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Sample records for cellular radiation response

  1. WORTMANNIN affect cellular response by radiation

    Objective: To observe radiation Response of cells by WORTMANNIN (WT), which is inhibitor for Phosphatidylinositol-3 Kinase (PI-3K). Methods: LP3 cells are prepared with different concentration of WT for 1 hour and receive different dose γ irradiation. To continue the cell for clone culture, and get the production of dose-survival curve. 1800 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is used to detect DNA double-strand breaks after the 20 Gy γ irradiation. Continue to use the mobility shift assays (Electrophoresis Mobility Shift Assay, EMSA) to observe NF-kB transcription factor of the corresponding changes. Result: WT can be found to increase the radiation sensitivity of SP3 cells, the best sensitizer concentration in 20 μmol /L or more, obvious sensitizing effect within 6 h time; the electrophoresis experiments showed that after irradiation with time, by 50 μmol /L WT group DNA the gel is higher than that of the simple exposure group; transcription factor NF-kB binding activity in the 6 hours after exposure experiences a low-rise and then the process of rising with its the peak of the change reaching after about 3 hours after irradiation. Conclusion: It suggests the existence of PI-3K-mediated radiation sensitizer pathways. Ionizing radiation may activate NF-kB, which caused some DNA damage repair and other defense mechanisms and cell-related gene activity in order to reduce radiation damage. WT may block this process through the early stages of radiation-sensitizing effect. (authors)

  2. Cellular response to modulated radiation fields

    Cell survival following exposure to spatially modulated beams, as created by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is investigated. In vitro experiments were performed using malignant melanoma cells (MM576) exposed to a therapeutic megavoltage photon beam. We compared cell survival in modulated fields with cell survival in uniform control fields. Three different spatial modulations of the field were used: a control 'uniform' field in which all cells in a flask were uniformly exposed; a 'quarter' field in which 25% of cells at one end of the flask were exposed and a 'striped' field in which 25% of cells were exposed in three parallel stripes. The cell survival in both the shielded and unshielded regions of the modulated fields, as determined by a clonogenic assay, were compared to the cell survival in the uniform field. We have distinguished three ways in which cell survival is influenced by the fate of neighbouring cells. The first of these (type I effect) is the previously reported classical Bystander effect, where cell survival is reduced when communicating with irradiated cells. We find two new types of Bystander effect. The type II effect is an observed increase in cell survival when nearby cells receive a lethal dose. The type III effect is an increase in the survival of cells receiving a high dose of radiation, when nearby cells receive a low dose. These observations of the Bystander effects emphasize the need for improved radiobiological models, which include communicated effects and account for the effects of modulated dose distribution

  3. Cellular response to modulated radiation fields

    Mackonis, E Claridge [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Camperdown 2050, NSW (Australia); Suchowerska, N [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Camperdown 2050, NSW (Australia); Zhang, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Camperdown 2050, NSW (Australia); Ebert, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); McKenzie, D R [Department of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Jackson, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Camperdown 2050, NSW (Australia)

    2007-09-21

    Cell survival following exposure to spatially modulated beams, as created by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is investigated. In vitro experiments were performed using malignant melanoma cells (MM576) exposed to a therapeutic megavoltage photon beam. We compared cell survival in modulated fields with cell survival in uniform control fields. Three different spatial modulations of the field were used: a control 'uniform' field in which all cells in a flask were uniformly exposed; a 'quarter' field in which 25% of cells at one end of the flask were exposed and a 'striped' field in which 25% of cells were exposed in three parallel stripes. The cell survival in both the shielded and unshielded regions of the modulated fields, as determined by a clonogenic assay, were compared to the cell survival in the uniform field. We have distinguished three ways in which cell survival is influenced by the fate of neighbouring cells. The first of these (type I effect) is the previously reported classical Bystander effect, where cell survival is reduced when communicating with irradiated cells. We find two new types of Bystander effect. The type II effect is an observed increase in cell survival when nearby cells receive a lethal dose. The type III effect is an increase in the survival of cells receiving a high dose of radiation, when nearby cells receive a low dose. These observations of the Bystander effects emphasize the need for improved radiobiological models, which include communicated effects and account for the effects of modulated dose distribution.

  4. Extended abstracts: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response [final report

    In July 1999, we organized the 4th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held in Killiney Bay, Dublin, Ireland, on July 17-18. Roughly 75 scientists (about equal numbers of physicists and biologists) attended the workshop, the fourth in a bi-annual series. Extended abstracts from the meeting were published in the Radiation Research journal, vol. 153, iss. 2, pp. 220-238 (February 2000)(attached). All the objectives in the proposal were met

  5. Cellular automaton model of cell response to targeted radiation

    It has been shown that the response of cells to low doses of radiation is not linear and cannot be accurately extrapolated from the high dose response. To investigate possible mechanisms involved in the behaviour of cells under very low doses of radiation, a cellular automaton (CA) model was created. The diffusion and consumption of glucose in the culture dish were computed in parallel to the growth of cells. A new model for calculating survival probability was introduced; the communication between targeted and non-targeted cells was also included. Early results on the response of non-confluent cells to targeted irradiation showed the capability of the model to take account for the non-linear response in the low-dose domain

  6. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  7. New insights into the cellular response to radiation using microbeams

    Folkard, Melvyn; Prise, Kevin; Schettino, Giuseppe; Shao, Chunlin; Gilchrist, Stuart; Vojnovic, Boris

    2005-04-01

    Micro-irradiation techniques continue to be highly relevant to a number of radiobiological studies, due to their ability to deliver precise doses of radiation to selected individual cells (or sub-cellular targets) in vitro. The Gray cancer institute (GCI) ion microbeam uses a 1 μm diameter bore glass capillary to vertically collimate protons, or helium ions accelerated by a 4 MV Van de Graaff. Using 3He2+ ions, 99% of cells are targeted with an accuracy of ±2 μm, and with a particle counting accuracy >99%. Using automated cell finding and irradiation procedures, up to 10,000 cells per hour can be individually irradiated. Microbeams are now being used to study a number of novel 'non-targeted' responses that do not follow the standard radiation model based on direct DNA damage and are now known to occur when living cells and tissues are irradiated. One such response is the so-called 'bystander effect' where unirradiated cells are damaged through signalling pathways initiated by a nearby irradiated cell. This effect predominates at low doses and profoundly challenges our understanding of environmental radiation risk. Furthermore, we now have evidence that simple molecules (such as nitric oxide) are involved in the signalling process, such that it may be possible to chemically influence the bystander response. If so, then this could eventually lead to improvements in the treatment of cancer by radiotherapy. Other studies have shown that the bystander effect is induced with equal effectiveness if either the nucleus or the cytoplasm of a cell is targeted.

  8. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report

    Work during the past year has been focused on three areas related to the cellular effects of radiation. Radiation effects on RNA and the regulation of gene expression and amino acid-nucleic acid interactions were studied. Studies on the radiation response of RNA in growing and confluent cells were continued. We have derived radiation survival curves and demonstrated repair of potentially lethal damage in 3T3 cells. Studies of giant cell formation and turnover of ribosomal RNA in irradiated cells has demonstrated differences in growing and confluent cells. We have sought evidence consistent with our hypothesis for regulation of eukaryotic gene expression with segments of RNA reutilized to prime new RNA synthesis. Data derived from the turnover of ribosomal RNA and the methylation pattern of ribosomal RNA during turnover are consistent with the possibility that a segment of 18s ribosomal RNA is being conserved during new RNA synthesis. We were unable to show reutilization of the 5' trinucleotide of 18s and 28s ribosomal RNA but did find a ribonuclease resistant oligonucleotide in 18s RNA which appeared to be reutilized. In studies of amino acid nucleic-acid interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy we have been able to successfully synthesize an amidate and begin an examination of the intramolecular interactions. We have also studied intermolecular interactions betweentryptophan and nucleoside monophosphates and found upfield shifts which provide evidence for preferential stacking of the 6-membered ring of tryptophan with adenine and evidence for specific geometry of interactions of tryptophan with cytosine. (U.S.)

  9. Role of natural antioxidant mediated cellular radiation response

    Need for the development of radioprotector was felt after witnessing the disastrous effects of ionizing radiation since World War II. Ionizing radiation is fatal for all living beings. Formation of free radicals (reactive oxygen species) are believed to be the prime reason for various cellular and molecular damages and death of cells. Different chemical agents having ability to quench these free radicals were selected logically for the development of radiation counter measure agents. WR2712 is the first FDA approved clinical cytoprotector, however acute toxicity necessitated search of safe chemical radiation countermeasure agents. Natural antioxidants possess strong antiradical properties and relatively less toxic and therefore currently persuaded for development of radioprotector. The objectives were to undertake a comprehensive mechanism based selection of suitable natural antioxidant compounds and evaluate their antiradical properties using standard assays. Further, validation of the radioprotective efficacy of selected antioxidant in vitro models and investigation in cell lines for elucidation of mechanism underlying radioprotection. Results of modified antiradical assays (ABTS, DPPH, ORAC and FRAP) suggested strong potential of sesamol in comparison to fifteen different antioxidants. Further comparative in vitro studies, prior treatment of antioxidant showed strong potential of sesamol with dose modifying factors of 10 (plasmid DNA) and 3 (V79 cells). The corresponding dose modifying factor of melatonin was 5 and 1.3 respectively. Furthermore, sesamol decreased radiation induced apoptosis, chromosomal aberration, cell cycle arrest, oxidative damages, mitochondrial depolarization in HEK293 cells. The mechanism of radioprotection proposed to be due to enhanced antioxidant enzyme activity and balance in cellular redox together with scavenging of free radicals by sesamol. Due to these potential of sesamol, further evaluation in preclinical models are required for

  10. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  11. The role of nuclear factor κB in the cellular response to different radiation qualities

    Koch, Kristina

    2013-04-11

    Radiation is currently one of the most important limiting factors for manned space flight. During such missions, there is a constant exposure to low doses of galactic cosmic radiation and in particular high-energy heavy ions. Together this is associated with an increased cancer risk which currently cannot be sufficiently reduced by shielding. As such, cellular radiation response needs to be further studied in order to improve risk estimation and develop appropriate countermeasures. It has been shown that exposure of human cells to accelerated heavy ions, in fluences that can be reached during long-term missions, leads to activation of the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Heavy ions with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 90 to 300 keV/μm were most effective in activating NF-κB. NF-κB as an important modulating factor in the cellular radiation response could improve cellular survival after heavy ion exposure, thereby influencing the cancer risk of astronauts. The NF-κB pathway may be a potential pharmacological target in the mitigation of radiation response during space missions; such as the prevention of massive cell death after high dose irradiation (acute effects), in addition to neoplastic cell transformation during chronic low-dose exposure (late effects). The aim of this work was to examine the role of NF-κB in the cellular response to space-relevant radiation. Firstly, NF-κB activation in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK) after exposure to different radiation qualities and quantities was investigated. Key elements of different NF-κB sub-pathways were chemically inhibited to analyze their role in NF-κB activation induced by low and high LET ionizing radiation. Finally a cell line, stably transfected with a plasmid coding for a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for a knockdown of the NF-κB subunit RelA, was established to assess the role of RelA in the cellular response to space-relevant radiation. The knockdown was verified on several levels and the cell

  12. The role of nuclear factor κB in the cellular response to different radiation qualities

    Radiation is currently one of the most important limiting factors for manned space flight. During such missions, there is a constant exposure to low doses of galactic cosmic radiation and in particular high-energy heavy ions. Together this is associated with an increased cancer risk which currently cannot be sufficiently reduced by shielding. As such, cellular radiation response needs to be further studied in order to improve risk estimation and develop appropriate countermeasures. It has been shown that exposure of human cells to accelerated heavy ions, in fluences that can be reached during long-term missions, leads to activation of the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Heavy ions with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 90 to 300 keV/μm were most effective in activating NF-κB. NF-κB as an important modulating factor in the cellular radiation response could improve cellular survival after heavy ion exposure, thereby influencing the cancer risk of astronauts. The NF-κB pathway may be a potential pharmacological target in the mitigation of radiation response during space missions; such as the prevention of massive cell death after high dose irradiation (acute effects), in addition to neoplastic cell transformation during chronic low-dose exposure (late effects). The aim of this work was to examine the role of NF-κB in the cellular response to space-relevant radiation. Firstly, NF-κB activation in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK) after exposure to different radiation qualities and quantities was investigated. Key elements of different NF-κB sub-pathways were chemically inhibited to analyze their role in NF-κB activation induced by low and high LET ionizing radiation. Finally a cell line, stably transfected with a plasmid coding for a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for a knockdown of the NF-κB subunit RelA, was established to assess the role of RelA in the cellular response to space-relevant radiation. The knockdown was verified on several levels and the cell

  13. General aspects of the cellular response to low- and high-LET radiation

    Radiobiological studies have shown for some time that the effects of ionising radiation on cells are mainly explained by modification of the DNA. Numerous studies over the past 50 years have accumulated clear evidence of the cause-effect relationship between damage to DNA and the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of ionising radiation. However, the path from irradiation of the cells to the induction of biological effects comprises several complex steps. The first step involves interactions between the radiation and the cellular environment. These consist of physical and chemical reactions which produce ions, excited molecules and radical species. Excitations and ionisations are complete in about 10-15 s, and are followed by a chemical thermal equilibrium of the species produced within 10-12 s. These species then diffuse from their site of production and provoke alterations to a variety of cellular components. This damage is detected by cellular surveillance systems, which in turn activate signalling cascades, gene transcription and enzyme recruitment, which participate in the cellular response. In most cases, cell cycle arrest occurs, allowing, according to the biological relevance of the DNA damage, either a process of DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). The accuracy of the DNA repair which is performed depends on the complexity of the DNA lesion and on the DNA repair machinery fidelity itself. Improper DNA repair can lead to mutation, chromosome aberration, genetic instability, oncogenic transformation and, ultimately, cell death. (orig.)

  14. Modeling of time-dose-LET effects in the cellular response to radiation

    This work is dedicated to the elucidation of time-dose- and if applicable linear energy transfer (LET) effects in the cellular response to ion or photon radiation. In particular, the common concept of the Local Effect Model (LEM) and the Giant Loop Binary Lesion (GLOBLE) model, which explains cell survival probabilities on the hand of clustering of double-strand breaks (DSB) in micrometer-sized sub-structural units of the DNA, was investigated with regard to temporal aspects. In previous studies with the LEM and GLOBLE model, it has been demonstrated that the definition of two lesion classes, characterized by single or multiple DSB in a DNA giant loop, with two repair fidelities is adequate to comprehensively describe the dose dependence of the cellular response to instantaneous photon irradiation or ion irradiation with varying LET. Furthermore, with the GLOBLE model for photon radiation, it has been shown that the assignment of two repair time scales to the two lesion classes allows to adequately reproduce time-dose effects after photon irradiation with an arbitrary constant dose-rate. In this work, the results of four projects that strengthen the mechanistic consistency and the practical applicability of the LEM and GLOBLE model will be presented. First, it was found that the GLOBLE model is applicable to describe time-dose effects in the cellular response to two split photon doses and in the occurrence of deterministic radiation effects. Second, in a comparison of ten models for the temporal course of DSB rejoining, it was revealed that a bi-exponential approach, as suggested by the LEM and GLOBLE model, finds a relatively large support by 61 experimental data sets. Third, in a comparison of four kinetic photon cell survival models that was based on fits to 13 dose-rate experiments, it was shown that the GLOBLE model performs well with respect to e.g. accuracy, parsimony, reliability and other factors that characterize a good approach. Last but not least, the

  15. Modeling of time-dose-LET effects in the cellular response to radiation

    Herr, Lisa Antje

    2015-07-20

    This work is dedicated to the elucidation of time-dose- and if applicable linear energy transfer (LET) effects in the cellular response to ion or photon radiation. In particular, the common concept of the Local Effect Model (LEM) and the Giant Loop Binary Lesion (GLOBLE) model, which explains cell survival probabilities on the hand of clustering of double-strand breaks (DSB) in micrometer-sized sub-structural units of the DNA, was investigated with regard to temporal aspects. In previous studies with the LEM and GLOBLE model, it has been demonstrated that the definition of two lesion classes, characterized by single or multiple DSB in a DNA giant loop, with two repair fidelities is adequate to comprehensively describe the dose dependence of the cellular response to instantaneous photon irradiation or ion irradiation with varying LET. Furthermore, with the GLOBLE model for photon radiation, it has been shown that the assignment of two repair time scales to the two lesion classes allows to adequately reproduce time-dose effects after photon irradiation with an arbitrary constant dose-rate. In this work, the results of four projects that strengthen the mechanistic consistency and the practical applicability of the LEM and GLOBLE model will be presented. First, it was found that the GLOBLE model is applicable to describe time-dose effects in the cellular response to two split photon doses and in the occurrence of deterministic radiation effects. Second, in a comparison of ten models for the temporal course of DSB rejoining, it was revealed that a bi-exponential approach, as suggested by the LEM and GLOBLE model, finds a relatively large support by 61 experimental data sets. Third, in a comparison of four kinetic photon cell survival models that was based on fits to 13 dose-rate experiments, it was shown that the GLOBLE model performs well with respect to e.g. accuracy, parsimony, reliability and other factors that characterize a good approach. Last but not least, the

  16. 7th International Workshop on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The extended abstracts that follow present a summary of the Proceedings of the 7th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at Columbia University’s Kellogg Center in New York City on March 15–17, 2006. These International Workshops on Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response have been held regularly since 1993 (1–5). Since the first workshop, there has been a rapid growth (see Fig. 1) in the number of centers developing microbeams for radiobiological research, and worldwide there are currently about 30 microbeams in operation or under development. Single-cell/single-particle microbeam systems can deliver beams of different ionizing radiations with a spatial resolution of a few micrometers down to a few tenths of a micrometer. Microbeams can be used to addressquestions relating to the effects of low doses of radiation (a single radiation track traversing a cell or group of cells), to probe subcellular targets (e.g. nucleus or cytoplasm), and to address questions regarding the propagation of information about DNA damage (for example, the radiation-induced bystander effect). Much of the recent research using microbeams has been to study low-dose effects and ‘‘non-targeted’’ responses such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. This Workshop provided a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. Over 100 participants reviewed the current state of microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments in the fields of both physics and biology.

  17. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization

    Patrick Maier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization.

  18. Nuclear and cytoplasmic signalling in the cellular response to ionising radiation

    DNA is the universal primary target for ionising radiation; however, the cellular response is highly diversified not only by differential DNA repair ability. The monitoring system for the ionising radiation-inflicted DNA damage consists of 3 apparently independently acting enzymes which are activated by DNA breaks: two protein kinases, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase) and a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, PARP-1. These 3 enzymes are the source of alarm signals, which affect to various extents DNA repair, progression through the cell cycle and eventually the pathway to cell death. Their functions probably are partly overlapping. On the side of DNA repair their role consists in recruiting and/or activating the repair enzymes, as well as preventing illegitimate recombination of the damaged sites. A large part of the nuclear signalling pathway, including the integrating role of TP53 has been revealed. Two main signalling pathways start at the plasma membrane: the MAPK/ERK (mitogen and extracellular signal regulated protein kinase family) 'survival pathway' and the SAPK/JNK (stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase) 'cell death pathway'. The balance between them is likely to determine the cell's fate. An additional important 'survival pathway' starts at the insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF-IR), involves phosphoinositide- 3 kinase and Akt kinase and is targeted at inactivation of the pro-apoptotic BAD protein. Interestingly, over-expression of IGF-IR almost entirely abrogates the extreme radiation sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia cells. When DNA break rejoining is impaired, the cell is unconditionally radiation sensitive. The fate of a repair-competent cell is determined by the time factor: the cell cycle arrest should be long enough to ensure the completion of repair. Incomplete repair or misrepair may be tolerated, when generation of the death signal is prevented. So, the character and timing

  19. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  20. A mathematical framework for separating the direct and bystander components of cellular radiation response

    A mathematical model for fractional tumor cell survival was developed incorporating components of cell killing due to direct radiation interactions and bystander signals resulting from non-local dose deposition. Material and methods. Three possible mechanisms for signal production were tested by fitting predictions to available experimental results for tumor cells (non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 and melanoma MM576) exposed to gradient x-ray fields. The parameter fitting allowed estimation of the contribution of bystander signaling to cell death (20-50% for all models). Separation of the two components of cell killing allowed determination of the α and β parameters of the linear-quadratic model both with and without the presence of bystander signaling. Results and discussion. For both cell lines, cell death from bystander signaling and direct radiation interactions were comparable. For NCI-H460 cells, the values for α and β were 0.18 Gy-1 and 0.10 Gy-2 respectively when direct and bystander effects were combined, and 0.053 Gy-1 and 0.061 Gy-2 respectively when the signaling component was removed. For MM576, the corresponding respective values were 0.09 Gy-1 and 0.011 Gy-2 for the combined response, and 0.014 Gy-1 and 0.002 Gy-2 for the isolated direct radiation response. The bystander component in cell death was found to be significant and should not be ignored. Further experimental evidence is required to determine how these results translate to the in vivo situation where tumor control probability (TCP) models that currently assume cellular independence may need to be revised

  1. A mathematical framework for separating the direct and bystander components of cellular radiation response

    Ebert, Martin A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia (Australia)), E-mail: Martin.Ebert@health.wa.gov.au; Suchowerska, Natalka; Jackson, Michael A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)); McKenzie, David R. (School of Physics, Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia))

    2010-11-15

    A mathematical model for fractional tumor cell survival was developed incorporating components of cell killing due to direct radiation interactions and bystander signals resulting from non-local dose deposition. Material and methods. Three possible mechanisms for signal production were tested by fitting predictions to available experimental results for tumor cells (non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 and melanoma MM576) exposed to gradient x-ray fields. The parameter fitting allowed estimation of the contribution of bystander signaling to cell death (20-50% for all models). Separation of the two components of cell killing allowed determination of the alpha and beta parameters of the linear-quadratic model both with and without the presence of bystander signaling. Results and discussion. For both cell lines, cell death from bystander signaling and direct radiation interactions were comparable. For NCI-H460 cells, the values for alpha and beta were 0.18 Gy-1 and 0.10 Gy-2 respectively when direct and bystander effects were combined, and 0.053 Gy-1 and 0.061 Gy-2 respectively when the signaling component was removed. For MM576, the corresponding respective values were 0.09 Gy-1 and 0.011 Gy-2 for the combined response, and 0.014 Gy-1 and 0.002 Gy-2 for the isolated direct radiation response. The bystander component in cell death was found to be significant and should not be ignored. Further experimental evidence is required to determine how these results translate to the in vivo situation where tumor control probability (TCP) models that currently assume cellular independence may need to be revised

  2. Assessment of the cellular and electrophysiological response of cardiomyocytes to radiation

    Helm, Alexander; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Friess, Johannes; Thielemann, Christiane; Mr; Frank, Simon

    Cardiac disease is considered as a late effect resulting from an exposure during long-term space missions. Yet, the underlying mechanisms and the impact of radiation quality and dose are not well understood. To address this topic, we used cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) as a model system. This model has already been successfully used for cardiotoxicity screening of new drugs. Both, the cellular and electrophysiological response to X-ray irradiation were examined. Cellular endpoints such as the induction of micronuclei, apoptosis, number of binucleated cells and expression of connexin43 (Cx 43) were analyzed by standard techniques. For electrophysiological studies a microelectrode array (MEA) was used allowing non-invasive recordings of electrical signals such as signal amplitude and shape, beat rate and conduction velocity. Data analysis was performed using the MATLAB based software DrCell. As a first approach, cardiomyocytes were generated by differentiation of mESC via the formation of embryoid bodies. However, the system proved to be unsuitable due to large intra- and inter-sample variations. In consecutive experiments we used commercially available Cor.At cells, i.e. a pure culture of mESC derived cardiomyocytes. For the analysis of cellular and electrophysiological endpoints Cor.At cells were seeded onto chamber slides or MEA chips, respectively. Irradiation with 0.5 and 2 Gy X-rays (250 kV, 16 mA) was performed two days after seeding. At that time cardiomyocytes are electrically coupled through gap junctions and form a spontaneously beating network. Samples were examined up to four days after exposure. Analysis of the electrophysiological data revealed only minor differences between controls and X-irradiated samples indicating the functionality of cardiomyocytes is not within the dose range examined. Currently, further experiments are performed to statistically verify this finding. Additionally, the expression of Cx 43, a major

  3. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report, July 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Progress is reported on studies of the effects of x irradiation at the cellular level that lead ultimately to either malignant transformation or cell death. Experimental results consistent with the primer hypothesis for the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes are reported. It was found that oligonucleotides can be inserted en bloc into newly synthesized RNA. Studies on amino acid-nucleic acid interactions were continued by successfully synthesizing an amidate and beginning NMR studies on the interactions between its nucleic acid and amino acid moieties. In studies on radiation induced giant cells in 3T3 cells growing in culture, it was demonstrated that conditions which potentiate potential lethal damage repair and those which prevent radiation induced giant cell formation exist. In an examination of the in vitro effects of vasopressin, no direct effect was found of vasopressin on radiation sensitivity and significant effects of radiation on lysosomal enzyme activity in cultured cells were found

  4. Analysis of dose-rate effects on cellular responses to chronic radiation exposure

    The effects in the title were studied on their expression of various genes concerned with radiation exposure by the acute (1 Gy/min) and chronic (0.007-0.694 Gy/min) irradiations to various cell lines. Cell of human origin were the primarily cultured fibroblasts (F), their immortalized strain (imF) by transduction of human teromerase transcriptase (hTERT), breast cancer MCF-7, osteosarcoma U-20S, colon cancer HCT-116 and T-cell leukemia Jurkat. Acute irradiation was done in a gamma-cell with Cs-137 gamma-ray and chronic one, in a CO2-incubator with the Cs-137 source. Expression of genes was analyzed by mRNA sequence with Genome Analyzer. Proteins of p53, p53-Ser15-P, murine double minute 2 (MDM2), p21 and a/b-tubulin were analyzed by Western blotting. D0 values of acute irradiation were found in the range of 1.1-1.4 Gy, suggesting the similar sensitivity of used cells. However, responses to chronic exposure were different from cells to cells: particularly, at 0.347 mGy/min, no effect on growth was observed in cancer-derived cells until 10 days whereas a marked growth inhibition of F and imF cells was seen after 4 days. Arrest of proliferation of F cells after 10 days exposure at 0.347 mGy/min was tentative, but at 0.694 mGy/min, it was irreversible dependently on the exposure time. They were arrested at G0 stage. Gene expression analyzed by mRNA sequence was shown to be changed even by the lowest rate 0.007 mGy/min: levels of protein expressed under control of cancer-suppressing p53 were markedly altered. Western blotting showed an increased expression of examined proteins except for p53, at higher dose than 0.069 mGy/min. Results indicated that the cellular response to radiation involved not only DNA damage but also the process of yielding the damage. (T.T.)

  5. Cellular responses to 836 MHz and 1,765 GHz CDMA radiations

    The effect of radiofrequency (RF) radiation in the cellular phone communication range (836.5 MHz and 1.765 GHz code division multiple access, CDMA) on tumorigenesis and other health effect was measured using the in vitro cell culture system. To determine whether 836.5 MHz or 1.765 GHz CDMA radiations have any genotoxic effects to induce neoplastic transformation, C3H 10T1/2 cells were exposed to either of the above radiations at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 35.6W/Kg (836.5 MHz) and 38.2 W/kg(1.765 GHz) or sham- exposed at the same time for 7 days. Cells were maintained in incubators and refed with fresh growth medium every 3 days. At this SAR, radiofrequency radiation did not induce neoplastic transformation in vitro. The extent of alteration in the kinetics of cell proliferation indicated no significant differences between RF-radiation- and sham-exposed cells with respect to MTS assay and 8-OHdG. Under this experimental conditions tested, there is no evidence for the induction of genotoxic indices in human and mouse cells exposed in vitro for 7 days to 836.5 MHz or 1.765 GHz RF radiation at SARs of up to 35.6 or 38.2 W/kg

  6. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  7. Redox cycling by motexafin gadolinium enhances cellular response to ionizing radiation by forming reactive oxygen species

    Purpose: To examine the mechanism of radiation enhancement by motexafin gadolinium (Gd-Tex) in vitro. Methods and Materials: Oxidation of ascorbate and NADPH by Gd-Tex was evaluated in a neutral buffer. Growth inhibition of human uterine cancer cell line MES-SA was measured using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye. Clonogenic assays were used to measure radiation response in MES-SA, A549 human lung carcinoma, E89, a CHO cell line variant deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and murine lymphoma cell lines LYAR and LYAS. Results: Gd-Tex catalyzed the oxidation of NADPH and ascorbate under aerobic conditions, forming hydrogen peroxide. Decreased viability was observed in MES-SA cells incubated with Gd-Tex in media containing NADPH or ascorbate. Gd-Tex and ascorbate increased fluorescence in dichlorofluorescin acetate-treated cultures. Synergistic effects on the aerobic radiation response in MES-SA and A549 were seen using Gd-Tex in combination with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO). Incubation with Gd-Tex in the presence of ascorbate increased the aerobic radiation response of E89 and the apoptosis-sensitive B-cell line (LYAS). Conclusions: Gd-Tex sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation by increasing oxidative stress as a consequence of futile redox cycling. Optimization of the concentration of ascorbate (or other reducing species) may be required when evaluating Gd-Tex activity in vitro

  8. Proceedings of 6th International Microbeam Workshop/12th L.H. Gray Workshop Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology

  9. Identification of human genes involved in cellular responses to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular studies of gene encoding the p68 helicase in mammalian cells

    Cells submitted to genotoxic factors -like IR- activate several and important mechanisms such as repair, cell cycle arrest or 'apoptosis' to maintain genetic integrity. So, the damaged cells will induce many and different genes. The human transcriptome analysis by 'SSH' method in a human breast carcinoma cell line MCF7 γ-irradiated versus not irradiated, allowed to identify about one hundred genes. Among of these genes, we have focused our study on a radio-induced gene encoding the p68 helicase. In the conditions of irradiation used, our results show that the kinetic and the regulation of this gene expression differs between the nature of radiations used. Indeed, in γ-irradiated mammalian cells, ATM, a protein kinase activated by DSB and IR, is required to induce quickly P68 gene via the important transcription factor p53 stabilized by IR. In the case of UVC-irradiated cells, the P68 gene induction is late and the intracellular signalling pathway that lead to this induction is independent from the p53 protein. Finally, we show that the p68 protein under-expression is responsible for an increased radiosensitivity of MCF7 cells. Consequently, we can postulate that the p68 protein is involved in cellular responses to radiations to reduce the increased radiosensitivity of cells exposed to γ-rays. (author)

  10. INFLUENCE OF DOSE RATE ON THE CELLULAR RESPONSE TO LOW- AND HIGH-LET RADIATIONS

    Anne-Sophie eWozny

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC treatment failure is mostly explained by loco-regional progression or intrinsic radioresistance. Radiotherapy has recently evolved with the emergence of heavy ion radiations or new fractionation schemes of photon therapy which modify the dose-rate of treatment delivery. The aim of the present study was then to evaluate the in vitro influence of a dose rate variation during conventional radiotherapy or carbon ion hadrontherapy treatment in order to improve the therapeutic care of patient. In this regard, two HNSCC cell lines were irradiated with photons or 72MeV/n carbon ions at a dose rate of 0.5, 2 or 10Gy/min.For both radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, the change in dose rate significantly affected cell survival in response to photon exposure, this variation of radiosensitivity was associated to the number of initial and residual DNA double-strand breaks. By contrast, the dose rate change did not affect neither cell survival nor the residual DNA double-strand breaks after carbon ion irradiation. As a result, the Relative Biological Efficiency at 10% survival increased when the dose rate decreased.In conclusion, in the radiotherapy treatment of HNSCC, it is advised to remain very careful when modifying the classical schemes towards altered-fractionation. At the opposite, as the dose rate does not seem to have any effects after carbon ion exposure, there is less need to adapt hadrontherapy treatment planning during active system irradiation

  11. 8th international workshop on microbeam probes of cellular radiation response. Extended abstracts

    This meeting has been held regularly since 1993. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Advances in microbeam technology are continuously occurring and have greatly contributed to the studies in various fields of life sciences in ways that can not be achieved using conventional broad field exposures. Microbeam irradiation can inactivate subcellular compartments and cell/tissue sub-populations, and can be used to investigate the spatial dynamics of sub-nuclear irradiation-induced DNA damage repair and non-targeted responses such as bystander effects, or as a tool in radio-microsurgery in eukaryotes including plants, silkworm, and nematode. At the last meeting held in 2006, about 30 microbeams were reported in operation or under development in the world. Now, only also in Tokyo metropolitan area, several different microbeams, using protons, heavy charged particles, synchrotron and Al-K X-rays, are available for cell-targeting irradiation. This Workshop will provide a forum to assess the current state of microbeam technology and current biological applications, and to discuss future directions for development, both technological and biological. (author)

  12. Mitochondrial-Derived Oxidants and Cellular Responses to Low Dose/Low LET Ionizing Radiation

    Exposure to ionizing radiation results in the immediate formation of free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been assumed that the subsequent injury processes leading to genomic instability and carcinogenesis following radiation, derive from the initial oxidative damage caused by these free radicals and ROS. It is now becoming increasingly obvious that metabolic oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions can be altered by irradiation leading to persistent increases in steady-state levels of intracellular free radicals and ROS that contribute to the long term biological effects of radiation exposure by causing chronic oxidative stress. The objective during the last period of support (DE-FG02-05ER64050; 5/15/05-12/31/09) was to determine the involvement of mitochondrial genetic defects in metabolic oxidative stress and the biological effects of low dose/low LET radiation. Aim 1 was to determine if cells with mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits C and D (SDHC and SDHD in mitochondrial complex II) demonstrated increases in steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS; O2- and H2O2) as well as demonstrating increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation (10 cGy) in cultured mammalian cells. Aim No.2 was to determine if mitochondrially-derived ROS contributed to increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation in mammalian cells containing mutations in SDH subunits. Aim No.3 was to determine if a causal relationship existed between increases in mitochondrial ROS production, alterations in electron transport chain proteins, and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. Evidence gathered in the 2005-2009 period of support demonstrated that mutations in genes coding for mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins (ETC); either Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) subunit C (SDHC) or subunit D (SDHD); caused increased ROS production, increased genomic instability, and increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET

  13. Mitochondrial-Derived Oxidants and Cellular Responses to Low Dose/Low LET Ionizing Radiation

    Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-11-09

    Exposure to ionizing radiation results in the immediate formation of free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been assumed that the subsequent injury processes leading to genomic instability and carcinogenesis following radiation, derive from the initial oxidative damage caused by these free radicals and ROS. It is now becoming increasingly obvious that metabolic oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions can be altered by irradiation leading to persistent increases in steady-state levels of intracellular free radicals and ROS that contribute to the long term biological effects of radiation exposure by causing chronic oxidative stress. The objective during the last period of support (DE-FG02-05ER64050; 5/15/05-12/31/09) was to determine the involvement of mitochondrial genetic defects in metabolic oxidative stress and the biological effects of low dose/low LET radiation. Aim 1 was to determine if cells with mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits C and D (SDHC and SDHD in mitochondrial complex II) demonstrated increases in steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS; O2•- and H2O2) as well as demonstrating increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation (10 cGy) in cultured mammalian cells. Aim #2 was to determine if mitochondrially-derived ROS contributed to increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation in mammalian cells containing mutations in SDH subunits. Aim #3 was to determine if a causal relationship existed between increases in mitochondrial ROS production, alterations in electron transport chain proteins, and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. Evidence gathered in the 2005-2009 period of support demonstrated that mutations in genes coding for mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins (ETC); either Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) subunit C (SDHC) or subunit D (SDHD); caused increased ROS production, increased genomic instability, and increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation

  14. Characterization of the Kin17 gene, a new component of the cellular response to ultra-violet radiations in mammals

    The objective of this research thesis is to characterize the expression of a mammal gene, called Kin-17, which codes for a protein which has a structural homology with the RecA protein of E. coli. This protein plays a crucial role in the cellular response to irradiations and in mutagenesis. In order to better understand the Kin 17 protein function, the author determined the Kin 17 gene expression profile in tissues and cells in culture. It appears that this expression is ubiquitous and weak. The Kin 17 protein quantity and localisation are also studied. The author suggests that this protein belongs to an intra-nuclear network of proteins required during cell growth, and might influence biological processes related to the cellular cycle. The co-localisation of the protein with the T-antigen is studied by immunofluorescence. The expression profile of different Kin-17 genes in cells after UV irradiation has been studied. The obtained results and observations suggest that the Kin 17 protein intervenes in a biological process which allows a cell to counterbalance toxic effects of UV radiations

  15. A mathematical model of radiation-induced responses in a cellular population including cell-to-cell communications

    Cell-to-cell communication is an important factor for understanding the mechanisms of radiation-induced responses such as bystander effects. In this study, a new mathematical model of intercellular signalling between individual cells in a cellular population is proposed. The authors considered two types of transmission of signals: via culture medium and via gap junction. They focus on the effects that radiation and intercellular signalling have on cell-cycle modification. The cell cycle is represented as a virtual clock that includes several checkpoint pathways within a cyclic process. They also develop a grid model and set up diffusion equations to model the propagation of signals to and from spatially located cells. The authors have also considered the role that DNA damage plays in the cycle of cells which can progress through the cell cycle or stop at the G1, S, G2 or M-phase checkpoints. Results of testing show that the proposed model can simulate intercellular signalling and cell-cycle progression in individual cells during and after irradiation. (authors)

  16. Contribution to fundamental aspects of biophysics, radiobiology, and modeling of cellular response to low radiation doses

    Belchior, Ana Lúcia Vital, 1979-

    2014-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Engenharia Biomédica e Biofísica, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2014 This thesis aims at studying the direct and bystander effects (observations in which effects of ionizing radiation arise in non-irradiated cells) induced by alpha-particle irradiation, using a Po-210 source, in a human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549), and at investigating and providing a contribution to the clarification of the protective or potentially detrimental effects of low-do...

  17. Combined effect of misonidazole and glutathione depletion by buthionine sulphoximine on cellular radiation response

    Chinese hamster cells (V79) and glutathione-proficient (GSHsup(+/+)) and glutathione-deficient (GSHsup(-/-)) human fibroblasts were treated with a glutathione (GSH)-depleting agent buthionine sulphoximine (BSO) and the hypoxic radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO), separately or in combination. Subsequently, the cells were exposed to X-rays. Determination of the yield of single-strand DNA breaks (ssb) immediately after irradiation indicated no effect of BSO or MISO treatment when radiation exposure was made aerobically. Assuming that ssb determined immediately after irradiation reflects mainly the effect of radical processes, the results obtained with BSO and MISO, singly and in combination, agreed well with the predictions of a modified version of the 'competition model' using V79 and GSHsup(+-+) cells. Some results obtained with GSHsup(-/-) cells could not be so explained. (author)

  18. Cellular responses in primary epidermal cultures from oncorhynchus mykiss following the combined exposure of ionising radiation and a heavy metal

    Mechanisms of toxicant action on biological systems are difficult to identify when more than one contaminant is involved due to potential synergistic and antagonistic effects. There is a general paucity of research into the effect of radiation exposure in tandem with common environmental contaminants due to the inherent difficulties involved. In vitro cell cultures are particularly suited to the study of toxic mechanisms due to their proximity to toxic modes of action and the absence of the multiple defence mechanisms present in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures are particularly beneficial in this area of research as they still maintain many of their tissue specific functions. The objective of this study was to distinguish different mechanisms of cell death (growth arrest, apoptosis, primary and secondary necrosis and proliferation), following combination exposure to ionising radiation and a heavy metal (ZnCl2). The model system employed was a primary cell culture of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) epidermal tissue which has been previously used to study the effects of various environmental agents in this laboratory. Apoptosis and necrosis were quantified morphologically while proliferation was assessed immuno-cyto-chemically using an anti PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) antibody. While radiation doses up to and including 10 Gy had no effect on growth, exposure to ZnCl2 produced a significant dose dependent reduction in growth (10, 50, 75, 100 and 200 ppm ZnCl2). Preliminary results indicate no significant effect on growth following a combined exposure of 5 Gy + 50 ppm ZnCl2. These results may have important implications for understanding the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to multiple contaminant exposures. (author)

  19. Epigenetic and genetic factors in the cellular response to radiations and DNA-damaging chemicals

    DNA-damaging agents are widely used as therapeutic tools for a variety of disease states. Many such agents are considered to produce detrimental side effects. Thus, it is important to evaluate both therapeutic efficacy and potential risk. DNA-damaging agents can be so evaluated by comparison to agents whose therapeutic benefit and potential hazards are better known. We propose a framework for such comparison, demonstrating that a simple transformation of cytotoxicity-dose response patterns permits a facile comparison of variation between cells exposed to a single DNA-damaging agent or to different cytotoxic agents. Further, by transforming data from experiments which compare responses of 2 cell populations to an effects ratio, different patterns for the changes in cytotoxicity produced by epigenetic and genetic factors were compared. Using these transformations, we found that there is a wide variation (a factor of 4) between laboratories for a single agent (UVC) and only a slightly larger variation (factor of 6) between normal cell response for different types of DNA-damaging agents (x-ray, UVC, alkylating agents, crosslinking agents). Epigenetic factors such as repair and recovery appear to be a factor only at higher dose levels. Comparison in the cytotoxic effect of a spectrum of DNA-damaging agents in xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fanconi's anemia cells indicates significantly different patterns, implying that the effect, and perhaps the nature, of these genetic conditions are quite different

  20. Radiation, nitric oxide and cellular death

    The mechanisms of radiation induced cellular death constitute an objective of research ever since the first biological effects of radiation were first observed. The explosion of information produced in the last 20 years calls for a careful analysis due to the apparent contradictory data related to the cellular system studied and the range of doses used. This review focuses on the role of the active oxygen species, in particular the nitric oxides, in its relevance as potential mediator of radiation induced cellular death

  1. DNA damage induction and/or repair as mammalian cell biomarker for the prediction of cellular radiation response

    Baumstark-Khan, C.

    DNA damage and its repair processes are key factors in cancer induction and also in the treatment of malignancies. Cancer prevention during extended space missions becomes a topic of great importance for space radiobiology. The knowledge of individual responsiveness would allow the protection strategy to be tailored optimally in each case. Radiobiological analysis of cultured cells derived from tissue explants from individuals has shown that measurement of the surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) may be used to predict the individual responsiveness. However, clonogenic assays are timeconsuming, thus alternative assays for the determination of radiore-sponse are being sought. For that reason CHO cell strains having different repair capacities were used for examining whether DNA strand break repair is a suitable experimental design to allow predictive statements. Cellular survival (CFA assay) and DNA strand breaks (total DNA strand breaks: FADU technique; DSBs: non-denaturing elution) were determined in parallel immediately after irradiation as well as after a 24 hour recovery period according to dose. There were no correlations between the dose-response curves of the initial level of DNA strand breaks and parameters that describe clonogenic survival curves (SF2). A good correlation exists between intrinsic cellular radioresistance and the extent of residual DNA strand breaks.

  2. The German ISS-experiment Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CERASP): The effects of single and combined space flight conditions on mammalian cells

    Hellweg, C. E.; Thelen, M.; Arenz, A.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    The combined action of ionizing radiation and microgravity will continue to influence future manned space missions, with special risks for astronauts on the Moon surface or for long duration missions to Mars. There is increasing evidence that basic cellular functions are sensitive not only to radiation but also to microgravity. Previous space flight experiments gave contradictory results: from inhibition of DNA repair by microgravity to enhancement, whereas others did not detect any influence of microgravity on repair. At the Radiation Biology Department of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), recombinant bacterial and mammalian cell systems were developed as reporters for cellular signal transduction modulation by genotoxic environmental conditions. The space experiment “Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space” (CERASP) to be performed at the International Space Station (ISS) will make use of such reporter cell lines thereby supplying basic information on the cellular response to radiation applied in microgravity. One of the biological endpoints will be survival reflected by radiation-dependent reduction of constitutive expression of the enhanced variant of green fluorescent protein (EGFP). A second end-point will be gene activation by space flight conditions in mammalian cells, based on fluorescent promoter reporter systems using the destabilized d2EGFP variant. The promoter element to be investigated reflects the activity of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. The NF-κB family of proteins plays a major role in the inflammatory and immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis and tumor genesis. Results obtained with X-rays and accelerated heavy ions produced at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL imply that densely ionizing radiation has a stronger potential to activate NF-κB dependent gene expression than sparsely ionizing radiation. The correlation of NF-κB activation to negative regulation of apoptosis could favor

  3. A radiation measurement study on cellular phone

    This paper will explain the radiation level produced by various selected cellular phone from various models and brands available in the market. The result obtained from this study will also recommend whether a cellular phone is safe for public usage or it might cause any effect on public health. Finally, a database of radiation measurement level produced by selected various cellular phone will also be developed and exhibited in this paper. (Author)

  4. Deinococcus radiodurans PprI Switches on DNA Damage Response and Cellular Survival Networks after Radiation Damage*S⃞

    Lu, Huiming; Gao, Guanjun; Xu, Guangzhi; Fan, Lu; Yin, Longfei; Shen, Binghui; Hua, Yuejin

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary findings indicate that PprI is a regulatory protein that stimulates transcription and translation of recA and other DNA repair genes in response to DNA damage in the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. To define the repertoire of proteins regulated by PprI and investigate the in vivo regulatory mechanism of PprI in response to γ radiation, we performed comparative proteomics analyses on wild type (R1) and a pprI knock-out strain (YR1) under conditions of io...

  5. Macromolecular lesions and cellular radiation chemistry

    Our studies of the interaction of densely ionizing particles with macromolecules in the living cell may be divided into four parts: characterization of lesions to cellular DNA in the unmodified Bragg ionization curve; characterization of lesions to cellular DNA in the spread Bragg curve as used in radiation therapy; elucidation of the cellular radiation chemistry characteristic of high vs. low LET radiation qualities; and the introduction of novel techniques designed to give a better understanding of the fundamental properties of induction of lesions and their repair potentials in high LET radiation

  6. Cellular basis of radiation-induced fibrosis

    Fibrosis is a common sequela of both cancer treatment by radiotherapy and accidental irradiation and has been described in many tissues including skin, lung, heart and liver. The underlying mechanisms of the radiation-induced fibrosis still remain to be resolved. In the present review we tried to illustrate the basic cellular mechanisms of radiation-induced fibrosis based on the newest findings arising from molecular radiobiology and cell biology. Based on these findings the cellular mechanism of radiation-induced fibrosis can be seen as a multicellular process involving various interacting cell systems in the target organ resulting in the fibrotic phenotype of the fibroblast/fibrocyte cell system

  7. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2011-06-14

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  8. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying radiation carcinogenesis

    When considering and analyzing experimental material concerning cellular aspects of the problem of radiation carcinogenesis, the following conclusions can be made: neoplastic transformation of cells in a culture is caused already by small radiation doses, under the effect of which the level of DNA injury is quite insignificant; the frequency of cell transformation depends on the type of radiation, it is particularly pronounced under the effect of radiations with a high linear energy transfer; a correlation between the processes of postradiation recovery and radiogenic transformation of cells is detected, nonrepairable injures of DNA playing the most important role in radiation carcinogenesis; tumour promoters and anticarcinogenic agens produce a modifying effect on the transformation of irradiated cells. Molecular mechanisms of oncogene activation are thoroughly studied using the model of virus carcinogenesis, the problem of the nature of chemical and, in particular, radiation cell transformation remains scantily investigated

  9. Important role of catalase in the cellular response of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation indirectly causes oxidative stress in cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydroxyl radicals (OH(-)) generated by the radiolysis of water. We investigated how the catalase function was affected by ionizing radiation and analyzed the phenotype of mutants with a disrupted catalase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to radiation. The wild-type yeast strain and isogenic mutants with disrupted catalase genes were exposed to various doses of (60)Co gamma-rays. There was no difference between the wild-type strain and the cta1 disruption mutant following exposure to gamma-ray irradiation. In contrast, there was a significant decrease in the ctt1 disruption mutant, suggesting that this strain exhibited decreased survival on gamma-ray exposure compared with other strains. In all three strains, stationary phase cells were more tolerant to the exposure of gamma-rays than exponential phase cells, whereas the catalase activity in the wild-type strain and cta1 disruption mutant was higher in the stationary phase than in the exponential phase. These data suggest a correlation between catalase activity and survival following gamma-ray exposure. However, this correlation was not clear in the ctt1 disruption mutant, suggesting that other factors are involved in the tolerance to ROS induced by irradiation. PMID:25416226

  10. Molecular and cellular effects of radiations

    This program is concerned with the basic nature of the biological effects of mutagenic and carcinogenic environmental radiations, including those solar ultraviolet and visible radiations responsible for the most common form of human cancer: cancer of the skin. Concentrating on the damages to DNA caused by these radiations, the program attempts to delineate the basic mechanisms whereby such damage may occur. 14 refs

  11. Immune cellular response to HPV: current concepts

    Maria Alice Guimarães Gonçalves

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular immunity is essential for the elimination of human papillomavirus (HPV, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. We summarize the main mechanisms involved in cellular immune response to infections caused by HPV. Immunotherapies for HPV-related cancers require the disruption of T-cell response control mechanisms, associated with the stimulation of the Th1 cytokine response.

  12. DNA mismatch repair protein MSH2 dictates cellular survival in response to low dose radiation in endometrial carcinoma cells.

    Martin, Lynn M

    2013-07-10

    DNA repair and G2-phase cell cycle checkpoint responses are involved in the manifestation of hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS). The low-dose radioresponse of MSH2 isogenic endometrial carcinoma cell lines was examined. Defects in cell cycle checkpoint activation and the DNA damage response in irradiated cells (0.2 Gy) were evaluated. HRS was expressed solely in MSH2+ cells and was associated with efficient activation of the early G2-phase cell cycle checkpoint. Maintenance of the arrest was associated with persistent MRE11, γH2AX, RAD51 foci at 2 h after irradiation. Persistent MRE11 and RAD51 foci were also evident 24 h after 0.2 Gy. MSH2 significantly enhances cell radiosensitivity to low dose IR.

  13. Cellular metabolic responses of PET radiotracers to {sup 188}Re radiation in an MCF7 cell line containing dominant-negative mutant p53

    Cheon, Gi Jeong [Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: larry@kcch.re.kr; Chung, Hye-Kyung [Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jung-A [Laboratory of Radiation Experimental Therapeutics, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae [Laboratory of Radiation Experimental Therapeutics, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Soon-Hyuk [Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Sup [Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Chang Woon [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Moo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    We investigated the relations between the cell uptakes of metabolic radiotracers and {beta}-radiation pretreatment using a dominant mutant p53 (p53mt) cell line to evaluate the effects of p53 genes on {sup 18}F labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer uptakes. Methods: pCMV-Neo-Bam (control), which contains a neo-resistance marker, and p53 dominant-negative mutant expression constructs were stably transfected into MCF7 cell line. Cells were plated in 24-well plates at 1.0x10{sup 5} cells for 18 h. Rhenium-188 ({sup 188}Re) (a beta emitter) was added to the medium (3.7, 18.5, 37 MBq) and incubated for 24 h. We performed gamma-counting to determine the cellular uptakes of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), o-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) and 2'-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2'-deoxythymidine (FLT) (370 kBq, 60 min). Cell viabilities were determined by trypan blue staining and flow cytometry. Results: p53mt cells showed 1.5-2-fold higher FDG uptake than wild-type p53 cells in basal condition, and the difference of FDG uptake was greater after {sup 188}Re treatment (P<.01). FET uptake increased with {sup 188}Re dose without a significant difference between p53 statuses. p53mt cells showed lower FLT uptake than wild-type p53 cells in basal condition, and the difference of FLT uptake was greater after {sup 188}Re treatment. By cell viability testing and FACS analysis, p53mt cells showed lower viability and a larger apoptotic fraction (sub-G1) than wild-type p53 cells after {sup 188}Re treatment. Conclusion: We speculate that p53 dysfunction increases glucose and decreases thymidine metabolism in cancer cells and that this may be exaggerated by {sup 188}Re {beta}-radiation. Our findings suggest that FDG could reflect tumor viability and malignant potential after {sup 188}Re {beta}-radiation treatment, whereas FLT could be a more useful PET radiotracer for assessing therapeutic response to {beta}-radiation, especially in cancer cells

  14. Cellular host responses to gliomas.

    Joseph Najbauer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a 'network' with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a 'pair-wise' manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b high-generation xenografts (fifth passage had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with 'glomerulus-like' microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  15. The RBE of tritium-beta exposure for the induction of the adaptive response and apoptosis; cellular defense mechanisms against the biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Adaption to radiation is one of a few biological responses that has been demonstrated to occur in mammalian cells exposed to doses of ionizing radiation in the occupational exposure range. The adaptive response has been well characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, although the doses required to induce the response are higher than in mammalian cells. When yeast cells are primed with sublethal doses of gamma-radiation, they subsequently undergo an adaptive response and develop resistance to radiation, heat the chemical mutagens in a time and dose dependent manner. We have used this model system to assess the relative ability of tritium-beta radiation to induce the adaptive response the examined tritium-induced radiation resistance, thermal tolerance and suppression of mutation. The results show that sublethal priming doses of tritium caused yeast cells to develop resistance to radiation, heat, and a chemical mutagen MNNG. The magnitude and kinetics of the response, per unit dose, were the same for tritium and gamma-radiation. Therefore, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium induction of the adaptive response was about 1.0. Apoptosis is a genetically programmed cell death or cell suicide. Cells damaged by radiation can be selectively removed from the population by apoptosis and therefore eliminated as a potential cancer risk to the organism. Since we have previously shown that apoptosis is a sensitive indicator of radiation damage in human lymphocytes exposed to low doses, we have used this endpoint to investigate the potency of tritium-beta radiation. Initially, tritium was compared to X-rays for relative effectiveness at inducing apoptosis. The results showed the lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with X-rays or tritium had similar levels of apoptosis per unit dose. Therefore the relative biology effectiveness of tritium for induction of apoptosis in human lymphocytes was also about 1. In the work presented here, we have demonstrated that

  16. Phagocytosis, a cellular immune response in insects

    C Rosales

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Insects like many other organisms are exposed to a wide range of infectious agents. Defense against these agents is provided by innate immune systems, which include physical barriers, humoral responses, and cellular responses. The humoral responses are characterized by the production of antimicrobial peptides, while the cellular defense responses include nodulation, encapsulation, melanization and phagocytosis. The phagocytic process, whereby cells ingest large particles, is of fundamental importance for insects’ development and survival. Phagocytic cells recognize foreign particles through a series of receptors on their cell membrane for pathogen-associated molecules. These receptors in turn initiate a series of signaling pathways that instruct the cell to ingest and eventually destroy the foreign particle. This review describes insect innate humoral and cellular immune functions with emphasis on phagocytosis. Recent advances in our understanding of the phagocytic cell types in various insect species; the receptors involved and the signaling pathways activated during phagocytosis are discussed.

  17. Dynamic modeling of cellular response to DNA damage based on p53 stress response networks

    Jinpeng Qi; Yongsheng Ding; Shihuang Shao

    2009-01-01

    Under acute perturbations from the outside, cells can trigger self-defensive mechanisms to fight against genome stress. To investigate the cellular response to continuous ion radiation (IR), a dynamic model for p53 stress response networks at the cellular level is proposed. The model can successfully be used to simulate the dynamic processes of double-strand breaks (DSBs) generation and their repair, switch-like ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activation, oscillations occurring in the p53-MDM2 feedback loop, as well as toxins elimination triggered by p53 stress response networks. Especially, the model can predict the plausible outcomes of cellular response under different IR dose regimes.

  18. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  19. Mitochondria and ionizing radiation: their inter relationship toward cellular dysfunction

    The contemporary theory of radiobiology posit that cellular damage during an event of radiation exposure is mediated through DNA damage/repair signaling processes along with secondary mechanisms induced by free radical generation. Nevertheless, up-coming experimental data suggests that this speculative framework is not enough for unfolding extranuclear radiation effects, particularly the response of mitochondria, key organelles for maintaining cellular function. Therefore, the present study aims at understanding ionizing radiation induced cellular damage and the associated mitochondrial structure/functional changes, using normal human fibroblast cells as an experimental model. Cells were exposed to X-rays (using Faxitron CP 160; dose rate 1 Gray (Gy)/min, fitted with 0.5 mm Al filter). Changes in the mitochondrial structure/mass were investigated by fluorescence microscopy and fluorimetry using MiTotracker red/nonyl-acridine orange dyes. Functional changes were measured by comparative measurement of cytosolic/mitochondrial ROS release using DCFH2DA/MiToSOX dye, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) using Rhodamine 123, activity of respiratory complexes, ATP synthesis and DNA damage using long amplicon (LA) PCR. Results obtained showed that exposure to X-rays led to mitochondrial fragmentation, concomitantly increasing the mitochondrial mass. Elevated cytosolic ROS levels were correlated with increased mitochondrial superoxide levels in case of X-ray treated cells indicating increased oxidative stress accompanied by depletion in MMP and activity of respiratory enzyme complexes followed by lowering of ATP levels. LA-PCR data showed time dependent decrease in the amplification of 8.9 kb region of mitochondrial DNA and 13.5 kb region of beta-globin nuclear gene segment indicating ROS precedes mtDNA damage exhibiting the deleterious nature of X-ray which may be considered as a key causative factor for mitochondrial dysfunction. Also, the role of DRP1 (dynamin

  20. Sumo and the cellular stress response

    Enserink, Jorrit M.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin family member Sumo has important functions in many cellular processes including DNA repair, transcription and cell division. Numerous studies have shown that Sumo is essential for maintaining cell homeostasis when the cell encounters endogenous or environmental stress, such as osmotic stress, hypoxia, heat shock, genotoxic stress, and nutrient stress. Regulation of transcription is a key component of the Sumo stress response, and multiple mechanisms have been described by which ...

  1. Rapid Cellular Identification by Dynamic Electromechanical Response

    Nikiforov, Maxim [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Reukov, Vladimir V [ORNL; Vertegel, Alexey [ORNL; Thompson, Gary L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena is ubiquitous in living systems. Here, we demonstrate rapid identification of cellular organisms using difference in electromechanical activity in a broad frequency range. Principal component analysis of the dynamic electromechanical response spectra bundled with neural network based recognition provides a robust identification algorithm based on their electromechanical signature, and allows unambiguous differentiation of model Micrococcus Lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas Fluorescens system. This methodology provides a universal pathway for biological identification obviating the need for well-defined analytical models of Scanning Probe Microscopy response.

  2. Effect of ionizing radiation on humoral and cellular immunity in pigs vaccinated against Aujeszky's disease

    An effect of ionizing radiation on the immune response in pigs of both sexes weighing 35 kg vaccinated with an attenuated Aujeszky's disease virus was investigated. Ionizing radiation in a dose of 200 or 400 r reduced the number of IgM and IgG antibodies produced in vaccinated pigs. Additionally, the 400 r dose delyed the cellular immune response. No effect of the radiation on a clinical course of postvaccinal reaction was found

  3. Effect of cellular mobility on immune response

    Pandey, R. B.; Mannion, R.; Ruskin, H. J.

    2000-08-01

    Mobility of cell types in our HIV immune response model is subject to an intrinsic mobility and an explicit directed mobility, which is governed by Pmob. We investigate how restricting the explicit mobility, while maintaining the innate mobility of a viral-infected cell, affects the model's results. We find that increasing the explicit mobility of the immune system cells leads to viral dominance for certain levels of viral mutation. We conclude that increasing immune system cellular mobility indirectly increases the virus’ inherent mobility.

  4. Molecular and cellular fundamentals of stochastic radiation action

    Description of basic radiobiological processes in order to assess the risk of carcinogenesis due to radiotherapeutic procedures; demonstration of direct radiation-induced damage to DNA and indirect effects due to radiolysis of cellular water; description of repair mechanisms; radiation- induced chromosomal aberrations, genome mutations and disturbances of the cell cycle and their contributions to the carcinogenic effects of radiotherapy.(MG)

  5. Dose dependent rearrangement of cellular membranes induced by ionizing radiation

    The radiation-induced effects at dose rate of 0.35 Gy/min (in vivo) and of ultra-low doses (in vitro) on the cell membranes structural state were shown. The modifications of the membrane protein and lipid components and their dynamic state were revealed at experimental irradiation conditions by fluorescent probe analysis. The principal component analysis of the research data indicates the dose-dependent decrease of plasma membrane structural orderliness of the small intestine enterocytes with the increase of the ionizing irradiation acute dose of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 Gy at dose rate of 0.35 Gy/min. The complex response of the biological structure - the erythrocytes plasma membrane, on the ionizing radiation action at ultra-low doses that occurred through macromolecular structural rearrangements was also demonstrated. The features of the structural rearrangement of the cellular membranes depending on the ionizing radiation dose (dose rate) are found out

  6. Cellular and molecular studies on radiation quality

    The influence of radiation quality is measured for different biological endpoints like the induction of single and double strand breaks, chromosome aberrations, and cell cycle effects. From the analysis of the chromosome aberrations, it is expected to gain more insight the mechanism of the damage induction and interaction. Strand break induction of both single and double strand breaks, is measured as function of the chemical environment for extra- and intracellular DNA in order to estimate the influence of radiation quality. Studies of the perturbation of cell cycle progression are important for the interpretation of the chromosome aberration measurements, and they can be also used at a fast monitor of radiation damage. Objectives and results of the four contributions to the project for the reporting period are presented. (R.P.) 7 refs

  7. Cellular telephone-based wide-area radiation detection network

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2009-06-09

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  8. Cellular response to DNA damage. Link between p53 and DNA-PK

    Cells which lack DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) are very susceptible to ionizing radiation and display an inability to repair double-strand DNA breaks. DNA-PK is a member of a protein kinase family that includes ATR and ATM which have strong homology in their carboxy-terminal kinase domain with Pl-3 kinase. ATM has been proposed to act upstream of p53 in cellular response to ionizing radiation. DNA-PK may similarly interact with p53 in cellular growth control and in mediation of the response to ionizing radiation. (author)

  9. Radiatively-Driven Cosmology in the Cellular Automaton Universe

    Kurucz, R L

    2006-01-01

    This is an updated version of my paper "An outline of radiatively-driven cosmology" (Kurucz 2000). Here the Big Bang universe is replaced by a finite cellular automaton universe with no expansion (Kurucz 2006). The Big Bang is replaced by many little bangs spread throughout the universe that interact to produce the initial perturbations that form Population III stars, globular clusters, and galaxies, but no large-scale structure. These perturbations evolve into the universe as we now observe it. Evolution during the first billion years is controlled by radiation. Globular clusters are formed by radiatively-driven implosions, galaxies are formed by radiatively-triggered gravitational collapse of systems of globular clusters, and voids and the microwave background are formed by radiatively-driven expansion. After this period most of the strong radiation sources are exhausted and the universe relaxes into gravitational old age as we know it. To relieve the boredom we present the results of gedanken experiments (...

  10. Investigation of the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-induced Bystander Effects

    Furlong, Hayley

    2014-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in radiation-induced bystander effects in HaCaT cells, predominantly at low-doses of irradiation. They do not follow the original dose-response theory and exhibit a unique cascade of signalling events, which are under intense investigation for radiation risk purposes. An in vitro system was first used to observe the bystander effect, comparing two cell viability assays while measuring apoptotic cel...

  11. Cellular Stress Response to Engineered Nanoparticles: Effect of Size, Surface Coating, and Cellular Uptake

    CELLULAR STRESS RESPONSE TO ENGINEERED NANOPARTICLES: EFFECT OF SIZE, SURFACE COATING, AND CELLULAR UPTAKE RY Prasad 1, JK McGee2, MG Killius1 D Ackerman2, CF Blackman2 DM DeMarini2 , SO Simmons2 1 Student Services Contractor, US EPA, RTP, NC 2 US EPA, RTP, NC The num...

  12. Naringin abrogated radiation induced oxidative stress through modulation of redox regulated cellular signaling system

    Ionizing radiation is widely used as major diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation are due to generation of reactive oxygen species. The amounts of ionizing radiation that can be given to treat malignant tumours are often limited by toxicity in the surrounding normal tissues and organs. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Naringin (NG), a natural flavonoid, present in many plant parts against radiation induced oxidative stress with an evidence based exploration of the mechanism involved. Isolated murine splenocyte were irradiated with γ radiation (6 Gy) along with/without different concentrations of NG (50 and 100 μM). Biochemical, immunoblot, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence study was subject to be performed to observe its molecular mechanisms of action. Pretreatment with NG significantly prevented the radiation induced intracellular ROS generation, therefore prevented cellular TBARS formation and development of cellular nitrite. NG showed the significant reduction in nuclear DNA damage with respect to irradiated splenocyte through inhibition of DNA-PKcs and p-γH2AX. It recovered radiation induced reduced cell viability through modulation of redox regulated cell signaling system. It resulted in significant inhibition of radiation induced G1/S phase cell cycle arrest mediated by modulation of p53 dependent p21/WAF1 expression followed by Cyclin E and CDK2 expression. NG was involved in blocking radiation induced p38 function; reversed radiation mediated differential stress response through inhibition of NF-κB pathway. It prevented p-IKKα/β, p-IκBα, p-p65, COX2 expression. It also reversed the radiation induced p38/NF-κB guided inflammatory development. Thus it down regulated radiation induced CRP, MCP-1, and iNOS2 gene expression. This novel role of naringin provides a basis for therapeutic applications in future against radiation induced molecular and cellular functional

  13. Cellular effects after exposure to mixed beams of ionizing radiation

    Staaf, Elina

    2012-01-01

    Mixed beams of ionizing radiation in our environment originate from space, the bedrock and our own houses. Radiotherapy patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy or with high energy photons are also exposed to mixed beams of gamma radiation and neutrons. Earlier investigations have reported additivity as well as synergism (a greater than additive response) when combining radiations of different linear energy transfer. However, the outcome seemed to be dependent on the experimental s...

  14. P53 family and cellular stress responses in cancer

    Johanna ePflaum

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available p53 is an important tumor suppressor gene, which is stimulated by cellular stress like ionizing radiation, hypoxia, carcinogens and oxidative stress. Upon activation p53 leads to cell cycle arrest and promotes DNA repair or induces apoptosis via several pathways. p63 and p73 are structural homologs of p53 that can act similarly to the protein but also hold functions distinct from p53. Today more than forty different isoforms of the p53 family members are known. They result from transcription via different promoters and alternative splicing. Some isoforms have carcinogenic properties and mediate resistance to chemotherapy. Therefore, expression patterns of the p53 family genes can offer prognostic information in several malignant tumors. Furthermore, the p53 family constitutes a potential target for cancer therapy. Small molecules (e.g. Nutlins, RITA, PRIMA-1, and MIRA-1 among others have been objects of intense research interest in recent years. They restore pro-apoptotic wild-type p53 function and were shown to break chemotherapeutic resistance. Due to p53 family interactions small molecules also influence p63 and p73 activity. Thus, the members of the p53 family are key players in the cellular stress response in cancer and are expected to grow in importance as therapeutic targets.

  15. Radiation response of melanocytes

    Radiation response of melanocytes in resting and growing hair follicles is being studied using black C57B1/6J mice. The mid-dorsum of the posterior one-third of the body was exposed to 60Co gamma-rays, shielding the remainder of the body. Hair from the second growth cycle after irradiation was plucked and scored individually for the greying effect. The percentage of black hairs in a sample reflects the fraction of melanocytes surviving. Single and fractionated dose survival curves are being determined over a dose range of 300-1200 rad. The results are not affected by hair loss. The radiosensitivity of melanocytes in resting and growing phase follicles is being determined. Fractionated regimens using time intervals from 45 minutes to 12 hours are also being given to study the repair kinetics of melanocytes

  16. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response

    Kolodny, G. M.

    1979-09-01

    The initiation and control of the division process in normal cells is studied to gain insight into changes in these regards caused by x-irradiation and neoplasia. The Primer Hypothesis for eukaryotic gene regulation proposes that small molecular weight RNA acts as primer for new RNA synthesis by hybridizing with DNA and there initiating the transcription of a new RNA chain. The experiments reported here indicate that small molecular weight RNA will induce the production of new proteins. These results are consistent with the Primer Hypothesis, and demonstrate that RNA can be taken up from the media by cells in culture and can induce in vitro the production of differentiated cell products. (ACR)

  17. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response

    The initiation and control of the division process in normal cells is studied to gain insight into changes in these regards caused by x-irradiation and neoplasia. The Primer Hypothesis for eukaryotic gene regulation proposes that small molecular weight RNA acts as primer for new RNA synthesis by hybridizing with DNA and there initiating the transcription of a new RNA chain. The experiments reported here indicate that small molecular weight RNA will induce the production of new proteins. These results are consistent with the Primer Hypothesis, and demonstrate that RNA can be taken up from the media by cells in culture and can induce in vitro the production of differentiated cell products

  18. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure.

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-05-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism. PMID:27326395

  19. Early cellular signaling responses to axonal injury

    Wang Ai

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used optic nerve injury as a model to study early signaling events in neuronal tissue following axonal injury. Optic nerve injury results in the selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. The time course of cell death takes place over a period of days with the earliest detection of RGC death at about 48 hr post injury. We hypothesized that in the period immediately following axonal injury, there are changes in the soma that signal surrounding glia and neurons and that start programmed cell death. In the current study, we investigated early changes in cellular signaling and gene expression that occur within the first 6 hrs post optic nerve injury. Results We found evidence of cell to cell signaling within 30 min of axonal injury. We detected differences in phosphoproteins and gene expression within the 6 hrs time period. Activation of TNFα and glutamate receptors, two pathways that can initiate cell death, begins in RGCs within 6 hrs following axonal injury. Differential gene expression at 6 hrs post injury included genes involved in cytokine, neurotrophic factor signaling (Socs3 and apoptosis (Bax. Conclusion We interpret our studies to indicate that both neurons and glia in the retina have been signaled within 30 min after optic nerve injury. The signals are probably initiated by the RGC soma. In addition, signals activating cellular death pathways occur within 6 hrs of injury, which likely lead to RGC degeneration.

  20. Effects of high let radiation at the cellular level

    The complete evaluation of the impact of nuclear energy technologies on human health requires: identification and characterization of hazardous agents and their effects, which is well advanced; quantitative dose-effect relations for important effects under various conditions of radiation exposure and biological variation, which needs more work but which has been advancing fairly well, particularly in experimental animal research; an understanding of the cellular and tissue mechanisms of the hazardous effects in relation to the microdosimetry of the agents, which has advanced slowly and to a relatively limited degree; and integration of the dose-effect relations and mechanistic knowledge into theories and models which are intended to be predictive for estimation of human health risks at pertinent low levels of exposure. Several theories, hypotheses or models of radiation carcinogenesis, and some for alpha radiation in particular, have been developed on the basis of dose-effect relations in the necessary attempt to predict the hazards of low levels of radiation exposure for purposes of radiation protection in advance of adequate data on dose-effect relations and mchanisms. As such these theories or models have necessarily involved strings of explicit and implicit assumptions concerning mechanisms and the nature of dose-effect relations below the dose regions at which effects have been observed. Nevertheless, they have been useful in stimulating research to test their assumptions and in assuming the interpretation of data

  1. Relationship between cellular response models and biochemical mechanisms

    In most cellular response experiments, survival reflects the kinetics of a variety of damage and repair processes. Unfortunately, biochemical studies of molecular repair deal with mechanisms which cannot be readily correlated with these kinetic observations. The difference in these approaches sometimes leads to confusion over terms such as potentially-lethal and sublethal damage. These terms were introduced with operation definitions, derived from kinetic studies of cell survival, but some researchers have since attempted to associate them with specific biochemical mechanisms. Consequently, the terms are often used in totally different ways be different investigators. The use of carefully constructed models originating either out of assumptions based on mechanisms, or on kinetics, can be used to design experiments to eliminate some alternative kinetic schemes. In turn, some mechanisms may also be eliminated, resulting in a reduction in the number of mechanisms which must be investigated biochemically. One must take advantage of a wide range of specialized radiation procedures in order to accomplish this. Examples of the use of such specialized experimental designs, which have led to a more detailed understanding of the kinetics of both algal and mammalian cell responses, are discussed

  2. Summarizing cellular responses as biological process networks

    Lasher, Christopher D; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy; Murali, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Microarray experiments can simultaneously identify thousands of genes that show significant perturbation in expression between two experimental conditions. Response networks, computed through the integration of gene interaction networks with expression perturbation data, may themselves contain tens of thousands of interactions. Gene set enrichment has become standard for summarizing the results of these analyses in te...

  3. Studies on cellular immunity in patients with renal carcinoma: radiation-induced inhibition of leukocyte migration

    Thirty-two patients with hypernephroma (renal carcinoma) untreated or preoperatively exposed to local radiotherapy, were examined for tumor-directed cellular hypersensitivity by means of the indirect leukocyte migration test (LMT). (a) When soluble tumor extracts from preoperatively radiated hypernephromas were tested with autologous lymphocytes, 17 of 19 cancer patients gave a positive response; 10 of 11 were positive with allogenic lymphocytes from hypernephroma patients. In no instance could migration inhibition be induced with allogenic lymphocytes from 14 normal donors. Similarly, in 9 of 10 patients there was no significant inhibition with allogenic lymphocytes from patients with histologically different types of malignant tumors other than hypernephroma. (b) Tissue extracts from untreated hypernephromas failed to react in 12 of 13 patients when treated with autologous lymphocytes. LMT's, however, became positive in 6 of 7 patients from this group by in vitro-radiation of tumor samples (60Co or electrons) before preparation of tissue extracts. This radiation-induced effect was dose-related and specific, since radiation of normal kidney tissue did not significantly influence the migratory activity of leukocytes. Our data indicating that an in vivo as well as in vitro- radiation of the hypernephroma will be suitable for the induction and the demonstration of a directed cellular immune response, may be considered as an additional perspective in the integration of radiotherapy in the management of this neoplasm. (author)

  4. Ultraviolet radiation-mediated damage to cellular DNA

    Cadet, Jean [Laboratoire Lesions des Acides Nucleiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, CEA/DSM/Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, CEA-Grenoble, 17, Av. des Martyrs, Grenoble Cedex 9 F-38054 (France)]. E-mail: jcadet@cea.fr; Sage, Evelyne [Institut Curie, CNRS/IC UMR 2027, Centre Universitaire, Orsay (France); Douki, Thierry [Laboratoire Lesions des Acides Nucleiques, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique, CEA/DSM/Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, CEA-Grenoble, 17, Av. des Martyrs, Grenoble Cedex 9 F-38054 (France)

    2005-04-01

    Emphasis is placed in this review article on recent aspects of the photochemistry of cellular DNA in which both the UVB and UVA components of solar radiation are implicated individually or synergistically. Interestingly, further mechanistic insights into the UV-induced formation of DNA photoproducts were gained from the application of new accurate and sensitive chromatographic and enzymic assays aimed at measuring base damage. Thus, each of the twelve possible dimeric photoproducts that are produced at the four main bipyrimidine sites can now be singled out as dinucleoside monophosphates that are enzymatically released from UV-irradiated DNA. This was achieved using a recently developed high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay (HPLC-MS/MS) assay after DNA extraction and appropriate enzymic digestion. Interestingly, a similar photoproduct distribution pattern is observed in both isolated and cellular DNA upon exposure to low doses of either UVC or UVB radiation. This applies more specifically to the DNA of rodent and human cells, the cis-syn cyclobutadithymine being predominant over the two other main photolesions, namely thymine-cytosine pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone adduct and the related cyclobutyl dimer. UVA-irradiation was found to generate cyclobutane dimers at TT and to a lower extent at TC sites as a likely result of energy transfer mechanism involving still unknown photoexcited chromophore(s). Oxidative damage to DNA is also induced although less efficiently by UVA-mediated photosensitization processes that mostly involved {sup 1}O{sub 2} together with a smaller contribution of hydroxyl radical-mediated reactions through initially generated superoxide radicals.

  5. Cellular and molecular response to irradiation in ataxia telangiectasia and in Fanconi's anemia

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and Fanconi anemia (FA) are recessive genetic diseases featuring chromosomal instability, increased predisposition to cancer and in vitro hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (AT) or DNA cross-linking agents (FA). Moreover, an in vivo hypersensitivity to γ-rays exposure was reported in both syndromes. Cellular response to irradiation includes growth arrest (cell cycle modification) and cell death (by apoptosis or necrosis). Since it is generally accepted that apoptosis modulates cellular sensitivity to genotoxic stress, it was of interest to investigate the contribution of apoptosis in determining FA and AT responses to DNA Damaging Agents. The results support the contention that the in vivo hypersensitivity to radiation in these syndromes is not related to a higher rate of apoptotic cells but could be to a higher necrotic response triggering inflammatory reactions in the patients affected by this syndromes. (authors)

  6. Modeling In Vitro Cellular Responses to Silver Nanoparticles

    Dwaipayan Mukherjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nanoparticles (NPs have been widely demonstrated to induce toxic effects to various cell types. In vitro cell exposure systems have high potential for reliable, high throughput screening of nanoparticle toxicity, allowing focusing on particular pathways while excluding unwanted effects due to other cells or tissue dosimetry. The work presented here involves a detailed biologically based computational model of cellular interactions with NPs; it utilizes measurements performed in human cell culture systems in vitro, to develop a mechanistic mathematical model that can support analysis and prediction of in vivo effects of NPs. The model considers basic cellular mechanisms including proliferation, apoptosis, and production of cytokines in response to NPs. This new model is implemented for macrophages and parameterized using in vitro measurements of changes in cellular viability and mRNA levels of cytokines: TNF, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. The model includes in vitro cellular dosimetry due to nanoparticle transport and transformation. Furthermore, the model developed here optimizes the essential cellular parameters based on in vitro measurements, and provides a “stepping stone” for the development of more advanced in vivo models that will incorporate additional cellular and NP interactions.

  7. Cellular response of Campylobacter jejuni to trisodium phosphate

    Riedel, Charlotte Tandrup; Cohn, M. T.; Stabler, R. A.;

    2012-01-01

    The highly alkaline compound trisodium phosphate (TSP) is used as an intervention to reduce the load of Campylobacter on poultry meat in U.S. poultry slaughter plants. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cellular responses of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168 when exposed to sublethal...

  8. Problems, pitfalls, perspectives and potentials of quantitative theoretical models for cellular radiation action

    The problem of quantitative mathematical models in cellular radiation biology is discussed in a general way. It is emphasized that there are a number of stages, starting from the spatial pattern of energy deposition and ending with repair/misrepair processes which all need to be incorporated. Since different types of radiation commonly yield very similar dose-response curves a model which is only valid for one special case cannot claim general applicability. Interaction experiments with ultraviolet and ionizing radiation are discussed in this context. Also the role of different experimental systems (microorganisms versus mammalian cells) has to be taken into account. A number of current model approaches are discussed within this context, and it is shown that most of them do not satisfy the criterion of universal applicability and can therefore not claim to give a 'true' picture of biological reality. Shouldered survival curves are taken as an example to illustrate these points in a more specific way

  9. Involvement of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response of carcinoma cells to irradiation

    After a presentation of oxygen reactive species and their sources, the author describes the enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidative defenses, the physiological roles of oxygen reactive species, the oxidative stress, the water radiolysis, the anti-oxidative enzymes and the effects of ionizing radiations. The author then reports an investigation on the contribution of oxygen reactive species in the cellular response to irradiation, and an investigation on the influence of the breathing chain on the persistence of a radio-induced oxidative stress. He also reports a research on molecular mechanisms involved in the cellular radio-sensitivity

  10. Melanin and the cellular effects of ultrashort-pulse, near-infrared laser radiation

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Kumar, Neeru; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Stolarski, David J.

    2003-07-01

    Our research into laser bioeffects has increasingly focused on cytotoxic mechanisms affecting genomic expression and programmed cellular stress responses. In the context of DNA damage, we previously reported that more DNA strand breaks were produced in cultured retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells exposed to ultrashort pulse, than to CW, near-infrared (NIR) laser radiation. To test the hypothesis that RPE melanin was the cellular chromophore responsible for mediating this damage, the experiments were repeated with a line of human-derived RPE cells that could be grown in culture expressing varying levels of pigmentation. Lightly-pigmented cells were either unexposed, or exposed to the output of a Ti:Sapphire laser producing 810 nm light in mode-locked pulses (48-fsec at 80 MHz), or as CW radiation. Cells were irradiated at 160 W/cm2 or 80 W/cm2 (the estimated ED50 or half-ED50 for a retinal lesion). Immediately following the laser exposure, cells were processed for the comet assay. Longer "comet" tails and larger "comet" areas indicated more DNA strand breaks. In lightly-pigmented RPE cells, the overall comet assay differences among the laser-exposed groups were smaller than those observed in our earlier experiments which utilized highly pigmented primary cells. The comet tail lengths of cells exposed to the mode-locked pulses at the ED50, however, were significantly longer than those of the controls or the CW-exposed cells. The other comet assay parameters examined (tail moment, comet area) did not show consistent differences among the groups. While these results support the involvement of melanin in the ultrashort pulse laser-induced damage to DNA, they do not exclude the involvement of other cellular chromophores. Some preliminary experiments describing other measures of cellular stress responses to laser-induced oxidative stress are described.

  11. The influence of the cellular phone radiation on the growth of mark145 cell

    Objective: To explore the effects of radiation of cellular phone on the growth of cells. Methods: A radiation cycle was designed as working 25 minutes and then resting for 5 minutes for cellular phone. The Mark145 cell bottles were divided into six groups. The first two groups were radiated for two cycles, and the second two groups for four cycles, and the third two groups for five cycles. Each two groups were put 10cm far away from cellular phone and attach to it separately. Results: After culturing for 3 days there are many dead cells in the bottles. After culturing for 6 days, there is few living cells. Conclusions: cellular phone radiation is fatal to Mark145 cells, and the quantity of the dead cells change with the radiation time and the distance to radiation. That is to say, with the prolonging of radiation time and the shortening of the distance, the quantity of the dead cells is increasing. (authors)

  12. Ubiquitin Metabolism Affects Cellular Response to Volatile Anesthetics in Yeast

    Wolfe, Darren; Reiner, Thomas; Keeley, Jessica L.; Pizzini, Mark; Keil, Ralph L.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of action of volatile anesthetics, we are studying mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that have altered sensitivity to isoflurane, a widely used clinical anesthetic. Several lines of evidence from these studies implicate a role for ubiquitin metabolism in cellular response to volatile anesthetics: (i) mutations in the ZZZ1 gene render cells resistant to isoflurane, and the ZZZ1 gene is identical to BUL1 (binds ubiquitin ligase), which appears to be invo...

  13. Adaptation of the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular mechanisms.

    Kelly L Robertson

    Full Text Available Observations of enhanced growth of melanized fungi under low-dose ionizing radiation in the laboratory and in the damaged Chernobyl nuclear reactor suggest they have adapted the ability to survive or even benefit from exposure to ionizing radiation. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism of fungal responses to such radiation remains poorly understood. Using the black yeast Wangiella dermatitidis as a model, we confirmed that ionizing radiation enhanced cell growth by increasing cell division and cell size. Using RNA-seq technology, we compared the transcriptomic profiles of the wild type and the melanin-deficient wdpks1 mutant under irradiation and non-irradiation conditions. It was found that more than 3000 genes were differentially expressed when these two strains were constantly exposed to a low dose of ionizing radiation and that half were regulated at least two fold in either direction. Functional analysis indicated that many genes for amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism and cell cycle progression were down-regulated and that a number of antioxidant genes and genes affecting membrane fluidity were up-regulated in both irradiated strains. However, the expression of ribosomal biogenesis genes was significantly up-regulated in the irradiated wild-type strain but not in the irradiated wdpks1 mutant, implying that melanin might help to contribute radiation energy for protein translation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that long-term exposure to low doses of radiation significantly increased survivability of both the wild-type and the wdpks1 mutant, which was correlated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, increased production of carotenoid and induced expression of genes encoding translesion DNA synthesis. Our results represent the first functional genomic study of how melanized fungal cells respond to low dose ionizing radiation and provide clues for the identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and

  14. Thermal enhancement of cellular radiation damage: a review of complementary and synergistic effects

    Hyperthermia treatment can kill mammalian cells in a time and temperature dependent manner. Thermal sensitivity varies extensively among various cell lines in culture and cellular molecular and ultrastructural studies have not resolved which cellular mechanisms underlie thermal cell killing and radiosensitization. The response of cells to heat and radiation are complementary under certain conditions found in human tumors, such as hypoxia, low pH, low nutrient and the S-phase of the cell cycle. Thus, hyperthermia can be used as a complementary treatment modality in the radiotherapy of human cancer. Further studies show that heat treatment causes radiosensitization which is in part associated with the inhibition of repair of radiation damage and is strongly dependent on temperature and on the sequencing. In addition, the conditions such as pH and oxygenation during treatment sequencing can influence the degree of recovery of cells. These factors may be exploited in optimizing therapeutic gain in clinical cancer therapy. Data are shown that transformation from the normal to the tumorigenic state causes random small changes in radiosensitivity and heat sensitivity. Also, treatments combining heat and radiation can lead to increased or decreased transformation in cells depending on the treatment sequence.112 references

  15. Cellular Response to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Outside the protection of the geomagnetic field, astronauts and other living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. Whether spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, have effects on cellular responses to DNA damage induced by exposure to radiation or cytotoxic chemicals is still unknown, as is their impact on the radiation risks for astronauts and on the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and other spaceflight factors have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damages, human fibroblast cells flown to the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB) similar to the ionizing radiation. Damages in the DNA were measured by the phosphorylation of a histone protein H2AX (g-H2AX), which showed slightly more foci in the cells on ISS than in the ground control. The expression of genes involved in DNA damage response was also analyzed using the PCR array. Although a number of the genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly altered in the cells after bleomycin treatment, no significant difference in the expression profile of DNA damage response genes was found between the flight and ground samples. At the time of the bleomycin treatment, the cells on the ISS were found to be proliferating faster than the ground control as measured by the percentage of cells containing positive Ki-67 signals. Our results suggested that the difference in g-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the faster growth rate of the cells in space, but spaceflight did not affect initial transcriptional responses of the DNA damage response genes to

  16. Innate Cellular Immune Responses in Aedes caspius (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes.

    Soliman, D E; Farid, H A; Hammad, R E; Gad, A M; Bartholomay, L C

    2016-03-01

    Mosquitoes transmit a variety of pathogens that have devastating consequences for global public and veterinary health. Despite their capacity to serve as vectors, these insects have a robust capacity to respond to invading organisms with strong cellular and humoral immune responses. In Egypt, Aedes caspius (Pallas, 1771) has been suspected to act as a bridge vector of Rift Valley Fever virus between animals and humans. Microscopic analysis of Ae. caspius hemolymph revealed the presence of phagocytic cells called granulocytes. We further evaluated cellular immune responses produced by Ae. caspius as a result of exposure to a Gram-negative, and Gram-positive bacterium, and to latex beads. After challenge, a rapid and strong phagocytic response against either a natural or synthetic invader was evident. Hemocyte integrity in bacteria-inoculated mosquitoes was not morphologically affected. The number of circulating granulocytes decreased with age, reducing the overall phagocytic capacity of mosquitoes over time. The magnitude and speed of the phagocytic response suggested that granulocytes act as an important force in the battle against foreign invaders, as has been characterized in other important mosquito vector species. PMID:26792848

  17. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation

  18. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    Hazawa, Masaharu; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Obara, Chizuka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Gotoh, Takaya; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tajima, Katsushi, E-mail: tajima@nirs.go.jp

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation.

  19. Cellular Bases of Light-regulated Gravity Responses

    Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the most significant research accomplished in our NAG2-1347 project on the cellular bases of light-regulated gravity responses, It elaborates mainly on our discovery of the role of calcium currents in gravity-directed polar development in single germinating spore cells of the fern Ceratopteris, our development of RNA silencing as a viable method of suppressing the expression of specific genes in Ceratopteris, and on the structure, expression and distribution of members of the annexin family in flowering plants, especially Arabidopsis.

  20. HSV-I and the cellular DNA damage response

    Smith, Samantha; Weller, Sandra K.

    2015-01-01

    Peter Wildy first observed genetic recombination between strains of HSV in 1955. At the time, knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms was limited, and it has only been in the last decade that particular DNA damage response (DDR) pathways have been examined in the context of viral infections. One of the first reports addressing the interaction between a cellular DDR protein and HSV-1 was the observation by Lees-Miller et al. that DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit levels were depleted i...

  1. Radiation-induced changes in cellularity and proliferation in human oral mucosa

    Purpose: To quantify the oral mucosal cell density and proliferation rate during conventional radiotherapy of head-and-neck tumors and to compare these parameters with clinical scoring of oral mucositis. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1999, 22 patients were included in this study. Mucosal biopsies were taken before or during the radiotherapy course (5 x 2 Gy/wk). Biopsies were incubated in vitro with tritiated thymidine immediately after excision to label DNA-synthesizing cells. Results: Epithelial cell density followed a biphasic radiation response. A steep decrease to about 50% of the preirradiation value (1000 cells/mm epithelium) during Week 1 was followed by a more gradual loss to about 400 cells at the end of treatment. The initial phase was based on the depression of proliferation, with 5-10 labeled cells/mm at the end of Week 1 vs. 60 labeled cells/mm in controls. Subsequently, proliferation was partially restituted at 20 labeled cells/mm. A significant difference in cell numbers was seen between Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Grade 0 (∼850 cell/mm) and Grade 2 (325/mm) or Grade 3 (370/mm). No significant differences were observed between reaction grades 1, 2, and 3. Conclusion: Conventionally fractionated radiotherapy induces a rapid suppression in cell production in Week 1, which results in a prompt reduction in cell numbers. Subsequently, a partial restoration of proliferation significantly reduces the rate of cell loss. These processes clearly precede the clinical response. Regeneration, defined as restoration of cellularity, is already under way when the maximal clinical response is observed. Clinical reaction grading corresponds poorly to cellular density measures during conventional fractionation

  2. Antibody responses in allogeneic radiation chimeras

    The construction of long-lived allogeneic radiation chimeras, free of graft-versus-host disease, has been achieved using serologic elimination of Thy 1+ cells from donor bone marrow. Humoral immune function was not restored in these animals as evidenced by lack of primary antibody responses to a T cell-dependent antigen, namely, sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) both in vivo and in vitro. No evidence for a suppressor cell-mediated mechanism was found. Using separated chimera spleen cell populations and specific helper cell soluble mediators, the functional capabilities of chimera B cells, T cells, and macrophages were assessed. These findings suggested that the failure of chimeras to produce antibody is not the result of impaired B cell, T cell, or macrophage function, but rather, that it is due to ineffective cellular interactions. Physiologic cellular interactions depend upon the sharing of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) determinants between interacting cells. However, the self-recognition repertoire of developing T cells may be influenced by the environment which these cells differentiate such that they learn to recognize host MHC determinants as self. These findings support the interpretation that the immunologic hyporeactivity of allogeneic bone marrow chimeras reflects the role of the host environment in restricting the interactive capabilities of donor-derived cells

  3. Radiation protection - radiographer's role and responsibilities

    Ever since discovery of x-rays, radiographers has been the prime user of radiation. With the passage of time, the harmful effects of radiation were detected. Some of radiographers, radiologists and public were affected by radiation, but today with enough knowledge of radiation, the prime responsibility of radiation protection lies with the radiographers only. The radiologist and physicist are also associated with radiation protection to some extent

  4. Complex cellular responses to tooth wear in rodent molar.

    Mahdee, A; Alhelal, A; Eastham, J; Whitworth, J; Gillespie, J I

    2016-01-01

    The arrangement and roles of the odontoblast and its process in sensing and responding to injuries such as tooth wear are incompletely understood. Evidence is presented that dentine exposure by tooth wear triggers structural and functional changes that aim to maintain tooth integrity. Mandibular first molars from freshly culled 8 week Wistar rats were prepared for light microscopy ground-sections (n=6), or fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde, decalcified in 17% EDTA, sectioned and stained with antibodies to cyto-skeletal proteins (vimentin (vim), α-tubulin (tub) and α-actin), cellular homeostatic elements (sodium potassium ATPase (NaK-ATPase) and sodium hydrogen exchanger (NHE-1)), and sensory nerve fibres (CGRP) (n=10) for fluorescence microscopy of worn and unworn regions of the mesial cusp. Immunoreactivity (IR) to vim, actin, NaK-ATPase and CGRP was confined to the pulpal third of odontoblast processes (OPs). IR to tub and nhe-1 was expressed by OPs in full dentine thickness. In areas associated with dentine exposure, the tubules contained no OPs. In regions with intact dentine, odontoblasts were arranged in a single cell layer and easily distinguished from the sub-odontoblast cells. In regions with open tubules, the odontoblasts were in stratified or pseudo-stratified in arrangement. Differences in structural antibody expression suggest a previously unreported heterogeneity of the odontoblast population and variations in different regions of the OP. This combined with differences in OPs extension and pulp cellular arrangement in worn and unworn regions suggests active and dynamic cellular responses to the opening of dentinal tubules by tooth wear. PMID:26547699

  5. Functional genomics of UV radiation responses in human cells

    Koch-Paiz, Christine A.; Amundson, Sally A.; Bittner, Michael L.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Fornace, Albert J

    2004-05-18

    The gene expression responses of MCF-7, a p53 wild-type (wt) human cell line, were monitored by cDNA microarray hybridization after exposure to different wavelengths of UV irradiation. Equitoxic doses of UVA, UVB, and UVC radiation were used to reduce survival to 37%. The effects of suramin, a signal pathway inhibitor, on the gene expression responses to the three UV wavelengths were also compared in this model system. UVB radiation triggered the broadest gene expression responses, and 172 genes were found to be consistently responsive in at least two-thirds of independent UVB experiments. These UVB radiation-responsive genes encode proteins with diverse cellular roles including cell cycle control, DNA repair, signaling, transcription, protein synthesis, protein degradation, and RNA metabolism. The set of UVB-responsive genes included most of the genes responding to an equitoxic dose of UVC radiation, plus additional genes that were not strongly triggered by UVC radiation. There was also some overlap with genes responding to an equitoxic dose of UVA radiation, although responses to this lower energy UV radiation were overall weaker. Signaling through growth factor receptors and other cytokine receptors was shown to have a major role in mediating UV radiation stress responses, as suramin, which inhibits such receptors, attenuated responses to UV radiation in nearly all the cases. Inhibition by suramin was greater for UVC than for UVB irradiation. This probably reflects the more prominent role in UVB damage response of signaling by reactive oxygen species, which would not be affected by suramin. Our results with suramin demonstrate the power of cDNA microarray hybridization to illuminate the global effects of a pharmacologic inhibitor on cell signaling.

  6. The Cellular Bases of Antibody Responses during Dengue Virus Infection

    Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Aguilar-Medina, Elsa Maribel; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab) responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG) memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell-dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic, or memory) B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections. This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events such as the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation, and germinal centers (GCs) formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs), till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells, and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated. PMID:27375618

  7. The cellular bases of antibody responses during dengue virus infection

    Juan Carlos Yam-Puc

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and can cause from an asymptomatic disease to mild undifferentiated fever, classical dengue, and severe dengue. Neutralizing memory antibody (Ab responses are one of the most important mechanisms that counteract reinfections and are therefore the main aim of vaccination. However, it has also been proposed that in dengue, some of these class-switched (IgG memory Abs might worsen the disease. Although these memory Abs derive from B cells by T-cell dependent processes, we know rather little about the (acute, chronic or memory B cell responses and the complex cellular mechanisms generating these Abs during DENV infections.This review aims to provide an updated and comprehensive perspective of the B cell responses during DENV infection, starting since the very early events like the cutaneous DENV entrance and the arrival into draining lymph nodes, to the putative B cell activation, proliferation and germinal centers (GCs formation (the source of affinity-matured class-switched memory Abs, till the outcome of GC reactions such as the generation of plasmablasts, Ab-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells. We discuss topics very poorly explored such as the possibility of B cell infection by DENV or even activation-induced B cell death. The current information about the nature of the Ab responses to DENV is also illustrated.

  8. Simulating Quantitative Cellular Responses Using Asynchronous Threshold Boolean Network Ensembles

    Shah Imran

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increasing knowledge about the potential mechanisms underlying cellular functions, it is becoming feasible to predict the response of biological systems to genetic and environmental perturbations. Due to the lack of homogeneity in living tissues it is difficult to estimate the physiological effect of chemicals, including potential toxicity. Here we investigate a biologically motivated model for estimating tissue level responses by aggregating the behavior of a cell population. We assume that the molecular state of individual cells is independently governed by discrete non-deterministic signaling mechanisms. This results in noisy but highly reproducible aggregate level responses that are consistent with experimental data. Results We developed an asynchronous threshold Boolean network simulation algorithm to model signal transduction in a single cell, and then used an ensemble of these models to estimate the aggregate response across a cell population. Using published data, we derived a putative crosstalk network involving growth factors and cytokines - i.e., Epidermal Growth Factor, Insulin, Insulin like Growth Factor Type 1, and Tumor Necrosis Factor α - to describe early signaling events in cell proliferation signal transduction. Reproducibility of the modeling technique across ensembles of Boolean networks representing cell populations is investigated. Furthermore, we compare our simulation results to experimental observations of hepatocytes reported in the literature. Conclusion A systematic analysis of the results following differential stimulation of this model by growth factors and cytokines suggests that: (a using Boolean network ensembles with asynchronous updating provides biologically plausible noisy individual cellular responses with reproducible mean behavior for large cell populations, and (b with sufficient data our model can estimate the response to different concentrations of extracellular ligands. Our

  9. Cellular responses of Prochilodus lineatus hepatocytes after cylindrospermopsin exposure.

    Liebel, S; Oliveira Ribeiro, C A; Silva, R C; Ramsdorf, W A; Cestari, M M; Magalhães, V F; Garcia, J R E; Esquivel, B M; Filipak Neto, F

    2011-10-01

    Cylindrospermopsin is a potent toxicant for eukaryotic cells produced by several cyanobacteria. Recently, primary hepatocyte cultures of Neotropical fish have been established, demonstrating to be a quite efficient in vitro model for cellular toxicology studies. In the current study, a protocol for culture of Prochilodus lineatus hepatocytes was established and utilized to investigate the cellular responses to purified cylindrospermopsin exposure. Hepatocytes were successfully dissociated with dispase, resulting in a cell yield of 6.36 × 10(7)cells g(-1) of liver, viability of 97% and attachment on uncoated culture flasks. For investigation of cylindrospermopsin effects, hepatocytes were dissociated, cultured during 96 h and exposed to three concentrations of the toxin (0.1, 1.0 or 10 μgl(-1)) for 72 h. Cylindrospermopsin exposure significantly decreased cell viability (0.1 and 1 μgl(-1)) and multixenobiotic resistance mechanism, MXR (all exposed groups), but increased reactive oxygen/nitrogen species levels (all exposed groups) and lipid peroxidation (10 μgl(-1)). On the other hand no significant alterations were observed for other biochemical biomarkers as 2GSH/GSSG ratio, protein carbonyl levels and DNA strand breaks or glutathione S-transferase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities. In conclusion, hepatocytes might be made sensitive to cylindrospermopsin, at least in part, due to reduction of xenobiotics and endobiotics efflux capacity by MXR. Additionally, the toxin exposure suggests important issues regarding hepatocytes survival at the lowest cylindrospermopsin concentrations. PMID:21600976

  10. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage

    Turner, Nancy D.; Braby, Leslie A.; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2002-01-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations.

  11. AMPK regulates metabolism and survival in response to ionizing radiation

    Background and purpose: AMPK is a metabolic sensor and an upstream inhibitor of mTOR activity. AMPK is phosphorylated by ionizing radiation (IR) in an ATM dependent manner, but the cellular consequences of this phosphorylation event have remained unclear. The objective of this study was to assess whether AMPK plays a functional role in regulating cellular responses to IR. Methods: The importance of AMPK expression for radiation responses was investigated using both MEFs (mouse embryo fibroblasts) double knockout for AMPK α1/α2 subunits and human colorectal carcinoma cells (HCT 116) with AMPK α1/α2 shRNA mediated knockdown. Results: We demonstrate here that IR results in phosphorylation of both AMPK and its substrate, ACC. IR moderately stimulated mTOR activity, and this was substantially exacerbated in the absence of AMPK. AMPK was required for IR induced expression of the mTOR inhibitor REDD1, indicating that AMPK restrains mTOR activity through multiple mechanisms. Likewise, cellular metabolism was deregulated following irradiation in the absence of AMPK, as evidenced by a substantial increase in oxygen consumption rates and lactate production. AMPK deficient cells showed impairment of the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, and were unable to support long-term proliferation during starvation following radiation. Lastly, we show that AMPK proficiency is important for clonogenic survival after radiation during starvation. Conclusions: These data reveal novel functional roles for AMPK in regulating mTOR signaling, cell cycle, survival and metabolic responses to IR.

  12. Cellular response to titanium discs coated with polyelectrolyte multilayer films

    Jing Zhan; Qiao-jie Luo; Ying Huang; Xiao-dong Li

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) coatings on the biological behavior of titanium (Ti) substrates. Collagen typeΙ/hyaluronic acid (Col/HA) and chitosan/hyaluronic acid (Chi/HA) multilayer PEM coatings were in-troduced onto Ti substrates using layer-by-layer assembly. Contact angle instruments and quartz crystal microbalance were used for film characterization. The results obtained showed that both Col/HA and Chi/HA surfaces had high hydrophilicity and promoted cell adhesion in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast and human gingival fibroblast cells. In addition, the synthesis of function-related proteins and gene expression levels in both MC3T3-E1 and fibroblast cells was higher for the Col/HA coating compared with the Chi/HA coating, indicating better cellu-lar response to the Col/HA coating.

  13. Biology responses to low dose radiation

    Biology responses to low dose radiation is the most important problem of medical radiation and radiation protection. The especial mechanism of low dose or low dose rate induced cell responses, has been found independent with linear no-threshold model. This article emphasize to introduce low dose or low dose rate induced biology responses of adaptive response, by-effect, super-sensitivity and genomic instability. (authors)

  14. Ethanol Cellular Defense Induce Unfolded Protein Response in Yeast.

    Navarro-Tapia, Elisabet; Nana, Rebeca K; Querol, Amparo; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although, many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two S. cerevisiae strains, CECT10094, and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico) respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR) and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus, our data suggest that there

  15. Ethanol cellular defense induce unfolded protein response in yeast

    Elisabet eNavarro-Tapia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, CECT10094 and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus

  16. Robust network topologies for generating switch-like cellular responses.

    Najaf A Shah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Signaling networks that convert graded stimuli into binary, all-or-none cellular responses are critical in processes ranging from cell-cycle control to lineage commitment. To exhaustively enumerate topologies that exhibit this switch-like behavior, we simulated all possible two- and three-component networks on random parameter sets, and assessed the resulting response profiles for both steepness (ultrasensitivity and extent of memory (bistability. Simulations were used to study purely enzymatic networks, purely transcriptional networks, and hybrid enzymatic/transcriptional networks, and the topologies in each class were rank ordered by parametric robustness (i.e., the percentage of applied parameter sets exhibiting ultrasensitivity or bistability. Results reveal that the distribution of network robustness is highly skewed, with the most robust topologies clustering into a small number of motifs. Hybrid networks are the most robust in generating ultrasensitivity (up to 28% and bistability (up to 18%; strikingly, a purely transcriptional framework is the most fragile in generating either ultrasensitive (up to 3% or bistable (up to 1% responses. The disparity in robustness among the network classes is due in part to zero-order ultrasensitivity, an enzyme-specific phenomenon, which repeatedly emerges as a particularly robust mechanism for generating nonlinearity and can act as a building block for switch-like responses. We also highlight experimentally studied examples of topologies enabling switching behavior, in both native and synthetic systems, that rank highly in our simulations. This unbiased approach for identifying topologies capable of a given response may be useful in discovering new natural motifs and in designing robust synthetic gene networks.

  17. Radiation effects on membranes - 1. Cellular permeability and cell survival

    The effect of various doses of γ radiation (5-60 krad) on the membrane permeability and cell survival of Candida albicans, a pathogenic yeast, was investigated. A reduction in the cell survival and in the accumulation of amino acids (proline, glycine, lysine, and glutamic acid) was observed following irradiation. The rate of oxygen uptake, which is often associated with transport, was also reduced. There was no damage to available sulfhydryl groups following the exposure of cells to various doses of γ radiation. The membrane lipid composition of C. albicans cells can be altered by growing them in alkanes of varying chain lengths. The effects of such altered lipid composition on radiosensitivity was examined. It was observed that C. albicans cells with altered lipid content acquire resistance to γ radiation

  18. Cellular response to low Gamma-ray doses

    Lymphocytes, obtained from healthy donors, were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp70 and Hsc70.Hsp70 protein was detected after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 1.25 c Gy gamma-ray dose, lymphocytes expressed Hsp70 protein, indicating a threshold response to gamma rays. (Author)

  19. A new cellular stress response that triggers centriolar satellite reorganization and ciliogenesis

    Villumsen, Bine H; Danielsen, Jannie R; Povlsen, Lou;

    2013-01-01

    Centriolar satellites are small, granular structures that cluster around centrosomes, but whose biological function and regulation are poorly understood. We show that centriolar satellites undergo striking reorganization in response to cellular stresses such as UV radiation, heat shock, and...... transcription blocks, invoking acute and selective displacement of the factors AZI1/CEP131, PCM1, and CEP290 from this compartment triggered by activation of the stress-responsive kinase p38/MAPK14. We demonstrate that the E3 ubiquitin ligase MIB1 is a new component of centriolar satellites, which interacts...... with and ubiquitylates AZI1 and PCM1 and suppresses primary cilium formation. In response to cell stress, MIB1 is abruptly inactivated in a p38-independent manner, leading to loss of AZI1, PCM1, and CEP290 ubiquitylation and concomitant stimulation of ciliogenesis, even in proliferating cells...

  20. Radiating Frohlich system as a model of cellular electromagnetism

    Šrobár, Fedor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 4 (2015), s. 355-360. ISSN 1536-8378 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : electromagnetic radiation * Fröhlich systems * cell physiology Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.194, year: 2014

  1. Delayed effects of low-dose radiation on cellular immunity in atomic bomb survivors residing in the United States.

    Bloom, E T; Akiyama, M; Kusunoki, Y; Makinodan, T

    1987-05-01

    Several parameters of cellular immune function were assessed among persons who survived the 1945 atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki but who now reside in the United States. The subjects in this study were exposed to various low doses (T65D) of radiation at the time of the bomb. More than half received an estimated 0 Gy (S0 group). Of those exposed to more radiation (S+ group), nearly 90% received less than 0.50 Gy (50 rad). Lymphocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood of these individuals and were assessed for the following parameters of cellular immunity: mitogenic response to phytohemagglutinin, mitogenic response to allogeneic lymphocytes, natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC), and interferon production. In every case, the response of the S+ group was greater than that of the S0 group, although only the difference for NCMC was statistically significant. Results of studies presently being performed on A-bomb survivors residing in Hiroshima do not confirm this difference. Therefore, it is difficult to say whether the increase in natural cytotoxicity observed among the American and not the Japanese A-bomb survivors exposed to very low doses of radiation is a hormetic effect which was modulated by post-radiation environmental conditions or a result of selective migration. PMID:3570796

  2. Microarray analysis of radiation response genes in primary human fibroblasts

    Purpose: To identify radiation-induced early transcriptional responses in primary human fibroblasts and understand cellular pathways leading to damage correction. Methods and Materials: Primary human fibroblast cell lines were irradiated with 2 Gy γ-radiation and RNA isolated 2 h later. Radiation-induced transcriptional alterations were investigated with microarrays covering the entire human genome. Time- and dose dependent radiation responses were studied by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: About 200 genes responded to ionizing radiation on the transcriptional level in primary human fibroblasts. The expression profile depended on individual genetic backgrounds. Thirty genes (28 up- and 2 down-regulated) responded to radiation in identical manner in all investigated cells. Twenty of these consensus radiation response genes were functionally categorized: most of them belong to the DNA damage response (GADD45A, BTG2, PCNA, IER5), regulation of cell cycle and cell proliferation (CDKN1A, PPM1D, SERTAD1, PLK2, PLK3, CYR61), programmed cell death (BBC3, TP53INP1) and signaling (SH2D2A, SLIC1, GDF15, THSD1) pathways. Four genes (SEL10, FDXR, CYP26B1, OR11A1) were annotated to other functional groups. Many of the consensus radiation response genes are regulated by, or regulate p53. Time- and dose-dependent expression profiles of selected consensus genes (CDKN1A, GADD45A, IER5, PLK3, CYR61) were investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. Transcriptional alterations depended on the applied dose, and on the time after irradiation. Conclusions: The data presented here could help in the better understanding of early radiation responses and the development of biomarkers to identify radiation susceptible individuals

  3. Semantic annotation of biological concepts interplaying microbial cellular responses

    Carreira Rafael

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated extraction systems have become a time saving necessity in Systems Biology. Considerable human effort is needed to model, analyse and simulate biological networks. Thus, one of the challenges posed to Biomedical Text Mining tools is that of learning to recognise a wide variety of biological concepts with different functional roles to assist in these processes. Results Here, we present a novel corpus concerning the integrated cellular responses to nutrient starvation in the model-organism Escherichia coli. Our corpus is a unique resource in that it annotates biomedical concepts that play a functional role in expression, regulation and metabolism. Namely, it includes annotations for genetic information carriers (genes and DNA, RNA molecules, proteins (transcription factors, enzymes and transporters, small metabolites, physiological states and laboratory techniques. The corpus consists of 130 full-text papers with a total of 59043 annotations for 3649 different biomedical concepts; the two dominant classes are genes (highest number of unique concepts and compounds (most frequently annotated concepts, whereas other important cellular concepts such as proteins account for no more than 10% of the annotated concepts. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, a corpus that details such a wide range of biological concepts has never been presented to the text mining community. The inter-annotator agreement statistics provide evidence of the importance of a consolidated background when dealing with such complex descriptions, the ambiguities naturally arising from the terminology and their impact for modelling purposes. Availability is granted for the full-text corpora of 130 freely accessible documents, the annotation scheme and the annotation guidelines. Also, we include a corpus of 340 abstracts.

  4. Investigation of cellular responses upon interaction with silver nanoparticles

    Subbiah R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ramesh Subbiah,1,2 Seong Beom Jeon,3,4 Kwideok Park,1,2 Sang Jung Ahn,4,5 Kyusik Yun3 1Center for Biomaterials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejon, 3Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, 4Centre for Advanced Instrumentation, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, 5Major of Nano Science, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea Abstract: In order for nanoparticles (NPs to be applied in the biomedical field, a thorough investigation of their interactions with biological systems is required. Although this is a growing area of research, there is a paucity of comprehensive data in cell-based studies. To address this, we analyzed the physicomechanical responses of human alveolar epithelial cells (A549, mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3, and human bone marrow stromal cells (HS-5, following their interaction with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs. When compared with kanamycin, AgNPs exhibited moderate antibacterial activity. Cell viability ranged from ≤80% at a high AgNPs dose (40 µg/mL to >95% at a low dose (10 µg/mL. We also used atomic force microscopy-coupled force spectroscopy to evaluate the biophysical and biomechanical properties of cells. This revealed that AgNPs treatment increased the surface roughness (P<0.001 and stiffness (P<0.001 of cells. Certain cellular changes are likely due to interaction of the AgNPs with the cell surface. The degree to which cellular morphology was altered directly proportional to the level of AgNP-induced cytotoxicity. Together, these data suggest that atomic force microscopy can be used as a potential tool to develop a biomechanics-based biomarker for the evaluation of NP-dependent cytotoxicity and cytopathology. Keywords: AFM, roughness, nanoindentation, biomarker, cytotoxicity, biomechanics

  5. Cellular adaptation as an important response during chemical carcinogenesis

    Since disease processes are largely expressions of how living organisms react and respond to perturbations in the external and internal environments, adaptive or protective responses and their modulations and mechanisms are of the greatest concern in fundamental studies of disease pathogenesis. Such considerations are also of the greatest relevance in toxicology, including how living organisms respond to low levels of single and multiple xenobiotics and radiations. As the steps and mechanisms during cancer development are studied in greater depth, phenomena become apparent that suggest that adaptive reactions and responses may play important or even critical roles in the process of carcinogenesis. The question becomes whether the process of carcinogenesis is fundamentally an adversarial one (i.e., an abnormal cell in a vulnerable host), or is it more in the nature of a physiological selection or differentiation, which has survival value for the host as an adaptive phenomena? The very early initial interactions of mutagenic chemical carcinogens, radiations and viruses with DNA prejudice most to consider the adversarial 'abnormal' view as the appropriate one. Yet, the unusually common nature of the earliest altered rare cells that appear during carcinogenesis, their unusually bland nature, and their spontaneous differentiation to normal-appearing adult liver should be carefully considered

  6. Electromagnetic Radiation Measurements and Safety Issues of some Cellular

    A. Mousa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As the mobile telecommunication systems are tremendously growing allover the world then the numbers of handheld andbase stations are also rapidly growing and it became very popular to see these base stations distributed everywhere in theneighborhood and on roof tops which has caused a considerable amount of panic to the public in Palestine concerning witherthe radiated electromagnetic field from these base stations may cause any health effect or hazard. This paper focuses on theradiated electromagnetic energy from some typical mobile base stations around the city of Nablus. The exposure levels dueto these stations were measured and compared to some international standard guidelines like ICNIRP and FCC to see if itmeets these standards, this is in order to answer some of the public fear and concern. The results are presented and somecomments are made on the other sources of electromagnetic radiation in the 200 kHz to 3 GHz range.

  7. Lethal cellular changes induced by near ultraviolet radiation

    There is clear evidence that significant quantities of lesions are induced in DNA by near UV radiation and that these lesions, although susceptible to repair, may lead to cell death because of the simultaneous disruption of DNA repair systems by the same wavelengths. No particular DNA lesion can be linked to cell death in wild type strains. However, there are good grounds for speculating that a type of near UV lesion exists which is rapidly 'fixed' as a lethal event in cells as a result of the oxygen-dependent disruption of repair. There is a strong indication that the relative ability of various near UV wavelengths to sensitize cells to heat, chemicals or other radiations is directly related to their efficiency in disrupting DNA repair systems in general. (author)

  8. Cellular telephone-based radiation sensor and wide-area detection network

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2006-12-12

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  9. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    Xurui Zhang; Caiyong Ye; Fang Sun; Wenjun Wei; Burong Hu; Jufang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. ...

  10. Cognitive Effects of Radiation Emitted by Cellular Phones: A Summary of Three Experiments

    The widespread use of cellular phones has initiated research regarding the possible biological effects of exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation (RFR). This issue is of particular relevance because a considerable number of people are exposed to cellular RFR emitted in close proximity to their heads. Some studies, recently reviewed by Barth et al.(1), examined whether cognitive functions of human beings are altered while exposed to RFR emitted by cellular phones. This paper summarizes the results of three experiments we conducted in order to examine the effects of exposure to RFR emitted by a standard GSM phone at 890 MHz on human cognitive functions

  11. Calculation of impulse responses with a cellular automata algorithm

    Barjau, Ana

    2001-05-01

    The air columns in musical instruments usually have a predominant dimension and thus are very often modeled as 1D systems where uniparametric waves propagate. Different algorithms can be found in the literature to simulate this propagation. The more widely used are finite difference schemes and delay lines. A finite difference scheme (FD) is a numerical integration of a differential formulation (the wave equation), while delay lines (DL) use analytical exact solutions of the wave equation over finite lengths. A new and different approach is that of a cellular automaton (CA) scheme. The underlying philosophy is opposite those of FD and DL, as the starting point is not the wave equation. In a CA approach, the phenomenon to be studied is reduced to a few simple physical laws that are applied to a set of cells representing the physical system (in the present case, the propagation medium). In this paper, a CA will be proposed to obtain the impulse response of different bore geometries. The results will be compared to those obtained with other algorithms.

  12. Radiation-induced preventive bystander response and adaptive response

    Radiation-induced bystander response (BR) is a phenomenon not observed in cells irradiated directly but in cells nearby. Recently, the relationship between BR and adaptive response (AR) has been studied and BR is suggested to be one of important mechanisms involved in AR induction through key molecules like reactive oxygen (RO) and nitrogen species. In this paper, the possible contribution of BR to AR is discussed on recent findings including author's ones. Many biological responses in bystander cells, cultured tissues and mice by cell-cell communication molecules such as cytokines and nitrogen oxide (NO) have been elucidated for BR to involve the cell death, sister chromatid exchange, chromosome instability, mutation, increased/ decreased p53 level, etc. However, BR has been recently found to contain biologically favorable events like the increase of radio-resistance and of cellular take rate and decrease of micronucleus formation through NO by X-ray and HIMAC C-ion. AR is observed in irradiated cell population with previous exposure to low dose and involves the above mentioned biologically favorable responses, which having lead to the possible interrelationship between BR and AR. Together with findings obtained hitherto, hypothesized is that AR is induced in bystander cells through a sequence of signals of evoked radicals like RO/ NO by pre-irradiation, and of consequent intermediating molecules like transforming growth factor (TGF)-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1 and estrogen to activate NF-KB for inducing COX-2 and NO synthase, which resulting in stimulation of damaged DNA repairing mechanism and of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade that constructs the signaling between plasma membrane and nucleus. (K.T.)

  13. Role of membrane and cellular oxidative damage in gamma radiation induced apoptotic death in mouse thymocytes

    Full text: Involvement of plasma membrane in the molecular mechanism of radiation-induced apoptotic death has increasingly been recognized by radiobiologists in the recent years. In present investigation, alterations in plasma membrane and the associated cytoplasmic / nuclear events were studied in apoptotic mouse thymocytes after gamma radiation exposure. The membrane oxidative damage in irradiated thymocytes was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) method and change in membrane permeability was estimated employing fluorescein diacetate (FDA) as fluorescent probe. Radiation-induced apoptotic thymocytes showed an increase in membrane permeability as observed by leakage of FDA, while trypan blue failed to respond. Moreover, using fluorescence technique, the changes in thymocytes membrane permeability could be sensitively determined within low to moderate radiation doses (2 cGy to 2 Gy). The dose dependent increase in intra-cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was found in irradiated thymocytes determined by fluorescence method, which could sensitively detect the radiation exposure in sub cGy range. Radiation induced membrane changes were found correlated with induction of apoptotic death determined by annexin-V method, caspase-3 assay, measuring nuclear diameter using propidium iodide (PI) staining and DNA fragmentation by gel electrophoresis. It has been also shown that membrane associated events observed in radiation induced apoptotic thymocytes are prior to nuclear / cytosolic processes. The membrane lipid peroxidation, cellular oxidative damage and apoptosis in radiation treated thymocytes were significantly inhibited by membrane-localized antioxidants suggesting significant contribution of membrane damage and oxidative stress in radiation mediated apoptosis in thymocytes

  14. Fluorescence studies on radiation oxidative damage to membranes with implications to cellular radiosensitivity

    Radiation oxidative damage to plasma membrane and its consequences to cellular radiosensitivity have received increasing attention in the past few years. This review gives a brief account of radiation oxidative damage in model and cellular membranes with particular emphasis on results from our laboratory. Fluorescence and ESR spin probes have been employed to investigate the structural and functional alterations in membranes after γ-irradiation. Changes in the lipid bilayer in irradiated unilamellar liposomes prepared from egg yolk lecithin (EYL) were measured by using diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as a probe. The observed increase in DPH polarization and decrease in fluorescence intensity after γ-irradiation of liposomes imply radiation-induced decrease in bilayer fluidity. Inclusion of cholesterol in liposome was found to protect lipids against radiation damage, possibly by modulation of bilayer organization e.g. lipid packing. Measurements on dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes loaded with 6-carboxyfluorescein (CF) showed radiation dose-dependent release of the probe indicating radiation-induced increased permeability. Changes in plasma membrane permeability of thymocytes were monitored by fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined by 2,7-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCH-FDA). Results suggest a correlation between ROS generation and membrane permeability changes induced by radiation within therapeutic doses (0-10 Gy). It is concluded that increase in membrane permeability was the result of ROS-mediated oxidative reactions which might trigger processes leading to apoptotic cell death after radiation exposure. (author)

  15. Cellular adhesion molecules on endothelial cells participate in radiation-mediated inflammation

    Purpose: The acute and subacute clinical manifestations of ionizing radiation mimic the inflammatory response to a number of stimuli. During the early stages of the inflammatory response, endothelial cells rapidly and transiently express a number of glycoproteins such as E-selectin, P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 which influence leucocyte adhesion. We quantified the expression of these cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in irradiated endothelial cells in order to determine whether these glycoproteins participate in radiation-mediated inflammation. Methods: Primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and HMEC cells were grown to 90% confluence and irradiated with a GE Maxitron x-ray generator. The cells were incubated with primary IgG1 antibody (mouse anti-human ICAM-1, VCAM-1, P-selectin and E-selectin and incubated with FITC-conjugated secondary antibody (goat anti-mouse IgG1). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis was utilized for quantitation of receptor expression of each CAM on irradiated endothelial cells. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays of nuclear protein extracts from irradiated HUVEC cells were performed using the E-selectin NFkB binding sequence (5'AGCTTAGAGGGGATTTCCGAGAGGA-3'). The E-selectin promoter was ligated to the growth hormone reporter. Plasmids pE-sel(-587 +35)GH or pE-sel(-587 +35)GH Δ NFκB (5 μg) was transfected into HMEC or HUVEC cells by use of lipofection. Transfectants were incubated for 16 h after transfection followed by treatment with 10 Gy (1 Gy/min, GE Maxitron) of ionizing radiation, and or with TNF or IL-1. Leukocyte adhesion to irradiated endothelial cells was quantified by HL-60 binding. Results: The log fluorescence of cells incubated with the antibody to E-selectin shifted by 32% at 4 h after irradiation. In comparison, a shift of 35% occurred 20 h after irradiation for cells incubated with the antibody to ICAM. However, there was no significant increase in P-selectin or VCAM

  16. Interferon-γ: biological function and application for study of cellular immune response

    A. A. Lutckii

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular immune response plays a central role in control of intracellular pathogens like viruses, some bacteria and parasites. Evaluation of presence, specificity and strength of cellular immune response can be done by investigation of reaction of immune cells to specific stimulus, like antigen. The major cellular reactions to antigen stimulation are production of cytokines, proliferation and cytotoxicity. This review is focused on interferon-gamma as one of the central Th1 cytokines: its biology, immunological role and application as marker of cellular immune response.

  17. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Santos, Adriano M.; Grynberg, Suely Epsztein, E-mail: spm@cdtn.b, E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b, E-mail: seg@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nunes, Maria Eugenia S., E-mail: mariaeugenia@iceb.ufop.b [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  18. Cell damage from radiation-induced bystander effects for different cell densities simulated by a mathematical model via cellular automata

    During recent years, there has been a shift from an approach focused entirely on DNA as the main target of ionizing radiation to a vision that considers complex signaling pathways in cells and among cells within tissues. Several newly recognized responses were classified as the so-called non-target responses in which the biological effects are not directly related to the amount of energy deposited in the DNA of cells that were traversed by radiation. In 1992 the bystander effect was described referring to a series of responses such as death, chromosomal instability or other abnormalities that occur in non-irradiated cells that came into contact with irradiated cells or medium from irradiated cells. In this work, we have developed a mathematical model via cellular automata, to quantify cell death induced by the bystander effect. The model is based on experiments with irradiated cells conditioned medium which suggests that irradiated cells secrete molecules in the medium that are capable of damaging other cells. The computational model consists of two-dimensional cellular automata which is able to simulate the transmission of bystander signals via extrinsic route and via Gap junctions. The model has been validated by experimental results in the literature. The time evolution of the effect and the dose-response curves were obtained in good accordance to them. Simulations were conducted for different values of bystander and irradiated cell densities with constant dose. From this work, we have obtained a relationship between cell density and effect. (author)

  19. The regeneration of epidermal cells of Saintpaulia leaves as a new plant-tissue system for cellular radiation biology.

    Engels, F M; van der Laan, F M; Leenhouts, H P; Chadwick, K H

    1980-09-01

    Investigation of the nucleus of epidermal cells of the petioles of Saintpaulia leaves by cytofluorimetry revealed that all cells are in a non-cycling pre DNA synthesis phase. Cultivation of dissected leaves results in a synchronous regeneration process of a defined number of cells. Five days after onset of cultivation the cells reach the first mitosis. The nuclear development during the regeneration process is described. Irradiation of the leaves results in a directly visible inhibition of this regenerating capability which is used to quantify cell survival in a tissue. The data show that the radiation response has a similar shape to that of the survival of single cells in culture. This response can be observed before the first mitosis of the cells and its application as a new plant tissue system for cellular radiation research is discussed. PMID:7012060

  20. Nonlinear dose-response relationships and inducible cellular defence mechanisms

    With the inclusion of inducible radioprotective mechanisms in a radiobiological state-vector model it was possible to explain plateaus in dose-response relationships for neoplastic transformation produced by in vitro irradiation of different cell lines with low-LET irradiation at high dose rates. The current study repeated the simulation of one data set that contains a plateau at mid doses. In contrast to earlier studies, the new one did not model the repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) located in bulk DNA (likely via non-homologous end joining) as being inducible. Repair of specific DSBs located in actively transcribed genes was assumed to occur via homologous recombination and was considered to be inducible. This reduced the number of parameters that have to be determined by fitting the model to data. In addition, all types of radical scavengers were formerly considered to be inducible by radiation. This was redefined in the current work and the effectiveness of scavengers was implemented in a refined way. The current work investigated whether these and other model adjustments lead to an improved fit of the data set. (author)

  1. Fluorescence studies on radiation oxidative damage to membranes with implications to cellular radiosensitivity

    K P Mishra

    2002-12-01

    Radiation oxidative damage to plasma membrane and its consequences to cellular radiosensitivity have received increasing attention in the past few years. This review gives a brief account of radiation oxidative damage in model and cellular membranes with particular emphasis on results from our laboratory. Fluorescence and ESR spin probes have been employed to investigate the structural and functional alterations in membranes after g-irradiation. Changes in the lipid bilayer in irradiated unilamellar liposomes prepared from egg yolk lecithin (EYL) were measured by using diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as a probe. The observed increase in DPH polarization and decrease in fluorescence intensity after g-irradiation of liposomes imply radiationinduced decrease in bilayer fluidity. Inclusion of cholesterol in liposome was found to protect lipids against radiation damage, possibly by modulation of bilayer organization e.g. lipid packing. Measurements on dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes loaded with 6-carboxyfluorescein (CF) showed radiation dose-dependent release of the probe indicating radiation-induced increased permeability. Changes in plasma membrane permeability of thymocytes were monitored by fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined by 2,7-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCH-FDA). Results suggest a correlation between ROS generation and membrane permeability changes induced by radiation within therapeutic doses (0-10 Gy). It is concluded that increase in membrane permeability was the result of ROS-mediated oxidative reactions, which might trigger processes leading to apoptotic cell death after radiation exposure.

  2. Cancer stem cell overexpression of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase enhances cellular radiation resistance

    D’Andrea, Filippo P.; Safwat, Akmal; Kassem, Moustapha; Gautier, Laurent; Overgaard, Jens; Horsman, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundCancer stem cells are thought to be a radioresistant population and may be the seeds for recurrence after radiotherapy. Using tumorigenic clones of retroviral immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell with small differences in their phenotype, we investigated possible genetic expression...... analysis found the genes involved in cancer, proliferation, DNA repair and cell death. ConclusionsThe higher radiation resistance in clone CE8 is likely due to NNMT overexpression. The higher levels of NNMT could affect the cellular damage resistance through depletion of the accessible amounts of...... nicotinamide, which is a known inhibitor of cellular DNA repair mechanisms....

  3. The Effect of Radiation on the Immune Response to Cancers

    Bonggoo Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, the beneficial effects of radiation can extend beyond direct cytotoxicity to tumor cells. Delivery of localized radiation to tumors often leads to systemic responses at distant sites, a phenomenon known as the abscopal effect which has been attributed to the induction and enhancement of the endogenous anti-tumor innate and adaptive immune response. The mechanisms surrounding the abscopal effect are diverse and include trafficking of lymphocytes into the tumor microenvironment, enhanced tumor recognition and killing via up-regulation of tumor antigens and antigen presenting machinery and, induction of positive immunomodulatory pathways. Here, we discuss potential mechanisms of radiation-induced enhancement of the anti-tumor response through its effect on the host immune system and explore potential combinational immune-based strategies such as adoptive cellular therapy using ex vivo expanded NK and T cells as a means of delivering a potent effector population in the context of radiation-enhanced anti-tumor immune environment.

  4. Enhancing repair of radiation-induced strand breaks in cellular DNA as a radiotherapeutic potential

    Protection of mammalian organisms including man from deleterious effects of ionizing radiation is of paramount importance and development of effective approaches to combat radiation damages using non-toxic radioprotectors is of considerable interest for defence, nuclear industries, radiation accidents, space travels, etc., besides the protection of normal tissues during radiotherapy of tumours. Many synthetic as well as natural compounds have been investigated in the recent past for their efficacy to protect the biological systems from radiation induced damages. They include sulfhydryl compounds, antioxidants, plant extracts, immune-modulators, and other agents. However, the inherent toxicity of many of the synthetic agents at the effective radio-protective concentration warranted further search for safer and more effective radio-protectors. In this context, therapeutic radioprotectors which are effective on post irradiation administration are of special relevance. One of the property that can be applied while screening for such radiation protective therapeutics is their ability to enhance repair of radiation-induced lesions in cellular DNA in terms of cellular repair index based on the parameters of the DNA following comet assay. Post irradiation administration of some natural and synthetic agents have shown their potential to enhance repair of radiation-induced strand breaks in cellular DNA in mice. These include phytoceuticals such as gallic acid, sesamol etc., extracts of medicinal plants such as Andrographis panniculata, and a few synthetic compounds such as tocopherol-mono-glucoside. The talk will give an overview of the work on DNA repair enhancement by a few natural and synthetic agents. (author)

  5. Early response of lymphocyte proteins after gamma-radiation

    In radiation biology there is a recent trend of looking for suitable biological parameters to detect early radiation-induced cellular damage. The present paper mentions 29 early response proteins (ERPRO) in human lymphocytes separated by 2 D-SDS-PA gelelectrophoresis 15 minutes after γ-radiation (2 Gy). A third of these proteins including phosphoproteins were identified using Nano-HPLC-MS. Most of the proteins were structural proteins (β-actin, mutant β-actin, talin and zyxin) except phosphoglycerate kinase-1, an enzyme of the glycolysis. For a more complete and detailed picture of ERPRO, the amount of proteins per gel has to be increased in the future by using a preparative gel instead of an analytical one. (author)

  6. The expression level of the transcription factor Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) determines cellular survival after radiation treatment

    Tumour hypoxia promotes radioresistance and is associated with poor prognosis. The transcription factor Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), also designated as Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1β, is part of the HIF pathway which mediates cellular adaptations to oxygen deprivation and facilitates tumour progression. The subunits HIF-1α and ARNT are key players within this pathway. HIF-1α is regulated in an oxygen-dependent manner whereas ARNT is considered to be constitutively expressed. However, there is mounting evidence that certain tumour cells are capable to elevate ARNT in hypoxia which suggests a survival benefit. Therefore the objective of this study was to elucidate effects of an altered ARNT expression level on the cellular response to radiation. Different human cell lines (Hep3B, MCF-7, 786-Owt, 786-Ovhl, RCC4wt and RCC4vhl) originating from various tumour entities (Hepatocellular carcinoma, breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma respectively) were X-irradiated using a conventional linear accelerator. Knockdown of ARNT expression was achieved by transient siRNA transfection. Complementary experiments were performed by forced ARNT overexpression using appropriate plasmids. Presence/absence of ARNT protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Clonogenic survival assays were performed in order to determine cellular survival post irradiation. Statistical comparison of two groups was achieved by the unpaired t-test. The results of this study indicate that ARNT depletion renders tumour cells susceptible to radiation whereas overexpression of this transcription factor confers radioresistance. These findings provide evidence to consider ARNT as a drug target and as a predictive marker in clinical applications concerning the response to radiation. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-015-0539-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  7. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Cellular Structures, Induced Instability, and Carcinogenesis

    According to the American Cancer Society, the United States can expect 1,368,030 new cases of cancer in 2004 [1]. Among the many carcinogens Americans are exposed to, ionizing radiation will contribute to this statistic. Humans live in a radiation environment. Ionizing radiation is in the air we breathe, the earth we live on, and the food we eat. Man-made radiation adds to this naturally occurring radiation level thereby increasing the chance for human exposure. For many decades the scientific community, governmental regulatory bodies, and concerned citizens have struggled to estimate health risks associated with radiation exposures, particularly at low doses. While cancer induction is the primary concern and the most important somatic effect of exposure to ionizing radiation, potential health risks do not involve neoplastic diseases exclusively but also include somatic mutations that might contribute to birth defects and ocular maladies, and heritable mutations that might impact on disease risks in future generations. Consequently it is important we understand the effect of ionizing radiation on cellular structures and the subsequent long-term health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation

  8. Enhancement of radiation response with bevacizumab

    Hoang Tien

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that neutralizes VEGF. We examined the impact on radiation response by blocking VEGF signaling with bevacizumab. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC growth inhibition and apoptosis were examined by crystal violet assay and flow cytometry, respectively. In vitro HUVEC tube formation and in vivo Matrigel assays were performed to assess the anti-angiogenic effect. Finally, a series of experiments of growth inhibition on head and neck (H&N SCC1 and lung H226 tumor xenograft models were conducted to evaluate the impact of bevacizumab on radiation response in concurrent as well as sequential therapy. Results The anti-angiogenic effect of bevacizumab appeared to derive not only from inhibition of endothelial cell growth (40% but also by interfering with endothelial cell function including mobility, cell-to-cell interaction and the ability to form capillaries as reflected by tube formation. In cell culture, bevacizumab induced a 2 ~ 3 fold increase in endothelial cell apoptosis following radiation. In both SCC1 and H226 xenograft models, the concurrent administration of bevacizumab and radiation reduced tumor blood vessel formation and inhibited tumor growth compared to either modality alone. We observed a siginificant tumor reduction in mice receiving the combination of bevacizumab and radiation in comparison to mice treated with bevacizumab or radiation alone. We investigated the impact of bevacizumab and radiation treatment sequence on tumor response. In the SCC1 model, tumor response was strongest with radiation followed by bevacizumab with less sequence impact observed in the H226 model. Conclusions Overall, these data demonstrate enhanced tumor response when bevacizumab is combined with radiation, supporting the emerging clinical investigations that are combining anti

  9. Fluorescent cDNA microarray hybridization reveals complexity and heterogeneity of cellular genotoxic stress responses.

    Amundson, S A; Bittner, M; Chen, Y; Trent, J; Meltzer, P; Fornace, A J

    1999-06-17

    The fate of cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) may depend greatly on changes in gene expression, so that an improved view of gene induction profiles is important for understanding mechanisms of checkpoint control, repair and cell death following such exposures. We have used a quantitative fluorescent cDNA microarray hybridization approach to identify genes regulated in response to 7-irradiation in the p53 wild-type ML-1 human myeloid cell line. Hybridization of the array to fluorescently-labeled RNA from treated and untreated cells was followed by computer analysis to derive relative changes in expression levels of the genes present in the array, which agreed well with actual quantitative changes in expression. Forty-eight sequences, 30 not previously identified as IR-responsive, were significantly regulated by IR. Induction by IR and other stresses of a subset of these genes, including the previously characterized CIP1/ WAF1, MDM2 and BAX genes, as well as nine genes not previously reported to be IR-responsive, was examined in a panel of 12 human cell lines. Responses varied widely in cell lines with different tissues of origin and different genetic backgrounds, highlighting the importance of cellular context to genotoxic stress responses. Two of the newly identified IR-responsive genes, FRA-1 and ATF3, showed a p53-associated component to their IR-induction, and this was confirmed both in isogenic human cell lines and in mouse thymus. The majority of the IR-responsive genes, however, showed no indication of p53-dependent regulation, representing a potentially important class of stress-responsive genes in leukemic cells. PMID:10380890

  10. Biological responses to ionizing radiation

    Post-nuclear war local and global fall-out distribution and levels are discussed in relation to fission products and neutron activation radionuclides. Tables are presented of the sensitivities of the major ecosystems to ionising radiations, of the sensitivity of dormant seed, of small animals and birds, and of the main factors affecting plant sensitivity to radiation. Representative bioconcentration factors for Co, Cs and Sr for various species are listed, together with whole-body dose estimates to marine biota from 10,000 MT nuclear war. Internal doses, and pathways to humans are discussed. It is concluded that the direct effects of fallout on humans would far exceed the indirect effects resulting from destruction or disturbance of ecological systems. (UK)

  11. Cellular response after irradiation: Cell cycle control and apoptosis

    The importance of apoptotic death was assessed in a set of experiments, involving eight human tumour cell lines (breast cancer, bladder carcinoma, medulloblastoma). Various aspects of the quantitative study of apoptosis and methods based on the detection of DNA fragmentation (in situ tailing and comet assay) are described and discussed. Data obtained support the hypothesis that apoptosis is not crucial for cellular radiosensitivity and that the relationship between p53 functionality or clonogenic survival and apoptosis may bee cell type specific. (author)

  12. Bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive response, and cancer risk assessment for radiation and chemical exposures

    There is an increased interest in utilizing mechanistic data in support of the cancer risk assessment process for ionizing radiation and environmental chemical exposures. In this regard, the use of biologically based dose-response models is particularly advocated. The aim is to provide an enhanced basis for describing the nature of the dose-response curve for induced tumors at low levels of exposure. Cellular responses that might influence the nature of the dose-response curve at low exposures are understandably receiving attention. These responses (bystander effects, genomic instability, and adaptive responses) have been studied most extensively for radiation exposures. The former two could result in an enhancement of the tumor response at low doses and the latter could lead to a reduced response compared to that predicted by a linear extrapolation from high dose responses. Bystander responses, whereby cells other than those directly traversed by radiation tracks are damaged, can alter the concept of target cell population per unit dose. Similarly, induced genomic instability can alter the concept of total response to an exposure. There appears to be a role for oxidative damage and cellular signaling in the etiology of these cellular responses. The adaptive response appears to be inducible at very low doses of radiation or of some chemicals and reduces the cellular response to a larger challenge dose. It is currently unclear how these cellular toxic responses might be involved in tumor formation, if indeed they are. In addition, it is not known how widespread they are as regards inducing agents. Thus, their impact on low dose cancer risk remains to be established

  13. The effect of cellular carotenoid levels in micrococcus luteus on resistance to gamma radiation

    In the present study, a biological system was developed to link the cellular carotenoid levels to Gamma radiation resistance in bacteria for the frst time. thus, in a non-photosynrhetic bacterium, in Micrococcus Luteus an inverse relationship was found between the increase in diphenylamine (DPA) concentration (5.25 μg/ml culture) and the polar cellular carotenoid pigments (C-45 and C-50 carotenoids and their glucosides). It was also found that irradiation of cells with different carotenoid concentrations with doses of γ-radiation in the range of (0.2500 gray) under oxic, air and hypoxic conditions showed that carotenoid pigments offer no significant protection as they usually do in case of visible light. (author).15 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  14. UV radiation in marine ectotherms: Molecular effects and responses

    This review summarizes current knowledge on ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced cellular and molecular damage in marine ectotherms (invertebrates and fish). UVR impairs sperm motility, reduces fertilization, and causes embryo malformation that in turn affects recruitment and therefore the sustainability of natural populations. The direct molecular effects of UVR are mediated by absorption of certain wavelengths by specific macromolecules and the dissipation of the absorbed energy via photochemical reactions. Most organisms have defense mechanisms that either prevent UVR-induced damage, or mechanisms that repair the damage. Photoprotective pigments, antioxidant defense compounds, and cell cycle development genes are some of the molecules involved in UVR defense. Photoenzymatic repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two primary DNA repair systems in marine ectotherms. We anticipate that toxicogenomic studies will gain importance in UVR research because they can elucidate the primary processes involved in UVR damage and the cellular response to this damage.

  15. Repair and mutagenesis in procaryotes as cellular responses to ambiental agents

    The correct and incorrect mechanisms of DNA repair are discussed, as well as the cellular responses induced by the DNA lesions; the reductone mollecular effects; the cellular interactions among irradiated populations of microorganisms and the utilization of microbial assays for the detection of oncogenic activities of chemicals. (M.A.)

  16. Marine molluscs in environmental monitoring. I. Cellular and molecular responses

    Bresler, Vladimir; Abelson, Avigdor; Fishelson, Lev; Feldstein, Tamar; Rosenfeld, Michael; Mokady, Ofer

    2003-10-01

    The study reported here is part of an ongoing effort to establish sensitive and reliable biomonitoring markers for probing the coastal marine environment. Here, we report comparative measurements of a range of histological, cellular and sub-cellular parameters in molluscs sampled in polluted and reference sites along the Mediterranean coast of Israel and in the northern tip of the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. Available species enabled an examination of conditions in two environmental 'compartments': benthic (Donax trunculus) and intertidal (Brachidontes pharaonis, Patella caerulea) in the Mediterranean; pelagic (Pteria aegyptia) and intertidal (Cellana rota) in the Red Sea. The methodology used provides rapid results by combining specialized fluorescent probes and contact microscopy, by which all parameters are measured in unprocessed animal tissue. The research focused on three interconnected levels. First, antixenobiotic defence mechanisms aimed at keeping hazardous agents outside the cell. Paracellular permeability was 70-100% higher in polluted sites, and membrane pumps (MXRtr and SATOA) activity was up to 65% higher in polluted compared to reference sites. Second, intracellular defence mechanisms that act to minimize potential damage by agents having penetrated the first line of defence. Metallothionein expression and EROD activity were 160-520% higher in polluted sites, and lysosomal functional activity (as measured by neutral red accumulation) was 25-50% lower. Third, damage caused by agents not sufficiently eliminated by the above mechanisms (e.g. single-stranded DNA breaks, chromosome damage and other pathological alterations). At this level, the most striking differences were observed in the rate of micronuclei formation and DNA breaks (up to 150% and 400% higher in polluted sites, respectively). The different mollusc species used feature very similar trends between polluted and reference sites in all measured parameters. Concentrating on relatively basic

  17. Medical response to radiation emergencies in Argentina

    Although radiation accidents are not frequent, the increasing use of radioisotopes in medicine and industry increases the likelihood of such accidental situations. Additionally, risks posed by the malevolent use of radiation sources have been highlighted during the last few years. In this context, the enhancement of national capabilities for medical assistance of victims in radiation emergencies becomes relevant. This communication describes the organization of medical response to radiation emergencies existing in Argentina. A three-level system for medical response has been developed: pre-hospital response given on-site by local emergency services, assistance provided by emergency departments of local general hospitals and central reference hospitals for treatment of acute radiation syndrome, cutaneous radiation syndrome and internal contamination. An education and training program is regularly executed at the three levels, including theoretical background as well as practical training. Guidelines and protocols for medical handling of victims have been elaborated and implemented. Research and development of new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of radiation injuries are promoted by ARN in close collaboration with physicians belonging to reference hospitals. (author)

  18. GATA3 is a master regulator of the transcriptional response to low-dose ionizing radiation in human keratinocytes

    Lamartine Jérôme; Martin Michèle T; Berthier-Vergnes Odile; Malet Claude; Ginestet Chantal; Molina Manuella; Bonin Florian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The general population is constantly exposed to low levels of radiation through natural, occupational or medical irradiation. Even if the biological effects of low-level radiation have been intensely debated and investigated, the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to low doses remain largely unknown. Results The present study investigated the role of GATA3 protein in the control of the cellular and molecular response of human keratinocytes exposed to a 1...

  19. Tissue response after radiation exposure. Intestine

    Gastrointestinal syndrome followed by 'gut death' is due to intestinal disorders. This syndrome is induced by high-dose (>10 Gy) of ionizing radiation. Recovery from the gastrointestinal syndrome would depend on the number of survived clonogens and regeneration capability of crypts. These tissue alterations can be observed by high-dose radiation, however, cellular dynamics in crypts can be affected by low-dose radiation. For example, Potten et al. found that low-dose radiation induce apoptosis of intestinal stem cells, which produce all differentiated function cells. Recently, intestinal stem cells are characterized by molecular markers such as Lgr5. Since intestinal adenomas can be induced by deletion of Apc gene in Lgr5+ stem cells, it is widely recognized that Lgr5+ stem cells are the cell-of-origin of cancer. Duodenal Lgr5+ stem cells are known as radioresistant cells, however, we found that ionizing radiation significantly induces the turnover of colonic Lgr5+ stem cells. Combined with the knowledge of other radioresistant markers, stem-cell dynamics in tissue after irradiation are becoming clear. The present review introduces the history of gastrointestinal syndrome and intestinal stem cells, and discusses those future perspectives. (author)

  20. Reply to 'Comments on 'Cellular response to modulated radiation fields'

    We have reported two new bystander effects derived from experimental data on the survival fraction following spatially modulated irradiation of a melanoma cell line, using a 6 MV therapeutic photon beam (Claridge Mackonis et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 5469). The validity of survival fractions exceeding unity and statistical evidence for the new effects have been challenged (Ross and Klassen 2008). Survival fractions exceeding unity have been reported and are expected in the presence of conditions favouring colony formation. After a reanalysis using a comparison with a proportional hazards approach (Cox 1975 Biometrika 62 269) and separately modelling the different exposure types using a linear quadratic model, we are able to reconfirm our original conclusions for the melanoma cell line. We present new data for non-small cell lung cancer, which provide further support for the presence of new bystander effects. The usefulness of plots of average survival as a function of average dose to the cell culture is further discussed. From these plots we find significant evidence for a higher mean survival than would be expected in the absence of bystander effects. With the evidence provided by the additional data and further statistical analysis of all data, we conclude that there is strong evidence for bystander effects that promote cell survival. (letter to the editor)

  1. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Final technical report

    It has been suggested that low molecular weight RNA may play a role in eukaryotic gene regulation. The low molecular weight RNA was electrophoresed on 16% acrylamide gels but very small molecular weight RNA (vsRNA) was not visible after methylene blue staining. Radioautography of 3T3 and HeLa RNA labeled with 32P demonstrated RNA smaller than t-RNA in size. We subsequently developed a highly sensitive silver staining procedure which revealed a very fine bands of RNA migrating faster than t-RNA. The success of platinum containing antitumor agents has stimulated interest in iridium containing agents. Irradiation of a solution of (NH4)2(IrCl6) in ammonia with UV light for seven hours produced a product active against Ehrlich ascites tumor with a T/C of 140% using a daily dose of 100 mg/kg for 8 days. Testing against L1210 (BDF1 mice) indicated a low activity with a maximum increase in lifespan of 20%

  2. Response of MICROTOX organisms to leachates of autoclaved cellular concrete

    The MICROTOX bioassay, a toxicity test involving bioluminescent microorganisms, was conducted on aqueous leachates derived from a construction material made using coal fly ash as the key siliceous ingredient. The material is known as autoclaved cellular concrete (ACC). The test indicated an absence of toxic effects attributable to soluble species, which included the priority heavy metals in the filtered leachates. Toxic or inhibitive effects on the test bacteria were observed for the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachates, but this was probably due to acetic acid in the extractant rather than the solubilized metals. The ASTM (distilled-deionized water extractant) and simulated acid rain leachates, by comparison, produced a repeatable stimulative effect. Stimulation observed in the form of enhanced light output may be a manifestation of hormesis, a phenomenon reportedly caused by exposure to extremely low concentrations (part-per-billion range) of otherwise toxic agents such as heavy metals

  3. Response of MICROTOX organisms to leachates of autoclaved cellular concrete

    Latona, M.C.; Neufeld, R.D.; Hu, W.; Kelly, C.; Vallejo, L.E. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1997-08-01

    The MICROTOX bioassay, a toxicity test involving bioluminescent microorganisms, was conducted on aqueous leachates derived from a construction material made using coal fly ash as the key siliceous ingredient. The material is known as autoclaved cellular concrete (ACC). The test indicated an absence of toxic effects attributable to soluble species, which included the priority heavy metals in the filtered leachates. Toxic or inhibitive effects on the test bacteria were observed for the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachates, but this was probably due to acetic acid in the extractant rather than the solubilized metals. The ASTM (distilled-deionized water extractant) and simulated acid rain leachates, by comparison, produced a repeatable stimulative effect. Stimulation observed in the form of enhanced light output may be a manifestation of hormesis, a phenomenon reportedly caused by exposure to extremely low concentrations (part-per-billion range) of otherwise toxic agents such as heavy metals.

  4. Development of second generation peptides modulating cellular adiponectin receptor responses

    Otvos, Laszlo; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Kovalszky, Ilona; Olah, Julia; Hewitson, Tim; Stawikowska, Roma; Stawikowski, Maciej; Cudic, Predrag; Lin, Feng; Wade, John; Surmacz, Eva; Lovas, Sandor

    2014-10-01

    The adipose tissue participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis as an important endocrine organ that secretes a number of biologically active adipokines, including adiponectin. Recently we developed and characterized a first-in-class peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist by using in vitro and in vivo models of glioblastoma and breast cancer (BC). In the current study, we further explored the effects of peptide ADP355 in additional cellular models and found that ADP355 inhibited chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell proliferation and renal myofibroblast differentiation with mid-nanomolar IC50 values. According to molecular modeling calculations, ADP355 was remarkably flexible in the global minimum with a turn present in the middle of the peptide. Considering these structural features of ADP355 and the fact that adiponectin normally circulates as multimeric complexes, we developed and tested the activity of a linear branched dimer (ADP399). The dimer exhibited approximately 20-fold improved cellular activity inhibiting K562 CML and MCF-7 cell growth with high pM - low nM relative IC50 values. Biodistribution studies suggested superior tissue dissemination of both peptides after subcutaneous administration relative to intraperitoneal inoculation. After screening of a 397-member adiponectin active site library, a novel octapeptide (ADP400) was designed that counteracted 10-1000 nM ADP355- and ADP399-mediated effects on CML and BC cell growth at nanomolar concentrations. ADP400 induced mitogenic effects in MCF-7 BC cells perhaps due to antagonizing endogenous adiponectin actions or acting as an inverse agonist. While the linear dimer agonist ADP399 meets pharmacological criteria of a contemporary peptide drug lead, the peptide showing antagonist activity (ADP400) at similar concentrations will be an important target validation tool to study adiponectin functions.

  5. Development of second generation peptides modulating cellular adiponectin receptor responses

    Laszlo eOtvos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The adipose tissue participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis as an important endocrine organ that secretes a number of biologically active adipokines, including adiponectin. Recently we developed and characterized a first-in-class peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist by using in vitro and in vivo models of glioblastoma and breast cancer (BC. In the current study, we further explored the effects of peptide ADP355 in additional cellular models and found that ADP355 inhibited chronic myeloid leukemia (CML cell proliferation and renal myofibroblast differentiation with mid-nanomolar IC50 values. According to molecular modeling calculations, ADP355 was remarkably flexible in the global minimum with a turn present in the middle of the peptide. Considering these structural features of ADP355 and the fact that adiponectin normally circulates as multimeric complexes, we developed and tested the activity of a linear branched dimer (ADP399. The dimer exhibited approximately 20-fold improved cellular activity inhibiting K562 CML and MCF-7 cell growth with high pM - low nM relative IC50 values. Biodistribution studies suggested superior tissue dissemination of both peptides after subcutaneous administration relative to intraperitoneal inoculation. After screening of a 397-member adiponectin active site library, a novel octapeptide (ADP400 was designed that counteracted 10-1000 nM ADP355- and ADP399-mediated effects on CML and BC cell growth at nanomolar concentrations. ADP400 induced mitogenic effects in MCF-7 BC cells perhaps due to antagonizing endogenous adiponectin actions or acting as an inverse agonist. While the linear dimer agonist ADP399 meets pharmacological criteria of a contemporary peptide drug lead, the peptide showing antagonist activity (ADP400 at similar concentrations will be an important target validation tool to study adiponectin functions.

  6. Cellular immune response following pre-exposure and postexposure rabies vaccination by intradermal and intramuscular routes

    Venkataswamy, Manjunatha Muniswamappa; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Sanyal, Sampada Sudarshan; Taj, Shaheen; Belludi, Ashwin Yajaman; Mani, Reeta Subramaniam; Hazra, Nandita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Immunization against rabies in humans induces protective neutralizing antibodies; however, the induction of type 1 or type 2 cytokine mediated cellular immune responses following rabies vaccination is not understood. Hence, the present study investigated cellular cytokine responses in vaccinated individuals. Materials and Methods The study groups included healthy rabies antigen naive controls (n=10), individuals who received intradermal primary (n=10) or booster pre-exposure vaccinati...

  7. Radiation-induced gene responses

    In the process of identifying genes that are differentially regulated in cells exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV), we identified a transcript that was repressed following the exposure of cells to a combination of UV and salicylate, a known inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Sequencing this band determined that it has identify to lactate dehydrogenase, and Northern blots confirmed the initial expression pattern. Analysis of the sequence of the LDH 5' region established the presence of NF-kappaB, Sp1, and two Ap-2 elements; two partial AP- 1; one partial RE, and two halves of E-UV elements were also found. Electromobility shift assays were then performed for the AP-1, NF- kappaB, and E-UV elements. These experiments revealed that binding to NF-kappaB was induced by UV but repressed with salicylic acid; UV did not affect AP-1 binding, but salicylic acid inhibited it alone or following UV exposure; and E-UV binding was repressed by UV, and salicylic acid had little effect. Since the binding of no single element correlated with the expression pattern of LDH, it is likely that multiple elements govern UV/salicylate-mediated expression

  8. Radiation carcinogenesis

    This general discussion is dealt with under the following headings: problems of collecting information (epidemiology, experimental animal studies), the temporal stages of radiation action (physical and chemical effects and cellular response), human cancer, radiation dose and risk, epidemiology and dose-response relationships, cellular and molecular processes (cell inactivation, chromosome damage and cell mutation, radiation transformation, virus and oncogene activation, free radical aspects of radiation carcinogenesis, interaction of radiation and chemical carcinogens. (U.K.)

  9. Scolopendin 2 leads to cellular stress response in Candida albicans.

    Lee, Heejeong; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Dong Gun

    2016-07-01

    Centipedes, a kind of arthropod, have been reported to produce antimicrobial peptides as part of an innate immune response. Scolopendin 2 (AGLQFPVGRIGRLLRK) is a novel antimicrobial peptide derived from the body of the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans by using RNA sequencing. To investigate the intracellular responses induced by scolopendin 2, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione accumulation and lipid peroxidation were monitored over sublethal and lethal doses. Intracellular ROS and antioxidant molecule levels were elevated and lipids were peroxidized at sublethal concentrations. Moreover, the Ca(2+) released from the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated in the cytosol and mitochondria. These stress responses were considered to be associated with yeast apoptosis. Candida albicans cells exposed to scolopendin 2 were identified using diagnostic markers of apoptotic response. Various responses such as phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation were exhibited. Scolopendin 2 disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential and activated metacaspase, which was mediated by cytochrome c release. In conclusion, treatment of C. albicans with scolopendin 2 induced the apoptotic response at sublethal doses, which in turn led to mitochondrial dysfunction, metacaspase activation, and cell death. The cationic antimicrobial peptide scolopendin 2 from the centipede is a potential antifungal peptide, triggering the apoptotic response. PMID:27207682

  10. Lung function and radiation response.

    Hong, A; Dische, S; Saunders, M I; Lockwood, P; Crocombe, K

    1991-12-01

    This study investigated whether impaired respiratory function affected the response to radiotherapy. A prospective study was performed in which lung function, arterial oxygen and haemoglobin concentration were examined, before treatment with radical radiotherapy, in 141 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck cancer. The findings were considered to reflect the physiological conditions present at the time of radiotherapy and these were related to acute normal tissue reactions and tumour control. Although 53% of the patients showed some impairment of lung function and 47% demonstrated a haemoglobin oxygen saturation below the normal range, oxygen partial pressure was below expected levels in fewer patients (27%) and total arterial oxygen content was below normal in only 12% of patients. No correlation was found between the tests performed and the severity of acute morbidity or with local tumour control. In the patients with carcinoma of the bronchus, there was a trend for incomplete tumour control to be associated with a lower haemoglobin level, but this did not reach statistical significance. In patients selected for curative radiotherapy, lung function would not appear to be an important factor influencing the response of normal tissues or tumour to irradiation. PMID:1663411

  11. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax attenuates the ATM-mediated cellular DNA damage response.

    Chandhasin, Chandtip; Ducu, Razvan I; Berkovich, Elijahu; Kastan, Michael B; Marriott, Susan J

    2008-07-01

    Genomic instability, a hallmark of leukemic cells, is associated with malfunctioning cellular responses to DNA damage caused by defective cell cycle checkpoints and/or DNA repair. Adult T-cell leukemia, which can result from infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is associated with extensive genomic instability that has been attributed to the viral oncoprotein Tax. How Tax influences cellular responses to DNA damage to mediate genomic instability, however, remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effect of Tax on cellular pathways involved in recognition and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Premature attenuation of ATM kinase activity and reduced association of MDC1 with repair foci were observed in Tax-expressing cells. Following ionizing radiation-induced S-phase checkpoint activation, Tax-expressing cells progressed more rapidly than non-Tax-expressing cells toward DNA replication. These results demonstrate that Tax expression may allow premature DNA replication in the presence of genomic lesions. Attempts to replicate in the presence of these lesions would result in gradual accumulation of mutations, leading to genome instability and cellular transformation. PMID:18434398

  12. The inflammatory response plays a major role in the acute radiation syndrome induced by fission radiation

    Agay, D.; Chancerelle, Y.; Hirodin, F.; Mathieu, J.; Multon, E.; Van Uye, A.; Mestries, J.C. [Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees Emile Parde, Departement de Radiologie, 38 - La Tronche (France)

    1997-03-01

    At high dose rates, both gamma and neutron irradiation induce an acute inflammatory syndrome with huge intercellular communication disorders. This inflammatory syndrome evolves in two phases, separated by a latency phase. During the prodromal phase, the molecular and cellular lesions induced by free radicals trigger an initial response which associates cellular repair and multicellular interactions involving both humoral and nervous communications. A large part of perturbations constitute a non specific inflammatory syndrome and clinically silent coagulation disorders which are linked by common intercellular mediators. All these perturbations are rapidly reversible and there is no correlation between the radiation dose and the severity of the response. During the manifest-illness phase, both inflammatory and coagulation disorders resume, slightly preceding the clinical symptoms. Biochemical symptoms are moderate in the animals which will survive, but they escape regulatory mechanisms in those which will die, giving rise to a vicious circle. These biochemical disorders are largely responsible for the death. With lower dose rates, it cannot be excluded that great cellular communication disorders take place at the tissue level, with limited blood modifications. This aspect should be taken into account for the optimization of cytokine therapies. (authors)

  13. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92–1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  14. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  15. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    Xurui Zhang

    Full Text Available Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research.

  16. Interaction of heavy ions with nuclear chromatin: Spatiotemporal investigations of biological responses in a cellular environment

    Ion beams offer the possibility to generate strictly localized DNA lesions within subregions of a cell nucleus. The distribution of the ion-induced damage can be indirectly visualized by immunocytochemical detection of repair-related proteins as radiation-induced foci. The proteins analyzed here were the double-strand break marker γ-H2AX, the excision repair and replication protein PCNA and the cell cycle regulator CDKN1A. A newly developed adjustable sample holder is now used to apply an irradiation geometry characterized by a small angle between the plane of the cellular monolayer and the incoming ion beam. This allows the spatial analysis of protein accumulations along ion trajectories, revealing an unexpected clustering after irradiation with low-energy zinc ions. The patterns of protein aggregation observed show considerable intrinsic variability, but similar patterns of protein clustering were obtained for functionally different proteins irrespective of the type of ion beam applied, confirming previous observations for lower and higher LET beams. Foci sizes within ion tracks were found to be larger for γ-H2AX foci in comparison to CDKN1A foci, in agreement with the known histone H2AX phosphorylation response. The results suggest that not the pattern of dose deposition but the underlying chromatin structure determines the distribution of protein clusters along tracks. Therefore, the requirement of time-lapse studies using live cells is emphasized for future studies on chromatin movement as a potential component of the DNA damage response

  17. Modified cellular immune responses in dogs infected with Echinococcus multilocularis.

    Kato, Naoko; Nonaka, Nariaki; Oku, Yuzaburo; Kamiya, Masao

    2005-03-01

    Parasite-specific antigen responses and lymphocyte blastogenesis in dogs orally inoculated with Echinococcus multilocuralis metacestodes were examined. Serum IgG1 (Th2-oriented) and IgG2 (Th 1-oriented) levels against somatic and excretory-secretory (ES) antigens of protoscoleces and adult worms increased from 7 days post-infection (DPI), with the highest responses against protoscolex excretory-secretory antigen (PES). Specific blastogenesis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) against the parasite antigens was not observed during the 21-day infection period, but Peyer's patches cells from one out of two dogs at 21 DPI showed blastogenesis against PES (stimulation index: 4.65). Interestingly, only at 7 DPI were concanavalin A (ConA)-induce proliferative responses of PBMC reduced. Moreover, ConA-induced proliferative responses of lymphocytes from various origins were suppressed by the addition of parasite antigens, especially with PES. These data suggest that although both Th1- and Th2-oriented humoral immune responses were observed in E. multilocularis infected dogs, the parasite antigens, especially PES, may have incompletely suppressed lymphocyte responses in these dogs. PMID:15719262

  18. Study on radiation-responsive epigenomes

    The purpose of this project is development of world-class headspring techniques of biological science for application of plant genomes/epigenomes through study on radiation- responsive epigenomes and improvement of the national competitiveness in the field of fundamental technology for biological science and industry. Research scope includes 1) Investigation of radiation-responsive epigenomes and elucidation of their relation with phenotypes, 2) Elucidation of interaction and transcription control of epigenomes and epigenetic regulators using ionizing radiation (IR), 3) Investigation of epigenome-mediated traits in plant development, differentiation and antioxidant defense using IR, and 4) Development of application techniques of radiation-responsive epigenomes for eco-monitoring and molecular breeding. Main results are as follow: Setup of conditions for chromatin immunoprecipitation in irradiated plants: investigation of aberrations in DNA methylation after treatment with different IR: elucidation of responses of epigenetic regulators to gamma rays (GR): investigation of aberrations in GR-responsive epigenetic regulators at different developmental stages: elucidation of interactive aberrations of epigenomes and epigenetic regulators after treatment of GR: comparison of functional genomes after treatment of GR or H2O2: elucidation of relation of epigenomes with GR-induced delay in senescence: elucidation of relation of epigenomes with GR-induced aberrations in pigment metabolism: comparison of antioxidant defense in epigenetic mutants: investigation of senescence-associated changes in epigenomes: investigation of senescence-associated changes in epigenetic regulators: comparison of aberrations in epigenomes at different dose of GR for mutation

  19. Beyond annexin V: fluorescence response of cellular membranes to apoptosis.

    Demchenko, Alexander P

    2013-03-01

    Dramatic changes in the structure of cell membranes on apoptosis allow easy, sensitive and non-destructive analysis of this process with the application of fluorescence methods. The strong plasma membrane asymmetry is present in living cells, and its loss on apoptosis is commonly detected with the probes interacting strongly and specifically with phosphatidylserine (PS). This phospholipid becomes exposed to the cell surface, and the application of annexin V labeled with fluorescent dye is presently the most popular tool for its detection. Several methods have been suggested recently that offer important advantages over annexin V assay with the ability to study apoptosis by spectroscopy of cell suspensions, flow cytometry and confocal or two-photon microscopy. The PS exposure marks the integrated changes in the outer leaflet of cell membrane that involve electrostatic potential and hydration, and the attempts are being made to provide direct probing of these changes. This review describes the basic mechanisms underlying the loss of membrane asymmetry during apoptosis and discusses, in comparison with the annexin V-binding assay, the novel fluorescence techniques of detecting apoptosis on cellular membrane level. In more detail we describe the detection method based on smart fluorescent dye F2N12S incorporated into outer leaflet of cell membrane and reporting on apoptotic cell transformation by easily detectable change of the spectral distribution of fluorescent emission. It can be adapted to any assay format. PMID:22797774

  20. Characterization of humoral and cellular immune responses in patients with human papilloma virus

    A descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out in 30 females infected with the human papilloma virus, attended in the office of Immunology of the Specialty Polyclinic belonging to 'Saturnino Lora' Provincial Clinical Surgical Teaching Hospital in Santiago de Cuba, from June 2009 to June 2010, in order to characterize them according to immune response. To evaluate the humoral and cellular immune response rosetting assay and quantification of immunoglobulins were used respectively. Women between 25-36 years of age (40 %) infected with this virus, especially those coming from urban areas, prevailed in the series, and a significant decrease of the cellular response as compared to the humoral response was evidenced

  1. Distinctive molecular responses to ultraviolet radiation between keratinocytes and melanocytes.

    Sun, Xiaoyun; Kim, Arianna; Nakatani, Masashi; Shen, Yao; Liu, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the major risk factor for skin carcinogenesis. To gain new insights into the molecular pathways mediating UVR effects in the skin, we performed comprehensive transcriptomic analyses to identify shared and distinctive molecular responses to UVR between human keratinocytes and melanocytes. Keratinocytes and melanocytes were irradiated with varying doses of UVB (10, 20 and 30 mJ/cm(2) ) then analysed by RNA-Seq at different time points post-UVB radiation (4, 24 and 72 h). Under basal conditions, keratinocytes and melanocytes expressed similar number of genes, although they each expressed a distinctive subset of genes pertaining to their specific cellular identity. Upon UVB radiation, keratinocytes displayed a clear pattern of time- and dose-dependent changes in gene expression that was different from melanocytes. The early UVB-responsive gene set (4 h post-UVR) differed significantly from delayed UVB-responsive gene sets (24 and 72 h). We also identified multiple novel UVB signature genes including PRSS23, SERPINH1, LCE3D and CNFN, which were conserved between melanocyte and keratinocyte lines from different individuals. Taken together, our findings elucidated both common and distinctive molecular features between melanocytes and keratinocytes and uncovered novel UVB signature genes that might be utilized to predict UVB photobiological effects on the skin. PMID:27119462

  2. Cellular characterization of ultrasound-stimulated microbubble radiation enhancement in a prostate cancer xenograft model

    Azza A. Al-Mahrouki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor radiation resistance poses a major obstacle in achieving an optimal outcome in radiation therapy. In the current study, we characterize a novel therapeutic approach that combines ultrasound-driven microbubbles with radiation to increase treatment responses in a prostate cancer xenograft model in mice. Tumor response to ultrasound-driven microbubbles and radiation was assessed 24 hours after treatment, which consisted of radiation treatments alone (2 Gy or 8 Gy or ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles only, or a combination of radiation and ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles. Immunohistochemical analysis using in situ end labeling (ISEL and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL revealed increased cell death within tumors exposed to combined treatments compared with untreated tumors or tumors exposed to radiation alone. Several biomarkers were investigated to evaluate cell proliferation (Ki67, blood leakage (factor VIII, angiogenesis (cluster of differentiation molecule CD31, ceramide-formation, angiogenesis signaling [vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF], oxygen limitation (prolyl hydroxylase PHD2 and DNA damage/repair (γH2AX. Results demonstrated reduced vascularity due to vascular disruption by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles, increased ceramide production and increased DNA damage of tumor cells, despite decreased tumor oxygenation with significantly less proliferating cells in the combined treatments. This combined approach could be a feasible option as a novel enhancing approach in radiation therapy.

  3. Cellular stress responses for monitoring and modulating ageing

    Demirovic, Dino; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Nizard, Carine;

    2013-01-01

    protectors and stimulators of homeodynamics, and create a kind of “gold-standard” for monitoring the efficacy of other potential antiageing and pro-survival natural and synthetic compounds. We have so far standardised an effective method for detecting all seven stress response pathways, by several...

  4. Responsibility structure in medical radiation applications

    The author discusses the various aspects of the responsibilities of physicians and clinical physicists with regard to radiation protection in medical applications of ionizing radiation. It becomes still clearer that the physician, who carries out the examination or the treatment, also has to bear the responsibility. this holds for the indication assessment as well as for optimization of the quality of the examination or treatment versus radiation burden of the patient, radiologic worker and thirds. Further it is clear that the physician in these will have to delegate specific tasks and responsibilities, whether or not in the elongated-arm construction. The clinical physicist is responsible in particular for the applications of the physical methods and watches the quality of the apparatus and methods used. As such he also is responsible for the technical workers, who take care of the preventive and corrective maintenance. The principal responsibility of the clinical physicist however lies in the field of standardization and calibration of medical-physical instruments. Besides this investigation into and development of new techniques, methods and apparatus come up, while also education and training of various profession groups involved need attention. (author). 6 refs.; 1 tab

  5. Induction of stress responses by polluting agents which dis-regulate cellular homeostasis

    There is growing concern both in the scientific community and among the general public about the effects of exposure to low levels of radiation and environmental chemicals. The increased incidence of cancer, reproduction disorders and allergies have been associated with ambient environmental exposure to these pollutants. The pollution burden is generally made up of a mixture of agents, occurring at concentrations of the individual compounds which are not considered harmful and which are below the action level. Individual pollutants can act through a variety of primary toxicity mechanisms. However the resulting secondary and tertiary toxicity mechanisms which affect cellular homeostasis might be more common. These resulting stress responses, including oxidative stress, have been associated with effects that include increased level of death during cell division, increased levels of mutation and increased tolerance of mutations in cell populations, increased levels of cytogenetic abnormalities and many other symptoms. These effects are linked to a persistent increase in (oxidative) stress and are particularly evident in the haematopoietic system (possibly due to the high rate self of renewal in that system). Therefore prolonged exposure to mixtures of chemicals and radiation might result in additive and synergistic stress responses which can induce long-term delayed effects, often in progeny or in cells not directly exposed to the agent/s. The existence of a common (oxidative) stress mechanism means that the effects of individual pollutants may not be considered in isolation. Rather the total pollution burden may need to be measured using a response rather than a dose based scoring or ranking system. Improved understanding of toxicity mechanisms and effects underpins improved risk assessment and identification of biomarkers. The immune system plays a pivotal role in maintaining health status, and disruption of immune functions can lead to increased susceptibility to

  6. DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair

    1987-01-01

    For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees.

  7. DOE contractors' workshop: Cellular and molecular aspects of radiation induced DNA damage and repair

    For four decades the US Department of Energy and its predecessors have been the lead federal agency in supporting radiation biology research. Over the years emphasis in this program has gradually shifted from dose-effect studies on animals to research on the effects of radiations of various qualities on cells and molecules. Mechanistic studies on the action of radiation at the subcellular level are few in number and there is a need for more research in this area if we are to gain a better understanding of how radiation affects living cells. The intent of this workshop was to bring together DOE contractors and grantees who are investigating the effects of radiation at the cellular and molecular levels. The aims were to foster the exchange of information on research projects and experimental results, promote collaborative research efforts, and obtain an overview of research currently supported by the Health Effects Research Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The latter is needed by the Office for program planning purposes. This report on the workshop which took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 10-11, 1987, includes an overview with future research recommendations, extended abstracts of the plenary presentations, shorter abstracts of each poster presentation, a workshop agenda and the names and addresses of the attendees

  8. Effect of gamma radiation on starch content and cellular morphology of Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    The effect of five doses of gamma radiation (10, 100, 500, 1000 and 5000 Gy) on starch content and fine structure of Chlorella pyrenoidosa has been studied. Results show the accumulation of large amounts of starch on Chlorella cells after irradiation at 500, 1000 and 5000 Gy doses. The starch which is stored in the cytoplasm in form of great grains produces a de organization of the chloroplast structure, observed by electron microscopy techniques. The microphotographs presented also show a significant increase in the cellular size after irradiation up to 500 Gy. (Author) 29 refs

  9. Effect of gamma radiation on starch content and cellular morphology of chlorella pyrenoidose

    The effect of five doses of gamma radiation (10, 100, 500, 1000 and 5000 Gy) on starch content and fine structure of Chlorella pyrenoidose has been studied. Results show the accumulation of large amounts of starch on Chlorella cells after irradiation at 500, 1000 and 5000 Gy doses. The starch which is stored in the cytoplasm in form of great grains produces a disorganization of the chloroplast structure, observed by electron microscopy techniques. The microphotographs presented also show a significant increase in the cellular size after irradiation up to 500 Gy. (author)

  10. The mucosal cellular response to infection with Ancylostoma ceylanicum

    Alkazmi, L.M.M.; Dehlawi, M.S.; BEHNKE, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Although hookworms are known to stimulate inflammatory responses in the intestinal mucosa of their hosts, there is little quantitative data on this aspect of infection. Here we report the results of experiments conducted in hamsters infected with Ancylostoma ceylanicum. Infection resulted in a marked increase in goblet cells in the intestinal mucosa, which was dependent on the number of adult worms present and was sustained as long as worms persisted (over 63 days) but returned to baseline le...

  11. Gene Expression Profile Changes and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damage in Human Fibroblast Cells in Space

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Kidane, Yared; Feiveson, Alan; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms are constantly exposed to space radiation that consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles. In addition, DNA in space can be damaged by toxic chemicals or reactive oxygen species generated due to increased levels of environmental and psychological stresses. Understanding the impact of spaceflight factors, microgravity in particular, on cellular responses to DNA damage affects the accuracy of the radiation risk assessment for astronauts and the mutation rate in microorganisms. Although possible synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity have been investigated since the early days of the human space program, the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate the effects of spaceflight on cellular responses to DNA damage, confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) flown on the International Space Station (ISS) were treated with bleomycin for three hours in the true microgravity environment, which induced DNA damages including double-strand breaks (DSB). Damages in the DNA were quantified by immunofluorescence staining for ?-H2AX, which showed similar percentages of different types of stained cells between flight and ground. However, there was a slight shift in the distribution of the ?-H2AX foci number in the flown cells with countable foci. Comparison of the cells in confluent and in exponential growth conditions indicated that the proliferation rate between flight and the ground may be responsible for such a shift. A microarray analysis of gene expressions in response to bleomycin treatment was also performed. Comparison of the responsive pathways between the flown and ground cells showed similar responses with the p53 network being the top upstream regulator. Similar responses at the RNA level between different gravity conditions were also observed with a PCR array analysis containing a set of genes involved in DNA damage signaling; with BBC3, CDKN1A, PCNA and PPM1D being significantly

  12. Peroxisomes are platforms for cytomegalovirus’ evasion from the cellular immune response

    Magalhães, Ana Cristina; Ferreira, Ana Rita; Gomes, Sílvia; Vieira, Marta; Gouveia, Ana; Valença, Isabel; Islinger, Markus; Nascimento, Rute; Schrader, Michael; Kagan, Jonathan C.; Ribeiro, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus developed distinct evasion mechanisms from the cellular antiviral response involving vMIA, a virally-encoded protein that is not only able to prevent cellular apoptosis but also to inhibit signalling downstream from mitochondrial MAVS. vMIA has been shown to localize at mitochondria and to trigger their fragmentation, a phenomenon proven to be essential for the signalling inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that vMIA is also localized at peroxisomes, induces their fragm...

  13. Cellular Internalization of Fibroblast Growth Factor-12 Exerts Radioprotective Effects on Intestinal Radiation Damage Independently of FGFR Signaling

    Nakayama, Fumiaki, E-mail: f_naka@nirs.go.jp [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Umeda, Sachiko [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Yasuda, Takeshi [Radiation Emergency Medicine Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Fujita, Mayumi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan); Asada, Masahiro [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Meineke, Viktor [Bundeswehr Institute of Radiobiology affiliated to the University of Ulm, Munich (Germany); Imamura, Toru [Signaling Molecules Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) were shown to inhibit radiation-induced tissue damage through FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling; however, this signaling was also found to be involved in the pathogenesis of several malignant tumors. In contrast, FGF12 cannot activate any FGFRs. Instead, FGF12 can be internalized readily into cells using 2 cell-penetrating peptide domains (CPP-M, CPP-C). Therefore, this study focused on clarifying the role of FGF12 internalization in protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: Each FGF or peptide was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 hours before or after total body irradiation with γ rays at 9 to 12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Administration of FGF12 after radiation exposure was as effective as pretreatment in significantly promoting intestinal regeneration, proliferation of crypt cells, and epithelial differentiation. Two domains, comprising amino acid residues 80 to 109 and 140 to 169 of FGF12B, were identified as being responsible for the radioprotective activity, so that deletion of both domains from FGF12B resulted in a reduction in activity. Interestingly, these regions included the CPP-M and CPP-C domains, respectively; however, CPP-C by itself did not show an antiapoptotic effect. In addition, FGF1, prototypic FGF, possesses a domain corresponding to CPP-M, whereas it lacks CPP-C, so the fusion of FGF1 with CPP-C (FGF1/CPP-C) enhanced cellular internalization and increased radioprotective activity. However, FGF1/CPP-C reduced in vitro mitogenic activity through FGFRs compared with FGF1, implying that FGFR signaling might not be essential for promoting the radioprotective effect of FGF1/CPP-C. In addition, internalized FGF12 suppressed the activation of p38α after irradiation, resulting in reduced radiation-induced apoptosis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that FGF12 can protect the

  14. Cellular Internalization of Fibroblast Growth Factor-12 Exerts Radioprotective Effects on Intestinal Radiation Damage Independently of FGFR Signaling

    Purpose: Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) were shown to inhibit radiation-induced tissue damage through FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling; however, this signaling was also found to be involved in the pathogenesis of several malignant tumors. In contrast, FGF12 cannot activate any FGFRs. Instead, FGF12 can be internalized readily into cells using 2 cell-penetrating peptide domains (CPP-M, CPP-C). Therefore, this study focused on clarifying the role of FGF12 internalization in protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: Each FGF or peptide was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 hours before or after total body irradiation with γ rays at 9 to 12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Administration of FGF12 after radiation exposure was as effective as pretreatment in significantly promoting intestinal regeneration, proliferation of crypt cells, and epithelial differentiation. Two domains, comprising amino acid residues 80 to 109 and 140 to 169 of FGF12B, were identified as being responsible for the radioprotective activity, so that deletion of both domains from FGF12B resulted in a reduction in activity. Interestingly, these regions included the CPP-M and CPP-C domains, respectively; however, CPP-C by itself did not show an antiapoptotic effect. In addition, FGF1, prototypic FGF, possesses a domain corresponding to CPP-M, whereas it lacks CPP-C, so the fusion of FGF1 with CPP-C (FGF1/CPP-C) enhanced cellular internalization and increased radioprotective activity. However, FGF1/CPP-C reduced in vitro mitogenic activity through FGFRs compared with FGF1, implying that FGFR signaling might not be essential for promoting the radioprotective effect of FGF1/CPP-C. In addition, internalized FGF12 suppressed the activation of p38α after irradiation, resulting in reduced radiation-induced apoptosis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that FGF12 can protect the

  15. Cellular Responses to Cisplatin-Induced DNA Damage

    Alakananda Basu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the most effective anticancer agents widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. It is generally considered as a cytotoxic drug which kills cancer cells by damaging DNA and inhibiting DNA synthesis. How cells respond to cisplatin-induced DNA damage plays a critical role in deciding cisplatin sensitivity. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage activates various signaling pathways to prevent or promote cell death. This paper summarizes our current understandings regarding the mechanisms by which cisplatin induces cell death and the bases of cisplatin resistance. We have discussed various steps, including the entry of cisplatin inside cells, DNA repair, drug detoxification, DNA damage response, and regulation of cisplatin-induced apoptosis by protein kinases. An understanding of how various signaling pathways regulate cisplatin-induced cell death should aid in the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  16. Effects of localized radiotherapy upon the cellular immune response

    We delivered two regimens of fractionated doses, one of 700 rad three times in 1 week, and one of 400 rad three times a week for 3 weeks, to the left hind limbs of tumor-bearing mice. We then assessed the effect of this localized radiotherapy on tumor growth and immunological function. The first protocol only slightly delayed tumor growth and was accompanied by a decrease in cytotoxic activity of the splenocytes. The second protocol enabled 50% of the tumor-bearing group to survive for more than 6 months. At the same time, there was no decrease in cytotoxic activity of the spleen even after the full course of nine irradiations. We assumed that the depressive effect of 700 rad was due to the scatter, and elicited a threshold dose of 12 to 15 rad from the dose-response studies in cytotoxicity

  17. Recognition of chemical compounds in contaminated water using time-dependent multiple dose cellular responses

    Highlights: ► Dose- and time-dependent cellular responses are used to evaluate the cytotoxicity. ► The CI can reflect the cell number, cell viability, morphological change, etc. ► The CSVID can capture the dynamic information after cells exposed to toxins. ► The multi-class classification can distinguish the compounds using multi-doses. ► The majority vote strategy (fingerprint) can improve the classification accuracy. - Abstract: An early determination of toxicant compounds of water contaminations can gain critical time to protect citizens’ health and save substantial amounts of medical costs. To determine toxins in real time, a multi-dose classification algorithm using cellular state variable identification (CSVID) is developed in this paper. First, the dynamic cytotoxicity response profiles of living cells are measured using a real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) system. Changes in cell number expressed as cell index (CI) are recorded on-line as time series. Then CSVID, which reflects the cell killing, cell lysis and certain cellular pathological changes, is extracted from those dynamic cellular responses. Finally, a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm based on CSVID is employed to classify chemical compounds and determine their analogous cellular response pathway. In order to increase the classification accuracy, a majority vote of the class labels is also proposed. Several validation studies demonstrate that CSVID-based classification algorithm has great potential in distinguishing the cytotoxicity response of the cells in the presence of toxins.

  18. Natural products as radiation response modifiers

    Complete text of publication follows. Protection of cells and organisms against low doses of radiation is a complex issue which must be considered at the level of cells, tissues and organisms. 'Protection' at one level, for example, prevention of cell death, may be adverse at another level, if it allows a damaged cell to survive and form a malignant tumour. Conversely, death of a cell carrying damage can be protective for the organism if it eliminates a damaged cell. Thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms involved in protection against radiation damage at several hierarchical levels. The use of natural products as radiation response modifiers is very attractive. Many of these compounds are readily available and their function and pharmacology is well understood. Some derive from venoms or natural defenses and are currently used in medicine, others include vitamins, antioxidants or cofactors, which are tried and tested nutritional supplements. Radiation effects may be targeted or untargeted. Radiation may interact directly within a cell causing a direct DNA lesion or it may elicit a bystander response from the irradiated cell. A bystander effect is produced when the irradiated cell apparently exhibits no damage from the radiation, but passes on a biochemical signal which induces neighbouring cells to apoptose or undergo a number of other responses usually associated with irradiation such as mutation induction, transformation, induction of ROS responses etc.. Effects induced in progeny of non-targeted cells in receipt of bystander signals include genetic instability, mini and microsatellite mutations and carcinogenesis. A key characteristic of these non targeted effects is that they occur at very low acute doses (of the order of 5mGy) and saturate so that effective prevention requires an agent which can effectively shut off the mechanism. While the mechanism is not fully known, it is thought to involve signals from irradiated cells communicating via

  19. The relationship between cellular radiosensitivity and radiation-induced DNA damage measured by the comet assay

    The relationship between deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage and the cell death induced by γ-irradiation was examined in three kinds of cells, Chinese hamster ovary fibroblast CHO-K1, human melanoma HMV-II and mouse leukemia L5178Y. Cell survival was determined by a clonogenic assay. The induction and rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by radiation were measured by the alkaline and neutral comet assay. L5178Y cells were the most radiosensitive, while CHO-K1 cells and HMV-II cells were radioresistant. There was an inverse relationship between the survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) and the yield of initial DNA strand breaks per unit dose under the alkaline condition of the comet assay, and also a relationship between SF2 and the residual DNA strand breaks (for 4 hr after irradiation) under the neutral condition for the comet assay, the latter being generally considered to be relative to cellular radiosensitivity. In the present analysis, it was considered that the alkaline condition for the comet assay was optimal for evaluating the initial DNA strand breaks, while the neutral condition was optimal for evaluating the residual DNA strand breaks. Since the comet assay is simpler and more rapid than other methods for detecting radiation-induced DNA damage, this assay appears to be a useful predictive assay for evaluating cellular clonogenic radiosensitivity of tumor cells. (author)

  20. Interaction of alpha particles at the cellular level - Implications for the radiation weighting factor

    Since low dose effects of alpha particles are produced by cellular hits in a relatively small fraction of exposed cells, the present study focuses on alpha particle interactions in bronchial epithelial cells following exposure to inhaled radon progeny. A computer code was developed for the calculation of microdosimetric spectra, dose and hit probabilities for alpha particles emitted from uniform and non-uniform source distributions in cylindrical and Y-shaped bronchial airway geometries. Activity accumulations at the dividing spur of bronchial airway bifurcations produce hot spots of cellular hits, indicating that a small fraction of cells located at such sites may receive substantially higher doses. While presently available data on in vitro transformation frequencies suggest that the relative biological effectiveness for alpha particles ranges from about 3 to 10, the effect of inhomogeneous activity distributions of radon progeny may slightly increase the radiation weighting factor relative to a uniform distribution. Thus a radiation weighting factor of about 10 may be more realistic than the current value of 20, at least for lung cancer risk following inhalation of short-lived radon progeny. (authors)

  1. Cellular bases of radiation-induced residual insufficiency in the haematopoietic system

    Following radiation exposure, man's survival and further well-being largely depends on the degree of damage to his heamatopietic system. Stem cells are particualarly sensitive to radiation. Over and beyond acute radiation damge, residual radiation damage is of significance since it reduces the performance of the haematopietic system and enhances the risk of leukaemia. Knowledge concerning cellular bases may be important for preventive and therapeutic measures. The measurement method presented is based on the fact that stem cells from transfused bone marrow will settle in the spleen of highly irradiated mice and be able to reconstruct the haematopietic system. Initally individual colonies can be observed which originate from a single stem cell and the proliferation of its descendants. Counting these colonies will give the number of stem cells. The reduction of the proliferation factor measured in the stem-cell quality test apparently is not due to a shift in the age structure of the stem cell compartment but to a damage which is located within a more or less substantial proportion of the stem cells themselves. This damage is the cause of stem cell descendant growth retarded on an average. It is probable that recovery observed after irradiation is brought about by less-damaged or undamaged stem cells replacing damaged ones. Initial results point to the fact that this replacement can be influenced by treatment after irradiation. (orig./MG)

  2. Gymnemagenin-a triterpene saponin prevents γ-radiation induced cellular DNA damage

    Gymnema sylvestre an ethno-medicinally important plant was investigated for its protecting activity against radiation induced DNA damage. The major bioactive component present in Gymnema sylvestre such as gymnemic acid and gymnemagenin a triterpene saponin, were tested for its radioprotective effects against 60Co irradiation induced DNA damage in fish model using fresh water fish Pangasius sutchi. Fishes subjected to a dose of 133 Gy of gamma radiation and observed for eight days. The genotoxic assessment by micronucleus assay showed us that that the plant extract helped in reducing the frequency of micronucleated and binucleated erythrocytes compared to the irradiated control group. The genotoxic assessment by alkaline comet assay by single gel electrophoresis shows that pretreatment with the plant extract appreciably decreased the percentage of tail DNA towards the levels close to those of normal control group. The gradual increase in the level of the antioxidant enzymes: superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) during the course of the experiment indicates that the antioxidant enzyme activities play an important role in protecting organisms against gamma radiation-induced cellular oxidative stress. In conclusion the leaf extracts of Gymnema sylvstre exerts its radio protective potential by suppressing the toxic assault of ROS generated by the ionizing radiation through its ability to boost the levels of antioxidant enzymes (CAT and SOD) due to the presence of its phytochemicals like gymnemgenenin- a Triterpene Saponin. (author)

  3. The effect of the Electromagnetic fields Non Ionized radiations of cellular base station on human health

    Given the enormous expansion in the installation of Cellular Base Stations (CBS) on building tops, and the concern of residents, neighbouring those stations, of contracting serious diseases, because of their exposure to electromagnetic radiations, transmitted by (CBS) antennas, a scientific and statistical study has been conducted on residents neighbouring (CBS)s in several quarters of Damascus. The aim of the study is to identify the effect of the CBS's diation on the human body. The Study involves the following steps: 1. Site measurements have been carried out to evaluate the energy density, the strength of electrical and magnetic fields of the electromagnetic radiation, emitted from the CBS antennas, close to the buildings with (SBC)s on top, taking distance into account, in order to know the range of residents' exposure [to electromagnetic radiation], close to and far away from the CBS's antennas 2. Field Statistical Health Questionnaires of residents adjacent to ,or far away from (SBC)s,have been carried out, in order establish the link between the electromagnetic radiation transmitted by (SBC)s and diseases developed by nearby residents. Finally, very important scientific findings have been obtained. (author)

  4. Physicochemical determinants in the cellular responses to nanostructured amorphous silicas.

    Gazzano, Elena; Ghiazza, Mara; Polimeni, Manuela; Bolis, Vera; Fenoglio, Ivana; Attanasio, Angelo; Mazzucco, Gianna; Fubini, Bice; Ghigo, Dario

    2012-07-01

    Amorphous silicas, opposite to crystalline polymorphs, have been regarded so far as nonpathogenic, but few studies have addressed the toxicity of the wide array of amorphous silica forms. With the advent of nanotoxicology, there has been a rising concern about the safety of silica nanoparticles to be used in nanomedicine. Here, we report a study on the toxicity of amorphous nanostructured silicas obtained with two different preparation procedures (pyrolysis vs. precipitation), the pyrogenic in two very different particle sizes, in order to assess the role of size and origin on surface properties and on the cell damage, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response elicited in murine alveolar macrophages. A quartz dust was employed as positive control and monodispersed silica spheres as negative control. Pyrogenic silicas were remarkably more active than the precipitated one as to cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide synthesis, and production of tumor necrosis factor-α, when compared both per mass and per unit surface. Between the two pyrogenic silicas, the larger one was the more active. Silanols density is the major difference in surface composition among the three silicas, being much larger than the precipitated one as indicated by joint calorimetric and infrared spectroscopy analysis. We assume here that full hydroxylation of a silica surface, with consequent stable coverage by water molecules, reduces/inhibits toxic behavior. The preparation route appears thus determinant in yielding potentially toxic materials, although the smallest size does not always correspond to an increased toxicity. PMID:22491428

  5. Adjuvant activity of peanut, cottonseed and rice oils on cellular and humoral response

    Erika Freitas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The potentiality of the usage of vegetable oils such as soybean, corn, olive, sesame, murici seed, rapeseed, linseed, rice and cashew nuts as adjuvant of the humoral and cellular immune response has been recently shown. In the present work, besides of evaluating the adjuvant action of peanut, cottonseed and rice oils on humoral and cellular immune responses against ovalbumin (OVA we also evaluated the protective immune response induced by Leishmania antigens. The peanut oil significantly increased the synthesis of anti-ovalbumin antibodies in the primary response, but it did not favor cellular response. Concerning mice immunized with L. amazonensis antigens emulsified with peanut oil exacerbated skin lesions and lymph node parasite load what suggests stimulation of the Th2 immune response and down regulation of Th1 response. The cottonseed oil was shown to have adjuvant effect to the humoral response, stimulating a secondary response and also favored the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH response to OVA. The rice oil stimulated a strong DTH reaction to OVA and enhanced the synthesis of antibodies after the third dose. Mice immunized with L. amazonensis antigens emulsified with rice oil or cotton seed oil were protected from developing skin lesions and lymph node parasite load. These results emphasize the interest and importance of the vegetable oils as tools in different procedures of immunization and their differential role in relation to the other adjuvant under usage.

  6. Study on cellular survival adaptive response induced by low dose irradiation of 153Sm

    The present study engages in determining whether low dose irradiation of 153Sm could cut down the responsiveness of cellular survival to subsequent high dose exposure of 153Sm so as to make an inquiry into approach the protective action of adaptive response by second irradiation of 153Sm. Experimental results indicate that for inductive low dose of radionuclide 153Sm 3.7 kBq/ml irradiated beforehand to cells has obvious resistant effect in succession after high dose irradiation of 153Sm 3.7 x 102 kBq/ml was observed. Cells exposed to low dose irradiation of 153Sm become adapted and therefore the subsequent cellular survival rate induced by high dose of 153Sm is sufficiently higher than high dose of 153Sm merely. It is evident that cellular survival adaptive response could be induced by pure low dose irradiation of 153Sm only

  7. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 µg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by foci and pattern counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (?-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average foci counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profile of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in ?-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not significantly affect

  8. Potential Mechanisms for Cancer Resistance in Elephants and Comparative Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Humans

    Abegglen, Lisa M.; Caulin, Aleah F.; Chan, Ashley; Lee, Kristy; Robinson, Rosann; Campbell, Michael S.; Kiso, Wendy K.; Schmitt, Dennis L.; Waddell, Peter J; Bhaskara, Srividya; Jensen, Shane T.; Maley, Carlo C.; Schiffman, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Evolutionary medicine may provide insights into human physiology and pathophysiology, including tumor biology. OBJECTIVE To identify mechanisms for cancer resistance in elephants and compare cellular response to DNA damage among elephants, healthy human controls, and cancer-prone patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A comprehensive survey of necropsy data was performed across 36 mammalian species to validate cancer resistance in large and long-lived organisms, including elephants (n = 644). The African and Asian elephant genomes were analyzed for potential mechanisms of cancer resistance. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from elephants, healthy human controls, and patients with LFS were tested in vitro in the laboratory for DNA damage response. The study included African and Asian elephants (n = 8), patients with LFS (n = 10), and age-matched human controls (n = 11). Human samples were collected at the University of Utah between June 2014 and July 2015. EXPOSURES Ionizing radiation and doxorubicin. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cancer mortality across species was calculated and compared by body size and life span. The elephant genome was investigated for alterations in cancer-related genes. DNA repair and apoptosis were compared in elephant vs human peripheral blood lymphocytes. RESULTS Across mammals, cancer mortality did not increase with body size and/or maximum life span (eg, for rock hyrax, 1% [95%CI, 0%–5%]; African wild dog, 8%[95%CI, 0%–16%]; lion, 2%[95%CI, 0% –7%]). Despite their large body size and long life span, elephants remain cancer resistant, with an estimated cancer mortality of 4.81% (95%CI, 3.14%–6.49%), compared with humans, who have 11% to 25%cancer mortality. While humans have 1 copy (2 alleles) of TP53, African elephants have at least 20 copies (40 alleles), including 19 retrogenes (38 alleles) with evidence of transcriptional activity measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain

  9. Plant response to solar ultraviolet radiation

    Caldwell, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    Plant reactions and mechanisms of reaction to solar UV radiation are reviewed, along with characteristics of plants which enhance UV tolerance. Wavelength regions to which proteins are particularly sensitive are examined and the possibility of synergistic effects from photoreactions to multiple wavelengths is considered, along with available evidence of nonadditive plant spectral responses to UV radiation. Decreases in atmospheric ozone content are explored in terms of UV wavelengths which would increase with the ozone decreases, particularly for UV-B, which depresses photosynthesis and would increase 1% with a 16% reduction of stratospheric ozone. Higher elevations are projected to display effects of increased UV incident flux first, and global distributions of UV increases due to atmospheric inhomogeneity and water surface clarity are examined. Finally, the response of plant nucleic acids, DNA, chlorophyll to enhanced UV are described, along with repair, avoidance, and optical mechanisms which aid plant survival

  10. Enhancement of radiation response with bevacizumab

    Hoang Tien; Huang Shyhmin; Armstrong Eric; Eickhoff Jens C; Harari Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that neutralizes VEGF. We examined the impact on radiation response by blocking VEGF signaling with bevacizumab. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) growth inhibition and apoptosis were examined by crystal violet assay and flow cytometry, respectively. In vitro HUVEC tube formation and in vivo Matrigel assays were performed...

  11. Nonlinear response matrix methods for radiative transfer

    A nonlinear response matrix formalism is presented for the solution of time-dependent radiative transfer problems. The essential feature of the method is that within each computational cell the temperature is calculated in response to the incoming photons from all frequency groups. Thus the updating of the temperature distribution is placed within the iterative solution of the spaceangle transport problem, instead of being placed outside of it. The method is formulated for both grey and multifrequency problems and applied in slab geometry. The method is compared to the more conventional source iteration technique. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  12. Study on radiation-responsive epigenomes

    Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Seung Sik; Chung, Byung Yeoup; and others

    2013-01-15

    The purpose of this project is development of world-class head spring techniques of biological science for application of plant genomes/epigenomes through study on radiation-responsive epigenomes and improvement of the national competitiveness in the field of fundamental technology for biological science and industry. Research scope includes 1) Investigation of radiation-responsive epigenomes and elucidation of their relation with phenotypes, 2) Elucidation of interaction and transcription control of epigenomes and epigenetic regulators using IR, 3) Investigation of epigenome-mediated traits in plant development, differentiation and antioxidant defense using IR, and 4) Development of application techniques of radiation-responsive epigenomes for eco-monitoring and molecular breeding. Main results are as follow: investigation of the expression level of histone-modifying enzymes by IR; elucidation of the structural and functional changes of chaperone protein by IR; development of transgenic plant (DRD1-6); investigation of transcription control of epigenetic regulators by IR; investigation of relevance between DNA methylation and miRNA; comparison of gene expression in wild type and cmt mutant from Arabidopsis using gene chip; investigation control of epigenetic regulators in drd1-6 mutant by drought stress; development of transgenic plant using epigenetic regulators.

  13. Radiation response of Philippine natural rubber latex

    Our earlier work has shown that the natural rubber latex (NRL) produced and processed in the Philippines is suited for radiation vulcanization. The cast films from NRL with 50% TSC exhibited maximum tensile strengths of 25-32 MPa at 15 kGy, which is the vulcanization dose or Dv. In the manufacture of dipped NRL products, certain specifications such as %TSC, protein content and tensile properties, must be met to ensure an acceptable product. For radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex (RVNRL) to be accepted as an alternative process, it must also meet the requirements. Thus, this paper presents additional data on the radiation response of local NRL at different total solids contents (TSC), leachable proteins from NRL films as a function of dose, and the thermal activities of irradiated natural rubber latex (INRL). Different formulations of NRL showed varying tolerances to nBA. Data showed that as %TSC increases, the maximum concentration of nBA that can be added without affecting the stability of the latex decreases. The Dv increases as the %TSC increases and the nBA content decreases. This difference in response may be attributed to a lower concentration of nBA in formulations with higher %TSC. These data indicate that the parameters in the radiation treatment will be dictated by the intended applications of INRL. The thermogravimetric data showed greater stability of INRL to thermal oxidation relative to the unirradiated NRL, which correlates directly with the tensile properties of the INRL. A radiation dose of 10 kGy increased the amount of proteins leached from cast latex films. The amount of extractable proteins did not increase significantly at higher doses. The SDS PAGE analysis of the extractable proteins from unirradiated latex film showed distinct bands. An additional band at 60 Kda appeared at 10 kGy. All these bands became diffuse at higher doses, indicating the radiolysis of the proteins

  14. EICOSANOIDS MEDIATE MANDUCA SEXTA CELLULAR RESPONSE TO BEAUVERIA BASSIANA: A ROLE FOR THE LIPOXYGENASE PATHWAY

    Many studies have documented the involvement of eicosanoids in insect cellular immune responses to bacteria. The use of Beauveria bassiana as a nodulation elicitor, with inhibition of phospholipase A2 by dexamethasone extends the principal to fungi. This study also provides the first evidence of i...

  15. Precipitation Response to Regional Radiative Forcing

    Shindell, D. T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Milly, G.

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation shifts can have large impacts on human society and ecosystems. Many aspects of how inhomogeneous radiative forcings influence precipitation remain unclear, however. Here we investigate regional precipitation responses to various forcings imposed in different latitude bands in a climate model. We find that several regions show strong, significant responses to most forcings, but that the magnitude and even the sign depends upon the forcing location and type. Aerosol and ozone forcings typically induce larger responses than equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2) forcing, and the influence of remote forcings often outweighs that of local forcings. Consistent with this, ozone and especially aerosols contribute greatly to precipitation changes over the Sahel and South and East Asia in historical simulations, and inclusion of aerosols greatly increases the agreement with observed trends in these areas, which cannot be attributed to either greenhouse gases or natural forcings. Estimates of precipitation responses derived from multiplying our Regional Precipitation Potentials (RPP; the response per unit forcing relationships) by historical forcings typically capture the actual response in full transient climate simulations fairly well, suggesting that these relationships may provide useful metrics. The strong sensitivity to aerosol and ozone forcing suggests that although some air quality improvements may unmask greenhouse gas-induced warming, they have large benefits for reducing regional disruption of the hydrologic cycle.

  16. Precipitation response to regional radiative forcing

    D. T. Shindell

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation shifts can have large impacts on human society and ecosystems. Many aspects of how inhomogeneous radiative forcings influence precipitation remain unclear, however. Here we investigate regional precipitation responses to various forcings imposed in different latitude bands in a climate model. We find that several regions show strong, significant responses to most forcings, but the magnitude and even the sign depends upon the forcing location and type. Aerosol and ozone forcings typically induce larger responses than equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2 forcing, and the influence of remote forcings often outweighs that of local forcings. Consistent with this, ozone and especially aerosols contribute greatly to precipitation changes over the Sahel and South and East Asia in historical simulations, and inclusion of aerosols greatly increases the agreement with observed trends in these areas, which cannot be attributed to either greenhouse gases or natural forcings. Estimates of precipitation responses derived from multiplying our Regional Precipitation Potential (RPP; the response per unit forcing relationships by historical forcings typically capture the actual response in full transient climate simulations fairly well, suggesting that these relationships may provide useful metrics. The strong sensitivity to aerosol and ozone forcing suggests that although some air quality improvements may unmask greenhouse gas-induced changes in temperature, they have large benefits for reducing regional disruption of the hydrologic cycle.

  17. Precipitation response to regional radiative forcing

    D. T. Shindell

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation shifts can have large impacts on human society and ecosystems. Many aspects of how inhomogeneous radiative forcings influence precipitation remain unclear, however. Here we investigate regional precipitation responses to various forcings imposed in different latitude bands in a climate model. We find that several regions show strong, significant responses to most forcings, but that the magnitude and even the sign depends upon the forcing location and type. Aerosol and ozone forcings typically induce larger responses than equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2 forcing, and the influence of remote forcings often outweighs that of local forcings. Consistent with this, ozone and especially aerosols contribute greatly to precipitation changes over the Sahel and South and East Asia in historical simulations, and inclusion of aerosols greatly increases the agreement with observed trends in these areas, which cannot be attributed to either greenhouse gases or natural forcings. Estimates of precipitation responses derived from multiplying our Regional Precipitation Potentials (RPP; the response per unit forcing relationships by historical forcings typically capture the actual response in full transient climate simulations fairly well, suggesting that these relationships may provide useful metrics. The strong sensitivity to aerosol and ozone forcing suggests that although some air quality improvements may unmask greenhouse gas-induced warming, they have large benefits for reducing regional disruption of the hydrologic cycle.

  18. SEX DIFFERENCES AND ESTROGEN MODULATION OF THE CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSE AFTER INJURY

    Bird, Melanie D.; Karavitis, John; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2008-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is extremely important for resolution of infection and for proper healing from injury. However, the cellular immune response is dysregulated following injuries such as burn and hemorrhage. Sex hormones are known to regulate immunity, and a well-documented dichotomy exists in the immune response to injury between the sexes. This disparity is caused by differences in immune cell activation, infiltration, and cytokine production during and after injury. Estrogen and testos...

  19. Cellular Levels of Oxidative Stress Affect the Response of Cervical Cancer Cells to Chemotherapeutic Agents

    Maria Filippova; Valery Filippov; Williams, Vonetta M; Kangling Zhang; Anatolii Kokoza; Svetlana Bashkirova; Penelope Duerksen-Hughes

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of advanced and relapsed cervical cancer is frequently ineffective, due in large part to chemoresistance. To examine the pathways responsible, we employed the cervical carcinoma-derived SiHa and CaSki cells as cellular models of resistance and sensitivity, respectively, to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents, doxorubicin, and cisplatin. We compared the proteomic profiles of SiHa and CaSki cells and identified pathways with the potential to contribute to the differential response....

  20. Gestational Zinc Deficiency Impairs Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Hepatitis B Vaccination in Offspring Mice

    Ning Zhao; Xuelian Wang; Ying Zhang; Qiuhong Gu; Fen Huang; Wei Zheng; Zhiwei Li

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gestational zinc deficiency has been confirmed to impair the infant immune function. However, knowledge about effects of maternal mild zinc deficiency during pregnancy on hepatitis B vaccine responsiveness in offspring is limited. In this report, we aimed to examine how maternal zinc deficiency during pregnancy influences humoral and cellular immune responses to hepatitis B vaccination in offspring of BALB/c mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From day 1 of pregnancy upon delive...

  1. Cellular Responses during Morphological Transformation in Azospirillum brasilense and Its flcA Knockout Mutant

    Hou, Xingsheng; McMillan, Mary; Joëlle V. F. Coumans; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J.; Pereg, Lily

    2014-01-01

    FlcA is a response regulator controlling flocculation and the morphological transformation of Azospirillum cells from vegetative to cyst-like forms. To understand the cellular responses of Azospirillum to conditions that cause morphological transformation, proteins differentially expressed under flocculation conditions in A. brasilense Sp7 and its flcA knockout mutant were investigated. Comparison of 2-DE protein profiles of wild-type (Sp7) and a flcA deletion mutant (Sp7-flcAΔ) revealed a to...

  2. Recognition of chemical compounds in contaminated water using time-dependent multiple dose cellular responses

    Pan, T.H., E-mail: thpan@ujs.edu.cn [School of Electrical and Information Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G6 (Canada); Huang, B., E-mail: biao.huang@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Material Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G6 (Canada); Xing, J.Z., E-mail: jzxing@ualberta.ca [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2S2 (Canada); Zhang, W.P., E-mail: weiping.zhang@gov.ab.ca [Alberta Health and Wellness, Edmonton, Alberta T5J 1S6 (Canada); Gabos, S., E-mail: stephan.gabos@gov.ab.ca [Alberta Health and Wellness, Edmonton, Alberta T5J 1S6 (Canada); Chen, J., E-mail: jchen@ece.ualberta.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2S2 (Canada)

    2012-04-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dose- and time-dependent cellular responses are used to evaluate the cytotoxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CI can reflect the cell number, cell viability, morphological change, etc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CSVID can capture the dynamic information after cells exposed to toxins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The multi-class classification can distinguish the compounds using multi-doses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The majority vote strategy (fingerprint) can improve the classification accuracy. - Abstract: An early determination of toxicant compounds of water contaminations can gain critical time to protect citizens' health and save substantial amounts of medical costs. To determine toxins in real time, a multi-dose classification algorithm using cellular state variable identification (CSVID) is developed in this paper. First, the dynamic cytotoxicity response profiles of living cells are measured using a real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) system. Changes in cell number expressed as cell index (CI) are recorded on-line as time series. Then CSVID, which reflects the cell killing, cell lysis and certain cellular pathological changes, is extracted from those dynamic cellular responses. Finally, a support vector machine (SVM) algorithm based on CSVID is employed to classify chemical compounds and determine their analogous cellular response pathway. In order to increase the classification accuracy, a majority vote of the class labels is also proposed. Several validation studies demonstrate that CSVID-based classification algorithm has great potential in distinguishing the cytotoxicity response of the cells in the presence of toxins.

  3. Effect of dexamethasone on the cytotoxic and enzymatic response of cultured endothelial cells to radiation

    Experiments were conducted to determine (1) whether glucocorticoids directly protected endothelial cells (EC) from radiation and (2) if angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, known to be increased by glucocorticoid, played a role in the EC response to radiation. Confluent monolayers of EC cultured from bovine aorta EC were treated with dexamethasone (10-6 M); after irradiation (5.0 Gy, 60Co γ) ACE and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, DNA and protein contents, and nuclei number were measured. Combined dexamethasone treatment and radiation increased cellular ACE activity at a time when neither agent alone had an effect (24-hr dexamethasone exposure before 5 Gy and assayed 24 hr after 5 Gy). This interaction between radiation and dexamethasone treatment suggests that the glucocorticoid modifies the cell's response to injury. Although this interaction does not ameliorate radiation cytotoxicity, maintenance of ACE levels in injured vessels by hormones may have physiological significance in the hemodynamics of irradiated tissues

  4. Radioadaptive response viewed from the relationship with reactive oxygen species and anti oxidative cellular capability

    Radiation-induced adaptive response (PAR) is a phenomenon manifesting as a priming low dose-induced resistance against a subsequent irradiation at higher dose. To understand this biological defensive phenomenon against radiation, it is important to study from the mechanistic point of view of two basic aspects: One is the antioxidative capability to scavenge the reactive oxygen species generated by radiation, and the other is the capability to repair radiation-induced damages. In this review, we summarize the knowledge of reactive oxygen species, and discuss the relationship between the low dose-induced increase in antioxidative activity and PAR. (author)

  5. In vivo optical imaging of tumor and microvascular response to ionizing radiation.

    Maeda, Azusa; Leung, Michael K K; Conroy, Leigh; Chen, Yonghong; Bu, Jiachuan; Lindsay, Patricia E; Mintzberg, Shani; Virtanen, Carl; Tsao, Julissa; Winegarden, Neil A; Wang, Yanchun; Morikawa, Lily; Vitkin, I Alex; Jaffray, David A; Hill, Richard P; DaCosta, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a widely used cancer treatment. However, understanding how ionizing radiation affects tumor cells and their vasculature, particularly at cellular, subcellular, genetic, and protein levels, has been limited by an inability to visualize the response of these interdependent components within solid tumors over time and in vivo. Here we describe a new preclinical experimental platform combining intravital multimodal optical microscopy for cellular-level longitudinal imaging, a small animal x-ray microirradiator for reproducible spatially-localized millimeter-scale irradiations, and laser-capture microdissection of ex vivo tissues for transcriptomic profiling. Using this platform, we have developed new methods that exploit the power of optically-enabled microscopic imaging techniques to reveal the important role of the tumor microvasculature in radiation response of tumors. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of this preclinical platform to study quantitatively--with cellular and sub-cellular details--the spatio-temporal dynamics of the biological response of solid tumors to ionizing radiation in vivo. PMID:22927920

  6. Intraspecific variation in cellular and biochemical heat response strategies of Mediterranean Xeropicta derbentina [Pulmonata, Hygromiidae].

    Sandra Troschinski

    Full Text Available Dry and hot environments challenge the survival of terrestrial snails. To minimize overheating and desiccation, physiological and biochemical adaptations are of high importance for these animals. In the present study, seven populations of the Mediterranean land snail species Xeropicta derbentina were sampled from their natural habitat in order to investigate the intraspecific variation of cellular and biochemical mechanisms, which are assigned to contribute to heat resistance. Furthermore, we tested whether genetic parameters are correlated with these physiological heat stress response patterns. Specimens of each population were individually exposed to elevated temperatures (25 to 52°C for 8 h in the laboratory. After exposure, the health condition of the snails' hepatopancreas was examined by means of qualitative description and semi-quantitative assessment of histopathological effects. In addition, the heat-shock protein 70 level (Hsp70 was determined. Generally, calcium cells of the hepatopancreas were more heat resistant than digestive cells - this phenomenon was associated with elevated Hsp70 levels at 40°C.We observed considerable variation in the snails' heat response strategy: Individuals from three populations invested much energy in producing a highly elevated Hsp70 level, whereas three other populations invested energy in moderate stress protein levels - both strategies were in association with cellular functionality. Furthermore, one population kept cellular condition stable despite a low Hsp70 level until 40°C exposure, whereas prominent cellular reactions were observed above this thermal limit. Genetic diversity (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene within populations was low. Nevertheless, when using genetic indices as explanatory variables in a multivariate regression tree (MRT analysis, population structure explained mean differences in cellular and biochemical heat stress responses, especially in the group

  7. In vitro cellular response to hydroxyapatite scaffolds with oriented pore architectures

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the in vitro cellular response to hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds with oriented pore architectures. Hydroxyapatite scaffolds with approximately the same porosity (65-70%) but two different oriented microstructures, described as 'columnar' (pore diameter = 90-110 μm) and 'lamellar' (pore width = 20-30 μm), were prepared by unidirectional freezing of suspensions. The response of murine MLO-A5 cells, an osteogenic cell line, to these scaffolds was evaluated using assays of MTT hydrolysis, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and alizarin red staining. While the cellular response to both groups of scaffolds was better than control wells, the columnar scaffolds with the larger pore width provided the most favorable substrate for cell proliferation and function. These results indicate that HA scaffolds with the columnar microstructure could be used for bone repair applications in vivo.

  8. Cellular response within the periodontal ligament on application of orthodontic forces

    Nazeer Ahmed Meeran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During application of controlled orthodontic force on teeth, remodeling of the periodontal ligament (PDL and the alveolar bone takes place. Orthodontic forces induce a multifaceted bone remodeling response. Osteoclasts responsible for bone resorption are mainly derived from the macrophages and osteoblasts are produced by proliferations of the cells of the periodontal ligament. Orthodontic force produces local alterations in vascularity, as well as cellular and extracellular matrix reorganization, leading to the synthesis and release of various neurotransmitters, cytokines, growth factors, colony-stimulating factors, and metabolites of arachidonic acid. Although many studies have been reported in the orthodontic and related scientific literature, research is constantly being done in this field resulting in numerous current updates in the biology of tooth movement, in response to orthodontic force. Therefore, the aim of this review is to describe the mechanical and biological processes taking place at the cellular level during orthodontic tooth movement.

  9. Function of Membrane Rafts in Viral Lifecycles and Host Cellular Response

    Tadanobu Takahashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane rafts are small (10–200 nm sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains that compartmentalize cellular processes. Membrane rafts play an important role in viral infection cycles and viral virulence. Viruses are divided into four main classes, enveloped DNA virus, enveloped RNA virus, nonenveloped DNA virus, and nonenveloped RNA virus. General virus infection cycle is also classified into two sections, the early stage (entry process and the late stage (assembly, budding, and release processes of virus particles. In the viral cycle, membrane rafts act as a scaffold of many cellular signal transductions, which are associated with symptoms caused by viral infections. In this paper, we describe the functions of membrane rafts in viral lifecycles and host cellular response according to each virus classification, each stage of the virus lifecycle, and each virus-induced signal transduction.

  10. The role of glutathione in cellular response to a tertiary t-butlhydroperoxide

    Cellular nonprotein thiols (NPSH) consist of glutathione (GSH) and of other low molecular weight species. GSH's rate of depletion is partly dependent upon the cellular capacity for resynthesis. If resynthesis is blocked by L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO), GSH is depleted more rapidly. Human carcinoma cells (A549) and small cell lung carcinoma (H-69) are quickly removed of their GSH by L-BSO [ Dimethylfumarate (DMF) and are very sensitive to radiation, to radical producing drugs such as misonidazole and to peroxide or hydroperoxides. The authors focused on the toxicity of cells to hydroperoxides such as t-butylhydroperoxide (T-BOOH) because similar chemicals may be either produced through drug metabolism or are by-products of radical reaction. Cellular toxicity to t-BOOH is enhanced if GSH is depleted by L-BSO + DMF. T-BOOH also caused fragmentation of cellular DNA. GSH depleted cells are much more sensitive to the radiosensitizing effects of t-BOOH. T-BOOH does not behave as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizing drug

  11. [Electrosmog, cellular phones, sunbeds etc. -- adverse health effects from radiation? Health aspects of non-ionizing radiation].

    Bernhardt, J H

    2005-01-01

    This review supplies a survey of the three physical influences, i. e. UV radiation, high-frequency electromagnetic fields of radio telephone systems and other wireless radio applications as well as low-frequency fields of electric power supply. The exposure to UV radiation must be considered to be by far the highest health risk. The annual rate of about 2000 deaths from skin cancer in Germany, mainly caused by extensive exposure to solar UV radiation, demands protective measures. Teaching reasonable behaviour is the supreme issue. Recommended protective measures in the order of their effectiveness are protection by adaptation of behaviour, by clothes, sun hats and sunglasses as well as by sun creams. Children are the most important target group. With regard to UV tanning appliances it is recommended not to use artificial UV radiation for cosmetic purposes because of the related health risks. For the assessment of health impairments caused by exposure to electromagnetic fields, direct field reactions due to induced electric body currents, reactions on the surface of the body or heating effects should be separated from indirect field reactions (e. g. electric shocks and burns) due to contact currents or interference with electronic body aids and implants. Risk assessment has led to recommendations of threshold values which-in agreement with international research results-exclude all impairments of health caused by direct field reactions scientifically proven to date. Contrary to public concerns, which are mostly related to base transmitters of radio telephone systems, exposure due to handheld radio telephones (cellular phones) should rather be considered from the viewpoint of precautionary health protection, since it is more likely that their use can lead to high exposure of the user. Due to the protective measures provided so far and observance of the threshold values based on scientific results, exposures do not lead to health impairments-not even in children

  12. Radiation response issues for infrared detectors

    Kalma, Arne H.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

  13. Radiation response of human hematopoietic cells

    The radiosensitivity and capacity to accumulate and repair sub-lethal damage has been studied in hematopoietic cell lines of human origin and in stem cells derived from blood and bone narrow of normal human donors. The results were analysed in terms of the linear quadratic and multitarget models. For the cell lines intrinsic radiosensitivity varied widely with D/sub o/'s ranging from 0.53 to 1.39 Gy. Five of the cell lines showed same capacity to accumulate sub-lethal damage and in three of these survival was enhanced by dose fractionation or reduction of dose rate. Among the cell lines of leukemic origin, several did not conform in one or more respects with the highly radiosensitive and repair deficient model associated with hematopoietic cells. There was no apparent correlation between radiation response and the phenotype (myeloid, lymphoid or undifferentiated) of the cell lines studied. Variability of radiation response and in some cases an unpredicted degree of radioresistance and capacity to repair sub-lethal damage has now been demonstrated for both cultured and primary explants of human leukemic cells. These observations have implications for the design of Total Body Irradiation protocols for use prior to bone narrow transplant

  14. Radiation emergency response in Illinois, Alabama, and Texas

    The objective of this study was to examine state radiation emergency response and to locate any areas of emergency planning in need of improvement. This report briefly presents a summary of laws and defining documents governing radiation emergency response, describes the existing and projected need for such response, and presents the authors' analyses of the evolution of state response plans and their application to radiation incidents. Three states' programs are discussed in detail: Illinois, Alabama, and Texas. These states were selected because they have quite different emergency-response programs. Therefore, these state programs provide a wide variety of approaches to state radiation emergency response

  15. Radiation emergency response in Illinois, Alabama, and Texas

    Larsen, D.K.; Chester, R.O.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine state radiation emergency response and to locate any areas of emergency planning in need of improvement. This report briefly presents a summary of laws and defining documents governing radiation emergency response, describes the existing and projected need for such response, and presents the authors' analyses of the evolution of state response plans and their application to radiation incidents. Three states' programs are discussed in detail: Illinois, Alabama, and Texas. These states were selected because they have quite different emergency-response programs. Therefore, these state programs provide a wide variety of approaches to state radiation emergency response.

  16. Radiation response in prostate cancer stem cells

    The full text of the publication follows. Introduction: Currently, there is no successful treatment for secondary prostate cancer. Resistance of secondary tumours and metastases to radiotherapy and chemotherapy might be explained by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Prostate (P) CSCs are rare cells defined by cell surface markers, CD133+, a2b1integrinhi and CD44+, and are capable of self-renewal, differentiation and invasion in vitro and tumour initiation in vivo. Hypothesis: PCSCs have an alternative DNA damage response following radiation and are resistant to radiation treatment. Methods: Primary prostate (benign and cancer) epithelial stem (SC) transit amplifying (TA, CD133-/a2b1integrinhi/CD44+) and committed basal (CB, CD133-/a2b1integrinlo/CD44+) cells were exposed to 2 Gy of radiation (IR) to induce a DNA damage response. Immunofluorescence was used to quantify nuclear foci, representative of DNA damage response proteins (g-H2AX, 53BP1, phosphorylated ATM/ATR substrates, phospho-Chk2Th68). Immunofluorescence was also used to co-stain for heterochromatin and DNA damage markers. Comet assays (neutral and alkaline) were used to directly assess DNA damage. Results: In benign and cancer cells, the SCs had a lower percentage of cells containing initial foci (30 min post-IR), compared to the TA and CB cells. At 24 h post-IR there was a reduced percentage of cells positive for foci in TA and CB cells suggesting repair. Whilst there were also signs of repair in benign SCs, in the PCSCs there was an increase in percentage of cells positive for foci at 24 h, indicative of a delayed damage response. Comet assays indicated that SCs sustain different kinds of DNA damage to TA and CB cells. Heterochromatin staining indicated that DNA damage foci preferentially formed in euchromatin. Future work: Further studies will include apoptosis and clonogenic assays to measure PCSC survival. In addition, PCSC chromatin status will be examined to elucidate DNA repair kinetics. If we are able

  17. The relationship between cellular adhesion and surface roughness for polyurethane modified by microwave plasma radiation

    Heidari S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Saeed Heidari Keshel1, S Neda Kh Azhdadi2, Azadeh Asefnezhad2, Mohammad Sadraeian3, Mohamad Montazeri4, Esmaeil Biazar51Stem Cell Preparation Unit, Eye Research Center, Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences; 2Department of Biomaterial Engineering, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch - Islamic Azad University; 3Young Researchers Club, Islamic Azad University, North Tehran Branch, Tehran; 4Faculty of Medical Sciences, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol; 5Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Tonekabon, IranAbstract: Surface modification of medical polymers is carried out to improve biocompatibility. In this study, conventional polyurethane was exposed to microwave plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases for 30 seconds and 60 seconds. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra investigations of irradiated samples indicated the presence of functional groups. Atomic force microscope images of samples irradiated with inert and active gases indicated the nanometric topography of the sample surfaces. Samples irradiated by oxygen plasma indicated high roughness compared with those irradiated by inert plasma for the different lengths of time. In addition, surface roughness increased with time, which can be due to a reduction of contact angle of samples irradiated by oxygen plasma. Contact angle analysis indicated a reduction in samples irradiated with both types of plasma. However, samples irradiated with oxygen plasma indicated lower contact angle compared with those irradiated by argon plasma. Cellular investigations with unrestricted somatic stem cells showed better adhesion, cell growth, and proliferation among samples radiated by oxygen plasma for longer than for normal samples.Keywords: surface topography, polyurethane, plasma treatment, cellular investigation

  18. A signature microRNA expression profile for the cellular response to thermal stress

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Roth, Caleb C.; Ketchum, Norma; Ibey, Bennett L.; Waterworth, Angela; Suarez, Maria; Roach, William P.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, an extensive layer of intra-cellular signals was discovered that was previously undetected by genetic radar. It is now known that this layer consists primarily of a class of short noncoding RNA species that are referred to as microRNAs (miRNAs). MiRNAs regulate protein synthesis at the post-transcriptional level, and studies have shown that they are involved in many fundamental cellular processes. In this study, we hypothesized that miRNAs may be involved in cellular stress response mechanisms, and that cells exposed to thermal stress may exhibit a signature miRNA expression profile indicative of their functional involvement in such mechanisms. To test our hypothesis, human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to an established hyperthermic protocol, and the ensuing miRNA expression levels were evaluated 4 hr post-exposure using microRNA microarray gene chips. The microarray data shows that 123 miRNAs were differentially expressed in cells exposed to thermal stress. We collectively refer to these miRNAs as thermalregulated microRNAs (TRMs). Since miRNA research is in its infancy, it is interesting to note that only 27 of the 123 TRMs are currently annotated in the Sanger miRNA registry. Prior to publication, we plan to submit the remaining novel 96 miRNA gene sequences for proper naming. Computational and thermodynamic modeling algorithms were employed to identify putative mRNA targets for the TRMs, and these studies predict that TRMs regulate the mRNA expression of various proteins that are involved in the cellular stress response. Future empirical studies will be conducted to validate these theoretical predictions, and to further examine the specific role that TRMs play in the cellular stress response.

  19. Electrolyte effects on the surface chemistry and cellular response of anodized titanium

    Highlights: • Ti samples were anodized using various electrolytes. • Anodization decreased carbon adsorption, improving hydrophilicity. • Improved hydrophilicity led to improved cellular attachment. • Only one electrolyte showed any heteroatom incorporation into the TiO2 layer. • Choice of electrolyte played no role on the effects of anodization. - Abstract: Anodic oxidation of titanium (Ti) material is used to enhance biocompatibility, yet the effects of various electrolytes on surface characteristics and cellular behavior have not been completely elucidated. To investigate this topic, oxide layers were produced on Ti substrates by anodizing them in aqueous electrolytes of (NH4)2O·5B2O3, (NH4)2SO4, or (NH4)3PO4, after which their surface characteristics and cellular responses were examined. Overall, no surface differences between the electrolytes were visually observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the anodized surfaces are composed of titanium dioxide (TiO2), while incorporation from electrolyte was only observed for (NH4)3PO4. Surface adsorption of carbon contaminants during sterilization was suppressed by anodization, leading to lower water contact angles. The attachment of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells was also improved by anodization, as evidenced by visibly enlarged pseudopods. This improved attachment performance is likely due to TiO2 formation. Overall, electrolyte selection showed no effect on either surface chemistry or cellular response of Ti materials

  20. The involvement of XPC protein in the cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response

    Gan WANG; Alan DOMBKOWSKI; Lynn CHUANG; Xiao Xin S XU

    2004-01-01

    Recognition of DNA damage is a critical step for DNA damage-mediated cellular response. XPC is an important DNA damage recognition protein involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). We have studied the XPC protein in cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response. Comparison of the microarray data from both normal and XPCdefective human fibroblasts identified 861 XPC-responsive genes in the cisplatin treatment (with minimum fold change≥1.5).The cell cycle and cell proliferation-related genes are the most affected genes by the XPC defect in the treatment. Many other cellular function genes, especially the DNA repair and signal transduction-related genes, were also affected by the XPC defect in the treatment. To validate the microarray data, the transcription levels of some microarray-identified genes were also determined by an RT-PCR based real time PCR assay. The real time PCR results are consistent with the microarray data for most of the tested genes, indicating the reliability of the microarray data. To further validate the microarray data, the cisplatin treatment-mediated caspase-3 activation was also determined. The Western blot hybridization results indicate that the XPC defect greatly attenuates the cisplatin treatment-mediated Caspase-3 activation. We elucidated the role of p53 protein in the XPC protein DNA damage recognition-mediated signaling process. The XPC defect reduces the cisplatin treatment-mediated p53 response. These results suggest that the XPC protein plays an important role in the cisplatin treatment-mediated cellular response. It may also suggest a possible mechanism of cancer cell drug resistance.

  1. Radiation response of rodent neural precursor cells

    Full text: Therapeutic irradiation of the brain can cause cognitive dysfunction that is not treatable or well understood. Several lines of evidence from our laboratory suggest that radiation induced inhibition of neurogenesis in the hippocampus may be involved. To understand the mechanisms underlying these observations, we initiated studies using neural precursor cells isolated from the adult rat hippocampus. Cells were cultured exponentially and analyzed for acute (0-24h) and chronic (3-33 day) changes in apoptosis and oxidative stress following exposure to X-rays. Oxidative stress was measured using a dye sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis was measured using annexin V binding; each endpoint was quantified by fluorescent automated cell sorting (FACS). Following exposure to X-rays, neural precursor cells exhibit a dose-responsive increase in the level of ROS and apoptosis over acute and chronic time frames. ROS and apoptosis were maximal at 12h, increasing 35 and 37% respectively over that of unirradiated controls. ROS and apoptosis peaked again at 24h, increasing 31 and 21% respectively over controls. Chronic levels of ROS and apoptosis were persistently elevated in a dose-dependent manner. ROS showed significant increases (34-180%) over a 3-4 week interval, while increases in apoptosis were less dramatic, rising 45% by week one before dropping to background. Irradiation of rat neural precursor cells was associated with an increase in p53 protein levels, and the activation of G1/S and G2/M checkpoints. These data suggest that the apoptotic and ROS responses may be tied to p53 dependent regulation of cell cycle control and stress activated pathways. We propose that oxidative stress plays a critical role in the radiation response of neural precursor cells, and discuss how this might contribute to the inhibition of neurogenesis and the cognitive impairment observed in the irradiated CNS

  2. Understanding the role of p53 in adaptive response to radiation-induced germline mutations

    Full text: Radiation-induced adaptive response is now a widely studied area of radiation biology. Studies have demonstrated reduced levels of radiation-induced biological damage when an 'adaptive dose' is given before a higher 'challenge dose' compared to when the challenge dose is given alone. It has been shown in some systems to be a result of inducible cellular repair systems. The adaptive response has been clearly demonstrated in many model systems, however its impact on heritable effects in the mammalian germline has never been studied. Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) loci have been used as markers demonstrating that induced heritable mutations in mice follow a dose-response relationship. Recent data in our laboratory show preliminary evidence of radiation-induced adaptive response suppressing germline mutations at ESTR loci in wild type mice. The frequency of heritable mutations was significantly reduced when a priming dose of 0.1 Gy was given 24 hours prior to a 1 Gy acute challenging dose. We are now conducting a follow-up study to attempt to understand the mechanism of this adaptive response. P53 is known to play a significant role in governing apoptosis, DNA repair and cancer induction. In order to determine what function p53 has in the adaptive response for heritable mutations, we have mated radiation treated Trp53+/- male mice (C57Bl) to untreated, normal females (C57Bl). Using DNA fingerprinting, we are investigating the rate of inherited radiation-induced mutations on pre- and post-meiotic radiation-treated gametocytes by examining mutation frequencies in offspring DNA. If p53 is integral in the mechanism of adaptive response, we should not see an adaptive response in radiation-induced heritable mutations in these mice. This research is significant in that it will provide insight to understanding the mechanism behind radiation-induced adaptive response in the mammalian germline

  3. Effect of the nano-bio interface on the genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and associated cellular responses

    Prasad, Raju Yashaswi

    Several toxicological studies have shown that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2), one of the most widely produced engineered nanoparticles, can induce genotoxicity; however, potential adverse health effects associated with their physicochemical properties are not fully understood. Proteins in a biological medium can adsorb to the surface of the nanoparticle resulting in the formation of a protein corona that can alter the physicochemical properties of the particle. Furthermore, the protein corona may impact the interaction between nanoparticles and cells, referred to as the nano-bio interface, effecting the uptake, distribution, and toxicity of the particles. Despite the potential influence of the composition of the biological medium on the physicochemical properties and genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, the majority of studies have not examined systematically the influence of medium composition on protein corona, genotoxicity, and cellular responses. In this dissertation we tested the overall hypothesis that titanium dioxide nanoparticles in medium that produces the smallest agglomerates would be taken up into cells and induce genotoxicity, and that exposure would initiate the signaling of key mediators of a DNA damage and inflammation response. Three major findings were shown in this study: 1) Protein corona formation on the surface of nano-TiO2 can impact the nano-bio interface and change cellular interaction. 2) Smaller agglomerates of nano-TiO2 are taken up more by cells without inducing cell cycle arrest, thereby allowing induced DNA damage to be processed into micronuclei in BEAS-2B cells. 3) Nano-TiO 2 in medium that facilitates increased cellular interaction induces the upregulation of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response (similar to ionizing radiation) and NF-kappaB inflammation pathways. Taken together, our research provides a systematic examination of the physicochemical properties, genotoxicity, and cellular responses induced by

  4. Cellular Studies with UVA Radiation: A Role for Iron (invited paper)

    The UVA (320-380 nm) component of sunlight or sunbeds acts as an oxidising carcinogen and has been clearly implicated in skin cancer. Since UVA radiation interacts with cells by generating active oxygen species, the damaging effects of this radiation will be exacerbated by the presence of catalytically reactive iron in cells. It has now been shown by two independent techniques (dequenching of metal-quenched calcein fluorescence in cells and changes in the binding activity of the iron responsive protein IRPI) that UVA radiation causes an immediate release of 'free' iron in human skin fibroblasts via the proteolysis of ferritin (Ft). Within minutes of exposure to a range of doses of UVA at natural exposure levels, the binding activity of IRP-1, as well as Ft levels, decrease in a dose-dependent manner. It is proposed that the oxidative damage to lysosomes that leads to Ft degradation and the consequent release of potentially harmful 'free' iron to the cytosol might be a major factor in UVA-induced damage to the skin. UVA radiation also breaks down heme-containing proteins in the microsomal membrane to release free heme as an additional photosensitising component. This will provide another source of enhanced free iron in skin cells since constitutive heme oxygenase 2 (in keratinocytes) and UVA-inducible heme oxygenase-1 (in fibroblasts) are likely to break down any free heme to biliverdin and release iron and carbon monoxide in the process. It is postulated that, in skin fibroblasts, this free heme release and the enhanced free iron pools will lead to an adaptive response involving heme oxygenase (with a maximum about 10 h) and ferritin (in 24-48 h) that will scavenge the heme and iron released by subsequent oxidising (UVA) treatments. (author)

  5. Network analysis of oyster transcriptome revealed a cascade of cellular responses during recovery after heat shock.

    Lingling Zhang

    Full Text Available Oysters, as a major group of marine bivalves, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors including heat stress. Recent studies have shown that oysters pretreated with heat shock can result in induced heat tolerance. A systematic study of cellular recovery from heat shock may provide insights into the mechanism of acquired thermal tolerance. In this study, we performed the first network analysis of oyster transcriptome by reanalyzing microarray data from a previous study. Network analysis revealed a cascade of cellular responses during oyster recovery after heat shock and identified responsive gene modules and key genes. Our study demonstrates the power of network analysis in a non-model organism with poor gene annotations, which can lead to new discoveries that go beyond the focus on individual genes.

  6. Skeletal muscle plasticity: cellular and molecular responses to altered physical activity paradigms

    Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Haddad, Fadia

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine our current understanding of the chain of events known to be involved in the adaptive process whereby specific genes and their protein products undergo altered expression; specifically, skeletal muscle adaptation in response to altered loading states will be discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of the contractile protein, myosin heavy chain gene expression. This protein, which is both an important structural and regulatory protein comprising the contractile apparatus, can be expressed as different isoforms, thereby having an impact on the functional diversity of the muscle. Because the regulation of the myosin gene family is under the control of a complex set of processes including, but not limited to, activity, hormonal, and metabolic factors, this protein will serve as a cellular "marker" for studies of muscle plasticity in response to various mechanical perturbations in which the quantity and type of myosin isoform, along with other important cellular proteins, are altered in expression.

  7. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments ▿

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested o...

  8. Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Yersinia pestis Infection in Long-Term Recovered Plague Patients

    Li, Bei; Du, Chunhong; Zhou, Lei; Bi, Yujing; Wang, Xiaoyi; Wen, Li; Guo, Zhaobiao; Song, Zhizhong; Yang, Ruifu

    2012-01-01

    Plague is one of the most dangerous diseases and is caused by Yersinia pestis. Effective vaccine development requires understanding of immune protective mechanisms against the bacterium in humans. In this study, the humoral and memory cellular immune responses in plague patients (n = 65) recovered from Y. pestis infection during the past 16 years were investigated using a protein microarray and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot). The seroprevalence to the F1 antigen in all re...

  9. Independence of Measles-Specific Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to Vaccination

    Jacobson, Robert M.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Poland, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    With a larger, independent cohort and more sophisticated measures, we sought to confirm our work that indicated independence of humoral and cellular immunity following measles vaccination. We recruited an age-stratified random cohort of 764 healthy subjects from all socio-economic strata, all with medical-record documentation of two age-appropriate doses of measles-containing vaccine. We quantified measles-specific neutralizing antibody levels and assayed the IFN-γ ELISPOT response to measles...

  10. Medical Response in Radiation Emergency in Argentina

    According to the Nuclear Federal Law No. 24804, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regard to radiological and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. ARN has a system for intervention in radiological -and nuclear emergencies with a primary intervention group, which is on duty in weekly shifts all year round. This paper aims at describing the system as implemented at present. The Emergency Medical System has been developed into three levels: Level I: local emergency services. This level includes triage (conventional and radiological), first-aid care, and first management of contaminated victims Level II: emergency departments of local general hospitals that are in charge of performing a second triage by a biomedical approach, the treatment of conventional and/or radiocombined injuries and completing decontamination as necessary. In this way the initial triage is completed by a physical examination, timing and severity of prodromal signs and symptoms, sequential blood counts and serum enzymatic levels that allow a first-stage dosimetric approach at this level. Victims requiring higher complexity assistance shall be transferred to third-level hospitals. Level III: three central reference hospitals (Hospital Naval 'Pedro Mallo', Hospital de Quemados from Gobierno Autonomo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires and Hospital Britanico de Ciudad de Buenos Aires) capable of providing healthcare for diagnosis and treatment of acute radiation syndrome, cutaneous radiation syndrome and internal contamination constitute this level. An educational program for medical and paramedical responders is regularly carried out at the three levels, including theoretical background as well as practical training. Guidelines and protocols for medical handling of victims have been drawn up. Research and development of new strategies for first medical response, diagnosis and treatment of radiation

  11. Medical response in radiation emergency in Argentina

    According to the Nuclear Federal Law Nr. 24804, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) is empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regard to radiological and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. ARN has a system for intervention in radiological -and nuclear emergencies with a primary intervention group, which is on duty in weekly shifts all year round. This paper aims at describing the system as implemented at present. The Emergency Medical System has been developed into three levels: Level I: local emergency services. This level includes triage (conventional and radiological), first-aid care, and first management of contaminated victims. Level II: Emergency departments of local general hospitals that are in charge of performing a second triage by a biomedical approach, the treatment of conventional and/or radio-combined injuries and completing decontamination as necessary. In this way the initial triage is completed by a physical examination, timing and severity of prodromal signs and symptoms, sequential blood counts and serum enzymatic levels that allow a first-stage dosimetric approach at this level. Victims requiring higher complexity assistance shall be transferred to third-level hospitals. Level III: three central reference hospitals (Hospital Naval 'Pedro Mallo', Hospital de Quemados from Gobierno Autonomo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires and Hospital Britanico de Ciudad de Buenos Aires) capable of providing health care for diagnosis and treatment of acute radiation syndrome, cutaneous radiation syndrome and internal contamination constitute this level. An educational program for medical and paramedical responders is regularly carried out at the three levels, including theoretical background as well as practical training. Guidelines and protocols for medical handling of victims have been drawn up. Research and development of new strategies for first medical response, diagnosis and treatment of radiation

  12. In vivo and in vitro cellular response to PEG-based hydrogels for wound repair

    Waldeck, Heather

    Biomaterials are continuously being explored as a means to support, improve, or influence wound healing processes. Understanding the determining factors controlling the host response to biomaterials is crucial in developing strategies to employ materials for biomedical uses. In order to evaluate the host response to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels, both in vivo and in vitro studies were performed to determine its efficacy as a dermal wound treatment and to investigate the mechanisms controlling cell-material interaction, respectively. The results of an in vivo study using a full thickness wound in a rat model demonstrated that both soluble and immobilized bioactive factors could be incorporated into a PEG-based semi-interpenetrating network (sIPN) to enhance the rate and the quality of dermal wound healing. To gain a better understanding of the results observed in vivo, in vitro studies were then conducted to examine the dynamics and mechanisms of the cell-material interaction. Degradation of the sIPN was explored as an influential factor in both mediating cellular response and controlling solute transport from the material. As degradation through gelatin dissolution could be influenced by simple alterations to the material formulation, these results provide facile guidelines to control the delivery of high molecular weight compounds. Further investigation of the cellular response to PEG-based biomaterials focused on key factors influencing cell-material interaction. Specifically, the role of the beta1 integrin subunit and several serum proteins (TGF-aalpha, IL-1beta and PDGF-BB) in mediating cellular response was explored. As cell-material interactions are based on commonly occurring interfaces between cells and molecules of the native extracellular environment, these studies provided insight into the mechanisms controlling the observed cellular response. Finally, the inflammatory response of primary monocytes to biomaterials was examined. Monocytes

  13. Response of hematopoietic stem cells to ionizing radiation

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood and immune system throughout life and restore them after hematological injuries. Exposure of an organism to ionizing radiation (IR) causes rapid and acute myelosuppression and challenges the replenishment capacity of HSCs. Yet, the precise damages that are generated remain largely unexplored. To better understand these effects, phenotypic and functional changes in the stem/progenitor compartments of sublethally irradiated mice were monitored over a ten week period after radiation exposure. We report that shortly after sublethal IR-exposure, HSCs, defined by their repopulating ability, still segregate in the Hoechst dye excluding side population (SP); yet, their Sca-1 (S) and c-Kit (K) expression levels are increased and severely reduced, respectively, with a concurrent increase in the proportion of SPSK cells positive for established indicators of HSC presence: CD150+ and CD105+. A great proportion of HSCs quickly but transiently enter the cell cycle to replenish the bone marrow of myelo-ablated mice. Ten weeks after, whereas bone marrow cellularity has recovered and hematopoietic homeostasis is restored, major phenotypic modifications can be observed within the Lin-/low Sca-1+ c-Kit+ (LSK) stem/progenitor compartment: CD150+/Flk2- and CD150-/Flk2+ LSK cell frequencies are increased and dramatically reduced, respectively. CD150+ LSK cells also show impaired reconstitution capacity, accrued number of γ-H2AX foci and increased tendency to apoptosis. This demonstrates that the LSK compartment is not properly restored 10 weeks after sublethal exposure, and that long-term IR-induced injury to the bone marrow proceeds, at least partially, through direct damage to the stem cell pool. Thrombopoietin (TPO) has been shown to promote the survival of lethally irradiated mice when administrated quickly after exposure. We investigated the mechanisms underlying this effect, and found in a competitive transplant experiment that a

  14. The relationship between cellular adhesion and surface roughness in polystyrene modified by microwave plasma radiation

    Biazar E

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Esmaeil Biazar1, Majid Heidari2, Azadeh Asefnezhad2, Naser Montazeri11Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Tonekabon Branch, Mazandaran; 2Department of Biomaterial Engineering, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, IranBackground: Surface modification of medical polymers can improve biocompatibility. Pure polystyrene is hydrophobic and cannot provide a suitable environment for cell cultures. The conventional method for surface modification of polystyrene is treatment with plasma. In this study, conventional polystyrene was exposed to microwave plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases for 30, 60, and 180 seconds.Methods and results: Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra investigations of irradiated samples indicated clearly the presence of functional groups. Atomic force microscopic images of samples irradiated with inert and active gases indicated nanometric surface topography. Samples irradiated with oxygen plasma showed more roughness (31 nm compared with those irradiated with inert plasma (16 nm at 180 seconds. Surface roughness increased with increasing duration of exposure, which could be due to reduction of the contact angle of samples irradiated with oxygen plasma. Contact angle analysis showed reduction in samples irradiated with inert plasma. Samples irradiated with oxygen plasma showed a lower contact angle compared with those irradiated by argon plasma.Conclusion: Cellular investigations with unrestricted somatic stem cells showed better adhesion, cell growth, and proliferation for samples radiated by oxygen plasma with increasing duration of exposure than those of normal samples.Keywords: surface topography, polystyrene, plasma treatment, argon, oxygen

  15. Radiometric and Radiation Response of Visible FPAs

    Hubbs, John

    2007-01-01

    The readout integrated circuit (ROIC) used in these devices was originally developed for use in space based infrared systems operating at deep cryogenic temperatures and was selected because of its proven tolerance to total ionizing radiation? The detectors are a 128 x 128 array of 60 pm x 60 pm pixel elements that have been anti-reflection (AR) coated to improve the response at very short wavelengths. These visible focal plane arrays were operated at -40 C (233 K). Two focal planes were characterized using cobalt-60 radiation to produce ionizing total dose damage in the VFPAs. Both operational and performance data were obtained as functions of total dose. The first device tested showed no appreciable change in responsivity or noise up to 300 krad(Si). However, at the next dose level of 600 krad(Si), the readout was non-operational due to failure in the digital circuitry. The second device was characterized to a total dose of 750 krad(Si) with no observed change in responsivity. An increase dark current was observed in both devices, and in the second device, the dark current caused an increase in noise at low irradiance at 400 krad(Si) and above. The increase in dark current was somewhat un-expected for visible PIN detectors. The median dark current increased more than two orders of magnitude at 300 krad(Si) for the first device and a factor of 350 at 750 krad(Si) for pixels near the edge for the second device. The dark current was found to be a strong function of detector bias, with pixels near the edge of the array showing a greater increase in dark current with bias than those near the center. Since the optical response was not a function of bias, it is hypothesized that the dark current is a surface effect and that the variation in dark current with location is due to a variation in pixel bias, caused by a voltage drop across the pixel common lead. As the total dose increased, the dark current and the voltage drop increased

  16. Medical response and management of radiation accidents

    An overview is provided of educational programs and principles essential to the appropriate medical management of radiation accident victims. Such an education program will provide details of the physical properties of radiation, of the sources of radiation exposure, of radiation protection standards and of biological radiation effects. The medical management of individuals involved in radiation accidents is discussed. Such management includes emergency medical stabilization, locating and quantitating the level and degree of internal and/or external contamination, wound decontamination, medical surveillance and the evaluation and treatment of local radiation injuries

  17. Regulation of protein translation initiation in response to ionizing radiation

    Trivigno Donatella

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proliferating tumor cells require continuous protein synthesis. De novo synthesis of most proteins is regulated through cap-dependent translation. Cellular stress such as ionizing radiation (IR blocks cap-dependent translation resulting in shut-down of global protein translation which saves resources and energy needed for the stress response. At the same time, levels of proteins required for stress response are maintained or even increased. The study aimed to analyze the regulation of signaling pathways controlling protein translation in response to IR and the impact on Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic and radioprotective protein, which levels rapidly decline upon IR. Methods Protein levels and processing were analyzed by Western blot. The assembly of the translational pre-initiation complex was examined by Immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments with 7-methyl GTP agarose. To analyze IR-induced cell death, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation were determined by flow cytometry. Protein levels of the different initiation factors were down-regulated using RNA interference approach. Results IR induced caspase-dependent cleavage of the translational initiation factors eIF4G1, eIF3A, and eIF4B resulting in disassembly of the cap-dependent initiation complex. In addition, DAP5-dependent initiation complex that regulates IRES-dependent translation was disassembled in response to IR. Moreover, IR resulted in dephosphorylation of 4EBP1, an inhibitor of cap-dependent translation upstream of caspase activation. However, knock-down of eIF4G1, eIF4B, DAP5, or 4EBP1 did not affect IR-induced decline of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Conclusion Our data shows that cap-dependent translation is regulated at several levels in response to IR. However, the experiments indicate that IR-induced Mcl-1 decline is not a consequence of translational inhibition in Jurkat cells.

  18. Regulation of protein translation initiation in response to ionizing radiation

    Proliferating tumor cells require continuous protein synthesis. De novo synthesis of most proteins is regulated through cap-dependent translation. Cellular stress such as ionizing radiation (IR) blocks cap-dependent translation resulting in shut-down of global protein translation which saves resources and energy needed for the stress response. At the same time, levels of proteins required for stress response are maintained or even increased. The study aimed to analyze the regulation of signaling pathways controlling protein translation in response to IR and the impact on Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic and radioprotective protein, which levels rapidly decline upon IR. Protein levels and processing were analyzed by Western blot. The assembly of the translational pre-initiation complex was examined by Immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments with 7-methyl GTP agarose. To analyze IR-induced cell death, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation were determined by flow cytometry. Protein levels of the different initiation factors were down-regulated using RNA interference approach. IR induced caspase-dependent cleavage of the translational initiation factors eIF4G1, eIF3A, and eIF4B resulting in disassembly of the cap-dependent initiation complex. In addition, DAP5-dependent initiation complex that regulates IRES-dependent translation was disassembled in response to IR. Moreover, IR resulted in dephosphorylation of 4EBP1, an inhibitor of cap-dependent translation upstream of caspase activation. However, knock-down of eIF4G1, eIF4B, DAP5, or 4EBP1 did not affect IR-induced decline of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Our data shows that cap-dependent translation is regulated at several levels in response to IR. However, the experiments indicate that IR-induced Mcl-1 decline is not a consequence of translational inhibition in Jurkat cells

  19. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Karouia, Fathi; Stodieck, Louis; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 mg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by focus pattern and focus number counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (γg-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average focus counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profiles of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in γg-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not

  20. Conjunct action of gamma radiation and casiopeinas in two cellular types

    In Mexico the cancer occupies the second place in the causes of death and although already there are diverse useful treatments to attack this suffering, the search of new pharmaceuticals that present positive effect in the treatment of the cancer there is taken to the development of a group of substances called Casiopeinas. Its are coordination compounds constituted by a central atom of copper (Cu II) joined to organic ligands, with general condensed formula [Cu (NN)(ON)]NO3, or [Cu(NN)(OO)]NO3. Its present different cytotoxicity levels, as well as in vitro antineoplastic activity in diverse tissues derived of tumors. Even its ignore the mechanisms of it action, but one of them, it could be by generation of reactive species of oxygen (ERO), mediated by the metallic center that contain. Thinking of this possibility was carried out in vitro experiments, exposing lymphocytes or HeLa cells, to ionizing radiation, at two casiopeinas (Casiopeina llgly and the Casiopeina Ill-e-a) or the combination of both agents, in order to determine if the antineoplastic capacity of both types of treatments increase in conjunct action. To determine it its were carried out cytotoxicity tests by means of the differential dyeing of fluorescein diacetate and etidio bromide, in these the cells alive fluorescein in green color while the dead ones only the nucleus of red tinged. The genotoxicity was evaluated by means of the comet essay. The results hurtled that as much the casiopeinas as the radiation by separate don't present difference among both cellular types, probably due to the used method that only quantifies the damages at the moment and not to long term. And according to those treatments on the whole only to the concentrations and the doses more high it favors the additive effect due to an overproduction of free radicals that not can be neutralized. According to the genotoxicity, only proven for the radiation indicates that the HeLa cells presents a major number of cells with

  1. The CK1 family: contribution to cellular stress response and its role in carcinogenesis

    UweKnippschild

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Members of the highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed pleiotropic CK1 family play major regulatory roles in many cellular processes including DNA-processing and repair, proliferation, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicular trafficking, apoptosis, and cell differentiation. As a consequence of cellular stress conditions, interaction of CK1 with the mitotic spindle is manifold increased pointing to regulatory functions at the mitotic checkpoint. Furthermore, CK1 is able to alter the activity of key regulatory proteins and signal integration molecules and is tightly connected to the regulation of β-catenin, p53- and MDM2-specific functions and degradation. Considering the importance of CK1 for accurate cell division and regulation of tumor suppressor functions it is not surprising that mutations and alterations in the expression and/or activity of CK1 isoforms are often detected in various tumor entities including cancer of the kidney, choriocarcinomas, breast carcinomas, oral cancer, adenocarcinomas of the pancreas, and ovarian cancer. Therefore, effort has enormously increased (i to understand the regulation of CK1 and its involvement in tumorigenesis- and tumor progression-related signal transduction pathways and (ii to develop CK1-specific inhibitors for the use in personalized therapy concepts. In this review we summarize the current knowledge regarding the regulation, functions, and interactions of CK1 family members with cellular proteins playing central roles in cellular stress-responses and carcinogenesis.

  2. Modification of the cellular heat sensitivity of cucumber by growth under supplemental ultraviolet-B radiation

    The effect of ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation on the thermal sensitivity of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) was studied using UV-B-sensitive cv Poinsett 76 and UV-B-resistant cv Ashley grown under control and elevated (300 mW m-2) UV-B radiation levels. Using both cotyledon and leaf discs, the ability of the tissue to reduce triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) was determined after treatment at 50 degrees C for various times. Semilogarithmic plots of TTC reduction as a function of time at 50 degrees were curvilinear. They were monophasic for the control cucumber and biphasic for cucumber grown in the presence of elevated UV-B. Treatment of cucumber plants at 37 degrees C for 24 h or of tissue discs at acute UV-B levels for 1 h further modified their response to elevated temperature. These results suggest that growth of cucumber under enhanced UV-B radiation levels increased its ability to withstand elevated temperatures. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Immune Responses to AAV in Canine Muscle Monitored by Cellular Assays and Noninvasive Imaging

    Wang, Zejing; Storb, Rainer; Lee, Donghoon; Kushmerick, Martin J.; Chu, Baocheng; Berger, Carolina; Arnett, Andrea; Allen, James; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.; Riddell, Stanley R.; Tapscott, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that direct intramuscular injection of rAAV2 or rAAV6 in wild-type dogs resulted in robust T-cell responses to viral capsid proteins, and others have shown that cellular immunity to adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid proteins coincided with liver toxicity and elimination of transgene expression in a human trial of hemophilia B. Here, we show that the heparin-binding ability of a given AAV serotype does not determine the induction of T-cell responses following intra...

  4. Cellular responses of embryonic hyaline cartilage to experimental wounding in vitro.

    Walker, E A; Verner, A; Flannery, C R; Archer, C W

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that the reparative potential of many tissues is greatest during embryonic development. Despite the extensive literature documenting repair in nonembryonic cartilage models, there is no comparable wealth of experience relating to embryonic cartilage repair. With the embryonic chick sternum as a model of hyaline cartilage, this paper accounts cellular responses and alterations in extracellular matrix composition in response to experimental wounding in vitro. Creation of an experimental lesion induced a rapid (apoptosis and the expression of alpha5 and alpha6 integrin subunits. PMID:10716275

  5. The jejunal cellular responses in chickens infected with a single dose of Ascaridia galli eggs.

    Luna-Olivares, Luz Adilia; Kyvsgaard, Niels Chr; Ferdushy, Tania; Nejsum, Peter; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Roepstorff, Allan; Iburg, Tine Moesgaard

    2015-07-01

    This histopathological study was carried out in order to investigate the cellular response in the jejunum to Ascaridia galli during the first 7 weeks of infection. Fourty-two ISA Brown chickens (7 weeks old) were infected orally with 500 embryonated A. galli eggs each while 28 chickens were left as uninfected controls. Six infected and four control chickens were necropsied at each time point 3, 7, 10, 14, 21, 28 and 42 days post-infection (dpi). Samples for histopathology were taken from three sites of the jejunoileum. Significantly higher eosinophil counts were seen in infected chickens compared to uninfected at 3, 7, 10, 14 and 28 dpi (P galli infection induced changes in the mucosal thickness as reduced villi length at 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 dpi and in the degree of general cellular infiltration in the lamina propria of the mucosal layer. No adult worms were seen during the experiment; therefore, A. galli larvae have elicited a moderate cellular response in the lamina propria, mainly consisting of eosinophils in the early phase and later of mast cells. PMID:25877388

  6. Characterization of the cellular response triggered by gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation

    Kalies, Stefan; Keil, Sebastian; Sender, Sina; Hammer, Susanne C.; Antonopoulos, Georgios C.; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Meyer, Heiko; Heinemann, Dag

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based transfection techniques have proven high applicability in several cell biologic applications. The delivery of different molecules using these techniques has been extensively investigated. In particular, new high-throughput approaches such as gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection allow efficient delivery of antisense molecules or proteins into cells preserving high cell viabilities. However, the cellular response to the perforation procedure is not well understood. We herein analyzed the perforation kinetics of single cells during resonant gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation with an 850-ps laser system at a wavelength of 532 nm. Inflow velocity of propidium iodide into manipulated cells reached a maximum within a few seconds. Experiments based on the inflow of FM4-64 indicated that the membrane remains permeable for a few minutes for small molecules. To further characterize the cellular response postmanipulation, we analyzed levels of oxidative heat or general stress. Although we observed an increased formation of reactive oxygen species by an increase of dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, heat shock protein 70 was not upregulated in laser-treated cells. Additionally, no evidence of stress granule formation was visible by immunofluorescence staining. The data provided in this study help to identify the cellular reactions to gold nanoparticle-mediated laser manipulation.

  7. Response of health professionals in a radiation emergency

    The management of radiation injuries in community hospitals can be achieved by planning, and periodic practice with this plan will ensure appropriate response if an emergency arises. A radiation plan identifies key personnel, equipment, and a designated facility. An understanding of the different types of radiation exposure that are possible should lessen the anxiety of emergency room staff and ensure efficient response. Decontamination of the patient is carried out after assessing the ABCs and sources of radiation. Re-evaluation following decontamination will identify residual foci of radiation. Radiation resulting from inhalation or ingestion requires consultation with radiation experts and, possibly, transfer to a radiation emergency center. The Advanced Burn Life Support Course will provide a resource for the training and education of hospital staffs in the United States and Canada. The course will include a section on radiation emergencies

  8. Selected materials of the international workshop on radiation risk and its origin at molecular and cellular level

    The workshop ''International Workshop on Radiation Risk and its Origin at Molecular and Cellular Level'' was held at The Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, on the 6th and 7th of February 2003. The Laboratory of Radiation Risk Analysis of JAERI organized it. This international workshop attracted scientists from several different scientific areas, including radiation physics, radiation biology, molecular biology, crystallography of biomolecules, modeling and bio-informatics. Several foreign and domestic keynote speakers addresses the very fundamental areas of radiation risk and tried to establish a link between the fundamental studies at the molecular and cellular level and radiation damages at the organism. The symposium consisted of 13 oral lectures, 10 poster presentations and panel discussion. The 108 participants attended the workshop. This publication comprises of proceedings of oral and poster presentations where available. For the rest of contributions the abstracts or/and selections of presentation materials are shown instead. The 5 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. On the effects of geometry, defects, and material asymmetry on the mechanical response of shape memory alloy cellular lattice structures

    Karamooz Ravari, M. R.; Nasr Esfahani, S.; Taheri Andani, M.; Kadkhodaei, M.; Ghaei, A.; Karaca, H.; Elahinia, M.

    2016-02-01

    Shape memory alloy (such as NiTi) cellular lattice structures are a new class of advanced materials with many potential applications. The cost of fabrication of these structures however is high. It is therefore necessary to develop modeling methods to predict the functional behavior of these alloys before fabrication. The main aim of the present study is to assess the effects of geometry, microstructural imperfections and material asymmetric response of dense shape memory alloys on the mechanical response of cellular structures. To this end, several cellular and dense NiTi samples are fabricated using a selective laser melting process. Both cellular and dense specimens were tested in compression in order to obtain their stress-strain response. For modeling purposes, a three -dimensional (3D) constitutive model based on microplane theory which is able to describe the material asymmetry was employed. Five finite element models based on unit cell and multi-cell methods were generated to predict the mechanical response of cellular lattices. The results show the considerable effects of the microstructural imperfections on the mechanical response of the cellular lattice structures. The asymmetric material response of the bulk material also affects the mechanical response of the corresponding cellular structure.

  10. Mechanisms and biological importance of photon-induced bystander responses. Do they have an impact on low-dose radiation responses

    Elucidating the biological effect of low linear energy transfer (LET), low-dose and/or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation is essential in ensuring radiation safety. Over the past two decades, non-targeted effects, which are not only a direct consequence of radiation-induced initial lesions produced in cellular DNA but also of intra- and inter-cellular communications involving both targeted and non-targeted cells, have been reported and are currently defining a new paradigm in radiation biology. These effects include radiation-induced adaptive response, low-dose hypersensitivity, genomic instability, and radiation-induced bystander response (RIBR). RIBR is generally defined as a cellular response that is induced in non-irradiated cells that receive bystander signals from directly irradiated cells. RIBR could thus play an important biological role in low-dose irradiation conditions. However, this suggestion was mainly based on findings obtained using high-LET charged-particle radiations. The human population (especially the Japanese, who are exposed to lower doses of radon than the world average) is more frequently exposed to low-LET photons (X-rays or γ-rays) than to high-LET charged-particle radiation on a daily basis. There are currently a growing number of reports describing a distinguishing feature between photon-induced bystander response and high-LET RIBR. In particular, photon-induced by-stander response is strongly influenced by irradiation dose, the irradiated region of the targeted cells, and p53 status. The present review focuses on the photon-induced bystander response, and discusses its impact on the low-dose radiation effect. (author)

  11. Ras-Related Small GTPases RalA and RalB Regulate Cellular Survival After Ionizing Radiation

    Purpose: Oncogenic activation of Ras renders cancer cells resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), but the mechanisms have not been fully characterized. The Ras-like small GTPases RalA and RalB are downstream effectors of Ras function and are critical for both tumor growth and survival. The Ral effector RalBP1/RLIP76 mediates survival of mice after whole-body irradiation, but the role of the Ral GTPases themselves in response to IR is unknown. We have investigated the role of RalA and RalB in cellular responses to IR. Methods and Materials: RalA, RalB, and their major effectors RalBP1 and Sec5 were knocked down by stable expression of short hairpin RNAs in the K-Ras-dependent pancreatic cancer-derived cell line MIA PaCa-2. Radiation responses were measured by standard clonogenic survival assays for reproductive survival, γH2AX expression for double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) cleavage for apoptosis. Results: Knockdown of K-Ras, RalA, or RalB reduced colony-forming ability post-IR, and knockdown of either Ral isoform decreased the rate of DSB repair post-IR. However, knockdown of RalB, but not RalA, increased cell death. Surprisingly, neither RalBP1 nor Sec5 suppression affected colony formation post-IR. Conclusions: Both RalA and RalB contribute to K-Ras-dependent IR resistance of MIA PaCa-2 cells. Sensitization due to suppressed Ral expression is likely due in part to decreased efficiency of DNA repair (RalA and RalB) and increased susceptibility to apoptosis (RalB). Ral-mediated radioresistance does not depend on either the RalBP1 or the exocyst complex, the two best-characterized Ral effectors, and instead may utilize an atypical or novel effector.

  12. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to 56Fe irradiation

    Ramadan, Samy S.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A.; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a "priming" dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a "challenge" dose of 56Fe in a mouse model. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of 56Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of 56Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Results: Exposure to 56Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before 56Fe prevented all of the responses to 56Fe. Conclusions: This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions.

  13. Radiation-induced p53 protein response in the A549 cell line is culture growth-phase dependent

    Johnson, N.F.; Gurule, D.M.; Carpenter, T.R.

    1995-12-01

    One role of the p53 tumor suppressor protein has been recently revealed. Kastan, M.B. reported that p53 protein accumulates in cells exposed to ionizing radiation. The accumulation of p53 protein is in response to DNA damage, most importantly double-strand breaks, that results from exposure to ionizing radiation. The rise in cellular p53 levels is necessary for an arrest in the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle to provide additional time for DNA repair. The p53 response has also been demonstrated to enhance PCNA-dependent repair. p53 is thus an important regulator of the cellular response to DNA-damaging radiation. From this data, it can be concluded that the magnitude of the p53 response is not dependent on the phase of culture growth.

  14. Radiation-induced p53 protein response in the A549 cell line is culture growth-phase dependent

    One role of the p53 tumor suppressor protein has been recently revealed. Kastan, M.B. reported that p53 protein accumulates in cells exposed to ionizing radiation. The accumulation of p53 protein is in response to DNA damage, most importantly double-strand breaks, that results from exposure to ionizing radiation. The rise in cellular p53 levels is necessary for an arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle to provide additional time for DNA repair. The p53 response has also been demonstrated to enhance PCNA-dependent repair. p53 is thus an important regulator of the cellular response to DNA-damaging radiation. From this data, it can be concluded that the magnitude of the p53 response is not dependent on the phase of culture growth

  15. Electrolyte effects on the surface chemistry and cellular response of anodized titanium

    Ohtsu, Naofumi, E-mail: nohtsu@mail.kitami-it.ac.jp [Instrumental Analysis Center, Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan); Kozuka, Taro; Hirano, Mitsuhiro [Instrumental Analysis Center, Kitami Institute of Technology, 165 Koen-cho, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan); Arai, Hirofumi [Department of Biotechnology and Environmental Chemistry, Kitami Institute of Technology, Kitami, Hokkaido 090-8507 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ti samples were anodized using various electrolytes. • Anodization decreased carbon adsorption, improving hydrophilicity. • Improved hydrophilicity led to improved cellular attachment. • Only one electrolyte showed any heteroatom incorporation into the TiO{sub 2} layer. • Choice of electrolyte played no role on the effects of anodization. - Abstract: Anodic oxidation of titanium (Ti) material is used to enhance biocompatibility, yet the effects of various electrolytes on surface characteristics and cellular behavior have not been completely elucidated. To investigate this topic, oxide layers were produced on Ti substrates by anodizing them in aqueous electrolytes of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}O·5B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, or (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}PO{sub 4}, after which their surface characteristics and cellular responses were examined. Overall, no surface differences between the electrolytes were visually observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the anodized surfaces are composed of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), while incorporation from electrolyte was only observed for (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Surface adsorption of carbon contaminants during sterilization was suppressed by anodization, leading to lower water contact angles. The attachment of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells was also improved by anodization, as evidenced by visibly enlarged pseudopods. This improved attachment performance is likely due to TiO{sub 2} formation. Overall, electrolyte selection showed no effect on either surface chemistry or cellular response of Ti materials.

  16. Transition between immune and disease states in a cellular automaton model of clonal immune response

    Bezzi, M; Ruffo, S; Seiden, P E; Bezzi, Michele; Celada, Franco; Ruffo, Stefano; Seiden, Philip E.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we extend the Celada-Seiden (CS) model of the humoral immune response to include infectious virus and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (cellular response). The response of the system to virus involves a competition between the ability of the virus to kill the host cells and the host's ability to eliminate the virus. We find two basins of attraction in the dynamics of this system, one is identified with disease and the other with the immune state. There is also an oscillating state that exists on the border of these two stable states. Fluctuations in the population of virus or antibody can end the oscillation and drive the system into one of the stable states. The introduction of mechanisms of cross-regulation between the two responses can bias the system towards one of them. We also study a mean field model, based on coupled maps, to investigate virus-like infections. This simple model reproduces the attractors for average populations observed in the cellular automaton. All the dynamical behavior connect...

  17. Distinctive behavioral and cellular responses to fluoxetine in the mouse model for Fragile X syndrome

    Marko eUutela

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine is used as a therapeutic agent for autism spectrum disorder (ASD, including Fragile X syndrome (FXS. The treatment often associates with disruptive behaviors such as agitation and disinhibited behaviors in FXS. To identify mechanisms that increase the risk to poor treatment outcome, we investigated the behavioral and cellular effects of fluoxetine on adult Fmr1 knockout (KO mice, a mouse model for FXS. We found that fluoxetine reduced anxiety-like behavior of both wild type and Fmr1 KO mice seen as shortened latency to enter the center area in the open field test. In Fmr1 KO mice, fluoxetine normalized locomotor hyperactivity but abnormally increased exploratory activity. Reduced Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and increased TrkB receptor expression levels in the hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice associated with inappropriate coping responses under stressful condition and abolished antidepressant activity of fluoxetine. Fluoxetine response in the cell proliferation was also missing in the hippocampus of Fmr1 KO mice when compared with wild type controls. The postnatal expression of serotonin transporter was reduced in the thalamic nuclei of Fmr1 KO mice during the time of transient innervation of somatosensory neurons suggesting that developmental changes of serotonin transporter (SERT expression were involved in the differential cellular and behavioral responses to fluoxetine in wild type and Fmr1 mice. The results indicate that changes of BDNF/TrkB signaling contribute to differential behavioral responses to fluoxetine among individuals with ASD.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of plant response to ionising radiation. Exploration of the glucosinolate role in the anti-oxidative response

    Terrestrial organisms are exposed to low doses of ionising radiation from natural or anthropogenic sources. The major effects of the radiations are due to DNA deterioration and water radiolysis which generates an oxidative stress by free radical production. Plants constitute good models to study the effects of ionising radiations and the search of antioxidant molecules because of their important secondary metabolism. Thus this thesis, funded by the Brittany region, characterized the physiological and molecular response of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to low (10 Gy) and moderate (40 Gy) doses of ionising radiation, and was therefore interested in glucosinolates, characteristic compounds of the Brassicaceae family. The global proteomic and transcriptomic studies carried out on this model revealed (1) a common response for both doses dealing with the activation of DNA repair mechanisms, cell cycle regulation and protection of cellular structures; (2) an adjustment of the energetic metabolism and an activation of secondary compounds biosynthesis (i.e. glucosinolates and flavonoids) after the 10 Gy dose; (3) an induction of enzymatic control of ROS, the regulation of cellular components recycling and of programmed cell death after the 40 Gy dose. The potential anti-oxidative role of glucosinolates was then explored. The in vitro anti-oxidative power of some glucosinolates and their derivative products were demonstrated. Their modulating effects against irradiation-induced damages were then tested in vivo by simple experimental approaches. The importance of the glucosinolate level to give a positive or negative effect was demonstrated. (author)

  19. Different Candida parapsilosis clinical isolates and lipase deficient strain trigger an altered cellular immune response

    Renata eToth

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous human diseases can be associated with fungal infections either as potential causative agents or as a result of changed immune status due to a primary disease. Fungal infections caused by Candida species can vary from mild to severe dependent upon the site of infection, length of exposure and past medical history. Patients with impaired immune status are at increased risk for chronic fungal infections. Recent epidemiologic studies have revealed the increasing incidence of candidiasis caused by non-albicans species such as C. parapsilosis. Due to its increasing relevance we chose two distinct C. parapsilosis strains, to describe the cellular innate immune response towards this species. In the first section of our study we compared the interaction of CLIB 214 and GA1 cells with murine and human macrophages. Both strains are commonly used to investigate C. parapsilosis virulence properties. CLIB 214 is a rapidly pseudohyphae-forming strain and GA1 is an isolate that mainly exists in a yeast form. Our results showed, that the phagocyte response was similar in terms of overall uptake, however differences were observed in macrophage migration and engulfment of fungal cells. As C. parapsilosis releases extracellular lipases in order to promote host invasion we further investigated the role of these secreted components during the distinct stages of the phagocytic process. Using a secreted lipase deficient mutant strain and the parental strain GA1 individually and simultaneously, we confirmed that fungal secreted lipases influence the fungi’s virulence by detecting altered innate cellular responses.In this study we report that two isolates of a single species can trigger markedly distinct host responses and that lipase secretion plays a role on the cellular level of host pathogen interactions.

  20. A candidate DNA vaccine elicits HCV specific humoral and cellular immune responses

    Li-Xin Zhu; Jing Liu; Ye Ye; You-Hua Xie; Yu-Ying Kong; Guang-Di Li; Yuan Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the immunogenicity of candidate DNA vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) delivered by two plasmids expressing HCV envelope protein 1 (E1) and envelope protein 2 (E2) antigens respectively and to study the effect of CpG adjuvant on this candidate vaccine.METHODS: Recombinant plasmids expressing HCV E1 and E2 antigens respectively were used to simultaneously inoculate mice with or without CpG adjuvant. Antisera were then collected and titers of anti-HCV antibodies were analyzed by ELISA. One month after the last injection, animals were sacrificed to prepare single-cell suspension of splenocytes.These cells were subjected to HCVantigen specific proliferation assays and cytokine secretion assays to evaluate the cellular immune responses of the vaccinated animals.RESULTS: Antibody responses to HCV E1 and E2 antigens were detected in vaccinated animals. Animals receiving CpG adjuvant had slightly lower titers of anti-HCV antibodies in the sera, while the splenocytes from these animals showed higher HCV-antigen specific proliferation. Analysis of cytokine secretion from the splenocytes was consistent with the above results. While no antigen-specific IL-4 secretion was detected for all vaccinated animals, HCV antigen-specific INF-γ secretion was detected for the splenocytes of vaccinated animals. CpG adjuvant enhanced the secretion of INF-γ but did not change the profile of IL-4 secretion.CONCLUSION: Vaccination of mice with plasmids encoding HCV E1 and E2 antigens induces humoral and cellular immune responses. CpG adjuvant significantly enhances the cellular immune response.

  1. Response of hematopoietic stem cells to ionizing radiation; Reponse des cellules souches hematopoitiques aux radiations ionisantes

    Simonnet, A

    2008-12-15

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood and immune system throughout life and restore them after hematological injuries. Exposure of an organism to ionizing radiation (IR) causes rapid and acute myelosuppression and challenges the replenishment capacity of HSCs. Yet, the precise damages that are generated remain largely unexplored. To better understand these effects, phenotypic and functional changes in the stem/progenitor compartments of sublethally irradiated mice were monitored over a ten week period after radiation exposure. We report that shortly after sublethal IR-exposure, HSCs, defined by their repopulating ability, still segregate in the Hoechst dye excluding side population (SP); yet, their Sca-1 (S) and c-Kit (K) expression levels are increased and severely reduced, respectively, with a concurrent increase in the proportion of SP{sup SK} cells positive for established indicators of HSC presence: CD150{sup +} and CD105{sup +}. A great proportion of HSCs quickly but transiently enter the cell cycle to replenish the bone marrow of myelo-ablated mice. Ten weeks after, whereas bone marrow cellularity has recovered and hematopoietic homeostasis is restored, major phenotypic modifications can be observed within the Lin{sup -/low} Sca-1{sup +} c-Kit{sup +} (LSK) stem/progenitor compartment: CD150{sup +}/Flk2{sup -} and CD150{sup -}/Flk2{sup +} LSK cell frequencies are increased and dramatically reduced, respectively. CD150{sup +} LSK cells also show impaired reconstitution capacity, accrued number of {gamma}-H2AX foci and increased tendency to apoptosis. This demonstrates that the LSK compartment is not properly restored 10 weeks after sublethal exposure, and that long-term IR-induced injury to the bone marrow proceeds, at least partially, through direct damage to the stem cell pool. Thrombopoietin (TPO) has been shown to promote the survival of lethally irradiated mice when administrated quickly after exposure. We investigated the mechanisms underlying

  2. Evaluation of cellular effects of pulsed and continuous wave radiofrequency radiation

    Full text: In less than twenty years, the mobile telephone has gone from being rare, expensive equipment of the business elite to a pervasive, low-cost personal item. Since the introduction of mobile phones, concerns have been raised about the potential detrimental impacts on living beings from regular use. The first 'modern' network technology on second generation cellular technology was launched in 1991 in Finland on the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) standard. This study evaluates cellular effects of, both, continuous (CW) and pulsed GSM modulated waves (PW). Continuous cell culture of Chinese hamster lung cells, line V79, was used in this study. Cell growth and colony forming ability (CFA) was analyzed after 1, 2 and 3 hours of exposure to the both frequency fields, 935 MHz CW and 915 MHz PW. Selected frequency fields were generated inside gigahertz transversal electromagnetic mode cell (GTEM) equipped with the signal generators. Hewlett Packard HP8657A signal generator was used to generate CW 935 MHz frequency field. Anritzu MS2711B spectrum analyzer with tracking generator and Micro devices RF 3146 power amplifier module generated PW radiofrequency field of 915 MHz. Averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) belonging to the CW 935 MHz frequency field was calculated to be 0.12 W/kg, and for GSM modulated 915 MHz field was 0.23 W/kg. Cell samples were irradiated in triplicate. The sham exposed control cell samples were included in the study. The temperature inside the exposure set-up was recorded in ten-minute intervals through the irradiation treatment. Both, sham-exposed and exposed cell samples were kept in the same condition, except in the time of irradiation for experimental samples when signal generator was switched on. To determine cell growth, V79 samples were plated in concentration of 1x104cells/mL. Cells were maintained in the standard laboratory conditions, which are humidified atmosphere, 37 C degrees, and 5% CO2. Cell proliferation

  3. Detection, characterization and measure of a new radiation-induced damage in isolated and cellular DNA

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contains the genetic information and chemical injury to this macromolecule may have severe biological consequences. We report here the detection of 4 new radiation-induced DNA lesions by using a high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) approach. For that purpose, the characteristic fragmentation of most 2'-deoxy-ribo nucleosides, the loss of 116 Da corresponding to the loss of the 2-deoxyribose moiety, was used in the so-called neutral loss mode of the HPLC-MS/MS. One of the newly detected lesions, named dCyd341 because it is a 2'-deoxycytidine modification exhibiting a molecular weight of 341 Da, was also detected in cellular DNA. Characterization of this modified nucleoside was performed using NMR and exact mass determination of the product obtained by chemical synthesis. A mechanism of formation was then proposed, in which the first event is the H-abstraction at the C4 position of a 2-deoxyribose moiety. Then, the sugar modification produced exhibits a reactive aldehyde that, through reaction with a vicinal cytosine base, gives rise to dCyd341. dCyd341 could be considered as a complex damage since its formation involves a DNA strand break and a cross-link between a damaged sugar residue and a vicinal cytosine base located most probably on the complementary DNA strand. In addition to its characterization, preliminary biological studies revealed that cells are able to remove the lesion from DNA. Repair studies have revealed the ability of cells to excise the lesion. Identification of the repair systems involved could represent an interesting challenge. (author)

  4. Radiation biology of Caenorhabditis elegans. Germ cell response, aging and behavior

    The study of radiation effect in Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans has been carried out over three decades and now allow for understanding at the molecular, cellular and individual levels. This review describes the current knowledge of the biological effects of ionizing irradiation with a scope of the germ line, aging and behavior. In germ cells, ionizing radiation induces apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and DNA repair. Lots of molecules involved in these responses and functions have been identified in C. elegans, which are highly conserved throughout eukaryotes. Radiosensitivity and the effect of heavy-ion microbeam irradiation on germ cells with relationship between initiation of meiotic recombination and DNA lesions are discussed. In addition to DNA damage, ionizing radiation produces free radicals, and the free radical theory is the most popular aging theory. A first signal transduction pathway of aging has been discovered in C. elegans, and radiation-induced metabolic oxidative stress is recently noted for an inducible factor of hormetic response and genetic instability. The hormetic response in C. elegans exposed to oxidative stress is discussed with genetic pathways of aging. Moreover, C. elegans is well known as a model organism for behavior. The recent work reported the radiation effects via specific neurons on learning behavior, and radiation and hydrogen peroxide affect the locomotory rate similarly. These findings are discussed in relation to the evidence obtained with other organisms. Altogether, C. elegans may be a good 'in vivo' model system in the field of radiation biology. (author)

  5. Responses of populations of small mammals to ionizing radiation

    Studies on the responses of small mammals to ionizing radiation have, over the past 30 years, documented numerous effects on direct mortality, reproduction, the hemopoietic systems, and radionuclide metabolism. Three general findings have resulted from past efforts: (1) ionizing radiation is a factor in environmental stress, (2) the response of wild small mammals to ionizing radiation is a mosaic of varying radiosensitivities interacting with environmental variables, and (3) one of the most sensitive organismal processes to radiation is reproduction. While an excellent understanding of the biological effects resulting from high or intermediate-level radiation exposures has been developed, this is not the case for effects of low-level doses

  6. Design of radiation dose tumor response assays

    The efficient utilization of animals in a radiation dose response assay for tumor control requires a definition of the goal, e.g., TCD50 or slope. A series of computer modelled ''experiments'' have been performed for each of a number of allocations of dose levels (DL) and number of animals/DL. The authors stipulated that the assumed TCD50 was .85 of true value; assumed slope was correct. They stipulated a binominal distribution of observed tumor control results at each dose level. A pilot assay used 6 tumors at 7 DL (from TCD1-TCD97). The second assay used 30 tumors assigned to 2,3,5 or 9 DL and to selected tumor control probabilities (TCP derived from the pilot run. Results from 100 test runs were combined with the pilot run for each of the combination of DL and TCP values. Logit regression lines were fitted through these ''data'' and the 95% CL around the TCD50 and the TCD37 values and the variances of the slopes were computed. These experiments were repeated using the method suggested by Porter (1980). Results show that a different strategy is needed depending upon the goal, viz. TCD50 or TCD37 vs slope. The differences between the two approaches are discussed

  7. ST1571 (imatinib mesylate) reduces bone marrow cellularity and normalizes morphologic features irrespective of cytogenetic response.

    Hasserjian, Robert P; Boecklin, Federica; Parker, Sally; Chase, Andy; Dhar, Sunanda; Zaiac, Michael; Olavarria, Eduardo; Lampert, Irvin; Henry, Kristin; Apperley, Jane F; Goldman, John M

    2002-03-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI571 (imatinib mesylate, Gleevec) is an effective treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). We examined bone marrow samples from 53 patients with CML who were receiving STI571 in 3 multicenter phase 2 trials to assess morphologic changes and cytogenetic response to this drug. In most patients with initially increased blasts, the bone marrow blast count rapidly decreased during STI571 therapy. Reductions in cellularity, the myeloid/erythroid ratio (commonly with relative erythroid hyperplasia), and reticulin fibrosis (if present pretreatment) also were seen in most patients, resulting in an appearance resembling normal marrow in many cases. Eighteen patients (34%) had some degree of cytogenetic response. Surprisingly, these striking morphologic changes occurred irrespective of any cytogenetic response to STI571. Thus, STI571 seems to affect the differentiation of CML cells in vivo, causing even extensively Philadelphia chromosome-positive hematopoiesis to exhibitfeatures resembling normal hematopoiesis. PMID:11888075

  8. Capturing the dynamic nascent transcriptome during acute cellular responses: The serum response

    Killeen S. Kirkconnell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic regulation of gene expression via signal transduction pathways is of fundamental importance during many biological processes such as cell state transitioning, cell cycle progression and stress responses. In this study we used serum stimulation as a cell response paradigm to apply the nascent RNA Bru-seq technique in order to capture early dynamic changes in the nascent transcriptome. Our data provides an unprecedented view of the dynamics of genome-wide transcription during the first two hours of serum stimulation in human fibroblasts. While some genes showed sustained induction or repression, other genes showed transient or delayed responses. Surprisingly, the dynamic patterns of induction and suppression of response genes showed a high degree of similarity, suggesting that these opposite outcomes are triggered by a common set of signals. As expected, early response genes such as those encoding components of the AP-1 transcription factor and those involved in the circadian clock were immediately but transiently induced. Surprisingly, transcription of important DNA damage response genes and histone genes were rapidly repressed. We also show that RNA polymerase II accelerates as it transcribes large genes and this was independent of whether the gene was induced or not. These results provide a unique genome-wide depiction of dynamic patterns of transcription of serum response genes and demonstrate the utility of Bru-seq to comprehensively capture rapid and dynamic changes of the nascent transcriptome.

  9. Capturing the dynamic nascent transcriptome during acute cellular responses: The serum response.

    Kirkconnell, Killeen S; Paulsen, Michelle T; Magnuson, Brian; Bedi, Karan; Ljungman, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of gene expression via signal transduction pathways is of fundamental importance during many biological processes such as cell state transitioning, cell cycle progression and stress responses. In this study we used serum stimulation as a cell response paradigm to apply the nascent RNA Bru-seq technique in order to capture early dynamic changes in the nascent transcriptome. Our data provides an unprecedented view of the dynamics of genome-wide transcription during the first two hours of serum stimulation in human fibroblasts. While some genes showed sustained induction or repression, other genes showed transient or delayed responses. Surprisingly, the dynamic patterns of induction and suppression of response genes showed a high degree of similarity, suggesting that these opposite outcomes are triggered by a common set of signals. As expected, early response genes such as those encoding components of the AP-1 transcription factor and those involved in the circadian clock were immediately but transiently induced. Surprisingly, transcription of important DNA damage response genes and histone genes were rapidly repressed. We also show that RNA polymerase II accelerates as it transcribes large genes and this was independent of whether the gene was induced or not. These results provide a unique genome-wide depiction of dynamic patterns of transcription of serum response genes and demonstrate the utility of Bru-seq to comprehensively capture rapid and dynamic changes of the nascent transcriptome. PMID:27230646

  10. Ploidy influences cellular responses to gross chromosomal rearrangements in saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Lemoine Sophie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs such as aneuploidy are key factors in genome evolution as well as being common features of human cancer. Their role in tumour initiation and progression has not yet been completely elucidated and the effects of additional chromosomes in cancer cells are still unknown. Most previous studies in which Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for cancer cells have been carried out in the haploid context. To obtain new insights on the role of ploidy, the cellular effects of GCRs were compared between the haploid and diploid contexts. Results A total number of 21 haploid and diploid S. cerevisiae strains carrying various types of GCRs (aneuploidies, nonreciprocal translocations, segmental duplications and deletions were studied with a view to determining the effects of ploidy on the cellular responses. Differences in colony and cell morphology as well as in the growth rates were observed between mutant and parental strains. These results suggest that cells are impaired physiologically in both contexts. We also investigated the variation in genomic expression in all the mutants. We observed that gene expression was significantly altered. The data obtained here clearly show that genes involved in energy metabolism, especially in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, are up-regulated in all these mutants. However, the genes involved in the composition of the ribosome or in RNA processing are down-regulated in diploids but up-regulated in haploids. Over-expression of genes involved in the regulation of the proteasome was found to occur only in haploid mutants. Conclusion The present comparisons between the cellular responses of strains carrying GCRs in different ploidy contexts bring to light two main findings. First, GCRs induce a general stress response in all studied mutants, regardless of their ploidy. Secondly, the ploidy context plays a crucial role in maintaining the stoichiometric balance

  11. Toll-like receptors: cellular signal transducers for exogenous molecular patterns causing immune responses.

    Kirschning, C J; Bauer, S

    2001-09-01

    Innate immunity initiates protection of the host organism against invasion and subsequent multiplication of microbes by specific recognition. Germ line-encoded receptors have been identified for microbial products such as mannan, lipopeptide, peptidoglycan (PGN), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and CpG-DNA. The Drosophila Toll protein has been shown to be involved in innate immune response of the adult fruitfly. Members of the family of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in vertebrates have been implicated as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Ten TLRs are known and six of these have been demonstrated to mediate cellular activation by distinct microbial products. TLR4 has been implicated as activator of adaptive immunity, and analysis of systemic LPS responses in mice led to the identification of LPS-resistant strains instrumental in its identification as a transmembrane LPS signal transducer. Structural similarities between TLRs and receptor molecules involved in immune responses such as CD14 and the IL-1 receptors (IL-1Rs), as well as functional analysis qualified TLR2 as candidate receptor for LPS and other microbial products. Targeted disruption of the TLR9 gene in mice led to identification of TLR9 as CpG-DNA signal transducer. Involvement of TLR5 in cell activation by bacterial flagellin has been demonstrated. Further understanding of recognition and cellular signaling activated through the ancient host defense system represented by Toll will eventually lead to means for its therapeutic modulation. PMID:11680785

  12. Molecular mechanism of adaptive response to low dose radiation

    Adaptive response is a term used to describe the ability of a low, priming dose of ionizing radiation to modify the effects of a subsequent higher, challenge dose. Molecular mechanism of adaptive response to low dose radiation is involved in signal transduction pathway, reactive oxygen species, DNA damage repair

  13. Dexamethasone and radiation response in the Lewis lung tumour model

    The effect of dexamethasone on the radiation response of Lewis lung tumour growth in the gastronemius muscle of mice was studied. The log average tumour volume/time curve did not show any significant difference in radiation response between the mice given dexamethasone and the mice not given the drug. (UK)

  14. Ionizing radiation response effects on optical fibers in radiation therapy dosimetry applications

    Radiation effects on optical fibers result in two different effects: accumulated radiation damage resulting in a substantial loss of transmission and transient radiation response in which light is generated in the fiber material itself during exposure to radiation. In various medical applications, optical fibers are often exposed to radiation during certain clinical procedures which makes their radiation response and effect of concern to the medical community. Thus, this effect needs to be studied and quantified in that king of environment. This study involves radiation-resistant fibers and the quantification of their light emission response as a function of dose rate and irradiation field size for photon and electron beams at the various energies used in radiation therapy

  15. Cellular Immune Response of Weaned Pigs Fed Diet Supplemented with an Essential Oil

    János Tossenberger; Róbert Tóthi; Csaba Szabó; Zsuzsanna Pásti; Imre Nochta; Veronika Halas; László Babinszky

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of an essential oil product on growth performance and cellular immune response of 28-day-old weaned piglets. A total of 348 piglets (50% gilts, 50% barrows) were assigned to three dietary treatments (6 pens/trt). Th e basal diet was a commercial feed that was supplemented without any growth promoter (NC), with antibiotic growth promoter of 40 ppm avilamycin (PC), or with 0.25 g of an essential oil product (EO) per kg of feed. Al...

  16. Comparison of Yarrowia lipolytica and Pichia pastoris cellular response to different agents of oxidative stress

    Lopes, Marlene; Mota, M.; Belo, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Yeast cells exposed to adverse conditions employ a number of defense mechanisms in order to respond effectively to the stress effects of reactive oxygen species. In this work, the cellular response of Yarrowia lipolytica and Pichia pastoris to the exposure to the ROSinducing agents’ paraquat, hydrogen peroxide, and increased air pressure was analyzed. Yeast cells at exponential phase were exposed for 3 h to 1 mM paraquat, to 50 mM H2O2, or to increased air pressure of 3 or 5 bar. For both str...

  17. Functional recognition imaging using artificial neural networks: applications to rapid cellular identification via broadband electromechanical response

    Nikiforov, M P; Guo, S; Kalinin, S V; Jesse, S [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Reukov, V V; Thompson, G L; Vertegel, A A, E-mail: sergei2@ornl.go [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Functional recognition imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses at a single spatial location to identify the target behavior, which is reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain, obviating the need for analytical models. We demonstrate, as an example of recognition imaging, rapid identification of cellular organisms using the difference in electromechanical activity over a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method.

  18. Functional recognition imaging using artificial neural networks: applications to rapid cellular identification via broadband electromechanical response

    Nikiforov, M. P.; Reukov, V. V.; Thompson, G. L.; Vertegel, A. A.; Guo, S.; Kalinin, S. V.; Jesse, S.

    2009-10-01

    Functional recognition imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses at a single spatial location to identify the target behavior, which is reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain, obviating the need for analytical models. We demonstrate, as an example of recognition imaging, rapid identification of cellular organisms using the difference in electromechanical activity over a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method.

  19. Structure and Responsibilities of Radiation Protection Centre

    Constitution of Radiation Protection Centre (RPC) in Lithuania is presented. RPC was established in 1997, in 1999 the Government granted the status of the regulatory authority of Lithuania on radiation protection issues. Currently there are two departments at RPC: two in Vilnius - Department of Radiation Protection Supervision and Control and Department of Programs and Expertise, and four in the districts. Main tasks of RPC are listed

  20. Evaluation of cellular responses for a chimeric HBsAg-HCV core DNA vaccine in BALB/c mice

    Maryam Yazdanian

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Fusion of HBsAg to HCVcp in the context of a DNA vaccine modality could augment Th1-oriented cellular and CTL responses toward a protective epitope, comparable to that of HCVcp (subunit HCV vaccine immunization.

  1. Transcriptome analysis reveals the contribution of thermal and the specific effects in cellular response to millimeter wave exposure.

    Denis Habauzit

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency radiations constitute a new form of environmental pollution. Among them, millimeter waves (MMW will be widely used in the near future for high speed communication systems. This study aimed therefore to evaluate the biocompatibility of MMW at 60 GHz. For this purpose, we used a whole gene expression approach to assess the effect of acute 60 GHz exposure on primary cultures of human keratinocytes. Controls were performed to dissociate the electromagnetic from the thermal effect of MMW. Microarray data were validated by RT-PCR, in order to ensure the reproducibility of the results. MMW exposure at 20 mW/cm2, corresponding to the maximum incident power density authorized for public use (local exposure averaged over 1 cm2, led to an increase of temperature and to a strong modification of keratinocyte gene expression (665 genes differentially expressed. Nevertheless, when temperature is artificially maintained constant, no modification in gene expression was observed after MMW exposure. However, a heat shock control did not mimic exactly the MMW effect, suggesting a slight but specific electromagnetic effect under hyperthermia conditions (34 genes differentially expressed. By RT-PCR, we analyzed the time course of the transcriptomic response and 7 genes have been validated as differentially expressed: ADAMTS6, NOG, IL7R, FADD, JUNB, SNAI2 and HIST1H1A. Our data evidenced a specific electromagnetic effect of MMW, which is associated to the cellular response to hyperthermia. This study raises the question of co-exposures associating radiofrequencies and other environmental sources of cellular stress.

  2. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: → Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. → The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. → No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. → Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  3. Mechanisms of protective immunity against Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae. V. Anamnestic cellular and humoral responses following challenge infection

    Correa-Oliveira, R.; Sher, A.; James, S.L.

    1984-03-01

    Mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae display low levels of cellular and humoral immune responses toward schistosomulum antigens, as measured in vitro by lymphocyte blastogenesis and quantitation of anti-larval antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. Both responses wane with time after vaccination. However subsequent challenge infection provokes immune responses of classical anamnestic character, being both more rapid in appearance and of greater magnitude. Antigen responsive cells appear in lymph nodes draining the challenge site within 24 hours after infection. Both circulating anti-schistosomulum surface antibodies as well as cytophilic IgE anti-worm antigen antibodies increase substantially by 1 week after challenge. All of the anamnestic circulating antibodies belong to the IgG class. Those findings support the concept that vaccine-induced resistance to Schistosoma mansoni infection involves sensitized T and B lymphocytes, and point to the possible role of post-challenge anamnestic responses in the effector mechanism of parasite killing in this model.

  4. Mechanisms of protective immunity against Schistosoma mansoni infection in mice vaccinated with irradiated cercariae. V. Anamnestic cellular and humoral responses following challenge infection

    Mice vaccinated with radiation-attenuated cercariae display low levels of cellular and humoral immune responses toward schistosomulum antigens, as measured in vitro by lymphocyte blastogenesis and quantitation of anti-larval antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. Both responses wane with time after vaccination. However subsequent challenge infection provokes immune responses of classical anamnestic character, being both more rapid in appearance and of greater magnitude. Antigen responsive cells appear in lymph nodes draining the challenge site within 24 hours after infection. Both circulating anti-schistosomulum surface antibodies as well as cytophilic IgE anti-worm antigen antibodies increase substantially by 1 week after challenge. All of the anamnestic circulating antibodies belong to the IgG class. Those findings support the concept that vaccine-induced resistance to Schistosoma mansoni infection involves sensitized T and B lymphocytes, and point to the possible role of post-challenge anamnestic responses in the effector mechanism of parasite killing in this model

  5. CELLULAR RESPONSES TO DNA DAMAGE AND ONCOGENESIS BY THE p53 AND pRb/E2F PATHWAYS

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari; Ismu Suharsono Suwelo; Achmad Tjarta; Santoso Cornain; T. W. Rahardjo; Eto, K; Ikeda, M.A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular responses to stress including DNA damage, show multiple options involving the mechanisms of growth arrest. DNA repair and programmed cell death or apoptosis. Failures in these mechanisms can result in oncogenesis or accelerated senescence. Much of the response is coordinated by p53, a nuclear phosphoprotein with a central role in the defences against physical, chemical and pathogenic agents which challenge the DNA integrity. The p53 pathways for mobilising the cellular defences are l...

  6. The effects of short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing Net1 on ionizing radiation-induced damage responses

    Objective: To study the biological roles of the neuroepithelioma transforming gene 1 (Netl) in the cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR)-induced damage. Methods: Specific shRNA was used to deplete Netl in cells. The effects of Netl depletion on the cellular responses to ionizing radiation were investigated through the clonogenic survival assay and immunoblotting analysis of DNA damage response proteins' phosphorylation. Results: Netl-depleted cells were more sensitive to IR, with a significantly increased induction of apoptosis. In response to IR, the phosphorylation levels of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and checkpoint kinase 2 were much higher in the Net1-depleted cells than that in the control cells. Conclusion: Net1 protects IR-treated cells from apoptosis and possibly plays an important role in IR-induced damage response and repair. (authors)

  7. More Than a Pore: The Cellular Response to Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysins

    Sara K. B. Cassidy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Targeted disruption of the plasma membrane is a ubiquitous form of attack used in all three domains of life. Many bacteria secrete pore-forming proteins during infection with broad implications for pathogenesis. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDC are a family of pore-forming toxins expressed predominately by Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. The structure and assembly of some of these oligomeric toxins on the host membrane have been described, but how the targeted cell responds to intoxication by the CDCs is not as clearly understood. Many CDCs induce lysis of their target cell and can activate apoptotic cascades to promote cell death. However, the extent to which intoxication causes cell death is both CDC- and host cell-dependent, and at lower concentrations of toxin, survival of intoxicated host cells is well documented. Additionally, the effect of CDCs can be seen beyond the plasma membrane, and it is becoming increasingly clear that these toxins are potent regulators of signaling and immunity, beyond their role in intoxication. In this review, we discuss the cellular response to CDC intoxication with emphasis on the effects of pore formation on the host cell plasma membrane and subcellular organelles and whether subsequent cellular responses contribute to the survival of the affected cell.

  8. Cellular responses to low dose heavy-ion exposure in human cell

    Morimoto, S.; Goto, S.; Kato, T.; Izumi, M.; Komiyama-Kobayashi, M.; Fukunishi, N.; Honma, M.; Hanaoka, F.; Yatagai, F

    2002-07-01

    The human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 was used to study the cellular responses after low-dose (100, 200, 500 mGy) or high-dose (3 Gy) of X rays, C (22 keV.{mu}m{sup -1}) and Fe (1000 keV.{mu}m{sup -1}) ion exposures, p53 protein induction in individual cells was determined by indirect immunofluorescence staining. Cell-cycle progression after heavy-ion exposure was determined by using a laser scanning cytometer. A characteristic pattern of cell-cycle progression was observed with 3 Gy exposure of Fe ions but not with 100 mGy. Similarly such a pattern with 100 mGy C ion exposure did not match that with 3 Gy. The proportion of p53-induced cells is proportional to the probability of cell being hit by a primary heavy ion. The observed low-dose effect can be reflected in the probability of a hit, although detailed nature about their energy deposition must be considered for more precise estimation of such an effect. New detection methodology must be developed for identification of heavy-ion specific cellular responses. (author)

  9. Cellular Response to a Novel Fetal Acellular Collagen Matrix: Implications for Tissue Regeneration

    Robert C. Rennert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. PriMatrix (TEI Biosciences Inc., Boston, MA, USA is a novel acellular collagen matrix derived from fetal bovine dermis that is designed for use in partial- and full-thickness wounds. This study analyzes the cellular response to PriMatrix in vivo, as well as the ability of this matrix to facilitate normal tissue regeneration. Methods. Five by five mm squares of rehydrated PriMatrix were implanted in a subcutaneous fashion on the dorsum of wild-type mice. Implant site tissue was harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC, and flow cytometric analyses at multiple time points until day 28. Results. PriMatrix implants were found to go through a biological progression initiated by a transient infiltrate of inflammatory cells, followed by mesenchymal cell recruitment and vascular development. IHC analysis revealed that the majority of the implanted fetal dermal collagen fibers persisted through day 28 but underwent remodeling and cellular repopulation to form tissue with a density and morphology consistent with healthy dermis. Conclusions. PriMatrix implants undergo progressive in vivo remodeling, facilitating the regeneration of histologically normal tissue through a mild inflammatory and progenitor cell response. Regeneration of normal tissue is especially important in a wound environment, and these findings warrant further investigation of PriMatrix in this setting.

  10. Trichothiodystrophy, a human DNA repair disorder with heterogeneity in the cellular response to ultraviolet light

    Trichothiodystrophy (TTD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by brittle hair with reduced sulfur content, ichthyosis, peculiar face, and mental and physical retardation. Some patients are photosensitive. A previous study by Stefanini et al. showed that cells from four photosensitive patients with TTD had a molecular defect in DNA repair, which was not complemented by cells from xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D. In a detailed molecular and cellular study of the effects of UV light on cells cultured from three further TTD patients who did not exhibit photosensitivity we have found an array of different responses. In cells from the first patient, survival, excision repair, and DNA and RNA synthesis following UV irradiation were all normal, whereas in cells from the second patient all these responses were similar to those of excision-defective xeroderma pigmentosum (group D) cells. With the third patient, cell survival measured by colony-forming ability was normal following UV irradiation, even though repair synthesis was only 50% of normal and RNA synthesis was severely reduced. The excision-repair defect in these cells was not complemented by other TTD cell strains. These cellular characteristics of patient 3 have not been described previously for any other cell line. The normal survival may be attributed to the finding that the deficiency in excision-repair is confined to early times after irradiation. Our results pose a number of questions about the relationship between the molecular defect in DNA repair and the clinical symptoms of xeroderma pigmentosum and TTD

  11. Cellular responses to low dose heavy-ion exposure in human cell

    The human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6 was used to study the cellular responses after low-dose (100, 200, 500 mGy) or high-dose (3 Gy) of X rays, C (22 keV.μm-1) and Fe (1000 keV.μm-1) ion exposures, p53 protein induction in individual cells was determined by indirect immunofluorescence staining. Cell-cycle progression after heavy-ion exposure was determined by using a laser scanning cytometer. A characteristic pattern of cell-cycle progression was observed with 3 Gy exposure of Fe ions but not with 100 mGy. Similarly such a pattern with 100 mGy C ion exposure did not match that with 3 Gy. The proportion of p53-induced cells is proportional to the probability of cell being hit by a primary heavy ion. The observed low-dose effect can be reflected in the probability of a hit, although detailed nature about their energy deposition must be considered for more precise estimation of such an effect. New detection methodology must be developed for identification of heavy-ion specific cellular responses. (author)

  12. Meta-Analysis of High-Throughput Datasets Reveals Cellular Responses Following Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Infection

    Gavin C. Bowick

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The continuing use of high-throughput assays to investigate cellular responses to infection is providing a large repository of information. Due to the large number of differentially expressed transcripts, often running into the thousands, the majority of these data have not been thoroughly investigated. Advances in techniques for the downstream analysis of high-throughput datasets are providing additional methods for the generation of additional hypotheses for further investigation. The large number of experimental observations, combined with databases that correlate particular genes and proteins with canonical pathways, functions and diseases, allows for the bioinformatic exploration of functional networks that may be implicated in replication or pathogenesis. Herein, we provide an example of how analysis of published high-throughput datasets of cellular responses to hemorrhagic fever virus infection can generate additional functional data. We describe enrichment of genes involved in metabolism, post-translational modification and cardiac damage; potential roles for specific transcription factors and a conserved involvement of a pathway based around cyclooxygenase-2. We believe that these types of analyses can provide virologists with additional hypotheses for continued investigation.

  13. Cellular Response to Doping of High Porosity Foamed Alumina with Ca, P, Mg, and Si

    Edwin Soh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Foamed alumina was previously synthesised by direct foaming of sulphate salt blends varying ammonium mole fraction (AMF, foaming heating rate and sintering temperature. The optimal product was produced with 0.33AMF, foaming at 100 °C/h and sintering at 1600 °C. This product attained high porosity of 94.39%, large average pore size of 300 µm and the highest compressive strength of 384 kPa. To improve bioactivity, doping of porous alumina by soaking in dilute or saturated solutions of Ca, P, Mg, CaP or CaP + Mg was done. Saturated solutions of Ca, P, Mg, CaP and CaP + Mg were made with excess salt in distilled water and decanted. Dilute solutions were made by diluting the 100% solution to 10% concentration. Doping with Si was done using the sol gel method at 100% concentration only. Cell culture was carried out with MG63 osteosarcoma cells. Cellular response to the Si and P doped samples was positive with high cell populations and cell layer formation. The impact of doping with phosphate produced a result not previously reported. The cellular response showed that both Si and P doping improved the biocompatibility of the foamed alumina.

  14. Dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of maraging steel linear cellular alloy

    Jakus, Adam E.; Fredenberg, David A.; McCoy, Tammy; Thadhani, Naresh; Cochran, Joe K.

    2012-03-01

    The dynamic deformation and fragmentation response of 25% dense 9-cell linear cellular alloy (LCA) made of unaged 250 maraging steel, fabricated using a direct reduction and extrusion technique, is investigated. Explicit finite element simulations were implemented using AUTODYN finite element code. The maraging steel properties were defined using a Johnson-Cook strength model with previously validated parameters. Rod-on-anvil impact tests were performed using the 7.6mm helium gas gun and the transient deformation and fragmentation response was recorded with highspeed imaging. Analysis of observed deformation states of specimens and finite element simulations reveal that in the case of the 9-cell LCA, dissipation of stress and strain occurs along the interior cell wells resulting in significant and ubiquitous buckling prior to confined fragmentation.

  15. Effects of Radiation on Cellular Proliferation and Differentiation. Proceedings of a Symposium on the Effects of Radiation on Cellular Proliferation and Differentiation

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA in co-operation with the Joint Commission on Applied Radioactivity and held in Monaco, 1-5 April 1968. Over 100 scientists from 20 countries and two international organizations attended the meeting. Contents: Introductory address; Biochemical considerations of injury and repair; Haemopoietic stem cells: relationships and kinetics; Haemopoiesis: growth and differentiation; Lymphopoiesis and the immune response; Proliferative response of other mammalian systems: tumour cells and intestinal cells. Each paper is in its original language (36 English, 3 French and 1 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English, with a second one in the original language if this is not English. (author)

  16. Vitamin E Analogs as Radiation Response Modifiers

    Pankaj K. Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The potentially life-threatening effects of total body ionizing radiation exposure have been known for more than a century. Despite considerable advances in our understanding of the effects of radiation over the past six decades, efforts to identify effective radiation countermeasures for use in case of a radiological/nuclear emergency have been largely unsuccessful. Vitamin E is known to have antioxidant properties capable of scavenging free radicals, which have critical roles in radiation injuries. Tocopherols and tocotrienols, vitamin E analogs together known as tocols, have shown promise as radioprotectors. Although the pivotal mechanisms of action of tocols have long been thought to be their antioxidant properties and free radical scavenging activities, other alternative mechanisms have been proposed to drive their activity as radioprotectors. Here we provide a brief overview of the effects of ionizing radiation, the mechanistic mediators of radiation-induced damage, and the need for radiation countermeasures. We further outline the role for, efficacy of, and mechanisms of action of tocols as radioprotectors, and we compare and contrast their efficacy and mode of action with that of another well-studied chemical radioprotector, amifostine.

  17. Maize Prolamins Could Induce a Gluten-Like Cellular Immune Response in Some Celiac Disease Patients

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Juan P.; Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; Calderón de la Barca, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically prone individuals. The current treatment for CD is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, in some CD patients following a strict gluten-free diet, the symptoms do not remit. These cases may be refractory CD or due to gluten contamination; however, the lack of response could be related to other dietary ingredients, such as maize, which is one of the most common alternatives to wheat used in the gluten-free diet. In some CD patients, as a rare event, peptides from maize prolamins could induce a celiac-like immune response by similar or alternative pathogenic mechanisms to those used by wheat gluten peptides. This is supported by several shared features between wheat and maize prolamins and by some experimental results. Given that gluten peptides induce an immune response of the intestinal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro, peptides from maize prolamins could also be tested to determine whether they also induce a cellular immune response. Hypothetically, maize prolamins could be harmful for a very limited subgroup of CD patients, especially those that are non-responsive, and if it is confirmed, they should follow, in addition to a gluten-free, a maize-free diet. PMID:24152750

  18. Cellular responses to HSV-1 infection are linked to specific types of alterations in the host transcriptome.

    Hu, Benxia; Li, Xin; Huo, Yongxia; Yu, Yafen; Zhang, Qiuping; Chen, Guijun; Zhang, Yaping; Fraser, Nigel W; Wu, Dongdong; Zhou, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen invasion triggers a number of cellular responses and alters the host transcriptome. Here we report that the type of changes to cellular transcriptome is related to the type of cellular functions affected by lytic infection of Herpes Simplex Virus type I in Human primary fibroblasts. Specifically, genes involved in stress responses and nuclear transport exhibited mostly changes in alternative polyadenylation (APA), cell cycle genes showed mostly alternative splicing (AS) changes, while genes in neurogenesis, rarely underwent these changes. Transcriptome wide, the infection resulted in 1,032 cases of AS, 161 incidences of APA, 1,827 events of isoform changes, and up regulation of 596 genes and down regulations of 61 genes compared to uninfected cells. Thus, these findings provided important and specific links between cellular responses to HSV-1 infection and the type of alterations to the host transcriptome, highlighting important roles of RNA processing in virus-host interactions. PMID:27354008

  19. Cellular responses to HSV-1 infection are linked to specific types of alterations in the host transcriptome

    Hu, Benxia; Li, Xin; Huo, Yongxia; Yu, Yafen; Zhang, Qiuping; Chen, Guijun; Zhang, Yaping; Fraser, Nigel W.; Wu, Dongdong; Zhou, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen invasion triggers a number of cellular responses and alters the host transcriptome. Here we report that the type of changes to cellular transcriptome is related to the type of cellular functions affected by lytic infection of Herpes Simplex Virus type I in Human primary fibroblasts. Specifically, genes involved in stress responses and nuclear transport exhibited mostly changes in alternative polyadenylation (APA), cell cycle genes showed mostly alternative splicing (AS) changes, while genes in neurogenesis, rarely underwent these changes. Transcriptome wide, the infection resulted in 1,032 cases of AS, 161 incidences of APA, 1,827 events of isoform changes, and up regulation of 596 genes and down regulations of 61 genes compared to uninfected cells. Thus, these findings provided important and specific links between cellular responses to HSV-1 infection and the type of alterations to the host transcriptome, highlighting important roles of RNA processing in virus-host interactions. PMID:27354008

  20. Comparison of Cellular Uptake and Inflammatory Response via Toll-Like Receptor 4 to Lipopolysaccharide and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Akiyoshi Taniguchi; Koki Kanehira; Sharmy Saimon Mano

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune response is the earliest cellular response to infectious agents and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in these interactions. We have already shown that TLRs are involved with the uptake of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) and promote inflammatory responses. In this paper, we compared role of cellular uptake and inflammatory response via TLR 4 to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and TiO2 NPs. In the case o...

  1. p53-Dependent Adaptive Responses in Human Cells Exposed to Space Radiations

    Purpose: It has been reported that priming irradiation or conditioning irradiation with a low dose of X-rays in the range of 0.02-0.1 Gy induces a p53-dependent adaptive response in mammalian cells. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of space radiations on the adaptive response. Methods and Materials: Two human lymphoblastoid cell lines were used; one cell line bears a wild-type p53 (wtp53) gene, and another cell line bears a mutated p53 (mp53) gene. The cells were frozen during transportation on the space shuttle and while in orbit in the International Space Station freezer for 133 days between November 15, 2008 and March 29, 2009. After the frozen samples were returned to Earth, the cells were cultured for 6 h and then exposed to a challenging X-ray-irradiation (2 Gy). Cellular sensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored using dye-exclusion assays, Hoechst33342 staining assays, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In cells exposed to space radiations, adaptive responses such as the induction of radioresistance and the depression of radiation-induced apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in wtp53 cells but not in mp53 cells. Conclusion: These results have confirmed the hypothesis that p53-dependent adaptive responses are apparently induced by space radiations within a specific range of low doses. The cells exhibited this effect owing to space radiations exposure, even though the doses in space were very low.

  2. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low

    Kadhim, Munira A

    2012-08-22

    The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "non-targeted responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell

  3. Nanoparticle-allergen interactions mediate human allergic responses: protein corona characterization and cellular responses

    Radauer-Preiml, Isabella; Andosch, Ancuela; Hawranek, Thomas; Luetz-Meindl, Ursula; Wiederstein, Markus; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta; Himly, Martin; Boyles, Matthew; Duschl, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) interact with different biomolecules as soon as they are in contact, resulting in the formation of a biomolecule ‘corona’. Hence, the ‘corona’ defines the biological identity of the ENMs and could affect the response of the immune system to ENM exposure. With up to 40 % of the world population suffering from type I allergy, a possible modulation of allergen effects by binding to ENMs is highly relevant with respect to work place and consumer safety. ...

  4. Study of effects of radio-wave frequency radiation emitted from cellular telephones on embryonic development of danio rerio

    Vagula, Mary; Harkless, Ryan

    2013-05-01

    Radio wave frequency (RF) radiation emitted from cellular telephones has become increasingly ubiquitous as a result of the popularity of these phones. With the increasing and unavoidable exposure to RF radiation a reality, it is imperative that the effects of such radiation on living tissue be well understood. In particular, it is critical to understand any effects that RF radiation may have as a carcinogen and on embryonic development, as pregnant women are not exempt from such exposure. As a model organism, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have been studied extensively, and their value in studies of gene expression cannot be overstated. This study observed the effects of RF radiation on the embryonic development of zebrafish. The expression of two genes, shha and hoxb9a, that are key to the early development of the fish was examined. Both genes have homologs in humans as well as in other model organisms. Preliminary results suggest that exposure to cell phone radiation might have an effect on the expression of shha in zebrafish embryos, causing under expression. More trials are necessary to validate these results.

  5. Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation

    A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs

  6. Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation

    Elkind, M.M.; Bedford, J.; Benjamin, S.A.; Waldren, C.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Gotchy, R.L. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. Cellular cooperation during in vivo anti-hapten antibody responses. I. The effect of cell number on the response

    Cellular interactions in adoptive secondary anti-hapten antibody responses to the hapten 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) have been studied. It was shown that DNP-specific B cells must interact with carrier specific helper T cells to give optimal responses. Independent titration of B cell and helper cell activity in adoptive anti-DNP antibody responses gave the following results: Doubling the number of transferred B cells approximately doubled the subsequent antibody response. Doubling the number of helper cells leads to nearly 4 times as much anti-DNP antibody, measured 7 days after boosting (''premium effect''). This marked effect of helper cell number on the antibody response is thought to be due primarily to the interaction of two populations of carrier-specific cells in the helper effect, or to the interaction of two activities of a single population of helper cells, namely clone activation and clone expansion. Only a very small proportion of the premium effect given by helper cells could be attributed to increases in antibody affinity. (U.S.)

  8. Dynamics of uptake and metabolism of small molecules in cellular response systems.

    Maria Werner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proper cellular function requires uptake of small molecules from the environment. In response to changes in extracellular conditions cells alter the import and utilization of small molecules. For a wide variety of small molecules the cellular response is regulated by a network motif that combines two feedback loops, one which regulates the transport and the other which regulates the subsequent metabolism. RESULTS: We analyze the dynamic behavior of two widespread but logically distinct two-loop motifs. These motifs differ in the logic of the feedback loop regulating the uptake of the small molecule. Our aim is to examine the qualitative features of the dynamics of these two classes of feedback motifs. We find that the negative feedback to transport is accompanied by overshoot in the intracellular amount of small molecules, whereas a positive feedback to transport removes overshoot by boosting the final steady state level. On the other hand, the negative feedback allows for a rapid initial response, whereas the positive feedback is slower. We also illustrate how the dynamical deficiencies of one feedback motif can be mitigated by an additional loop, while maintaining the original steady-state properties. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis emphasizes the core of the regulation found in many motifs at the interface between the metabolic network and the environment of the cell. By simplifying the regulation into uptake and the first metabolic step, we provide a basis for elaborate studies of more realistic network structures. Particularly, this theoretical analysis predicts that FeS cluster formation plays an important role in the dynamics of iron homeostasis.

  9. GATA3 is a master regulator of the transcriptional response to low-dose ionizing radiation in human keratinocytes

    Lamartine Jérôme

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The general population is constantly exposed to low levels of radiation through natural, occupational or medical irradiation. Even if the biological effects of low-level radiation have been intensely debated and investigated, the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to low doses remain largely unknown. Results The present study investigated the role of GATA3 protein in the control of the cellular and molecular response of human keratinocytes exposed to a 1 cGy dose of X-rays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GATA3 to be able to bind the promoter of 4 genes responding to a 1 cGy exposure. To go further into the role of GATA3 after ionizing radiation exposure, we studied the cellular and molecular consequences of radiation in GATA3 knock-down cells. Knock-down was obtained by lentiviral-mediated expression of an shRNA targeting the GATA3 transcript in differentiated keratinocytes. First, radiosensitivity was assessed: the toxicity, in terms of immediate survival (with XTT test, associated with 1 cGy radiation was found to be increased in GATA3 knock-down cells. The impact of GATA3 knock-down on the transcriptome of X-ray irradiated cells was also investigated, using oligonucleotide microarrays to assess changes between 3 h and 72 h post-irradiation in normal vs GATA3 knock-down backgrounds; transcriptome response was found to be completely altered in GATA3 knock-down cells, with a strong induction/repression peak 48 h after irradiation. Functional annotation revealed enrichment in genes known to be involved in chaperone activity, TGFβ signalling and stress response. Conclusion Taken together, these data indicate that GATA3 is an important regulator of the cellular and molecular response of epidermal cells to very low doses of radiation.

  10. GATA3 is a master regulator of the transcriptional response to low-dose ionizing radiation in human keratinocytes

    Background: The general population is constantly exposed to low levels of radiation through natural, occupational or medical irradiation. Even if the biological effects of low-level radiation have been intensely debated and investigated, the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to low doses remain largely unknown. Results: The present study investigated the role of GATA3 protein in the control of the cellular and molecular response of human keratinocytes exposed to a 1 cGy dose of X-rays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GATA3 to be able to bind the promoter of 4 genes responding to a 1 cGy exposure. To go further into the role of GATA3 after ionizing radiation exposure, we studied the cellular and molecular consequences of radiation in GATA3 knock-down cells. Knockdown was obtained by lentiviral-mediated expression of an shRNA targeting the GATA3 transcript in differentiated keratinocytes. First, radiosensitivity was assessed: the toxicity, in terms of immediate survival (with XTT test), associated with 1 cGy radiation was found to be increased in GATA3 knock-down cells. The impact of GATA3 knock-down on the transcriptome of X-ray irradiated cells was also investigated, using oligonucleotide micro-arrays to assess changes between 3 h and 72 h post-irradiation in normal vs GATA3 knock-down backgrounds; transcriptome response was found to be completely altered in GATA3 knock-down cells, with a strong induction/repression peak 48 h after irradiation. Functional annotation revealed enrichment in genes known to be involved in chaperone activity, TGFβ signalling and stress response. Conclusion: Taken together, these data indicate that GATA3 is an important regulator of the cellular and molecular response of epidermal cells to very low doses of radiation. (authors)

  11. GATA3 is a master regulator of the transcriptional response to low-dose ionizing radiation in human keratinocytes

    Bonin, F.; Molina, M.; Berthier-Vergnes, O.; Lamartine, J. [Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Universite Lyon 1, Lyon, F-69003 (France); CNRS, UMR5534, Centre de Genetique Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Villeurbanne, F-69622 (France); Malet, C.; Ginestet, C. [Centre Leon Berard, Service de Radiotherapie, Lyon F-69008 (France); Martin, M.T. [Laboratoire de Genomique et Radiobiologie de la Keratinopoiese, CEA, IRCM, Evry F-91000 (France)

    2009-07-01

    Background: The general population is constantly exposed to low levels of radiation through natural, occupational or medical irradiation. Even if the biological effects of low-level radiation have been intensely debated and investigated, the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to low doses remain largely unknown. Results: The present study investigated the role of GATA3 protein in the control of the cellular and molecular response of human keratinocytes exposed to a 1 cGy dose of X-rays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GATA3 to be able to bind the promoter of 4 genes responding to a 1 cGy exposure. To go further into the role of GATA3 after ionizing radiation exposure, we studied the cellular and molecular consequences of radiation in GATA3 knock-down cells. Knockdown was obtained by lentiviral-mediated expression of an shRNA targeting the GATA3 transcript in differentiated keratinocytes. First, radiosensitivity was assessed: the toxicity, in terms of immediate survival (with XTT test), associated with 1 cGy radiation was found to be increased in GATA3 knock-down cells. The impact of GATA3 knock-down on the transcriptome of X-ray irradiated cells was also investigated, using oligonucleotide micro-arrays to assess changes between 3 h and 72 h post-irradiation in normal vs GATA3 knock-down backgrounds; transcriptome response was found to be completely altered in GATA3 knock-down cells, with a strong induction/repression peak 48 h after irradiation. Functional annotation revealed enrichment in genes known to be involved in chaperone activity, TGF{beta} signalling and stress response. Conclusion: Taken together, these data indicate that GATA3 is an important regulator of the cellular and molecular response of epidermal cells to very low doses of radiation. (authors)

  12. Repeatedly administered antidepressant drugs modulate humoral and cellular immune response in mice through action on macrophages.

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Kozlowski, Michael; Bryniarski, Pawel; Strobel, Spencer; Bryk, Agata; Myszka, Michal; Tyszka, Anna; Kuszmiersz, Piotr; Nowakowski, Jaroslaw; Filipczak-Bryniarska, Iwona

    2016-08-01

    Depression is associated with an altered immune response, which could be normalized by antidepressant drugs. However, little is known about the influence of antidepressants on the peripheral immune response and function of macrophages in individuals not suffering from depression. Our studies were aimed at determining the influence of antidepressant drugs on the humoral and cellular immune response in mice. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with imipramine, fluoxetine, venlafaxine, or moclobemide and contact immunized with trinitrophenyl hapten followed by elicitation and measurement of contact sensitivity by ear swelling response. Peritoneal macrophages from drug-treated mice were either pulsed with sheep erythrocytes or conjugated with trinitrophenyl and transferred into naive recipients to induce humoral or contact sensitivity response, respectively. Secretion of reactive oxygen intermediates, nitric oxide, and cytokines by macrophages from drug-treated mice was assessed, respectively, in chemiluminometry, Griess-based colorimetry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the expression of macrophage surface markers was analyzed cytometrically. Treatment of mice with fluoxetine, venlafaxine, and moclobemide results in suppression of humoral and cell-mediated immunity with a reduction of the release of macrophage proinflammatory mediators and the expression of antigen-presentation markers. In contrast, treatment with imipramine enhanced the humoral immune response and macrophage secretory activity but slightly suppressed active contact sensitivity. Our studies demonstrated that systemically delivered antidepressant drugs modulate the peripheral humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, mostly through their action on macrophages. Imipramine was rather proinflammatory, whereas other tested drugs expressed immunosuppressive potential. Current observations may be applied to new therapeutic strategies dedicated to various disorders associated with excessive

  13. Chinese experience on medical response to radiation emergencies

    Full text: Chinese Center for Medical Response to Radiation Emergency (CCMRRE) was established in 1992, based on the National Institute for Radiological Protection, China CDC (NIRP, China CDC). CCMRRE is a liaison of WHO/REMPAN and functions as a national and professional institute for medical preparedness and response to emergencies involving radioactive material. CCMRRE participates in drafting National Medical Assistant Program for Radiation Emergency and relevant technical documents, develops preventive measures and technique means of medical preparedness and response to radiation emergency. CCMRRE is responsible for medical response to radiological or nuclear accident on national level. CCMRRE holds training courses, organizes drills and provides technical support to local medical organizations in practicing medical preparedness and response to radiation emergency. CCMRRE collects, analyzes and exchanges information on medical response to radiological and nuclear emergency and establishes relevant database. CCMRRE also guides and participates in radiation pollution monitoring on accident sites. In the past ten years, we accumulate much knowledge and experience on medical response to radiation emergencies. In this context, we will discuss Xinzhou Accident, which took place in 1992 and involved in three deaths, and Ha'erbin Accident that took place in 2005 and involved one death. A father and two brothers in Xinzhou Accident died of over-exposed to 60Co source and misdiagnosis and improper treatment, which indicates that most general practitioners are uncertain about the health consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation and the medical management of exposed patients. When Ha'erbin Accident happened in 2005, the local hospital gave the right diagnosis and treatment based on the clinic symptoms and signs, which prevent more people suffering from over-expose to 192Ir source. The distinct changes comes from the education and training to primary doctors related

  14. Cellular mechanisms of tissue fibrosis. 6. Purinergic signaling and response in fibroblasts and tissue fibrosis.

    Lu, David; Insel, Paul A

    2014-05-01

    Tissue fibrosis occurs as a result of the dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis. Tissue fibroblasts, resident cells responsible for the synthesis and turnover of ECM, are regulated via numerous hormonal and mechanical signals. The release of intracellular nucleotides and their resultant autocrine/paracrine signaling have been shown to play key roles in the homeostatic maintenance of tissue remodeling and in fibrotic response post-injury. Extracellular nucleotides signal through P2 nucleotide and P1 adenosine receptors to activate signaling networks that regulate the proliferation and activity of fibroblasts, which, in turn, influence tissue structure and pathologic remodeling. An important component in the signaling and functional responses of fibroblasts to extracellular ATP and adenosine is the expression and activity of ectonucleotideases that attenuate nucleotide-mediated signaling, and thereby integrate P2 receptor- and subsequent adenosine receptor-initiated responses. Results of studies of the mechanisms of cellular nucleotide release and the effects of this autocrine/paracrine signaling axis on fibroblast-to-myofibroblast conversion and the fibrotic phenotype have advanced understanding of tissue remodeling and fibrosis. This review summarizes recent findings related to purinergic signaling in the regulation of fibroblasts and the development of tissue fibrosis in the heart, lungs, liver, and kidney. PMID:24352335

  15. Vaccination with dengue virus-like particles induces humoral and cellular immune responses in mice

    Zhang Quanfu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of dengue, an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV, has dramatically increased around the world in recent decades and is becoming a severe public health threat. However, there is currently no specific treatment for dengue fever, and licensed vaccine against dengue is not available. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs has shown considerable promise for many viral diseases, but the effect of DENV VLPs to induce specific immune responses has not been adequately investigated. Results By optimizing the expression plasmids, recombinant VLPs of four antigenically different DENV serotypes DENV1-4 were successfully produced in 293T cells. The vaccination effect of dengue VLPs in mice showed that monovalent VLPs of each serotype stimulated specific IgG responses and potent neutralizing antibodies against homotypic virus. Tetravalent VLPs efficiently enhanced specific IgG and neutralizing antibodies against all four serotypes of DENV. Moreover, vaccination with monovalent or tetravalent VLPs resulted in the induction of specific cytotoxic T cell responses. Conclusions Mammalian cell expressed dengue VLPs are capable to induce VLP-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice, and being a promising subunit vaccine candidate for prevention of dengue virus infection.

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    Highlights: • LPA5 inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA5 suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA5 on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA1 in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA5 in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA5 acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA1–LPA6) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA1 inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA5 in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA1 and LPA5 on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA5 may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA1

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  18. Metabolic Discrimination of Select List Agents by Monitoring Cellular Responses in a Multianalyte Microphysiometer

    John Wikswo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the potential of cells as complex biosensors promises the potential to create sensitive and selective detectors for discrimination of biodefense agents. Here we present toxin detection and suggest discrimination using cells in a multianalyte microphysiometer (MMP that is capable of simultaneously measuring flux changes in four extracellular analytes (acidification rate, glucose uptake, oxygen uptake, and lactate production in real-time. Differential short-term cellular responses were observed between botulinum neurotoxin A and ricin toxin with neuroblastoma cells, alamethicin and anthrax protective antigen with RAW macrophages, and cholera toxin, muscarine, 2,4-dinitro-phenol, and NaF with CHO cells. These results and the post exposure dynamics and metabolic recovery observed in each case suggest the usefulness of cell-based detectors to discriminate between specific analytes and classes of compounds in a complex matrix, and furthermore to make metabolic inferences on the cellular effects of the agents. This may be particularly valuable for classifying unknown toxins.

  19. Response of monitoring instruments to high-energy photon radiation

    Haridas, G; Pradhan, S D; Nayak, A R; Bhagwat, A M

    2000-01-01

    Response of commercially available monitoring instruments to high-energy photon radiation was studied under the stored beam condition of a few milliamperes in the storage ring of the Synchrotron Radiation Source, INDUS-I, at Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore. The storage ring has a circumference of 18.96 m, where electrons at 450 MeV are stored for a few hours, during which the emitted synchrotron radiation is exploited for scientific research and other applications. Radiation environment near storage ring has bremsstrahlung photons of various energies (maximum 450 MeV). A study has indicated underestimation of dose by conventional radiation monitoring instruments by a factor of 2-4. Response after transmission of photons through massive shield was also studied, which indicated spectral degradation and good response by the survey meters.

  20. MOSFET and MOS capacitor responses to ionizing radiation

    Benedetto, J. M.; Boesch, H. E., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The ionizing radiation responses of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) field-effect transistors (FETs) and MOS capacitors are compared. It is shown that the radiation-induced threshold voltage shift correlates closely with the shift in the MOS capacitor inversion voltage. The radiation-induced interface-state density of the MOSFETs and MOS capacitors was determined by several techniques. It is shown that the presence of 'slow' states can interfere with the interface-state measurements.

  1. Gestational zinc deficiency impairs humoral and cellular immune responses to hepatitis B vaccination in offspring mice.

    Ning Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gestational zinc deficiency has been confirmed to impair the infant immune function. However, knowledge about effects of maternal mild zinc deficiency during pregnancy on hepatitis B vaccine responsiveness in offspring is limited. In this report, we aimed to examine how maternal zinc deficiency during pregnancy influences humoral and cellular immune responses to hepatitis B vaccination in offspring of BALB/c mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From day 1 of pregnancy upon delivery, maternal mice were given a standard diet (30 mg/kg/day zinc, zinc deficient diet (8 mg/kg/day zinc, or combination of zinc deficient diet (8 mg/kg/day zinc in the first 2 weeks of gestation and zinc supplement diet (150 mg/kg/day zinc for the last week of pregnancy, respectively. Newborn pups of these maternal mice were immunized with hepatitis B vaccine at postnatal weeks 0, 2 and 4. Then, splenocytes and blood samples from the offspring mice were harvested for detection of serum zinc concentrations, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, expression of cytokines using ELISA, CCK-8 and flow cytometric analysis. Results from the present study demonstrated that gestational zinc deficiency inhibited antibody responses, and decreased the proliferative capacity of T cells in offsprings immunized with hepatitis B vaccine. Additionally, HBsAg-specific cytokines analysis revealed that gestational zinc deficiency could inhibit secretion of IFN-γ from splenocytes, and decrease IFN-γ expression of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Gestational zinc deficiency can weaken the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to hepatitis B vaccine via decreasing B cell counts and hepatitis B virus-specific immunoglobulin G production, as well as reducing T cell proliferation, CD4(+/CD8(+ T cell ratio, and Th1-type immune responses.

  2. Computer simulation of a cellular automata model for the immune response in a retrovirus system

    Immune response in a retrovirus system is modeled by a network of three binary cell elements to take into account some of the main functional features of T4 cells, T8 cells, and viruses. Two different intercell interactions are introduced, one of which leads to three fixed points while the other yields bistable fixed points oscillating between a healthy state and a sick state in a mean field treatment. Evolution of these cells is studied for quenched and annealed random interactions on a simple cubic lattice with a nearest neighbor interaction using inhomogenous cellular automata. Populations of T4 cells and viral cells oscillate together with damping (with constant amplitude) for annealed (quenched) interaction on increasing the value of mixing probability B from zero to a characteristic value Bca (Bcq). For higher B, the average number of T4 cells increases while that of the viral infected cells decreases monotonically on increasing B, suggesting a phase transition at Bca (Bcq)

  3. Unraveling the cellular response to oxidative stress in the endoplasmic reticulum

    Hansen, Henning Gram

    , disulfide bonds are predominantly generated by the two isoforms of the ER oxidoreductin-1 (Ero1) family: Ero1α and Ero1β. Both enzymes oxidize the active-site cysteines in protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs), which in turn introduce disulfide bonds into newly synthesized proteins. Ero1 is re......-oxidized by molecular oxygen and this step generates hydrogen peroxide: a reactive oxygen species. Intramolecular disulfide bonds tightly regulate the oxidase activity of Ero1α. Whereas the regulatory mechanisms that regulate Ero1α activity are well understood, the overall cellular response to oxidative stress...... that these enzymes are PDI peroxidases and may comprise an as yet unidentified pathway for disulfide bond formation in cells. However, the results presented here indicate that GPx7 and GPx8 do not comprise a major pathway for disulfide bond formation in the ER in cells deficient in Ero1 and peroxiredoxin-4...

  4. Humoral and cellular response to BoHV-1 in buffalo and cattle treated with an inactivated marker vaccine

    A. Marocchi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The study is aimed at assessing and comparing the immune response to BoHV-1 elicited by an inactivated marker vaccine in buffaloes and cattle. Vaccination did not produced any local or general reactions in buffaloes. Seroneutralizing antibodies and cellular response by IFN-γ- test have been detected in buffaloes and cattle after a prime/ booster vaccination strategy. Humoral and cellular responses were significantly higher in cattle than in buffaloes. Data pointed out the possibility to use the marker vaccine in buffaloes. However, further studies must be planned to assess the immune pressure of marker vaccines in terms of IBR eradicative attitude in infected buffalo herds.

  5. Study of radiation detectors response in standard X, gamma and beta radiation standard beams

    The response of 76 Geiger-Mueller detectors, 4 semiconductor detectors and 34 ionization chambers were studied. Many of them were calibrated with gamma radiation beams (37Cs and 60Co), and some of them were tested in beta radiation (90Sr+9'0Y e 204Tl) and X radiation (N-60, N-80, N-100, N-150) beams. For all three types of radiation, the calibration factors of the instruments were obtained, and the energy and angular dependences were studied. For beta and gamma radiation, the angular dependence was studied for incident radiation angles of 0 deg and +- 45 deg. The curves of the response of the instruments were obtained over an angle interval of 0 deg to +- 90 deg, for gamma, beta and X radiations. The calibration factors obtained for beta radiation were compared to those obtained for gamma radiation. For gamma radiation, 24 of the 66 tested Geiger-Mueller detectors presented results for the energy dependence according to international recommendation of ISO 4037-2 and 56 were in accordance with the Brazilian ABNT 10011 recommendation. The ionization chambers and semiconductors were in accordance to national and international recommendations. All instruments showed angular dependence less than 40%. For beta radiation, the instruments showed unsatisfactory results for the energy dependence and angular dependence. For X radiation, the ionization chambers presented results for energy dependence according to the national recommendation, and the angular dependence was less than 40%. (author)

  6. 3D scaffold alters cellular response to graphene in a polymer composite for orthopedic applications.

    Kumar, Sachin; Azam, Dilkash; Raj, Shammy; Kolanthai, Elayaraja; Vasu, K S; Sood, A K; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2016-05-01

    Graphene-based polymer nanocomposites are being studied for biomedical applications. Polymer nanocomposites can be processed differently to generate planar two-dimensional (2D) substrates and porous three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds. The objective of this work was to investigate potential differences in biological response to graphene in polymer composites in the form of 2D substrates and 3D scaffolds. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating 1% of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO). GO increased modulus and strength of PCL by 44 and 22% respectively, whereas RGO increased modulus and strength by 22 and 16%, respectively. RGO increased the water contact angle of PCL from 81° to 87° whereas GO decreased it to 77°. In 2D, osteoblast proliferated 15% more on GO composites than on PCL whereas RGO composite showed 17% decrease in cell proliferation, which may be attributed to differences in water wettability. In 3D, initial cell proliferation was markedly retarded in both GO (36% lower) and RGO (55% lower) composites owing to increased roughness due to the presence of the protruding nanoparticles. Cells organized into aggregates in 3D in contrast to spread and randomly distributed cells on 2D discs due to the macro-porous architecture of the scaffolds. Increased cell-cell contact and altered cellular morphology led to significantly higher mineralization in 3D. This study demonstrates that the cellular response to nanoparticles in composites can change markedly by varying the processing route and has implications for designing orthopedic implants such as resorbable fracture fixation devices and tissue scaffolds using such nanocomposites. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 732-749, 2016. PMID:26482196

  7. Transcriptional and cellular responses of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids.

    Sanchez, David; Houde, Magali; Douville, Mélanie; De Silva, Amila O; Spencer, Christine; Verreault, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Perfluoroalkyl phosphonic acids (PFPAs), a new class of perfluoroalkyl substances used primarily in the industrial sector as surfactants, were recently detected in surface water and wastewater treatment plant effluents. Toxicological effects of PFPAs have as yet not been investigated in aquatic organisms. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of perfluorooctylphosphonic acid (C8-PFPA) and perfluorodecylphosphonic acid (C10-PFPA) exposure (31-250μg/L) on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using genomic (qRT-PCR), biochemical (reactive oxygen species production (ROS) and lipid peroxidation), and physiological (cellular viability) indicators. After 72h of exposure, no differences were observed in cellular viability for any of the two perfluorochemicals. However, increase in ROS concentrations (36% and 25.6% at 125 and 250μg/L, respectively) and lipid peroxidation (35.5% and 35.7% at 125 and 250μg/L, respectively) was observed following exposure to C10-PFPA. C8-PFPA exposure did not impact ROS production and lipid peroxidation in algae. To get insights into the molecular response and modes of action of PFPA toxicity, qRT-PCR-based assays were performed to analyze the transcription of genes related to antioxidant responses including superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX I). Genomic analyses revealed that the transcription of CAT and APX I was up-regulated for all the C10-PFPA concentrations. In addition, PFPAs were quantified in St. Lawrence River surface water samples and detected at concentrations ranging from 250 to 850pg/L for C8-PFPA and 380 to 650pg/L for C10-PFPA. This study supports the prevalence of PFPAs in the aquatic environment and suggests potential impacts of PFPA exposure on the antioxidant defensive system in C. reinhardtii. PMID:25621396

  8. Time-lapse analysis of potential cellular responsiveness to Johrei, a Japanese healing technique

    Moore Dan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Johrei is an alternative healing practice which involves the channeling of a purported universal healing energy to influence the health of another person. Despite little evidence to support the efficacy of such practices the use of such treatments is on the rise. Methods We assessed cultured human cancer cells for potential responsiveness to Johrei treatment from a short distance. Johrei treatment was delivered by practitioners who participated in teams of two, alternating every half hour for a total of four hours of treatment. The practitioners followed a defined set of mental procedures to minimize variability in mental states between experiments. An environmental chamber maintained optimal growth conditions for cells throughout the experiments. Computerized time-lapse microscopy allowed documentation of cancer cell proliferation and cell death before, during and after Johrei treatments. Results Comparing eight control experiments with eight Johrei intervention experiments, we found no evidence of a reproducible cellular response to Johrei treatment. Conclusion Cell death and proliferation rates of cultured human cancer cells do not appear responsive to Johrei treatment from a short distance.

  9. Cellular and molecular responses of E. fetida coelomocytes exposed to TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Bigorgne, Emilie, E-mail: emilie.bigorgne@univ-lorraine.fr; Foucaud, Laurent [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologique Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE) (France); Caillet, Celine [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire Environnement et Mineralurgie (LEM) CNRS UMR7569 (France); Giamberini, Laure; Nahmani, Johanne [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologique Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE) (France); Thomas, Fabien [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire Environnement et Mineralurgie (LEM) CNRS UMR7569 (France); Rodius, Francois [Universite de Lorraine-Laboratoire des Interactions Ecotoxicologique Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE) (France)

    2012-07-15

    An in vitro approach using coelomocytes of Eisenia fetida was investigated to evaluate toxicity of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Coelomocytes were exposed to well-dispersed suspension of small aggregates (130 nm) of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (1-25 {mu}g/ml) during 4, 12 and 24 h. Intracellular localisation suggested that the main route of uptake was endocytosis. Cellular responses showed that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were not cytotoxic and had no effect on phagocytosis at any of the four concentrations for each time tested. Concerning molecular responses, an increase of fetidin and metallothionein mRNA expression was observed starting from 4 h of exposure. In contrast, expression of coelomic cytolytic factor mRNA decreased for 10 and 25 {mu}g/ml after 4 h. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase expression were not modified suggesting that oxidative stress was not induced by TiO{sub 2} in our experimental conditions. This in vitro approach showed that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were taken up by coelomocytes and they could modify the molecular response of immune and detoxification system.

  10. Cellular, physiological, and molecular adaptive responses of Erwinia amylovora to starvation.

    Santander, Ricardo D; Oliver, James D; Biosca, Elena G

    2014-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight, a destructive disease of rosaceous plants distributed worldwide. This bacterium is a nonobligate pathogen able to survive outside the host under starvation conditions, allowing its spread by various means such as rainwater. We studied E. amylovora responses to starvation using water microcosms to mimic natural oligotrophy. Initially, survivability under optimal (28 °C) and suboptimal (20 °C) growth temperatures was compared. Starvation induced a loss of culturability much more pronounced at 28 °C than at 20 °C. Natural water microcosms at 20 °C were then used to characterize cellular, physiological, and molecular starvation responses of E. amylovora. Challenged cells developed starvation-survival and viable but nonculturable responses, reduced their size, acquired rounded shapes and developed surface vesicles. Starved cells lost motility in a few days, but a fraction retained flagella. The expression of genes related to starvation, oxidative stress, motility, pathogenicity, and virulence was detected during the entire experimental period with different regulation patterns observed during the first 24 h. Further, starved cells remained as virulent as nonstressed cells. Overall, these results provide new knowledge on the biology of E. amylovora under conditions prevailing in nature, which could contribute to a better understanding of the life cycle of this pathogen. PMID:24476337

  11. Role of toll-like receptors 3, 4 and 7 in cellular uptake and response to titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Chen, Peng; Kanehira, Koki; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi

    2013-02-01

    Innate immune response is believed to be among the earliest provisional cellular responses, and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical to these interactions. We hypothesize that TLRs also play an important role in interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and cells, although little information has been reported concerning such an interaction. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR3, TLR4 and TLR7 in cellular uptake of titanium dioxide NP (TiO2 NP) agglomerates and the resulting inflammatory responses to these NPs. Our data indicate that TLR4 is involved in the uptake of TiO2 NPs and promotes the associated inflammatory responses. The data also suggest that TLR3, which has a subcellular location distinct from that of TLR4, inhibits the denaturation of cellular protein caused by TiO2 NPs. In contrast, the unique cellular localization of TLR7 has middle-ground functional roles in cellular response after TiO2 NP exposure. These findings are important for understanding the molecular interaction mechanisms between NPs and cells.

  12. Role of toll-like receptors 3, 4 and 7 in cellular uptake and response to titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Peng Chen, Koki Kanehira and Akiyoshi Taniguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immune response is believed to be among the earliest provisional cellular responses, and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are critical to these interactions. We hypothesize that TLRs also play an important role in interactions between nanoparticles (NPs and cells, although little information has been reported concerning such an interaction. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR3, TLR4 and TLR7 in cellular uptake of titanium dioxide NP (TiO2 NP agglomerates and the resulting inflammatory responses to these NPs. Our data indicate that TLR4 is involved in the uptake of TiO2 NPs and promotes the associated inflammatory responses. The data also suggest that TLR3, which has a subcellular location distinct from that of TLR4, inhibits the denaturation of cellular protein caused by TiO2 NPs. In contrast, the unique cellular localization of TLR7 has middle-ground functional roles in cellular response after TiO2 NP exposure. These findings are important for understanding the molecular interaction mechanisms between NPs and cells.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus avirulent mutant vaccine induces humoral and cellular immune responses on pregnant heifers.

    Pellegrino, M; Rodriguez, N; Vivas, A; Giraudo, J; Bogni, C

    2016-06-17

    Bovine mastitis produces economic losses, attributable to the decrease in milk production, reduced milk quality, costs of treatment and replacement of animals. A successful prophylactic vaccine against Staphylococcus aureus should elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. In a previous report we evaluated the effectiveness of a live vaccine to protect heifers against challenge with a virulent strain. In the present study the immunological response of heifers after combined immunization schedule was investigated. In a first experimental trial, heifers were vaccinated with 3 subcutaneous doses of avirulent mutant S. aureus RC122 before calving and one intramammary dose (IMD) after calving. Antibodies concentration in blood, bactericidal effect of serum from vaccinated animals and lymphocyte proliferation was determined. The levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 in colostrum and the lymphocyte proliferation index were significantly higher in vaccinated respect to non-vaccinated group throughout the experiment. The second trial, where animals were inoculated with different vaccination schedules, was carried out to determine the effect of the IMD on the level of antibodies in blood and milk, cytokines (IL-13 and IFN-γ) concentration and milk's SCC and bacteriology. The bacterial growth of the S. aureus strains was totally inhibited at 1-3×10(6) and 1-3×10(3)cfu/ml, when the strains were mixed with pooled serum diluted 1/40. The results shown that IMD has not a significant effect on the features determinate. In conclusion, a vaccination schedule involving three SC doses before calving would be enough to stimulate antibodies production in milk without an IMD. Furthermore, the results showed a bactericidal effect of serum from vaccinated animals and this provides further evidence about serum functionality. Immune responses, humoral (antigen-specific antibodies and Th2 type cytokines) and cellular (T-lymphocyte proliferation responses and Th1 type cytokines), were

  14. Response of Graphene Based Gated Nanodevices Exposed to THz Radiation

    Fedorov G.E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report on the response of asymmetric graphene based devices to subterahertz and terahertz radiation. Our devices are made in a configuration of a field-effect transistor with conduction channel between the source and drain electrodes formed with a CVD-grown graphene. The radiation is coupled through a spiral antenna to source and top gate electrodes. Room temperature responsivity of our devices is close to the values that are attractive for commercial applications. Further optimization of the device configuration may result in appearance of novel terahertz radiation detectors.

  15. Response of radiation detectors in electron accelerator environment

    Full text: Due to the complex nature of radiation field present in high-energy electron accelerators and in associated systems, radiation measurements and interpretation of the results become a difficult task. In the present paper response of radiation instruments due to pulsed radiation of different duty cycle, radio frequency (RF) and low frequency (LF) interference from radio frequency generators (eg. magnetron) and associated systems are studied and the results are presented. The results show that gas filled detectors operated in the multiplicative region (eg. GM tube) severely underestimate the radiation field at very low duty cycles. The response is found to improve as the duty cycle is increased. RF, LF and magnetic field interference also is studied and the results are discussed

  16. DNA-damage response network at the crossroads of cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis

    SCHMITT Estelle; PAQUET Claudie; BEAUCHEMIN Myriam; BERTRAND Richard

    2007-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis requires a carefully-orchestrated balance between cell proliferation,cellular senescence and cell death.Cells proliferate through a cell cycle that is tightly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase activities.Cellular senescence is a safeguard program limiting the proliferative competence of cells in living organisms.Apoptosis eliminates unwanted cells by the coordinated activity of gene products that regulate and effect cell death.The intimate link between the cell cycle,cellular senescence,apoptosis regulation,cancer development and tumor responses to cancer treatment has become eminently apparent.Extensive research on tumor suppressor genes,oncogenes,the cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory genes has revealed how the DNA damage-sensing and -signaling pathways,referred to as the DNA-damage response network,are tied to cell proliferation,cell-cycle arrest,cellular senescence and apoptosis.DNA-damage responses are complex,involving "sensor" proteins that sense the damage,and transmit signals to "transducer" proteins,which,in turn,convey the signals to numerous "effector" proteins implicated in specific cellular pathways,including DNA repair mechanisms,cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis.The Bcl-2 family of proteins stands among the most crucial regulators of apoptosis and performs vital functions in deciding whether a cell will live or die after cancer chemotherapy and irradiation.In addition,several studies have now revealed that members of the Bcl-2 family also interface with the cell cycle,DNA repair/recombination and cellular senescence,effects that are generally distinct from their function in apoptosis.In this review,we report progress in understanding the molecular networks that regulate cell-cycle checkpoints,cellular senescence and apoptosis after DNA damage,and discuss the influence of some Bcl-2 family members on cell-cycle checkpoint regulation.

  17. Green light radiation effects on free radicals inhibition in cellular and chemical systems.

    Comorosan, Sorin; Polosan, Silviu; Jipa, Silviu; Popescu, Irinel; Marton, George; Ionescu, Elena; Cristache, Ligia; Badila, Dumitru; Mitrica, Radu

    2011-01-10

    Free radicals generation is inhibited through green light (GL) irradiation in cellular systems and in chemical reactions. Standard melanocyte cultures were UV-irradiated and the induced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified by the fluorescence technique. The same cell cultures, previously protected by a 24h GL exposure, displayed a significantly lower ROS production. A simple chemical reaction is subsequently chosen, in which the production of free radicals is well defined. Paraffin wax and mineral oil were GL irradiated during thermal degradation and the oxidation products checked by chemiluminescence [CL] and Fourier transform infrared spectra [FT-IR]. The same clear inhibition of the radical oxidation of alkanes is recorded. A quantum chemistry modeling of these results is performed and a mechanism involving a new type of Rydberg macromolecular systems with implications for biology and medicine is suggested. PMID:20934350

  18. Emergency response and radiation monitoring systems in Russian regions

    Full text: Preparedness of the emergency response system to elimination of radiation incidents and accidents is one of the most important elements of ensuring safe operation of nuclear power facilities. Routine activities on prevention of emergency situations along with adequate, efficient and opportune response actions are the key factors reducing the risks of adverse effects on population and environment. Both high engineering level and multiformity of the nuclear branch facilities make special demands on establishment of response system activities to eventual emergency situations. First and foremost, while resolving sophisticated engineering and scientific problems emerging during the emergency response process, one needs a powerful scientific and technical support system.The emergency response system established in the past decade in Russian nuclear branch provides a high efficiency of response activities due to the use of scientific and engineering potential and experience of the involved institutions. In Russia the responsibility for population protection is imposed on regional authority. So regional emergence response system should include up-to-date tools of radiation monitoring and infrastructure. That's why new activities on development of radiation monitoring and emergency response system were started in the regions of Russia. The main directions of these activities are: 1) Modernization of the existing and setting-up new facility and territorial automatic radiation monitoring systems, including mobile radiation surveillance kits; 2) Establishment of the Regional Crisis Centres and Crisis Centres of nuclear and radiation hazardous facilities; 3) Setting up communication systems for transfer, acquisition, processing, storage and presentation of data for participants of emergency response at the facility, regional and federal levels; 4) Development of software and hardware systems for expert support of decision-making on protection of personnel, population

  19. PHANTOM MODEL OF HUMAN BRAIN TISSUE FOR CELLULAR PHONE FREQUENCIES IN ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD RADIATION ABSORPTION STUDIES

    Özen, Şükrü; Köylü, Halis

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACTThere is a necessity of tissue equivalent (phantom) models in research of electromagnetic (EM) effects in biologic tissues. Recently, many kinds of tissue models depend on the different aim were proposed. So many studies were carried on the interaction of human-head and cellular phone. The most of them are related to numerical models. Owing to difficulty of study on human body, simulation of human tissues is required. In this study two different, for 900MHz and for 1800MHz, brain equi...

  20. Cellular responses in sea fan corals: granular amoebocytes react to pathogen and climate stressors.

    Laura D Mydlarz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Climate warming is causing environmental change making both marine and terrestrial organisms, and even humans, more susceptible to emerging diseases. Coral reefs are among the most impacted ecosystems by climate stress, and immunity of corals, the most ancient of metazoans, is poorly known. Although coral mortality due to infectious diseases and temperature-related stress is on the rise, the immune effector mechanisms that contribute to the resistance of corals to such events remain elusive. In the Caribbean sea fan corals (Anthozoa, Alcyonacea: Gorgoniidae, the cell-based immune defenses are granular acidophilic amoebocytes, which are known to be involved in wound repair and histocompatibility. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate for the first time in corals that these cells are involved in the organismal response to pathogenic and temperature stress. In sea fans with both naturally occurring infections and experimental inoculations with the fungal pathogen Aspergillus sydowii, an inflammatory response, characterized by a massive increase of amoebocytes, was evident near infections. Melanosomes were detected in amoebocytes adjacent to protective melanin bands in infected sea fans; neither was present in uninfected fans. In naturally infected sea fans a concurrent increase in prophenoloxidase activity was detected in infected tissues with dense amoebocytes. Sea fans sampled in the field during the 2005 Caribbean Bleaching Event (a once-in-hundred-year climate event responded to heat stress with a systemic increase in amoebocytes and amoebocyte densities were also increased by elevated temperature stress in lab experiments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The observed amoebocyte responses indicate that sea fan corals use cellular defenses to combat fungal infection and temperature stress. The ability to mount an inflammatory response may be a contributing factor that allowed the survival of even infected sea fan corals during a

  1. Exposure to low infective doses of HCV induces cellular immune responses without consistently detectable viremia or seroconversion in chimpanzees

    In hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, there is accumulating data suggesting the presence of cellular immune responses to HCV in exposed but seemingly uninfected populations. Some studies have suggested cross-reactive antigens rather than prior HCV exposure as the main reason for the immune responses. In this study we address this question by analyzing the immune response of chimpanzees that have been sequentially exposed to increasing doses of HCV virions. The level of viremia, as well as the immune responses to HCV at different times after virus inoculation, were examined. Our data indicate that HCV infective doses as low as 1-10 RNA (+) virions induce detectable cellular immune responses in chimpanzees without consistently detectable viremia or persistent seroconversion. However, increasing the infective doses of HCV to 100 RNA (+) virions overcame the low-inoculum-induced immune response and produced high-level viremia followed by seroconversion

  2. Gamma radiation induced micronuclei and erythrocyte cellular abnormalities in the fish Catla catla

    Anbumani, S. [Biodosimetry Laboratory, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India); Mohankumar, Mary N., E-mail: marynmk@rediffmail.com [Biodosimetry Laboratory, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2012-10-15

    Ionizing radiation induced DNA damage in fishes is a scarcely studied topic and very few studies are available in fishes exposed to ionizing radiation using the erythrocyte micronucleus assay under laboratory conditions. Since radionuclides released accidentally or during a nuclear disaster can contaminate inland water bodies, biomonitoring methods are required for assessing the impacts of high and low levels of radiation that may ultimately result in ionizing radiation exposure to both humans and non-human biota. Fresh water fish, Catla catla were subjected to protracted (0.002 Gy/min) and acute (3.2 Gy/min) gamma radiation to a total dose of 5 Gy. Peripheral blood samples were collected at different intervals (days 3, 6, 12, 18, 30, 45, 90, 135, 202) and analyzed by the erythrocyte micronucleus assay. Nuclear anomalies observed were micronuclei (MN), deformed nuclei (DN), nuclear bud (NBu), nuclear bridge (NBr), vacuolated nucleus (VN), binucleated cell (BNC), apoptotic cells (AC) while cytoplasmic abnormalities detected were vacuolated cytoplasm (VC), anisochromasia (AN), echinocytes (EC) and enucleus (EN). Both exposures caused a statistically significant increase in nuclear and cytoplasmic abnormalities that correlated with micronucleus and other nuclear anomalies. However, the extent of damage is higher after an acute exposure lasting for a longer period leading to apoptosis. Nuclear and cytoplasmic abnormalities are the resultants of gamma radiation induced genotoxicity and cytotoxicity.

  3. How relevant to radiation protection is the adaptive response mechanism?

    There is evidence that the phenomenon of adaptive response (AR) which results from a low dose exposure could modify the risk of a subsequent radiation exposure, and conceivably could even provide a net benefit rather than the putative radiation detriment at low doses. The AR has been widely observed in human and other mammalian cells exposed to low doses and low-dose rates. The phenomenon has been demonstrated at the level of one track per cell, the lowest insult a cell can receive. The AR to radiation has been shown to: (i) protect against the DNA damaging effects of radiation and many chemical carcinogens; (ii) increase the probability that improperly repaired cells will die by apoptosis, thereby reducing risk to the whole organism; (iii) suppress both spontaneous- and radiation-induced neoplastic transformation in vitro; and (iv) reduce life-shortening in mice that develop myeloid leukemia as a result of a radiation exposure. It remains unclear, however, if the AR will be relevant to either risk assessment or radiation protection. There is currently no evidence of AR's influence on the incidence of radiogenic cancer in vivo although recent data indicate that adapting doses could lead to reduced risk in animal or human populations. Currently the existing dose control and dose management programs attempt to limit or eliminate even very low exposures, without evidence that such an approach has economic and societal benefits. Indeed, if adaptation from exposure to low doses provides the same responses in vivo as have been shown in vitro, then the current approach to protection against low doses may be counterproductive However, the demonstrated principles of the adaptive response to radiation in vitro will not likely influence the long held current formulation of radiation protection practices until the biological action of accumulated low doses of radiation in vivo and its impact on the modulation of radiation carcinogenesis are better understood. (author)

  4. Activation of the cellular unfolded protein response by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    Balaji Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR is a stress-induced cyto-protective mechanism elicited towards an influx of large amount of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In the present study, we evaluated if AAV manipulates the UPR pathways during its infection. We first examined the role of the three major UPR axes, namely, endoribonuclease inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1α, activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6 and PKR-like ER kinase (PERK in AAV infected cells. Total RNA from mock or AAV infected HeLa cells were used to determine the levels of 8 different ER-stress responsive transcripts from these pathways. We observed a significant up-regulation of IRE1α (up to 11 fold and PERK (up to 8 fold genes 12-48 hours after infection with self-complementary (scAAV2 but less prominent with single-stranded (ssAAV2 vectors. Further studies demonstrated that scAAV1 and scAAV6 also induce cellular UPR in vitro, with AAV1 vectors activating the PERK pathway (3 fold while AAV6 vectors induced a significant increase on all the three major UPR pathways [6-16 fold]. These data suggest that the type and strength of UPR activation is dependent on the viral capsid. We then examined if transient inhibition of UPR pathways by RNA interference has an effect on AAV transduction. siRNA mediated silencing of PERK and IRE1α had a modest effect on AAV2 and AAV6 mediated gene expression (∼1.5-2 fold in vitro. Furthermore, hepatic gene transfer of scAAV2 vectors in vivo, strongly elevated IRE1α and PERK pathways (2 and 3.5 fold, respectively. However, when animals were pre-treated with a pharmacological UPR inhibitor (metformin during scAAV2 gene transfer, the UPR signalling and its subsequent inflammatory response was attenuated concomitant to a modest 2.8 fold increase in transgene expression. Collectively, these data suggest that AAV vectors activate the cellular UPR pathways and their selective inhibition may be beneficial during AAV mediated gene transfer.

  5. Frequent biphasic cellular responses of permanent fish cell cultures to deoxynivalenol (DON)

    Contamination of animal feed with mycotoxins is a major problem for fish feed mainly due to usage of contaminated ingredients for production and inappropriate storage of feed. The use of cereals for fish food production further increases the risk of a potential contamination. Potential contaminants include the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) which is synthesized by globally distributed fungi of the genus Fusarium. The toxicity of DON is well recognized in mammals. In this study, we confirm cytotoxic effects of DON in established permanent fish cell lines. We demonstrate that DON is capable of influencing the metabolic activity and cell viability in fish cells as determined by different assays to indicate possible cellular targets of this toxin. Evaluation of cell viability by measurement of membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and lysosomal function after 24 h of exposure of fish cell lines to DON at a concentration range of 0-3000 ng ml-1 shows a biphasic effect on cells although differences in sensitivity occur. The cell lines derived from rainbow trout are particularly sensitive to DON. The focus of this study lies, furthermore, on the effects of DON at different concentrations on production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the different fish cell lines. The results show that DON mainly reduces ROS production in all cell lines that were used. Thus, our comparative investigations reveal that the fish cell lines show distinct species-related endpoint sensitivities that also depend on the type of tissue from which the cells were derived and the severity of exposure. - Highlights: → DON uptake by cells is not extensive. → All fish cell lines are sensitive to DON. → DON is most cytotoxic to rainbow trout cells. → Biphasic cellular responses were frequently observed. → Our results are similar to studies on mammalian cell lines.

  6. Graphene oxide scaffold accelerates cellular proliferative response and alveolar bone healing of tooth extraction socket

    Nishida, Erika; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kato, Akihito; Takita, Hiroko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Momose, Takehito; Ogawa, Kosuke; Murakami, Shusuke; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) consisting of a carbon monolayer has been widely investigated for tissue engineering platforms because of its unique properties. For this study, we fabricated a GO-applied scaffold and assessed the cellular and tissue behaviors in the scaffold. A preclinical test was conducted to ascertain whether the GO scaffold promoted bone induction in dog tooth extraction sockets. For this study, GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a collagen sponge scaffold with 0.1 and 1 µg/mL GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), physical testing, cell seeding, and rat subcutaneous implant testing. Then a GO scaffold was implanted into a dog tooth extraction socket. Histological observations were made at 2 weeks postsurgery. SEM observations show that GO attached to the surface of collagen scaffold struts. The GO scaffold exhibited an interconnected structure resembling that of control subjects. GO application improved the physical strength, enzyme resistance, and adsorption of calcium and proteins. Cytocompatibility tests showed that GO application significantly increased osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. In addition, an assessment of rat subcutaneous tissue response revealed that implantation of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold stimulated cellular ingrowth behavior, suggesting that the GO scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility. The tissue ingrowth area and DNA contents of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold were, respectively, approximately 2.5-fold and 1.4-fold greater than those of the control. Particularly, the infiltration of ED2-positive (M2) macrophages and blood vessels were prominent in the GO scaffold. Dog bone-formation tests showed that 1 µg/mL GO scaffold implantation enhanced bone formation. New bone formation following GO scaffold implantation was enhanced fivefold compared to that in control subjects. These results suggest that GO was biocompatible and had high bone-formation capability for the scaffold

  7. Cerium dioxide nanoparticles can interfere with the associated cellular mechanistic response to diesel exhaust exposure.

    Steiner, Sandro; Mueller, Loretta; Popovicheva, Olga B; Raemy, David O; Czerwinski, Jan; Comte, Pierre; Mayer, Andreas; Gehr, Peter; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J D

    2012-10-17

    The aim of this study was to compare the biological response of a sophisticated in vitro 3D co-culture model of the epithelial airway barrier to a co-exposure of CeO(2) NPs and diesel exhaust using a realistic air-liquid exposure system. Independent of the individual effects of either diesel exhaust or CeO(2) NPs investigation observed that a combined exposure of CeO(2) NPs and diesel exhaust did not cause a significant cytotoxic effect or alter cellular morphology after exposure to diesel exhaust for 2h at 20μg/ml (low dose) or for 6h at 60μg/ml (high dose), and a subsequent 6h exposure to an aerosolized solution of CeO(2) NPs at the same doses. A significant loss in the reduced intracellular glutathione level was recorded, although a significant increase in the oxidative marker HMOX-1 was found after exposure to a low and high dose respectively. Both the gene expression and protein release of tumour necrosis factor-α were significantly elevated after a high dose exposure only. In conclusion, CeO(2) NPs, in combination with diesel exhaust, can significantly interfere with the cell machinery, indicating a specific, potentially adverse role of CeO(2) NPs in regards to the biological response of diesel exhaust exposure. PMID:22960666

  8. Cellular responses to disruption of the permeability barrier in a three-dimensional organotypic epidermal model

    Repeated injury to the stratum corneum of mammalian skin (caused by friction, soaps, or organic solvents) elicits hyperkeratosis and epidermal thickening. Functionally, these changes serve to restore the cutaneous barrier and protect the organism. To better understand the molecular and cellular basis of this response, we have engineered an in vitro model of acetone-induced injury using organotypic epidermal cultures. Rat epidermal keratinocytes (REKs), grown on a collagen raft in the absence of any feeder fibroblasts, developed all the hallmarks of a true epidermis including a well-formed cornified layer. To induce barrier injury, REK cultures were treated with intermittent 30-s exposures to acetone then were fixed and paraffin-sectioned. After two exposures, increased proliferation (Ki67 and BrdU staining) was observed in basal and suprabasal layers. After three exposures, proliferation became confined to localized buds in the basal layer and increased terminal differentiation was observed (compact hyperkeratosis of the stratum corneum, elevated levels of K10 and filaggrin, and heightened transglutaminase activity). Thus, barrier disruption causes epidermal hyperplasia and/or enhances differentiation, depending upon the extent and duration of injury. Given that no fibroblasts are present in the model, the ability to mount a hyperplastic response to barrier injury is an inherent property of keratinocytes

  9. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in human macrophages: uptake, intracellular distribution and cellular responses

    Silver nanoparticles (SNP) are among the most commercialized nanoparticles worldwide. They can be found in many diverse products, mostly because of their antibacterial properties. Despite its widespread use only little data on possible adverse health effects exist. It is difficult to compare biological data from different studies due to the great variety in sizes, coatings or shapes of the particles. Here, we applied a novel synthesis approach to obtain SNP, which are covalently stabilized by a small peptide. This enables a tight control of both size and shape. We applied these SNP in two different sizes of 20 or 40 nm (Ag20Pep and Ag40Pep) and analyzed responses of THP-1-derived human macrophages. Similar gold nanoparticles with the same coating (Au20Pep) were used for comparison and found to be non-toxic. We assessed the cytotoxicity of particles and confirmed their cellular uptake via transmission electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy. Importantly a majority of the SNP could be detected as individual particles spread throughout the cells. Furthermore we studied several types of oxidative stress related responses such as induction of heme oxygenase I or formation of protein carbonyls. In summary, our data demonstrate that even low doses of SNP exerted adverse effects in human macrophages.

  10. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in human macrophages: uptake, intracellular distribution and cellular responses

    Haase, A; Tentschert, J; Jungnickel, H; Goetz, M E; Luch, A [BfR - Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department of Product Safety, Thielallee 88-92, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Graf, P [University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, Klingelbergstrasse 80, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Mantion, A; Thuenemann, A F [BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter-Strasse 11, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Draude, F; Galla, S; Arlinghaus, H F [University of Muenster, Institute of Physics, Wilhelm Klemm Strasse 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Plendl, J [Free University of Berlin, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, Koserstrasse 20, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Masic, A; Taubert, A, E-mail: andrea.haase@bfr.bund.de, E-mail: alexandre.mantion@bam.de [University of Potsdam, Institute of Chemistry, Karl- Liebknecht- Strasse 24-25, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany)

    2011-07-06

    Silver nanoparticles (SNP) are among the most commercialized nanoparticles worldwide. They can be found in many diverse products, mostly because of their antibacterial properties. Despite its widespread use only little data on possible adverse health effects exist. It is difficult to compare biological data from different studies due to the great variety in sizes, coatings or shapes of the particles. Here, we applied a novel synthesis approach to obtain SNP, which are covalently stabilized by a small peptide. This enables a tight control of both size and shape. We applied these SNP in two different sizes of 20 or 40 nm (Ag20Pep and Ag40Pep) and analyzed responses of THP-1-derived human macrophages. Similar gold nanoparticles with the same coating (Au20Pep) were used for comparison and found to be non-toxic. We assessed the cytotoxicity of particles and confirmed their cellular uptake via transmission electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy. Importantly a majority of the SNP could be detected as individual particles spread throughout the cells. Furthermore we studied several types of oxidative stress related responses such as induction of heme oxygenase I or formation of protein carbonyls. In summary, our data demonstrate that even low doses of SNP exerted adverse effects in human macrophages.

  11. Cellular responses during morphological transformation in Azospirillum brasilense and Its flcA knockout mutant.

    Xingsheng Hou

    Full Text Available FlcA is a response regulator controlling flocculation and the morphological transformation of Azospirillum cells from vegetative to cyst-like forms. To understand the cellular responses of Azospirillum to conditions that cause morphological transformation, proteins differentially expressed under flocculation conditions in A. brasilense Sp7 and its flcA knockout mutant were investigated. Comparison of 2-DE protein profiles of wild-type (Sp7 and a flcA deletion mutant (Sp7-flcAΔ revealed a total of 33 differentially expressed 2-DE gel spots, with 22 of these spots confidently separated to allow protein identification. Analysis of these spots by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and MASCOT database searching identified 48 proteins (≥10% emPAI in each spot. The functional characteristics of these proteins included carbon metabolism (beta-ketothiolase and citrate synthase, nitrogen metabolism (Glutamine synthetase and nitric oxide synthase, stress tolerance (superoxide dismutase, Alkyl hydroperoxidase and ATP-dependent Clp protease proteolytic subunit and morphological transformation (transducer coupling protein. The observed differences between Sp7 wild-type and flcA- strains enhance our understanding of the morphological transformation process and help to explain previous phenotypical observations. This work is a step forward in connecting the Azospirillum phenome and genome.

  12. Epitope specificity of human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] responses.

    Pollara, Justin; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M Anthony; Pazgier, Marzena; Haynes, Barton F; Ferrari, Guido

    2013-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity [ADCC] has been suggested to play an important role in control of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 [HIV-1] viral load and protection from infection. ADCC antibody responses have been mapped to multiple linear and conformational epitopes within the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Many epitopes targeted by antibodies that mediate ADCC overlap with those recognized by antibodies capable of virus neutralization. In addition, recent studies conducted with human monoclonal antibodies derived from HIV-1 infected individuals and HIV-1 vaccine-candidate vaccinees have identified a number of antibodies that lack the ability to capture primary HIV-1 isolates or mediate neutralizing activity, but are able to bind to the surface of infected CD4+ T cells and mediate ADCC. Of note, the conformational changes in the gp120 that may not exclusively relate to binding of the CD4 molecule are important in exposing epitopes recognized by ADCC responses. Here we discuss the HIV-1 envelope epitopes targeted by ADCC antibodies in the context of the potential protective capacities of ADCC. PMID:24191939

  13. Tumor suppressor BTG1 promotes PRMT1-mediated ATF4 function in response to cellular stress

    Tijchon, Esther; van Ingen Schenau, Dorette; van Emst, Liesbeth; Levers, Marloes; Palit, Sander A.L.; Rodenbach, Caroline; Poelmans, Geert; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Shan, Jixiu; Kilberg, Michael S.; Scheijen, Blanca; van Leeuwen, Frank N.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are frequently exposed to physiological stress conditions such as hypoxia and nutrient limitation. Escape from stress-induced apoptosis is one of the mechanisms used by malignant cells to survive unfavorable conditions. B-cell Translocation Gene 1 (BTG1) is a tumor suppressor that is frequently deleted in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and recurrently mutated in diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Moreover, low BTG1 expression levels have been linked to poor outcome in several solid tumors. How loss of BTG1 function contributes to tumor progression is not well understood. Here, using Btg1 knockout mice, we demonstrate that loss of Btg1 provides a survival advantage to primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) under stress conditions. This pro-survival effect involves regulation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4), a key mediator of cellular stress responses. We show that BTG1 interacts with ATF4 and positively modulates its activity by recruiting the protein arginine methyl transferase PRMT1 to methylate ATF4 on arginine residue 239. We further extend these findings to B-cell progenitors, by showing that loss of Btg1 expression enhances stress adaptation of mouse bone marrow-derived B cell progenitors. In conclusion, we have identified the BTG1/PRMT1 complex as a new modifier of ATF4 mediated stress responses. PMID:26657730

  14. Cellular response to substrate rigidity is governed by either stress or strain.

    Yip, Ai Kia; Iwasaki, Katsuhiko; Ursekar, Chaitanya; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Saxena, Mayur; Chen, Huiling; Harada, Ichiro; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Cells sense the rigidity of their substrate; however, little is known about the physical variables that determine their response to this rigidity. Here, we report traction stress measurements carried out using fibroblasts on polyacrylamide gels with Young's moduli ranging from 6 to 110 kPa. We prepared the substrates by employing a modified method that involves N-acryloyl-6-aminocaproic acid (ACA). ACA allows for covalent binding between proteins and elastomers and thus introduces a more stable immobilization of collagen onto the substrate when compared to the conventional method of using sulfo-succinimidyl-6-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl-amino) hexanoate (sulfo-SANPAH). Cells remove extracellular matrix proteins off the surface of gels coated using sulfo-SANPAH, which corresponds to lower values of traction stress and substrate deformation compared to gels coated using ACA. On soft ACA gels (Young's modulus 20 kPa), traction stress plateaus at a limiting value and the substrate deformation decreases with increasing substrate rigidity. Sustained substrate strain on soft substrates and sustained traction stress on stiff substrates suggest these may be factors governing cellular responses to substrate rigidity. PMID:23332055

  15. Signaling beyond Punching Holes: Modulation of Cellular Responses by Vibrio cholerae Cytolysin

    Barkha Khilwani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pore-forming toxins (PFTs are a distinct class of membrane-damaging cytolytic proteins that contribute significantly towards the virulence processes employed by various pathogenic bacteria. Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC is a prominent member of the beta-barrel PFT (beta-PFT family. It is secreted by most of the pathogenic strains of the intestinal pathogen V. cholerae. Owing to its potent membrane-damaging cell-killing activity, VCC is believed to play critical roles in V. cholerae pathogenesis, particularly in those strains that lack the cholera toxin. Large numbers of studies have explored the mechanistic basis of the cell-killing activity of VCC. Consistent with the beta-PFT mode of action, VCC has been shown to act on the target cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric beta-barrel pores, thereby leading to permeabilization of the target cell membranes. Apart from the pore-formation-induced direct cell-killing action, VCC exhibits the potential to initiate a plethora of signal transduction pathways that may lead to apoptosis, or may act to enhance the cell survival/activation responses, depending on the type of target cells. In this review, we will present a concise view of our current understanding regarding the multiple aspects of these cellular responses, and their underlying signaling mechanisms, evoked by VCC.

  16. Cell-permeable intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis protect and rescue intestinal epithelial cells from radiation-induced cell death

    One of the important mechanisms for gastrointestinal (GI) injury following high-dose radiation exposure is apoptosis of epithelial cells. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) and cellular IAP2 (cIAP2) are intrinsic cellular inhibitors of apoptosis. In order to study the effects of exogenously added IAPs on apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells, we constructed bacterial expression plasmids containing genes of XIAP (full-length, BIR2 domain and BIR3-RING domain with and without mutations of auto-ubiquitylation sites) and cIAP2 proteins fused to a protein-transduction domain (PTD) derived from HIV-1 Tat protein (TAT) and purified these cell-permeable recombinant proteins. When the TAT-conjugated IAPs were added to rat intestinal epithelial cells IEC6, these proteins were effectively delivered into the cells and inhibited apoptosis, even when added after irradiation. Our results suggest that PTD-mediated delivery of IAPs may have clinical potential, not only for radioprotection but also for rescuing the GI system from radiation injuries. (author)

  17. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  18. Radiation sterilized bone response to dynamic loading

    Mardas, Marcin, E-mail: marcin.mardas@skpp.edu.pl [Department of Oncology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, ul. Szamarzewskiego 82/84, 60-569 Poznan (Poland); Kubisz, Leszek [Department of Biophysics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, ul. Fredry 10, 61-701 Poznan (Poland); Biskupski, Piotr; Mielcarek, Slawomir [Department of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Stelmach-Mardas, Marta [Department of Bromatology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, ul. Marcelinska 420, 60-354 Poznan (Poland); Kaluska, Iwona [Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, ul. Dorodna 16, 03-195 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-08-01

    Allogeneic bone grafts are used on a large scale in surgeries. To avoid the risk of infectious diseases, allografts should be radiation-sterilized. So far, no international consensus has been achieved regarding the optimal radiation dose. Many authors suggest that bone sterilization deteriorates bone mechanical properties. However, no data on the influence of ionizing radiation on bone dynamic mechanical properties are available. Bovine femurs from 2-year old animal were machine cut and irradiated with the doses 10, 15, 25, 35, 45 and 50 kGy. Dynamic mechanical analysis was performed at 1-10 Hz at the temperature range of 0-350 Degree-Sign C in 3-point bending configuration. No statistically significant differences in storage modulus were observed. However, there were significant decreased values of loss modulus between the samples irradiated with doses of 10 ({down_arrow}14.3%), 15, 45 and 50 kGy ({down_arrow}33.2%) and controls. It was stated that increased irradiation dose decreases the temperature where collagen denaturation process starts and increases the temperature where the collagen denaturation process finishes. It was shown that activation energy of denaturation process is significantly higher for the samples irradiated with the dose of 50 kGy (615 kJ/mol) in comparison with control samples and irradiation with other doses (100-135 kJ/mol). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the storage modulus and loss modulus of samples irradiated with doses of 10-50 kGy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the denaturation temperature of samples irradiated with doses of 10-50 kGy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the activation energy of denaturation process of samples irradiated with doses of 10-50 kGy.

  19. Radiation sterilized bone response to dynamic loading

    Allogeneic bone grafts are used on a large scale in surgeries. To avoid the risk of infectious diseases, allografts should be radiation-sterilized. So far, no international consensus has been achieved regarding the optimal radiation dose. Many authors suggest that bone sterilization deteriorates bone mechanical properties. However, no data on the influence of ionizing radiation on bone dynamic mechanical properties are available. Bovine femurs from 2-year old animal were machine cut and irradiated with the doses 10, 15, 25, 35, 45 and 50 kGy. Dynamic mechanical analysis was performed at 1–10 Hz at the temperature range of 0–350 °C in 3-point bending configuration. No statistically significant differences in storage modulus were observed. However, there were significant decreased values of loss modulus between the samples irradiated with doses of 10 (↓14.3%), 15, 45 and 50 kGy (↓33.2%) and controls. It was stated that increased irradiation dose decreases the temperature where collagen denaturation process starts and increases the temperature where the collagen denaturation process finishes. It was shown that activation energy of denaturation process is significantly higher for the samples irradiated with the dose of 50 kGy (615 kJ/mol) in comparison with control samples and irradiation with other doses (100–135 kJ/mol). - Highlights: ► We examine changes in the storage modulus and loss modulus of samples irradiated with doses of 10–50 kGy. ► We examine changes in the denaturation temperature of samples irradiated with doses of 10–50 kGy. ► We examine changes in the activation energy of denaturation process of samples irradiated with doses of 10–50 kGy.

  20. Oxidative Stress and Autophagy Responses of Osteocytes Exposed to Spaceflight-like Radiation.

    Tahimic, Candice; Rael, Victoria E.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2015-01-01

    Weightlessness and radiation, two of the unique elements of the space environment, causes a profound decrement in bone mass that mimics aging. This bone loss is thought to result from increased activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and functional changes in bone-forming osteoblasts, cells that give rise to mature osteocytes. Our current understanding of the signaling factors and mechanisms underlying bone loss is incomplete. However, it is known that oxidative stress, characterized by the excess production of free radicals, is elevated during radiation exposure. The goals of this study is to examine the response of osteocytes to spaceflight-like radiation and to identify signaling processes that may be targeted to mitigate bone loss in scenarios of space exploration, earth-based radiotherapy and accidental radiation exposure. We hypothesize that (1) oxidative stress, as induced by radiation, decreases osteocyte survival and increases pro-osteoclastogenic signals and that (2) autophagy is one of the key cellular defenses against oxidative stress. Autophagy is the process by which cellular components including organelles and proteins are broken down and recycled. To test our hypothesis, we exposed the osteocyte-like cell line, MLO-Y4, to 0.5, 1, and 2 Gy of simulated space radiation (Iron-56 radiation at 600 MeV/n) and assessed cell numbers, cell growth-associated molecules as well as markers of autophagy and oxidative stress at various time points post-irradiation. We observed a reduction in cell numbers in the groups exposed to 1 and 2 Gy of Iron-56 radiation. Collectively, flow cytometry and gene expression analysis revealed that radiation caused a shift in cell cycle distribution consistent with growth arrest. Compared to sham-treatment, 2 Gy of Iron-56 increased FoxO3, SOD1, and RANKL gene expression yet unexpectedly decreased LC3B-II protein levels at 4 and 24 hours post-IR. Taken together, these findings suggest that simulated space radiation invoke

  1. The reconstitution of the thymus in immunosuppressed individuals restores CD4-specific cellular and humoral immune responses.

    Plana, Montserrat; Garcia, Felipe; Darwich, Laila; Romeu, Joan; López, Anna; Cabrera, Cecilia; Massanella, Marta; Canto, Esther; Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Blanco, Julià; Sánchez, Marcelo; Gatell, Josep M; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ruiz, Lidia; Bofill, Margarita

    2011-07-01

    Infection with HIV-1 frequently results in the loss of specific cellular immune responses and an associated lack of antibodies. Recombinant growth hormone (rGH) administration reconstitutes thymic tissue and boosts the levels of peripheral T cells, so rGH therapy may be an effective adjuvant through promoting the recovery of lost cellular and T-cell-dependent humoral immune responses in immunosuppressed individuals. To test this concept, we administered rGH to a clinically defined group of HIV-1-infected subjects with defective cellular and serological immune responses to at least one of three commonly employed vaccines (hepatitis A, hepatitis B or tetanus toxoid). Of the original 278 HIV-1-infected patients entering the trial, only 20 conformed to these immunological criteria and were randomized into three groups: Group A (n = 8) receiving rGH and challenged with the same vaccine to which they were unresponsive and Groups B (n = 5) and C (n = 7) who received either rGH or vaccination alone, respectively. Of the eight subjects in Group A, five recovered CD4 cellular responses to vaccine antigen and four of these produced the corresponding antibodies. In the controls, three of the five in group B recovered cellular responses with two producing antibodies, whereas three of the seven in Group C recovered CD4 responses, with only two producing antibodies. Significantly, whereas seven of ten patients receiving rGH treatment in Group A (six patients) and B (one patient) recovered T-cell responses to HIVp24, only two of six in Group C responded similarly. In conclusion, reconstitution of the thymus in immunosuppressed adults through rGH hormone treatment restored both specific antibody and CD4 T-cell responses. PMID:21501161

  2. Vanguards of paradigm shift in radiation biology. Radiation-induced adaptive and bystander responses

    The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv) are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation, using a linear no-threshold model (LNT model). However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose/low dose-rate radiation than they do to high dose/high dose-rate radiation. In other words, there are accumulated findings which cannot be explained by the classical ''target theory'' of radiation biology. The radioadaptive response, radiation-induced bystander effects, low-dose radio-hypersensitivity, and genomic instability are specifically observed in response to low dose/low dose-rate radiation, and the mechanisms underlying these responses often involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. Recently, correlations between the radioadaptive and bystander responses have been increasingly reported. The present review focuses on the latter two phenomena by summarizing observations supporting their existence, and discussing the linkage between them from the aspect of production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. (author)

  3. Immune Modulation and Stereotactic Radiation: Improving Local and Abscopal Responses

    Jing Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New and innovative treatment strategies for cancer patients in the fields of immunotherapy and radiotherapy are rapidly developing in parallel. Among the most promising preclinical treatment approaches is combining immunotherapy with radiotherapy where early data suggest synergistic effects in several tumor model systems. These studies demonstrate that radiation combined with immunotherapy can result in superior efficacy for local tumor control. More alluring is the emergence of data suggesting an equally profound systemic response also known as “abscopal” effects with the combination of radiation and certain immunotherapies. Studies addressing optimal radiation dose, fractionation, and modality to be used in combination with immunotherapy still require further exploration. However, recent anecdotal clinical reports combining stereotactic or hypofractionated radiation regimens with immunotherapy have resulted in dramatic sustained clinical responses, both local and abscopal. Technologic advances in clinical radiation therapy has made it possible to deliver hypofractionated regimens anywhere in the body using stereotactic radiation techniques, facilitating further clinical investigations. Thus, stereotactic radiation in combination with immunotherapy agents represents an exciting and potentially fruitful new space for improving cancer therapeutic responses.

  4. CELLULAR AND POPULATION PLASTICITY OF HELPER CD4 T CELL RESPONSES

    Gesham eMagombedze

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrates are constantly exposed to pathogens, and the adaptive immunity has most likely evolved to control and clear such infectious agents. CD4 T cells are the major players in the adaptive immune response to pathogens. Following recognition of pathogen-derived antigens naïve CD4 T cells differentiate into effectors which then control pathogen replication either directly by killing pathogen-infected cells or by assisting with generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes or pathogen-specific antibodies. Pathogen-specific effector CD4 T cells are highly heterogeneous in terms of cytokines they produce. Three major subtypes of effector CD4 T cells have been identified: T-helper 1 (Th1 cells producing IFN-g and TNF-α, Th2 cells producing IL-4 and IL-10, and Th17 cells producing IL-17. How this heterogeneity is maintained and what regulates changes in effector T cell composition during chronic infections remains poorly understood. In this review we discuss recent advances in our understanding of CD4 T cell differentiation in response to microbial infections. We propose that a change in the phenotype of pathogen-specific effector CD4 T cells during chronic infections, for example, from Th1 to Th2 response as observed in Mycobacteriumavium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP infection of ruminants, can be achieved by conversion of T cells from one effector subset to another (cellular plasticity or due to differences in kinetics (differentiation, proliferation, death of different effector T cell subsets (population plasticity. We also shortly review mathematical models aimed at describing CD4 T cell differentiation and outline areas for future experimental and theoretical research.

  5. HIV-1 transgenic rats display alterations in immunophenotype and cellular responses associated with aging.

    Susan J Abbondanzo

    Full Text Available Advances in anti-retroviral therapy over the last two decades have allowed life expectancy in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus to approach that of the general population. The process of aging in mammalian species, including rats, results in immune response changes, alterations in immunological phenotypes, and ultimately increased susceptibility to many infectious diseases. In order to investigate the immunological pathologies associated with chronic HIV-1 disease, particularly in aging individuals, the HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg rat model was utilized. HIV-1Tg rats were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS to determine immunological alterations during the aging process. LPS is known to cause an imbalance in cytokine and chemokine release, and provides a method to identify changes in immune responses to bacterial infection in an HIV animal model. An immune profile and accompanying cellular consequences as well as changes in inflammatory cytokine and chemokine release related to age and genotype were assessed in HIV-1Tg rats. The percentage of T cells decreased with age, particularly T cytotoxic cells, whereas T helper cells increased with age. Neutrophils and monocytes increased in HIV-1Tg rats during maturation compared to age-matched F344 control rats. Aging HIV-1Tg rats displayed a significant increase in the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α, along with an increase in the chemokine, KC/GRO, in comparison to age-matched controls. Our data indicate that immunophenotype and immune responses can change during aging in HIV-positive individuals. This information could be important in determining the most beneficial age-dependent therapeutic treatment for HIV patients.

  6. NR4A2 is regulated by gastrin and influences cellular responses of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    Kristine Misund

    Full Text Available The peptide hormone gastrin is known to play a role in differentiation, growth and apoptosis of cells in the gastric mucosa. In this study we demonstrate that gastrin induces Nuclear Receptor 4A2 (NR4A2 expression in the adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J and AGS-GR, which both possess the gastrin/CCK2 receptor. In vivo, NR4A2 is strongly expressed in the gastrin responsive neuroendocrine ECL cells in normal mucosa, whereas gastric adenocarcinoma tissue reveals a more diffuse and variable expression in tumor cells. We show that NR4A2 is a primary early transient gastrin induced gene in adenocarcinoma cell lines, and that NR4A2 expression is negatively regulated by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER and zinc finger protein 36, C3H1 type-like 1 (Zfp36l1, suggesting that these gastrin regulated proteins exert a negative feedback control of NR4A2 activated responses. FRAP analyses indicate that gastrin also modifies the nucleus-cytosol shuttling of NR4A2, with more NR4A2 localized to cytoplasm upon gastrin treatment. Knock-down experiments with siRNA targeting NR4A2 increase migration of gastrin treated adenocarcinoma AGS-GR cells, while ectopically expressed NR4A2 increases apoptosis and hampers gastrin induced invasion, indicating a tumor suppressor function of NR4A2. Collectively, our results uncover a role of NR4A2 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells, and suggest that both the level and the localization of NR4A2 protein are of importance regarding the cellular responses of these cells.

  7. Nick translation detection in situ of cellular DNA strand break induced by radiation

    DNA strand break in HeLa cells induced by radiation was detected using the in situ nick translation method. The cells were exposed to radiation of 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 Gy in Lab-Tek tissue culture chamber/slides and were fixed with ethanol/acetic acid on the slide glass. The break sites in DNA were translated artificially in the presence of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I and [3H]-labeled dTTP. Autoradiographic observation was made of the level of break sites in the DNA. The DNA strand break appeared even with a 3 Gy exposure, increased 8.6 times at 24 Gy compared with the control cells, and this level correlated reciprocally to change in cell viability. This nick translation method provides a rapid in situ assay for determining radiation-induced DNA damage of cultured cells, in a semi-quantitative manner

  8. Modeling clinical radiation responses in the IMRT era

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the critical issues of radiobiological models, particularly as they apply to clinical radiation therapy. Developing models of radiation responses has a long history that continues to the present time. Many different models have been proposed, but in the field of radiation oncology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has had the most impact on the design of treatment protocols. Questions have been raised as to the value of the LQ model given that the biological assumption underlying it has been challenged by molecular analyses of cell and tissue responses to radiation. There are also questions as to use of the LQ model for hypofractionation, especially for high dose treatments using a single fraction. While the LQ model might over-estimate the effects of large radiation dose fractions, there is insufficient information to fully justify the adoption of alternative models. However, there is increasing evidence in the literature that non-targeted and other indirect effects of radiation sometimes produce substantial deviations from LQ-like dose-response curves. As preclinical and clinical hypofractionation studies accumulate, new or refined dose-response models that incorporate high-dose/fraction non-targeted and indirect effects may be required, but for now the LQ model remains a simple, useful tool to guide the design of treatment protocols.

  9. Mitigation of radiation induced cellular damage using sulphorafane, a dietary HDACi

    Sulforaphane (SFN), a naturally occurring organosulfur and HDAC inhibitor, has been implicated beneficial in several pathophysiological conditions and cancers. We investigated the ability of SFN to mitigate the mutagenic potential of certain chemical agents as well as ionizing radiation using the cytochalasin-B blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay in human whole blood cultures. Whole blood was exposed to 0-2 Gy a-radiation and then cultured. The chemical mutagens were treated for one hour and then washed off before PHA stimulation. 400nM SFN was added to the culture medium either at 2 or 20h post-PHA stimulation for G0 and G1 treatments respectively. Blood samples collected from a cohort of human beings accidentally exposed to varying doses of low dose rate a-radiation was also cultured to evaluate the ability of SFN to mitigate radiation injuries. With 2Gy in vitro irradiation the CBMN frequency was found to be 136 ± 28 MN/1000 bi-nucleated (BN) cells compared to 44 ± 9 and 56 ± 11 MN in 1000 BN cells in the G0 and G1 SFN treated groups respectively. Sulforaphane treatment of whole blood cultures from individuals accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation reduced the MN frequency up to 43-72% compared to the respective SFN untreated samples. SFN was found effective in reducing the MN frequency induced by bleomycin and doxorubicin while not effective in reducing the colchicines-induced MN frequency indicating SFN probably could enhance DNA repair. These studies implicate sulforaphane as a potential bio-antimutagen against ionizing radiation and chemical induced mutagenesis. (author)

  10. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor β immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent

  11. Radiation in response to food preservation

    Preservation of food items is a pre-requisite for food security. The seasonal nature of production, perishable nature of food materials (fruits, vegetables and other value added products) and the rising gap between demand and supply have posed great challenges to conventional techniques of food preservation and thereby to food security. Food irradiation, one of the beneficial applications of atomic energy, is an important innovation in food preservation, since the development of canning in the 19th century. It provides an effective alternative to fumigants, which are being phased out owing to their adverse effects on the environment and human health. Moreover, exposure of food material to radiation has strong advantages over conventional methods of preservation such as cold storage, fumigation, salting and drying because it does not lead to loss of taste, texture, flavour, odour etc. or overall quality attributes. Generally, two types of radiations are used i.e., ionizing and non-ionizing. Since radiation does not generate heat, it is termed 'cold sterilization'. Gamma rays, E-beam and X-rays are used for irradiation. Irradiation under approved conditions has been demonstrated to have no dangerous effects on food, either chemical or microbial in nature and does not cause any significant loss of macronutrients. Proteins, fats and carbohydrates undergo little change in nutritional value during irradiation even with doses over 10 kGy, though there may be sensory changes. Similarly, the essential amino acids, essential fatty acids, minerals and trace elements are also unaffected. There can be a decrease in certain vitamins (particularly thiamin) but these are of the same order of magnitude as occurs in other manufacturing processes such as drying/dehydration or canning (thermal sterilization). So, there is urgent need to exploit the benefits of irradiation involve standardization, communication and education. The potential benefits of irradiation technology have been

  12. Transcriptional responses to radiation exposure facilitate the discovery of biomarkers functioning as radiation biodosimeters

    The development of new methods for a retrospective quantification of the radiation dose of exposed individuals is of widespread interest. To this end, I developed a computational framework for biomarker discovery and radiation dose prediction and successfully identified gene signatures with which low and medium to high radiation doses can be accurately quantified. To enhance our understanding of the radiation-induced transcriptional response, I additionally analyzed microarray data of human PBLs after ex vivo gamma-irradiation and characterized affected functional processes and pathways.

  13. Transcriptional responses to radiation exposure facilitate the discovery of biomarkers functioning as radiation biodosimeters

    Strunz, Sonja

    2014-05-13

    The development of new methods for a retrospective quantification of the radiation dose of exposed individuals is of widespread interest. To this end, I developed a computational framework for biomarker discovery and radiation dose prediction and successfully identified gene signatures with which low and medium to high radiation doses can be accurately quantified. To enhance our understanding of the radiation-induced transcriptional response, I additionally analyzed microarray data of human PBLs after ex vivo gamma-irradiation and characterized affected functional processes and pathways.

  14. Embryonic exposure to lead: comparison of immune and cellular responses in unchallenged and virally stressed chickens

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Kao, Elizabeth; Dietert, Rodney R. [Institute for Comparative and Environmental Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Naqi, Syed A. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Lead, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been shown to modulate various functions of the immune system and decrease host resistance to infectious disease. However, limited information is available concerning the direct effects of lead on the host immune response to an infectious agent after developmental exposure. The current study utilized chickens to examine the effect of embryonic lead exposure on immune and cellular responses during viral challenge. Sublethal doses of lead were introduced into fertilized Cornell K Strain White Leghorn chicken eggs via the air sac at day 5 or day 12 of embryonic development (designated as E5 and E12, respectively). Four-week-old female chickens were inoculated with infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strain M41. Antibody titer to IBV, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response against bovine serum albumin (BSA), the absolute number and percentage of leukocyte subpopulations, and interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma})-like cytokine production by splenocytes were evaluated at 5-6 weeks of age. While antibody response to IBV in juvenile chicks was unaffected by the in ovo lead exposure, IFN-{gamma}-like cytokine production by splenocytes was significantly depressed following lead exposure at both developmental stages. In contrast with this pattern, the DTH response against BSA was unaffected following E5 exposure, but was significantly decreased after E12 exposure to lead. These changes were similar to those previously reported in chickens not exposed to IBV. While lead exposure at E5 induced significant changes in the percentage of circulating heterophils at 1 day postinfection (dpi), lead did not cause any change in relative leukocyte counts after E12 exposure. At 7 dpi, E5 lead exposure resulted in decreased absolute number and percentage of circulating lymphocytes, while total leukocyte counts, and the absolute number and percentage of circulating monocytes and heterophils were significantly reduced in E12 lead

  15. Low dose radiation effects on the transcription of consensus radiation response genes in primary and immortalized human fibroblast cells

    Complete text of publication follows. OBJECTIVE: The linear non-threshold model suggests that tumors might be induced even by low radiation doses. Still, most of the conventional methods are unable to detect damages below 100 mGy. We have studied whether transcriptional responses of consensus radiation response genes can be detected after low dose radiation exposure in directly exposed or bystander primary human fibroblast cells. The short term proliferation capacity of primary fibroblast cells in culture limits their long term application. Therefore we tried to immortalize the cells by the introduction of the human telomerase gene using retroviral vectors. METHODS: Primary human fibroblast cell lines were established from skin biopsies of cancer patients and foreskin samples of young children. To create immortalized cell lines the human telomerase gene was cloned into a retroviral vector. Primary fibroblast cells were transduced and their proliferation capacity studied. To investigate radiation induced transcriptional alterations, cells were irradiated with 60Co γ-rays (0; 0.01; 0,04; 0,1; 2 and 8 Gy) and 2 hours later total cellular RNA was isolated both from directly exposed and bystander cells. Transcriptional alterations were followed in consensus radiation response genes (CDKN1, GADD45, GDF15, IER5, PLK3, TP53INP1) with quantitative real time PCR (Corbett/ SybrGreen). RESULTS: There is an elevated expression of CDKN1, GADD45, GDF15, PLK3, TP53INP1 in the exposed cells. We see only for the PLK3 a dose-dependent increase which manifested also at low doses. It seems this gene is the most sensitive to radiation at low doses. The hTERT-immortalized cells were morphologically identical to the primary cells. the radiation-induced transcriptional profile of immortalized cells were very similar to the primary ones. CONCLUSIONS: hTERT immortalized cells can be used to mimic alterations in primary cells. Low dose irradiation doesn't influence the expression of most of

  16. CELLULAR RESPONSES TO DNA DAMAGE AND ONCOGENESIS BY THE p53 AND pRb/E2F PATHWAYS

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to stress including DNA damage, show multiple options involving the mechanisms of growth arrest. DNA repair and programmed cell death or apoptosis. Failures in these mechanisms can result in oncogenesis or accelerated senescence. Much of the response is coordinated by p53, a nuclear phosphoprotein with a central role in the defences against physical, chemical and pathogenic agents which challenge the DNA integrity. The p53 pathways for mobilising the cellular defences are linked to the pRB/E2D pathways regulating the cell cycle progression. This paper aims to review the current understanding on the networks and main molecular machinery of these processes. In addition, the implications on cellular decision making for the defences as well as revolutionary aspects of these mechanisms are discussed in brief.

  17. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    Bueno, J., E-mail: j.bueno@sron.nl; Baselmans, J. J. A [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Visser, P. J. de [SRON, Netherlands Institute of Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Klapwijk, T. M. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Driessen, E. F. C. [Université Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Doyle, S. [Cardiff University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queens Buildings, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-10

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  18. Electrospun PCL/Gelatin composite fibrous scaffolds: mechanical properties and cellular responses.

    Yao, Ruijuan; He, Jing; Meng, Guolong; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Fang

    2016-06-01

    Electrospinning of hybrid polymer has gained widespread interest by taking advantages of the biological property of the natural polymer and the mechanical property of the synthetic polymer. However, the effect of the blend ratio on the above two properties has been less reported despite the importance to balance these two properties in various tissue engineering applications. To this aim, we investigated the electrospun PCL/Gelatin composite fibrous scaffolds with different blend ratios of 4:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, respectively. The morphology of the electrospun samples was observed by SEM and the result showed that the fiber diameter distribution became more uniform with the increase of the gelatin content. The mechanical testing results indicated that the 2:1 PCL/Gelatin sample had both the highest tensile strength of 3.7 MPa and the highest elongation rate of about 90%. Surprisingly, the 2:1 PCL/Gelatin sample also showed the best mesenchymal stem cell responses in terms of attachment, spreading, and cytoskeleton organization. Such correlation might be partly due to the fact that the enhanced mechanical property, an integral part of the physical microenvironment, likely played an important role in regulating the cellular functions. Overall, our results indicated that the PCL/Gelatin sample with the blend ratio of 2:1 was a superior candidate for scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. PMID:27044505

  19. Signaling pathways involved in PDGF-evoked cellular responses in human RPE cells

    We examined whether PDGF may directly stimulate the expression of VEGF by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro, and the involvement of three signal transduction pathways in the regulation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, migration, and production of VEGF-A was investigated. PDGF stimulated the gene and protein expression of VEGF-A by RPE cells, and increased cell proliferation and chemotaxis. PDGF activated all signaling pathways investigated, as determined by increased phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, p38, and Akt proteins. The three signaling pathways were involved in the mediation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, while p38 and PI3K mediated cell migration, and PI3K mediated secretion of VEGF-A. In addition to VEGF-A, the cells expressed mRNAs for various members of the VEGF family and for their receptors, including VEGF-B, -C, -D, flt-1, and KDR. The data indicate that PDGF selectively stimulates the expression of VEGF-A in RPE cells. PDGF evokes at least three signal transduction pathways which are differentially involved in various cellular responses

  20. Genomic interrogation of mechanism(s) underlying cellular responses to toxicants

    Assessment of the impact of xenobiotic exposure on human health and disease progression is complex. Knowledge of mode(s) of action, including mechanism(s) contributing to toxicity and disease progression, is valuable for evaluating compounds. Toxicogenomics, the subdiscipline which merges genomics with toxicology, holds the promise to contributing significantly toward the goal of elucidating mechanism(s) by studying genome-wide effects of xenobiotics. Global gene expression profiling, revolutionized by microarray technology and a crucial aspect of a toxicogenomic study, allows measuring transcriptional modulation of thousands of genes following exposure to a xenobiotic. We use our results from previous studies on compounds representing two different classes of xenobiotics (barbiturate and peroxisome proliferator) to discuss the application of computational approaches for analyzing microarray data to elucidate mechanism(s) underlying cellular responses to toxicants. In particular, our laboratory demonstrated that chemical-specific patterns of gene expression can be revealed using cDNA microarrays. Transcript profiling provides discrimination between classes of toxicants, as well as, genome-wide insight into mechanism(s) of toxicity and disease progression. Ultimately, the expectation is that novel approaches for predicting xenobiotic toxicity in humans will emerge from such information

  1. Computer simulation of a cellular automata model for the immune response in a retrovirus system

    Pandey, R. B.

    1989-02-01

    Immune response in a retrovirus system is modeled by a network of three binary cell elements to take into account some of the main functional features of T4 cells, T8 cells, and viruses. Two different intercell interactions are introduced, one of which leads to three fixed points while the other yields bistable fixed points oscillating between a healthy state and a sick state in a mean field treatment. Evolution of these cells is studied for quenched and annealed random interactions on a simple cubic lattice with a nearest neighbor interaction using inhomogenous cellular automata. Populations of T4 cells and viral cells oscillate together with damping (with constant amplitude) for annealed (quenched) interaction on increasing the value of mixing probability B from zero to a characteristic value B ca ( B cq). For higher B, the average number of T4 cells increases while that of the viral infected cells decreases monotonically on increasing B, suggesting a phase transition at B ca ( B cq).

  2. Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2

    Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

    2009-09-09

    Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

  3. Cellular and molecular responses to increased skeletal muscle loading after irradiation

    Adams, Gregory R.; Caiozzo, Vincent J.; Haddad, Fadia; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    2002-01-01

    Irradiation of rat skeletal muscles before increased loading has been shown to prevent compensatory hypertrophy for periods of up to 4 wk, possibly by preventing satellite cells from proliferating and providing new myonuclei. Recent work suggested that stem cell populations exist that might allow irradiated muscles to eventually hypertrophy over time. We report that irradiation essentially prevented hypertrophy in rat muscles subjected to 3 mo of functional overload (OL-Ir). The time course and magnitude of changes in cellular and molecular markers of anabolic and myogenic responses were similar in the OL-Ir and the contralateral nonirradiated, overloaded (OL) muscles for the first 3-7 days. These markers then returned to control levels in OL-Ir muscles while remaining elevated in OL muscles. The number of myonuclei and amount of DNA were increased markedly in OL but not OL-Ir muscles. Thus it appears that stem cells were not added to the irradiated muscles in this time period. These data are consistent with the theory that the addition of new myonuclei may be required for compensatory hypertrophy in the rat.

  4. The role of dose rate in radiation cancer risk: evaluating the effect of dose rate at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels using key events in critical pathways following exposure to low LET radiation

    Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Preston, R. Julian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: This review evaluates the role of dose rate on cell and molecular responses. It focuses on the influence of dose rate on key events in critical pathways in the development of cancer. This approach is similar to that used by the U.S. EPA and others to evaluate risk from chemicals. It provides a mechanistic method to account for the influence of the dose rate from low-LET radiation, especially in the low-dose region on cancer risk assessment. Molecular, cellular, and tissues changes are observed in many key events and change as a function of dose rate. The magnitude and direction of change can be used to help establish an appropriate dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF). Conclusions: Extensive data on key events suggest that exposure to low dose-rates are less effective in producing changes than high dose rates. Most of these data at the molecular and cellular level support a large (2–30) DREF. In addition, some evidence suggests that doses delivered at a low dose rate decrease damage to levels below that observed in the controls. However, there are some data human and mechanistic data that support a dose-rate effectiveness factor of 1. In summary, a review of the available molecular, cellular and tissue data indicates that not only is dose rate an important variable in understanding radiation risk but it also supports the selection of a DREF greater than one as currently recommended by ICRP (2007) and BEIR VII (NRC/NAS 2006). PMID:27266588

  5. Single-cell bioelectrical impedance platform for monitoring cellular response to drug treatment

    The response of cells to a chemical or biological agent in terms of their impedance changes in real-time is a useful mechanism that can be utilized for a wide variety of biomedical and environmental applications. The use of a single-cell-based analytical platform could be an effective approach to acquiring more sensitive cell impedance measurements, particularly in applications where only diminutive changes in impedance are expected. Here, we report the development of an on-chip cell impedance biosensor with two types of electrodes that host individual cells and cell populations, respectively, to study its efficacy in detecting cellular response. Human glioblastoma (U87MG) cells were patterned on single- and multi-cell electrodes through ligand-mediated natural cell adhesion. We comparatively investigated how these cancer cells on both types of electrodes respond to an ion channel inhibitor, chlorotoxin (CTX), in terms of their shape alternations and impedance changes to exploit the fine detectability of the single-cell-based system. The detecting electrodes hosting single cells exhibited a significant reduction in the real impedance signal, while electrodes hosting confluent monolayer of cells showed little to no impedance change. When single-cell electrodes were treated with CTX of different doses, a dose-dependent impedance change was observed. This enables us to identify the effective dose needed for this particular treatment. Our study demonstrated that this single-cell impedance system may potentially serve as a useful analytical tool for biomedical applications such as environmental toxin detection and drug evaluation

  6. Cellular Immune Response of Weaned Pigs Fed Diet Supplemented with an Essential Oil

    János Tossenberger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of an essential oil product on growth performance and cellular immune response of 28-day-old weaned piglets. A total of 348 piglets (50% gilts, 50% barrows were assigned to three dietary treatments (6 pens/trt. Th e basal diet was a commercial feed that was supplemented without any growth promoter (NC, with antibiotic growth promoter of 40 ppm avilamycin (PC, or with 0.25 g of an essential oil product (EO per kg of feed. All pigs were immunized by inactivated Aujeszky’s disease virus vaccine at week one and three of the experiment (28- and 44-days-age, respectively. Blood samples were taken four times (on day one, 16, 24, 32 of the experiment for lymphocyte stimulation (LST tests with ConA, PWM, PHA used as non-specific and Aujeszky virus used as specific mitogens from 2 pigs/pen. All piglets were individually weighed on day 0, 8, 16, 24 and 32 of the trial.There was no significant difference among average daily gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio of piglets fed different dietary treatments. The non-specific LST test at the 4th blood sampling showed higher values in pigs received feeds with essential oil supplementation (EO than that of the positive (PC and negative control (NC groups (P<0.05. However, no significant difference in specific immune response of pigs in different dietary treatments was found. It can be concluded that essential oil supplementation may enhance the non-specific immunocompetence of 28-day-old weaning pigs without compromising their growth performance.

  7. Effect of MWCNT surface and chemical modification on in vitro cellular response

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with diameter in the range of 10–30 nm) before and after chemical surface functionalisation on macrophages response. The study has shown that the detailed analysis of the physicochemical properties of this particular form of carbon nanomaterial is a crucial issue to interpret properly its impact on the cellular response. Effects of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) characteristics, including purity, dispersity, chemistry and dimension upon the nature of the cell environment–material interaction were investigated. Various techniques involving electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been employed to evaluate the physicochemical properties of the materials. The results demonstrate that the way of CNT preparation prior to biological tests has a fundamental impact on their behavior, cell viability and the nature of cell–nanotube interaction. Chemical functionalisation of CNTs in an acidic ambient (MWCNT-Fs) facilitates interaction with cells by two possible mechanisms, namely, endocytosis/phagocytosis and by energy-independent passive process. The results indicate that MWCNT-F in macrophages may decrease the cell proliferation process by interfering with the mitotic apparatus without negative consequences on cell viability. On the contrary, the as-prepared MWCNTs, without any surface treatment produce the least reduction in cell proliferation with reference to control, and the viability of cells exposed to this sample was substantially reduced with respect to control. A possible explanation of such a phenomenon is the presence of MWCNT’s agglomerates surrounded by numerous cells releasing toxic substances.

  8. Heat-shock-induced cellular responses to temperature elevations occurring during orthopaedic cutting.

    Dolan, E B; Haugh, M G; Tallon, D; Casey, C; McNamara, L M

    2012-12-01

    Severe heat-shock to bone cells caused during orthopaedic procedures can result in thermal damage, leading to cell death and initiating bone resorption. By contrast, mild heat-shock has been proposed to induce bone regeneration. In this study, bone cells are exposed to heat-shock for short durations occurring during surgical cutting. Cellular viability, necrosis and apoptosis are investigated immediately after heat-shock and following recovery of 12, 24 h and 4 days, in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 and osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells, using flow cytometry. The regeneration capacity of heat-shocked Balb/c mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and MC3T3-E1s has been investigated following 7 and 14 day's recovery, by quantifying proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. An immediate necrotic response to heat-shock was shown in cells exposed to elevated temperatures (45°C, 47°C and most severe at 60°C). A longer-term apoptotic response is induced in MLO-Y4s and, to a lesser extent, in MC3T3-E1s. Heat-shock-induced differentiation and mineralization by MSCs. These findings indicate that heat-shock is more likely to induce apoptosis in osteocytes than osteoblasts, which might reflect their role as sensors detecting and communicating damage within bone. Furthermore, it is shown for the first time that mild heat-shock (less than equal to 47°C) for durations occurring during surgical cutting can positively enhance osseointegration by osteoprogenitors. PMID:22915633

  9. Substance P: binding properties and studies on cellular responses in guinea pig macrophages

    The neuropeptide Substance P (SP) has been recognized to modulate functional activities of inflammatory cells. The authors have previously shown that it mediates macrophage activation. In this study they examined binding characteristics of SP and searched for additional evidence of heightened metabolic activity of guinea pig peritoneal macrophages upon challenge with this peptide. Radioligand studies indicated the existence of a homogeneous class of specific binding sites with high affinity for SP on macrophages. Scatchard analysis yielded an apparent K/sub D/ of 1.9 +/- 0.4 x 10-8 M (range: 1.4 to 2.4 x 10-8 M), which was confirmed by kinetic studies. Binding was dose related, saturable, reversible, and could be inhibited by the SP antagonist (D-Pro2, D-Phe7, D-Trp9)-SP. Examination of peptide structural requirements revealed that both the COOH- and NH2-terminus contribute to receptor-ligand interaction. Other members of the tachykinin group of peptides were devoid of stimulatory action on macrophages. Cellular responses after engagement of the receptor sites by SP included downregulation of the membrane-associated enzyme 5'-nucleotidase and stimulation of synthesis and release of arachidonic acid metabolites, as well as of the lysosomal enzyme ADGase. These actions were specific as evidenced by immunoabsorption experiments. The findings demonstrate that macrophage activation afforded by SP is effected through a receptor-mediated mechanism. Liberation of proinflammatory and immunomodulating substances in response to SP may be relevant to the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory disease

  10. Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses

    In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5' region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3' region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process

  11. Cellular and subcellular alterations in immune cells induced by chronic, intermittent exposure in vivo to very low doses of ionizing radiation (LDR), and its ameliorating effects on progression of autoimmune disease and mammary tumor growth

    Previous studies have shown that low doses of ionizing radiation can enhance immune response and down-regulate tumor incidence. This suggested that low dose ionizing radiation can act as a hormetic agent by modulating antigen-stimulated clonal growth and/or differentiation of immune cells. A mouse model was therefore developed to investigate the enhancing effect of LDR at the cellular and organismic levels. At he cellular level, the author investigated the up-regulating effect of LDR on the proliferative growth of mitogen-stimulated splenocytes and on the modulating influence of LDR on thymocytes undergoing differentiation. At the organismic level, the up-regulating effects of LDR on the resistance to spontaneously occurring mammary tumor and lupus-type autoimmune disease were investigated. (author). 14 refs., 2 tabs

  12. Knowledge-based matrix factorization temporally resolves the cellular responses to IL-6 stimulation

    Gretz Norbert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background External stimulations of cells by hormones, cytokines or growth factors activate signal transduction pathways that subsequently induce a re-arrangement of cellular gene expression. The analysis of such changes is complicated, as they consist of multi-layered temporal responses. While classical analyses based on clustering or gene set enrichment only partly reveal this information, matrix factorization techniques are well suited for a detailed temporal analysis. In signal processing, factorization techniques incorporating data properties like spatial and temporal correlation structure have shown to be robust and computationally efficient. However, such correlation-based methods have so far not be applied in bioinformatics, because large scale biological data rarely imply a natural order that allows the definition of a delayed correlation function. Results We therefore develop the concept of graph-decorrelation. We encode prior knowledge like transcriptional regulation, protein interactions or metabolic pathways in a weighted directed graph. By linking features along this underlying graph, we introduce a partial ordering of the features (e.g. genes and are thus able to define a graph-delayed correlation function. Using this framework as constraint to the matrix factorization task allows us to set up the fast and robust graph-decorrelation algorithm (GraDe. To analyze alterations in the gene response in IL-6 stimulated primary mouse hepatocytes, we performed a time-course microarray experiment and applied GraDe. In contrast to standard techniques, the extracted time-resolved gene expression profiles showed that IL-6 activates genes involved in cell cycle progression and cell division. Genes linked to metabolic and apoptotic processes are down-regulated indicating that IL-6 mediated priming renders hepatocytes more responsive towards cell proliferation and reduces expenditures for the energy metabolism. Conclusions GraDe provides

  13. Posintro™-HBsAg, a modified ISCOM including HBsAg, induces strong cellular and humoral responses

    Schiött, Asa; Larsson, Kristina; Manniche, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    HBsAg vaccine formulation, Posintro™-HBsAg, was compared to two commercial hepatitis B vaccines including aluminium or monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and the two adjuvant systems MF59 and QS21 in their efficiency to prime both cellular and humoral immune responses. The Posintro™-HBsAg induced...

  14. Toxicity of cadmium in Japanese quail: Evaluation of body weight, hepatic and renal function, and cellular immune response

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental pollutant that is able to alter the immune function. Previous studies have shown that, in mammals, chronic exposure to Cd decreases the release of macrophagic cytokines such as IL1 and TNα and decreases phagocytosis activity. On the other hand contradictory results showed an increase in the humoral response. The cellular response could be decreased by exposure to Cd. These alterations were observed in mammals. The present study aimed to investigate some of the toxic effects of Cd exposure in birds. In particular, the main objective of this work was to elucidate the effects of exposure to this pollutant on the cellular immune function of the Japanese quail as a model for the study of toxicity in animals exposed in nature. The animals were exposed to the metal (100 ppm, per os) during development, i.e., from 1 to 28 days old. Body weight, biochemical parameters, and cellular immune response were measured during and at the end of treatment. The results showed that the exposure to Cd for 28 days significantly reduced the body weight and induced hepatic toxicity. The kidney function and cellular immune response were not affected by the Cd exposure

  15. Cellular and humoral immune responses in a population from the Baringo District, Kenya to Leishmania promastigote lipophosphoglycan

    Kurtzhals, J A; Hey, A S; Theander, T G;

    1992-01-01

    In a cross-sectional house-to-house study in a leishmaniasis-endemic area in Kenya, the cellular and humoral immune response to Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG) was determined. Clinical data, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and plasma were obtained from 50 individuals over the age of eight...

  16. Survey instrument response to beta radiations

    Available survey instruments do not have the beta measurement characteristics needed for accurate dose rate assessments. Such instruments have severe angular and energy dependence. In addition, beta measurements often require corrections for the source geometry response of the detector to permit accurate assessments. Studies were performed to characterize present instruments and to determine optimum characteristics for a field instrument. Results of the studies were used to specify and procure an instrument with improved characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of the studies and the design of the instrument

  17. Survey instrument response to beta radiations

    Available survey instruments do not have the beta measurement characteristics needed for accurate dose rate assessments. Such instruments have severe angular and energy dependence. In addition, beta measurements often require corrections for the source geometry response of the detector to permit accurate assessments. Studies were performed to characterize present instruments and to determine optimum characteristics for a field instrument. Results of the studies were used to specify and procure an instrument with improved characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of the studies and the design of the instrument. 6 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Graphene oxide scaffold accelerates cellular proliferative response and alveolar bone healing of tooth extraction socket

    Nishida E

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Erika Nishida,1 Hirofumi Miyaji,1 Akihito Kato,1 Hiroko Takita,2 Toshihiko Iwanaga,3 Takehito Momose,1 Kosuke Ogawa,1 Shusuke Murakami,1 Tsutomu Sugaya,1 Masamitsu Kawanami11Department of Periodontology and Endodontology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Sapporo, Japan; 2Support Section for Education and Research, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Sapporo, Japan; 3Laboratory of Histology and Cytology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, JapanAbstract: Graphene oxide (GO consisting of a carbon monolayer has been widely investigated for tissue engineering platforms because of its unique properties. For this study, we fabricated a GO-applied scaffold and assessed the cellular and tissue behaviors in the scaffold. A preclinical test was conducted to ascertain whether the GO scaffold promoted bone induction in dog tooth extraction sockets. For this study, GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a collagen sponge scaffold with 0.1 and 1 µg/mL GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, physical testing, cell seeding, and rat subcutaneous implant testing. Then a GO scaffold was implanted into a dog tooth extraction socket. Histological observations were made at 2 weeks postsurgery. SEM observations show that GO attached to the surface of collagen scaffold struts. The GO scaffold exhibited an interconnected structure resembling that of control subjects. GO application improved the physical strength, enzyme resistance, and adsorption of calcium and proteins. Cytocompatibility tests showed that GO application significantly increased osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation. In addition, an assessment of rat subcutaneous tissue response revealed that implantation of 1 µg/mL GO scaffold stimulated cellular ingrowth behavior, suggesting that the GO scaffold exhibited good biocompatibility. The tissue ingrowth area and DNA contents of 1

  19. Radiation induced bystander effects in modification of cellular radio-sensitivity in human cancer cells

    Radiation-induced Bystander Effect is manifestation of radiation effects in non-irradiated cells in the population. The phenomenon may have significant implication in risk of radiation induced cancer incidence and outcome of cancer radiotherapy. To understand the bystander interaction in tumor cells, we have studied secretion of diffusible factors from control and irradiated tumor cells of different origin. Our results showed a good correlation between magnitude of secretion of diffusible factors and survival of tumor cells. These diffusible factors are shown to affect proliferation and survival of tumor cells involving regulation of kinases and genes/proteins involved in apoptotic machinery. Our experiments using pharmacological inhibitors showed involvement of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) signaling in survival of tumor cells after treatment with diffusible factors. These factors seem to be involved in exerting radio-resistance in tumor cells. Furthermore, in proton microbeam irradiation studies showed induction of double strand break measured as gH2AX foci in human lung carcinoma cells, which was found to propagate to bystander tumor cells during post-irradiation incubation. Implication of these observations in outcome of cancer radiotherapy scenario would be discussed. (author)

  20. A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Radiation Dose-Response Estimation.

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cologne, John B; Cullings, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    In evaluating the risk of exposure to health hazards, characterizing the dose-response relationship and estimating acceptable exposure levels are the primary goals. In analyses of health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, while there is a clear agreement that moderate to high radiation doses cause harmful effects in humans, little has been known about the possible biological effects at low doses, for example, below 0.1 Gy, which is the dose range relevant to most radiation exposures of concern today. A conventional approach to radiation dose-response estimation based on simple parametric forms, such as the linear nonthreshold model, can be misleading in evaluating the risk and, in particular, its uncertainty at low doses. As an alternative approach, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric model that has a connected piece-wise-linear dose-response function with prior distributions having an autoregressive structure among the random slope coefficients defined over closely spaced dose categories. With a simulation study and application to analysis of cancer incidence data among Japanese atomic bomb survivors, we show that this approach can produce smooth and flexible dose-response estimation while reasonably handling the risk uncertainty at low doses and elsewhere. With relatively few assumptions and modeling options to be made by the analyst, the method can be particularly useful in assessing risks associated with low-dose radiation exposures. PMID:26581473

  1. Development of a radiation-responsive gene expression system

    We have obtained a promoter enhancing expression of a gene of our interest connected downstream after activation in response to radiation stimulation and it could be used in radiogenetic therapy, a combination between radiotherapy and gene therapy. The promoter has been chosen out of a library of DNA fragments constructed by connecting the TATA box to randomly combined binding sequences of transcription factors that are activated in response to radiation. Although it was shown that the promoter activation was cell type specific, it turned out that radiation responsive promoters could be obtained for a different type of cells by using another set of transcription factor binding sequences, suggesting that the method would be feasible to obtain promoters functioning in any type of cells. Radiation reactivity of obtained promoters could be improved by techniques such as random introduction of point mutations. The improved promoters significantly enhanced expression of the luciferase gene connected downstream in response to radiation even in vivo, in addition, a gene cassette composed of one such promoter and the fcy::fur gene was confirmed useful for suicide gene therapy as shown in vitro simulation experiment, suggesting possible clinical application. (author)

  2. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  3. Cellular and humoral responses to Leishmania major virulence factors in healed cutaneous leishmaniasis and Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis patients.

    Lakhal-Naouar, Inès; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Meddeb-Garnaoui, Amel; Ben Achour-Chenik, Yosser; Louzir, Hechmi; Chenik, Mehdi

    2009-01-01

    Cellular and humoral immune responses of healed cutaneous leishmaniasis and Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis patients were evaluated against results for Leishmania major virulence proteins L. major protein disulfide isomerase (LmPDI) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK). Only MAPKK induces significant peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation with gamma interferon production as well as antibody responses. Thus, MAPKK may be of interest in Leishmania vaccination and se...

  4. RAD9 deficiency enhances radiation induced bystander DNA damage and transcriptomal response

    Radiation induced bystander effects are an important component of the overall response of cells to irradiation and are associated with human health risks. The mechanism responsible includes intra-cellular and inter-cellular signaling by which the bystander response is propagated. However, details of the signaling mechanism are not well defined. We measured the bystander response of Mrad9+/+ and Mrad9−/− mouse embryonic stem cells, as well as human H1299 cells with inherent or RNA interference-mediated reduced RAD9 levels after exposure to 1 Gy α particles, by scoring chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei formation, respectively. In addition, we used microarray gene expression analyses to profile the transcriptome of directly irradiated and bystander H1299 cells. We demonstrated that Mrad9 null enhances chromatid aberration frequency induced by radiation in bystander mouse embryonic stem cells. In addition, we found that H1299 cells with reduced RAD9 protein levels showed a higher frequency of radiation induced bystander micronuclei formation, compared with parental cells containing inherent levels of RAD9. The enhanced bystander response in human cells was associated with a unique transcriptomic profile. In unirradiated cells, RAD9 reduction broadly affected stress response pathways at the mRNA level; there was reduction in transcript levels corresponding to genes encoding multiple members of the UVA-MAPK and p38MAPK families, such as STAT1 and PARP1, suggesting that these signaling mechanisms may not function optimally when RAD9 is reduced. Using network analysis, we found that differential activation of the SP1 and NUPR1 transcriptional regulators was predicted in directly irradiated and bystander H1299 cells. Transcription factor prediction analysis also implied that HIF1α (Hypoxia induced factor 1 alpha) activation by protein stabilization in irradiated cells could be a negative predictor of the bystander response, suggesting that local hypoxic stress

  5. Water-filtered infrared-A radiation (wIRA is not implicated in cellular degeneration of human skin

    Applegate, Lee Ann

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Excessive exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation is involved in the complex biologic process of cutaneous aging. Wavelengths in the ultraviolet-A and -B range (UV-A and UV-B have been shown to be responsible for the induction of proteases, e. g. the collagenase matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1, which are related to cell aging. As devices emitting longer wavelengths are widely used in therapeutic and cosmetic interventions and as the induction of MMP-1 by water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA had been discussed, it was of interest to assess effects of wIRA on the cellular and molecular level known to be possibly involved in cutaneous degeneration. Objectives: Investigation of the biological implications of widely used water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA radiators for clinical use on human skin fibroblasts assessed by MMP-1 gene expression (MMP-1 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA expression. Methods: Human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with approximately 88% wIRA (780-1400 nm and 12% red light (RL, 665-780 nm with 380 mW/cm² wIRA(+RL (333 mW/cm² wIRA on the one hand and for comparison with UV-A (330-400 nm, mainly UV-A1 and a small amount of blue light (BL, 400-450 nm with 28 mW/cm² UV-A(+BL on the other hand. Survival curves were established by colony forming ability after single exposures between 15 minutes and 8 hours to wIRA(+RL (340-10880 J/cm² wIRA(+RL, 300-9600 J/cm² wIRA or 15-45 minutes to UV-A(+BL (25-75 J/cm² UV-A(+BL. Both conventional Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR and quantitative real-time RT-PCR techniques were used to determine the induction of MMP-1 mRNA at two physiologic temperatures for skin fibroblasts (30°C and 37°C in single exposure regimens (15-60 minutes wIRA(+RL, 340-1360 J/cm² wIRA(+RL, 300-1200 J/cm² wIRA; 30 minutes UV-A(+BL, 50 J/cm² UV-A(+BL and in addition at 30°C in a repeated exposure protocol (up to 10 times 15 minutes wIRA(+RL with 340 J/cm² wIRA(+RL, 300 J/cm² w

  6. Radiation response of the mouse tongue epithelium

    Mouse tongue mucosa has been used as a model to study dose responses to local irradiation. Although the irradiation procedures is less feasible and more time-consuming than e.g. snout irradiation, the tongue is the only location where a reasonable area of intraoral, multilayered epithelium in the mouse can be locally treated and scored, and a relatively small burden is imposed on the animal. In pilot experiments with external 300 kV x-irradiation just tolerated by the lip, the authors did not see critical damage to the tongue. In the present model, the onset of denudation was not correctly predicted by the normal turnover time of the tissue. (UK)

  7. Modulation of radiation response by histone deacetylase inhibition

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, which modulate chromatin structure and gene expression, represent a class of anticancer agents that hold particular potential as radiation sensitizers. In this study, we examine the capacity of the HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) to modulate radiation response in human tumor cell lines and explore potential mechanisms underlying these interactions. Methods and materials: Cell proliferation: Exponentially growing tumor cells were incubated in medium containing 0-10 μM of SAHA for 72 h. Cells were fixed/stained with crystal violet to estimate cell viability. Apoptosis: Caspase activity was analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy using a fluorescein labeled pan-caspase inhibitor. Cells were harvested after 48 h of exposure to SAHA (1.0 μM), radiation (6 Gy), or the combination. Whole cell lysates were evaluated for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage by western blot analysis. Radiation survival: Cells were exposed to varying doses of radiation ± 3 days pretreatment with SAHA (0.75-1.0 μM). After incubation intervals of 14-21 days, colonies were stained with crystal violet and manually counted. Immunocytochemistry: Cells were grown and treated in chamber slides. At specified times after treatment with SAHA, cells were fixed in paraformaldehyde, permeabilized in methanol, and probed with primary and secondary antibody solutions. Slides were analyzed using an epifluorescent microscope. Results: SAHA induced a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation in human prostate (DU145) and glioma (U373vIII) cancer cell lines. Exposure to SAHA enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis as measured by caspase activity (p < 0.05) and PARP cleavage. The impact of SAHA on radiation response was further characterized using clonogenic survival analysis, which demonstrated that treatment with SAHA reduced tumor survival after radiation exposure. We identified several oncoproteins and DNA damage repair proteins

  8. Comparison of Cellular Uptake and Inflammatory Response via Toll-Like Receptor 4 to Lipopolysaccharide and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    Akiyoshi Taniguchi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune response is the earliest cellular response to infectious agents and mediates the interactions between microbes and cells. Toll-like receptors (TLRs play an important role in these interactions. We have already shown that TLRs are involved with the uptake of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs and promote inflammatory responses. In this paper, we compared role of cellular uptake and inflammatory response via TLR 4 to lipopolysaccharide (LPS and TiO2 NPs. In the case of LPS, LPS binds to LPS binding protein (LBP and CD 14, and then this complex binds to TLR 4. In the case of TiO2 NPs, the necessity of LBP and CD 14 to induce the inflammatory response and for uptake by cells was investigated using over-expression, antibody blocking, and siRNA knockdown experiments. Our results suggested that for cellular uptake of TiO2 NPs, TLR 4 did not form a complex with LBP and CD 14. In the TiO2 NP-mediated inflammatory response, TLR 4 acted as the signaling receptor without protein complex of LPS, LBP and CD 14. The results suggested that character of TiO2 NPs might be similar to the complex of LPS, LBP and CD 14. These results are important for development of safer nanomaterials.

  9. Electric currents and fields induced in cells in the human brain by radiation from hand-held cellular telephones

    King, Ronold W. P.

    2000-01-01

    After a review of recent work on the interaction of electromagnetic fields from cellular telephones with the human head, the structural and radiating properties of two common types of transceivers are determined. These include the impedance and current amplitude distribution of the antennas. The tangential electric field maintained by the antennas on the adjacent surface of the head is next determined. From this, the electric field propagating through the skull into the brain is analyzed and, from it, the electric field in spherical and long cylindrical cells is determined. It ranges from 27 to 13.5 V/m in the first 3 cm inside the skull. Of interest is the fact that the induced field in the interior of all cells, regardless of their shape, is the same as the incident field in the brain. It is hoped that biomedical scientists will review these results and determine possible biological effects.

  10. Epidermal stem cells response to radiative genotoxic stress

    Human skin is the first organ exposed to various environmental stresses, which requires the development by skin stem cells of specific mechanisms to protect themselves and to ensure tissue homeostasis. As stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of epidermis during individual lifetime, the preservation of genomic integrity in these cells is essential. My PhD aimed at exploring the mechanisms set up by epidermal stem cells in order to protect themselves from two genotoxic stresses, ionizing radiation (Gamma Rays) and ultraviolet radiation (UVB). To begin my PhD, I have taken part of the demonstration of protective mechanisms used by keratinocyte stem cells after ionizing radiation. It has been shown that these cells are able to rapidly repair most types of radiation-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this repair is activated by the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). In order to know if this protective mechanism is also operating in cutaneous carcinoma stem cells, we investigated the response to gamma Rays of carcinoma stem cells isolated from a human carcinoma cell line. As in normal keratinocyte stem cells, we demonstrated that cancer stem cells could rapidly repair radio-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factor 2 also mediates this repair, notably thanks to its nuclear isoforms. The second project of my PhD was to study human epidermal stem cells and progenitors responses to UVB radiation. Once cytometry and irradiation conditions were set up, the toxicity of UVB radiation has been evaluate in the primary cell model. We then characterized UVB photons effects on cell viability, proliferation and repair of DNA damage. This study allowed us to bring out that responses of stem cells and their progeny to UVB are different, notably at the level of part of their repair activity of DNA damage. Moreover, progenitors and stem cells transcriptomic responses after UVB irradiation have been study in order to analyze the global

  11. The effect of ionizing radiation with different ionizing density on the uni-cellular Alga Micrasterias denticulate Breb

    The uni-cellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata Breb is very suitable for cytological, ultrastructural investigations as well as for growth studies of cell populations because of its size and its specific cellular pattern. Therefore these cells were investigated for their cell-cycle-dependent reaction to different types of radiation, dose-rates and cumulated doses and compared with results from the literature on radiobiological effects on single cells. Different types of ionizing radiation were used such as gamma rays (60Co, 241Am), alpha rays (241Am) neutrons (252Cf and 14 MeV-neutrons from a particle-accelerator) and protons (20-MeV-protons from a particle-accelerator). Irradiation with low doses (gamma-, neutron irradiation) did not show any statistically significant results. No effects could be observed after alpha irradiation because of the alpha particles could not penetrate the mucus cover. Irradiation with gamma rays and protons showed statistically significant reversible and irreversible effects. The reversible effect appeared in a dose-dependent division-delay of the populations. The results from literature, cell-cycle observations and ultra-structural investigations point to a block in the G2-phase and prolongation of the S-phase. Irreversible irradiation damage is caused by neutron- and proton irradiation. In the first case the length of division delay shows no dose-dependence. In the second case the following cell-cycles are retarded. The dose-effect-curves of proton-irradiations with different dose-rates show a plateau at high doses, which seems to be effected by the turn-on of an additional repair-mechanism. (Author)

  12. Delayed type hypersensitivity responses to radiation leukemia virus variants

    DTH responses were evaluated in different strains of mice shown to be resistant or sensitive to leukemogenesis by the radiation leukemia virus variants A-RadLV and D-RadLV. A significant response was observed only in the H-2 complex-linked resistant haplotypes to RadLV leukemogenesis. The DTH response could be transferred by immune cells of mice resistant to the appropriate RadLV variant. Thus, an inverse relationship between the leukemogenic activity of the virus and its immunization ability expressed by DTH response was demonstrated in different mouse strains

  13. Cellular responses to modified Plasmodium falciparum MSP119 antigens in individuals previously exposed to natural malaria infection

    Awobode Henrietta O

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MSP1 processing-inhibitory antibodies bind to epitopes on the 19 kDa C-terminal region of the Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP119, inhibiting erythrocyte invasion. Blocking antibodies also bind to this antigen but prevent inhibitory antibodies binding, allowing invasion to proceed. Recombinant MSP119 had been modified previously to allow inhibitory but not blocking antibodies to continue to bind. Immunization with these modified proteins, therefore, has the potential to induce more effective protective antibodies. However, it was unclear whether the modification of MSP119 would affect critical T-cell responses to epitopes in this antigen. Methods The cellular responses to wild-type MSP119 and a panel of modified MSP119 antigens were measured using an in-vitro assay for two groups of individuals: the first were malaria-naïve and the second had been naturally exposed to Plasmodium falciparum infection. The cellular responses to the modified proteins were examined using cells from malaria-exposed infants and adults. Results Interestingly, stimulation indices (SI for responses induced by some of the modified proteins were at least two-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type MSP119. A protein with four amino acid substitutions (Glu27→Tyr, Leu31→Arg, Tyr34→Ser and Glu43→Leu had the highest stimulation index (SI up to 360 and induced large responses in 64% of the samples that had significant cellular responses to the modified proteins. Conclusion This study suggests that specific MSP119 variants that have been engineered to improve their antigenicity for inhibitory antibodies, retain T-cell epitopes and the ability to induce cellular responses. These proteins are candidates for the development of MSP1-based malaria vaccines.

  14. Enhanced radiation response in radioresistant MCF-7 cells by targeting peroxiredoxin II

    Diaz AJG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthony Joseph Gomez Diaz,1 Daniel Tamae,2 Yun Yen,3 JianJian Li,4 Tieli Wang1 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University at Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, 2Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology, Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 3Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA Abstract: In our previous study, we identified that a protein target, peroxiredoxin II (PrxII, is overexpressed in radioresistant MCF+FIR3 breast-cancer cells and found that its expression and function is associated with breast-cancer radiation sensitivity or resistance. Small interference RNA (siRNA targeting PrxII gene expression was able to sensitize MCF+FIR3 radioresistant breast-cancer cells to ionizing radiation. The major focus of this work was to investigate how the radiation response of MCF+FIR3 radioresistant cells was affected by the siRNA that inhibits PrxII gene expression. Our results, presented here, show that silencing PrxII gene expression increased cellular toxicity by altering cellular thiol status, inhibiting Ca2+ efflux from the cells, and perturbing the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. By combining radiotherapy and siRNA technology, we hope to develop new therapeutic strategies that may have potential to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents due to this technology's property of targeting to specific cancer-related genes. Keywords: siRNA, PrxII, radiation resistance, Ca2+, MCF+FIR3

  15. Low-Radiation Cellular Inductive Powering of Rodent Wireless Brain Interfaces: Methodology and Design Guide.

    Soltani, Nima; Aliroteh, Miaad S; Salam, M Tariqus; Perez Velazquez, Jose Luis; Genov, Roman

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a general methodology of inductive power delivery in wireless chronic rodent electrophysiology applications. The focus is on such systems design considerations under the following key constraints: maximum power delivery under the allowable specific absorption rate (SAR), low cost and spatial scalability. The methodology includes inductive coil design considerations within a low-frequency ferrite-core-free power transfer link which includes a scalable coil-array power transmitter floor and a single-coil implanted or worn power receiver. A specific design example is presented that includes the concept of low-SAR cellular single-transmitter-coil powering through dynamic tracking of a magnet-less receiver spatial location. The transmitter coil instantaneous supply current is monitored using a small number of low-cost electronic components. A drop in its value indicates the proximity of the receiver due to the reflected impedance of the latter. Only the transmitter coil nearest to the receiver is activated. Operating at the low frequency of 1.5 MHz, the inductive powering floor delivers a maximum of 15.9 W below the IEEE C95 SAR limit, which is over three times greater than that in other recently reported designs. The power transfer efficiency of 39% and 13% at the nominal and maximum distances of 8 cm and 11 cm, respectively, is maintained. PMID:26960227

  16. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  17. Elemental mapping by synchrotron radiation X-Ray microfluorescence in cellular spheroid of prostate tumor cells

    Leitao, R.G.; Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T., E-mail: roberta@lin.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Santos, C.A.N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia; Palumbo Junior, A.; Souza, P.A.V.R.; Nasciutti, L.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas; Pereira, G.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ensaios Nao Destrutivos, Corrosao e Soldagem

    2013-08-15

    Prostate cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and the third most common in males in Western industrialized countries. Cellular spheroid serves as excellent physiologic tumor models as they mimic avascular tumors and micrometastases. Trace elements play a significant role in biological processes. They are capable of affecting human health by competing with essential elements for available binding sites and by the activation or inhibition of reactions between metabolic enzymes. It is well known that zinc levels in the peripheral zone of dorsal and lateral lobes of the prostate are almost 10 times higher than in other soft tissues. Prostate tumor cells were isolated of the prostate tissue samples that were collected from patients submitted to surgery. The measurements were performed in XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas, Brazil. The results showed that all elements were heterogeneously distributed in different areas of the spheroids analyzed. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed while K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution. In all spheroids analyzed, Zn presented more intense distributions in the central region of the spheroid. The relationship between the function of Zn in the secretory epithelial cells and the carcinogenic process suggests that more studies on elemental mapping in spheroids are necessary. (author)

  18. Early radiation dose-response in lung: an ultrastructural study

    A systematic fine-structural study of dog lungs was undertaken to ascertain the radiation dose response in the lungs of large animals. The capillary endothelium appeared to be the initial site of the post-irradiation pulmonary damage. This subpheural response included diffuse septal thickening, fibrosis, edema, and reduced alveolar lumina. The deep parenchymal response involved perivascular fibrosis, which was associated with perivascular hyperplasia of Type II pneumocytes, increased number and sizes of lamellar bodies, increased production and release of lamellar surfactant. No changes of alveolar luminar size were noted. The most significant changes were observed in those dose zones exposed to greater than 2400 rad, suggesting the possibility of an identifiable dose-response relationship. Early detection of radiation pneumonitis by electron microscopy is demonstrated, and qualitative and quantitative correlation of injury with both postirradiation time and dose is presented

  19. Metabolic response of lung cancer cells to radiation in a paper-based 3D cell culture system.

    Simon, Karen A; Mosadegh, Bobak; Minn, Kyaw Thu; Lockett, Matthew R; Mohammady, Marym R; Boucher, Diane M; Hall, Amy B; Hillier, Shawn M; Udagawa, Taturo; Eustace, Brenda K; Whitesides, George M

    2016-07-01

    This work demonstrates the application of a 3D culture system-Cells-in-Gels-in-Paper (CiGiP)-in evaluating the metabolic response of lung cancer cells to ionizing radiation. The 3D tissue-like construct-prepared by stacking multiple sheets of paper containing cell-embedded hydrogels-generates a gradient of oxygen and nutrients that decreases monotonically in the stack. Separating the layers of the stack after exposure enabled analysis of the cellular response to radiation as a function of oxygen and nutrient availability; this availability is dictated by the distance between the cells and the source of oxygenated medium. As the distance between the cells and source of oxygenated media increased, cells show increased levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, decreased proliferation, and reduced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Each of these cellular responses are characteristic of cancer cells observed in solid tumors. With this setup we were able to differentiate three isogenic variants of A549 cells based on their metabolic radiosensitivity; these three variants have known differences in their metastatic behavior in vivo. This system can, therefore, capture some aspects of radiosensitivity of populations of cancer cells related to mass-transport phenomenon, carry out systematic studies of radiation response in vitro that decouple effects from migration and proliferation of cells, and regulate the exposure of oxygen to subpopulations of cells in a tissue-like construct either before or after irradiation. PMID:27116031

  20. Response of radiation monitors for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10)

    Radiation monitors are used all over the world to evaluate if places with presence of ionising radiation present safe conditions for people. Radiation monitors should be tested according to international or national standards in order to be qualified for use. This work describes a methodology and procedures to evaluate the energy and angular responses of any radiation monitor for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), according to the recommendations of ISO and IEC standards. The methodology and the procedures were applied to the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026, developed by the Instituto em Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), to evaluate and to adjust its response for H*(10), characterizing it as an ambient dose equivalent meter. The tests were performed at the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI), at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), and results showed that the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026 can be used as an EI*(10) meter, in accordance to the IEC 60846 standard requirements. The overall estimated uncertainty for the determination of the MIR 7026 response, in all radiation qualities used in this work, was 4,5 % to a 95 % confidence limit. (author)

  1. Global DNA methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure

    Full text: High radiation doses cause breaks in the DNA which are considered the critical lesions in initiation of radiation-induced cancer. However, at very low radiation doses relevant for the general public, the induction of such breaks will be rare, and other changes to the DNA such as DNA methylation which affects gene expression may playa role in radiation responses. We are studying global DNA methylation after low dose radiation exposure to determine if low dose radiation has short- and/or long-term effects on chromatin structure. We developed a sensitive high resolution melt assay to measure the levels of DNA methylation across the mouse genome by analysing a stretch of DNA sequence within Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements-I (LINE I) that comprise a very large proportion of the mouse and human genomes. Our initial results suggest no significant short-term or longterm) changes in global NA methylation after low dose whole-body X-radiation of 10 J1Gyor 10 mGy, with a significant transient increase in NA methylation observed I day after a high dose of I Gy. If the low radiation doses tested are inducing changes in bal DNA methylation, these would appear to be smaller than the variation observed between the sexes and following the general stress of the sham-irradiation procedure itself. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Biological and Environmental Research, US DOE, Grant DE-FG02-05ER64104 and MN is the recipient of the FMCF/BHP Dose Radiation Research Scholarship.

  2. Microstructures, mechanical behavior, cellular response, and hemocompatibility of bulk ultrafine-grained pure tantalum.

    Nie, F L; Zheng, Y F; Wang, Y; Wang, J T

    2014-02-01

    Bulk ultrafine-grained (UFG) pure Ta had been successfully prepared by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) technique till eight passes. The 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 8th ECAPed Ta samples were investigated in the current study, with the 0th ECAPed Ta sample as the microcrystalline counterpart control. The microstructure and grain size distribution were characterized by X-ray diffractometer patterns, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analysis by means of histogram. Although the mechanical behavior of all the experimental samples were analyzed through uniaxial tensile measurement and microhardness test, in vitro biological interactions onto the substrates such as protein adsorption, cellular responses derived from different types of cell lines, and the activity of erythrocyte and platelets were further evaluated and specifically assessed by bicinchoninic acid assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the method of colorimetric reading. A superior percentage of protein adsorption can be observed on the substrate of the UFG 8th ECAPed Ta (around 90%), even above those on the tissue culture plate (control) and the other ECAPed Ta samples. Furthermore, the UFG 8th ECAPed Ta shows no cytotoxic within 4 days culture when incubated with the murine fibroblast cell lines (L929). In addition, a priority order in the growth of endothelial cells (ECV304) other than vascular smooth muscle cells was observed in the case of the UFG 8th ECAPed Ta. In terms of hemolysis rate and adhered platelets (both the amount and the individual morphology), an evolutionary outcome of preferentially enhanced hemocompatibility can be concluded for the case of the UFG 8th ECAPed Ta. PMID:23908098

  3. P53 activation, a key event of the cellular response to gamma irradiation

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 encodes a protein whose major function is to protect organisms from proliferation of potentially tumorigenic cells. In normal conditions (unstressed cells), the p53 protein is inert and maintained at low level through its association with the Mdm2 oncogene, causing its translocation from the nucleus into the cytoplasm and its degradation through ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In response to damaged DNA or to a variety of stresses, p53 accumulates in the nucleus and is activated as a transcriptional trans-activator. Posttranslational modifications of p53 including multi-site phosphorylation and acetylation are the major mechanism of p53 regulation. After exposure to ionising radiation, p53 activation implicates ATM, ATR, Chk2 and Chk1 kinases that phosphorylate the N-terminal domain on Ser15 (ATM and/or ATR), and Ser20 (Chk2 and/or Chk1), causing the dissociation of the p53/Mdm2 complex and thereby the stabilisation of p53. The process initiated by γ-irradiation exposure involves also increased interaction of the p53 N-terminal domain with CBP/p300 and P/CAF leading to acetylation of the distant C-terminal domain at Lys 320, 373 and 382. In addition, the ATM-mediated dephosphorylation of Ser376 creates a fixation site for 14-3-3 protein. Taken together, phosphorylation, acetylation and association with co factors induce the stimulation of p53 transcriptional activity resulting in the expression of a set of genes involved, notably, in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This stress-induced p53 pathways lead to one of two outcomes: growth arrest or apoptosis and consequently protects the organism from the genotoxic effects of ionising radiation. (author)

  4. Unraveling the global microRNAome responses to ionizing radiation in human embryonic stem cells.

    Mykyta V Sokolov

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNA comprise a group of short ribonucleic acid molecules implicated in regulation of key biological processes and functions at the post-transcriptional level. Ionizing radiation (IR causes DNA damage and generally triggers cellular stress response. However, the role of miRNAs in IR-induced response in human embryonic stem cells (hESC has not been defined yet. Here, by using system biology approaches, we show for the first time, that miRNAome undergoes global alterations in hESC (H1 and H9 lines after IR. Interrogation of expression levels of 1,090 miRNA species in irradiated hESC showed statistically significant changes in 54 genes following 1 Gy of X-ray exposures; global miRNAome alterations were found to be highly temporally and cell line--dependent in hESC. Time-course studies showed that the 16 hr miRNAome radiation response of hESC is much more robust compared to 2 hr-response signature (only eight genes, and may be involved in regulating the cell cycle. Quantitative real-time PCR performed on some miRNA species confirms the robustness of our miRNA microarray platform. Positive regulation of differentiation-, cell cycle-, ion transport- and endomembrane system-related processes were predicted to be negatively affected by miRNAome changes in irradiated hESC. Our findings reveal a fundamental role of miRNAome in modulating the radiation response, and identify novel molecular targets of radiation in hESC.

  5. Changes in the cellularity of the cortex of human hairs as an indicator of radiation exposure

    Growing hair follicles with their rapid cell proliferation would be expected to be sensitive organs to cytotoxic agents such as radiation. Various abnormalities in the hair and hair follicles have been reported in the past. Changes in the number of cells in the newly forming hair cortex have been shown in the mouse to be one of the more sensitive assays for radiation effects, and this approach could provide a basis for a biological dosimeter. Here we show for the first time using hair cortex cell counts some preliminary data indicating that the number of cell nuclei in a unit of length (140 μm) of the cortex of human hairs from the chest and scalp of patients undergoing fractionated radiotherapy falls significantly (P = 0.005) by 5%-10% 3 days after the first dose in a fractionated sequence of irradiations. The first dose was delivered on a Friday, and no further exposures were delivered until after the hair sample was taken on the 3rd day (Monday). No significant effect of radiation dose could be detected over the available, limited range of doses studied (5 - 6.5 Gy with one exit dose sample at 2.6 Gy). Also, the width varies from hair to hair. If the width of the hair is taken into account and the cortical nuclei counts are normalised to the width of each hair, the effects seen at day 3 become slightly more significant (P = 0.002), and those at day 5 also become significant (P = 0.012). Samples taken on the 5th day after the first (Friday) exposure were also 2 days after the second exposure and 1 day after the third exposure. However, little expression of damage attributable to the 2nd and 3rd exposures was anticipated since their effects would take some time to be expressed in the cortical region examined, which is some distance from the proliferative region of the follicle. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Correlations between cellular resistance to ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents: Patterns of interaction with DFMO

    The authors evaluated a number of antitumor agents to determine the extent to which cytotoxic responses to these agents correlate with those of x-rays and PUVA. As part of this determination, the authors measured the effect of depletion of cellular levels of polyamines by DFMO on the survival patterns in V79 cells. These studies indicate several agents are cosensitive with x-rays and PUVA in that cell survival is markedly decreased in DFMO treated cells: cis-platinum, nitrogen mustard, mitomycin-C and 4 hydroxycyclophosphamide. The authors data taken in toto suggest common factors in the cytotoxic response of mammalian cells to most DNA-damaging agents whose initial level of damage can be modulated by higher-order chromatin structure

  7. Tissue responses to radiation exposure in the lung

    This article provides an outline on the influences of radiation on the lung carcinogenesis. External and internal radiation exposures cause acute and late effects, such as pneumonia, pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancers in humans and experimental animals. The acute radiation pneumonia is lethal at a high dose, and the inflammatory response may progress for chronic fibrosis. High LET radiation exposures, such as internal exposure of alpha radionuclides and external exposure of neutron, are more effective for lung cancer induction than external exposure of low LET radiation. The lung cancers are classified into adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma (human only), and radiation induces any of the cancers. The target cells of the lung cancers are considered as type 2 alveolar epithelial cells and Clara (secretory) cells for the adenocarcinoma, as basal cells for the squamous cell carcinoma and as pulmonary neuroendocrine cells for the small cell carcinoma. The recent studies are revealing molecular mechanisms of the radiation-induced lung cancer. (author)

  8. Tolerance to Gamma Radiation in the Tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini from Embryo to Adult Correlate Inversely with Cellular Proliferation.

    Eliana Beltrán-Pardo

    Full Text Available Tardigrades are highly tolerant to desiccation and ionizing radiation but the mechanisms of this tolerance are not well understood. In this paper, we report studies on dose responses of adults and eggs of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini exposed to gamma radiation. In adults the LD50/48h for survival was estimated at ~ 4200 Gy, and doses higher than 100 Gy reduced both fertility and hatchability of laid eggs drastically. We also evaluated the effect of radiation (doses 50 Gy, 200 Gy, 500 Gy on eggs in the early and late embryonic stage of development, and observed a reduced hatchability in the early stage, while no effect was found in the late stage of development. Survival of juveniles from irradiated eggs was highly affected by a 500 Gy dose, both in the early and the late stage. Juveniles hatched from eggs irradiated at 50 Gy and 200 Gy developed into adults and produced offspring, but their fertility was reduced compared to the controls. Finally we measured the effect of low temperature during irradiation at 4000 Gy and 4500 Gy on survival in adult tardigrades, and observed a slight delay in the expressed mortality when tardigrades were irradiated on ice. Since H. dujardini is a freshwater tardigrade with lower tolerance to desiccation compared to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, the high radiation tolerance in adults, similar to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, is unexpected and seems to challenge the idea that desiccation and radiation tolerance rely on the same molecular mechanisms. We suggest that the higher radiation tolerance in adults and late stage embryos of H. dujardini (and in other studied tardigrades compared to early stage embryos may partly be due to limited mitotic activity, since tardigrades have a low degree of somatic cell division (eutely, and dividing cells are known to be more sensitive to radiation.

  9. Radiation Response of Emerging High Gain, Low Noise Detectors

    Becker, Heidi N.; Farr, William H; Zhu, David Q.

    2007-01-01

    Data illustrating the radiation response of emerging high gain, low noise detectors are presented. Ionizing dose testing of silicon internal discrete avalanche photodiodes, and 51-MeV proton testing of InGaAs/InAlAs avalanche photodiodes operated in Geiger mode are discussed.

  10. Nigella sativa oil Ameliorates ionizing Radiation induced cellular injury in Male Albino Rats

    Nigella sativa (NS), commonly known as black seed, is a plant spices in which thymoquinone is the main active ingredient isolated from the black seeds. The seeds of Nigella sativa are used in herbal medicine all over the world for the treatment and prevention of a number of diseases. The aim of this study was focused on investigating the possible protective effect of NS against gamma radiation induced nephrotoxicity and inflammatory changes in male albino rats. Twenty four albino rats were divided into four equal groups as follows: control group, irradiated group (animals subjected to whole body gamma irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy), treated group (rats treated with 0.2 ml/kg, i.p., NS oil for 4 weeks), and treated irradiated group (animals treated with 0.2 mL/kg, i.p., NS oil for 4 weeks then exposed to whole body gamma irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy). The obtained results revealed that the administration of Nigella sativa oil to irradiated rats significantly ameliorated the changes induced in kidney antioxidant system; catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities as well as reduced glutathione concentration. Also, NS oil restored the kidney function indices (urea and creatinine) near normal level when compared with their equivalent values in irradiated rats. In addition, the changes in serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) activities were markedly improved compared to the corresponding values of irradiated group. The histopathological results showed distinctive pattern of ischemic renal injury in irradiated group, while in treated- irradiated group the renal tissues showed relatively well-preserved architecture with or without focal degeneration. In conclusion, NS acts in the kidney as a potent scavenger of free radicals to prevent or ameliorates the toxic effects of gamma irradiation as shown in the biochemical and histopathological study and also NS oil might provide substantial protection against

  11. Study of the response of radiation protection monitors in terms of H*(10) in X radiation

    The ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), is an operational quantity recommended by the International Commission of radiation Units and Measurements Report 39 for measurements in area monitoring. However, most of the monitoring instruments used in radiation protection in Brazil still use the old quantities exposure rate and absorbed dose rate. Therefore, it is necessary to study how to change the operational quantity to H*(10). In this work, the response of radiation protection monitoring detectors was studied in terms of H*(10) for different energies using standard X-rays (narrow beams) at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. (author)

  12. Development of an in vivo assay for non-targeted radiation effects based on response rather than dose

    An adaptive response may be defined as the effect of a small priming dose of radiation modifying the anticipated cellular response of the same tissues so as to alter the predicted response to a larger dose of radiation. We and others have demonstrated that at low radiation doses (less than 0.5 Gy) the lethal and mutational effect of the radiation is mainly, possibly entirely, due to the non-targeted effects. This is the dose range for priming doses in adaptive response protocols. In an associated presentation from our group, we demonstrate that the adaptive response may be explicable as a non targeted (bystander) response. In this paper we present data from exposed people, showing that a simple assay using blood can demonstrate variation in the extent and type of non-targeted effects and that exposure to radiation can modulate the subsequent non-targeted response to a later dose. The serum from blood samples of exposed individuals was harvested, diluted in tissue culture medium and added to reporter cells. The toxicity or growth promoting activity of the serum was measured using a clonogenic assay coupled with immunocytochemical measurement of various proteins involved in apoptosis or growth. While the assay has only been applied to human blood so far, it is expected that it would be useful for monitoring response to low doses in fish or mammals. There is already evidence that bystander effects are controlled by both genetic and epigenetic (lifestyle) factors. These data could support the development of a simple blood based assay to predict overall response of critical species to low doses of radiation taking all the low dose factors into account. A key element of the assay is that it allows response to be measured and correlates response rather than dose with harm. (author)

  13. Gadd45a, a p53- and BRCA1-regulated stress protein, in cellular response to DNA damage

    Mammalian cells exhibit complex, but intricate cellular responses to genotoxic stress, including cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair and apoptosis. Inactivation of these important biological events may result in genomic instability and cell transformation, as well as alterations of therapeutic sensitivity. Gadd45a, a p53- and BRCA1-regulated stress-inducible gene, has been characterized as one of the important players that participate in cellular response to a variety of DNA damage agents. Interestingly, the signaling machinery that regulates Gadd45a induction by genotoxic stress involves both p53-dependent and -independent pathways; the later may employ BRCA1-related or MAP kinase-mediated signals. Gadd45a protein has been reported to interact with multiple important cellular proteins, including Cdc2 protein kinase, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), p21Waf1/Cip1 protein, core histone protein and MTK/MEKK4, an up-stream activator of the JNK/SAPK pathway, indicating that Gadd45a may play important roles in the control of cell cycle checkpoint, DNA repair process, and signaling transduction. The importance of Gadd45a in maintaining genomic integrity is well manifested by the demonstration that disruption of endogenous Gadd45a in mice results in genomic instability and increased carcinogenesis. Therefore, Gadd45a appears to be an important component in the cellular defense network that is required for maintenance of genomic stability

  14. Toxicity potentials from waste cellular phones, and a waste management policy integrating consumer, corporate, and government responsibilities

    Cellular phones have high environmental impact potentials because of their heavy metal content and current consumer attitudes toward purchasing new phones with higher functionality and neglecting to return waste phones into proper take-back systems. This study evaluates human health and ecological toxicity potentials from waste cellular phones; highlights consumer, corporate, and government responsibilities for effective waste management; and identifies key elements needed for an effective waste management strategy. The toxicity potentials are evaluated by using heavy metal content, respective characterization factors, and a pathway and impact model for heavy metals that considers end-of-life disposal in landfills or by incineration. Cancer potentials derive primarily from Pb and As; non-cancer potentials primarily from Cu and Pb; and ecotoxicity potentials primarily from Cu and Hg. These results are not completely in agreement with previous work in which leachability thresholds were the metric used to establish priority, thereby indicating the need for multiple or revised metrics. The triple bottom line of consumer, corporate, and government responsibilities is emphasized in terms of consumer attitudes, design for environment (DfE), and establishment and implementation of waste management systems including recycling streams, respectively. The key strategic elements for effective waste management include environmental taxation and a deposit-refund system to motivate consumer responsibility, which is linked and integrated with corporate and government responsibilities. The results of this study can contribute to DfE and waste management policy for cellular phones.

  15. Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce robust humoral and cellular responses in a bovine viral diarrhea virus vaccine in mice.

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Silveira, Fernando; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; dos Santos, Helton Fernandes; Yendo, Anna Carolina; de Costa, Fernanda; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano; Gosmann, Grace; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2016-04-01

    A saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis leaves (QB-90) and a semi-purified aqueous extract (AE) were evaluated as adjuvants in a bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) vaccine in mice. Animals were immunized on days 0 and 14 with antigen plus either QB-90 or AE or an oil-adjuvanted vaccine. Two-weeks after boosting, antibodies were measured by ELISA; cellular immunity was evaluated by DTH, lymphoproliferation, cytokine release and single cell IFN-γ production. Serum anti-BVDV IgG, IgG1 and IgG2b were significantly increased in QB-90- and AE-adjuvanted vaccines. A robust DTH response, increased splenocyte proliferation, Th1-type cytokines and enhanced production of IFN-γ by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were detected in mice that received QB-90-adjuvanted vaccine. The AE-adjuvanted preparation stimulated humoral responses but not cellular immune responses. These findings reveal that QB-90 is capable of stimulating both cellular and humoral immune responses when used as adjuvant. PMID:27012913

  16. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn, E-mail: dc17@york.ac.uk

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening

  17. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naïve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naïve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naïve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naïve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: ► A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. ► Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naïve nuclei. ► PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. ► Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. ► LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening approach.

  18. Model of cell response to {\\alpha}-particle radiation

    Liu, Longjian

    2012-01-01

    Starting from a general equation for organism (or cell system) growth and attributing additional cell death rate (besides the natural rate) to therapy, we derive an equation for cell response to {\\alpha} radiation. Different from previous models that are based on statistical theory, the present model connects the consequence of radiation with the growth process of a biosystem and each variable or parameter has meaning regarding the cell evolving process. We apply this equation to model the dose response for {\\alpha}-particle radiation. It interprets the results of both high and low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. When LET is high, the additional death rate is a constant, which implies that the localized cells are damaged immediately and the additional death rate is proportional to the number of cells present. While at low LET, the additional death rate includes a constant term and a linear term of radiation dose, implying that the damage to some cell nuclei has a time accumulating effect. This model ...

  19. The radiation response of skin in young and old rats

    The results of this investigation clearly demonstrate the different radiation skin response in rats of differing ages. The reasons for these differences cannot be clarified until cell kinetic studies have been completed. These results obtained for rodent skin would appear to be in disagreement with the available data for human skin (Rubin and Casarett 1968) where no marked age-related changes were reported. Also, in pig skin studies (Hopewell and Young 1982) there was no evidence of an age effect in the dermal vascular response in 3-12-month-old animals. This may be related to the different tissue being investigated or it may reflect important species differences. Whatever the reasons behind these observations, the different skin response to radiation in rats of 7, 14 and 52 weeks of age has clearly been demonstrated and should be borne in mind when extrapolating data with rodent skin to the clinical situation. (author)

  20. A cellular stress response (CSR) that interacts with NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) is a new regulator of hypoxic response.

    Oguro, Ami; Koyama, Chika; Xu, Jing; Imaoka, Susumu

    2014-02-28

    NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR) was previously found to contribute to the hypoxic response of cells, but the mechanism was not clarified. In this study, we identified a cellular stress response (CSR) as a new factor interacting with NPR by a yeast two-hybrid system. Overexpression of CSR enhanced the induction of erythropoietin and hypoxia response element (HRE) activity under hypoxia in human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (Hep3B), while knockdown of CSR suppressed them. This new finding regarding the interaction of NPR with CSR provides insight into the function of NPR in hypoxic response. PMID:24491563

  1. Final Report for Grant No. DE-FG02-01ER63220 "The Dynamics of Cellular Stress Responses in Deinococcus radiodurans"

    PI: Michael J. Daly, Ph.D., Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences; Co-Investigators: James K. Fredrickson, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richard D. Smith, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Eugene Koonin, Ph.D., National Center for Biotechnology Information; Jizhong Zhou, Ph.D.\t, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Mary S. Lipton, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-03-06

    Bacteria belonging to the family Deinococcaceae are some of the most ionizing radiation (IR) resistant organisms yet discovered. Deinococcus radiodurans is obligate aerobic, capable of growth under chronic IR (60 Gy/hour) and relatively resistant to many DNA damaging conditions including exposure to desiccation, ultraviolet radiation and hydrogen peroxide. The genes and cellular pathways underlying the survival strategies of D. radiodurans have been under investigation for fifty years. In the last decade, D. radiodurans was subjected to whole-genome sequencing, annotation and comparative analysis, whole-transcriptome and whole-proteome analyses, and numerous DNA repair studies. Collectively, published reports support that the key to survival of D. radiodurans resides in its ability to repair DNA, but the mechanisms responsible remain poorly defined. Unexpectedly, many novel genes implicated in recovery from IR by transcriptome and proteome profiling have had little effect on survival when disrupted, and there is reason to ask if something is missing from classical models of radiation resistance. The prevailing dogma of radiation toxicity has been that the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of radiation are principally the result of DNA damage that occurs during IR. However, in light of available whole genome sequences, one broad observation that is difficult to reconcile with this view is that many organisms that encode a compliment of DNA repair and protection functions are killed at radiation doses that cause little DNA damage. This indicates that there are cellular targets involved in recovery that are more vulnerable to IR damage than DNA. It has been reported that D. radiodurans and other resistant organisms accumulate very high intracellular concentrations of Mn(II), and restricting the amount of Mn(II) during recovery from IR substantially reduced survival of D. radiodurans. At high intracellular concentrations, Mn(II) is known to act as a true catalyst of the

  2. Cellular heredity in haploid cultures of somatic cells. Comprehensive report, April 1975--June 1977. [UV radiation

    Freed, J.J.

    1977-07-01

    This report reviews genetic studies carried out since 1975 on a haploid cultured cell line from frog embryos (ICR 2A). Although a single chromosome set would be expected to facilitate recovery of recessive mutants, experiments suggested that cell culture variants might arise through processes more complex than the selection of simple mutational changes. Therefore, the objectives of the work reported here have been to throw light on just how cell culture variants arise in this system. First, we have continued to characterize the ICR 2A line, with emphasis on stability of karyotype and DNA content. Second, we have studied in detail the origin of two classes of drug-resistant variants. Bromodeoxyuridine resistance of the thymidine deficiency type has been shown to arise through sequential loss of two forms of thymidine-phosphorylating enzyme; loss of the second form of enzyme is complex, suggesting that changes more complex than simple recessive mutations may be involved. Another form of resistance, in which tolerance of high levels of bromodeoxyuridine is found in cells that continue to express thymidine kinase, remains under study. Variants resistant to microtubule inhibitors were isolated. It was found that these haploid strains have properties distinguishing them from analogous resistant strains isolated from diploid mammalian cell cultures in other laboratories. In order to understand better how mutagens are involved in the origin of cell culture variants, we have examined the effect of different forms of DNA repair on the frequency of drug-resistant colonies induced by ultraviolet radiation. Preliminary experiments suggest that the frequency of such colonies is greater when repair takes place through (presumably error-prone) dark repair than when (error-free) photoreversal is allowed to occur. Such experiments can determine whether new phenotypes arise from alterations in DNA, and thus whether, in a broad sense, they are likely to be mutational in nature.

  3. SINGLE-CELL LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF CYTOSKELETAL/CELLULAR RESPONSE TO EXTERNAL STIMULI

    Hiddessen, A L

    2007-02-26

    A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which chemical signals control cell behavior is needed if the complex biological processes of embryogenesis, development, health and disease are to be completely understood. Yet, if we are to fully understand the molecular mechanisms controlling cell behavior, measurements at the single cell level are needed to supplement information gained from population level studies. One of the major challenges to accomplishing studies at the single cell level has been a lack of physical tools to complement the powerful molecular biological assays which have provided much of what we currently know about cell behavior. The goal of this exploratory project is the development of an experimental platform that facilitates integrated observation, tracking and analysis of the responses of many individual cells to controlled environmental factors (e.g. extracellular signals). Toward this goal, we developed chemically-patterned microarrays of both adherent and suspension mammalian cell types. A novel chemical patterning methodology, based on photocatalytic lithography, was developed to construct biomolecule and cell arrays that facilitate analysis of biological function. Our patterning techniques rely on inexpensive stamp materials and visible light, and do not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates. Patterned silicon and glass substrates are modified such that there is a non-biofouling polymer matrix surrounding the adhesive regions that target biomolecules and cells. Fluorescence and reflectance microscopy reveal successful patterning of proteins and single to small clusters of mammalian cells. In vitro assays conducted upon cells on the patterned arrays demonstrate the viability of cells interfacing with this synthetic system. Hence, we have successfully established a versatile cell measurement platform which can be used to characterize the molecular regulators of cellular behavior in a variety of important

  4. Obligations and responsibilities in radiation protection in the medical field

    This document briefly presents the various obligations and responsibilities of the various actors involved in or concerned by radiation protection in the medical field: the hospital administration (with respect to workers and patients), the physician (authorization and declaration, justification, optimization), the medical electro-radiology operator, the person with expertise in medical radio-physics (PSRPM), the radio-pharmacist (he is required in nuclear medicine with internal use of pharmaceutical product), the personnel with expertise in radiation protection (PCR), and other health professionals

  5. Cellular fibronectin response to supervised moderate aerobic training in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] Physical activity is one of the most pivotal targets for the prevention and management of vascular complications, especially endothelial dysfunctions. Cellular fibronectin is an endothelium-derived protein involved in subendothelial matrix assembly. Its plasma levels reflect matrix alterations and vessel wall destruction in patients with type II diabetes. This study investigated the influence of 12 weeks of supervised aerobic training on cellular fibronectin and its relationship with insulin resistance and body weight in type II diabetic subjects. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 50 men with type II diabetes who had a mean age of 48.8 ± 14.6 years and were randomly divided into two groups: an aerobic exercise group (12 weeks, three 50 minutes sessions per week) and control group. To examine changes in cellular fibronectin, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin resistance, fasting insulin, fasting blood sugar, and lipid profile, 5 ml of blood was taken from the brachial vein of patients before and 48 hours after completion of the exercise period and after 12 hours of fasting at rest. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS-16 software with the independent and paired t-tests. [Results] A significant decrease was observed in body mass index and body fat percentage in the experimental group. Compared with the control group, the aerobic exercise group showed a significant decrease in cellular fibronectin, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin resistance, fasting insulin, fasting blood sugar, and lipid profile after 12 weeks of aerobic exercise. The change in cellular fibronectin showed positive significant correlation with body mass index, diabetic biomarkers, and physical activity level. [Conclusion] The results showed that supervised aerobic exercise as a stimulus can change the levels of cellular fibronectin as matrix metalloproteinase protein a long with improvement of insulin sensitivity and glycosylated hemoglobin in order to prevent

  6. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with 137Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u-1 in the dose range of 5- 40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality. (authors)

  7. Glioblastoma stem cells: radiobiological response to ionising radiations of different qualities.

    Pecchia, I; Dini, V; Ricci-Vitiani, L; Biffoni, M; Balduzzi, M; Fratini, E; Belli, M; Campa, A; Esposito, G; Cirrone, G; Romano, F; Stancampiano, C; Pelacchi, F; Pallini, R; Tabocchini, M A

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour, with very poor prognosis. The high recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are expected to be related to the presence of radio-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) inside the tumour mass. CSCs can both self-renew and differentiate into the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Recent evidence showed a higher effectiveness of C-ions and protons in inactivating CSCs, suggesting a potential advantage of Hadrontherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy for GBM treatment. To investigate the mechanisms involved in the molecular and cellular responses of CSCs to ionising radiations, two GBM stem cell (GSC) lines, named lines 1 and 83, which were derived from patients with different clinical outcomes and having different metabolic profiles (as shown by NMR spectroscopy), were irradiated with (137)Cs photons and with protons or C-ions of 62 MeV u(-1) in the dose range of 5-40 Gy. The biological effects investigated were: cell death, cell cycle progression, and DNA damage induction and repair. Preliminary results show a different response to ionising radiation between the two GSC lines for the different end points investigated. Further experiments are in progress to consolidate the data and to get more insights on the influence of radiation quality. PMID:25969527

  8. Identification of genes responsive to solar simulated UV radiation in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Hortensia de la Fuente

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV irradiation has profound effects on the skin and the systemic immune system. Several effects of UV radiation on Dendritic cells (DCs functions have been described. However, gene expression changes induced by UV radiation in DCs have not been addressed before. In this report, we irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs with solar-simulated UVA/UVB and analyzed regulated genes on human whole genome arrays. Results were validated by RT-PCR and further analyzed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA. Solar-simulated UV radiation up-regulated expression of genes involved in cellular stress and inflammation, and down-regulated genes involved in chemotaxis, vesicular transport and RNA processing. Twenty four genes were selected for comparison by RT-PCR with similarly treated human primary keratinocytes and human melanocytes. Several genes involved in the regulation of the immune response were differentially regulated in UVA/UVB irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs, such as protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type E (PTPRE, thrombospondin-1 (THBS1, inducible costimulator ligand (ICOSL, galectins, Src-like adapter protein (SLA, IL-10 and CCR7. These results indicate that UV-exposure triggers the regulation of a complex gene repertoire involved in human-DC-mediated immune responses.

  9. Profiling human protein degradome delineates cellular responses to proteasomal inhibition and reveals a feedback mechanism in regulating proteasome homeostasis

    Yu, Tao; Tao, Yonghui; Yang, Meiqiang; Chen, Peng; Gao, XiaoBo; Zhang, Yanbo; Zhang,Tao; Chen, Zi; Hou, Jian; Zhang, Yan; Ruan, Kangcheng; Wang, Hongyan; Hu, Ronggui

    2014-01-01

    Global change in protein turnover (protein degradome) constitutes a central part of cellular responses to intrinsic or extrinsic stimuli. However, profiling protein degradome remains technically challenging. Recently, inhibition of the proteasome, e.g., by using bortezomib (BTZ), has emerged as a major chemotherapeutic strategy for treating multiple myeloma and other human malignancies, but systematic understanding of the mechanisms for BTZ drug action and tumor drug resistance is yet to be a...

  10. Integrative analysis of large scale expression profiles reveals core transcriptional response and coordination between multiple cellular processes in a cyanobacterium

    Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi Maitrayee

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria are the only known prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. They play significant roles in global biogeochemical cycles and carbon sequestration, and have recently been recognized as potential vehicles for production of renewable biofuels. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been extensively used as a model organism for cyanobacterial studies. DNA microarray studies in Synechocystis have shown varying degrees of transcriptome reprogramming under altered environmental conditions. However, it is not clear from published work how transcriptome reprogramming affects pre-existing networks of fine-tuned cellular processes. Results We have integrated 163 transcriptome data sets generated in response to numerous environmental and genetic perturbations in Synechocystis. Our analyses show that a large number of genes, defined as the core transcriptional response (CTR, are commonly regulated under most perturbations. The CTR contains nearly 12% of Synechocystis genes found on its chromosome. The majority of genes in the CTR are involved in photosynthesis, translation, energy metabolism and stress protection. Our results indicate that a large number of differentially regulated genes identified in most reported studies in Synechocystis under different perturbations are associated with the general stress response. We also find that a majority of genes in the CTR are coregulated with 25 regulatory genes. Some of these regulatory genes have been implicated in cellular responses to oxidative stress, suggesting that reactive oxygen species are involved in the regulation of the CTR. A Bayesian network, based on the regulation of various KEGG pathways determined from the expression patterns of their associated genes, has revealed new insights into the coordination between different cellular processes. Conclusion We provide here the first integrative analysis of transcriptome data sets generated in a cyanobacterium. This

  11. Development of mechano-responsive polymeric scaffolds using functionalized silica nano-fillers for the control of cellular functions

    Griffin, M.; Nayyer, L.; Butler, P. E.; R.G. Palgrave; Seifalian, A. M.; Kalaskar, D. M.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an efficient method to produce mechano-responsive polymeric scaffolds which can alter cellular functions using two different functionalized (OH and NH2) silica nano-fillers. Fumed silica-hydroxyl and fumed silica-amine nano-fillers were mixed with a biocompatible polymer (POSS-PCU) at various wt% to produce scaffolds. XPS and mechanical testing demonstrate that bulk mechanical properties are modified without changing the scaffold's surface chemistry. Mechanical testing showed s...

  12. Engineering an Integrated Cellular Interface in Three-Dimensional Hydrogel Cultures Permits Monitoring of Reciprocal Astrocyte and Neuronal Responses*

    East, Emma; Golding, Jon P.; Phillips, James B.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports a new type of three-dimensional (3D) tissue model for studying interactions between cell types in collagen hydrogels. The aim was to create a 3D cell culture model containing separate cell populations in close proximity without the presence of a mechanical barrier, and demonstrate its relevance to modeling the axon growth-inhibitory cellular interfaces that develop in the central nervous system (CNS) in response to damage. This provides a powerful new tool to determine whic...

  13. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach

    Triboulet, Sarah,; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc...

  14. Highlighting a Need to Distinguish Cell Cycle Signatures from Cellular Responses to Chemotherapeutics in SR-FTIR Spectroscopy

    C Hughes, M D Brown, P Dumas, N W Clarke, K R Flower and P Gardner

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has seen difficulties in establishing clear discrimination by principal component analysis (PCA) between drug-treated cells analysed by single point SR-FTIR spectroscopy, relative to multisampling cell monolayers by conventional FTIR. It is suggested that the issue arises due to signal mixing between cellular-response signatures and cell cycle phase contributions in individual cells. Consequently, chemometric distinction of cell spectra treated with multiple drugs is difficu...

  15. Cellular Immune Responses in HIV-Negative Immunodeficiency with Anti-Interferon-γ Antibodies and Opportunistic Intracellular Microorganisms

    Wipasa, Jiraprapa; Wongkulab, Panuwat; Chawansuntati, Kriangkrai; Chaiwarit, Romanee; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell-mediated immunity plays a crucial role in resistance to intracellular infection. We previously reported antibodies against interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) in HIV− negative (HIV−) patients with acquired immunodeficiency presenting with repeated episodes of disseminated infection caused by uncommon opportunistic intracellular fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens. This follow-up study aimed to investigate cellular immune responses in these unusual patients. Methods Twenty HIV− patient...

  16. Expression and cellular distribution of ubiquitin in response to injury in the developing spinal cord of Monodelphis domestica

    Noor, Natassya M; Møllgård, Kjeld; Wheaton, Benjamin J;

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitin, an 8.5 kDa protein associated with the proteasome degradation pathway has been recently identified as differentially expressed in segment of cord caudal to site of injury in developing spinal cord. Here we describe ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in spinal cord up to pos....... Apparent changes in ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in development and response to spinal injury suggest an intricate regulatory system that modulates these responses which, when better understood, may lead to potential therapeutic targets....... postnatal day P35 in control opossums (Monodelphis domestica) and in response to complete spinal transection (T10) at P7, when axonal growth through site of injury occurs, and P28 when this is no longer possible. Cords were collected 1 or 7 days after injury, with age-matched controls and segments rostral......Ubiquitin, an 8.5 kDa protein associated with the proteasome degradation pathway has been recently identified as differentially expressed in segment of cord caudal to site of injury in developing spinal cord. Here we describe ubiquitin expression and cellular distribution in spinal cord up to...

  17. Modification of radiation response in V79 cells with solcoseryl

    Solcoseryl is a deproteinized extract of calf serum which has been used for various purposes. It has been shown to simulate wound healing, to protect against carbon monoxide poisoning and to prevent teratogenic effects of cyclosphosphamide in mice. In addition, it has been reported to be a radiation protector and to modify radiation response in patients undergoing radiation treatment. The present study attempted to assess the effect of Solcoseryl on V79 cell survival and DNA damage after gamma irradiation. WR-1065 (4mM) was tested for comparative purpose. DNA damage was assayed using the alkaline elution technique while cell survival was determined in vitro using a standard clongenic assay. The results indicate that Solcoseryl doses protect against single-strand DNA breaks (SSB) but has little if any protective effect on cell survival. WR-1065- however, protects against both SSB and survival after gamma irradiation

  18. Cellular Immune Responses in Humans Induced by Two Serogroup B Meningococcal Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccines Given Separately and in Combination.

    Oftung, Fredrik; Korsvold, Gro Ellen; Aase, Audun; Næss, Lisbeth M

    2016-04-01

    MenBvac and MeNZB are safe and efficacious outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines against serogroup B meningococcal disease. Antibody responses have previously been investigated in a clinical trial with these two OMV vaccines given separately (25 μg/dose) or in combination (12.5 and 12.5 μg/dose) in three doses administered at 6-week intervals. Here, we report the results from analyzing cellular immune responses against MenBvac and MeNZB OMVs in terms of antigen-specific CD4(+)T cell proliferation and secretion of cytokines. The proliferative CD4(+)T cell responses to the combined vaccine were of the same magnitude as the homologous responses observed for each individual vaccine. The results also showed cross-reactivity in the sense that both vaccine groups receiving separate vaccines responded to both homologous and heterologous OMV antigen when assayed for antigen-specific cellular proliferation. In addition, a multiplex bead array assay was used to analyze the presence of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in cell culture supernatants. The results showed that gamma interferon, interleukin-4 (IL-4), and IL-10 responses could be detected as a result of vaccination with both the MenBvac and the MeNZB vaccines given separately, as well as when given in combination. With respect to cross-reactivity, the cytokine results paralleled the observations made for proliferation. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that cross-reactive cellular immune responses involving both Th1 and Th2 cytokines can be induced to the same extent by different tailor-made OMV vaccines given either separately or in combination with half the dose of each vaccine. PMID:26865595

  19. New Modeling Approaches to Investigate Cell Signaling in Radiation Response

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem L.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation damages individual cells and tissues leading to harmful biological effects. Among many radiation-induced lesions, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are considered the key precursors of most early and late effects [1] leading to direct mutation or aberrant signal transduction processes. In response to damage, a flow of information is communicated to cells not directly hit by the radiation through signal transduction pathways [2]. Non-targeted effects (NTE), which includes bystander effects and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells and tissues, may be particularly important for space radiation risk assessment [1], because astronauts are exposed to a low fluence of heavy ions and only a small fraction of cells are traversed by an ion. NTE may also have important consequences clinical radiotherapy [3]. In the recent years, new simulation tools and modeling approaches have become available to study the tissue response to radiation. The simulation of signal transduction pathways require many elements such as detailed track structure calculations, a tissue or cell culture model, knowledge of biochemical pathways and Brownian Dynamics (BD) propagators of the signaling molecules in their micro-environment. Recently, the Monte-Carlo simulation code of radiation track structure RITRACKS was used for micro and nano-dosimetry calculations [4]. RITRACKS will be used to calculate the fraction of cells traversed by an ion and delta-rays and the energy deposited in cells in a tissue model. RITRACKS also simulates the formation of chemical species by the radiolysis of water [5], notably the .OH radical. This molecule is implicated in DNA damage and in the activation of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF), a signaling molecule involved in NTE. BD algorithms for a particle near a membrane comprising receptors were also developed and will be used to simulate trajectories of signaling molecules in the micro-environment and characterize autocrine

  20. Primary stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to gamma radiation

    As the environment is inevitably exposed to ionizing radiation from natural and anthropogenic sources, it is important to evaluate gamma radiation induced stress responses in plants. The objective of this research is therefore to investigate radiation effects in Arabidopsis thaliana on individual and subcellular level by exposing 2-weeks-old seedlings for 7 days to total doses of 3.9 Gy, 6.7 Gy, 14.8 Gy and 58.8 Gy and evaluating growth, photosynthesis, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoid concentrations and antioxidative enzyme capacities. While the capacity of photosystem II (PSII measured as Fv/Fm) remained intact, plants started optimizing their photosynthetic process at the lower radiation doses by increasing the PSII efficiency (φPSII) and the maximal electron transport rate (ETRmax) and by decreasing the non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). At the highest radiation dose, photosynthetic parameters resembled those of control conditions. On subcellular level, roots showed increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) capacities under gamma irradiation but catalase (CAT), syringaldazine peroxidase (SPX) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) activities, on the other hand, decreased. In the leaves no alterations were observed in SOD, CAT and SPX capacities, but GPX was highly affected. Based on these results it seems that roots are more sensitive for oxidative stress under gamma radiation exposure than leaves. - Highlights: • The efficiency of photosystem II increased after irradiation with 3.9 to 14.8 Gy. • Also the maximal electron transport rate increased under these radiation conditions. • Non-photochemical quenching declined in leaves irradiated with 3.9, 6.7 and 14.8 Gy. • Photosynthetic parameters returned to control values in leaves exposed to 58.8 Gy. • Antioxidative enzyme capacities are mostly affected in irradiated roots

  1. Surface radiation governs precipitation responses in transient and equilibrium climates

    Sun, Shanshan; Moyer, Elisabeth

    2014-05-01

    Changes in radiative forcing are important not only for their impact on the Earth's temperature but also for their impact on the hydrological cycle. We show that model predictions of an amplified hydrological cycle under higher-CO2 conditions are well explained by changes in the surface energy budget: increased latent heat export largely balances increased downwelling longwave radiation, primarily due to increased humidity in a warmer atmosphere (see also Wild and Liepert 2010). We demonstrate that similar fundamental radiative adjustments govern global precipitation evolution across models, using twenty different GCMs in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5), purpose-run simulations with a fully-coupled GCM (CCSM3), and a simple one-column climate model (CliMT) with no cloud feedbacks but full representations of radiation, convection, turbulence, and surface ocean-atmosphere interaction. Physically understandable surface energy balance changes explain precipitation evolution in both equilibrium and transient climates (the well-documented 'fast' and 'slow' responses), in cases with different forcing agents (solar insolation and CO2), and in geo-engineering simulations where reduced shortwave forcing compensates for increased longwave opacity. We show that the enhancement in precipitation after an increase in radiative forcing is primarily due to the radiative effects of increased water vapor, which in turn produces the similarity in precipitation evolution in solar- and CO2-forced climates. We also show that differences in precipitation evolution between GCMs are due largely to differences in model shortwave feedbacks. The results of this study suggest that changes in the Earth's hydrological cycle under climate change can best be monitored and understood with surface measurements of longwave and shortwave fluxes, especially in the tropics and subtropics that account for the majority of the global moisture supply. References Wild, M. and B

  2. ESA IBER-2 Molecular and Cellular Changes in Human Endothelial Cells in Response to Nickel Ion Irradiation (CORALS project)

    Moreels, M.; Quintens, R.; De Vos, W.; Beck, M.; Tabury, K.; Suetens, A.; Abouelaradat, K.; Dieriks, B.; Ernst, E.; Lee, R.; Lambert, C.; Van Oostveldt, P.; Baatout, S.

    2013-02-01

    On Earth, most radiation exposures (medical and natural background) consist of low-linear energy transfer (LET) photons. In space, astronauts are exposed to higher doses and to more varied types of radiation. Cosmic radiation mainly consists of high-energy protons and high-Z and -energy (HZE) particles. These high-LET particles are predicted to account for most of the radiation induced health effects. In this regard, further analysis of the biological effects of HZE particles is essential. In the present study, endothelial cells were irradiated with different doses of nickel ions produced in the synchrotron at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany). After different time points, RNA was extracted for genome-wide analysis and supernatants were collected for multiplex cytokine assay. DNA double strand breaks were detected using γH2AX staining. Our results demonstrated that nickel irradiation induced molecular and cellular changes in human endothelial cells. Further analysis is ongoing to confirm the obtained data and to further explore the biological effects after nickel ion exposure.

  3. Framework for radiation emergency response in the USA

    The author analyses the US regulatory provisions for radiation emergency response in the light of the recent accident at Three Mile Island-2 nuclear power plant. The role in this respect of the federal agencies and of local authorities is reviewed. After a description of the federal authorities' reaction to the TMI-2 accident, the author reviews its possible consequences at Congressional level and the first recommendations made regarding emergency planning. (NEA)

  4. Rapid maize leaf and immature ear responses to UV-B radiation

    Plants have evolved adaptations to environmental factors, including solar radiation. In addition to acting as a developmental and physiological signal, UV-B photons also cause cellular damage. Elevated UV-B radiation has pleiotropic effects on plant development, morphology, and physiology, but the regulation of systemic responses is not well-understood. To gain a better understanding of the initial events in UV-B acclimation, we have analyzed a 10min to 1h time course of transcriptome responses in irradiated and shielded leaves, and immature maize ears to unravel the systemic physiological and developmental responses in exposed and shielded organs. To identify metabolites as possible signaling molecules, we looked for compounds that increased within 5-90 min in both irradiated and shielded leaves, to explain the kinetics of profound transcript changes within 1h. We found that myoinositol is one such candidate metabolite, and it also has support from RNA profiling: after 1h UV-B, transcripts for myoinositol-1-phosphate synthase, are decreased in both irradiated and shielded leaves suggesting down-regulation of biogenesis. We also demonstrate that if 0.1mM myoinositol is applied to leaves of greenhouse maize, some metabolites that are changed by UV-B are also changed similarly by the chemical treatment. (author)

  5. Cellular biomarker responses of limpets (Mollusca as measure of sensitivity to cadmiumcontamination

    Koot Reinecke

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the availability and chemical nature of some heavy metals, sub-lethal toxicant levels may persist in the ocean waters and may cause physiological problems and toxicity in invertebrates and other marine organisms. Although studies of metal concentrations in False Bay showed relatively low mean concentrations of Cd, invertebrates such as molluscs, crustaceans and many other groups are able to accumulate high levels of heavy metals in their tissues and still survive in the heaviest polluted areas. They can accumulate numerous pollutants from natural waters in quantities that are many orders of magnitude higher than background levels. Bioaccumulation ofcadmium in intertidal species could cause stress which may be measurable at the cellular level. A variety of limpet species that may serve as suitable ecotoxicological monitoring species occur in abundance on rocky shores along the South African coastline. The aim of this study was to obtain sensitivity data which could contribute to the selection of a suitable monitoring species and the eventual establishment of a species sensitivity distribution model (SSD with a biomarker responseas endpoint. The limpets Cymbula oculus, Scutellastra longicosta, Cymbula granatina and Scutellastragranularis as well as water samples were collected at two localities in False Bay, South Africa. Analysis of water and biological samples were done by atomic absorption spectrometry. Exposures were done to three different sublethal concentrations of cadmium in the laboratory in static flow tanks over three days. There was a moderate increase in cadmium body concentrations over time. Results obtained at three exposure concentrations showed no significant differences in metal concentrations between the different C. oculus samples. Significant differences were obtained between the control and the exposure groups for each exposure time except between the control and the 1mg/L CdCl2 exposure group after 24 and 72 hours of

  6. Tumor Cell Response to Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy Differs Markedly From Cells in Normal Tissues

    Purpose: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) can be effective at destroying tumors in animal models while causing very little damage to normal tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular processes behind this observation of potential clinical importance. Methods and Materials: MRT was performed using a lattice of 25 μm-wide, planar, polychromatic, kilovoltage X-ray microbeams, with 200-μm peak separation. Inoculated EMT-6.5 tumor and normal mouse skin tissues were harvested at defined intervals post-MRT. Immunohistochemical detection of γ-H2AX allowed precise localization of irradiated cells, which were also assessed for proliferation and apoptosis. Results: MRT significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation by 24 h post-irradiation (p = 0.002). An unexpected finding was that within 24 h of MRT, peak and valley irradiated zones were indistinguishable in tumors because of extensive cell migration between the zones. This was not seen in MRT-treated normal skin, which appeared to undergo a coordinated repair response. MRT elicited an increase in median survival times of EMT-6.5 and 67NR tumor-inoculated mice similar to that achieved with conventional radiotherapy, while causing markedly less normal tissue damage. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of a differential response at a cellular level between normal and tumor tissues after synchrotron MRT.

  7. Medical preparedness and response. Educational material. Training for radiation emergency preparedness and response

    Radiation is widely used in medicine, industry, agriculture and research. It provides invaluable benefits. However, radiation sources can be lost, stolen, or otherwise not under proper control, and this can lead to injuries to people who come into contact with them. Even so, radiation accidents are rare. Between 1944 and 2001, altogether 420 accidents were registered worldwide: approximately 3000 persons were injured, with 133 fatalities (including the 28 victims of the Chernobyl accident). Often the victims of radiation emergencies are unaware that they may have been exposed to radiation. Even if health consequences of exposure are first seen by medical doctors, a proper diagnosis may not be immediately forthcoming. Lack of knowledge about the clinical effects of radiation exposure is one of the main reasons why many accidental injuries are not recognized sufficiently early to prevent further exposures and to provide for the most effective treatment. Therefore, a wider understanding of the health consequences of radiation exposure among health authorities and medical personnel, needs to be developed. The IAEA-WHO educational programme on Medical Preparedness and Response to Radiation Emergencies was developed to provide medical personnel with knowledge of health consequences of radiation exposure. The programme consists of 24 modules including 30 lectures, a demonstration, a drill and five video films. By the end of the course the participants will be able to train: emergency medical personnel to recognize and respond to radiation overexposure including establishing and maintaining contact with appropriate response authorities; emergency medical teams to provide pre-hospital care for overexposed, injured or contaminated persons; hospital staff to provide treatment for overexposed, injured or contaminated victims

  8. Discovering the cellular-localized functional modules and modular interactions in response to liver cancer

    Zhu Jing; Guo Zheng; Yang Da; Zhang Min; Wang Jing; Wang Chenguang

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly identify the functional modules enriched with differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and characterized by biological processes in specific cellular locations, based on gene ontology (GO) and microarray data. Then, we further define and filter disease relevant signature modules according to the ranking of the disease discriminating abilities of the pre-selected functional modules. At last, we analyze the potential way by which they cooperate towards human disease. Application of the proposed method to the analysis of a liver cancer dataset shows that, using the same false discovery rate (FDR) threshold, we can find more biologically meaningful and detailed processes by using the cellular localization information. Some biological evidences support the relevancy of our biological modules to the disease mechanism.

  9. Increased cellular proliferation in rat skeletal muscle and tendon in response to exercise

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Bayer, Monika L; Mackey, Abigail;

    2010-01-01

    -derived standardized uptake values were calculated for Achilles tendons and calf muscles and compared to gene expression and immunohistochemical evaluations of Ki67. RESULTS: Treadmill running induced increased uptake of FLT uptake in calf muscles (30%; p < 0.001) and in Achilles tendon (21%, p < 0.001). The image......-derived results were supported by a correlation in calf muscle to Ki67 (protein and mRNA level), while this coherence was not found in tendon. CONCLUSION: FLT-PET seems to be a promising tool for imaging of exercise-induced cellular proliferation in musculo-tendinous tissue.......PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to investigate exercise-induced cellular proliferation in rat skeletal muscle/tendon with the use of 3'-[F-18]fluoro-3'deoxythymidine (FLT) and to quantitatively study concomitant changes in the proliferation-associated factor, Ki67. PROCEDURES: Wistar rats (n...

  10. An analysis of the cellular and humoral immune responses of Galleria mellonella larvae

    Browne, Niall

    2015-01-01

    The invertebrate immune system is composed of the intertwined cellular and humoral components which have similar structural and functional attributes to the mammalian innate immune system. For this reason insects have served as useful screening tools in academic and industry research for the assessment of pathogenicity of microorganisms or the antimicrobial efficacy of drugs. Due to the low cost, fast turnover of results and lack of ethical constrictions the insect screening model has been us...

  11. Cellular and secretory mechanisms related to delayed radiation-induced microvessel dysfunction in the spinal cord of rats

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate long-term, radiation-induced changes in microvessel permeability, the profile of the vasoactive mediators endothelin and nitric oxide, and the response of specific cell systems in the irradiated spinal cord of rats. Methods and Materials: The thoracolumbar spinal cords of Fischer rats were irradiated to a dose of 15 Gy, and the rats were sacrificed at various times afterward. Endothelin levels and nitric oxide-synthase (NOS) activity were assayed in extracts of spinal cords. Microvascular permeability and the effect of treatment with recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase (r-hMnSOD) were assessed quantitatively. Immunohistochemistry evaluated astrocytes, microglia, vascular basal membrane, and neurofilaments. Results: None of the rats developed neurologic dysfunction. Endothelin levels were significantly reduced at 18 h after irradiation and markedly attenuated after 10 days (p < 0.007). Thereafter, endothelin levels returned to normal values at 56 days after radiation and escalated to markedly high levels after 120 and 180 days (p < 0.002). NOS activity remained very low throughout the period of follow-up and failed to counterbalance the shifts in endothelin levels. Treatment with r-hMnSOD had no effect on normal vascular permeability but it abolished the abnormally increased permeability measured at 18 h after radiation and again after 120 and 180 days. Standard microscopic evaluation failed to reveal abnormalities in the irradiated spinal cord, but immunohistochemical staining showed a progressive increase in the number of microglial cells per field after 120 and 180 days (p < 0003). A similar increase in the number of astrocytic cells per field was noted after more than 180 days, but an earlier short lasting peak was also noted at 14 days after radiation. No abnormalities were found in blood vessel configuration, density, diameter, and basal membrane staining, or in the neurofilaments. Conclusion: Marked

  12. The jejunal cellular responses in chickens infected with a single dose of Ascaridia galli eggs

    Luna Olivares, Luz Adilia; Kyvsgaard, Niels Christian; Ferdushy, Tania; Nejsum, Peter; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Roepstorff, Allan Knud; Iburg, Tine Moesgaard

    2015-01-01

    This histopathological study was carried out in order to investigate the cellular response in the jejunum to Ascaridia galli during the first 7 weeks of infection. Fourty-two ISA Brown chickens (7 weeks old) were infected orally with 500 embryonated A. galli eggs each while 28 chickens were left as.......001), 28 (P < 0.01) and 42 dpi (P < 0.05). A. galli infection induced changes in the mucosal thickness as reduced villi length at 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 dpi and in the degree of general cellular infiltration in the lamina propria of the mucosal layer. No adult worms were seen during the experiment; therefore...

  13. Study on the radiation-induced biological responses based on the analysis of metabolites

    1. Objectives □ Establishment of basis of biological radiation response study by metabolite analysis 2. Project results □ Establishment of analytical basis of radiation-responsive metabolites in biological samples - Large scale collection of tissue samples from irradiated animal for radiation metabolomics research - Establishment of mass spectromety (GC MS, LC MS-MS) analysis methods of biological samples - 3 Standard Operation Protocols (SOP) for ultra high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS, Q-TOF MS) analysis of metabolites from biological samples - Establishment of database for radiation metabolites □ Basic research on radiation-responsive metabolites and the interpretation of their functions - Validation of spermidine as a candidate biomarker of acute radiation response in mouse blood - Verification of 5 radiation-responsive steroid hormones and alteration of their metabolic enzyme activities in mouse blood - Verification of 13 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain -Verification of 10 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain - Verification of 74 radiation-responsive metabolites in whole rat brain by ultra high resolution FT-ICR MS and Q-TOF MS analysis 3. Expected benefits and plan of application □ Establishment of research basis of radiation metabolomics in Korea □ Provision of core technology in radiation bioscience and safety field by application of radiation metabolomics results to the technology development in radiation biodosimetry, and radiation response evaluation and modulation

  14. Study on the radiation-induced biological responses based on the analysis of metabolites

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran; Roh, Changhyun; Shin, Heejune; Ryu, Dongkyoung

    2013-01-15

    1. Objectives □ Establishment of basis of biological radiation response study by metabolite analysis 2. Project results □ Establishment of analytical basis of radiation-responsive metabolites in biological samples - Large scale collection of tissue samples from irradiated animal for radiation metabolomics research - Establishment of mass spectromety (GC MS, LC MS-MS) analysis methods of biological samples - 3 Standard Operation Protocols (SOP) for ultra high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS, Q-TOF MS) analysis of metabolites from biological samples - Establishment of database for radiation metabolites □ Basic research on radiation-responsive metabolites and the interpretation of their functions - Validation of spermidine as a candidate biomarker of acute radiation response in mouse blood - Verification of 5 radiation-responsive steroid hormones and alteration of their metabolic enzyme activities in mouse blood - Verification of 13 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain -Verification of 10 radiation-responsive amino acids (related to oxidative stress, neurotransmission, energy metabolism) in regional mouse brain - Verification of 74 radiation-responsive metabolites in whole rat brain by ultra high resolution FT-ICR MS and Q-TOF MS analysis 3. Expected benefits and plan of application □ Establishment of research basis of radiation metabolomics in Korea □ Provision of core technology in radiation bioscience and safety field by application of radiation metabolomics results to the technology development in radiation biodosimetry, and radiation response evaluation and modulation.

  15. Rapid response radiation sensors for homeland security applications

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul

    2014-09-01

    The National Security Technologies, LLC, Remote Sensing Laboratory is developing a rapid response radiation detection system for homeland security field applications. The intelligence-driven system is deployed only when non-radiological information about the target is verifiable. The survey area is often limited, so the detection range is small; in most cases covering a distance of 10 meters or less suffices. Definitive response is required in no more than 3 seconds and should minimize false negative alarms, but can err on the side of positive false alarms. The detection system is rapidly reconfigurable in terms of size, shape, and outer appearance; it is a plug-and-play system. Multiple radiation detection components (viz., two or more sodium iodide scintillators) are used to independently "over-determine" the existence of the threat object. Rapid response electronic dose rate meters are also included in the equipment suite. Carefully studied threat signatures are the basis of the decision making. The use of Rad-Detect predictive modeling provides information on the nature of the threat object. Rad-Detect provides accurate dose rate from heavily shielded large sources; for example those lost in Mexico were Category 1 radiation sources (~3,000 Ci of 60Co), the most dangerous of five categories defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Taken out of their shielding containers, Category 1 sources can kill anyone who is exposed to them at close range for a few minutes to an hour. Whenever possible sub-second data acquisition will be attempted, and, when deployed, the system will be characterized for false alarm rates. Although the radiation detection materials selected are fast (viz., faster scintillators), their speed is secondary to sensitivity, which is of primary importance. Results from these efforts will be discussed and demonstrated.