaemia, but primary brain tumours seldom show cells in CSF. Human chorionic gonadotrophin and alpha-fetoprotein determinations assist in the early detection of cerebral germ cell tumours and of relapses, even in the subclinical stage. Desmosterol may aid in the diagnosis of medulloblastomas and malignant gliomas and in monitoring therapy. Putrescine levels are elevated in CSF of patients with medulloblastoma and correlate with the clinical state, and serial analyses may reveal relapses. Fibronectin, when determined in CSF at the time of diagnosis, appears to be of great significance for the prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Ferritin and beta-2-microglobulin may help in some well-defined conditions. Brain-specific proteins and antibodies to them are non-specific markers whereas tumour-specific antigens and growth factors may be more significant. PMID:3058481

  7. Diagnostic value of circulating tumor cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    Ning Mu; Chunhua Ma; Rong Jiang; Yuan Lv; Jinduo Li; Bin Wang; Liwei Sun


    To assess circulating tumor cells in cerebrospinal fluid as a diagnostic approach to identify meningeal metastasis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer by using tumor marker immunostaining–fluorescence in situ hybridization (TM-iFISH).

  8. Continuous cerebrospinal fluid drainage by spinal puncture for cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea after pituitary adenoma surgery

    Zhengnian Ding; Weixing Hu


    Objective: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea may be a serious complication after neurosurgery. Some of them can be treated conservatively by continuous CSF drainage with a lumbar subarachnoid catheter. On the other hand, spinal puncture may result in headache by CSF leakage. Methods: Present a 17-year-old female who suffered from CSF rhinorrhea after pituitary surgery was treated by making use of spinal puncture after failed catheter drainage. Results: The patient was successfully treated by this way.Conclusion: Spinal puncture by 16-gauge Touhy needle seems to be a possible way to substitute the traditional continuous lumbar subarachnoid catheter to drain the CSF in patients with rhinorrhea.

  9. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid markers of Alzheimer pathology and positron emission tomography tau imaging.

    Gordon, Brian A; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brier, Matthew; Blazey, Tyler; Su, Yi; Christensen, Jon; Aldea, Patricia; McConathy, Jonathan; Holtzman, David M; Cairns, Nigel J; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L S


    The two primary molecular pathologies in Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-β plaques and tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles. Investigations into these pathologies have been restricted to cerebrospinal fluid assays, and positron emission tomography tracers that can image amyloid-β plaques. Tau tracers have recently been introduced into the field, although the utility of the tracer and its relationship to other Alzheimer biomarkers are still unknown. Here we examined tau deposition in 41 cognitively normal and 11 cognitively impaired older adults using the radioactive tau ligand (18)F-AV-1451 (previously known as T807) who also underwent a lumbar puncture to assess cerebrospinal fluid levels of total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181) and amyloid-β42 Voxel-wise statistical analyses examined spatial patterns of tau deposition associated with cognitive impairment. We then related the amount of tau tracer uptake to levels of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. All analyses controlled for age and gender and, when appropriate, the time between imaging and lumbar puncture assessments. Symptomatic individuals (Clinical Dementia Rating > 0) demonstrated markedly increased levels of tau tracer uptake. This elevation was most prominent in the temporal lobe and temporoparietal junction, but extended more broadly into parietal and frontal cortices. In the entire cohort, there were significant relationships among all cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and tracer uptake, notably for tau-related cerebrospinal fluid markers. After controlling for levels of amyloid-β42, the correlations with tau uptake were r = 0.490 (P Alzheimer's disease, there is focal tauopathy in the medial temporal lobes and adjacent cortices. PMID:27286736

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid space alterations in melancholic depression.

    Esther Via

    Full Text Available Melancholic depression is a biologically homogeneous clinical entity in which structural brain alterations have been described. Interestingly, reports of structural alterations in melancholia include volume increases in Cerebro-Spinal Fluid (CSF spaces. However, there are no previous reports of CSF volume alterations using automated whole-brain voxel-wise approaches, as tissue classification algorithms have been traditionally regarded as less reliable for CSF segmentation. Here we aimed to assess CSF volumetric alterations in melancholic depression and their clinical correlates by means of a novel segmentation algorithm ('new segment', as implemented in the software Statistical Parametric Mapping-SPM8, incorporating specific features that may improve CSF segmentation. A three-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI was obtained from seventy patients with melancholic depression and forty healthy control subjects. Although imaging data were pre-processed with the 'new segment' algorithm, in order to obtain a comparison with previous segmentation approaches, tissue segmentation was also performed with the 'unified segmentation' approach. Melancholic patients showed a CSF volume increase in the region of the left Sylvian fissure, and a CSF volume decrease in the subarachnoid spaces surrounding medial and lateral parietal cortices. Furthermore, CSF increases in the left Sylvian fissure were negatively correlated with the reduction percentage of depressive symptoms at discharge. None of these results were replicated with the 'unified segmentation' approach. By contrast, between-group differences in the left Sylvian fissure were replicated with a non-automated quantification of the CSF content of this region. Left Sylvian fissure alterations reported here are in agreement with previous findings from non-automated CSF assessments, and also with other reports of gray and white matter insular alterations in depressive samples using automated approaches

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid may mediate CNS ischemic injury

    Soriano Sulpicio G


    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central nervous system (CNS is extremely vulnerable to ischemic injury. The details underlying this susceptibility are not completely understood. Since the CNS is surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF that contains a low concentration of plasma protein, we examined the effect of changing the CSF in the evolution of CNS injury during ischemic insult. Methods Lumbar spinal cord ischemia was induced in rabbits by cross-clamping the descending abdominal aorta for 1 h, 2 h or 3 h followed by 7 d of reperfusion. Prior to ischemia, rabbits were subjected to the following procedures; 1 CSF depletion, 2 CSF replenishment at 0 mmHg intracranial pressure (ICP, and 3 replacement of CSF with 8% albumin- or 1% gelatin-modified artificial CSF, respectively. Motor function of the hind limbs and histopathological changes of the spinal cord were scored. Post-ischemic microcirculation of the spinal cord was visualized by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC albumin. Results The severity of histopathological damage paralleled the neurological deficit scores. Paraplegia and associated histopathological changes were accompanied by a clear post-ischemic deficit in blood perfusion. Spinal cord ischemia for 1 h resulted in permanent paraplegia in the control group. Depletion of the CSF significantly prevented paraplegia. CSF replenishment with the ICP reduced to 0 mmHg, did not prevent paraplegia. Replacement of CSF with albumin- or gelatin-modified artificial CSF prevented paraplegia in rabbits even when the ICP was maintained at 10–15 mmHg. Conclusion We conclude that the presence of normal CSF may contribute to the vulnerability of the spinal cord to ischemic injury. Depletion of the CSF or replacement of the CSF with an albumin- or gelatin-modified artificial CSF can be neuroprotective.

  12. Identification of a novel biomarker candidate, a 4.8-kDa peptide fragment from a neurosecretory protein VGF precursor, by proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid from children with acute encephalopathy using SELDI-TOF-MS

    Fujino Osamu


    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute encephalopathy includes rapid deterioration and has a poor prognosis. Early intervention is essential to prevent progression of the disease and subsequent neurologic complications. However, in the acute period, true encephalopathy cannot easily be differentiated from febrile seizures, especially febrile seizures of the complex type. Thus, an early diagnostic marker has been sought in order to enable early intervention. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel marker candidate protein differentially expressed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of children with encephalopathy using proteomic analysis. Methods For detection of biomarkers, CSF samples were obtained from 13 children with acute encephalopathy and 42 children with febrile seizure. Mass spectral data were generated by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS technology, which is currently applied in many fields of biological and medical sciences. Diagnosis was made by at least two pediatric neurologists based on the clinical findings and routine examinations. All specimens were collected for diagnostic tests and the remaining portion of the specimens were used for the SELDI-TOF MS investigations. Results In experiment 1, CSF from patients with febrile seizures (n = 28, patients with encephalopathy (n = 8 (including influenza encephalopathy (n = 3, encephalopathy due to rotavirus (n = 1, human herpes virus 6 (n = 1 were used for the SELDI analysis. In experiment 2, SELDI analysis was performed on CSF from a second set of febrile seizure patients (n = 14 and encephalopathy patients (n = 5. We found that the peak with an m/z of 4810 contributed the most to the separation of the two groups. After purification and identification of the 4.8-kDa protein, a 4.8-kDa proteolytic peptide fragment from the neurosecretory protein VGF precursor (VGF4.8 was identified as a novel biomarker for encephalopathy. Conclusions

  13. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.


    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  14. Preliminary analysis of cerebrospinal fluid proteome in patients with neurocysticercosis

    TIAN Xiao-jun; LI Jing-yi; HUANG Yong; XUE Yan-ping


    Background Neurocysticercosis is the infection of the nervous system by the larvae of Taenia solium (T. solium). Despite continuous effort, the experimental diagnosis of neurocysticercosis remains unresolved. Since the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contacts with the brain, dynamic information about pathological processes of the brain is likely to be reflected in CSF. Therefore, CSF may serve as a rich source of putative biomarkers related to neurocysticercosis. Comparative proteomic analysis of CSF of neurocysticercosis patients and control subjects may find differentially expressed proteins. Methods Two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) was used to investigate differentially expressed proteins in CSF of patients with neurocysticercosis by comparing the protein profile of CSF from neurocysticercosis patients with that from control subjects. The differentially expressed spots/proteins were recognized with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-time of flight (MALDI-TOF-TOF) mass spectrometry. Results Forty-four enzyme digested peptides were obtained from 4 neurocysticercotic patients. Twenty-three were identified through search of the NCBI protein database with Mascot software, showing 19 up-expressed and 4 down-expressed. Of these proteins, 26S proteosome related to ATP- and ubiquitin-dependent degradation of proteins and lipocalin type prostaglandin D synthase involved in PGD2-synthesis and extracellular transporter activities were up-expressed, while transferrin related to iron metabolism within the brain was down-expressed. Conclusions This study established the proteomic profile of pooled CSF from 4 patients with neurocysticercosis, suggesting the potential value of proteomic analysis for the study of candidate biomarkers involved in the diagnosis or pathogenesis of neurocysticercosis.

  15. Population Pharmacokinetics of Abacavir in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Capparelli, Edmund V; Letendre, Scott L.; ELLIS, Ronald J.; Patel, Parul; Holland, Diane; MCCUTCHAN, J. Allen


    The distribution of abacavir into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was assessed by use of a population pharmacokinetic analysis. Plasma and CSF abacavir concentrations in 54 subjects were determined. The abacavir CSF/plasma ratio averaged 36% and increased throughout the dose interval. Abacavir penetrates into the CSF in adequate concentrations to inhibit local human immunodeficiency virus replication.

  16. Ongoing HIV replication in cerebrospinal fluid under successful monotherapy

    M. Bierhoff (Marieke); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); A. Fibriani (Azzania); R.W. ten Kate (Reinier)


    textabstractWe report a case of an HIV-infected patient who was successfully treated with ritonavir/lopinavir (r/LPV) monotherapy for several years. He presented with neurological symptoms and high HIV RNA levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Sequencing of the HIV from the CSF revealed mutations in

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G disrupts blood brain barrier

    Asgari, Nasrin; Berg, Carsten Tue; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen;


    To clarify the significance of immunoglobulin G autoantibody specific for the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was administered intrathecally to naïve mice, and the distribution and pathogenic impact was...

  18. Entamoeba histolytica meningoencephalitis diagnosed by trophozoites in cerebrospinal fluid

    Goh, L M L; Marrone, J R


    Entamoeba histolytica meningoencephalitis has not been described in the modern literature, which is distinct from that caused by free-living amoebae. We report the first case of E. histolytica meningoencephalitis without liver or brain abscesses. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed 2 + very motile trophozoites. Our patient was successfully treated with intravenous metronidazole.

  19. Arachnoid cysts do not contain cerebrospinal fluid: A comparative chemical analysis of arachnoid cyst fluid and cerebrospinal fluid in adults

    Haaland Øystein A


    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arachnoid cyst (AC fluid has not previously been compared with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from the same patient. ACs are commonly referred to as containing "CSF-like fluid". The objective of this study was to characterize AC fluid by clinical chemistry and to compare AC fluid to CSF drawn from the same patient. Such comparative analysis can shed further light on the mechanisms for filling and sustaining of ACs. Methods Cyst fluid from 15 adult patients with unilateral temporal AC (9 female, 6 male, age 22-77y was compared with CSF from the same patients by clinical chemical analysis. Results AC fluid and CSF had the same osmolarity. There were no significant differences in the concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium or glucose. We found significant elevated concentration of phosphate in AC fluid (0.39 versus 0.35 mmol/L in CSF; p = 0.02, and significantly reduced concentrations of total protein (0.30 versus 0.41 g/L; p = 0.004, of ferritin (7.8 versus 25.5 ug/L; p = 0.001 and of lactate dehydrogenase (17.9 versus 35.6 U/L; p = 0.002 in AC fluid relative to CSF. Conclusions AC fluid is not identical to CSF. The differential composition of AC fluid relative to CSF supports secretion or active transport as the mechanism underlying cyst filling. Oncotic pressure gradients or slit-valves as mechanisms for generating fluid in temporal ACs are not supported by these results.

  20. Characterization of acid sphingomyelinase activity in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    Christiane Mühle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As a key enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM is involved in the regulation of cell fate and signaling via hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to form ceramide. While increased activity of the lysosomal form has been associated with various pathological conditions, there are few studies on secretory ASM limited only to cell models, plasma or serum. METHODS: An optimized assay based on a fluorescent substrate was applied to measure the ASM activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF collected from mice and from 42 patients who were classified as controls based on normal routine CSF values. RESULTS: We have detected ASM activity in human CSF, established a sensitive quantitative assay and characterized the enzyme's properties. The enzyme resembles plasmatic ASM including protein stability and Zn(2+-dependence but the assays differ considerably in the optimal detergent concentration. Significantly increased activities in the CSF of ASM transgenic mice and undetectable levels in ASM knock-out mice prove that the measured ASM activity originates from the ASM-encoding gene SMPD1. CSF localized ASM activities were comparable to corresponding serum ASM levels at their respective optimal reaction conditions, but no correlation was observed. The large variance in ASM activity was independent of sex, age or analyzed routine CSF parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Human and mouse CSF contain detectable levels of secretory ASM, which are unrelated to serum ASM activities. Further investigations in humans and in animal models will help to elucidate the role of this enzyme in human disease and to assess its value as a potential biomarker for disease type, severity, progress or therapeutic success.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 in central nervous system inflammatory diseases.

    Alexandre Wullschleger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL-6 is recognised as an important cytokine involved in inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS. OBJECTIVE: To perform a large retrospective study designed to test cerebrospinal fluid (CSF IL-6 levels in the context of neurological diseases, and evaluate its usefulness as a biomarker to help discriminate multiple sclerosis (MS from other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed 374 CSF samples for IL-6 using a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Groups tested were composed of demyelinating diseases of the CNS (DD, n = 117, including relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS, n = 65, primary progressive MS (PPMS, n = 11, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, n = 11, optic neuritis (ON, n = 30; idiopathic transverse myelitis (ITM, n = 10; other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND, n = 35; and non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND, n = 212. Differences between groups were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test. RESULTS: CSF IL-6 levels exceeded the positivity cut-off of 10 pg/ml in 18 (51.4% of the 35 OIND samples, but in only three (3.9% of the 76 MS samples collected. CSF IL-6 was negative for all NIND samples tested (0/212. IL-6 cut-off of 10 pg/ml offers 96% sensitivity to exclude MS. CONCLUSION: CSF IL-6 may help to differentiate MS from its major differential diagnosis group, OIND.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G disrupts blood brain barrier.

    Asgari, Nasrin; Berg, Carsten Tue; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor


    To clarify the significance of immunoglobulin G autoantibody specific for the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G from a neuromyelitis optica patient was administered intrathecally to naïve mice, and the distribution and pathogenic impact was evaluated. A distinct distribution pattern of aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G deposition was observed in the subarachnoid and subpial spaces where vessels penetrate the brain parenchyma, via a paravascular route with intraparenchymal perivascular deposition. Perivascular astrocyte-destructive lesions were associated with blood-borne horseradish peroxidase leakage indicating blood-brain barrier breakdown. The cerebrospinal fluid aquaporin-4-immunoglobulin G therefore distributes widely in brain to initiate astrocytopathy and blood-brain barrier breakdown. PMID:26339679

  3. A porous silicon immunoassay platform for fluorometric determination of α-synuclein in human cerebrospinal fluid

    Levels of total and/or oligomeric α-synuclein may be used as a biomarker tool to aid in the diagnosis and development of new disease-modifying therapies. We report here on a porous silicon antibody microarray for the fluorimetric determination of cerebrospinal fluid levels of total α-synuclein, a protein involved the pathology of Parkinson’s disease. The surface of porous silicon has a 3-dimensional macro- and nanoporous structure, and this offers a large binding capacity for capturing probe molecules. Porous silicon also warrants efficient immobilization of antibodies by surface adsorption, and does not require chemical immobilization. The platform requires 10 μL of cerebrospinal fluid, and each test requires 4 h for assay only (including immobilization of capturing antibody). The limit of detection is 35 pg mL−1 of α-synuclein in cerebrospinal fluid, and the dynamic analytical range extends from 0.01 to 100 ng·mL−1. (author)

  4. Gentamicin penetration into cerebrospinal fluid in experimental Haemophilus influenzae meningitis.

    Smith, A. L.; Daum, R S; Siber, G R; Scheifele, D. W.; Syriopoulou, V P


    We studied the effect of meningitis and the method of parenteral gentamicin administration (intramuscular injection, a 30-min intravenous infusion, or intravenous bolus administration) on achievable concentrations of drug in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In normal animals, only intravenous bolus administration of 2 to 8 mg/kg produced a gentamicin concentration of greater than 0.1 microgram/ml in CSF in some animals. All CSF samples contained less than the limit of detection (0.1 microgram/ml) a...

  5. Acetylcholinesterase assay for cerebrospinal fluid using bupivacaine to inhibit butyrylcholinesterase

    Anders Jens; Pietsch Stefan; Bauer Heike I; Kluge Harald H; Kluge Wolfram H; Venbrocks Rudolf A


    Abstract Background Most test systems for acetylcholinesterase activity (E.C. are using toxic inhibitors (BW284c51 and iso-OMPA) to distinguish the enzyme from butyrylcholinesterase (E.C. which occurs simultaneously in the cerebrospinal fluid. Applying Ellman's colorimetric method, we were looking for a non-toxic inhibitor to restrain butyrylcholinesterase activity. Based on results of previous in vitro studies bupivacaine emerged to be a suitable inhibitor. Results Pharmaco...

  6. Experiences with cerebrospinal fluid analysis in Dutch memory clinics

    Spies, P.E.; Slats, D.; Ramakers, I.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.


    BACKGROUND: Evidence on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis to demonstrate Alzheimer's disease has not yet been implemented in diagnostic guidelines. METHODS: We investigated the use of CSF analysis in a survey amongst all known memory clinics in the Netherlands, of which 85 of 113 (75.2%) responded. RESULTS: Sixty per cent of respondents used CSF analysis in 5% (median) of patients. The analysis almost always confirmed the working diagnosis in 68.4% and sometimes changed it in 28.2%. Complica...

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in the context of CNS demyelinating diseases

    Sandro Luiz de Andrade Matas; Felipe von Glehn; Gustavo Bruniera Peres Fernandes; Carlos Augusto Senne Soares


    The central nervous system demyelinating diseases are a group of disorders with different etiologies, characterized by inflammatory lesions that are associated with loss of myelin and eventually axonal damage. In this group the most studied ones are multiple sclerosis (MS), neuromyelitis optic (NMO) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). The cerebrospinal fluid is essential to differentiate between these different syndromes and to define multiple sclerosis, helping to assess the pro...

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis in the context of CNS demyelinating diseases

    Sandro Luiz de Andrade Matas


    Full Text Available The central nervous system demyelinating diseases are a group of disorders with different etiologies, characterized by inflammatory lesions that are associated with loss of myelin and eventually axonal damage. In this group the most studied ones are multiple sclerosis (MS, neuromyelitis optic (NMO and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM. The cerebrospinal fluid is essential to differentiate between these different syndromes and to define multiple sclerosis, helping to assess the probability of Clinical Isolated Syndrome turn into multiple sclerosis.

  9. Vitamin B6 in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of children

    Monique Albersen; Marjolein Bosma; Jans, Judith J. M.; Hofstede, Floris C.; van Hasselt, Peter M.; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G. M.; Gepke Visser; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.


    Background Over the past years, the essential role of vitamin B6 in brain development and functioning has been recognized and genetic metabolic disorders resulting in functional vitamin B6 deficiency have been identified. However, data on B6 vitamers in children are scarce. Materials and Methods B6 vitamer concentrations in simultaneously sampled plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 70 children with intellectual disability were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem m...

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid Analysis Should Be Considered in Patients with Cognitive Problems

    Henrik Zetterberg


    Full Text Available Hepatologists assay liver enzymes and cardiologists structural heart proteins in serum to diagnose and monitor their patients. This way of thinking has not quite made it into the memory clinics yet, in spite of the availability of validated cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for key pathological events in the brain in neurodegeneration. Here, we argue that a spinal tap should be considered in all patients who seek medical advice for memory problems and list the highly relevant clinical questions CSF analyses can address.

  11. Swiftly Decreasing Cerebrospinal Fluid Cathelicidin Concentration Predicts Improved Outcome in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis.

    Savonius, Okko; Helve, Otto; Roine, Irmeli; Andersson, Sture; Fernández, Josefina; Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula


    We investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cathelicidin concentrations in childhood bacterial meningitis on admission and during antimicrobial treatment. CSF cathelicidin concentrations on admission correlated with CSF white cell counts and protein levels but not with bacterial etiology. A greater decrease in the concentration in response to treatment was associated with a better outcome. Since the CSF cathelicidin concentration reflects the degree of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, it may be used as a novel biomarker in childhood bacterial meningitis. An early decrease during treatment likely signals more rapid mitigation of the disease process and thus a better outcome. PMID:27008883

  12. A plasma polymerization technique to overcome cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections

    Prosthetic devices, mainly shunts, are frequently used for temporary or permanent drainage of cerebrospinal fluid. The pathogenesis of shunt infection is a very important problem in modern medicine and generally this is characterized by staphylococcal adhesion to the cerebrospinal fluid shunt surfaces. In this paper, the prevention of the attachment of test microorganism Staphylococcus epidermidis on the cerebrospinal fluid shunt surfaces by 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) precursor modification in the plasma polymerization system, is reported. Different plasma polymerization conditions (RF discharge power 10-20-30 W, exposure time 5-10-15 min) were employed during the surface modification. The surface chemistry and topology of unmodified and modified shunts was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Also, static contact angle measurements were performed to state the change of surface hydrophilicity. All samples were tested in vitro with Staphylococcus epidermidis. A plasma-polymerized HEMA film (PP HEMA) was found to be an alternative simple method to decrease the microorganism attachment and create bacterial anti-fouling surfaces. The attachment of the model microorganism Staphylococcus epidermidis on the shunt surface modified by PP HEMA at 20 W and 15 min was reduced 62.3% if compared to the unmodified control surface of the shunt

  13. Acetylcholinesterase assay for cerebrospinal fluid using bupivacaine to inhibit butyrylcholinesterase

    Anders Jens


    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most test systems for acetylcholinesterase activity (E.C. are using toxic inhibitors (BW284c51 and iso-OMPA to distinguish the enzyme from butyrylcholinesterase (E.C. which occurs simultaneously in the cerebrospinal fluid. Applying Ellman's colorimetric method, we were looking for a non-toxic inhibitor to restrain butyrylcholinesterase activity. Based on results of previous in vitro studies bupivacaine emerged to be a suitable inhibitor. Results Pharmacokinetic investigations with purified cholinesterases have shown maximum inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase activity and minimal interference with acetylcholinesterase activity at bupivacaine final concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 mmol/l. Based on detailed analysis of pharmacokinetic data we developed three equations representing enzyme inhibition at bupivacaine concentrations of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 mmol/l. These equations allow us to calculate the acetylcholinesterase activity in solutions containing both cholinesterases utilizing the extinction differences measured spectrophotometrically in samples with and without bupivacaine. The accuracy of the bupivacaine-inhibition test could be confirmed by investigations on solutions of both purified cholinesterases and on samples of human cerebrospinal fluid. If butyrylcholinesterase activity has to be assessed simultaneously an independent test using butyrylthiocholine iodide as substrate (final concentration 5 mmol/l has to be conducted. Conclusions The bupivacaine-inhibition test is a reliable method using spectrophotometrical techniques to measure acetylcholinesterase activity in cerebrospinal fluid. It avoids the use of toxic inhibitors for differentiation of acetylcholinesterase from butyrylcholinesterase in fluids containing both enzymes. Our investigations suggest that bupivacaine concentrations of 0.1, 0.2 or 0.5 mmol/l can be applied with the same effect using 1 mmol/l acetylthiocholine iodide as substrate.

  14. Pittsburgh compound B imaging and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β in a multicentre European memory clinic study.

    Leuzy, Antoine; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rinne, Juha O; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Otto, Markus; Lleó, Alberto; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Santana, Isabel; Johansson, Jarkko; Anderl-Straub, Sarah; von Arnim, Christine A F; Beer, Ambros; Blesa, Rafael; Fortea, Juan; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Portelius, Erik; Pannee, Josef; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Nordberg, Agneta


    The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between data on cerebral amyloidosis, derived using Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography and (i) multi-laboratory INNOTEST enzyme linked immunosorbent assay derived cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of amyloid-β42; (ii) centrally measured cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 using a Meso Scale Discovery enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; and (iii) cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 centrally measured using an antibody-independent mass spectrometry-based reference method. Moreover, we examined the hypothesis that discordance between amyloid biomarker measurements may be due to interindividual differences in total amyloid-β production, by using the ratio of amyloid-β42 to amyloid-β40 Our study population consisted of 243 subjects from seven centres belonging to the Biomarkers for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease Initiative, and included subjects with normal cognition and patients with mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and vascular dementia. All had Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography data, cerebrospinal fluid INNOTEST amyloid-β42 values, and cerebrospinal fluid samples available for reanalysis. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were reanalysed (amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β40) using Meso Scale Discovery electrochemiluminescence enzyme linked immunosorbent assay technology, and a novel, antibody-independent, mass spectrometry reference method. Pittsburgh compound B standardized uptake value ratio results were scaled using the Centiloid method. Concordance between Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry reference measurement procedure findings and Pittsburgh compound B was high in subjects with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, while more variable results were observed for cognitively normal and non-Alzheimer's disease groups. Agreement between Pittsburgh compound B classification and Meso Scale Discovery/mass spectrometry reference

  15. Phosphorylated tau/amyloid beta 1-42 ratio in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid reflects outcome in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Patel Sunil; Lee Edward B; Xie Sharon X; Law Anica; Jackson Eric M; Arnold Steven E; Clark Christopher M; Shaw Leslie M; Grady M Sean; Trojanowski John Q; Hamilton Roy H


    Abstract Background Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is a potentially reversible cause of dementia and gait disturbance that is typically treated by operative placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The outcome from shunting is variable, and some evidence suggests that the presence of comorbid Alzheimer's disease (AD) may impact shunt outcome. Evidence also suggests that AD biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may predict the presence of AD. The aim of this study was to i...

  16. Recurrent purulent meningitis associated with cerebrospinal fluid leak from the idiopathic oval window

    Purulent meningitis recurred 6 times in a 7-year-old boy. There was unilateral serous rhinorrhea, for which right cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea was suspected on 111In DTPA cisternogram. Examination of the right tympanum through the mastoid antrum revealed a fistula in the stapes foot plate, causing cerebrospinal fluid leakage. The stapes was removed and was replaced with the muscle and fascia. As a result, cerebrospinal fluid leakage discontinued, followed by a satisfactory course. (Chiba, N.)

  17. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak following a pilates class: a case report

    Davis, James; Yanny, Irini; Chatu, Sukhdev; Dubois, Patrick; Hayee, Bu; Moran, Nick


    Introduction A spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak is the most common cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension which is an uncommon but increasingly recognized cause of headache. This article describes the first reported case of pilates being associated with a spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid leak whilst also highlighting the key information about spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks that will be useful to the general clinician. Case presentation We present the case of a 42-year-old C...

  18. Confocal Raman microscopy of pathologic cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    In this work, the spatial localization of leucocytes, bacteria, and erythrocytes in the crystal pattern of a dried droplet of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is established. Characteristic lines are detected and identified in the Raman spectrum of the CSF that point to the presence of pathologic cells therein and can be used in a timely way to diagnose meningitis, the spectroscopic sample preparation procedure being simple enough. A dry CSF sample retains its characteristic spectral features for no less than three days, which is important for its safe keeping and transportation, and also for the computer processing of its spectra. (letter)

  19. CT finding and cerebrospinal fluid proteins in muscular dystrophy patients

    We analyzed the microcomponents of protein fractions in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with various types of muscular dystrophy. The degenerative pattern is characterized by an increase in the prealbumin and a decrease in the γ-globulin fraction is shown in the Duchenne and congenital muscular dystrophy. The increase in CSF IgG, γ-globulin fraction is shown in the myotonic dystrophy. In addition to the abnormality of IQ, EEG, and brain CT, abnormal CSF proteins obviously suggest the presence of CNS involvement in muscular dystrophy. (author)

  20. Diagnosis of chordoma by cytologic examination of cerebrospinal fluid.

    Marigil, M A; Pardo-Mindan, F J; Joly, M


    This is a case report of a 44-year-old man with a chordoma of the clivus that caused dysphonia, low back pain, and urinary and fecal incontinence. The diagnosis was made by cytologic study of the CSF, which demonstrated vacuolated malignant cells. The patient was treated with intrathecal methotrexate, dexamethasone, and radiotherapy. At autopsy extensive dissemination of chordoma was found at the base of the brain, in the ventricles, and in the leptomeninges of the spinal cord. This is the sixth reported case of intrathecal dissemination of a chordoma and the first diagnosed by cytology of the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:6881106

  1. Sleep deprivation increases oleoylethanolamide in human cerebrospinal fluid

    Koethe, Dagmar; Schreiber, Daniela; Giuffrida, Andrea; Mauss, Christian; Faulhaber, Johannes; Heydenreich, Bernd; Hellmich, Martin; Graf, Rudolf; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Piomelli, Daniele; Leweke, F. Markus


    This study investigated the role of two fatty acid ethanolamides, the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide and its structural analog oleoylethanolamide in sleep deprivation of human volunteers. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained from 20 healthy volunteers before and after a night of sleep deprivation with an interval of about 12 months. We found increased levels of oleoylethanolamide in CSF (P = 0.011) but not in serum (P = 0.068) after 24 h of sleep deprivation. Oleoyleth...

  2. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel


    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  3. Low Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-Beta Concentration Is Associated with Poorer Delayed Memory Recall in Women

    Fanni Haapalinna


    Full Text Available Background: Data on the association of memory performance with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD are inconsistent. The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease neuropsychological battery (CERAD-NB is a commonly used validated cognitive tool; however, only few studies have examined its relationship with CSF biomarkers for AD. We studied the correlation of pathological changes in CSF biomarkers with various CERAD-NB subtests and total scores. Methods: Out of 79 subjects (36 men, mean age 70.5 years, 63 had undergone an assessment of cognitive status with CERAD-NB and a CSF biomarker analysis due to a suspected memory disorder, and 16 were controls with no memory complaint.Results: In women we found a significant correlation between CSF amyloid-beta (Aβ1-42 and several subtests measuring delayed recall. Word List Recall correlated with all markers: Aβ1-42 (r = 0.323, p = 0.035, tau (r = -0.304, p = 0.050 and hyperphosphorylated tau (r = -0.331, p = 0.046. No such correlations were found in men. Conclusions: CSF biomarkers correlate with delayed memory scores in CERAD-NB in women, and women may have more actual AD pathology at the time of the investigations than men.

  4. Presaturation tagging of neuraxis motion and cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    This paper describes motion of the spinal cord and of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examined with use of spatially selective presaturation pulses to tag portions of tissue or fluid. The plane of presaturation was perpendicular to the imaging plane and less than 1 mm thick. The observation of pulsatile motion of the tags in the cervical cord relative to stationary tissue provides a direct visual demonstration of actual cord deflection that can be applied to the evaluation of diseases restricting cord motion by tethering or compression. Visualization of motion of the tags within the CSF directly shows the direction and magnitude of flow and can be useful for the noninvasive assessment of diseases involving the CSF circulation

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David


    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  6. Evaluation of the Production and Absorption of Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    Miyajima, Masakazu; Arai, Hajime


    The traditional hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics presumes that CSF is primarily produced in the choroid plexus (CP), then flows from the ventricles into the subarachnoid spaces, and mainly reabsorbed in the arachnoid granulations. This hypothesis is necessary to reconsider in view of recent research and clinical observations. This literature review presents numerous evidence for a new hypothesis of CSF hydrodynamics-(1) A significantly strong relationship exists between the CSF and interstitial fluid (IF), (2) CSF and IF are mainly produced and absorbed in the parenchymal capillaries of the brain and spinal cord. A considerable amount of CSF and IF are also absorbed by the lymphatic system, and (3) CSF movement is not unidirectional flow. It is only local mixing and diffusion. PMID:26226980

  7. Antifungal activity in human cerebrospinal fluid and plasma after intravenous administration of Allium sativum.

    Davis, L E; Shen, J K; Cai, Y.


    Commercial Allium sativum (garlic) extract was given intravenously to two patients with cryptococcal meningitis and three patients with other types of meningitis. Plasma titers of anti-Cryptococcus neoformans activity rose twofold over preinfusion titers. Anti-C. neoformans activity was detected in four of five cerebrospinal fluid samples but not in pooled normal cerebrospinal fluid.


    Ye Tian; Ke-yi Yu; Yi-peng Wang; Jun Qian; Gui-xing Qiu


    Objective To investigate the management and outcome of cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSFL) after cervical surgery. Methods Medical records of 642 patients who underwent cervical surgery between December 1999 and December 2005 at our hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients complicated by CSFL after surgery were enrolled, of which 4 cases were complicated after ossified posterior longitudinal ligament or posterior vertebral osteophyte resection directly injuring the dura, and 1 case after posterior cervical double-door laminoplasty with out observed dural injury during surgery. Of the 5 CSFL cases, 4 cases occurred at 1-3 days after operation and 1 case at 9 days after operation. All 5 postoperative CSFL cases were treated through wound drainage removal, wound sutures, prophylactic antibiotics, and continuous subarachnoid drainage in the elevated head position.Results All 5 CSFL cases experienced leakage cessation within 1-3 days and wound healing within 4-8 days, and subarachnoid drainage lasted 11-16 days with an average volume of 320 mL (range, 150-410 mL). Four cases experienced headache, nausea and vomiting, 1 case suffered from somnolence and hyponatremia, and symptoms subsided after symptomatic treatment and intravenous fluid administration. All patients were followed up for an average of 32 months (range, 22-50 months). No occurrence of cerebrospinal fluid cyst or wound infection was observed. CSFL produced no significant negative effects upon neuromuscular function recovery.Conclusion Continuous subarachnoid cavity drainage in combination with elevated head position is a simple and safe non-surgical method in treatment of CSFL following cervical surgery.

  9. Identification of brain-enriched proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid proteome by LC-MS/MS profiling and mining of the Human Protein Atlas

    Begcevic, Ilijana; Brinc, Davor; Drabovich, Andrei P.; Batruch, Ihor; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.


    Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a proximal fluid which communicates closely with brain tissue, contains numerous brain-derived proteins and thus represents a promising fluid for discovery of biomarkers of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. The main purpose of this study was to generate an extensive CSF proteome and define brain-related proteins identified in CSF, suitable for development of diagnostic assays. Methods Six non-pathological CSF samples from three female and three mal...

  10. Evidence for Elevated Cerebrospinal Fluid ERK1/2 Levels in Alzheimer Dementia

    Philipp Spitzer


    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from 33 patients with Alzheimer dementia (AD, 21 patients with mild cognitive impairment who converted to AD during followup (MCI-AD, 25 patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI-stable, and 16 nondemented subjects (ND were analyzed with a chemiluminescence immunoassay to assess the levels of the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. The results were evaluated in relation to total Tau (tTau, phosphorylated Tau (pTau, and beta-amyloid 42 peptide (Aβ42. CSF-ERK1/2 was significantly increased in the AD group as compared to stable MCI patients and the ND group. Western blot analysis of a pooled cerebrospinal fluid sample revealed that both isoforms, ERK1 and ERK2, and low amounts of doubly phosphorylated ERK2 were detectable. As a predictive diagnostic AD biomarker, CSF-ERK1/2 was inferior to tTau, pTau, and Aβ42.

  11. Arachnoid granulations may control heat exchange between intracranial dural sinuses and cerebrospinal fluid

    Abdullah Kaya


    Full Text Available Selective brain cooling is a system in a human that protects the brain from hyperthermia. Cool venous blood from head skin and upper respiratory tract drains into intracranial dural sinuses. In that region, cool blood in the dural sinuses decreases the temperature of the cerebrospinal fluid. Cerebrospinal fluid provides brain cooling. All cortical arteries to the brain pass the cerebrospinal fluid compartment. Also cerebrospinal fluid washes cortical nervous tissue. To provide optimal temperature for the brain cortex, heat exchange between cerebrospinal fluid and venous blood in dural sinuses should be well controlled. Head skin is in direct contact with the outside, and significant heat exchanges may occur within dural sinuses. A barrier made of dura mater and arachnoid mater has been proposed to transmit heat from dural sinuses to the cerebrospinal fluid. However, this barrier is a mechanical barrier and can’t optimize the temperature of cerebrospinal fluid. Also it has two laminas (dura mater and arachnoid mater and dura mater has a high vascularization. Therefore, this barrier may obstruct heat exchange. In this hypothetical paper, I offer arachnoid granulations as a functional barrier for heat exchange between blood in dural sinuses and cerebrospinal fluid. Arachnoid granulations are invaginations of arachnoid mater to the dural sinuses. Cerebrospinal fluid passes to the dural sinuses via arachnoid granulations. An arachnoid granulation provides a very thin wall between two compartments and may transmit heat effectively. Also arachnoid granulations may control cerebrospinal fluid flow to the dural sinuses according to temperature differences between two compartments. It is worth researching whether there are any functional or histological differences of the arachnoid granulations between people living in cold and hot places. There may also be an association between pathologies such as migraine and pseudotumor cerebri and this possible

  12. A quantitative analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow in posttraumatic syringomyelia

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow within the spinal canal and syrinx in posttraumatic syringomyelia were studied by cardiac-gated phase images of magnetic resonance imaging in 12 normal volunteers and 8 patients with syringomyelia. The cardiac-gated phase method was simple and useful for detection of CSF flow. Phase modulation was in direct proportion to flow velocity. Phase modulation was not affected by the T1 or T2 relaxation time. In normal volunteers, CSF flows caudally during systole and cranially during diastole. The maximum caudal CSF flow velocity at C2 level was from 0.45 cm/sec to 1.71 cm/sec, average; 1.27 cm/sec. All of symptomatic posttraumatic syringomyelia patients had the flow in the syrinx. (author)

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid carnitine levels in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Rubio, J C; de Bustos, F; Molina, J A; Jiménez-Jiménez, F J; Benito-León, J; Martín, M A; Campos, Y; Ortí-Pareja, M; Cabrera-Valdivia, F; Arenas, J


    We assessed free carnitine (FC) and acylcarnitine esters (AC) in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from 24 patients with diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and from 28 healthy matched-controls. We found no significant correlation between FC and AC levels in CSF. FC and AC levels in CSF did not differ significantly between AD patients and controls, but plasma FC levels were significantly lower in AD patients. CSF and plasma FC and AC levels did not correlate with age, age at onset of AD, duration of AD, and scores of the Minimental State Examination of Folstein. Although these results suggest that CSF carnitine levels are apparently unrelated with the risk for AD, the trend of the FC/AC ratio to be higher in AD patients might suggest the possibility of a lower carnitine acetyltransferase activity in AD, as previously reported in some brain areas. PMID:9562266

  14. Massive Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of the Temporal Bone

    Giannicola Iannella


    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage of the temporal bone region is defined as abnormal communications between the subarachnoidal space and the air-containing spaces of the temporal bone. CSF leak remains one of the most frequent complications after VS surgery. Radiotherapy is considered a predisposing factor for development of temporal bone CSF leak because it may impair dural repair mechanisms, thus causing inadequate dural sealing. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old man with a massive effusion of CSF which extended from the posterior and lateral skull base to the first cervical vertebrae; this complication appeared after a partial enucleation of a vestibular schwannoma (VS with subsequent radiation treatment and second operation with total VS resection.

  15. Altered cerebrospinal fluid proteins in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome patients.

    Cologna, Stephanie M; Shieh, Christine; Toth, Cynthia L; Cougnoux, Antony; Burkert, Kathryn R; Bianconi, Simona E; Wassif, Christopher A; Porter, Forbes D


    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is an autosomal recessive, multiple malformation syndrome with neurocognitive impairment. SLOS arises from mutations in the 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase gene which results in impaired enzymatic conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol. In the current work, we sought to measure proteins that were altered in the cerebrospinal fluid from SLOS patients compared to pediatric controls. Using a multi-analyte antibody-based assay, we found that 12 proteins are altered in SLOS patients. Validation studies were carried out and the findings from this study suggest alterations in extracellular matrix remodeling and further evidence of oxidative stress within the disease pathophysiology. The results of this study will be used to explore biological pathways altered in SLOS and identifies a set of CSF proteins that can be evaluated as biomarkers in future therapeutic trials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27148958

  16. Early embryonic brain development in rats requires the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid.

    Martin, C; Alonso, M I; Santiago, C; Moro, J A; De la Mano, A; Carretero, R; Gato, A


    Cerebrospinal fluid has shown itself to be an essential brain component during development. This is particularly evident at the earliest stages of development where a lot of research, performed mainly in chick embryos, supports the evidence that cerebrospinal fluid is involved in different mechanisms controlling brain growth and morphogenesis, by exerting a trophic effect on neuroepithelial precursor cells (NPC) involved in controlling the behaviour of these cells. Despite it being known that cerebrospinal fluid in mammals is directly involved in corticogenesis at fetal stages, the influence of cerebrospinal fluid on the activity of NPC at the earliest stages of brain development has not been demonstrated. Here, using "in vitro" organotypic cultures of rat embryo brain neuroepithelium in order to expose NPC to or deprive them of cerebrospinal fluid, we show that the neuroepithelium needs the trophic influence of cerebrospinal fluid to undergo normal rates of cell survival, replication and neurogenesis, suggesting that NPC are not self-sufficient to induce their normal activity. This data shows that cerebrospinal fluid is an essential component in chick and rat early brain development, suggesting that its influence could be constant in higher vertebrates. PMID:19540909

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease%阿尔茨海默病患者的脑脊液tau蛋白及Aβ1-42水平

    单守勤; 赵权; 张立营; 孙英姿


    目的 探讨脑脊液(cerebrospinal fluid,CSF)中tau蛋白及β-淀粉样蛋白1-42(Aβ1-42)对诊断阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's disease,AD)的早期诊断价值,寻找AD理想的生物学标志.方法 采用酶联免疫吸附法检测36例AD、24例血管性痴呆患者(vascular dementia,VD)和26名正常对照者(对照组)CSF中tau蛋白及Aβ1-42浓度的变化.结果 CSF中tau蛋白平均浓度:AD组(336±126)ng/L,VD组(183±96)ng/L,对照组(98±54)ng/L,AD组CSF中tau蛋白浓度明显高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);CSF中Aβ1-42平均浓度:AD组(341β113)ng/L,VD组(457±132)ng/L,对照组(502±167)ng/L,AD组CSF中Aβ1-42浓度明显低于对照组.差异有显著性意义(P<0.05).结论 脑脊液Aβ1-42、tau蛋白浓度的变化,不仅对诊断阿尔茨海默病具有较高的敏感性和特异性,而且亦可作为阿尔茨海默病与血管性痴呆鉴别诊断的生物学指标.%Objective To investigate the relationship between impaired hippocampal neurogenesis and altered Notchl signaling in depressed rats. Methods In the present study, chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) was used to inhibit the neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The function of Notchl signaling was investigated by using realtime PCR and western blot at different time points (14 d and 28 d) during chronic stress. The hippocampal neurogenesis was monitored by assessing cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Results After 14 days, CUMS significantly reduced weight (P < 0.05), the sucrose preference (P < 0.001), number of squares crossed (P < 0.01) and number of grooming and rearing compared with the controls. The immobility time was significantly increased after 14 d CUMS treated relative to the controls (P < 0.001). Twenty-eight days after CUMS protocol, these parameters were significantly difference in rats exposed to CUMS compare with the controls (weight, P < 0.05; sucrose preference, P < 0.001; number of squares crossed, P< 0.001; number of

  18. Drug delivery to the human brain via the cerebrospinal fluid

    This Study investigates the flow of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) inside the human ventricular system with particular emphasis on drug path flow for the purpose of medical drug injections. The investigation is conducted using the computational fluid dynamics package FLUENT. The role of the ventricular system is very important in protecting the brain from injury by cushioning it against the cranium during sudden movements. If for any reason the passage of CSF through the ventricular system is blocked (usually by stenosis) then a condition known as Hydrocephalus occurs, where by the blocked CSF causes the Intra Cranial Pressure (ICP) inside the brain to rise. If this is not treated then severe brain damage and death can occur. Previous work conducted by the authors on this subject has focused on the technique of ventriculostomy to treat hydrocephalus. The present study carries on from the previous work but focuses on delivering medical drugs to treat brain tumors that are conventionally not accessible and which require complicated surgical procedures to remove them. The study focuses on the possible paths for delivering drugs to tumors in the human nervous system through conventionally accessible locations without major surgery. The results of the investigation have shown that it is possible to reach over 95% of the ventricular system by injection of drugs however the results also show that there are many factors that can affect the drug flow paths through the ventricular system and thus the areas reachable, by these drugs. (author)

  19. Clinical value of determination HIV viral load in the cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected patients

    V. B. Musatov; Yakovlev, A. A.; S. G. Andreeva; M. V. Ivanova


    Aim. To analyze the concentration of HIV RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid and to evaluate its significance in the pathology of the central nervous system among HIV infected persons.Materials: We examined 36 patients with HIV infection with signs of pathology of the central nervous system. All patients was done completed a standard investigation of cerebrospinal fluid, cytological examination and detection viral load of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum.Results. A different of opportunist...

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Markers of Neurodegeneration and Rates of Brain Atrophy in Early Alzheimer Disease

    Tarawneh, Rawan; Head, Denise; Allison, Samantha; Buckles, Virginia; Fagan, Anne M.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.


    IMPORTANCE Measures of neuronal loss are likely good surrogates for clinical and radiological disease progression in Alzheimer disease (AD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of neuronal injury or neurodegeneration may offer usefulness in predicting disease progression and guiding outcome assessments and prognostic decisions in clinical trials of disease-modifying therapies. Visinin-like protein 1 (VILIP-1) has demonstrated potential usefulness as a marker of neuronal injury in AD. OBJECTIVE To investigate the usefulness of CSF VILIP-1, tau, p-tau181, and Aβ42 levels in predicting rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in early AD and cognitively normal control subjects over time. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Longitudinal observational study of brain atrophy in participants with early AD and cognitively normal controls. Study participants had baseline CSF biomarker measurements and longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging assessments for a mean follow-up period of 2 to 3 years. Mixed linear models assessed the ability of standardized baseline CSF biomarker measures to predict rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy over the follow-up period. The setting was The Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis. Participants (mean age, 72.6 years) were individuals with a clinical diagnosis of very mild AD (n = 23) and cognitively normal controls (n = 64) who were enrolled in longitudinal studies of healthy aging and dementia. The study dates were 2000 to 2010. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Correlations between baseline CSF biomarker measures and rates of whole-brain or regional atrophy in the AD and control cohorts over the follow-up period. RESULTS Baseline CSF VILIP-1, tau, and p-tau181 levels (but not Aβ42 levels) predicted rates of whole-brain and regional atrophy in AD over the follow-up period. Baseline CSF VILIP-1 levels predicted whole-brain (P = .006), hippocampal (P = .01), and

  1. Equine cerebrospinal fluid: reference values of normal horses.

    Mayhew, I G; Whitlock, R H; Tasker, J B


    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected from the atlanto-occipital (AO) and lumbosacral (LS) subarachnoid spaces of 24 horses and 21 ponies that had no clinical evidence of neurologic disease. Depth of needle insertion, pressures, refractive index, rapid reagent strip test (protein, glucose, blood, pH) results, cell counts, content of protein, glucose, sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, phosphorus, urea nitrogen, and cholesterol, and activities of creatine phosphokinase, aspartate transaminase, lactic dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase were determined. The resulting clinical reference values obtained were discussed in light of the published normal values for CSF from horses, other animals, and man. White cell counts in CSF were found to be from 0 to 6/microliters. Values for protein content were distributed between wider limits than previously reported values. The LS-AO difference is proposed as a criterion for clinical evaluation of CSF protein content. Ponies were found to have more protein in their CSF than did the horses, and CSF from the LS site contained more glucose than that from the AO site. The CSF electrolyte composition was similar to that of previous reports. Enzyme activities in equine CSF are reported for the 1st time. PMID:911095

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid folate and cobalamin levels in febrile convulsion.

    Osifo, B O; Lukanmbi, F A; Familusi, J B


    Folate and cobalamin parameters were studied in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of 40 febrile paediatric patients. Eighteen of these children were in a state of febrile convulsion while the remaining 22 were non-convulsing. The serum folate concentration of all the patients was higher than that of the control group but the highest value was found in the convulsing children. There was no significant difference in the CSF folate levels between the two groups of patients. The serum cobalamin levels of the patients were significantly lower than those of the control children and the lowest mean was observed in the convulsing state. On the other hand, there was no difference in the CSF cobalamin between the convulsing and non-convulsing children. These results confirm that there is an effective blood-brain barrier system for folate even when serum folate levels are higher than normal. There is also a definite decrease in serum cobalamin during pyrexia but this decrease is more apparent in the convulsing state. The role of cobalamin metabolism in convulsion is not clear. PMID:4009203

  3. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA in cerebrospinal fluid.



    Full Text Available Levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were measured by radioreceptor assay (RRA in 25 normal controls and in 121 patients with various central nervous system disorders. CSF-GABA levels could be measured down to 5 pmoles/ml reliably by this assay. In normal controls, the mean (+/- SEM GABA level in CSF was 127 +/- 5.2 pmoles/ml. There was no correlation between age, sex and the CSF-GABA level in normal controls. The lowest CSF-GABA level, which was 60 +/- 6.0 pmoles/ml, was observed in alcoholic patients suffering from cerebellar ataxia. The CSF-GABA levels were quite low in patients with Alzheimer's disease, late cortical cerebellar atrophy, neuro-Behcet's syndrome, olivopontocerebellar atrophy, Huntington's chorea, Parkinson's disease and cerebral hemorrhage. On the other hand, the CSF-GABA levels of meningitis patients were significantly increased. These findings suggest that measuring the CSF-GABA level is quite beneficial in the diagnosis and pathophysiological determinations of some diseases.

  4. Vitamin B6 in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of children.

    Monique Albersen

    Full Text Available Over the past years, the essential role of vitamin B6 in brain development and functioning has been recognized and genetic metabolic disorders resulting in functional vitamin B6 deficiency have been identified. However, data on B6 vitamers in children are scarce.B6 vitamer concentrations in simultaneously sampled plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 70 children with intellectual disability were determined by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. For ethical reasons, CSF samples could not be obtained from healthy children. The influence of sex, age, epilepsy and treatment with anti-epileptic drugs, were investigated.The B6 vitamer composition of plasma (pyridoxal phosphate (PLP > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxal (PL differed from that of CSF (PL > PLP > pyridoxic acid > pyridoxamine. Strong correlations were found for B6 vitamers in and between plasma and CSF. Treatment with anti-epileptic drugs resulted in decreased concentrations of PL and PLP in CSF.We provide concentrations of all B6 vitamers in plasma and CSF of children with intellectual disability (±epilepsy, which can be used in the investigation of known and novel disorders associated with vitamin B6 metabolism as well as in monitoring of the biochemical effects of treatment with vitamin B6.

  5. Virtual MRI endoscopy of the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid spaces

    Shigematsu, Y.; Korogi, Y.; Hirai, T. [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Okuda, T.; Ikushima, I.; Sugahara, T.; Liang, L.; Ge, Y.; Takahashi, M.


    We used constructive interference in steady state (CISS) 3D Fourier transform (3DFT) MRI data sets to obtain three-dimensional (3D) virtual MRI endoscopic views of the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, processing them with a commercially available perspective endoscopic algorithm. We investigated the potential of the intracranial virtual MRI endoscopy applied to visualisation of the pathology in 13 patients with surgically confirmed trigeminal neuralgia (3), hemifacial spasm (3), acoustic neuroma (3), suprasellar germinoma (1), Langerhans cell histiocytosis (1), lateral ventricle nodules (1) and pituitary dwarfism (1). All images were acquired using a 1.5-T imager employing a circular polarised head coil. The CISS-3DFT data sets were transferred to a workstation for processing with the perspective endoscopic algorithm. Postprocessing for virtual MRI endoscopy was possible for all data sets. The lesions in 12 patients, and their complex anatomical relationships with the surrounding structures, were well seen on the 3D images. A small acoustic neuroma in the internal auditory meatus was not seen using virtual endoscopy. Although virtual MRI endoscopy has limitations, it provides 3D images which cannot be acquired using any other procedure. (orig.) With 6 figs., 16 refs.

  6. Dynamic oxygen-enhanced MRI of cerebrospinal fluid.

    Taha M Mehemed

    Full Text Available Oxygen causes an increase in the longitudinal relaxation rate of tissues through its T1-shortening effect owing to its paramagnetic properties. Due to such effects, MRI has been used to study oxygen-related signal intensity changes in various body parts including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF space. Oxygen enhancement of CSF has been mainly studied using MRI sequences with relatively longer time resolution such as FLAIR, and T1 value calculation. In this study, fifteen healthy volunteers were scanned using fast advanced spin echo MRI sequence with and without inversion recovery pulse in order to dynamically track oxygen enhancement of CSF. We also focused on the differences of oxygen enhancement at sulcal and ventricular CSF. Our results revealed that CSF signal after administration of oxygen shows rapid signal increase in both sulcal CSF and ventricular CSF on both sequences, with statistically significant predominant increase in sulcal CSF compared with ventricular CSF. CSF is traditionally thought to mainly form from the choroid plexus in the ventricles and is absorbed at the arachnoid villi, however, it is also believed that cerebral arterioles contribute to the production and absorption of CSF, and controversy remains in terms of the precise mechanism. Our results demonstrated rapid oxygen enhancement in sulcal CSF, which may suggest inhaled oxygen may diffuse into sulcal CSF space rapidly probably due to the abundance of pial arterioles on the brain sulci.

  7. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control.

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M F; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E


    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called "embryonic CSF." Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.


    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  9. Phantom model of physiologic intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan


    We describe herein a novel life-size phantom model of the intracranial cavity and its validation. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) domains including ventricular, cysternal, and subarachnoid spaces were derived via magnetic resonance imaging. Brain mechanical properties and cranio-spinal compliance were set based on published data. Both bulk and pulsatile physiologic CSF flow were modeled. Model validation was carried out by comparisons of flow and pressure measurements in the phantom with published in vivo data of healthy subjects. Physiologic intracranial pressure with 10 mmHg mean and 0.4 mmHg peak pulse amplitude was recorded in the ventricles. Peak CSF flow rates of 0.2 and 2 ml/s were measured in the cerebral aqueduct and subarachnoid space, respectively. The phantom constitutes a first-of-its-kind approach to modeling physiologic intracranial dynamics in vitro. Herein, we describe the phantom design and manufacturing, definition and implementation of its operating parameters, as well as the validation of the modeled dynamics. PMID:22333981

  10. Serum procalcitonin and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines level in children with meningitis

    Erdal Taskın


    Full Text Available Aims: To determine the level of serum procalcitonin and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines in children with bacterial or viral meningitis and to document the use of these parameters in differential diagnosis.

  11. Enterovirus-D68 in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Two Children with Aseptic Meningitis.

    Esposito, Susanna; Lunghi, Giovanna; Zampiero, Alberto; Tagliabue, Claudia; Orlandi, Anna; Torresani, Erminio; Niesters, Hubert; Principi, Nicola


    This case report describes two previously healthy children with aseptic meningitis whose cerebrospinal fluid was positive for enterovirus-D68, which indicates direct involvement of this infectious agent in the development of this neurologic disease. PMID:26859634

  12. Biomarkers of Brain Damage: S100B and NSE Concentrations in Cerebrospinal Fluid—A Normative Study

    Hajduková, Lenka; Sobek, Ondřej; Prchalová, Darina; Bílková, Zuzana; Koudelková, Martina; Lukášková, Jiřina; Matuchová, Inka


    NSE and S100B belong among the so-called structural proteins of the central nervous system (CNS). Lately, this group of structural proteins has been profusely used as specific biomarkers of CNS tissue damage. So far, the majority of the research papers have focused predominantly on the concentrations of these proteins in blood in relation to CNS damage of various origins. Considering the close anatomic and functional relationship between the brain or spinal cord and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), in case of a CNS injury, a rapid and pronounced increase of the concentrations of structural proteins specifically in CSF takes place. This study inquires into the physiological concentrations of NSE and S100B proteins in CSF, carried out on a sufficiently large group of 601 patients. The detected values can be used for determination of a normal reference range in CSF in a clinical laboratory diagnostics. PMID:26421286

  13. Evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid in Southeast Asian refugees with reactive serologic tests for syphilis.

    Buchwald, D; Collier, A.C.; Lukehart, S A; Kith, P; Goldstein, E; Hooton, T M


    To determine the prevalence of cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities in Southeast Asian refugees with reactive serologic tests for syphilis, we evaluated 65 patients, 36 prospectively and 29 retrospectively, in a primary care clinic. Information was collected on history of treponemal infections, neurologic symptoms and signs, and total protein concentration, leukocyte count, and the VDRL test in the cerebrospinal fluid. Neurologic symptoms were reported by all patients for whom data were availabl...

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Alzheimer Markers in Depressed Elderly Subjects with and without Alzheimer's Disease

    Kramberger, Milica Gregoric; Jelic, Vesna; Kåreholt, Ingemar; Enache, Daniela; Eriksdotter Jönhagen, Maria; Winblad, Bengt; Aarsland, Dag


    Background The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease (AD) markers and depression in elderly people. Method We included subjects with AD as well as persons with subjective cognitive impairment and normal cognition. Depression was assessed with the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, and a cut-off score of >6 was used to define depression. Cerebrospinal fluid was analyzed using commercially available assays for β-amyloid 1–42, to...

  15. Normal permeability of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier to phosphorus 32

    The permeability of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) to 32P-inorganic phosphate in sixty five carefully selected individuals free of any organic diseases is studied. The lowest permeability of BCSFB to phosphorus 32 is 0.5 per cent and the highest - 5.0 per cent. Apparently these values are closest to the real fluctuations of normal permeability of BCSFB to the radioactive isotope under study. No sex and age related difference in BCSFB permeability is established, regardless of the fact that the mean permeability of BCSFB to phosphorus 32 after the 50th year of life is 0.6 per cent lower than that in the age 1 to 49 years, the difference is statistically unreliable (p>0.05). A good correlative dependence is established between the concentration of cerebrospinal fluid protein and phosphorus 32 penetration in the cerebrospinal fluid (r = 0.621) which dependence is absent in the organic diseases of the nervous system. No correlative dependence is found between penetration of phosphorus 32 within the cerebrospinal fluid and concentration of cerebrospinal fluid sugar, chlorides and number of cells. In some morbide condition a correlative dependence may occur between permeability of BCSFB to phosphorus 32 and the number of cerebrospinal fluid white cells. (author)

  16. Data for a comprehensive map and functional annotation of the human cerebrospinal fluid proteome

    Yang Zhang


    Full Text Available Knowledge about the normal human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF proteome serves as a baseline reference for CSF biomarker discovery and provides insight into CSF physiology. In this study, high-pH reverse-phase liquid chromatography (hp-RPLC was first integrated with a TripleTOF 5600 mass spectrometer to comprehensively profile the normal CSF proteome. A total of 49,836 unique peptides and 3256 non-redundant proteins were identified. To obtain high-confidence results, 2513 proteins with at least 2 unique peptides were further selected as bona fide CSF proteins. Nearly 30% of the identified CSF proteins have not been previously reported in the normal CSF proteome. More than 25% of the CSF proteins were components of CNS cell microenvironments, and network analyses indicated their roles in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. The top canonical pathway in which the CSF proteins participated was axon guidance signaling. More than one-third of the CSF proteins (788 proteins were related to neurological diseases, and these proteins constitute potential CSF biomarker candidates. The mapping results can be freely downloaded at, which can be used to navigate the CSF proteome. For more information about the data, please refer to the related original article [1], which has been recently accepted by Journal of Proteomics.

  17. Sphingolipid metabolism correlates with cerebrospinal fluid Beta amyloid levels in Alzheimer's disease.

    Alfred N Fonteh

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer's disease (AD is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but

  18. Progressive Differentiation and Instructive Capacities of Amniotic Fluid and Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteomes following Neural Tube Closure.

    Chau, Kevin F; Springel, Mark W; Broadbelt, Kevin G; Park, Hye-Yeon; Topal, Salih; Lun, Melody P; Mullan, Hillary; Maynard, Thomas; Steen, Hanno; LaMantia, Anthony S; Lehtinen, Maria K


    After neural tube closure, amniotic fluid (AF) captured inside the neural tube forms the nascent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Neuroepithelial stem cells contact CSF-filled ventricles, proliferate, and differentiate to form the mammalian brain, while neurogenic placodes, which generate cranial sensory neurons, remain in contact with the AF. Using in vivo ultrasound imaging, we quantified the expansion of the embryonic ventricular-CSF space from its inception. We developed tools to obtain pure AF and nascent CSF, before and after neural tube closure, and to define how the AF and CSF proteomes diverge during mouse development. Using embryonic neural explants, we demonstrate that age-matched fluids promote Sox2-positive neurogenic identity in developing forebrain and olfactory epithelia. Nascent CSF also stimulates SOX2-positive self-renewal of forebrain progenitor cells, some of which is attributable to LIFR signaling. Our Resource should facilitate the investigation of fluid-tissue interactions during this highly vulnerable stage of early brain development. PMID:26702835

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in Chiari malformation associated with syringomyelia

    LIU Bin; WANG Zhen-yu; XIE Jing-cheng; HAN Hong-bin; PEI Xin-long


    Background About 50%-70% of patients with Chiari malformation I (CMI) presented with syringomyelia (SM), which is supposed to be related to abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow around the foramen magnum. The aim of this study was to investigate the cerebrospinal fluid dynamics at levels of the aqueduct and upper cervical spine in patients with CMI associated with SM, and to discuss the possible mechanism of formation of SM.Methods From January to April 2004, we examined 10 adult patients with symptomatic CMI associated with SM and 10 healthy volunteers by phase-contrast MRI. CSF flow patterns were evaluated at seven regions of interest (ROI): the aqueduct and ventral and dorsal subarachnoid spaces of the spine at levels of the cerebellar tonsil, C2-3, and C5-6. The CSF flow waveforms were analyzed by measuring CSF circulation time, durations and maximum velocities of cranial- and caudal-directed flows, and the ratio between the two maximum velocities. Data were analyzed by ttest using SPSS 11.5.Results We found no definite communication between the fourth ventricle and syringomyelia by MRI in the 10 patients.In both the groups, we observed cranial-directed flow of CSF in the early cardiac systolic phase, which changed the direction from cranial to caudal from the middle systolic phase to the early diastolic phase, and then turned back in cranial direction in the late diastolic phase. The CSF flow disappeared at the dorsal ROI at the level of C2-3 in 3 patients and 1 volunteer, and at the level of C5-6 in 6 patients and 3 volunteers. The durations of CSF circulation at all the ROIs were significantly shorter in the patients than those in the healthy volunteers (P=0.014 at the midbrain aqueduct, P=0.019 at the inferior margin of the cerebellar tonsil, P=0.014 at the level of C2-3, and P=0.022 at the level of C5-6). No significant difference existed between the two groups in the initial point and duration of the caudal-directed CSF flow during a cardiac cycle at

  20. Two-compartment model of radioimmunotherapy delivered through cerebrospinal fluid

    He, Ping [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kramer, Kim; Cheung, Nai-Kong V. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pediatrics, New York, NY (United States); Smith-Jones, Peter; Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Zanzonico, Pat; Humm, John [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States)


    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using {sup 131}I-3F8 injected into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was a safe modality for the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases (JCO, 25:5465, 2007). A single-compartment pharmacokinetic model described previously (JNM 50:1324, 2009) showed good fitting to the CSF radioactivity data obtained from patients. We now describe a two-compartment model to account for the ventricular reservoir of {sup 131}I-3F8 and to identify limiting factors that may impact therapeutic ratio. Each parameter was examined for its effects on (1) the area under the radioactivity concentration curve of the bound antibody (AUC[C{sub IAR}]), (2) that of the unbound antibody AUC[C{sub IA}], and (3) their therapeutic ratio (AUC[C{sub IAR}]/AUC[C{sub IA}]). Data fitting showed that CSF kBq/ml data fitted well using the two-compartment model (R = 0.95 {+-} 0.03). Correlations were substantially better when compared to the one-compartment model (R = 0.92 {+-} 0.11 versus 0.77 {+-} 0.21, p = 0.005). In addition, we made the following new predictions: (1) Increasing immunoreactivity of {sup 131}I-3F8 from 10% to 90% increased both (AUC[C{sub IAR}]) and therapeutic ratio (AUC[C{sub IAR}]/AUC[C{sub IA}]) by 7.4 fold, (2) When extrapolated to the clinical setting, the model predicted that if {sup 131}I-3F8 could be split into 4 doses of 1.4 mg each and given at {>=}24 hours apart, an antibody affinity of K{sub D} of 4 x 10{sup -9} at 50% immunoreactivity were adequate in order to deliver {>=}100 Gy to tumor cells while keeping normal CSF exposure to <10 Gy. This model predicted that immunoreactivity, affinity and optimal scheduling of antibody injections were crucial in improving therapeutic index. (orig.)

  1. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid pressure in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Fellmann Jere


    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF production and turnover, seen in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH and in Alzheimer's disease (AD, may be an important cause of amyloid retention in the brain and may relate the two diseases. There is a high incidence of AD pathology in patients being shunted for NPH, the AD-NPH syndrome. We now report elevated CSF pressure (CSFP, consistent with very early hydrocephalus, in a subset of AD patients enrolled in a clinical trial of chronic low-flow CSF drainage. Our objective was to determine the frequency of elevated CSFP in subjects meeting National Institutes of Neurological and Communicative Diseases and Stroke – Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for AD, excluding those with signs of concomitant NPH. Methods AD subjects by NINCDS-ADRDA criteria (n = 222, were screened by history, neurological examination, and radiographic imaging to exclude those with clinical or radiographic signs of NPH. As part of this exclusion process, opening CSFP was measured supine under general anesthesia during device implantation surgery at a controlled pCO2 of 40 Torr (40 mmHg. Results Of the 222 AD subjects 181 had pressure measurements recorded. Seven subjects (3.9% enrolled in the study had CSFP of 220 mmH20 or greater, mean 249 ± 20 mmH20 which was significantly higher than 103 ± 47 mmH2O for the AD-only group. AD-NPH patients were significantly younger and significantly less demented on the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS. Conclusion Of the AD subjects who were carefully screened to exclude those with clinical NPH, 4% had elevated CSFP. These subjects were presumed to have the AD-NPH syndrome and were withdrawn from the remainder of the study.

  2. Placental ischemia increases seizure susceptibility and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines.

    Warrington, Junie P


    Eclampsia is diagnosed in preeclamptic patients who develop unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum. Eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, accounting for ~13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Little is known about the mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of eclampsia, partly due to the lack of suitable animal models. This study tested the hypothesis that placental ischemia, induced by reducing utero-placental perfusion, increases susceptibility to seizures, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation, and neurokinin B (NKB) expression in brain and plasma. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a pro-convulsive drug, was injected into pregnant and placental ischemic rats (40 mg/kg, i.p.) on gestational day 19 followed by video monitoring for 30 min. Seizure scoring was blindly conducted. Placental ischemia hastened the onset of seizures compared to pregnant controls but had no effect on seizure duration. Placental ischemia increased CSF levels of IL-2, IL-17, IL-18 and eotaxin (CCL11), had no effect on plasma NKB; however, PTZ increased plasma NKB in both pregnant and placental ischemic rats. NKB was strongly correlated with latency to seizure in normal pregnant rats (R(2) = 0.88 vs. 0.02 in placental ischemic rats). Lastly, NKB decreased in the anterior cerebrum in response to placental ischemia and PTZ treatment but was unchanged in the posterior cerebrum. These data demonstrate that placental ischemia is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures and CSF inflammation; thus provides an excellent model for elucidating mechanisms of eclampsia-like symptoms. Further studies are required to determine the role of CSF cytokines/chemokines in mediating increased seizure susceptibility. PMID:26603461

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using 111In-DTPA ventriculography

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by 111In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (111In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis

  4. Increased digitalis-like activity in human cerebrospinal fluid after expansion of the extracellular fluid volume

    The present study was designed to determine whether acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume influenced the digitalis-like activity of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), previously described. Human CSF samples, drawn before and 30 minutes after the intravenous infusion of 1 liter of either saline or glucose solutions, were assayed for digitalis-like activity by inhibition of either the 86Rb+ uptake into human erythrocytes or by the activity of a purified Na+-K+ ATPase. The CSF inhibitory activity on both systems significantly increased after the infusion of sodium solutions but did not change after the infusion of glucose. These results indicate that the digitalis-like factor of human CSF might be involved in the regulation of the extracellular fluid volume and electrolyte content and thereby in some of the physiological responses to sodium loading. 31 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  5. Research of essential elements composition in the cerebrospinal fluid in patients with outcomes of traumatic brain injury



    The aim of this research is to investigate the essential elements composition in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with different outcomes of traumatic brain injury before and after complex treatment with the use of endolumbal and intracystal introduction of ozone and pyracetam in dynamics. Essential elements composition was investigated in the cerebrospinal fluid of 83 patients. Thus, it may be noted positive changes in the metabolism of essential elements in the cerebrospinal fluid of pat...

  6. Clinical value of determination HIV viral load in the cerebrospinal fluid of HIV-infected patients

    V. B. Musatov


    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze the concentration of HIV RNA in the cerebrospinal fluid and to evaluate its significance in the pathology of the central nervous system among HIV infected persons.Materials: We examined 36 patients with HIV infection with signs of pathology of the central nervous system. All patients was done completed a standard investigation of cerebrospinal fluid, cytological examination and detection viral load of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum.Results. A different of opportunistic and HIV-related disease was diagnosed in 29 patients. The most frequent pathology of the nervous system (12 cases is a diffuse HIV-associated brain damage occurring in 7 patients in the form of aseptic non purulent meningitis and in 5 patients in the form of encephalitis. The average value of the absolute and relative count of CD4-lymphocytes in patients amounted 147,0 cells/μl (40,0; 408,75 and 10.0% (4,00; 18,50. Pathological changes in cellular composition and protein concentration of cerebrospinal fluid detected in 19 cases. Replication of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid are detected in 31 of 32 patients not receiving antiretroviral therapy, including 17 patients with normal values of cerebrospinal fluid. The average HIV viral load in the cerebrospinal fluid was 15 133,0 copies/ml (2501,0; 30624,0 or 4,18 (3,35; 4,48 lg HIV RNA, average HIV viral load in serum – 62 784,0 copies/ml (6027,5; 173869,0 or 4,80 4,80 (3,7; 5,2 lg HIV RNA. The concentration of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid was significantly lower than in serum (4,18 and 4,80 lg HIV RNA, p=0.027. 4 patients with severe, multietiology damage of the central nervous system viral, microbial and fungal etiology, there was an inverse relationship between the concentration of HIV in the cerebrospinal fluid and in serum, the concentrations of HIV was higher in the cerebrospinal fluid.Conclusion: Among the majority of HIV-infected patients with signs of the central

  7. Experimental determination of the Stern layer thickness at the interface of the human arachnoid membrane and the cerebrospinal fluid

    The paper is part of an investigation of the electrostatic forces contributing to the interaction between colloidal molecules, suspended in the cerebrospinal fluid, with other molecules of the cerebrospinal fluid and with the surrounding environment. The study is based on experimental observations and theoretical considerations. We are reporting about the microscopic observation of particles suspended in the cerebrospinal fluid which was obtained by lumbar puncture of 27 neurosurgery patients. We found that the mean particle diameter and therefore the mean thickness of the Stern layer at the interface of the arachnoid membrane with the cerebrospinal fluid is a few micrometers. Individual variations of this diameter have been observed. (orig.)

  8. Mammalian embryonic cerebrospinal fluid proteome has greater apolipoprotein and enzyme pattern complexity than the avian proteome.

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Bueno, David


    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid, which has an essential role in the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. We identified and analyzed the proteome of Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid from rat embryos (Rattus norvegicus), which includes proteins involved in the regulation of Central Nervous System development. The comparison between mammalian and avian Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteomes reveals great similarity, but also greater complexity in some protein groups. The pattern of apolipoproteins and enzymes in CSF is more complex in the mammals than in birds. This difference may underlie the greater neural complexity and synaptic plasticity found in mammals. Fourteen Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid gene products were previously identified in adult human Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteome, and interestingly they are altered in patients with neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis may contribute to our understanding of Central Nervous System development and evolution, and these human diseases. PMID:16335996

  9. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and prealbumin in cerebrospinal fluid from depressed patients

    Jørgensen, Ole Steen


    The size of the soluble form of the human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM-sol, was by gel permeation chromatography estimated to 160-250 kDa. Within the CSF the concentration of NCAM-sol was found about 15-25% increased in lumbar fluid and 25% increased in ventricular...

  10. Indication for and value of information obtained by scintigraphy of the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid space

    56 scintigraphic examinations of the cerebrospinal fluid space for differential diagnosis of hydrocephalus as well as for the demonstration and localization of liquorrhea and of disturbances of the spinal fluid passage are reported. When using 169Yb-DTPA the procedure has proved to be very reliable and side reactions need not be expected

  11. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês;


    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild...... cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau...... in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42...

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid markers before and after shunting in patients with secondary and idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Tisell Magnus


    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to explore biochemical changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF induced by shunt surgery and the relationship between these changes and clinical improvement. Methods We measured clinical symptoms and analysed lumbar CSF for protein content, neurodegeneration and neurotransmission markers in patients with secondary (SNPH, n = 17 and idiopathic NPH (INPH, n = 18 before and 3 months after shunt surgery. Patients were divided into groups according to whether or not there was improvement in clinical symptoms after surgery. Results Preoperatively, the only pathological findings were elevated neurofilament protein (NFL, significantly more so in the SNPH patients than in the INPH patients, and elevated albumin content. Higher levels of NFL correlated with worse gait, balance, wakefulness and neuropsychological performance. Preoperatively, no differences were seen in any of the CSF biomarkers between patients that improved after surgery and those that did not improve. Postoperatively, a greater improvement in gait and balance performance correlated with a more pronounced reduction in NFL. Levels of albumin, albumin ratio, neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal peptide and ganglioside GD3 increased significantly after shunting in both groups. In addition, Gamma amino butyric acid increased significantly in SNPH and tau in INPH. Conclusion We conclude that a number of biochemical changes occur after shunt surgery, but there are no marked differences between the SNPH and INPH patients. The results indicate that NFL may be a marker that can predict a surgically reversible state in NPH.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    Palmqvist, Sebastian; Mattsson, Niklas; Hansson, Oskar; ,


    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET ...

  14. Cytomegalovirus associated transverse myelitis in an immunocompetent host with DNA detection in cerebrospinal fluid; a case report

    Karunarathne Suneth; Govindapala Dumitha; Udayakumara Yapa; Fernando Harshini


    Abstract Background Cytomegalovirus associated transverse myelitis among immunocompetent adults has been rarely reported. We report a patient presenting with clinical myelitis followed by previously unreported finding of cytomegalovirus deoxyribonucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid. Case report A forty year old immunocompetent male presented with acute onset progressive bilateral lower limb weakness. His spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and clinical pict...

  15. [A Case of Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Associated with Cervical Spondylosis].

    Arai, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Hirohito; Shiomi, Ryoji; Tatsumi, Shotaro; Kohmura, Eiji


    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak and intracranial hypotension associated with cervical spondylosis have rarely been observed, and only a few cases are reported. A 69-year-old woman, previously treated for rectal and thyroid cancer, complained of a non-postural persistent headache. The patient regularly practiced aerobic exercise, but a month earlier she had started experiencing headache and neck pain while exercising. Computed tomography(CT)showed bilateral chronic subdural hematomas, and magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)revealed diffuse dural enhancement and tonsillar herniation. We drained the subdural hematomas and replaced the ventricular reservoir to safely access the cerebrospinal fluid space. After surgery, the persistent headache disappeared for several days, but a postural headache emerged. CT myelogram showed extradural accumulation of the contrast medium at the C2-5 level with cervical spondylosis. The patient was treated with conservative therapy of bed rest and intravenous fluid hydration for two weeks, and the headache improved. CT myelogram after treatment showed no extradural accumulation of the contrast medium. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak associated with cervical spondylosis could be induced by the repeated minor mechanical stress caused by physical exercise. Therefore, the possibility that non-postural persistent headache may be caused by spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak should not be underestimated. PMID:27605479

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease - a systematic review

    Andersen, A D; Binzer, M; Gramsbergen, J B;


    significant role in distinguishing PD from other neurodegenerative diseases. Several oxidative stress markers are related to disease severity, with the antioxidant urate also having a prognostic value in terms of disease severity. Increased levels of amyloid and tau-proteins correlate with cognitive decline......, neuroinflammation, lysosomal dysfunction and proteins involved in PD and other neurodegenerative disorders, focusing on four clinical domains: their ability to (1) distinguish PD from healthy subjects and other neurodegenerative disorders as well as their relation to (2) disease duration after initial diagnosis, (3...

  17. Evaluation of postmortem drug concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid compared with blood and pericardial fluid.

    Tominaga, Mariko; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Inamori-Kawamoto, Osamu; Oritani, Shigeki; Maeda, Hitoshi


    In forensic toxicology, body fluids are important materials not only as alternatives to blood but also for investigation of postmortem drug redistributions and pharmaco-/toxicokinetic analysis; however, there are limited data on postmortem drug distributions in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The present study reviewed toxicological data of autopsy cases (n=103), in which drugs were detected in CSF using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), to investigate drug concentrations in CSF, compared with blood and pericardial fluid (PCF) concentrations. Oral/injected amphetamines (n=23) showed similar CSF and blood/PCF concentrations with partly lower CSF concentrations (about ×0.5-1.1). CSF concentrations of the venous anesthetic midazolam (n=7) were lower with poor correlations. Oral caffeine (n=15), acetaminophen (n=7), chlorpheniramine (n=6), dihydrocodeine (n=6), and phenobarbital (n=21) showed equivalent to lower CSF concentrations (about ×0.2-1.2), compared with blood and PCF concentrations; however, CSF phenobarbital concentrations were high in a fatal intoxication case. CSF concentrations of phenothiazine derivatives (n=29) were markedly lower (about ×0.1) than blood/PCF concentrations. The distribution of the local anesthetic lidocaine used in critical medical care (n=49) markedly varied by case. These findings suggest that CSF is useful in routine forensic toxicology as an alternative to blood as well as for investigating pharmaco-/toxicokinetics and postmortem redistributions. PMID:26218406

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine depletion during pegylated asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Henriksen, Louise T; Nersting, Jacob; Raja, Raheel A;


    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine depletion is considered a marker of asparaginase effect in the central nervous system (CNS) and may play a role in CNS-directed anti-leukaemia therapy. The...

  19. A rapid and simple cannulation technique for repeated sampling of cerebrospinal fluid in freely moving rats

    Bouman, H.J.; Wimersma Greidanus, T.B. van


    A cannulation technique for frequent sampling of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in unanaesthetized freely moving rats is described. A permanent stainless steel cannula, constructed in such a way that no loss of CSF occurs, is placed into the rat's cisterna magna and fixed to the skull by anchoring screws

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid glucose and lactate: age-specific reference values and implications for clinical practice.

    Leen, W.G.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Wevers, R.A.; Verbeek, M.M.


    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is an important tool in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological disorders, but reference ranges for CSF glucose, CSF/plasma glucose ratio and CSF lactate based on studies with large numbers of CSF samples are not available. Our aim was to define age-specific re

  1. Therapy failure following selection of enfuvirtide-resistant HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid

    van Lelyveld, S F L; Nijhuis, M; Baatz, F; Wilting, I; van den Bergh, W M; Kurowski, M; de Jong, D.; Hoepelman, A I M; Wensing, A M J


    We report the selection of enfuvirtide-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cerebrospinal fluid, resulting in subsequent loss of viral suppression in the plasma. This case report emphasizes the potential danger of low-level penetration of entry inhibitors into the central nervous system.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Moxifloxacin in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Plasma in Patients with Tuberculous Meningitis

    Alffenaar, J. W. C.; van Altena, R.; Bokkerink, H. J.; Luijckx, G. J.; van Soolingen, D.; Aarnoutse, R. E.; van der Werf, T. S.


    Moxifloxacin cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration was evaluated by obtaining full plasma and CSF time concentration curves for 4 patients with tuberculous meningitis. The geometric mean ratio of the areas under the curve for CSF to plasma were 0.82 (range, 0.70-0.94) at 400 mg once per day and 0.71

  3. Pharmacokinetics of moxifloxacin in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in patients with tuberculous meningitis.

    Alffenaar, J.W.C.; Altena, R. van; Bokkerink, H.J.; Luijckx, G.J.R.; Soolingen, D. van; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Werf, T.S. van der


    Moxifloxacin cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration was evaluated by obtaining full plasma and CSF time concentration curves for 4 patients with tuberculous meningitis. The geometric mean ratio of the areas under the curve for CSF to plasma were 0.82 (range, 0.70-0.94) at 400 mg once per day and 0.71

  4. Preliminary analysis of proton magnetic resonance 1D spectra of cerebrospinal fluid and brain cancer extracts

    In series of cerebrospinal fluid samples from 25 patients proton spectra of magnetic resonance were measured. The spectra were measured also for series of brain tumor tissue extracts received from another 25 patients. This paper presents an attempt to apply statistical methods of image recognition for spectra analysis of the two measured series

  5. Abnormal expression of cerebrospinal fluid cation chloride cotransporters in patients with Rett syndrome.

    Sofia Temudo Duarte

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Rett Syndrome is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder caused mainly by mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2. The relevance of MeCP2 for GABAergic function was previously documented in animal models. In these models, animals show deficits in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. Neuronal Cation Chloride Cotransporters (CCCs play a key role in GABAergic neuronal maturation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor is implicated in the regulation of CCCs expression during development. Our aim was to analyse the expression of two relevant CCCs, NKCC1 and KCC2, in the cerebrospinal fluid of Rett syndrome patients and compare it with a normal control group. METHODS: The presence of bumetanide sensitive NKCC1 and KCC2 was analysed in cerebrospinal fluid samples from a control pediatric population (1 day to 14 years of life and from Rett syndrome patients (2 to 19 years of life, by immunoblot analysis. RESULTS: Both proteins were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid and their levels are higher in the early postnatal period. However, Rett syndrome patients showed significantly reduced levels of KCC2 and KCC2/NKCC1 ratio when compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced KCC2/NKCC1 ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid of Rett Syndrome patients suggests a disturbed process of GABAergic neuronal maturation and open up a new therapeutic perspective.

  6. Proteomics comparison of cerebrospinal fluid of relapsing remitting and primary progressive multiple sclerosis

    M.P. Stoop (Marcel); V. Singh (Vaibhav); L.J.M. Dekker (Lennard); M.K. Titulaer (Mark); C. Stingl (Christoph); P.C. Burgers (Peter); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); R.Q. Hintzen (Rogier); T.M. Luider (Theo)


    textabstractBackground: Based on clinical representation of disease symptoms multiple sclerosis (MScl) patients can be divided into two major subtypes; relapsing remitting (RR) MScl (85-90%) and primary progressive (PP) MScl (10-15%). Proteomics analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has detected a n

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta42/phosphorylated tau ratio discriminates between Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    Jong, D. de; Jansen, R.W.M.M.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.


    BACKGROUND: The differentiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) from vascular dementia (VaD) is hampered by clinical diagnostic criteria with disappointing sensitivity and specificity. The objective of this study was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau protein (t-tau), a

  8. Bace1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid and its relation to markers of ad pathology

    Mulder, S.D.; Flier, W.M. van der; Verheijen, J.H.; Mulder, C.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Hack, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.


    Several studies have shown that reduced amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ {42}) and increased tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflect increased Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the brain. β-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is thought to be the major β-secretase involved in Aβ production in the brain,

  9. Levels of arginine-vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid during passive avoidance behavior in rats

    Kloet, E.R. de; Laczi, F.; Gaffori, O.; Fekete, M.; Wied, D. de


    The concentration of immunoreactive arginine-vasopressin (IR-AVP) was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during acquisition and retention of passive avoidance behavior. IR-AVP level in CSF of male Wistar rats immediately after the learning trial was increased; the rate of which was related to

  10. Fourier analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities: MR imaging study. The Scandinavian Flow Group

    Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F; Stubgaard, M;


    An interleaved pseudocinematographic FLASH (fast low-angle shot) sequence with additional pulsed gradients for flow encoding was used to quantify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow velocities and CSF production. Flow-dependent phase information was obtained by subtracting two differently encoded phase...

  11. Glycemia and Levels of Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid and Tau in Patients Attending a Memory Clinic

    Exalto, Lieza G.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Scheltens, Phillip; Biessels, Geert Jan


    OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between markers of glycemia and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid beta 1-42 (A beta 42) and tau levels in patients attending a memory clinic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Memory clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred forty-five consecutive patients atte

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid flow and production in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus studied by MRI

    Gideon, P; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C;


    An interleaved velocity-sensitised fast low-angle shot pulse sequence was used to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cerebral aqueduct, and supratentorial CSF production in 9 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and 9 healthy volunteers. The peak aqueduct CSF flow, both caudal...

  13. Prediction of bacterial meningitis based on cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis in children

    Sofia Águeda


    Full Text Available Children with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis are frequently treated with parenteral antibiotics, but only a few have bacterial meningitis. Although some clinical prediction rules, such as bacterial meningitis score, are of well-known value, the cerebrospinal fluid white blood cells count can be the initial available information. Our aim was to establish a cutoff point of cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count that could distinguish bacterial from viral and aseptic meningitis. A retrospective study of children aged 29 days to 17 years who were admitted between January 1st and December 31th, 2009, with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis (white blood cell > 7 µL-1 was conducted. The cases of traumatic lumbar puncture and of antibiotic treatment before lumbar puncture were excluded. There were 295 patients with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, 60.3% females, medium age 5.0 ± 4.3 years distributed as: 12.2% 1-3 months; 10.5% 3-12 months; 29.8% 12 months to 5 years; 47.5% >5 years. Thirty one children (10.5% were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis, 156 (52.9% viral meningitis and 108 (36.6% aseptic meningitis. Bacterial meningitis was caused by Neisseria meningi tidis (48.4%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (32.3%, other Streptococcus species (9.7%, and other agents (9.7%. cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count was significantly higher in patients with bacterial meningitis (mean, 4839 cells/µL compared to patients with aseptic meningitis (mean, 159 cells/µL, p < 0.001, with those with aseptic meningitis (mean, 577 cells/µL, p < 0.001 and with all non-bacterial meningitis cases together (p < 0.001. A cutoff value of 321 white blood cell/µL showed the best combination of sensitivity (80.6% and specificity (81.4% for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis (area under receiver operating characteristic curve 0.837. Therefore, the value of cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count was found to be a useful and rapid diagnostic test to distinguish

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Vasospasm Enhances Endothelin Contraction in Rat Cerebral Arteries

    Assenzio, Barbara; Martin, Erica L.; Stankevicius, Edgaras; Civiletti, Federica; Fontanella, Marco; Boccaletti, Riccardo; Berardino, Maurizio; Mazzeo, AnnaTeresa; Ducati, Alessandro; Simonsen, Ulf; Mascia, Luciana


    Introduction Previous studies have suggested that cerebrospinal fluid from patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) leads to pronounced vasoconstriction in isolated arteries. We hypothesized that only cerebrospinal fluid from SAH patients with vasospasm would produce an enhanced contractile response to endothelin-1 in rat cerebral arteries, involving both endothelin ETA and ETB receptors. Methods Intact rat basilar arteries were incubated for 24 hours with cerebrospinal fluid from 1) SAH patients with vasospasm, 2) SAH patients without vasospasm, and 3) control patients. Arterial segments with and without endothelium were mounted in myographs and concentration-response curves for endothelin-1 were constructed in the absence and presence of selective and combined ETA and ETB receptor antagonists. Endothelin concentrations in culture medium and receptor expression were measured. Results Compared to the other groups, the following was observed in arteries exposed to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with vasospasm: 1) larger contractions at lower endothelin concentrations (p<0.05); 2) the increased endothelin contraction was absent in arteries without endothelium; 3) higher levels of endothelin secretion in the culture medium (p<0.05); 4) there was expression of ETA receptors and new expression of ETB receptors was apparent; 5) reduction in the enhanced response to endothelin after ETB blockade in the low range and after ETA blockade in the high range of endothelin concentrations; 6) after combined ETA and ETB blockade a complete inhibition of endothelin contraction was observed. Conclusions Our experimental findings showed that in intact rat basilar arteries exposed to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with vasospasm endothelin contraction was enhanced in an endothelium-dependent manner and was blocked by combined ETA and ETB receptor antagonism. Therefore we suggest that combined blockade of both receptors may play a role in counteracting vasospasm in patients

  15. Detection of an occult transclival cerebrospinal fluid fistula by CT and MRI

    We describe an unusual occult transclival cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula to the sphenoid sinus demonstrated by MRI. CT was performed because of a posterior cerebral infarct caused by cardiac arrhythmia. Axial sections showed fluid in the sphenoid sinus. High-resolution scans revealed a bony defect 3 mm in diameter of the posterior wall of the sphenoid sinus, and MRI showed a transclival CSF fistula. This occult lesion was confirmed by surgery and duraplasty was successfully performed via an endonasal approach. (orig.)

  16. High Resolution Discovery Proteomics Reveals Candidate Disease Progression Markers of Alzheimer's Disease in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    Ronald C Hendrickson

    Full Text Available Disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD constitute a major goal in medicine. Current trends suggest that biomarkers reflective of AD neuropathology and modifiable by treatment would provide supportive evidence for disease modification. Nevertheless, a lack of quantitative tools to assess disease modifying treatment effects remains a major hurdle. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biochemical markers such as total tau, p-tau and Ab42 are well established markers of AD; however, global quantitative biochemical changes in CSF in AD disease progression remain largely uncharacterized. Here we applied a high resolution open discovery platform, dMS, to profile a cross-sectional cohort of lumbar CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients versus those from non-AD/non-demented (control patients. Multiple markers were identified to be statistically significant in the cohort tested. We selected two markers SME-1 (p<0.0001 and SME-2 (p = 0.0004 for evaluation in a second independent longitudinal cohort of human CSF from post-mortem diagnosed AD patients and age-matched and case-matched control patients. In cohort-2, SME-1, identified as neuronal secretory protein VGF, and SME-2, identified as neuronal pentraxin receptor-1 (NPTXR, in AD were 21% (p = 0.039 and 17% (p = 0.026 lower, at baseline, respectively, than in controls. Linear mixed model analysis in the longitudinal cohort estimate a decrease in the levels of VGF and NPTXR at the rate of 10.9% and 6.9% per year in the AD patients, whereas both markers increased in controls. Because these markers are detected by mass spectrometry without the need for antibody reagents, targeted MS based assays provide a clear translation path for evaluating selected AD disease-progression markers with high analytical precision in the clinic.

  17. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid regulates neuroepithelial survival, proliferation, and neurogenesis in chick embryos.

    Gato, Angel; Moro, J A; Alonso, M I; Bueno, D; De La Mano, A; Martín, C


    Early in development, the behavior of neuroepithelial cells is controlled by several factors, which act in a developmentally regulated manner. Diffusible factors are secreted locally by the neuroepithelium itself, although other nearby structures may also be involved. Evidence suggests a physiological role for the cerebrospinal fluid in the development of the brain. Here, using organotypic cultures of chick embryo neuroepithelial explants from the mesencephalon, we show that the neuroepithelium in vitro is not able to self-induce cell survival, replication, and neurogenesis. We also show that the embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF) promotes neuroepithelial stem cell survival and induces proliferation and neurogenesis in mesencephalic explants. These data strongly suggest that E-CSF is involved in the regulation of neuroepithelial cells behavior, supporting the hypothesis that this fluid plays a key role during the early development of the central nervous system. PMID:15803475

  18. Dissociable brain biomarkers of fluid intelligence.

    Paul, Erick J; Larsen, Ryan J; Nikolaidis, Aki; Ward, Nathan; Hillman, Charles H; Cohen, Neal J; Kramer, Arthur F; Barbey, Aron K


    Cognitive neuroscience has long sought to understand the biological foundations of human intelligence. Decades of research have revealed that general intelligence is correlated with two brain-based biomarkers: the concentration of the brain biochemical N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and total brain volume measured using structural MR imaging (MRI). However, the relative contribution of these biomarkers in predicting performance on core facets of human intelligence remains to be well characterized. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the role of NAA and brain volume in predicting fluid intelligence (Gf). Three canonical tests of Gf (BOMAT, Number Series, and Letter Sets) and three working memory tasks (Reading, Rotation, and Symmetry span tasks) were administered to a large sample of healthy adults (n=211). We conducted exploratory factor analysis to investigate the factor structure underlying Gf independent from working memory and observed two Gf components (verbal/spatial and quantitative reasoning) and one working memory component. Our findings revealed a dissociation between two brain biomarkers of Gf (controlling for age and sex): NAA concentration correlated with verbal/spatial reasoning, whereas brain volume correlated with quantitative reasoning and working memory. A follow-up analysis revealed that this pattern of findings is observed for males and females when analyzed separately. Our results provide novel evidence that distinct brain biomarkers are associated with specific facets of human intelligence, demonstrating that NAA and brain volume are independent predictors of verbal/spatial and quantitative facets of Gf. PMID:27184204

  19. The cerebrospinal fluid proteome in HIV infection: change associated with disease severity

    Angel Thomas E


    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central nervous system (CNS infection is a nearly universal feature of untreated systemic HIV infection with a clinical spectrum that ranges from chronic asymptomatic infection to severe cognitive and motor dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has played an important part in defining the character of this evolving infection and response to treatment. To further characterize CNS HIV infection and its effects, we applied advanced high-throughput proteomic methods to CSF to identify novel proteins and their changes with disease progression and treatment. Results After establishing an accurate mass and time (AMT tag database containing 23,141 AMT tags for CSF peptides, we analyzed 91 CSF samples by LC-MS from 12 HIV-uninfected and 14 HIV-infected subjects studied in the context of initiation of antiretroviral therapy and correlated abundances of identified proteins a within and between subjects, b with all other proteins across the entire sample set, and c with "external" CSF biomarkers of infection (HIV RNA, immune activation (neopterin and neural injury (neurofilament light chain protein, NFL. We identified a mean of 2,333 +/- 328 (SD peptides covering 307 +/-16 proteins in the 91 CSF sample set. Protein abundances differed both between and within subjects sampled at different time points and readily separated those with and without HIV infection. Proteins also showed inter-correlations across the sample set that were associated with biologically relevant dynamic processes. One-hundred and fifty proteins showed correlations with the external biomarkers. For example, using a threshold of cross correlation coefficient (Pearson's ≤ -0.3 and ≥0.3 for potentially meaningful relationships, a total of 99 proteins correlated with CSF neopterin (43 negative and 56 positive correlations and related principally to neuronal plasticity and survival and to innate immunity. Pathway analysis defined several networks connecting

  20. The cerebrospinal fluid proteome in HIV infection: change associated with disease severity.

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Spudich, Serena S.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fuchs, Dietmar; Liegler, Teri; Zetterberg, Henrik; Camp, David G.; Price, Richard W.; Smith, Richard D.


    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a constant feature of systemic HIV infection with a clinical spectrum that ranges from chronic asymptomatic infection to severe cognitive and motor dysfunction. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has played an important part in defining the character of this evolving infection and response to treatment. To further characterize CNS HIV infection and its effects, we applied advanced high-throughput proteomic methods to CSF to identify novel proteins and their changes with disease progression and treatment. After establishing an accurate mass and time (AMT) tag database containing 23,141 AMT tags for CSF peptides, we analyzed 91 CSF samples by LC-MS from 12 HIV-uninfected and 14 HIV-infected subjects studied in the context of initiation of antiretroviral and correlated abundances of identified proteins (a) within and between subjects, (b) with all other proteins across the entire sample set, and (c) with 'external' CSF biomarkers of infection (HIV RNA), immune activation (neopterin) and neural injury (neurofilament light chain protein, NFL). We identified a mean of 2,333 +/- 328 (SD) peptides covering 307 +/-16 proteins in the 91 CSF sample set. Protein abundances differed both between and within subjects sampled at different time points and readily separated those with and without HIV infection. Proteins also showed inter-correlations across the sample set that were associated with biologically relevant dynamic processes. One-hundred and fifty proteins showed correlations with the external biomarkers. For example, using a threshold of cross correlation coefficient (Pearson's) {le}0.3 and {ge}0.3 for potentially meaningful relationships, a total of 99 proteins correlated with CSF neopterin (43 negative and 56 positive correlations) and related principally to neuronal plasticity and survival and to innate immunity. Pathway analysis defined several networks connecting the identified proteins, including one with

  1. Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    Regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglu) and cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites were measured in two cases of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) with different clinical courses. A marked decrease in rCMRglu was found in the cortical gray matter of a patient with rapidly developing SSPE (3.6 - 4.2 mg/100 g brain tissue/min). However, the rCMRglu was preserved in the caudate and lenticular nuclei of the patient (7.7 mg/100 g/min). The rCMRglu in a patient with slowly developing SSPE revealed patterns and values similar to those of the control. Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites ; homovanilic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, were decreased in both rapidly and slowly developing SSPE. These data indicated that rCMRglu correlated better with the neurological and psychological status and that dopaminergic and serotonergic abnormalities have been implicated in pathophysiology of SSPE. (author)

  2. Cytokine network analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Hornig, M; Gottschalk, G; Peterson, D L; Knox, K K; Schultz, A F; Eddy, M L; Che, X; Lipkin, W I


    Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome is an unexplained debilitating disorder that is frequently associated with cognitive and motor dysfunction. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid from 32 cases, 40 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 19 normal subjects frequency-matched for age and sex using a 51-plex cytokine assay. Group-specific differences were found for the majority of analytes with an increase in cases of CCL11 (eotaxin), a chemokine involved in eosinophil recruitment. Network analysis revealed an inverse relationship between interleukin 1 receptor antagonist and colony-stimulating factor 1, colony-stimulating factor 2 and interleukin 17F, without effects on interleukin 1α or interleukin 1β, suggesting a disturbance in interleukin 1 signaling. Our results indicate a markedly disturbed immune signature in the cerebrospinal fluid of cases that is consistent with immune activation in the central nervous system, and a shift toward an allergic or T helper type-2 pattern associated with autoimmunity. PMID:25824300

  3. Olfactory route for cerebrospinal fluid drainage into the cervical lymphatic system in a rabbit experimental model☆

    Liu, Haisheng; Ni, Zhili; Chen, Yetao; Wang, Dong; Qi, Yan; Zhang, Qiuhang; Wang, Shijie


    The present study analyzed the anatomical association between intracranial subarachnoid space and the cervical lymphatic system. X-ray contrast medium and Microfil® (Microfil compounds fill and opacify microvascular and other spaces of non-surviving animals and post-mortem tissue under physiological injection pressure) were injected into the cisterna magna of the rabbit, and perineural routes of cerebrospinal fluid outflow into the lymphatic system were visualized. Under a surgical operating ...

  4. Detection of Antibodies to Brucella Cytoplasmic Proteins in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Neurobrucellosis

    Baldi, Pablo C.; Araj, George F.; Racaro, Graciela C.; Wallach, Jorge C.; Fossati, Carlos A.


    The diagnosis of human neurobrucellosis usually relies on the detection of antibodies to Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by agglutination tests or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Here we describe the detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to cytoplasmic proteins (CP) of Brucella spp. by ELISA and Western blotting in seven CSF samples from five patients with neurobrucellosis. While IgG to CP (titers of 200 to 12,800) and IgG to...

  5. Spinal cerebrospinal fluid seeding of a clival chordoma; A case report

    Baek, Seung Hwan; Yu, In Kyu; Kim, Seong Min; Park, Ki Seok; Son, Hyun Jin [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)


    Chordomas originate from remnants of the embryonic notochord and account for < 2% of all malignant bone tumors. Chordomas have a high rate of local recurrence. However, spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) seeding of a chordoma is extremely rare. Here, we present a very rare case of clival chordoma with spinal seeding. Radiologists should consider spinal CSF seeding of a clival chordoma, particularly when accompanied by signs of dural perforation or caudal extension.

  6. Occurrence of Overlooked Zoonotic Tuberculosis: Detection of Mycobacterium bovis in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Shah, N.P.; Singhal, A.; A Jain; P. Kumar; Uppal, S. S.; Srivatsava, M. V. P.; Prasad, H. K.


    The paucibacillary nature of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been a major obstacle in the diagnosis of human tuberculous meningitis (TBM). This study shows that with molecular techniques direct precise determination to the species level of mycobacterial pathogens can be made. The present report describes the utility of a nested PCR (N-PCR) assay (A. Mishra, A. Singhal, D. S. Chauhan, V. M. Katoch, K. Srivastava, S. S. Thakral, S. S. Bharadwaj, V. Sreenivas, and H. K. Prasad, J. Clin. Microb...

  7. Diagnostic Value of Cerebrospinal Fluid Level of Carcinoembryonic Antigen in Patients with Leptomeningeal Carcinomatous Metastasis

    Kang, Sung Jin; Kim, Kwang Soo; Ha, Yoon Suk; Huh, So Young; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jong Kuk; Kim, Min Jeong


    Background and Purpose Multifocal seeding of the leptomeninges by malignant cells, which is usually referred to as leptomeningeal carcinomatous metastasis, produces substantial morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastasis is usually established by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) investigation, including cytology, cell counts, protein, glucose, and a tumor marker such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). This study examined the diagnostic value of CEA in the CSF. Methods We meas...

  8. Mycophenolic acid inhibits replication of Type 2 Winnipeg, a cerebrospinal fluid-derived reovirus isolate

    Hermann, Laura L.; Coombs, Kevin M.


    BACKGROUND: The role of reoviruses in human disease is uncertain. Most identified cases are sporadic and asymptomatic or produce minor upper respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms. In November 1997, a reovirus was isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of a severe combined immune deficient infant in Winnipeg, Manitoba. RNA characterization and sequencing studies demonstrated this reovirus isolate to be unique. Thus, the virus was named Type 2 Winnipeg (T2W).OBJECTIVES: Mycophenolic acid (MPA...


    Subirá, D.; Simó, M.; Illán, J.; Castañón, S.; Gonzalo, R; Martínez-García, M.; Pardo, J.; Gómez, L.; Navarro, M.; Bruna, J


    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory-cell infiltrate surrounding solid tumours is progressively gaining importance, in an attempt to reach a better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, and also improve future design of immune-based cancer therapies. However, information about the inflammatory cell populations in leptomeningeal disease is scarce. STUDY DESIGN: We have studied the distribution of the main inflammatory cell populations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 83 patients di...

  10. An evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal banding confirmed by immunofixation on agarose gel.

    George, P M; Lorier, M A; Donaldson, I M


    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 115 consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic lumbar puncture or myelography was examined to determine the usefulness of immunofixation, following agarose gel electrophoresis, in the detection of oligoclonal IgG. All electrophoretic patterns were evaluated with and without immunofixation, and the interpretation of 9% of specimens was altered by immunofixation. The demonstration of oligoclonal IgG was shown to be more reliable in the diagnosis of multiple sc...

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid signs of neuronal damage after antiretroviral treatment interruption in HIV-1 infection

    Deeks Steven G; Hagberg Lars; Rosengren Lars; Gisslén Magnus; Price Richard W


    Abstract Background The neurofilament is a major structural component of myelinated axons. Increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the light chain of the neurofilament protein (NFL) can serve as a sensitive indicator of central nervous system (CNS) injury. To assess whether interrupting antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection might have a deleterious effect on the CNS, we measured NFL levels in HIV-infected subjects interrupting therapy. We identified subjects who had CSF HIV ...

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid viral breakthrough in two HIV-infected subjects on darunavir/ritonavir monotherapy

    Gisslén, Magnus; Fuchs, Dietmar; Hagberg, Lars; Svennerholm, Bo; Zetterberg, Henrik


    Darunavir/ritonavir monotherapy maintains HIV suppression in most patients who have achieved an undetectable viral load on combination antiretroviral treatment, and is increasingly used in the clinic. However, concerns have been raised about the effectiveness of ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI/r) monotherapy in the prevention of HIV replication in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we report the cases of 2 patients on darunavir/r maintenance monotherapy with cerebrospinal fluid v...

  13. Evidence for Fungal Infection in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Brain Tissue from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Alonso, Ruth; Pisa, Diana; Marina, Ana Isabel; Morato, Esperanza; Rábano, Alberto; Rodal, Izaskun; Carrasco, Luis


    Among neurogenerative diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal illness characterized by a progressive motor neuron dysfunction in the motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. ALS is the most common form of motor neuron disease; yet, to date, the exact etiology of ALS remains unknown. In the present work, we have explored the possibility of fungal infection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in brain tissue from ALS patients. Fungal antigens, as well as DNA from several fungi, we...

  14. Development of a Cerebrospinal Fluid Lateral Reservoir Model in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Cynthia M. Lester McCully; Bacher, John; MacAllister, Rhonda P; Steffen-Smith, Emilie A.; Saleem, Kadharbatcha; Thomas, Marvin L.; Cruz, Rafael; Warren, Katherine E.


    Rapid, serial, and humane collection of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in nonhuman primates (NHP) is an essential element of numerous research studies and is currently accomplished via two different models. The CSF reservoir model (FR) combines a catheter in the 4th ventricle with a flexible silastic reservoir to permit circulating CSF flow. The CSF lateral port model (LP) consists of a lateral ventricular catheter and an IV port that provides static access to CSF and volume restrictions on sample...

  15. Levels of arginine-vasopressin in cerebrospinal fluid during passive avoidance behavior in rats

    Kloet, E.R. de; Laczi, F.; Gaffori, O.; Fekete, M.; Wied, D. de


    The concentration of immunoreactive arginine-vasopressin (IR-AVP) was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during acquisition and retention of passive avoidance behavior. IR-AVP level in CSF of male Wistar rats immediately after the learning trial was increased; the rate of which was related to the intensity of the electric footschock during the learning trial and the avoidance latency as measured 1 day after the learning trial. Immediately after the 24 h retention test IR-AVP levels wer...

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Colorimetric Microtiter Plate Systems for Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Tang, Yi-Wei; Rys, Paul N.; Rutledge, Barbara J.; Mitchell, P. Shawn; Smith, Thomas F.; Persing, David H.


    In the past few years, application of the PCR to the detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with encephalitis and meningitis has become standard laboratory practice. However, from an operational perspective, the true diagnostic value of PCR in this setting is yet to be realized because most laboratories subject the amplification products to lengthy probe hybridization procedures by Southern blotting. As alternatives to Southern blotting, we ...

  17. Proteomics Comparison of Cerebrospinal Fluid of Relapsing Remitting and Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Stoop, Marcel P.; Vaibhav Singh; Dekker, Lennard J; Titulaer, Mark K; Christoph Stingl; Burgers, Peter C.; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Luider, Theo M.


    textabstractBackground: Based on clinical representation of disease symptoms multiple sclerosis (MScl) patients can be divided into two major subtypes; relapsing remitting (RR) MScl (85-90%) and primary progressive (PP) MScl (10-15%). Proteomics analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has detected a number of proteins that were elevated in MScl patients. Here we specifically aimed to differentiate between the PP and RR subtypes of MScl by comparing CSF proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings: ...

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid human immunodeficiency virus viral load in patients with neurosyphilis

    Almeida, Sergio Monteiro de; Bhatt, Archana; Riggs, Patricia K.; Durelle, Janis; Lazzaretto, Deborah; Marquie-Beck, Jennifer; McCutchan, Allen; Letendre, Scott; Ellis, Ronald


    Syphilis is a frequent coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Whereas systemic syphilis infection increases plasma HIV RNA levels (viral load; VL), effects of syphilis on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) VL are unknown. We hypothesized that intrathecal immune activation in neurosyphilis would selectively increase CSF VL in coinfected patients. In this study, HIV-infected research subjects (N = 225) were categorized into three groups based on serum rapid plasma reagin (RPR), microhemagl...

  19. S-Adenosylmethionine is decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Linnebank, M.; Popp, J.; Smulders, Y.; Smith, D.; Semmler, A; Farkas, M.; Kulic, L.; Cvetanovska, G; Blom, H; Stoffel-Wagner, B.; Kölsch, H; Weller, M.; Jessen, F.


    Background: Increased plasma homocysteine levels have been described as an independent risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the underlying pathophysiology is unclear. Objective: This single-center, cross-sectional, correlational study analyzed homocysteine metabolism in 60 AD patients and 60 control subjects. Methods: Fasting plasma levels of vitamin B(12), folate and homocysteine as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of folate derivates, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), S-adenosylh...

  20. Intrathecal radiogold prophylaxis and findings of the cerebrospinal fluid in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Intrathecal radiogold application represents an alternative to the prophylaxis of meningosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its compatibility is good, there are rarely any clinical side effects. In addition to inconstant phagocytosis, changes of the protein value and its fractions could be identified in the cerebrospinal fluid. The cumulative rates of remission and survival are less marked in these groups of patients than in those who received a prophylactic skull irradiation. (author)

  1. Changes in cerebral artery blood flow velocity after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

    Kempley, S T; Gamsu, H R


    Doppler ultrasound was used to measure blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery of six premature infants with posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus, before and after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, on 23 occasions. There was a significant increase in mean blood flow velocity after the drainage procedures (+5.6 cm/s, 95% confidence interval +2.9 to +8.3 cm/s), which was accompanied by a decrease in velocity waveform pulsatility. CSF pressure also fell significantly. In pat...

  2. Acute Subdural Hematoma Following Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage in a Patient with Freezing of Gait

    Kim, Han-Joon; Cho, Yong-Jin; Cho, Joong-Yang; Lee, Dong-Ha; Hong, Keun-Sik


    Background Headache is a common complication of lumbar puncture (LP). Although in most cases post-LP headaches are not severe and have a benign course, they can also be a manifestation of a potentially life-threatening complication such as subdural hematoma (SDH). Case Report We describe a patient in whom a massive SDH developed after LP and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, which were performed during the diagnostic evaluation of freezing of gait. Conclusions SDH should not be excluded fro...

  3. Metabolomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Indicates Iron Deficiency Compromises Cerebral Energy Metabolism in the Infant Monkey

    Rao, Raghavendra; Ennis, Kathleen; Oz, Gulin; Lubach, Gabriele R.; Georgieff, Michael K.; Coe, Christopher L.


    Iron deficiency anemia affects many pregnant women and young infants worldwide. The health impact is significant, given iron’s known role in many body functions, including oxidative and lipid metabolism, protein synthesis and brain neurochemistry. The following research determined if 1H NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) could detect the adverse influence of early life iron deficiency on the central nervous system. Using a controlled dietary model in 43 i...

  4. Effects of Various Handling and Storage Conditions on Stability of Treponema pallidum DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Villanueva, A. V.; Podzorski, R. P.; Reyes, M. P.


    Treponema pallidum DNA from even small numbers of organisms was detectable in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stored at room temperature or at 4°C for several hours and in CSF subjected to three freeze-thaw cycles. These results suggest that negative PCR results for T. pallidum from patients diagnosed with T. pallidum invasion of the central nervous system are probably not due to the loss of target DNA prior to testing.

  5. Detection of posture-induced constriction of the cervical cerebrospinal fluid space by scintiscanning

    Scintiscanning of the cervical cerebrospinal fluid space at maximum ante- and retroflexion in 24 patients revealed the method to be recommended for use in the case of cervical myelopathy when the polymorphous early symptoms appear and before myelography as well as for follow-up examination. The detection of posture-induced constriction of the lumen provides additional information and increases the sensitivity considerably because, particularly during retroflexion, minor inflammatory reactions lead to scintigraphically detectable reduction in the liquor space. (author)

  6. Assessment of the Central Effects of Natural Uranium via Behavioural Performances and the Cerebrospinal Fluid Metabolome

    P. Lestaevel; Grison, S.; Favé, G.; Elie, C.; B. Dhieux; Martin, J.C.; Tack, K.; Souidi, M.


    Natural uranium (NU), a component of the earth’s crust, is not only a heavy metal but also an alpha particle emitter, with chemical and radiological toxicity. Populations may therefore be chronically exposed to NU through drinking water and food. Since the central nervous system is known to be sensitive to pollutants during its development, we assessed the effects on the behaviour and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) metabolome of rats exposed for 9 months from birth to NU via lactation and drin...

  7. Fluoride in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with fluorosis.

    Hu, Y H; Wu, S S


    The CSF fluoride level of individuals drinking water with normal fluoride content and of patients with endemic fluorosis were studied. For the purpose of studying the relationship between the dynamic equilibrium of the CSF fluoride and other body fluids, urine and blood fluoride were examined simultaneously. Fluoride was revealed in every CSF sample of the control group and its mean value was lower than that of the blood. The CSF fluoride concentration of patients with fluorosis was slightly ...

  8. Instability of cerebrospinal fluid after delayed storage and repeated freezing: a holistic study by drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy

    Klener, J.; Hofbauerová, Kateřina; Bartoš, A.; Říčný, J.; Řípová, D.; Kopecký, V. Jr.


    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2014), s. 657-664. ISSN 1434-6621 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease * cerebrospinal fluid * cold denaturation Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.707, year: 2014

  9. Utility of Measuring (1,3)-β-d-Glucan in Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Fungal Central Nervous System Infection

    Lyons, Jennifer L.; Thakur, Kiran T.; Lee, Rick; Watkins, Tonya; Pardo, Carlos A.; Carson, Kathryn A.; Markley, Barbara; Finkelman, Malcolm A.; Kieren A Marr; Roos, Karen L.; Zhang, Sean X.


    (1-3)-β-d-Glucan (BDG) from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a promising marker for diagnostic and prognostic aid of central nervous system (CNS) fungal infection, but its relationship to serum values has not been studied. Herein, we detected BDG from CSF at levels 2-fold lower than those in serum in patients without evidence of fungal disease but 25-fold higher than those in in serum in noncryptococcal CNS fungal infections. CSF BDG may be a useful biomarker in the evaluation of fungal CNS disea...

  10. Levels of 17beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 10 in Cerebrospinal Fluid of People with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Various Types of Dementias

    Krištofíková, Z.; Říčný, J.; Vyhnálek, M.; Hort, J.; Laczó, J.; Šírová, J.; Klaschka, Jan; Řípová, D.


    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2015), s. 105-114. ISSN 1387-2877 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0078; Prague Psychiatric Center (CZ) MH CZ–DRO: 00023752 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : 17beta-HSD10 * Alzheimer’s disease * amyloid-beta peptides * biomarker * cerebrospinal fluid Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.151, year: 2014

  11. Neuron-specific enolase in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of patients with acute ischemic brain disease

    Selaković Vesna M.


    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the dynamics of change of neuron-specific enolase concentration in patients with acute ischemic brain disease in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma. The study included 103 patients, their mean age 58-66 years. The control group consisted of 16 patients, of matching age and sex, with radicular lesions of discal origin, subjected to diagnostic radiculography. Concentration of neuron-specific enolase was measured by a flouroimmunometric method. The results showed that the concentration of neuron-specific enolase in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of patients with brain ischemic disease within first seven days significantly increased compared to the control. The highest increase of concentration was established in brain infarction, somewhat lower in reversible ischemic attack, and the lowest in transient ischemic attack. Maximal concentration was established on the 3rd-4th day upon the brain infarction. Neuron-specific enolase concentration in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma may be an indicator of pathophysiological processes in the acute phase of brain ischemia and is significant in early diagnostics and therapy of the disease.

  12. Strain-dependent disruption of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier by Streptoccocus suis in vitro.

    Tenenbaum, Tobias; Adam, Rüdiger; Eggelnpöhler, Ingo; Matalon, David; Seibt, Annette; K Novotny, Gerd E; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Schroten, Horst


    Streptococcus suis capsular type 2 is an important agent of diseases including meningitis among pigs worldwide, and is also a zoonotic agent. The barrier function of the choroid plexus epithelium that constitutes the structural basis for the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier has not been elucidated yet in bacterial meningitis. We investigated the influence of various S. suis isolates on the barrier function of cultured porcine choroid plexus epithelial cells with respect to the transepithelial resistance and paracellular [(3)H]-mannitol flux. Preferentially apical application of S. suis isolates significantly decreased transepithelial resistance and significantly increased paracellular [(3)H]-mannitol flux in a time-, dose- and strain-dependent manner. Viable S. suis isolates caused cytotoxicity determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay and electron microscopy, whereas S. suis sonicates and UV-inactivated S. suis did not cause cytotoxicity. The observed effects on porcine choroid plexus epithelial cells barrier function could not exclusively be ascribed to known virulence factors of S. suis such as suilysin. In conclusion, S. suis isolates induce loss of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function in an in vitro model. Thus, S. suis may facilitate trafficking of bacteria and leucocytes across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. The underlying mechanisms for the barrier breakdown have yet to be determined. PMID:15780575

  13. Effect of tryptophan administration on tryptophan, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and indoleacetic acid in human lumbar and cisternal cerebrospinal fluid.

    Young, S N; Gauthier, S.


    Tryptophan 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and indoleacetic acid were measured in cerebrospinal fluid taken during pneumoencephalography from patients, some of whom took a 3 g or 6 g tryptophan load at various times before. Measurements were made on both lumbar and cisternal cerebrospinal fluid and the results showed similarities between indoleamine metabolism in human brain and spinal cord. Our data suggested that (1) the blood-brain barrier active transport system for tryptophan is not far from ...

  14. Increased prothrombin, apolipoprotein A-IV, and haptoglobin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Huntington's disease.

    Yen-Chu Huang

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by an unstable CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion. The need for biomarkers of onset and progression in HD is imperative, since currently reliable outcome measures are lacking. We used two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to analyze the proteome profiles in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 6 pairs of HD patients and controls. Prothrombin, apolipoprotein A-IV (Apo A-IV and haptoglobin were elevated in CSF of the HD patients in comparison with the controls. We used western blot as a semi-quantified measurement for prothrombin and Apo A-IV, as well as enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for measurement of haptoglobin, in 9 HD patients and 9 controls. The albumin quotient (Qalb, a marker of blood-brain barrier (BBB function, was not different between the HD patients and the controls. The ratios of CSF prothrombin/albumin (prothrombin/Alb and Apo A-IV/albumin (Apo A-IV/Alb, and haptoglobin level were significantly elevated in HD. The ratio of CSF prothrombin/Alb significantly correlated with the disease severity assessed by Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS. The results implicate that increased CSF prothrombin, Apo A-IV, and haptoglobin may be involved in pathogenesis of HD and may serve as potential biomarkers for HD.

  15. Coupling poroelasticity and CFD for cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics.

    Tully, Brett; Ventikos, Yiannis


    This research uses a novel coupling of poroelastic theory and computational fluid dynamics to investigate acute hydrocephalus resulting from stenosis of the cerebral aqueduct. By coupling poroelastic theory with a multidimensional simulation of the cerebral aqueduct we are able to investigate, for the first time, the impact of physically relevant stenosis patterns on ventricular enlargement, accounting for the nonintuitive long time history responses of the ventricular system. Preliminary findings demonstrate clearly the importance that the fluidic-poroelastic coupling plays: ventricular enlargement is significantly smaller with local stenosis patterns and almost all of the observable pressure drop occurs across the stenosis. Short timescale effects [O(heartbeat)] are explored and their contribution to the long timescales interrogated. PMID:19304478

  16. EDA-containing fibronectin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis.

    Pupek, Małgorzata; Jasonek, Jolanta; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona


    Fibronectin containing an alternatively spliced extra domain A (EDA-FN) participates in diverse biological cell functions, being also directly or indirectly engaged during an inflammatory response to brain injury and/or neuron regeneration. We analyzed FN and EDA-FN isoform levels by ELISA in 85 cerebrospinal fluid samples and 67 plasma samples obtained from children suffering from bacterial or viral meningitis and non-meningitis peripheral inflammation. We have found that the cerebrospinal level of EDA-FN was significantly lower in the bacterial meningitis group than in the viral- and non-meningitis groups. In the patients' plasma, EDA-FN was almost undetectable. The determination of fibronectin containing the EDA segment might be considered as an additional diagnostic marker of bacterial meningitis in children. PMID:23884219

  17. Vasopressin content in the cerebrospinal fluid and fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles in rats after the afferent vagus nerve fibres stimulation

    Experiments were carried out on male rats in urethane anaesthesia. Cerebroventricular system was perfused with McIlwain-Rodniht's solution from lateral ventricles to cerebellomedullary cistern. Both vagus nerves were cut and the central ends of the nerves were electrically stimulated during the collection of the third 30-min portion of perfusing fluid. Vasopressin (AVP) was determined by radioimmunoassay in samples of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (the first portion) and in five successive samples of the perfusing fluid. AVP concentration in the CSF was several times greater than in the fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles. Alternate electrical stimulation of both vagus nerves did not change considerably the release of AVP into the fluid perfusing the cerebral ventricles in rat, although a certain upward tendency could be observed. It seems that only AVP raised in circulating blood and not in CSF, after vagus nerves stimulation may act on the central nervous structures. (author). 37 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  18. Vasopressin content in the cerebrospinal fluid and fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles in rats after the afferent vagus nerve fibres stimulation

    Orlowska-Majdak, M.; Traczyk, W.Z. [Akademia Medyczna, Lodz (Poland). Katedra Fizjologii


    Experiments were carried out on male rats in urethane anaesthesia. Cerebroventricular system was perfused with McIlwain-Rodniht`s solution from lateral ventricles to cerebellomedullary cistern. Both vagus nerves were cut and the central ends of the nerves were electrically stimulated during the collection of the third 30-min portion of perfusing fluid. Vasopressin (AVP) was determined by radioimmunoassay in samples of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (the first portion) and in five successive samples of the perfusing fluid. AVP concentration in the CSF was several times greater than in the fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles. Alternate electrical stimulation of both vagus nerves did not change considerably the release of AVP into the fluid perfusing the cerebral ventricles in rat, although a certain upward tendency could be observed. It seems that only AVP raised in circulating blood and not in CSF, after vagus nerves stimulation may act on the central nervous structures. (author). 37 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab.

  19. Adhesion molecule levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in children with bacterial meningitis and sepsis

    Soad M Jaber


    Full Text Available Background : Adhesion molecules play a role in leukocyte recruitment during central nervous system (CNS inflammation. Aim: This study was designed to compare serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF concentrations of adhesion molecules in children with meningitis and sepsis, and to evaluate their sources. Setting : This study was carried out at Pediatric Department, King Abdulaziz University Hospital from January 2007 to June 2008. Design: Serum and CSF samples were collected on admission from meningitis (n = 40, sepsis (n = 20 patients, and sera from controls (n = 20. Materials and Methods : Endothelial (E, leukocyte (L, platelet (P selectins intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecules-1 (VCAM-1 were measured using ELISA. Statistics : ANOVA and Spearman′s correlations were used. Adhesion molecules with albumin concentration were estimated in CSF/serum to calculate concentration quotients. Results : In meningitis, serum sE-, sL-, sP-selectins sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 levels were higher than controls. Compared to sepsis, serum sE-selectin, sL-selectin, sVCAM-1, CSF-sL-selectin, CSF-sVCAM-1, VCAM-1 ratio and index were higher, while serum sP-selectin was lower than meningitis. sE-selectin ratio, CSF sICAM-1 were higher in meningitis with positive than negative culture. The sE-selectin index was higher in meningitis with neurological complication than those without it. In meningitis, correlation was found between CSF protein and CSF white blood cell counts (WBCs, CSF sICAM-1, CSF sVCAM-1 and between CSF sE-selectin and CSF sICAM-1. Conclusions : This study supports the role of adhesion molecules especially sL-selectin, sVCAM-1 in meningitis and suggests further research to determine their use as biomarkers for meningitis and use of their antagonists as therapeutic for CNS inflammation. The presence of discrepancy of CSF/serum ratios for molecules of same molecular weight suggest intrathecal shedding in addition to

  20. Effects of cerebrovascular disease on amyloid precursor protein metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid

    Rosengren Lars


    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD and cerebrovascular disease (CVD including chronic small vessel disease of the brain (SVD are the most frequent causes of dementia. AD is associated with metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and low levels of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ X-42 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. CVD and SVD are established risk factors for AD, brain white matter lesions (WML are established surrogate markers for SVD and are also associated with reduced CSF AβX-42. A cohort survey was performed to examine whether SVD or acute CVD affects APP metabolism and to explore a potential association between WML and APP metabolism in two groups; cognitively impaired patients, subjective and mild (SCI and MCI and stroke patients. Through measurements of CSF APP metabolite levels in patients with a wide range of WML volumes, this study aimed to determine how SVD influences APP metabolism. Methods Sixty-three patients were included: 37 with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI or mild cognitive impairment (MCI without stroke, and 26 after acute stroke. Chronic and acute WML volume and infarct volume were determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI post-scan processing, and CSF levels of α- and β-cleaved soluble APP (sAPP-α and sAPP-β, AβX-38, AβX-40 and AβX-42 were determined. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the patient groups. Chronic and acute WML volumes, infarct volume, age, and sex were used as predictors for CSF biomarker levels in linear regression analysis. Results CSF levels of sAPP-α and sAPP-β were strongly correlated (r = 0.95, p p p p ≤ 0.005; p ≤ 0.01; p ≤ 0.01; p ≤ 0.05; p ≤ 0.05 respectively, but not with acute WML or infarct volumes. Conclusions Lower CSF levels of sAPP-α and sAPP-β in the stroke group than in the SCI/MCI group and an inverse correlation with chronic WML indicate that ischemia lowers the levels of CSF sAPP metabolites and suggests that APP axonal transport or

  1. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid β1-42, Tau, and Alpha-Synuclein Predict the Heterogeneous Progression of Cognitive Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease

    Kang, Ju-Hee


    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with heterogeneous pathological and clinical features. Cognitive dysfunction, a frequent non-motor complication, is a risk factor for poor prognosis and shows inter-individual variation in its progression. Of the clinical studies performed to identify biomarkers of PD progression, the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is the largest study that enrolled drug-naïve and very early stage PD patients. The baseline characteristics of the PPMI cohort were recently published. The diagnostic utility of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, including alpha-synuclein (α-syn), total tau, phosphorylated tau at Thr181, and amyloid β1-42, was not satisfactory. However, the baseline data on CSF biomarkers in the PPMI study suggested that the measurement of the CSF biomarkers enables the prediction of future cognitive decline in PD patients, which was consistent with previous studies. To prove the hypothesis that the interaction between Alzheimer’s pathology and α-syn pathology is important to the progression of cognitive dysfunction in PD, longitudinal observational studies must be followed. In this review, the neuropathological nature of heterogeneous cognitive decline in PD is briefly discussed, followed by a summarized interpretation of baseline CSF biomarkers derived from the data in the PPMI study. The combination of clinical, biochemical, genetic and imaging biomarkers of PD constitutes a feasible strategy to predict the heterogeneous progression of PD. PMID:27240810

  2. Beta-2-transferrin to detect cerebrospinal fluid pleural effusion: a case report

    Smith Jennifer C


    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pleural effusion secondary to ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion is a rare and potentially life-threatening occurrence. Case presentation We describe a 14-month-old Caucasian boy who had a ventriculoperitoneal shunt inserted for progressive hydrocephalus of unknown etiology. Two and a half months post-shunt insertion, the patient presented with mild respiratory distress. A chest radiograph revealed a large right pleural effusion and a shunt series demonstrated an appropriately placed distal catheter tip. A subsequent abdominal ultrasound revealed marked ascites. Fluid drained via tube thoracostomy was sent for beta-2-transferrin electrophoresis. A positive test was highly suggestive of cerebral spinal fluid hydrothorax. Post-externalization of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt, the ascites and pleural effusion resolved. Conclusion Testing for beta-2-transferrin protein in pleural fluid may serve as a useful technique for diagnosing cerebrospinal fluid hydrothorax in patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts.

  3. Comparison of methods for miRNA extraction from plasma and quantitative recovery of RNA from plasma and cerebrospinal fluid

    Melissa A McAlexander


    Full Text Available Interest in extracellular RNA has intensified as evidence accumulates that these molecules may be useful as indicators of a wide variety of biological conditions. To establish specific extracellular RNA molecules as clinically relevant biomarkers, reproducible recovery from biological samples and reliable measurements of the isolated RNA are paramount. Towards these ends, careful and rigorous comparisons of technical procedures are needed at all steps from sample handling to RNA isolation to RNA measurement protocols. In the investigations described in this methods paper, RT-qPCR was used to examine the apparent recovery of specific endogenous miRNAs and a spiked-in synthetic RNA from blood plasma samples. RNA was isolated using several widely used RNA isolation kits, with or without the addition of glycogen as a carrier. Kits examined included total RNA isolation systems that have been commercially available for several years and commonly adapted for extraction of biofluid RNA, as well as more recently introduced biofluids-specific RNA methods. Our conclusions include the following: some RNA isolation methods appear to be superior to others for the recovery of RNA from biological fluids; addition of a carrier molecule seems to be beneficial for some but not all isolation methods; and partially or fully quantitative recovery of RNA is observed from increasing volumes of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

  4. Minocycline fails to modulate cerebrospinal fluid HIV infection or immune activation in chronic untreated HIV-1 infection: results of a pilot study

    Fuchs Dietmar


    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minocycline is a tetracycline antibiotic that has been shown to attenuate central nervous system (CNS lentivirus infection, immune activation, and brain injury in model systems. To initiate assessment of minocycline as an adjuvant therapy in human CNS HIV infection, we conducted an open-labelled pilot study of its effects on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and blood biomarkers of infection and immune responses in 7 viremic subjects not taking antiretroviral therapy. Results There were no discernable effects of minocycline on CSF or blood HIV-1 RNA, or biomarkers of immune activation and inflammation including: CSF and blood neopterin, CSF CCL2, CSF white blood cell count, and expression of cell-surface activation markers on CSF and blood T lymphocytes and monocytes. Conclusions This pilot study of biological responses to minocycline suggests little potential for its use as adjunctive antiviral or immunomodulating therapy in chronic untreated HIV infection.

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    Stocker, Sean D; Lang, Susan M; Simmonds, Sarah S; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B


    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or polysynaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to cerebrospinal fluid hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15 mol/L, 0.6 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L NaCl (5 µL/10 minutes) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure, despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally projecting RVLM neurons revealed 3 distinct populations based on discharge responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl: type I excited (46%; 11/24), type II inhibited (37%; 9/24), and type III no change (17%; 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in cerebrospinal fluid NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and arterial blood pressure. PMID:26416846

  6. Multiple sclerosis test or the 4 humors: cerebrospinal fluid serum, tears and saliva

    4 were studied biological fluids easily accessible to the immune exploration (cerebrospinal fluid, serum, tears and saliva) in 25 patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) during a push clinical disease. The level of interleukin-2 receptor soluble (RsIL-2) was significantly increased by at least 3 of these 4 fluids, compared with normal controls. The sensitivity and specificity of its determination for the diagnosis of the condition was higher than other immunochemical parameters, oligoclonal distribution (OD) of immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain imbalance-and-evoked electrophysiological studies. This method is used to establish a more accurate diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis as well as to monitor its biological activity with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) (Author)

  7. Clearance from cerebrospinal fluid of intrathecally administered beta-endorphin in monkeys

    Five adult male monkeys (Macaca mulatta) weighing 7.1-9.9 kg were given synthetic human beta-endorphin (800 micrograms) and [14C]methoxy-inulin (50 microCi) in 400 microliters of normal saline intrathecally. Serial samples of cerebrospinal fluid were drawn through a previously positioned indwelling spinal catheter and were assayed for concentrations of beta-endorphin (determined by radioimmunoassay) and inulin (determined by liquid scintillation counter). Spinal fluid concentrations of beta-endorphin and inulin peaked and declined in a parallel manner. The clearance ratio (calculated from the reciprocal of the ratio of the areas under the respective curves of elimination of the two species) remained remarkably similar from animal to animal, giving a mean value of 1.060 +/- 0.090 (SEM). This ratio, being near unity, suggests that beta-endorphin is eliminated from spinal fluid in a fashion similar to that of inulin, which is removed exclusively by bulk absorption

  8. The Cerebrospinal Fluid in Severe Pain Conditions : Clinical, Pharmacological and Proteomic Aspects

    Bäckryd, Emmanuel


    The treatment of both cancer pain and non-cancer chronic pain is still suboptimal. The overall aim of this PhD thesis was to conduct translational pain research at the interface between clinical pain medicine and the field of human proteomics, using the practice of intrathecal analgesia at our institution as a starting point. Hence, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is at the centre of the present dissertation, both as a target for infusing analgesics (Papers I and II – clinical and pharmacologic...


    Meijer, Lisethe; Veal, Gareth; Walker, David; Grundy, Richard


    INTRODUCTION: Daily intra-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) etoposide administration regimens are in use, by-passing the blood-brain-barrier and offering higher CSF drug concentrations at 1/30th to 1/340th the dose in conventional systemically administered standard and high dose etoposide regimens, respectively. METHOD: 42 pharmacokinetic samples were obtained from a paediatric (36) and adult patient (6). Etoposide 0.75 mg was administered over 1-2 minutes via the intra-ventricular (IVT) or lumbar ro...

  10. Transfer of liraglutide from blood to cerebrospinal fluid is minimal in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Christensen, M; Sparre-Ulrich, A H; Hartmann, B;


    Treatment with liraglutide leads to weight loss. We investigated whether blood-to-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) transfer of liraglutide occurs, and if so, whether it associates with clinical weight loss following liraglutide treatment in humans. We performed lumbar puncture and blood sampling in eight...... patients with type 2 diabetes (mean (range)): age 63 (54-79) years; actual body weight: 90 (75-118) kg treated with 1.8 mg liraglutide for 14 (5-22) months and with a treatment-induced weight loss of 8.4 (7-11) kg. We measured liraglutide in plasma and CSF with a radioimmunoassay specific for the N...