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Sample records for center kyoto university

  1. Kyoto University Reactor diagnostic system

    For the safety of a nuclear reactor, it is very important that the operators and manager make exact judgement about the various conditions of the nuclear reactor occurring at times. The research is advanced for the purpose of adopting a computer system for the research reactor of Kyoto University (KUR), offering effective information to operators and maintenance workers, making the advice for exactly judging the conditions of the reactor by sufficiently grasping them, consequently, developing the system for increasing the safety of the reactor. For the development of this system, also technical officials took part positively and cooperated in the research and development based on the experience of the maintenance and operation of the research reactor carried out daily. The system comprises the data acquisition part, data base, abnormality diagnostic part, man-machine interface part, and individual dealing part. The abnormality of the reactor is identified by the judgement of operators by referring to the data memorized in the data base, then, the reactor is operated. The constitution of the computer system used is shown. The CPU is a minicomputer ECLIPSE S-140, and the main memory is 512 kB. The auxiliary memories are a fixed disk equipment of 73 MB, two floppy disk equipments and a magnetic tape equipment. Respective subsystems are explained. (Kako, I.)

  2. Present status of Kyoto University MIR-FEL facility

    We have developed a linac based Mid Infrared Free electron Laser (MIR-FEL) facility in Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University. The Kyoto University Free electron laser (KU-FEL) consists of 4.5-cell thermionic RF gun, S-band accelerator tube and Halbach undulator. The lasing wavelength is 12-14 μm at present. The limitation of the lasing wavelength mainly comes from instability of the thermionic RF gun and performance of the undulator. In order to extend tuning range of wavelength and improve stability we have been working on the study of electron source, beam diagnostic and control, and replacement of the undulator. As a pilot application to evaluate selective phonon excitation processes in solid materials by irradiating with MIR-FEL, a PL measurement system was installed and we have started test measurement. In 2011, the Joint Usage/Research Center program 'The core research center program on Zero-Emission Energy' was authorized by the MEXT and the KU-FEL facility is open for users through the program. (author)

  3. Present status of Kyoto University MIR-FEL facility

    A linac based Mid Infrared Free electron Laser (MIR-FEL) facility has been developed in Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University. The linac consists of 4.5-cell thermionic RF gun and S-band accelerator tube generates up to 40 MeV electron beam whose macro-pulse duration is 5.5 μs. Up to now 12-14 μm FEL beam has been generated by use of this electron beam and continuous studies are carried out to extend the FEL wavelength as well as to generate stabilized lasing. For MIR-FEL application researches an MIR-FEL transport line has been installed and an application room is under preparation. The KU-FEL facility is open for users through 'The Collaboration Program of the Laboratory for Complex Energy Processes, Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University'. http://www.iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp/. (author)

  4. Experiments of low temperature irradiations in Kyoto University reactor

    The existing Kyoto University reactor (KUR) is of power output 5000 kW and fast neutron flux 1 x 1012 fn/cm2 sec, and will commemorate the 20 years anniversary of the criticality in June, 1984. The low temperature irradiation facility installed in the E-4 experimental hole of the KUR has been used for 14 years for common utilization experiments. The renewal of the compressor and refrigerator and the repair of the safety system of the vacuum system were carried out in 1973. The results of the research on the low temperature irradiation facility of the KUR and the themes of the common utilization experiments using the facility show the demand of users penetrating into diverse fields. The plan of the Kyoto University high neutron flux reactor (KUHFR) has been advanced to meet the demand, but the consent of the related community was not able to be obtained. The plan of installing the vertical low temperature irradiation facility as well as the cold neutron source in the KUR is forwarded. The existing low temperature irradiation facility carries out the continuous irradiation for 80 hours at 20 K. The necessity of the vertical low temperature irradiation facility, the outline of its equipment and the contents of research are described. (Kako, I.)

  5. Safety and interlock system of Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    KUCA (Kyoto University Critical Assembly) is an entirely new type of critical facility which is composed of three independent highly enriched uranium cores, two with solid moderators and the other with a light water moderator. These three cores share many common facilities such as control rod drive mechanism, instrumentation system, and various experimental facilities. To secure safety and smooth operation of this multi-core system, a safety and interlock system was developed based on the ten years experiences in design, construction, and operation of research reactors at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University. The first critical experiment with KUCA was performed in August 1974. Since then, this safety and interlock system have served as the nucleus of the network of KUCA. This document provides with the basic concept of the safety and interlock system together with various experiences in its construction and operation. Safety logics and system flow charts in various operational procedures are explained with many figures and tables. (Aoki, K.)

  6. Aseismatic design of Kyoto University No.2 reactor

    In the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University, the additional installation of a high neutron flux reactor (hereinafter, called KUHFR) with thermal output of 30,000 kW was approved in 1978, and at present, the deliberation is continued in the nuclear reactor problem council of Osaka Prefecture. In this report, the aseismatic design of the facility is mainly reported, which is one of the safety evaluations carried out at the time of the application for the approval of the installation of the KUHFR. In case of the reactor facilities for research, the thermal output is smaller than power reactors, and also the temperature and pressure in the primary system are lower, but the aseismatic design of the KUHFR is as severe as that of power reactors. The investigation of the ground in the site of the expected construction, the classification of the importance of the facilities, the determination of the earthquake motion for design, the analysis of the earthquake response of the reactor building, and the examination of the aseismatic safety of the supporting ground are reported. It is required to determine the earthquake motion for design by adequately evaluating the vibration characteristics peculiar to the place of location. For the purpose, the observation of earthquakes simultaneously at many points has been carried out since 1982 at the Kyoto University reactor. (Kako, I.)

  7. Reactor physics experiments at Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) is a multi-core type critical assembly established in 1974. It has three independent cores, namely, two solid-moderated cores (A, B cores) and one light water-moderated core (C core). A pulsed neutron generator by D-T reactions and new FFAG proton accelerator are installed, which can be used in combination with the A-core. In the KUCA, basic studies on reactor physics are being performed. Recent research topics includes 1) nuclear characteristics of thorium fueled reactor, 2) critical experiments loaded with erbium at various spectrum indices, 3) subcriticality measurements, 4) development of innovative neutron detector and 5) simulation experiments of accelerator driven system (ADS). For education, the reactor laboratory course on reactor physics is offered for 12 Japanese universities since 1975. More than 150 graduate or undergraduate students majoring in nuclear engineering are joining this course every year and same reactor laboratory course has been offered for Korean and Swedish students.

  8. Present status of Kyoto University MIR-FEL facility

    A Mid-infrared Free Electron Laser (MIR-FEL) facility for energy sciences has been developed in Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University. The FEL consists of a 4.5-cell thermionic RF gun, an S-band accelerator tube, an undulator and an optical cavity. The tunable range of the FEL is extended from 10-13 μm to 5-14.5 μm after replacing its undulator and cavity mirrors. In the last fiscal year, the total operation time of FEL driver linac was 315 hours and 17% of the operation time was assigned to user experiments. In this paper, undergoing R and D work for the MIR-FEL is also reported. (author)

  9. Positron beam facility at Kyoto University Research Reactor

    A positron beam facility is presently under construction at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), which is a light-water moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A cadmium (Cd) - tungsten (W) source similar to that used in NEPOMUC was chosen in the KUR because Cd is very efficient at producing γ-rays when exposed to thermal neutron flux, and W is a widely used in converter and moderator materials. High-energy positrons are moderated by a W moderator with a mesh structure. Electrical lenses and a solenoid magnetic field are used to extract the moderated positrons and guide them to a platform outside of the reactor, respectively. Since Japan is an earthquake-prone country, a special attention is paid for the design of the in-pile positron source so as not to damage the reactor in the severe earthquake.

  10. Neutron standard field at Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University

    Neutron fields and the method of neutron measurements at the Research Reactor Institute (KUR) of Kyoto University are described. The neutron fields are a thermal neutron field with Maxwell distribution and a U-235 fission field of fission plate. Those are obtained at the heavy water facility of KUR. The neutron spectrum in the reactor core is similar to the standard fission spectrum for the energy above 1.5 MeV. The I/E type spectrum can be obtained at a graphite assembly. The standard methods of neutron measurement at KUR are foil activation method, the time of flight method and proton recoil method. The average cross sections of various threshold reactions for fission neutrons and thermal neutrons have been measured by these facilities. (Kato, T.)

  11. Radioactive waste management in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    The joint utilization by the researchers of the universities and others in whole Japan of the reactor facilities in Kyoto University was begun in 1965. The facility for abandoning radioactive waste was constructed in fiscal year 1963, and comprises 500 kg/h vaporization and concentration facility, 2 systems of 5 m3/h flocculation, precipitation and filtration facility, and 2 systems of 5 m3/h ion exchange facility for liquid waste, 50x103 kg pressing capacity, four-column type press for reducing volume of solid waste, and waste store for 400 standard drums. Radioactive Waste Treatment Department was organized, and the stipulations on security and radiation injury prevention were enforced in 1964. Liquid and solid wastes have been accepted since 1964. The radioactivity in discharged water in each year is shown. About 600 m3 of waste liquid has been accepted in one year since 1980. The trust of solid waste treatment to Japan Radioisotope Association has been carried out 51 times. The radioactive waste which is temporarily stored in the waste store is reported. Hereafter, the construction of the facility for storing large finished equipment and the appearance of waste treatment enterprises are desirable. (K.I.)

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  13. Nuclear and process instrumentations of Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) is a new type critical assembly with three cores which consist of highly enriched uranium and of solid moderator or light water moderator. Three fission chambers, three un-compensated ionization chambers and co-axial cables connected to preamplifiers or to a cable junction box are located at each core assembly. By the junction box near at the entrance of the reactor room, each channel of amplifier, high voltage and some interlock cables are connected to a set of six neutron detectors of the operating core. The basic role of the operating staff of a nuclear research reactor is, of course, to operate the reactor safety and efficiently. In achieving this, the philosophy of ''fail safe'', ''fool proof'', ''high reliability'' and many other contrivances are employed in designing the nuclear instrumentation. the initial critical experiment of KUCA was performed in August 1974. Since then, several troubles occured in the first one year, e.g. spurious scram LOG-N amplifier, but these troubles have been solved. In a whole, the nuclear instrumention has been operated as expected. In the present report, the basic concept of instrumentation, its construction, and the operation experience are described. (author)

  14. Ion and electron Van de Graaff accelerators of Kyoto University

    Two Van de Graaff accelerators are available at the Uji campus of Kyoto University. One is a 4MV machine, which is used for heavy ion acceleration, while the other is a 2MV machine for electron acceleration. These machines have been modified in various parts and currently used very actively in many fields of investigation. Important modifications of the 4MV machine are: use of a newly developed accelerating tube, addition of a charge-changer before the analyzing magnet, renewal of the charging belt, and development of a microbeam system for PIXE and RBS analysis. An attempt is now being made to accelerate micro-particles using the 2MV machine. The new accelerating tube has bucket type electrodes with large accelerating apertures. By charge-changing the accelerated 1+ ions to higher charge states, 2+, 3+, ..., at the entrance of the analyzing magnet, Ar ions with energies of up to 2.73, 6.21, .... MeV can be deflected to the duct. Scanning microbeam PIXE and RBS are powerful tools for analysis of spatial elemental distribution. Calculations suggest that a beam size of about 3 μm can be attained by using an object aperture of 10μm in diameter and controlling the beam divergence within 10μ rad in both directions. (N.K.)

  15. l=1 helical axis heliotron device in Kyoto university

    Helical systems are an attractive candidate for magnetic fusion reactor. Recently, there has been great progress in theoretical research of three dimensional magnetic field structures, resulting in several kinds of confinement optimization being proposed for toroidal magnetic confinement system. For example, some sophisticated ideas have appeared on stage such as quasi-helical symmetry and quasi-isodynamic system. To find experimentally which way is the best Optimisation, a new helical axis heliotron device, so called 'Heliotron J', is under construction in the Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Japan. In this conference, the basic concept and the present status will be presented. In the conventional plane axis helical system, it was difficult to have both good particle confinement and good MHD stability simultaneously. The goal of Heliotron J project is to clarify their compatibility in the spatial axis toroidal device. The best way for Optimising the helical magnetic field configuration will be explored by investigating the plasma response to the change in the field components. The main subjects for plasma experiment are: demonstration of the existence of good magnetic flux surfaces, reduction of neoclassical transport in collisionless regime, MHD Stabilisation in high β plasma, controllability of bootstrap current, good confinement of high energy particles

  16. History of the research reactor institute of Kyoto University in view of nuclear science information data base (KURRIP)

    Since the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University was established as an inter-university research institute in 1963, a large number of cooperative research projects have been achieved by visiting scientists and its own staff in various research fields, making use of facilities centered around the Kyoto University Reactor, as well as the other experimental facilities. Ten years ago, the construction of the 'KURRIP' data base was initiated to grasp the whole aspect of the research activities at the Institute, in commemoration of its 20th anniversary. At the present time, KURRIP contains the information on 5,910 papers published for 29 years from 1963 to 1991. As this academic year is the 30th anniversary of the Institute, the history of its research activities was reviewed again using this data base. All of the publications were classified by authors's affiliations, kinds of papers, publishers, fields of studies, and research facilities used, and their historical variations are checked and discussed. (author)

  17. Science Hall of Atomic Energy in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    The Science Hall of Atomic Energy was built as a subsidiary facility of the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. The purpose of this facility is to accept outside demands concerning the application of the research reactor. The building is a two story building, and has the floor area of 901.47 m2. There are an exhibition room, a library, and a big lecture room. In the exhibition room, models of the Kyoto University Research Reactor and the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are placed. Various pictures concerning the application of the reactor are on the wall. In the library, people from outside of the Institute can use various books on science. Books for boys and girls are also stocked and used for public use. At the lecture room, various kinds of meeting can be held. (Kato, T.)

  18. Annual report of Radiation Laboratory Department of Nuclear Engineering Kyoto University for fiscal 1993

    This publication is the collection of the papers presented research activities of Radiation Laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University during the 1993 academic/fiscal year (April, 1993 - March, 1994). The 47 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Annual report of Radiation Laboratory Department of Nuclear Engineering Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University

    This publication is the collection of the papers presented research activities of Radiation laboratory, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University during the 1992 academic/fiscal year (April, 1992 - March, 1993). The 48 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Studies on ADS as a neutron source at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    For developing an accelerator-driven system (ADS), many studies, such as those on accelerator development, subcritical system neutronics, materials irradiation effects, and thermal hydraulics, are required. In the Research Reactor Institute at Kyoto University (KURRI), ADS is planned as a future neutron source. Recent activities of relevant ADS studies at KURRI are introduced herein

  1. Status report of Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University

    Electron cooled short bunch proton beam (∼3.1 ns) fast extracted from S-LSR is to be used for biomaterial irradiation. Laser cooling in 3 dimension at S-LSR has been pushed forward in collaboration with MPI-K, Seika University, Hiroshima University and LBNL. Nondestructive investigation of superconducting cavity has been developed for ILC. (author)

  2. Data base of reactor physics experimental results in Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities

    The Kyoto University critical assembly experimental facilities belong to the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, and are the versatile critical assembly constructed for experimentally studying reactor physics and reactor engineering. The facilities are those for common utilization by universities in whole Japan. During more than ten years since the initial criticality in 1974, various experiments on reactor physics and reactor engineering have been carried out using many experimental facilities such as two solidmoderated cores, a light water-moderated core and a neutron generator. The kinds of the experiment carried out were diverse, and to find out the required data from them is very troublesome, accordingly it has become necessary to make a data base which can be processed by a computer with the data accumulated during the past more than ten years. The outline of the data base, the data base CAEX using personal computers, the data base supported by a large computer and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  3. Reactor laboratory course for students majoring in nuclear engineering with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    With the use of the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA), a joint reactor laboratory course of graduate level is offered every summer since 1975 by nine associated Japanese universities (Hokkaido University, Tohoku University, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokai University, Nagoya University, Osaka University, Kobe University of Mercantile Marine and Kyushu University) in addition to a reactor laboratory course of undergraduate level for Kyoto University. These courses are opened for three weeks (two weeks for the joint course and one week for the undergraduate course) to students majoring in nuclear engineering and a total of 1,360 students have taken the course in the last 21 years. The joint course has been institutionalized with the background that it is extremely difficult for a single university in Japan to have her own research or training reactor. By their effort, the united faculty team of the joint course have succeeded in giving an effective, unique one-week course, taking advantage of their collaboration. Last year, an enquete (questionnaire survey) was conducted to survey the needs for the educational experiments of graduate level and precious data have been obtained for promoting reactor laboratory courses. (author)

  4. Zero-Carbon Energy Kyoto 2011 : Special Edition of Jointed Symposium of Kyoto University Global COE “Energy Science in the Age of Global Warming” and Ajou University BK21

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear plant accident at Fukushima in the wake of the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami has had a major impact on the energy strategy of Japan and the world. From a global perspective, approach to energy is of greater and greater consequence. The Global Center of Excellence (COE) Program of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, with the support of university faculty members, has established an international education and research platform to foster educators, researchers, and policy makers who can develop technologies and propose policies for establishing a CO2 zero-emission society no longer dependent on fossil fuels by the year 2100. Since 2008, a program called “Energy Science in the Age of Global Warming—Toward a CO2 Zero-Emission Energy System” has been in progress at Kyoto University. A third international symposium, titled “Zero-Carbon Energy, Kyoto 2011,” was held jointly with Ajou University, Korea, in August 2011, and this book is a compila...

  5. Analysis of kyoto university reactor physics critical experiments using NCNSRC calculation methodology

    The kyoto university reactor physics experiments on the university critical assembly is used to benchmark validate the NCNSRC calculations methodology. This methodology has two lines, diffusion and Monte Carlo. The diffusion line includes the codes WIMSD4 for cell calculations and the two dimensional diffusion code DIXY2 for core calculations. The transport line uses the MULTIKENO-Code vax Version. Analysis is performed for the criticality, and the temperature coefficients of reactivity (TCR) for the light water moderated and reflected cores, of the different cores utilized in the experiments. The results of both Eigen value and TCR approximately reproduced the experimental and theoretical Kyoto results. However, some conclusions are drawn about the adequacy of the standard wimsd4 library. This paper is an extension of the NCNSRC efforts to assess and validate computer tools and methods for both Et-R R-1 and Et-MMpr-2 research reactors. 7 figs., 1 tab

  6. Two neutron diffraction facilities in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR)

    The control systems for KUR neutron diffraction facilities provided with an 8 bit microcomputer PDC-8 are introduced. The KUR has a four-axis type neutron diffraction facility mainly applied to crystal structure analysis and a three-axis type neutron diffraction facility capable of analyzing scattered neutron energy and also aiming at magnetic structure analysis. In the four-axis type facility, the neutron intensity scattered from each crystal face is automatically measured by rotating each of three-dimensional sample crystal faces in a plane, and in the three-axis type facility, measurement is automatically made on a crystal face desired to be measured, which is placed in a plane in advance. The computer system consists of counting systems, a goniometer and a typewriter centering around the PDC-8. The PDC-8 is provided with an operating panel, interface cards and a power supply, and operated using BASIC. The operation of the system is executed by the interactive form with TTY, the selection of measuring modes and the data inputting proceed under the CPU commands, and the program selection is performed by inputting control codes at the keyboard. The present microcomputer capacity has a sufficient speed to control, though processing speed is slow. However, it is disadvantageous for input parameters requiring complicated calculation. This calculation is executed using a FACOM U-200 computer, and the PDC-8 is controlled by inputting the results with paper tapes. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Vitiligo vulgaris and autoimmune diseases in Japan: A report from vitiligo clinic in Kyoto University Hospital

    TANIOKA, MIKI; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Katoh, Mayumi; Takahashi, Kenzo; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed the causes of loss of skin color in 144 patients, who visited Vitiligo Clinic of Kyoto University Hospital between April 2005 and August 2008. The numbers of patients with generalized and segmental Vitiligo vulgaris were 98 (68.1%) and 26 (18.1%), respectively. Small numbers of the patients suffered from Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease, piebaldism, congenital albinism, Hypomelanosis of Ito, post-inflammatory hypopigmentation, white leaf-shaped macules associated with tuberous scler...

  8. Long time irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) and its performance

    In the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR), the in-core long time irradiation has been installed since the early stage of the reactor. About 15 years ago, the remote welding apparatus was introduced, and then it has been improved several times. The dual aluminium capsule as a long time irradiation capsule has been used. In this report, the flow chart of procedures, irradiation facility, welding apparatus, welding process, neutron energy spectrum, helium exchange, leak detection, X-ray radiography inspection and other works are described. Also irradiation temperature measurements of the capsule have been carried out by using the shape memory alloys. (author)

  9. Present status of mid-infrared free electron laser in Kyoto University

    A mid-infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility, named Kyoto University FEL (KU-FEL), has been developed for energy related sciences in Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University. In fiscal year 2012, the FEL operated for 570 hours. About 70% of operation time is dedicated for users. There were two shutdown periods in FY2012; one was for the electric power saving in August and September 2012, and the other was for the building refinement in February and March 2013. During the winter shutdown, the vacuum chamber for the undulator was replaced with a narrower one. After the replacement, the tunable range of KU-FEL has been extended from 5-14 μm to 5-20 μm. Now there are two major problems in KU-FEL linac. One is SF6 gas leakage through an RF window to the vacuum side. The other is a timing drift of a klystron pulse. Those are not critical for the linac operation, but they should be fixed in near future. In this paper, undergoing R and D work for the MIR-FEL is also reported. (author)

  10. Research project on accelerator-driven subcritical system using FFAG accelerator and Kyoto University critical assembly

    The KART (Kumatori Accelerator-driven Reactor Test facility) project started in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University in fiscal year 2002 with the grant by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The purpose of this research project is to demonstrate the basis feasibility of accelerator driven system (ADS), studying the effect of incident neutron energy on the effective multiplication factor in a subcritical nuclear fuel system. For this purpose, a variable-energy FFAG (Fixed Field Alternating Gradient) accelerator complex is being constructed to be coupled with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). The FFAG proton accelerator complex consists of ion-beta, booster and main rings. This system aims to attain 1 μA proton beam with energy range from 20 to 150 MeV with a repetition rate of 120 Hz. The first beam from the FFAG complex is expected to be available by the end of FY 2005, and the experiment on ADS with KUCA and the FFAG complex (FFAG-KUCA experiment) will start in FY 2006. Before the FFAG-KUCA experiment starts, preliminary experiments with 14 MeV neutrons are currently being performed using a Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator coupled with the KUCA. Experimental data are analyzed using continuous energy Monte-Carlo codes MVP, MCNP and MNCP-X. (author)

  11. Interim report on construction of data base for atomic energy science documents (concerning Kyoto University Reactor)

    The Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute was established in 1963 as a research institute for all universities in Japan utilizing the facilities in common. The construction of a document data base has been undertaken in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the institute. The data base concerns the research works performed at the institute and also the publications and reports on the research made by the personnel belonging to the institute. Input data are gathered from concerned researchers. In this interim report, the structure and contents of this data base are shortly described. One of the features of this data base is that it handles data with both Japanese and English at the same time. (Aoki, K.)

  12. Summary reports of activities under visiting research program in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 1988

    The Technical Report of Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, is published on occasion summarizing in the form of prompt report the results of the functional test on various experimental facilities, the test results of the articles made for trial, the circumstance of radiation control and waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the remarkable results obtained amid research, new method, the discussion on other papers and reports and others. In this report, 40 summaries of the Visiting Research Projects utilizing the KUR and 13 summaries of those utilizing the KUCA in 1988, and 2 unreported summaries before 1988 are collected. In each summary, the number of adoption, title, the names of reporters and the gist of report are given. (K.I.)

  13. Construction of 100 MeV electron linac in Kyoto University

    An electron linear accelerator and a compact storage ring have been constructed at Kyoto University. The beam energy of the storage ring is 300 MeV and will be utilized as a synchrotron radiation source. The output beam energy of the linac is 100 MeV and the designed beam current is 100 mA at the pulse width of 1 μsec. The construction of the linac had been finished and the test is under going. The electron beam of 300 mA is extracted from the electron gun and the peak RF power of 20 MW is successfully fed to the accelerating structures at the pulse width of 2 μsec. (author)

  14. Introduction of Kyoto University Research Reactor with low enriched uranium core

    Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is a light water moderated / cooled tank-type reactor. The project to convert the KUR fuel from HEU to LEU was achieved on March 24, 2010. After the successful achievement of first criticality on April 15 and the reactor has been operating since May 28. The nuclear design of KUR with LEU core is calculated using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.3 and the burn-up calculations are performed using SRAC-COREBN. In this paper, the purpose of the project to convert the KUR fuel, the fuel transport, the experimental results, the burn-up characteristics and calculation of KUR LEU core are presented. (author)

  15. Clinical experience of BNCT for brain and skin tumors at Kyoto University Reactor

    The research nuclear reactor of Kyoto University (KUR), which was established in 1963, has the power of 5 MW and has rendered services to scientists in various fields including biology and medicine. The first clinical application was carried out on a brain tumor patient by Professor Hatanaka in 1974. Eight Japanese, 2 German and one American patients were treated. The ages of patients were 9-66 years and all were male. Skin tumors were irradiated at KUR to measure 10B content in the tissues by Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube (NMNGT) attached to KUR, before BNCT. Except in a few cases, patients had recurrent tumours after previous treatment by chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgical treatments. The absorbed dose used in the previous radiotherapy before BNCT was a curative dose. The time intervals between previous radiotherapy and BNCT varied. The treated skin tumours included various grades of melanoma. Some cases appeared to be astrocytoma grade IV

  16. Development of a mono-energetic positron beam line at the Kyoto University Research Reactor

    Sato, K. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Xu, Q., E-mail: xu@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T. [The Oarai Branch, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Shirai, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Positron beam facilities are widely used for solid state physics and material science studies. A positron beam facility has been constructed at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) in order to expand its application range. The KUR is a light-water-moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A positron beam has been transported successfully from the reactor to the irradiation chamber. The total moderated positron rate was greater than 1.4 10{sup 6}/s while the reactor operated at a reduced power of 1 MW. Special attention was paid for the design of the in-pile position source to prevent possible damage of the reactor in case of severe earthquakes.

  17. Transmutation research and fuel cycle (report on discussion at Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University)

    A symposium was held on a topic of 'Transmutation Research' on Dec. 21 and 22, 1999 at Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. This meeting was held as a joint-meeting of KUR's specialist meeting and Tokyo University's activity supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research of Ministry of Education, Sport and Culture of Japan. This paper describes the overview of the discussions of this joint-meeting, and interprets their significance. Major themes discussed are, needed discussions on the transmutation research, policy and concepts of the organizations doing transmutation researches, a view from university side, transmutation researches in the oversea countries, opinions from various standpoints of the nuclear fuel cycle, conclusive discussions. 'the meanings of the transmutation research should be discussed together with the geological disposal and fast reactor system', 'transmutation may be a cooperative option for the disposal, thus, they should not be in a independent relation', and Balance evaluation will be needed' are the examples of the conclusive remarks of this meeting. (author)

  18. Research on the reactor physics using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    The Kyoto University Critical Assembly [KUCA] is a multi-core type critical assembly established in 1974, as a facility for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. Thereafter, many reactor physics experiments have been carried out using three cores (A-, B-, and C-cores) in the KUCA. In the A- and B-cores, solid moderator such as polyethylene or graphite is used, whereas light-water is utilized as moderator in the C-core. The A-core has been employed mainly in connection with the Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator installed in the KUCA, to measure (1) the subcriticality by the pulsed neutron technique for the critical safety research and (2) the neutron spectrum by the time-of-flight technique. Recently, a basic study on the tight lattice core has also launched using the A-core. The B-core has been employed for the research on the thorium fuel cycle ever since. The C-core has been employed (1) for the basic studies on the nuclear characteristics of light-water moderated high-flux research reactors, including coupled-cores, and (2) for a research related to reducing enrichment of uranium fuel used in research reactors. The C-core is being utilized in the reactor laboratory course experiment for students of ten universities in Japan. The data base of the KUCA critical experiments is generated so far on the basis of approximately 350 experimental reports accumulated in the KUCA. Besides, the assessed KUCA code system has been established through analyses on the various KUCA experiments. In addition to the KUCA itself, both of them are provided for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. (author)

  19. Research progress on accelerator-driven system in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    The experimental studies on the accelerator-driven system (ADS) are being conducted for nuclear transmutation analyses with the combined use of the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA; A-core: solid-moderated and -reflected core) and the fixed-field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator, in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. The ADS experiments with 100 MeV protons obtained from the FFAG accelerator had been carried out to investigate the neutronic characteristics of ADS, and the static and kinetic parameters were accurately analyzed through both the measurements and the numerical simulations (MCNPX; ENDF/B-VII.0; JENDL/HE-2007; JENDL-4.0; JENDL/D-99) and of reactor physics parameters, including the reaction rates, the neutron spectrum, the neutron multiplication (M), the subcritical multiplication factor (ks), the neutron decay constants (α) and the subcriticality (ρ). In addition to the uranium-loaded core, the spallation neutrons generated by 100 MeV protons from the FFAG accelerator had been also injected into the thorium-loaded core to conduct the feasibility studies on the thorium-loaded ADS through the experimental analyses of the static conditions and kinetic behaviors. An upcoming ADS at KUCA could be composed of highly-enriched uranium fueled and Pb-Bi zoned core, in consideration of an actual ADS designed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The neutronic characteristics of Pb-Bi in ADS are considered importantly analyzed experimentally from the viewpoint of reactor physics: neutron yield and neutron spectrum by the solid Pb-Bi target; uncertainties of Pb-Bi cross sections in the core. At KUCA, as preliminary study on the solid Pb-Bi characteristics, the critical mass and the sample worth experiments relating Pb-Bi could be conducted to investigate the uncertainties of Pb-Bi cross sections with the use of solid Pb-Bi plates, in addition to solid Pb and Bi plates. Furthermore, irradiation experiments of the minor actinides (237Np and 241Am) could be conducted in hard spectrum core at KUCA to examine the feasibility of conversion analyses of nuclear transmutation. (author)

  20. Experimental study on the safety of Kyoto University Research Reactor at natural circulation cooling mode

    Highlights: • The natural circulation cooling capacity of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) was experimentally investigated. • The distributions of the outlet temperature of the fuel elements under natural circulation operations were measured. • The average temperature rise and the average natural circulation flow velocity in core were calculated. • The safety of KUR under all of the normal operations with natural circulation cooling mode has been analyzed. • The natural circulation flow after the reactor shutdown was confirmed. - Abstract: In this study, the natural circulation cooling capacity of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is experimentally investigated by measuring the inlet and outlet temperatures of the core under natural circulation operation at various thermal powers ranging from 10 kW to 100 kW and the shutdown state. In view of the uneven power distribution and the resultant inconsistent coolant outlet temperature in the core, eight measuring points located separately in the outlet of the fuel elements were chosen to investigate the distribution of the outlet temperature of the core. The natural circulation cooling capacity represented by the average natural circulation flow velocity in the core is calculated from the temperature difference between the outlet and inlet temperature of the core. The measured outlet temperature of the fuel elements shows a cross-sectional distribution agreeing with the distribution of the thermal output of the fuel elements in the core. Since the measured outlet temperatures decrease quickly in the flow direction in a small local region above the outlet of the core, the mixing of the hot water out of the core with the cold water around the core outlet is found to happen in the small region not more than 5 cm far from the core outlet. The natural circulation flow velocity in the core increases non-linearly with the thermal power. The safety of KUR has been analysed by conservatively estimating the highest coolant temperature, the highest fuel cladding temperature, the highest fuel meat temperature and the minimum DNBR under all of the normal operations with natural circulation cooling mode. The natural circulation operation at the thermal power of 100 kW is the most serious operating condition. The average natural circulation flow velocity at the thermal power of 100 kW is 3.13 cm/s. All of these estimated parameters under normal natural circulation operation meet the safety criterion of research reactor

  1. Subcriticality measurements in accelerator-driven system at Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    Subcriticality measurements in the Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) are described in this paper. The Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is going ahead with an innovative research project on ADS using a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator. The goal of the research project is to demonstrate the basic feasibility of ADS as a next-generation neutron source using KUCA coupled with a newly developed variable energy FFAG accelerator. The construction of the accelerator complex has been completed and its beam commissioning is currently being conducted. It is expected that the ADS experiments using the FFAG accelerator could start in February 2009. At the ADS with the FFAG accelerator, the high-energy neutrons generated by nuclear reactions with 150 MeV proton beams in a tungsten target will be injected into a solid-moderated and -reflected core (A-core) in thermal neutron field of KUCA. The maximum power of the A-core and maximum neutron yield at the target are limited to 100 W and 1 x 1010 n/s, respectively, and the average beam current is 1 nA. Prior to the ADS experiments with 150 MeV protons, the ADS experiments with 14 MeV neutrons, which is a conventional pulsed neutron generator of the Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator, have been conducted in KUCA, including subcriticality, neutron multiplication, reaction rate distribution, neutron spectrum, neutron decay constant. Among these reactor physics parameters, an exact measurement of subcriticality is an interesting issue in the ADS studies. At the KUCA A-core, subcriticality measurement experiments the ADS with 14 MeV neutrons are carried out by using several methods: Feynman-alpha, Rossi-alpha, Neutron source multiplication and Pulsed neutron methods. In these subcriticality benchmark problems, these facts are demonstrated experimentally that the dependence of subcriticality on the detector positions is found, and that the measurement precision varies both in accordance with the degree of subcriticality and each measurement technique. (author)

  2. Present status of tandem accelerator in Department of Science, Kyoto University

    The 8UDH tandem accelerator in Department of Science, Kyoto University, has been utilized for six and a half years since the start, and at present, the joint utilization in the first half of fiscal year 1996 is carried out. Also in this year, experiment is carried out by limiting terminal voltage to below 7 MV for general users. Accelerator Group is developing by placing emphasis on a nuclear physics project PIS and an interdisciplinary project AMS, subsequently to the last fiscal year. The terminal voltage and the time of operation of pellet chains in the operation from October, 1995 to July, 1996 are shown. The course of the improvement, troubles and the repair from July, 1995 to June, 1996 is reported. The countermeasures to the damage of column tension rods did not end, and the new parts will be attached in coming autumn. Two large and four small chain tension pulleys were replaced. The surfaces of nylon rods were scratched and repaired. The belts driving the SF6 gas blower have been exchanged every about 8000 hours operation. A maniford was attached to the ion source for mixing gases. As the utilization from October 1995 to March 1996, 23 subjects for 83 days were adopted, and from April to October, 1996, the subjects for 65 days were adopted. (K.I.)

  3. Tentative set of group constants for C-core of Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    A tentative set of group constants is presented for the C-core of the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA), which is light-water moderated, and which can furnish loadings of three different pitches (2.96, 3.49 and 4.54 mm). The fast group constants were prepared by the familiar computer code ''UGMG-42'', which employs continuous slowing-down model; thermal group constants by ''THERMOS''. Special care has been taken so that the buckling as input data of UGMG is chosen consistently with the leakage in the stage of criticality calculation. With the resulting constants as input, criticality calculation is carried out by a two-dimensional code ''EQUIPOISE-3''. The difference between criticality calculation and experiment proves to be 0.7 -- 2.2%. The effect of diffusion constant on neutron flux is examined by intentionally giving different values of this quantity. In view of the considerable effect, it is concluded that the procedures of producing the thermal diffusion constant for the core has to be further investigated. The exponential attenuation constant of fast neutron flux in the reflector has to be incorporated adequately in future in the fast constant preparation. (author)

  4. Water flow characteristics of Baumkuchen type fuel elements for Kyoto University high neutron flux reactor

    The Kyoto University high neutron flux reactor is a light water-moderated and cooled, divided core type reactor with heavy water reflector. In the core, six inside fuel elements and twelve outside fuel elements are arranged in double ring form, and two cylindrical, divided cores are placed at 15 cm distance. The flow rate distribution and pressure loss in the fuel elements constitute the base of the thermo-hydraulic design of the core, therefore the model fuel elements of full size were made, and the water flow experiment was carried out to examine their characteristics. It was found that the flow velocity in channels was strongly affected by the accuracy of channel gaps. The calculation of pressure loss in fuel elements, the experiments on inside fuel elements and outside fuel elements, and the results of experiments such as the calibration of the cooling channels in outside fuel elements, the relation between total flow rate and pressure loss, and the characteristics of flow at the time of reverse flow are reported. The general characteristics of flow in fuel elements were in good agreement with the prediction. In the pressure loss in fuel elements, the friction between fuel plates and the resistance of nozzles were the controlling factors under the rated operating conditions of the HFR. (Kako, I.)

  5. A survey of attitudes toward clinical research among physicians at Kyoto University Hospital

    Yokode Masayuki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, only clinical research related to investigational new drug trials must be notified to regulatory bodies, and this lack of a uniform standard for clinical research has caused a number of difficulties. The objective of this study was to assess the willingness of physicians to participate in clinical research and to identify effective methods to promote and enhance clinical research. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey by administrating questionnaires to physicians in 31 departments in Kyoto University Hospital from October through November 2007. Results A total of 51.5% (310 of 602 of physicians completed the questionnaire. More than two-thirds of them reported currently participating in clinical research, and nearly all believed that clinical research is necessary for physicians. Less than 20% of respondents had specific training regarding clinical research, and most reported a need to acquire concepts and skills regarding clinical research, especially those related to statistics. "Paperwork was complicated and onerous" was the most frequently cited obstacle in conducting clinical research, followed by "few eligible patients" and "lack of time". Previous participation in and prospective participation in clinical research, previous writing a research protocol were positively associated with current participation in clinical research. Conclusions Physicians in university hospitals need more training regarding clinical research, particularly in biostatistics. They also require administrative assistance. Our findings indicate that the quality of clinical research could be improved if training in clinical research methodology and biostatistics were provided, and if greater assistance in the preparation of study documents requested by the institutional Independent Ethics Committee were available.

  6. Experimental study on thorium fuel cycle by using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    It was recognized from the early days of nuclear energy history that thorium (Th) would become a practical energy source, although the transmutation of 232Th into 233U is inevitable in the Th fuel cycle. Attractive points of the Th fuel cycle are as follows: (1) The abundance of Th resource is estimated to be triple of the uranium resource. (2) The thermal breeding is feasible, whereas the fast breeding is necessary in the current uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) fuel cycle. (3) The production of transuranium (TRU) is essentially lower compared with the U-Pu fuel cycle. Recently, under the delay of practical use of fast breeder reactors, the Th fuel cycle has internationally been paid attention especially in relation to the transmutation or incineration of TRU including both Pu and minor actinides (MAs). An experimental study on the Th fuel cycle was initiated in 1977 by using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) established in 1974 for the joint use program among Japanese universities including the research and education of reactor physics. Thereafter, the experimental study on the Th fuel cycle has being performed in the KUCA by using Th metal plates. A solid moderator core is utilized for the series of critical experiments on the Th fuel cycle. In addition, basic experiments on Th hybrid reactors were performed by using a Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator installed in the KUCA. In order to promote the experimental study on the Th fuel cycle in the KUCA, a future plan is being investigated to perform various experiments by introducing the 233U fuel from US. (author)

  7. Summary report of activities under visiting research program in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, second half of 1989

    The Technical Report is published on occasion by summarizing in the form of prompt report the data required at the time of research and experiment, such as the results of the functional test on various experimental facilities, the test results for the articles made for trial, the state of radiation control and waste treatment, the reports of study meetings and so on, or the remarkable results and new methods obtained in research, the discussion on other papers and reports and others in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. In this report, the gists of 69 studies carried out by using the Research Reactor and 15 studies by using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are collected. Adoption number, classification, title, the names of reporters and gist are given for each report. (K.I.)

  8. Reactor Physics Experiments by Korean Under-Graduate Students in Kyoto University Critical Assembly Program (KUGSiKUCA Program)

    The Reactor Laboratory Course for Korean Under-Graduate Students in Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUGSiKUCA) program has been launched from 2003, as one of international collaboration programs of Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI). This program was suggested by Department of Nuclear Engineering, College of Advanced Technology, Kyunghee University (KHU), and was adopted by Ministry of Science and Technology of Korean Government as one of among Nuclear Human Resources Education and Training Programs. On the basis of her suggestion for KURRI, memorandum for academic corporation and exchange between KHU and KURRI was concluded on July 2003. The program has been based on the background that it is extremely difficult for any single university in Korea to have her own research or training reactor. Up to this 2006, total number of 61 Korean under-graduate school students, who have majored in nuclear engineering of Kyunghee University, Hanyang University, Seoul National University, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Chosun University and Cheju National University in all over the Korea, has taken part in this program. In all the period, two professors and one teaching assistant on the Korean side led the students and helped their successful experiments, reports and discussions. Due to their effort, the program has succeeded in giving an effective and unique course, taking advantage of their collaboration

  9. Characteristics of neutron irradiation facility and dose estimation method for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University research reactor institute

    The neutron irradiation characteristics of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KIJRRI) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), is described. The present method of dose measurement and its evaluation at the KURRI, is explained. Especially, the special feature and noticeable matters were expounded for the BNCT with craniotomy, which has been applied at present only in Japan. (author)

  10. A design study on hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University Reactor

    A study about the installation of a hyper-thermal neutron converter to a clinical collimator was performed, as a series of the design study on a hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. From the parametric-surveys by Monte Carlo calculation, it was confirmed that the practical irradiation field of hyper-thermal neutrons would be feasible by the modifications of the clinical collimator and the bismuth-layer structure. (author)

  11. Proceedings of the specialist research meeting on 'introduction of total micro-element analysis system and its application in Kyoto University Reactor'

    The lecture contents are here summarized that have been presented in the specialist research meeting of research reactor institute of Kyoto University held under the theme 'Introduction of total micro-element analysis system and its application in Kyoto University Reactor'. Here 12 lectures were presented and the current states of radiochemical neutron activation analysis in Thailand and Korea were also mentioned. (M.H.)

  12. 78 FR 69173 - University Transportation Centers Program

    2013-11-18

    ... Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY... opportunity to submit applications for a grant as a Regional Center in the University Transportation Centers... will solicit competitive grant applications for two regional university transportation centers,...

  13. Report of research by common utilization in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, in first half of fiscal 1980

    In the technical report, the data required for research and experiment, such as the result of functional test of various experimental facilities, the test results of the products manufactured for trial, the state of radiation control and waste treatment, and the reports of study meetings, or the remarkable results and new methods obtained in research, and the discussion on other papers and reports in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, are summarized as prompt report. The subject, reporters and synopsis of 54 papers are reported in this publication. (Kako, I.)

  14. Safety Re-evaluation of Kyoto University Research Reactor by reflecting the Accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Nakajima, K.; Yamamoto, T. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is a light-water moderated tank-type reactor operated at rated thermal power of 5MW. After the accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, we have settled a 40-ton water tank near the reactor room, and prepared a mobile fire pump and a mobile power generator as additional safety measures for beyond design basis accidents (BDBAs). We also have conducted the safety re-evaluation of KUR, and confirmed that the integrity of KUR fuels could be kept against the BDBA with the use of the additional safety measures when the several restrictions were imposed on the reactor operation.

  15. Report of research by common utilization in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, in latter half of fiscal 1980

    In the technical report, the data required for research and experiment, such as the result of functional test of various experimental facilities, the test results of the products manufactured for trial, the state of radiation control and waste treatment, and the reports of study meetings, or the remarkable results and new methods obtained in research and the discussion on other papers and reports in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, are summarized as prompt report. The subject, reporters and synopsis of 69 papers are reported in this publication. (Kako, I.)

  16. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, latter half of fiscal year 1982

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 65 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as Moessbauer spectroscopic study of ferrocene and its derivative iodides by I-129, decomposition of cadmium telluride during heat treatment, element distribution in resource living things and environmental substances produced in northern ocean, radioactivation analysis of trace elements in blood of tumor-bearing animals, radioactivation analysis of noble metal elements in geochemical samples, relaxation phenomena by gamma-gamma perturbation angle correlation, separation of components in Allende meteorite and their radioactivation analysis, measurement of cross section of Pa-231 (n, gamma) reaction and others. (Kako, I.)

  17. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, latter half of fiscal year 1981

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 61 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as radioactivation analysis of trace elements in rocks and minerals, anodic oxidation films of GaAs and structure, measurement of yield of uranium isotopes produced by reactor neutron irradiation of thorium, geochemical study of trace elements in hydrosphere by radio-activation analysis, various diseases and variation of elements in rat furs, Moessbauer spectroscopic study of gold compounds with singular coupling by Au-197, measurement of grass-eating quantity and rate of digestion of cows using Au and Eu, sickness biochemical study of trace elements in hair samples of patients and others. (Kako, I.)

  18. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, first half of fiscal year 1982

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 47 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as diffusion of impurities ion-implanted in silicon into natural oxide films, origin of igneous rocks by trace element distribution study, element distribution in black ore and its accompanying rocks and origin of black ore, reprocessing of molten salt fuel of thorium group, forerunning martensite transformation of Fe-Pt invar alloy, change of nucleic acid component to recoil tritium at cryogenic temperature, gamma irradiation effect of KC1 containing Pb2+, radiation effect on cadmium halide crystals and impurity metallic ions and others. (Kako, I.)

  19. Report of researches by common utilization of facilities in Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, first half of fiscal year 1981

    The technical report of the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute is published any time to immediately report on the results of the functional tests of various experimental facilities, the test results for the products made for trial, radiation control, the situation of waste treatment, the data required for research and experiment such as the reports of study meetings, the conspicuous results obtained amid researches, new processes, and the discussion on other papers and reports. In this report, the title, the names of reporters and the summary of 57 researches carried out by the common utilization of the facilities in the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute are collected. The themes of the researches are such as neutron radiography using a research reactor, measurement of Zr/Hf ratio in zirconium, interstitial germanium atoms in thermal neutron irradiation study, measurement of induced radioactivity due to neutrons in Nagasaki and Hiroshima atomic bombings, properties of semiconductor electrons in radiation study, induction of mutation in crops by neutron irradiation and utilization for breeding, thermal fluorescence mechanism of alkali halide and MgO single crystals, atomic configuration in PZT rhombohedron phase, modulated structure of Cu-Co alloys, excitation of nuclei by positron annihilation and others. (Kako, I.)

  20. Performance of the 100 MeV injector linac for the electron storage ring at Kyoto University

    An electron linear accelerator has been constructed as an injector of a 300 MeV electron storage ring (Kaken Storage Ring, KSR) at Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University. The output beam energy of the linac is 100 MeV and the designed beam current is 100 mA at the 1 μsec long pulse mode. The transverse and longitudinal emittance are measured to evaluate the beam quality for the beam injection into the KSR. They are observed by the profile monitors combined with quadrupole magnets or an RF accelerator. The results are that the normalized transverse emittance is 120 π.mm.mrad. The longitudinal emittance is 15 π.deg.MeV and the energy spread is ±2.2 %. (author)

  1. Application of heavy-ion microbeam system at Kyoto University: Energy response for imaging plate by single ion irradiation

    A heavy-ion microbeam system for cell irradiation has been developed using an accelerator at Kyoto University. We have successfully developed proton-, carbon-, fluorine- and silicon-beams in order to irradiate a micro-meter sized area with ion counting, especially single ion irradiation. In the heavy-ion microbeam system, an imaging plate (IP) was utilized for beam diagnostics on the irradiation. The IP is widely used for radiography studies in biology. However, there are a few studies on the low linear energy transfer (LET) by single ions, i.e., low-intensity exposure. Thus we have investigated the energy response for the IP, which can be utilized for microbeam diagnostics.

  2. Application of heavy-ion microbeam system at Kyoto University: Energy response for imaging plate by single ion irradiation

    Tosaki, M.; Nakamura, M.; Hirose, M.; Matsumoto, H.

    2011-12-01

    A heavy-ion microbeam system for cell irradiation has been developed using an accelerator at Kyoto University. We have successfully developed proton-, carbon-, fluorine- and silicon-beams in order to irradiate a micro-meter sized area with ion counting, especially single ion irradiation. In the heavy-ion microbeam system, an imaging plate (IP) was utilized for beam diagnostics on the irradiation. The IP is widely used for radiography studies in biology. However, there are a few studies on the low linear energy transfer (LET) by single ions, i.e., low-intensity exposure. Thus we have investigated the energy response for the IP, which can be utilized for microbeam diagnostics.

  3. Homogeneity of neutron flux during irradiation for 40Ar/39Ar age dating in the research reactor at Kyoto University

    Homogeneity of neutron fluxes during irradiation experiments done in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, was evaluated using J-values collected in 40Ar/39Ar age determinations. The laser fusion results of approximately 0.3 mm-size individual mineral grains (Hb3gr hornblendes) indicate insignificant change in J-values both in horizontal and vertical directions within a size of the cylindrical sample holder (φ16x18). The reactor seems to have a relatively uniform fast neutron density distribution within the dimensions for 40Ar/39Ar dating. Correction factors obtained from potassium and calcium salts were also reviewed. The J-values of Hb3gr have minor effects from these factors because of little contribution of the interfering isotopes. (author)

  4. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  5. Forthcoming experiments on accelerator-driven systems with 100 MeV protons at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    At the Kyoto University Critical Assembly, a series of uranium-loaded accelerator-driven system (ADS) experiments are planned to be carried out to conduct the conversion analysis of capture and fission reactions to investigate the uncertainties of cross-section data of minor actinides in the case of the variation of the subcriticality, the external neutron source and the neutron spectrum. Then, the uranium-loaded ADS experiments with 100 MeV protons could be conducted using the Pb-Bi-zoned region to examine the feasibility of the nuclear transmutation by ADS, including 237Np and 241Am. Also, another conversion analysis of 232Th capture and 233U fission reactions is expected to investigate the reaction rate characteristics in ADS when subcriticality, neutron spectrum and external neutron source are varied in the subcritical system. (authors)

  6. Sacred Groves: Three University Fine Art Centers

    Architectural Forum, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The Power Center for the Performing Arts at the University of Michigan; The Center for the Arts at Wesleyan; and the Fine Arts Center at the Amherst campus of the University of Massachusetts -- are temples to the performing arts. (Arthor)

  7. KYOTO project

    Agirre Bengoa, Eneko; Casillas Rubio, Arantza; Díaz de Ilarraza Sánchez, Arantza; Estarrona Ibarloza, Ainara; Fernández Terrones, Enrique; Gojenola Galletebeitia, Koldo; Laparra Martín, Egoitz; Rigau Claramunt, German; Soroa Etxabe, Aitor

    2009-01-01

    El proyecto Kyoto construye un sistema de información independiente del lenguaje para un dominio específico (medio ambiente, ecología y diversidad) basado en una ontología independiente del lenguaje que estará enlazada a Wordnets en siete idiomas.

  8. Proceeding of the 20th technical meeting on nuclear reactor and radiation for KURRI engineers and the 11th technical official group section 5 meeting in Kyoto University

    Five presentations were given with a focus on the measures for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident. (1) 'Support activities of KURRI on the measures for the Fukushima nuclear accident': Introduction of the state of personal dispatch and support activities for radiation survey performed at evacuation centers. (2) 'New RI usage-emitting α-ray aiming at single cell': Developing state of a new cell irradiation effect observation system that can perform the localized irradiation of RI-derived He ion while targeting single cell under a microscope. (3) 'Reactivity measurement system at Kyoto University research reactor (KUR)': Explanation of the composition and performance of the system of real time display on the output, reactivity, and cooling water temperature of KUR, etc. and the introduction of that this system used in student experiments. (4) 'Introduction of GPS-linked automatic radiation measuring system, KURAMA': Introduction of a voluntarily developed vehicle-mounted type radiation measurement system that takes into account the local conditions of Fukushima (KURAMA). (5) 'Internal exposure dose evaluation of staff members dispatched to Fukushima': Indication of the methods and results of dose assessment, and report on that exposure management has been properly performed. The 3 of 5 papers presented at the entitled meeting are indexed individually. (A.O.)

  9. Summary reports of activities under visiting research program in Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, first half of 1989

    This book contains 56 brief reports of studies carried out at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University. These reports deal with 'Neutron Transmutation Doping on Compound Semiconductor', 'Study on the Influence of the Neutron Irradiation on the Low Temperature Strength of Various Welded Joint of Dissimilar Materials', 'Low Temperature Irradiation Effect on Iron-Alloys and Ceramics', 'Luminescent Phenomena from Some Kinds of Rock and Mineral Slices Accompanied with Gamma-irradiation', 'Study of Irradiation Effects on Simulated Waste Glass Irradiated Using 10B(n,γ)7Li Reaction', 'Neutron Spectrometry with CR-39 Track Detector', 'Performance Study on Superconducting Magnet Materials in Thermonuclear Fusion Conditions', 'Fast Neutron Radiography with KUR-Linac', 'Study of Photo-Excited Metastable State and Their Relaxation of Irradiation Defects in Silicon and Diamond by Using a SQUID Magnetometer', 'Moessbauer Study on Radiation Damage of Metals and Alloys', 'Radiation Damages in Super Ionic Conductors', 'Basic Study on 74As Production by (γ,n) Reaction', etc. (N.K.)

  10. Kyoto ugly?

    In a personal consideration of the issues surrounding the Kyoto Protocol, the author argues that economic access to fossil fuels will not last forever and that their direct and indirect prices will eventually increase faster than we can afford. The Kyoto Protocol was drawn up by politicians in response to concerns about global warming resulting from man-made carbon dioxide emissions, but has received considerable criticism. Renewable energy will only be able to replace part of the current use of fossil fuels for energy generation; cost-effective use of energy will also be necessary. To improve their standard of living, developing countries are likely to reach similar rates of consumption and pollution as developed countries. The author acknowledges nuclear power as a means of power generation without carbon dioxide emissions, but notes that nuclear fusion could avoid the problems associated with nuclear fission. He also stresses the need to plan for the period when short-term emergency measures have been taken

  11. Universes with and without a center

    Tomozawa, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Two types of universe, with and without a center, are discussed; and their implications for the observed cmb (cosmic microwave background radiation) dipole are described. Theorems useful for understanding the cause for a cmb dipole are presented. Using the theorems stated and all existing data, a computation for the location of the center of the universe has been performed. In the universe without center, however, a complication arises by the appearance of the apparent center after the expans...

  12. Beta Cell Workshop 2013 Kyoto

    Heller, R Scott; Madsen, Ole D; Nielsen, Jens Hiriis

    2013-01-01

    The very modern Kyoto International Conference Center provided the site for the 8th workshop on Beta cells on April 23-26, 2013. The preceding workshops were held in Boston, USA (1991); Kyoto, Japan (1994); Helsingr, Denmark (1997); Helsinki, Finland (2003); El Perello, Spain (2006); Peebles......, Scotland (2009); and Helsingr, Denmark (2011). The Kyoto meeting drew more than 200 attendees from 18 different countries. There were 47 main oral presentations, and approximately 75 posters covered virtually all aspects of the pancreas function, development and genetics of disease. Here we will review...

  13. Proceedings of the 18th technical meeting on nuclear reactor and radiation for KURRI engineers and the 9th technical official group section 5 meeting in Kyoto University

    This report is a summary of 18th Technical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor and Radiation for KURRI Engineers in Kyoto University. This was also the 9th meeting for technical official group section 5 (nuclear and radiation) in Kyoto University. In the workshop, three special lectures held were: (1) 'On Border Between Subcritical and Supercritical', (2) 'Memories of Nuclear Power Plant Management for 40 Years', and (3) 'Introduction of Technical Office in Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University'. The technical presentations held were: (1) 'Radiation Background Study of Specialty Products in Senshu Region', (2) 'Introduction of Radioactivation Analysis at KUR', (3) 'Consideration of Critical Approach Method for KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC', (4) 'Evaluation of Temperature Coefficient of KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC'. As training for technical staffs in Technical Office, we visited the facility in Ashiu Research Forest. An introduction of this facility and the comments from the participants were included in this report. (S.K.)

  14. Preliminary experiments on accelerator-driven subcritical reactor with pulsed neutron generator in Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    A series of preliminary experiments on an accelerator-driven subcritical reactor (ADSR) with 14 MeV neutrons were conducted at Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) with the prospect of establishing a new neutron source for research. A critical assembly of a solid-moderated and -reflected core was combined with a Cockcroft-Walton-type accelerator. A neutron shield and a beam duct were installed in the reflector region for directing as large a number as possible of the high-energy 14 MeV neutrons generated by deuteron-tritium (D-T) reactions to the fuel region, since the tritium target is located outside the core. And then, neutrons (14 MeV) were injected into a subcritical system through a polyethylene reflector. The objectives of this paper are to investigate the neutron design accuracy of the ADSR with 14 MeV neutrons and to examine experimentally the neutronic properties of the ADSR with 14 MeV neutrons at KUCA. The reaction rate distribution and the neutron spectrum were measured by the foil activation method for investigating the neutronic properties of the ADSR with 14 MeV neutrons. The eigenvalue and fixed-source calculations were executed using a continuous-energy Monte Carlo calculation code MCNP-4C3 with ENDF/B-VI.2 for the subcriticality and the reaction rate distribution, respectively; the unfolding calculation was done using the SAND-II code coupled with JENDL Activation Cross Section File 96 for the neutron spectrum. The values of the calculated subcriticality and the reaction rate distribution were in good agreement with those of the experiments. The results of the experiments and the calculations demonstrated that the installation of the neutron shield and the beam duct was experimentally valid and that the MCNP-4C3 calculations were accurately carried out for analyzing the neutronic properties of the ADSR with 14 MeV neutrons at KUCA. (author)

  15. Experience With A Small Scale All Digital CT And MRI Clinical Service Unit: Present Status Of Kyoto University Hospital Image Database And Communication System

    Minato, K.; Komori, M.; Nakano, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Kyoto University Hospital is currently developing a prototype PAC system named KIDS (Kyoto univ. hosp. Image Database and communication System). The present goal of the system is to achieve the totally digital CT and MRI unit in the radiological department. Because KIDS is designed as a first step of a long-range plan towards a hospital wide system, it includes all of the basic functions required in realizing the PAC system, such as communication networks, a long term archiving unit, a laser film printer and image workstations. The system concept, architecture and current status are described in this paper. Our early experience and evaluations with the system in a clinical environment are also mentioned.

  16. 77 FR 60012 - University Transportation Centers Program

    2012-10-01

    ... Research and Innovative Technology Administration University Transportation Centers Program AGENCY... submit grant applications for the University Transportation Centers (UTCs) program. The Department... complete Privacy Act statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78), or...

  17. Open University Center of the Pontifical Javeriana University, Colombia

    Omayra Parra de Marroquin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Garcia Canclini (1990 there is the assumption that Colombia is a hybrid society. Upon this standpoint, and within a traditional higher education structure characterized by being fundamentally conventional or campus based, the Open University Center of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana was created as an education program that breaks with every traditional scheme, which in turn, encourages a new learning pattern. The Open University Center emerges as a "social response" focused on the "here and now" of today's society in Colombia.The Javeriana University (a hybrid university can be placed in this context as well as the Open University Center, as a part of it. Since its creation, through its programs this center offers education to the most vulnerable of Colombia's population, contributing to raise their quality of life.In this article, the authors outline the Open University Center's place in the University's context: its historical development and its structure concerning students, programs, regulations, infrastructure and technological equipment. They also identify the implications and relationships of the traditional education proper of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, as well as the projection and contributions of the Open University Center to the University's future in the pedagogical order of distance education towards virtual education.

  18. A report of the research works in joint use of Kyoto University's Research Reactor Institute for the period of October 1977 to March 1978

    This is the report of the results of each investigation performed in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, during the second half of fiscal year 1977. It includes 61 reports. It is briefly divided into 5 reports on radiation proper, 11 reports on biology and medicine and 45 reports on physics, chemistry and mineralogy. In the last 45 reports, 6 reports on material, 10 reports on activation analysis and 1 report on dating are included. Since each report is limited to the abstract of 1 page using the same format, details of the contents are not known. However, general trends of Investigations may be known. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  19. Open University Center of the Pontifical Javeriana University, Colombia

    Omayra Parra de Marroquin; Lina Claricia Corredor Moyano

    2002-01-01

    According to Garcia Canclini (1990) there is the assumption that Colombia is a hybrid society. Upon this standpoint, and within a traditional higher education structure characterized by being fundamentally conventional or campus based, the Open University Center of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana was created as an education program that breaks with every traditional scheme, which in turn, encourages a new learning pattern. The Open University Center emerges as a "social response" focused...

  20. Center Focus: The Instructional Technology Center at Iowa State University.

    Rieck, Don

    2000-01-01

    Provides a history of the Instructional Technology Center at Iowa State University and describes its present operations. Highlights include an organizational chart; classroom services; instructional development services, related to faculty development and courseware creation; creative services that support multimedia, graphics, and television…

  1. University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging

    Bernstein, Dr. Ira [University of Vermont and State Agricultural College

    2013-08-02

    This grant was awarded in support of Phase 2 of the University of Vermont Center for Biomedical Imaging. Phase 2 outlined several specific aims including: The development of expertise in MRI and fMRI imaging and their applications The acquisition of peer reviewed extramural funding in support of the Center The development of a Core Imaging Advisory Board, fee structure and protocol review and approval process.

  2. The survey on the supporting ground on the construction site of High Flux Reactor Building in Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University

    As part of the seismic design of the High Flux Reactor building which is planned to be constructed by Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, the stability of the supporting ground has been analyzed. This report concerns the ground survey which has been carried out to obtain the basic data on the supporting ground. The outline of the ground around the construction site of High Flux Reactor has been already made clear by the last survey. Therefore, the purpose of this ground survey is mainly to make clear the mechanical properties of the soil. The survey has been carried out concerning the supporting ground and several layers deeper than that. The main items obtained are as follows. (1) modulus of deformation (2) breaking strength and creep strength (3) coefficient of permeability (4) ground water level. (author)

  3. SUBIC : Stockholm University Brain Imaging Center

    Lacerda, Francisco; Lindblom, Björn

    2014-01-01

    This contribution presents an outline of SUBIC (Stockholm University Brain Imaging Center, working name). SUBIC is conceived as an interdisciplinary infrastructure that will promote Stockholm University’s participation in international cutting-edge research focusedon the function and the morphologic evolution of the brain.

  4. The industrial Center at Mississippi State University

    b.K. Hodge; Mary C. Emplaincourt

    2007-04-30

    The Mississippi State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) is one of 26 centers supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at universities across the country. The Mississippi State University IAC in existence since 1994 provides plant assessments at no cost to eligible small and mid-sized manufacturers categorized in Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes 20-39. Client eligibility is based on gross sales below $100 million, fewer than 500 employees at the plant, annual utility bills more than $100,000 and less than $2 million, and no in-house professional staff to perform an assessment. IAC assessment benefits include no cost to the clients, increased profitability and competitiveness, confidentiality, non-regulatory, nonobligatory, and student involvement.

  5. Moving beyond Kyoto

    In November 2000, just after the presidential elections in the United States, negotiators will meet in The Hague at the sixth meeting of the Conference of Parties (COP6) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Chang the Kyoto Protocol on global climate change at COP3, which was held in Kyoto in December 1997. Intense negotiations over the intervening period have focused on how to implement the Kyoto Protocol. The Kyoto Protocol has been signed by 84 countries but not ratified by any of the key countries, and ratification does not appear to be imminent, especially in the United Sates, where the Senate has registered its strong opposition. (author)

  6. The Russian Federation and the Kyoto Protocol

    Douma, Wybe; Ratsiborinskaya, Daria

    2007-01-01

    This book brings together the results of two conferences: 'The Kyoto Protocol and beyond: A legal perspective', organised by the University of Siena on 10-11 June 2006, and 'Tackling Climate Change: An appraisal of the Kyoto Protocol and options for the future', held at the T.M.C. Asser Institute in The Hague on 30-31 March 2007. These conferences focused on the legal aspects of the Kyoto Protocol implementation and the post-2012 regime. Experts in European and international environmental law...

  7. Challenger Center's Window on the Universe Program

    Bobrowsky, M.; Goldstein, J.; Livengood, T.; Offringa, K.; Richards, S.; Riddle, B.

    2001-05-01

    Each year, Challenger Center's Window on the Universe launches thousands of everyday people---teachers and students, parents---on a fantastic journey through our universe. Recently, for example, we visited Nogales, Arizona, where we trained 350 teachers, talked to 6000 students in classrooms, and 1500 more students and their families as part of ``Family Science Night'' presentations. Window aims to increase community involvement in science education within underserved communities throughout the United States. Challenger Center's national team works with a local team in the participating community to provide training for teachers, classroom talks, and Family Science Night presentations for the community. The national team includes at least one astronomer and one educator from Challenger Center, as well as at least two Visiting Researchers (VRs) from other institutions. (However, in Washington, D.C., there were 40 VRs from 12 different institutions who, along with the national team, visited every 6th grade classroom in the city! Window materials have become an essential part of the 6th grade curriculum in Washington, D.C.) VRs are scientists or engineers in the fields of astronomy, space science, or human space flight who are gifted at communicating their passion about research to audiences of all ages. Their research is related to the topics covered in the Window educational modules, which provide the core content for Window on the Universe programming. VRs travel to Window communities during one of the Window weeks, where they visit classrooms and sometimes conduct Family Science Night presentations. Researchers from any institution are invited to participate as VRs in Window programs and showcase their research and their institution. If you or someone from your institution is interested in participating, please visit http://challenger.org/wotu/ and click on ``Find Out More.'' Window on the Universe is funded by grants from NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space Enterprise and Office of Space Science.

  8. Study on remodeling the heavy water facility of the Kyoto University reactor for neutron capture therapy from the concept of neutron energy spectrum control

    In August 1988, there was heavy water leakage from the thermocouple guide pipe of the heavy water tank adjacent to the core of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The need for a fundamental reexamination of the Heavy Water Thermal Neutron Facility (HWTNF) has been recognized since the guide pipe was repaired. Clinical irradiation was restarted in February 1990, and as of September 1, 1992, 24 clinical treatments had been carried out. Some improvements for the clinical treatment have been requested by clinicians and other users, especially the ability to use the facility while the reactor is in continuous operations. From the viewpoints of reactor engineering and medical physics, there are four goals for remodeling the present HWTNF: (1) to simplify and secure maintenance, overhaul, and repair, (2) to enable the facility to be used during continuous operation of the KUR, (3) to improve the performances of the irradiation field of thermal neutrons for biomedical uses, and (4) to control neutron energy spectrum. In this paper, an outline for the redesign of the facility is reported

  9. The study on the stability of the supporting ground on the construction site of High Flux Reactor building in Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University

    This report provides the results of the study on the stability of the supporting gwound which has been carried out as a part of the seismic design of the High Flux Reactor building which is planned to be constructed by Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute. In this work the finite element method is used. The stresses and displacements of the ground are calculated under the following conditions; (1) Stress-strain relationships for the individual elements are linear. (2) The problem is analyzed on two-dimensional plane strain distributions. (3) No-tension analysis is applied to the calculation for earthquake load. (4) The mechanical properties of the ground are obtained from the soil survey which has been performed at the construction site of High Flux Reactor building. The results are summarized as follows; (1) The settlement of the building is estimated to be about 2 -- 5 cm for long-time loading, including the result from elastic theory, while the relative settlement is about 0.3 cm at both ends of the building. (2) Safety factor is larger than 1.4 for long-time loading. (3) Maximum angle of the deformation of the building due to the earthquake load is estimated to be about 9.2 x 10-3 degree (1.6 x 10-4 rad). (4) Safety factor is larger than 1.2 -- 1.3 for earthquake load. Judging from these results described above, the ground at the construction site of the High Flux Reactor is appropriate for the supporting ground of the reactor building, and the mat foundation can be adopted for the foundation form. (author)

  10. The Promotion of Peace Education through Guides in Peace Museums. A Case Study of the Kyoto Museum for World Peace, Ritsumeikan University

    Tanigawa, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on how peace education at a peace museum is promoted by a volunteer guide service for visitors. Peace museums are places where many materials related to war and peace history are on display. To support the learning experience of museum visitors, many peace museums in Japan provide a volunteer guide service. The Kyoto Museum for…

  11. The Kyoto protocol development; La viabilite du protocole de Kyoto

    Cooper, R. [Harvard Univ., Barrow, AK (United States); Guesneris, R. [College de France, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-04-01

    From the author R. Cooper point of view the Kyoto Protocol is a flawed concept. The reasons for dropping Kyoto are presented in this paper insisting that rejecting Kyoto not means to imply that global climate change is not a serious problem. After a presentation of the US policy facing the Climatic Change, some concluding propositions are proposed. (A.L.B.)

  12. The marbles of Kyoto

    Reduction of greenhouse gases can result in considerable costs and benefits for businesses. Financial institutes (e.g. banking and assurance companies) can develop and provide financial products to support industry and businesses which have to meet environmental regulations as set in the Kyoto Protocol and national environmental regulations. 6 refs

  13. Slovenia and Kyoto Obligation

    The paper gives the possibilities of emission reduction as an obligation from Kyoto Protocol. The Slovenia environmental and energy strategies are regulated to implement the agreement to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases by 8% to the year 2012 as regard the basic year 1986 in energy, transportation, industrial and other sectors, especially focused on electric power sector. (author)

  14. University of Washington Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  15. Academic Specialization and Contemporary University Humanities Centers

    Brownley, Martine W.

    2012-01-01

    Given the academic specialization endemic today in humanities disciplines, some of the most important work of humanities centers has become promoting education about the humanities in general. After charting the rise of humanities centers in the US, three characteristics of centers that enable their advancement of larger concerns of the humanities…

  16. 13 CFR 306.7 - Performance evaluations of University Centers.

    2010-01-01

    ... evaluation period. (b) The performance evaluation will determine in part whether a University Center can... one (1) other University Center in the performance evaluation on a cost-reimbursement basis. ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance evaluations...

  17. Anomaly Busters hit Kyoto

    The Anomaly Busters' - this was how Roy Schwitters of Harvard summed up the International Symposium on Lepton and Photon Interactions at High Energies, held in Kyoto from 19-24 August. Recent results had given clues of possible anomalous behaviour - neutrino masses, the so-called 'monojets' in high energy proton-antiproton collisions, unexplained muon signals from the star Cygnus X-3, etc

  18. Kyotos helte og skurke

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    1998-01-01

    USA blev på Kyoto-konferencen i december kritiseret af energi- og miljøminister Svend Auken for at ville tjene på et globalt CO2-marked. Men håndhæves dette effektivt af FN, kommer det alle til gode. Et globalt CO2-marked kan blive et banebrydende styringsmiddel, som kan løse globale miljøproblem...

  19. Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics, Auburn University

    Deis, Dan W.; Hopkins, Richard H.

    The union of Auburn University's Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics and the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center to form a Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) is discussed. An area of focus for the CCDS will be the development of silicon carbide electronics technology, in terms of semiconductors and crystal growth. The discussion is presented in viewgraph form.

  20. Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics, Auburn University

    Deis, Dan W.; Hopkins, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The union of Auburn University's Center for Space Power and Advanced Electronics and the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center to form a Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) is discussed. An area of focus for the CCDS will be the development of silicon carbide electronics technology, in terms of semiconductors and crystal growth. The discussion is presented in viewgraph form.

  1. Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

    Kraus, George A.

    2006-10-17

    The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: • Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials • Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals • Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis • Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic system that performs both esterification (of free fatty acids) and transesterification (of soybean oil) in a one-pot fashion. This will allow the biodiesel producers to use the aforementioned cheap feedstocks without any pretreatment. In addition, the catalyst system is heterogeneous and is highly recyclable and reusable. Although markets currently exist for glycerin, concern is mounting that the price of glycerin may plummet to $.05 - $.10 per pound if future production exceeds demand. Developing a system to make high value chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol from the glycerin stream will add value for biodiesel producers who implement the new technology. Given the fact that both DuPont and Shell chemicals have announced the commercialization of two new PDO-based polymers, a rapid increase of market demand for a cheaper PDO source is very likely. 4. Comparison of actual accomplishments with goals and objectives From our progress reports, the four areas are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D)

  2. Joint marketing cites excellence: Fairview-University Medical Center advertises cooperatively with University of Minnesota Physicians.

    Botvin, Judith D

    2004-01-01

    Fairview-University Medical Center and University of Minnesota Physicians, both in Minneapolis, are enjoying the benefits of a co-branded advertising campaign. It includes print ads, brochures, and other marketing devices. PMID:15487283

  3. The Library: Center of the Restructured University.

    Battin, Patricia

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes traditional roles and services of academic libraries, summarizes new communication links, and suggests major policy areas to be considered by university officers: centralized financial and technological planning, integration of information services with academic programs, access to scholarly resources, electronic publishing, copyright and…

  4. Memphis State University Center for Nuclear Studies progress report

    This quarterly report outlines the progress made by the Center for Nuclear Studies at Memphis State University in the development of specialized educational programs for the nuclear industry through the month of February, 1976

  5. International Students, University Health Centers, and Memorable Messages about Health

    Carmack, Heather J.; Bedi, Shireen; Heiss, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    International students entering US universities often experience a variety of important socialization messages. One important message is learning about and using the US health system. International students often first encounter the US health system through their experiences with university health centers. The authors explore the memorable…

  6. The Syracuse University Center for Training and Research in Hypersonics

    LaGraff, John; Blankson, Isaiah (Technical Monitor); Robinson, Stephen K. (Technical Monitor); Walsh, Michael J. (Technical Monitor); Anderson, Griffin Y. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In Fall 1993, NASA Headquarters established Centers for Hypersonics at the University of Maryland, the University of Texas-Arlington, and Syracuse University. These centers are dedicated to research and education in hypersonic technologies and have the objective of educating the next generation of engineers in this critical field. At the Syracuse University Center for Hypersonics this goal is being realized by focusing resources to: Provide an environment in which promising undergraduate students can learn the fundamental engineering principles of hypersonics so that they may make a seamless transition to graduate study and research in this field; Provide graduate students with advanced training in hypersonics and an opportunity to interact with leading authorities in the field in both research and instructional capacities; and Perform fundamental research in areas that will impact hypersonic vehicle design and development.

  7. Kyoto and other tales

    Takis Fotopoulos

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The worsening ecological crisis, as part of the multidimensional crisis, was in the limelight again this week when the Kyoto protocol came into force among futile, if not disorientating, celebrations by the ‘progressive’ part of the transnational elite. Some 141 countries - which account for about 55% of greenhouse gas emissions thought by most experts to be the cause of drastic climatic change - have ratified the treaty, which pledges to cut these emissions by 5.2% by 2012. Still, the USA and Australia, which, together with China and India in the periphery, are mainly responsible for the remaining 45% of the greenhouse gas emissions, have put themselves outside the treaty’s framework, assigning greater priority to the market economy’s dynamic and its complement, the growth economy[1], rather than to the threatening climatic disaster.

  8. Climate policy after Kyoto

    The Kyoto Convention recommends reductions in emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, to mitigate the rate of climate change. Lively debate has taken place in many countries, not least over the political and economic implications. The basis for the Kyoto discussions was a set of studies commissioned, compiled and published by the UN's International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). At first glance this scientific foundation plainly shows that significant climate change will occur unless emissions of greenhouse gases are sharply curtailed. On closer examination, the scientific evidence provided in the IPCC material is far from clear. Reputable scientists have expressed critical views about the interpretation of the scientific results and, even more, of the way the material is being used for policy purposes. The main purpose of this book is to voice this critique. To give the reader some context, a central section from the IPCC's basic document is presented first. There follow nine papers, by prominent natural and social scientists, in which the reasons for their sceptical attitudes are developed. A final paper by Professor Bert Bolin, chairman of the IPCC during the time when most of the material was produced, provides a response and commentary to the critique. The aim of the editor and authors, in presenting the material in this way, rather than as a polemical tract, is to leave open to the reader the question: Is global warming a consequence of man's activities, or are there other reasons; if so, is adopting policies with significant economic consequences, a reasonable response? (Author)

  9. Increasing use of yellow colors in Kyoto

    Akita, Munehira; Nara, Iwao

    2002-06-01

    Colors used for commercial signboards, displayed outdoors as well as indoors through windows, such as a store sign, an advertising sign, a sky sign, a poster, a placard, and a billboard were extensively surveyed in Kyoto City, Japan, in 1998. The survey showed that various kinds of yellow painted signs have increased rapidly and invaded a center area and suburbs of the city. Vivid yellow, what we called it the Y98 virus, is specially considered a color unpleasantly matched to the city image of Kyoto which was the capital of Japan for nearly 1000 years (794 to 1868) and is endowed with cultural and historic heritage. Discussions trying to find out what we could do to prevent the rapid spread of a big commercial display painted with vivid yellows what we called 'the Y98 virus' over the city will be summarized in a main text.

  10. Kyoto Protocol one step closer

    Showstack, Randy

    The European Union (EU) could soon decide to ratify the Kyoto Protocol on climate change, following a 4 March meeting of the European Commissions environment council to approve the treaty.European Commission President Romani Prodi said the council's move enables the 15 EU member states to take the steps toward simultaneous ratification together with the commission before 1 June."I urge our partners both in the developed and in the developing countries to also ratify the Kyoto Protocol soon," he said.

  11. Bulimia: Issues a University Counseling Center Needs To Address.

    Whitner, Phillip A.; Shetterly, Arminta

    The eating disorder known as bulimia is a relatively new and baffling phenomenon. This paper raises questions that college and university counseling center professionals need to address regarding this phenomenon. The first section focuses on defining the term "bulimia" and its evolution. The second section identifies numerous symptoms that need to…

  12. New Student Center, Clemson University, Clemson, S.C.

    Design Cost Data, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the building of the new student center of Clemson University, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on the architects, manufacturers/suppliers, and construction team; a general building description; and a case study of construction costs and specifications. Also provides the floor plan and photographs.…

  13. Rice University: Building an Academic Center for Nonprofit Education

    Seaworth, Angela

    2012-01-01

    According to the author, the setting for their nonprofit education center was close to ideal: Support from a dean who cares deeply about nonprofit organizations; encouragement from the university and its renewed focus on reaching beyond its walls on the eve of its centennial; and a generous gift from alumni who have been affiliated with the

  14. Electronic Commerce Resource Centers. An Industry--University Partnership.

    Gulledge, Thomas R.; Sommer, Rainer; Tarimcilar, M. Murat

    1999-01-01

    Electronic Commerce Resource Centers focus on transferring emerging technologies to small businesses through university/industry partnerships. Successful implementation hinges on a strategic operating plan, creation of measurable value for customers, investment in customer-targeted training, and measurement of performance outputs. (SK)

  15. Group Treatment of Eating Disorders in a University Counseling Center.

    Snodgrass, Gregory; And Others

    Sociocultural pressures to pursue an unrealistic ideal of thinness have contributed to an increasing number of students seeking help at a university counseling center for the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia. To help these students, a group treatment technique was developed using a cognitive-behavioral approach. Treatment

  16. Group Treatment of Eating Disorders in a University Counseling Center.

    Snodgrass, Gregory; And Others

    Sociocultural pressures to pursue an unrealistic ideal of thinness have contributed to an increasing number of students seeking help at a university counseling center for the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia. To help these students, a group treatment technique was developed using a cognitive-behavioral approach. Treatment…

  17. Off-center observers versus supernovae in inhomogeneous pressure universes

    Balcerzak, Adam; Denkiewicz, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Exact luminosity distance and apparent magnitude formulas are applied to Union2 557 supernovae sample in order to constrain possible position of an observer outside of the center of symmetry in spherically symmetric inhomogeneous pressure Stephani universes which are complementary to inhomogeneous density Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) void models. Two specific models are investigated. The first which allows a barotropic equation of state at the center of symmetry with no scale factor function being specified (model IIA), and the second which has no barotropic equation of state at the center, but has an explicit dust-like scale factor evolution (model IIB). It is shown that even at $3\\sigma$ CL, an off-center observer cannot be further than about 3-4 Gpc away from the center of symmetry which is comparable to the reported size of a void in LTB models with the most likely value of the distance from the center about 270 Mpc for Model IIA. The off-center observer cannot be farther away from the center than about ...

  18. Off-center observers versus supernovae in inhomogeneous pressure universes

    Exact luminosity distance and apparent magnitude formulae are applied to the Union2 557 supernovae sample in order to constrain the possible position of an observer outside of the center of symmetry in spherically symmetric inhomogeneous pressure Stephani universes, which are complementary to inhomogeneous density Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) void models. Two specific models are investigated. The first allows a barotropic equation of state at the center of symmetry without the need to specify a scale factor function (model IIA). The second has no barotropic equation of state at the center, but has an explicit dust-like scale factor evolution (model IIB). It is shown that even at 3σ CL, an off-center observer cannot be further than about 4.4 Gpc away from the center of symmetry, which is comparable to the reported size of a void in LTB models with the most likely value of the distance from the center at about 341 Mpc for model IIA and 68 Mpc for model IIB. The off-center observer cannot be farther away from the center than about 577 Mpc for model IIB at 3σ CL. It is determined that the best-fit parameters which characterize inhomogeneity are Ωinh = 0.77 (dimensionless: model IIA) and α = 7.31 × 10–9 (s km–1)2/3 Mpc–4/3 (model IIB).

  19. 77 FR 59660 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology... Stanford University Archaeology Center. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated...

  20. University / Science Center Exhibit Development Collaboration: Strategies and Lessons Learned

    Raddick, M. J.; Carliles, S.; Bartelme, L.; Patterson, J.

    2008-06-01

    Through funding from the NSF's Internship in Public Science Education (IPSE) program, Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and the Maryland Science Center (MSC) have worked together to create an exhibit based on JHU's research with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a project to map the universe. The exhibit is a kiosk-based interactive presentation that connects to online data about the sky. It is currently displayed in SpaceLink, an area at the MSC that focuses on current events and research in astronomy. The person primarily responsible for the exhibit was a graduate student in computer science in the JHU Physics and Astronomy department. He worked with an EPO professional in the department and two members of the MSC's planetarium and exhibit staff to plan the exhibit. The team also worked with a coordinator in the JHU chemistry department, and an external evaluator. Along with increased public understanding of science, our goal was to create and evaluate a sustainable partnership between a research university and a local science center. We are producing an evaluation report discussing our collaboration and detailing lessons learned. We hope that our experience can be a model for other university / science center collaborations in the future. Some lessons that we have learned in our development effort are: start all design decisions with learning goals and objectives, write goals with evaluation in mind, focus on the process of science, and do not underestimate the challenges of working with the web as part of the exhibit technology.

  1. GAME ANALYSIS OF KYOTO AND POST-KYOTO SCHEMES

    Haruo Imai [Kyoto Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto (Japan)

    2008-09-30

    Kyoto protocol, put in force in Feb. 2005, is criticized from both sides, those demanding a stricter target for GHG (green house gas) emission reduction on the one side, and those claiming for more flexible and comprehensive controls of the emission on the other side, for its modest target and narrow coverage. Even though its value could be that of a mere precedent and experimentation, Kyoto protocol includes very special experimentation to assist the world wide cooperation for a mitigation of climate change, i.e. the introduction of three mechanisms, emissions trading, joint implementation, and clean development mechanism (CDM). Together, they are called Kyoto mechanisms. Evaluation of mechanisms is one important role of microeconomics and the game theory is a major tool for it. We shall scrutinize these mechanisms from such viewpoint. A special attention is placed on CDM, as it is the novel mechanism introduced by Kyoto protocol, and gives a unique link between Annex I nations (mostly developed countries) and non-Annex I nations (mostly developing countries). Next, we examine some of the currently proposed schemes after 2013, the post Kyoto schemes. One of the chief issues is the possibility of making a comprehensive agreement including both the USA and large developing countries with rapidly increasing emission levels of GHG like China and India. Adding to these, not only the proposed schemes themselves, but the process of negotiation itself inspired several researches in cooperative game theory and in particular, coalition formation theory. We shall touch upon this issue separately, and examine how successfully they predicted the outcome leading to Kyoto, retrospectively. Finally, we end our discussion with a brief consideration over the underlining normative argument concerning these schemes.

  2. Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center. Evolution of carbon therapy

    Cancer treatments with high energy carbon beams have been initiated at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, GHMC, in March of this year. Aiming the wide spread of the carbon therapy, the grand design of the facility and a variety of R and D studies were conducted by HIMAC group of National Institute of Radiological Sciences, NIRS, in collaboration with Gunma University. The design concepts of the facility include the high reliability, high efficiency, and low construction and operation cost. The success of the facility will open up new era of the carbon therapy. (author)

  3. The Propagation Information Center at the University of Colorado

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1988-08-01

    A Propagation Information Center is in the process of being established at the University of Colorado with connections to NAPEX and to the NASA program at Colodado University (CU) for Interdisciplinary Research in Telecommunications Policy and Technology Issues. The Propagation Information Center was conceived as a response to several items in the Science Review of the NASA Propagation Program carried out in September of 1986 by a distinguished panel of experts. The program for the Center is conceived as including archival aspects: a memory of past work by NAPEX members; accounts of relevant research activities around the world; papers published in pertinent areas of propagation; and pertinent propagation data files. Duties of the Center should include: exchanging information on future plans with research organizations around the world; scanning the literature for possible contributions; carrying out quick response studies requested by program management; conducting customer surveys of users; preparing a quarterly newsletter to help maintain communication amongst program participants; and assisting students and faculty who are working on policy issues for NASA in the propagation field.

  4. The University of Miami Center for Oceans and Human Health

    Fleming, L. E.; Smith, S. L.; Minnett, P. J.

    2007-05-01

    Two recent major reports on the health of the oceans in the United States have warned that coastal development and population pressures are responsible for the dramatic degradation of U.S. ocean and coastal environments. The significant consequences of this increased population density, particularly in sub/tropical coastal regions, can be seen in recent weather events: Hurricanes Andrew, Ivan, and Katrina in the US Gulf of Mexico states, and the Tsunami in Southeast Asia in December 2004, all causing significant deaths and destruction. Microbial contamination, man-made chemicals, and a variety of harmful algal blooms and their toxins are increasingly affecting the health of coastal human populations via the seafood supply, as well as the commercial and recreational use of coastal marine waters. At the same time, there has been the realization that the oceans are a source of unexplored biological diversity able to provide medicinal, as well as nutritional, benefits. Therefore, the exploration and preservation of the earth's oceans have significant worldwide public health implications for current and future generations. The NSF/NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health Center (COHH) at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School and its collaborators builds on several decades of collaborative and interdisciplinary research, education, and training to address the NIEHS-NSF research initiative in Oceans and Human Health. The COHH focuses on issues relevant to the Southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as global Sub/Tropical areas worldwide, to integrate interdisciplinary research between biomedical and oceanographic scientists. The Center includes three Research Projects: (1) research into the application of toxic algal culture, toxin analysis, remote sensing, oceanography, and genomics to subtropical/tropical Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) organism and toxin distribution; (2) exploring the interaction between functional genomics and oceanography of the subtropical/tropical HAB organism, Karenia brevis, and its environmental interactions; and (3) exploring the relationship between microbial indicators and human health effects in sub/tropical recreational marine waters. There are three Facilities Cores supporting this research in Genomics, Remote Sensing, and Toxic Algal Culture. To accomplish this research program in subtropical/tropical oceans and human health, the University of Miami Oceans & Human Health Center collaborates with interdisciplinary scientists at Florida International University (FIU), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Miami Dade County Dept of Health, the University of Florida, and other institutions, as well as other Oceans and Human Health Centers and researchers.

  5. Determination of prompt-neutron decay constant from phase shift between beam current and neutron detection signals for an accelerator-driven system in the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    A unique power spectral analysis for a subcritical reactor system driven by a pulsed 14 MeV neutron source was carried out at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). In this analysis, a complex cross-power spectral density between time-sequence signal data from an accelerator beam ammeter and a neutron detector was measured to determine the prompt-neutron decay constant of an accelerator-driven system (ADS) from the phase data of the spectral density. Assuming the one-point kinetics model, in theory, the decay constant can be arithmetically derived from the phase at the integral multiples of the pulse repetition frequency. However, the actual derivation from the phase at a pulse repetition frequency of 20 Hz considerably underestimated the prompt-neutron decay constant, compared with that obtained by a previous pulsed neutron experiment, and the derived decay constant apparently decreased with an increase in the multiple of the pulsed repetition frequency. Considering a lag time in detector response, the above underestimation and the above apparent decrease were solved to obtain the consistent decay constant. While both previous power spectral analysis and Feynman-α analysis for pulsed neutron source require non-linear least-squares fits of the respective complicated formulae, the present analysis makes the fitting unnecessary except at regular calibration of the lag time. This feature is advantageous for a robust online monitoring of subcritical reactivity of an actual ADS. (author)

  6. The Universe Observation Center: an educational center devoted to Astronomy in Catalonia

    Fernández, D.

    The Universe Observation Center (in Catalan language, Centre d'Observació de l'Univers, COU) is located in close proximity to the Montsec Astronomical Observatory (Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec, OAM), in eastern Catalonia (Spain). Both centers comprise the Montsec Astronomical Park (Parc Astronòmic Montsec, PAM), managed by the Consorci del Montsec. Montsec Mountain remains the finest location for astronomical observation in Catalonia, as demonstrated by a site-testing campaign conducted by the Astronomy and Meteorology Department of the University of Barcelona. The COU consists of a Central Building (including a permanent exhibition and three classrooms possessing broadband Internet access), the Telescope Park (two astronomical domes equipped with medium-size telescopes, a coelostat for solar observation, and a portable telescope park), the Eye of Montsec (a digital planetarium and, at the same time, an extremely innovative platform for sky observation) and the Garden of the Universe (a tour of the land surrounding the COU, visiting several areas within it). The COU will offer to the Spanish academic community a host of fascinating and unique activities in the fields of astronomy and geology. The Center is open not only to students (from primary school through university), but also to amateur astronomers, people interested in science and the general public.

  7. Kyoto valed prioriteedid / Bjorn Lomborg

    Lomborg, Bjorn

    2005-01-01

    Raamatu "Skeptiline keskkonnakaitsja" autor ütleb, et Kyoto protokolliga kulutab maailm 150 miljardit aastas, tehes vähe heategusid. ÜRO on seisukohal, et poolega sellest summast suudaksime hankida puhta joogivee, kanalisatsiooni, elementaarse tervishoiusüsteemi ja hariduse igale inimesele maailmas

  8. The Kyoto conference: French perspective

    The present article approaches the problem of the climate change from a French perspective, describing the process that let the topic acquire importance in the national government level. Also, they stand out the difficulties generated in the negotiations of the Kyoto Protocol, because the opposing positions have United States and the European block

  9. Building a university and center for energy in Sumatra, Indonesia

    Szwilski, T. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (US))

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that the Directorate General of Higher Education (DGHE) in Indonesia recognized the need to provide quality education to a rapidly expanding student population. This stimulus prompted DGHE to establish an Inter-University Center (IUC) for Energy in Palembang, Sumatra. The region was chosen because it is well endowed with large reserves of coal, petroleum and natural gas. The IUC will be one of many centers of excellence already established throughout Indonesia at more prestigious universities. Subsequently, funds were provided by the government of Indonesia to upgrade UNSRI. It currently has a small campus with very few physical facilities and a student population of about 9,000. The new campus will accommodate up to 20,000 students. It is presently being constructed on 300 hm{sup 2} (741 acres) of land 35 km (22 miles) south of Palembang, and a two-hour drive north of Bukit Asam, a large surface coal mine. There are many shortcomings in the energy sector in developing countries. Principal among these are the lack of experience and training of engineers and managers, inadequate training facilities and lack of familiarity with available new technology. Many key personnel in the energy industry graduate from universities with ill-designed curricula and inadequate and general support facilities.

  10. Sectoral impacts of Kyoto compliance

    Wigle, R. [Wilfrid Laurier Univ., Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2001-03-01

    In this document, the author focuses on two questions concerning Canada's compliance with its Kyoto Protocol obligations. The first question attempts to determine the sectors that might be negatively or positively affected by the modalities of compliance with the Kyoto Protocol. Secondly, the author examines the impact of exempting some sectors from the domestic implementation plan on the costs of compliance. A simulation model of the world economy, the static Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) based on the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) was used to conduct the analysis. The results were broken down into 31 sectors and 11 regions. Two approaches, the national and global carbon permit trading, were first looked at. Sectoral effects and the relative compliance costs associated with different domestic implementation schemes represented the focus of this document. The various modalities of domestic implementation and their effect on the sector-by-sector impacts of compliance are examined. The results indicated that the most energy-intensive sectors of the Canadian economy can expect a marked decline if the Kyoto Protocol is implemented by reducing Canadian emissions by approximately 25 per cent. The negative sectoral impacts are no longer a concern if the Kyoto Protocol is implemented with significant international trading. Some energy-intensive industries might face a modest expansion. The costs are very high if all abatement takes place within Canada and carbon restrictions are narrowly focused. Other scenarios and their conclusions were reviewed. The document is divided in chapters as follows: chapter 1 contains the introduction and outline, chapter 2 reviews previous research. Chapter 3 focusses on the model and data, while chapter 4 analyses Kyoto compliance from both the national permit schemes perspective and from the global permit schemes perspective. Chapter 5 provides a summary and the conclusions. Four appendices are included, followed by notes and the bibliography. Finally, a listing of Industry Canada research publications is available. 23 refs., tabs., figs.

  11. Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  12. The Briscoe Library, University of Texas Health Science Center.

    Bowden, V M

    1994-09-01

    The Briscoe Library at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio opened in 1983, to replace and expand space for the growing campus. Work on the design phase began in 1979, once the legislature allocated $9.5 million for the new building. Of the 23 design objectives specified in the building program, flexibility to accommodate changing services and technology was given first priority. Details cover layout and technology, as well as changes to the environment and the building since it opened. PMID:7842661

  13. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report

    Dorland, William [University of Maryland

    2014-11-18

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical report describes the physics results from the UMD CMPD.

  14. The Universe Observing Center a modern center to teach and communicate astronomy

    Ribas, Salvador J.

    2011-06-01

    The Universe Observing Center is one of the parts of the Parc Astronòmic Montsec (PAM). PAM is an initiative of the Catalan government, through the Consorci del Montsec (Montsec Consortium), to take advantage of the capabilities and potential of the Montsec region to develop scientific research, training and outreach activities, particularly in the field of Astronomy. The choice of the Montsec mountains to install the PAM was motivated by the magnificent conditions for observing the sky at night; the sky above Montsec is the best (natural sky free of light pollution) in Catalonia for astronomical observations. The PAM has two main parts: the Observatori Astronòmic del Montsec (OAdM) and the Universe Observing Center (COU). The OAdM is a professional observatory with an 80-cm catadioptric telescope (Joan Oró Telescope). This telescope is a robotic telescope that can be controlled from anywhere in the world via the Internet. The COU is a large multipurpose center which is intended to become an educational benchmark for teaching and communicate astronomy and other sciences in Catalonia. The management of the COU has three main goals: 1) Teach primary and secondary school students in our Educational Training Camp. 2) Teach university students housing the practical astronomy lectures of the universities. 3) Communicate astronomy to the general public. The COU comprises special areas for these purposes: the Telescopes Park with more than 20 telescopes, a coelostat for solar observations and two dome containing full-automated telescopes. The most special equipment is ``The Eye of Montsec'', with its 12m dome containing a multimedia digital planetarium and a platform for direct observation of the sky and the environment. During 2009 we expect around 10000 visitors in Montsec area to enjoy science with Montsec dark skies and an special natural environment.

  15. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    This Annual Report covers the research activities and the technical developments of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, for the period from April 1988 to March 1989. Laborious work of refreshing 12UD has continued throughout the year, in parallel with the regular machine-time service. Almost 95% of the work has been completed by the end of March 1989. At the time of writing this manuscript, 12UD is running up modestly beyond 11.0MV, raising joyous murmur of pellet chains. She has recovered up to the hilt. In spite of the considerable time consumed by the refreshing, the total machine-time has exceeded 3,000 hours. Activities at the Center covered a wide area of research field, viz. 1) nuclear spectroscopy of transitional nuclei, 2) heavy ion fusion and fission processes, 3) polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions, 4) charge exchange process in atomic collisions, 5) application of energetic heavy ions to investigating solid-state physics, and 6) effect of ion-irradiation on the fatigue properties of metal. Theoretical work pertinent to the nuclear structure is also included in this report. Prospects for a project attempting to equip the Center with a crystal-ball spectrometer is, at least, not gloomy. First streaks of light seems to begin glimmering. (author)

  16. 77 FR 59661 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology... to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Stanford University...

  17. Cost estimation of Kyoto Protocol

    This article proposes a reflection on important aspects in the costs determination performance of Kyoto Protocol. The evaluation of the main models evidence possible impacts on the economies. A key role in the determination of the cost is represented by the relative hypothesis to emission trading and the projects CDM-JI and from the political capacity at the cost negative or equal to zero

  18. Kyoto : implications for utility regulation

    The author provided a historical perspective of energy use and the role of carbon in the western hemisphere by displaying a series of graphs showing carbon intensity of energy, carbon emissions from energy, and the long path to green power. The 1990s represented a decade of progress. Almost three times as much wind capacity as nuclear capacity was added worldwide in 2001. The main challenge for the 21st century will be to bring under-developed countries into the fold while perpetuating the economic and human progress of the twentieth century. It was emphasized that environmental damage caused by utilities must be reversed. The contemporary context for the Kyoto Protocol was reviewed. Canada's commitment under the Kyoto Protocol is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 6 per cent below 1990 levels. The challenge for utility regulators to meet this commitment was examined. The costs are not entirely excessive. Some of the regulatory issues were discussed, namely revising a broad rate making framework, cost recovery and others. The Kyoto compliance plan was also reviewed with reference to internal options, external options, identification of regulatory barriers, and consideration of greenhouse gas credit markets. figs

  19. New Mexico State University Arrowhead Center PROSPER Project

    Peach, James

    2012-12-31

    This document is the final technical report of the Arrowhead Center Prosper Project at New Mexico State University. The Prosper Project was a research and public policy initiative funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Prosper project (DOE Grant Number DE-NT0004397) began on October 1, 2008 (FY2009, Quarter 1) and ended on December 31, 2012 (FY2013, Quarter 1). All project milestones were completed on time and within the budget. This report contains a summary of ten technical reports resulting from research conducted during the project. This report also contains a detailed description of the research dissemination and outreach activities of the project including a description of the policy impacts of the project. The report also describes project activities that will be maintained after the end of the project.

  20. Joint development utility and university and utility and research center

    Pinto, Roberto del Giudice R.; Valgas, Helio Moreira [Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This paper shows the background acquired by CEMIG in dealing with projects associated with R and D (Research and Development), carried out as a result of the establishment of contracts or governants with universities and research center for direct application on the solution of problems related to the operation of the system, within the scope of electrical operation planning. The various aspects of a project of this nature such as legal questions, characterization of a contract or a covenant, main developments and new opportunity areas should be covered. Finally the subject shall be dealt with under the Total Quality approach, involving the proposition of control items associated to the process and goals to be reached. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    This Annual Report covers the research activities and the technical developments of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, for the period from April 1989 to March 1990. Laborious but promising work of refreshing 12UD has continued throughout the year, in the intervals of the regular machine-time service. The terminal voltage of 12UD has gone beyond 12MV. At the time of writing this manuscript, 12UD is running up stably around 12.4MV, the loss current being essentially zero. She has recovered and further begins to flesh up without a surgical operation of grafting 'compressed tubes'. In the course of conditioning, the voltage has reached to 12.78MV. In spite of the considerable time consumed by the refreshing, the total machine-time has exceeded 2,000 hours. In addition to the improvement of 12UD, activities at the Center covered a wide area of research field, viz. 1) nuclear spectroscopy of transitional nuclei, 2) heavy ion fusion and fission processes, 3) polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions, 4) charge exchange process in atomic collisions, 5) application of energetic heavy ions investigating solid-state physics, and 6) effect of ion-irradiation on the fatigue properties of metal. Theoretical work pertinent to the nuclear structure is also included in this report. (author)

  2. Hydro in the Kyoto era

    Quebec has the best performance in North America in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Unlike neighbouring provinces and states which rely heavily on coal for power generation, Quebec generates 96 per cent of its electricity from hydroelectric power. However, no new dams have been built in the past decade in Quebec due to land disputes with Aboriginal communities and general distrust among many ecologists. It takes about 12 years for a hydroelectric project to come to fruition. For that reason, and in order to capitalize on energy market opportunities, Hydro-Quebec is seriously considering expanding its generating capability beyond the needs of Quebec consumers, with gas-fired thermal generating stations. Environmental groups claim that the proposal to build the Suroit combined-cycle facility near the United States border destroys Quebec's efforts to honour the Kyoto Protocol. Economists argue that it is entirely in the spirit of Kyoto if exports of hydroelectricity or natural gas from Canada to the United States leads to less use of oil or coal. But one energy modeling expert at INRS-Energie et Materiaux claims that Quebec has a moral obligation to develop hydroelectricity for its own use as well as for export purposes, noting that any country with the good fortune to have renewable forms of energy, such as wind and hydro, should develop them to lower world GHG emissions. Quebec has many opportunities to sell hydroelectricity even while domestic demand grows. Hydroelectricity from Quebec should interest some states that have adopted their own GHG reduction standards, despite the U.S. government's refusal to ratify Kyoto. It should also interest Ontario and the Maritimes because they will be trying to reduce emissions from their thermal plants. The current situation does not favour the Kyoto Protocol. Exports of electricity from Quebec have dropped because no new dams have been built in recent years and gas-fired plants are looking more attractive to power producers because they can be built quickly. In addition, the rules for environmental processes for hydroelectric projects unfairly favour thermal projects. This paper also cautioned that the low price of energy does not help energy conservation programs. It was suggested that the only simple and efficient way to reduce GHG emissions and lower energy consumption is to charge a price that reflects the real cost of energy. It was suggested that coal and gas should be taxed as motivation to choose renewable forms of energy, and that electricity should not be subsidized for energy-intensive industries such as aluminium smelters. 5 figs

  3. 77 FR 59968 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    2012-10-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center... Archaeology Center, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items... affiliated with the cultural items may contact the Stanford University Archaeology Center....

  4. The Kyoto Mechanisms and Technological Innovation

    Lund, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Climate change response, including implementation of the Kyoto targets as the first step, calls for technological innovation of future sustainable energy systems. One of the important agreements in several declarations, including the Kyoto protocol, has been to promote and coordinate the...... collaboration between the countries in the necessary technological development. The paper encourage that the Kyoto mechanisms will be used for acceleration of the necessary technical innovation in Denmark....

  5. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  6. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements

  7. Present status of Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center

    Operation of cancer treatment has been carried out at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center since March 2010. Total 714 patients were treated until the end of June 2013. Layer stacking irradiation has been applied since January 2013 and accounts for about 20-30% of all treatment irradiations. Present operation of the accelerator is stable with optimization of gas flow of the ECR ion source and the RF power the injector linac. In order to improve the stability of the extracted beam, experimental researches of COD correction to suppress the position movement and of beam emittance enhancement to minimize the beam energy deviation for the extraction has been carried out. Scanning irradiation is under development in the experiment irradiation room. A dose uniformity of ±1% (1σ) in the 2-D uniform irradiation of 10 x 10 cm was achieved by suppression of the beam size and position deviation. Further experiment will be performed to realize 3-D spherical uniform irradiation. (author)

  8. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    This annual report includes the research activities and the technical developments carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center in University of Tsukuba for the period from April 1991 to March 1992. Research activities covered the following subjects. Experimental investigations were made on 1) nuclear spectroscopy of high-spin rotational states and high-spin isomers in odd-odd nuclei, anomalous Fermi-coupling constant in the β decay of 35Ar and the search for new isotopes around the mass number 90; 2) polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions; 3) the application of energetic heavy ions to solid state physics; 4) the properties of defects in metal produced by proton irradiation; 5) the magnetic properties of LiVO2 by NMR; 6) off line Moessbauer studies; and 7) the mechanism of micro-cluster formation at the surface of material by heavy-ion bombardment. Theoretical work pertinent to the nuclear collective motion and the relativistic mean-field theory is also included in this report. (J.P.N.)

  9. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    This annual report covers the work carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, during fiscal year 1984. The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator was operated very stably. In addition, the heavy ion post accelerator with interdigital-H structure has worked well, providing additional energy of 2 MeV per charge for heavy ions. The constructions of a new Lamb-shift polarized ion source, a multi-computer control system for the ion sources of the UTTA, an electrostatic inflection system of incident ions for the UTTA, a new beam bunching system, and a new SF6 gas handling system were under way. The development and performance test of various radiation detector systems were carried out. Two thirds of the research works were performed by using the beam from the Lamb-shift polarized ion source (PIS). A newly constructed fast spin state interchange control system for the PIS made polarization experiment more effective and accurate. The research activities in the fields of nuclear physics, atomic and solid state physics, and biology and medical science are reported. (Kako, I.)

  10. Loneliness and Depression Levels of Students Usıng a University Counseling Center

    Ceyhan, Esra; Anadolu University; Ceyhan, Aydogan Aykut; Anadolu University

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated loneliness and depression levels of university students who use the counseling center. The participants of the study were 550 university students who came to the counseling center of a university. Findings indicated that students who came to the counseling center had an average level of loneliness and that their depression level mean was high in general. In the study, it was also revealed that male students had higher levels of loneliness and depression than fem...

  11. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGY (UC-CEIN)

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: 0830117Title: University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC-CEIN)Investigator: Andre E. NelInstitution: University of California - Los AngelesEPA Project Officer: Nor...

  12. Bush criticism on Kyoto cuts ice

    According to the authors the president of the USA, George W. Bush, has some relevant objections to the Kyoto Protocol. Some of the short-comings of the Protocol are discussed and recommendations are made for the best strategy of the European Union to 're-involve' the US in the Kyoto Protocol. 8 refs

  13. Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Final Report

    Heffington, Warren M.; Eggebrecht, James A.

    2007-02-24

    This project benefited the public by assisting manufacturing plants in the United States to save costly energy resources and become more profitable. Energy equivalent to over 75,000 barrels of oil was conserved. The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) visited 96 manufacturing plants and spent 101 days in those plants during the contract period from August 9, 2002, through November 30, 2006. Recommended annual energy savings for manufacturers were 37,400,000 kWh (127,600 MMBtu—site basis) of electricity and 309,000 MCF (309,000 MMBtu) of natural gas. Each manufacturer subsequently was surveyed, and based on these surveys reportedly implemented 79% of the electricity savings and 36% of the natural gas savings for an overall energy savings of 48% of recommended. Almost 800 (798) projects were recommended to manufacturers, and they accomplished two-thirds of the projects. Cost savings recommended were $12.3 million and implemented savings were $5.7 million or 47%. During the contract period our average time between site visit and report submittal averaged 46 days; and decreased from 48 days in 2003 to 44 days in 2006. Serving clients well and promptly has been a priority. We visited five ESA overflow clients during FY 06. The Texas A&M University IAC pioneered the presentation of air pollution information in reports, and includes NOx and CO2 reductions due to energy savings in all reports. We also experimented with formal PowerPoint BestPractices presentations called Lunchtime/Showtime in each plant and with delivering electronic versions of the report. During the period of the contract, the director served on the Texas Industries of the Future (IOF) Refining and Chemicals Committee, which oversaw the showcases in 2003 and 2006. The assistant director was the Executive Director of the International Energy Technology Conference held annually. The director and assistant director became qualified specialists in the Process Heating Assessment Scoping Tool and the Steam System Scoping Tool, respectively. Research was performed relating to energy conservation and IAC needs, resulting in a paper presented at the ACEEE meeting in 2005, and an internet software tool through the Texas IOF office.

  14. Kyoto survives - after extensive care

    NONE

    2001-08-01

    180 countries, but not the US, agreed to a compromise political solution to break the deadlock between two groups of countries who face targets under the Kyoto Protocol meeting in late July. The article discusses how this could affect the coal trade, quoting largely from a paper by Mark O'Neill, director of Sustainable Development at the Australian Coal Association, presented at CoalTrans Asia 2001. He considered that it is a fossil fuel fantasy to say all fossil fuels are bad, their use must be ended as soon as possible and they have no role to play in sustainable development. He agreed that a policy framework should recognise the need to develop emission reduction solutions from fossil fuels. 2 photos.

  15. [Climate change and Kyoto protocol].

    Ergasti, G; Pippia, V; Murzilli, G; De Luca D'Alessandro, E

    2009-01-01

    Due to industrial revolution and the heavy use of fossil fuels, the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has increased dramatically during the last hundred years, and this has lead to an increase in mean global temperature. The environmental consequences of this are: the melting of the ice caps, an increase in mean sea-levels, catastrophic events such as floodings, hurricanes and earthquakes, changes to the animal and vegetable kingdoms, a growth in vectors and bacteria in water thus increasing the risk of infectious diseases and damage to agriculture. The toxic effects of the pollution on human health are both acute and chronic. The Kyoto Protocol is an important step in the campaign against climatic changes but it is not sufficient. A possible solution might be for the States which produce the most of pollution to adopt a better political stance for the environment and to use renewable resources for the production of energy. PMID:19798904

  16. Kyoto protocol: the unfinished agenda

    The groups and negotiations at the Third Conference of Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change in Kyoto are described. The lobbying groups included: the fossil fuel industry; the environmentalist groups. the Europeans; the Developing world; and the USA. The compromise reached. The author considered that all countries should be involved in the reduction of emissions, but this may best be done by transferring highly efficient new technologies to developing countries, thus leapfrogging the older highly polluting type of plant. Funds for the leapfrogging could best be provide by carbon taxes, permits would not raise revenue in the same way. Carbon taxes could also be used to fund environmental protection or restoration initiatives. Any new institutions should be flexible in their approach. 46 refs

  17. Taming the Anxious Mind: An 8-Week Mindfulness Meditation Group at a University Counseling Center

    Murphy, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an eight-week mindfulness meditation-based group that took place at a university counseling center. The group is patterned after the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program developed by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn at the Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. Group members are taught…

  18. How to make progress post-Kyoto

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document provides papers presented during the workshop on ''how to make progress post-Kyoto'', hold at the French Institute of International Relations (IFRI) in Paris on march 19, 2003. The following topics were presented: reflections on Kyoto, guidance for the future, how to make progress post-kyoto, the lessons from the past; the Bonn voyage; US climate policy after Kyoto, elements of success; preparing for widening and deepening the kyoto protocol; capping emissions and costs; absolute versus intensity-based emissions caps; intensity targets in perspective; negotiating commitments for further emission reductions; exploring new tools; defining meaningful participation of developing countries in climate change mitigation; economic and environmental effectiveness of a technology-based climate regime; US participation in the linkage between research and development and climate cooperation; designing a technology strategy; ''greening'' economic development; some critical comments post-Kyoto; the foreign policy perspective of climate negotiations; Kyoto and the double spiral; burden-sharing rules for stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations and their equity implications. (A.L.B.)

  19. Remote Sensing and the Kyoto Protocol: A Workshop Summary

    Rosenqvist, Ake; Imhoff, Marc; Milne, Anthony; Dobson, Craig

    2000-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change contains quantified, legally binding commitments to limit or reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels and allows carbon emissions to be balanced by carbon sinks represented by vegetation. The issue of using vegetation cover as an emission offset raises a debate about the adequacy of current remote sensing systems and data archives to both assess carbon stocks/sinks at 1990 levels, and monitor the current and future global status of those stocks. These concerns and the potential ratification of the Protocol among participating countries is stimulating policy debates and underscoring a need for the exchange of information between the international legal community and the remote sensing community. On October 20-22 1999, two working groups of the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) joined with the University of Michigan (Michigan, USA) to convene discussions on how remote sensing technology could contribute to the information requirements raised by implementation of, and compliance with, the Kyoto Protocol. The meeting originated as a joint effort between the Global Monitoring Working Group and the Radar Applications Working Group in Commission VII of the ISPRS, co-sponsored by the University of Michigan. Tile meeting was attended by representatives from national government agencies and international organizations and academic institutions. Some of the key themes addressed were: (1) legal aspects of transnational remote sensing in the context of the Kyoto Protocol; (2) a review of the current and future and remote sensing technologies that could be applied to the Kyoto Protocol; (3) identification of areas where additional research is needed in order to advance and align remote sensing technology with the requirements and expectations of the Protocol; and 94) the bureaucratic and research management approaches needed to align the remote sensing community with both the science and policy communities.

  20. R&D Characteristics and Organizational Structure: Case Studies of University-Industry Research Centers

    Hart, Maureen McArthur

    2013-01-01

    Within the past few decades, university-industry research centers have been developed in large numbers and emphasized as a valuable policy tool for innovation. Yet little is known about the heterogeneity of organizational structure within these centers, which has implications regarding policy for and management of these centers. This dissertation…

  1. The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Research Center for Families and Children at Tulane University

    Moon, Katie Lauve; Buttell, Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Elizabeth Wisner Social Welfare Center for Families and Children is a community-based research center within the School of Social Work at the Tulane University. The Wisner Center primarily supports research projects that examine the causes and consequences of intimate partner violence, promote the development of new frameworks for…

  2. University Counseling Center Use of Prolonged Exposure Therapy: In-Clinic Treatment for Students with PTSD

    Bonar, Ted C.

    2015-01-01

    Students utilize university counseling center services to address distress related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Since counseling centers services such as group work or general psychotherapy may not address specific PTSD-symptom reduction, centers often give community referrals in such cases. Evidence-based therapies (EBTs), including

  3. Peripheries and Centers: Research Universities in Developing Countries

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2009-01-01

    The research university is a central institution of the twenty-first century--providing access to global science, producing basic and applied research, and educating leaders of the academe and society. Worldwide, there are very few research universities--they are expensive to develop and support, and the pressures of massification have placed

  4. Peripheries and Centers: Research Universities in Developing Countries

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2009-01-01

    The research university is a central institution of the twenty-first century--providing access to global science, producing basic and applied research, and educating leaders of the academe and society. Worldwide, there are very few research universities--they are expensive to develop and support, and the pressures of massification have placed…

  5. Proceedings of the specialist research meeting on 'the introduction of total micro-element analysis system and its application in Kyoto University Reactor and the latest study on analysis of trace amount of elements using activation analysis'

    At the research meetings of 'Construction and application of total micro-element analysis at Kyoto University research reactor (KUR)' in 2011, and 'Current state of trace element analysis using activation analysis' in 2012, 23 items of presentations were given. The main topics are as follows. (1) Development of a simple and high-precision neutron distribution measurement method using an inkjet printer, (2) Evaluation of poor oxygen water mass in deep Tokyo Bay, using the concentrations of thorium, cerium, and uranium in the sediment as indexes. (3) Analysis of cosmochemical samples based on radiation activation analysis. (4) KUR after the resumption and others. (5) Current state of research reactor utilization in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (6) Inference of the earth's surface denudation process through the quantification of cosmogenic nuclide 36Cl in rocks. (7) Possibility of the quantification of Mn in iron meteorites through neutron activation analysis. (8) Neutron activation analysis in the samples collected by Hayabusa using the Kyoto University reactor. (9) Chemical separation method for the microanalysis of environmental samples. (10) Activation analysis of Hiroshima city soil for estimating the ambient dose associated with the Hiroshima atomic bomb-induced radioactivity. (11) International comparison on the quantification of harmful elements in the algae: CCQM-P118. The 2 of 25 papers presented at the entitled meeting are indexed individually. (A.O.)

  6. PREFACE: Beyond Kyoto - the necessary road

    Margrethe Basse, Ellen

    2009-03-01

    The Beyond Kyoto conference in Aarhus March 2009 was organised in collaboration with other knowledge institutions, businesses and authorities. It brought together leading scientists, policy-makers, authorities, intergovernmental organisations, NGO's, business stakeholders and business organisations. The conference was a joint interdisciplinary project involving many academic areas and disciplines. These conference proceedings are organised in central and recurring themes that cut across many debates on climate change, the climatic challenges as well as the solutions. In the front there is a short presentation of the conference concept. Part I of the proceedings focuses on issues related to the society - covering climate policy, law, market based instruments, financial structure, behaviour and consumption, public participation, media communication and response from indigenous peoples etc. Part II of the proceedings concerns the scientific knowledge base on climate related issues - covering climate change processes per se, the potential impacts of projected climate change on biodiversity and adaptation possibilities, the interplay between climate, agriculture and biodiversity, emissions, agricultural systems, increasing pressure on the functioning of agriculture and natural areas, vulnerability to extreme weather events and risks in respect to sea-level rise etc. The conference proceedings committee consists of four professors from Aarhus University: Jens-Christian Svenning, Jørgen E Olesen, Mads Forchhammer and Ellen Margrethe Basse. Aarhus University's Climate Secretariat has had the overall responsibility for coordinating the many presentations, as well as the practical side of arranging the conference and supporting the publication of papers. As Head of the Climate Secretariat and Chair of Aarhus University's Climate Panel, I would like to thank everyone for their contribution. This applies both to the scientific and the practical efforts. Special thanks to Project Manager Henrik Dalgaard for his excellent editorial services and to stud.mag. Nanna Katrine Lüders Kaalund for her practical assistance with the proceedings. The European Commission under the Regional Development Fund has funded the conference and the publication of the proceedings.

  7. Implementation of the Kyoto protocol

    The Rio Earth summit in 1992 has been the starting point of an international awareness about the global risk of climatic change. At this occasion, the richest countries committed themselves to stabilize their greenhouse gas emissions and to reach by the year 2000 an emissions level equivalent to the one of 1990. The Kyoto protocol in 1997 has permitted to convert this will into juridically constraining quantitative commitments. In 2005, Russia ratified the protocol while in 2001 the USA refused to do so. Because the commitments signed are ambitious, flexibility mechanisms have been implemented: 'emission permits' (emissions trading), 'joint implementation' allowing the investments abroad for greenhouse gases abatement in another developed country, and 'clean development mechanisms' when investments are made in a developing country. The Marrakech conference of December 2001 has permitted to fix up the eligibility criteria of projects belonging to the joint implementation and clean development mechanisms. The effective implementation of these mechanisms still raises technical difficulties to evaluate and measure the effective abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. (J.S.)

  8. Latest approaches of Kyoto protocol

    Recently EURELECTRIC welcome the proposal of new EC Directive concerning the inclusion in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) of credits from the project mechanisms - Joint Implementation (JI) and Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). The proposed Directive is an amendment to the EU Emissions Trading Directive adopted in June 2003. EURELECTRIC calls for unlimited use of credits in ETS. The draft Directive provides for the application of these mechanisms to begin as of 2008, on condition that the Kyoto Protocol does actually enter into force, an event which is still dependent on Russia's ratification. Such ratification has been subject to contradictory statements from the Russian Government, and the question of whether their signature to the Protocol is forthcoming is still fraught with uncertainty. Although it is not anticipated that significant quantities of JI or CDM certified credits will be available in the period 2005-2007, those that do become available would provide some additional liquidity in the emissions trading market. There is a direct relation between the coming ETS and electricity pricing: environmental policy is the driver, based on the need to switch to a low-carbon future and manage the necessary investments in a rational manner - and emissions trading is the best solution available. Romania has good opportunities to be involved in the greenhouse gases market, both in ETS and JI mechanisms. Some JI projects between Romanian and The Netherlands are already done or underway. (author)

  9. The Center for Aerospace Research: A NASA Center of Excellence at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

    Lai, Steven H.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and outcomes of our research and educational programs at NASA-CORE in NCA&TSU. The goal of the center was to establish a quality aerospace research base and to develop an educational program to increase the participation of minority faculty and students in the areas of aerospace engineering. The major accomplishments of this center in the first year are summarized in terms of three different areas, namely, the center's research programs area, the center's educational programs area, and the center's management area. In the center's research programs area, we focus on developing capabilities needed to support the development of the aerospace plane and high speed civil transportation system technologies. In the educational programs area, we developed an aerospace engineering option program ready for university approval.

  10. University of Illinois at Chicago Health Policy Center - Funding

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1991-2013. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Funding Data, Appropriations...

  11. Gallaudet University, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

    Subscribe Resources For Families New to Deaf Education Online Networks Odyssey Magazine Publications Shared Reading Project Cochlear Implant Education Center Products Info To Go American Sign Language Assistive Technology ...

  12. University of Illinois at Chicago Health Policy Center - Funding

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services 1991-2013. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Funding Data, Appropriations...

  13. The Kyoto mechanisms and technological innovation

    Lund, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    countries. Consequently, the innovative technological development has changed. This paper evaluates the character of such change and makes preliminary recommendations for policies to encourage the use of the Kyoto Mechanisms as an acceleration of the necessary technological innovation.......Climate change response, including the implementation of the Kyoto targets as the first step, calls for technological innovation of future sustainable energy systems. Based on the Danish case, this paper evaluates the type of technological change necessary. During a period of 30 years, Denmark...

  14. User-Centered Design in Practice: The Brown University Experience

    Bordac, Sarah; Rainwater, Jean

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study in user-centered design that explores the needs and preferences of undergraduate users. An analysis of LibQual+ and other user surveys, interviews with public service staff, and a formal American with Disabilities Act accessibility review served as the basis for planning a redesign of the Brown University…

  15. Learning at the Center: A Proposal for Dynamic Assessment in a Combined University and Community Adult Learning Center Course

    Prins, Lisa; Pauchulo, Ana Laura; Brooke, Auralia; Corrigan, Joe

    2015-01-01

    We ask the reader to consider a proposal for cooperative renewal in the evaluation of a course (OurU) offered in partnership between a university and community-based adult learning center. This proposal's aim is to enhance adult learners' ability to evaluate their learning experiences, with the goal of adopting more learner-directed content into

  16. Chalcogenide materials at the research center of Pardubice University

    Frumar, M.; Wágner, T.; Málek, J.; Němec, P.; Frumarová, Božena; Přikryl, J.; Orava, J.; Kohoutek, T.

    Pardubice : University of Pardubice, 2011. s. 39-40. ISBN 978-80-7395-419-2. [International Days of Materials Science 2011. 16.09.2011-16.09.2011, Pardubice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0827 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : crystalline chalcogenides * amorphous chalcogenides Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  17. Inventory of Microform Centers on a Major University Campus.

    Vandenburgh, Anne

    1978-01-01

    Describes a survey used to produce an inventory of microform machines and an overview of microform collections on the University of Wisconsin--Madison campus. Such an inventory can be used as a general information or reference guide for students and faculty who need to use microform readers and reader/printers. (CMV)

  18. Midsemester Academic Interventions in a Student-Centered Research University

    Boretz, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In this descriptive study, the use of a midsemester Success Workshop is evaluated within the context of the persistence and motivation of students placed on academic probation in a state university between 2005 and 2010. Elements of the Success Workshop are described. The self-assessments, workshop evaluation results, and other institutional data…

  19. The Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) Network National Information and Reporting System (NIRS)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A searchable, web-based tool for accessing data on AUCD training programs, projects, activities, and products. Includes data on the University Center for Excellence...

  20. The Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Maryland: the first complementary and alternative medicine center in a US medical school

    Lixing LAO

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of Maryland was founded in 1991 and was the first center dedicated to evaluating complementary and alternative medicine at a US medical school. The center has been a National Institutes of Health center of excellence since 1995 focused on evaluating the efficacy, safety and mechanism of action of traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture, and mind-body modalities including Qigong and mindfulness meditation. The Center functions as an interdisciplinary center in the university and is composed of four main areas—research, patient care, informatics, and education—that mutually enhance each other and create a cohesive unit. The Center has recently increased its international collaboration on acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine research, particularly with universities in China such as Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM and other TCM universities.

  1. A Wish List for the Advancement of University and College Counseling Centers

    Bishop, John B.

    2016-01-01

    University and college counseling centers continue to meet emerging challenges in higher education. This article addresses three issues: the need for a more unified organizational structure to represent the profession, the potential value for counseling centers in seeking accreditation, and the importance of specialized training for those entering…

  2. Responding to a Community Need: Oakland University's Adult Career Counseling Center.

    Goodman, Jane; Savage, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    Rapid changes in the world of work coupled with changes in individuals' needs necessitate career counseling assistance. The Oakland University Adult Career Counseling Center uses the services of counseling students to offer career advising to community adults at no charge. The center and its approach are described, along with brief examples of…

  3. Renata Adler Memorial Research Center for Child Welfare and Protection, Tel-Aviv University

    Ronen, Tammie

    2011-01-01

    The Renata Adler Memorial Research Center for Child Welfare and Protection operates within the Bob Shapell School of Social Work at Tel-Aviv University in Israel. The main aims of this research center are to facilitate study and knowledge about the welfare of children experiencing abuse or neglect or children at risk and to link such knowledge to…

  4. The Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University: An Example of Replication and Reformation

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2005-01-01

    This article describes implementation of the talent search model developed by Julian Stanley at the Center for Talent Development of Northwestern University. While remaining true to the basic components of the talent search, the talent center at Northwestern has emphasized using talent search as a means to influence programming in local schools…

  5. The Utility of an Efficient Outcomes Assessment System at University Counseling Centers

    Kopta, S. Mark; Petrik, Megan L.; Saunders, Stephen M.; Mond, Michael; Hirsch, Glenn; Kadison, Richard; Raymond, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased demands placed on university counseling centers (UCCs) in recent years, there is a need for these centers to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of their psychological services. Regularly monitoring client progress is one approach to increase the likelihood of positive clinical outcomes. This article describes the use of the

  6. The Utility of an Efficient Outcomes Assessment System at University Counseling Centers

    Kopta, S. Mark; Petrik, Megan L.; Saunders, Stephen M.; Mond, Michael; Hirsch, Glenn; Kadison, Richard; Raymond, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased demands placed on university counseling centers (UCCs) in recent years, there is a need for these centers to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of their psychological services. Regularly monitoring client progress is one approach to increase the likelihood of positive clinical outcomes. This article describes the use of the…

  7. Integrating Student-Centered Learning in Finance Courses: The Case of a Malaysian Research University

    Janor, Hawati; Rahim, Ruzita Abdul; Rahman, Aisyah Abdul; Auzairy, Noor Azryani; Hashim, Noor Azuan; Yusof, Muhamad Zain

    2013-01-01

    The student-centered learning (SCL) approach is an approach to education that focuses on learners and their needs, rather than relying upon the input of the teacher's. The present paper examines how the SCL approach is integrated as a learner-centered paradigm into finance courses offered at a business school in a research university in Malaysia.…

  8. University creates new Center for Student Engagement and Community Partnerships, names founding director

    Felker, Susan B.

    2008-01-01

    Virginia Tech has launched a Center for Student Engagement and Community Partnerships to coordinate partnerships, service, and experiential learning activities, and to develop faculty and partner capacity for community-university engagement. Associate Professor James Dubinsky, who co-chaired Virginia Tech's Task Force on Student Engagement, is directing the new center.

  9. Pressures We Face in Running Counseling Centers on College and University Campuses

    Meilman, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Georgetown University Counseling and Psychiatric Service director Philip Meilman discusses two distinct emerging pressures faced by directors of college and university counseling centers. The first of these is the pressure to provide more of, and an increasing range of, counseling and psychiatric services. The second is related:…

  10. A Place of Her Own: The Case for University-Based Centers for Women Entrepreneurs

    Riebe, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The author describes the benefits of university-based women entrepreneur centers as an educational and outreach strategy and argues for their establishment and support by universities interested in educating women entrepreneurs and advancing women-owned businesses. Based on extensive research on women business owners and firsthand experience with…

  11. Integrating Student-Centered Learning in Finance Courses: The Case of a Malaysian Research University

    Hawati Janor; Ruzita Abdul Rahim; Aisyah Abdul Rahman; Noor Azryani Auzairy; Noor Azuan Hashim; Muhamad Zain Yusof

    2013-01-01

    The student-centered learning (SCL) approach is an approach to education that focuses on learners and their needs, rather than relying upon the input of the teacher's. The present paper examines how the SCL approach is integrated as a learner-centered paradigm into finance courses offered at a business school in a research university in Malaysia. Specifically, this paper identifies how a learner-centered environment is integrated into teaching methods, learning activities and evaluation tools...

  12. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONS OF THE CONTINUING EDUCATION CENTERS AT TURKISH UNIVERSITIES

    Mehmet Metin ARSLAN

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Continuing education centers mainly organize activities for the society in the fields that have gained importance on the improvement of individuals with a view of career building, improving professional knowledge and skills, achieving new skills and supplying individual development needs. Such centers have been established within universities through the principle of making continuing education accessible to everyone as a starting point for a lifelong learning process. These centers ...

  13. Center for Space Power, Texas A and M University

    Jones, Ken

    Johnson Controls is a 106 year old company employing 42,000 people worldwide with $4.7 billion annual sales. Though we are new to the aerospace industry we are a world leader in automobile battery manufacturing, automotive seating, plastic bottling, and facilities environment controls. The battery division produces over 24,000,000 batteries annually under private label for the new car manufacturers and the replacement market. We are entering the aerospace market with the nickel hydrogen battery with the help of NASA's Center for Space Power at Texas A&M. Unlike traditional nickel hydrogen battery manufacturers, we are reaching beyond the space applications to the higher volume markets of aircraft starting and utility load leveling. Though space applications alone will not provide sufficient volume to support the economies of scale and opportunities for statistical process control, these additional terrestrial applications will. For example, nickel hydrogen batteries do not have the environmental problems of nickel cadmium or lead acid and may someday start your car or power your electric vehicle. However you envision the future, keep in mind that no manufacturer moves into a large volume market without fine tuning their process. The Center for Space Power at Texas A&M is providing indepth technical analysis of all of the materials and fabricated parts of our battery as well as thermal and mechanical design computer modeling. Several examples of what we are doing with nickel hydrogen chemistry to lead to these production efficiencies are presented.

  14. The Influence of Lifestyle on Cardio-metabolic Risk in Students from Timisoara University Center

    Mihaela ORAVIȚAN; Avram, Claudiu; Stela IURCIUC; Petru MERGHEȘ; Bogdan ALMĂJAN-GUȚĂ

    2013-01-01

    This study is a part of the activities in a cross border cooperation project that has proposed the management of obesity and cardiometabolic risk at students from Timisoara and Szeged university centres. The target group of Timisoara University Center was formed out of 600 students enrolled in the four major universities from Timisoara; target group students were questioned about their lifestyle and were evaluated anthropometric parameters, body composition and arterial stiffness; based on qu...

  15. Status report of Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University

    The HSRC is a synchrotron radiation facility of Hiroshima University established in 1996. The HiSOR is a compact racetrack-type storage ring having 21.95 m circumference, therefore its natural emittance of 400 πnmrad is not so small compared with the other medium∼large storage rings. The most outstanding advantage of the facility lies in good combination with beamlines for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy in energy range in VUV ∼ soft X-ray. We report the operation status of HiSOR and the present status of beamlines and experimental stations. The user time last year was achieved 1521 hours which was at the same level with those in the past several years because there was no serious trouble. The Quasi-periodic APPLE-II undulator for BL-9A and B was installed last summer. (author)

  16. Status report of Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University

    The HSRC is a synchrotron radiation facility of Hiroshima University established in 1996. The HiSOR is a compact racetrack-type storage ring having 21.95 m circumference, therefore its natural emittance of 400 πnmrad is very large compared with those of other medium ∼ large storage rings. The most outstanding advantage of the facility lies in good combination with beamlines for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy in energy range in VUV ∼ soft X-ray. We report the operation status of HiSOR and the present status of beamlines and experimental stations. Since the quasi-periodic APPLE-II undulator for BL-9A and B was installed in FY2011, the ring and undulator operation has been in good shape. However, several vacuum leak incidents occurred in autumn, 2012. After series of these incidents a certain amount of users' operation time was lost. (author)

  17. Status report of Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University

    The HSRC is a synchrotron radiation facility of Hiroshima University established in 1996. The HiSOR is a compact racetrack-type storage ring having 21.95 m circumference, therefore its natural emittance of 400 πnmrad is not so small compared with the other medium-large storage rings. The most outstanding advantage of the facility lies in good combination with beamlines for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy in energy range in VUV ∼ soft X-ray. We report the operation status of HiSOR and the present status of beamlines and experimental stations. The user time last year was achieved 1576 hours which was at the same level with those in the past several years because there was no serious trouble. The helical undulator for BL-9A and B is going to be replaced to Quasi-periodic APPLE-II undulator in this summer. (author)

  18. The Kyoto mechanisms and technological innovation

    Climate change response, including the implementation of the Kyoto targets as the first step, calls for technological innovation of future sustainable energy systems. Based on the Danish case, this paper evaluates the type of technological change necessary. During a period of 30 years, Denmark managed to stabilize primary energy supply, and CO2 emissions decreased by 10%, during a period of 20 years. However, after the introduction of the Kyoto Mechanisms, Denmark has changed its strategy. Instead of continuing the domestic CO2 emission controls, Denmark plans to buy CO2 reductions in other countries. Consequently, the innovative technological development has changed. This paper evaluates the character of such change and makes preliminary recommendations for policies to encourage the use of the Kyoto Mechanisms as an acceleration of the necessary technological innovation. (author)

  19. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONS OF THE CONTINUING EDUCATION CENTERS AT TURKISH UNIVERSITIES

    Mehmet Metin ARSLAN

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Continuing education centers mainly organize activities for the society in the fields that have gained importance on the improvement of individuals with a view of career building, improving professional knowledge and skills, achieving new skills and supplying individual development needs. Such centers have been established within universities through the principle of making continuing education accessible to everyone as a starting point for a lifelong learning process. These centers which aim at providing continuing education, implement more flexible programs compared to those executed at higher education institutions. In this study, the structure and functions of Continuing Education Centers at Turkish Universities are investigated. The scope of the study includes all the centers that have web pages established under state and public universities in Turkey. Data pertaining to structure and functions of the centers meeting this criterion, the number of which is 43 in total comprising 34 state and 9 private universities, have been evaluated. As a result of the study it was discovered that these centers had very similar foundation principles and organizational structures.

  20. [Consumption of benzodiazepines in a university hospital center].

    Vandel, S; Nezelof, S; Bonin, B; Mesnage, A D; Bertschy, G; Jacquet, M; Bizouard, P

    1992-01-01

    Benzodiazepine consumption has been studied in an inpatient population of a hospitalo-universitary center. The different user wards were classified by their cost or the importance of their benzodiazepine use. In a second step, the authors studied the prescription in the 6 most consumer medical wards. The most prescribed benzodiazepines were lorazepam and dipotassium clorazepate (27 and 23% respectively). In these six wards, on the day of the study, 48% of the 227 inpatients were taking benzodiazepines. Fourteen out of them were taking more than one of these drugs. In 80% of the cases, the patient was asking for the prescription. Out of the 110 inpatients found to have taken a benzodiazepine on the day of the study, 74 had already regularly used it during the years before hospital admission, mainly women (64%) and old people. Finally, out of the 227 inpatients studied, the hospitalization is a possible inducer of the benzodiazepine intake and dependence in 16% of the patients. The results are discussed against the background of other studies concerning benzodiazepine consumption. PMID:1297587

  1. An alternative strategy for Kyoto protocol

    Europe will unlikely meet its Kyoto target of reducing greenhouse gas emission by 8 percent below 1990 levels. The economic impact of reductions might be dramatic, especially given Europe's slow economic growth. An alternative strategy should then be considered, in order to gain a global participation to the process and find a long-term solution

  2. The Kyoto protocol in a global perspective

    Tjaša Redek

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The global climate has changed notably since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gasses (GHG have increased dramatically followed by an increase in global average temperature. In order to avoid negative potential outcomes of global warming, countries have adopted the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change that has so far been ratified by 192 countries. In 1997 the Kyoto Protocol, a binding GHG reduction plan, was adopted and entered into force in 2005. But several countries, including the USA, have had doubts about the potential negative consequences of the planned 5% global joint reduction of GHG. However, studies generally show that on a macroeconomic level: (1 welfare loss in terms of GDP and lost growth in EU is low; (2 it differs among economies; and (3 permit trading and permit price (in either global or regional markets is highly correlated with the welfare loss. The main objective of the paper is to describe the attitudes and responses to the Kyoto Protocol from a global perspective. The paper has three objectives. First, to provide an overview of global greenhouse gas emissions and the big drivers behind these emissions. Second, to present where different countries, both developed and less developed countries, such as India, China and the countries of South-east Europe currently stand as regards their efforts to achieve the Kyoto Protocol requirements. Third, to analyse the responses and attitudes to the Kyoto Protocol from a country development perspective.

  3. Teadlased : USA liitub Kyoto protokolliga / Neeme Raud

    Raud, Neeme, 1969-

    2004-01-01

    USA ja Austraalia on ainsad riigid, mis pole Kyoto protokollile alla kirjutanud. Princetoni ülikooli professori Michael Oppenheimeri arvates võib USA president George W. Bush oma seisukohti keskkonnaküsimustes muuta, sest teiseks ametiajaks valitud presidendid ei pea mõtlema uuele kampaaniale ning püüavad enne Valgest Majast lahkumist oma mainet maailma silmis parandada

  4. Climate Change And The Kyoto Protocol

    The problem of global warming is addressed. Changes in earth surface temperature, emission of CO2 and other four major green house gases are presented. Effect of global warming on weather, ocean, and ecosystem is discussed. A brief history of the Kyoto protocol starting from the 151 Earth Summit in 1972 is outlined. An overview of the protocol and a brief summary are given

  5. Venemaa avas tee Kyoto protokolli jõustumiseks / Arko Olesk

    Olesk, Arko, 1981-

    2004-01-01

    Kuigi USA on 1997. aastal sõlmitud globaalse soojenemise vastu suunatud Kyoto protokolli vastu, võib see rakenduda, sest Venemaa valitsus kiitis 30. septembril leppe heaks. Lisa: Venemaa Kyoto protokolli kaalukeelena

  6. Center for Molecular Electronics, University of Missouri, St. Louis. Environmental Assessment

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the University of Missouri, St. Louis to proceed with the detailed design and construction of the proposed Center for Molecular Electronics. The proposed Center would consist of laboratories and offices housed in a three-story building on the University campus. The proposed modular laboratories would be adaptable for research activities principally related to physics, chemistry, and electrical engineering. Proposed research would include the development and application of thin-film materials, semi-conductors, electronic sensors and devices, and high-performance polymers. Specific research for the proposed Center has not yet been formulated, therefore, specific procedures for any particular process or study cannot be described at this time. The proposed construction site is an uncontaminated panel of land located on the University campus. This report contains information about the environmental assessment that was performed in accordance with this project.

  7. EU CLIMATE POLICY FROM KYOTO TO DURBAN

    ELENA ANDREEVSKA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The risks posed by climate change are real and its impacts are already taking place. The biggest challenge about climate change is that there is no one single answer, no one single solution. This characteristic, together with the long history of political frictions and disputes worsened by environmental stresses suggests that global climatic changes have the potential to exacerbate existing international tensions. On December 31, 2012, the Kyoto Protocol's first commitment period will expire. Unless states agree to a second commitment period, requiring a further round of emissions cuts, the Protocol will no longer impose any quantitative limits on states' greenhouse gas emissions. Although, as a legal matter, the Protocol will continue in force, it will be a largely empty shell, doing little if anything to curb global warming. Unlike the Kyoto Protocol negotiations, which focused exclusively on developed country emissions, the ongoing negotiations on a post-2012 climate change regime have also addressed developing country mitigation actions, without which a solution to the climate change problem is impossible. This has made the current negotiations as much between developed and developing countries as between the U.S. and the European Union. Key issues include: Legal Form; Regulatory approach; and Differentiation. By the Durban conference in December 2011 the EU needs to decide whether - and how - it will sign-up to a second commitment period for the Kyoto Protocol. This article focuses on the European Union needs to decide whether – and – how it will sign- up a second commitment period for the Kyoto Protocol. Because asking, whether others will act is the wrong question. The real question is whether signing- up to some form of second Kyoto commitment period will support Europe’s fundamental interests.

  8. Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program, Center for Housing Innovation, University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center

    Brown, G.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This research program addresses the need to increase the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers have responsibility for the program: the Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. The two organizations provide complementary architectural, systems engineering, and industrial engineering capabilities. In 1989 we worked on these tasks: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. The current research program, under the guidance of a steering committee composed of industry and government representatives, focuses on three interdependent concerns -- (1) energy, (2) industrial process, and (3) housing design. Building homes in a factory offers the opportunity to increase energy efficiency through the use of new materials and processes, and to increase the value of these homes by improving the quality of their construction. Housing design strives to ensure that these technically advanced homes are marketable and will meet the needs of the people who will live in them.

  9. Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University Center for Injury Biomechanics 10 Year History

    Duma, Stefan M.

    2013-01-01

    The Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University Center for Injury Biomechanics (CIB) has completed 10 years of research in the fields of automobile safety, military restraints, and sports biomechanics. The CIB has grown to include 74 researchers lead by 10 faculty and 48 staff and student researchers. These researchers examine human tolerance across a range of dynamic loading environments for all body regions. The CIB is the largest university based injury biomechanics research group in the world. I...

  10. The UNCG Center for New North Carolinians: University Research and Service for Immigrant Empowerment

    Richard Bailey

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of how a university can serve as a resource for newcomer empowerment in light of changing demographics. The University of North Carolina at Greensboros Center for New North Carolinians (CNNC) was established during a time of dramatic demographic change in the state due to immigrant in-migration. CNNC began with a commitment to culturally appropriate outreach services that empower immigrant communities. This article is adapted from and expands upon a present...

  11. Ever-changing Space. Spatial Design Guidelines for Aalto University Learning Center

    Gryada, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    This thesis introduces spatial design guidelines for Aalto University Learning Center that could also be used as a platform for upgrading the existing facilities of the University. The work was driven by a vision of an ideal learning environment a space that always meets the needs of its occupants and embraces constant transformation as an essential part of its nature. The concept of an Ever-changing Space was developed through observation, experimentation, and reflection. First, the ...

  12. The Influence of Lifestyle on Cardio-metabolic Risk in Students from Timisoara University Center

    Mihaela ORAVIȚAN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is a part of the activities in a cross border cooperation project that has proposed the management of obesity and cardiometabolic risk at students from Timisoara and Szeged university centres. The target group of Timisoara University Center was formed out of 600 students enrolled in the four major universities from Timisoara; target group students were questioned about their lifestyle and were evaluated anthropometric parameters, body composition and arterial stiffness; based on questionnaires was determine too the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes mellitus type II. Analysis of the results revealed the strong correlations between lifestyle and cardio-metabolic risk in these students.

  13. Performance Evaluation of Extension Education Centers in Universities Based on the Balanced Scorecard

    Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Yi-Kuei; Chang, Chi-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at developing a set of appropriate performance evaluation indices mainly based on balanced scorecard (BSC) for extension education centers in universities by utilizing multiple criteria decision making (MCDM). Through literature reviews and experts who have real practical experiences in extension education, adequate performance…

  14. Academic Faculty in University Research Centers: Neither Capitalism's Slaves nor Teaching Fugitives

    Bozeman, Barry; Boardman, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses university-industry interactions for both educational and industrial outcomes. The results suggest that while academic faculty who are affiliated with centers are more involved with industry than non-affiliated faculty, affiliates are also more involved with and supportive of students at the undergraduate, graduate, and…

  15. A Follow-Up of Adult Career Counseling Clients of a University Extension Center.

    Healy, Charles C.

    2001-01-01

    A follow-up evaluation of 181 out-of-school adults who had enrolled in a program of individual career counseling at a university extension center indicated that 78% were satisfied or very satisfied. Satisfaction was not significantly related to completion of allotted counseling interviews, program, gender, or education level. Considers the…

  16. Performance Evaluation of Extension Education Centers in Universities Based on the Balanced Scorecard

    Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Yi-Kuei; Chang, Chi-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at developing a set of appropriate performance evaluation indices mainly based on balanced scorecard (BSC) for extension education centers in universities by utilizing multiple criteria decision making (MCDM). Through literature reviews and experts who have real practical experiences in extension education, adequate performance

  17. Current status of Center for Accelerator and Beam Applied Science of Kyushu University

    The construction of the 150-MeV FFAG accelerator has been completed in December 2010 at Center for Accelerator and Beam Applied Science of Kyushu University. Beam commissioning of the main ring has been started in March 2011. In this paper, details of the accelerator facility and status of beam commissioning are described. (author)

  18. Standardized ultrasound evaluation of carotid stenosis for clinical trials: University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center

    Beach Kirk W; Bergelin Robert O; Leotta Daniel F; Primozich Jean F; Sevareid P Max; Stutzman Edward T; Zierler R Eugene

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Serial monitoring of patients participating in clinical trials of carotid artery therapy requires noninvasive precision methods that are inexpensive, safe and widely available. Noninvasive ultrasonic duplex Doppler velocimetry provides a precision method that can be used for recruitment qualification, pre-treatment classification and post treatment surveillance for remodeling and restenosis. The University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center (UWURC) provides a unifor...

  19. The Atlanta University Center: A Consortium-Based Dual Degree Engineering Program

    Jackson, Marilyn T.

    2007-01-01

    The Atlanta University Center (AUC) comprises five historically black colleges and a centralized library. All are separate institutions, each having its own board of directors, president, infrastructure, students, faculty, staff, and traditions. To encourage coordination of effort and resources, the AUC was formed and the first formal cooperative…

  20. Implementing the Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity in University Counseling Center Internships

    Illfelder-Kaye, Joyce; Lese-Fowler, Karen; Bursley, Kevin; Reyes, Elizabeth; Bieschke, Kathleen J.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the potential contribution of the "Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth the "Values Statement") to predoctoral internship training programs housed in university counseling centers. The purpose of this article is to present recommendations for how to best implement the Values…

  1. A Descriptive "Snapshot" of Cross-Racial Supervision in University Counseling Center Internships.

    Duan, Changming; Roehlke, Helen

    2001-01-01

    Results of a survey of cross-racial supervision dyads at university counseling centers showed supervisees were more sensitive to cultural/racial issues than were supervisors; supervisors reported making more efforts to address cultural issues than supervisees perceived; and satisfaction with supervision was related to supervisees' self-disclosure

  2. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  3. Legal Action Taken against College and University Counseling Centers 1986-2008

    Affsprung, Eric H.

    2010-01-01

    In this exploratory study, archival survey data were examined in an effort to determine the general prevalence and nature of legal action taken against college and university counseling centers during the 23 years from 1986 and 2008. While relatively infrequent, a variety of lawsuits and other sorts of legal complaints were filed by student…

  4. Academic Faculty in University Research Centers: Neither Capitalism's Slaves nor Teaching Fugitives

    Bozeman, Barry; Boardman, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses university-industry interactions for both educational and industrial outcomes. The results suggest that while academic faculty who are affiliated with centers are more involved with industry than non-affiliated faculty, affiliates are also more involved with and supportive of students at the undergraduate, graduate, and

  5. The Medical Library and Media Center of Keio University in Tokyo: report on a visit.

    Accart, J P

    1995-01-01

    The Medical Library and Media Center at Keio University in Tokyo offers many facilities to its users: access to medical information within a large catalog of monographs and journals, online searching and CD-ROM databases, and a dynamic interlibrary loan service. This article is a report of a professional visit to the library on September 30, 1993.

  6. Implementing the Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity in University Counseling Center Internships

    Illfelder-Kaye, Joyce; Lese-Fowler, Karen; Bursley, Kevin; Reyes, Elizabeth; Bieschke, Kathleen J.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the potential contribution of the "Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth the "Values Statement") to predoctoral internship training programs housed in university counseling centers. The purpose of this article is to present recommendations for how to best implement the Values

  7. Preliminary Evidence on the Effectiveness of Psychological Treatments Delivered at a University Counseling Center

    Minami, Takuya; Davies, D. Robert; Tierney, Sandra Callen; Bettmann, Joanna E.; McAward, Scott M.; Averill, Lynnette A.; Huebner, Lois A.; Weitzman, Lauren M.; Benbrook, Amy R.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Wampold, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment data from a university counseling center (UCC) that utilized the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 (OQ-45; M. J. Lambert et al., 2004), a self-report general clinical symptom measure, was compared against treatment efficacy benchmarks from clinical trials of adult major depression that utilized similar measures. Statistical analyses suggested…

  8. Obstacles and Solutions of Commercialization of University Research: Case Study of Small Businesses Development Center of University of Tehran

    Jahangir Yadolahi FARSI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available With the entrepreneurship mission incorporated into the education and research missions of universities, their role in the economic and social development in societies has increased. Thus, subjects revolving around academic entrepreneurship and knowledge commercialization have drawn the attention of many researchers and politicians in different countries in the world. In Iran, too, the knowledge commercialization phenomenon is in its prime and is in its early stages of taking shape and development. Therefore, this paper aims to identify obstacles and solutions in the commercialization of university research in Iran. The qualitative research method has been used in the form of a case study. The research data collection tools consist of semi-structured interviews. As a compliment of data collection tools, some evidence and documents were also studies. The research statistical population includes all the individuals engaged in knowledge commercialization in the University of Tehran. Twenty six interviews were conducted before data saturation reached. The results of the qualitative research indicate that the organizational, environmental/institutional and internal university research commercialization impeding factors are critical obstacles in the Small Business Development Center (SBDC of the University of Tehran and policy makers should devise proper strategies in light of these factors.

  9. Clean energy exports and the Kyoto Protocol

    This paper discussed Canada's attempt in international negotiations to gain credits for energy exports that may result in greenhouse gas emission reductions in the United States. It examined how well founded this position is from an environmental perspective and in terms of international equity and political reality. The author emphasized that the clean energy export issue does not provide a legitimate reason to delay Canada's ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, and cautioned that further renegotiation of Kyoto targets for the first commitment period would not be practical and would jeopardize Canada's international standing. The author did note, however, that for the second commitment period, this issue could be reintroduced. Although the problem can potentially be resolved by granting credits to producers and exempting emissions, it was suggested that the most effective approach would be for countries to factor energy export considerations into their negotiating positions

  10. The Kyoto Protocol Is Cost-effective

    Giulio A. De Leo

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances, there is a high degree of uncertainty concerning the climate change that would result from increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Also, opponents of the Kyoto Protocol raised the key objection that reducing emissions would impose an unacceptable economic burden on businesses and consumers. Based on an analysis of alternative scenarios for electricity generation in Italy, we show that if the costs in terms of damage to human health, material goods, agriculture, and the environment caused by greenhouse gas emissions are included in the balance, the economic argument against Kyoto is untenable. Most importantly, the argument holds true even if we exclude global external costs (those due to global warming, and account for local external costs only (such as those due to acidic precipitation and lung diseases resulting from air pollution.

  11. Kyoto protocol and Nepal's energy sector

    Nepal has recently ratified Kyoto Protocol, which considers justifiable use of resources to limit or reduce the emission of gases that contribute to green house gas inventory in the atmosphere. Nepal's per capita green gas (GHG) emission from energy use is insignificant. However, it is important for Nepal to adopt environmentally friendly energy options based on local resources like hydropower and biomass. Nepal can benefit from the provisions of clean development mechanism (CDM) under the Kyoto Protocol of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC) or carbon funds being promoted by various organizations in order to obtain funding for new projects that reduce GHG emissions (ER). Funding can be generated through Carbon trading in international market as well. In this paper, the country's current contribution to GHG due to energy consumption is evaluated. Options for promoting more sustainable and environmentally friendly projects have also been discussed

  12. Kyoto mechanisms: market incentives for hydro?

    This article considers whether the Joint Implementation (JI) of climate protection projects and the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), introduced by the Kyoto Protocol, could offer incentives to make hydro power more attractive since only 2 of the 130 pilot projects approved by participating countries to test the Kyoto Protocol mechanisms involve hydroelectric power. The calculation of the emission reduction due to JI and CDM projects, and the International Emission Trading (IET) mechanism are discussed. Experiences with the hydroelectric power projects in Costa Rica and Bhutan are outlined, and the promotion of hydroelectric power for climate friendly power generation, and the problem of assessing additional climate impact from new installations financed by the JI/CDM investments are examined. (UK)

  13. Emission trading under the Kyoto Protocol

    Holtsmark, Bjart; HAGEM Cathrine

    2003-01-01

    On 11 December 1997, delegates to the third conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change agreed upon the Kyoto Protocol. The protocol sets binding emission targets for developed nations (Annex B countries). The Protocol states that Annex B countries may participate in emission trading. The rules for emission trading are to be discussed at the fourth Conference of the Parties in November 1998. differentiation of targets among countries, but not in any systematic...

  14. Pressure for backing Kyoto Protocol grows

    Showstack, Randy

    The European Union and its 15 member states simultaneously ratified the Kyoto Protocol on climate change on 31 May; Japan followed suit on 4 June; and pressure is building for other countries to approve the treaty so that it can come into force in time for the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg, South Africa late this year. The summit runs from 26 August through 4 September.

  15. The Kyoto protocol in a global perspective

    Tjaša Redek; Matjaž Koman; Polona Domadenik; Andreja Cirman

    2010-01-01

    The global climate has changed notably since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gasses (GHG) have increased dramatically followed by an increase in global average temperature. In order to avoid negative potential outcomes of global warming, countries have adopted the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change that has so far been ratified by 192 countries. In 1997 the Kyoto Protocol, a binding GHG reduction plan, ...

  16. The Kyoto Protocol Is Cost-effective

    De Leo, Giulio A.; Luca Rizzi; Andrea Caizzi; Marino Gatto

    2002-01-01

    Despite recent advances, there is a high degree of uncertainty concerning the climate change that would result from increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Also, opponents of the Kyoto Protocol raised the key objection that reducing emissions would impose an unacceptable economic burden on businesses and consumers. Based on an analysis of alternative scenarios for electricity generation in Italy, we show that if the costs in terms of damage to human health, material goods, agric...

  17. EU CLIMATE POLICY FROM KYOTO TO DURBAN

    ELENA ANDREEVSKA

    2012-01-01

    The risks posed by climate change are real and its impacts are already taking place. The biggest challenge about climate change is that there is no one single answer, no one single solution. This characteristic, together with the long history of political frictions and disputes worsened by environmental stresses suggests that global climatic changes have the potential to exacerbate existing international tensions. On December 31, 2012, the Kyoto Protocol's first commitment period will expire....

  18. NAFTA's shadow hangs over Kyoto's implementation

    The Canadian government recently stated that it will not meet its Kyoto targets by the end of the first period in 2012, and instead proposed a twofold solution to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The solutions involve the development of a Clean Air Act that will seek a 50 per cent reduction in emissions by 2050; and, participation in negotiations to determine the next steps for the Kyoto Protocol, post-2012. It was noted that as a ratified member of the Kyoto Protocol, Canada is still legally obligated to achieve its reduction requirements. However, as a co-signatory of the North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canada may be impeded from introducing and maintaining GHG reducing initiative since there are elements of NAFTA which may be used to block efforts that are considered discriminatory to trade. Chapter 11 of NAFTA assigns rights to Canadian, American and Mexican private investors to promote investment, ensure equal treatment and protect their investments against discrimination by NAFTA governments other than their own. These rights may challenge independent action by member states to reduce environmental risks. The authors emphasized that in order to avoid the possibility of legal challenges through Chapter 11 of NAFTA, it is important for the Canadian government to address various aspects of the flexibility mechanisms in the Kyoto Protocol. Three of these mechanisms were designed to reduce the financial burden and technological capacity issues associated with mitigating GHG emissions. These include emissions trading system, clean development mechanism, and joint implementation. The authors presented some policy recommendations to avoid future conflict. 26 refs

  19. A 2004 view of the Kyoto Protocol

    It may not be a household word, but by now the Kyoto Protocol has become a well-known political slogan. It is either ''fundamentally flawed'' (George W. Bush) or it is essential for saving the climate and humanity (Al Gore). There seems to be no in between. The Kyoto Protocol is a treaty to limit (i.e., ration) the use of energy to satisfy the concerns of environmental groups and other believers in global warming catastrophes. This group includes not only certified kooks but also such notables as former Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill and Sir David King, chief scientific adviser to Her Majesty's government who equates the threat of warming with that of international terrorism. But Kyoto is quite ineffective, that is, it cannot really affect climate or even change the composition of the atmosphere. It is costly. And it is probably also defunct. Where did this treaty come from? Why is it being adopted by some countries but not by others? And what is its likely future?

  20. Nuclear energy and the Kyoto protocol

    The implementation of the Kyoto Protocol and the application of its 'flexible mechanisms' are at the forefront of energy policy debates in most OECD countries. The potential role of nuclear energy in this context is viewed very differently and assessed against various criteria by the range of stakeholders in governments and civil society according to their interests and priorities. This book provides key facts concerning nuclear energy and the Kyoto Protocol. It highlights the challenges and opportunities for the future development of nuclear energy in the context of implementing the Kyoto Protocol, and more broadly in alleviating the risks of global climate change. The report will be of interest to energy policy makers and senior experts in the field as well as to members of civil society eager to better understand the issues raised within the debate on the role of nuclear energy in sustainable development. It will assists in making the necessary trade-off involved in addressing global climate change concerns. (authors)

  1. Present status of FEL-SUT: IR-FEL Research Center of Tokyo University of Science

    The IR-FEL Research Center of Tokyo University of Science (FEL-SUT) was established to develop high performance IR-FEL and new photo science by use of it. The center has MIR-FEL device which consists of an RF gun with a thermionic cathode, an alpha magnet, an S-band linac and a permanent magnet undulator combined with an optical resonance cavity of hole-coupling mode. It has been operated providing FEL light of the wavelength range from 4 to 16 μm for various application experiments. We present the status of FEL-SUT in this paper. (author)

  2. The Preparation of Master's-Level Professional Counselors for Positions in College and University Counseling Centers

    Shaw, Brian M.; Remley, Theodore P., Jr.; Ward, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated college and university counseling center directors' perceptions of the adequacy of the preparation of master's-level counselors for work in college and university counseling centers. Results indicated that counselors were rated on average as prepared; however, many directors had concerns about counselors'…

  3. Research and industrial applications at the McClellan Nuclear Research Center, University of California, Davis

    The MNRC is a facility centered around a 2 MW TRIGA research reactor, one of the three largest university research reactors in the US and the youngest. A wide range of research studies is underway including the imaging of fuel cells, tomography of geological minerals, neutron activation analysis of biological samples and plant seed irradiation. Industrial applications include radiography of precision aerospace castings and irradiation of electronics. The McClellan reactor may become part of a consortium of university reactors that will provide radiopharmaceuticals in response to a critical shortage in North America.

  4. A University-based Forensics Training Center as a Regional Outreach, Education, and Research activity

    David A. Dampier

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a university-based Forensics Training Center (FTC established by a Department of Justice grant for the purpose of improving the ability of state and local law enforcement in the Southeastern part of the United States to address the rising incidence of computer based crime. The FTC effort is described along with supporting evidence of its need. The program is not only a service activity, but also contributes to the Mississippi State University (MSU security program pedagogy, and research effort.

  5. Pain, Work-related Characteristics, and Psychosocial Factors among Computer Workers at a University Center

    Mainenti, Mriam Raquel Meira; Felicio, Lilian Ramiro; Rodrigues, rika de Carvalho; Ribeiro da Silva, Dalila Terrinha; Vigrio dos Santos, Patrcia

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Complaint of pain is common in computer workers, encouraging the investigation of pain-related workplace factors. This study investigated the relationship among work-related characteristics, psychosocial factors, and pain among computer workers from a university center. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects (median age, 32.0?years; interquartile range, 26.834.5?years) were subjected to measurement of bioelectrical impedance; photogrammetry; workplace measurements; ...

  6. Thoracic outlet syndrome: a 50-year experience at Baylor University Medical Center

    Urschel, Harold C.; Kourlis, Harry

    2007-01-01

    During the past 5 decades, the recognition and management of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) have evolved. This article elucidates these changes and improvements in the diagnosis and management of TOS at Baylor University Medical Center. The most remarkable change over the past 50 years is the use of nerve conduction velocity to diagnose and monitor patients with nerve compression. Recognition that procedures such as breast implantation and median sternotomy may produce TOS has been revealing....

  7. The Quality of Collaboration among Medical Research Centers, Universities, Health Executives and the Community in ?ran

    Asefzadeh, Saeed

    2005-01-01

    A health research system is defined as a system for planning, coordinating, monitoring and managing health research resources and activities, and for promoting research aimed at effective and equitable national health development. This study was conducted to describe the quality of mutual collaboration among medical research centers, universities, executive organizations and the community. In this situation analysis qualitative methods were applied. In-depth interviews were held with the ...

  8. Exploring the Feasibility of Adopting Cloud Computing in Computer Center Taiz University

    Mohammed A.M. Ibrahim; Alsabry, Fatimah, Ameen

    2015-01-01

    The paper would discuss the possibilities of using cloud computing as a solution to expand work efficiency at Taiz university (TU) Computer Center and Information Technology (CCIT) labs, these Labs equipped with hardware and software resources. Cloud computing has been adopted for managing the labs to facilitate maintenance and network management according to cloud computing characteristics, also paper has studied the different types of cloud-based computing to decide the appropriate type tha...

  9. Prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in the university medical center of Rabat, Morocco

    Razine Rachid; Azzouzi Abderrahim; Barkat Amina; Khoudri Ibtissam; Hassouni Fadil; Chefchaouni Almontacer; Abouqal Redouane

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The aims of this study were to determine the hospital-acquired infections (HAI) prevalence in all institutions of Rabat University Medical Center, to ascertain risk factors, to describe the pathogens associated with HAI and their susceptibility profile to antibiotics. Materials and methods Point-prevalence survey in January 2010 concerning all patients who had been in the hospital for at least 48 hours. At bedside, 27 investigators filled a standardized questionnaire from ...

  10. THE INCIDENCE OF CAESAREAN SECTIONS IN THE UNIVERSITY CLINICAL CENTER OF KOSOVO

    Elshani, Brikene; Daci, Armond; Gashi, Sanije; Lulaj, Shefqet

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: As in most countries of the world also at Kosovo the rate of Cesarean section from year to year is increasing. Aim: The main purpose of this paper was to present the incidence of births completed by Caesarean section at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics of University Clinical Center of Kosovo in Prishtinë. Material and methods: This study is retrospective, namely its made by collecting epidemiological data from patients’ histories that completed birth by Caesarean section ...

  11. Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University. Environmental Assessment

    1994-04-01

    The Environmental Assessment (EA) of the Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer`s Disease (CNMR) at the Health Sciences Center, at West Virginia University in Morgantown, West Virginia for the construction and operation was prepared by DOE. The EA documents analysis of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts that might occur as a result of these actions, and characterizes potential impacts on the environment. In the EA, DOE presents its evaluation of potential impacts of construction and operation of the CNMR on health and safety of both workers and the public, as well as on the external environment. Construction impacts include the effects of erosion, waste disposal, air emissions, noise, and construction traffic and parking. Operational impacts include the effects of waste generation (domestic, sanitary, hazardous, medical/biological, radioactive and mixed wastes), radiation exposures, air emissions (radioactive, criteria, and air toxics), noise, and new workers. No sensitive resources (wetlands, special sources of groundwater, protected species) exist in the area of project effect.

  12. University Research Center Resources and Partnerships for Public and K-12 Outreach and Engagement

    Zenner Petersen, Greta M.

    2011-03-01

    Collaboration and partnerships are essential to successful outreach and engagement in science. Through working together across disciplines and institutions, we can take advantage of a broad range of skills and expertise to strengthen a project and its outcomes. Additionally, building upon outreach and engagement resources developed by others is equally important to efficiently increasing impact and reducing redundancy. Research centers based at universities and other institutions of higher education commonly serve as both partners and resources for those active in education and outreach. This talk will share successful examples of public and K-12 outreach and engagement efforts that partner with a research center and/or use resources developed by a research center. A thorough discussion of strategies and recommendations for fostering such collaborations, as well as a broad survey of partnership models that exist, will help those at all levels of outreach and engagement experience pursue their science education ideas and goals. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation through the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Materials Research Science and Engineering Center on Nanostructured Interfaces (DMR-0520527).

  13. Kyoto protocol: at last the agreement has been reached; Protocole de Kyoto: un accord enfin conclu

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    After more than 3 years of negotiations, 180 countries agreed at Bonn on the application of the Kyoto protocol to fight the climatic warming. The main aspects of this agreement are discussed: the carbon wells, the tools of the pollution control for the developed countries and the financial help to the developing countries. (A.L.B.)

  14. Publications of the University of Karlsruhe (T.H.) and the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe 1981

    This is the 14th volume of the joint list of publications of the University of Karlsruhe (T.H.), the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe and some institutions which are closely linked to the University. It contains the publications of the year 1981 as well as some addenda from 1980. Included were books and journals, journal articles and contributions from compilations, research reports, dissertations and habilitation theses which were written or published by these institutions, their bodies and institutes as well as their teachers and scientific staff, and also patents. Not included were, as a rule, diploma theses, newspaper articles, reviews, internal reports and bulletins. The list of publications from University is mainly based on entries made by the institutes and chairs; its completeness can not be granted here. (orig./RW)

  15. Austraalia uus valitsus ühines Kyoto lepinguga

    2007-01-01

    Austraalia uus peaminister Kevin Rudd ratifitseeris kasvuhoonegaaside õhkupaiskamist piirava Kyoto lepingu. Austraalia senine valitsus on olnud seisukohal, et heitgaaside piiramine kahjustab riigi majandust

  16. The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Nossal, S. M.; Watson, L. E.; Hooper, E.; Huesmann, A.; Schenker, B.; Timbie, P.; Rzchowski, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides academic support and small-group supplemental instruction to students studying introductory algebra-based and calculus-based physics. These classes are gateway courses for majors in the biological and physical sciences, pre-health fields, engineering, and secondary science education. The Physics Learning Center offers supplemental instruction groups twice weekly where students can discuss concepts and practice with problem-solving techniques. The Center also provides students with access on-line resources that stress conceptual understanding, and to exam review sessions. Participants in our program include returning adults, people from historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, students from families in lower-income circumstances, students in the first generation of their family to attend college, transfer students, veterans, and people with disabilities, all of whom might feel isolated in their large introductory course and thus have a more difficult time finding study partners. We also work with students potentially at-risk for having academic difficulty (due to factors academic probation, weak math background, low first exam score, or no high school physics). A second mission of the Physics Learning Center is to provide teacher training and leadership experience for undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors. These Peer Tutors lead the majority of the weekly group sessions in close supervision by PLC staff members. We will describe our work to support students in the Physics Learning Center, including our teacher-training program for our undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors

  17. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public. PMID:26266460

  18. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  19. Global post-Kyoto scenario analyses at PSI

    Kypreos, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Scenario analyses are described here using the Global MARKAL-Macro Trade (GMMT) model to study the economic implications of the Kyoto Protocol to the UN Convention on Climate change. Some conclusions are derived in terms of efficient implementations of the post-Kyoto extensions of the Protocol. (author) 2 figs., 5 refs.

  20. Environment. Planet warming: the expected effects of the Kyoto protocol

    The authors wonder on the effects of the Kyoto protocol objectives, on the global warming: what are the consequences of the Kyoto Protocol ratification? Which changes? Why and how reducing the emissions? What will happen in 2012? What about the problem of emissions resulting from the transports? (A.L.B.)

  1. Kyoto leppe jõustumine toob Eestile kasu / Tõnis Arnover

    Arnover, Tõnis, 1952-

    2005-01-01

    Kyoto protokollist, mis kohustab sellega ühinenud riike vähendama kasvuhoonegaase. Eesti võttis endale leppe ratifitseerimisel kohustuse vähendada aastaks 2012 heitekogust 1990. aastaga võrreldes 8%. Lisa: Eestile Kyoto lepe raskusi ei valmista

  2. The Kyoto protocol and carbon fixation. Gold and green forests

    The article discusses the implications of the Kyoto protocol on forests. It deals with the global deforestation, problems of measuring carbon fixation, implications of variations in the carbon dioxide levels and emission reductions. There are referrals to the Kyoto protocol, short surveys of the status of the global forests and of the controversial activities of the firm Norwegian Tree Farms, in Tanzania

  3. Kyoto commitments: CHP will help the UK

    In order to meet the United Kingdom's targets for carbon dioxide emissions reduction, agreed at the Kyoto Summit, the UK Government is promoting the use of combined heat and power (CHP) plants. Such schemes need to offer over 70% efficiency, have on-site or nearby heat uses, and allow flexibility for the export of electricity where this is appropriate. Electricity trading arrangements will need to be re-organised in line with similar commodities, in order to facilitate and promote the growth of CHP and renewable energy schemes. Financial incentives and regulation of electricity prices will also contribute to the promotion of CHP schemes, ultimately leading to reduced CO2 pollution as a result of the growth in the UK's CHP capacity. (UK)

  4. May the Kyoto protocol produce results?

    A not well managed drastic reduction of greenhouse emissions might result in significant decrease of living standards, but without such reduction efforts, climate change might have five to twenty times higher costs. Thus, while indicating estimated consequences or evolutions of greenhouse emissions and temperature, the author stresses the need of emission reduction. She discusses the role of economic instruments which can be used in policies aimed at the struggle against climate change. She recalls the emission reduction commitments specified in the Kyoto protocol, discusses the present status, operation and results of the international emission trading scheme, the lessons learned after the first years of operation, comments the involvement of emerging countries in relationship with another mechanism defined in the protocol: the Clean Development Mechanism

  5. Will OPEC lose from the Kyoto Protocol?

    A range of energy-economy models forecast losses to members of the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) should the Kyoto Protocol come into force. These forecasts are a powerful influence in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations. They are used by OPEC to advance the agenda on the impacts of response measures, covertly arguing for compensation for lost oil revenues arising from implementation of the Protocol. This paper discusses this issue, and explores the key assumptions of these models and their uncertainties. Assumptions about carbon leakage, future availability of oil reserves, substitution, innovation, and capital turnover are considered. The paper suggests that losses will not affect OPEC countries equally, and that these losses are not likely to be as substantial as the models forecast. A range of policy measures are proposed to lessen any impact the Protocol may have on OPEC

  6. Meteor observation by the Kyoto meteor radar

    The Kyoto Meteor Radar is a monostatic coherent pulsed Doppler radar operating on the frequency of 31.57 MH. The system is computer controlled and uses radio interferometry for echo height determination. The antenna, an improvement, can be directed either to the north or the east. The system has been continuously collecting data on winds at meteor heights by radar observation. The meteor echo rate was also measured, the echo rate distribution with height and the daily variation in height integrated echo rate are discussed. Investigations of atmospheric tides are being pursued by cooperative observations. A novel approach to the study of gravity waves was attempted using the meteor radar which is able to detect the horizontal propagation of the waves by observing the changing phase through the region illuminated by the radar

  7. What the Kyoto Protocol means for Russians

    The only impediment to the Kyoto protocol entering into force now is the Russians. The only global agreement to save climate, which has been ratified by 110 countries, is still in limbo. This article presents an up-to-the-minute analysis of the reasons. The history of progress up to and back from ratification is summarised, including the latest facts from early June 2003. The views of all relevant ministries, business, Parliament and the general public are briefly presented, as are the intentions and/or plans. It is clear that there is progress toward ratification, but serious opposition still exists. The selfish interests of agencies, clumsy bureaucracy and misunderstandings should and can be overcome

  8. Present status of the accelerator in Research Center for Electron Photon Science, Tohoku University

    Research Center for Electron Photon Science (RCEPS) was established in December 2009 in the Mikamine Campus of the Tohoku University as an Electron Photon Science User Facility. The center carried on all electron accelerators from Laboratory of Nuclear Science (LNS). Such impressive advances have been supported by advanced developments of beam-delivery and accelerator technologies and by maintenance works for high-reliability operation. Furthermore, it was authorized as a base research facility of the national collaboration use from 1 April 2011 by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. However, the accelerators ware serious damaged by the 11 March 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake. We had no effect of tsunami and no one was injured. It is predicted, unfortunately, that a considerably long period would be required until the accelerators could resume operations. The report describes the status of the accelerators and recovery of the damaged accelerators for RCEPS. (author)

  9. An ASEAN Ion Beam Analysis Center at Chiang Mai University, Thailand

    To contribute to the development of nuclear science and technology in Thailand, a comprehensive ion beam analysis center unique in the ASEAN region has recently been established at Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The center is equipped with a 1.7-MV Tandetron tandem accelerator with an ion beam analysis beam line. The beam line is currently capable of performing ion beam analysis techniques such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), RBS/channeling, Elastic BackScattering (EBS), Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Ionoluminescence (IL) with assistance of commercial and in-house-developed softwares. Micro ion beam for MeV-ion mapping using programmable aperture or capillary focusing techniques is being developed. Ion beam analysis experiments and applications have been vigorously developed, especially for novel materials analysis focused on archeological, gemological and biological materials besides other conventional materials.

  10. The University of Nebraska at Omaha Center for Space Data Use in Teaching and Learning

    Grandgenett, Neal

    2000-01-01

    Within the context of innovative coursework and other educational activities, we are proposing the establishment of a University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) Center for the Use of Space Data in Teaching and Learning. This Center will provide an exciting and motivating process for educators at all levels to become involved in professional development and training which engages real life applications of mathematics, science, and technology. The Center will facilitate innovative courses (including online and distance education formats), systematic degree programs, classroom research initiatives, new instructional methods and tools, engaging curriculum materials, and various symposiums. It will involve the active participation of several Departments and Colleges on the UNO campus and be well integrated into the campus environment. It will have a direct impact on pre-service and in-service educators, the K12 (kindergarten through 12th grade) students that they teach, and other college students of various science, mathematics, and technology related disciplines, in which they share coursework. It is our belief that there are many exciting opportunities represented by space data and imagery, as a context for engaging mathematics, science, and technology education. The UNO Center for Space Data Use in Teaching and Learning being proposed in this document will encompass a comprehensive training and dissemination strategy that targets the improvement of K-12 education, through changes in the undergraduate and graduate preparation of teachers in science, mathematics and technology education.

  11. Neutron beam design at the University of California, Davis, McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center

    The McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center (MNRC) is centred on a 2 MW Triga research reactor, built by General Atomics (GA) for the United States Air Force (USAF), and originally dedicated to state of the art neutron radiography of aircraft structures. The MNRC was operated by the USAF from January 1990 to February 2000, performing this function as well as a variety of research projects for the US Department of Defense, industry and universities. The USAF closed the military base in January 2001, however, the MNRC was maintained and transferred to the University of California at Davis (UCD) in February 2000. The UCD/MNRC has become a world-class leader in neutron imaging; the heart of this state of the art neutron imaging is the design of the four beam tubes described in this paper

  12. Chelation research at the Institute of Environmental Medicine, New York University Medical Center

    Chelation research should be continued in order to improve the effectiveness and safety of this mode of decontamination therapy. At the New York University Medical Center we are evaluating various treatment procedures using Na3(Zn-DTPA) and Na3(CA-DTPA) for removing americium, curium, and plutonium from the baboon, an animal whose blood and urine chemistries are similar to those of man. It has been determined, thus far, that the treatment schedules presently recommended for man may not be optimal

  13. Status of center for accelerator and beam applied science of Kyushu University

    A new facility of Center for Accelerator and Beam Applied Science is under construction on Ito Campus of Kyushu University. The facility consists mainly of a 10 MeV proton cyclotron as an injector and a 150 MeV Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator developed at KEK as a prototype of proton FFAG for various applications. The construction of the first stage building of the facility has been completed. The 150 MeV FFAG was transported from KEK to Ito Campus in March 2008. The reconstruction of the 150 MeV FFAG is now in progress and the beam commissioning will be started in near future. (author)

  14. The new library building at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

    Kronick, D A; Bowden, V M; Olivier, E R

    1985-04-01

    The new University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Library opened in June 1983, replacing the 1968 library building. Planning a new library building provides an opportunity for the staff to rethink their philosophy of service. Of paramount concern and importance is the need to convey this philosophy to the architects. This paper describes the planning process and the building's external features, interior layouts, and accommodations for technology. Details of the move to the building are considered and various aspects of the building are reviewed. PMID:3995205

  15. A new apparatus at hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, University of Tokyo

    In the hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, following apparatuses were newly installed for accelerator relating apparatus on 1995 fiscal year; 1) Hyper ion microbeam analysis apparatus, 2) Fourier conversion infrared microscopy, 3) Pico second two-dimensional fluorescence measuring apparatus, 4) Femto second wave-length reversible pulse laser radiation apparatus, and others. In addition to double irradiation, pulse beam irradiation experiment and so forth characteristic in conventional hyper irradiation research apparatus, upgrading of material irradiation experiments using these new apparatuses are intended. (G.K.)

  16. Twenty years' experience at the Heart Transplant Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark

    Clemmensen, Tor Skibsted; Munk, Kim; Tram, Else Marie; Ilkjr, Lars Bo; Severinsen, Inge Krogh; Eiskjr, Hans

    2013-01-01

    %) underwent renal transplantation, and 29 patients (11%) developed severe renal dysfunction requiring dialysis. Sixty-four (25%) patients developed cancer, with skin cancer being most common. Conclusion. HTX is an excellent treatment for selected patients with end-stage heart failure. The prognosis has......Abstract Objectives. The Heart Transplantation Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, now has 20 years' experience with heart transplantation (HTX). This study aims to evaluate long-term outcome after HTX including incidences of cancer and severe renal dysfunction. Design. Outcomes were...... improved in the latest transplantation eras. With balanced immunosuppressive treatment, severe renal dysfunction and cancer can be limited to an acceptable level....

  17. Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Systems, New Mexico State University

    Horan, Stephen; DeLeon, Phillip; Borah, Deva; Lyman, Ray

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Center for Space Telemetering and Telecommunications Systems activities at New Mexico State University. Presentations cover the following topics: (1) small satellite communications, including nanosatellite radio and virtual satellite development; (2) modulation and detection studies, including details on smooth phase interpolated keying (SPIK) spectra and highlights of an adaptive turbo multiuser detector; (3) decoupled approaches to nonlinear ISI compensation; (4) space internet testing; (4) optical communication; (5) Linux-based receiver for lightweight optical communications without a laser in space, including software design, performance analysis, and the receiver algorithm; (6) carrier tracking hardware; and (7) subband transforms for adaptive direct sequence spread spectrum receivers.

  18. Centers of universal enveloping algebras of Lie superalgebras in prime characteristic

    Wei, Junyan; Zheng, Lisun; Shu, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Let $\\ggg=\\ggg_\\bz+\\ggg_\\bo$ be a basic classical Lie superalgebra over an algebraically closed field $k$ of characteristic $p>2$, and $G$ be an algebraic supergroup satisfying $\\Lie(G)=\\ggg$, with the purely even subgroup $G_\\ev$ which is a reductive group. In this paper, we prove that the center $\\cz:=\\cz(\\ggg)$ of the universal enveloping algebra of $\\ggg$ is a domain, and $U(\\ggg)\\otimes_{\\cz}\\Frac(\\cz)$ is a simple superalgebra over $\\Frac(\\cz)$. And then we prove that the quotient field...

  19. Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

    Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation`s energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University`s use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

  20. Improving manufacturing energy efficiency: The Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center at the University of Florida

    The University of Florida Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (UFEADC) is part of an industrial service program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and coordinated by the University Science Center in Philadelphia, PA. The main activity of the EADCs is to perform energy audits for small and medium size manufacturing facilities and to make recommendations that would increase their energy efficiency, reduce their energy costs, and help them become more profitable and competitive. This paper describes the EADC program, discusses the operation of the UFEADC, and summarizes the results of the UFEADC program. The UFEADC has completed 40 industrial audits in just under two years, and has identified and analyzed more than fifty different Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs). An ECO is presented to the plant management as an efficiency measure which if implemented will provide an energy and dollar savings with an associated simple payback period typically under two years. In many cases these energy control programs will result in reduced air and water emissions as well as reduced energy consumption

  1. THE ROLE OF STUDENT-CENTERED EDUCATION IN STIMULATING THE ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT OF UNIVERSITY GRADUATES

    Rosca Remus

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship plays a major role in the economic growth and development of most modern economies. Measures are being taken by most governments in order to stimulate entrepreneurship, however even more can be done by promoting entrepreneurship in the educational context. According to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Global Report (2013 Romania is performing slightly under the average of similar countries when it comes to entrepreneurial activity, is above the average at necessity-driven entrepreneurship and low at innovation driven entrepreneurship. Under these circumstances, a focus on entrepreneurship in higher education is required in order to help Romania bridge the gap to the other efficiency-driven economies. Our study aims to assess the impact of the university level education on the career choices of present entrepreneurs in the Bihor county of Romania. 30 university graduates that are currently running a business have been interviewed regarding the reasons for starting their companies as well as the relationship that they had and have with the university from which they graduated. While some of the entrepreneurs claim that their education had little impact on the decision to become an entrepreneur, most of them believe that it played a big role on their performance and it prepared them somewhat for the challenges they faced once they opened their businesses. Also a large portion of them report being involved in the activity of the university. The participants offered valuable feedback regarding their experience with the university. They also provided considerable information regarding the improvement that they would like to see in the future and how a more student-centered education process could positively impact the development of entrepreneurial spirit and better prepare future graduates to start and run a business. We further discuss the means through which this could be achieved in the context of our institution and other learning institutions that have similar goals and face similar challenges.

  2. University Satellite Consortium and Space Education in Japan Centered on Micro-Nano Satellites

    Nakasuka, S.; Kawashima, R.

    2002-01-01

    in Japan especially centered on micro or nano class satellites. Hands-on training using micro-nano satellites provide unique opportunity of space education to university level students, by giving them a chance to experience the whole space project cycle from mission creation, satellite design, fabrication, test, launch, operation through analysis of the results. Project management and team working are other important skills that can be trained in these projects. include 1) low cost, which allows one laboratory in university to carry out a project, 2) short development period such as one or two year, which enables students to obtain the results of their projects before they graduate, and 3) small size and weight, which enables fabrication and test within usually very narrow university laboratory areas. In Japan, several projects such as CanSat, CubeSat or Whale Observation Satellite have been carried out, proving that micro-nano satellites provide very unique and valuable educational opportunity. with the objective to make a university student and staff community of these micro-nano satellite related activities in Japan. This consortium aims for many activities including facilitating information and skills exchange and collaborations between member universities, helping students to use ground test facilities of national laboratories, consulting them on political or law related matters, coordinating joint development of equipments or projects, and bridging between these university activities and the needs or interests of the people in general. This kind of outreach activity is essential because how to create missions of micro-nano satellites should be pursued in order for this field to grow larger than a merely educational enterprise. The final objectives of the consortium is to make a huge community of the users, mission creators, investors and manufactures(i.e., university students) of micro-nano satellites, and provide a unique contribution to the activation of the space development. activities, including how to acquire frequency permission, how to obtain launch opportunity and financial support, how to operate the launched satellites using cheap ground stations, etc. Especially, the frequency problem should be solved as soon as possible because so many universities in the world are planning similar projects and the frequency in the amateur band are already very congested. One idea is that universities should make a world wide "university satellite community" and collaboratively ask for a kind of "Educational frequency" to ITU, and share the obtained frequency within the community under the community's own management. This kind of community will also be useful for collaborative satellite operation, because the universities which have a ground station spread over the world. I hope the IAC meeting will provide a good opportunity for discussing these problems and facilitating the construction of world wide university community to tackle with these problems.

  3. Suggested Minimum Data Set for Speech Therapy Centers Affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Damanabi, Shahla; Abdolnejad, Shawbo; Karimi, Gelavizh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The minimum data considered as a conceptual framework, based on the achievement of effectiveness indicators and it ensures to access of precise and clear health data. The aims of the present study were identified and proposed a data element set of speech therapy centers affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Material and Methods: This study that was cross sectional type, performed in 9 speech therapy clinic from medical university in 2014. Firstly, the minimum data elements set evaluated using the check list in these centers. Using the findings from the first step and survey of internal and external documentation forms, designed a questionnaire containing a minimum data speech therapy files and it shared between 36 Speech therapy experts using 5 options of Likert scale. Validity of questionnaire was examined through its validity and reliability of content by retest. For data analysis, data processing was performed using descriptive statistics by SPSS21 software. Results: The minimum data set for speech therapy were divided into two categories: clinical and administrative data. The Name and surname, date of birth, gender, address, telephone number, date of admission and the number of treatments, the patients complaint, the time of occurrence of injury or disorder, reason and age of disease considered as the most important elements for management data and health history. For the most important elements of clinical information were selected Short-term and long-term aims and development of speech history. Conclusion: The design and implementation of suitable data collection of speech therapy for gathering of data, we recommended planning for the control and prevention of speech disorders to providing high quality and good care of patient in speech therapy centers. PMID:26483600

  4. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    Mago, Pedro [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Newell, LeLe [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2014-01-31

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  5. Annual review of Plasma Physics Laboratory, Kyoto University, April, 1983

    The devices for additionally heating joul-heated plasma in the Heliotron E, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating and neutral beam injection, were in operation in 1982. In the ECRH experiment, the microwaves of 200 kW at 28 GHz were generated by a gyrotron, but the pulse width was extended from 10 ms to 40 ms this year. By this, a currentless plasma of Te-1 keV was achieved. In the NB1 experiment, the neutral beam of about 1.5 MW was injected into joule-heated plasma, and the plasma of Ti(O)-950 eV, Te(O)-800 eV and Ne = 3 x 1019/m3 was attained. The first experiment to inject neutral beam into ECRH currentless plasma was carried out. By this method, the density of the plasma increased as well as the ion temperature and electron temperature. As to the theory, a critical beta was calculated by using stellarator expansion, which should be 3 to 7 % in the Heliotron E. Two gyrotrons of 200 kW at 53 GHz each and an ion cyclotron resonance heating equipment of 1.5 MW at 26.7 MHz are prepared. As to the reactor study, the design of Heliotron H in the first phase was completed. The location of impurity sources in NB1 ion sources and beam lines was found. (Kako, I.)

  6. Annual review of Plasma Physics Laboratory, Kyoto University, July, 1981

    The construction of the Heliotron E was completed in June, 1980. After the preliminary examination for two months and the improvement of the power supply, the Joule heating experiment was carried out from September, 1980, to January, 1981. The experiment of electron cyclotron resonance heating was also carried out in January, 1981. Then, experiment was stopped to install the neutral beam injection apparatus. The results obtained by both experiments are reported. The target may be attained by producing high density plasma with low plasma current, and heating the plasma by NBI additionally. In the ECRH experiment, plasma was produced and heated successfully without Joule heating current, by the Gyrotron with 200 kW power output. The favorable results of the confinement experiment with current-free plasma indicate the possibility of a stationary fusion reactor of Heliotron type. The Heliotron magnetic field configuration was proposed in 1959, and since then, the experiments of Heliotron A, B, C, D and DM were carried out in succession. Now, the purpose of the experiment to prove the principle is being achieved with Heliotron E. Hope is placed on the NBI experiment in preparation. (Kako, I.)

  7. Present status of accelerator laboratory at ICR, Kyoto University

    Transverse laser cooling in horizontal direction by application of synchro-betatron resonance has been demonstrated for the first time by detecting a horizontal beam profile of Mg ion beam with a cooled CCD camera. Laser-produced proton beam up to ∼2 MeV has been phase-rotated to create energy peaks resulting ∼3 times intensity increase at the peak. Such proton beams are emitted into a rather small angular region in vertical direction. Electron facilities at ICR, KSR and 100 MeV linac are successfully utilized for proof of principle of SCRIT and ion chamber calibration for T2K neutrino experiment, respectively. (author)

  8. Present status of PACS at Kyoto University Hospital

    The authors' experimental picture archiving and communications system (in operation since 1985) has been expanded to integrate all the digital imaging modalities, such as CT, MR imaging, digital subtraction angiography, and computed radiography. A fiber-optic LAN supports these imaging modalities, a jukebox-style optical disk library, a laser film printer, a magnetic tape station, and a film digitizer. In the new imaging workstation, the image memory (with 64-Mbyte random-access memory [RAM]) and the 1.2-Gbyte magnetic disk speed up the image-handling operation. The system functions as both the hard-copy and the electronic-archiving system, which makes possible the storage and on-line retrieval of digital medical-image data

  9. Reconstruction of pneumatic irradiation facility in Kyoto University Reactor

    There are three pneumatic sub-facilities in KUR allowing simultaneous irradiation of three samples. The Pn facility is sub-divided as follows, hot cave room (Pn-1), junior cave room (Pn-2), chemical laboratory (Pn-3). The capsule to be tested is sent into the KUR core, via the Pn facility by CO2 gas pressure and irradiated by neutrons and gamma rays in the KUR core. After irradiation, the capsule returns to the desired Pn station by similar means. The dispatch-return mechanism for the capsules was altered during this reconstruction. One major alteration in the system was the replacement of the one machine used for dispatch and return, by two machines for despatch and return. In consequence of this new design, the dispatch machine has a capsule setting box, and the return machine has a return ball valve. The electric circuitry for this system was improved at this time. A new emergency return circuit was added, and the photodetector system that indicated the insertion of the capsule into the core was refined. In addition, the CO2 gas tank, use for the capsule propulsion, was transfered from the reactor basement to the rear area of the hot laboratory. This was done to facilitate easy access to the gas tank for future repressurization of low CO2 gas tank pressures. (author)

  10. Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

    Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation's energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University's use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

  11. Kyoto, coal and sharing the cost burden

    Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (the Rio Treaty) at their first conference in 1995 agreed that the commitments entered into under the Convention were 'not adequate' to achieve its objective. These nations determined to proceed to strengthen those commitments under a protocol to be prepared for the third conference at Kyoto. Also it was to contain 'quantified emissions limitation objectives' (binding targets) on the industrial countries. For such targets to be consistent with Australia's interests, they would need to recognise Australia's relatively fast population and economic growth (both of which imply relatively faster growth in emissions), the increasing preponderance of energy intensive industries in the Australian economy, and our dependence on the export of energy intensive manufactures (like aluminium and other metals) and direct export of fossil fuels (including coal and natural gas). Major parties to the protocol negotiations - the USA and the EU - were advocates of uniform percentage emissions reductions from 1990 levels. Uniform percentage reductions, however intuitively appealing, impose widely different costs on different parties on account of their different circumstances. Australia would have been penalised by uniform reductions because our projected business-as-usual emissions trajectory is relatively steep, and measures adopted internationally to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions impact disproportionately on this economy (notably on account of reduced demand for Australian coal). The accompanying charts depict ABAREs 'less stringent' emissions scenario - addressing a goal of stabilising industrial countries' emissions of C02 rather than reducing them. ABARE's simulation for Australia by sector shows big negative impacts on output of non-ferrous metals, iron and steel, and coal. The metals industries, directly or indirectly are the coal industry's most important domestic customers. It is argued that because of the impact of Kyoto agreement on the international markets for coal, both in volume and price,coal is disproportionately disadvantaged. what the coal industry should be aiming to achieve, on equity grounds, is not simply a target allocation sufficient to cover its own emissions, but one greatly surplus to its own needs that can be sold

  12. Kyoto agreement: coal's challenge, Australia's opportunity

    Member countries to the Framework Convention on Climate Change met in Kyoto, Japan in December 1997 to set targets for greenhouse gas emission reductions. This review looks at how the target might be met and identifies some opportunities it presents. This meeting was critical for Australia. Of the so-called Annex 1 countries (OECD countries and some eastern European economies) that are bound by the agreed targets and commitments, only Australia has an economy that is almost totally based on fossil fuels. Together with its position as the world's largest coal exporter, the economic cost to Australia of meeting any target will exceed that of most other countries. Australia played an active role in the negotiations and achieved an outcome that allows it to assume emission limitation commitments that reflect its economic dependence on fossil fuels. The extent of its contribution to the debate was demonstrated by the convention's adoption of Australia's proposal for the negotiation of differentiated targets. Based on each country's particular circumstances, differentiation, it was argued, would not only deliver fairness and equity: it would also do so more efficiently and cost effectively

  13. Climate economics: post-Kyoto tracks

    Commitments obtained by the Kyoto protocol will end in 2012. An impressive series of conferences - Bali (2007), Copenhagen (2009), Cancun (2010) to mention the main ones - were organised to prepare the post-2012 regime. Everything was supposed to be decided at the Copenhagen meeting but the state representatives came up against the obstacle. The pre-Copenhagen hope has given place to disillusion and has led to a turn-off towards a weekly coordinated regime which requires a strategic revision of approaches. This book presents the lessons learnt from the relative failure of these negotiations and proposes new paths for the future. It puts forward some strategic stakes that have to be taken into account for the future: the equity between very heterogeneous countries and populations, the industrial competitiveness, the carbon leaks and the violation of the most ambitious climate policies due to the heterogeneity of commitment levels, and the geopolitical reality. The world will have to live for a long time with heterogeneous carbon prices, themselves reflecting heterogeneous commitment levels. New modalities have to be defined which would manage to combine justice and efficiency. Two complementary paths are developed in this book: the establishing of adjustment mechanisms at borders and of international sectoral agreements. (J.S.)

  14. Emission Trading under the Kyoto Protocol

    Holtsmark, Bjart; Hagem, Cathrine

    1998-12-01

    This report discusses the potential gains from emission trading and raises some crucial questions. It shows that the total costs of the Kyoto Protocol could be reduced by about 95% through emission trading. Emission trading is an option also in the domestic arenas. The governments of the Annex B countries may allocate emission quotas to local enterprises as emission permits. Thus new markets for greenhouse gas emission quotas may emerge, domestically and internationally. It is emphasized that emission trading at the national and international levels must be discussed separately. The Nordic governments, for example, will find several good reasons for supporting emission trading at the international level if not necessarily domestically. The Nordic countries have already implemented domestic taxes on CO{sub 2} emissions and this tax policy could be sustained while these governments support and take part in emission trading at the international level.The report also considers a possible side effect of emission trading: free emission trading among Annex B countries could reduce the total abatement compared to a non-tradable policy as a consequence of the fact that some of the countries that are in transition to a market economy may be given emission limitations above their business-as-usual emissions. 40 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Hydro in the Kyoto era; Hydro a l'heure de Kyoto

    Bourdon, M.-C.

    2003-06-01

    Quebec has the best performance in North America in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Unlike neighbouring provinces and states which rely heavily on coal for power generation, Quebec generates 96 per cent of its electricity from hydroelectric power. However, no new dams have been built in the past decade in Quebec due to land disputes with Aboriginal communities and general distrust among many ecologists. It takes about 12 years for a hydroelectric project to come to fruition. For that reason, and in order to capitalize on energy market opportunities, Hydro-Quebec is seriously considering expanding its generating capability beyond the needs of Quebec consumers, with gas-fired thermal generating stations. Environmental groups claim that the proposal to build the Suroit combined-cycle facility near the United States border destroys Quebec's efforts to honour the Kyoto Protocol. Economists argue that it is entirely in the spirit of Kyoto if exports of hydroelectricity or natural gas from Canada to the United States leads to less use of oil or coal. But one energy modeling expert at INRS-Energie et Materiaux claims that Quebec has a moral obligation to develop hydroelectricity for its own use as well as for export purposes, noting that any country with the good fortune to have renewable forms of energy, such as wind and hydro, should develop them to lower world GHG emissions. Quebec has many opportunities to sell hydroelectricity even while domestic demand grows. Hydroelectricity from Quebec should interest some states that have adopted their own GHG reduction standards, despite the U.S. government's refusal to ratify Kyoto. It should also interest Ontario and the Maritimes because they will be trying to reduce emissions from their thermal plants. The current situation does not favour the Kyoto Protocol. Exports of electricity from Quebec have dropped because no new dams have been built in recent years and gas-fired plants are looking more attractive to power producers because they can be built quickly. In addition, the rules for environmental processes for hydroelectric projects unfairly favour thermal projects. This paper also cautioned that the low price of energy does not help energy conservation programs. It was suggested that the only simple and efficient way to reduce GHG emissions and lower energy consumption is to charge a price that reflects the real cost of energy. It was suggested that coal and gas should be taxed as motivation to choose renewable forms of energy, and that electricity should not be subsidized for energy-intensive industries such as aluminium smelters. 5 figs.

  16. Exploring rapid radiochemical separations at the University of Tennessee Radiochemistry Center of Excellence

    The University of Tennessee formed its Radiochemistry Center of Excellence (RCoE) in 2013 with support from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration. One of the major thrusts of the RCoE is to develop deeper understanding of rapid methods for radiochemical separations that are relevant to both general radiochemical analyses as well as post-detonation nuclear forensics. Early work has included the development and demonstration of rapid separations of lanthanide elements in the gas phase, development of a gas-phase separation front-end for ICP-TOF-MS analysis, and the development of realistic analytical surrogates for post-detonation debris to support methods development. (author)

  17. Annual report 1992 of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba

    This annual report includes the research activities and the technical developments carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center in University of Tsukuba for the period from April 1992 to March 1993. New experimental investigations were made on (1) nuclear spectroscopy was initiated by a new γ ray spectrometer; (2) polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions; (3) the application of energetic heavy ions to solid state physics; (4) the behavior of self interstitial atoms and its migration mechanism in Mo metal (5) the studies on electronic conduction of metal oxides and bronzes by NMR; (6) Moessbauer studies on Fe-Cr alloy and the RBS analysis of YBCO superconductor films; and (7) a new field was challenged on the micro cluster physics. Nuclear collective motion and the relativistic mean-field theory is also included in this report. (J.P.N.)

  18. The Family Medicine Accelerated Track at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.

    Jones, Betsy Goebel; Berk, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Meeting Texas' future health care needs will be challenging, including the goal for a physician workforce more balanced toward primary care. To help expand the primary care physician workforce, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Medicine developed the Family Medicine Accelerated Track (FMAT), a three-year curriculum that culminates in the MD degree and links medical students to family medicine residency programs at TTUHSC campuses in Lubbock, Amarillo, or the Permian Basin (Odessa and Midland). Twenty current family medicine residents are graduates of the FMAT program, and 30 medical students are enrolled in the program, which is charting a path for curricular innovation in medical education that will be increasingly competency-based. PMID:26859377

  19. The role of university and college counseling centers in advancing the professionalization of psychology.

    Bingham, Rosie Phillips

    2015-11-01

    Psychologists in university and college counseling centers (UCCCs) have helped to shape and advance the professionalization of psychology. Most definitions of a profession contain at least 5 components. A profession has (1) systematic theories and underlying principles; (2) authority to practice provided by the client; (3) a long educational process, including training and mentoring; (4) standards and a code of ethics; and (5) a culture of service and accountability to the public. UCCC professionals have evolved in a manner that demonstrates all 5 components of a profession. They advance the discipline of psychology as a profession through their counseling interventions because such interventions are based on scientific theories and principles. While their practice rests on scientific principles, their work helps to confirm and modify that science. Authority to practice is evidenced by the continuous growth of counseling centers since World War II. UCCCs aid the extended educational process for psychology graduate students as evidenced by their providing more internship training sites than any other category of training agencies. The majority of UCCC professionals are licensed and must abide by their state code of ethics. Such codes hold psychologists accountable to the public because they regularly deliver counseling service to at least 10% of the campus student population and offer outreach services to many more in their communities. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26618974

  20. Phased implementation of AT and T PACS at Duke University Medical Center

    ''Help me communicate more quickly and more effectively with referring clinicians''. This request was the driving behind the installation of the AT and T CommView System at Duke. The CommView System is a type of Digital Image Management System and Picture Archival Communication System whose chief purpose is to deliver interpolated diagnostic images to referring clinicians and attending physicians. The system acquires electronic images from modalities in a diagnostic imaging facility, stores these images in computer managed patient files and distributes these on demand over fiber optic cable to Display Consoles. The CommView System was designed at AT and T Bell Labs; it uses fiber optic ribbon cable between buildings fused to multistrand lightguide building cables to distribute images, typically around a medical center or campus at data transfer rates of 40 Mbps. This paper gives the rationale used in designing a start-up network and placing the initial equipment for a field of the AT and T CommView System in the Radiology Department of Duke University Medical Center

  1. Implementing the Kyoto protocol:the role of environmental agreements

    Torvanger, Asbjørn; Skodvin, Tora

    1999-01-01

    Voluntary agreements between an industry or a company and the government to regulate various environmental impacts is a popular policy tool in many OECD countries. Since the adoption of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in December 1997 there has been a discussion of choice of policy tools to implement the Protocol in many industrialized countries. Not enough parties to make it enter into force have yet ratified the Kyoto Protocol, but ma...

  2. How Effective is the Kyoto Protocol in Impelling Emission Reduction

    Yang, Haoyuan; Zhang, Qian

    2011-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol is one of the most important international climate change treaties aimed at fighting global warming. On January 1st 2005, the protocol was enforced with its first commitment period 2008-2012. However, the effectiveness of reducing CO2 emission has long been debated. The purpose of this thesis is to empirically as-sess the impact of the Kyoto Protocol on carbon dioxide reduction across countries, whether the protocol led significant difference after entering force in 2005. T...

  3. Past and Future of the Kyoto Protocol. Final report

    The present report reflects findings from a study on the realization of and prospects for the Kyoto Protocol. The purpose of the study was (1) to obtain insights into the factors that enabled the realization of the Kyoto Protocol, in particular the interactions among major parties involved; (2) to assess the future opportunities and threats of the Kyoto Protocol, in particular against the backdrop of an increasingly globalised world. The study was conducted from February up to December 2003 by (a) reviewing the literature, especially publications on the negotiation history of the Kyoto process, the social interactions enabling the realization of the Protocol, analyses of strengths and weaknesses, and future climate regimes; (b) conducting a series of interviews with representatives from government, academia, non-governmental organisations, and business, who have been - directly or indirectly - involved in the Kyoto process; (c) internal discussions,brainstorming and analysing the Protocol's strengths and weaknesses, possible future scenarios (including policy options), and the management of a possible failure of the Kyoto Protocol. The present report reflects and integrates the different sources. The first section deals with the past and the present. It discusses how the Kyoto Protocol could be realized despite the divergent interests, reflects on its architecture, and analyses major strengths and weaknesses. In the second section, we present possible future scenarios. We explore how different combinations of domestic and international commitment provide possible realities that national government may face when crafting climate policy. The third section provides an in-depth analysis of the possible event that the Kyoto Protocol fails. We discuss its definition and policy implications. The final section is reserved for overall conclusions and policy recommendations

  4. Banner plans to issue new bonds to cover university of Arizona medical center purchase

    Robbns RA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Modern Healthcare is reporting that Banner Health is issuing new bonds this week to refinance older debt (1. Banner financed the $1 billion purchase of the University of Arizona Health Network (UAHN including the University of Arizona Medical Center with a $700 million short-term loan from investment bank Mizuho in February. Banner is issuing $100 million in tax-exempt, fixed rate Series 2015A bonds. It is also planning to take on an additional $500 million in taxable and tax-exempt debt that will be used to replace the short-term loans associated with the purchase. Banner is focusing on how to improve the return on its UAHN investment, which has dragged down its earnings. UAHN's financial performance has deteriorated with an operating margin declining to -4.3% in fiscal 2014, down from -1.2% the previous fiscal year. Before that, UAHN was profitable, according to Banner Chief Financial Officer Dennis Dahlen. Banner reported an operating ...

  5. Proceedings of the Kyoto international symposium : the jubilee of the meson theory

    Kyoto international symposium: The Jubilee of the Meson Theory was held at Kyoto International Conference Hall from August 15 to 17, 1985, under the auspices of the Research Institute for Fundamental Physics, the Faculty of Science and the College of Liberal Arts of Kyoto University, in cooperation with many organizations concerned. Meson theory was proposed by Hideki Yukawa in 1935, only a decade after the birth of quantum mechanics. At that time, much confusion prevailed about the applicability of quantum theory. Yukawa's meson theory indicated the right direction for developing particle physics, and established that quantum field theory is the correct theory even inside a nucleus. Thus it may be said that particle physics began with Yukawa's meson theory. The purpose of this symposium was to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Yukawa's meson theory, to review the development of particle physics during these 50 years and the application of meson physics to various fields, and to discuss current topics in particle physics in order to obtain some insight into its future progress in the fundamental theory of space-time and matter. 88 foreign physicists from 18 countries and 172 Japanese scientists participated, and 32 interesting talks were given. (Kako, I.)

  6. Kyoto's enemy:the american oil industry's influence in the signing and non-ratification of the Kyoto protocol

    Andresen, Anne Cecilie

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary This study is an empirical and theoretical analysis of the influence obtained by the American oil industry in the United States decision to first sign and then not ratify the Kyoto Protocol. The purpose of the study is to explore and measure the influence the industry managed to obtain and then compare the period before the signing to the period between the signing and the decision to not ratify Kyoto. By employing theoretical framework, the empirical data collected will ...

  7. Standardized ultrasound evaluation of carotid stenosis for clinical trials: University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center

    Beach Kirk W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Serial monitoring of patients participating in clinical trials of carotid artery therapy requires noninvasive precision methods that are inexpensive, safe and widely available. Noninvasive ultrasonic duplex Doppler velocimetry provides a precision method that can be used for recruitment qualification, pre-treatment classification and post treatment surveillance for remodeling and restenosis. The University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center (UWURC provides a uniform examination protocol and interpretation of duplex Doppler velocity measurements. Methods Doppler waveforms from 6 locations along the common carotid and internal carotid artery path to the brain plus the external carotid and vertebral arteries on each side using a Doppler examination angle of 60 degrees are evaluated. The UWURC verifies all measurements against the images and waveforms for the database, which includes pre-procedure, post-procedure and annual follow-up examinations. Doppler angle alignment errors greater than 3 degrees and Doppler velocity measurement errors greater than 0.05 m/s are corrected. Results Angle adjusted Doppler velocity measurements produce higher values when higher Doppler examination angles are used. The definition of peak systolic velocity varies between examiners when spectral broadening due to turbulence is present. Examples of measurements are shown. Discussion Although ultrasonic duplex Doppler methods are widely used in carotid artery diagnosis, there is disagreement about how the examinations should be performed and how the results should be validated. In clinical trails, a centralized reading center can unify the methods. Because the goals of research examinations are different from those of clinical examinations, screening and diagnostic clinical examinations may require fewer velocity measurements.

  8. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting

    Shah M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Results: Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32% completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as excellent, 44% as good, 5% as fair, and 0% stated poor. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise.Conclusion: In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  9. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, 1987

    This annual report covers the research activities and technical developments of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, in the period from April, 1987 to March, 1988. In the field of nuclear physics, the elastic and inelastic scattering of polarized protons from even-even medium weight nuclei was investigated systematically by light ion beam experiment. A QDQ type magnetic spectrograph for double scattering experiment was almost complete. The studies on heavy ion-induced fission reaction advanced by measuring anisotropy in fission angular distribution, and a view on the mechanism of the reaction was acquired. A new, ingenious technique enabled to identify prompt characteristics X-ray accompanying the fusion reaction induced by heavy ions. In the field of atomic and solid state physics, a strange dependence of equilibrium charge state on the atomic number of projectile heavy ions has been elucidated. The research on ion beam shadowing effect on the emission of ion-induced secondary electrons was continued. The Rutherford backscattering of O4+ ions was applied to determine the composition of Y-Ba-Cu oxide film, and it shed light on the condition governing the nature of superconductive materials. The 12 UD Pelletron was operated quite satisfactorily. (Kako, I.)

  10. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1993 - March 31, 1994

    In this annual report, the research activities and the technical developments carried out at the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, for the period from April, 1993 to March, 1994 are described. The tandem accelerator worked with high stability, and provided with sufficient beam time for experiments till the middle of November, however, one of the charging chains broke on November 18. The replacement of the chain was finished in a short time, and experiments were continued to the end of December. From January, 1994, the operation of the accelerator was shut down to replace the cooling towers for building air conditioning and to reconstruct the cooling system for the accelerator. In this book, the activities in the accelerator and experimental facilities and the departments of the experiment and theory on nuclear physics, atomic and solid state physics, and ion beam application are reported. As the new development of experimental instruments, a new rf amplifier for the heavy ion postaccelerator was constructed, and with a liquid helium polarimeter, test experiments are in progress. (K.I.)

  11. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy at the Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center: New Facility Set-up

    Ohno, Tatsuya, E-mail: tohno@gunma-u.ac.jp; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru; Yusa, Ken; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Torikai, Kota; Yoshida, Yukari; Kitada, Yoko; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Takayoshi; Nakano, Takashi [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Gunma University, Showa 3-39-22, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan)

    2011-10-26

    Carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) offers superior dose conformity in the treatment of deep-seated tumors compared with conventional X-ray therapy. In addition, carbon ion beams have a higher relative biological effectiveness compared with protons or X-ray beams. C-ion RT for the first patient at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC) was initiated in March of 2010. The major specifications of the facility were determined based on the experience of clinical treatments at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), with the size and cost being reduced to one-third of those at NIRS. The currently indicated sites of cancer treatment at GHMC are lung, prostate, head and neck, liver, rectum, bone and soft tissue. Between March 2010 and July 2011, a total of 177 patients were treated at GHMC although a total of 100 patients was the design specification during the period in considering the optimal machine performance. In the present article, we introduce the facility set-up of GHMC, including the facility design, treatment planning systems, and clinical preparations.

  12. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, Nuclear and Solid State Research Project, University of Tsukuba

    This is the fifth annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, as well as the third of the Nuclear and Solid State Research Project at the University of Tsukuba. It contains the short descriptions of the activities during the period from April, 1979, to March, 1980. The 12 UD Pelletron has worked well and was utilized over 2900 hours as the time of beam on targets. The performance of the polarized ion source has been quite good, and it produced the beams of polarized protons and deuterons as well as of alpha particles. The sputter ion source (TUNIS) replaced the direct extraction duoplasmatron in most cases, and it produced the beams of isotopes of O, F, Si, Cl, Ni, Cu, etc., without gas injection. The construction of the second measuring room has been completed, and four beam courses are equipped with a general purpose scattering chamber, the devices for perturbed angular correlation, inner and outer shell ionization, and biological studies. The beam pulsing system was installed on the accelerator, and will be in operation soon. Further efforts have been made to develop detection and data processing systems. The examples of the recent researches mainly under the program of the NSSRP in various fields are enumerated. The exchange and collaboration with other institutions were active. (Kako, I.)

  13. Carbon Sequestered, Carbon Displaced and the Kyoto Context

    The integrated system that embraces forest management, forest products, and land-use change impacts the global carbon cycle - and hence the net emission of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide - in four fundamental ways. Carbon is stored in living and dead biomass, carbon is stored in wood products and landfills, forest products substitute in the market place for products made from other materials, and forest harvests can be used wholly or partially to displace fossil fuels in the energy sector. Implementation of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change would result in the creation of international markets for carbon dioxide emissions credits, but the current Kyoto text does not treat all carbon identically. We have developed a carbon accounting model, GORCAM, to examine a variety of scenarios for land management and the production of forest products. In this paper we explore, for two simple scenarios of forest management, the carbon flows that occur and how these might be accounted for under the Kyoto text. The Kyoto protocol raises questions about what activities can result in emissions credits, which carbon reservoirs will be counted, who will receive the credits, and how much credit will be available? The Kyoto Protocol would sometimes give credits for carbon sequestered, but it would always give credits when fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are displaced

  14. State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn: Clinical Practice Management Plan. Report 93-S-82.

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    This audit report addresses the compliance of the Clinical Practice Management Plan at the Health Science Center (HSC) at Brooklyn with policies established by the State University of New York (SUNY) Board of Trustees. An executive summary highlights the scope of the audit, audit observations and conclusions, and comments of SUNY officials. An

  15. State University of New York, Health Science Center at Stony Brook: Clinical Practice Management Plan. Report 94-S-34.

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    An evaluation was done of the use of funds generated by clinical practices at the Clinical Practice Management Plan of the State University of New York (SUNY) Health Science Center (HSC) at Stony Brook. The audit looked at compliance with Board of Trustee policies regarding: (1) whether 5 percent of the gross receipts from clinical practices were

  16. State University of New York Health Science Center at Syracuse: Clinical Practice Management Plan. Report 93-S-54.

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    This audit report addresses the compliance of the Clinical Practice Management Plan at the Health Science Center (HSC) at Syracuse with policies established by the State University of New York (SUNY) Board of Trustees. An executive summary highlights the scope of the audit, audit observations and conclusions, and comments of SUNY officials. An

  17. The Experimental Teaching Reform in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology for Undergraduate Students in Peking University Health Science Center

    Yang, Xiaohan; Sun, Luyang; Zhao, Ying; Yi, Xia; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Pu; Lin, Hong; Ni, Juhua

    2015-01-01

    Since 2010, second-year undergraduate students of an eight-year training program leading to a Doctor of Medicine degree or Doctor of Philosophy degree in Peking University Health Science Center (PKUHSC) have been required to enter the "Innovative talent training project." During that time, the students joined a research lab and…

  18. Educational Entrepreneurism in Higher Education: A Comparative Case Study of Two Academic Centers within One Land-Grant University

    Wilcox, Lori

    2009-01-01

    This research explored the relationship of educational entrepreneurism and organizational culture in the creation and evolution of academic centers within one Midwestern land-grant university facing resource constraints. Particular attention was given to: (a) synthesizing current entrepreneurial and organizational culture and evolution theory as…

  19. Intake Concerns of Racial and Ethnic Minority Students at a University Counseling Center: Implications for Developmental Programming and Outreach.

    Constantine, Madonna G.; Chen, Eric C.; Ceesay, Paulette

    1997-01-01

    Examined the presenting concerns of racial and ethnic minority students (N=157) at a university counseling center. Results indicate that family and romantic relationship issues, academic concerns, and depression were among their primary concerns. Implications for developing outreach programs to address the mental health needs of similar college…

  20. Thirdspace Explorations in Online Writing Studios: Writing Centers, Writing in the Disiplines and First Year Composition in the Corporate University

    Miley, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the use of online writing studios housed in the University Writing Center and attached to a Writing in the Disciplines course in the College of Technology and a First Year Composition program. The original goal of the online writing studio, modified from Grego and Thompson's (2009) writing studio approach, was to create an

  1. A project for increasing the rate of participation in mammographic breast cancer screening in Kyoto prefecture to 50%

    The rate of participation in breast cancer screening carried out by inspection and palpation associated with mammography in Kyoto Prefecture has been still low. In order to decrease the rate of breast cancer death, a high rate of screening participation must be achieved. We have organized the Kyoto Executive Committee of Pink Ribbon Activity aiming at the goal of achieving a 50% rate of participation in mammography screening by the end of 2010, and undertaken the following campaign activities: performing free screening, distribution and display of posters and leaflets about breast cancer screening, cooperation with various media to spread educational and informative messages, cooperation with a commercial institute in Kyoto City to distribute useful information, performing free breast cancer screening, and holding public lecture meetings, distribution of leaflets at student festivals at universities and colleges in Kyoto, and holding a ''Pink Ribbon symposium'' in a cosponsored company. All the above projects were performed successfully and many participants attended. We will continue these activities until the 50% participation rate is achieved. (author)

  2. Construction of an 8 MV tandem accelerator at Kyushu University. Present status report

    An 8 MV tandem accelerator is being installed at Center for Accelerator and Beam Applied Science, Kyushu University. The tandem accelerator will be operated as a heavy-ion injector to the main FFAG accelerator. The tandem accelerator can be also used independently for AMS, student experiments, RI beam production, and low-energy heavy-ion experiments. Originally, the tandem accelerator had been operated at Faculty of Science, Kyoto University until 2011, when the accelerator was shut down. The accelerator components have been sent to Kyushu University. The accelerator will be reconstructed in FY2012 and tuned in FY2013 for the first beam. (author)

  3. Climate Change and Kyoto. What next? Key Issues and Challenges

    Over seven years after the negotiations in Kyoto and three years after the main detailed rules of the Kyoto Protocol were agreed in Marrakech, the Protocol finally entered into force on 16 February, 2005. It is timely therefore to explore a range of what next issues. While touching on the period from now to the end of the Protocol's first commitment period (2012), the major focus is on the future, out 'Beyond Kyoto'. In particular, the article seeks to draw out the major challenges for the public sector, both in domestic policy and the next round of international negotiations. While the science of climate change has been getting considerable media attention lately, the policy implications are less discussed

  4. Explicit and implicit issues at the Kyoto meeting

    The Kyoto meeting has to set binding objectives for reducing the emission of 'greenhouse gases' in developed nations. It also has to decide which, among several proposed instruments, is best suited for reaching these objectives. Have the eventual signatories weighed the treat's full implications? To quantify matters in this field entails working out common technical standards and, thus, restricting national sovereignty. Nor should we forget the hard to assess economic impact. For example, what about the 'pollution permits', which may take quite different forms and have unmanageable consequences if left unregulated and uncontrolled? Will delegations at the kyoto meeting be able to lay down such regulations? Will they find the formulas for both launching significant actions and making up for the risks of uncontrolled institutional mechanisms? That is one thing at stake in Kyoto. (author)

  5. Just transition : a labour perspective on the Kyoto jobs debate

    The Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada (CEP) represents workers in the oil, gas, petrochemicals, electricity, uranium and related industries. In a recent national convention in 2002, the CEP voted to support ratification of the Kyoto Protocol. The decision was made after an 18 month process that included research, debate, and a look at their responsibilities to defend members in addressing environmental issues. This paper presents a labour perspective of the impact of the Kyoto Accord and the Canada Climate Change Action Plan. It was emphasized that a broad social analysis is needed to understand the implications of climate change and the Kyoto Protocol on labour and society. The CEP seriously considered the claims made by the Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters Association which predicted major job losses resulting from ratification of Kyoto. It also examined the link between energy supplies and the opposition by some energy industries to the Kyoto Protocol. The CEP decided that responsibility to the environment must come before concerns over economic impacts on members, but by the same token did not accept claims of major job losses. The Analysis and Modeling Group of the National Climate Change Process has projected that 1.26 million new jobs will be created in Canada over the period 2002 to 2010, which is 60,000 less jobs than would have been created in the Business as Usual Scenario. It was emphasized that the impacts of Kyoto compliance on Canada will be modest in comparison with the normal activities of a trillion dollar economy. 5 refs., 1 tab

  6. Submission to the British Columbia government on the Kyoto Protocol

    The Business Council provided its comments concerning the Kyoto Protocol and climate change to the government of British Columbia, recommending that a clear position be established quickly on the matter. The adopted position should also be disseminated broadly to allow stake holders sufficient time to prepare for the upcoming meetings of the Joint Ministers and First Ministers. The federal government has announced that the decision on whether to ratify the Kyoto Protocol will be made before the end of 2002, and this decision will have numerous effects on the people of British Columbia, businesses, workers, and consumers alike. The Business Council of British Columbia believes that the unique interests of the province can best be protected by a proactive approach. Actions plans are being prepared by several of the other provinces and territories, who have already stated their position concerning the Kyoto Protocol. The long-term risks of climate change for British Columbia have not been determined nor have the elements of a provincial approach. The following elements should be included in British Columbia's position on the Kyoto Protocol, according to the Business Council of British Columbia: (1) a credible and cost-effective implementation plan that does not unduly burden the province and other jurisdictions must be developed before Canada decides to ratify the Protocol. British Columbia should go on the record stating it does not support the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol in its present form. (2) the province should advocate for a national approach to climate change that can be achieved within a reasonable time frame, reflects the long-term nature of the problem, and is in agreement with the economic development objectives of British Columbia, (3) a plan detailing how the province intends to deal with the growth of greenhouse gas emissions should supplement and support the position of the province on the Kyoto Protocol. Consumers and business should be engaged in the development of measures to reduce the intensity of emissions of the province's economy

  7. PRE AND POST TRAINING EVALUATION ON UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS (UP PRACTICES AT PUTAT JAYA HEALTH CENTER, SURABAYA

    Cholis Bachroen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Praktek untuk mematuhi 'universal precaution' (UP di institusi pelayanan kesehatan (termasuk puskesmas, klinik dsb dimaksudkan untuk melindungi pasien dan petugas kesehatan dari penularan penyakit yang dapat terjadi karena tindakan pelayanan kesehatan yang kurang atau tidaktepat (tidak mengikuti UP. Penyakit yang mungkin dapat menular dengan tidak ditepatinya UP oleh petugas kesehatan antara lain adalah penyakit yang dapat menular lewat darah (blood bome diseases termasuk HIV/AIDS dan Hepatitis B dan C. Mengingat kepatuhan terhadap UP di antara petugas kesehatan selama melayani pasien dinilai masih kurang, maka dilaksanakan Pelatihan UP di puskesmas. Study ini dilakukan di Puskesmas Putat Jays yang Juga mempunyai klinik yang khusus melayani Pekerja Seksual Komersial (PSK dalam rangka menekan terjadinya penularan penyakit kelamin dan HIV/AIDS. Puskesmas Putat Jays merupakan sasaran yang strategis karena mempunyat daerah binaan antara lain Lokalisasi (PSK Dolly dan Jarak. Studi evaluatif ini dimaksudkan untuk melihat tingkat kepatuhan petugas terhadap UP selamamelayani pasien serta mengkaji adanya perubahan kepatuhan tersebut setelah mendapat pelatihan. Data kualitaltf dan kuantitatif dikumpulkan melalui observasi, indepth interview dan diskusi. Hasil studi menunjukkan bahwa setelah pelatihan, pengetahuan tentang UP secara umumserta kesadaran untuk melindungi pasien dari penularan penyakit meningkat. Penggunaan ulang jarum suntik sudah tidak dilakukan (selalu memakai jarum diposable, spuit dan jarum di-disinfeksi sebelum dibuang serta pelaksanaan disinfeksilsterilisasi telah sesuai dengan prosedur. Data kuantitatif menunjukkan bahwa dengan pelatihan terjadi peningkatan jumlah petugas kesehatan yang mempunyai kebiasaan mencuci tangan secara tepat pada waktu melayani pasien yaitu dari 10% menjadi 90%, mengganti sarung tangan dengan tepat dari 33,3% menjadi 66,67%, memakai 'one hand technique' waktu menutup jarum dari 0% menjadi 100%, dan membersihkan instrumen secara tepat rata-rata naik sekitar 35%. Kalau dihitung peningkatan kepatuhan terhadap UP pada setiap menangani kasus, maka terflhat bahwa kenaikan setelah pelatihan adalah dari 0% menjadi 19,6% untuk mencuci tangan sebelum menyuntik, mengganti sarung tangan setiap melayani pasien meningkat dari 17,9% menjadi 59,5%, penggunaan 'one hand technique' dalam 'recapping' jarum suntik dari 6,7% menjadi 100% serta mengganti sarung tangan untuk petugas poli gigi dari 20,5% menjadi 100%.Keywords: Training Evaluation, Universal Precaution, Health Center, Diseases Prevention

  8. Kyoto protocol and its implementation in pakistan: hurdles and expectations

    In 1997 Kyoto protocol was adopted at the third session of Conference of the parties of UNFCC in Kyoto, Japan. This protocol restricts the industrialized countries and those in transition to a market economy agreed to limit or reduce their emissions. In Pakistan the government is also taking steps to reduce the pollution. This paper discusses the possible low carbon emitting electricity generation options by keeping in view the current energy scenario of Pakistan and the new energy policy announced by the Government of Pakistan for renewable energy promotion. (author)

  9. Report: demonstrable progresses of the France according the Kyoto protocol

    This document constitutes the report of the France on the demonstrable progresses according the application of the 3 article of the Kyoto protocol. The first chapter is a description of the french climatic policy, as the second presents the tendencies and the projections concerning the greenhouse effect gases emissions. The chapter 3 details the policies effects and the measures ( energy, transport, industry and wastes). The last chapter is devoted to the respect of the other engagements articles 10 and 11 of the Kyoto protocol. (A.L.B.)

  10. Annual report of Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. April 1, 1993 - March 31, 1994

    This volume of the RCNP annual report gives briefly research activities of the RCNP (Research Center for Nuclear Physics), Osaka University, in the academic year of 1993 (April 1993 - March 1994). RCNP is a national nuclear physics laboratory with the AVF cyclotron and the ring cyclotron. This annual report includes major research activities at RCNP as follows. 1) Low-energy nuclear physics by means of the K=140 MeV AVF cyclotron. Nuclear reactions and nuclear structures were studied. 2) Medium-energy nuclear physics by means of the 0.4 GeV ring cyclotron. The new ring cyclotron is in full operation, and several new progresses in the medium energy nuclear physics have been made. In particular, spin-isospin responses for discrete states, giant resonances and for quasi-free scattering processes have been studied by means of charge exchange reactions. 3) Heavy-ion physics with the secondary radio-active nuclear beams. It includes production of radioactive nuclei with large spin-polarization and studies of snow-balls. 4) Non-accelerator physics programs have started in collaboration with the Dept. Phys. group. Neutrino studies by means of double beta decays and dark matter searches by means of scintillators are under progress at the Kamioka underground laboratory. 5) Theoretical works on nuclear structures and nuclear reactions. The RCNP computers are widely used for theoretical studies all over Japan. 6) Developments of accelerators and detector systems. The new external ion-source and the new axial injection line are build in order to increase beam currents. (J.P.N.)

  11. Brucellosis in Kosovo and Clinical Features of Brucellosis at University clinical center of Kosovo

    Emine Qehaja Buçaj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Brucellosis became a remarkable disease in Kosovo. But there is not a comprehensive epidemiological study about epidemiology and clinical course of this disease from Kosovo. The aim of our study is to present demographic and clinical data of patients with brucellosis at University Clinical Center of Kosovo. Methods: A retrospective study was performed for the patients with brucellosis treated in our clinic during years 2011- 2012. The data about demography, history of the disease, clinical presentations, serological test, serum biochemistry and reatment were collected from hospital medical records. The diagnosis of brucellosis based on clinical and laboratory findings. Results: This descriptive study included 47 patients, who 33 of them (70.2% were males. The mean age was 37.9 ± 19.3 years. The route of transmission of the disease was known in 28 59.5% of them. Direct contact with livestock in 22 (46.8% and ingestion of dairy products in six cases (12.7% were reported as the transmission route. The majority of patients (27 patients, 57.4% were from rural area. The main presenting symptoms were atigue, fever and arthralgia. Osteoarticular manifestations were the common forms of localized disease. Regarding to the therapy, 45 (95.7% of patients were treated with streptomycin and doxycycline for the first three weeks. Conclusion: Human brucellosis is not a common in Kosovo but there is a potential risk. Osteoarticular symptoms were the most common presentation reasons. The most effective and preferred treatment regimen was Streptomycin plus Doxycycline for the first three weeks, and Doxycycline plus Rifampicin thereafter. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(4: 147-150

  12. Upgrading the Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing - a GATE Center of Excellence at the University of Michigan-Dearborn

    Mallick, P. K.

    2012-08-30

    The Center for Lightweighting Materials and Processing (CLAMP) was established in September 1998 with a grant from the Department of Energy’s Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) program. The center received the second round of GATE grant in 2005 under the title “Upgrading the Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing”. Using the two grants, the Center has successfully created 10 graduate level courses on lightweight automotive materials, integrated them into master’s and PhD programs in Automotive Systems Engineering, and offered them regularly to the graduate students in the program. In addition, the Center has created a web-based lightweight automotive materials database, conducted research on lightweight automotive materials and organized seminars/symposia on lightweight automotive materials for both academia and industry. The faculty involved with the Center has conducted research on a variety of topics related to design, testing, characterization and processing of lightweight materials for automotive applications and have received numerous research grants from automotive companies and government agencies to support their research. The materials considered included advanced steels, light alloys (aluminum, magnesium and titanium) and fiber reinforced polymer composites. In some of these research projects, CLAMP faculty have collaborated with industry partners and students have used the research facilities at industry locations. The specific objectives of the project during the current funding period (2005 – 2012) were as follows: (1) develop new graduate courses and incorporate them in the automotive systems engineering curriculum (2) improve and update two existing courses on automotive materials and processing (3) upgrade the laboratory facilities used by graduate students to conduct research (4) expand the Lightweight Automotive Materials Database to include additional materials, design case studies and make it more accessible to outside users (5) provide support to graduate students for conducting research on lightweight automotive materials and structures (6) provide industry/university interaction through a graduate certificate program on automotive materials and technology idea exchange through focused seminars and symposia on automotive materials.

  13. History of the renal section, New York University School of Medicine 1926-1986, New York University Medical Center.

    Chasis, H.

    1989-01-01

    This history of the Renal Section at New York University School of Medicine ascribes its birth to a policy introduced by John Henry Wyckoff in 1924 that divided the Department of Medicine into sections devoted to the various subspecialties. Physicians selected to head each section sought further training. William Goldring, asked to organize the kidney section, spent a sabbatical year working with Homer William Smith, chairman and professor of the department of physiology at New York Universit...

  14. Obstacles and Solutions of Commercialization of University Research: Case Study of Small Businesses Development Center of University of Tehran

    Jahangir Yadolahi FARSI; Meisam MODARRESI; Hadi ZAREA

    2011-01-01

    With the entrepreneurship mission incorporated into the education and research missions of universities, their role in the economic and social development in societies has increased. Thus, subjects revolving around academic entrepreneurship and knowledge commercialization have drawn the attention of many researchers and politicians in different countries in the world. In Iran, too, the knowledge commercialization phenomenon is in its prime and is in its early stages of taking shape and develo...

  15. Thirty years of derivation of geomagnetic indices at the WDC for geomagnetism, Kyoto and lessons learnt

    Complete text of publication follows. The derivation of AE, Dst and ASY/SYM indices started at the WDC for Geomagnetism, Kyoto, in 1978, 1985 and 1990, respectively. Before we started derivation of the AE indices, they were derived at the University of Alaska and then at NOAA. On the Dst index, it was derived and distributed by Prof. Masahisa Sugiura for long time at NASA/GSFC and when he moved to Kyoto University, we succeeded the service. The method of derivation of the AE and the Dst indices had been established when we succeeded derivation and they were rather simple. Most of the problems we had so far relate to obtaining the data used for the derivation. It is essential to get continuous data with high quality, however, it is not so easy for each observatory to keep the quality high under severe conditions in economic, political or technical aspects. International supports such as IAGA resolutions helped very much to improve the situation and continue derivation. Another problem we experienced was the change (or variety) of needs. Progress in space weather research or many new satellite programs requested more quick (or real-time) derivation of the indices, and our efforts were devoted to near real-time data transfer and derivation since middle of 1990's. The efforts still continue under the collaboration with various groups, institutions and observatories. In this talk, we report our current status.

  16. Implementation of the Kyoto protocol; La mise en oeuvre du protocole de Kyoto

    NONE

    2006-07-15

    The Rio Earth summit in 1992 has been the starting point of an international awareness about the global risk of climatic change. At this occasion, the richest countries committed themselves to stabilize their greenhouse gas emissions and to reach by the year 2000 an emissions level equivalent to the one of 1990. The Kyoto protocol in 1997 has permitted to convert this will into juridically constraining quantitative commitments. In 2005, Russia ratified the protocol while in 2001 the USA refused to do so. Because the commitments signed are ambitious, flexibility mechanisms have been implemented: 'emission permits' (emissions trading), 'joint implementation' allowing the investments abroad for greenhouse gases abatement in another developed country, and 'clean development mechanisms' when investments are made in a developing country. The Marrakech conference of December 2001 has permitted to fix up the eligibility criteria of projects belonging to the joint implementation and clean development mechanisms. The effective implementation of these mechanisms still raises technical difficulties to evaluate and measure the effective abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. (J.S.)

  17. Kyoto and beyond : A plan of action to meet and exceed Manitoba's Kyoto targets

    This document represents the next step in Manitoba's effort to mitigate the effects of climate change. A message from the Manitoba Premier and the Minister of Conservation of Manitoba are included in the introduction. The Action Plan is based in part on the discussion among climate experts and public input gathered in the course of the 2001 task force and the 2001 public forum on climate change. A rise in average global temperatures is affecting most of the planet, which is due in part to the upsetting of the balance of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere as a result of human activities. It is affecting weather patterns, water, agriculture, forests, health and welfare, and life in the North. The Manitoba government is committed to meeting and exceeding the reduction targets set under the Kyoto Protocol through renewable electricity, Selkirk conversion, ethanol, methane capture, and other measures targeted toward industry. Energy efficiency also plays a big part in the process of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The government is leading by example, and also investing in knowledge. It is promoting technology development and innovation while enhancing awareness and understanding. All sectors are being encouraged to implement appropriate measures. The various initiatives undertaken by each department and organization under each of those headings are described. figs

  18. Research on fabrication of aspheres at the Center of Optics Technology (University of Applied Science in Aalen); Techical Digest

    Boerret, Rainer; Burger, Jochen; Bich, Andreas; Gall, Christoph; Hellmuth, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    The Center of Optics Technology at the University of Applied Science, founded in 2003, is part of the School of Optics & Mechatronics. It completes the existing optical engineering department with a full optical fabrication and metrology chain and serves in parallel as a technology transfer center, to provide area industries with the most up-to-date technology in optical fabrication and engineering. Two examples of research work will be presented. The first example is the optimizing of the grinding process for high precision aspheres, the other is generating and polishing of a freeform optical element which is used as a phase plate.

  19. Sixteenth progress report of the Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    The Nuclear Science Center is operated by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station as a service to Texas A and M University and the State of Texas. The facility is available to the University, other educational institutions, governmental agencies, and private organizations and individuals. Reactor utilization continued to grow during 1979 with an increase in the total number of irradiations, sample irradiation hours, number of samples irradiated, and total experiment hours. Reactor operation of 85.71 Mw-days for 1979 was essentially the same as the previous year. The reactor was not pulsed during the reporting period due to a restriction on pulsing until the fuel damage study is completed

  20. Response by the energy industry to the Kyoto agreement

    The Kyoto agreement has called for an appropriate response by the energy industry to the perceived problem of global warming. However, while governments are justify in researching low-probability energy technologies to solve uncertain problems, the private sector has non such luxury. The experience of oil crises in the '70s should be a good lesson

  1. The Kyoto mechanisms. Opportunities and barriers for the trade

    The Kyoto Mechanisms are the basis for emerging global markets for greenhouse gas emission permits. This paper explores opportunities arising for companies in greenhouse gas emitting industries, and discusses possible barriers. Starting point is an examination of the basic nature of Joint Implementation, Clean Development Mechanism and International Emissions Trading

  2. Making it work: Kyoto, trade and politics : Executive summary

    In this document, the author examines the constraints that would be placed on policy makers in the event of the implementation of the Kyoto Protocol, and how it would affect trade agreements and federalism in Canada. A description of the Protocol and the concessions (carbon sinks and international emissions trading) gained by Canada are presented at the beginning of the document. The author offers several conclusions that could disturb both proponents and opponents of the Kyoto Protocol. It is said that the implementation of Kyoto can take a route other than that of drastic domestic emissions reductions, and this position is explored in the second section. The author indicates that corporate competitiveness could be boosted by strict environmental regulations. A range of policies that could be adopted by Canada, as proposed by numerous organizations, are highlighted in the third section of the document. The point of the World Trade Organization and the constraints imposed are not necessarily preventing all types of actions. However, the author is of the opinion that the North America Free Trade Agreement represents a real threat to the implementation of the Kyoto Protocol. Finally, it is indicated that Canada requires a national electricity policy, where big hydro utilities and public investment have major roles to play

  3. The Kyoto Protocol and the coal industry in Colombia

    In this article is studied the possible incidence of the commitments reached in the Kyoto Protocol on the coal market, making emphasis in the Colombian case. Projections, made in a study of Hill y Associates, points out that in a scenario of greenhouse gases emissions reduction, the market of the thermal coal will be seriously affected by the incidence on their demand

  4. Mapping Land Use Changes for the Kyoto Reporting

    Pedersen, Birger Faurholt

    Kyoto-rapportering til De Forenede Nationers rammekonvention om klimaændringer (UNFCCC) omfatter en sammenligning af arealanvendelsen i 1990, 2005 og 2008-2012, som er nødvendig for at identificere de ændringer i arealanvendelsen og til at beregne de mulige ændringer i kulstoflagrene. For at udfø...

  5. Service-Learning Center celebrates 10 years of university-community partnership

    Felker, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Service-Learning Center will celebrate 10 years of helping faculty and students put knowledge to work through community service with a banquet from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, April 27, at the Donaldson Brown Hotel and Conference Center, Otey Street, on Virginia Tech's campus. Tickets are $35 per person with proceeds benefiting the Service-Learning Center.

  6. Ocean fertilization, carbon credits and the Kyoto Protocol

    Westley, M. B.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2008-12-01

    Commercial interest in ocean fertilization as a carbon sequestration tool was excited by the December 1997 agreement of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Convention on Climate Change. The Protocol commits industrialized countries to caps on net greenhouse gas emissions and allows for various flexible mechanisms to achieve these caps in the most economically efficient manner possible, including trade in carbon credits from projects that reduce emissions or enhance sinks. The carbon market was valued at 64 billion in 2007, with the bulk of the trading (50 billion) taking place in the highly regulated European Union Emission Trading Scheme, which deals primarily in emission allowances in the energy sector. A much smaller amount, worth $265 million, was traded in the largely unregulated "voluntary" market (Capoor and Ambrosi 2008). As the voluntary market grows, so do calls for its regulation, with several efforts underway to set rules and standards for the sale of voluntary carbon credits using the Kyoto Protocol as a starting point. Four US-based companies and an Australian company currently seek to develop ocean fertilization technologies for the generation of carbon credits. We review these plans through the lens of the Kyoto Protocol and its flexible mechanisms, and examine whether and how ocean fertilization could generate tradable carbon credits. We note that at present, ocean sinks are not included in the Kyoto Protocol, and that furthermore, the Kyoto Protocol only addresses sources and sinks of greenhouse gases within national boundaries, making open-ocean fertilization projects a jurisdictional challenge. We discuss the negotiating history behind the limited inclusion of land use, land use change and forestry in the Kyoto Protocol and the controversy and eventual compromise concerning methodologies for terrestrial carbon accounting. We conclude that current technologies for measuring and monitoring carbon sequestration following ocean fertilization are unlikely to meet the Kyoto Protocol's verification and accounting standards for trading carbon credits on the regulated market. The marketability of ocean fertilization in the voluntary carbon marketplace will likely depend on companies' efforts to minimize environmental risks and consumers' willingness to accept remaining risks.

  7. Number Theory : A Seminar held at the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York

    Chudnovsky, Gregory; Cohn, Harvey; Nathanson, Melvyn

    1989-01-01

    The New York Number Theory Seminar was organized in 1982 to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of recent advances in higher arithmetic and its applications. Papers included in this volume are based on the lectures presented by their authors at the Seminar at the Graduate Center of C.U.N.Y. in 1985-88. Papers in the volume cover a wide spectrum of number theoretic topics ranging from additive number theory and diophantine approximations to algebraic number theory and relations with algebraic geometry and topology.

  8. Design of a full PACS with experiences of mini-PACS in Yonsei University Medical Center

    Kim, Hee-Joung; Huh, Jae-Man; Kim, Namhyun; Kim, Kee-Deog; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Kim, Sang-Jin; Yoo, Hyung-Sik

    2000-05-01

    Yonsei University Medical Center (YUMC) in Seoul, Korea is 114 years old and 1,582 beds in Shinchon Severance hospital in main university campus and 746 beds in affiliated Youngdong Severance hospital which is 20 miles away from the main campus. The dental hospital in main campus is also included in a full-PACS system. The numbers of exams/year for main, affiliated, and dental hospitals are approximately 558,000, 365,000, and 181,000, respectively. Since 1997, a Mini-PACS with 3xMRI, 2xDSI, and 2xCT in Shinchon Severance hospital has been operating to archive the digital data and to view them with DICOM viewer PiViewTM. An archiving system with 2xCT and 2xMRI in Youngdong Severance has been operating to archive the digital data. We are now designing a large-scale full-PACS for YUMC with experiences of running a mini-PACS for 3 years. The 11xUS, 7xEndoscopy, 7xCR, 3xSPECT, 1xPET, 1xCT simulator, and digital camera based patient database in the Dept. of radiation oncology in Shinchon Severance hospital will be connected to an archiving server system through modality interface gateway. The 3xCR, 2xDSA, 2xFD, 5xUS, 3xEndoscopy in Youngdong Severance hospital will be connected to the main archiving system. The 1xCT, 10xIntraoral X-ray unit DR, 4xPanoramic&cephalometric unit DR, 1xTranscranial CR, 1xScanora X-ray unit CR, 1xSectography CR in dental hospital will be connected to archiving server system through modality interface gateway. The estimated amount of data for Shinchon severance, Youngdong severance, and dental hospitals per year are 11.55TB, 5.88TB, and 0.96TB, respectively. The current mini-PACS server includes 54 GB RAID, 520 GB DLT with SUN SpectraTM server. The main server in Shinchon Severance hospital needs to be upgraded to 600GB RAID for 30 days and 10TB ODJ or DLT for the first two years. Youngdong Severance hospital needs to be installed a main server with 600GB RAID for > 30 days and 10TB ODJ or DLT for > 2 years. The interface between HIS/RIS and PACS needs to be developed using a PACS broker. YUMC has successfully been operating the Mini- PACS for last 3 years and now expanding to a full-PACS for 558,000 exams/year in Shinchon Severance, 365,000 exams/year in affiliated Youngdong Severance, and 181,000 exams/year in dental hospitals.

  9. Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba, annual report 1998. April 1, 1998 - March 31, 1999

    The operation of the 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerators was very stable until December 12, 1998. A total beam time for experiments is 2383 hours. This report describes the activities at Tandem Accelerator Center of the University of Tsukuba in fiscal year 1998. The 32 reports are presented in the 4 categories; that are (1) Accelerator and Experimental Facilities (7 reports), (2) Nuclear Physics (12 reports), (3) Atomic and Solid State Physics, and Cluster Science (10 reports), (4) Ion Beam Application (3 reports). New development of experimental instruments were made on a proton polarimeter at very low energies, a detector of atomic cluster at low velocity, a long focal-plane position sensitive detector, and a liquid-helium-free superconducting solenoid for an Ecr ion source. In the field of nuclear physics, progresses were made in proton total-reaction cross sections, the continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) theory, (d, αX) reactions, 7Li breakup reactions, hole states via (p, d) reaction, and nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam γ ray spectroscopy. New approaches were initiated on the precise measurement of proton-proton elastic scattering to search for magnetic monopole, and on perturbed angular correlations to measure nuclear g-factors in the pico second region. The investigation of ion-induced secondary electron is made in the binary-encounter electron emission from crystalline and non crystalline targets. An applicability of ion-induced Auger electrons to structure analysis was also demonstrated. An experiments of Br and I ions opened a new approach to the study of structural defects in amorphous silica. The study of deuteron implantation into silicon single crystal resulted in an interpretation of macroscopic migration. Microscopic migration was investigated on some metals. In atomic cluster physics, angular distributions of several noble-gas ions were measured to derive a new interaction potential. Mass spectra of semiconductor and 3d-transition metal clusters were also studied. A careful test experiment of PIXE was performed on the trace element analysis of single fluid inclusions in minerals. (Y. Tanaka)

  10. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy: An evaluation of therapies provided by trainees at a university psychotherapy training center

    Hiltunen, Arto J; Kocys, Elo; Perrin-Wallqvist, Renée

    2013-01-01

    At the psychotherapy training center at Karlstad University, a study was carried out to examine the levels of symptom change and satisfaction with therapy in a heterogeneous population of clients treated using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) by less experienced trainee therapists with limited theoretical education. The clients received an average of 11 therapy sessions. The results suggested that CBT performed by less experienced trainee therapists can be effective. According to client est...

  11. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center remains tracker: A novel application for tracking decedents and improving the autopsy workflow

    Smith, Matthew A.; Somak Roy; Rick Nestler; Beth Augustine; David Miller; Anil Parwani; Lawrence Nichols

    2011-01-01

    All hospitals deal with patient deaths. Multiple departments and personnel must be coordinated to ensure that decedents are safely managed. Prior to 2004, at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), when a patient passed away, the process of alerting involved personnel, transporting the decedent, and tracking the completion of clinical documents was cumbersome and inefficient. In order to address these concerns, UPMC Remains Tracker, a web-based application, was developed to improv...

  12. Astrophysics Conducted by the Lunar University Network for Astrophysics Research (LUNAR) and the Center for Lunar Origins (CLOE)

    Burns, Jack O.; Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Bottke, William

    2012-01-01

    [Abridged] The Moon is a unique platform from and on which to conduct astrophysical measurements. The Lunar University Network for Astrophysics Research (LUNAR) and the Center for Lunar Origins and Evolution (CLOE) teams within the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI) are illustrating how the Moon can be used as a platform to advance important goals in astrophysics. Of relevance to Astrophysics and aligned with NASA strategic goals, all three of the primary research themes articulated by New W...

  13. The kyoto protocol and the developing countries after 2012; Le protocole de Kyoto et les PED apres 2012

    Lecocq, F.; Le Pesant, Th.

    2003-07-01

    In the framework of the kyoto protocol, the author wonder about the impacts on the developing countries. Three problems are analyzed: the equity of the efforts distribution,the negotiation in the uncertain context and the incentives. (A.L.B.)

  14. Pre-Counseling Help Sources; A Look at Where Clients Go Before Contacting the University Counseling Center. Research Report No. 5-75.

    Christensen, Kathleen C.; And Others

    Five hundred ninety-one clients from two university counseling centers indicated the help sources they had contacted before going to the counseling center. Analysis of the rank order in which help-givers were consulted yielded significant differences both within and across the counseling centers under two types of problems, emotional-social and

  15. Managing Disaster Recovery Centers on Campus: The Experience of Southeastern Louisiana University

    Lawrence, Heather; Shafer, Duane

    2007-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005, Southeastern Louisiana University was spared the brunt of the storm and was fortunate that most structures on campus remained intact. However, the storm still affected the campus for weeks. This article reflects on the experiences of university leaders and facility managers as they provided

  16. At University of Chicago, Dispute over Friedman Center Continues to Simmer

    Glenn, David

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the dispute about the creation of an institute named for the late economist and free-market advocate Milton Friedman at the University of Chicago. Five months after the University of Chicago announced plans to invest $200-million in an economics institute named for the late Milton Friedman, the project is still generating…

  17. Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science Center for Computational Imaging XNAT: A multimodal data archive and processing environment.

    Harrigan, Robert L; Yvernault, Benjamin C; Boyd, Brian D; Damon, Stephen M; Gibney, Kyla David; Conrad, Benjamin N; Phillips, Nicholas S; Rogers, Baxter P; Gao, Yurui; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University Institute for Imaging Science (VUIIS) Center for Computational Imaging (CCI) has developed a database built on XNAT housing over a quarter of a million scans. The database provides framework for (1) rapid prototyping, (2) large scale batch processing of images and (3) scalable project management. The system uses the web-based interfaces of XNAT and REDCap to allow for graphical interaction. A python middleware layer, the Distributed Automation for XNAT (DAX) package, distributes computation across the Vanderbilt Advanced Computing Center for Research and Education high performance computing center. All software are made available in open source for use in combining portable batch scripting (PBS) grids and XNAT servers. PMID:25988229

  18. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Aeronautics, Space Sciences and Technology, Earth Systems Sciences, Global Hydrology, and Education. Volumes 2 and 3

    Coleman, Tommy L. (Editor); White, Bettie (Editor); Goodman, Steven (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor); Randolph, Lynwood (Editor); Rickman, Doug (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This volume chronicles the proceedings of the 1998 NASA University Research Centers Technical Conference (URC-TC '98), held on February 22-25, 1998, in Huntsville, Alabama. The University Research Centers (URCS) are multidisciplinary research units established by NASA at 11 Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCU's) and 3 Other Minority Universities (OMU's) to conduct research work in areas of interest to NASA. The URC Technical Conferences bring together the faculty members and students from the URC's with representatives from other universities, NASA, and the aerospace industry to discuss recent advances in their fields.

  19. Operation of the Nuclear Radiation Center as an all-university facility

    The TRIGA at WSU is part of an all university research unit and its structure and work organization are presented. The facility seeks users from the university and from outside the university. In many cases projects are jointly sponsored by NRC faculty together with faculty from elsewhere on campus. In other cases neutrons or free use of other equipment is provided. The promotional efforts are rather sharply focused on environmental and health related problems. The effects of the institutional arrangement on the operation of the Centre are discussed

  20. The George W. Woodruff Physical Education Center at Atlanta's Emory University.

    Partin, Clyde

    1985-01-01

    The George W. Woodruff Physical Education Center was designed to exude openness and space which would encourage participation while preserving existing playing fields and programs. Exterior and interior design of the facility are described. (DF)

  1. 76 FR 37191 - Notice of Competition for University Transportation Centers (UTC) Program Grants

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Research and Innovative Technology Administration Notice of Competition for University Transportation... Transportation (U.S. DOT) is providing notice that it intends to conduct a competition for...

  2. The way forward in capacity building in developing countries: space research center at Minoufiyia University, Egypt, as case study

    Mosalam Shaltout, M. A.

    With the starting the year 2002 the Menoufiyia University Council taked an Issue by construction Space Research Center, as a first Center for Space Research in the Egyptian Universities (20 Universities), as a part from the Desert Environment Research Institute for temporal time, then after the growth, it will be independent center. The green area of Egypt (Nile Valley and Delta) are 4% only from the total area of Egypt, the remain 96% is desert area. The most useful thing is to study the desert from space. For that the suggested projects to be performed in this new center are: 1. Monitoring the storage tanks of the underground water in the Egyptian Desert (Sahara) by artificial satellites as GRACE of NASA and DLR. 2. Building 32 meter Radio telescope at Abu-Simbel in the South of Egypt as part of the European VLBI network (EVN) to cover the gab between the radio telescope in the western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebessthock in South Africa. The cooperation of International interested institutions is being explored for this important project of Egypt. 3. Solar activity and the climatic changes through the 21st century as clarified by global solar radiation data at Khargha Oases at the western desert of Egypt. 4. Testing of the Martian exploration instruments for 2005 space trips to Mars in the western desert of Egypt, as it is the driest area in the world, where are similarity between the dry atmosphere of Sahara and the atmosphere of Mars, also in the soil, and dry valleys. In collaboration with NASA and ESA. 5. Studding the eastern structure, due to meteoric impact in the western desert of Egypt since 28 Million years. Also, studding the meteors chemistry, for meteors found in the Egyptian desert, and the origin of life as meteor (Nachlet) in collaboration with NASA and ESA. 6. Solar energy and humidity distribution over Sahara from artificial Satellite Meteostat observations.

  3. North-South Partnership in Space Research and Application: Space Research Center at Minufiyia University, Egypt, as Case Study

    Shaltout, M.

    With the starting the year 2002 the Minufiyia University Council taked an Issue by construction Space Research Center, as a first Center for Space Research in the Egyptian Universities (20 Universities), as a part from the Desert Environment Research Institute for temporal time, then after the growth, it will be independent center. The green area of Egypt (Nile Valley and Delta) are 4% only from the total area of Egypt, the remain 96% is desert area. The most useful thing is to study the desert from space. For that the suggested projects to be performed in this new center are: 1.Monitoring the storage tanks of the underground water in the Egyptian Desert (Sahara) by artificial satellites as GRACE of NASA and DLR. 2.Building 32 meter Radio telescope at Abu-Simbel in the South of Egypt as part of the European VLBI network (EVN) to cover the gab between the radio telescope in the western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebessthock in South Africa. The cooperation of International interested institutions is being explored for this important project of Egypt. 3.Solar activity and the climatic changes through the 21st century as clarified by global solar radiation data at Khargha Oases at the western desert of Egypt. 4.Testing of the Martian exploration instruments for 2003 and 2005 space trips to Mars in the western desert of Egypt, as it is the driest area in the worl d, where are similarity between the dry atmosphere of Sahara and the atmosphere of Mars, also in the soil, and dry valleys. In collaboration with NASA and ESA. 5.Studding the eastern structure, due to meteoric impact in the western desert of Egypt since 28 Million years. Also, studding the meteors chemistry, for meteors found in the Egyptian desert, and the origin of life as meteor (Nachlet) in collaboration with NASA and ESA. Solar energy and humidity distribution over Sahara from artificial Satellite Meteostat observations.

  4. The role of university hospitals as centers of excellence for shared health-care-delivery of in- and outpatients

    Problem. Health care delivery in Germany has to face severe challenges that will lead to a closer integration of services for in- and out-patients. University hospitals play an important role due to their activities in research, education and health care delivery. They are requested to promote and evaluate new means and ways for health care delivery. Methods. The Institute of Clinical Radiology at the University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University started teleradiological services for hospitals and general practices in January 1999 in the framework of the ''Imaging services - teleradiological center of excellence''. Legal, technical and organizational prerequisites were analyzed. Results. Networks between university hospitals and general practices are not likely to solve all future problems. They will, however, increase the availability of the knowledge of experts even in rural areas and contribute to a quality ensured health care at the patients home. Future developments may lead to international co-operations and such services may be available to patients abroad. Conclusion. Legal, technical and organizational obstacles have to be overcome to create a framework for high quality telemedical applications. University hospitals will play an important role in promoting and evaluating teleradiological services. (orig.)

  5. Analyzing the economic cost of the Kyoto protocol

    This paper examines the cost of meeting the Kyoto Protocol commitments under alternative assumptions regarding technology and technical change. Real GDP is modeled as a function of the capital, labor, and energy inputs. The analysis is based on data for 23 Annex 1 countries from 1965 to 1999. Two important results emerge. First, the standard assumption of Hicks neutral technical change and time and scale independent output elasticities is not supported by the data. Second, when technical change is allowed to be biased in favor of the energy and capital inputs, and when the output elasticities vary with the level of factor use and over time, the loss in real GDP due to the Kyoto commitments rises substantially. On average, the loss in real GDP is one and a half times higher than obtained under the standard assumptions. 26 refs

  6. Can Equity Enhance Efficiency? Lessons from the Kyoto Protocol

    This paper analyses the relationship between different equity rules and the incentives to sign and ratify a climate agreement. A widespread conjecture suggests that a more equitable ex-ante distribution of the burden of reducing emissions would provide the right incentives for more countries - particularly big emitters - to accept an emission reduction scheme defined within an international climate agreement. This paper shows that this conjecture is only partly supported by the empirical evidence that can be derived from the Kyoto Protocol. Even though more equitable burden sharing rules provide better incentives to sign and ratify a climate agreement than the burden-sharing rule implicit in the Kyoto Protocol, a stable global agreement cannot be achieved. A possible strategy to achieve a global agreement without free-riding incentives is a policy mix in which global emission trading is coupled with a transfer mechanism designed to offset ex-post incentives to free ride

  7. The Kyoto agreement not that expensive for Norway

    It will not be that expensive for Norway to reduce the climatic gas discharges at home and buy quotas abroad. The development in the oil and gas markets internationally will be more significant for the Norwegian economy than the Kyoto agreement. The article discusses specific Norwegian problems and concludes with that the total Norwegian costs for reducing the climatic gas discharges internally and buy sufficient quotas abroad will not be alarmingly high. The distribution of the costs on various sectors may create serious problems for parts of the Norwegian economy and for certain local communities in Norway even if the total costs do not seem alarming. The political costs of the Kyoto demands may become higher than the costs measured in NOK. 7 figs

  8. Non-Kyoto Radiative Forcing in Long-Run Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change Scenarios

    Rose, Steven K.; Richels, Richard G.; Smith, Steven J.; Riahi, Keywan; Stefler, Jessica; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2014-04-27

    Climate policies designed to achieve climate change objectives must consider radiative forcing from the Kyoto greenhouse gas, as well as other forcing constituents, such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone. Net positive forcing leads to global average temperature increases. Modeling of non-Kyoto forcing is a relatively new component of climate management scenarios. Five of the nineteen models in the EMF-27 Study model both Kyoto and non-Kyoto forcing. This paper describes and assesses current non-Kyoto radiative forcing modeling within these integrated assessment models. The study finds negative forcing from aerosols masking significant positive forcing in reference non-climate policy projections. There are however large differences across models in projected non-Kyoto emissions and forcing, with differences stemming from differences in relationships between Kyoto and non-Kyoto emissions and fundamental differences in modeling structure and assumptions. Air pollution and non-Kyoto forcing decline in the climate policy scenarios. However, non-Kyoto forcing appears to be influencing mitigation results, including allowable carbon dioxide emissions, and further evaluation is merited. Overall, there is substantial uncertainty related to non-Kyoto forcing that must be considered.

  9. U.S. State Department weathers Kyoto Protocol criticisms

    Showstack, Randy

    On future occasions, Frank Loy, U.S. Undersecretary of State for Global Affairs, may want to cite his September 28 U.S. Senate testimony as one more sign of global warming.In the hot seat for nearly two hours, Loy was grilled by several Republican senators suspicious of the Clinton Administration's continued efforts to promote and negotiate the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change—despite the Senate's expressed overwhelming concern about what they have called the treaty's shortcomings.

  10. Kyoto Protocol Objectives in Croatia Energy Planning: Nuclear Scenario

    Croatia as an Annex I country of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and a country that has pledged in the Annex B of the Kyoto Protocol to reduce its greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions by 5% from the pre-transition level by the budget period 2008-12, will have to envisage a new energy strategy. Compared to the energy consumption collapse in some transitional countries like Russia and Ukraine, Croatia has passed through a relatively limited long term reduction of GHG emissions since 1990 because of higher efficiency of its pre-transition economy. It is expected that in case of business as usual scenario it will breach the Kyoto target in 2003 since the demand for energy will be high, especially as the income continues to rise, particularly in domestic use for heating, for transport and for electricity generation. Several scenarios of developing energy system are compared from the point of view of GHG emissions. The energy sector that will most probably be the most influenced by the UNFCCC objectives is electricity generation. Several scenarios are compared. The cost-effective scenario expects a mixture of coal and gas fired power plants to be built to satisfy the new demand and to replace the old power plants that are being decommissioned. More Kyoto friendly scenario envisages the construction of mostly nuclear power plants in the future, while decommissioning the old ones as planned, and is compared to the others from the GHG emissions point of view. The conclusion is that by measures tackling only electricity generation it will not be possible to keep GHG emission under the Kyoto target level, but that choosing the nuclear option might reduce significantly the cost of compliance. (author)

  11. Post Kyoto options for Belgium, 2012-2050

    Nijs, Wouter; Van Regemorter, Denise

    2007-01-01

    This report examines possible post-Kyoto options for Belgium. Climate change is coming up again at the top of the policy agenda with the decision of the European Commission to reduce its GHG emissions by 20% by 2020. The analysis is done with the MARKAL/TIMES model, a partial equilibrium model for the energy system. It is a technico-economic model, which assembles in a simple but economic consistent way technological information (conversion-efficiency, investment- and variable costs, emission...

  12. A Comment on Kyoto and Electricity Generation in Croatia

    Kyoto convention signed in December 1997 will, pending ratification, introduce legal obligations to countries of Annex I of the Convention to reduce CO2 emission. Reductions will be obligatory for a number of small and medium European countries. Croatia will have to reduce its emission to 95% of the 1990 level. Possibility to meet this target without the use of new nuclear facility is doubtful. (author)

  13. Kyoto protocol cooperation: does government corruption facilitate environmental lobbying?

    Fredriksson, Per G.; Neumayer, Eric; Ujhelyi, Gergely

    2007-01-01

    Does environmental lobbying affect the probability of environmental treaty ratification? Does the level of government corruption play a role for the success of such lobbying? In this paper, we propose that a more corruptible government may be more responsive to the demands of the environmental lobby. We use several stratified hazard models and panel data from 170 countries on the timing of Kyoto Protocol ratification to test this hypothesis. We find that increased environmental lobby group ac...

  14. Takeaway sushiravintolan liiketoimintasuunnitelman laadinta: Miten Kyoto Sushi selviytyy ostoskeskuksessa?

    Van, Vo Quoc Cuong

    2011-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena on laatia liiketoimintasuunnitelma perustettavalle takeawaytyyppiselle ”Kyoto-Sushi”-ravintolalle. Ensisijaisena tavoitteena on selvittää yrityksen selviytymistä Itäkeskuksen kovassa kilpailukentässä hyvin laaditun ja realistisen liiketoimintasuunnitelman avulla. Toissijaisena tavoitteena on madaltaa ravintoloitsijaksi ryhtymisen kynnystä perehtymällä aloittavan yrittäjän vastuisiin ja velvollisuuksiin. Opinnäytetyö koostuu kolmesta osuudesta: teoreettisesta viit...

  15. As if Kyoto mattered: The clean development mechanism and transportation

    Transportation is a major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the most rapidly growing anthropogenic source. In the future, the developing world will account for the largest share of transport GHG increases. Four basic components drive transportation energy consumption and GHG emissions: activities (A), mode share (S), fuel intensity (I) and fuel choice (F) (ASIF). Currently, the Kyoto Protocol's clean development mechanism (CDM) serves as the main international market-based tool designed to reduce GHG emissions from the developing world. Theoretically, the CDM has the dual purpose of helping developing countries achieve 'sustainable development' goals and industrialized countries meet their Kyoto emissions reduction commitments. This paper reviews overall CDM activities and transportation CDM activities to date and then presents findings from three case studies of transportation CDM possibilities examined with the ASIF framework in Santiago de Chile. The analysis suggests that bus technology switch (I) provides a fairly good project fit for the CDM, while options aimed at inducing mode share (S) to bicycle, or modifying travel demand via land use changes (ASI) face considerable challenges. The implications of the findings for the CDM and the 'post-Kyoto' world are discussed

  16. Is Kyoto Fatally Flawed? An Analysis with MacGEM

    In this paper we present some numerical simulations with the MacGEM model to evaluate the consequences of the recent Marrakesh agreements and the defection of the USA for the Kyoto Protocol. MacGEM is a global marginal abatement cost model for carbon emissions from fossil fuel use based on the GEM-E3-World general equilibrium. Nonparticipation of the USA causes the equilibrium carbon price in Annex B countries to fall by approximately 50% since an important share of permit demand falls out. Carbon sinks enhancement activities enable Parties to fulfil their reduction commitment at lower compliance costs and cause the equilibrium permit price to decrease by 40%. Finally, it is shown that the former Soviet Union and central European countries have substantial monopoly power in the Kyoto carbon permit market. We conclude that the recent accords have eroded completely the Kyoto Protocol's emission targets but that they have the merit to have saved the international climate change negotiation framework

  17. The costs of the Kyoto Protocol in the European Union

    We estimate reference CO2 emission projections in the European Union, and quantify the economic impacts of the Kyoto commitment on Member States. We consider the case where each EU member individually meets a CO2 emissions target, applying a country-wide cap and trade system to meet the target but without trade among countries. We use a version of the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, here disaggregated to separately include 9 European Community countries and commercial and household transportation sectors. We compare our results with that of four energy-economic models that have provided detailed analyses of European climate change policy. In the absence of specific additional climate policy measures, the EPPA reference projections of carbon emissions increase by 14% from 1990 levels. The EU-wide target under the Kyoto Protocol to the Framework Convention on Climate Change is a reduction in emissions to 8% below 1990 levels. EPPA emissions projections are similar to other recent modeling results, but there are underlying differences in energy and carbon intensities among the projections. If EU countries were to individually meet the EU allocation of the Community-wide carbon cap specified in the Kyoto Protocol, we find using EPPA that carbon prices vary from $91 in the United Kingdom to $385 in Denmark; welfare costs range from 0.6% to 5%

  18. Rethinking the options. Kyoto's flexible mechanisms and nuclear power

    Cutting emissions of greenhouse gases is a major aim of the Kyoto Protocol that countries have adopted in december 1997. But the cuts will not be easy to achieve, reductions of the magnitude postulated in the Protocol would involve a substantial restructuring of energy production and use in most industrialised countries. In November this year, the Sixth Conference of Parties will continue negotiating the rules and regulations for the flexible mechanisms of Kyoto Protocol. Previous Conferences of Parties avoided a formal debate about a nuclear role. It remains to be seen whether nuclear power will be included as a clean and sustainable technology. The role of nuclear power needs to be reconsidered, given the potential risk of climatic change, and the very technically and economically feasible means of drastically mitigating greenhouse gases emission in the short run. Nuclear energy can generate cost-effective tradable emissions credits and it would be highly discriminatory not to allow developing countries to exercise similar options as the industrialised ones, like Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) modeled after the concept of Joint Implementation adopted at the Kyoto Conference. The CDM reinforces the key role developing countries can play in solving the problem of limiting future emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, while meeting their justifiable needs for economic development. Financing nuclear power projects in developing countries in exchange for emission credits meets both goals

  19. [Implementation of the Kyoto obligation and the climate change debate

    The importance of cooperative international implementation mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol was emphasized. In December 1997, more than 50 countries signed the Protocol, although to date, none has ratified it. Canada agreed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by six per cent below 1990 levels by 2008-2012. Implications of this commitment and Canada's ability to make good on the commitment were assessed. The federal government has launched several initiatives to build awareness among Canadians to the climate change issue, and some 450 of the best experts are engaged in trying to identify the obstacles that need to be overcome, the prime opportunities that could be seized, the best practices and how they might be more broadly applied, and to find options in all the sectors of the economy that could bring us to '1990 minus 6'. The objective is clear: an implementation strategy that is effective and meets our Kyoto obligation, is compatible with sustained growth of the economy and maintains or increases our international competitiveness in a number of areas. While an effective implementation strategy will most likely include major changes in lifestyle, in energy efficiency and in energy utilization, the author's view is that Canada has the expertise, the means and the collective will to achieve the target. Canada should also increase its efforts to ensure that some of the key developing countries cooperate in the post Kyoto process. This will not be easy since it involves working with the largest greenhouse gas emitters in the developing world

  20. An economic assessment of the Kyoto Protocol application

    Scope of this paper is to investigate scenarios concerning the economic implications of the Kyoto Protocol (The Kyoto Protocol to the Convention on Climate change, http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/convkp/kpeng.pdf) in its current version including the clean development mechanisms (CDMs), the Marrakesh Accords (Seventh session of the Conference of Parties, 29 October-9 November, Marrakesh, Morocco, http://unfccc.int/cop7/index.html) and the Conference of Parties 9 in Milan (Nineth session of the Conference of Parties, 1-12 December, Milan, http://unfccc.int/cop9/index.html). The general equilibrium model, GTAP-E was used for the investigation of the experiments which are focused on the cases of the USA participation and on the role of Russia as a major emission credits seller. A significant issue in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations is the introduction of sinks in the Marrakech Accords. This seems to weaken the initial targets by replacing CO2 emissions reduction with forestation activities and reduces the cost of the Protocol compliance. It is also shown that the absence of the USA may reduce the costs for the other developed countries and may influence the total costs more than the CDMs. A new scenario is studied by introducing a guaranteed minimum of 60% in the emission credits sold by Russia. Results show that the profits of Russia are not significantly affected by the guaranteed minimum

  1. An economic assessment of the Kyoto Protocol application

    Dagoumas, A.S. [Power Systems Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)] e-mail: dagoumas@auth.gr; Papagiannis, G.K. [Power Systems Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Dokopoulos, P.S. [Power Systems Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2006-01-01

    Scope of this paper is to investigate scenarios concerning the economic implications of the Kyoto Protocol (The Kyoto Protocol to the Convention on Climate change, http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/convkp/kpeng.pdf) in its current version including the clean development mechanisms (CDMs), the Marrakesh Accords (Seventh session of the Conference of Parties, 29 October-9 November, Marrakesh, Morocco, http://unfccc.int/cop7/index.html) and the Conference of Parties 9 in Milan (Nineth session of the Conference of Parties, 1-12 December, Milan, http://unfccc.int/cop9/index.html). The general equilibrium model, GTAP-E was used for the investigation of the experiments which are focused on the cases of the USA participation and on the role of Russia as a major emission credits seller. A significant issue in the Kyoto Protocol negotiations is the introduction of sinks in the Marrakech Accords. This seems to weaken the initial targets by replacing CO{sub 2} emissions reduction with forestation activities and reduces the cost of the Protocol compliance. It is also shown that the absence of the USA may reduce the costs for the other developed countries and may influence the total costs more than the CDMs. A new scenario is studied by introducing a guaranteed minimum of 60% in the emission credits sold by Russia. Results show that the profits of Russia are not significantly affected by the guaranteed minimum.

  2. Surgical Residency Training at a University-Based Academic Medical Center.

    Hoffman, Rebecca L; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2016-02-01

    The past two decades have been witness to some of the most dynamic changes that have occurred in surgical education in all of its history. Political policies, social revolution, and the competing priorities of a new generation of surgical trainees are defining the needs of modern training paradigms. Although the university-based academic program's tripartite mission of clinical service, research, and education has remained steadfast, the mechanisms for achieving success in this mission necessitate adaptation and innovation. The resource-rich learning environment and the unique challenges that face university-based programs contribute to its ability to generate the future leaders of the surgical workforce. PMID:26612020

  3. A School-Based Health Center-University Nursing Partnership: How We Filled in the GAPS

    Larson, Kim; Clark, Amy; Colborn, Brittanie; Perez, Ashley; Engelke, Martha K.; Hill, Phyllis

    2011-01-01

    Young adolescents, age 10-15 years, have increasing psychosocial and biomedical health care needs, yet are some of the lowest users of conventional health services. In eastern North Carolina, school-based health centers (SBHCs) provide primary health care to thousands of school-age children in the most rural, medically underserved areas. SBHCs…

  4. Teaching on Weekends and in Shopping Centers. A Guide for Colleges and Universities.

    East, James R.

    A directory of 233 weekend and 30 shopping center programs in the United States and Canada is presented, along with a general discussion of these types of programs and an annotated bibliography. The listing for each program includes: the institution's name, address, and contact person; the funding sources; the date the program was started; the

  5. A Case Study: An ACT Stress Management Group in a University Counseling Center

    Daltry, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) stress management group in a college counseling center setting. This study explored (a) the effectiveness of ACT in increasing participants' ability to tolerate distress, which directly affects their ability to function in a stressful college

  6. Effects of Biofeedback on Distress in a University Counseling Center: Preliminary Results

    Kipper-Smith, Adriana; Tift, Jay H.; Frye, Joan F.

    2016-01-01

    Biofeedback (BF) and its mechanisms of change were examined alongside self-regulation and mind-body approaches in the context of counseling centers. The advance in psychopathology within this context and its intersections with neurophysiological, psychological, and social variables were highlighted. Although BF is commonly provided to students,…

  7. An example of a DOE [Department of Energy]/university partnership: South Carolina Pilot Center

    A consortium of educational institutions in South Carolina proposed to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in July 1989 a working partnership for mutual improvement of technical capability in the environmental restoration and waste management fields. The institutions forming the consortium are Clemson University, the University of South Carolina, the Medical University of South Carolina, and South Carolina State College. A major component of the partnership is applied research closely coupled with the problems and issues of the Savannah River site regarding demonstration of waste management processes and concepts of disposal and disposal site closure. A primary benefit to DOE from this partnership is expected to be improved public perception of the actions being taken by DOE to protect the public, particularly in areas of environmental restoration and waste management. It is evident at the Savannah River site that this is a key factor in successfully achieving the site's mission. The strength of the interest of the South Carolina institutions in developing initiatives in waste management forecasts a healthy long-term prospect for the partnership. The State of South Carolina has established a hazardous waste research fund of approximately $650 thousand annually for research by the partnership universities to seek better ways to maintain a healthy environment and to reduce, dispose of, or store waste products safely

  8. IDEAL: Integrating Computerized Educational Methods at the University of Washington Health Sciences Center

    Solomon, Clifford E.; Barrett, Jim E.

    1998-01-01

    At the University of Washington, the IAIMS initiative has helped the six Health Sciences schools integrate the use of computers into their curricula. This presentation will describe these efforts, focusing on a multi-tiered approach to computer based instructional development and on the Innovations in Health Sciences Teaching awards.

  9. Workshop Tutorials: Accommodating Student-Centered Learning in Large First Year University Physics Courses.

    Sharma, Manjula D.; Millar, Rosemary; Seth, Suman

    1999-01-01

    Presents the results of introducing cooperative learning tutorials into large first-year physics classes at the University of Sydney. Finds that students attending more than half the total number of tutorials scored significantly better than those attending less than half. Student reaction to the tutorials was generally positive. Contains 31…

  10. Yoga for Stress Management Program as a Complementary Alternative Counseling Resource in a University Counseling Center

    Milligan, Colleen K.

    2006-01-01

    A Yoga for Stress Management Program (YSMP) that served as a complementary alternative therapy resource was successfully implemented at a midsize, predominantly undergraduate university. It was offered in addition to traditional treatments for student mental health. Counselors, Residence Life staff, and faculty found that the program was useful

  11. Building a Creative-Arts Therapy Group at a University Counseling Center

    Boldt, Randal W.; Paul, Sherin

    2011-01-01

    Creative-arts therapy groups offer university students powerful ways to address intrapersonal and interpersonal concerns. These groups combine the strengths of a traditional process group with the benefits of participation in the expressive arts. The creative process draws students in, invites insight and introspection, and facilitates outward…

  12. Final Report for The University of Texas at Arlington Optical Medical Imaging Section of Advanced Imaging Research Center

    Khosrow Behbehani

    2013-02-26

    The goal of this project was to create state-of-the-art optical medical imaging laboratories for the Biomedical Engineering faculty and student researchers of the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) on the campus of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW). This has been successfully achieved. These laboratories provide an unprecedented opportunity for the bioengineers (from UTA) to bring about new breakthroughs in medical imaging using optics. Specifically, three major laboratories have been successfully established and state-of-the-art scientific instruments have been placed in the labs. As a result of this grant, numerous journal and conference publications have been generated, patents for new inventions have been filed and received, and many additional grants for the continuation of the research has been received.

  13. Melter performance during surrogate vitrification campaigns at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University

    This report summarizes the results from seven melter campaigns performed at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University. A brief description of the EnVitco EV-16 Joule heated glass melter and the Stir-Melter WV-0.25 stirred melter are included for reference. The report discusses each waste stream examined, glass formulations developed and utilized, specifics relating to melter operation, and a synopsis of the results from the campaigns. A 'lessons learned' section is included for each melter to emphasize repeated processing problems and identify parameters which are considered extremely important to successful melter operation

  14. Archive of information about geological samples available for research from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Polar Rock Repository

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Polar Rock Repository (PRR) operated by the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) at the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  15. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the Ohio State University Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Sediment Core Repository

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center (BPCRC) Sediment Core Repository operated by the Ohio State University is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine...

  16. The Project Based Mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol. Credible Instruments or Challenges to the Integrity of the Kyoto Protocol?

    Takeuchi Waldegren, Linn

    2006-03-15

    The project based mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol are innovative instruments which allow projects to earn credits for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The credits can in turn be used by countries to reach their emissions targets according to the Kyoto Protocol. The Project based mechanisms are known as the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and the Joint Implementation (JI). If the project based mechanisms are to be effective policy instruments they must ensure the integrity of the Kyoto Protocol, and their ability to promote and prove real emission reductions is critical. The environmental credibility of the project based mechanisms will also ensure their ability to promote cost effectiveness. Key concepts in this context are environmental and project additionality, and their role and value for the project based mechanisms are analyzed. Environmental additionality is established by comparing a project's emissions to a baseline. The baseline's credibility is thus vital. The concept of project additionality is somewhat controversial, but is nonetheless of equal importance. The case studies of CDM approved methodologies (AMs) and proposed projects suggest that there are credibility issues that need to be addressed if the project based mechanisms are to promote real emissions reductions.

  17. On the Universality of Jordan Centers for Estimating Infection Sources in Tree Networks

    Luo, Wuqiong; Leng, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Finding the infection sources in a network when we only know the network topology and infected nodes, but not the rates of infection, is a challenging combinatorial problem, and it is even more difficult in practice where the underlying infection spreading model is usually unknown a priori. In this paper, we are interested in finding a source estimator that is applicable to various spreading models, including the Susceptible-Infected (SI), Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR), Susceptible-Infected-Recovered-Infected (SIRI), and Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) models. We show that under the SI, SIR and SIRI spreading models and with mild technical assumptions, the Jordan center is the infection source associated with the most likely infection path in a tree network with a single infection source. This conclusion applies for a wide range of spreading parameters, while it holds for regular trees under the SIS model with homogeneous infection and recovery rates. Since the Jordan center does not depend on t...

  18. Center for Tobacco Policy Research at Saint Louis University. Project LEAP. Florida

    Jenine Harris

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, The Center for Tobacco Policy Research (CTPR) partnered with Florida and sever other states to evaluate how unstable state financial climates were affecting state tobacco control conrol funding reductions. Using both quantitative methodologies, information was collected from the eight state tobacco control programs on topics such as state financial and political climates, partner relationships, program capacity, and the effects of funding reductions on program implementation. This re...

  19. Center for Tobacco Policy Research at Saint Louis University. Project LEAP. Minnesota

    Jenine Harris

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, The Center for Tobacco Policy Research (CTPR) partnered with Minnesota and several other states to evaluate how unstable state financial climates were affecting state tobacco control funding reductions. Using both quantitative methodologies, information was collected from the eight state tobacco control programs on topics such as state financial and political climates, partner relationships, program capacity, and the effects of funding reductions on program implementation. This repor...

  20. Center for Tobacco Policy Research at Saint Louis University. Project LEAP. Michigan

    Jenine Harris

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, The Center for Tobacco Policy Research (CTPR) partnered with Michigan and several other states to evaluate how unstable state financial climates were affecting state tobacco control funding reductions. Using both quantitative methodologies, information was collected from the eight state tobacco control programs on topics such as state financial and political climates, partner relationships, program capacity, and the effects of funding reductions on program implementation. This report...

  1. Center for Tobacco Policy Research at Saint Louis University. Project LEAP. Nebraska

    Jenine Harris

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, The Center for Tobacco Policy Research (CTPR) partnered with Nebraska and sever other states to evaluate how unstable state financial climates were affecting state tobacco control conrol funding reductions. Using both quantitative methodologies, information was collected from the eight state tobacco control programs on topics such as state financial and political climates, partner relationships, program capacity, and the effects of funding reductions on program implementation. This r...

  2. Center for Tobacco Policy Research at Saint Louis University. Project LEAP. New Mexico

    Jenine Harris

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, The Center for Tobacco Policy Research (CTPR) partnered with New Mexico and several other states to evaluate how unstable state financial climates were affecting state tobacco control funding reductions. Using both quantitative methodologies, information was collected from the eight state tobacco control programs on topics such as state financial and political climates, partner relationships, program capacity, and the effects of funding reductions on program implementation. This repo...

  3. Center for Tobacco Policy Research at Saint Louis University. Project LEAP. Indiana

    Jenine Harris

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, The Center for Tobacco Policy Research (CTPR) partnered with Indiana and several other states to evaluate how unstable state financial climates were affecting state tobacco control funding reductions. Using both quantitative methodologies, information was collected from the eight state tobacco control programs on topics such as state financial and political climates, partner relationships, program capacity, and the effects of funding reductions on program implementation. This report ...

  4. Center for Tobacco Policy Research at Saint Louis University. Project LEAP. North Carolina

    Jenine Harris

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, The Center for Tobacco Policy Research (CTPR) partnered with North Carolina and several other states to evaluate how unstable state financial climates were affecting state tobacco control funding reductions. Using both quantitative methodologies, information was collected from the eight state tobacco control programs on topics such as state financial and political climates, partner relationships, program capacity, and the effects of funding reductions on program implementation. This ...

  5. Center for Tobacco Policy Research at Saint Louis University. Project LEAP. Oregon

    Jenine Harris

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, The Center for Tobacco Policy Research (CTPR) partnered with Oregon and several other states to evaluate how unstable state financial climates were affecting state tobacco control funding reductions. Using both quantitative methodologies, information was collected from the eight state tobacco control programs on topics such as state financial and political climates, partner relationships, program capacity, and the effects of funding reductions on program implementation. This report p...

  6. Proposed Establishment of San Jose State University's Tri-County Center in Salinas. A Report to the Governor and Legislature in Response to a Request by the California State University for Funds to Create an Off-Campus Center to Serve Monterey, San Benito, and Santa Cruz Counties. Report No. 88-37.

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    The California State Commission on Postsecondary Education recommends approval of a request by the Trustees of the California State University to establish a temporary upper-division and graduate off-campus center of San Jose State University in Salinas. Such approval of new or off-campus centers is required by California law. Following a history…

  7. Osteoradionecrosis of the jaw bones at the University of Kentucky Medical Center

    There is disagreement over the management of teeth in irradiated head and neck cancer patients. Some oral surgeons support preirradiation extraction; others favor maintaining teeth. Before 1974, The University of Kentucky Department of Radiation Medicine found osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaw in 10.9% of 220 irradiated cancer patients. After a program of oral care was instituted, the incidence declined to 2.7%. Of 109 patients who received radiotherapy between 1976 and 1985, only three (2.7%) developed ORN of the mandible. There was also a reduction in patients treated with interstitial therapy during this time. A review of the most recent experiences shows that, with present management methods at the University of Kentucky, ORN is not a significant problem. Of 30 patients treated in 1986, only one had ORN, and this was of the maxilla. Post-irradiation extractions were not identified as a significant risk for necrosis. Hyperbaric oxygen is used as a treatment for persistent ORN

  8. Cardiovascular emergency preparedness in recreation facilities at major US universities: college fitness center emergency readiness.

    Herbert, William G; Herbert, David L; McInnis, Kyle J; Ribisl, Paul M; Franklin, Barry A; Callahan, Mandy; Hood, Aaron W

    2007-01-01

    Recent American Heart Association/American College of Sports Medicine (AHA/ACSM) guidelines advocate preparticipation screening, planning, and rehearsal for emergencies and automated external defibrillators in all health/fitness facilities. The authors evaluated adherence to these recommendations at 158 recreational service departments in major US universities (51% response rate for 313 institutions queried). Many made their facilities available to unaffiliated residents, with 39% offering programs for those with special medical conditions. Only 18% performed universal preparticipation screening. Twenty-seven percent reported having 1 or more exercise-related instances of cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death within the past 5 years. Seventy-three percent had an automated external defibrillator, but only 6% reported using it in an emergency. Almost all had written emergency plans, but only 50% posted their plans, and only 27% performed the recommended quarterly emergency drills. The authors' findings suggest low awareness of and adherence to the AHA/ACSM recommendations for identifying individuals at risk for exercise-related cardiovascular complications and for handling such emergencies in university-based fitness facilities. ( PMID:17617775

  9. Application of the Kyoto Mechanisms in Finland's climate policy. Report of the Finnish Committee on the Kyoto mechanisms

    By the flexible mechanisms under the Kyoto Protocol are meant project-specific Joint Implementation, JI, intended for emissions reduction in the industrialised countries and the Clean Development Mechanism, CDM, designed for emissions reduction in the developing countries. Joint Implementation Projects can be found particularly in the economies-in-transition The flexible mechanisms under the Protocol also include Emissions Trading, ET, which States - and according to the view of several parties, enterprises, too - can conduct subject to rules to be later agreed upon in connection with emissions rights The international climate negotiations on the Kyoto Protocol and on drafting more detailed rules on the use of the mechanisms are still pending. In fact, the Working Group thinks that the uncertainties so far connected with the flexible mechanisms will lead to a situation in which the national climate policy must, at this stage, be primarily based on domestic reduction measures. Even if Finland were prepared to meet her climate policy obligations through domestic measures, there is, in the Working Group's opinion, skill reason to continue the preparations for the possibilities of using the Kyoto flexible mechanisms, too. The prime goal of the flexible mechanisms is an internationally cost-efficient climate policy, which creates the preconditions for the gradual tightening of emission limitations in a manner that will hinder economic and other societal activity as little as possible. Thus the flexible mechanisms can become more important during later commitment periods. According to model calculations, using the mechanisms would probably be inexpensive compared to the domestic emission reduction measures. It seems that the international markets for assigned amount units obtained through the use of the mechanisms would be big enough in view of the relatively limited immediate needs of the Finnish Climate Policy. The larger the group of countries and operators trading in the mechanisms is, the bigger cost benefits for the entire area would be achieved with the mechanisms. However, many uncertainties are connected with the picture given by the model calculations on the inexpensiveness of the project-specific mechanisms. In the opinion of the Working Group, preparations should be made for the use of the flexible mechanisms. The aim should be that the use of the Kyoto mechanisms would be based in the longer term on well functioning international markets on which enterprises can buy and sell assigned amount units within the limits laid down by the parties to the Kyoto Protocol. The Working Group suggests that a task force be set up at the beginning of 2001 to prepare for the bureaucracy related to the use of the mechanisms and to make a draft for legislation concerning the organisation of these bureaucratic functions. The Working Group proposes that a broadly-based body be set up to prepare for the operating models for the use of the mechanisms and to draft the necessary legislation no later than at the stage when the main principles and rules on the use of the Kyoto mechanisms have been agreed upon in international negotiations. The Working Group states that it is important to analyse the various options for emissions trading and project-specific mechanisms in terms of their implementation. The preparedness of taking a position to possible emissions trading on the EU level and to the issues related to the Kyoto mechanisms coming up in international negotiations must be improved. The Working Group proposes that, while drafting the Finnish positions, such broadly-based analysis work on the mechanisms could be utilised more than before in which the expertise and views of the different authorities and operators would be made avail of Interaction between the authorities and operators should be increased. (orig.)

  10. Corrosion Research Center of the University of Minnesota. Progress report, July 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    At present, the research ranges from the quantum mechanics of the corrosion unit reactions, organic and inorganic coatings, surface reactions on polymers, metals and semiconductors to high-temperature chemistry of interest to solar-energy conversion. A second objective of the Center is to increase the utilization of corrosion data by the technical community through education and through the dissemination of appropriately formatted information. At present, two projects are in the planning stage for the near future. One is a pedagogical symposium on corrosion in microelectronic components and systems; the other is a series of lectures and videotapes, as well as a workshop on cathodic protection

  11. Program of Research in Flight Dynamics, The George Washington University at NASA Langley Research Center

    Murphy, Patrick C. (Technical Monitor); Klein, Vladislav

    2005-01-01

    The program objectives are fully defined in the original proposal entitled Program of Research in Flight Dynamics in GW at NASA Langley Research Center, which was originated March 20, 1975, and in the renewals of the research program from January 1, 2003 to September 30, 2005. The program in its present form includes three major topics: 1. the improvement of existing methods and development of new methods for wind tunnel and flight data analysis, 2. the application of these methods to wind tunnel and flight test data obtained from advanced airplanes, 3. the correlation of flight results with wind tunnel measurements, and theoretical predictions.

  12. Corrosion Research Center of the University of Minnesota. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1981

    Many of the projects which began with the inception of the Corrosion Research Center in early 1980 have progressed from the stage of acquisition and assembly of apparatus to that of generation of research results. In the area of research on surface reactions, notable progress has been made on the microscopic theory of corrosion, most importantly the recognition that the quantum mechanical depletion layer at the metal layer makes an appreciable contribution to the potential drop across the metal-electrolyte interface and to the capacitance of the interface

  13. Universal visual communication system design for a shopping center and other entertaining places and activities

    Harizanova, Petya

    2010-01-01

    To create a sign / character that: •can be understood without any help / assistance by anyone, •which explains an action with only a few strokes, •in a way that the image looks as if it is moving. is not that simple as it seems. It requires knowledge in different areas. Designing a universal system for visual communication (in brief “pictograms”), requires basic knowledge in psychology, sensation (perception), associative and everything else that is related to the basic thin...

  14. Cost saving methods in University/Health Center radioactive waste disposal

    A brief description is given of the various measures that have been, are being, and will soon be instituted by the Radiation Safety Office of Temple University, Philadelphia to reduce the volume of radioactive waste transferred to commercial handlers. The categories of waste considered are 1) liquid scintillation vials containing 3H or 14C in concentrations 3H or 14C in average concentrations 3H or 14C and 5) nuclear medicine waste. The alternative radioactive waste processing procedures will result in a 47% reduction in expenditure. (U.K.)

  15. Projektarbejde i fremmedsprogene: Rapport fra seminar pa Roskilde Universitetscenter (Project Work in Foreign Languages: Report from a Seminar at Roskilde University Center). ROLIG-papir 38.

    Jakobsen, Karen Sonne, Ed.

    This report describes a seminar at Roskilde University Center (Denmark) on project work in foreign languages, which brought together language teachers and theorists from different schools, including universities, business schools, technical schools, merchants schools, and high schools, to discuss their experiences with project work in foreign

  16. Students’ Common Writing Problems & Practices at King Abdulaziz University: An Inquiry to Move a Writing Center From Conception Towards Conceptualization

    Khalid Mohammed Abalhassan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the results of a quantitative investigation of the most shared writing problems and practices King Abdulaziz University (KAU students have in common, the students’ attitudes towards the teaching of basic writing and research methods, their readiness and attitude towards the kinds of activities writing centers usually have, and their self-perceptions with regards to writing skills. The study also attempts to shed some light on how the student service centers (SSC affect students’ self-reliance and their academic achievement. The study also examines the feasibility of using the concept of writing center at King Abdulaziz. Findings of the questionnaire to which 543 subjects have responded rendered indications that a history of seeking help from SSCs exists among students, who also pointed out the need for professional academic help to be provided on campus, and the determination to use such services if conceptualized. The study also found that a US model of WCs is feasible and reliable to adopt. A number of recommendations conclude the study.

  17. University 4.4 A Development Strategy for Education and Research Centers

    Catalin BOJA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to increased demand for qualified human resources, for 'new & rare skills', for software solutions, reliable products and services in the field of applied informatics, there are large available financial funds that can be accessed by Informatics and Cybernetics schools. Edu-cational and research departments must capitalize funds provided by the Europe-an/international institutions and private companies, by supporting the creation of spin-off en-tities that will conduct technology transfer projects. These funds must be used to increase the quality of teaching and to improve research results by assuring the financial needs and tech-nical resources of teachers (project based payments, students (scholarships projects and the community (public available projects. The presented strategy, University 4.4 describes four development directions for a four years period. It has been developed by Catalin Boja, Razvan Bologa, Marius Popa and Cristian Toma and since November 2011 it represents the assumed development strategy of The Department of Economic Informatics and Cybernetics (DICE from The Bucharest University of Economic Studies.

  18. Discussions from the Leaders' Roundtable on the Kyoto Protocol

    Leaders from a variety of sectors came together to discuss 4 options put forward in the 'Discussion Paper on Canada's Contribution to Addressing Climate Change', released on May 15, 2002. Their objective was to provide the federal and Alberta environment ministers with feedback prior to the federal and provincial conference on the Kyoto Protocol which sets targets for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Canada's target is to reduce emissions to 6 per cent below 1990 levels by 2008-2012, which translates to a 240 megatonne reduction per year. In 2001, the United States withdrew from the Kyoto Protocol, and many Canadians are divided on the issue of whether Canada should ratify the Protocol and how the target can be achieved. The federal government has proposed the following 4 options to meet the target: (1) all fossil fuel producers and importers enter a cap-and-trade emissions trading system, (2) targeted measures including regulation, fiscal measures, and investments in technology and best practices to promote emission reductions by consumers and industries, (3) mixed approach of domestic trading for large final emitters, targeted measures and purchase of international pollution permits by government and business, and (4) modified mixed approach of emissions permits, targeted measures and credits to Canada for clean energy exports. The majority of leaders at the roundtable felt that Canada should design a fifth option that would commit the government to reducing GHGs without ratifying the Kyoto Protocol. They also suggested that there is a need for better analysis of the economic impacts and that the financial sector must participate in the analysis

  19. An evaluation of business implications of the Kyoto Protocol

    This report has been commissioned by Norsk Hydro ASA and written in November-December 2001. The aim of the report is to present and analyze the newest developments in the climate negotiations, particularly the seventh Conference of the Parties to the Climate Convention in Marrakech, Morocco, in October/November 2001, and to provide an evaluation of what the finalized Kyoto Protocol means for business. The report is organized as a collection of slides with supporting text explaining the background and contents of each slide. (author)

  20. Global property rights. The Kyoto protocol and the knowledge revolution

    This paper is about the origin of today's global environmental problems, and how to resolve them. At stake are catastrophic risks from global warming and damage to the world's biodiversity that ranks as the planet' sixth great extinction. The origin of today's global environmental problems is a historic difference in property rights regimes between industrial and developing countries, the North and the South. The solutions we suggest involve redefining property rights in the use of the global environment as well as in knowledge. We discuss the Kyoto Protocol's new systems of property rights on the use of the planet's atmosphere, and propose a parallel system of property rights on knowledge. Resources such as forests and oil and other mineral deposits are owned as private property in industrial countries but they are treated as common or government property in developing countries. Ill-defined protected property rights lead to the over-extraction of resources in the South, such as timber and oil. They are exported at low prices to the North that over-consumes them. The international market amplifies the tragedy of the commons, leading to inferior solutions for the world economy as a whole (Chichilnisky 1994). Updating property rights on resources in developing countries would face formidable opposition. The lack of property rights in inputs to production, such as timber and oil, could be compensated by assigning property rights on by-products of outputs. The 1997 Kyoto Protocol provides an example as it limits the countries' rights to emit carbon, a by-product of burning fossil fuels. Our suggestions for trading emissions rights (Chichilnisky 1995, 96) was adopted in the Kyoto Protocol, yet the atmosphere's carbon concentration is a global public good, which makes trading tricky. Trading rights to forests' carbon sequestration services or to genetic blueprints would also be trading global public goods. Markets that trade public goods have been shown to require a measure of equity to ensure efficiency (Chichilnisky 1996, Chichilnisky and Heal 2002). This conclusion has been validated theoretically and is also in line with what was agreed by 160 nations in the Kyoto Protocol. Somewhat surprisingly, the same conclusion applies also to trading knowledge goods. Knowledge is a global public good. This paper proposes a new property rights regimes for knowledge goods and for environmental assets that seem crucial for economic progress in the era of the Knowledge RevolutionTM. (author)

  1. Canada's nuclear industry, greenhouse gas emissions, and the Kyoto Protocol

    The Kyoto Protocol of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate change, dated December 10, 1997 committed Canada to reduce greenhouse gases to 6% below 1990 levels by 2008-2012. Other nations also committed to varying degrees of reduction. The Protocol includes provisions for credit to the 'developed' counties for initiatives which lead to greenhouse gas reduction in the 'developing' countries and for the sharing of credit between 'developed' countries for projects undertaken jointly. The rules and details for implementation of these guidelines remain to be negotiated. We begin our study by establishing the magnitude of greenhouse gas emissions already avoided by the nuclear industry in Canada since the inception of commercial power plants in 1971. We then review projections of energy use in Canada and anticipated increase in electricity use up to the year 2020. These studies have anticipated no (or have 'not permitted') further development of nuclear electricity production in spite of the clear benefit with respect to greenhouse gas emission. The studies also predict a relatively small growth of electricity use. In fact the projections indicate a reversal of a trend toward increased per capita electricity use which is contrary to observations of electricity usage in national economies as they develop. We then provide estimates of the magnitude of greenhouse gas reduction which would result from replacing the projected increase in fossil fuel electricity by nuclear generation through the building of more plants and/or making better use of existing installations. This is followed by an estimate of additional nuclear capacity needed to avoid CO2 emissions while providing the electricity needed should per capita usage remain constant. Canada's greenhouse gas reduction goal is a small fraction of international commitments. The Kyoto agreement's 'flexibility mechanism' provisions provide some expectation that Canada could obtain some credit for greenhouse gas reductions established by deployment of Canadian CANDU technology in other countries. Such credits could ultimately result in economic benefits accruing to electricity generation which does not emit greenhouse gases. We explore the implications of the Kyoto Protocol to the Canadian nuclear industry and the Canadian economy. Establishing credit to Canada for its contribution via nuclear technology poses many unanswered questions at this stage of development of the principles established by the Kyoto Protocol. Nevertheless, the potential contribution of nuclear energy to carbon dioxide emissions management is extremely large. (author)

  2. Options for the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol

    Hoehne, Niklas; Phylipsen, Dian; Ullrich, Simone; Blok, Kornelis

    2005-02-15

    This study assesses available options for the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol. The study includes the following sections: An introduction, an overview of proposals and establishing a network, analysis of interests of countries, selected country case studies, an overview of the issues to be considered, options for adaptation to climate change, a new approach ''Common but Differentiated Convergence'', an update of the Triptych approach, a comprehensive compromise proposal, the comparison of emission allowances under various approaches and a negotiation strategy for the EU and Germany. (orig.)

  3. Cogeneration's European future: cogeneration in a post-Kyoto world

    This article focuses on the future of cogeneration in Europe, and considers the results of the completed 'future cogen' study. The ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, liberalising energy markets, the vulnerability of cogeneration in the face of competition in the electricity sector, and the European Commission's call for a doubling of cogeneration power generation are discussed. Details are given of tbe SAFIRE model to assess the potential future of cogeneration and the development of 4 scenarios, and the potential for cogeneration in Europe to 2020 is plotted against capacity. Brief overviews of cogeneration in 28 countries are presented, and recommendations resulting from 'future cogen' study are listed

  4. Is Kyoto fatally flawed? An analysis with MacGEM

    Eyckmans , Johan; Van Regemorter, Denise; Van Steenberghe, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present some numerical simulations with the MacGEM model to evaluate the consequences for the Kyoto Protocol on the reduction of greenhouse gases of the recent Bonn agreement and the nonratification by the USA. MacGEM is a global marginal abatement cost model for carbon emissions from fossil fuel use. Marginal abatement cost functions are estimated on data generated with the GEM-E3-World general equilibrium model under the assumption that abatement is produced in a cost effic...

  5. Green certificates - additional instruments at Kyoto Protocol's flexible mechanisms

    The paper presents four mechanisms, designed to realize certain objectives - to stimulate the use of electricity produced from renewable energy sources and to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. The operation mode of these mechanisms is analyzed and their common characteristics are determined, as well as the possibility to interact each other. The systems analysed are Tradable Green Certificates and Flexible Mechanisms of Kyoto Protocol. The Green Certificates System is explained more thoroughly because the Romanian Government chose them to promote electricity from renewable energy sources on the internal electricity market. The main characteristic of these systems, which combine elements of centralization with the use of market mechanisms are outlined

  6. Carbon emissions: the economic benefits of the Kyoto Protocol

    The third Conference of the Parties in Kyoto set the target of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions by an average of 5.3 per cent with respect to 1990 values by 2008 - 2012. One of the main objections to the protocol's ratification is that compliance would pose an unbearable economic burden on the countries involved. But we show here that this is not the case if costs apart from the direct costs of energy production are also considered. Costs are also incurred in rectifying damage to human health, material goods, agriculture and the environment related to greenhouse-gas emissions. (author)

  7. An evaluation of business implications of the Kyoto Protocol

    Torvanger, Asbjoern

    2001-12-01

    This report has been commissioned by Norsk Hydro ASA and written in November-December 2001. The aim of the report is to present and analyze the newest developments in the climate negotiations, particularly the seventh Conference of the Parties to the Climate Convention in Marrakech, Morocco, in October/November 2001, and to provide an evaluation of what the finalized Kyoto Protocol means for business. The report is organized as a collection of slides with supporting text explaining the background and contents of each slide. (author)

  8. The Kyoto Protocol : Canada's risky rush to judgement

    This paper outlined the 4 proposed policy options to implement the Kyoto Protocol in Canada and presented reasons why the Canadian timetable to ratify the Kyoto Protocol is an unrealistic and unsound policy. The Canadian Prime Minister will ask Parliament to ratify the agreement before the end of 2002 but the authors claim that before any decision regarding ratification is made, the government should cost out all relevant options, under all reasonable contingencies. For policy purposes, this paper focuses on reductions of carbon dioxide. Canada's obligation is to reduce them 6 per cent below 1990 levels by 2010, but because of economic growth, emissions among participating countries may be 30 per cent above their aggregate target. In addition, the withdrawal of the United States means that about two-thirds of the world's emissions are not covered by Kyoto. The first policy option involves the selling of emission permits covering about 80 per cent of domestic emitters. It results in 16 MT of domestic emissions reductions being accomplished and 128 MT of foreign permits being purchased. This first option is considered to be the least costly of the four. The second option relies on command-and-control measures in which 104 MT worth of new targeted measures are forced through. Although the government has not provided cost estimates for option 2, it is likely to be much more costly than option 1. The third option slightly adjusts the mix of permits trading and command-and-control measures, and distributes the permits freely instead of selling them. Only the large emitters are involved in the trading system, covering 40 per cent of domestic emission sources. The cost of emissions reductions would be lower than under option 1. The fourth and final option combines tradable permits systems in which only large emitters are involved, but where permits are distributed according to sectoral emission reduction costs, expected future emission growth rates as well as economic, social and environmental goals. It is concluded that all 4 options include targeted measures that are not likely to be cost-effective in any way, in fact, they require a lot of domestic emissions reductions that are needlessly costly. The authors emphasized that more information is needed to understand the economic consequences and risks of accepting the Kyoto target as legally binding. refs., tabs., figs

  9. The Kyoto protocol, cafe standards, and gasoline taxes

    Agras, J. [Stratus Consulting Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Chapman, D. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The Kyoto protocol mandates that the U.S. reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to 93% of their 1990 levels by the period 2008-2012. This paper explores the possibility of reducing carbon dioxide emissions in the transportation sector to 7% below their 1990 level by 2010. This paper examines two policies to achieve these reductions, Corporate Average Fuel Efficiency standards and gasoline taxes. The introduction of these policies individually makes the task seem daunting, yet when using the policies jointly the objective is achievable. (author)

  10. Kyoto protocol, the Brazil perspectives concerning the carbon market

    The carbon market is mechanism which allows the purchase of greenhouse gases emission (essentially carbon dioxide) rights so called pollution rights. The Clean Development Mechanisms have been proposed by the Brazil for the Kyoto Protocol. They are allowing countries of annex 1 to finance or buy emission reduction volumes coming from projects realized in non annexe 1 countries. These exchanges are contributing to the economy, to the ''clean'' technologies transfers from north to south and to the sustainable development of non annex 1 countries. This document describes the operating of these Clean Development Mechanisms. (A.L.B.)

  11. [Pediatrics at an academic medical center: organization of university pediatric services].

    Claris, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Pediatric medicine is one of the most important activities of any teaching hospital. Its internal organization depends on the size of the hospital and must take into account not only its missions of advice, reference and proximity, but also economic issues. Regional networking with general hospitals, private clinics and community pediatricians is necessary, if only to regulate use of the emergency department. The activity of pediatric units fluctuates over time and is not always controllable, involving both rapid turnover and extended stays. Cost of health is often underestimated or unadapted, and many units are in financial deficit despite their best efforts. University pediatrician training is highly demanding in order to ensure the quality of recruitment, but it must be sufficiently flexible if it is to attract a suficient number of candidates. As with other specialties, research is relatively easy to evaluate, contrary to teaching and clinical activity. PMID:25803925

  12. Issue-centered Earth Science undergraduate instruction in U.S. colleges and universities

    Liddicoat, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Semester-long introductory courses in Earth Science at U.S. colleges and universities often contain astronomy, meteorology, oceanography, and geology taught as single entities. My experience teaching Earth Science that way and using a trade Earth Science textbook results in cursory knowledge and poor retention of each topic area. This seems to be especially true for liberal arts students who take Earth Science to satisfy a distribution requirement in the sciences. Instead, my method of teaching Earth Science at the State University of New York is to use two books that together explore consequences of global warming caused by the combustion of fossil fuels by humans. In this way, students who do not intend to major in science are given in-depth information about how and why this challenge to the well-being of life on Earth in the present century and beyond must be addressed in a thoughtful way. The books, Tyler Volk's CO2 Rising - The World's Greatest Environmental Challenge and James Edinger's Watching for the Wind, are inexpensive paperbacks that the students read in their entirety. Besides supplemental information I provide in the lectures, students have weekly examinations that are narrative in form, and there are written assignments for exhibits at science and other museums in NYC that complement some of the topics. The benefit of teaching Earth Science in this non-traditional way is that students seem more interested in the subject because it is relevant to everyday experience and news accounts about a serious global science problem for which an informed public must take a positive role to solve.

  13. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. Annual report, September 15, 1990--December 31, 1991

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  14. The Effectiveness of the Kyoto Protocol and Consummating the Legal Institution for International Technology Transfer

    Zhongfa Ma

    2010-01-01

    Kyoto Protocol has several provisions and established mechanisms concerning technology transfer which is supposed to favoring technology transfer for reducing the emission of greenhouse gases (GHG) in the world. However, mainly due to the flaws of the provisions and mechanisms, the environmentally sound technologies have not been transferred as smoothly as possible to realize the Kyoto Protocol’s objectives. Therefore, the international community shall take the effectiveness of Kyoto Protocol...

  15. Non-Kyoto radiative forcing in long-run greenhouse gas emissions and climate change scenarios

    Rose, S.K.; Kriegler, E.; Bibas, R.; K. Calvin; A. Popp; Van Vuuren, D.P.; Weyant, J.

    2014-01-01

    Climate policies must consider radiative forcing from Kyoto greenhouse gases, as well as other forcing constituents, such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone that result from air pollutants. Non-Kyoto forcing constituents contribute negative, as well as positive forcing, and overall increases in total forcing result in increases in global average temperature. Non-Kyoto forcing modeling is a relatively new component of climate management scenarios. This paper describes and assesses current non-...

  16. Strengthening the role of universities in addressing sustainability challenges: the Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions as an institutional experiment

    David D. Hart

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As the magnitude, complexity, and urgency of many sustainability problems increase, there is a growing need for universities to contribute more effectively to problem solving. Drawing upon prior research on social-ecological systems, knowledge-action connections, and organizational innovation, we developed an integrated conceptual framework for strengthening the capacity of universities to help society understand and respond to a wide range of sustainability challenges. Based on experiences gained in creating the Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions (Mitchell Center, we tested this framework by evaluating the experiences of interdisciplinary research teams involved in place-based, solutions-oriented research projects at the scale of a single region (i.e., the state of Maine, USA. We employed a multiple-case-study approach examining the experiences of three interdisciplinary research teams working on tidal energy development, adaptation to climate change, and forest vulnerability to an invasive insect. Drawing upon documents, observations, interviews, and other data sources, three common patterns emerged across these cases that were associated with more effective problem-solving strategies. First, an emphasis on local places and short-term dynamics in social-ecological systems research provides more frequent opportunities for learning while doing. Second, iterative stakeholder engagement and inclusive forms of knowledge co-production can generate substantial returns on investment, especially when researchers are dedicated to a shared process of problem identification and they avoid framing solutions too narrowly. Although these practices are time consuming, they can be accelerated by leveraging existing stakeholder relationships. Third, efforts to mobilize interdisciplinary expertise and link knowledge with action are facilitated by an organizational culture that emphasizes mutual respect, adaptability, and solutions. Participation of faculty associated with interdisciplinary academic programs, solutions-oriented fields, and units with partnership-oriented missions hastens collaboration within teams and between teams and stakeholders. The Mitchell Center also created a risk-tolerant culture that encouraged organizational learning. Solutions-focused programs at other universities can potentially benefit from the lessons we learned.

  17. Hurricane Public Health Research Center at Louisiana State University a Case of Academia Being Prepared

    van Heerden, I. L.

    2006-12-01

    Recent floods along the Atlantic and Gulf seaboards and elsewhere in the world before Katrina had demonstrated the complexity of public health impacts including trauma; fires; chemical, sewerage, and corpse contamination of air and water; and diseases. We realized that Louisiana's vulnerability was exacerbated because forty percent of the state is coastal zone in which 70% of the population resides. Ninety percent of this zone is near or below sea level and protected by man-made hurricane-protection levees. New Orleans ranked among the highest in the nation with respect to potential societal, mortality, and economic impacts. Recognizing that emergency responders had in the past been unprepared for the extent of the public health impacts of these complex flooding disasters, we created a multi-disciplinary, multi-campus research center to address these issues for New Orleans. The Louisiana Board of Regents, through its millennium Health Excellence Fund, awarded a 5-year contract to the Center in 2001. The research team combined the resources of natural scientists, social scientists, engineers, and the mental health and medical communities. We met annually with a Board of Advisors, made up of federal, state, local government, and non-governmental agency officials, first responders and emergency managers. Their advice was invaluable in acquiring various datasets and directing aspects of the various research efforts. Our center developed detailed models for assessment and amelioration of public health impacts due to hurricanes and major floods. Initial research had showed that a Category 3 storm would cause levee overtopping, and that most levee systems were unprotected from the impacts of storm-induced wave erosion. Sections of levees with distinct sags suggested the beginnings of foundation and subsidence problems. We recognized that a slow moving Cat 3 could flood up to the eaves of houses and would have residence times of weeks. The resultant mix of sewage, corpses and chemicals in these standing flood waters would set the stage for massive disease outbreaks and prolonged chemical exposure. Before Katrina, population evacuation behavior had been determined, computer models could be used to predict storm surge flooding, government databases and GIS technology allowed documentation of at-risk areas, probable chemical and sewerage release sites had been mapped, tropical disease experts and social scientists had determined possible public health impacts; that injured and displaced animal pets and wild animals would be a major problem had been identified; and, an interactive GIS database was available for utilization in all aspects of the assessment and remediation post landfall. The value of this project has been many-fold. First, before Katrina it had a positive impact on emergency preparedness in the state of Louisiana. Second, during the hurricane Katrina catastrophe the project offered a major service to the state as the various data sets and research outputs were extensively used throughout the flooding thus reducing deaths, disease, pain, and suffering. Third, the model of academia aiding in disaster science and management is being exported nationally and internationally. Finally, our research results are applicable to other complex disasters such as earthquakes, tornadoes, chemical spills or terrorism.

  18. Universal photonic quantum gates assisted by ancilla diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers coupled to resonators

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Long, Gui Lu

    2015-03-01

    We propose two compact, economic, and scalable schemes for implementing optical controlled-phase-flip and controlled-controlled-phase-flip gates by using the input-output process of a single-sided cavity strongly coupled to a single nitrogen-vacancy-center defect in diamond. Additional photonic qubits, necessary for procedures based on the parity-check measurement or controlled-path and merging gates, are not employed in our schemes. In the controlled-path gate, the paths of the target photon are conditionally controlled by the control photon, and these two paths can be merged back into one by using a merging gate. Only one half-wave plate is employed in our scheme for the controlled-phase-flip gate. Compared with the conventional synthesis procedures for constructing a controlled-controlled-phase-flip gate, the cost of which is two controlled-path gates and two merging gates, or six controlled-not gates, our scheme is more compact and simpler. Our schemes could be performed with a high fidelity and high efficiency with current achievable experimental techniques.

  19. Predicting Factors of Drop Out Counseling Process in University Psychological Counseling and Guidance Center

    Omer OZER

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predicting factors the drop out the counseling process. Methods: The study group consists of 555 college students admitted to a Counseling and Guidance Center (CGC and participated in at least one session of counseling after the first view in the 2013-2014 academic year. As a data collection tool, an “Application Form” on the demographic information and the “Brief Symptom Inventory” was applied to the students; and independent samples t-test and binary logistic regression techniques were used in the analysis of the collected data. Results: According to the analysis results, the age of the students attending the counseling process was found to be higher than those who drop out, but no significant difference was found in their psychometric properties in terms of continuation of the counseling process. Only the age of clients and their previous psychiatric help history was found to predict the dropping out counseling process early. Conclusion: Drop outs are less frequently observed in clients having a previous psychiatric help experience. In addition, it was determined that older clients less frequently drop out the counseling process

  20. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1996 - March 31, 1997

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator has been operated successfully from April, 1996 to January, 1997. Although the operation of the accelerator became unstable in the middle of January, it was a short period. The research in the Tandem Accelerator Center covers wide fields, that is, polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions, the nonresonant breakup of Li-7, the further refinement of the CDCC theory, fusion and fission in heavy ion reactions, nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam {gamma} ray spectroscopy, solid state physics using fast ion bemas, Moessbauer effect, NMR, the application of accelerated ion beams to PIXE, and accelerator mass spectrometry. In addition, two major installations were carried out in this academic year. One is a small tandem accelerator which was moved from Electrotechnical Laboratory in Tsukuba, and the other is a system for the production and analysis of atomic clusters. The research activities at the accelerator and experimental facilities and on experimental nuclear physics, theoretical nuclear physics, atomic and solid state physics, cluster science, and ion beam application are reported in this book. Also the list of the publications by these groups is given. Ph. D. and M. Sc. theses are listed, and the speakers and the titles of seminars are reported. (K.I.)

  1. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1996 - March 31, 1997

    The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator has been operated successfully from April, 1996 to January, 1997. Although the operation of the accelerator became unstable in the middle of January, it was a short period. The research in the Tandem Accelerator Center covers wide fields, that is, polarization phenomena in nuclear reactions, the nonresonant breakup of Li-7, the further refinement of the CDCC theory, fusion and fission in heavy ion reactions, nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam γ ray spectroscopy, solid state physics using fast ion bemas, Moessbauer effect, NMR, the application of accelerated ion beams to PIXE, and accelerator mass spectrometry. In addition, two major installations were carried out in this academic year. One is a small tandem accelerator which was moved from Electrotechnical Laboratory in Tsukuba, and the other is a system for the production and analysis of atomic clusters. The research activities at the accelerator and experimental facilities and on experimental nuclear physics, theoretical nuclear physics, atomic and solid state physics, cluster science, and ion beam application are reported in this book. Also the list of the publications by these groups is given. Ph. D. and M. Sc. theses are listed, and the speakers and the titles of seminars are reported. (K.I.)

  2. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1997 - March 31, 1998

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    This report briefly described the investigations performed during the period from April 1997 to March 1998 in Tandem Accelerator Center. The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator was reconstructed and the first beam test was carried out in Nov. 1997. In nuclear physics, the measurement of total reaction cross sections, the non-resonant breakup of {sup 7}Li and {sup 9}Be, the investigation of hole states via (p,d) reaction, nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam {gamma} ray spectroscopy and the study of the three dimensional cranking model have been performed. In interdisciplinary fields, the development of AMS system has been continued. The trace element analysis of mineral samples has been carried out by means of PIXE with the proton beam which was focused on the sample as narrow as 50 {mu}m{sup 2}. The hydrogen analysis using H({sup 19}F,{alpha}{gamma}) reaction has been started aiming at the extension of the measurement of depth profile down to a few tens of {mu}m deep region. (M.N.)

  3. Annual report of the Tandem Accelerator Center, University of Tsukuba. April 1, 1997 - March 31, 1998

    This report briefly described the investigations performed during the period from April 1997 to March 1998 in Tandem Accelerator Center. The 12 UD Pelletron tandem accelerator was reconstructed and the first beam test was carried out in Nov. 1997. In nuclear physics, the measurement of total reaction cross sections, the non-resonant breakup of 7Li and 9Be, the investigation of hole states via (p,d) reaction, nuclear structure physics by means of in-beam γ ray spectroscopy and the study of the three dimensional cranking model have been performed. In interdisciplinary fields, the development of AMS system has been continued. The trace element analysis of mineral samples has been carried out by means of PIXE with the proton beam which was focused on the sample as narrow as 50 μm2. The hydrogen analysis using H(19F,αγ) reaction has been started aiming at the extension of the measurement of depth profile down to a few tens of μm deep region. (M.N.)

  4. Update and Expansion of the Center of Automotive Technology Excellence Under the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Irick, David

    2012-08-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its seventh year of operation under this agreement, its thirteenth year in total. During this period the Center has involved eleven GATE Fellows and three GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center’s focus area: Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Control Systems. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $2,000,000.

  5. The Potential of the Market for the Kyoto Mechanisms

    The Kyoto Protocol is the first international environmental agreement to set legally binding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions targets and timetables for Annex I countries. It incorporates emissions trading and two project-based flexibility mechanisms, namely joint implementation (JI) and the clean development mechanism (CDM) to help Annex I countries to meet their Kyoto targets at a lower overall cost. The extent to which their compliance cost can be lowered depends on the size of the market for all three flexibility mechanisms under the Protocol. This article estimates the size of such a market and demonstrates that restrictions on the use of flexibility mechanisms not only reduce potential of the Annex I countries' efficiency gains, but are furthermore not beneficial to developing countries since they restrict the total financial flows to developing countries under the CDM. Thus, from the perspective of husbanding the world's limited resources, the fewer the restrictions on the use of flexibility mechanisms, the greater are the gains from their use

  6. The compatibility of flexible instruments under the Kyoto Protocol

    The compatibility of the Kyoto Protocol flexible instruments and the lessons that can be learned form the AIJ-phase (AIJ stands for Activities Implemented Jointly) are discussed. The key point to be made is that there may be various applications of flexible instruments which can create situations where the various instruments would crowd out each other. On the other hand, applying flexible instruments may create a leverage for Parties in terms of achieving domestic environmental objectives. In addition, several issues related to the implementation of Joint Implementation (JI) , Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and international emissions trading are discussed. The issues concern mainly those that have been included in the working programme on flexible instruments for CoP4 and CoP5 (CoP stands for Convention of Parties). As such the report discusses the consequences of possible negotiations outcomes at CoP for the effectiveness of flexible instruments, Parties' capabilities to achieve their Kyoto Protocol commitments cost-effectively, and the role of the private sector on the national and international credits markets(s). 106 refs

  7. Implementing the Kyoto Protocol. The role of environmental agreements

    Torvanger, Asbjoern; Skodvin, Tora

    1999-09-01

    This report examines under what circumstances voluntary agreements to curb greenhouse gas emissions could be an attractive policy option from the government`s perspective. The report begins by defining the term Environmental Agreement (EA) and then explores EAs in three steps: (1) Advantages and disadvantages of EAs compared to other policy tools (direct regulation, taxes and tradable permits), based on theoretical studies and experience from practical use, (2) The potential of EAs as an international policy tool, either in a bilateral or regional setting, (3) The attractiveness of EAs to implement the Kyoto Protocol, and the relation to joint implementation and international emissions trading. The main conclusions are: (1) Experience from OECD countries suggests that EAs are most attractive as a supplement to traditional command and control, or to market-based policy tools. (2) Skillful design of EAs can improve their efficiency. (3) Bilateral EAs is an interesting policy option to regulate pollution from other countries. (4) Regional EAs are rare but could have important advantages. (5) EAs can play a role in a soft transition stage from traditional command and control to domestic emission trading, and further on to a Kyoto Protocol regime of emission trading and joint implementation. 52 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. The road from Kyoto : A U.S. industry view

    An American industry perspective of the Kyoto Protocol and its ability to produce a viable solution to global warming was offered. The Protocol would require most industrialized nations (including Canada and the United States) to cut their carbon dioxide emissions by 6 to 8 per cent below 1990 levels by year 2008 to 2012. Developing countries would not have to meet this target. It was argued that this set of targets and timetables assumes that climate risks are known with great certainty, when in fact, the long term risks of climate change are highly uncertain and near-term risks are small. It was also argued that developing countries account for more than half of the growth in CO2 emissions, therefore, their exemption from the Kyoto Protocol would make the Protocol ineffective against even a moderate warming scenario. Furthermore, the Protocol has the potential to create reactionary incentives for energy-intensive industries to move their facilities and jobs to countries without the curbs on CO2 emissions. It was suggested that a better climate policy would include all countries in CO2 reductions. It would be less expensive to achieve a target CO2 atmospheric concentration by curbing emissions slowly at first, developing technology to do so more cheaply and moving more aggressively in later years. The reality is that if the climate policy is too expensive, it is less practical and more difficult to achieve, both economically and politically. 1 tab., 2 figs

  9. Observation of immuno-labeled cells at high resolution using soft X-ray microscope at Ritsumeikan University SR Center

    Yamamoto, A.; Takemoto, K.; Fukui, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Okuno, K.; Namba, H.; Kihara, H.

    2009-09-01

    Mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 cells were labeled with the heavy metal (silver and gold) and observed intracellular structure under an X-ray microscope. Microtubules, Golgi apparatus and early endosomes of NIH3T3 cells were stained with immuno-gold nanoparticles, and immuno-staining was intensified by silver or gold enhancement procedure. Using a transmission soft X-ray microscope beamline (BL12) at Ritsumeikan University SR center, we observed immuno-stained NIH3T3 cells with several wavelengths just below and above oxygen edge (λ = 2.32 nm). Using this method, cytoskeleton (microtubules) and organelles (Golgi apparatus and early endosomes) were successfully imaged with high resolution. Thus, immuno-gold silver and gold enhancement technique is useful for specific labeling of intracellular structure under an X-ray microscope.

  10. Beyond the Letter of the Law: Accessibility, Universal Design, and Human-Centered Design in Video Tutorials

    Amanda S. Clossen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article demonstrates how Universal and Human-Centered Design approaches can be applied to the process of library video tutorial creation in order to enhance accessibility. A series of questions that creators should consider in order to focus their design process is discussed. These questions break down various physical and cognitive limitations that users encounter, providing a framework for future video creation that is not dependent on specific software. By approaching accommodations more holistically, videos are created with accessibility in mind from their conception. Working toward the ideal of a video tutorial that is accessible to every user leads to the creation of more clearly worded, effective learning objects that are much more inclusive, making instructional concepts available to users of all abilities.

  11. Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center. Twenty-first progress report, January 1-December 31, 1984

    The Nuclear Science Center is operated by the Texas Engineering Experiment Station as a service to the Texas A and M University System and the State of Texas. The facility is available to the University, other educational institutions, governmental agencies, and private organizations and individuals. Reactor utilization decreased from 1983 as indicated by a slightly smaller number of samples irradiated and of total irradiations. Core VIII, established in December 1982, was used throughout 1984. Several major facility projects modifications, and improvements were completed during the past year. Experimentally the Beam Port No. 4 reflector and shutter was improved, the pulsing instrumentation is being expanded, and the pneumatic system controller developed for Lab No. 4 is now in use in the Center for Trace Characterization (CTC) and Shell Development labs. Several operational problems occurred in 1984 but did not result in a significant loss of reactor operating time. During this reporting period there were no changes made to the site area; however, there has been made a proposal to extend the runway at nearby Easterwood Airport such tha larger aircraft can be accommodated. This extension should occur in 1985 and should have no affect on the air traffic patterns relative to the NSC. Administratively during 1984 efforts have been made to stabilize the reactor operations staff following the mid year resignations of both a Reactor Supervisor and Manager of Reactor Operations. A long term replacement has been hired to fill the vacated Reactor Supervisor position; however, the manager position has not yet been filled and those duties have been assumed by the Assistant Director

  12. Increasing Internal Stakeholder Consensus about a University Science Center's Outreach Policies and Procedures

    Fisher, Richard D.

    For decades the United States has tried to increase the number of students pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and careers. Educators and policy makers continue to seek strategies to increase the number of students in the STEM education pipeline. Public institutions of higher education are involved in this effort through education and public outreach (EPO) initiatives. Arizona State University opened its largest research facility, the new Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV (ISTB4) in September, 2012. As the new home of the School of Earth & Space Exploration (SESE), ISTB4 was designed to serve the school's dedication to K-12 education and public outreach. This dissertation presents a menu of ideas for revamping the EPO program for SESE. Utilizing the Delphi method, I was able to clarify which ideas would be most supported, and those that would not, by a variety of important SESE stakeholders. The study revealed that consensus exists in areas related to staffing and expansion of free programming, whereas less consensus exist in the areas of fee-based programs. The following most promising ideas for improving the SESE's EPO effort were identified and will be presented to SESE's incoming director in July, 2013: (a) hire a full-time director, theater manager, and program coordinator; (b) establish a service-learning requirement obligating undergraduate SESE majors to serve as docent support for outreach programs; (c) obligate all EPO operations to advise, assist, and contribute to the development of curricula, activities, and exhibits; (d) perform a market and cost analysis of other informational education venues offering similar programming; (3) establish a schedule of fee-based planetarium and film offerings; and (f) create an ISTB4 centric, fee-based package of programs specifically correlated to K12 education standards that can be delivered as a fieldtrip experience.

  13. Service Center for Climate Change Adaptation in Agriculture - an initiative of the University of West Hungary

    Matyas, Cs.; Berki, I.; Drüszler, A.; Eredics, A.; Galos, B.; Moricz, N.; Rasztovits, E.

    2012-04-01

    In whole Central Europe agricultural production is highly vulnerable and sensitive to impacts of projected climatic changes. The low-elevation regions of the Carpathian Basin (most of the territory of Hungary), where precipitation is the minimum factor of production, are especially exposed to climatic extremes, especially to droughts. Rainfed agriculture, animal husbandry on nature-close pastures and nature-close forestry are the most sensitive sectors due to limited possibilities to counterbalance moisture supply constraints. These sectors have to be best prepared to frequency increase of extreme events, disasters and economic losses. So far, there is a lack of information about the middle and long term consequences on regional and local level. Therefore the importance of complex, long term management planning and of land use optimation is increasing. The aim of the initiative is to set up a fine-scale, GIS-based, complex, integrated system for the definition of the most important regional and local challenges and tasks of climate change adaptation and mitigation in agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry and also nature protection. The Service Center for Climate Change Adaptation in Agriculture is planned to provide the following services: § Complex, GIS-supported database, which integrates the basic information about present and projected climates, extremes, hydrology and soil conditions; § Evaluation of existing satellite-based and earth-based monitoring systems; § GIS-supported information about the future trends of climate change impacts on the agroecological potential and sensitivity status on regional and local level (e.g. land cover/use and expectable changes, production, water and carbon cycle, biodiversity and other ecosystem services, potential pests and diseases, tolerance limits etc.) in fine-scale horizontal resolution, based first of all on natural produce, including also social and economic consequences; § Complex decision supporting system on regional and local scale for middle- and long term adaptation and mitigation strategies, providing information on optimum technologies and energy balances. Cooperation with already existing Climate Service Centres and national and international collaboration in monitoring and research are important elements of the activity of the Centre. In the future, the Centre is planned to form part of a national information system on climate change adaptation and mitigation, supported by the Ministry of Development. Keywords: climate change impacts, forestry, rainfed agriculture, animal husbandry

  14. Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling (CEMM) University of Utah SAPP 2007. Final Status Report

    During the third and final period of this grant, our goal was to refine the algorithmic approaches used to detect and visualize magnetic islands and their corresponding null points within both the NIMROD and M3D data sets. We refined our geometric approach, which gave a greater confidence in the accuracy of the Poincareplots created. The final results are best demonstrated through Figures 2-6 attached to the report. Technical details this work was reported in both the Physics and Visualization communities. The algorithms used to analyze the magnetic field lines and detect magnetic islands have been packaged into a library and were used within the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment which is being used by members of the CEMM for visualization. In addition, the library interface was developed so that it could be used by both the NIMROD and M3D codes directly. Thus allowing the fusion scientist to perform this analysis while their simulations were actively running. The use of the library for analysis and visualization was not limited to just within the CEMM SciDAC. Other groups such as the SciDAC for the Simulation of Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics using Silo code have used the tools for the analysis of their simulations, Figure 1. Though the funding of this project had concluded there is still much work to be performed on this analysis. The techniques developed are fast and robust when not in the presence of chaos. Magnetic field lines that are near the separatrices where chaos is most often present can be difficult to analyze yet these are the field lines that are greatest interest. We believe that investigating and developing techniques based on time frequency analysis may hold some promise. Two other issues that need to be address is the ability to automatically search for the magnetic islands and the ability to track the development of the magnetic islands over time. Our initial effort into automatically searching for the islands did not prove as robust as hoped and required more effort than could be allocated. These areas as well as other issues related to 'orbit analysis' are of interest to many members within of each of the Fusion SciDAC Centers and should be the subject of continuing SAPs such as this one.

  15. The Study of Quality of Life in Aphasic Stroke Patients in University- Medical Centers of Hamedan

    M. Mazdeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and ObjectivesAs clinical improvement of patients surviving stroke is frequently incomplete and is followed by residual neurologic deficit, evaluation of the consequent function of these patients in three respects i.e; physical, social and emotional, which are considered as quality of life is useful in decision making for health care providers. Since few studies have been carried out in this regard, the aim of the present study was to obtain the average life quality score in four levels in aphasic stroke patients and comparing it with the quality of life score of the healthy population which is 5.Methods This study was a descriptive-cross sectional research carried out on 105 aphasic stroke patients referring to medical centers in Hamadan, Iran. Their diagnoses were confirmed by clinical and radiological findings. These patients were eligible for the study and had survived the stroke for at least six months. Sampling was non randomized and goal-oriented. Dependent variables included psychological, communicational, energy and physical status of the patients measured quantitatively. Data were gathered using the SAQOL-39 questionnaire.Results In this study the female population (58.1% was greater than the male. The greater number of the aphasic patients (42% was between 71 to 85 years old and the smallest number (6.7% was between 39 to 50 years old. The greatest average score of life quality in the studied patients was related to the psychological state (2.17, while the smallest was related to the energy state (1.49. Average score of the life quality in the total population of the studied patients was calculated to be (1.88.ConclusionThe findings of the present study can lead to special supportive measures with the aim of improving life quality in aphasic stroke patients. We suggest that life quality of the patient after stroke should be compared to his/her own quality of life before stroke. Because there is no special service for care providers of stroke patients, an international program should be planned so that by reducing stress, they could have a better relation with the patients.Keywords: Life Quality; Stroke; Aphasia.

  16. Strong leadership and teamwork drive culture and performance change: Ohio State University Medical Center 2000-2006.

    Sanfilippo, Fred; Bendapudi, Neeli; Rucci, Anthony; Schlesinger, Leonard

    2008-09-01

    Several characteristics of academic health centers have the potential to create high levels of internal conflict and misalignment that can pose significant leadership challenges. In September 2000, the positions of Ohio State University (OSU) senior vice president for health sciences, dean of the medical school, and the newly created position of chief executive officer of the OSU Medical Center (OSUMC) were combined under a single leader to oversee the OSUMC. This mandate from the president and trustees was modeled after top institutions with similar structures. The leader who assumed the role was tasked with improving OSUMC's academic, clinical, and financial performance. To achieve this goal, the senior vice president and his team employed the service value chain model of improving performance, based on the premise that leadership behavior/culture drives employee engagement/satisfaction, leading to customer satisfaction and improved organizational performance. Implementing this approach was a seven-step process: (1) selecting the right leadership team, (2) assessing the challenges and opportunities, (3) setting expectations for performance and leadership behavior, (4) aligning structures and functions, (5) engaging constituents, (6) developing leadership skills, and (7) defining strategies and tracking goals. The OSUMC setting during this period provides an observational case study to examine how these stepwise changes, instituted by strong leadership and teamwork, were able to make and implement sound decisions that drove substantial and measurable improvements in the engagement and satisfaction of faculty and staff; the satisfaction of students and patients; and academic, clinical, and financial performance. PMID:18728440

  17. Production of Astatine-211 at the Duke University Medical Center for its regional distribution

    Zalutsky, Michael [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Systemic targeted radiation therapy and radioimmunotherapy continue to be important tools in the treatment of certain cancers. Because of their high energy and short path length, alpha particle emitters such as 211At are more effective than either external beam x- ray or in vivo beta radiation in delivering potentially curative doses of radiation. The limited clinical trials that have been conducted to date have yielded encouraging responses in some patients, e.g., malignant brain tumors. In order to escalate the additional necessary research and development in radiochemistry, radiobiology and efficacy evaluation of alpha particle radiotherapeutics, it is universally agreed that access to an affordable, reliable supply of 211At is warranted. In conjunction with the Department of Energy's intent to enhance stable and radioactive isotope availability for research applications, it is the primary objective of this project to improve 211At production and purification capabilities at Duke so that this radionuclide can be supplied to researchers at other institutions throughout the US.The most widely used 211At production method involves the α,2n reaction on Bismuth using a cyclotron with beams ≤ 28 MeV. Yields can be enhanced with use of an internal target that allows for a higher alpha fluence plus efficient heat dissipation in the target. Both of these items are in place at Duke; however, in order to support production for multi-institutional use, irradiation campaigns in excess of 50 µAp and four hours duration will be needed. Further, post-irradiation processing equipment is lacking that will enable the distribution process. Financial support is sought for i) a shielded, ventilated processing/containment hood; ii) development of a post-irradiation target retrieval system; iii) fabrication of a 211At distillation and recovery module and iv) a performance review and, where needed, an enhancement of seven major subsystems that comprise the CS-30 Cyclotron. With these modifications in place, routine production of ≥200 mCi of At-211 should be readily achievable, given our methodological development of At-211 target preparation, internal target irradiation and dry distillation to recover the radionuclide.

  18. Informing Science (IS and Science and Technology Studies (STS: The University as Decision Center (DC for Teaching Interdisciplinary Research

    Teresa Castelao-Lawless

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Students of history and philosophy of science courses at my University are either naïve robust realists or naïve relativists in relation to science and technology. The first group absorbs from culture stereotypical conceptions, such as the value-free character of the scientific method, that science and technology are impervious to history or ideology, and that science and religion are always at odds. The second believes science and technology were selected arbitrarily by ideologues to have privileged world views of reality to the detriment of other interpretations. These deterministic outlooks must be challenged to make students aware of the social importance of their future roles, be they as scientists and engineers or as science and technology policy decision makers. The University as Decision Center (DC not only reproduces the social by teaching standard solutions to well-defined problems but also provides information regarding conflict resolution and the epistemological, individual, historical, social, and political mechanisms that help create new science and technology. Interdisciplinary research prepares students for roles that require science and technology literacy, but raises methodological issues in the context of the classroom as it increases uncertainty with respect to apparently self-evident beliefs about scientific and technological practices.

  19. Accreditation the Education Development Centers of Medical-Sciences Universities: Another Step toward Quality Improvement in Education

    M Mohagheghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: : In order to improve the quality of education in universities of medical sciences (UMS, and because of the key role of education development centers (EDCs, an accreditation scheme was developed to evaluate their performance.Method: A group of experts in the medical education field was selected based on pre-defined criteria by EDC of Ministry of Health and Medical education. The team, worked intensively for 6 months to develop a list of essential standards to assess the performance of EDCs. Having checked for the content validity of standards, clear and measurable indicators were created via consensus. Then, required information were collected from UMS EDCs; the first round of accreditation was carried out just to check the acceptability of this scheme, and make force universities to prepare themselves for the next factual round of accreditation.Results: Five standards domains were developed as the conceptual framework for defining main categories of indicators. This included: governing and leadership, educational planning, faculty development, assessment and examination and research in education. Nearly all of UMS filled all required data forms precisely with minimum confusion which shows the practicality of this accreditation scheme.Conclusion: It seems that the UMS have enough interest to provide required information for this accreditation scheme. However, in order to receive promising results, most of universities have to work intensively in order to prepare minimum levels in all required standards. However, it seems that in long term, implementation of a valid accreditation scheme plays an important role in improvement of the quality of medical education around the country.

  20. Kyoto Protocol, constraint or opportunity for coal based electricity producers

    Coming into force of Kyoto Protocol (KP) in February 2005, as a result of its signing by Russian Federation, created the lawfulness of its provisions and mechanisms in order to reduce the average emission of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) at a global level down to 5.2 %. Passing this environment problem from a constrained area (regulations, directives) to an opportunity area (business) created the possibility that the achievement of KP objectives to be not an exclusive financial task of 'polluting actors', but opened the opportunity of bringing on stage all the necessary elements of a modern business environment: banks, investments from founds companies, consultants, buyers, sellers, stocks exchange. Until now, the investments and emissions transactions based by KP mechanisms at the worldwide level was focused on renewable energy area. Because for the most of countries, including Romania, the production of electricity based on fossil fuels (special coal) is one of the main option, bringing the KP mechanisms in operation in this area is difficult for at least two reasons: - the investments are huge; - the emissions reduction is not spectacular. In these circumstances, this paper gives an overview of the present GHG emission market, transaction mechanisms on this market and of the ways through which coal based electricity producers from Romania can access this market. We consider that the filtration of the information in this area from electricity producer point of view makes the content of this paper a good start for a new approach of environment management and its conversion from constraint (financial resources consumer) to opportunity ( financial resources producer). The paper contains are as follows: 1. Kyoto Protocol at a glance; 2. Emission trading mechanisms; 2.1. Transaction mechanisms under KP; 2.1.1. Joint Implementation (JI); 2.1.2 Clean Development Mechanism (CDM); 2.1.3. Emissions Trading (ET); 2.2. Other transactions mechanisms; 2.2.1. European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU-ETS); 2.2.2. Green Investment Scheme (GIS); 3. GHG emissions reduction present market; 3.1. The projects based market; 3.2. Permissions market; 4. Romanian coal based energy producers, which way to follow up?; 5. Conclusions. In conclusion, in the present paper authors make an analysis of environmental constraints to opportunities transformation, suggesting the directions and possibilities to finance the environmental projects using the Kyoto Protocol mechanisms in the particular case of coal based energy producers from Oltenia area. The authors, consider that for these large producers the most suitable mechanism is at the moment the Green Investments Scheme and after adhesion of Romania to EU, the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme

  1. Dōmo arigatō Kyoto: four key lessons from the Kyoto Protocol for a new agreement in Paris 2015

    Morel, Romain; Shishlov, Igor; Bellassen, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    The results from the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol (KP) show that developed countries fulfilled their commitments through varied strategies. However, the Kyoto protocol did not manage to stabilize global GHG concentrations; furthermore its direct impact on domestic emissions reductions is unclear. Nevertheless, the KP has likely paved the way for a low-carbon transition by establishing international standards on emissions monitoring and on emission reductions projects. Yet, do...

  2. PENERAPAN KONSEP FUZZY DALAM VARIABLE-CENTERED INTELLIGENT RULE SYSTEM (Studi Kasus: Pemilihan Jurusan di Chinese University of Hongkong

    Irfan Subakti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Variable-Centered Intelligent Rule System (VCIRS is a system which is inspired by Rule-based System (RBS and Ripple Down Rules (RDR. The system architecture is adapted from RBS, while from RDR this system obtained its advantages. The system organized Rule Base (RB in a special structure so that easy knowledge building, powerful knowledge inferencing and evolutionally system performance refining can be obtained in the same time. In this paper, the architecture of VCIRS is used to build an expert system for helping students to choose a department at a university. The application of this expert system is able to handle fuzzy concepts (e.g., such as good, high or rather high which is a prominent part of sentences in natural language. This system is able to cope with exact values, fuzzy (or inexact values and combined reasoning, allowing fuzzy and normal terms to be freely mixed in the rules and facts. An application example in this paper is a RBS which is employed fuzzy logic and fuzzy number for inexact reasoning. It uses two inexact basic concepts, i.e., fuzziness and uncertainty. A case study presented here is the department admission at Chinese University of Hongkong, formed in a RB containing with fuzzy and normal terms. From experiments performed, there's the proper result obtained comparing with the result from Z-II system (i.e., a comprehensive expert system builder tool developed by Chinese University of Hongkong which is this paper refers to. So that the conclusion is a fuzzy VCIRS proposed here, is working properly and producing the right and true results. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Variable-Centered Intelligent Rule System (VCIRS adalah sistem yang terinspirasi dari Rule-based System (RBS dan Ripple Down Rules (RDR. Arsitektur sistem diadaptasi dari RBS dan ia mengambil kelebihan-kelebihan dari RDR. Sistem ini mengorganisasikan basis aturan dalam sebuah struktur yang spesial sehingga kemudahan pembangunan pengetahuan, penelusuran pengetahuan yang kuat, dan perbaikan unjuk kerja sistem yang selalu berkembang dapat diperoleh pada waktu yang sama. Dalam paper ini, arsitektur VCIRS dimanfaatkan untuk membangun sebuah sistem pakar yang dapat membantu calon mahasiswa memilih jurusan pada suatu Perguruan Tinggi. Aplikasi sistem pakar ini dapat menangani konsep fuzzy seperti good, high, atau rather high, yang merupakan bagian kalimat yang sangat berarti dalam bahasa sehari-hari. Sistem ini dapat menangani nilai yang tepat/teliti, nilai fuzzy (atau tidak tepat/tidak teliti, dan jenis pertimbangan gabungan, serta mengijinkan istilah fuzzy dan istilah normal untuk digabungkan secara bebas dalam aturan dan fakta. Contoh aplikasi dalam paper ini adalah sebuah sistem berbasis aturan yang menggunakan logika fuzzy dan bilangan fuzzy untuk jenis pertimbangan yang tidak tepat/tidak teliti. Sistem ini menggunakan dua konsep dasar ketidaktepatan/ketidaktelitian, yaitu fuzziness dan uncertainty. Kasus dalam penelian ini adalah pemilihan jurusan di Chinese University of Hongkong dalam bentuk basis aturan yang didalamnya mengandung istilah fuzzy dan istilah normal. Dari uji coba yang dilakukan, didapat hasil yang sesuai dengan hasil dari sistem Z-II, yaitu alat bantu pembangun sistem pakar komprehensif yang dikembangkan di Chinese University of Hongkong, yang menjadi acuan dari paper ini. Sehingga dapat disimpulkan bahwa fuzzy VCIRS dapat bekerja dengan baik, serta memberikan hasil yang benar dan dapat dipercaya. Kata kunci: rule-based systems, VCIRS, knowledge building, knowledge inferencing, knowledge refining, logika fuzzy, bilangan fuzzy.

  3. Venemaa vehib Kyoto trumpässaga / Jüri Piirisild

    Piirisild, Jüri

    2004-01-01

    1997. aastal vastuvõetud Kyoto protokoll, mis peaks panema piiri Maa atmosfääri saastamisele ja sellega otseselt seotud kliima soojenemisele, pole siiani vajalikku arvu ratifitseerimisallkirju saanud. Kui Venemaa lepingule alla kirjutab, saab vajalik arv allkirju kokku ning Kyoto lepingu täitmine muutub kohustuslikuks

  4. Una aproximació al protocol de Kyoto i al desenvolupament sostenible

    Associació Ide@Sostenible

    2005-01-01

    Davant de la perspectiva de l’entrada en vigor de l’anomenat protocol de Kyoto el passat 16 de Febrer, es fa necessari analitzar què és el protocol de Kyoto i quin paper hi juga realment el Desenvolupament Sostenible, per a esbrinar el perquè de tot plegat.

  5. From Kyoto to Bonn: implications and opportunities for renewable energy

    The article discusses the need for the uptake of renewable energy sources to increase to meet the commitments made in Bonn in July for compliance with the Kyoto Protocol. The article is presented under the sub-headings of: (i) the Bonn Agreement; (ii) implications and opportunities for renewable energy; (iii) the commercialisation and mainstreaming of renewable energy technologies; (iv) greenhouse gas-reducing projects (v) renewable portfolio standards and renewable certificate trading programmes; (vi) increased funding for product and technology development; (vii) emissions trading; (viii) domestic legislation and initiatives; (ix) regulatory effects in Annex I countries specifically impacting renewable energy (UK, Germany, Australia, EU Renewable Energy Law) and (x) US efforts in the absence of a national climate policy

  6. The emperor's new clothes. Redressing the Kyoto Protocol

    US President Bush repudiated the Kyoto Protocol because, in his view, it is 'fatally flawed in fundamental ways'. This paper evaluates seven proposals to redress the protocol according to their potential to deal with three key issues that have reinforced US intransigence: hot air, cost uncertainty and developing country participation. It argues that negotiations on intensity targets hold the most promise. Because intensity targets limit hot air, but do not limit economic growth, and a high variance of carbon intensity exists among countries with similar GDP per capita, intensity targets based on best practice levels might be agreeable to developing countries and the US. If a protocol specifying such targets were implemented, less warming would be associated with larger world GDP than would otherwise be the case, and countries' carbon intensity and emissions per capita would tend to converge to best practice levels at every stage of development

  7. Karl Popper: antes y después de Kyoto

    Zanotti, Gabriel

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Not available.En su último libro sobre Karl Popper, Mariano Artigas plantea una hermenéutica revolucionaria: muestra que la ética de Popper es el fundamento de su epistemología, y que el fundamento de esa ética está lejos del «conjeturalismo» que suele atribuirse a Popper. Artigas analiza qué significa en Popper la «fe irracional en la razón» y utiliza, como fuente inédita, el dramático relato que hace Popper de su relación con W. W. Bartley, por primera vez, en Kyoto, en 1992. Sea cual fuere la opinión del lector, el libro de Artigas divide la hermenéutica de Popper en un antes y un después.

  8. Kyoto and beyond: Meeting the climate change challenge

    In response to Canada's weak performance in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the international negotiations in Kyoto regarding such emissions, the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development has examined the current situation with respect to climate change efforts in Canada. This report begins with background information on global climate change, previous Canadian and international commitments to protect the atmosphere and address the climate change problem, and previous work by the Standing Committee regarding climate change issues. Current government measures to reduce greenhouse gases are then reviewed at Natural Resources Canada, Public Works and Government Services, the Dept. of Finance, and other departments. Finally, recommendations are made which the Committee believes will assist the government in meeting Canada's climate change obligations

  9. Regimes de atmosfera controlada para o armazenamento de caqui ?Kyoto?

    Brackmann Auri; Freitas Sérgio Tonetto de; Giehl Ricardo Fabiano Hettwer; Mello Anderson Machado de; Benedetti Marlova; Oliveira Viviani Ruffo de; Guarienti Affonso José Wietzke

    2004-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de regimes de atmosfera controlada associados ou não com o uso de baixa umidade relativa e com a aplicação pós-colheita de fungicida sobre a conservação da qualidade de caqui ?Kyoto?. Após o período de dois meses de armazenamento refrigerado a -0,5degreesC mais cinco dias a 20masculineC, a firmeza de polpa manteve-se mais elevada nos frutos submetidos a 0,5kPa de O2 e 5kPa de CO2. A maior incidência de podridões ocorreu nos frutos armazenados a 2...

  10. 5 years of experience implementing a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus search and destroy policy at the largest university medical center in the Netherlands

    Vos, Margreet; Behrendt, Myra; Melles, Damian; Mollema, Femke; Groot, Woutrinus; Parlevliet, Gerard; Ott, Alewijn; Horst-Kreft, Deborah; van Belkum, Alex; Verbrugh, Henri

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of a rigorous search and destroy policy for controlling methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonization. DESIGN: Hospital-based observational follow-up study. SETTING: Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, a 1,200-bed tertiary care center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. METHODS: Outbreak control was accomplished by the use of active surveillance cultures for persons at risk, by the preemptive isolation of patients at ...

  11. 29C. The University of Arizona Integrative Health Center: The Development and Testing of a New Business Model for Integrative Primary Care

    Herman, Patricia; Crocker, Robert; Begaye, Dawn; Maizes, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Focus Area: Sustainable Business Models This session will advance the development of sustainable complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) practice models by presenting the business plan for a model integrative primary care clinic, its results to date, and the plan for its continuous evaluation. The Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine recently opened the University of Arizona Integrative Health Center (UAIHC), an adult primary care clinic in Phoenix, Arizona, in affiliation with Distri...

  12. Communication for heath behavior change: experiences lived at the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins University.

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira Monteiro dos SANTOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sharing experiences is the best way to learn and contribute to the construction of knowledge. It is with this intention that arises this article, a result of the lived experience of the author in workshop taught by the Center for Communication Programs - CCP (Communication Programs Center at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, USA, in June 2014. In this workshop intensive of 20 days, with daily classes full-time, the author had the opportunity to study and share experiences with great thinkers and professionals from Johns Hopkins. This promoted contact with the philosophy of the institution and the methodologies they developed and implemented in countries around the world, in order to promote improvements in the health status of populations through strategic planning focused on behavior change communication. This was an experience not just in study and planning communication, but a leadership training experience, withmore aware, engaged and complete professionals and, above all, of self-knowledge and personal growth. An article would not be enough to describe all this experience, so we chose to focus on issues about the institution’s vision on health, the practice of health communication, behavior change and an overview of the essential aspects the methodology developed and used by them, called P process. In this article, the reader will come across a breach of academic theoretical reflections promoted by further technical discussions practices, managerial characteristics. This ends up reflecting the logic implemented by the CCP, which develops the practice based on a broad theoretical framework. And in the same way that the institution does not close in their theories and allows to reinvent itself, this article will also feature the author’s own reflections about some of the issues presented.

  13. Annual report of Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. 1994 (April 1, 1994 - March, 31, 1995)

    This report is a compilation of the research activities and operations of the Research Center For Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, during the period of the academic year 1994, April 1994 to March 1995. RCNP is the national laboratory for nuclear physics in Japan. The AVF cyclotron with K = 0.14GeV and the ring cyclotron with K = 0.4GeV and EP = 0.4GeV are the major user facilities at RCNP. They have been extensively used for studying nuclear nucleon-meson systems. All facilities are open for users from universities and research institutes in Japan as well as those in foreign countries. The research activities at the RCNP cyclotron laboratory include studies of nuclear interactions and nuclear potentials, spin isospin excitations and decays nuclear reaction dynamics and others. Studies of solid state and atomic physics and medical applications were carried out also at the cyclotron laboratory. New external ion sources have been instaled for the injector cyclotron. New extensions of the RCNP research activities are under progress. One is the possible use of the 8 GeV electron storage ring built at the synchrotron radiation laboratory SPring-8. It is located 100 Km west of Osaka. It is expected to start its operation in 1997. The Compton back-scattering of laser photons from the 8 GeV electron beam provides 1-3.5 GeV γ-rays, which are very promising for studying nuclear quark and meson systems. Other is the non-accelerator physics for ultra-rare nuclear processes at the new under ground laboratory 'Ohto Cosmo Observatory'. It is located 100 km south of Osaka. Neutrino studies by investigating double beta decays, dark matter studies by investigating nuclear responses to them, and studies of other weak processes are planned to be studied there. (J.P.N.)

  14. Kyoto and the economics of global warming; Kyoto et l'economie de l'effet de serre

    Guesnerie, R.

    2003-07-01

    This report sheds light on the economic issues surrounding climate change. The objective is to fuel a longer term reflexions. The greenhouse effect raises many questions dealing with economic policy. In particular what is the right agenda for action taking into account the low reversibility of the increasing concentration of greenhouse gases? What about the Kyoto protocol architecture? How to deal with countries that will not participate in the effort for controlling emissions, while enjoying the benefits of the preservation of the climate, a collective good? How to protect the competitiveness of countries that impose environmental constraints on their producers? This report is then discussed by P. Champsaur and A. Lipietz. (A.L.B.)

  15. From Kyoto to Copenhagen: Rethinking the Place of Flexible Mechanisms in the Kyoto Protocol's post 2012 Commitment Period

    Damilola S. Olawuyi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Amidst debates between the North and the South, Emission Trading (ET, Clean Development Mechanism (CDM, and Joint Implementation (JI were adopted as flexible mechanisms under the Kyoto Protocol. These mechanisms allow developed countries to meet their emission reduction targets by investing in clean projects in other countries of their choice. The implementation of these mechanisms have however been faced with many problems which cast doubts on their efficacy as viable options for combating climate change. One main criticism of these mechanisms is that they lead to a trade off between sustainability and emission reduction. This paper examines the efficiency of these mechanisms in combating climate change. It reviews the main criticisms of the flexibility mechanisms in an attempt to answer the question whether the flexibility idea should still be retained as part of the post 2012 commitments. While arguing in favor of flexibility, this paper offers ideas on how their effectiveness can be enhanced in the post 2012 commitment period.

  16. Kyoto or non-Kyoto - people or politics: results of recent public opinion surveys on energy and climate change

    Full text: We present the results of a survey of an Australian public opinion survey in the area of climate change and energy technologies and compare the results with similar studies conducted in the other major non-Kyoto-adherent party, the United States, as well as to Kyoto-adherent countries including the UK, Japan, Sweden and Spain. We explore some of the differences and similarities in attitudes and understandings. In our survey, Australians place environment, health care and petrol prices as the most important issues facing their country, while in America it is terrorism, health care and the economy and in the UK it is asylum seekers, crime and health care. In many other areas, the differences are considerably smaller and there are some remarkable similarities. Whereas climate change is increasingly cited as the leading environmental issue in most countries surveyed, in Australia, climate change is second to water availability as the top environmental concern. The study examines where climate change and energy technologies fit within these broader national and environmental priorities and identifies the general public's preferred solutions. We find clear support in Australia and the other countries surveyed for renewable energy technologies, particularly solar energy and to a lesser extent wind and biomass energy. We also find considerable disagreement in all countries regarding the future of nuclear power as well as with regard to carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies (albeit the latter with much larger uncertainty). The paper also explores the current knowledge levels of the general public in a number of countries about carbon dioxide emissions and how much as individuals, they are prepared to pay to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. We find that, in general, at a more detailed level in terms of both attitudes and understandings of energy and climate issues there is considerable agreement across disparate countries Gudged on their national climate policies)

  17. Immunosuppressive effects of the standardized extract of Phyllanthus amarus on cellular immune responses in Wistar-Kyoto rats

    Ilangkovan M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Menaga Ilangkovan, Ibrahim Jantan, Mohamed Ahmed Mesaik, Syed Nasir Abbas BukhariDrug and Herbal Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaAbstract: Phyllanthus amarus (family: Euphorbiaceae is of immense interest due to its wide spectrum of biological activities. In the present study, the standardized 80% ethanol extract of P.amarus was investigated for its modulatory activity on various cellular immune parameters, including chemotaxis of neutrophils, engulfment of Escherichia coli by neutrophils, and Mac-1 expression, in leukocytes isolated from treated/nontreated Wistar-Kyoto rats. The detailed cell-mediated activity of P.amarus was also investigated, including analysis of the effects on T- and B-cell proliferation and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in splenic mononuclear cells, and estimation of serum cytokine production by activated T-cells. The main components of the extract, phyllanthin, hypophyllanthin, corilagin, geraniin, ellagic acid, and gallic acid were identified and quantitatively analyzed in the extracts, using validated reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC methods. N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP-induced neutrophils isolated from rats administered with the extract of P.amarus, at doses ranging from 100 to 400 mg/kg for 14 days, revealed a significant dose-dependent reduction in neutrophil migration (P<0.05. Similar patterns of inhibition were also observed in phagocytic activity and in fMLP-induced changes in expression of ?2 integrin polymorphonuclear neutrophils. The results in P.amarus-treated rats also demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibition of both lipopolysaccharide-stimulated B-cell proliferation and concanavalin Astimulated T-cell proliferation as compared with sensitized control. At a dose of 400 mg/kg (P<0.01, there was a significant decrease in the (% expression of CD4+ and CD8+ in splenocytes and in serum cytokines of T helper (Th1 (IL-2 and IFN-? and Th2 (IL-4. In conclusion, P.amarus showed effective immunosuppressive activities in cellular immune response, by various immune regulatory mechanisms, and may be useful for improvement of immune-related disorders.Keywords: immunosuppression, leukocytes migration, phagocytic activity, splenic mononuclear cells, T- and B-cell proliferation

  18. Lessons learned from vitrification campaigns at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University

    Six vitrification campaigns on surrogate low-level radioactive mixed wastes have been completed at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University. Two glass melters were utilized in these trials: the EnVitco EV-16 Joule heated glass melter and the Stir-Melter WV-0.25 stiffed melter. The quality of glass made in the melters was excellent. In all cases, glass durabilities (measured by the Product Consistency Test - PCT) were much better than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass and leachabilities (measured by Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure - TCLP) were lower than Land Disposal Requirements (LDR). A few processing difficulties were encountered during the melter campaigns. These difficulties were due in part to a desire to obtain high waste loadings and aggressive operation of the melters. Devitrification of the melts was especially evident with high calcium compositions. In the EnVitco melter, corrosion of molybdenum electrodes occurred by alloying with reduced metals in the melt and significant corrosion of flux block refractory occurred when operating at high temperatures. In the stirred melter, rapid degradation of the impeller was observed in two instances likely due to localized melting of Inconel trademark 690 caused by a malfunctioning power supply. The focus of this paper is to describe the performance of the melters and convey open-quotes lessons learnedclose quotes from these campaigns for application to current and future vitrification efforts

  19. Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Katrina Inspired Disaster Screenings (KIDS): Psychometric Testing of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network Hurricane Assessment and Referral Tool

    Hansel, Tonya Cross; Osofsky, Joy D.; Osofsky, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Post disaster psychosocial surveillance procedures are important for guiding effective and efficient recovery. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Katrina Inspired Disaster Screenings (KIDS) is a model designed with the goal of assisting recovering communities in understanding the needs of and targeting services…

  20. A Comparative Study of Illinois State University Elementary Teacher Graduates of the Regular Student Teaching and the Joliet Teacher Education Center Programs 1970-71.

    Fitch, Thomas; Klima, Kenneth

    Student graduates' opinions regarding their teacher preparation programs were surveyed, compared, and evaluated. The two programs studied were the regular student teaching program at Illinois State University (I.S.U.) and the Joliet Teaching Education Center Program (J.T.E.C.). Participants were 75 J.T.E.C. students and 75 students from the I.S.U.

  1. Universe

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  2. Universe

    2008-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help

  3. Cavity QED implementation of non-adiabatic holonomies for universal quantum gates in decoherence-free subspaces with nitrogen-vacancy centers.

    Zhou, Jian; Yu, Wei-Can; Gao, Yu-Mei; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2015-06-01

    A cavity QED implementation of the non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces is proposed with nitrogen-vacancy centers coupled commonly to the whispering-gallery mode of a microsphere cavity, where a universal set of quantum gates can be realized on the qubits. In our implementation, with the assistant of the appropriate driving fields, the quantum evolution is insensitive to the cavity field state, which is only virtually excited. The implemented non-adiabatic holonomies, utilizing optical transitions in the Λ type of three-level configuration of the nitrogen-vacancy centers, can be used to construct a universal set of quantum gates on the encoded logical qubits. Therefore, our scheme opens up the possibility of realizing universal holonomic quantum computation with cavity assisted interaction on solid-state spins characterized by long coherence times. PMID:26072772

  4. Kyoto, the oil sands and the GHG emissions market

    This paper reviews uncertainties in the oil sands industry in relation to climate change, greenhouse gas emissions and the Kyoto Protocol. Other issues contributing to uncertainties in the industry were also discussed, including water and natural gas issues, refinery capacity and markets, price and exchange rates as well as capital availability and project cost overruns. The potential economic impact of the Kyoto Protocol on oil sands was outlined with prices per barrel. Government regulations were examined in the context of the evolving expectations of the Canadian public. U.S. actions on climate change were examined at the federal and state level. Emissions trading systems were reviewed with reference to a post 2012 regime. The 2005 budget was discussed, along with the Canadian legislative agenda and domestic offsets program, as well as the regulatory agenda in June of 2005. Post 2012 issues were examined, including discussions on the next commitment period, with reference to the fact that there was no support for new commitments among developing countries but that domestic pressures was building in the U.S. for air and climate regulations. Pressures from shareholders and the scientific community were discussed. Emissions trading in the European Union was reviewed. Stabilization goals will mean significant cuts to emissions in order to accommodate growth. Scenario planning and climate change uncertainties were also reviewed. The benefits of scenario planning in complex situations were outlined and were seen to encourage the development of strategic options. Issues concerning environmental stewardship and possible responses by the Unites States were discussed. Three scenarios were outlined: that climate change is not man-made and all the problems will go away; that technology will evolve to accommodate changes; and that policy will be insensitive to the economy, technology will lag and the energy sector will be faced with much higher costs. Various risk management strategies were reviewed, including the determining of risk exposures; an evaluation of internal options; hedging of deemed risk via market mechanisms, investments and divestments; and an incorporation of scenarios and market information into capital allocation and operating decisions. A Natsource buyer's pool was presented, with a pool of $200 million to purchase project based compliance instruments aimed at lowest cost compliance. Seven entities are currently committed with $70 million raised. tabs, figs

  5. [Kyoto global consensus report for treatment of Helicobacter pylori and its implications for China].

    Chuan, Xie; Nonghua, Lyu

    2016-05-25

    Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis ( Gut, July 2015) is another important international consensus since the European Maastricht Ⅳ consensus was published. Kyoto consensus will improve the etiology-based classification, the diagnostic assessment of gastritis, and the treatment of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia and H. pylori gastritis. However, because of high rate of H. pylori infection and antibiotic resistance as well as limited health resources in China, we need to develop our own strategies of H. pylori infection control with the reference of the Kyoto global consensus. PMID:27045234

  6. Assessment of supply-demand balance for Kyoto offsets (CERs and ERUs) up to 2020

    Delbosc, Anaïs; Stephan, Nicolas; Bellassen, Valentin; Cormier, Alain; Leguet, Benoît

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to estimate the supply and potential demand as regards Kyoto carbon credits (CER and ERU) up to 2020. Two distinct periods have been pinpointed: 2008-2012, the first commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol, and 2013-2020, the phase when the climate-energy package will be implemented in Europe, and the period for compliance with international commitments agreed in Cancún. Demand for Kyoto credits is estimated at between 2.2 and 4.4 billion for ...

  7. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of family physicians regarding diabetic neuropathy in family practice centers: Suez Canal University

    Nadia Mabrouk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetic neuropathy (DN can affect any part of the nervous system and should be suspected in all patients who have had diabetes for more than 5 years. Family physicians (FPs can play an important role with the care and education of people with diabetes. They can augment the knowledge and motivate the diabetics to acquire a healthy life style, which would further lead to a good glycemic control providing protection from the chronic complications. Lack of compliance with the guidelines on the part of the diabetic subjects, indicates deficiencies in the FPs' knowledge, implementation techniques, and attitude problems. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess FPs' knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding DN for further educational interventions that will improve their quality of care for diabetic patients in family practice centers. Materials and Methods: The study population was 60 FPs working in family practice centers affiliated to Suez Canal University Hospitals. The questionnaire composed of three groups of questions to collect data for evaluation of knowledge, attitude, and practice; two written patient problems to assess their practice and two questions to assess barriers and recommendations of physicians. To pass the evaluation; 50, 80, and 60% were the cut off points to pass the evaluation for knowledge, attitude, and practice, respectively. Results: 48.3, 66.7, and 43.3% of the evaluated FPs passed the knowledge, attitude, and practice assessment, respectively. Eighty-five percent of physicians felt that they need more knowledge and training in DN management. Physicians' qualification (P = 0.037 was a significant variable in passing the knowledge test, but qualification and experience years (P = 0.007 and 0.035, respectively were significant variables in passing the practice test. There was a positive significant (P = 0.021 correlation between practice and knowledge score. Postgraduate knowledge accounts the majority (78.3% as a source of information about DN. Providing physicians with standardized guidelines (81.7%, continuous medical education seminars (76.7% and training courses (76.7% came at the top of physician's recommendations to improve DN care by FPs. Conclusion: This study has identified the need for improvement in family medicine physician practices for treating and educating diabetics and recommended that awareness and educational programs are necessary to update the FPs on screening, effective treatment of diabetes and prevention of DN.

  8. A study on abdomen ultrasonography classified by particular disease practiced in health promotion center of a university hospital

    This study is to get preliminary data for an effectiveness evaluation of abdominal examination and improvement of it. Abnormal cases of abdominal ultrasonography are classified by sex, frequency, diagnosis and age, 4.924 examinees were included at a university hospital of health promotion center from January to December in 1999. The results are as follow. According to the distribution of sex, there are more male patients(55.0%) than females patients (48.0%). for men, 40's showed the highest percentage among examinees. For women, 50's were the highest. The reason that 'they visited the health promotion center was that they wanted to check their health status'. This answers were reported the highest (59.3%). Patients that had abnormal cases of abdominal ultrasonography were 48.3%. Liver, kidney, gallbladder showed the highest percentage of abnormal cases in order of organs. Additionally, abnormal cases were discovered in liver cases. According to the frequency of abnormal cases among examinees, the slight fatty liver were the highest regardless of sex. Men had the slight fatty liver, kidney simple cyst, liver calcification and liver simple cyst in order of abnormal cases. Women showed the slight fatty liver kidney simple cyst, kidney calcification, liver simple cyst, and blood vessel tumor in order of abnormal cases. For the abnormal cases of live by sex and age, the 50's reported the highest number of abnormal cases in men (299 patients). In addition, 60's had the highest of disease rata 47.8%. For women, 50's reported the highest number of abnormal cases (361 patients).. Over 70's patients had the highest of disease rata 52.6%. For kidney, men and women showed the highest number of abnormal cases -62 vs 44 respectively. Over 70's patients had the highest percentage of disease rata -23.2% vs 14.0% respectively. For gallbladder, the number of abnormal cases were the most in men's 60's (31 patients) and in women's in the same age group (32 patients). According to malignant tumor, 17 patients were liver cancer, 2 patients stomach ca and 1pt kidney cancer. The relationship between the malignant tumor and the examination motive was that 'they wanted to check their health status (41.0%)' and 'regular checkup (24.0%)'

  9. [An analysis of mental disorders of international students visiting the Mental Health Service at Tsukuba University Health Center].

    Hori, Takafumi; Tachikawa, Hirokazu; Ishii, Terumi; Shimada, Naoko; Takemori, Tadashi; Lebowitz, Adam; Asadas, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    With the expected increase in the number of international students coming to Japan as part of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology's "300,000 Foreign Student (Global 30) Plan", the demands on university mental health facilities will also increase. However, the rate of mental disorders of recent international students has not been fully evaluated. As part of an initiative to establish effective treatment measures for the mental health of international students, we investigated the present status and recent trends of these students who visited the Mental Health Service (MHS) in the Tsukuba University Health Center. The demographic characteristics, pathway, stress, and diagnosis of international students who visited the MHS from 2005 to 2010 were investigated retrospectively based on medical records. The subjects were 59 international students (15 male, 44 female; mean age: 28.4). The consultation rate of international students was significantly lower than that of Japanese students each year. Although the rate is almost stable in Japanese students (2.1-2.5%), it has increased significantly in international students, from 0.5% in 2005 to 1.4% in 2010. A larger percentage of the subjects were from Asia (66%), compared to the former Soviet Union (10%) and Europe (7%). A greater proportion of the subjects were graduate students (67%). The diagnoses were as follows: depression (34%), adjustment disorder (32%), insomnia (15%), and schizophrenia (9%). The percentage requiring emergency consultation was 24%, including the most severe cases that had to return to their home country. Sixty-nine percent of the subjects stayed in Japan for more than 1 year. Half of the subjects decided to visit the MHS themselves. The results of the present study show that the consultation rate of international students was lower than that of Japanese students in spite of the "culture shock" experienced by international students. This result is in agreement with previous reports. Among international students, however, there is a trend indicating an increase of visits to the MHS in recent years, approaching the rate for Japanese students. Preparations for emergency consultation are still important. PMID:22420147

  10. Abatement costs of post-Kyoto climate regimes

    This article analyses the abatement costs of three post-Kyoto regimes for differentiating commitments compatible with stabilising atmospheric greenhouse gases concentrations at 550 ppmv CO2 equivalent in 2100. The three regimes explored are: (1) the Multi-Stage approach assumes a gradual increase in the number of Parties involved who are adopting either emission intensity or reductions targets; (2) the Brazilian Proposal approach, i.e. the allocation or reductions based on countries' contribution to temperature increase; (3) Contraction and Convergence, with full participation in convergence of per capita emission allowances. In 2050, the global costs increase up to about 1% of the world GDP, ranging from 0.5% to 1.5%, depending on baseline scenario and marginal abatement costs. Four groups of regions can be identified on the basis of similar costs (expressed as the percentage of GDP). These are: (1) OECD regions with average costs; (2) FSU, the Middle East and Latin America with high costs; (3) South-East Asia and East Asia (incl. China) with low costs; and (4) South Asia (incl. India) and Africa with net gains from emissions trading for most regimes. The Brazilian Proposal approach gives the highest costs for groups 1 and 2. The distribution of costs for the Contraction and Convergence approach highly depends on the convergence year. The Multi-Stage approach and Contraction and Convergence (convergence year 2050) seem to result in relatively the most even distribution of costs amongst all Parties

  11. Political realities and economic realities towards a Kyoto protocol

    The current climate change commitments and the negotiating positions of Annex I countries were discussed. It was pointed out that the energy sector is not homogeneous and therefore, climate change should focus on the areas all over the world which are most sensitive to a carbon value. It was also noted that while the present time is ripe for action on climate change, actions should not take place at any cost. A scenario based on the three principal functions of energy, i.e. to supply mobility, electricity and heat was proposed. It was claimed that this proposal had the potential to bridge the gap between the political reality of Kyoto and the economic realities of the energy sector. The essence of the proposal centred around the concept of 'carbon value'. The effect of establishing carbon values for each of the different energy services worldwide, was discussed. Various mechanisms for establishing carbon values, such as emission trading, joint implementation with non-Annex I parties, penalties for non-compliance, mitigation efforts in least-cost options, were also reviewed

  12. Health promotion and partnerships: collaboration of a community health management center, county health bureau, and university nursing program.

    Huang, Chih-Ling

    2002-06-01

    Effective partnerships were established between a community health management center, a county health bureau and a university nursing program. A health fair was undertaken to heighten public health awareness through the collaboration of these various agencies. In this research, formative, process, and summative evaluations were conducted to determine the benefits of partnerships. Elements evaluated included the planning process, health fair relevancy, integration of community resources, participants satisfaction and knowledge acquisition, and partnership satisfaction. The samples of this study included (1) 529 adult participants who completed the on-site evaluation questionnaires; (2) 1,090 child participants who returned gift-reward cards; (3) 114 partners who gave written feedback on their satisfaction; and (4) 57 third-year and 16 fourth-year undergraduate nursing student participants. Data was collected from the evidence report of the Department of Health, the project proposal, activity protocols, meeting records, the project final report, students term papers, and questionnaires. The chief administrator of the County Health Bureau was very impressed with the creative exhibits in the fair and, therefore, invited a coalition to continue further workshops. Seventeen educational exhibits, two dance programs and two drama programs related to health issues were demonstrated in the fair. Resources from community organizations were successfully integrated and allocated. Community participants expressed satisfaction with the fair and anticipated similar activities in the future. Participants revealed more than 80% accuracy in health knowledge quizzes. The senior nursing students highlighted their interaction with the community, community health nurses, and health volunteers. Community-based health promotion and nursing education can be successfully connected when various disciplines and sectors form effective partnerships. PMID:12119594

  13. Un ente innovativo di ricerca e di servizi per la informazione geospaziale: GIS Research Center della Feng-Chia University di Taiwan (GIS.FCU

    Mauro Salvemini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La storia di un Laboratorio GIS a Taiwan nato da un accordo tra Feng-Chia University e la Università di Roma “LaSapienza” oggi tra i primi nel mondo nel settore dell’informazione geospaziale per la ricerca nell’ambito dei testdell’interoperabilità.A body of research and innovative services for geospatial infor-mation: GIS Research Center of Feng-Chia University in Taiwan (GIS.FCUThe story of a GIS laboratory in Taiwan born on an agreement between the Feng-Chia University and the University of Rome "La Sapienza" now among the first in the world in the field of information for research for geospatial application.

  14. Report: demonstrable progresses of the France according the Kyoto protocol; Rapport: progres demontrables de la France selon le protocole de Kyoto

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    This document constitutes the report of the France on the demonstrable progresses according the application of the 3 article of the Kyoto protocol. The first chapter is a description of the french climatic policy, as the second presents the tendencies and the projections concerning the greenhouse effect gases emissions. The chapter 3 details the policies effects and the measures ( energy, transport, industry and wastes). The last chapter is devoted to the respect of the other engagements articles 10 and 11 of the Kyoto protocol. (A.L.B.)

  15. The Pacific Pact: A political fig leaf or an alternative to the Kyoto Protocol

    The article discusses the consequences of the Kyoto Protocol and the necessity for an expanded approach as seen in the beginning Oceania work represented by the Asia-Pacific-Partnership. Some possibilities for pollution limiting aspects are also discussed

  16. WW instituudi direktor Christopher Flavin : Kyoto protokoll viiakse ellu Bushita / Christopher Flavin ; interv. Tarmo Virki

    Flavin, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    World Watch Instituudi direktor leiab, et maailm vajaks globaalset keskkonnaorganisatsiooni, mis tasakaalustaks Maailma Kaubandusorganisatsiooni mõju. Euroopa Liit ja Jaapan suudavad Kyoto protokolli ratifitseerimise ellu viia ka ilma USA-ta. Lisa: Tuumaenergia pole lahendus

  17. Influence of outdoor advertisement colors on psychological evaluation of townscape in Kyoto

    Onishi, Ayumi; Ishida, Taiichiro; Katsuya, Yoshiko

    2002-06-01

    Outdoor advertisements must be one of the major factors that affect our psychological impression for townscapes. They often conflict with propr color environments in cities particularly in historic cities like Kyoto. In this study we investigated how outdoor advertisements influenced our visual evaluation of townscapes in Kyoto. In recent years, a new regulation for outdoor advertisements came into operation in Kyoto and some of the advertisements have been replaced or removed gradually. We examined psychological evaluation for the townscapes before and after their changes. In the experiment, subjects evaluated 'visual harmony,' 'visual busyness,' 'visual comfort' and 'suitability to Kyoto' of townscapes projected on a screen. The results indicated that the evaluation of 'visual busyness' significantly decreased with the amount of the advertisements. The relations between the advertisements and the psychological evaluation of the townscape are discussed.

  18. WW instituudi direktor Christopher Flavin : Kyoto protokoll viiakse ellu Bushita / Christopher Flavin ; interv. Tarmo Virki

    Flavin, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    World Watch Instituudi direktor leiab, et maailm vajaks globaalset keskkonnaorganisatsiooni, mis tasakaalustaks Maailma Kaubandusorganisatsiooni mju. Euroopa Liit ja Jaapan suudavad Kyoto protokolli ratifitseerimise ellu viia ka ilma USA-ta. Lisa: Tuumaenergia pole lahendus

  19. Global warming and environmental production efficiency ranking of the Kyoto Protocol nations.

    Feroz, Ehsan H; Raab, Raymond L; Ulleberg, Gerald T; Alsharif, Kamal

    2009-02-01

    This paper analyzes the United Nations Organization's Kyoto Protocol nations to address two questions. First, what are the environmental production efficiency rankings of these nations? Second, is there a relationship between a nation's ratification status and its environmental production efficiency ranking? Our findings suggest that the nations that have ratified the Kyoto Protocol are more likely to be environmentally production efficient as compared to the nations that have not ratified the Protocol. PMID:18597918

  20. Cooling down hot air: a global CGE analysis of post-Kyoto carbon abatement strategies

    Böhringer, Christoph

    1999-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol marks a break-through in global warming mitigation policies as it sets legally binding emissions targets for major emitting regions. However, realisation of the Protocol depends on the clarification of several issues one of which is the permissible scope of international emissions trading between signatory countries. Unrestricted trade produces hot air when signatory countries whose Kyoto targets are well above their business as usual emissions trade in larger amounts of ?a...