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Sample records for carbon nanofibers cnfs

  1. Effect of carbon nano-fibers (CNFs) content on thermal and mechanical properties of CNFs/SiC nano-composites

    Carbon nano-fibers dispersed ?-SiC (CNFs/SiC) nano-composites were prepared by hot-pressing via a transient eutectic phase route at 1900 C for 1 h under 20 MPa in Ar. The effects of additional CNFs content between 1 and 10 wt.% were investigated, based on densification, microstructure, thermal and mechanical properties. The CNFs/SiC nano-composites by the CNFs contents below 5 wt.% exhibited excellent relative densities over 98% with well dispersed CNFs. However, the CNFs/SiC nano-composites containing the CNFs of 10 wt.% possessed a relative density of 92%, accompanying CNFs agglomerates and many pores located inside the agglomerates. The three point bending strength gradually decreased with the increase of CNFs content, but the indentation fracture toughness increased to 5.7 MPa m1/2 by the CNFs content of 5 wt.% The thermal conductivity was enhanced with the increase of CNFs content and represented a maximum value of 80 W/mK at the CNFs content of 5 wt.%. (authors)

  2. Microcellular foam injection molding with cellulose nanofibers (CNFs)

    Ohshima, Masahiro; Kubota, Masaya; Ishihara, Shota; Hikima, Yuta; Sato, Akihiro; Sekiguchi, Takafumi

    2016-03-01

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) nanocomposites polypropylene foams are prepared by microcellular foam injection molding with core-back operation. The modified CNFs were blended with isotactic-polypropylene (i-PP) at different CNFs weight percentages and foamed to investigate the effect of CNFs on cell morphology. CNFs in i-PP increased the elastic modulus and induced a strain hardening behavior. CNFs also shifted the crystallization temperature of i-PP to higher temperature and enhanced crystallization. With these changes in rheological and thermal properties, CNFs could reduce the cell size and increase the cell density of the foams. By adjusting the core-back timing i.e., foaming temperature, the closed cell and the nano-fibrillated open cellular structure could be produced. The flexural modulus and bending strength of foams were measured by three point flexural tester. The flexural modulus and bending strength were increased as the CNFs content in i-PP was increased at any foam expansion ratio.

  3. Improved Electrical Conductivity of Carbon/Polyvinyl Alcohol Electrospun Nanofibers

    Nader Shehata; Nabil Madi; Mariam Al-Maadeed; Ibrahim Hassounah; Abdullah Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) gained much interest in the last few years due to their promising electrical, chemical, and mechanical characteristics. This paper investigates a new nanocomposite composed of carbon nanofibers hosted by PVA and both are integrated in one electrospun nanofibers web. This technique shows a simple and cheap way to offer a host for CNFs using traditional deposition techniques. The results show that electrical conductivity of the formed nanofibers has been improved up to ...

  4. Strong Metal-Support Interaction: Growth of Individual Carbon Nanofibers from Amorphous Carbon Interacting with an Electron Beam

    Zhang, Wei; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the growth behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). It mentions that CNFs can be synthesized using methods such as arc-discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition. It further states that CNFs can be grown from a physical mixing of amorphous carbon and CGO/Ni nanopar......The article discusses the growth behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). It mentions that CNFs can be synthesized using methods such as arc-discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition. It further states that CNFs can be grown from a physical mixing of amorphous carbon and CGO...

  5. Silane coupling agent structures on carbon nanofibers.

    Palencia, Cristina; Rubio, Juan; Rubio, Fausto; Fierro, Jos Luis G; Oteo, Jos Luis

    2011-05-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are considered ideal materials for reinforcing polymers due to their excellent mechanical properties, among others. In order to obtain composites of optimal properties the clue is to enhance the interaction between reinforcement (CNFs) and polymer matrix. Surface modification of CNFs with silane coupling agents (SCAs) has revealed as one of the most interesting methods. The silanization process has been carried out mixing at room temperature and for one minute the hydrolysed silane with CNFs. We have use four different SCAs: 3-aminopropyltriethoxyxilane (APS), 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AMMO), N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-(aminopropyltrimethoxysilane) (DAMO), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO), in order to elucidate the SCA-CNFs interaction and the silane structures formed on CNFs surface. XPS and FTIR-ATR techniques have pointed out that each silane adsorbs on CNFs surface through chemical bonding, forming multilayers. Silane nature determines the structure taken on CNFs surface. APS and AMO silanes adsorb taking vertical structures on CNFs surface, while DMO and GMO adsorb on CNFs taking horizontal structures, stabilized by zwitterions formed through H-bonds with hydroxyl groups from CNFs surface. PMID:21780418

  6. A catechol biosensor based on electrospun carbon nanofibers

    Dawei Li; Zengyuan Pang; Xiaodong Chen; Lei Luo; Yibing Cai; Qufu Wei

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were prepared by combining electrospinning with a high-temperature carbonization technique. And a polyphenol biosensor was fabricated by blending the obtained CNFs with laccase and Nafion. Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) were, respectively, employed to investigate the structures and morphologies of the CNFs and of the mixtures. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were empl...

  7. Strong Metal-Support Interaction: Growth of Individual Carbon Nanofibers from Amorphous Carbon Interacting with an Electron Beam

    Zhang, Wei; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the growth behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). It mentions that CNFs can be synthesized using methods such as arc-discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition. It further states that CNFs can be grown from a physical mixing of amorphous carbon and CGO...

  8. Modification of powdered activated carbon for the production of carbon nano fibers (CNFs)

    Full text: In the present work, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was modified and used for the production of carbon nano fibers (CNFs). The modification of PAC was done by the impregnation of nickel on the surface of the activated carbon using the wet impregnation method. Variable weight percentage ratios of the catalyst (nickel) ratio were used. The nano fibers were synthesized on the surface of modified PAC by using the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) method at a temperature of ∼680 degree Celsius for one hour in the presence of acetylene as a carbon source. FESEM, TEM, and TGA were used for the characterization of the product. (author)

  9. Controllable synthesis of helical, straight, hollow and nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers and their magnetic properties

    Li, Xun [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructure, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Xu, Zheng, E-mail: zhengxu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructure, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The helical, straight and hollow carbon nanofibers can be selectively synthesized by adjusting either the reaction temperature or feed gas composition. Display Omitted Highlights: ► CNFs were synthesized via pyrolysis of acetylene on copper NPs. ► The helical, straight, hollow and N-doped CNFs can be selectively synthesized. ► The growth mechanism of different types of CNFs was proposed. -- Abstract: Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with various morphologies were synthesized by catalytic pyrolysis of acetylene on copper nanoparticles which were generated from the in situ decomposition of copper acetylacetonate. The morphology of the pristine and acid-washed CNFs was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope. Helical, straight and hollow CNFs can be selectively synthesized by adjusting either the reaction temperature or feed gas composition. The growth mechanism for these three types of CNFs was proposed.

  10. NiCu Alloy Nanoparticle-Loaded Carbon Nanofibers for Phenolic Biosensor Applications

    Dawei Li; Pengfei Lv; Jiadeng Zhu; Yao Lu; Chen Chen; Xiangwu Zhang; Qufu Wei

    2015-01-01

    NiCu alloy nanoparticle-loaded carbon nanofibers (NiCuCNFs) were fabricated by a combination of electrospinning and carbonization methods. A series of characterizations, including SEM, TEM and XRD, were employed to study the NiCuCNFs. The as-prepared NiCuCNFs were then mixed with laccase (Lac) and Nafion to form a novel biosensor. NiCuCNFs successfully achieved the direct electron transfer of Lac. Cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry were used to study the electrochemical propertie...

  11. Ultrasensitive electrospun nickel-doped carbon nanofibers electrode for sensing paracetamol and glucose

    The long, uniform and smooth Ni(NO3)2-loaded polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers were prepared via electrospinning on a nonconductive quartz plate. The nanofibers were stabilized at 300 °C for 3 h in nitrogen atmosphere, and then the continuous heating to 800 °C at the rate of 2 °C min−1 keeping 3 h was used to prepare nickel-doped carbon nanofibers (Ni:CNFs). The composites were characterized with Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The Ni:CNFs were used as the working electrode to sense paracetamol (PCT) and glucose (GLU), respectively. When sensing PCT, the Ni:CNFs electrode showed an electrochemical behavior like on macroelectrode; but for GLU, it displayed an electrochemical behavior like on microelectrode. For both of the species, higher sensitivities on the Ni:CNFs electrodes were obtained than those on bulk glassy carbon and nickel electrodes

  12. Fabrication of Uniform AuCarbon Nanofiber by Two-Step Low Temperature Decomposition

    Lee Myeongsoon; Hong Seong-Cheol; Kim Don

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents a facile and efficient way to prepare carbon nanofibers ornamented with Au nanoparticles (Au/CNFs). Gold nanoparticles were first deposited in the channels of an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane by thermal decomposition of HAuCl4and then carbon nanofibers were produced in the same channels loaded with the Au nanoparticles by decomposition of sucrose at 230 C. An electron microscopy study revealed that the carbon nanofibers, ~10 nm thick and 6 ?m l...

  13. Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties of Carbon Nanofibers and SiO2/Carbon Nanofiber Composite on Ni-Cu/C-Fiber Textiles.

    Nam, Ki-Mok; Park, Heai-Ku; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-11-01

    In this study, carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were grown by chemical vapor deposition on C-fiber textiles that had Ni and Cu catalyst deposited via electrophoretic deposition. Before the CNFs were coated with silica layer via hydrolysis of TEOS (Tetraethyl orthosilicate), the carbon nanofibers were oxidized by nitric acid. Due to oxidation, the hydroxyl group was created on the carbon nanofibers and this was used as an activation site for the SiO2. The physicochemical properties of the grown carbon nanofibers were investigated with Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The structures of SiO2-coated carbon nanofibers were characterized by XPS and TEM. The electrochemical properties and the capacitance of the materials were investigated by galvanostatic charge-discharge and cyclic voltammetry. Different types of carbon nanofibers were grown upon the deposition utilizing catalysts, with the SiO2 uniformly coated on the surface of carbon nanofibers. When used as an anode material for the Li secondary battery, the SiO2/CNFs composite had a lower capacity maintenance and a greater discharge capacity as compared to the carbon nanofibers. PMID:26726630

  14. High performance supercapacitor based on Ni3S2/carbon nanofibers and carbon nanofibers electrodes derived from bacterial cellulose

    Yu, Wendan; Lin, Worong; Shao, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhaoxia; Li, Ruchun; Yuan, Dingsheng

    2014-12-01

    The Ni3S2 nanoparticles have been successfully grown on the carbon nanofibers (CNFs) derived from bacterial cellulose via a hydrothermal method, which the as-prepared composite exhibited high specific capacitance (883 F g-1 at 2 A g-1), much more than CNFs (108 F g-1 at 2 A g-1), and good cycle stability. The asymmetric supercapacitor was designed to contain the CNFs coated Ni3S2 nanoparticles (Ni3S2/CNFs) as positive electrode and CNFs as negative electrode in 2 M KOH electrolyte. Due to the synergistic effects of the two electrodes, asymmetric cell showed superior electrochemical performances. The optimized asymmetric supercapacitor gave a operating potential of 1.7 V in 2 M KOH aqueous solution, exhibiting a high specific capacitance of 56.6 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 and considerably high energy density of 25.8 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 425 W kg-1. Meanwhile, Ni3S2/CNFs//CNFs asymmetric supercapacitor showed excellent cycling stability with 97% specific capacitance retained after 2500 cycles.

  15. Performance of electrodes synthesized with polyacrylonitrile-based carbon nanofibers for application in electrochemical sensors and biosensors

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the performance of electrodes synthesized with Polyacrylonitrile-based carbon nanofibers (PAN-based CNFs). The homogenous PAN solutions with different concentrations were prepared and electrospun to acquire PAN nanofibers and then CNFs were fabricated by heat treatment. The effective parameters for the production of electrospun CNF electrode were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize electrospun nanofibers. Cyclic voltammetry was applied to investigate the changes of behavior of electrospun CNF electrodes with different diameters. The structure of CNFs was also evaluated via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The results exhibited that diameter of nanofibers reduced with decreasing polymer concentration and applied voltage and increasing tip-to-collector distance, while feeding rate did not have significant effect on nanofiber diameter. The investigations of electrochemical behavior also demonstrated that cyclic voltammetric response improved as diameter of CNFs electrode decreased. - Highlights: • Electrospun CNFs can be directly used as working electrode. • Cyclic voltammetric response improved as diameter of CNFs electrode decreased. • The diameter of nanofibers reduced with decreasing polymer concentration. • The diameter of nanofibers reduced with decreasing applied voltage. • The diameter of nanofibers reduced with increasing tip-to-collector distance

  16. Performance of electrodes synthesized with polyacrylonitrile-based carbon nanofibers for application in electrochemical sensors and biosensors

    Adabi, Mahdi [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saber, Reza [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridi-Majidi, Reza, E-mail: refaridi@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush [Science and Technology in Medicine (RCSTIM), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the performance of electrodes synthesized with Polyacrylonitrile-based carbon nanofibers (PAN-based CNFs). The homogenous PAN solutions with different concentrations were prepared and electrospun to acquire PAN nanofibers and then CNFs were fabricated by heat treatment. The effective parameters for the production of electrospun CNF electrode were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize electrospun nanofibers. Cyclic voltammetry was applied to investigate the changes of behavior of electrospun CNF electrodes with different diameters. The structure of CNFs was also evaluated via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The results exhibited that diameter of nanofibers reduced with decreasing polymer concentration and applied voltage and increasing tip-to-collector distance, while feeding rate did not have significant effect on nanofiber diameter. The investigations of electrochemical behavior also demonstrated that cyclic voltammetric response improved as diameter of CNFs electrode decreased. - Highlights: • Electrospun CNFs can be directly used as working electrode. • Cyclic voltammetric response improved as diameter of CNFs electrode decreased. • The diameter of nanofibers reduced with decreasing polymer concentration. • The diameter of nanofibers reduced with decreasing applied voltage. • The diameter of nanofibers reduced with increasing tip-to-collector distance.

  17. Control of carbon nanostructure: From nanofiber toward nanotube and back

    The unique properties of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) make them attractive for numerous applications ranging from field emitters to biological probes. In particular, it is the deterministic synthesis of CNFs, which requires precise control over geometrical characteristics such as location, length, diameter, and alignment, that enables the diverse applications. Catalytic plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of vertically aligned CNFs is a growth method that offers substantial control over the nanofiber geometry. However, deterministic synthesis also implies control over the nanofiber's physical and chemical properties that are defined by internal structure. Until now, true deterministic synthesis has remained elusive due to the lack of control over internal graphitic structure. Here we demonstrate that the internal structure of CNFs can be influenced by catalyst preparation and ultimately defined by growth conditions. We have found that when the growth rate is increased by 100-fold, obtained through maximized pressure, plasma power, and temperature, the resulting nanofibers have an internal structure approaching that of multiwalled nanotubes. We further show that the deliberate modulation of growth parameters results in modulation of CNF internal structure, and this property has been used to control the CNF surface along its length for site specific chemistry and electrochemistry

  18. Carbon nanofibers, precious commodities from sunlight & CO2 to ameliorate global warming

    Licht, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces the high yield, electrolytic synthesis of carbon nanofibers, CNFs, directly from carbon dioxide. Production of a precious commodity such as CNFs from atmospheric carbon dioxide provides impetus to limit this greenhouse gas and mitigate the rate of climate change. CNFs are formed at high rate using inexpensive nickel and steel electrodes in molten electrolytes. The process is demonstrated as a scaled-up stand-alone electrolytic cell, and is also shown compatible with the STEP, solar thermal electrochemical process, using concentrated sunlight at high solar to electric efficiency to provide the heat and electrical energy to drive the CNF production.

  19. Production of Carbon Nanofibers Using a CVD Method with Lithium Fluoride as a Supported Cobalt Catalyst

    S. A. Manafi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers (CNFs have been synthesized in high yield (>70% by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD on Co/LiF catalyst using acetylene as carbon source. A novel catalyst support (LiF is reported for the first time as an alternative for large-scale production of carbon nanofibers while purification process of nanofibers is easier. In our experiment, the sealed furnace was heated at 700∘C for 0.5 hour (the heating rate was 10∘C/min and then cooled to room temperature in the furnace naturally. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition is of interest for fundamental understanding and improvement of commercial synthesis of carbon nanofibers (CNFs. The obtained sample was sequentially washed with ethanol, dilutes acid, and distilled water to remove residual impurities, amorphous carbon materials, and remaining of catalyst, and then dried at 110∘C for 24 hours. The combined physical characterization through several techniques, such as high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, thermogarvimetric analysis (TGA, and zeta-sizer and Raman spectroscopy, allows determining the geometric characteristic and the microstructure of individual carbon nanofibers. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition is of interest for fundamental understanding and improvement of commercial synthesis of carbon nanofibers (CNFs. As a matter of fact, the method of CCVD guarantees the production of CNFs for different applications.

  20. Porous Carbon Nanofibers from Electrospun Biomass Tar/Polyacrylonitrile/Silver Hybrids as Antimicrobial Materials.

    Song, Kunlin; Wu, Qinglin; Zhang, Zhen; Ren, Suxia; Lei, Tingzhou; Negulescu, Ioan I; Zhang, Quanguo

    2015-07-15

    A novel route to fabricate low-cost porous carbon nanofibers (CNFs) using biomass tar, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and silver nanoparticles has been demonstrated through electrospinning and subsequent stabilization and carbonization processes. The continuous electrospun nanofibers had average diameters ranging from 392 to 903 nm. The addition of biomass tar resulted in increased fiber diameters, reduced thermal stabilities, and slowed cyclization reactions of PAN in the as-spun nanofibers. After stabilization and carbonization, the resultant CNFs showed more uniformly sized and reduced average diameters (226-507 nm) compared to as-spun nanofibers. The CNFs exhibited high specific surface area (>400 m(2)/g) and microporosity, attributed to the combined effects of phase separations of the tar and PAN and thermal decompositions of tar components. These pore characteristics increased the exposures and contacts of silver nanoparticles to the bacteria including Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli, leading to excellent antimicrobial performances of as-spun nanofibers and CNFs. A new strategy is thus provided for utilizing biomass tar as a low-cost precursor to prepare functional CNFs and reduce environmental pollutions associated with direct disposal of tar as an industrial waste. PMID:26110209

  1. Fabrication of a carbon nanofiber sheet as a micro-porous layer for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Duan, Qiongjuan; Wang, Jiong; Lu, Yonggen [College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Biao; Wang, Huaping [State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2010-12-15

    A carbon nanofiber sheet (CNFS) has been prepared by electrospinning, stabilisation and subsequent carbonisation processes. Imaging with scanning electron microscope (SEM) indicates that the CNFS is formed by nonwoven nanofibers with diameters between 400 and 700 nm. The CNFS, with its three-dimensional pores, shows excellent electrical conductivity and hydrophobicity. In addition, it is found that the CNFS can be successfully applied as a micro-porous layer (MPL) in the cathode gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The GDL with the CNFS as a MPL has higher gas permeability than a conventional GDL. Moreover, the resultant cathode GDL exhibits excellent fuel cell performance with a higher peak power density than that of a cathode GDL fabricated with a conventional MPL under the same test condition. (author)

  2. Fabrication and the enhanced emission uniformity of carbon nanofibers using a glass cap

    Sung, Woo Yong; Ok, Jong Girl; Kim, Wal Jun; Lee, Seung-Min; Jang, Eui Yun; Kim, Yong Hyup [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Sillim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-22

    Uniformity is one of the most important qualifications for reliable field emission devices based on carbon nanofibers (CNFs). We synthesized CNFs by thermal chemical vapor deposition at 600 deg. C on the glass substrate, promising practical large-area applications. A glass cap was introduced to enhance the uniformity of CNF emitters vertically grown under the guidance of micro-grooves, which provided passages for the diffusion of precursor gas to CNF growth sites. Our CNFs, vertically leveled by the glass cap with the support of the micro-grooves, and without any post-treatments, showed excellent uniformity in field emission as well as long-term stability.

  3. Electron gun using carbon-nanofiber field emitter

    An electron gun constructed using carbon-nanofiber (CNF) emitters and an electrostatic Einzel lens system has been characterized for the development of a high-resolution x-ray source. The CNFs used were grown on tungsten and palladium tips by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Electron beams with the energies of 10< E<20 keV were focused by the electrostatic lens and impinged on a W target for x-ray radiography. Analyzing the recorded x-ray radiographs, the focal spot size of the electron beam extracted from the CNFs was estimated to be D<50 ?m in diameter. Superior performance was realized by using CNFs with larger fiber radii (100-500 nm) grown sparsely on the metal tips, which were installed in a holder at the short length L=0.5 mm

  4. Electrical properties of carbon nanofiber reinforced multiscale polymer composites

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF) reinforced epoxy matrix nanocomposites and CNF reinforced glass hollow particle filled syntactic foams are studied for electrical properties. The effect of CNF weight fraction, hollow particle volume fraction, and hollow particle wall thickness on impedance and dielectric constant are characterized. The results show that the impedance decreases and the dielectric constant increases with increasing CNF content in the composites. Nanocomposites containing 10 wt.% CNFs showed significantly higher dielectric constant because of the presence of a continuous network of CNFs in the composite. CNF reinforced syntactic foams showed higher dielectric constant than the neat resin. The CNF content had a more prominent effect on the dielectric constant than the glass hollow particle volume fraction and wall thickness. The Maxwell–Garnett and the Jayasundere–Smith models are modified to include the effect of hollow particle wall thickness and obtain predictions of dielectric constants of syntactic foams. The semi-empirical predictions obtained from Maxwell–Garnett models are closer to the experimental values. Lightweight syntactic foams, tailored for electrical properties, can be useful in electronic packaging applications. - Highlights: • Using carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and glass hollow particles in multiphase composites. • The dielectric constant (ε) of composites increases with CNF content. • Interconnected network of CNFs at high volume fraction exponentially increases ε. • Two theoretical models accurately predicted data trends of CNF/syntactic foams

  5. Carbon nanofibers grown on activated carbon fiber fabrics as electrode of supercapacitors

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were grown directly on activated carbon fiber fabric (ACFF), which was then used as the electrode of supercapacitors. Cyclic voltammetry and ac impedance were used to characterize the electrochemical properties of ACFF and CNF/ACFF electrodes in both aqueous and organic electrolytes. ACFF electrodes show higher specific capacitance than CNF/ACFF electrodes due to larger specific surface area. However, the spaces formed between the CNFs in the CNF/ACFF electrodes are more easily accessed than the slit-type pores of ACFF, and much higher electrical-double layer capacitance was obtained for CNF/ACFF electrodes

  6. Multi-scale carbon micro/nanofibers-based adsorbents for protein immobilization

    In the present study, different proteins, namely, bovine serum albumin (BSA), glucose oxidase (GOx) and the laboratory purified YqeH were immobilized in the phenolic resin precursor-based multi-scale web of activated carbon microfibers (ACFs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs). These biomolecules are characteristically different from each other, having different structure, number of parent amino acid molecules and isoelectric point. CNF was grown on ACF substrate by chemical vapor deposition, using Ni nanoparticles (Nps) as the catalyst. The ultra-sonication of the CNFs was carried out in acidic medium to remove Ni Nps from the tip of the CNFs to provide additional active sites for adsorption. The prepared material was directly used as an adsorbent for proteins, without requiring any additional treatment. Several analytical techniques were used to characterize the prepared materials, including scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, BET surface area, pore-size distribution, and UVvis spectroscopy. The adsorption capacities of prepared ACFs/CNFs in this study were determined to be approximately 191, 39 and 70 mg/g for BSA, GOx and YqeH, respectively, revealing that the carbon micro-nanofibers forming synthesized multi-scale web are efficient materials for the immobilization of protein molecules. - Highlights: Ni metal Np-dispersed carbon micro-nanofibers (ACFs/CNFs) are prepared. ACFs/CNFs are mesoporous. Significant adsorption of BSA, GOx and YqeH is observed on ACFs/CNFs. Multi-scale web of ACFs/CNFs is effective for protein immobilization

  7. Synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers-carbon nanowalls by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    Okamoto, Atsuto; Tanaka, Kei; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Ueda, Kazuyuki; Ghosh, Pradip; Tanemura, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VA-CNFs)-carbon nanowalls (CNWs) have been prepared on a silicon (Si) substrate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The VA-CNFs-CNWs were formed at bias voltage of - 185 V, whereas conventional VA-CNFs were synthesized under conditions of high bias voltages. Degenerated CNWs with turbostratic graphite structure were created on amorphous carbon layer around CNFs like a flag attached to a pole, which is evidenced by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Electron field emission characteristics of VA-CNFs-CNWs with unique microstructure, fabricated on the Si substrate, were primarily investigated. As a result, the VA-CNFs-CNWs showed the turn-on and the threshold fields of 1.7 V x microm(-1) and 3.35 V x microm(-1) with current densities of 10 nA x cm(-2) and 1 microA x cm(-2), respectively. The field enhancement factor beta was estimated to be 1059 by using Fowler-Nordheim theory. PMID:23755628

  8. Facile synthesis of carbon nanofibers-bridged porous carbon nanosheets for high-performance supercapacitors

    Jiang, Yuting; Yan, Jun; Wu, Xiaoliang; Shan, Dandan; Zhou, Qihang; Jiang, Lili; Yang, Deren; Fan, Zhuangjun

    2016-03-01

    A facile and one-step method is demonstrated to prepare carbon nanofibers (CNFs)-bridged porous carbon nanosheets (PCNs) through carbonization of the mixture of bacterial cellulose and potassium citrate. The CNFs bridge PCNs to form integrated porous carbon architecture with high specific surface area of 1037 m2 g-1, much higher than those of pure PCNs (381 m2 g-1) and CNFs (510 m2 g-1). As a consequence, the PCN/CNF composite displays high specific capacitance of 261 F g-1, excellent rate capability and outstanding cycling stability (97.6% of capacitance retention after 10000 cycles). Moreover, the assembled symmetric supercapacitor with PCN/CNF electrodes delivers an ultrahigh energy density of 20.4 Wh kg-1 and outstanding cycling life (94.8% capacitance retention after 10000 cycles) in an aqueous electrolyte.

  9. Magnetic properties of NiFe2O4/carbon nanofibers from Venezuelan petcoke

    Briceo, Sarah; Silva, Pedro; Molina, Wilmer; Brmer-Escamilla, Werner; Alcal, Olgi; Caizales, Edgard

    2015-05-01

    NiFe2O4/carbon nanofibers (NiFe2O4/CNFs) have been successfully synthesized by hydrotermal method using Venezuelan petroleum coke (petcoke) as carbon source and NiFe2O4 as catalyst. The morphology, structural and magnetic properties of nanocomposite products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). XRD analysis revealed a cubic spinel structure and ferrite phase with high crystallinity. HR-TEM reveals the presence of CNFs with diameters of 42 nm. At room temperature, NiFe2O4/CNFs show superparamagnetic behavior with a maximum magnetization of 15.35 emu/g. Our findings indicate that Venezuelan petroleum coke is suitable industrial carbon source for the growth of magnetic CNFs.

  10. Carbon nanofibers suppress fungal inhibition of seed germination of maize (Zea mays) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) crop

    Joshi, Anjali; Sharma, Arti; Nayyar, Harsh; Verma, Gaurav; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-08-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are one of allotropes of carbon, consists of graphene layers arrangement in the form of stacked cones or like a cup diameter in nanometer and several millimeters in length. Their extraordinary mechanical, chemical and electronic properties are due to their small size. CNFs have been successfully applied in field of medicine in variety of diagnostic methods. They proven to be an excellent system for drug delivery, tissue regeneration, biosensor etc. This research focuses the applications of CNFs in all fields of Agriculture. In the we treated some fungal disease seed of maize and barley using functionalised CNFs. We find that the tested seeds grow just as well as the healthy seeds whereas the untreated fungal disease seeds, by themselves show very poor germination and seedling growth. This simple experiment shows the extraordinary ability of Carbon nanofibers in carrying effectively inside the germinated seeds.

  11. The Formation of Carbon Nanofibers on Powdered Activated Carbon Impregnated with Nickel

    Ahmed, Y. M.; Al-Mamun, A. A.; Muyibi, S. A.; Al-Khatib, M. F. R.; Jameel, A. T.; AlSaadi, M. A.

    2009-06-01

    In the present work, the production and characterization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) composite is reported. Carbon nanofibers (CNF) were produced on powdered activated carbon PAC—impregnated with nickel—by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of a hydrocarbon in the presence of hydrogen at ˜780° C. The flow rates of carbon source and hydrogen were fixed. The CNFs were formed directly over the impregnated AC. Variable weight percentage ratios of the catalyst salt (Ni+2) were used for the impregnation (1, 3, 5, 7 and 9%, respectively). The product displays a relatively high surface area, essentially constituted by the external surface, and the absence of the bottled pores encountered with activated carbon. FSEM, TEM and TGA were used for the characterization of the product.

  12. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on hierarchically structured cobalt nanoparticle/carbon nanofiber/carbon felt composites.

    Zarubova, Sarka; Rane, Shreyas; Yang, Jia; Yu, Yingda; Zhu, Ye; Chen, De; Holmen, Anders

    2011-07-18

    The hierarchically structured carbon nanofibers (CNFs)/carbon felt composites, in which CNFs were directly grown on the surface of microfibers in carbon felt, forming a CNF layer on a micrometer range that completely covers the microfiber surfaces, were tested as a novel support material for cobalt nanoparticles in the highly exothermic Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. A compact, fixed-bed reactor, made of disks of such composite materials, offered the advantages of improved heat and mass transfer, relatively low pressure drop, and safe handling of immobilized CNFs. An efficient 3-D thermal conductive network in the composite provided a relatively uniform temperature profile, whereas the open structure of the CNF layer afforded an almost 100 % effectiveness of Co nanoparticles in the F-T synthesis in the fixed bed. The greatly improved mass and heat transport makes the compact reactor attractive for applications in the conversion of biomass, coal, and natural gas to liquids. PMID:21563315

  13. Study on mechanical, morphological and electrical properties of carbon nanofiber/polyetherimide composites

    Polyetherimide (PEI) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) composites have been developed successfully by using a Sigma high temperature internal mixer and then compression molded. The amount of carbon nanofibers used was 1-3 phr (parts per hundred of polymer), respectively. Thermal properties were characterized by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Thermal conductivity was measured at temperatures between 50 and 180 oC. Thermal conductivity increased with the incorporation of CNFs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the state of dispersion of CNFs, in the entire volume of matrix. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) demonstrates that both the storage modulus (E') and glass transition temperature (Tg) of the PEI/CNF composites is increased. The storage modulus of the polymer is significantly increased by the incorporation of acid treated CNFs particularly at high temperatures, indicating there is some chemical bonding between PEI and CNFCOOH (acid treated CNFs). The study showed that acid treatment of carbon nanofibers enhanced the dispersion and interfacial bonding between fibers and the matrix, and hence improved the electrical conductivity properties. Modification results in a significant decrease in resistivity compared to as received CNFs composites. The electrical conductivity of the composites was measured as a function of temperature

  14. Magnetic properties of NiFe2O4/carbon nanofibers from Venezuelan petcoke

    NiFe2O4/carbon nanofibers (NiFe2O4/CNFs) have been successfully synthesized by hydrotermal method using Venezuelan petroleum coke (petcoke) as carbon source and NiFe2O4 as catalyst. The morphology, structural and magnetic properties of nanocomposite products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). XRD analysis revealed a cubic spinel structure and ferrite phase with high crystallinity. HR-TEM reveals the presence of CNFs with diameters of 4±2 nm. At room temperature, NiFe2O4/CNFs show superparamagnetic behavior with a maximum magnetization of 15.35 emu/g. Our findings indicate that Venezuelan petroleum coke is suitable industrial carbon source for the growth of magnetic CNFs. - Highlights: • NiFe2O4/CNFs have been synthesized by hydrothermal method using petroleum coke. • Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were used as the catalyst. • HR-TEM reveals the presence of CNFs with diameters of 4±2 nm. • The size of the nanoparticles defines the diameter of the CNFs

  15. Study of Pb Adsorption by Carbon Nanofibers Grown on Powdered Activated Carbon

    Ma`an Fahmi R. Al-Khatib; Muyibi, S. A.; Abdullah-Al- Mamun; Yehya M. Ahmed; A.T. Jameel; Mohammed A. AlSaadi

    2010-01-01

    The sorption of lead (Pb) from aqueous solutions by using carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown on nickel impregnated Powdered Activated Carbon (PAC) was studied. In this study, we investigated the affection of the lead initial concentration on the sorption of the heavy metal from water. The isotherm of the sorption of the heavy metal onto the nanocomposite was also studied. Firstly, the optimum pH for the sorption of the lead ions was determined. The maximum sorption capacity of the heavy metal ont...

  16. Urea-treated carbon nanofibers as efficient catalytic materials for oxygen reduction reaction

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Xueping; You, Tianyan

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (NCNFs) are prepared by the thermal treatment of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) using urea as nitrogen source. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been employed to characterize the morphology and composition of CNFs and NCNFs. Compared with CNFs, NCNFs display thinner diameter, rougher surface and higher content of pyrrolic-N. As a metal-free catalyst for ORR, NCNFs exhibit comparable catalytic activity, significantly enhanced long-time stability and selectivity in comparison with commercial available Pt/C catalyst. Importantly, the self-supported NCNFs films could be conveniently utilized for electrode modification which is attractive in fuel cells. This work offers a promising metal-free catalyst as an alternative for Pt/C catalyst.

  17. Preparation of a new adsorbent from activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) for manufacturing organic-vacbpour respirator cartridge

    Mehdi Jahangiri; Javad Adl; Seyyed Jamaleddin Shahtaheri; Alimorad Rashidi; Amir Ghorbanali; Hossein Kakooe; Abbas Rahimi Forushani; Mohammad Reza Ganjali

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this study a composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) was prepared to improve the performance of activated carbon (AC) for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its utilization for respirator cartridges. Activated carbon was impregnated with a nickel nitrate catalyst precursor and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were deposited directly on the AC surface using catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Deposited CNFs on catalyst particles in AC micropores, were a...

  18. Carbon nanofibersulfur composite cathode materials with different binders for secondary Li/S cells

    A sulfur-coated carbon nanofiber (CNFS) composite cathode material was prepared by a chemical deposition method in an aqueous solution. This CNFS material was evaluated as the cathode material in lithium/sulfur cells with three different binders. The results of the SEM and TGA measurements reveal that CNFS has a typical coreshell structure, containing 75.7 w/o sulfur coated uniformly on the surface of the CNFs. The effects of different binders on the potential profiles, electrode capacity and capacity retention with cycling were investigated. The electrode prepared with CMC + SBR binder has the best performance compared with PVdF and PEO binders, exhibiting a specific capacity of up to 1313 mAh g?1 S at the initial discharge and a specific capacity of 586 mAh g?1 S after 60 cycles.

  19. Carbon nanofiber supercapacitors with large areal capacitances

    McDonough, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We develop supercapacitor (SC) devices with large per-area capacitances by utilizing three-dimensional (3D) porous substrates. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) functioning as active SC electrodes are grown on 3D nickel foam. The 3D porous substrates facilitate a mass loading of active electrodes and per-area capacitance as large as 60 mg/ cm2 and 1.2 F/ cm2, respectively. We optimize SC performance by developing an annealing-free CNF growth process that minimizes undesirable nickel carbide formation. Superior per-area capacitances described here suggest that 3D porous substrates are useful in various energy storage devices in which per-area performance is critical. © 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Fabrication of a novel visible-light-driven photocatalyst Ag-AgI-TiO2 nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Visible-light-induced Ag-AgI-TiO2/CNFs nanocomposites had been successfully prepared. • Ag-AgI-TiO2/CNFs could be easily separated and recycled from an aqueous solution. • The application of CNFs acting as supporters made the photocatalysts have high adsorption capacity. • Ag-AgI-TiO2/CNFs could efficiently degrade different organic dyes. - Abstract: Novel visible-light-driven photocatalysts Ag-AgI-TiO2 nanoparticles embedded onto carbon nanofibers were successfully prepared. Electrospinning technology followed by high-temperature calcination was adopted for the fabrication of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) acting as a supporter. Ag-TiO2/CNFs nanocomposites were prepared by combining in situ reduction with physical adsorption process. Ag-AgI-TiO2/CNFs were synthesized by oxidizing some silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) contained in Ag-TiO2/CNFs to silver iodine (AgI) via chemical oxidation method using iodine (I2) as oxidation agents. The as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The as-fabricated Ag-AgI-TiO2/CNFs showed high efficient adsorption and photocatalytic activity for decomposition of methyl orange (MO), acid red 18 (AR18), methylene blue (MB), and fluorescence sodium under visible light irradiation, which were attributed to the synergistic effects between the high adsorption capacity, good conductivity of carbon nanofibers, and the extraordinary plasma effect of Ag-AgI nanoparticles. In addition, the as-prepared composites could be easily separated from the solution phase due to the large length–diameter ratio of CNFs. The mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic activity concerned with Ag-AgI-TiO2/CNFs was proposed

  1. Processing and Structure of Carbon Nanofiber Paper

    Zhongfu Zhao; Jihua Gou; Aurangzeb Khan

    2009-01-01

    A unique concept of making nanocomposites from carbon nanofiber paper was explored in this study. The essential element of this method was to design and manufacture carbon nanofiber paper with well-controlled and optimized network structure of carbon nanofibers. In this study, carbon nanofiber paper was prepared under various processing conditions, including different types of carbon nanofibers, solvents, dispersants, and acid treatment. The morphologies of carbon nanofibers within the nanofi...

  2. Nanoporous Carbon Nanofibers Decorated with Platinum Nanoparticles for Non-Enzymatic Electrochemical Sensing of H2O2

    Yang Li; Mingfa Zhang; Xiaopeng Zhang; Guocheng Xie; Zhiqiang Su; Gang Wei

    2015-01-01

    We describe the preparation of nanoporous carbon nanofibers (CNFs) decorated with platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) in this work by electrospining polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers and subsequent carbonization and binding of PtNPs. The fabricated nanoporous CNF-PtNP hybrids were further utilized to modify glass carbon electrodes and used for the non-enzymatic amperometric biosensor for the highly sensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The morphologies of the fabricated nanoporous CNF-...

  3. Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrodes for Biosensing Applications

    Koehne, Jessica Erin

    2014-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. Here, we report two studies using vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for biomedical applications. CNF arrays are investigated as neural stimulation and neurotransmitter recording electrodes for application in deep brain stimulation (DBS). Polypyrrole coated CNF nanoelectrodes have shown great promise as stimulating electrodes due to their large surface area, low impedance, biocompatibility and capacity for highly localized stimulation. CNFs embedded in SiO2 have been used as sensing electrodes for neurotransmitter detection. Our approach combines a multiplexed CNF electrode chip, developed at NASA Ames Research Center, with the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) system, developed at the Mayo Clinic. Preliminary results indicate that the CNF nanoelectrode arrays are easily integrated with WINCS for neurotransmitter detection in a multiplexed array format. In the future, combining CNF based stimulating and recording electrodes with WINCS may lay the foundation for an implantable smart therapeutic system that utilizes neurochemical feedback control while likely resulting in increased DBS application in various neuropsychiatric disorders. In total, our goal is to take advantage of the nanostructure of CNF arrays for biosensing studies requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and selective biofunctionalization.

  4. Structure, mechanical properties and friction behavior of UHMWPE/HDPE/carbon nanofibers

    Effects of untreated and pretreated carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the crystallization behavior, friction behavior, and mechanical properties of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)/high density polyethylene (HDPE) nanocomposites prepared by a twin-screw extrusion were studied. The differential scanning calorimetry and wide angle X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that the addition of CNFs impacted the temperature of crystallization, but had no significant effects on the crystalline structure of the UHMWPE/HDPE blend. The degree of crystallinity, and the tensile strength and modulus of the UHMWPE/HDPE systems exhibited an increasing trend initially with addition of CNFs, followed by a decrease at higher contents. With the increase of untreated CNF content, the friction coefficient of UHMWPE/HDPE was decreasing and displayed less change in the process of friction. The microstructure features on the fracture surfaces and friction surfaces of the polymer blend and the nanocomposites were analyzed in detail by scanning electron microscope observations. The degree of crystallinity of the nanocomposites with the pretreated CNFs exhibited a decrease due to the better interface adhesion compared to that in the nanocomposites with the same loading untreated CNFs. The enhancement in tensile strength of nanocomposites containing 0.5 wt% treated CNFs was four times higher (32%) than that of the nanocomposites containing untreated CNFs (8%) over that of the pure polymer

  5. Direct production of carbon nanofibers decorated with Cu2O by thermal chemical vapor deposition on Ni catalyst electroplated on a copper substrate

    MA Vesaghi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  Carbon nanofibers (CNFs decorated with Cu2O particles were grown on a Ni catalyst layer deposited on a Cu substrate by thermal. chemical vapor deposition from liquid petroleum gas. Ni catalyst nanoparticles with different sizes were produced in an electroplating system at 35˚C. These nanoparticles provide the nucleation sites for CNF growth, removing the need for a buffer layer. High temperature surface segregation of the Cu substrate into the Ni catalyst layer and its exposition to O2 at atmospheric environment, during the CNFs growth, lead to the production of CNFs decorated with Cu2O particles. The surface morphology of the Ni catalyst films and grown CNFs over it was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed the formation of CNFs. The selected area electron diffraction pattern and electron diffraction studies show that these CNFs were decorated with Cu2O nanoparticles.

  6. Growth of carbon nanofibers on carbon fabric with Ni nanocatalyst prepared using pulse electrodeposition

    The pulse electrodeposition (PED) technique was utilized to deposit nanosized (≤10 nm) Ni catalysts on carbon fabric (CF). Via an in situ potential profile, the PED technique can control the Ni catalyst loading, which is an important parameter for the growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on CF. The preparation of CNF-coated CF (carpet-like CF) was carried out in a thermal chemical vapor deposition system with an optimum loading of Ni catalysts deposited in the PED pulse range from 20 to 320 cycles. CNFs grown at 813 K using different pulse cycles had a narrow diameter distribution, around 15 ± 5 nm to 29 ± 7 nm; they have a hydrophobic surface, like lotus leaves. Transmission electron microscopy images confirmed the graphene structural transformation of CNFs with the growth temperature. Solid wire CNFs were initially grown at 813 K with graphene edges exposed on the external surface. At elevated growth temperatures (1073 and 1173 K), bamboo-like CNFs were obtained, with herringbone structures and intersectional hollow cores

  7. Flexible one-dimensional carbon-selenium composite nanofibers with superior electrochemical performance for Li-Se/Na-Se batteries

    Zeng, Linchao; Wei, Xiang; Wang, Jiaqing; Jiang, Yu; Li, Weihan; Yu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    A facile strategy is developed to synthesis selenium/carbon composites (Se@CNFs-CNT) by co-heating Se powder and electrospun Polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-CNT nanofibers at 600Cin a sealed vessel. The Se molecules are chemically bonded and physical encapsulated by carbonized PAN-CNT composite (CNFs-CNT), which leads to prevent the dissolution of polyselenide intermediates in carbonate based electrolyte. When directly used as flexible free-standing cathode material for Li-Se batteries in low cost carbonate-based electrolyte, the Se@CNFs-CNT electrode exhibits improved cyclability (517 mAh g-1 after 500 cycles at 0.5 A g-1) and rate capability (485 mAh g-1 at 1 A g-1). Moreover, when tested as sodium batteries, it maintains a reversible capacity of 410 mAh g-1 after 240 cycles at 0.5 A g-1. The superior electrochemical performance (especially at high rates) of Se@CNFs-CNT is attributed to synergistic effect of the additive of CNT, the well confine of Se in the CNFs-CNT matrix through chemical bonding and the 3D interconnected carbon nanofibers (CNFs). This simple yet efficient process thus provides a promising route towards fabrication of a variety of high performance flexible Li-Se and Na-Se batteries.

  8. Change in carbon nanofiber resistance from ambient to vacuum

    Shusaku Maeda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The electrical properties of carbon nanofibers (CNFs can be affected by adsorbed gas species. In this study, we compare the resistance values of CNF devices in a horizontal configuration in air and under vacuum. CNFs in air are observed to possess lower current capacities compared to those in vacuum. Further, Joule heating due to current stressing can result in desorption of gas molecules responsible for carrier trapping, leading to lower resistances and higher breakdown currents in vacuum, where most adsorbed gaseous species are evacuated before any significant re-adsorption can occur. A model is proposed to describe these observations, and is used to estimate the number of adsorbed molecules on a CNF device.

  9. Novel phenolic biosensor based on a magnetic polydopamine-laccase-nickel nanoparticle loaded carbon nanofiber composite.

    Li, Dawei; Luo, Lei; Pang, Zengyuan; Ding, Lei; Wang, Qingqing; Ke, Huizhen; Huang, Fenglin; Wei, Qufu

    2014-04-01

    A novel phenolic biosensor was prepared on the basis of a composite of polydopamine (PDA)-laccase (Lac)-nickel nanoparticle loaded carbon nanofibers (NiCNFs). First, NiCNFs were fabricated by a combination of electrospinning and a high temperature carbonization technique. Subsequently, the magnetic composite was obtained through one-pot Lac-catalyzed oxidation of dopamine (DA) in an aqueous suspension containing Lac, NiCNFs, and DA. Finally, a magnetic glass carbon electrode (MGCE) was employed to separate and immobilize the composite; the modified electrode was then denoted as PDA-Lac-NiCNFs/MGCE. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and cyclic voltammetry (CV) analyses revealed the NiCNFs had good biocompatibility for Lac immobilization and greatly facilitated the direct electron transfer between Lac and electrode surface. The immobilized Lac showed a pair of stable and well-defined redox peaks, and the electrochemical behavior of Lac was a surface-controlled process in pH 5.5 acetate buffer solution. The PDA-Lac-NiCNFs/MGCE for biosensing of catechol exhibited a sensitivity of 25 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), a detection limit of 0.69 μM (S/N = 3), and a linear range from 1 μM to 9.1 mM, as well as good selectivity and stability. Meanwhile, this novel biosensor demonstrated its promising application in detecting catechol in real water samples. PMID:24606719

  10. Copper/zinc bimetal nanoparticles-dispersed carbon nanofibers: A novel potential antibiotic material.

    Ashfaq, Mohammad; Verma, Nishith; Khan, Suphiya

    2016-02-01

    Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) nanoparticles (NPs) were asymmetrically distributed in carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown on an activated carbon fiber (ACF) substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The CVD conditions were chosen such that the Cu NPs moved along with the CNFs during tip-growth, while the Zn NPs remained adhered at the ACF. The bimetal-ACF/CNF composite material was characterized by the metal NP release profiles, in-vitro hemolytic and antibacterial activities, and bacterial cellular disruption and adhesion assay. The synergetic effects of the bimetal NPs distributed in the ACFs/CNFs resulted from the relatively slower release of the Cu NPs located at the tip of the CNFs and faster release of the Zn NPs dispersed in the ACF. The Cu/Zn-grown ACFs/CNFs inhibited the growth of the Gram negative Escherichia coli, Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, and Methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus bacterial strains, with superior efficiency (instant and prolonged inhibition) than the Cu or Zn single metal-grown ACFs/CNFs. The prepared bimetal-carbon composite material in this study has potential to be used in different biomedical applications such as wound healing and antibiotic wound dressing. PMID:26652451

  11. Fabrication of carbon nanofiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites assisted by aluminum coating formed on nanofiber surface by in situ chemical vapor deposition

    The van der Waals agglomeration of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and the weight difference and poor wettability between CNFs and aluminum hinder the fabrication of dense CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites with superior properties. In this study, to improve this situation, CNFs were coated with aluminum by a simple and low-cost in situ chemical vapor deposition (in situ CVD). Iodine was used to accelerate the transport of aluminum atoms. The coating layer formed by the in situ CVD was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the CNFs were successfully coated with aluminum. The composites were fabricated to investigate the effect of the aluminum coating formed on the CNFs. The dispersion of CNFs, density, Vickers micro-hardness and thermal conductivity of the composites fabricated by powder metallurgy were improved. Pressure-less infiltration experiments were conducted to fabricate composites by casting. The results demonstrated that the wettability and infiltration were dramatically improved by the aluminum coating layer on CNFs. The aluminum coating formed by the in situ CVD technique was proved to be effective for the fabrication of CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites. (paper)

  12. Fabrication of carbon nanofiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites assisted by aluminum coating formed on nanofiber surface by in situ chemical vapor deposition

    Ogawa, Fumio; Masuda, Chitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The van der Waals agglomeration of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and the weight difference and poor wettability between CNFs and aluminum hinder the fabrication of dense CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites with superior properties. In this study, to improve this situation, CNFs were coated with aluminum by a simple and low-cost in situ chemical vapor deposition (in situ CVD). Iodine was used to accelerate the transport of aluminum atoms. The coating layer formed by the in situ CVD was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the CNFs were successfully coated with aluminum. The composites were fabricated to investigate the effect of the aluminum coating formed on the CNFs. The dispersion of CNFs, density, Vickers micro-hardness and thermal conductivity of the composites fabricated by powder metallurgy were improved. Pressure-less infiltration experiments were conducted to fabricate composites by casting. The results demonstrated that the wettability and infiltration were dramatically improved by the aluminum coating layer on CNFs. The aluminum coating formed by the in situ CVD technique was proved to be effective for the fabrication of CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites.

  13. Catalytic Growth of Macroscopic Carbon Nanofibers Bodies with Activated Carbon

    Carbon-carbon composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofibers have been synthesized by growing Carbon nanofiber (CNF) on Palm shell-based Activated carbon (AC) with Ni catalyst. The composites are in an agglomerated shape due to the entanglement of the defective CNF between the AC particles forming a macroscopic body. The macroscopic size will allow the composite to be used as a stabile catalyst support and liquid adsorbent. The preparation of CNT/AC nanocarbon was initiated by pre-treating the activated carbon with nitric acid, followed by impregnation of 1 wt% loading of nickel (II) nitrate solutions in acetone. The catalyst precursor was calcined and reduced at 300 deg. C for an hour in each step. The catalytic growth of nanocarbon in C2H4/H2 was carried out at temperature of 550 deg. C for 2 hrs with different rotating angle in the fluidization system. SEM and N2 isotherms show the level of agglomeration which is a function of growth density and fluidization of the system. The effect of fluidization by rotating the reactor during growth with different speed give a significant impact on the agglomeration of the final CNF/AC composite and thus the amount of CNFs produced. The macrostructure body produced in this work of CNF/AC composite will have advantages in the adsorbent and catalyst support application, due to the mechanical and chemical properties of the material.

  14. Effects of the catalyst and substrate thickness on the carbon nanotubes/nanofibers as supercapacitor electrodes

    The different growth conditions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/carbon nanofibers (CNFs) which lead to different characteristics when used as supercapacitor electrodes are reported. A layer of SiO2 was coated onto the Si substrate and then a layer of Ti was evaporated as a current collector. CNTs/CNFs were synthesized on the Ti surface via a water-assisted chemical vapor deposition method at 800 °C and at atmospheric pressure utilizing iron (Fe) nanoparticles as catalysts, ethylene (C2H4) as the precursor gas and argon (Ar) and hydrogen (H2) as the carrier gases. The effects of different thicknesses of the catalyst (5 and 10 nm) and Ti substrate layer (10, 30 and 150 nm) on the specific capacitance of the CNFs were studied and the capacitance of the CNTs/CNFs-based device was dependent on CNT/CNF morphology of the CNFs that varied for different combinations of the catalyst and Ti layer thicknesses. The characterization of CNTs/CNFs was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. The specific capacitance was measured using cyclic voltammetry via a three-electrode system. The highest specific capacitance (60 F g-1) was obtained in the sample grown with 5 nm of Fe catalyst onto 10 nm of Ti substrate.

  15. Thin, Flexible Supercapacitors Made from Carbon Nanofiber Electrodes Decorated at Room Temperature with Manganese Oxide Nanosheets

    Nataraj, S.K.; Song, Q.; Al-Muhtaseb, S. A.; Dutton, S. E.; Zhang, Q; Sivaniah, E.

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication and electrochemical performance of a flexible thin film supercapacitor with a novel nanostructured composite electrode. The electrode was prepared by in situ coprecipitation of two-dimensional (2D) MnO2 nanosheets at room temperature in the presence of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). The highest specific capacitance of 142 F/g was achieved for CNFs-MnO2 electrodes in sandwiched assembly with PVA-H4SiW12O40.nH2O polyelectrolyte separator.

  16. Understanding greater cardiomyocyte functions on aligned compared to random carbon nanofibers in PLGA

    Asiri AM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah M Asiri,1 Hadi M Marwani,1 Sher Bahadar Khan,1 Thomas J Webster1,2 1Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Previous studies have demonstrated greater cardiomyocyte density on carbon nanofibers (CNFs aligned (compared to randomly oriented in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA composites. Although such studies demonstrated a closer mimicking of anisotropic electrical and mechanical properties for such aligned (compared to randomly oriented CNFs in PLGA composites, the objective of the present in vitro study was to elucidate a deeper mechanistic understanding of how cardiomyocyte densities recognize such materials to respond more favorably. Results showed lower wettability (greater hydrophobicity of CNFs embedded in PLGA compared to pure PLGA, thus providing evidence of selectively lower wettability in aligned CNF regions. Furthermore, the results correlated these changes in hydrophobicity with increased adsorption of fibronectin, laminin, and vitronectin (all proteins known to increase cardiomyocyte adhesion and functions on CNFs in PLGA compared to pure PLGA, thus providing evidence of selective initial protein adsorption cues on such CNF regions to promote cardiomyocyte adhesion and growth. Lastly, results of the present in vitro study further confirmed increased cardiomyocyte functions by demonstrating greater expression of important cardiomyocyte biomarkers (such as Troponin-T, Connexin-43, and ?-sarcomeric actin when CNFs were aligned compared to randomly oriented in PLGA. In summary, this study provided evidence that cardiomyocyte functions are improved on CNFs aligned in PLGA compared to randomly oriented in PLGA since CNFs are more hydrophobic than PLGA and attract the adsorption of key proteins (fibronectin, laminin, and vironectin that are known to promote cardiomyocyte adhesion and expression of important cardiomyocyte functions. Thus, future studies should use this knowledge to further design improved CNF:PLGA composites for numerous cardiovascular applications. Keywords: cardiomyocytes, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, carbon nanofibers, aligned, nanotechnology, anisotropy, mechanism, vitronectin, fibronectin, laminin

  17. Processing and Structure of Carbon Nanofiber Paper

    Zhongfu Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique concept of making nanocomposites from carbon nanofiber paper was explored in this study. The essential element of this method was to design and manufacture carbon nanofiber paper with well-controlled and optimized network structure of carbon nanofibers. In this study, carbon nanofiber paper was prepared under various processing conditions, including different types of carbon nanofibers, solvents, dispersants, and acid treatment. The morphologies of carbon nanofibers within the nanofiber paper were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. In addition, the bulk densities of carbon nanofiber papers were measured. It was found that the densities and network structures of carbon nanofiber paper correlated to the dispersion quality of carbon nanofibers within the paper, which was significantly affected by papermaking process conditions.

  18. NiO nanowall-assisted growth of thick carbon nanofiber layers on metal wires for fiber supercapacitors.

    Zhu, Guoyin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Ziqiang; Kang, Qi; Feng, Xiaomiao; Li, Yi; Huang, Zhendong; Wang, Lianhui; Ma, Yanwen

    2016-02-01

    Thick carbon nanofiber (CNF) films were uniformly grown on metal wires with the assistance of pre-deposited NiO nanowalls. The as-prepared wire-shaped composites that integrate the capacitance of CNFs and Ni particles were directly used as electrodes to construct high capacitive fiber supercapacitors for micro-power supplies. PMID:26758814

  19. Carbon Nanotube/Nanofibers and Graphite Hybrids for Li-Ion Battery Application

    Yosuke Nomura; Ilya V. Anoshkin; Chikaaki Okuda; Motoyuki Iijima; Yoshio Ukyo; Hidehiro Kamiya; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2014-01-01

    To improve the electrical conductivity of negative electrodes of lithium ion batteries, we applied a direct CVD synthesis of carbon nanomaterials on the surface of graphite particles. To prepare a catalyst, two alternative approaches were utilized: colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) and metal (Ni and Co) nitrate salt precursors deposited on the graphite surface. Both colloidal and precursor systems allowed us to produce carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the graphite surface with high coverage under the ...

  20. Room-temperature growth of a carbon nanofiber on the tip of conical carbon protrusions

    Glassy carbon was Ar+-ion bombarded with a simultaneous Mo supply under ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a microprotrusion fabrication system that consists of a differentially pumped ion gun and a seed-material supply source. Conical protrusions were formed by sputtering with a seed supply, and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grew on the tips even at room temperature. The length of CNFs reached up to ?10 ?m, and their diameter was almost uniform (50 nm) in the growth direction. The short CNFs aligned in the ion beam direction, whereas the long ones were non-aligned. The CNF growth on a glassy carbon surface was ascribed to the enhanced surface texturing and to the massive redeposition of C atoms onto cones, both of which are specific to the oblique ion bombardment: The former would lead to an increase in the number of possible nucleation sites for the CNF growth, and the C atoms arising from the latter process would migrate toward the conical tips, thus forming CNFs

  1. Strong magnetic field-assisted growth of carbon nanofibers and its microstructural transformation mechanism

    Luo, Chengzhi; Fu, Qiang; Pan, Chunxu

    2015-03-01

    It is well-known that electric and magnetic fields can control the growth direction, morphology and microstructure of one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials (1-DCNMs), which plays a key role for its potential applications in micro-nano-electrics and devices. In this paper, we introduce a novel process for controlling growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with assistance of a strong magnetic field (up to 0.5 T in the center) in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. The results reveal that: 1) The CNFs get bundled when grown in the presence of a strong magnetic field and slightly get aligned parallel to the direction of the magnetic field; 2) The CNFs diameter become narrowed and homogenized with increase of the magnetic field; 3) With the increase of the magnetic field, the microstructure of CNFs is gradually changed, i.e., the strong magnetic field makes the disordered ``solid-cored'' CNFs transform into a kind of bamboo-liked carbon nanotubes; 4) We propose a mechanism that the reason for these variations and transformation is due to diamagnetic property of carbon atoms, so that it has direction selectivity in the precipitation process.

  2. One-step catalytic growth of carbon nanofiber arrays vertically aligned on carbon substrate

    Li, Xun [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructure, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Xu, Zheng, E-mail: zhengxu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructure, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ? Acetylene as carbon resource and copper foil as catalyst. ? Three carbon nanostructures are synthesized by modulating feeding gas compositions. ? NH{sub 3} is a key factor in the growth of VA-CNF arrays. -- Abstract: Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VA-CNF) arrays on carbon substrate have been synthesized via one-step chemical vapor deposition process on copper foil, by using acetylene as carbon resource. Three types of carbon nanostructures, viz. bare carbon films, CNFs and VA-CNFs grown on carbon substrate, could be selectively synthesized by only modulating the concentration of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} in the feeding gases. It was found that NH{sub 3} was a key factor in the growth of VA-CNF arrays, which could increase the diffusion capability of copper atoms in carbon materials, therefore promote forming larger spherical Cu NPs catalysts for the growth of VA-CNFs. Furthermore, a growth mechanism in different feeding gas compositions was proposed.

  3. Characterization of field emission from carbon nanofibers on a metal tip

    Field electron emission from carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown on a tungsten tip has been characterized by measuring emission current-voltage (I-V) curves and observing emission patterns on a phosphor screen. CNFs were vertically grown on the tip by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Field emission from the CNFs over 100 ?A was strongly dependent on emitter-anode distance, and the dominant field electrons were emitted within an angular spread of ???25 deg., indicating the electron emission took place mainly from the emitter's apex area. By analyzing the I-V curves with the aid of the Fowler-Nordheim theory, the maximum current density was estimated to be about J=2x109 A/m2.

  4. Characterization of field emission from carbon nanofibers on a metal tip

    Sakai, Y.; Tone, D.; Nagatsu, S.; Endo, T.; Kita, S.; Okuyama, F.

    2009-08-01

    Field electron emission from carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown on a tungsten tip has been characterized by measuring emission current-voltage (I-V) curves and observing emission patterns on a phosphor screen. CNFs were vertically grown on the tip by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Field emission from the CNFs over 100 ?A was strongly dependent on emitter-anode distance, and the dominant field electrons were emitted within an angular spread of ?? 25, indicating the electron emission took place mainly from the emitter's apex area. By analyzing the I-V curves with the aid of the Fowler-Nordheim theory, the maximum current density was estimated to be about J =2109 A/m2.

  5. Controlled growth of carbon nanofibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition: Effect of catalyst thickness and gas ratio

    The characteristics of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown, using direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system reactor under various acetylene to ammonia gas ratios and different catalyst thicknesses were studied. Nickel/Chromium-glass (Ni/Cr-glass) thin film catalyst was employed for the growth of CNF. The grown CNFs were then characterized using Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman spectroscopy showed that the Ni/Cr-glass with thickness of 15 nm and gas ratio acetylene to ammonia of 1:3 produced CNFs with the lowest ID/IG value (the relative intensity of D-band to G-band). This indicated that this catalyst thickness and gas ratio value is the optimum combination for the synthesis of CNFs under the conditions studied. TEM observation pointed out that the CNFs produced have 104 concentric walls and the residual catalyst particles were located inside the tubes of CNFs. It was also observed that structural morphology of the grown CNFs was influenced by acetylene to ammonia gas ratio and catalyst thickness.

  6. Aerosol Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production: Mobile Direct-Reading Sampling

    Evans, Douglas E.; Ku, Bon Ki; BIRCH, M. EILEEN; Dunn, Kevin H.

    2010-01-01

    Detailed investigations were conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Presented research summarizes the direct-reading monitoring aspects of the study. A mobile aerosol sampling platform, equipped with an aerosol instrument array, was used to characterize emissions at different locations within the facility. Particle number, respirable mass, active surface area, and photoelectric response were monitored with a condensation particle counter (CPC), a pho...

  7. Fabrication and Properties of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate-Carbon Nanofiber Nanocomposites

    George JinuJacob; Bhowmick Anil

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Carbon nanofiber (CNF) is one of the stiffest materials produced commercially, having excellent mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. The reinforcement of rubbery matrices by CNFs was studied in the case of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA). The tensile strength was greatly (61%) increased, even for very low fiber content (i.e., 1.0 wt.%). The surface modification of the fiber by high energy electron beam and gamma irradiation led to better dispersion in the rubber matrix. This ...

  8. Processing and properties of carbon nanofibers reinforced epoxy powder composites

    Commercially available CNFs (diameter 30–300 nm) have been used to develop both bulk and coating epoxy nanocomposites by using a solvent-free epoxy matrix powder. Processing of both types of materials has been carried out by a double-step process consisting in an initial physical premix of all components followed by three consecutive extrusions. The extruded pellets were grinded into powder and sieved. Carbon nanofibers powder coatings were obtained by electrostatic painting of the extruded powder followed by a curing process based in a thermal treatment at 200 °C for 25 min. On the other hand, for obtaining bulk carbon nanofibers epoxy composites, a thermal curing process involving several steps was needed. Gloss and mechanical properties of both nanocomposite coatings and bulk nanocomposites were improved as a result of the processing process. FE-SEM fracture surface microphotographs corroborate these results. It has been assessed the key role played by the dispersion of CNFs in the matrix, and the highly important step that is the processing and curing of the nanocomposites. A processing stage consisted in three consecutive extrusions has reached to nanocomposites free of entanglements neither agglomerates. This process leads to nanocomposite coatings of enhanced properties, as it has been evidenced through gloss and mechanical properties. A dispersion limit of 1% has been determined for the studied system in which a given dispersion has been achieved, as the bending mechanical properties have been increased around 25% compared with the pristine epoxy resin. It has been also demonstrated the importance of the thickness in the nanocomposite, as it involves the curing stage. The complex curing treatment carried out in the case of bulk nanocomposites has reached to reagglomeration of CNFs.

  9. Nondestructive evaluation of 45 flat-braided carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers with carbon nanofibers using HTS-SQUID gradiometer

    Highlights: ? Tensile load was applied to braided CFRPs with and without CNFs and cutting edges. ? Visualization method using SQUID gradiometer was also applied to the braided CFRPs. ? Different destructive mechanisms and current distributions were obtained. ? Dispersed CNFs enhanced mechanical and electrical properties of the braided CFRPs. -- Abstract: Step-by-step tensile tests were applied to flat-braided carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers with and without added dispersions of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and with and without sample sides cut off to study their mechanical properties and destructive mechanisms by means of in situ observation and stressstrain measurements. An ex situ nondestructive evaluation technique, using a high-temperature superconductor superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer, was also applied to the samples to study their electrical properties; the relationships between the mechanical and electrical properties by visualizing current maps in the samples during ac current injection was also studied. Clear differences were observed in the mechanical and electrical properties and the destructive mechanisms between the samples with and without CNFs and with and without cut off sides. These differences were mainly attributed to the addition of CNFs, which enhanced the mechanical and electrical connections between the carbon fiber bundles

  10. Ti-doped SnOx encapsulated in Carbon nanofibers with enhanced lithium storage properties

    Hybrid nanocomposites composed of carbon nanofibers and Ti-doped SnOx nanoparticles with varied molar ratios of Ti/Sn (=0.05, 0.1 and 0.2) have been prepared through electrospinning technique and subsequent thermal treatments. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that the Ti-doped SnOx nanoparticles with a very small particle size of 2∼4 nm were uniformly encapsulated in the carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Among the as-prepared samples, the electrode with the Ti/Sn molar ratio of 0.1 delivered the best reversible capacity of 670.7 mAh g−1 at the 60th cycle, which was 17.9% higher than that of the pristine SnOx/CNFs (SOC). What is more, the optimal electrode presented good rate performance (302.1 mAh g−1 at 2 A g−1). The enhanced lithium storage properties of Ti-doped SnOx/CNFs (TSOC) can be attributed to the uniform encapsulation of ultrafine SnOx nanoparticles in the conductive CNFs as well as the doping with Ti4+

  11. Greater cardiomyocyte density on aligned compared with random carbon nanofibers inpolymer composites

    Asiri AM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah M Asiri,1 Hadi M Marwani,1 Sher Bahadar Khan,1 Thomas J Webster1,2 1Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, SaudiArabia; 2Department of Chemical Engineering,Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Carbon nanofibers (CNFs randomly embedded in poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA composites have recently been shown to promote cardiomyocyte growth when compared with conventional PLGA without CNFs. It was shown then that PLGA:CNF composites were conductive and that conductivity increased as greater amounts of CNFs were added to pure PLGA. Moreover, tensile tests showed that addition of CNFs increased the tensile strength of the PLGA composite to mimic that of natural heart tissue. Most importantly, throughout all cytocompatibility experiments, cardiomyocytes were viable and expressed important biomarkers that were greatest on 50:50 wt% CNF:PLGA composites. The increased selective adsorption of fibronectin and vitronectin (critical proteins that mediate cardiomyocyte function onto such composites proved to be the mechanism of action. However, the natural myocardium is anisotropic in terms of mechanical and electrical properties, which was not emulated in these prior PLGA:CNF composites. Thus, the aim of this in vitro study was to create and characterize CNFs aligned in PLGA composites (at 50:50 wt%, including their mechanical and electrical properties and cardiomyocyte density, comparing such results with randomly oriented CNFs in PLGA. Specifically, CNFs were added to soluble biodegradable PLGA (50:50 PGA:PLA weight ratio and aligned by applying a voltage and then allowing the polymer to cure. CNF surface micron patterns (20 m wide on PLGA were then fabricated through a mold method to further mimic myocardium anisotropy. The results demonstrated anisotropic mechanical and electrical properties and significantly improved cardiomyocyte density for up to 5 days on CNFs aligned in PLGA compared with being randomly oriented in PLGA. These results indicate that CNFs aligned in PLGA should be further explored for improving cardiomyocyte density, which is necessary in numerous cardiovascular applications. Keywords: cardiomyocytes, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, carbon nanofibers, aligned, nanotechnology, anisotropy

  12. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanofiber nucleation: the effect of carbon concentration in Ni carbide.

    Tang, Xian; Xie, Zhiyong; Yin, Teng; Wang, Ji-Wei; Yang, Piaopiao; Huang, Qizhong

    2013-10-14

    The atomic-scale nucleation mechanism of vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) is investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulations with a developed parameterization. Carbon precipitation and graphene plane formation are simulated, taking into account the carbon concentration (CC) in Ni carbide. The simulated results show that the carbon atoms formed sp(2) networks or sp chains in the Ni nanocrystals and then precipitated onto the Ni surface with distinct precipitation dynamics and time intervals that are dependent on the CC. The lowest-energy configurations of the precipitated carbon atoms exhibit an irregular corrugated network, a defective graphene plane, and separate defective graphene planes under high, medium, and low CC, respectively. These observations are in good agreement with the microstructural characteristics of different types of CNFs from experiments. Pair correlation function calculations show that the precipitated carbon structures exhibit different graphite orderings. The study reveals the atomistic CNF nucleation mechanism and emphasizes the critical role of metal carbide CC in the microstructure formation of CNFs during synthesis. PMID:23999539

  13. Thermal Expansion of Carbon Nanofiber-Reinforced Multiscale Polymer Composites

    Poveda, Ronald L.; Achar, Sriniket; Gupta, Nikhil

    2012-10-01

    Improved dimensional stability of composites is desired in applications where they are exposed to varying temperature conditions. The current study aims at analyzing the effect of vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the thermal expansion behavior of epoxy matrix composites and hollow particle-filled composites (syntactic foams). CNFs have a lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) than epoxy resin, which results in composites with increased dimensional stability as the CNF content is increased. The experimental measurements show that with 10 wt.% CNF, the composite has about 11.6% lower CTE than the matrix resin. In CNF-reinforced syntactic foams, the CTE of the composite decreases with increasing wall thickness and volume fraction of hollow particle inclusions. With respect to neat epoxy resin, a maximum decrease of 38.4% is also observed in the CNF/syntactic foams with microballoon inclusions that range from 15 vol.% to 50 vol.% in all composite mixtures. The experimental results for CNF/syntactic foam are in agreement with a modified version of Kerner's model. A combination of hollow microparticles and nanofibers has resulted in the ability to tailor the thermal expansion of the composite over a wide range.

  14. Carbon nanofibers synthesized by pyrolysis of chloroform and ethanol mixture

    Lin, Wang-Hua [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, 62102, Taiwan (China); Li, Yuan-Yao, E-mail: chmyyl@ccu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, 62102, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Opto-Mechatronics, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, 62102, Taiwan (China); Advanced Institute of Manufacturing with High-Tech Innovations, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, 62102, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-01

    Platelet graphite nanofibers (PGNFs) and turbostratic carbon nanofibers (TSCNFs) were synthesized by the pyrolysis of 3 and 10 vol% chloroform in ethanol, respectively, in the presence of Ni catalyst at 700 °C. Auger electron spectrometry analysis reveals that the participation of chloroform in the synthesis led to Ni–Cl bonding on the surface of the catalysts, resulting in a relatively poor crystalline layer and a coarse surface. Furthermore, the Ni–Cl compound affected the melting point and mobility of Ni, changing the morphology and geometrical shape of Ni particles. A low amount of chlorine in the catalyst led to the formation of smaller catalyst particles with a flat surface, resulting in graphene nanosheets stacked perpendicular to the fiber axis, which became PGNFs. In contrast, a high amount of chlorine in the catalyst led to the aggregation of the catalyst and thus the formation of large catalyst particles with a rough surface, resulting in the random stacking of graphene nanosheets, which became TSCNFs. The participation of chlorine was found to be important in the synthesis of the PGNFs and TSCNFs. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The morphology of CNFs changed while different amount of CHCl{sub 3} presented. • The interaction of Ni and Cl changed the geometry and morphology of catalysts. • The structure of CNFs formed attributed to the surface morphology of catalysts. • PGNFs and TSCNFs were perpendicular and random stacking of graphene.

  15. Carbon nanofibers synthesized by pyrolysis of chloroform and ethanol mixture

    Platelet graphite nanofibers (PGNFs) and turbostratic carbon nanofibers (TSCNFs) were synthesized by the pyrolysis of 3 and 10 vol% chloroform in ethanol, respectively, in the presence of Ni catalyst at 700 °C. Auger electron spectrometry analysis reveals that the participation of chloroform in the synthesis led to Ni–Cl bonding on the surface of the catalysts, resulting in a relatively poor crystalline layer and a coarse surface. Furthermore, the Ni–Cl compound affected the melting point and mobility of Ni, changing the morphology and geometrical shape of Ni particles. A low amount of chlorine in the catalyst led to the formation of smaller catalyst particles with a flat surface, resulting in graphene nanosheets stacked perpendicular to the fiber axis, which became PGNFs. In contrast, a high amount of chlorine in the catalyst led to the aggregation of the catalyst and thus the formation of large catalyst particles with a rough surface, resulting in the random stacking of graphene nanosheets, which became TSCNFs. The participation of chlorine was found to be important in the synthesis of the PGNFs and TSCNFs. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The morphology of CNFs changed while different amount of CHCl3 presented. • The interaction of Ni and Cl changed the geometry and morphology of catalysts. • The structure of CNFs formed attributed to the surface morphology of catalysts. • PGNFs and TSCNFs were perpendicular and random stacking of graphene

  16. Extraordinary improvement of the graphitic structure of continuous carbon nanofibers templated with double wall carbon nanotubes.

    Papkov, Dimitry; Beese, Allison M; Goponenko, Alexander; Zou, Yan; Naraghi, Mohammad; Espinosa, Horacio D; Saha, Biswajit; Schatz, George C; Moravsky, Alexander; Loutfy, Raouf; Nguyen, Sonbinh T; Dzenis, Yuris

    2013-01-22

    Carbon nanotubes are being widely studied as a reinforcing element in high-performance composites and fibers at high volume fractions. However, problems with nanotube processing, alignment, and non-optimal stress transfer between the nanotubes and surrounding matrix have so far prevented full utilization of their superb mechanical properties in composites. Here, we present an alternative use of carbon nanotubes, at a very small concentration, as a templating agent for the formation of graphitic structure in fibers. Continuous carbon nanofibers (CNF) were manufactured by electrospinning from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) with 1.2% of double wall nanotubes (DWNT). Nanofibers were oxidized and carbonized at temperatures from 600 °C to 1850 °C. Structural analyses revealed significant improvements in graphitic structure and crystal orientation in the templated CNFs, with the largest improvements observed at lower carbonization temperatures. In situ pull-out experiments showed good interfacial bonding between the DWNT bundles and the surrounding templated carbon matrix. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of templated carbonization confirmed oriented graphitic growth and provided insight into mechanisms of carbonization initiation. The obtained results indicate that global templating of the graphitic structure in fine CNFs can be achieved at very small concentrations of well-dispersed DWNTs. The outcomes reveal a simple and inexpensive route to manufacture continuous CNFs with improved structure and properties for a variety of mechanical and functional applications. The demonstrated improvement of graphitic order at low carbonization temperatures in the absence of stretch shows potential as a promising new manufacturing technology for next generation carbon fibers. PMID:23249440

  17. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode

    Ma, Junqing (Inventor); Newman, Aron (Inventor); Lennhoff, John (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A carbon nanofiber can have a surface and include at least one crystalline whisker extending from the surface of the carbon nanofiber. A battery anode composition can be formed from a plurality of carbon nanofibers each including a plurality of crystalline whiskers.

  18. Nitrogen-Doped Titanium/Carbon Nanofibers Mats as Promising Oxygen Reduction Reac-tion Electrocatalysts in Acidic Media

    El-Safty S.A.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The numerous desire for higher density power supplies has forced the researchers to seek for alternative solutions. Nowadays, low-cost and scalable fuel cells receive a great attention because the commerciality of such kind of power resources will be difficult to realize if the expensive platinum-based electrocatalysts for Oxygen reduction reaction (ORRs cannot be replaced by other efficient, low-cost, and stable electrodes. An extensional rheology study is conducted to improve the catalytic activity of nitrogen-doped carbon (N-CNFs towards ORR in acidic media. This paper reports that the activity of N-CNFs for ORR could be enhanced by using an organic semiconducting material such as titanium isopropoxide (Ti. To further corroborate our findings and develop high surface area nanofibers, electrospinning process allows us to develop the co-continuous morphology of polyacrylonitrile (PAN and Ti within the nanofibers. N-Ti/CNFs were prepared by carbonizing the electrospun Ti/PAN. Interestingly, N- Ti/CNFs exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity for ORR in acidic media, it act as a metal-free electrode with better electrocatalytic activity. The present work provides a feasible approach to promote the ORR activity of N-Ti/CNFs hold high promise in developing cheap and efficient cathodic electrocatalysts for fuel cells applications as a good alternative to Pt catalyst.

  19. Facile electrospinning preparation of phosphorus and nitrogen dual-doped cobalt-based carbon nanofibers as bifunctional electrocatalyst

    Wang, Zhuang; Zuo, Pengjian; Fan, Liquan; Han, Jianan; Xiong, Yueping; Yin, Geping

    2016-04-01

    A novel electrochemical catalyst of phosphorus and nitrogen dual-doped cobalt-based carbon nanofibers (Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs) is prepared by a facile and cost-effective electrospinning technique. Excellent features of the porous carbon nanofibers with large amounts of Co atoms, N/P-doping effect, abundant pyridinic-N and Cosbnd Nx clusters as catalytic active sites, and the advantages of the structure and composition result in a high catalytic efficiency. In alkaline or acidic media, Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activities and kinetics for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), superior methanol tolerance and stability, and a similar four-electron pathway. In addition, Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs also shows excellent performance for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), offering a low onset potential of -0.216 V and a stable current density of 10 mA cm-2 at potential of -0.248 V. The mechanism of ORR and HER catalytic active site arises from the doping of N/P atoms in the Co-based CNFs, which is responsible for the excellent electrocatalytic performance. Due to the excellent catalytic efficiencies, Cosbnd Nsbnd P-CNFs act as a promising catalyst material for fuel cells and water splitting technologies.

  20. A nonlinear effective thermal conductivity model for carbon nanotube and nanofiber suspensions

    It has been experimentally demonstrated that suspensions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs) significantly increase the thermal conductivity of nanofluids; however, a physically sound theory of the underlying phenomenon is still missing. In this study, the nonlinear nature of the effective thermal conductivity enhancement with the particle concentration of CNT and CNF nanofluids is explained physically using the excluded volume concept. Specifically, the number of contacting CNTs and CNFs could be calculated by using the excluded volume concept, where the distance for heat to travel in a cylinder between the contacting cylinders in the thermal network of percolating CNTs and CNFs increased with the excluded volume. In contrast to the effective thermal conductivity model of Sastry et al (2008 Nanotechnology 19 055704) the present revised model could reproduce the nonlinear increase of the thermal conductivity with particle concentration, as well as the dependence on the diameter and aspect ratio of the CNTs and CNFs. It was found that the alignment of CNTs and CNFs due to the long range repulsion force decreases the excluded volume, leading to both the convex and concave nonlinear as well as linear increase of the thermal conductivity with particle concentration. The difference between various carrier fluids of the suspensions could be explained as the result of the change in the excluded volume in different base fluids

  1. Effect of carbon nanofibers on the infiltration and thermal conductivity of carbon/carbon composites

    Highlights: → The CNFs improve the infiltration rate and thermal properties of carbon/carbon composites. → The densification rate increases with the CNF content increasing at the beginning of infiltration. → The values of the thermal conductivity of the composite obtain their maximum values at 5 wt.%. -- Abstract: Preforms containing 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt.% carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were fabricated by spreading layers of carbon cloth, and infiltrated using the electrified preform heating chemical vapor infiltration method (ECVI) under atmospheric pressure. Initial thermal gradients were determined. Resistivity and density evolutions with infiltration time have been recorded. Scanning electron microscopy, polarized light micrograph and X-ray diffraction technique were used to analyze the experiment results. The results showed that the infiltration rate increased with the rising of CNF content, and after 120 h of infiltration, the density was the highest when the CNF content was 5 wt.%, but the composite could not be densified efficiently as the CNF content ranged from 10 wt.% to 20 wt.%. CNF-reinforced C/C composites have enhanced thermal conductivity, the values at 5 wt.% were increased by nearly 5.5-24.1% in the X-Y direction and 153.8-251.3% in the Z direction compared to those with no CNFs. When the additive content was increased to 20 wt.%, due to the holes and cavities in the CNF web and between carbon cloth and matrix, the thermal conductivities in the X-Y and Z directions decreased from their maximum values at 5 wt.%.

  2. Fabrication of Uniform AuCarbon Nanofiber by Two-Step Low Temperature Decomposition

    Lee Myeongsoon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a facile and efficient way to prepare carbon nanofibers ornamented with Au nanoparticles (Au/CNFs. Gold nanoparticles were first deposited in the channels of an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO membrane by thermal decomposition of HAuCl4and then carbon nanofibers were produced in the same channels loaded with the Au nanoparticles by decomposition of sucrose at 230 C. An electron microscopy study revealed that the carbon nanofibers, ~10 nm thick and 6 ?m long, were decorated with Au nanoparticles with a diameter of 10 nm. This synthetic route can produce uniform Au nanoparticles on CNF surfaces without using any additional chemicals to modify the AAO channels or the CNF surfaces.

  3. Synthesis of Carbon Nanofibers Based on Resol Type Phenol Resin and Fe(III) Catalysts

    Hyun, Yura; Lee, Changseop [Keimyung Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Haesik [Korea E and S Co. Ltd., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The carbon nanofibers (CNFs) used in this study were synthesized with an iron catalyst and ethylene as a carbon source. A concentration of 30 wt % iron(III) acetylacetonate was dissolved in resol type phenol resin and polyurethane foam was put into the solution. The sample was calendered after being cured at 80 .deg. C in air for 24 h. Stabilization and carbonization of the resol type phenol resin and reduction of the Fe{sup 3+} were completed in a high-temperature furnace by the following steps: heating to 600 .deg. C at a rate of 10 .deg. C/min with a mixture of H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} for 4 h to reduce the Fe{sup 3+} to Fe; heating to 1000 .deg. C in N{sub 2} at a rate 10 .deg. C/min for 30 minutes for pyrolysis; synthesizing CNFs in a mixture of 20.1% ethylene and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} at 700 .deg. C for 2 h using a CVD process. Finally, the structural characterization of the CNFs was performed by scanning electron microscopy and a synthesis analysis was carried out using energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Specific surface area analysis of the CNFs was also performed by N{sub 2}-sorption.

  4. In situ growth cupric oxide nanoparticles on carbon nanofibers for sensitive nonenzymatic sensing of glucose

    Highlights: • CuO nanoparticles were directly and homogeneously grown on carbon nanofibers. • The obtained nanocomposite showed high electrooxidize activity to glucose. • A nonenzymatic glucose sensor was constructed based on the functional nanocomposite. • This sensor showed good performance to glucose. • The proposed sensor was successfully applied in detection of glucose in blood serum. -- Abstract: A novel method was employed to directly and homogeneously attaching cupric oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) on carbon nanofibers (CNFs) for sensitive amperometric nonenzymatic sensing of glucose. The obtained CuONPs-CNFs nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The CuONPs-CNFs nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode showed high electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of glucose in alkaline media and a nonenzymatic glucose sensor was constructed based on the functional nanocomposite modified electrode. Under optimal experimental conditions, the designed sensor exhibited a wide linear response to glucose ranging from 5.0 × 10−7 to 1.1 × 10−2 M with a high sensitivity of 2739 μA mM−1 cm−2 and a low detection limit down to 0.2 μM at the signal to noise ratio of 3. This sensor showed good accuracy, acceptable precision and reproducibility. Moreover, the proposed sensor was successfully applied in the detection of glucose in human blood serum indicating its possibility in practical application

  5. Fabrication of a novel visible-light-driven photocatalyst Ag-AgI-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers

    Yu, Dandan; Bai, Jie, E-mail: baijie@imut.edu.cn; Liang, Haiou; Wang, Junzhong; Li, Chunping

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Visible-light-induced Ag-AgI-TiO{sub 2}/CNFs nanocomposites had been successfully prepared. • Ag-AgI-TiO{sub 2}/CNFs could be easily separated and recycled from an aqueous solution. • The application of CNFs acting as supporters made the photocatalysts have high adsorption capacity. • Ag-AgI-TiO{sub 2}/CNFs could efficiently degrade different organic dyes. - Abstract: Novel visible-light-driven photocatalysts Ag-AgI-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles embedded onto carbon nanofibers were successfully prepared. Electrospinning technology followed by high-temperature calcination was adopted for the fabrication of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) acting as a supporter. Ag-TiO{sub 2}/CNFs nanocomposites were prepared by combining in situ reduction with physical adsorption process. Ag-AgI-TiO{sub 2}/CNFs were synthesized by oxidizing some silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) contained in Ag-TiO{sub 2}/CNFs to silver iodine (AgI) via chemical oxidation method using iodine (I{sub 2}) as oxidation agents. The as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The as-fabricated Ag-AgI-TiO{sub 2}/CNFs showed high efficient adsorption and photocatalytic activity for decomposition of methyl orange (MO), acid red 18 (AR18), methylene blue (MB), and fluorescence sodium under visible light irradiation, which were attributed to the synergistic effects between the high adsorption capacity, good conductivity of carbon nanofibers, and the extraordinary plasma effect of Ag-AgI nanoparticles. In addition, the as-prepared composites could be easily separated from the solution phase due to the large length–diameter ratio of CNFs. The mechanism for the enhanced photocatalytic activity concerned with Ag-AgI-TiO{sub 2}/CNFs was proposed.

  6. Highly Flexible Freestanding Porous Carbon Nanofibers for Electrodes Materials of High-Performance All-Carbon Supercapacitors.

    Liu, Ying; Zhou, Jinyuan; Chen, Lulu; Zhang, Peng; Fu, Wenbin; Zhao, Hao; Ma, Yufang; Pan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhenxing; Han, Weihua; Xie, Erqing

    2015-10-28

    Highly flexible porous carbon nanofibers (P-CNFs) were fabricated by electrospining technique combining with metal ion-assistant acid corrosion process. The resultant fibers display high conductivity and outstanding mechanical flexibility, whereas little change in their resistance can be observed under repeatedly bending, even to 180°. Further results indicate that the improved flexibility of P-CNFs can be due to the high graphitization degree caused by Co ions. In view of electrode materials for high-performance supercapacitors, this type of porous nanostructure and high graphitization degree could synergistically facilitate the electrolyte ion diffusion and electron transportation. In the three electrodes testing system, the resultant P-CNFs electrodes can exhibit a specific capacitance of 104.5 F g(-1) (0.2 A g(-1)), high rate capability (remain 56.5% at 10 A g(-1)), and capacitance retention of ∼94% after 2000 cycles. Furthermore, the assembled symmetric supercapacitors showed a high flexibility and can deliver an energy density of 3.22 Wh kg(-1) at power density of 600 W kg(-1). This work might open a way to improve the mechanical properties of carbon fibers and suggests that this type of freestanding P-CNFs be used as effective electrode materials for flexible all-carbon supercapacitors. PMID:26449440

  7. Carbon-Nanofiber-Reinforced Syntactic Foams: Compressive Properties and Strain Rate Sensitivity

    Poveda, Ronald L.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2014-01-01

    The current study is focused on exploring the possibility of reinforcing syntactic foams with carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Syntactic foams are hollow, particle-filled composites that are widely used in marine structures and are now finding applications in other modes of transportation due to their high stiffness-to-weight ratio. The compressive properties of syntactic foams reinforced with CNFs are characterized over the strain rate range of 10-4 to 3,000 s-1, which covers seven orders of magnitude. The results show that despite lower density with respect to neat epoxy, CNF/syntactic foams can have up to 7.3% and 15.5% higher quasi-static compressive strength and modulus, respectively, for the compositions that were characterized in the current study. In addition, these properties can be tailored over a wide range by means of hollow particle wall thickness and volume fraction, and CNF volume fraction. The compressive strength of CNF/syntactic foams is also shown to generally increase by up to a factor of 3.41 with increasing strain rate when quasi-static and high-strain-rate testing data are compared. Extensive microscopy of the CNF/syntactic foams is conducted to understand the failure and energy absorption mechanisms. Crack bridging by CNFs is observed in the specimens, which can delay final failure and increase the energy absorption capacity of the specimens. Deformation of CNFs is also noticed in the material microstructure. The deformation and failure mechanisms of nanofibers are related to the test strain rate and the structure of CNFs.

  8. NiCu Alloy Nanoparticle-Loaded Carbon Nanofibers for Phenolic Biosensor Applications

    Dawei Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available NiCu alloy nanoparticle-loaded carbon nanofibers (NiCuCNFs were fabricated by a combination of electrospinning and carbonization methods. A series of characterizations, including SEM, TEM and XRD, were employed to study the NiCuCNFs. The as-prepared NiCuCNFs were then mixed with laccase (Lac and Nafion to form a novel biosensor. NiCuCNFs successfully achieved the direct electron transfer of Lac. Cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry were used to study the electrochemical properties of the biosensor. The finally prepared biosensor showed favorable electrocatalytic effects toward hydroquinone. The detection limit was 90 nM (S/N = 3, the sensitivity was 1.5 µA µM−1, the detection linear range was 4 × 10−7–2.37 × 10−6 M. In addition, this biosensor exhibited satisfactory repeatability, reproducibility, anti-interference properties and stability. Besides, the sensor achieved the detection of hydroquinone in lake water.

  9. NiCu Alloy Nanoparticle-Loaded Carbon Nanofibers for Phenolic Biosensor Applications.

    Li, Dawei; Lv, Pengfei; Zhu, Jiadeng; Lu, Yao; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xiangwu; Wei, Qufu

    2015-01-01

    NiCu alloy nanoparticle-loaded carbon nanofibers (NiCuCNFs) were fabricated by a combination of electrospinning and carbonization methods. A series of characterizations, including SEM, TEM and XRD, were employed to study the NiCuCNFs. The as-prepared NiCuCNFs were then mixed with laccase (Lac) and Nafion to form a novel biosensor. NiCuCNFs successfully achieved the direct electron transfer of Lac. Cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry were used to study the electrochemical properties of the biosensor. The finally prepared biosensor showed favorable electrocatalytic effects toward hydroquinone. The detection limit was 90 nM (S/N = 3), the sensitivity was 1.5 µA µM(-1), the detection linear range was 4 × 10(-7)-2.37 × 10(-6) M. In addition, this biosensor exhibited satisfactory repeatability, reproducibility, anti-interference properties and stability. Besides, the sensor achieved the detection of hydroquinone in lake water. PMID:26610505

  10. Hierarchical Graphene-Containing Carbon Nanofibers for Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    Dufficy, Martin K; Khan, Saad A; Fedkiw, Peter S

    2016-01-20

    We present a method to produce composite anodes consisting of thermally reduced graphene oxide-containing carbon nanofibers (TRGO/CNFs) via electrospinning a dispersion of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and graphene oxide (GO) sheets in dimethylformamide followed by heat treatment at 650 °C. A range of GO (1-20 wt % GO relative to polymer concentration) was added to the polymer solution, with each sample comprising similar polymer chain packing and subsequent CNF microstructure, as assessed by X-ray diffraction. An increase from 0 to 20 wt % GO in the fibers led to carbonized nonwovens with enhanced electronic conductivity, as TRGO sheets conductively connected the CNFs. Galvanostatic half-cell cycling revealed that TRGO addition enhanced the specific discharge capacity of the fibers. The optimal GO concentration of 5 wt % GO enhanced first-cycle discharge capacities at C/24 rates (15.6 mA g(-1)) 150% compared to CNFs, with a 400% capacity increase at 2-C rates (750 mA g(-1)). We attribute the capacity enhancement to a high degree of GO exfoliation. The TRGO/CNFs also experienced no capacity fade after 200 cycles at 2-C rates. Impedance spectroscopy of the composite anodes demonstrated that charge-transfer resistances decreased as GO content increased, implying that high GO loadings result in more electrochemically active material. PMID:26704705

  11. Effect of Sulfur Concentration on the Morphology of Carbon Nanofibers Produced from a Botanical Hydrocarbon

    Ghosh Kaushik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCarbon nanofibers (CNF with diameters of 20–130 nm with different morphologies were obtained from a botanical hydrocarbon: Turpentine oil, using ferrocene as catalyst source and sulfur as a promoter by simple spray pyrolysis method at 1,000 °C. The influence of sulfur concentration on the morphology of the carbon nanofibers was investigated. SEM, TEM, Raman, TGA/DTA, and BET surface area were employed to characterize the as-prepared samples. TEM analysis confirms that as-prepared CNFs have a very sharp tip, bamboo shape, open end, hemispherical cap, pipe like morphology, and metal particle trapped inside the wide hollow core. It is observed that sulfur plays an important role to promote or inhibit the CNF growth. Addition of sulfur to the solution of ferrocene and turpentine oil mixture was found to be very effective in promoting the growth of CNF. Without addition of sulfur, carbonaceous product was very less and mainly soot was formed. At high concentration of sulfur inhibit the growth of CNFs. Hence the yield of CNFs was optimized for a given sulfur concentration.

  12. Interweaved Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites as anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Graphical abstract: In summary, a serious of high-energy wet ball milling, closed spray drying and subsequent chemical vapor deposition methods were introduced successfully to fabricated novel Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites with carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibres interweaved with carbon coated silicon spherical composites as superior anodes in lithium-ion batteries. The core-shell structure of Si@C composites can accommodate the volume change of electrode during charge and discharge. Meanwhile, the citric acid pyrolyzed carbon was coated on the surface of the silicon perfectly and constructs the connection network of nano silicon particles. Moreover, the carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibres, which is interweaved with nano-silicon, also allows high electrical conductivity, improved solid–electrolyte interface formation and structural integrity. Compared with pure silicon and Si@C composites, the novel Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites had the best combination of reversible capacity and cycleablity, and this anode materials exhibited excellent electrochemical performance. The Si/C composite had a fairly high initial discharge capacity of 2168.7 mA h g−1 with an efficiency of 73%, and the discharge capacity of the 50th cycle maintained surprisingly of 1194.9 mA h g−1. Meanwhile, spray drying and chemical vapor deposition are environmentally friendly, economical, and relatively high-yield method for the production of the Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites in large quantities. Consequently, the novel Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composite electrodes may be a potential alternative to graphite for high energy density lithium ion batteries. Highlights: • The core/shell structured silicon/carbon composites were prepared by a facile way. • The as-prepared Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites shows excellent electrochemical performance. • The preparation method has mild experiment conditions and high production rate. • The structure benefited electronic transfer and accommodated volume expansion. -- Abstract: Novel silicon@ carbon/carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibres (Si@C/CNTs and CNFs) composites have been successfully synthesized by a serious of high-energy wet ball milling, closed spray drying and subsequently chemical vapor deposition methods, in which carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers are interweaved with carbon coated silicon (Si@C) spherical composites. As anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites demonstrate a high first discharge capacity and excellent cycle ability. The high initial specific discharge capacity is approximately 2169 mA h g−1 and a reversible specific capacity approached 1195 mA h g−1 after 50 cycles at a high current density of 300 mA g−1

  13. Anchoring Fe3O4 nanoparticles on three-dimensional carbon nanofibers toward flexible high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Wan, Yizao; Yang, Zhiwei; Xiong, Guangyao; Guo, Ruisong; Liu, Ze; Luo, Honglin

    2015-10-01

    There is growing interest in flexible, cost-effective, and binder-free energy storage devices to meet the special needs of modern electronic systems. Herein we report a general, scalable, eco-friendly, and cost-effective approach for the fabrication of nano-Fe3O4-anchored three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanofiber (CNFs) aerogels (Fe3O4@BC-CNFs). The preparation processes include the anchoring of Fe2O3 nanoparticles on bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers with intrinsic 3D network structure and subsequent carbonization at different temperatures. The aerogel carbonized at 600 °C (Fe3O4@BC-CNFs-600) is highly flexible and was directly used as working electrodes in lithium-ion batteries without metal current collectors, conducting additives, or binders. The Fe3O4@BC-CNFs-600 demonstrates greatly improved electrochemical performance in comparison to the bare Fe3O4 nanoparticles. In addition to its excellent flexibility, a stable capacity of 755 mAh g-1 for up to 80 cycles is also higher than most of carbon-Fe3O4 hybrids. The high reversible capacity and excellent rate capability are attributed to its 3D porous network structure with well-dispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surfaces of CNFs.

  14. Effects of Thickness and Amount of Carbon Nanofiber Coated Carbon Fiber on Improving the Mechanical Properties of Nanocomposites

    Ferial Ghaemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, carbon nanofibers (CNFs were grown on a carbon fiber (CF surface by using the chemical vapor deposition method (CVD and the influences of some parameters of the CVD method on improving the mechanical properties of a polypropylene (PP composite were investigated. To obtain an optimum surface area, thickness, and yield of the CNFs, the parameters of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD method, such as catalyst concentration, reaction temperature, reaction time, and hydrocarbon flow rate, were optimized. It was observed that the optimal surface area, thickness, and yield of the CNFs caused more adhesion of the fibers with the PP matrix, which enhanced the composite properties. Besides this, the effectiveness of reinforcement of fillers was fitted with a mathematical model obtaining good agreement between the experimental result and the theoretical prediction. By applying scanning electronic microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and Raman spectroscopy, the surface morphology and structural information of the resultant CF-CNF were analyzed. Additionally, SEM images and a mechanical test of the composite with a proper layer of CNFs on the CF revealed not only a compactness effect but also the thickness and surface area roles of the CNF layers in improving the mechanical properties of the composites.

  15. Adsorbents based on carbon microfibers and carbon nanofibers for the removal of phenol and lead from water.

    Chakraborty, Anindita; Deva, Dinesh; Sharma, Ashutosh; Verma, Nishith

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the production, characteristics, and efficacy of carbon microfibers and carbon nanofibers for the removal of phenol and Pb(2+) from water by adsorption. The first adsorbent produced in the current investigation contained the ammonia (NH(3)) functionalized micron-sized activated carbon fibers (ACF). Alternatively, the second adsorbent consisted of a multiscale web of ACF/CNF, which was prepared by growing carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on activated ACFs via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and sonication, which was conducted to remove catalytic particles from the CNF tips and open the pores of the CNFs. The two adsorbents prepared in the present study, ACF and ACF/CNF, were characterized by several analytical techniques, including SEM-EDX and FT-IR. Moreover, the chemical composition, BET surface area, and pore-size distribution of the materials were determined. The hierarchal web of carbon microfibers and nanofibers displayed a greater adsorption capacity for Pb(2+) than ACF. Interestingly, the adsorption capacity of ammonia (NH(3)) functionalized ACFs for phenol was somewhat larger than that of the multiscale ACF/CNF web. Difference in the adsorption capacity of the adsorbents was attributed to differences in the size of the solutes and their reactivity towards ACF and ACF/CNF. The results indicated that ACF-based materials were efficient adsorbents for the removal of inorganic and organic solutes from wastewater. PMID:21507421

  16. A Review on Nanomaterial Dispersion, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    Raul Fangueiro; Shama Parveen; Sohel Rana

    2013-01-01

    Excellent mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs) have motivated the development of advanced nanocomposites with outstanding and multifunctional properties. After achieving a considerable success in utilizing these unique materials in various polymeric matrices, recently tremendous interest is also being noticed on developing CNT and CNF reinforced cement-based composites. However, the problems related to nanomaterial dispersion also exi...

  17. In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/carbon nanofibers/Au ternary synergetic system: Hierarchical assembly and enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity

    Zhang, Xin; Shao, Changlu, E-mail: clshao@nenu.edu.cn; Li, Xinghua, E-mail: lixh781@nenu.edu.cn; Lu, Na; Wang, Kexin; Miao, Fujun; Liu, Yichun

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: We describe a route to synthesize In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/CNFs/Au ternary synergetic system with high efficiency visible-light photocatalytic activity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/CNFs/Au ternary synergetic system. • Enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity. • Easy photocatalyst separation and reuse. - Abstract: In this paper, carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were successfully synthesized by electrospinning technique. Next, Au nanoparticles (NPs) were assembled on the electrospun CNFs through in situ reduction method. By using the obtained Au NPs modified CNFs (CNFs/Au) as hard template, the In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/CNFs/Au composites were synthesized through hydrothermal technique. The results showed that the super long one-dimensional (1D) CNFs (about 306 nm in average diameter) were well connected to form a nanofibrous network; and, the Au NPs with 18 nm in average diameter and In{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanosheets with 5–10 nm in thickness were uniformly grown onto the surface of CNFs. Photocatalytic studies revealed that the In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/CNFs/Au composites exhibited highest visible-light photocatalytic activities for the degradation of Rhodamine B (RB) compared with pure In{sub 2}S{sub 3} and In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/CNFs. The enhanced photocatalytic activity might arise from the high separation efficiency of photogenerated electron–hole pairs based on the positive synergetic effect between In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, CNFs and Au components in this ternary photocatalytic system. Meanwhile, the In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/CNFs/Au composites with hierarchical structure possess a strong adsorption ability towards organic dyes, which also contributed to the enhancement of photocatalytic activity. Moreover, the In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/CNFs/Au composites could be recycled easily by sedimentation due to their nanofibrous network structure.

  18. Characteristics and Electrochemical Performance of Si-Carbon Nanofibers Composite as Anode Material for Binder-Free Lithium Secondary Batteries.

    Hyun, Yura; Park, Heai-Ku; Park, Ho-Seon; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-11-01

    The carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and Si-CNFs composite were synthesized using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method with an iron-copper catalyst and silicon-covered Ni foam. Acetylene as a carbon source was flowed into the quartz reactor of a tubular furnace heated to 600 degrees C. This temperature was maintained for 10 min to synthesize the CNFs. The morphologies, compositions, and crystal quality of the prepared CNFs were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical characteristics of the Si-CNFs composite as an anode of the Li secondary batteries were investigated using a three-electrode cell. The as-deposited Si-CNF composite on the Ni foam was directly employed as an working electrode without any binder, and lithium foil was used as the counter and reference electrode. A glass fiber separator was used as the separator membrane. Two kinds of electrolytes were employed; 1) 1 M LiPF6 was dissolved in a mixture of EC (ethylene carbonate): PC (propylene carbonate): EMC (Ethyl methyl carbonate) in a 1:1:1 volume ratio and 2) 1 M LiClO4 was dissolved in a mixture of propylene carbonate (PC): ethylene carbonate (EC) in a 1:1 volume ratio. The galvanostatic charge-discharge cycling and cyclic voltammetry measurements were carried out at room temperature by using a battery tester. The resulting Si-CNFs composite achieved the large discharge capacity of 613 mAh/g and much improved cycle-ability with the retention rate of 87% after 20 cycles. PMID:26726625

  19. Immobilization of WO3 or MoO3 on macroscopic silica fiber via CNFs template

    Graphical abstract: Uniform immobilization of tungsten trioxide (WO3) or molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) on silica fiber was successfully achieved by using carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as template. FE-SEM coupled with XRD analysis confirmed the template effect and the existence of WO3 or MoO3 immobilized on silica fiber. It is expected that such materials with direct macroscopic shapes would hold promise as highly functionalized materials for potential practical applications, especially in photocatalysis. - Highlights: • WO3 or MoO3 with macroscopic shapes were successfully obtained. • WO3 and MoO3 immobilization depended on CNFs templates. • FE-SEM and XRD confirmed the structure and phase composition. - Abstract: Uniform immobilization of tungsten trioxide (WO3) or molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) on silica fiber was successfully achieved by using carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as template. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), coupled with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the template effect and the existence of WO3 or MoO3 immobilized on silica fiber. It is expected that such materials with direct macroscopic shapes would hold promise as highly functionalized materials for potential practical applications, especially in photocatalysis

  20. A fine-focusing x-ray source using carbon-nanofiber field emitter

    Sugimoto, W.; Sugita, S.; Sakai, Y.; Goto, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohga, Y.; Kita, S.; Ohara, T.

    2010-08-01

    A fine-focusing x-ray source has been constructed employing a field electron emitter prepared by growing carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) on a metal tip. The x-ray source is composed of a CNF field electron emitter, an electrostatic lens, two magnetic lenses, and a W-target for generating x-rays by electron impact. The CNFs provided field electrons with a current density of J 5109 A/m2, which was evaluated with the aid of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron beam extracted from the CNF emitter was accelerated to the energies of E =10-25 keV, and then focused by the lenses. By recording the x-ray images of test charts, the optimum resolution of the x-ray source was estimated to be approximately Dx=0.5 ?m.

  1. A fine-focusing x-ray source using carbon-nanofiber field emitter

    A fine-focusing x-ray source has been constructed employing a field electron emitter prepared by growing carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) on a metal tip. The x-ray source is composed of a CNF field electron emitter, an electrostatic lens, two magnetic lenses, and a W-target for generating x-rays by electron impact. The CNFs provided field electrons with a current density of J?5x109 A/m2, which was evaluated with the aid of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron beam extracted from the CNF emitter was accelerated to the energies of E=10-25 keV, and then focused by the lenses. By recording the x-ray images of test charts, the optimum resolution of the x-ray source was estimated to be approximately Dx=0.5 ?m.

  2. Fabrication and Properties of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate-Carbon Nanofiber Nanocomposites

    George JinuJacob

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanofiber (CNF is one of the stiffest materials produced commercially, having excellent mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. The reinforcement of rubbery matrices by CNFs was studied in the case of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA. The tensile strength was greatly (61% increased, even for very low fiber content (i.e., 1.0 wt.%. The surface modification of the fiber by high energy electron beam and gamma irradiation led to better dispersion in the rubber matrix. This in turn gave rise to further improvements in mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties of EVA. The thermal conductivity also exhibited improvements from that of the neat elastomer, although thermal stability of the nanocomposites was not significantly altered by the functionalization of CNFs. Various results were well supported by the morphological analysis of the nanocomposites.

  3. Sensitivity of Dielectric Properties to Wear Process on Carbon Nanofiber/High-Density Polyethylene Composites

    Liu, Tian; Wood, Weston; Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-12-01

    We examined the correlation of wear effects with dielectric properties of carbon nanofibers (CNFs; untreated and organosilane-treated)-reinforced high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. Wear testing for the nanocomposites over up to 120 h was carried out, and then, dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss factor of the polymer composites with the increased wear time were studied. Scanning electron microscope and optical microscope observations were made to analyze the microstructure features of the nanocomposites. The results reveal that there exist approximate linear relationships of permittivity with wear coefficient for the nanocomposites. Composites containing silanized CNFs with the sufficiently thick coating exhibited high wear resistance. The change in permittivity was more sensitive to the increased wear coefficient for the nanocomposites with lower wear resistance. This work provides potential for further research on the application of dielectric signals to detect the effects of wear process on lifetime of polymeric materials.

  4. Optical limiting of high-repetition-rate laser pulses by carbon nanofibers suspended in polydimethylsiloxane

    Videnichev, Dmitry A.; Belousova, Inna M.

    2014-06-01

    The optical limiting (OL) behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was studied and compared with that of CNFs in water, and polyhedral multi-shell fullerene-like nanostructures (PMFNs) also in water. It was shown that when switching from single-shot to pulse-periodic regime of laser pulses (10 Hz), the CNF in PDMS suspension retains its OL characteristics, while in the aqueous suspensions, considerable degradation of OL characteristics is observed. It was also observed that a powerful laser pulse causes the CNF in PDMS suspension to become opaque for at least three seconds, while such a pulse brings out a bleaching effect in aqueous PMFN and CNF suspensions. The processes of OL degradation in aqueous suspensions, bleaching and darkening of the studied materials are discussed herein.

  5. In situ characterization of vertically oriented carbon nanofibers for three-dimensional nano-electro-mechanical device applications

    We have performed mechanical and electrical characterization of individual as-grown, vertically oriented carbon nanofibers (CNFs) using in situ techniques, where such high-aspect-ratio, nanoscale structures are of interest for three-dimensional (3D) electronics, in particular 3D nano-electro-mechanical-systems (NEMS). Nanoindentation and uniaxial compression tests conducted in an in situ nanomechanical instrument, SEMentor, suggest that the CNFs undergo severe bending prior to fracture, which always occurs close to the bottom rather than at the substrate-tube interface, suggesting that the CNFs are well adhered to the substrate. This is also consistent with bending tests on individual tubes which indicated that bending angles as large as ? 700 could be accommodated elastically. In situ electrical transport measurements revealed that the CNFs grown on refractory metallic nitride buffer layers were conducting via the sidewalls, whereas those synthesized directly on Si were electrically unsuitable for low-voltage dc NEMS applications. Electrostatic actuation was also demonstrated with a nanoprobe in close proximity to a single CNF and suggests that such structures are attractive for nonvolatile memory applications. Since the magnitude of the actuation voltage is intimately dictated by the physical characteristics of the CNFs, such as diameter and length, we also addressed the ability to tune these parameters, to some extent, by adjusting the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition growth parameters with this bottom-up synthesis approach.

  6. Metal-Support Interactions of Platinum Nanoparticles Decorated N-Doped Carbon Nanofibers for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Melke, Julia; Peter, Benedikt; Habereder, Anja; Ziegler, Juergen; Fasel, Claudia; Nefedov, Alexei; Sezen, Hikmet; Wll, Christof; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Roth, Christina

    2016-01-13

    N-doped carbon materials are discussed as catalyst supports for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. This work deals with the preparation of Pt nanoparticles (NPs) supported on N-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNF) from a polyaniline nanofiber (PANI NF) precursor, and investigates the ORR activity of the produced materials. Initially, Pt NPs are deposited on PANI NFs. The PANI NF precursors are characterized by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. It is shown, that in the PANI NF precursor materials electrons from the Pt are being transferred toward the ?-conjugated systems of the aromatic ring. This strong interaction of Pt atoms with PANI explains the high dispersion of Pt NPs on the PANI NF. Subsequently, the PANI NF precursors are carbonized at different heat-treatment conditions resulting in structurally different N-CNFs which are characterized by NEXAFS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) ,and TEM measurements. It is shown that an interaction between N-groups and Pt NPs exists in all investigated N-CNFs. However, the N-CNFs differ in the composition of the N-species and the dispersion of the Pt NPs. A small mean Pt NP size with a narrow size distribution is attributed to the presence of pyrdinic N-groups in the N-CNFs, whereas, for the N-CNFs with mainly graphitic and pyrrolic N-groups, an increase in the average Pt NP size with a broad size distribution is found. The ORR activity in alkaline media investigated by Koutecky-Levich analysis of rotating disk electrode measurements showed a largely enhanced ORR activity in comparison to a conventional Pt/C catalyst. PMID:26673813

  7. Carbon Nanofiber/3D Nanoporous Silicon Hybrids as High Capacity Lithium Storage Materials.

    Park, Hyeong-Il; Sohn, Myungbeom; Kim, Dae Sik; Park, Cheolho; Choi, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Hansu

    2016-04-21

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF)/3D nanoporous (3DNP) Si hybrid materials were prepared by chemical etching of melt-spun Si/Al-Cu-Fe alloy nanocomposites, followed by carbonization using a pitch. CNFs were successfully grown on the surface of 3DNP Si particles using residual Fe impurities after acidic etching, which acted as a catalyst for the growth of CNFs. The resulting CNF/3DNP Si hybrid materials showed an enhanced cycle performance up to 100 cycles compared to that of the pristine Si/Al-Cu-Fe alloy nanocomposite as well as that of bare 3DNP Si particles. These results indicate that CNFs and the carbon coating layer have a beneficial effect on the capacity retention characteristics of 3DNP Si particles by providing continuous electron-conduction pathways in the electrode during cycling. The approach presented here provides another way to improve the electrochemical performances of porous Si-based high capacity anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. PMID:26970098

  8. Effects of vapor grown carbon nanofibers on electrical and mechanical properties of a thermoplastic elastomer

    Basaldua, Daniel Thomas

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF) reinforced composites are exceptional materials that exhibit superior properties compared to conventional composites. This paper presents the development of a vapor grown carbon nanofiber (VGCNF) thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composite by a melt mixing process. Dispersion and distribution of CNFs inside the TPU matrix were examined through scanning electron microscopy to determine homogeneity. The composite material underwent durometer, thermal gravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, heat transfer, hysteresis, dynamic modulus, creep, tensile, abrasion, and electrical conductivity testing to characterize its properties and predict behavior. The motivation for this research is to develop an elastomer pad that is an electrically conductive alternative to the elastomer pads currently used in railroad service. The material had to be a completely homogenous electrically conductive CNF composite that could withstand a harsh dynamically loaded environment. The new material meets mechanical and conductive requirements for use as an elastomer pad in a rail suspension.

  9. Bimetal (Ni-Co) nanoparticles-incorporated electrospun carbon nanofibers as an alternative counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Rameez, Md.; Saranya, K.; Subramania, A.; Sivasankar, N.; Mallick, S.

    2016-02-01

    Counter electrode (CE) plays an important role in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Electron transfer from external circuit to redox couple is mediated and facilitated by it to complete the DSSC circuit. Platinum (Pt) is widely employed as CE in DSSCs. However, due to its high cost and scarcity, efforts are being made to replace Pt. In this study, a bimetal (Ni-Co) nanoparticles-incorporated carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are prepared by electrospinning technique and used as CE material for DSSC applications. The morphology of prepared CNFs is characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope studies. The structural properties are confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy studies. The electrochemical characterization of Ni-Co nanoparticles-incorporated CNFs is carried out using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance and Tafel polarization studies and compared with CNFs and std. Pt. The photo-conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSC assembled with Ni-Co nanoparticles-incorporated CNFs as CE is very nearer to that of the same assembled with std. Pt as CE. Hence, Ni-Co nanoparticles-incorporated CNFs can be used as a cost-effective alternative CE for DSSCs.

  10. Enhanced Activity and Selectivity of Carbon Nanofiber Supported Pd Catalysts for Nitrite Reduction

    Shuai, Danmeng

    2012-03-06

    Pd-based catalyst treatment represents an emerging technology that shows promise to remove nitrate and nitrite from drinking water. In this work we use vapor-grown carbon nanofiber (CNF) supports in order to explore the effects of Pd nanoparticle size and interior versus exterior loading on nitrite reduction activity and selectivity (i.e., dinitrogen over ammonia production). Results show that nitrite reduction activity increases by 3.1-fold and selectivity decreases by 8.0-fold, with decreasing Pd nanoparticle size from 1.4 to 9.6 nm. Both activity and selectivity are not significantly influenced by Pd interior versus exterior CNF loading. Consequently, turnover frequencies (TOFs) among all CNF catalysts are similar, suggesting nitrite reduction is not sensitive to Pd location on CNFs nor Pd structure. CNF-based catalysts compare favorably to conventional Pd catalysts (i.e., Pd on activated carbon or alumina) with respect to nitrite reduction activity and selectivity, and they maintain activity over multiple reduction cycles. Hence, our results suggest new insights that an optimum Pd nanoparticle size on CNFs balances faster kinetics with lower ammonia production, that catalysts can be tailored at the nanoscale to improve catalytic performance for nitrite, and that CNFs hold promise as highly effective catalyst supports in drinking water treatment. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. Carbon Nanofibers and Their Composites: A Review of Synthesizing, Properties and Applications

    Lichao Feng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofiber (CNF, as one of the most important members of carbon fibers, has been investigated in both fundamental scientific research and practical applications. CNF composites are able to be applied as promising materials in many fields, such as electrical devices, electrode materials for batteries and supercapacitors and as sensors. In these applications, the electrical conductivity is always the first priority need to be considered. In fact, the electrical property of CNF composites largely counts on the dispersion and percolation status of CNFs in matrix materials. In this review, the electrical transport phenomenon of CNF composites is systematically summarized based on percolation theory. The effects of the aspect ratio, percolation backbone structure and fractal characteristics of CNFs and the non-universality of the percolation critical exponents on the electrical properties are systematically reviewed. Apart from the electrical property, the thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of CNF composites are briefly reviewed, as well. In addition, the preparation methods of CNFs, including catalytic chemical vapor deposition growth and electrospinning, and the preparation methods of CNF composites, including the melt mixing and solution process, are briefly introduced. Finally, their applications as sensors and electrode materials are described in this review article.

  12. How do vapor grown carbon nanofibers nucleate and grow from deoiled asphalt?

    Research highlights: → A modified growth mechanism of carbon nanofibers was proposed. → Growth process includes (1) pyrolysis and aggregation, (2) nucleation, coalescence and self-assembly and (3) deveplopment and maturation. → The nucleation and rearrangement of graphitic layers depend on the crystal orientation of the metal nanoparticles. - Abstract: During the experiments aimed at understanding the evolution mechanism by which vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCNFs) nucleate and grow, a series of carbon nanomaterials were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using deoiled asphalt (DOA) as carbon source and ferrocene as catalyst precursor with an experimental strategy developed to quench the CVD at different deposition times (3-30 min). The morphology and microstructure of the products were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope, high resolution transmission electron microscope and X-ray powder diffractometer. The formation of hollow/metal-encapsulating carbon nanoparticles at short deposition time (3 min) of CVD and the subsequent evolution of these nanoparticles into carbon nanotubes/nanofibers at longer deposition time suggest a multi-step growth model for VGCNFs, which includes the stages of (1) pyrolysis and aggregation, (2) nucleation, coalescence and self-assembly, and (3) development and maturation. At first, C, Fe and Fe/C clusters are produced by decomposition and agglomeration of C and Fe species from the pyrolysis of DOA and ferrocene; second, the carbon nanoparticles are self-assembled into nanowires with dispersive metal nanoparticles, which are further developed into nanotubes for structural stability and minimum surface energy, meanwhile fishbone-like CNFs might be formed by rearranging carbon layers at an angle against the tube axis under the nucleation of small graphitic layers on certain crystal orientation of the metal particles; finally, CNFs are formed by the synergistic action of metal catalysis and continuous rearrangement of graphitic layers.

  13. How do vapor grown carbon nanofibers nucleate and grow from deoiled asphalt?

    Yang Yongzhen [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Liu Xuguang, E-mail: liuxuguang@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Jia Husheng; Xu Bingshe [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials (Taiyuan University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} A modified growth mechanism of carbon nanofibers was proposed. {yields} Growth process includes (1) pyrolysis and aggregation, (2) nucleation, coalescence and self-assembly and (3) deveplopment and maturation. {yields} The nucleation and rearrangement of graphitic layers depend on the crystal orientation of the metal nanoparticles. - Abstract: During the experiments aimed at understanding the evolution mechanism by which vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCNFs) nucleate and grow, a series of carbon nanomaterials were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using deoiled asphalt (DOA) as carbon source and ferrocene as catalyst precursor with an experimental strategy developed to quench the CVD at different deposition times (3-30 min). The morphology and microstructure of the products were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope, high resolution transmission electron microscope and X-ray powder diffractometer. The formation of hollow/metal-encapsulating carbon nanoparticles at short deposition time (3 min) of CVD and the subsequent evolution of these nanoparticles into carbon nanotubes/nanofibers at longer deposition time suggest a multi-step growth model for VGCNFs, which includes the stages of (1) pyrolysis and aggregation, (2) nucleation, coalescence and self-assembly, and (3) development and maturation. At first, C, Fe and Fe/C clusters are produced by decomposition and agglomeration of C and Fe species from the pyrolysis of DOA and ferrocene; second, the carbon nanoparticles are self-assembled into nanowires with dispersive metal nanoparticles, which are further developed into nanotubes for structural stability and minimum surface energy, meanwhile fishbone-like CNFs might be formed by rearranging carbon layers at an angle against the tube axis under the nucleation of small graphitic layers on certain crystal orientation of the metal particles; finally, CNFs are formed by the synergistic action of metal catalysis and continuous rearrangement of graphitic layers.

  14. Direct synthesis of mesostructured carbon nanofibers decorated with silver-nanoparticles as a multifunctional membrane for water treatment

    Aboueloyoun Taha, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    One-dimensional (1D) porous carbon nanofibers (CNFs) decorated by silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared using a one-pot/self-template synthesis strategy by combining electrospinning and carbonization methods. The characterization results revealed that AgNPs were homogenously distributed along the CNFs and possessed a relatively uniform nano-size of about 12 nm. The novel membrane distinctively displayed enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation. The membrane exhibited excellent dye degradation and bacteria disinfection in batch experiments. The high photocatalytic activity can be attributed to the highly accessible surface areas, good light absorption capability, and high separation efficiency of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. The as-prepared membranes can be easily recycled because of their 1D property.

  15. Activated carbon nanofibers (ACNF) as cathode for single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs)

    Santoro, Carlo; Stadlhofer, Astrid; Hacker, Viktor; Squadrito, Gaetano; Schrder, Uwe; Li, Baikun

    2013-12-01

    The suitability of carbon nanofibers (CNF) based cathodes as alternative to the platinum (Pt)-based cathode in single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs) were extensively studied over 3-month operational period. MFCs were fed with two solutions: synthetic wastewater (phosphate buffer (PBS) plus sodium acetate) and real wastewater (mixed liquor suspendedsolid (MLSS) solution). CNFs were chemically activated using HNO3 and then hot pressed on a carbon cloth support to increase surface area. The cathode polarization showed a better behavior of the clean Pt-based cathode in abiotic conditions. The activation of the nanofibers (ACNFs) gave an advantage to the cathode performances compared to the raw CNFs. The SCMFCs fed with PBS showed four times higher power generation compared to MLSS solution. All the cathodes showed a decrease in performances over time, and the advantage of the Pt over CNF/ACNF disappeared. CNF/ACNF cathodes showed more stability in performances in long time operations. Biofilm formation, salt precipitations on the cathode, and the presence of hydrogen sulfide decreased the activity of Pt cathodes. A degradation and Pt detachment were noticed on Pt cathodes over time. In contrast, CNF/ACNF cathodes exhibited less deterioration throughout the operational period, which demonstrated a great potential as cost-effective cathodes for long-term operation.

  16. Lithium aluminosilicate reinforced with carbon nanofiber and alumina for controlled-thermal-expansion materials

    Borrell, Amparo; García-Moreno, Olga; Torrecillas, Ramón; García-Rocha, Victoria; Fernández, Adolfo

    2012-02-01

    Materials with a very low or tailored thermal expansion have many applications ranging from cookware to the aerospace industry. Among others, lithium aluminosilicates (LAS) are the most studied family with low and negative thermal expansion coefficients. However, LAS materials are electrical insulators and have poor mechanical properties. Nanocomposites using LAS as a matrix are promising in many applications where special properties are achieved by the addition of one or two more phases. The main scope of this work is to study the sinterability of carbon nanofiber (CNFs)/LAS and CNFs/alumina/LAS nanocomposites, and to adjust the ratio among components for obtaining a near-zero or tailored thermal expansion. Spark plasma sintering of nanocomposites, consisting of commercial CNFs and alumina powders and an ad hoc synthesized β-eucryptite phase, is proposed as a solution to improving mechanical and electrical properties compared with the LAS ceramics obtained under the same conditions. X-ray diffraction results on phase compositions and microstructure are discussed together with dilatometry data obtained in a wide temperature range (-150 to 450 °C). The use of a ceramic LAS phase makes it possible to design a nanocomposite with a very low or tailored thermal expansion coefficient and exceptional electrical and mechanical properties.

  17. Lithium aluminosilicate reinforced with carbon nanofiber and alumina for controlled-thermal-expansion materials

    Materials with a very low or tailored thermal expansion have many applications ranging from cookware to the aerospace industry. Among others, lithium aluminosilicates (LAS) are the most studied family with low and negative thermal expansion coefficients. However, LAS materials are electrical insulators and have poor mechanical properties. Nanocomposites using LAS as a matrix are promising in many applications where special properties are achieved by the addition of one or two more phases. The main scope of this work is to study the sinterability of carbon nanofiber (CNFs)/LAS and CNFs/alumina/LAS nanocomposites, and to adjust the ratio among components for obtaining a near-zero or tailored thermal expansion. Spark plasma sintering of nanocomposites, consisting of commercial CNFs and alumina powders and an ad hoc synthesized β-eucryptite phase, is proposed as a solution to improving mechanical and electrical properties compared with the LAS ceramics obtained under the same conditions. X-ray diffraction results on phase compositions and microstructure are discussed together with dilatometry data obtained in a wide temperature range (−150 to 450 °C). The use of a ceramic LAS phase makes it possible to design a nanocomposite with a very low or tailored thermal expansion coefficient and exceptional electrical and mechanical properties.

  18. Lithium aluminosilicate reinforced with carbon nanofiber and alumina for controlled-thermal-expansion materials

    Amparo Borrell, Olga García-Moreno, Ramón Torrecillas, Victoria García-Rocha and Adolfo Fernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials with a very low or tailored thermal expansion have many applications ranging from cookware to the aerospace industry. Among others, lithium aluminosilicates (LAS are the most studied family with low and negative thermal expansion coefficients. However, LAS materials are electrical insulators and have poor mechanical properties. Nanocomposites using LAS as a matrix are promising in many applications where special properties are achieved by the addition of one or two more phases. The main scope of this work is to study the sinterability of carbon nanofiber (CNFs/LAS and CNFs/alumina/LAS nanocomposites, and to adjust the ratio among components for obtaining a near-zero or tailored thermal expansion. Spark plasma sintering of nanocomposites, consisting of commercial CNFs and alumina powders and an ad hoc synthesized β-eucryptite phase, is proposed as a solution to improving mechanical and electrical properties compared with the LAS ceramics obtained under the same conditions. X-ray diffraction results on phase compositions and microstructure are discussed together with dilatometry data obtained in a wide temperature range (−150 to 450 °C. The use of a ceramic LAS phase makes it possible to design a nanocomposite with a very low or tailored thermal expansion coefficient and exceptional electrical and mechanical properties.

  19. Free-standing anode of N-doped carbon nanofibers containing SnOx for high-performance lithium batteries

    Highlights: • Self-standing SnOx N-CNF electrodes were synthesized by electrospinning. • The SnOx N-CNFs anode exhibits high capacity, good cyclic stability, and excellent rate performance for lithium ion batteries. • The enhanced performance is ascribed to the synergetic effects between N-CNFs and SnOx nanoparticles. - Abstract: Free-standing paper of N-doped carbon nanofibers (NCNFs) containing SnOx was prepared by electrospinning. The structure and morphology of the sample were analyzed by XRD, XPS, SEM, and TEM. The results show that nitrogen atoms were successfully doped into CNFs. The SnOx were homogenously embedded in the N-doped CNFs via annealing treatment. Subsequently, the SnOx NCNF paper was cut into disks and used as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The anodes of SnOx NCNFs exhibit excellent cycling stability and show high capacity of 520 mA h g−1 tested at a 200 mA g−1 after 100 cycles. More importantly, at a high current density of 500 mA g−1, a large reversible capacity of 430 mA h g−1 after 100 cycles can still be obtained. The good electrochemical performance should be attributed to the good electronic conductivity from the NCNFs and the synergistic effects from NCNFs and SnOx materials

  20. Single-step synthesis of graphene-carbon nanofiber hybrid material and its synergistic magnetic behaviour

    Sahoo, R.K. [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Jeyapandiarajan, P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Devi Chandrasekhar, K. [Cryogenics Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Daniel, B.S.S. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Venimadhav, A. [Cryogenics Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Sant, S.B. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Jacob, C., E-mail: cxj14_holiday@yahoo.com [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Graphene-CNF-alloy nanoparticle hybrid nanostructure fabricated using CVD. • The hybrid consists of highly crystalline graphene, alloy nanoparticles and CNFs. • The hybrid carbon nanomaterial exhibits interesting induced magnetism. - Abstract: Graphene-carbon nanofiber (CNF) hybrid materials were synthesized by a simple one-step chemical vapour deposition method using propane over a Co{sub 63}Ni{sub 37} alloy catalyst supported on a silicon substrate at 800 °C. The process involves catalyst de-wetting, carbon diffusion and precipitation, with the additional carbon being provided by the polymer (photo-resist, HPR-504). The formation of a graphene-CNF hybrid structure was observed in the presence of the polymer. The polymer plays a crucial role in the formation of the flat carbon nanostructures. In the absence of the polymer, only carbon nanotube growth was observed with the same catalyst under identical experimental conditions. The effect of the polymeric photo-resist layer on the growth of the hybrid structure was analyzed. Structural and morphological data in combination with the Raman spectroscopic data confirmed the formation of a few layers of highly crystalline graphene and CNFs in a hybrid structure. The magnetic behaviour of these as-grown graphene-CNF hybrid samples has been analyzed by using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The results from the magnetic measurements on these samples have also been discussed.

  1. Damping Augmentation of Nanocomposites Using Carbon Nanofiber Paper

    Jihua Gou; Scott O'Braint; Haichang Gu; Gangbing Song

    2006-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process was used to fabricate the nanocomposites through integrating carbon nanofiber paper into traditional glass fiber reinforced composites. The carbon nanofiber paper had a porous structure with highly entangled carbon nanofibers and short glass fibers. In this study, the carbon nanofiber paper was employed as an interlayer and surface layer of composite laminates to enhance the damping properties. Experiments conducted using the nanocomposit...

  2. Using Converter Dust to Produce Low Cost Cementitious Composites by in situ Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Synthesis

    Pter Ludvig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs and nanofibers (CNFs were synthesized on clinker and silica fume particles in order to create a low cost cementitious nanostructured material. The synthesis was carried out by an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD process using converter dust, an industrial byproduct, as iron precursor. The use of these materials reduces the cost, with the objective of application in large-scale nanostructured cement production. The resulting products were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and were found to be polydisperse in size and to have defective microstructure. Some enhancement in the mechanical behavior of cement mortars was observed due to the addition of these nano-size materials. The contribution of these CNTs/CNFs to the mechanical strength of mortar specimens is similar to that of high quality CNTs incorporated in mortars by physical mixture.

  3. Surface morphology and field emission characteristics of carbon nanofiber films grown by chemical vapor deposition on alloy catalyst

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF) films have been successfully grown on Pd-Se, Fe-Ni, and Ni-Cu alloy catalysts at low temperatures by a thermal chemical vapor deposition method. Among these alloy catalysts, Ni-Cu alloy catalyst was found to be most suitable for low temperature growth of CNF (400 deg. C). Using Pd-Se and Fe-Ni alloy catalysts, CNFs were grown at the lowest temperature of 500 deg. C. The CNFs grown using Pd-Se catalyst were found to have more defective structure than that obtained with the other catalysts, and exhibited excellent field emission property (threshold field is estimated about 1.1 V/mm). It is likely that defects play a role as electron emission sites

  4. Electrical resistance of carbon-nanofiber concrete

    Concrete is the most widely used construction material, and carbon nanofibers have many advantages in both mechanical and electrical properties such as high strength, high Young's modulus and high conductivity. In this paper, the mechanical and electrical properties of concrete containing carbon nanofibers (CNF) are experimentally studied. The test results indicate that the compressive strength and per cent reduction in electrical resistance while loading concrete containing CNF are much greater than those of plain concrete. Finally, a reasonable concentration of CNF is obtained for use in concrete which not only enhances compressive strength, but also improves the electrical properties required for strain monitoring, damage evaluation and self-health monitoring of concrete

  5. Label-Free Detection of Cardiac Troponin-I Using Carbon Nanofiber Based Nanoelectrode Arrays

    Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Koehne, Jessica Erin; Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Meyyappan, M.

    2013-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. A carbon nanofiber (CNF) multiplexed array has been fabricated with 9 sensing pads, each containing 40,000 carbon nanofibers as nanoelectrodes. Here, we report the use of vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for the detection of cardiac Troponin-I for the early diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Antibody, antitroponin, probe immobilization and subsequent binding to human cardiac troponin-I were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry techniques. Each step of the modification process resulted in changes in electrical capacitance or resistance to charge transfer due to the changes at the electrode surface upon antibody immobilization and binding to the specific antigen. This sensor demonstrates high sensitivity, down to 0.2 ng/mL, and good selectivity making this platform a good candidate for early stage diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  6. Interweaved Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites as anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Zhang, Miao [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Hou, Xianhua, E-mail: houxh@scnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Jie; Li, Min [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Hu, Shejun [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Engineering Research Center of Materials and Technology for Electrochemical Energy Storage Ministry of Education, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Shao, Zongping [Nanjing University of Technology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing 210009 (China); Liu, Xiang [Institute of Advanced Materials, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-03-05

    Graphical abstract: In summary, a serious of high-energy wet ball milling, closed spray drying and subsequent chemical vapor deposition methods were introduced successfully to fabricated novel Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites with carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibres interweaved with carbon coated silicon spherical composites as superior anodes in lithium-ion batteries. The core-shell structure of Si@C composites can accommodate the volume change of electrode during charge and discharge. Meanwhile, the citric acid pyrolyzed carbon was coated on the surface of the silicon perfectly and constructs the connection network of nano silicon particles. Moreover, the carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibres, which is interweaved with nano-silicon, also allows high electrical conductivity, improved solidelectrolyte interface formation and structural integrity. Compared with pure silicon and Si@C composites, the novel Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites had the best combination of reversible capacity and cycleablity, and this anode materials exhibited excellent electrochemical performance. The Si/C composite had a fairly high initial discharge capacity of 2168.7 mA h g{sup ?1} with an efficiency of 73%, and the discharge capacity of the 50th cycle maintained surprisingly of 1194.9 mA h g{sup ?1}. Meanwhile, spray drying and chemical vapor deposition are environmentally friendly, economical, and relatively high-yield method for the production of the Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites in large quantities. Consequently, the novel Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composite electrodes may be a potential alternative to graphite for high energy density lithium ion batteries. Highlights: The core/shell structured silicon/carbon composites were prepared by a facile way. The as-prepared Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites shows excellent electrochemical performance. The preparation method has mild experiment conditions and high production rate. The structure benefited electronic transfer and accommodated volume expansion. -- Abstract: Novel silicon@ carbon/carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibres (Si@C/CNTs and CNFs) composites have been successfully synthesized by a serious of high-energy wet ball milling, closed spray drying and subsequently chemical vapor deposition methods, in which carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers are interweaved with carbon coated silicon (Si@C) spherical composites. As anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the Si@C/CNTs and CNFs composites demonstrate a high first discharge capacity and excellent cycle ability. The high initial specific discharge capacity is approximately 2169 mA h g{sup ?1} and a reversible specific capacity approached 1195 mA h g{sup ?1} after 50 cycles at a high current density of 300 mA g{sup ?1}.

  7. Evaluation of carbon fiber composites modified by in situ incorporation of carbon nanofibers

    Andr Navarro de Miranda; Luiz Claudio Pardini; Carlos Alberto Moreira dos Santos; Ricardo Vieira

    2011-01-01

    Nano-carbon materials, such as carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers, are being thought to be used as multifunctional reinforcement in composites. The growing of carbon nanofiber at the carbon fiber/epoxy interface results in composites having better electrical properties than conventional carbon fiber/epoxy composites. In this work, carbon nanofibers were grown in situ over the surface of a carbon fiber fabric by chemical vapor deposition. Specimens of carbon fiber/nanofiber/epoxy (CF/CNF/e...

  8. Sacrificial bonds in stacked-cup carbon nanofibers: biomimetic toughening mechanisms for composite systems.

    Palmeri, Marc J; Putz, Karl W; Brinson, L Catherine

    2010-07-27

    Many natural composites, such as nacre or bone, achieve exceptional toughening enhancements through the rupture of noncovalent secondary bonds between chain segments in the organic phase. This "sacrificial bond" rupture dissipates enormous amounts of energy and reveals significant hidden lengths due to unraveling of the highly coiled macromolecules, leaving the structural integrity of their covalent backbones intact to large extensions. In this work, we present the first evidence of similar sacrificial bond mechanisms in the inorganic phase of composites using inexpensive stacked-cup carbon nanofibers (CNF), which are composed of helically coiled graphene sheets with graphitic spacing between adjacent layers. These CNFs are dispersed in a series of high-performance epoxy systems containing trifunctional and tetrafunctional resins, which are traditionally difficult to toughen in light of their highly cross-linked networks. Nonetheless, the addition of only 0.68 wt % CNF yields toughness enhancements of 43-112% for the various blends. Analysis of the relevant toughening mechanisms reveals two heretofore unseen mechanisms using sacrificial bonds that complement the observed crack deflection, rupture, and debonding/pullout that are common to many composite systems. First, embedded nanofibers can splay discretely between adjacent graphitic layers in the side walls; second, crack-bridging nanofibers can unravel continuously. Both of these mechanisms entail the dissipation of the pi-pi interactions between layers in the side walls without compromising the structural integrity of the graphene sheets. Moreover, increases in electrical conductivity of approximately 7-10 orders of magnitude were found, highlighting the multifunctionality of CNFs as reinforcements for the design of tough, inexpensive nanocomposites with improved electrical properties. PMID:20568708

  9. Hydrogenation catalyst based on modified carbon nanofibers

    The aim of this work was to study the palladium-carboxylated carbon nanofibers (CNF) as a catalyst for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene model reaction. It is shown that the efficiency of the catalyst obtained more than 6 times higher than that of the industrial counterpart (Pd/C).

  10. Carbon nanofibers decorated with platinum nanoparticles: a novel three-dimensional platform for non-enzymatic sensing of hydrogen peroxide

    We have developed a 3-dimensional (3-D) electrochemical sensor for highly sensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Porous 3-D carbon nanofibers (CNFs), prepared by electrospinning, served as scaffold on a glassy carbon electrode. The 3-D CNFs were functionalized with platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) by in-situ gas-phase decomposition of platinum salts at high temperature. The Pt-NPs act as an electrocatalyst for the decomposition of H2O2. TEM revealed that large amounts of Pt-NPs are deposited in the electrospun CNFs electrode even without using any stabilizer or reducing reagent. The sensor was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry and displays a good response to H2O2 with a linear range between 10 μM and 15 mM (R = 0.9994), a low detection limit (3.4 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3), and a response time of 3 s. The sensor shows excellent stability and selectivity. (author)

  11. Preparation of flexible zinc oxide/carbon nanofiber webs for mid-temperature desulfurization

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and zinc precursor were electrospun and heat-treated for preparing zinc oxide (ZnO) modified carbon nanofibers (CNF). • A facile synthesis of composite webs resulted in uniformly loaded ZnO on the surface of CNFs. • The composites showed significant hydrogen sulfide adsorption efficiency at 300 °C. • The flexible webs can be applied for mid-temperature desulfurization. - Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) derived carbon nanofiber (CNF) webs loaded with zinc oxide (ZnO) were synthesized using electrospinning and heat treatment at 600 °C. Uniformly dispersed ZnO nanoparticles, clarified by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, were observed on the surface of the nanofiber composites containing 13.6–29.5 wt% of ZnO. The further addition of ZnO up to 34.2 wt% caused agglomeration with a size of 50–80 nm. Higher ZnO contents led the concentrated ZnO nanoparticles on the surface of the nanofibers rather than uniform dispersion along the cross-section of the fiber. The flexible composite webs were crushed and tested for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) adsorption at 300 °C. Breakthrough experiments with the ZnO/CNF composite containing 25.7 wt% of ZnO for H2S adsorption showed three times higher ZnO utilization efficiency compared to pure ZnO nano powders, attributed to chemisorption of the larger surface area of well dispersed ZnO particles on nanofibers and physical adsorption of CNF

  12. Preparation of flexible zinc oxide/carbon nanofiber webs for mid-temperature desulfurization

    Kim, Soojung; Bajaj, Bharat [Carbon Convergence Materials Research Center, Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, San 101, Eunha-ri, Bongdong-eup, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do 565-905 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Chang Ki; Kwon, Soon-Jin [Department of Chemical Engineering Education, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Joh, Han-Ik [Carbon Convergence Materials Research Center, Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, San 101, Eunha-ri, Bongdong-eup, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do 565-905 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Kwang Bok, E-mail: cosy32@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering Education, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sungho, E-mail: sunghol@kist.re.kr [Carbon Convergence Materials Research Center, Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, San 101, Eunha-ri, Bongdong-eup, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do 565-905 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano Material Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and zinc precursor were electrospun and heat-treated for preparing zinc oxide (ZnO) modified carbon nanofibers (CNF). • A facile synthesis of composite webs resulted in uniformly loaded ZnO on the surface of CNFs. • The composites showed significant hydrogen sulfide adsorption efficiency at 300 °C. • The flexible webs can be applied for mid-temperature desulfurization. - Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) derived carbon nanofiber (CNF) webs loaded with zinc oxide (ZnO) were synthesized using electrospinning and heat treatment at 600 °C. Uniformly dispersed ZnO nanoparticles, clarified by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, were observed on the surface of the nanofiber composites containing 13.6–29.5 wt% of ZnO. The further addition of ZnO up to 34.2 wt% caused agglomeration with a size of 50–80 nm. Higher ZnO contents led the concentrated ZnO nanoparticles on the surface of the nanofibers rather than uniform dispersion along the cross-section of the fiber. The flexible composite webs were crushed and tested for hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) adsorption at 300 °C. Breakthrough experiments with the ZnO/CNF composite containing 25.7 wt% of ZnO for H{sub 2}S adsorption showed three times higher ZnO utilization efficiency compared to pure ZnO nano powders, attributed to chemisorption of the larger surface area of well dispersed ZnO particles on nanofibers and physical adsorption of CNF.

  13. Mass Production of Carbon Nanofibers Using Microwave Technology.

    Mubarak, N M; Abdullah, E C; Sahu, J N; Jayakumar, N S; Ganesan, P

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNFs) were produced by gas phase single stage microwave assisted chemical vapour deposition (MA-CVD) using ferrocene as a catalyst and acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen (H2) as precursor gases. The effect of the process parameters such as microwave power, radiation time, and gas ratio of C2H2/H2 was investigated. The CNFs were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Results reveal that the optimized conditions for CNF production were 1000 W reaction power, 35 min radiation time, and 0.8 gas ratio of C2H2/H2. TEM analyses revealed that the uniformly dispersed CNFs diameters ranging from 115-131 nm. The TGA analysis showed that the purity of CNF produced was 93%. PMID:26682380

  14. Free-standing nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber films as highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Xueping; Sun, Zaicheng; You, Tianyan

    2013-09-01

    Free-standing nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (NCNF) films based on polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were prepared simply by the combination of electrospinning and thermal treatment. We reused the nitrogen-rich gas generated as the byproduct of PAN at elevated temperature, mainly NH3, for surface etching and nitrogen doping. The as-obtained NCNFs exhibited a rougher surface and smaller diameter than pristine carbon nanofibers. Despite the decreased total N content, a significant increase in the content of pyrrolic-N was observed for the NCNFs. In application to electrochemistry, the free-standing NCNF films showed comparable catalytic activity with a close four-electron pathway to a commercial Pt/C catalyst in alkaline medium toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which can be attributed to the nitrogen doping and high hydrophilicity. More importantly, the ORR current density on the NCNFs only dropped 6.6% after 10 000 s of continuous operation, suggesting an enhanced long-time durability. In addition, the NCNFs also showed better electrocatalytic selectivity than Pt/C. Our work reveals a facile but efficient approach for the synthesis of free-standing NCNF films as a promising alternative to Pt-based electrocatalysts in fuel cells.Free-standing nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (NCNF) films based on polyacrylonitrile (PAN) were prepared simply by the combination of electrospinning and thermal treatment. We reused the nitrogen-rich gas generated as the byproduct of PAN at elevated temperature, mainly NH3, for surface etching and nitrogen doping. The as-obtained NCNFs exhibited a rougher surface and smaller diameter than pristine carbon nanofibers. Despite the decreased total N content, a significant increase in the content of pyrrolic-N was observed for the NCNFs. In application to electrochemistry, the free-standing NCNF films showed comparable catalytic activity with a close four-electron pathway to a commercial Pt/C catalyst in alkaline medium toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which can be attributed to the nitrogen doping and high hydrophilicity. More importantly, the ORR current density on the NCNFs only dropped 6.6% after 10 000 s of continuous operation, suggesting an enhanced long-time durability. In addition, the NCNFs also showed better electrocatalytic selectivity than Pt/C. Our work reveals a facile but efficient approach for the synthesis of free-standing NCNF films as a promising alternative to Pt-based electrocatalysts in fuel cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental and characterization details; SEM, contact angles of CNFs-A, CNFs-B and NCNFs; rotating disk electrode voltammograms and Koutecky-Levich plots of CNFs-A and CNFs-B; rotating ring-disk electrode voltammograms of NCNFs and Pt/C; and the electrocatalytic selectivity of the NCNFs and Pt/C. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03229a

  15. Carbon nanofibers: a versatile catalytic support

    Nelize Maria de Almeida Coelho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is present an overview of the promising results obtained while using carbon nanofibers based composites as catalyst support for different practical applications: hydrazine decomposition, styrene synthesis, direct oxidation of H2S into elementary sulfur and as fuel-cell electrodes. We have also discussed some prospects of the use of these new materials in total combustion of methane and in ammonia decomposition. The macroscopic carbon nanofibers based composites were prepared by the CVD method (Carbon Vapor Deposition employing a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and ethane. The results showed a high catalytic activity and selectivity in comparison to the traditional catalysts employed in these reactions. The fact was attributed, mainly, to the morphology and the high external surface of the catalyst support.

  16. Carbon nanofiber/cobalt oxide nanopyramid core-shell nanowires for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    An, Geon-Hyoung; Ahn, Hyo-Jin

    2014-12-01

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF)/Co3O4 nanopyramid core-shell nanowires (NWs) are synthesized using an electrospinning method followed by reduction and hydrothermal treatment in order to improve the capacity, cycle stability, and high-rate capability of the electrodes in Li ion batteries (LIBs). The morphology, crystal structure, and chemical states of all samples are investigated by means of field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. For comparison, conventional CNFs, octahedral Co3O4, and Co3O4/CNF composite electrodes are prepared. LIB cells fabricate with the CNF/Co3O4 nanopyramid core-shell NWs exhibit superb discharge capacity (1173 mAh g-1 at the 1st cycle), cycle stability (795 mAh g-1 at 50 cycles), high initial Coulombic efficiency (84.8%), and high-rate capability (570 mAh g-1 at a current density of 700 mA g-1) as compared to the conventional CNF, octahedral Co3O4, and Co3O4/CNF composite electrodes. The performance improvement is owing to the introduction of one-dimensional CNFs relative to efficient electron transport in the core region, extensive utilization of Co3O4 nanopyramids with high capacity grown closely on the CNFs in the shell region, and the network structures of the electrode relative to the improvement of Li ion diffusion.

  17. Fe3O4 nanoparticles-wrapped carbon nanofibers as high-performance anode for lithium-ion battery

    One-dimensional hierarchical nanostructures composed of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have been successfully synthesized through a facile solvothermal method followed by a simple thermal annealing treatment. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy reveal that Fe3O4 nanoparticles with a size of 80–100 nm are uniformly dispersed on CNFs. The Fe3O4/CNFs nanocomposites show an enhanced reversible capacity and excellent rate performance as anode for Li-ion battery. The reversible capacity of the nanocomposites retains 684 mAh g−1 after 55 cycles at 100 mA g−1. Even when cycled at various rate (100, 200, 500, 1000, and 2000 mA g−1) for 50 cycles, the capacity can recover to 757 mAh g−1 at the current of 100 mA g−1. The enhanced electrochemical performances are attributed to the characteristics of interconnected one-dimensional nanostructures that provide three-dimensional networks for Li-ion diffusion and electron transfer, and can further accommodate the volumetric change of Fe3O4 nanoparticles during charge–discharge cycling

  18. Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrodes for Neural Stimulation and Chemical Detection: The Era of Smart Deep Brain Stimulation

    Koehne, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. Here, we report two studies using vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for biomedical applications. CNF arrays are investigated as neural stimulation and neurotransmitter recording electrodes for application in deep brain stimulation (DBS). Polypyrrole coated CNF nanoelectrodes have shown great promise as stimulating electrodes due to their large surface area, low impedance, biocompatibility and capacity for highly localized stimulation. CNFs embedded in SiO2 have been used as sensing electrodes for neurotransmitter detection. Our approach combines a multiplexed CNF electrode chip, developed at NASA Ames Research Center, with the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) system, developed at the Mayo Clinic. Preliminary results indicate that the CNF nanoelectrode arrays are easily integrated with WINCS for neurotransmitter detection in a multiplexed array format. In the future, combining CNF based stimulating and recording electrodes with WINCS may lay the foundation for an implantable "smart" therapeutic system that utilizes neurochemical feedback control while likely resulting in increased DBS application in various neuropsychiatric disorders. In total, our goal is to take advantage of the nanostructure of CNF arrays for biosensing studies requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and selective biofunctionalization.

  19. A Novel Carbon Nanofibers Grown on Glass Microballoons Immunosensor: A Tool for Early Diagnosis of Malaria

    Emmanuel Gikunoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method for direct detection of Plasmodium falciparum histidine rich protein-2 (PfHRP-2 antigen using carbon nanofiber (CNF forests grown on glass microballoons (NMBs. Secondary antibodies specific to PfHRP-2 densely attached to the CNFs exhibit extraordinary ability for the detection of minute concentrations of Plasmodium species. A sandwich immunoassay protocol was employed, where a glass substrate was used to immobilize primary antibodies at designated capture zones. High signal amplification was obtained in both colorimetric and electrical measurements due to the CNFs through specific binding. As a result, it was possible to detect PfHRP-2 levels as low as 0.025 ng/mL concentration in phosphate buffered saline (PBS using a visual signal within only 1 min of test duration. Lower limits of 0.01 ng/mL was obtained by measuring the electrical resistivity of the capture zone. This method is also highly selective and specific in identifying PfHRP-2 and other Plasmodium species from the same solution. In addition, the stability of the labeling mechanism eliminates the false signals generated by the use of dyes in current malaria rapid diagnostic test kits (MRDTs. Thus, the rapid, sensitive and high signal amplification capabilities of NMBs is a promising tool for early diagnosis of malaria and other infectious diseases.

  20. Controlled Synthesis of Carbon Nanofibers Anchored with ZnxCo3-xO4 Nanocubes as Binder-Free Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Chen, Renzhong; Hu, Yi; Shen, Zhen; Chen, Yanli; He, Xia; Zhang, Xiangwu; Zhang, Yan

    2016-02-01

    The direct growth of complex ternary metal oxides on three-dimensional conductive substrates is highly desirable for improving the electrochemical performance of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We herein report a facile and scalable strategy for the preparation of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) anchored with ZnxCo3-xO4 (ZCO) nanocubes, involving a hydrothermal process and thermal treatment. Moreover, the size of the ZCO nanocubes was adjusted by the quantity of urea used in the hydrothermal process. Serving as a binder-free anode material for LIBs, the ZnCo2O4/CNFs composite prepared using 1.0 mmol of urea (ZCO/CNFs-10) exhibited excellent electrochemical performance with high reversible capacity, excellent cycling stability, and good rate capability. More specifically, a high reversible capacity of ?600 mAh g(-1) was obtained at a current density of 0.5 C following 300 charge-discharge cycles. The excellent electrochemical performance could be associated with the controllable size of the ZCO nanocubes and synergistic effects between ZCO and the CNFs. PMID:26761129

  1. Free-standing anode of N-doped carbon nanofibers containing SnO{sub x} for high-performance lithium batteries

    Zou, Mingzhong [College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Li, Jiaxin, E-mail: ljx3012982@yahoo.com [College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Wen, Weiwei; Lin, Yingbin [College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Lai, Heng, E-mail: laiheng@fjnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Huang, Zhigao, E-mail: zghuang@fjnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Energy, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: Self-standing SnO{sub x} N-CNF electrodes were synthesized by electrospinning. The SnO{sub x} N-CNFs anode exhibits high capacity, good cyclic stability, and excellent rate performance for lithium ion batteries. The enhanced performance is ascribed to the synergetic effects between N-CNFs and SnO{sub x} nanoparticles. - Abstract: Free-standing paper of N-doped carbon nanofibers (NCNFs) containing SnO{sub x} was prepared by electrospinning. The structure and morphology of the sample were analyzed by XRD, XPS, SEM, and TEM. The results show that nitrogen atoms were successfully doped into CNFs. The SnO{sub x} were homogenously embedded in the N-doped CNFs via annealing treatment. Subsequently, the SnO{sub x} NCNF paper was cut into disks and used as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The anodes of SnO{sub x} NCNFs exhibit excellent cycling stability and show high capacity of 520 mA h g{sup ?1} tested at a 200 mA g{sup ?1} after 100 cycles. More importantly, at a high current density of 500 mA g{sup ?1}, a large reversible capacity of 430 mA h g{sup ?1} after 100 cycles can still be obtained. The good electrochemical performance should be attributed to the good electronic conductivity from the NCNFs and the synergistic effects from NCNFs and SnO{sub x} materials.

  2. The synthesis of titanium carbide-reinforced carbon nanofibers

    Zhu, Pinwen; Hong, Youliang; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian

    2009-06-01

    Tailoring hard materials into nanoscale building blocks can greatly extend the applications of hard materials and, at the same time, also represents a significant challenge in the field of nanoscale science. This work reports a novel process for the preparation of carbon-based one-dimensional hard nanomaterials. The titanium carbide-carbon composite nanofibers with an average diameter of 90 nm are prepared by an electrospinning technique and a high temperature pyrolysis process. A composite solution containing polyacrylonitrile and titanium sources is first electrospun into the composite nanofibers, which are subsequently pyrolyzed to produce the desired products. The x-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy results show that the main phase of the as-synthesized nanofibers is titanium carbide. The Raman analyses show that the composite nanofibers have low graphite clusters in comparison with the pure carbon nanofibers originating from the electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibers. The mechanical property tests demonstrate that the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes have four times higher tensile strength than the carbon nanofiber membranes, and the Young's modulus of the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes increases in direct proportion to the titanium quantity.

  3. The synthesis of titanium carbide-reinforced carbon nanofibers

    Tailoring hard materials into nanoscale building blocks can greatly extend the applications of hard materials and, at the same time, also represents a significant challenge in the field of nanoscale science. This work reports a novel process for the preparation of carbon-based one-dimensional hard nanomaterials. The titanium carbide-carbon composite nanofibers with an average diameter of 90 nm are prepared by an electrospinning technique and a high temperature pyrolysis process. A composite solution containing polyacrylonitrile and titanium sources is first electrospun into the composite nanofibers, which are subsequently pyrolyzed to produce the desired products. The x-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy results show that the main phase of the as-synthesized nanofibers is titanium carbide. The Raman analyses show that the composite nanofibers have low graphite clusters in comparison with the pure carbon nanofibers originating from the electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibers. The mechanical property tests demonstrate that the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes have four times higher tensile strength than the carbon nanofiber membranes, and the Young's modulus of the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes increases in direct proportion to the titanium quantity.

  4. Controlling dispersion and electric-field-assisted alignment of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for multi-functional epoxy composites

    Sharma, Ambuj

    The objective of this investigation is to enhance the elastic modulus and tailor the electrical conductivity of nanoreinforced epoxy composites. The resin employed in this investigation is a bisphenol F epoxide with an aromatic diamine curative, extensively used for high performance composites. The nanofillers are unfunctionalized and functionalized carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The objectives are achieved by controlling the dispersion and alignment of unfunctionalized and functionalized CNFs and CNTs. The process of ultrasonic agitation was used to disperse nanofillers in epoxy resin. The dispersed nanofillers were aligned using alternating current electric field (AC). Continuous use of ultrasonic agitation reduced the lengths, and increased the degree of dispersion of CNFs and CNTs. The parameters of the ultrasonic agitation process were optimized to minimize the reduction in CNF and CNT lengths while achieving good dispersion of CNFs and CNTs in the resin. The composites manufactured with well dispersed CNFs and CNTs increased the elastic modulus as expected based on the theory of short fiber reinforced composites. The alignment and chaining of CNFs and CNTs dispersed in resin were investigated by experiments and modeling. The assembly of chains was found to depend on the frequency of AC electric field used. The mechanism of CNF/CNT chain assembly and growth in a low viscosity epoxy was investigated by developing a finite element model of a chain attached to an electrode. The model includes the combined effects of electrostatic and electro-hydrodynamic forces on chain morphology. The electro-hydrodynamic forces are modeled using the theory of AC electroosmosis. Predictions of the model are compared to experimental results. The experiments were conducted on a CNF/epoxide/curative mixture by applying an AC field at frequencies ranging from 100 -- 100,000 Hz. Predictions of the model qualitatively capture the variations of chain morphology and growth rate as functions of AC frequency. Higher frequencies promote a more uniform and denser network of chains. The rate of growth of chains is highest at an intermediate frequency. A uniform network of chains was observed at frequencies of 1 kHz and greater in the experiments. The rate of growth of chains was maximized at a frequency of 1 kHz for a liquid viscosity of 0.03 Pa˙s. Based on the knowledge of chaining mechanisms, networks of aligned CNFs and CNTs were developed over a 25-mm distance in CNF and CNT epoxy composites. This distance is roughly an order of magnitude greater than previously reported distances obtained with AC electric fields and was accomplished without highly sophisticated electrical equipment. A wide range of anisotropy in direct current (DC) resistivity of CNT/epoxy and CNT/glass fiber/epoxy composites was engineered by using electric fields at different frequencies. The use of AC and DC electric fields in manufacturing buckypapers of aligned CNFs and CNTs was explored. The methods developed to use DC and AC electric fields were found unsuitable for making functional buckypapers with aligned CNFs and CNTs.

  5. Synthesis of carbon nanofibers on copper particles

    Kol'tsova, T. S.; Larionova, T. V.; Shusharina, N. N.; Tolochko, O. V.

    2015-08-01

    We analyze the synthesis of carbon nanostructures from the gas phase (mixture of acetylene or ethylene with hydrogen) on the surface of copper particles without using other catalysts. The synthesized structures (multilayer graphene and carbon nanofibers) are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. It is shown that the fiber structure is determined by the C: H ratio in the gas phase. The kinetics of synthesis is analyzed in terms of the formal kinetics of conversion in accordance with the JohnsonMehlAvrami equation.

  6. Effect of carbon nanofiber surface groups on oxygen reduction reaction of supported Pt electrocatalyst

    Highlights: ? We studied the effect of oxygen-groups on the particle size and deposition of Pt particles. ? Pt/CNF-OH exhibits smaller Pt mean particle size compared with Pt/CNF-OX. ? Pt/CNF-OH/GC electrode exhibits a better ORR activity than Pt/CNF-OX/GC electrode. -- Abstract: Pt nanoparticles supported on the acid-treated carbon nanofiber (CNF-OX) and LiAlH4-treated carbon nanofiber (CNF-OH) are synthesized via ethylene glycol reduction method. The nature of oxygen-containing surface groups on the CNF-OX and CNF-OH is investigated by potentiometric titration and XPS characterization. Titration of the support materials shows that LiAlH4 can effectively convert the carboxylic acid groups (from 0.21 mmol g?1 to 0.06 mmol g?1) to hydroxyl groups (from 0.09 mmol g?1 to 0.17 mmol g?1), which is agreed well with the results of XPS characterization. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) characterization shows that the Pt nanoparticles are highly dispersed on the two modified CNFs, and the Pt nanoparticles supported on the CNF-OH have a smaller particle size and a more uniform particle size distribution. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) analysis reveals that Pt/CNF-OH exhibits a better activity for ORR than Pt/CNF-OX, and this may be associated with the smaller particle size and better dispersion of Pt nanoparticles on the CNF-OH

  7. The role of carbon nanofiber defects on the electrical and mechanical properties of CNF-based resins

    Guadagno, Liberata; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Vittoria, Vittoria; Vertuccio, Luigi; Lafdi, Khalid; De Vivo, Biagio; Lamberti, Patrizia; Spinelli, Giovanni; Tucci, Vincenzo

    2013-08-01

    Heat treatment of carbon nanofibers has proven to be an effective method in removing defects from carbon nanofibers, causing a strong increase in their structural perfection and thermal stability. It affects the bonding states of carbon atoms in the nanofiber structure and causes a significant transformation in the hybridization state of the bonded carbon atoms. Nanofilled resins made of heat-treated CNF show significant increases in their electrical conductivity even at low concentrations. This confirms that enhancement in the perfection of the fiber structure with consequent change in the morphological features plays a prominent role in affecting the electrical properties. Indeed heat-treated CNFs display a stiff structure and a smooth surface which tends to lower the thickness of the unavoidable insulating epoxy layer formed around the CNF which, in turn, plays a fundamental role in the electrical transport properties along the conducting clusters. This might be very beneficial in terms of electrical conductivity but might have negligible effect on the mechanical properties.

  8. The role of carbon nanofiber defects on the electrical and mechanical properties of CNF-based resins

    Heat treatment of carbon nanofibers has proven to be an effective method in removing defects from carbon nanofibers, causing a strong increase in their structural perfection and thermal stability. It affects the bonding states of carbon atoms in the nanofiber structure and causes a significant transformation in the hybridization state of the bonded carbon atoms. Nanofilled resins made of heat-treated CNF show significant increases in their electrical conductivity even at low concentrations. This confirms that enhancement in the perfection of the fiber structure with consequent change in the morphological features plays a prominent role in affecting the electrical properties. Indeed heat-treated CNFs display a stiff structure and a smooth surface which tends to lower the thickness of the unavoidable insulating epoxy layer formed around the CNF which, in turn, plays a fundamental role in the electrical transport properties along the conducting clusters. This might be very beneficial in terms of electrical conductivity but might have negligible effect on the mechanical properties. (paper)

  9. Preparation of interconnected carbon nanofibers as electrodes for supercapacitors

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The interconnected carbon nanofibers were prepared by an electrospinning technique. • The interconnected fibers developed conductive pathways. • The interconnected fibers showed 24% enhancement on the specific capacitance. • The interconnected fibers are promising to be used as electrodes for supercapacitors. - Abstract: The interconnected carbon nanofibers were prepared by an electrospinning technique using a polymer solution composed of polyacrylonitrile (PAN), poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene (PAN-co-PB) copolymer, and N,N-dimethylformamide. Post-treatment including stabilization at 250 °C and carbonization at 800 °C converted electrospun fibers to bonded carbon nanofibers. The formation of interconnected carbon nanofibers was attributed to the decomposition of PB, which reduced the viscosity of nanofibers and caused the fusion of connecting points. As a result, the conductive pathways developed, leading to an increase in both the electrical conductivity and microcrystallite size. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the specific capacitance of the 90:10 PAN/PAN-co-PB derived carbon nanofibers was 170.2 F/g, which was about 24% higher than that of the neat PAN-derived carbon nanofibers. Furthermore, the fibers showed good cycling stability of energy storage with the retention ratio of 100% after 2000 cycles. Our results corroborated the advantage of these interconnected nanofibers

  10. Highly conductive electrospun carbon nanofiber/MnO2 coaxial nano-cables for high energy and power density supercapacitors

    Zhi, Mingjia; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Meng, Fanke; Wu, Nianqiang

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents highly conductive carbon nanofiber/MnO2 coaxial cables in which individual electrospun carbon nanofibers are coated with an ultrathin hierarchical MnO2 layer. In the hierarchical MnO2 structure, an around 4 nm thick sheath surrounds the carbon nanofiber (CNF) in a diameter of 200 nm, and nano-whiskers grow radically outward from the sheath in view of the cross-section of the coaxial cables, giving a high specific surface area of MnO2. The CNFs are synthesized by electrospinning a precursor containing iron acetylacetonate (AAI). The addition of AAI not only enlarges the specific surface area of the CNF but also greatly enhances their electronic conductivity, which leads to a dramatic improvement in the specific capacitance and the rate capability of the CNF/MnO2 electrode. The AAI-CNF/MnO2 electrode shows a specific capacitance of 311 F g-1 for the whole electrode and 900 F g-1 for the MnO2 shell at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1. Good cycling stability, high energy density (80.2 Wh kg-1) and high power density (57.7 kW kg-1) are achieved. This work indicates that high electronic conductivity of the electrode material is crucial to achieving high power and energy density for pseudo-supercapacitors.

  11. Nanoporous Carbon Nanofibers Decorated with Platinum Nanoparticles for Non-Enzymatic Electrochemical Sensing of H2O2

    Yang Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe the preparation of nanoporous carbon nanofibers (CNFs decorated with platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs in this work by electrospining polyacrylonitrile (PAN nanofibers and subsequent carbonization and binding of PtNPs. The fabricated nanoporous CNF-PtNP hybrids were further utilized to modify glass carbon electrodes and used for the non-enzymatic amperometric biosensor for the highly sensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. The morphologies of the fabricated nanoporous CNF-PtNP hybrids were observed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and their structure was further investigated with Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET surface area analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectrum. The cyclic voltammetry experiments indicate that CNF-PtNP modified electrodes have high electrocatalytic activity toward H2O2 and the chronoamperometry measurements illustrate that the fabricated biosensor has a high sensitivity for detecting H2O2. We anticipate that the strategies utilized in this work will not only guide the further design and fabrication of functional nanofiber-based biomaterials and nanodevices, but also extend the potential applications in energy storage, cytology, and tissue engineering.

  12. IN-SITU SYNCHROTRON SAXS/WAXD STUDIES DURING MELT SPINNING OF MODIFIED CARBON NANOFIBER AND ISOTACTIC POLYPROPYLENE NANOCOMPOSITE

    The structural development of a nanocomposite, containing 95 wt% isotactic polypropylene (iPP) and 5 wt% modified carbon nanofiber (MCNF), during fiber spinning was investigated by in situ synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques. The modification of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was accomplished by a chemical surface treatment using in situ polymerization of olefin segments to enhance its compatibility with iPP, where the iPP/MCNF nanocomposite was prepared by twostep blending to ensure the dispersion of MCNF. X-ray results showed that at low spin-draw ratios, the iPP/MCNF nanocomposite fiber exhibited much higher iPP crystalline orientation than the control iPP fiber. At higher spin-draw ratios, the crystalline orientation of the nanocomposite fiber and that of the pure iPP fiber was about the same. The crystallinity of the composite fiber was higher than that of the control iPP fiber, indicating the nucleating effect of the modified carbon nanofibers. The nanocomposite fiber also showed larger long periods at low spin-draw ratios. Measurements of mechanical properties indicated that the nanocomposite fiber with 5 wt% MCNF had much higher tensile strength, modulus and longer elongation to break. The mechanical enhancement can be attributed to the dispersion of MCNF in the matrix, which was confirmed by SEM results

  13. Effect of Carbon Nanofiber on Mechanical Behavior of Asphalt Concrete

    Saeed Ghaffarpour Jahromi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Uses of fibers to improve material properties have a scientific background in recent years in civil engineering. Use of Nanofiber reinforcement of materials refers to incorporating materials with desired properties within some other materials lacking those properties. Use of fibers for improvement is not a new phenomenon as the technique of fiber-reinforced bitumen began as early as 1950, but using nanofiber is a new idea. In this research the mechanical properties of asphalt mixture that have been modified with carbon nanofiber were investigated using mechanical tests, which can improve the performance of flexible pavements. To evaluate the effect of nanofiber contents on bituminous mixtures, laboratory investigations were carried out on the samples with and without nanofibers. During the course of this study, various tests were undertaken applying the Marshall test, indirect tensile test, resistance to fatigue cracking by using repeated load indirect tensile test and creep test. Carbon nanofiber exhibited consistency in results and it was observed that the addition of nanofiber can change the properties of bituminous mixtures, increase its stability and decrease the flow value. Results indicate that nanofiber have the potential to resist structural distress in the pavement and thus improve fatigue by increasing resistance to cracks or permanent deformation, when growing traffic loads. On the whole, the results show that the addition of carbon nanofiber will improve some of the mechanical properties such as fatigue and deformation in the flexible pavement.

  14. Development of bimetal-grown multi-scale carbon micro-nanofibers as an immobilizing matrix for enzymes in biosensor applications

    This study describes the development of a novel bimetal (Fe and Cu)-grown hierarchical web of carbon micro-nanofiber-based electrode for biosensor applications, in particular to detect glucose in liquids. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are grown on activated carbon microfibers (ACFs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Cu and Fe as the metal catalysts. The transition metal-fiber composite is used as the working electrode of a biosensor applied to detect glucose in liquids. In such a bi-nanometal-grown multi-scale web of ACF/CNF, Cu nanoparticles adhere to the ACF-surface, whereas Fe nanoparticles used to catalyze the growth of nanofibers attach to the CNF tips. By ultrasonication, Fe nanoparticles are dislodged from the tips of the CNFs. Glucose oxidase (GOx) is subsequently immobilized on the tips by adsorption. The dispersion of Cu nanoparticles at the substrate surface results in increased conductivity, facilitating electron transfer from the glucose solution to the ACF surface during the enzymatic reaction with glucose. The prepared Cu-ACF/CNF/GOx electrode is characterized for various surface and physicochemical properties by different analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), BET surface area analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrochemical tests show that the prepared electrode has fast response current, electrochemical stability, and high electron transfer rate, corroborated by CV and calibration curves. The prepared transition metal-based carbon electrode in this study is cost-effective, simple to develop, and has a stable immobilization matrix for enzymes. - Graphical abstract: A novel bimetal (Fe and Cu)-grown hierarchical web of carbon micro-nanofiber-based electrode is synthesized for biosensor applications, in particular to detect glucose in liquids. Carbon nanofibers are grown on activated carbon microfibers by chemical vapor deposition using Cu and Fe as the metal catalysts. In such a bi-nanometal-grown multi-scale web of ACF/CNF, Cu nanoparticles adhere to the ACF-surface, whereas Fe nanoparticles used to catalyze the growth of nanofibers attach to the CNF tips. Following ultrasonication, Fe nanoparticles are dislodged and replaced with glucose oxidase. The electrochemical tests show that the prepared electrode has fast response current, electrochemical stability, and high electron transfer rate, corroborated by its CV and calibration curves. Highlights: • Fe–Cu-grown web of carbon micro-nanofiber-based electrode was prepared. • The carbon electrode was applied to detect glucose in liquids. • It has electrochemical stability and high electron transfer rate. • The electrode is cost-effective and simple to develop. • It has a stable immobilization matrix for enzymes

  15. Development of bimetal-grown multi-scale carbon micro-nanofibers as an immobilizing matrix for enzymes in biosensor applications

    Hood, Amit R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Saurakhiya, Neelam; Deva, Dinesh [DST Unit on Nanosciences, Kanpur, 208016 (India); Sharma, Ashutosh [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); DST Unit on Nanosciences, Kanpur, 208016 (India); Verma, Nishith, E-mail: nishith@iitk.ac.in [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India); Center for Environmental Science and Engineering, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2013-10-15

    This study describes the development of a novel bimetal (Fe and Cu)-grown hierarchical web of carbon micro-nanofiber-based electrode for biosensor applications, in particular to detect glucose in liquids. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are grown on activated carbon microfibers (ACFs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Cu and Fe as the metal catalysts. The transition metal-fiber composite is used as the working electrode of a biosensor applied to detect glucose in liquids. In such a bi-nanometal-grown multi-scale web of ACF/CNF, Cu nanoparticles adhere to the ACF-surface, whereas Fe nanoparticles used to catalyze the growth of nanofibers attach to the CNF tips. By ultrasonication, Fe nanoparticles are dislodged from the tips of the CNFs. Glucose oxidase (GOx) is subsequently immobilized on the tips by adsorption. The dispersion of Cu nanoparticles at the substrate surface results in increased conductivity, facilitating electron transfer from the glucose solution to the ACF surface during the enzymatic reaction with glucose. The prepared Cu-ACF/CNF/GOx electrode is characterized for various surface and physicochemical properties by different analytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), BET surface area analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrochemical tests show that the prepared electrode has fast response current, electrochemical stability, and high electron transfer rate, corroborated by CV and calibration curves. The prepared transition metal-based carbon electrode in this study is cost-effective, simple to develop, and has a stable immobilization matrix for enzymes. - Graphical abstract: A novel bimetal (Fe and Cu)-grown hierarchical web of carbon micro-nanofiber-based electrode is synthesized for biosensor applications, in particular to detect glucose in liquids. Carbon nanofibers are grown on activated carbon microfibers by chemical vapor deposition using Cu and Fe as the metal catalysts. In such a bi-nanometal-grown multi-scale web of ACF/CNF, Cu nanoparticles adhere to the ACF-surface, whereas Fe nanoparticles used to catalyze the growth of nanofibers attach to the CNF tips. Following ultrasonication, Fe nanoparticles are dislodged and replaced with glucose oxidase. The electrochemical tests show that the prepared electrode has fast response current, electrochemical stability, and high electron transfer rate, corroborated by its CV and calibration curves. Highlights: FeCu-grown web of carbon micro-nanofiber-based electrode was prepared. The carbon electrode was applied to detect glucose in liquids. It has electrochemical stability and high electron transfer rate. The electrode is cost-effective and simple to develop. It has a stable immobilization matrix for enzymes.

  16. Improving interfacial adhesion with epoxy matrix using hybridized carbon nanofibers containing calcium phosphate nanoparticles for bone repairing.

    Gao, Xukang; Lan, Jinle; Jia, Xiaolong; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-04-01

    Hybridized carbon nanofibers containing calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CNF/CaP) were investigated as osteocompatible nanofillers for epoxy resin. The CNF/CaP was produced by electrospinning mixture solution of polyacrylonitrile and CaP precursor sol-gel, followed by preoxidation and carbonization. The continuous and long CNF/CaP was ultrasonically chopped, mixed into epoxy resin and thermo-cured. Compared to pure CNFs with similar ultrasonication treatment, the shortened CNF/CaP reinforced composites demonstrated significant enhancement in flexural properties of epoxy composites, benefiting from the improved interfacial adhesion between CNF/CaP and resin matrix. The resulting composites also displayed good biocompatibility and sustained calcium ion release, which categorized them as promising materials for bone repairing. PMID:26838838

  17. Enhancing the rate performance of graphite anodes through addition of natural graphite/carbon nanofibers in lithium-ion batteries

    Highlights: ? Internal pores of graphite increased the rate property of anode in Li-ion battery. ? Added NG/CNFs into graphite successfully increased the internal pores. ? Introduced internal pores suppressed the anodic volume change in chargedischarge. - Abstract: Mesophase pitch-derived synthetic graphite was hybridized with natural graphite/carbon nanofiber (NG/CNF) composites prepared by mechanical mixing, carbonization, and graphitization processes. Addition of the NG/CNF composites introduced effective internal pores inside the synthetic graphite matrix, thereby improving the rate performance, 1st cycle coulombic efficiency, and cyclability. Hybridized graphite with 10 wt% of added NG/CNF composite exhibited the best rate performance, with a discharge capacity retention rate of over 90% after a 5 C discharge test

  18. Potential applications of nanofiber textile covered by carbon coatings

    Z. Rożek

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Nanospider technology is modified electrospinning method for production nanofiber textile from polymer solutions. This material can be used as wound dressing and filter materials for example. Carbon coatings deposited onto surface of polymer nanofiber textiles are predicted to improve filtration effectivity of filters and bioactivity of wound dressings. Carbon coatings have been produced by Microwave Radio Frequency Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW/RF PACVD method.Design/methodology/approach: Carbon coatings were deposited on polymer nanofiber textile by MW/RF PACVD method. Nanocomposite obtained in this way was characterized by the contact angle studies and by scanning electron microscope (SEM.Findings: Carbon coatings can be deposited on the polymer nanofibers by MW/RF PACVD method. Content of diamond phase in produced carbon coatings has been confirmed by wetability test. A SEM microscopic images have shown that the spaces between the nanofibers have not been closed by the material of the film.Research limitations/implications: MW/RF PACVD makes carbon coating synthesis possible in lower temperature, what is essential in case of applying the polymer substrate. Use of any other method than MW/RF PACVD for deposition of carbon coatings onto polymer nanofiber textile is not covered in this paper.Practical implications: Nanofiber textile produced by Nanospider is very good mechanical filter. Carbon onto surface of nanofibers can cause from this material active filter. Since this nanocomposite enables the transport of oxygen and exudate, simultaneously is impenetrable for bacteria or even viruses, it can be used for wound dressing.Originality/value: It is our belief that we are first to have deposited carbon coatings on nanofiber textile. We hope that in this way we have prepared very good material for filtration of air and for wound dressing.

  19. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanoparticle-Carbon Nanofiber Composite as an Efficient Metal-Free Cathode Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Saito, Nagahiro; Ishizaki, Takahiro

    2016-03-23

    Metal-free nitrogen-doped carbon materials are currently considered at the forefront of potential alternative cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cell technology. Despite numerous efforts in this area over the past decade, rational design and development of a new catalyst system based on nitrogen-doped carbon materials via an innovative approach still present intriguing challenges in ORR catalysis research. Herein, a new kind of nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle-carbon nanofiber (NCNP-CNF) composite with highly efficient and stable ORR catalytic activity has been developed via a new approach assisted by a solution plasma process. The integration of NCNPs and CNFs by the solution plasma process can lead to a unique morphological feature and modify physicochemical properties. The NCNP-CNF composite exhibits a significantly enhanced ORR activity through a dominant four-electron pathway in an alkaline solution. The enhancement in ORR activity of NCNP-CNF composite can be attributed to the synergistic effects of good electron transport from highly graphitized CNFs as well as abundance of exposed catalytic sites and meso/macroporosity from NCNPs. More importantly, NCNP-CNF composite reveals excellent long-term durability and high tolerance to methanol crossover compared with those of a commercial 20 wt % supported on Vulcan XC-72. We expect that NCNP-CNF composite prepared by this synthetic approach can be a promising metal-free cathode catalyst candidate for ORR in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:26908214

  20. Electrochemical Performance of Electrospun carbon nanofibers as free-standing and binder-free anodes for Sodium-Ion and Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Highlights: • Electrospun carbon nanofiber webs were prepared by pyrolysis of polyacrylonitrile. • The webs as binder-free and current collector-free electrodes for SIBs and LIBs. • Different layer spacing and pore size for Li and Na lead different electrochemical behavior. • Electrochemical performances of the electrodes were high. - Abstract: A series of hard carbon nanofiber-based electrodes derived from electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers (PAN-CNFs) have been fabricated by stabilization in air at about 280 °C and then carbonization in N2 at heat treatment temperatures (HTT) between 800 and 1500 °C. The electrochemical performances of the binder-free, current collector-free carbon nanofiber-based anodes in lithium-ion batteries and sodium-ion batteries are systematically investigated and compared. We demonstrate the presence of similar alkali metal insertion mechanisms in both cases, but just the differences of the layer spacing and pore size available for lithium and sodium ion lead the discharge capacity delivered at sloping region and plateau region to vary from the kinds of alkali elements. Although the anodes in sodium-ion batteries show poorer rate capability than that in lithium-ion batteries, they still achieve a reversible sodium intercalation capacity of 275 mAh g−1 and similar cycling stability due to the conductive 3-D network, weakly ordered turbostratic structure and a large interlayer spacing between graphene sheets. The feature of high capacity and stable cycling performance makes PAN-CNFs to be promising candidates as electrodes in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries and lithium-ion batteries

  1. Preparation of a new adsorbent from activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) for manufacturing organic-vacbpour respirator cartridge.

    Jahangiri, Mehdi; Adl, Javad; Shahtaheri, Seyyed Jamaleddin; Rashidi, Alimorad; Ghorbanali, Amir; Kakooe, Hossein; Forushani, Abbas Rahimi; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    In this study a composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) was prepared to improve the performance of activated carbon (AC) for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its utilization for respirator cartridges. Activated carbon was impregnated with a nickel nitrate catalyst precursor and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were deposited directly on the AC surface using catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Deposited CNFs on catalyst particles in AC micropores, were activated by CO2 to recover the surface area and micropores. Surface and textural characterizations of the prepared composites were investigated using Brunauer, Emmett and Teller's (BET) technique and electron microscopy respectively. Prepared composite adsorbent was tested for benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) adsorption and then employed in an organic respirator cartridge in granular form. Adsorption studies were conducted by passing air samples through the adsorbents in a glass column at an adjustable flow rate. Finally, any adsorbed species not retained by the adsorbents in the column were trapped in a charcoal sorbent tube and analyzed by gas chromatography. CNFs with a very thin diameter of about 10-20 nm were formed uniformly on the AC/CNF. The breakthrough time for cartridges prepared with CO2 activated AC/CNF was 117 minutes which are significantly longer than for those cartridges prepared with walnut shell- based activated carbon with the same weight of adsorbents. This study showed that a granular form CO2 activated AC/CNF composite could be a very effective alternate adsorbent for respirator cartridges due to its larger adsorption capacities and lower weight. PMID:23369424

  2. Preparation of a new adsorbent from activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF for manufacturing organic-vacbpour respirator cartridge

    Forushani Abbas Rahimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study a composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF was prepared to improve the performance of activated carbon (AC for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs and its utilization for respirator cartridges. Activated carbon was impregnated with a nickel nitrate catalyst precursor and carbon nanofibers (CNF were deposited directly on the AC surface using catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Deposited CNFs on catalyst particles in AC micropores, were activated by CO2 to recover the surface area and micropores. Surface and textural characterizations of the prepared composites were investigated using Brunauer, Emmett and Teller’s (BET technique and electron microscopy respectively. Prepared composite adsorbent was tested for benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX adsorption and then employed in an organic respirator cartridge in granular form. Adsorption studies were conducted by passing air samples through the adsorbents in a glass column at an adjustable flow rate. Finally, any adsorbed species not retained by the adsorbents in the column were trapped in a charcoal sorbent tube and analyzed by gas chromatography. CNFs with a very thin diameter of about 10-20 nm were formed uniformly on the AC/CNF. The breakthrough time for cartridges prepared with CO2 activated AC/CNF was 117 minutes which are significantly longer than for those cartridges prepared with walnut shell- based activated carbon with the same weight of adsorbents. This study showed that a granular form CO2 activated AC/CNF composite could be a very effective alternate adsorbent for respirator cartridges due to its larger adsorption capacities and lower weight.

  3. Carbon nanofiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites and syntactic foams - mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties

    Poveda, Ronald Leonel

    The tailorability of composite materials is crucial for use in a wide array of real-world applications, which range from heat-sensitive computer components to fuselage reinforcement on commercial aircraft. The mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of composites are highly dependent on their material composition, method of fabrication, inclusion orientation, and constituent percentages. The focus of this work is to explore carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as potential nanoscale reinforcement for hollow particle filled polymer composites referred to as syntactic foams. In the present study, polymer composites with high weight fractions of CNFs, ranging from 1-10 wt.%, are used for quasi-static and high strain rate compression analysis, as well as for evaluation and characterization of thermal and electrical properties. It is shown that during compressive characterization of vapor grown carbon nanofiber (CNF)/epoxy composites in the strain rate range of 10-4-2800 s-1, a difference in the fiber failure mechanism is identified based on the strain rate. Results from compression analyses show that the addition of fractions of CNFs and glass microballoons varies the compressive strength and elastic modulus of epoxy composites by as much as 53.6% and 39.9%. The compressive strength and modulus of the syntactic foams is also shown to generally increase by a factor of 3.41 and 2.96, respectively, with increasing strain rate when quasi-static and high strain rate testing data are compared, proving strain rate sensitivity of these reinforced composites. Exposure to moisture over a 6 month period of time is found to reduce the quasi-static and high strain rate strength and modulus, with a maximum of 7% weight gain with select grades of CNF/syntactic foam. The degradation of glass microballoons due to dealkalization is found to be the primary mechanism for reduced mechanical properties, as well as moisture diffusion and weight gain. In terms of thermal analysis results, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of CNF/epoxy and CNF/syntactic foam composites reinforced with glass microballoons decrease by as much as 11.6% and 38.4%. The experimental CTE values for all of the composites also fit within the bounds of established analytical models predicting the CTE of fiber and particle-reinforced composites. Further thermal studies through dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrated increased thermal stability and damping capability, where the maximum use and glass transition temperatures increase as much as 27.1% and 25.0%, respectively. The electrical properties of CNF reinforced composites are evaluated as well, where the electrical impedance decreases and the dielectric constant increases with addition of CNFs. Such behavior occurs despite the presence of epoxy and glass microballoons, which serve as insulative phases. Such results are useful in design considerations of lightweight composite materials used in weight saving, compressive strength, and damage tolerance applications, such as lightweight aircraft structure reinforcement, automobile components, and buoyancy control with marine submersibles. The results of the analyses have also evaluated certain factors for environmental exposure and temperature extremes, as well as considerations for electronics packaging, all of which have also played a role in shaping avant-garde composite structure designs for efficient, versatile, and long-life service use.

  4. Carbon nanofiber/polyethylene nanocomposite: Processing behavior, microstructure and electrical properties

    Highlights: • Electrically conductive CNF/HDPE nanocomposite were prepared by melt compounding. • The effect of processing on the nanocomposites macro and micro structures was analyzed. • 1.4 vol% CNF were required to construct a conductive network within the HDPE matrix. • An EMI SE of 42 dB was reported for 15 vol% CNF/HDPE nanocomposite. • An empirical model was developed to estimate the EMI SE. - Abstract: Electrically conductive polymer nanocomposite of high density polyethylene (HDPE) filled with carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were prepared by melt compounding in a batch mixer. The nanocomposite processing behavior was studied by monitoring the mixing torque vs. time as function of filler content. Scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy were used to investigate the nanocomposite dispersion of nanofiller and the adhesion between the nanofiller and polymer matrix. The electrical and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding behaviors of the nanocomposite were reported as function of nanofibers concentration, and an empirical correlation related the EMI SE to the nanocomposite’s electrical resistivity was developed. Good level of CNF dispersion was evident despite the poor adhesion exhibited between the nanofibers and the HDPE matrix. At 1.5 vol% CNF loading, the nanocomposite exhibited an electrical volume resistivity of 105 Ω·cm. EMI shielding effectiveness was found to increase with increase in nanofiller concentration. In the 0.1–1.5 GHz frequency range, 2 mm thick plate made of 5 vol% CNF/HDPE nanocomposite exhibits an EMI shielding effectiveness of 20 dB

  5. Growth of carbon nanostructures on carbonized electrospun nanofibers with palladium nanoparticles

    This paper studies the mechanism of the formation of carbon nanostructures on carbon nanofibers with Pd nanoparticles by using different carbon sources. The carbon nanofibers with Pd nanoparticles were produced by carbonizing electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers including Pd(Ac)2. Such PAN-based carbon nanofibers were then used as substrates to grow hierarchical carbon nanostructures. Toluene, pyridine and chlorobenzine were employed as carbon sources for the carbon nanostructures. With the Pd nanoparticles embedded in the carbonized PAN nanofibers acting as catalysts, molecules of toluene, pyridine or chlorobenzine were decomposed into carbon species which were dissolved into the Pd nanoparticles and consequently grew into straight carbon nanotubes, Y-shaped carbon nanotubes or carbon nano-ribbons on the carbon nanofiber substrates. X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to capture the mechanism of formation of Pd nanoparticles, regular carbon nanotubes, Y-shaped carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-ribbons. It was observed that the Y-shaped carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-ribbons were formed on carbonized PAN nanofibers containing Pd-nanoparticle catalyst, and the carbon sources played a crucial role in the formation of different hierarchical carbon nanostructures

  6. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) proposes to develop a silicon whisker and carbon nanofiber composite anode for lithium ion batteries on a Phase I program. This anode...

  7. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has successfully developed a silicon whisker and carbon nanofiber composite anode for lithium ion batteries on a Phase I program. PSI...

  8. Synergistic effect of carbon nanofiber and sub-micro filamentary nickel nanostrand on the shape memory polymer nanocomposite

    This work studies the synergistic effect of carbon nanofiber (CNF) and sub-micro filamentary nickel nanostrand on the thermal and electrical properties, as well as the electro-active shape memory behavior, of a shape memory polymer (SMP) nanocomposite. The combination of electrical CNF and electromagnetic nickel nanostrand is used to render insulating thermo-responsive SMPs conductive. Subsequently, the shape memory behavior of the SMP can be activated by the electrical resistive heating. It is shown that sub-micro filamentary nickel-coated nanostrands significantly improved the electrical conductivity to facilitate the actuation of the SMP nanocomposite despite the low nanostrand volume content and low electrical voltage. Also the CNFs are blended with the SMP resin to facilitate the dispersion of nanostrands and improve the thermal conductivity to accelerate the electro- and thermo-active responses

  9. Interfacial engineering of carbon nanofiber-graphene-carbon nanofiber heterojunctions in flexible lightweight electromagnetic shielding networks.

    Song, Wei-Li; Wang, Jia; Fan, Li-Zhen; Li, Yong; Wang, Chan-Yuan; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2014-07-01

    Lightweight carbon materials of effective electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding have attracted increasing interest because of rapid development of smart communication devices. To meet the requirement in portable electronic devices, flexible shielding materials with ultrathin characteristic have been pursued for this purpose. In this work, we demonstrated a facile strategy for scalable fabrication of flexible all-carbon networks, where the insulting polymeric frames and interfaces have been well eliminated. Microscopically, a novel carbon nanofiber-graphene nanosheet-carbon nanofiber (CNF-GN-CNF) heterojunction, which plays the dominant role as the interfacial modifier, has been observed in the as-fabricated networks. With the presence of CNF-GN-CNF heterojunctions, the all-carbon networks exhibit much increased electrical properties, resulting in the great enhancement of EMI shielding performance. The related mechanism for engineering the CNF interfaces based on the CNF-GN-CNF heterojunctions has been discussed. Implication of the results suggests that the lightweight all-carbon networks, whose thickness and density are much smaller than other graphene/polymer composites, present more promising potential as thin shielding materials in flexible portable electronics. PMID:24914611

  10. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles-wrapped carbon nanofibers as high-performance anode for lithium-ion battery

    Jiang, Fei; Zhao, Saihua; Guo, Jinxin; Su, Qingmei; Zhang, Jun; Du, Gaohui, E-mail: gaohuidu@zjnu.edu.cn [Zhejiang Normal University, Institute of Physical Chemistry (China)

    2015-08-15

    One-dimensional hierarchical nanostructures composed of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have been successfully synthesized through a facile solvothermal method followed by a simple thermal annealing treatment. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy reveal that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with a size of 80–100 nm are uniformly dispersed on CNFs. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/CNFs nanocomposites show an enhanced reversible capacity and excellent rate performance as anode for Li-ion battery. The reversible capacity of the nanocomposites retains 684 mAh g{sup −1} after 55 cycles at 100 mA g{sup −1}. Even when cycled at various rate (100, 200, 500, 1000, and 2000 mA g{sup −1}) for 50 cycles, the capacity can recover to 757 mAh g{sup −1} at the current of 100 mA g{sup −1}. The enhanced electrochemical performances are attributed to the characteristics of interconnected one-dimensional nanostructures that provide three-dimensional networks for Li-ion diffusion and electron transfer, and can further accommodate the volumetric change of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles during charge–discharge cycling.

  11. Hierarchically mesoporous carbon nanofiber/Mn3O4 coaxial nanocables as anodes in lithium ion batteries

    Park, Seok-Hwan; Lee, Wan-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Carbon nanofiber/Mn3O4 (CNF/Mn3O4) coaxial nanocables with a three-dimensional (3D) structure are prepared for lithium ion batteries by electrophoretic deposition on an electrospun CNF cathode followed by heat treatment in air. The bark-like Mn3O4 shell with a thickness of 30 nm surrounds the CNFs with a diameter of 200 nm; this hierarchically mesoporous Mn3O4 shell consisted of interconnected nanoparticles grows radially toward the CNF core when viewed from the cross-section of the coaxial cables. The charge transfer resistance of the CNF/Mn3O4 is much smaller than that of the Mn3O4 powder, because of (i) the abundant inner spaces provided via the formation of the 3D coaxial core/shell nanocables, (ii) the high electric pathway for the Mn3O4 nanoparticles attained with the 1D CNFs, and (iii) the structural stability obtained through the cushioning effect created by the CNF/Mn3O4 coaxial morphology. These unique characteristics contribute to achieving a high capacity, excellent cyclic stability, and good rate capability. The CNF/Mn3O4 nanocables deliver an initial capacity of 1690 mAh g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1 and maintain a high reversible capacity of 760 mAh g-1 even after 50 charge-discharge cycles without showing any obvious decay.

  12. Magnetite (Fe3O4)-filled carbon nanofibers as electro-conducting/superparamagnetic nanohybrids and their multifunctional polymer composites

    A mild-temperature, nonchemical technique is used to produce a nanohybrid multifunctional (electro-conducting and magnetic) powder material by intercalating iron oxide nanoparticles in large aspect ratio, open-ended, hollow-core carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Single-crystal, superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (10 nm average diameter) filled the CNF internal cavity (diameter <100 nm) after successive steps starting with dispersion of CNFs and magnetite nanoparticles in aqueous or organic solvents, sequencing or combining sonication-assisted capillary imbibition and concentration-driven diffusion, and finally drying at mild temperatures. The influence of several process parameters—such as sonication type and duration, concentration of solids dispersed in solvent, CNF-to-nanoparticle mass ratio, and drying temperature—on intercalation efficiency (evaluated in terms of particle packing in the CNF cavity) was studied using electron microscopy. The magnetic CNF powder was used as a low-concentration filler in poly(methyl methacrylate) to demonstrate thin free-standing polymer films with simultaneous magnetic and electro-conducting properties. Such films could be implemented in sensors, optoelectromagnetic devices, or electromagnetic interference shields

  13. Alumina-carbon nanofibers nanocomposites obtained by spark plasma sintering for proton exchange membrane fuel cell bipolar plates

    Borrell, A.; Torrecillas, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN) Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Oviedo, Principado de Asturias, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera Asturias (Spain); Rocha, V.G.; Fernandez, A. [ITMA Materials Technology, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera Asturias (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    There is an increasing demand of multifunctional materials for a wide variety of technological developments. Bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells are an example of complex functionality components that must show among other properties high mechanical strength, electrical, and thermal conductivity. The present research explored the possibility of using alumina-carbon nanofibers (CNFs) nanocomposites for this purpose. In this study, it was studied for the first time the whole range of powder compositions in this system. Homogeneous powders mixtures were prepared and subsequently sintered by spark plasma sintering. The materials obtained were thoroughly characterized and compared in terms of properties required to be used as bipolar plates. The control on material microstructure and composition allows designing materials where mechanical or electrical performances are enhanced. A 50/50 vol.% alumina-CNFs composite appears to be a very promising material for this kind of application. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Lightweight Structures Utilizing CNFs Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AxNano proposes a novel method for producing robust, high-volume, cost-effective carbon fibers in support of next-generation materials for structural composite...

  15. Characterization of small-scale batch-fabricated carbon nanofiber probes

    Linear-shaped single carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were batch-grown onto commercially available Si cantilevers for atomic force microscope by the Ar+-ion-irradiation method (9 cantilevers/batch). The force-curve measurements revealed that the long CNF probes (? 1 ?m in length) were as flexible as the carbon nanotubes probes, whereas the short CNF probes (? 400 nm in length) were characterized by the rigid nature similar to the Si probes. Thus, the mechanical properties of CNF probes were controllable by the CNF length. The ion-induced CNF probes were metallic in electrical property, and the higher resolution images in scanning spreading resistance microscopy was attained by the CNF probes than by conventional conductive diamond probes, due to the small tip radius, high aspect ratio and the durability of the CNF probes. Because the small-scale batch-fabricated CNF probes showed good uniformity in the size, mechanical and electrical properties, it was concluded that they are promising as practical conductive SPM probes

  16. Structural transformation of vapor grown carbon nanofibers studied by HRTEM

    Vapor grown carbon nanofibers have been extensively manufactured and investigated in recent years. In this study commercially available vapor grown carbon nanofibers subjected to different processing and post processing conditions were studied employing high resolution TEM images. The analysis showed that the fibers consist primarily of conical nanofibers, but can contain a significant amount of bamboo nanofibers. Most conical nanofibers were found to consist of an ordered inner layer and a disordered outer layer, with the cone angle distribution of the inner layers indicating that these cannot have a stacked cone structure but are compatible with a cone-helix structure. Fibers that have been heat treated to temperatures above 1,500 oC undergo a structural transformation with the ordered inner layers changing from a cone-helix structure to a highly ordered multiwall stacked cone structure. The bamboo nanofibers were found to have a tapered multiwall nanotube structure for the wall and a multishell fullerene structure for the cap of each segment, surrounded by a disordered outer layer. When these fibers are heat treated the disordered outer layers transform to an ordered multiwall nanotube structure and merge with the wall of each segment. The end caps of each segment transform from a smooth multiwall fullerene structure to one consisting of disjointed graphene planes. A reaction-diffusion mechanism is proposed to explain the growth and structure of the bamboo nanofibers.

  17. Fe-added Fe3C carbon nanofibers as anode for Li ion batteries with excellent low-temperature performance

    Graphical abstract: The assembled lithium batteries with novel composites of Fe/Fe3C carbon nanofibers as anodes can afford excellent low-temperature electrochemical performance. - Abstract: The poor conductivity of anodic carbon materials at low temperature hampers their high-level applications in Li ion batteries (LIBs). Introducing some reliable metals with good electrical conductivity into anodes could alleviate these problems. In this work, the novel composites of Fe-added Fe3C carbon nanofibers (Fe/Fe3C−CNFs) were synthesized via facile electrospinning method and used as anode materials for LIBs. The resulting anodes with Fe/Fe3C−CNF materials exhibited a high reversible capacity of 500 mAh g−1 tested at 200 mA g−1 even after 70 cycles and excellent performance at room temperature. Importantly, it delivered a high capacity of 250 mAh g−1 at 400 mA g−1 even after 55 cycles at a low temperature of −15 °C. The superior low-temperature electrochemical performance of the Fe/Fe3C−CNF anodes is associated with an improved effect of the highly conducting Fe at low temperature

  18. Facile Fabrication of Binder-free Metallic Tin Nanoparticle/Carbon Nanofiber Hybrid Electrodes for Lithium-ion Batteries

    In this work, a Sn nanoparticle (NP)/carbon nanofiber (CNF) hybrid with unique structure has been designed and fabricated via electrospinning and subsequent heat treatment. The cell assembled by the binder-free Sn NP/CNF hybrid demonstrates an effective capacity (46 mAh g−1 at 200 mA g−1 after 200 cycles) with high coulombic efficiency (up to 99.8%), suggesting a facile strategy for the scalable fabrication of electrochemically stable electrodes for LIBs. For understanding the electrochemical behaviors of the metallic Sn and carbon nanofibers in the lithiation/delithiation process, in situ transmission electron microscopy was applied to study the single hybrid structure. In the first charge/discharge process, real-time size variation of the Sn NP and CNFs was mainly focused, suggesting a two-step lithiation process in the metallic Sn NP. Structural characterization also indicates an irreversible delithiation in a single Sn NP/CNF hybrid structure. The electrochemical performance based on influence of carbonization temperature has also been discussed. The results and fundamental understanding of the lithiation/delithiation in the Sn-based hybrid anodes enables the communities to design flexible high-performance electrodes based on metallic active materials in a rational way

  19. Growth and Characterization of Carbon Nanofibers on Fe/C-Fiber Textiles Coated by Deposition-Precipitation and Dip-Coating.

    Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2015-09-01

    This research was conducted to synthesize carbon nanofibers on C-fiber textiles, by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Fe catalyst. The substrate, which was a carbon textile consisting of non-woven carbon fibers and attached graphite particles, was oxidized by nitric acid, before the deposition process. Hydroxyl groups were created on the C-fiber textile, due to the oxidization step. Fe(III) hydroxide was subsequently deposited on the oxidized surface of the C-fiber textile. To deposit ferric particles, two different methods were tested: (i) deposition-precipitation, and (ii) dip-coating. For the experiments using both types of catalyst deposition, the weight ratio of Fe to C-fiber textile was also varied. Ferric particles were reduced to iron after deposition, by using H2/N2 gas, and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were grown by flowing ethylene gas. Properties of carbon nanofibers created like this were analyzed through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), N2-sorption (BET), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectoscopy (XPS), Thermal analysis (TG/DTA), and Raman spectroscopy. In the case of the deposition-precipitation method, the results show that the diameter of carbon nanofibers grew up to 40-60 nm and 30-55 nm, at which the weight ratios of Fe catalyst to C-fiber textiles were 1:30 and 1:70, respectively. When Fe particles were deposited by the dip-coating method, the diameter of carbon nanofibers grew up to 40-60 nm and 25-30 nm, for the ratios of Fe catalyst to C-fiber textiles of 1:10 and 1:30, respectively. PMID:26716329

  20. Patterned Growth of Carbon Nanotubes or Nanofibers

    Delzeit, Lance D.

    2004-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the growth of carbon nanotubes or nanofibers in a desired pattern has been invented. The essence of the method is to grow the nanotubes or nanofibers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto a patterned catalyst supported by a substrate. The figure schematically depicts salient aspects of the method and apparatus in a typical application. A substrate is placed in a chamber that contains both ion-beam sputtering and CVD equipment. The substrate can be made of any of a variety of materials that include several forms of silicon or carbon, and selected polymers, metals, ceramics, and even some natural minerals and similar materials. Optionally, the substrate is first coated with a noncatalytic metal layer (which could be a single layer or could comprise multiple different sublayers) by ion-beam sputtering. The choice of metal(s) and thickness(es) of the first layer (if any) and its sublayers (if any) depends on the chemical and electrical properties required for subsequent deposition of the catalyst and the subsequent CVD of the carbon nanotubes. A typical first-sublayer metal is Pt, Pd, Cr, Mo, Ti, W, or an alloy of two or more of these elements. A typical metal for the second sublayer or for an undivided first layer is Al at a thickness .1 nm or Ir at a thickness .5 nm. Proper choice of the metal for a second sublayer of a first layer makes it possible to use a catalyst that is chemically incompatible with the substrate. In the next step, a mask having holes in the desired pattern is placed over the coated substrate. The catalyst is then deposited on the coated substrate by ion-beam sputtering through the mask. Optionally, the catalyst could be deposited by a technique other than sputtering and/or patterned by use of photolithography, electron- beam lithography, or another suitable technique. The catalytic metal can be Fe, Co, Ni, or an alloy of two or more of these elements, deposited to a typical thickness in the range from 0.1 to 20 nm.

  1. On the growth of carbon nanofibers on glass with a Cr layer by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition: The effect of Ni film thickness

    We have studied the effect of the thickness of catalytic Ni film for the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VA-CNFs) on glass substrates coated with a conductive underlayer of Cr. Both the pretreatment process through which the catalytic Ni nanoparticles were formed and the growth of well-aligned CNFs were carried out in an inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) system. The VA-CNFs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, as well as field emission measurements. The results of VA-CNF growth shows that as the Ni film thicknesses decrease, not only the length but also the density of the CNFs drop, although the density of catalytic Ni nanoparticles increases. The variation of CNF density with Ni film thicknesses is believed to be a result of the detachment of the CNFs from the substrate, caused by the electrostatic force produced by the plasma sheath electric field, as well as an ion-enhanced chemical etching effect due to atomic/ionic hydrogen, during the ICP-CVD growth. A field emission measurement apparatus based on a metallic probe of spherical anode structure was also constructed in this study. An electrostatic image model was employed to determine the electric field distribution on the cathode surface. Along with the standard F-N field emission model, the dependence of field emission current density on the cathode surface electric field, as well as an effective field enhancement factor, were extracted from the current-voltage measurement results. The threshold electric field (Ethreshold, for a current density of 1 mA/cm2) increases from 9.2 V/μm to 13.1 V/μm, and then drops to 11.5 V/μm for the CNFs with Ni film thicknesses of 20 nm, 30 nm, and 40 nm, respectively. The electrostatic model results also indicate that the 20 nm case has the greatest space-charge effect on the emission current, consistent with the growth results that the 20 nm case has the lowest CNF density. On the other hand, the CNF length of the 40 nm case is longer than that of the 30 nm one, while the densities are nearly the same; as a result, Ethreshold for the 30 nm case is higher

  2. Health effects of exposure to carbon nanofibers: Systematic review, critical appraisal, meta analysis and research to practice perspectives

    Background: Literature reviews examining the relationship between exposure to carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and health consequences are qualitative in nature and do not employ an evidence-based assessment. Objective: This research deals with a systematic review, critical appraisal, and meta-analysis designed to examine the potential health effects associated with exposure to CNFs. The utilization of research findings into practice is also explored. Methods: Published articles were obtained from a search of electronic databases and bibliographies of identified articles. A critical appraisal was conducted using an 'Experimental Appraisal Instrument' developed in this study. The meta-analysis was established using statistical techniques with/without the incorporation of overall study quality. The likelihood of utilizing research findings into practice (i.e., from research to practice) was computed using a four-step algorithm based on the criteria of: strength of association, consistency among studies, temporality, biological gradient, type of experimental unit, type of CNF (single- and multi-wall nanotubes), CNF grade (commercial or altered), exposure dose, exposure duration, and support by analogy from the published literature. Results: Twenty-one experimental studies satisfied the inclusion criteria and were performed on human cells, experimental animal models and animal cells as experimental units. The methodological qualities of published studies ranged from 'very poor' to 'excellent', with 'overall study description' scoring 'good' and 'study execution' equal to 'moderate'. The random-effects model was applied in the meta-analysis calculations as heterogeneity was significant at the 10% for all outcomes reported. The mean standardized meta-estimates for the experimental groups were significantly lower than those for the control groups for cell viability and cell death, respectively. Incorporating the effect of overall study quality score widened the gap between the experimental and control groups. Assessment of research findings on the basis of the four-step algorithm revealed that the likelihood of the results to occur in practice is 'somewhat possible' at this time. That is, if exposure conditions to CNF in the reported studies are similar to those in nano-manufacturing plants, it is somewhat possible that CNFs alter the function of human cells resulting in loss of cell viability and cell death. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that it is 'somewhat possible' for the CNF to penetrate the human cells in the targeted organs and to cause cellular damage. Although the weight of evidence is not sufficient, it is advisable that actions be taken to ensure the protection of workers exposed to CNFs, that is, (a) engineering controls should be established to contain exposure to CNF, and (b) simultaneously rigorous personnel protective equipment should be planned to further minimize the risk of CNF exposure.

  3. Radiation Effects on Polypropylene Carbon Nanofibers

    Hamilton, John; Mion, Thomas; Chipara, Alin C.; Ibrahim, Elamin I.; Lozano, Karen; Chipara, Magdalena; Tidrow, Steven C.; Chipara, Mircea

    2010-03-01

    Dispersion of carbon nanostructures within polymeric matrices affects most physical and chemical properties of the polymeric matrix (increased Young modulus, improved thermal stability, faster crystallization rates, higher equilibrium degree of crystallinity, modified glass, melting, and crystallization temperatures, enhanced thermal and electrical conductivity). Such changes have been reported and explained by thorough spectroscopic investigations. Nevertheless, little is known about the radiation stability of such nanocomposites. The research is focused on spectroscopic investigations of radiation-induced modifications in isotactic polypropylene (iPP)-vapor grown nanofiber (VGCNF)composites. VGCNF were dispersed within iPP by extrusion at 180^oC. Composites containing various amounts of VGCNFs ranging from 0 to 20 % wt. were prepared and subjected to gamma irradiation, at room temperature, at various integral doses (10 MGy, 20 MGy, and 30 MGy). Raman spectroscopy, ATR, and WAXS were used to assess the radiation-induced modifications in these nanocomposites. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Welch Foundation (Department of Chemistry at UTPA) and by US Army Research Office (AMSRD-ARL-RO-SI: 54498-MS-ISP).

  4. Synthesis of cellulose nanofiber composites for mechanical reinforcement and other advanced applications

    Xu, Xuezhu

    Cellulose nanofibers from bioresources have attracted intensive research interest in recent years due to their unique combination of properties including high strength and modulus, low density, biocompatibility/biodegradability and rich surface chemistry for functionalization. The nanofibers have been widely studied as nanoreinforcements in polymer nanocomposites; while the nanocomposite research is still very active, new research directions of using the nanofibers for hydrogels/aerogels, template for nanoparticle synthesis, scaffold, carbon materials, nanopaper, etc. have emerged. In this Ph.D. thesis, fundamental studies and application developments are performed on three types of cellulose nanofibers, i.e. cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) and bacterial cellulose (BC). First CNCs and CNFs are systematically compared in terms of their effects on the mechanical properties, crystallization and failure behavior of the nanocomposites, which provides a guideline for the design of cellulose nanofiber reinforced composites. Second, CNFs and BC are used to develop core-shell carbon fibers and flexible carbon aerogels for energy storage applications. This part is focused on developing nanocarbon materials with multi-scale features. Lastly, hybrid CNC/CNF nanopaper with superior optical, mechanical, and electrical properties is developed and its application is demonstrated on a LED device.

  5. Preparation of Electrically Conductive Polystyrene/Carbon Nanofiber Nanocomposite Films

    Sun, Luyi; O'Reilly, Jonathan Y.; Tien, Chi-Wei; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2008-01-01

    A simple and effective approach to prepare conductive polystyrene/carbon nanofiber (PS/CNF) nanocomposite films via a solution dispersion method is presented. Inexpensive CNF, which has a structure similar to multi-walled carbon nanotubes, is chosen as a nanofiller in this experiment to achieve conductivity in PS films. A good dispersion is…

  6. Human cytochrome P450 3A4 and a carbon nanofiber modified film electrode as a platform for the simple evaluation of drug metabolism and inhibition reactions.

    Xue, Qiang; Kato, Dai; Kamata, Tomoyuki; Guo, Qiaohui; You, Tianyan; Niwa, Osamu

    2013-11-01

    Electrochemical biosensors consisting of cytochrome P450 enzyme modified electrodes have been developed to provide a simple method for screening the metabolism of a drug and its inhibitor. Here, we report a very simple electrochemically driven biosensor for detecting drug metabolism and its inhibition based on cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and a carbon nanofiber (CNF) modified film electrode without any other modified layers such as mediator films. Direct electron transfer (DET) between CYP3A4 and CNFs was observed at a formal potential of -0.302 V. The electrocatalytic reduction current increased with the addition of drugs including testosterone and quinidine. In contrast, the reduction current was greatly suppressed in the presence of ketoconazole, which is a CYP3A4 inhibitor. CNFs with high conductivity, a large surface area and sufficient edge planes provide a suitable microenvironment for achieving excellent DET and biocatalysis properties, which could not be observed when we used other carbon materials such as carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon black (CB) modified electrodes, indicating that our system is promising as a new bioelectronic platform for electrochemical biosensing. PMID:24027778

  7. Co3O4 nanoparticles decorated carbon nanofiber mat as binder-free air-cathode for high performance rechargeable zinc-air batteries

    Li, Bing; Ge, Xiaoming; Goh, F. W. Thomas; Hor, T. S. Andy; Geng, Dongsheng; Du, Guojun; Liu, Zhaolin; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Xiaogang; Zong, Yun

    2015-01-01

    An efficient, durable and low cost air-cathode is essential for a high performance metal-air battery for practical applications. Herein, we report a composite bifunctional catalyst, Co3O4 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanofibers (CNFs), working as an efficient air-cathode in high performance rechargeable Zn-air batteries (ZnABs). The particles-on-fibers nanohybrid materials were derived from electrospun metal-ion containing polymer fibers followed by thermal carbonization and a post annealing process in air at a moderate temperature. Electrochemical studies suggest that the nanohybrid material effectively catalyzes oxygen reduction reaction via an ideal 4-electron transfer process and outperforms Pt/C in catalyzing oxygen evolution reactions. Accordingly, the prototype ZnABs exhibit a low discharge-charge voltage gap (e.g. 0.7 V, discharge-charge at 2 mA cm-2) with higher stability and longer cycle life compared to their counterparts constructed using Pt/C in air-cathode. Importantly, the hybrid nanofiber mat readily serves as an integrated air-cathode without the need of any further modification. Benefitting from its efficient catalytic activities and structural advantages, particularly the 3D architecture of highly conductive CNFs and the high loading density of strongly attached Co3O4 NPs on their surfaces, the resultant ZnABs show significantly improved performance with respect to the rate capability, cycling stability and current density, promising good potential in practical applications.An efficient, durable and low cost air-cathode is essential for a high performance metal-air battery for practical applications. Herein, we report a composite bifunctional catalyst, Co3O4 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanofibers (CNFs), working as an efficient air-cathode in high performance rechargeable Zn-air batteries (ZnABs). The particles-on-fibers nanohybrid materials were derived from electrospun metal-ion containing polymer fibers followed by thermal carbonization and a post annealing process in air at a moderate temperature. Electrochemical studies suggest that the nanohybrid material effectively catalyzes oxygen reduction reaction via an ideal 4-electron transfer process and outperforms Pt/C in catalyzing oxygen evolution reactions. Accordingly, the prototype ZnABs exhibit a low discharge-charge voltage gap (e.g. 0.7 V, discharge-charge at 2 mA cm-2) with higher stability and longer cycle life compared to their counterparts constructed using Pt/C in air-cathode. Importantly, the hybrid nanofiber mat readily serves as an integrated air-cathode without the need of any further modification. Benefitting from its efficient catalytic activities and structural advantages, particularly the 3D architecture of highly conductive CNFs and the high loading density of strongly attached Co3O4 NPs on their surfaces, the resultant ZnABs show significantly improved performance with respect to the rate capability, cycling stability and current density, promising good potential in practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TGA curves of as electrospun Co(ii)-PAN fiber and C-CoPAN900 EDX and XPS spectra of the C-CoPAN900 photo of a home-built Zn-air cell and the preparation method of conventional catalyst electrode; polarization curves and corresponding power density plots of the battery using conventional type cathode of C-CoPN900 and commercial Pt/C catalyst; the electrocatalytic properties of hybrid CNFs obtained from varied weight ratios of PAN to cobalt acetate, e.g. 16 : 1 and 8 : 1, and their corresponding TGA curves; a comparison of the Zn-air battery performance of this work with recent literatures. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05988c

  8. Electromagnetic interference shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polymer composites.

    Yang, Yonglai; Guptal, Mool C; Dudley, Kenneth L; Lawrence, Roland W

    2007-02-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding characteristics of carbon nanofiber-polystyrene composites were investigated in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (Ku-band). It was observed that the shielding effectiveness of such composites was frequency independent, and increased with increasing carbon nanofiber loading within Ku-band. The experimental data exhibited that the shielding effectiveness of the polymer composite containing 20 wt% carbon nanofibers could reach more than 36 dB in the measured frequency region, indicating such composites can be applied to the potential EMI shielding materials. In addition, the results showed that the contribution of reflection to the EMI shielding effectiveness was much larger than that of absorption, implying the primary EMI shielding mechanism of such composites was reflection of electromagnetic radiation within Ku-band. PMID:17450793

  9. Synthesis of carbon nanofiber films and nanofiber composite coatings by laser-assisted catalytic chemical vapor deposition

    Uniform carbon nanofiber films and nanofiber composite coatings were synthesized from ethylene on nickel coated alumina substrates by laser-assisted catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Laser annealing of a 50 nm thick nickel film produced the catalytic nanoparticles. Thermal decomposition of ethylene over nickel nanoparticles was initiated and maintained by an argon ion laser operated at 488 nm. The films were examined by scanning electron microscopy and by transmission electron microscopy. Overall film uniformity and structure were assessed using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Film quality was related to the experimental parameters such as incident laser power density and irradiation time. For long irradiation times, carbon can be deposited by a thermal process rather than by a catalytic reaction directly over the nanofiber films to form carbon nanocomposite coatings. The process parameters leading to high quality nanofiber films free of amorphous carbon by-products as well as those leading to nanofiber composite coatings are presented

  10. Preparation of C/Ni-NiO composite nanofibers for anode materials in lithium-ion batteries

    Luo, Chenghao; Lu, Weili; Li, Yu; Feng, Yiyu; Feng, Wei; Zhao, Yunhui; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) embedded with various amounts of Ni and NiO nanoparticles (C/Ni-NiO) were prepared by electrospinning of polyacrylonitrile (PAN), followed by heat treatment. The structure and composition of the obtained C/Ni-NiO composite nanofibers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results suggested that the morphology, nanofiber diameter, and the content of the Ni-NiO nanoparticles in the CNFs were controlled by different amounts of nickel acetate added into the PAN. The electrochemical measurements of a charge/discharge experiment and a cyclic voltammetry test indicated that the content and the size of Ni-NiO nanoparticles embedded in the CNFs had a great influence on the electrochemical performance of lithium-ion batteries. CNFs embedded with a certain content of Ni-NiO nanoparticles as binder-free anodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries exhibited improved electrochemical performance, including high reversible capacities, good capacity retention, and stable cycling performance. This is mainly ascribed to the formation of a well-distributed Ni-NiO nanoparticle structure and the buffering role of the carbon nanofiber matrix, together with the high theoretical capacity of NiO and the increase in electrode connectivity caused by the formation of electrochemically inactive Ni nanoparticles.

  11. Preparation of a New Adsorbent from Activated Carbon and Carbon Nanofiber (AC/CNF for Manufacturing Organic-Vacbpour Respirator Cartridge

    Mehdi Jahangiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF was prepared to improve the performance of activated carbon (AC for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs and its utilization for respirator cartridges. Activated carbon was impregnated with a nickel nitrate catalyst precursor and carbonnanofibers (CNF were deposited directly on the AC surface using catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Deposited CNFs on catalyst particles in AC micropores, were activated by CO2 to recover the surface area and micropores.Surface and textural characterizations of the prepared composites were investigated using Brunauer, Emmett andTeller’s (BET technique and electron microscopy respectively. Prepared composite adsorbent was tested forbenzene, toluene and xylene (BTX adsorption and then employed in an organic respirator cartridge in granularform. Adsorption studies were conducted by passing air samples through the adsorbents in a glass column at an adjustable flow rate. Finally, any adsorbed species not retained by the adsorbents in the column were trapped in a charcoal sorbent tube and analyzed by gas chromatography. CNFs with a very thin diameter of about 10-20 nmwere formed uniformly on the AC/CNF. The breakthrough time for cartridges prepared with CO2 activated AC/CNF was 117 minutes which are significantly longer than for those cartridges prepared with walnut shell- based activated carbon with the same weight of adsorbents. This study showed that a granular form CO2 activated AC/CNF composite could be a very effective alternate adsorbent for respirator cartridges due to its larger adsorption capacities and lower weight.

  12. Adsorption behavior of perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomer on highly graphitized carbon nanofibers and their thermal stabilities

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Borghei, Maryam; Dhiman, Rajnish; Ruiz, Virginia; Kauppinen, Esko; Skou, Eivind Morten

    2014-01-01

    CNFs of decreasing hydrophobicity. This is indicated by the initial decrease and then increase in the value of Keq. with the increasing strength of the acid treatment. The corresponding carbon - ionomer composite also showed varying thermal stability depending on Nafion orientation. The specific...... isotherm), the ionomer has varying affinities for CNFs (Keq. = between 5 and 22) as compared to Vulcan (Keq. = 18), depending on surface treatments. However, the interactions are most likely governed by different adsorption mechanisms depending on hydrophilicity / hydrophobicity of the adsorbent carbon...

  13. Toward CH4 dissociation and C diffusion during Ni/Fe-catalyzed carbon nanofiber growth: A density functional theory study

    Fan, Chen; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Chen, De; Cheng, Hong-Ye; Zhu, Yi-An

    2011-04-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to investigate CH4 dissociation and C diffusion during the Ni/Fe-catalyzed growth of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Two bulk models with different Ni to Fe molar ratios (1:1 and 2:1) are constructed, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) simulations are conducted to evaluate their reliability. With the comparison between the calculated and experimental XRD patterns, these models are found to be well suited to reproduce the crystalline structures of Ni/Fe bulk alloys. The calculations indicate the binding of the C1 derivatives to the Ni/Fe closest-packed surfaces is strengthened compared to that on Ni(111), arising from the upshift of the weighted d-band centers of catalyst surfaces. Then, the transition states for the four successive dehydrogenation steps in CH4 dissociation are located using the dimer method. It is found that the energy barriers for the first three steps are rather close on the alloyed Ni/Fe and Ni surfaces, while the activation energy for CH dissociation is substantially lowered with the introduction of Fe. The dissolution of the generated C from the surface into the bulk of the Ni/Fe alloys is thermodynamically favorable, and the diffusion of C through catalyst particles is hindered by the Fe component. With the combination of density functional theory calculations and kinetic analysis, the C concentration in catalyst particles is predicted to increase with the Fe content. Meanwhile, other experimental conditions, such as the composition of carbon-containing gases, feedstock partial pressure, and reaction temperature, are also found to play a key role in determining the C concentration in bulk metal, and hence the microstructures of generated CNFs.

  14. Structure and properties of carbon nanofibers. application as electrocatalyst support

    S. del Rio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to gain an insight into the physical-chemical properties of carbon nanofibers and the relationship between those properties and the electrocatalytic behavior when used as catalyst support for their application in fuel cells.

  15. Surface functionalization of carbon nanofibers by sol-gel coating of zinc oxide

    In this paper the functional carbon nanofibers were prepared by the carbonization of ZnO coated PAN nanofibers to expand the potential applications of carbon nanofibers. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning. The electrospun PAN nanofibers were then used as substrates for depositing the functional layer of zinc oxide (ZnO) on the PAN nanofiber surfaces by sol-gel technique. The effects of coating, pre-oxidation and carbonization on the surface morphology and structures of the nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results of SEM showed a significant increase of the size of ZnO nanograins on the surface of nanofibers after the treatments of coating, pre-oxidation and carbonization. The observations by SEM also revealed that ZnO nanoclusters were firmly and clearly distributed on the surface of the carbon nanofibers. FTIR examination also confirmed the deposition of ZnO on the surface of carbon nanofibers. The XRD analysis indicated that the crystal structure of ZnO nanograins on the surface of carbon nanofibers

  16. Surface functionalization of carbon nanofibers by sol gel coating of zinc oxide

    Shao, Dongfeng; Wei, Qufu; Zhang, Liwei; Cai, Yibing; Jiang, Shudong

    2008-08-01

    In this paper the functional carbon nanofibers were prepared by the carbonization of ZnO coated PAN nanofibers to expand the potential applications of carbon nanofibers. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning. The electrospun PAN nanofibers were then used as substrates for depositing the functional layer of zinc oxide (ZnO) on the PAN nanofiber surfaces by sol-gel technique. The effects of coating, pre-oxidation and carbonization on the surface morphology and structures of the nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results of SEM showed a significant increase of the size of ZnO nanograins on the surface of nanofibers after the treatments of coating, pre-oxidation and carbonization. The observations by SEM also revealed that ZnO nanoclusters were firmly and clearly distributed on the surface of the carbon nanofibers. FTIR examination also confirmed the deposition of ZnO on the surface of carbon nanofibers. The XRD analysis indicated that the crystal structure of ZnO nanograins on the surface of carbon nanofibers.

  17. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of multiwalled carbon nanofibers

    Matthews, Kristopher; Cruden, Brett A.; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.; Delzeit, Lance

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to grow vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanofibers (MWNFs). The graphite basal planes in these nanofibers are not parallel as in nanotubes; instead they exhibit a small angle resembling a stacked cone arrangement. A parametric study with varying process parameters such as growth temperature, feedstock composition, and substrate power has been conducted, and these parameters are found to influence the growth rate, diameter, and morphology. The well-aligned MWNFs are suitable for fabricating electrode systems in sensor and device development.

  18. Synthesis of Carbon Nanofibers by a Glow-Arc Discharge

    Pacheco, Marquidia; Pacheco, Joel; Valdivia, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    A simple technique for CNFs synthesis is reported, the duration of processes is lower than 5 minutes and it requires neither preheating nor high flux of carrier gas. The synthesis has been achieved by the decomposition of methane in an AC low energy plasma discharge. The formed CNFs, exhibited a diameter of about 80nm with relatively no impurities. This purity allows the CNFs to be used as a catalyst support for subsequent applications in polymer composite formation or polluted gas absorbers....

  19. Controllable preparation of multi-dimensional hybrid materials of nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxide nanorods/nanosheets on electrospun carbon nanofibers for high-performance supercapacitors

    Graphical Abstract: Multi-dimensional hybrid materials of nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxide nanorods/nanosheets grown on electrospun carbon nanofiber membranes were prepared via electrospinning combined with solution co-deposition for high-performance supercapacitor electrodes. - Highlights: • Ni-Co LDH@CNFhybridswerepreparedbyelectrospinningandsolutionco-deposition. • Ni-Co LDH@CNF hybrids show high electrochemical performance for supercapacitors. • This method can be extended to other bimetallic@CNF hybrids for electrode materials. - Abstract: Hybrid nanomaterials with hierarchical structures have been considered as one kind of the most promising electrode materials for high-performance supercapacitors with high capacity and long cycle lifetime. In this work, multi-dimensional hybrid materials of nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxide (Ni-Co LDH) nanorods/nanosheets on carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were prepared by electrospinning technique combined with one-step solution co-deposition method. Carbon nanofiber membranes were obtained by electrospinning of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) followed by pre-oxidation and carbonization. The successful growth of Ni-Co LDH with different morphologies on CNF membrane by using two kinds of auxiliary agents reveals the simplicity and universality of this method. The uniform and immense growth of Ni-Co LDH on CNFs significantly improves its dispersion and distribution. Meanwhile the hierarchical structure of carbon nanofiber@nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxide nanorods/nanosheets (CNF@Ni-Co LDH NR/NS) hybrid membranes provide not only more active sites for electrochemical reaction but also more efficient pathways for electron transport. Galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements reveal high specific capacitances of 1378.2 F g−1 and 1195.4 F g−1 (based on Ni-Co LDH mass) at 1 A g−1 for CNF@Ni-Co LDH NR and CNF@Ni-Co LDH NS hybrid membranes, respectively. Moreover, cycling stabilities for both hybrid membranes are significantly enhanced compared with those of Ni-Co LDH NR and NS powders. This facile method provides a new strategy for designs and applications of binary transition metal oxides/hydroxides deposited on various substrates for next-generation energy storage devices

  20. Mass-transport-controlled, large-area, uniform deposition of carbon nanofibers and their application in gas diffusion layers of fuel cells

    Tang, Xian; Xie, Zhiyong; Huang, Qizhong; Chen, Guofen; Hou, Ming; Yi, Baolian

    2015-04-01

    The effect of mass transport on the growth characteristics of large-area vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was investigated by adjusting the substrate deposition angle (?). The catalyst precursor solution was coated onto one side of a 2D porous carbon paper substrate via a decal printing method. The results showed that the CNFs were grown on only one side of the substrate and ? was found to significantly affect the growth uniformity. At ? = 0, the growth thickness, the density, the microstructure and the yield of the CNF film were uniform across the substrate surface, whereas the growth uniformity decreased with increasing ?, suggesting that the large-area CNF deposition processes were mass-transport-controlled. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of the gas diffusion processes revealed the homogeneous distributions of the carbon-source-gas concentration, pressure, and velocity near the substrate surface at ? = 0, which were the important factors in achieving the mass-transport-limited uniform CNF growth. The homogeneity of the field distributions decreased with increasing ?, in accordance with the variation in the growth uniformity with ?. When used as a micro-porous layer, the uniform CNF film enabled higher proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance in comparison with commercial carbon black by virtue of its improved electronic and mass-transport properties confirmed by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results.The effect of mass transport on the growth characteristics of large-area vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was investigated by adjusting the substrate deposition angle (?). The catalyst precursor solution was coated onto one side of a 2D porous carbon paper substrate via a decal printing method. The results showed that the CNFs were grown on only one side of the substrate and ? was found to significantly affect the growth uniformity. At ? = 0, the growth thickness, the density, the microstructure and the yield of the CNF film were uniform across the substrate surface, whereas the growth uniformity decreased with increasing ?, suggesting that the large-area CNF deposition processes were mass-transport-controlled. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of the gas diffusion processes revealed the homogeneous distributions of the carbon-source-gas concentration, pressure, and velocity near the substrate surface at ? = 0, which were the important factors in achieving the mass-transport-limited uniform CNF growth. The homogeneity of the field distributions decreased with increasing ?, in accordance with the variation in the growth uniformity with ?. When used as a micro-porous layer, the uniform CNF film enabled higher proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance in comparison with commercial carbon black by virtue of its improved electronic and mass-transport properties confirmed by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Descriptions of fabrication and characterization of CP and CFD methods; optical images of CNFs; field distributions; fitted impedance parameters; Nyquist plots of PEMFCs. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00022j

  1. Electrospun Carbon Nanofiber Membranes for Filtration of Nanoparticles from Water

    Mirko Faccini; Guadalupe Borja; Marcel Boerrigter; Diego Morillo Martn; Sandra Martnez Crespiera; Socorro Vzquez-Campos; Laurent Aubouy; David Amantia

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, hundreds of consumer products contain metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (NP); this increases the probability of such particles to be released to natural waters generating a potential risk to human health and the environment. This paper presents the development of efficient carboneous nanofibrous membranes for NP filtration from aqueous solutions. Free-standing carbon nanofiber (CNF) mats with different fiber size distribution ranging from 126 to 554?nm in diameter were produced by...

  2. Silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber composite electrodes for ibuprofen detection

    Manea, Florica; Motoc, Sorina; Pop, Aniela; Remes, Adriana; Schoonman, Joop

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare and characterize two types of silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite electrodes, i.e., silver-decorated CNF-epoxy and silver-modified natural zeolite-CNF-epoxy composite electrodes suitable for ibuprofen detection in aqueous solution. Ag carbon nanotube composite electrode exhibited the best electroanalytical parameters through applying preconcentration/differential-pulsed voltammetry scheme.

  3. Silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber composite electrodes for ibuprofen detection

    Manea, F.; Motoc, S.; A. POP; Remes, A; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare and characterize two types of silver-functionalized carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite electrodes, i.e., silver-decorated CNF-epoxy and silver-modified natural zeolite-CNF-epoxy composite electrodes suitable for ibuprofen detection in aqueous solution. Ag carbon nanotube composite electrode exhibited the best electroanalytical parameters through applying preconcentration/differential-pulsed voltammetry scheme.

  4. High-Resolution Imaging of Plasmid DNA in Liquids in Dynamic Mode Atomic Force Microscopy Using a Carbon Nanofiber Tip

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Ito, Shuichi; Yagi, Akira; Sakai, Nobuaki; Uekusa, Yoshitugu; Ohta, Ryo; Inaba, Kazuhisa; Hayashi, Akari; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tanemura, Masaki

    2011-08-01

    To understand the motion of DNA and DNA complexes, the real-time visualization of living DNA in liquids is quite important. Here, we report the high-resolution imaging of plasmid DNA in water using a rapid-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) system equipped with a carbon nanofiber (CNF) probe. To achieve a rapid high-resolution scan, small SiN cantilevers with dimensions of 2 (width) × 0.1 (thickness) × 9 µm (length) and a bent end (tip view structure) were employed as base cantilevers onto which single CNFs were grown. The resonant frequencies of the cantilever were 1.5 MHz in air and 500 kHz in water, and the spring constant was calculated to be 0.1 N/m. Single CNFs, typically 88 nm in length, were formed on an array of the cantilevers in a batch process by the ion-irradiation method. An AFM image of a plasmid DNA taken in water at 0.2 fps (5 s/image) using a batch-fabricated CNF-tipped cantilever clearly showed the helix turns of the double strand DNA. The average helical pitch measured 3.4 nm (σ: 0.5 nm), which was in good agreement with that determined by the X-ray diffraction method, 3.4 nm. Thus, it is presumed that the combined use of the rapid-scan AFM system with the ion-induced CNF probe is promising for the dynamic analysis of biomolecules.

  5. Anchoring Mechanism of ZnO Nanoparticles on Graphitic Carbon Nanofiber Surfaces through a Modified Co-Precipitation Method to Improve Interfacial Contact and Photocatalytic Performance.

    Dillip, Gowra Raghupathy; Banerjee, Arghya Narayan; Anitha, Veettikunnu Chandran; Joo, Sang Woo; Min, Bong Ki; Sawant, Sandesh Y; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2015-10-26

    A facile three-step co-precipitation method is developed to synthesize graphitic carbon nanofibers (CNFs) decorated with ZnO nanoparticles (NPs). By interchanging intermediate steps of the reaction processes, two kinds of nanohybrids are fabricated with stark morphological and physicochemical differences. The morphologies differ because of the different chemical environments of the NP/nanocluster formation. The hybrid with larger and non-uniform ZnO nanocluster size is formed in liquid phase and resulted in considerable interfacial defects that deteriorate the charge-transfer properties. The hybrid with smaller and uniform ZnO NPs was formed in a dry solid phase and produced near-defect-free interfaces, leading to efficient charge transfer for superior photocatalytic performance. The results broaden the understanding of the anchoring/bonding mechanism in ZnO/CNF hybrid formation and may facilitate further development of more effective exfoliation strategies for the preparation of high-performance composites/hybrids. PMID:26336943

  6. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber Based Biosensor Platform for Glucose Sensor

    Mamun, Khandaker Abdullah Al [ORNL; Tulip, Fahmida S [ORNL; Macarthur, Kimberly C [ORNL; McFarlane, Nicole M [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) have recently become an important tool for biosensor design. Carbon nanofibers (CNF) have excellent conductive and structural properties with many irregularities and defect sites in addition to exposed carboxyl groups throughout their surfaces. These properties allow a better immobilization matrix compared to carbon nanotubes and offer better resolution when compared with the FET-based biosensors. VACNFs can be deterministically grown on silicon substrates allowing optimization of the structures for various biosensor applications. Two VACNF electrode architectures have been employed in this study and a comparison of their performances has been made in terms of sensitivity, sensing limitations, dynamic range, and response time. The usage of VACNF platform as a glucose sensor has been verified in this study by selecting an optimum architecture based on the VACNF forest density. Read More: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0129156414500062

  7. Broad-Band Electrical Conductivity of High Density Polyethylene Nanocomposites with Carbon Nanoadditives: Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Nanofibers

    Linares, A.; Canalda, J C; Cagiao, M. E.; García-Gutiérrez, M. C.; Nogales, A.; Martín-Gullón, I.; J. de Vera; Ezquerra, T A

    2008-01-01

    A study is presented of the electrical properties of a series of nanocomposites based on high density polyethylene (HDPE) as a matrix and either carbon nanofiber (CNF) or multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) as a nanoadditive. The measurements of the electrical conductivity over a broad-band of frequencies (10-2 > F/Hz > 109)allow improvement of the description of the electrical properties of polymer nanocomposites based on either carbon nanofibers or carbon nanotubes. Despite the lack of ...

  8. In Situ Probing of Oxygen-Containing Groups on Acid-treated Carbon Nanofibers using Aromatic Molecules

    Nishikiori, Hiromasa; Kubota, Satoshi; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Endo, Morinobu; Fujii, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    A unique procedure to create a highly disperse system of CNFs throughout solvents allows in situ fluorescence measurements using aromatic probe molecules even though the fluorescence of those adsorbed on carbon materials is scarcely observed due to strong quenching. Oxidized groups on the outer surface of acid-treated CNFs are quantified using 1-naphthol (1-NP), whereas it is difficult to obtain quantitative information of the chemical species existing in a monolayer or only a few layers of t...

  9. Template Synthesis of Carbon Nanofibers Containing Linear Mesocage Arrays

    Wang Yongwen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanofibers containing linear mesocage arrays were prepared via evaporation induced self-assembly method within AAO template with an average channel diameter of about 25 nm. The TEM results show that the mesocages have an elongated shape in the transversal direction. The results of N2 adsorptiondesorption analysis indicate that the sample possesses a cage-like mesoporous structure and the average mesopore size of the sample is about 18 nm.

  10. Self-heating function of carbon nanofiber cement pastes

    Galao Malo, Óscar; Baeza de los Santos, Francisco Javier; Zornoza Gómez, Emilio; GARCÉS TERRADILLOS, PEDRO

    2014-01-01

    The viability of carbon nanofiber (CNF) composites in cement matrices as a self-heating material is reported in this paper. This functional application would allow the use of CNF cement composites as a heating element in buildings, or for deicing pavements of civil engineering transport infrastructures, such as highways or airport runways. Cement pastes with the addition of different CNF dosages (from 0 to 5% by cement mass) have been prepared. Afterwards, tests were run at different fixed vo...

  11. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers as sacrificial templates for nanofluidic structures

    We report a method to fabricate nanoscale pipes ('nanopipes') suitable for fluidic transport. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition are used as sacrificial templates for nanopipes with internal diameters as small as 30 nm and lengths up to several micrometers that are oriented perpendicular to the substrate. This method provides a high level of control over the nanopipe location, number, length, and diameter, permitting them to be deterministically positioned on a substrate and arranged into arrays

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon nanofibers on Co and Cu Catalysts by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    This study reports on the synthesis of carbon nanofibers via chemical vapor deposition using Co and Cu as catalysts. In order to investigate the suitability of their catalytic activity for the growth of nanofibers, we prepared catalysts for the synthesis of carbon nanofibers with Cobalt nitrate and Copper nitrate, and found the optimum concentration of each respective catalyst. Then we made them react with Aluminum nitrate and Ammonium Molybdate to form precipitates. The precipitates were dried at a temperature of 110 .deg. C in order to be prepared into catalyst powder. The catalyst was sparsely and thinly spread on a quartz tube boat to grow carbon nanofibers via thermal chemical vapor deposition. The characteristics of the synthesized carbon nanofibers were analyzed through SEM, EDS, XRD, Raman, XPS, and TG/DTA, and the specific surface area was measured via BET. Consequently, the characteristics of the synthesized carbon nanofibers were greatly influenced by the concentration ratio of metal catalysts. In particular, uniform carbon nanofibers of 27 nm in diameter grew when the concentration ratio of Co and Cu was 6:4 at 700 .deg. C of calcination temperature; carbon nanofibers synthesized under such conditions showed the best crystallizability, compared to carbon nanofibers synthesized with metal catalysts under different concentration ratios, and revealed 1.26 high amorphicity as well as 292 m2g-1 high specific surface area

  13. Effect of carbon nanofiber dispersion on the properties of PIP-SiC/SiC composites

    SiC/SiC composites with and without dispersed carbon nanofiber were fabricated by the polymer impregnation and pyrolysis process. The effect of dispersing carbon nanofiber on the mechanical and thermal properties of SiC/SiC composites was investigated. The bending strength and elastic modulus of SiC/SiC composites with carbon nanofiber decreased slightly compared to those of the SiC/SiC composites without the nanofiber. On the other hand, the thermal conductivity of SiC/SiC composites increased with increasing amount of dispersed nanofiber. The dominant reason is considered to be that the pore shape changed from an oblong shape perpendicular to the direction of heat flow to an isotropic. The shape change resulted from the dispersed carbon nanofiber.

  14. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu/ZrO2 catalyst

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu‐ZrO2/CNF) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO3). The CNF activated with 5% HNO3 produced higher surface area which is 155 m2/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N2 adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO3 concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst

  15. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu / ZrO2 catalyst

    Din, Israf Ud; Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Subbarao, Duvvuri; Naeem, A.

    2014-10-01

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu - ZrO2/ CNF ) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO3). The CNF activated with 5% HNO3 produced higher surface area which is 155 m2/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N2 adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO3 concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst.

  16. Designing an ultrathin silica layer for highly durable carbon nanofibers as the carbon support in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Hwang, Sun-Mi; Park, Jae-Hyun; Lim, Seongyop; Jung, Doo-Hwan; Guim, Hwanuk; Yoon, Young-Gi; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kim, Tae-Young

    2014-09-01

    A critical issue for maintaining long-term applications of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is the development of an innovative technique for the functionalization of a carbon support that preserves their exceptional electrical conductivity and robustly enriches their durability. Here, we report for the first time how the formation of a partially coated, ultrathin, hydrophobic silica layer around the surfaces of the carbon nanofiber (CNF) helps improve the durability of the CNF without decreasing the significant electrical conductivity of the virgin CNF. The synthesis involved the adsorption of polycarbomethylsilane (PS) on the CNF's sidewalls, followed by high temperature pyrolysis of PS, resulting in a highly durable, conductive carbon support in PEFCs. The Pt nanoparticles are in direct contact with the surface of the carbon in the empty spaces between unevenly coated silica layers, which are not deposited directly onto the silica layer. The presence of a Pt nanoparticle layer that was thicker than the silica layer would be a quite advantageous circumstance that provides contact with other neighboring CNFs without having a significant adverse effect that deeply damages the electrical conductivity of the neighboring CNF composites with the silica layer. Furthermore, the ultrathin, hydrophobic silica layer around the surfaces of the CNF provides great potential to reduce the presence of water molecules in the vicinity of the carbon supports and the &z.rad;OH radicals formed on the surface of the Pt catalyst. As a result, the CNF with a 5 wt% silica layer that we prepared has had extremely high initial performance and durability under severe carbon corrosion conditions, starting up with 974 mA cm-2 at 0.6 V and ending up with more than 58% of the initial performance (i.e., 569 mA cm-2 at 0.6 V) after a 1.6 V holding test for 6 h. The beginning-of-life and end-of-life performances based on the virgin CNF without the silica layer were 981 and 340 mA cm-2 at 0.6 V, respectively. The CNF having a silica layer had long-term durability which was superior to that of the virgin CNF.

  17. Relationship between Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Individual Dispersion Behavior and Properties of Electrospun Nanofibers

    Haji A.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion stability behavior of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT has important effects on morphological and mechanical properties of SWCNT/polymer composite nanofibers. The relationship of the dispersion conditions with morphological and mechanical characteristics for SWCNT / polyacrylonitrile (PAN / polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP composite nanofibers have been examined. The SEM and TEM analyses of the nanofibers revealed that the deformation in the nanofiber structures increases with increasing SWCNT concentration. Our data indicate that with increasing the amount of SWCNT (from 0 to 2 wt %, the average nanofiber diameter was increased from 163±19 nm to 307±34 nm. Tensile results showed that only 2 wt % SWCNT loading to the electrospun composite nanofibers gave rise to 10-fold and 3-fold increase in the tensile modulus and tenacity of nanofiber layers, respectively. Essentially, high mechanical properties and uniform morphology of the composite naofibers were found at SWCNT concentration of ~2 wt % due to their stable and individual dispersion.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and formation process of transition metal oxide nanotubes using carbon nanofibers as templates

    Mono and binary transition metal oxide nanotubes could be synthesized by the immersion of carbon nanofiber templates into metal nitrate solutions and removal of the templates by heat treatment in air. The transition metal oxide nanotubes were composed of nano-crystallites of metal oxides. The functional groups on the carbon nanofiber templates were essential for the coating of these templates: they acted as adsorption sites for the metal nitrates, ensuring a uniform metal oxide coating. During the removal of the carbon nanofiber templates by calcination in air, the metal oxide coatings promoted the combustion reaction between the carbon nanofibers and oxygen. - Graphical abstract: Mono and binary transition metal-oxide nanotubes could be synthesized by the immersion of carbon nanofiber templates into metal nitrate solutions and removal of the templates by heat treatment in air.

  19. CoSn/carbon composite nanofibers for applications as anode in lithium-ion batteries

    Lu, Weili; Luo, Chenghao; Li, Yu; Feng, Yiyu; Feng, Wei, E-mail: weifeng@tju.edu.cn; Zhao, Yunhui; Yuan, Xiaoyan, E-mail: yuanxy@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin University, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials (China)

    2013-09-15

    CoSn/carbon composite nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning followed by heat treatment. Uniform morphologies and microstructures were observed by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results demonstrated that well-dispersed nanoparticles of CoSn intermetallic compound and Sn with diameter of about 30-50 nm embedded in carbon nanofibers were prepared after carbonization at 850 Degree-Sign C. Compared with pure carbon nanofibers without the nanoparticles, CoSn/carbon composite nanofibers showed a high reversible capacity and excellent cycling performance, resulting from the formation of CoSn intermetallic nanoparticles and buffering by the carbon nanofiber matrix. The nanofiber mats with good flexibility were utilized as anodes in lithium-ion batteries, and the CoSn/carbon composite nanofibers exhibited a good fibrous morphology after the discharge/charge processes. Results indicated that electrospinning could be a feasible method to prepare Co-Sn-C composite nanofibers as anodes in lithium-ion batteries.

  20. CoSn/carbon composite nanofibers for applications as anode in lithium-ion batteries

    CoSn/carbon composite nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning followed by heat treatment. Uniform morphologies and microstructures were observed by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results demonstrated that well-dispersed nanoparticles of CoSn intermetallic compound and Sn with diameter of about 30–50 nm embedded in carbon nanofibers were prepared after carbonization at 850 °C. Compared with pure carbon nanofibers without the nanoparticles, CoSn/carbon composite nanofibers showed a high reversible capacity and excellent cycling performance, resulting from the formation of CoSn intermetallic nanoparticles and buffering by the carbon nanofiber matrix. The nanofiber mats with good flexibility were utilized as anodes in lithium-ion batteries, and the CoSn/carbon composite nanofibers exhibited a good fibrous morphology after the discharge/charge processes. Results indicated that electrospinning could be a feasible method to prepare Co–Sn–C composite nanofibers as anodes in lithium-ion batteries

  1. Composite Nanofibers of Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and Amino-functionalized Carbon Nanotubes Electrospun from Dimethylsulfoxide

    NEN, Aysen H.; Ucar, Nuray; KIZILDAG, Nuray; EREN, Olcay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, DMSO was used as the solvent and PAN nanofibers reinforced with amino-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) were successfully electrospun from the electrospinning solutions prepared in DMSO. The concentration of f-MWCNTs were changed as 1w% and 3w% with respect to the weight of PAN. The effect of f-MWCNT concentration on morphology, conductivity and mechanical properties of composite nanofibers were examined and compared to that of pure PAN nanofibers. Uniform ...

  2. Structural and electronic characteristics induced by carbonization control of mesoporous carbon nanofibers

    Highlights: Controlled structural property and electrical property of mesoporous carbon nanofiber depending on change of carbonization temperature. Increasing La, Lc and decreasing d-space at higher carbonization temperature. The lower Ea and energy gap are reduced by high carbonization temperature. Developing mesoporous carbon nanofiber with higher conductivity is expected to be useful in application for gas sensor. - Abstract: Mesoporous carbon nanofibers (MCNFs) are fabricated at various carbonization temperatures. The carbonization temperature plays a key role in determining the structural characteristics and the electronic properties of MCNFs. The band gap energies of MCNFs are estimated to be 0.080, 0.036, and 0.014 eV at the carbonization temperatures of 600, 900, and 1200 C, respectively. The MCNF carbonized at 1200 C has the highest stacking height of graphene planes (Lc) and the largest number of graphene layers (Lc/d). Raman data show the intensity ratio of D to G peaks, which is related to the graphene size (La). La increases with increasing the carbonization temperature. In addition, as the carbonization temperature increases, the conductivity of MCNF increases due to larges values of Lc, La, and Lc/d

  3. Structural and electronic characteristics induced by carbonization control of mesoporous carbon nanofibers

    Im, Ji-Eun [Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Min-Soo [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Li, Jing [Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Kyung-Hwa, E-mail: khyoo@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong-Rok, E-mail: yrkim@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Controlled structural property and electrical property of mesoporous carbon nanofiber depending on change of carbonization temperature. • Increasing L{sub a}, L{sub c} and decreasing d-space at higher carbonization temperature. • The lower E{sub a} and energy gap are reduced by high carbonization temperature. • Developing mesoporous carbon nanofiber with higher conductivity is expected to be useful in application for gas sensor. - Abstract: Mesoporous carbon nanofibers (MCNFs) are fabricated at various carbonization temperatures. The carbonization temperature plays a key role in determining the structural characteristics and the electronic properties of MCNFs. The band gap energies of MCNFs are estimated to be 0.080, 0.036, and 0.014 eV at the carbonization temperatures of 600, 900, and 1200 °C, respectively. The MCNF carbonized at 1200 °C has the highest stacking height of graphene planes (L{sub c}) and the largest number of graphene layers (L{sub c}/d). Raman data show the intensity ratio of D to G peaks, which is related to the graphene size (L{sub a}). L{sub a} increases with increasing the carbonization temperature. In addition, as the carbonization temperature increases, the conductivity of MCNF increases due to larges values of L{sub c}, L{sub a}, and L{sub c}/d.

  4. Oxygen adsorption-induced surface segregation of titanium oxide by activation in carbon nanofibers for maximizing photocatalytic performance.

    Lee, Sung-In; Jo, Seong-Mu; Joh, Han-Ik; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Lee, Sungho

    2015-02-14

    This research demonstrates a simple method for synthesizing titanium dioxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanofibers. These nanofibers showed highly efficient degradation of methylene blue under UV light because of the synergistic effects of the large surface-active sites of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and the carbon nanofibers on the photocatalytic properties. PMID:25575123

  5. Reverse Kebab Structure Formed inside Carbon Nanofibers via Nanochannel Flow.

    Nie, Min; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Fisher, Frank T

    2015-09-15

    The morphology of polymers inside a confined space has raised great interest in recent years. However, polymer crystallization within a one-dimensional carbon nanostructure is challenging due to the difficulty of polar solvents carrying polymers to enter a nonpolar graphitic nanotube in bulk solution at normal temperature and pressure. Here we describe a method whereby nylon-11 was crystallized and periodically distributed on the individual graphitic nanocone structure within hollow carbon nanofibers (CNF). Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction indicate that the nylon polymer is in the crystalline phase. A mechanism is suggested for the initiation of nanochannel flow in a bulk solvent as a prerequisite condition to achieve interior polymer crystallization. Selective etching of polymer crystals on the outer wall of CNF indicates that both surface tension and viscosity affect the flow within the CNF. This approach provides an opportunity for the interior functionalization of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for applications in the biomedical, energy, and related fields. PMID:26313253

  6. Effect of temperature on the electron field emission from aligned carbon nanofibers and multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Effect of temperature and aspect ratio on the field emission properties of vertically aligned carbon nanofiber and multiwalled carbon nanotube thin films were studied in detail. Carbon nanofibers and multiwalled carbon nanotube have been synthesized on Si substrates via direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Surface morphologies of the films have been studied by a scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and an atomic force microscope. It is found that the threshold field and the emission current density are dependent on the ambient temperature as well as on the aspect ratio of the carbon nanostructure. The threshold field for carbon nanofibers was found to decrease from 5.1 to 2.6 V/?m when the temperature was raised from 300 to 650 K, whereas for MWCNTs it was found to decrease from 4.0 to 1.4 V/?m. This dependence was due to the change in work function of the nanofibers and nanotubes with temperature. The field enhancement factor, current density and the dependence of the effective work function with temperature and with aspect ratio were calculated and we have tried to explain the emission mechanism

  7. Carbon Nanofibers Synthesized on Selective Substrates for Nonvolatile Memory and 3D Electronics

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Khan, Abdur R.

    2011-01-01

    A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) growth technique has been developed where the choice of starting substrate was found to influence the electrical characteristics of the resulting carbon nanofiber (CNF) tubes. It has been determined that, if the tubes are grown on refractory metallic nitride substrates, then the resulting tubes formed with dc PECVD are also electrically conducting. Individual CNFs were formed by first patterning Ni catalyst islands using ebeam evaporation and liftoff. The CNFs were then synthesized using dc PECVD with C2H2:NH3 = [1:4] at 5 Torr and 700 C, and approximately equal to 200-W plasma power. Tubes were grown directly on degenerately doped silicon substrates with resistivity rho approximately equal to 1-5 meterohm-centimeter, as well as NbTiN. The approximately equal to 200-nanometer thick refractory NbTiN deposited using magnetron sputtering had rho approximately equal to 113 microohm-centimeter and was also chemically compatible with CNF synthesis. The sample was then mounted on a 45 beveled Al holder, and placed inside a SEM (scanning electron microscope). A nanomanipulator probe stage was placed inside the SEM equipped with an electrical feed-through, where tungsten probes were used to make two-terminal electrical measurements with an HP 4156C parameter analyzer. The positive terminal nanoprobe was mechanically manipulated to physically contact an individual CNF grown directly on NbTiN as shown by the SEM image in the inset of figure (a), while the negative terminal was grounded to the substrate. This revealed the tube was electrically conductive, although measureable currents could not be detected until approximately equal to 6 V, after which point current increased sharply until compliance (approximately equal to 50 nA) was reached at approximately equal to 9.5 V. A native oxide on the tungsten probe tips may contribute to a tunnel barrier, which could be the reason for the suppressed transport at low biases. Currents up to approximately 100 nA could be cycled, which are likely to propagate via the tube surface, or sidewalls, rather than the body, which is shown by the I-V in figure (a). Electrical conduction via the sidewalls is a necessity for dc NEMS (nanoelectromechanical system) applications, more so than for the field emission applications of such tubes. During the tests, high conductivity was expected, because both probes were shorted to the substrate, as shown by curve 1 in the I-V characteristic in figure (b). When a tube grown on NbTiN was probed, the response was similar to the approximately equal to 100 nA and is represented by curve 2 in figure (b), which could be cycled and propagated via the tube surface or the sidewalls. However, no measureable currents for the tube grown directly on Si were observed as shown by curve 3 in figure (b), even after testing over a range of samples. This could arise from a dielectric coating on the sidewalls for tubes on Si. As a result of the directional nature of ion bombardment during dc PECVD, Si from the substrate is likely re-sputtered and possibly coats the sidewalls.

  8. Experimental study of mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanofiber/epoxy composites

    Epoxy nanocomposites of different content of carbon nanofibers up to 1 wt.% have been fabricated under room temperature and refrigerated curing conditions. The composites were studied in terms of mechanical and electrical properties. Flexural modulus and hardness were found to increase significantly in refrigerated samples due to prevention of aggregates of nanofibers during cure condition. Increase and shifting in G-band by Raman spectra of these samples confirmed stress transfer and reinforcement between epoxy matrix and carbon nanofiber. Electrical conductivity improved by 3-6 orders after infusing carbon nanofibers in insulating epoxy. Room temperature samples acquired higher conductivity that was attributed to network formation by aggregates of nanofibers along the fiber alignment direction as revealed by electron microscopic studies.

  9. Branched carbon nanofiber network synthesis at room temperature using radio frequency supported microwave plasmas

    Carbon nanofibers have been grown at room temperature using a combination of radio frequency and microwave assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanofibers were grown, using Ni powder catalyst, onto substrates kept at room temperature by using a purposely designed water-cooled sample holder. Branched carbon nanofiber growth was obtained without using a template resulting in interconnected carbon nanofiber network formation on substrates held at room temperature. This method would allow room-temperature direct synthesized nanofiber networks over relatively large areas, for a range of temperature sensitive substrates, such as organic materials, plastics, and other polymers of interest for nanoelectronic two-dimensional networks, nanoelectromechanical devices, nanoactuators, and composite materials

  10. Activated carbon nanofiber webs made by electrospinning for capacitive deionization

    Activated carbon fiber (ACF) webs with a non-woven multi-scale texture were fabricated from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and their electrosorption performance in capacitive deionization for desalination was investigated. PAN nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning, followed by oxidative stabilization and activation with carbon dioxide at 750–900 °C, resulting in the ACF webs that were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption. The results show that the as-made ACFs have a specific surface area of 335–712 m2/g and an average nanofiber diameter of 285–800 nm, which can be tuned by varying the activation temperature. With the ACF webs as an electrode, an electrosorption capacity as high as 4.64 mg/g was achieved on a batch-type electrosorptive setup operated at 1.6 V. The ACF webs made by electrospinning are of potential as an excellent electrode material for capacitive deionization for desalination.

  11. High performance carbon nanotube - polymer nanofiber hybrid fabrics

    Yildiz, Ozkan; Stano, Kelly; Faraji, Shaghayegh; Stone, Corinne; Willis, Colin; Zhang, Xiangwu; Jur, Jesse S.; Bradford, Philip D.

    2015-10-01

    Stable nanoscale hybrid fabrics containing both polymer nanofibers and separate and distinct carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are highly desirable but very challenging to produce. Here, we report the first instance of such a hybrid fabric, which can be easily tailored to contain 0-100% millimeter long CNTs. The novel CNT - polymer hybrid nonwoven fabrics were created by simultaneously electrospinning nanofibers onto aligned CNT sheets which were drawn and collected on a grounded, rotating mandrel. Due to the unique properties of the CNTs, the hybrids show very high tensile strength, very small pore size, high specific surface area and electrical conductivity. In order to further examine the hybrid fabric properties, they were consolidated under pressure, and also calendered at 70 °C. After calendering, the fabric's strength increased by an order of magnitude due to increased interactions and intermingling with the CNTs. The hybrids are highly efficient as aerosol filters; consolidated hybrid fabrics with a thickness of 20 microns and areal density of only 8 g m-2 exhibited ultra low particulate (ULPA) filter performance. The flexibility of this nanofabrication method allows for the use of many different polymer systems which provides the opportunity for engineering a wide range of nanoscale hybrid materials with desired functionalities.Stable nanoscale hybrid fabrics containing both polymer nanofibers and separate and distinct carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are highly desirable but very challenging to produce. Here, we report the first instance of such a hybrid fabric, which can be easily tailored to contain 0-100% millimeter long CNTs. The novel CNT - polymer hybrid nonwoven fabrics were created by simultaneously electrospinning nanofibers onto aligned CNT sheets which were drawn and collected on a grounded, rotating mandrel. Due to the unique properties of the CNTs, the hybrids show very high tensile strength, very small pore size, high specific surface area and electrical conductivity. In order to further examine the hybrid fabric properties, they were consolidated under pressure, and also calendered at 70 °C. After calendering, the fabric's strength increased by an order of magnitude due to increased interactions and intermingling with the CNTs. The hybrids are highly efficient as aerosol filters; consolidated hybrid fabrics with a thickness of 20 microns and areal density of only 8 g m-2 exhibited ultra low particulate (ULPA) filter performance. The flexibility of this nanofabrication method allows for the use of many different polymer systems which provides the opportunity for engineering a wide range of nanoscale hybrid materials with desired functionalities. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02732b

  12. Method for production of polymer and carbon nanofibers from water-soluble polymers.

    Spender, Jonathan; Demers, Alexander L; Xie, Xinfeng; Cline, Amos E; Earle, M Alden; Ellis, Lucas D; Neivandt, David J

    2012-07-11

    Nanometer scale carbon fibers (carbon nanofibers) are of great interest to scientists and engineers in fields such as materials science, composite production, and energy storage due to their unique chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. Precursors currently used for production of carbon nanofibers are primarily from nonrenewable resources. Lignin is a renewable natural polymer existing in all high-level plants that is a byproduct of the papermaking process and a potential feedstock for carbon nanofiber production. The work presented here demonstrates a process involving the rapid freezing of an aqueous lignin solution, followed by sublimation of the resultant ice, to form a uniform network comprised of individual interconnected lignin nanofibers. Carbonization of the lignin nanofibers yields a similarly structured carbon nanofiber network. The methodology is not specific to lignin; nanofibers of other water-soluble polymers have been successfully produced. This nanoscale fibrous morphology has not been observed in traditional cryogel processes, due to the relatively slower freezing rates employed compared to those achieved in this study. PMID:22716198

  13. Electromagnetic Properties of Novel Carbon Nanofibers

    WANG Gai-Hua, DAI Bo, MA Yong-Jun, REN Yong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbonized bacterial cellulose (CBC with a three dimensional net-linked framework were synthesized from carbonized bacterial cellulose and investigated by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum and Transmission electron microscopy. The complex permittivity and permeability of CBC/paraffin wax composite with certain ratio of the composite were measured by vector network analysis in the frequency range of 0.1–18 GHz. It is found that the composite has high permittivity and dielectric loss, especially at the low frequency. The electromagnetic characteristics of the CBC/Fe3O4 complex absorbers synthesized by mixing a small quantity of CBC with Fe3O4 were also studied, aiming at improving the microwave absorbing properties of Fe3O4/Wax composite. When the sample’s thickness was 1.2 mm, the reflection loss reached a minimal value of –21 dB for CBC - Fe3O4/Wax and of –2 dB for Fe3O4/Wax as well.

  14. Binder-free Si nanoparticles@carbon nanofiber fabric as energy storage material

    A nonwoven nanofiber fabric with paper-like qualities composed of Si nanoparticles and carbon as binder-free anode electrode is reported. The nanofiber fabrics are prepared by convenient electrospinning technique, in which, the Si nanoparticles are uniformly confined in the carbon nanofibers. The high strength and flexibility of the nanofiber fabrics are beneficial for alleviating the structural deformation and facilitating ion transports throughout the whole composited electrodes. Due to the absence of binder, the less weight, higher energy density, and excellent electrical conductivity anodes can be attained. These traits make the composited nanofiber fabrics excellent used as a binder-free, mechanically flexible, high energy storage anode material in the next generation of rechargeable lithium ions batteries

  15. High performance carbon nanotube--polymer nanofiber hybrid fabrics.

    Yildiz, Ozkan; Stano, Kelly; Faraji, Shaghayegh; Stone, Corinne; Willis, Colin; Zhang, Xiangwu; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2015-10-28

    Stable nanoscale hybrid fabrics containing both polymer nanofibers and separate and distinct carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are highly desirable but very challenging to produce. Here, we report the first instance of such a hybrid fabric, which can be easily tailored to contain 0-100% millimeter long CNTs. The novel CNT - polymer hybrid nonwoven fabrics were created by simultaneously electrospinning nanofibers onto aligned CNT sheets which were drawn and collected on a grounded, rotating mandrel. Due to the unique properties of the CNTs, the hybrids show very high tensile strength, very small pore size, high specific surface area and electrical conductivity. In order to further examine the hybrid fabric properties, they were consolidated under pressure, and also calendered at 70 C. After calendering, the fabric's strength increased by an order of magnitude due to increased interactions and intermingling with the CNTs. The hybrids are highly efficient as aerosol filters; consolidated hybrid fabrics with a thickness of 20 microns and areal density of only 8 g m(-2) exhibited ultra low particulate (ULPA) filter performance. The flexibility of this nanofabrication method allows for the use of many different polymer systems which provides the opportunity for engineering a wide range of nanoscale hybrid materials with desired functionalities. PMID:26399497

  16. Tunable Graphitic Carbon Nano-Onions Development in Carbon Nanofibers for Multivalent Energy Storage

    Schwarz, Haiqing L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel porous graphitic carbon nanofiber material using a synthesis strategy combining electrospinning and catalytic graphitization. RF hydrogel was used as carbon precursors, transition metal ions were successfully introduced into the carbon matrix by binding to the carboxylate groups of a resorcinol derivative. Transition metal particles were homogeneously distributed throughout the carbon matrix, which are used as in-situ catalysts to produce graphitic fullerene-like nanostructures surrounding the metals. The success design of graphitic carbons with enlarged interlayer spacing will enable the multivalent ion intercalation for the development of multivalent rechargeable batteries.

  17. Carbonized Micro- and Nanostructures: Can Downsizing Really Help?

    Mohammad Naraghi; Sneha Chawla

    2014-01-01

    In this manuscript, we discuss relationships between morphology and mechanical strength of carbonized structures, obtained via pyrolysis of polymeric precursors, across multiple length scales, from carbon fibers (CFs) with diameters of 5–10 µm to submicron thick carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Our research points to radial inhomogeneity, skin–core structure, as a size-dependent feature of polyacrylonitrile-based CFs. This inhomogeneity is a surface effect, caused by suppressed diffusion of oxygen a...

  18. MnO-carbon hybrid nanofiber composites as superior anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    MnO-carbon hybrid nanofiber composites are fabricated by electrospinning polyimide/manganese acetylacetonate precursor and a subsequent carbonization process. The composition, phase structure and morphology of the composites are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The results indicate that the composites exhibit good nanofibrous morphology with MnO nanoparticles uniformly encapsulated by carbon nanofibers. The hybrid nanofiber composites are used directly as freestanding anodes for lithium-ion batteries to evaluate their electrochemical properties. It is found that the optimized MnO-carbon nanofiber composite can deliver a high reversible capacity of 663 mAh g−1, along with excellent cycling stability and good rate capability. The superior performance enables the composites to be promising candidates as an anode alternative for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

  19. Effect of carbon nanofibers on tensile and compressive characteristics of hollow particle filled composites

    The effect of presence of carbon nanofibers on the tensile and compressive properties of hollow particle filled composites is studied. Such composites, called syntactic foams, are known to have high specific modulus and low moisture absorption capabilities and are finding applications as core materials in aerospace and marine sandwich structures. The results of this study show that addition of 0.25 wt.% carbon nanofibers results in improvement in tensile modulus and strength compared to similar syntactic foam compositions that did not contain nanofibers. Compressive modulus decreased and strength remained largely unchanged for most compositions. Tensile and compressive failure features are analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Mesoporous Carbon Nanofibers Embedded with MoS2 Nanocrystals for Extraordinary Li-Ion Storage.

    Hu, Shan; Chen, Wen; Uchaker, Evan; Zhou, Jing; Cao, Guozhong

    2015-12-01

    MoS2 nanocrystals embedded in mesoporous carbon nanofibers are synthesized through an electrospinning process followed by calcination. The resultant nanofibers are 100-150?nm in diameter and constructed from MoS2 nanocrystals with a lateral diameter of around 7?nm with specific surface areas of 135.9?m(2) ?g(-1) . The MoS2 @C nanofibers are treated at 450?C in H2 and comparison samples annealed at 800?C in N2 . The heat treatments are designed to achieve good crystallinity and desired mesoporous microstructure, resulting in enhanced electrochemical performance. The small amount of oxygen in the nanofibers annealed in H2 contributes to obtaining a lower internal resistance, and thus, improving the conductivity. The results show that the nanofibers obtained at 450?C in H2 deliver an extraordinary capacity of 1022?mA?h?g(-1) and improved cyclic stability, with only 2.3?% capacity loss after 165 cycles at a current density of 100?mA?g(-1) , as well as an outstanding rate capability. The greatly improved kinetics and cycling stability of the mesoporous MoS2 @C nanofibers can be attributed to the crosslinked conductive carbon nanofibers, the large specific surface area, the good crystallinity of MoS2 , and the robust mesoporous microstructure. The resulting nanofiber electrodes, with short mass- and charge-transport pathways, improved electrical conductivity, and large contact area exposed to electrolyte, permitting fast diffusional flux of Li ions, explains the improved kinetics of the interfacial charge-transfer reaction and the diffusivity of the MoS2 @C mesoporous nanofibers. It is believed that the integration of MoS2 nanocrystals and mesoporous carbon nanofibers may have a synergistic effect, giving a promising anode, and widening the applicability range into high performance and mass production in the Li-ion battery market. PMID:26515375

  1. Electrospun vanadium pentoxide/carbon nanofiber composites for supercapacitor electrodes

    The vanadium pentoxide (V2O5)/carbon nanofiber composites (CNFCs) were prepared from polyacrylonitrile/V2O5 in N,N-dimethylformamide by a simple electrospinning method, and their electrochemical properties as supercapacitor electrodes were investigated. Different loadings of V2O5, the microstructures of the CNFCs (e.g., nanometer-size diameters, high specific surface areas, narrow pore size distributions, and tunable porosities) were changed, and the textural parameters significantly affected the electrochemical properties of the composites. The CNFC capacitors delivered the high specific capacitances of 150.0 F g?1 for the CNFCs in an aqueous, with promising energy densities of 18.8 Wh kg?1, over a power density range of 40020,000 W kg?1. The CNFCs simultaneously exhibited excellent capacity retention.

  2. Ni-catalysed carbon nanotubes and nanofibers assemblies grown on TiN/Si(1 0 0) substrates using hot-filaments combined with d.c. plasma CVD

    Fleaca, Claudiu Teodor; Le Normand, François

    2014-02-01

    Different carbon nanotubes or nanofibers (CNTs or CNFs) assemblies were obtained using Ni catalyst deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) on TiN/Si(1 0 0) substrate from a H2/C2H2 mixture using plasma emerging from triode configured electrodes with two pairs of intercalated incandescent filaments at 1 kPa and 700 °C. In the presence of a relative intense plasma (54 W power), a dense CNT carpet was grown. The TEM images revealed the presence of elongated yet contorted 10-15 nm diameter CNTs with encapsulated Ni particles at their tips. Using a low plasma power (8 W) in similar conditions and from the same catalyst, a different morphology resulted: few self-sustained long fibrils (diameter around 1 μm) which are curved under the action of their own weight containing compacted CNTs/CNFs and (only in the confined zones near the lateral edges) 50-200 nm thick filaments presenting buds-like structures and Y-shape junctions.

  3. Physicochemical investigations of carbon nanofiber supported Cu/ZrO{sub 2} catalyst

    Din, Israf Ud, E-mail: drisraf@yahoo.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my; Shaharun, Maizatul S., E-mail: drisraf@yahoo.com, E-mail: maizats@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Subbarao, Duvvuri, E-mail: duvvuri-subbarao@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (Malaysia); Naeem, A., E-mail: naeeem64@yahoo.com [National Centre of Excellence in Physical Chemistry, University of Peshawar (Pakistan)

    2014-10-24

    Zirconia-promoted copper/carbon nanofiber catalysts (Cu‐ZrO{sub 2}/CNF) were prepared by the sequential deposition precipitation method. The Herringbone type of carbon nanofiber GNF-100 (Graphite nanofiber) was used as a catalyst support. Carbon nanofiber was oxidized to (CNF-O) with 5% and 65 % concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The CNF activated with 5% HNO{sub 3} produced higher surface area which is 155 m{sup 2}/g. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption. The results showed that increase of HNO{sub 3} concentration reduced the surface area and porosity of the catalyst.

  4. Effects of palladium coating on field-emission properties of carbon nanofibers in a hydrogen plasma

    Results from electron field-emission studies using arrays of patterned carbon nanofiber bundles are reported. We find that the desired field-emission characteristics were not compromised when a protective coating consisting of a layer of palladium of 5 and 30 nm thickness was applied. Following exposure to a hydrogen plasma for several hours we find that the coatings impede plasma damage significantly, whereas the field-emission properties of uncoated nanofibers degraded much more rapidly. The results demonstrate that carbon nanofibers with protective conformal metal coatings can be integrated into harsh plasma environments enabling a range of applications such as field-ionization ion sources and advanced (micro)-plasma discharges. - Highlights: • Carbon nanofibers were uniformly coated with palladium. • Energy-filtered transmission electron microscope confirms uniformity of coating. • Tips were exposed to atomic hydrogen environment. • Field emission characteristics were measured and compared to uncoated samples. • Coated samples show better field emission properties and longer lifetime

  5. Effects of palladium coating on field-emission properties of carbon nanofibers in a hydrogen plasma

    Waldmann, Ole [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Persaud, Arun, E-mail: APersaud@lbl.gov [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Allen, Frances I. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Javey, Ali [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schenkel, Thomas [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Results from electron field-emission studies using arrays of patterned carbon nanofiber bundles are reported. We find that the desired field-emission characteristics were not compromised when a protective coating consisting of a layer of palladium of 5 and 30 nm thickness was applied. Following exposure to a hydrogen plasma for several hours we find that the coatings impede plasma damage significantly, whereas the field-emission properties of uncoated nanofibers degraded much more rapidly. The results demonstrate that carbon nanofibers with protective conformal metal coatings can be integrated into harsh plasma environments enabling a range of applications such as field-ionization ion sources and advanced (micro)-plasma discharges. - Highlights: • Carbon nanofibers were uniformly coated with palladium. • Energy-filtered transmission electron microscope confirms uniformity of coating. • Tips were exposed to atomic hydrogen environment. • Field emission characteristics were measured and compared to uncoated samples. • Coated samples show better field emission properties and longer lifetime.

  6. Zinc oxide nanorod assisted rapid single-step process for the conversion of electrospun poly(acrylonitrile) nanofibers to carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content

    Nain, Ratyakshi; Singh, Dhirendra; Jassal, Manjeet; Agrawal, Ashwini K.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for immobilization of polymer chains and assisted in uniform heat distribution. This facilitated rapid and efficient conversion of the polymer structure to the ladder, and subsequently, the graphitized structure. At the end of the process, the ZnO nanorods were found to completely separate from the carbonized fibers yielding pure carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content and surface area. The approach could be used to eliminate the slow, energy intensive stabilization step and achieve fast conversion of randomly laid carbon nanofiber webs in a single step to carbon nanofibers without the application of external tension or internal templates usually employed to achieve a high graphitic content in such systems.The effect of incorporation of rigid zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures on carbonization behavior of electrospun special acrylic fiber grade poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN-SAF) nanofibers was investigated. ZnO nanorods with high aspect ratios were incorporated into a PAN-N,N-dimethylformamide system and the composite nanofibers reinforced with aligned ZnO rods up to 50 wt% were successfully electrospun, and subsequently, carbonized. The morphology and the structural analysis of the resultant carbon nanofibers revealed that the rigid ZnO nanorods, present inside the nanofibers, possibly acted as scaffolds (temporary support structures) for immobilization of polymer chains and assisted in uniform heat distribution. This facilitated rapid and efficient conversion of the polymer structure to the ladder, and subsequently, the graphitized structure. At the end of the process, the ZnO nanorods were found to completely separate from the carbonized fibers yielding pure carbon nanofibers with a high graphitic content and surface area. The approach could be used to eliminate the slow, energy intensive stabilization step and achieve fast conversion of randomly laid carbon nanofiber webs in a single step to carbon nanofibers without the application of external tension or internal templates usually employed to achieve a high graphitic content in such systems. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The scanning electron micrographs (SEMs) of electrospun composite PAN nanofibers, separated ZnO nanorod white mass, TGA curves for PAN and ZnO-PAN composite nanofibers and Raman spectra of precursor and carbonized composite nanofibers. XRD spectrum of ZnO nanorods. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06809f

  7. High quality fluorescent cellulose nanofibers from endemic rice husk: isolation and characterization.

    Kalita, E; Nath, B K; Deb, P; Agan, F; Islam, Md R; Saikia, K

    2015-05-20

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) with high crystallinity and purity were isolated from two endemic rice husk varieties using a hydrothermal approach followed by acid-alkali treatments and mechanical disruption. The CNFs isolated had a mean diameter of ? 35 nm. The TGA and DTG profiles showed good thermostability of the CNFs. The CNFs also showed a prominent photoluminescence peak at 404 nm with high quantum yield (? 58%). This is the first report on the native fluorescence property of nanocellulose in absence of any conjugated fluorescence molecule/dye. The CNFs further demonstrated appreciable hemocompatibility in the hemolysis test, exhibiting its potential for biomedical applications. PMID:25817673

  8. Orientation of Carbon Nano-fiber in Carbon/Silica Composite Prepared under High Magnetic Field

    Carbon/silica composite films were prepared from colloidal silica aqueous solution in which vapour grown carbon nano-fibers dispersed. The orientation of nano-fibers was attempted by dip-coating substrates under high magnetic field up to 10 T. The fibers started to align along the direction of magnetic field below 1 T. The degree of orientation was saturated at about 6 T. The anisotropic susceptibility, Δχ = χ||-χperpendicular, was estimated to be (3.05±1.10)x10-7 cm3/mol from the fitting of numerical simulation. It was smaller than that reported in previous studies. It was deduced that perturbation of fiber orientation in the sol during drawing and drying, and the existence of coupled fibers in the starting materials suppressed the orientation of fibers.

  9. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  10. Cobalt/copper-decorated carbon nanofibers as novel non-precious electrocatalyst for methanol electrooxidation

    Barakat, Nasser A. M.; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Al-Deyab, Salem S.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Co/Cu-decorated carbon nanofibers are introduced as novel electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation. The introduced nanofibers have been prepared based on graphitization of poly(vinyl alcohol) which has high carbon content compared to many polymer precursors for carbon nanofiber synthesis. Typically, calcination in argon atmosphere of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate tetrahydrate, copper acetate monohydrate, and poly(vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The graphitization of the poly(vinyl alcohol) has been enhanced due to presence of cobalt which acts as effective catalyst. The physicochemical characterization affirmed that the metallic nanoparticles are sheathed by thin crystalline graphite layer. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity of the introduced nanofibers toward methanol oxidation indicates good performance, as the corresponding onset potential was small compared to many reported materials; 310 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl electrode) and a current density of 12 mA/cm2 was obtained. Moreover, due to the graphite shield, good stability was observed. Overall, the introduced study opens new avenue for cheap and stable transition metals-based nanostructures as non-precious catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  11. Carbonized Micro- and Nanostructures: Can Downsizing Really Help?

    Mohammad Naraghi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we discuss relationships between morphology and mechanical strength of carbonized structures, obtained via pyrolysis of polymeric precursors, across multiple length scales, from carbon fibers (CFs with diameters of 5–10 µm to submicron thick carbon nanofibers (CNFs. Our research points to radial inhomogeneity, skin–core structure, as a size-dependent feature of polyacrylonitrile-based CFs. This inhomogeneity is a surface effect, caused by suppressed diffusion of oxygen and stabilization byproducts during stabilization through skin. Hence, reducing the precursor diameters from tens of microns to submicron appears as an effective strategy to develop homogeneous carbonized structures. Our research establishes the significance of this downsizing in developing lightweight structural materials by comparing intrinsic strength of radially inhomogeneous CFs with that of radially homogeneous CNF. While experimental studies on the strength of CNFs have targeted randomly oriented turbostratic domains, via continuum modeling, we have estimated that strength of CNFs can reach 14 GPa, when the basal planes of graphitic domains are parallel to nanofiber axis. The CNFs in our model are treated as composites of amorphous carbon (matrix, reinforced with turbostratic domains, and their strength is predicted using Tsai–Hill criterion. The model was calibrated with existing experimental data.

  12. Carbon nanofiber electrode array for electrochemical detection of dopamine using fast scan cyclic voltammetry

    Koehne, Jessica E.; Marsh, Michael; Boakye, Adwoa; Douglas, Brandon; Kim, In Yong; Chang, Su-Youne; Jang, Dong-Pyo; Bennet, Kevin E.; Kimble, Christopher; Andrews, Russell; Meyyappan, M; Lee, Kendall H

    2011-01-01

    A carbon nanofiber (CNF) electrode array was integrated with the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Sensor System (WINCS) for detection of dopamine using fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV). Dopamine detection performance by CNF arrays was comparable to that of traditional carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMs), demonstrating that CNF arrays can be utilized as an alternative carbon electrodes for neurochemical monitoring.

  13. Platinum nanocluster growth on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays: Sputtering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    Highlights: ► Molecular dynamics simulation of platinum cluster growth on model carbon nanofibers. ► We compare modeled and experimental cluster growth. ► We determine sticking coefficient evolution among deposition time and type of nanofibers. ► We determine cluster size distribution on various model nanofibers. - Abstract: Sputtered platinum nanocluster growth on previously plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition – PECVD – grown vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays is presented. Experimental cluster size distribution is shown to decrease from the CNF top to bottom, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for understanding early stages of Pt growth on model CNF arrays. Especially, sticking coefficients, concentration profiles along CNF wall, cluster size distributions are calculated. Simulated cluster size distribution are consistent with experimental finding. Sticking coefficient decreases against deposition time. The shape of the sticking curve reflects the nanocluster growth process.

  14. Platinum nanocluster growth on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays: Sputtering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    Brault, Pascal, E-mail: Pascal.Brault@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, UMR7344 CNRS-Universite d' Orleans BP 6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Caillard, Amaeel [GREMI, UMR7344 CNRS-Universite d' Orleans BP 6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Graves, David B. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, 201 Gilman Hall 1462, University of California Berkeley, CA 94720-1462 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular dynamics simulation of platinum cluster growth on model carbon nanofibers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compare modeled and experimental cluster growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determine sticking coefficient evolution among deposition time and type of nanofibers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determine cluster size distribution on various model nanofibers. - Abstract: Sputtered platinum nanocluster growth on previously plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition - PECVD - grown vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays is presented. Experimental cluster size distribution is shown to decrease from the CNF top to bottom, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for understanding early stages of Pt growth on model CNF arrays. Especially, sticking coefficients, concentration profiles along CNF wall, cluster size distributions are calculated. Simulated cluster size distribution are consistent with experimental finding. Sticking coefficient decreases against deposition time. The shape of the sticking curve reflects the nanocluster growth process.

  15. Hollow Carbon Nanofiber-Encapsulated Sulfur Cathodes for High Specific Capacity Rechargeable Lithium Batteries

    Zheng, Guangyuan

    2011-10-12

    Sulfur has a high specific capacity of 1673 mAh/g as lithium battery cathodes, but its rapid capacity fading due to polysulfides dissolution presents a significant challenge for practical applications. Here we report a hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur cathode for effective trapping of polysulfides and demonstrate experimentally high specific capacity and excellent electrochemical cycling of the cells. The hollow carbon nanofiber arrays were fabricated using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, through thermal carbonization of polystyrene. The AAO template also facilitates sulfur infusion into the hollow fibers and prevents sulfur from coating onto the exterior carbon wall. The high aspect ratio of the carbon nanofibers provides an ideal structure for trapping polysulfides, and the thin carbon wall allows rapid transport of lithium ions. The small dimension of these nanofibers provides a large surface area per unit mass for Li2S deposition during cycling and reduces pulverization of electrode materials due to volumetric expansion. A high specific capacity of about 730 mAh/g was observed at C/5 rate after 150 cycles of charge/discharge. The introduction of LiNO3 additive to the electrolyte was shown to improve the Coulombic efficiency to over 99% at C/5. The results show that the hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur structure could be a promising cathode design for rechargeable Li/S batteries with high specific energy. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. Development of radiation processing to functionalize carbon nanofiber to use in nanocomposite for industrial application

    Radiation can be used to modify and improve the properties of materials. Electron beam and gamma ray irradiation has potential application in modifying the structure of carbon fibers in order to produce useful defects in the graphite structure and create reactive sites. In this study was investigated a methodology for radiation grafting processing to modify carbon nanofiber surfaces by grafting acrylic acid. The samples were submitted to direct radiation process. Several parameters were changed such as acrylic acid concentration, radiation dose and percentage of inhibitor to achieve functionalization with higher percentage of oxygen functional groups on carbon nanofiber surface and better dispersion. The samples were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and the dispersion stability upon storage was visually investigated. Carbon nanofiber directed irradiated with electron beam and gamma ray in a solution of acrylic acid with 6% of inhibitor (FeSO4.7H2O) and irradiated at 100 kGy had an increase of 20% of oxygen content onto carbon nanofiber surface. The Auger D-parameter for the samples direct irradiated grafted ranged between 17.0-17.7 compared to 21.1-18.9 of the unirradiated ones. This indicated that these samples had less sp2 and more sp3 bonding characteristics than unirradiated samples. This can be an indication of C=C bond breaking leading to the formation of new sp3 carbon atoms on carbon nanofiber surface with oxygen functional groups grafted. The samples grafted presented a good and stable dispersion. (author)

  17. The Optical Excitation of Zigzag Carbon Nanotubes with Photons Guided in Nanofibers

    Broadfoot, S.; Dorner, U.; Jaksch, D.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the excitation of electrons in semiconducting carbon nanotubes by photons from the evanescent field created by a subwavelength-diameter optical fiber. The strongly changing evanescent field of such nanofibers requires dropping the dipole approximation. We show that this leads to novel effects, especially a high dependence of the photon absorption on the relative orientation and geometry of the nanotube-nanofiber setup in the optical and near infrared domain. In particular, we calc...

  18. Positional control of catalyst nanoparticles for the synthesis of high density carbon nanofiber arrays

    Scott T. Retterer; Melechko, Anatoli; Hensley, Dale K.; Simpson, Michael L.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2008-01-01

    Precise arrangement of nanoscale elements within larger systems, is essential to controlling higher order functionality and tailoring nanophase material properties. Here, we present findings on growth conditions for vertically aligned carbon nanofibers that enable synthesis of high density arrays and individual rows of nanofibers, which could be used to form barriers for restricting molecular transport, that have regular spacings and few defects. Growth through plasma-enhanced chemical vapor ...

  19. Ultracold Thermal Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates Interacting with a Single Carbon Nanofiber

    Schneeweiß, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    The present thesis investigates the decay of ultracold atoms from a magnetic trap due to the interaction with a single carbon nanofiber. The latter is spatially overlapping with the atomic cloud. For both an ultracold thermal cloud and a Bose-Einstein condensate, the atomic loss has been measured for different interaction times and degrees of cloud-nanofiber overlap. Relevant theoretical concepts to analyze the measurements are derived and applied to the experimental results. For the thermal ...

  20. Investigating the plasma chemistry for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes/nanofibres in an inductively coupled plasma enhanced CVD system: the effect of different gas mixtures

    Mao, M; Bogaerts, A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A hybrid model, called the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM) was used to study an inductively coupled plasma in gas mixtures of H 2 or NH 3 with CH 4 or C 2 H 2 used for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes or carbon nanofibers (CNTs/CNFs). The plasma properties are discussed for the different gas mixture at low and moderate pressure, and the growth precursors for CNTs/CNFs are analyzed. It is found that C 2 H 2, C 2 H 4, and C 2 H 6 are the predominant molecules in CH 4 containin...

  1. Electrospun single-walled carbon nanotube/polyvinyl alcohol composite nanofibers: structure-property relationships

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/PVA composite nanofibers have been produced by electrospinning. An apparent increase in the PVA crystallinity with a concomitant change in its main crystalline phase and a reduction in the crystalline domain size were observed in the SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers, indicating the occurrence of a SWNT-induced nucleation crystallization of the PVA phase. Both the pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers were subjected to the following post-electrospinning treatments: (i) soaking in methanol to increase the PVA crystallinity, and (ii) cross-linking with glutaric dialdehyde to control the PVA morphology. Effects of the PVA morphology on the tensile properties of the resultant electrospun nanofibers were examined. Dynamic mechanical thermal analyses of both pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite electrospun nanofibers indicated that SWNT-polymer interaction facilitated the formation of crystalline domains, which can be further enhanced by soaking the nanofiber in methanol and/or cross-linking the polymer with glutaric dialdehyde

  2. Preparation and Application of Carbon Nanofibers-supported Palladium Nanoparticles Catalysts Based on Electrospinning

    GUO Li-Ping, BAI Jie, LIANG Hai-Ou, LI Chun-Ping, SUN Wei-Yan, MENG Qing-Run

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers-supported palladium nanoparticle catalysts were prepared by electrospinning, chemical reduction and the subsequent high temperature carbonization methods. The experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of different reducing agents (sodium borohydride, hydrazine hydrate and hydrogen gas on morphology of palladium nanoparticles and carbon nanofibers in detail. Catalysts were characterized by UV-Vis spectra, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectrum, scanning electron microscope, field emission transmission electron microscope. Results show that the palladium nanoparticles are distributed uniformly on the carbon nanofibers with dimension of about 7 nm, and the catalyst is relatively flexible by using hydrogen gas as reducing agent. Then it was applied to the Heck coupling reaction to test catalytic properties and recyclability. Results indicate that the catalyst possesses excellent stability and recyclability.

  3. Characterisation of hydrophobic carbon nanofiber-silica composite film electrodes for redox liquid immobilisation

    Carbon (50-150 nm diameter) nanofibers were embedded into easy to prepare thin films of a hydrophobic sol-gel material and cast onto tin-doped indium oxide substrate electrodes. They promote electron transport and allow efficient electrochemical reactions at solid|liquid and at liquid|liquid interfaces. In order to prevent aggregation of carbon nanofibers silica nanoparticles of 7 nm diameter were added into the sol-gel mixture as a 'surfactant' and homogeneous high surface area films were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the presence of carbon nanofibers at the electrode surface. The results of voltammetric experiments performed in redox probe-ferrocenedimethanol solution in aqueous electrolyte solution indicate that in the absence of organic phase, incomplete wetting within the hydrophobic film of carbon nanofibers can cause hemispherical diffusion regime typical for ultramicroelectrode like behaviour. The hydrophobic film electrode was modified with two types of redox liquids: pure tert-butylferrocene or dissolved in 2-nitrophenyloctylether as a water-insoluble solvent and immersed in aqueous electrolyte solution. With a nanomole deposit of pure redox liquid, stable voltammetric responses are obtained. The presence of carbon nanofibers embedded in the mesoporous matrix substantially increases the efficiency of the electrode process and stability under voltammetric conditions. Also well-defined response for diluted redox liquids is obtained. From measurements in a range of different aqueous electrolyte media a gradual transition from anion transfer dominated to cation transfer dominated processes is inferred depending on the hydrophilicity of the transferring anion or cation

  4. Microwave absorption properties of helical carbon nanofibers-coated carbon fibers

    Lei Liu; Pingge He; Kechao Zhou; Tengfei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs) coated-carbon fibers (CFs) were fabricated by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. TEM and Raman spectroscopy characterizations indicate that the graphitic layers of the HCNFs changed from disorder to order after high temperature annealing. The electromagnetic parameters and microwave absorption properties were measured at 2–18 GHz. The maximum reflection loss is 32 dB at 9 GHz and the widest bandwidth under −10 dB is 9.8 GHz from 8.2 to 18 GHz for the...

  5. Electrochemical stability of carbon nanofibers in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Alvarez, Garbine [Energy Department, CIDETEC-IK4, Po Miramon, 196, 20009 San Sebastian (Spain); Alcaide, Francisco, E-mail: falcaide@cidetec.es [Energy Department, CIDETEC-IK4, Po Miramon, 196, 20009 San Sebastian (Spain); Miguel, Oscar [Energy Department, CIDETEC-IK4, Po Miramon, 196, 20009 San Sebastian (Spain); Cabot, Pere L. [Laboratori d' Electroquimica de Materials i del Medi Ambient, Dept. Quimica Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques, 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Martinez-Huerta, M.V.; Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), Marie Curie 2, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-30

    This fundamental study deals with the electrochemical stability of several non-conventional carbon based catalyst supports, intended for low temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathodes. Electrochemical surface oxidation of raw and functionalized carbon nanofibers, and carbon black for comparison, was studied following a potential step treatment at 25.0 deg. C in acid electrolyte, which mimics the operating conditions of low temperature PEMFCs. Surface oxidation was characterized using cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle measurements. Cyclic voltammograms clearly showed the presence of the hydroquinone/quinone couple. Furthermore, identification of carbonyl, ether, hydroxyl and carboxyl surface functional groups were made by deconvolution of the XPS spectra. The relative increase in surface oxides on carbon nanofibers during the electrochemical oxidation treatment is significantly smaller than that on carbon black. This suggests that carbon nanofibers are more resistant to the electrochemical corrosion than carbon black under the experimental conditions used in this work. This behaviour could be attributed to the differences found in the microstructure of both kinds of carbons. According to these results, carbon nanofibers possess a high potential as catalyst support to increase the durability of catalysts used in low temperature PEMFC applications.

  6. Electrochemical stability of carbon nanofibers in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    This fundamental study deals with the electrochemical stability of several non-conventional carbon based catalyst supports, intended for low temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) cathodes. Electrochemical surface oxidation of raw and functionalized carbon nanofibers, and carbon black for comparison, was studied following a potential step treatment at 25.0 deg. C in acid electrolyte, which mimics the operating conditions of low temperature PEMFCs. Surface oxidation was characterized using cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle measurements. Cyclic voltammograms clearly showed the presence of the hydroquinone/quinone couple. Furthermore, identification of carbonyl, ether, hydroxyl and carboxyl surface functional groups were made by deconvolution of the XPS spectra. The relative increase in surface oxides on carbon nanofibers during the electrochemical oxidation treatment is significantly smaller than that on carbon black. This suggests that carbon nanofibers are more resistant to the electrochemical corrosion than carbon black under the experimental conditions used in this work. This behaviour could be attributed to the differences found in the microstructure of both kinds of carbons. According to these results, carbon nanofibers possess a high potential as catalyst support to increase the durability of catalysts used in low temperature PEMFC applications.

  7. Radiation Effects on Polypropylene Carbon Nanofibers Composites: Spectroscopic Investigations

    Hamilton, John; Mion, Thomas; Cristian Chipara, Alin; Ibrahim, Elamin I.; Lozano, Karen; Tidrow, Steven; Magdalena Chipara, Dorina; Chipara, Mircea

    2010-03-01

    Dispersion of carbon nanostructures within polymeric matrices affects their physical and chemical properties (increased Young modulus, improved thermal stability, faster crystallization rates, higher equilibrium degree of crystallinity, modified glass, melting, and crystallization temperatures, enhanced thermal and electrical conductivity). Nevertheless, little is known about the radiation stability of such nanocomposites. The research is focused on spectroscopic investigations of radiation-induced modifications in isotactic polypropylene (iPP)-vapor grown nanofiber (VGCNF) composites. VGCNF were dispersed within iPP by extrusion at 180^oC. Composites containing various amounts of VGCNFs ranging from 0 to 20 % wt. were prepared and subjected to gamma irradiation, at room temperature, at various integral doses (10 MGy, 20 MGy, and 30 MGy). Raman spectroscopy, ATR, and WAXS were used to assess the radiation-induced modifications in these nanocomposites. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Welch Foundation (Department of Chemistry at UTPA), by Air Force Research Laboratory (FA8650-07-2-5061) and by US Army Research Laboratory/Office (W911NF-08-1-0353).

  8. A novel nano-nonwoven fabric with three-dimensionally dispersed nanofibers: entrapment of carbon nanofibers within nonwovens using the wet-lay process

    Karwa, Amogh N.; Barron, Troy J.; Davis, Virginia A.; Tatarchuk, Bruce J.

    2012-05-01

    This study demonstrates, for the first time, the manufacturing of novel nano-nonwovens that are comprised of three-dimensionally distributed carbon nanofibers within the matrices of traditional wet-laid nonwovens. The preparation of these nano-nonwovens involves dispersing and flocking carbon nanofibers, and optimizing colloidal chemistry during wet-lay formation. The distribution of nanofibers within the nano-nonwoven was verified using polydispersed aerosol filtration testing, air permeability, low surface tension liquid capillary porometry, SEM and cyclic voltammetry. All these characterization techniques indicated that nanofiber flocks did not behave as large solid clumps, but retained the ‘nanoporous’ structure expected from nanofibers. These nano-nonwovens showed significant enhancements in aerosol filtration performance. The reduction-oxidation reactions of the functional groups on nanofibers and the linear variation of electric double-layer capacitance with nanofiber loading were measured using cyclic voltammetry. More than 65 m2 (700 ft2) of the composite were made during the demonstration of process scalability using a Fourdrinier-type continuous pilot papermaking machine. The scalability of the process with the control over pore size distribution makes these composites very promising for filtration and other nonwoven applications.

  9. A novel nano-nonwoven fabric with three-dimensionally dispersed nanofibers: entrapment of carbon nanofibers within nonwovens using the wet-lay process

    This study demonstrates, for the first time, the manufacturing of novel nano-nonwovens that are comprised of three-dimensionally distributed carbon nanofibers within the matrices of traditional wet-laid nonwovens. The preparation of these nano-nonwovens involves dispersing and flocking carbon nanofibers, and optimizing colloidal chemistry during wet-lay formation. The distribution of nanofibers within the nano-nonwoven was verified using polydispersed aerosol filtration testing, air permeability, low surface tension liquid capillary porometry, SEM and cyclic voltammetry. All these characterization techniques indicated that nanofiber flocks did not behave as large solid clumps, but retained the ‘nanoporous’ structure expected from nanofibers. These nano-nonwovens showed significant enhancements in aerosol filtration performance. The reduction–oxidation reactions of the functional groups on nanofibers and the linear variation of electric double-layer capacitance with nanofiber loading were measured using cyclic voltammetry. More than 65 m2 (700 ft2) of the composite were made during the demonstration of process scalability using a Fourdrinier-type continuous pilot papermaking machine. The scalability of the process with the control over pore size distribution makes these composites very promising for filtration and other nonwoven applications. (paper)

  10. A novel nano-nonwoven fabric with three-dimensionally dispersed nanofibers: entrapment of carbon nanofibers within nonwovens using the wet-lay process.

    Karwa, Amogh N; Barron, Troy J; Davis, Virginia A; Tatarchuk, Bruce J

    2012-05-11

    This study demonstrates, for the first time, the manufacturing of novel nano-nonwovens that are comprised of three-dimensionally distributed carbon nanofibers within the matrices of traditional wet-laid nonwovens. The preparation of these nano-nonwovens involves dispersing and flocking carbon nanofibers, and optimizing colloidal chemistry during wet-lay formation. The distribution of nanofibers within the nano-nonwoven was verified using polydispersed aerosol filtration testing, air permeability, low surface tension liquid capillary porometry, SEM and cyclic voltammetry. All these characterization techniques indicated that nanofiber flocks did not behave as large solid clumps, but retained the 'nanoporous' structure expected from nanofibers. These nano-nonwovens showed significant enhancements in aerosol filtration performance. The reduction-oxidation reactions of the functional groups on nanofibers and the linear variation of electric double-layer capacitance with nanofiber loading were measured using cyclic voltammetry. More than 65 m (700 ft) of the composite were made during the demonstration of process scalability using a Fourdrinier-type continuous pilot papermaking machine. The scalability of the process with the control over pore size distribution makes these composites very promising for filtration and other nonwoven applications. PMID:22498976

  11. Effect of twist and porosity on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber yarns

    This study focuses on the effect of twist and porosity on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber (CNF) yarns. The process of fabrication of CNF yarns included the synthesis of aligned ribbons of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers via electrospinning. The PAN ribbons were twisted into yarns with twist levels ranging from zero twist to high twists of 1300 turn per meter (tpm). The twist imposed on the ribbons substantially improved the interactions between nanofibers and reduced the porosity. The PAN yarns were subsequently stabilized in air, and then carbonized in nitrogen at 1100? C for 1 h. Compressive stresses developed between the PAN nanofibers as a result of twist promoted interfusion between neighboring nanofibers, which was accelerated by heating the yarns during stabilization to temperatures above the glass transition of PAN. The electrical conductivity of the yarns was measured with a four point probe measurement technique. Although increasing the twist promotes electrical conductivity between nanofibers by forming junctions between them, our results indicate that the electrical conductivity does not continuously increase with increasing twist, but reaches a threshold value after which it starts to decrease. The causes for this behavior were studied through experimental techniques and further explored using a yarn-equivalent electrical circuit model. (paper)

  12. Carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles dispersed in reticular structured nanofibers for lithium-ion battery anodes

    Niu, Xiao [College of Textiles and Clothing, Xin Jiang University, Xinjiang, Urumqi 830046 (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Donghua University, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhou, Huimin; Li, Zhiyong; Shan, Xiaohong [College of Textiles and Clothing, Xin Jiang University, Xinjiang, Urumqi 830046 (China); Xia, Xin, E-mail: xjxiaxin@163.com [College of Textiles and Clothing, Xin Jiang University, Xinjiang, Urumqi 830046 (China); Key Laboratory of Textile Science and Technology, Donghua University, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • Sn{sub 0.92}Sb{sub 0.08}O{sub 2.04} nanoparticles as SnSb alloy precursor. • Carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles were prepared and then embedded in carbon nanofibers. • The synergic effect of carbon coating and special structure improved cycling stability. - Abstract: Carbon coating and carbon nanofiber processes were used to enhance the cycling performance of SnSb alloys. Carbon-coated SnSb alloys were firstly prepared by a simple hydrothermal method to build the first protection, and then carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles were embedded in carbon nanofibers via single-spinneret electrospinning followed by carbonization. The crystal structure of carbon-coated SnSb/C hybrid nanofibers was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The morphologies of carbon-coated SnSb alloys and hybrid nanofibers were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The thermal stability of hybrid nanofibers were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The electrochemical properties were investigated as a potential high-capacity anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The results showed that the hybrid nanofibers exhibited excellent electrochemical performance due to the special structure. The carbon shell can effectively hinder the agglomeration of SnSb alloys, while maintaining electronic conduction as well as accommodating drastic volume changes during lithium insertion and extraction and carbon nanofibers formed a further protection. The resultant carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles dispersed in carbon nanofibers deliver a high capacity of 674 mA h g{sup −1} and a good capacity retention of 68.7% after 50 cycles.

  13. Carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles dispersed in reticular structured nanofibers for lithium-ion battery anodes

    Highlights: • Sn0.92Sb0.08O2.04 nanoparticles as SnSb alloy precursor. • Carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles were prepared and then embedded in carbon nanofibers. • The synergic effect of carbon coating and special structure improved cycling stability. - Abstract: Carbon coating and carbon nanofiber processes were used to enhance the cycling performance of SnSb alloys. Carbon-coated SnSb alloys were firstly prepared by a simple hydrothermal method to build the first protection, and then carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles were embedded in carbon nanofibers via single-spinneret electrospinning followed by carbonization. The crystal structure of carbon-coated SnSb/C hybrid nanofibers was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The morphologies of carbon-coated SnSb alloys and hybrid nanofibers were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The thermal stability of hybrid nanofibers were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The electrochemical properties were investigated as a potential high-capacity anode material for lithium-ion batteries. The results showed that the hybrid nanofibers exhibited excellent electrochemical performance due to the special structure. The carbon shell can effectively hinder the agglomeration of SnSb alloys, while maintaining electronic conduction as well as accommodating drastic volume changes during lithium insertion and extraction and carbon nanofibers formed a further protection. The resultant carbon-coated SnSb nanoparticles dispersed in carbon nanofibers deliver a high capacity of 674 mA h g−1 and a good capacity retention of 68.7% after 50 cycles

  14. Oxidative steam reforming of ethanol over carbon nanofiber supported Co catalysts

    da Silva, A.L.M.; Mattos, L.V.; den Breejen, J.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837318; Bitter, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/160581435; De Jong, K. P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; Noronha, F.B.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the cobalt particle size in the ethanol oxidative steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production was investigated using cobalt on carbon nanofiber catalysts. The smallest (4 nm) were quite stable during OSR reaction but significant carbon formation was detected.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes/Nanofibers by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Teo, K. B. K.; Hash, D. B.; Bell, M. S.; Chhowalla, M.; Cruden, B. A.; Amaratunga, G. A. J.; Meyyappan, M.; Milne, W. I.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) has been recently used for the production of vertically aligned carbon nanotubedfibers (CN) directly on substrates. These structures are potentially important technologically as electron field emitters (e.g. microguns, microwave amplifiers, displays), nanoelectrodes for sensors, filter media, superhydrophobic surfaces and thermal interface materials for microelectronics. A parametric study on the growth of CN grown by glow discharge dc-PECVD is presented. In this technique, a substrate containing thin film Ni catalyst is exposed to C2H2 and NH3 gases at 700 C. Without plasma, this process is essentially thermal CVD which produces curly spaghetti-like CN as seen in Fig. 1 (a). With the plasma generated by biasing the substrate at -6OOV, we observed that the CN align vertically during growth as shown in Fig. l(b), and that the magnitude of the applied substrate bias affects the degree of alignment. The thickness of the thin film Ni catalyst was found to determine the average diameter and inversely the length of the CN. The yield and density of the CN were controlled by the use of different diffusion barrier materials under the Ni catalyst. Patterned CN growth [Fig. l(c)], with la variation in CN diameter of 4.1% and 6.3% respectively, is achieved by lithographically defining the Ni thin film prior to growth. The shape of the structures could be varied from very straight nanotube-like to conical tip-like nanofibers by increasing the ratio of C2H2 in the gas flow. Due to the plasma decomposition of C2H2, amorphous carbon (a-C) is an undesirable byproduct which could coat the substrate during CN growth. Using a combination of depth profiled Auger electron spectroscopy to study the substrate and in-situ mass spectroscopy to examine gas phase neutrals and ions, the optimal conditions for a-C free growth of CN is determined.

  16. Effect of Carbon Nanofiber on Mechanical Behavior of Asphalt Concrete

    Saeed Ghaffarpour Jahromi

    2015-01-01

    Uses of fibers to improve material properties have a scientific background in recent years in civil engineering. Use of Nanofiber reinforcement of materials refers to incorporating materials with desired properties within some other materials lacking those properties. Use of fibers for improvement is not a new phenomenon as the technique of fiber-reinforced bitumen began as early as 1950, but using nanofiber is a new idea. In this research the mechanical properties of asphalt mixture that hav...

  17. Genotoxicity of carbon nanofibers: Are they potentially more or less dangerous than carbon nanotubes or asbestos?

    The production of carbon nanofibers and nanotubes (CNF/CNT) and their composite products is increasing globally. CNF are generating great interest in industrial sectors such as energy production and electronics, where alternative materials may have limited performance or are produced at a much higher cost. However, despite the increasing industrial use of carbon nanofibers, information on their potential adverse health effects is limited. In the current study, we examine the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of carbon-based nanofibers (Pyrograf (registered) -III) and compare this material with the effects of asbestos fibers (crocidolite) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The genotoxic effects in the lung fibroblast (V79) cell line were examined using two complementary assays: the comet assay and micronucleus (MN) test. In addition, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect the chromatin pan-centromeric signals within the MN indicating their origin by aneugenic (chromosomal malsegregation) or clastogenic (chromosome breakage) mechanisms. Cytotoxicity tests revealed a concentration- and time-dependent loss of V79 cell viability after exposure to all tested materials in the following sequence: asbestos > CNF > SWCNT. Additionally, cellular uptake and generation of oxygen radicals was seen in the murine RAW264.7 macrophages following exposure to CNF or asbestos but not after administration of SWCNT. DNA damage and MN induction were found after exposure to all tested materials with the strongest effect seen for CNF. Finally, we demonstrated that CNF induced predominately centromere-positive MN in primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) indicating aneugenic events. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved in CNF-induced genotoxicity.

  18. Carbon nanofiber-based counter electrodes for low cost dye-sensitized solar cells

    Sebastián del Río, David; Baglio, Vincenzo; Girolamo, M.; Moliner Álvarez, Rafael; Lázaro Elorri, María Jesús; Aricò, Antonino Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Carbon materials represent an attractive alternative to platinum in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) counter electrodes to contribute to an efficient conversion of solar energy into electricity. The use of highly graphitic carbon nanofibers (CNFs) is investigated by analyzing the effect of the filament diameter, surface area and graphitization degree on the DSSC cathode performance. To this purpose, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectro...

  19. Electrochemical enzymatic biosensors using carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays

    Li, Jun; Li, Yi-fen; Swisher, Luxi Z.; Syed, Lateef U.; Prior, Allan M.; Nguyen, Thu A.; Hua, Duy H.

    2012-10-01

    The reduction of electrode size down to nanometers could dramatically enhance detection sensitivity and temporal resolution. Nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) are of particular interest for ultrasensitive biosensors. Here we report the study of two types of biosensors for measuring enzyme activities using NEAs fabricated with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs). VACNFs of ~100 nm in average diameter and 3-5 ?m in length were grown on conductive substrates as uniform vertical arrays which were then encapsulated in SiO2 matrix leaving only the tips exposed. We demonstrate that such VACNF NEAs can be used in profiling enzyme activities through monitoring the change in electrochemical signals induced by enzymatic reactions to the peptides attached to the VACNF tip. The cleavage of the tetrapeptide with a ferrocene tag by a cancerrelated protease (legumain) was monitored with AC voltammetry. Real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) was used for fast label-free detection of two reversible processes, i.e. phosphorylation by c-Src tyrosine kinase and dephosphorylation by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). The REIS data of phosphorylation were slow and unreliable, but those of dephosphorylation showed large and fast exponential decay due to much higher activity of phosphatase PTP1B. The kinetic data were analyzed with a heterogeneous Michaelis-Menten model to derive the "specificity constant" kcat/Km, which is 8.2x103 M-1s-1 for legumain and (2.1 0.1) x 107 M-1s-1 for phosphatase (PTP1B), well consistent with literature. It is promising to develop VACNF NEA based electrochemical enzymatic biosensors as portable multiplex electronic techniques for rapid cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring.

  20. Strong and stiff aramid nanofiber/carbon nanotube nanocomposites.

    Zhu, Jiaqi; Cao, Wenxin; Yue, Mingli; Hou, Ying; Han, Jiecai; Yang, Ming

    2015-03-24

    Small but strong carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are fillers of choice for composite reinforcement owing to their extraordinary modulus and strength. However, the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are still much below those for mechanical parameters of individual nanotubes. The gap between the expectation and experimental results arises not only from imperfect dispersion and poor load transfer but also from the unavailability of strong polymers that can be effectively utilized within the composites of nanotubes. Aramid nanofibers (ANFs) with analogous morphological features to nanotubes represent a potential choice to complement nanotubes given their intrinsic high mechanical performance and the dispersible nature, which enables solvent-based processing methods. In this work, we showed that composite films made from ANFs and multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) by vacuum-assisted flocculation and vacuum-assisted layer-by-layer assembly exhibited high ultimate strength of up to 383 MPa and Young's modulus (stiffness) of up to 35 GPa, which represent the highest values among all the reported random CNT nanocomposites. Detailed studies using different imaging and spectroscopic characterizations suggested that the multiple interfacial interactions between nanotubes and ANFs including hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking are likely the key parameters responsible for the observed mechanical improvement. Importantly, our studies further revealed the attractive thermomechanical characteristics of these nanocomposites with high thermal stability (up to 520 °C) and ultralow coefficients of thermal expansion (2-6 ppm·K(-1)). Our results indicated that ANFs are promising nanoscale building blocks for functional ultrastrong and stiff materials potentially extendable to nanocomposites based on other nanoscale fillers. PMID:25712334

  1. Plasma oxidation and stabilization of electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofiber for carbon nanofiber formation

    Hamideh Mortazavi, S.; Pilehvar, Soheil; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Hosseinnejad, M. T.; Zargham, Shamim; Mirarefi, Ali A.; Mirarefi, Amir Y.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of plasma treatment on the stabilization of copolymer P(AN-MA) containing 6.1 mol% methyl acrylate (MA) prepared by an electrospinning technique has been investigated at various oxygen contents (10 %, 20 % and 30 %) and different exposure times. The morphology and chemical structural evolution of electrospun and oxidized nanofibers were studied using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). FT-IR analysis indicated that the treated nanofibers were effectively oxidized under different contents of oxygen and prolonged plasma exposure times by increasing the peak intensities of polar groups at 1730 and 3400 cm-1 corresponding to C=O stretching band and OH stretching vibration mode, respectively. Additionally, a reduction in the extent of the cyclization reaction is observed with further increase in exposure times and contents of oxygen, which implies lower conversion of C?N bands into C=N ones in the copolymer chain. According to the FE-SEM studies, the surfaces of the treated nanofibers were completely etched after 15 min of treatment due to the existence of strong ion bombardment and a reduction in the average fiber diameters was observed.

  2. Electrochemical behavior of TiO2/carbon dual nanofibers

    The charge transfer processes are favored in dual nanofibers composed by TiO2Rutile-Csemigraphitic/Csemigraphitic over other systems such as TiO2Anatase and Rutile-Camorphous/Camorphous and TiO2Rutile-Camorphous, dual and single nanofibers respectively. The study of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) shows that the net of nanofibers presented a charge transfer resistance value (Rct) of 3.15 Ω. The increased ability of these materials to favor the diffusion of electroactive species in individual nanofibers is that the junction between the n-type semiconductor TiO2 and the semigraphitic material can be of the ohmic kind. Moreover, this observation was supported by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrical conductivity studies by two-probe method. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) confirmed the continuity and duality in the morphology of these materials. The effect of heat treatment on crystallinity was evident in the results obtained from the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) studies. Due to the electrochemical performance and morphological features of TiO2Rutile-Csemigraphitic/Csemigraphitic dual nanofibers; this novel nanostructured material can be regarded as an excellent candidate for applications such as a base material for electronic devices, photocatalysis, among other similar technologies

  3. The fabrication and electrochemical properties of electrospun nanofibers of a multiwalled carbon nanotube grafted by chitosan

    Feng, Wei; Wu, Zigang; Li, Yu; Feng, Yiyu; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2008-03-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were grafted by chitosan (CS); the product could disperse well in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) aqueous solution with 2% (v/v) acetic acid solution. Because this product has potential in several biological fields, it was electrospun so as to enlarge the surface area. Raman spectra indicated that the electrospinning process did not severely alter the electron hybridization of carbon atoms within the nanotube framework. Moreover and interestingly, these nanofibers showed a novel sheath-core structure; the outer and inner diameters of these sheath-core nanofibers were about 200 nm and 100 nm, respectively. These nanofibers' electrochemical properties were characterized by detection of hydrogen peroxide and voltammetric responses of potassium ferricyanide. The electrospun fibers' web displayed faster electron transfer kinetics and better electrochemical properties than its cast film, which justified further applications in biological areas.

  4. The fabrication and electrochemical properties of electrospun nanofibers of a multiwalled carbon nanotube grafted by chitosan

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were grafted by chitosan (CS); the product could disperse well in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) aqueous solution with 2% (v/v) acetic acid solution. Because this product has potential in several biological fields, it was electrospun so as to enlarge the surface area. Raman spectra indicated that the electrospinning process did not severely alter the electron hybridization of carbon atoms within the nanotube framework. Moreover and interestingly, these nanofibers showed a novel sheath-core structure; the outer and inner diameters of these sheath-core nanofibers were about 200 nm and 100 nm, respectively. These nanofibers' electrochemical properties were characterized by detection of hydrogen peroxide and voltammetric responses of potassium ferricyanide. The electrospun fibers' web displayed faster electron transfer kinetics and better electrochemical properties than its cast film, which justified further applications in biological areas

  5. Nickel/carbon nanofibers composite electrodes as supercapacitors prepared by electrospinning

    Nickel-embedded carbon nanofibers were prepared by the processes of stabilization and carbonation after electrospinning a mixture solution of nickel acetate and polyacrylonitrile in N,N-dimethylformamide. The surface morphology and structure of composites were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Compared with performances of composite electrodes with different mass ratios of nickel and carbon by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronopotentiogram test, the results show that the introduction of a proper proportion of nickel into carbon could enhance both specific capacitance (SC) and electrochemical stability. The specific capacitance of the carbon nanofiber electrode without the Ni loading was 50 F/g, while that of 22.4 wt.% Ni/carbon electrode increased to 164 F/g. The improved specific capacitance may be attributed to synergic effects from each pristine component, and the electrochemical catalysis effect of nickel.

  6. Controlling the optimum surfactants concentrations for dispersing carbon nanofibers in aqueous solution

    Wang, Bao-Min; Yuan, Zhang; Guo, Zhi-Qiang; Ma, Hai-Nan; Lai, Chuan Fook

    2013-12-01

    As a new nano-scale functional material, it is necessary to achieve a uniform distribution in the composites for gaining the CNFs' excellent reinforcing effect. In this paper, CNFs were purified by the method of high temperature annealing treatment. Six surfactants, methylcellulose (MC), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecylamine (DDA), N, N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) were used individually and combinatorially in a certain concentration to disperse the CNFs in aqueous solution. To achieve a good dispersion of the CNFs, a method utilizing ultrasonic processing was employed. The CNFs treated by the method of high temperature annealing treatment were characterized by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), and the ultrasonication-driven dispersion of CNFs in aqueous solutions were monitored by UVvis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experiments reveal that the method of high temperature annealing treatment purified the CNFs and the maximum achievable dispersion of CNFs corresponds to the maximum UV absorbance of the solution. All results show that the surfactants mixture of MC and SDS in a certain concentration of 0.4 and 2.0 g/L has the maximum dispersion effect on CNFs in aqueous solution, the optimum concentration ratio of MC, SDS, and CNFs was 2: 10: 1.

  7. Carbon functionalized TiO2 nanofibers for high efficiency photocatalysis

    TiO2 nanofibers (30–50 nm diameter), fabricated by the electro-spinning process, were modified with organo-silane agents via a coupling reaction and were grafted with carbohydrate molecules. The mixture was carbonized to produce a uniform coating of amorphous carbon on the surface of the TiO2 nanofibers. The TiO2@C nanofibers were characterized by high resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic property of the functional TiO2 and carbon nanocomposite was tested via the decomposition of an organic pollutant. The catalytic activity of the covalently functionalized nanocomposite was found to be significantly enhanced in comparison to unfunctionalized composite and pristine TiO2 due to the synergistic effect of nanostructured TiO2 and amorphous carbon bound via covalent bonds. The improvement in performance is due to bandgap modification in the 1D co-axial nanostructure where the anatase phase is bound by nano-carbon, providing a large surface to volume ratio within a confined space. The superior photocatalytic performance and recyclability of 1D TiO2@C nanofiber composites for water purification were established through dye degradation experiments. (papers)

  8. High-performance lithium storage in nitrogen-enriched carbon nanofiber webs derived from polypyrrole

    Highlights: • N-enriched carbon nanofiber webs are prepared via direct carbonization route with polyporrole as template. • The pyrolysis time plays an important role in N doping level and existing type. • Effect of N-doping on performance of the carbon anode material is investigated. • High reversible capacity of 238 mAh g−1 at 5 A g−1 is attained. -- Abstract: Nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber webs (N-CNFWs) are prepared by direct pyrolyzation of polypyrrole (PPy) nanofiber webs at 600 °C. The structure and morphology of N-CNFWs are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectra and elemental analysis. Both the doped N content and the N existing type in carbon, change with the pyrolysis time. As anode material for lithium-ion battery, the N-CNFWs show high capacity and good rate capability. The reversible capacity is up to 668 mAh g−1 at a current density of 0.1 A g−1 and 238 mAh g−1 at 5 A g−1, which can be ascribed to the nanofiber structure and high nitrogen content

  9. Carbon functionalized TiO2 nanofibers for high efficiency photocatalysis

    Raghava Reddy, Kakarla; Gomes, Vincent G.; Hassan, Mahbub

    2014-03-01

    TiO2 nanofibers (30-50 nm diameter), fabricated by the electro-spinning process, were modified with organo-silane agents via a coupling reaction and were grafted with carbohydrate molecules. The mixture was carbonized to produce a uniform coating of amorphous carbon on the surface of the TiO2 nanofibers. The TiO2@C nanofibers were characterized by high resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic property of the functional TiO2 and carbon nanocomposite was tested via the decomposition of an organic pollutant. The catalytic activity of the covalently functionalized nanocomposite was found to be significantly enhanced in comparison to unfunctionalized composite and pristine TiO2 due to the synergistic effect of nanostructured TiO2 and amorphous carbon bound via covalent bonds. The improvement in performance is due to bandgap modification in the 1D co-axial nanostructure where the anatase phase is bound by nano-carbon, providing a large surface to volume ratio within a confined space. The superior photocatalytic performance and recyclability of 1D TiO2@C nanofiber composites for water purification were established through dye degradation experiments.

  10. Low- and high-temperature controls in carbon nanofiber growth in reactive plasmas

    A numerical growth model is used to describe the catalyzed growth of carbon nanofibers in the sheath of a low-temperature plasma. Using the model, the effects of variation in the plasma sheath parameters and substrate potential on the carbon nanofiber growth characteristics, such as the growth rate, the effective carbon flux to the catalyst surface, and surface coverages, have been investigated. It is shown that variations in the parameters, which change the sheath width, mainly affect the growth parameters at the low catalyst temperatures, whereas the other parameters such as the gas pressure, ion temperature, and percentages of the hydrocarbon and etching gases, strongly affect the carbon nanofiber growth at higher temperatures. The conditions under which the carbon nanofiber growth can still proceed under low nanodevice-friendly process temperatures have been formulated and summarized. These results are consistent with the available experimental results and can also be used for catalyzed growth of other high-aspect-ratio nanostructures in low-temperature plasmas.

  11. Scaling up the Fabrication of Mechanically-Robust Carbon Nanofiber Foams

    William Curtin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to identify and address the main challenges associated with fabricating large samples of carbon foams composed of interwoven networks of carbon nanofibers. Solutions to two difficulties related with the process of fabricating carbon foams, maximum foam size and catalyst cost, were developed. First, a simple physical method was invented to scale-up the constrained formation of fibrous nanostructures process (CoFFiN to fabricate relatively large foams. Specifically, a gas deflector system capable of maintaining conditions supportive of carbon nanofiber foam growth throughout a relatively large mold was developed. ANSYS CFX models were used to simulate the gas flow paths with and without deflectors; the data generated proved to be a very useful tool for the deflector design. Second, a simple method for selectively leaching the Pd catalyst material trapped in the foam during growth was successfully tested. Multiple techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, surface area measurements, and mechanical testing, were employed to characterize the foams generated in this study. All results confirmed that the larger foam samples preserve the basic characteristics: their interwoven nanofiber microstructure forms a low-density tridimensional solid with viscoelastic behavior. Fiber growth mechanisms are also discussed. Larger samples of mechanically-robust carbon nanofiber foams will enable the use of these materials as strain sensors, shock absorbers, selective absorbents for environmental remediation and electrodes for energy storage devices, among other applications.

  12. Electrospun carbon nanofibers for improved electrical conductivity of fiber reinforced composites

    Alarifi, Ibrahim M.; Alharbi, Abdulaziz; Khan, Waseem S.; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2015-04-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was dissolved in dimethylformamide (DMF), and then electrospun to generate nanofibers using various electrospinning conditions, such as pump speeds, DC voltages and tip-to-collector distances. The produced nanofibers were oxidized at 270 C for 1 hr, and then carbonized at 850 C in an argon gas for additional 1 hr. The resultant carbonized PAN nanofibers were placed on top of the pre-preg carbon fiber composites as top layers prior to the vacuum oven curing following the pre-preg composite curing procedures. The major purpose of this study is to determine if the carbonized nanofibers on the fiber reinforced composites can detect the structural defects on the composite, which may be useful for the structural health monitoring (SHM) of the composites. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that the electrospun PAN fibers were well integrated on the pre-preg composites. Electrical conductivity studies under various tensile loads revealed that nanoscale carbon fibers on the fiber reinforced composites detected small changes of loads by changing the resistance values. Electrically conductive composite manufacturing can have huge benefits over the conventional composites primarily used for the military and civilian aircraft and wind turbine blades.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of hybrid nanofibers from poly(vinyl alcohol), milk protein and metal carbonates.

    Mahanta, Narahari; Teow, Yiwei; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2012-08-01

    Porous three dimensional nanofibrous membranes were fabricated from poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), milk protein and inorganic salts such as calcium carbonate (CaCO3) or magnesium carbonate (MgCO3). Microscopic investigations showed that the fibers have smooth morphology with an average diameter of 300-500 nm and a surface area of 5.29 m2g(-1). Thermal analysis of the composite nanofibers showed a decrease in glass transition temperature as compared to PVA nanofiber. Incorporation of CaCO3 and MgCO3 into the nanofiber matrix was confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The cytocompatibility of electrospun composite nanofiber sheets was evaluated using human lung fibroblasts (IMR-90). There was an increase in cell attachment and cell density on milk protein incorporated to PVA-CaCO3 and PVA-MgCO3 fibers within a week of cell seeding. The cytocompatibility and increase in cell adhesion property of the hybrid nanofiber may provide significant advantages for such materials in biomedical applications. PMID:22962721

  14. Remarkable improvement in microwave absorption by cloaking a micro-scaled tetrapod hollow with helical carbon nanofibers.

    Jian, Xian; Chen, Xiangnan; Zhou, Zuowan; Li, Gang; Jiang, Man; Xu, Xiaoling; Lu, Jun; Li, Qiming; Wang, Yong; Gou, Jihua; Hui, David

    2015-02-01

    Helical nanofibers are prepared through in situ growth on the surface of a tetrapod-shaped ZnO whisker (T-ZnO), by employing a precursor decomposition method then adding substrate. After heat treatment at 900 C under argon, this new composite material, named helical nanofiber-T-ZnO, undergoes a significant change in morphology and structure. The T-ZnO transforms from a solid tetrapod ZnO to a micro-scaled tetrapod hollow carbon film by reduction of the organic fiber at 900 C. Besides, helical carbon nanofibers, generated from the carbonization of helical nanofibers, maintain the helical morphology. Interestingly, HCNFs with the T-hollow exhibit remarkable improvement in electromagnetic wave loss compared with the pure helical nanofibers. The enhanced loss ability may arise from the efficient dielectric friction, interface effect in the complex nanostructures and the micro-scaled tetrapod-hollow structure. PMID:25510199

  15. A self-template strategy for the synthesis of mesoporous carbon nanofibers as advanced supercapacitor electrodes

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Fan; Dou, Yuqian; Wu, Zhangxiong; Liu, Haijing; Qian, Xufang; Gu, Dong; Xia, Yongyao; Tu, Bo; Zhao, Dongyuan [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials and Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Self-construction: A facile self-templating strategy is presented for the synthesis of mesoporous carbon nanofibers by using zinc glycolate fibers as the built-in template. The spectacular architectures show excellent performances as recommended electrode material for electrochemical capacitors. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Surface modified PLGA/carbon nanofiber composite enhances articular chondrocyte functions

    Park, Grace Eunseung

    Since articular cartilage has a limited self regeneration capability, alternative methods are needed for repairing cartilage defects. The purpose of the present in vitro study was to explore the effects of material surface properties and external stimulation on chondrocyte (cartilage-synthesizing cell) functions. Based on this information, a goal of this research was to propose a scaffold composite material for enhancing articular chondrocyte function. To improve functions of chondrocytes, material (namely, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid); PLGA) surfaces were modified via chemical (NaOH) etching techniques. Chondrocytes were cultured on surface-modified 2-D PLGA films and 3-D PLGA tissue engineering scaffolds, which were created by a salt-leaching method. Carbon nanofibers were imprinted on PLGA matrices in an aligned pattern for controlled electrically-active surface features. Electrical stimulation was applied to expedite and enhance chondrocyte functions. Results demonstrated that both NaOH-treated 2-D and 3-D substrates enhanced chondrocyte functions (cell numbers as well as extracellular matrix production) compared to non-treated PLGA substrates. Furthermore, chondrocytes preferred to attach along the carbon nanofiber patterns imprinted on PLGA. Electrical stimulation also enhanced chondrocyte functions on carbon nanofiber/PLGA composites. Underlying material properties that may have enhanced chondrocyte functions include a more hydrophilic surface, surface energy differences due to the presence of carbon nanofibers, increased surface area, altered porosity, and a greater degree of nanometer roughness. Moreover, these altered surface properties positively influenced select protein adsorption that controlled subsequent chondrocyte adhesion. Collectively, this study provided a scaffold model for osteochondral defects that can be synthesized using the above techniques and a layer by layer approach to accommodate the property differences in each layer of natural cartilage. Specifically, these results suggest that the superficial zone, middle zone, and deep zone of cartilage should be composed of carbon nanofibers aligned parallel to the surface in PLGA, randomly oriented carbon nanofibers in PLGA, and carbon nanofibers aligned perpendicular to the surface in PLGA, respectively. Clearly, such scaffolds may ultimately enhance the efficacy of scaffolds used for articular cartilage repair.

  17. Microwave absorption properties of helical carbon nanofibers-coated carbon fibers

    Lei Liu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs coated-carbon fibers (CFs were fabricated by catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. TEM and Raman spectroscopy characterizations indicate that the graphitic layers of the HCNFs changed from disorder to order after high temperature annealing. The electromagnetic parameters and microwave absorption properties were measured at 2–18 GHz. The maximum reflection loss is 32 dB at 9 GHz and the widest bandwidth under −10 dB is 9.8 GHz from 8.2 to 18 GHz for the unannealed HCNFs coated-CFs composite with 2.5 mm in thickness, suggesting that HCNFs coated-CFs should have potential applications in high performance microwave absorption materials.

  18. Enhancing capacitive deionization performance of electrospun activated carbon nanofibers by coupling with carbon nanotubes.

    Dong, Qiang; Wang, Gang; Wu, Tingting; Peng, Senpei; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-05-15

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is an alternative, effective and environmentally friendly technology for desalination of brackish water. The performance of the CDI device is highly determined by the electrode materials. In this paper, a composite of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in activated carbon nanofiber (ACF) was prepared by a direct co-electrospinning way and subsequent CO2 activation. The introduction of CNTs can greatly improve the conductivity while the CO2-mediated activation can render the final product with high porosity. As such, the hybrid structure can provide an excellent storage space and pathways for ion adsorption and conduction. When evaluated as electrode materials for CDI, the as-prepared CNT/ACF composites with higher electrical conductivity and mesopore ratios exhibited higher electrosorption capacity and good regeneration performance in comparison with the pure ACF. PMID:25595622

  19. Polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon composites as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Bin; Jia, Mengqiu; Zhang, Mei; Cao, Bin; Zhao, Xiaonan; Wang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    A composite of polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon (PANI-F/LMC) hybrid was prepared by an in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer with nano-CaCO3 templated LMC as host matrix for supercapacitors. The morphology, composition and electronic structure of the composites (PANI-F/LMC) together with pure PANI nanofibers and the LMC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is found that the PANI nanofibers were incorporated into the large mesochannels of LMC with interpenetrating framework formed. Such unique structure endows the PANI-F/LMC composite with a high capacitance of 473 F g-1 at a current load of 0.1 A g-1 with good rate performance and cycling stability, suggesting its potential application in the electrode material for supercapacitors.

  20. The Optical Excitation of Zigzag Carbon Nanotubes with Photons Guided in Nanofibers

    Broadfoot, S; Jaksch, D

    2011-01-01

    We consider the excitation of electrons in semiconducting carbon nanotubes by photons from the evanescent field created by a subwavelength-diameter optical fiber. The strongly changing evanescent field of such nanofibers requires dropping the dipole approximation. We show that this leads to novel effects, especially a high dependence of the photon absorption on the relative orientation and geometry of the nanotube-nanofiber setup in the optical and near infrared domain. In particular, we calculate photon absorption probabilities for a straight nanotube and nanofiber depending on their relative angle. Nanotubes orthogonal to the fiber are found to perform much better than parallel nanotubes when they are short. As the nanotube gets longer the absorption of parallel nanotubes is found to exceed the orthogonal nanotubes and approach 100% for extremely long nanotubes. In addition, we show that if the nanotube is wrapped around the fiber in an appropriate way the absorption is enhanced. We find that optical and ne...

  1. Durability of Carbon Nanofiber (CNF) & Carbon Nanotube (CNT) as Catalyst Support for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Borghei, Maryam; Lund, Peter; Elina, Yli-Rantala; Pasanen, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko; Ruiz, Virginia; Kauranen, Pertti; Skou, Eivind Morten

    2013-01-01

    Durability issues have recently been given much attention in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) research. It gives fundamental definition for cell life time, capital cost, system stability and technique reliability. Loss of catalyst surface area due to corrosion of supporting material (normally carbon black) is one of the essential degradation mechanisms during cell operation. In this work, durability of Carbon Nanofibers (CNF) & Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) as alternative platinum cata...

  2. Polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon composites as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    Highlights: • The composites of polyaniline nanofiber and large mesoporous carbon were prepared for supercapacitors. • The large mesoporous carbons were simply prepared by nano-CaCO3 template method. • The composites exhibit high capacitance and good rate capability and cycle stability. - Abstract: A composite of polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon (PANI-F/LMC) hybrid was prepared by an in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer with nano-CaCO3 templated LMC as host matrix for supercapacitors. The morphology, composition and electronic structure of the composites (PANI-F/LMC) together with pure PANI nanofibers and the LMC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is found that the PANI nanofibers were incorporated into the large mesochannels of LMC with interpenetrating framework formed. Such unique structure endows the PANI-F/LMC composite with a high capacitance of 473 F g−1 at a current load of 0.1 A g−1 with good rate performance and cycling stability, suggesting its potential application in the electrode material for supercapacitors

  3. Polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon composites as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Bin; Jia, Mengqiu, E-mail: jiamq@mail.buct.edu.cn; Zhang, Mei; Cao, Bin; Zhao, Xiaonan; Wang, Yu

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • The composites of polyaniline nanofiber and large mesoporous carbon were prepared for supercapacitors. • The large mesoporous carbons were simply prepared by nano-CaCO{sub 3} template method. • The composites exhibit high capacitance and good rate capability and cycle stability. - Abstract: A composite of polyaniline nanofiber/large mesoporous carbon (PANI-F/LMC) hybrid was prepared by an in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer with nano-CaCO{sub 3} templated LMC as host matrix for supercapacitors. The morphology, composition and electronic structure of the composites (PANI-F/LMC) together with pure PANI nanofibers and the LMC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It is found that the PANI nanofibers were incorporated into the large mesochannels of LMC with interpenetrating framework formed. Such unique structure endows the PANI-F/LMC composite with a high capacitance of 473 F g{sup −1} at a current load of 0.1 A g{sup −1} with good rate performance and cycling stability, suggesting its potential application in the electrode material for supercapacitors.

  4. Using Mechanical Alloying to Create Bimetallic Catalysts for Vapor-Phase Carbon Nanofiber Synthesis

    Laura Guevara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers were generated over bimetallic catalysts in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD reactor. Catalyst compositions of Fe 30 at%, Cu and Ni 30 at% and Cu were mechanically alloyed using high-energy ball milling over durations of 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 h. The catalyst powders were then used to produce carbon nanofibers in ethylene and hydrogen (4:1 at temperatures of 500, 550, and 600 C. The microstructures of the catalysts were characterized as a function of milling time as well as at deposition temperature. The corresponding carbon deposition rates were assessed and are correlated to the microstructural features of each catalyst. The milling process directly determines the performance of each catalyst toward carbon deposition, and both catalysts performed comparably to those made by traditional co-precipitation methods. Considerations in miscible and immiscible nanostructured alloy systems are discussed.

  5. Carbon Nanofibers and Their Composites: A Review of Synthesizing, Properties and Applications

    Lichao Feng; Ning Xie; Jing Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF), as one of the most important members of carbon fibers, has been investigated in both fundamental scientific research and practical applications. CNF composites are able to be applied as promising materials in many fields, such as electrical devices, electrode materials for batteries and supercapacitors and as sensors. In these applications, the electrical conductivity is always the first priority need to be considered. In fact, the electrical property of CNF composites...

  6. Carbon nanofiber mesoporous films: efficient platforms for bio-hydrogen oxidation in biofuel cells.

    de Poulpiquet, Anne; Marques-Knopf, Helena; Wernert, Vronique; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie Thrse; Gadiou, Roger; Lojou, Elisabeth

    2014-01-28

    The discovery of oxygen and carbon monoxide tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenases was the first necessary step toward the definition of a novel generation of hydrogen fed biofuel cells. The next important milestone is now to identify and overcome bottlenecks limiting the current densities, hence the power densities. In the present work we report for the first time a comprehensive study of herringbone carbon nanofiber mesoporous films as platforms for enhanced biooxidation of hydrogen. The 3D network allows mediatorless hydrogen oxidation by the membrane-bound hydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. We investigate the key physico-chemical parameters that enhance the catalytic efficiency, including surface chemistry and hierarchical porosity of the biohybrid film. We also emphasize that the catalytic current is limited by mass transport inside the mesoporous carbon nanofiber film. Provided hydrogen is supplied inside the carbon film, the combination of the hierarchical porosity of the carbon nanofiber film with the hydrophobicity of the treated carbon material results in very high efficiency of the bioelectrode. By optimization of the whole procedure, current densities as high as 4.5 mA cm(-2) are reached with a turnover frequency of 48 s(-1). This current density is almost 100 times higher than when hydrogenase is simply adsorbed at a bare graphite electrode, and more than 5 times higher than the average of the previous reported current densities at carbon nanotube modified electrodes, suggesting that carbon nanofibers can be efficiently used in future sustainable H2/O2 biofuel cells. PMID:24296569

  7. Development of Electro-Mechanical Spinning for Controlled Deposition of Carbon Nanofibers

    Canton, Giulia

    In the past few decades the fields of nanotechnology and miniaturized devices had an exponentially growth of interest in academic and research environment, leading to breakthroughs discoveries that are envisioned to have a profound impact on our economy and society in the near future. Recently, the focus is moving toward the development of technologies that enable the production of micro- /nano-devices on a larger scale and at lower costs. Among the different micro- /nano-devices manufacturing challenges, in this dissertation the aim is to reliably fabricate suspend carbon micro- /nano-fibers between two carbon electrode walls in a way that can be mass produced at relatively low cost. The first part of this thesis provides an in depth overview of current methods used for the fabrication of carbon based micro devices (C-MEMS) and of electrospinning, a manufacturing technology that emerges as a simple and inexpensive approach to produce nanofibers. Electro-Mechanical Spinning (EMS) has been developed from electrospinning and optimized for the production of suspended carbon nanofibers, aiming to achieve greater deposition control at the single nanofiber level, while maintaining the low cost of electrospinning. After the successful development of EMS, the so fabricated carbon micro- /nano-fibers have been characterized, first from the electrical point of view, then from the mechanical one. The electrical characterization involves conductivity measurements of fibers with respect of different and controllable manufacturing processes steps. Variations of those manufacturing parameters have been proven to be capable of tailoring the carbon structure and, therefore, the conductivity of the fibers within a desired range. Further investigation regarding the electrical properties was also conducted to prevent (or control) current induced fiber breakdown. Finally, the Young's modulus of those fibers was investigated and observed to be dependent on the fibers thickness. Similarly to conductivity, variations in Young's modulus are also related to formation of a different carbon structure when fibers diameter is below certain values. In conclusion, appropriate combinations of EMS and C-MEMS processes were proven to be capable of fabricating controllable suspended carbon nanofibers with tuned conductivity and Young's modulus properties.

  8. The interfacial strength of carbon nanofiber epoxy composite using single fiber pullout experiments

    Carbon nanotubes and nanofibers are extensively researched as reinforcing agents in nanocomposites for their multifunctionality, light weight and high strength. However, it is the interface between the nanofiber and the matrix that dictates the overall properties of the nanocomposite. The current trend is to measure elastic properties of the bulk nanocomposite and then compare them with theoretical models to extract the information on the interfacial strength. The ideal experiment is single fiber pullout from the matrix because it directly measures the interfacial strength. However, the technique is difficult to apply to nanocomposites because of the small size of the fibers and the requirement for high resolution force and displacement sensing. We present an experimental technique for measuring the interfacial strength of nanofiber-reinforced composites using the single fiber pullout technique and demonstrate the technique for a carbon nanofiber-reinforced epoxy composite. The experiment is performed in situ in a scanning electron microscope and the interfacial strength for the epoxy composite was measured to be 170 MPa.

  9. Study on glow discharge effects on catalyst films for growing aligned carbon nanofibers in negative bias-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition system

    Aligned carbon nanofibers (ACNFs) were grown on silicon substrates coated with NiFe catalyst films by negative bias-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The growth and structure of the aligned carbon nanofibers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that the aligned carbon nanofibers could be synthesized after the glow discharge appears when the negative bias is higher than a certain value, while they are bent if the glow discharge does not appear. Furthermore, the diameters of the aligned carbon nanofibers are reduced and their lengths are increased with increasing the negative bias. It is shown that the glow discharge resulting from the negative bias plays an important role in the growth of aligned carbon nanofibers. Here, the effects of the glow discharge on the growth and structure of the aligned carbon nanofibers are discussed

  10. Fe3O4/carbon composite nanofiber absorber with enhanced microwave absorption performance

    Highlights: ► PAN/AAI/DMF solutions for electrospinning. ► Fe3O4/carbon composite nanofibers as microwave absorbers. ► Microwave absorption performance has been much enhanced than pure carbon naonfibers. ► Microwave absorption mechanisms have been discussed as a key point. - Abstract: Fe3O4/carbon composite nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/acetyl acetone iron (AAI)/dimethyl formamide (DMF) solution, followed by stabilization and carbonization. SEM and TEM observations reveal that the fibers are lengthy and uniform, and are loaded with well-distributed Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which are evidenced by XRD. Electrical and magnetic properties of the samples were studied to show the effect of enhancement of electrical conductivity and magnetic hysteresis performance. Finally, the permittivity and permeability parameters were measured by a vector network analyzer, and the reflectivity loss was calculated based on Transmission Line Theory. Results show that Fe3O4/C composite nanofibers exhibit enhanced properties of microwave absorption as compared to those of pure carbon nanofibers by: decreasing reflectivity loss values; widening absorption width and improving performance in low frequency (2–5 GHz) absorption. Absorption properties can be tuned by changing AAI content, carbonization temperature, composite fiber/paraffin ratio and coating thickness. It is shown that with coating thickness of 5 mm and fiber/paraffin ratio of 5 wt.%, the bandwidth for reflection loss under −5 dB can reach a maximum of 12–13 GHz in the range of 2–18 GHz, accompanying with a minimum reflection loss of −40 to −45 dB, and preferred low frequency band absorption can also be obtained. The mechanisms for the enhanced absorption performance were briefly discussed. It is supposed that this kind of composite material is promising for resolving the problems of weak absorption in the low frequency range and narrow bandwidth absorption.

  11. LiCoPO4—3D carbon nanofiber composites as possible cathode materials for high voltage applications

    Electrospun and carbonized 3D nanofiber mats coated with olivine structured lithium cobalt phosphate (LiCoPO4) were formed by a Pechini-assisted sol–gel process as cathode material for lithium ion batteries. 3D nonwoven nanofibers were soaked in aqueous solution containing lithium, cobalt salts and phosphates at 80 °C for 2 h. Then, the composites were dried and annealed at 730 °C for 2 to 12 h in nitrogen atmosphere. Crystalline deposits were uniformly distributed on the carbon nanofiber surface. The “loading” of the cathode material on the 3D carbon nanofiber composites reached 300 wt%. The electrochemical measurements revealed the discharge specific capacity (measured at a discharge rate of 0.1 C and room temperature) reaching a maximum value of 46 mAh g−1 after annealing time t = 5 h

  12. Noble metal/functionalized cellulose nanofiber composites for catalytic applications.

    Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Bang, Hyunsik; Yuan, Guohao; Yin, Chuan; Song, Kyung-Hun; Lee, Jung Soon; Chung, Ill Min; Karvembu, Ramasamy; Kim, Ick Soo

    2015-11-01

    In this study, cellulose acetate nanofibers (CANFs) with a mean diameter of 325 2.0 nm were electrospun followed by deacetylation and functionalization to produce anionic cellulose nanofibers (f-CNFs). The noble metal nanoparticles (RuNPs and AgNPs) were successfully decorated on the f-CNFs by a simple wet reduction method using NaBH4 as a reducing agent. TEM and SEM images of the nanocomposites (RuNPs/CNFs and AgNPs/CNFs) confirmed that the very fine RuNPs or AgNPs were homogeneously dispersed on the surface of f-CNFs. The weight percentage of the Ru and Ag in the nanocomposites was found to be 13.29 wt% and 22.60 wt% respectively; as confirmed by SEM-EDS analysis. The metallic state of the Ru and Ag in the nanocomposites was confirmed by XPS and XRD analyses. The usefulness of these nanocomposites was realized from their superior catalytic activity. In the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, the RuNPs/CNFs system gave a better yield of 89% with 100% selectivity. Similarly, the AgNPs/CNFs produced an excellent yield of 99% (100% selectivity) in the aza-Michael reaction of 1-phenylpiperazine with acrylonitrile. Mechanism has been proposed for the catalytic systems. PMID:26256382

  13. Enhanced visible-light photocatalytic performance of electrospun carbon-doped TiO2/halloysite nanotube hybrid nanofibers.

    Jiang, Ling; Huang, Yunpeng; Liu, Tianxi

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the effects of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) on the visible-light photocatalytic ability of electrospun carbon doped TiO2/HNT (C-TH) nanofibers have been explored. Structural and morphological investigations demonstrate that incorporation of HNTs into anatase C-TH hybrid nanofibers was easily achieved by using sol-gel processing combined with electrospinning approach, thus HNTs could be uniformly embedded in the electrospun nanofibers. The visible-light photocatalytic efficiency of C-TH hybrid on the degradation of methyl blue (MB) was greatly enhanced with the combination of moderate amount of HNTs (8%), which was 23 times higher than that of commercial anatase TiO2. Mechanism of the enhancing effect of HNTs has been explored by analyzing the dual-effect of adsorption and photocatalysis in various amounts of HNTs incorporated C-TiO2 nanofibers. With nanotubular structure and considerable adsorption ability, incorporated HNTs functioned as porogen agent in C-TH nanofibers. This simple incorporation approach increases the specific surface areas of nanofibers, which improves the mass transport of reactant into the nanofibers and the adsorption of visible-light by scattering, meanwhile may suppress the charge recombination and enhance photoinduced charge separation, thus efficiently enhancing visible-light photocatalytic performance of the C-TH hybrid nanofibers. PMID:25463176

  14. Synthesis and characterization of electrospun carbon nanofiber supported Pt catalyst for fuel cells

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The functionalized and optimized e-CNF has been prepared. • Increasing functionalization period, the fiber morphology slightly affected. • The suitability of the Pt/fe-CNF was studied in the lab made set-ups of PEMFC. - Abstract: Polyacrylonitrile polymer nanofibers were prepared using an electrospinner. These nanofibers were subjected to stabilization and carbonization processes. The electrospun carbon nanofibers (e-CNF) were functionalized using sulfuric acid and nitric acid under three different refluxing periods (i.e., 1f, 3f, and 5f) to optimize the functionalization level. The thermal stability of the obtained carbon supports was characterized by TGA. The Pt loaded carbon supports (20 wt%) for the three functionalized (1fe, 3fe, and 5fe-CNF) samples were prepared using chloroplatinic acid with ethylene glycol as the reducing agent. The dispersion of platinum on e-CNF and the size of Pt nanoparticles were characterized by HRSEM and HRTEM and the crystalline nature was confirmed by XRD. The surface area and pore size distribution were calculated from Brunner Emmett Teller method. The performance of five different samples such as Pt/C, Pt/1fe, 3fe, 5fe-CNF and e-CNF as electrodes and laboratory prepared hydrocarbon based sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) as electrolyte were studied in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and the results were compared with commercially available Pt/C catalyst and Nafion-117 membrane

  15. Preparation of flexible zinc oxide/carbon nanofiber webs for mid-temperature desulfurization

    Kim, Soojung; Bajaj, Bharat; Byun, Chang Ki; Kwon, Soon-Jin; Joh, Han-Ik; Yi, Kwang Bok; Lee, Sungho

    2014-11-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) derived carbon nanofiber (CNF) webs loaded with zinc oxide (ZnO) were synthesized using electrospinning and heat treatment at 600 °C. Uniformly dispersed ZnO nanoparticles, clarified by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, were observed on the surface of the nanofiber composites containing 13.6-29.5 wt% of ZnO. The further addition of ZnO up to 34.2 wt% caused agglomeration with a size of 50-80 nm. Higher ZnO contents led the concentrated ZnO nanoparticles on the surface of the nanofibers rather than uniform dispersion along the cross-section of the fiber. The flexible composite webs were crushed and tested for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) adsorption at 300 °C. Breakthrough experiments with the ZnO/CNF composite containing 25.7 wt% of ZnO for H2S adsorption showed three times higher ZnO utilization efficiency compared to pure ZnO nano powders, attributed to chemisorption of the larger surface area of well dispersed ZnO particles on nanofibers and physical adsorption of CNF.

  16. Preparation and Study on Nickel Oxide Reduction of Polyacrylonitrile-Based Carbon Nanofibers by Thermal Treatment.

    Lee, Yeong Ju; Kim, Hyun Bin; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Lee, Dae Soo; Koo, Dong Hyun; Kang, Phil Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Carbon materials containing magnetic nanopowder have been attractive in technological applications such as electrochemical capacitors and electromagnetic wave shielding. In this study, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers containing nickel nanoparticles were prepared using an electrospinning method and thermal stabilization. The reduction of nickel oxide was investigated under a nitrogen atmosphere within a temperature range of 600 to 1,000 °C. Carbon nanofibers containing nickel nanoparticles were characterized by FE-SEM, EDS, XRD, TGA, and VSM. It was found that nickel nanoparticles were formed by a NiO reduction in PAN as a function of the thermal treatment. These results led to an increase in the coercivity of nanofibers and a decrease in the remanence magnetization. PMID:26369192

  17. Improvement by Nanofibers of Load Transfer in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composites

    Alexandre Vivet

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the load transfer improvement caused by nanofibers (NF in carbon fiber reinforced composites. Load transfer is defined as the ability to transfer the mechanical loading between two adjacent fibers through the surrounding matrix. NF action is explored with a finite element model representing two carbon fibers separated by a layer of a NF reinforced matrix. It appears that the role of the NF network is to strengthen the matrix by increasing matrix shear rigidity, and thus to improve the load transfer between the carbon fibers. NF network morphology, defined by NF orientation, NF spatial distribution or NF diameter, governs the NF network efficiency.

  18. Cobalt supported on carbon nanofibers as catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Bezemer, G.L.

    2006-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process converts synthesis gas (H2/CO) over a heterogeneous catalyst into hydrocarbons. Generally, cobalt catalysts supported on oxidic carriers are used for the FT process, however it appears to be difficult to obtain and maintain fully reduced cobalt particles. To overcome these problems we started to use carbon nanofibers (CNF), a novel support material on which cobalt-support compounds are not expected to form. In chapter 2 we describe our research on the pre...

  19. In vitro Characterization of an Electroactive Carbon-Nanotube-Based Nanofiber Scaffold for Tissue Engineering

    Mackle, Joseph N.; Blond, David J.-P.; Mooney, Emma; et al.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to reduce organ replacement and enhance tissue repair, there has been a tremendous effort to create biomechanically optimized scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. In contrast, the development and characterization of electroactive scaffolds has attracted little attention. Consequently, the creation and characterization of a carbon nanotube based poly(lactic acid) nanofiber scaffold is described herein. After 28 d in physiological solution at 37 °C, a change in the mass, ...

  20. Label-free electrochemical impedance detection of kinase and phosphatase activities using carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays

    LI, Yifen; Syed, Lateef; Liu, JianWei; Hua, Duy H.; Li , Jun

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a label-free electrochemical method to detect the kinetics of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of surface-attached peptides catalyzed by kinase and phosphatase, respectively. The peptides with a sequence specific to c-Src tyrosine kinase and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) were first validated with ELISA-based protein tyrosine kinase assay and then functionalized on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs). Real-tim...

  1. Experimental and numerical studies on ballistic phonon transport of cup-stacked carbon nanofiber

    A carbon nanofiber material, consisting of a stacked graphene cups, with the potential to conduct heat ballistically has been discovered and tested. Its unexpected high thermal conductivity can be understood by the similarity to a one-dimensional harmonic chain where no phonon is scattered even for an infinite length. A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation for this fiber validated this hypothesis by revealing a uniform temperature distribution between hot and cold reservoirs.

  2. Carbon Nanofibers enhance the Fracture toughness and Fatigue Performance of a Structural Epoxy system

    Bortz, Daniel R.; Merino, Csar; Martin-Gullon, Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This study investigates the monotonic and dynamic fracture characteristics of a discontinuous fiber reinforced polymer matrix. Specifically, small amounts (0-1 wt%) of a helical-ribbon carbon nanofiber (CNF) were added to an amine cured epoxy system. The resulting nanocomposites were tested to failure in two modes of testing; Mode I fracture toughness and constant amplitude of stress tension-tension fatigue. Fracture toughness testing revealed that adding 0.5 and 1.0 wt% C...

  3. The effect of filler aspect ratio on the electromagnetic properties of carbon-nanofibers reinforced composites

    De Vivo, B.; Lamberti, P.; Spinelli, G.; Tucci, V.; Guadagno, L.; Raimondo, M.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of filler aspect ratio on the electromagnetic properties of epoxy-amine resin reinforced with carbon nanofibers is here investigated. A heat treatment at 2500 C of carbon nanofibers seems to increase their aspect ratio with respect to as-received ones most likely due to a lowering of structural defects and the improvement of the graphene layers within the dixie cup conformation. These morphological differences revealed by Raman's spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses may be responsible for the different electrical properties of the resulting composites. The DC characterization of the nanofilled material highlights an higher electrical conductivity and a lower electrical percolation threshold for the heat-treated carbon nanofibers based composites. In fact, the electrical conductivity is about 0.107 S/m and 1.36 10-3 S/m for the nanocomposites reinforced with heat-treated and as received fibers, respectively, at 1 wt. % of nanofiller loading, while the electrical percolation threshold falls in the range [0.05-0.32]wt. % for the first nanocomposites and above 0.64 wt. % for the latter. Moreover, also a different frequency response is observed since the critical frequency, which is indicative of the transition from a resistive to a capacitive-type behaviour, shifts forward of about one decade at the same filler loading. The experimental results are supported by theoretical and simulation studies focused on the role of the filler aspect ratio on the electrical properties of the nanocomposites.

  4. Antitumor Activity of Doxorubicin-Loaded Carbon Nanotubes Incorporated Poly(Lactic-Co-Glycolic Acid) Electrospun Composite Nanofibers

    Yu, Yuan; Kong, Lijun; Li, Lan; Li, Naie; Yan, Peng

    2015-08-01

    The drug-loaded composite electrospun nanofiber has attracted more attention in biomedical field, especially in cancer therapy. In this study, a composite nanofiber was fabricated by electrospinning for cancer treatment. Firstly, the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were selected as carriers to load the anticancer drug—doxorubicin (DOX) hydrochloride. Secondly, the DOX-loaded CNTs (DOX@CNTs) were incorporated into the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers via electrospinning. Finally, a new drug-loaded nanofibrous scaffold (PLGA/DOX@CNTs) was formed. The properties of the prepared composite nanofibrous mats were characterized by various techniques. The release profiles of the different DOX-loaded nanofibers were measured, and the in vitro antitumor efficacy against HeLa cells was also evaluated. The results showed that DOX-loaded CNTs can be readily incorporated into the nanofibers with relatively uniform distribution within the nanofibers. More importantly, the drug from the composite nanofibers can be released in a sustained and prolonged manner, and thereby, a significant antitumor efficacy in vitro is obtained. Thus, the prepared composite nanofibrous mats are a promising alternative for cancer treatment.

  5. Preparation and electrochemical properties of carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers

    Wei, Bin-bin; Wu, Yan-bo; Yu, Fang-yuan; Zhou, Ya-nan

    2016-04-01

    Carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers as cathode materials for Li-ion batteries were obtained by coaxial electrospinning. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area analysis, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to investigate the crystalline structure, morphology, and electrochemical performance of the as-prepared hollow nanofibers. The results indicate that the carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers have good long-term cycling performance and good rate capability: at a current density of 0.2C (1.0C = 170 mA·g-1) in the voltage range of 2.5-4.2 V, the cathode materials achieve an initial discharge specific capacity of 153.16 mAh·g-1 with a first charge-discharge coulombic efficiency of more than 97%, as well as a high capacity retention of 99% after 10 cycles; moreover, the materials can retain a specific capacity of 135.68 mAh·g-1, even at 2C.

  6. Characterization of carbon nanofiber mats produced from electrospun lignin-g-polyacrylonitrile copolymer.

    Youe, Won-Jae; Lee, Soo-Min; Lee, Sung-Suk; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Yong Sik

    2016-01-01

    The graft copolymerization of acrylonitrile (AN) onto methanol-soluble kraft lignin (ML) was achieved through a two-step process in which AN was first polymerized with an α,α'-azobisisobutyronitrile initiator, followed by radical coupling with activated ML. A carbon nanofiber material was obtained by electrospinning a solution of this copolymer in N,N-dimethylformamide, then subjecting it to a heat treatment including thermostabilization at 250°C and subsequent carbonization at 600-1400°C. Increasing the carbonization temperature was found to increase the carbon content of the resulting carbon nanofibers from 70.5 to 97.1%, which had the effect of increasing their tensile strength from 35.2 to 89.4 MPa, their crystallite size from 13.2 to 19.1 nm, and their electrical conductivity from ∼0 to 21.3 Scm(-1). The morphology of the mats, in terms of whether they experienced beading or not, was found to be dependent on the concentration of the initial electrospinning solution. From these results, it is proposed that these mats could provide the basis for a new class of carbon fiber material. PMID:26459170

  7. Aerosynthesis: Growths of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers with Air DC Plasma

    Kodumagulla, A [North Carolina State University; Varanasi, V [North Carolina State University; Pearce, Ryan [North Carolina State University; Wu, W-C [North Carolina State University; Hensley, Dale K [ORNL; Tracy, Joseph B [North Carolina State University; McKnight, Timothy E [ORNL; Melechko, Anatoli [North Carolina State University

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNF) have been synthesized in a mixture of acetone and air using catalytic DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Typically, ammonia or hydrogen is used as etchant gas in the mixture to remove carbon that otherwise passivates the catalyst surface and impedes growth. Our demonstration of using air as the etchant gas opens up a possibility that ion etching could be sufficient to maintain the catalytic activity state during synthesis. It also demonstrates the path toward growing VACNFs in open atmosphere.

  8. Controlling SEI Formation on SnSb-Porous Carbon Nanofibers for Improved Na Ion Storage

    Ji, Liwen; Gu, Meng; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Xiaolin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2014-05-14

    Porous carbon nanofiber (CNF)-supported tin-antimony (SnSb) alloys is synthesized and applied as sodium ion battery anode. The chemistry and morphology of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film and its correlation with the electrode performance are studied. The addition of fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) in electrolyte significantly reduces electrolyte decomposition and creates a very thin and uniform SEI layer on the cycled electrode surface which could promote the kinetics of Na-ion migration/transportation, leading to excellent electrochemical performance.

  9. Copper-based Composite Materials Reinforced with Carbon Nanostructures

    Tatiana KOLTSOVA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is devoted to development of high performance Cu-based material reinforced with carbon. For this purpose Cu-C composite powders were produced by one-step CVD process. The powders containing carbon nanofibers and graphene were subjected to compacting and analyzed. Mechanical properties of Cu-carbon nanofibers (CNFs and Cu-graphene composites were compared to traditional Cu-graphite and pure copper samples compacted under the same technology. Cu-CNFs material showed the best performance (1.7 times increase in the hardness compared to copper, that is primarily explained by the smallest matrix grain size, which growth is inhibited by the homogeneously dispersed CNFs. Friction coefficient of the Cu-(17 33 vol.%CNF was found to be 9 times less than that of pure copper and coincides within the error with Cu-graphite, however the wear of Cu-33 vol.%CNF reduced by more than 2 times over Cu-33 vol.% graphite samples.

  10. Non-lithographic organization of nickel catalyst for carbon nanofiber synthesis on laser-induced periodic surface structures

    We present a non-lithographic technique that produces organized nanoscale nickel catalyst for carbon nanofiber growth on a silicon substrate. This technique involves three consecutive steps: first, the substrate is laser-irradiated to produce a periodic nanorippled structure; second, a thin film of nickel is deposited using glancing-angle ion-beam sputter deposition, followed by heat treatment, and third, a catalytic dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process is conducted to produce the vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNF). The nickel catalyst is distributed along the laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) and the Ni particle dimension varies as a function of the location on the LIPSS and is correlated to the nanoripple dimensions. The glancing angle, the distance between the ion beam collimators and the total deposition time all play important roles in determining the final catalyst size and subsequent carbon nanofiber properties. Due to the gradual aspect ratio change of the nanoripples across the sample, Ni catalyst nanoparticles of different dimensions were obtained. After the prescribed three minute PECVD growth, it was observed that, in order for the carbon nanofibers to survive, the nickel catalyst dimension should be larger than a critical value of ∼19 nm, below which the Ni is insufficient to sustain carbon nanofiber growth

  11. Flexible binder-free silicon/silica/carbon nanofiber composites as anode for lithium–ion batteries

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • Flexible Si/SiO2/C composite nanofibers were introduced as Li–ion battery anodes. • SiO2 component of composite nanofibers facilitated the high flexibility. • Flexible Si/SiO2/C composite nanofibers were coated with CVD-carbon. • CVD carbon coating and SiO2 component led to high capacity retention. -- Abstract: High-capacity flexible electrode materials for high-energy lithium–ion batteries become critically important with technological improvements on portable and bendable electronic equipment such as rollup displays, implantable medical devices, active radio-frequency identification tags, and wearable devices. Although different types of bendable electrode materials have been introduced, it is very important to fabricate highly-flexible electrode materials with reasonable fabrication technique and high electrochemical performance similar to those of conventional high-capacity electrode materials. Herein, we introduced high-capacity, flexible Si/SiO2/C nanofiber composite anode materials by simple electrospinning and subsequent heat treatment processes. To further improve the long-term cycling performance, additional nanoscale carbon coating of flexible Si/SiO2/C nanofibers was performed by CVD technique. Electrochemical performance results showed that CVD carbon-coated flexible Si/SiO2/C nanofiber composites exhibited high capacity retention of 86.7% and high coulombic efficiency of 96.7% at the 50th cycle. It is, therefore, demonstrated that CVD carbon-coated flexible Si/SiO2/C nanofiber composites are promising anode material candidate for next-generation flexible and high-energy lithium–ion batteries

  12. Effect of Temperature on Morphology and Electrochemical Capacitive Properties of Electrospun Carbon Nanofibers and Nickel Hydroxide Composites

    Highlights: • Ni(OH)2 nanoflakes connected with electrospun carbon fibers were prepared. • Most Ni(OH)2 nanoflakes were converted to NiO at 350 °C, forming NiO microparticles. • The specific capacitance of the composites reached a maximum at 300 °C. - Abstract: Binder-free Ni(OH)2/carbon nanofiber composites used as supercapacitor electrodes were fabricated through the chemical precipitation of Ni(OH)2 on electrospun carbon nanofibers. These composites exhibited a hierarchical structure in which Ni(OH)2 nanoflakes connected with the carbon fiber network. We varied the annealing temperature to investigate the morphological progress and the subsequent electrochemical performance of the composite fibers. The hierarchical structure remained unchanged when the annealing temperature was lower than 300 °C. At 350 °C, most Ni(OH)2 was converted to NiO, and NiO peeled off from the fiber surface, forming NiO microparticles. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the specific capacity of the Ni(OH)2/carbon nanofiber composites increased with an increase in the annealing temperature and reached a maximum of 455 C/g at 300 °C. In addition, the Ni(OH)2/carbon nanofiber composites exhibited a favorable cycling stability after 2000 cycles without fading. The electrochemical performance of the composites was satisfactory because of the synergetic effect of the faradaic behavior of Ni(OH)2 and easily accessible electron transport in the carbon nanofiber network. At 350 °C, the peeling off and aggregation of NiO microparticles caused a reduction in the specific capacity of the Ni(OH)2/carbon nanofiber composites

  13. Preparation and electrochemical performance of heteroatom-enriched electrospun carbon nanofibers from melamine formaldehyde resin.

    Ma, Chang; Song, Yan; Shi, Jingli; Zhang, Dongqing; Guo, Quangui; Liu, Lang

    2013-04-01

    Melamine formaldehyde resin was used to prepare heteroatom-enriched carbon nanofibers by electrospinning for the first time. The melamine formaldehyde resin-based carbon fibers without any activation treatment showed a moderate specific surface area ranging from 130 to 479 m2/g and rich surface functionalities (2.56-5.34 wt.% nitrogen and 10.39-11.2 9 wt.% oxygen). Both the specific surface area and surface functionality greatly depended on the carbonization temperature. The capacitive performance was evaluated in 6M KOH aqueous solution. The electrochemically active surface functionalities played an important role in improving the surface capacitance of the electrodes. The sample carbonized at 600C showed the highest specific surface capacitance of 1.4 F/m2, which was attributed to the most active functionalities (10.69 wt.% of N and O). In addition, the sample carbonized at 750C exhibited the highest specific capacitance of 206 F/g. PMID:23375805

  14. A general approach to fabricate free-standing metal sulfide@carbon nanofiber networks as lithium ion battery anodes.

    Fei, Ling; Williams, Brian Patrick; Yoo, Sang Ha; Carlin, Joseph Michael; Joo, Yong Lak

    2016-01-14

    A general approach for fabricating free-standing metal sulfide and carbon nanofiber mats is developed via electrospinning, starting with cheap and abundant raw materials. The prepared free-standing samples have metal sulfide nanoparticles dispersed throughout the interconnected carbon fibers. When applied to LIB, the composites demonstrate excellent cyclability and rate capability. PMID:26659850

  15. Control of physical properties of carbon nanofibers obtained from coaxial electrospinning of PMMA and PAN with adjustable inner/outer nozzle-ends.

    Kaerkitcha, Navaporn; Chuangchote, Surawut; Sagawa, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Hollow carbon nanofibers (HCNFs) were prepared by electrospinning method with several coaxial nozzles, in which the level of the inner nozzle-end is adjustable. Core/shell nanofibers were prepared from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as a pyrolytic core and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as a carbon shell with three types of normal (viz. inner and outer nozzle-ends are balanced in the same level), inward, and outward coaxial nozzles. The influence of the applied voltage on these three types of coaxial nozzles was studied. Specific surface area, pore size diameter, crystallinity, and degree of graphitization of the hollow and mesoporous structures of carbon nanofibers obtained after carbonization of the as spun PMMA/PAN nanofibers were characterized by BET analyses, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy in addition to the conductivity measurements. It was found that specific surface area, crystallinity, and graphitization degree of the HCNFs affect the electrical conductivity of the carbon nanofibers. PMID:27067734

  16. Control of physical properties of carbon nanofibers obtained from coaxial electrospinning of PMMA and PAN with adjustable inner/outer nozzle-ends

    Kaerkitcha, Navaporn; Chuangchote, Surawut; Sagawa, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    Hollow carbon nanofibers (HCNFs) were prepared by electrospinning method with several coaxial nozzles, in which the level of the inner nozzle-end is adjustable. Core/shell nanofibers were prepared from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as a pyrolytic core and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as a carbon shell with three types of normal (viz . inner and outer nozzle-ends are balanced in the same level), inward, and outward coaxial nozzles. The influence of the applied voltage on these three types of coaxial nozzles was studied. Specific surface area, pore size diameter, crystallinity, and degree of graphitization of the hollow and mesoporous structures of carbon nanofibers obtained after carbonization of the as spun PMMA/PAN nanofibers were characterized by BET analyses, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy in addition to the conductivity measurements. It was found that specific surface area, crystallinity, and graphitization degree of the HCNFs affect the electrical conductivity of the carbon nanofibers.

  17. Superior Electrochemical Properties of Nanofibers Composed of Hollow CoFe2 O4 Nanospheres Covered with Onion-Like Graphitic Carbon.

    Hong, Young Jun; Cho, Jung Sang; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-12-01

    Nanofibers composed of hollow CoFe2 O4 nanospheres covered with onion-like carbon are prepared by applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion to the electrospinning process. Amorphous carbon nanofibers embedded with CoFe2 @onion-like carbon nanospheres are prepared by reduction of the electrospun nanofibers. Oxidation of the CoFe2 -C nanofibers at 300?C under a normal atmosphere produces porous nanofibers composed of hollow CoFe2 O4 nanospheres covered with onion-like carbon. CoFe2 nanocrystals are transformed into the hollow CoFe2 O4 nanospheres during oxidation through a well-known nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process. The discharge capacities of the carbon-free CoFe2 O4 nanofibers composed of hollow nanospheres and the nanofibers composed of hollow CoFe2 O4 nanospheres covered with onion-like carbon are 340 and 930?mA?h?g(-1) , respectively, for the 1000th cycle at a current density of 1?A?g(-1) . The nanofibers composed of hollow CoFe2 O4 nanospheres covered with onion-like carbon exhibit an excellent rate performance even in the absence of conductive materials. PMID:26542385

  18. Immobilization and release strategies for DNA delivery using carbon nanofiber arrays and self-assembled monolayers

    Peckys, Diana B [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6030 (United States); Melechko, Anatoli V [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Simpson, Michael L [University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States); McKnight, Timothy E [Measurement Science and Systems Engineering Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6006 (United States)], E-mail: peckysdb@ornl.gov

    2009-04-08

    We report a strategy for immobilizing dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) onto vertically aligned carbon nanofibers and subsequently releasing this dsDNA following penetration and residence of these high aspect ratio structures within cells. Gold-coated nanofiber arrays were modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAM) to which reporter dsDNA was covalently and end-specifically bound with or without a cleavable linker. The DNA-modified nanofiber arrays were then used to impale, and thereby transfect, Chinese hamster lung epithelial cells. This mechanical approach enables the transport of bound ligands directly into the cell nucleus and consequently bypasses extracellular and cytosolic degradation. Statistically significant differences were observed between the expression levels from immobilized and releasable DNA, and these are discussed in relation to the distinct accessibility and mode of action of glutathione, an intracellular reducing agent responsible for releasing the bound dsDNA. These results prove for the first time that an end-specifically and covalently SAM-bound DNA can be expressed in cells. They further demonstrate how the choice of immobilization and release methods can impact expression of nanoparticle delivered DNA.

  19. Immobilization and release strategies for DNA delivery using carbon nanofiber arrays and self-assembled monolayers

    We report a strategy for immobilizing dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) onto vertically aligned carbon nanofibers and subsequently releasing this dsDNA following penetration and residence of these high aspect ratio structures within cells. Gold-coated nanofiber arrays were modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAM) to which reporter dsDNA was covalently and end-specifically bound with or without a cleavable linker. The DNA-modified nanofiber arrays were then used to impale, and thereby transfect, Chinese hamster lung epithelial cells. This mechanical approach enables the transport of bound ligands directly into the cell nucleus and consequently bypasses extracellular and cytosolic degradation. Statistically significant differences were observed between the expression levels from immobilized and releasable DNA, and these are discussed in relation to the distinct accessibility and mode of action of glutathione, an intracellular reducing agent responsible for releasing the bound dsDNA. These results prove for the first time that an end-specifically and covalently SAM-bound DNA can be expressed in cells. They further demonstrate how the choice of immobilization and release methods can impact expression of nanoparticle delivered DNA.

  20. High performance of NiCo nanoparticles-doped carbon nanofibers as counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NiCo nanoparticles(NPs)-doped carbon nanofibers were synthesized by calcination of electrospun nanofibers composed of nickel acetate, cobalt acetate and poly(vinyl alcohol) in argon atmosphere and used as an efficient and alternative Pt-free electrocatalyst as counter electrode materials for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Structural and electrochemical properties of the NiCo NPs-doped carbon nanofibers counter-electrodes were inspected by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), andelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This Pt-free counter electrode shows high catalytic activity, surface area and conductivity. Moreover, more catalytic active sites for the reduction reaction at the electrolyte/counter electrode interface and strong contact between the film and FTO substrate have been observed. Therefore, the DSSCs based on NiCo (NPs) carbon nanofibers counter exhibits an enhanced photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 4.47%. As the result, the introduced nanofibers can be considered as a promising counter electrode for DSSCs

  1. Fabrication of Homogeneous Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube/ Poly (vinyl alcohol Composite Nanofibers for Microwave Absorption Application

    Shoushtari A.M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Poly (vinyl alcohol (PVA / sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS / multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT camposite nanofibers with various MWCNT contents (up to 10 wt% were fabricated by electrospinning process and their microwave absorption properties were evaluated by a vector network analyzer in the frequency range of 8-12 GHz (X-band at room temperature. The uniform, stable dispersion and well oriented MWCNT within the PVA matrix were achieved through using SDS as dispersing agent. The SEM analysis of the nanofibers samples revealed that the deformation of the nanofibers increases with increasing MWCNT concentration. Very smooth surface of the composite electrospun nanofibers even for the nanofibers with concentration of 10 wt% MWCNT have been successfully prepared because of the high stability dispersion of MWCNT. It was observed that absorption microwave properties improved with increasing in the loading levels of MWCNT. Finally, the PVA/SDS/MWCNT composite nanofibers sample with the 10 wt% content of MWCNT has shown the reflection loss of 15 dB at the frequency of 8 GHz.

  2. Synthesis and photocatalytic property of porous metal oxides nanowires based on carbon nanofiber template

    Fan, Weiqiang; Li, Meng; Xu, Jinfu; Bai, Hongye; Zhang, Rongxian; Chen, Chao

    2015-11-01

    A series of porous metal oxides nanowires (Fe2O3, Co3O4, NiO and CuO) have been successfully synthesized, where commercial carbon nanofibers were used as the template. The obtained samples were systematically characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis diffuse reflectance (UV-Vis DR) spectra and transmission electron microscope (TEM). According to the photodegradation data, the porous metal oxides nanowires exhibit significantly photocatalytic activity for degrading tetracycline (TC). Furthermore, the porous Fe2O3 nanowires show the best photocatalytic performance among all the samples.

  3. Electrospun carbon-cobalt composite nanofiber as an anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Carbon-cobalt (C/Co) composite nanofibers with diameters from 100 to 300 nm were prepared by electrospinning and subsequent heat treatment. They were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, galvanostatic cell cycling and impedance spectroscopy. As a lithium storage material, these fibers exhibit excellent electrochemical properties with high reversible capacity (>750 mA h g-1) and good rate capability (578 mA h g-1 at 1 C rate). These composite fibers are a promising anode material for high-power Li-ion batteries

  4. Hierarchically mesoporous CuO/carbon nanofiber coaxial shell-core nanowires for lithium ion batteries

    Seok-Hwan Park; Wan-Jin Lee

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchically mesoporous CuO/carbon nanofiber coaxial shell-core nanowires (CuO/CNF) as anodes for lithium ion batteries were prepared by coating the Cu2(NO3)(OH)3 on the surface of conductive and elastic CNF via electrophoretic deposition (EPD), followed by thermal treatment in air. The CuO shell stacked with nanoparticles grows radially toward the CNF core, which forms hierarchically mesoporous three-dimensional (3D) coaxial shell-core structure with abundant inner spaces in nanoparticle-s...

  5. Platinum nanocluster growth on vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays: Sputtering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    Brault, Pascal; Caillard, Amaël; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.; Graves, David B.

    2012-12-01

    Sputtered platinum nanocluster growth on previously plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition - PECVD - grown vertically aligned carbon nanofiber arrays is presented. Experimental cluster size distribution is shown to decrease from the CNF top to bottom, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for understanding early stages of Pt growth on model CNF arrays. Especially, sticking coefficients, concentration profiles along CNF wall, cluster size distributions are calculated. Simulated cluster size distribution are consistent with experimental finding. Sticking coefficient decreases against deposition time. The shape of the sticking curve reflects the nanocluster growth process.

  6. Formation of carbon nanostructures containing single-crystalline cobalt carbides by ion irradiation method

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with a diameter of 17 nm, and carbon nanoneedles (CNNs) with sharp tips have been synthesized on graphite substrates by ion irradiation of argon ions with the Co supplies rate of 1 and 3.4 nm/min, respectively. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, combined with selected area electron diffraction patterns has been used to identify the chemical composition and crystallinity of these carbon nanostructures. The CNFs were found to be amorphous in nature, while the structures of the CNNs consisted of cubic CoCx, orthorhombic Co2C and Co3C depending on the cobalt content in the CNNs. The diameter of the carbide crystals was almost as large as the diameter of the CNN. Compared to the ion-induced nickel carbides and iron carbides, the formation of single-crystalline cobalt carbides might be due to the high temperature produced by the irradiation.

  7. A carbon nanofiber-based label free immunosensor for high sensitive detection of recombinant bovine somatotropin.

    Lim, Syazana Abdullah; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin

    2015-08-15

    A carbon nanofiber-based label free electrochemical immunosensor for sensitive detection of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) was developed. In this immunosensor design, a mild site-directed antibody immobilization via interaction of boronic acid and oligosaccharide moiety found on Fc region of an antibody was performed to preserve the biological activity of antibody and improve the sensor's sensitivity. Electrochemical characterization of the immunosensor fabrication was carried out by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in Fe(CN)6(3-)/Fe(CN)6(4-) probe. A comparison study between different transducer platforms showed carbon nanofiber gave higher current signal response than single-walled carbon nanotube. In this work, calibration curve was obtained from the decrease of DPV peak current of Fe(CN)6(3-)/Fe(CN)6(4-) after immunocomplexed was formed. A linear relationship between DPV current change signal response and rbST concentrations from 1 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL (correlation coefficient of 0.9721) was achieved with detection limit of 1 pg/mL. Our developed immunosensor demonstrated high selectivity in cross-reactivity studies and a good percentage recovery in spiked bovine serum sample. PMID:25794957

  8. Effect of the nature the carbon precursor on the physico-chemical characteristics of the resulting activated carbon materials

    Carbon materials, including amorphous carbon, graphite, carbon nanospheres (CNSs) and different types of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) [platelet, herringbone and ribbon], were chemically activated using KOH. The pore structure of carbon materials was analyzed using N2/77 K adsorption isotherms. The presence of oxygen groups was analyzed by temperature programmed desorption in He and acid-base titration. The structural order of the materials was studied by X-ray diffraction and temperature programmed oxidation. The morphology and diameter distribution of CNFs and CNSs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The materials were also characterized by temperature-desorption programmed of H2 and elemental composition. The ways in which the different structures were activated are described, showing the type of pores generated. Relationships between carbon yield, removed carbon, activation degree and graphitic character were also examined. The oxygen content in the form of oxygen-containing surface groups increased after the activation giving qualitative information about them. The average diameter of both CNFs and CNSs was decreased after the activation process as consequence of the changes produced on the material surface.

  9. Hollow activated carbon nanofibers prepared by electrospinning as counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Hollow activated carbon nanofibers (H-ACNF) were prepared by concentric electrospinning of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as a pyrolytic core precursor and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) as a carbon shell precursor, followed by stabilization, carbonization, and activation. The H-ACNF with 190 and 270 nm for core and shell diameter showed excellent mesoporous structure, and 1-D conducting pathway in employing as catalysts of counter electrodes (CEs) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The mesoporous structure of H-ACNF represented surface area of 1037.5 m2 g−1 with average mesopore diameter of 17.4 nm. The overall conversion efficiency of H-ACNF is comparable to that of Pt CE because its characteristics promotes the electron and ion transfer, decreases the resistance of charge transfer, and increases the contact area between liquid electrolyte and H-ACNF

  10. Design and evaluation of carbon nanofiber and silicon materials for neural implant applications

    McKenzie, Janice L.

    Reduction of glial scar tissue around central nervous system implants is necessary for improved efficacy in chronic applications. Design of materials that possess tunable properties inspired by native biological tissue and elucidation of pertinent cellular interactions with these materials was the motivation for this study. Since nanoscale carbon fibers possess the fundamental dimensional similarities to biological tissue and have attractive material properties needed for neural biomaterial implants, this present study explored cytocompatibility of these materials as well as modifications to traditionally used silicon. On silicon materials, results indicated that nanoscale surface features reduced astrocyte functions, and could be used to guide neurite extension from PC12 cells. Similarly, it was determined that astrocyte functions (key cells in glial scar tissue formation) were reduced on smaller diameter carbon fibers (125 nm or less) while PC12 neurite extension was enhanced on smaller diameter carbon fibers (100 nm or less). Further studies implicated laminin adsorption as a key mechanism in enhancing astrocyte adhesion to larger diameter fibers and at the same time encouraging neurite extension on smaller diameter fibers. Polycarbonate urethane (PCU) was then used as a matrix material for the smaller diameter carbon fibers (100 and 60 nm). These composites proved very versatile since electrical and mechanical properties as well as cell functions and directionality could be influenced by changing bulk and surface composition and features of these matrices. When these composites were modified to be smooth at the micronscale and only rough at the nanoscale, P19 cells actually submerged philopodia, extensions, or whole cells bodies beneath the PCU in order to interact with the carbon nanofibers. These carbon nanofiber composites that have been formulated are a promising material to coat neural probes and thereby enhance functionality at the tissue interface. This improved chronic tissue interaction has the potential to reduce invasive intervention surgeries and provide sustained benefits from neural implants in patients with pathologies such as Parkinson's disease.

  11. Thermoplastic polybutadiene-based polyurethane/carbon nanofiber composites

    Špírková, Milena; Duszová, A.; Poreba, Rafal; Kredatusová, Jana; Bureš, R.; Fáberová, M.; Šlouf, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 67, December (2014), s. 434-440. ISSN 1359-8368 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-06700S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : carbon fibre * polymer–matrix composites (PMCs) * mechanical properties Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.983, year: 2014

  12. Radiation grafting of methacrylate onto carbon nanofiber surface

    Radiation can be used to modify and improve the properties of materials. Electron beam irradiation has potential application in modifying the structure of carbon fibers in order to produce useful defects in the graphite structure and create reactive sites. In this study, vapor grown carbon nano fibers (VGCF) were irradiated with a high energy (3 MeV) electron beam in air to dose of 1000 kGy to create active sites and added to methyl methacrylate (MMA) dissolved in water/methanol (50% V). The irradiated samples were analyzed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy to assess the impact on surface and bulk properties. Oxygen was readily incorporated enhancing the dispersion of VGCF. Raman spectroscopy analyses indicated that the sample irradiated and preirradiated grafted sample with MMA had the intensity ratio increased. (author)

  13. Morphological characterization of carbon-nanofiber-reinforced epoxy nanocomposites using ultra-small angle scattering

    Studies of the properties of nanocomposites reinforced with vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (VGCFs) can be found throughout the literature. Electrical, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties are just a few of the characteristics that have been well discussed. Although these properties depend on morphology, morphological characterization is rare. Due to its 2-dimensional nature, microscopy is of limited value when analyzing network morphologies. This work will show how the characterization of the three-dimensional geometry and network formation of VGCFs can be determined using ultra-small angle scattering techniques. Ultra-small angle x-ray and neutron scattering (USAXS and USANS) were used to characterize the morphology of carbon nanofibers suspended in epoxy. Using a simplified tube model, we estimate the dimensions of suspended fibers. The assumption of tubular fibers accounts for the increased surface area observed with USAXS that is not accounted for using a solid rod model. Furthermore, USANS was used to search for a structural signature associated with the electrical percolation threshold. USANS extends to longer dimensional scales than USAXS, which measures a smaller range of momentum transfer. To determine the electrical percolation threshold, AC impedance spectroscopy was employed to verify that an electrically conductive, percolated network forms at VGCNF loadings of 0.8% < CNF wt% < 1.2%. These values correlate with the USANS data, where a morphological transition is seen at ?1.2% loading.

  14. Superhydrophobic and conductive carbon nanofiber/PTFE composite coatings for EMI shielding.

    Das, Arindam; Hayvaci, Harun T; Tiwari, Manish K; Bayer, Ilker S; Erricolo, Danilo; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a solvent-based, mild method to prepare superhydrophobic, carbon nanofiber/PTFE-filled polymer composite coatings with high electrical conductivity and reports the first data on the effectiveness of such coatings as electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials. The coatings are fabricated by spraying dispersions of carbon nanofibers and sub-micron PTFE particles in a polymer blend solution of poly(vinyledene fluoride) and poly(methyl methacrylate) on cellulosic substrates. Upon drying, coatings display static water contact angles as high as 158° (superhydrophobic) and droplet roll-off angles of 10° indicating self-cleaning ability along with high electrical conductivities (up to 309 S/m). 100 μm-thick coatings are characterized in terms of their EMI shielding effectiveness in the X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz). Results show up to 25 dB of shielding effectiveness, which changed little with frequency at a fixed composition, thus indicating the potential of these coatings for EMI shielding applications and other technologies requiring both extreme liquid repellency and high electrical conductivity. PMID:20889160

  15. Nanocomposite of Au Nanoparticles/Helical Carbon Nanofibers and Application in Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor.

    Zhai, Mumu; Cui, Rongjing; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Genhua; Lin, Wang; Yu, Lingjun

    2015-06-01

    A combined sol-gel/hydrogen reduction method has been developed for the mass production of helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs) by the pyrolysis of acetylene at 425 degrees C in the presence of NiO nanoparticles. The synthesized HCNFs were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The helical-structured carbon nanofibers have a large specific surface area and excellent biocompatibility. A novel enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor was then successfully fabricated based on the nanocomposites containing HCNFs and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The results indicated that the Au/HCNFs nanocomposites exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of H2O2, offering a wide linear range from 1.0 μM to 3157 μM with a detection limit as low as 0.46 μM. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant of the biosensor was 0.61 mM. The as-fabricated biosensor showed a rapid and sensitive amperometric response to hydrogen peroxide with acceptable preparation reproducibility and excellent stability. Because of their low cost and high stability, these novel HCNFs represent seem to be a kind of promising biomaterial and may find wide new applications in scopes such as biocatalysis, immunoassay, environmental monitoring and so on. PMID:26369097

  16. Investigation of Lithium-Air Battery Discharge Product Formed on Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Electrodes

    Mitchell, Robert Revell, III

    Carbon nanotubes have been actively investigated for integration in a wide variety of applications since their discovery over 20 years ago. Their myriad desirable material properties including exceptional mechanical strength, high thermal conductivities, large surface-to-volume ratios, and considerable electrical conductivities, which are attributable to a quantum mechanical ability to conduct electrons ballistically, have continued to motivate interest in this material system. While a variety of synthesis techniques exist, carbon nanotubes and nanofibers are most often conveniently synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), which involves their catalyzed growth from transition metal nanoparticles. Vertically-aligned nanotube and nanofiber carpets produced using CVD have been utilized in a variety of applications including those related to energy storage. Li-air (Li-O2) batteries have received much interest recently because of their very high theoretical energy densities (3200 Wh/kgLi2O2 ). which make them ideal candidates for energy storage devices for future fully-electric vehicles. During operation of a Li-air battery O2 is reduced on the surface a porous air cathode, reacting with Li-ions to form lithium peroxide (Li-O2). Unlike the intercalation reactions of Li-ion batteries, discharge in a Li-air cell is analogous to an electrodeposition process involving the nucleation and growth of the depositing species on a foreign substrate. Carbon nanofiber electrodes were synthesized on porous substrates using a chemical vapor deposition process and then assembled into Li-O2 cells. The large surface to volume ratio and low density of carbon nanofiber electrodes were found to yield a very high gravimetric energy density in Li-O 2 cells, approaching 75% of the theoretical energy density for Li 2O2. Further, the carbon nanofiber electrodes were found to be excellent platforms for conducting ex situ electron microscopy investigations of the deposition Li2O2 phase, which was found to have unique disc and toroid morphologies. Subsequent studies were conducted using freestanding carpets of multi-walled CNT arrays, which were synthesized using a modified CVD process. The freestanding CNT arrays were used as a platform for studying the morphological evolution of Li2O2 discharge product as a function of rate and electrode capacity. SEM imaging investigations found that the Li2O 2 particles underwent a shape evolution from discs to toroids as their size increased. TEM imaging and diffraction studies showed that the microscale Li2O2 particles are composed of stacks of thin Li 2O2 crystallites and that splaying of the stacked crystallite array drives the observed disc to toroid transition. Modeling was performed to gain insights into the nucleation and growth processes involved during discharge in Li-O2 cells. The modeling study suggests that poor electronic conductivity of the depositing phase limits the rate capability obtainable in Li-O2 cells. Modeling can provide substantial insights into paths toward electrode optimization. Understanding the size and shape evolution of Li2O2 particles and engineering improved electrode architectures is critical to efficiently filling the electrode void volume during discharge thereby improving the volumetric energy density of Li-O2 batteries. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  17. Rhodium nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers as an arene hydrogenation catalyst highly tolerant to a coexisting epoxido group.

    Motoyama, Yukihiro; Takasaki, Mikihiro; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Mochida, Isao; Nagashima, Hideo

    2009-11-01

    Rhodium nanoparticles supported on a carbon nanofiber (Rh/CNF-T) show high catalytic activity toward arene hydrogenation under mild conditions in high turnover numbers without leaching the Rh species; the reaction is highly tolerant to epoxido groups, which often undergo ring-opening hydrogenation with conventional catalysts. PMID:19788269

  18. Superhydrophocity via gas-phase monomers grafting onto carbon nanotubes

    Zha, Jinlong; Batisse, Nicolas; Claves, Daniel; Dubois, Marc; Frezet, Lawrence; Kharitonov, Alexander P.; Alekseiko, Leonid N.

    2016-05-01

    Superhydrophobic films were prepared using dispersions of fluorinated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or nanofibers (CNFs) in toluene. The grafting of polystyrene allowed stable dispersions to be obtained. The grafting of polystyrene (PS), polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polyaniline (PANI) onto nanofibers and MWCNTs was first evidenced by solid state NMR and Infrared Spectroscopy. The graft polymerization of styrene, acrylic acid and aniline monomers was initiated by radicals (dangling bonds) formed due to the initial fluorination. The process appeared as highly versatile and efficient for different polymers. The consumption of those radicals in the course of grafting was evidenced by EPR, through decrease of the spin density. The hydrophobic/hydrophilic character was tuned according to the grafted polymer nature, i.e. hydrophobic with PS or hydrophilic with PAA. Finally, in order to reach superhydrophobicity, films were prepared from CNFs or MWCNTs, irrespective of their average diameter, that allowed adequate structuring of the surface. The presence of fluorine atoms on their surface also favors superhydrophobicity. Water contact angles of 155 ± 2° and 159 ± 2° were measured for the films casted from fluorinated CNFs or MWCNTs with grafted polystyrene, respectively.

  19. Fabrication of carbon nanofiber-driven electrodes from electrospun polyacrylonitrile/polypyrrole bicomponents for high-performance rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

    Ji, Liwen; Yao, Yingfang; Toprakci, Ozan; Lin, Zhan; Liang, Yinzheng; Shi, Quan; Medford, Andrew J.; Millns, Christopher R.; Zhang, Xiangwu [Fiber and Polymer Science Program, Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science, North Carolina State University, 2401 Research Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695-8301 (United States)

    2010-04-02

    Carbon nanofibers were prepared through electrospinning a blend solution of polyacrylonitrile and polypyrrole, followed by carbonization at 700 C. Structural features of electrospun polyacrylonitrile/polypyrrole bicomponent nanofibers and their corresponding carbon nanofibers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimeter, thermo-gravimetric analysis, wide-angle X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that intermolecular interactions are formed between two different polymers, which influence the thermal properties of electrospun bicomponent nanofibers. In addition, with the increase of polypyrrole concentration, the resultant carbon nanofibers exhibit increasing disordered structure. These carbon nanofibers were used as anodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries without adding any polymer binder or conductive material and they display high reversible capacity, improved cycle performance, relatively good rate capability, and clear fibrous morphology even after 50 charge/discharge cycles. The improved electrochemical performance of these carbon nanofibers can be attributed to their unusual surface properties and unique structural features, which amplify both surface area and extensive intermingling between electrode and electrolyte phases over small length scales, thereby leading to fast kinetics and short pathways for both Li ions and electrons. (author)

  20. Chemical isolation and characterization of different cellulose nanofibers from cotton stalks.

    Soni, Bhawna; Hassan, El Barbary; Mahmoud, Barakat

    2015-12-10

    Recently, cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) have received wide attention in green nanomaterial technologies. Production of CNFs from agricultural residues has many economic and environmental advantages. In this study, four different CNFs were prepared from cotton stalks by different chemical treatments followed by ultrasonication. CNFs were prepared from untreated bleached pulp, sulfuric acid hydrolysis, and TEMPO [(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl) oxy radical]-mediated oxidation process. Physical and chemical properties of the prepared CNFs such as morphological (FE-SEM, AFM), structural (FTIR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were investigated. Characterization results clearly showed that the method of preparation results in a significant difference in the structure, thermal stability, shape and dimensions of the produced CNFs. TEMPO-mediated oxidation produced brighter and higher yields (>90%) of CNFs compared to other methods. FE-SEM and AFM analysis clearly indicated that, TEMPO-mediated oxidation produced uniform nano-sized fibers with a very small diameter (3-15 nm width) and very small length (10-100 nm). This was the first time uniform and very small nanofibers were produced. PMID:26428161

  1. Biodegradability and mechanical properties of reinforced starch nanocomposites using cellulose nanofibers.

    Babaee, Mehran; Jonoobi, Mehdi; Hamzeh, Yahya; Ashori, Alireza

    2015-11-01

    In this study the effects of chemical modification of cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) on the biodegradability and mechanical properties of reinforced thermoplastic starch (TPS) nanocomposites was evaluated. The CNFs were modified using acetic anhydride and the nanocomposites were fabricated by solution casting from corn starch with glycerol/water as the plasticizer and 10 wt% of either CNFs or acetylated CNFs (ACNFs). The morphology, water absorption (WA), water vapor permeability rate (WVP), tensile, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and fungal degradation properties of the obtained nanocomposites were investigated. The results demonstrated that the addition of CNFs and ACNFs significantly enhanced the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites and reduced the WVP and WA of the TPS. The effects were more pronounced for the CNFs than the ACNFs. The DMA showed that the storage modulus was improved, especially for the CNFs/TPS nanocomposite. Compared with the neat TPS, the addition of nanofibers improved the degradation rate of the nanocomposite and particularly ACNFs reduced degradation rate of the nanocomposite toward fungal degradation. PMID:26256317

  2. Carbon nanotube-templated polyaniline nanofibers: synthesis, flash welding and ultrafiltration membranes

    Liao, Yaozu; Yu, Deng-Guang; Wang, Xia; Chain, Wei; Li, Xin-Gui; Hoek, Eric M. V.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2013-04-01

    Electro-active switchable ultrafiltration membranes are of great interest due to the possibility of external control over permeability, selectivity, anti-fouling and cleaning. Here, we report on hybrid single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-polyaniline (PANi) nanofibers synthesized by in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of oxidized SWCNTs. The composite nanofibers exhibit unique morphology of core-shell (SWCNT-PANi) structures with average total diameters of 60 nm with 10 to 30 nm thick PANi coatings. The composite nanofibers are easily dispersed in polar aprotic solvents and cast into asymmetric membranes via a nonsolvent induced phase separation. The hybrid SWCNT-PANi membranes are electrically conductive at neutral pH and exhibit ultrafiltration-like permeability and selectivity when filtering aqueous suspensions of 6 nm diameter bovine serum albumin and 48 nm diameter silica particles. A novel flash welding technique is utilized to tune the morphology, porosity, conductivity, permeability and nanoparticle rejection of the SWCNT-PANi composite ultrafiltration membranes. Upon flash welding, both conductivity and pure water permeability of the membranes improves by nearly a factor of 10, while maintaining silica nanoparticle rejection levels above 90%. Flash welding of SWCNT-PANi composite membranes holds promise for formation of electrochemically tunable membranes.Electro-active switchable ultrafiltration membranes are of great interest due to the possibility of external control over permeability, selectivity, anti-fouling and cleaning. Here, we report on hybrid single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-polyaniline (PANi) nanofibers synthesized by in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of oxidized SWCNTs. The composite nanofibers exhibit unique morphology of core-shell (SWCNT-PANi) structures with average total diameters of 60 nm with 10 to 30 nm thick PANi coatings. The composite nanofibers are easily dispersed in polar aprotic solvents and cast into asymmetric membranes via a nonsolvent induced phase separation. The hybrid SWCNT-PANi membranes are electrically conductive at neutral pH and exhibit ultrafiltration-like permeability and selectivity when filtering aqueous suspensions of 6 nm diameter bovine serum albumin and 48 nm diameter silica particles. A novel flash welding technique is utilized to tune the morphology, porosity, conductivity, permeability and nanoparticle rejection of the SWCNT-PANi composite ultrafiltration membranes. Upon flash welding, both conductivity and pure water permeability of the membranes improves by nearly a factor of 10, while maintaining silica nanoparticle rejection levels above 90%. Flash welding of SWCNT-PANi composite membranes holds promise for formation of electrochemically tunable membranes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characteristic chemical shifts/transmittances of ATR/FT-IR spectral bands for SWCNT-PANi EB composite membranes under different numbers of flash welds at full power can be seen in Table S1. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00441d

  3. Graphene oxides and carbon nanotubes embedded in polyacrylonitrile-based carbon nanofibers used as electrodes for supercapacitor

    Hsu, Hsin-Cheng; Wang, Chen-Hao; Chang, Yu-Chung; Hu, Jin-Hao; Yao, Bing-Yuan; Lin, Chun-Yao

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates the use of graphene oxides (GOs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded in polyacrylonitrile-based carbon nanofibers (GO-CNT/CNF) as electrodes for the supercapacitor. GO-CNT/CNF was prepared by electrospinning, and was subsequently stabilized and activated. The specific capacitance of GO-CNT/CNF is 120.5 F g-1 in 0.5 M Na2SO4 electrolyte, which is higher than or comparable to the specific capacitances of carbon-based materials in neutral aqueous electrolyte, as prepared in this study. GO-CNT/CNF also exhibits a superior cycling stability, and 109% of the initial specific capacitance after 5000 cycles. The high capacitance of GO-CNT/CNF could be attributed to the edge planes and the functional groups of GO, the highly electrical conductivity of CNT, and the network structure of the electrode.

  4. Nanographene derived from carbon nanofiber and its application to electric double-layer capacitors

    The fascinating properties of graphene are attracting considerable attention in engineering fields such as electronics, optics, and energy engineering. These properties can be controlled by controlling graphene's structure, e.g., the number of layers and the sheet size. In this study, we synthesized nanosized graphene from a platelet-type carbon nanofiber. The thickness and size of nanographene oxide are around 1 nm and 60 nm and we obtained nanographene by hydrazine reduction of nanographene oxide. We applied the nanographene to an ionic-liquid electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC), which exhibited a much larger capacitance per specific surface area than an EDLC using conventional activated carbon. Furthermore, the capacitance increased significantly with increasing cycle time. After 30th cycle, the capacitance was achieved 130 F g?1, though the surface area was only 240 m2 g?1. These results suggest that nanographene structure induce the capacitance enhancement.

  5. Synthesis of Polyaniline (PANI in Nano-Reaction Field of Cellulose Nanofiber (CNF, and Carbonization

    Yuki Kaitsuka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymerization of aniline in the presence of cellulose nano-fiber (CNF is carried out. We used dried CNF, CNF suspension, and CNF treated by enzyme and ultra-sonification to obtain polyaniline (PANI/CNF as a synthetic polymer/natural nano-polymer composite. The polymerization proceeds on the surface of CNF as a nano-reaction field. Resultant composites show extended effective π-conjugation length because CNF as a reaction field in molecular level produced polymer with expanded coil structure with an aid of orientation effect of CNF. Possibility of PANI β-pleats structure in molecular level of PANI on the CNF is also discussed. SEM observation showed that fine structure is easily obtained by combining PANI with CNF. Carbonization of PANI/CNF allows production of nano-fine form with shape preserved carbonization (SPC.

  6. A New Strategy to Pretreat Carbon Nanofiber and Its Application in Determination of Dopamine

    Dong Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel sonochemical process, using hydrogen peroxide in a laboratory ultrasonic bath, was employed to pretreat the carbon nanofiber (CNF for creating oxygen-rich groups on the surface of CNF. After the sonochemical process, the CNF showed good hydrophilicity and high electrochemical activity. Compared to normal pretreatment process, this sonochemical process is timesaving and effective for dispersion and functionalization of CNF. The resulting CNF showed high catalytic activity toward the oxidation of DA. A carbon paste electrode modified by CNF (CPE-CNF was used to determine the dopamine (DA in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA. The detection limit is 0.05 μM, with the linear range from 0.05 μM to 6.4 μM.

  7. Oriented carbon nanostructures grown by hot-filament plasma-enhanced CVD from self-assembled Co-based catalyst on Si substrates

    Fleaca, Claudiu Teodor; Morjan, Ion; Rodica, Alexandrescu; Dumitrache, Florian; Soare, Iuliana; Gavrila-Florescu, Lavinia; Sandu, Ion; Dutu, Elena; Le Normand, Franois; Faerber, Jacques

    2012-03-01

    We report the synthesis of coral- and caterpillar-like carbon nanostructures assemblies starting from cobalt nitrate ethanol solutions deposited by drop-casting onto blank or carbon nanoparticles film covered Si(1 0 0) substrates. The seeded films were pre-treated with glow discharge hydrogen plasma aided by hot-filaments at 550 C followed by introduction of acetylene at 700 C. The resultant carbon nanostructure assemblies contain a high density of aligned carbon nanotubes/nanofibers (CNTs/CNFs). The influence of the forces that act during liquid-mediated self-assembly of Co catalyst precursor is discussed.

  8. Electrosorptive desalination by carbon nanotubes and nanofibres electrodes and ion-exchange membranes.

    Li, Haibo; Gao, Yang; Pan, Likun; Zhang, Yanping; Chen, Yiwei; Sun, Zhuo

    2008-12-01

    A novel membrane capacitive deionization (MCDI) device, integrating both the advantages of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers (CNTs-CNFs) composite film and ion-exchange membrane, was proposed with high removal efficiency, low energy consumption and low cost. The CNTs-CNFs film was synthesized by low pressure and low temperature thermal chemical vapor deposition. Several experiments were conducted to compare desalination performance of MCDI with capacitive deionization (CDI), showing that salt removal of the MCDI system was 49.2% higher than that of the CDI system. The electrosorption isotherms of MCDI and CDI show both of them follow Langmuir adsorption, indicating no change in adsorption behavior when ion-exchange membranes are introduced into CDI system. The better desalination performance of MCDI than that of CDI is due to the minimized ion desorption during electrosorption. PMID:18929385

  9. Preparation of poly(L-lactic acid) nanofiber scaffolds with a rough surface by phase inversion using supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Yang, Ding-Zhu; Chen, Ai-Zheng; Wang, Shi-Bin; Li, Yi; Tang, Xiao-Lin; Wu, Yong-Jing

    2015-06-01

    Phase inversion using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) has been widely used in the development of tissue engineering scaffolds, and particular attention has been given to obtaining desired morphology without additional post-treatments. However, the main challenge of this technique is the difficulty in generating a three-dimensional (3D) nanofiber structure with a rough surface in one step. Here, a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) 3D nanofiber scaffold with a rough surface is obtained via phase inversion using SC-CO2 by carefully choosing fabrication conditions and porogens. It is found that this method can effectively modulate the structure morphology, promote the crystallization process of semicrystalline polymer, and induce the formation of rough structures on the surface of nanofibers. Meanwhile, the porogen of ammonium bicarbonate (AB) can produce a 3D structure with large pores, and porogen of menthol can improve the interconnectivity between the micropores of nanofibers. A significant increase in the fiber diameter is observed as the menthol content increases. Furthermore, the menthol may affect the mutual transition between the α' and α crystals of PLLA during the phase separation process. In addition, the results of protein adsorption, cell adhesion, and proliferation assays indicate that cells tend to have higher viability on the nanofiber scaffold. This process combines the characteristic properties of SC-CO2 and the solubility of menthol to tailor the morphology of polymeric scaffolds, which may have potential applications in tissue engineering. PMID:26107415

  10. INHALATION EXPOSURE TO CARBON NANOTUBES (CNT) AND CARBON NANOFIBERS (CNF): METHODOLOGY AND DOSIMETRY

    Oberdörster, Günter; Castranova, Vincent; Asgharian, Bahman; Sayre, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers (CNF) are used increasingly in a broad array of commercial products. Given current understandings, the most significant life-cycle exposures to CNT/CNF occur from inhalation when they become airborne at different stages of their life cycle, including workplace, use, and disposal. Increasing awareness of the importance of physicochemical properties as determinants of toxicity of CNT/CNF and existing difficulties in interpreting results of mostly acute rodent inhalation studies to date necessitate a reexamination of standardized inhalation testing guidelines. The current literature on pulmonary exposure to CNT/CNF and associated effects is summarized; recommendations and conclusions are provided that address test guideline modifications for rodent inhalation studies that will improve dosimetric extrapolation modeling for hazard and risk characterization based on the analysis of exposure-dose-response relationships. Several physicochemical parameters for CNT/CNF, including shape, state of agglomeration/aggregation, surface properties, impurities, and density, influence toxicity. This requires an evaluation of the correlation between structure and pulmonary responses. Inhalation, using whole-body exposures of rodents, is recommended for acute to chronic pulmonary exposure studies. Dry powder generator methods for producing CNT/CNF aerosols are preferred, and specific instrumentation to measure mass, particle size and number distribution, and morphology in the exposure chambers are identified. Methods are discussed for establishing experimental exposure concentrations that correlate with realistic human exposures, such that unrealistically high experimental concentrations need to be identified that induce effects under mechanisms that are not relevant for workplace exposures. Recommendations for anchoring data to results seen for positive and negative benchmark materials are included, as well as periods for postexposure observation. A minimum data set of specific bronchoalveolar lavage parameters is recommended. Retained lung burden data need to be gathered such that exposure-dose-response correlations may be analyzed and potency comparisons between materials and mammalian species are obtained considering dose metric parameters for interpretation of results. Finally, a list of research needs is presented to fill data gaps for further improving design, analysis, and interpretation and extrapolation of results of rodent inhalation studies to refine meaningful risk assessments for humans. PMID:26361791

  11. Manufacturing of Nanocomposite Carbon Fibers and Composite Cylinders

    Tan, Seng; Zhou, Jian-guo

    2013-01-01

    Pitch-based nanocomposite carbon fibers were prepared with various percentages of carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and the fibers were used for manufacturing composite structures. Experimental results show that these nanocomposite carbon fibers exhibit improved structural and electrical conductivity properties as compared to unreinforced carbon fibers. Composite panels fabricated from these nanocomposite carbon fibers and an epoxy system also show the same properties transformed from the fibers. Single-fiber testing per ASTM C1557 standard indicates that the nanocomposite carbon fiber has a tensile modulus of 110% higher, and a tensile strength 17.7% times higher, than the conventional carbon fiber manufactured from pitch. Also, the electrical resistance of the carbon fiber carbonized at 900 C was reduced from 4.8 to 2.2 ohm/cm. The manufacturing of the nanocomposite carbon fiber was based on an extrusion, non-solvent process. The precursor fibers were then carbonized and graphitized. The resultant fibers are continuous.

  12. Enhanced Electrochemical Performance of Electrospun Ag/Hollow Glassy Carbon Nanofibers as Free-standing Li-ion Battery Anode

    Silver with a high theoretical capacity for lithium storage is an attractive alloy based anode for Li-ion batteries, but large volume changes associated with AgLix alloy formation leads to electrode cracking, pulverization and rapid capacity fading. A buffer matrix, like the electrospun hollow carbon nanofibers, can reduce this problem to a great extent. Herein, we demonstrate the facile synthesis of a free-standing, binder free Ag-C hybrid electrode through co-axial electrospinning, where well dispersed Ag nanoparticles are embedded in hollow carbon nanofibers. Using this approach, the long cycle life of carbon is complemented with the high lithium storage capacity of Ag, resulting in a high performance anode. The Ag-C composite electrode delivers a capacity of 739 mAh g−1 (>conventional graphite anodes) at 50 mA g−1, with ∼85% capacity retention after 100 cycles. In addition, the Ag-C composite nanofibers are highly porous and exhibit a large accessible surface area (∼726.9 m2 g−1) with an average pore diameter of ∼6.07 nm. The encapsulation of Ag in the hollow interiors not only provides additional lithium storage sites but also enhances the electronic conductivity, which combined with the reduced lithium diffusion path lengths in the nanofibers result in faster charge-discharge kinetics and hence a high rate performance

  13. Morphological characterization of carbon nanofiber aerosol using tandem mobility and aerodynamic size measurements

    Characterizing microstructural and transport properties of non-spherical particles, such as carbon nanofibers (CNF), is important for understanding their transport and deposition in human respiratory system and engineered devices such as particle filters. We describe an approach to obtain morphological information of non-spherical particles using a tandem system of differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI). Effective density, dynamic shape factors (DSF), particle mass, and fractal dimension-like mass-scaling exponent of nanofibers were derived using the measured mobility and aerodynamic diameters, along with the known material density of CNF. Multiple charging of particles during DMA classification, which tends to bias the measured shape factors and particle mass toward higher values, was accounted for using a correction procedure. Particle mass derived from DMAELPI measurements agreed well with the direct mass measurements using an aerosol particle mass analyzer. Effective densities, based on mobility diameters, ranged from 0.32 to 0.67 g cm?3. The DSF of the CNF ranged from 1.8 to 2.3, indicating highly non-spherical particle morphologies.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of magnetically active carbon nanofiber/iron oxide composites with hierarchical pore structures

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution containing the iron oxide precursor iron (III) acetylacetonate (AAI) was electrospun and thermally treated to produce electrically conducting, magnetic carbon nanofiber mats with hierarchical pore structures. The morphology and material properties of the resulting multifunctional nanofiber mats including the surface area and the electric and magnetic properties were examined using various characterization techniques. Scanning electron microscopy images show that uniform fibers were produced with a fiber diameter of ∼600 nm, and this uniform fiber morphology is maintained after graphitization with a fiber diameter of ∼330 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman studies reveal that both graphite and Fe3O4 crystals are formed after thermal treatment, and graphitization can be enhanced by the presence of iron. A combination of XRD and transmission electron microscopy experiments reveals the formation of pores with graphitic nanoparticles in the walls as well as the formation of magnetite nanoparticles distributed throughout the fibers. Physisorption experiments show that the multifunctional fiber mats exhibit a high surface area (200-400 m2 g-1) and their pore size is dependent on the amount of iron added and graphitization conditions. Finally, we have demonstrated that the fibers are electrically conducting as well as magnetically active.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of magnetically active carbon nanofiber/iron oxide composites with hierarchical pore structures

    Panels, Jeanne E.; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Kang Yeol; Kang, Seung Yeon; Marquez, Manuel; Wiesner, Ulrich; Lak Joo, Yong

    2008-11-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution containing the iron oxide precursor iron (III) acetylacetonate (AAI) was electrospun and thermally treated to produce electrically conducting, magnetic carbon nanofiber mats with hierarchical pore structures. The morphology and material properties of the resulting multifunctional nanofiber mats including the surface area and the electric and magnetic properties were examined using various characterization techniques. Scanning electron microscopy images show that uniform fibers were produced with a fiber diameter of ~600 nm, and this uniform fiber morphology is maintained after graphitization with a fiber diameter of ~330 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman studies reveal that both graphite and Fe3O4 crystals are formed after thermal treatment, and graphitization can be enhanced by the presence of iron. A combination of XRD and transmission electron microscopy experiments reveals the formation of pores with graphitic nanoparticles in the walls as well as the formation of magnetite nanoparticles distributed throughout the fibers. Physisorption experiments show that the multifunctional fiber mats exhibit a high surface area (200-400 m2 g-1) and their pore size is dependent on the amount of iron added and graphitization conditions. Finally, we have demonstrated that the fibers are electrically conducting as well as magnetically active.

  16. Towards Scalable Binderless Electrodes: Carbon Coated Silicon Nanofiber Paper via Mg Reduction of Electrospun SiO2 Nanofibers

    Favors, Zachary; Bay, Hamed Hosseini; Mutlu, Zafer; Ahmed, Kazi; Ionescu, Robert; Ye, Rachel; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2015-01-01

    The need for more energy dense and scalable Li-ion battery electrodes has become increasingly pressing with the ushering in of more powerful portable electronics and electric vehicles (EVs) requiring substantially longer range capabilities. Herein, we report on the first synthesis of nano-silicon paper electrodes synthesized via magnesiothermic reduction of electrospun SiO2 nanofiber paper produced by an in situ acid catalyzed polymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in-flight. Free-...

  17. Enhanced performances in primary lithium batteries of fluorinated carbon nanofibers through static fluorination

    Using galvanostatic discharges, the electrochemical properties of fluorinated carbon nanofibers (CNF) have been investigated. Several methods of fluorination are compared, (i) direct process using a flux of pure molecular fluorine F2 (dynamic process), (ii) controlled fluorination using atomic fluorine released continuously by the thermal decomposition of a solid fluorinating agent (TbF4), and (iii) static fluorination by the filling of a closed reactor with undiluted molecular fluorine as reactive gas. Electrochemical performances of the resulting materials are compared highlighting significant improvement using the static method. The discharge potential increases from 2.27 V (vs. Li+/Li°) for materials obtained by the direct route to a medium 2.40 V by the static route resulting from a two steps discharge mechanism. Owing to a complete characterization of each fluorinated materials by X-ray diffraction (XRD), solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the increased average potential of fluorinated sample through the static way has been explained by the peculiar distribution of fluorine and carbon sites in the nanomaterial. Then, in order to understand the two steps discharge mechanism of the latter material, its discharge mechanism through galvanostatic measurements at different depths of discharge has been investigated in different electrolytes. The discharged materials have been studied owing to 19F MAS NMR, XRD and scanning electron microscopy characterizations. The texture and cristallinity of lithium fluoride particles are key parameters acting on the ionic diffusion of Li+ and F− ions and as a consequence on the electrochemical performances. Its high solubility in EC/PC/3DMC solvent mixture prevents from overvoltage phenomenon occurring during the discharge of fluorinated carbon nanofibers in primary lithium battery

  18. Spherical and rodlike inorganic nanoparticle regulated the orientation of carbon nanotubes in polymer nanofibers

    Jiang, Linbin; Tu, Hu; Lu, Yuan; Wu, Yang; Tian, Jing; Shi, Xiaowen; Wang, Qun; Zhan, Yingfei; Huang, Zuqiang; Deng, Hongbing

    2016-04-01

    PVA nanofibers containing carboxylic-modified MWCNTs were fabricated via electrospinning of PVA/MWCNTs mixed solution. The alignment of MWCNTs in PVA nanofibers was studied using transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope. In addition, the orientation of MWCNTs in PVA nanofibers was further investigated in the presence of rod-like nanoparticle rectorite (REC) and of spherical nanoparticle titanium dioxide (TiO2). The images demonstrated the embedment of MWCNTs in the nanofibers and the alignment of MWCNTs along the fiber axis. Moreover, the addition of REC and TiO2 improved the alignment of MWCNTs in PVA nanofibers.

  19. Graphitic Carbon-Coated FeSe2 Hollow Nanosphere-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrid Nanofibers as an Efficient Anode Material for Sodium Ion Batteries

    Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-04-01

    A novel one-dimensional nanohybrid comprised of conductive graphitic carbon (GC)-coated hollow FeSe2 nanospheres decorating reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanofiber (hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO) was designed as an efficient anode material for sodium ion batteries and synthesized by introducing the nanoscale Kirkendall effect into the electrospinning method. The electrospun nanofibers transformed into hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hybrid nanofibers through a Fe@GC–rGO intermediate. The discharge capacities of the bare FeSe2 nanofibers, nanorod FeSe2–rGO–amorphous carbon (AC) hybrid nanofibers, and hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hyrbid nanofibers at a current density of 1 A g‑1 for the 150th cycle were 63, 302, and 412 mA h g‑1, respectively, and their corresponding capacity retentions measured from the 2nd cycle were 11, 73, and 82%, respectively. The hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hybrid nanofibers delivered a high discharge capacity of 352 mA h g‑1 even at an extremely high current density of 10 A g‑1. The enhanced electrochemical properties of the hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO composite nanofibers arose from the synergetic effects of the FeSe2 hollow morphology and highly conductive rGO matrix.

  20. Graphitic Carbon-Coated FeSe2 Hollow Nanosphere-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrid Nanofibers as an Efficient Anode Material for Sodium Ion Batteries

    Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-01-01

    A novel one-dimensional nanohybrid comprised of conductive graphitic carbon (GC)-coated hollow FeSe2 nanospheres decorating reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanofiber (hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO) was designed as an efficient anode material for sodium ion batteries and synthesized by introducing the nanoscale Kirkendall effect into the electrospinning method. The electrospun nanofibers transformed into hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hybrid nanofibers through a Fe@GC–rGO intermediate. The discharge capacities of the bare FeSe2 nanofibers, nanorod FeSe2–rGO–amorphous carbon (AC) hybrid nanofibers, and hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hyrbid nanofibers at a current density of 1 A g−1 for the 150th cycle were 63, 302, and 412 mA h g−1, respectively, and their corresponding capacity retentions measured from the 2nd cycle were 11, 73, and 82%, respectively. The hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO hybrid nanofibers delivered a high discharge capacity of 352 mA h g−1 even at an extremely high current density of 10 A g−1. The enhanced electrochemical properties of the hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC–rGO composite nanofibers arose from the synergetic effects of the FeSe2 hollow morphology and highly conductive rGO matrix. PMID:27033096

  1. Effects of carbon nanoparticles on properties of thermoset polymer systems

    Movva, Siva Subramanyam

    Polymer nanocomposites are novel materials in which at least one of the dimensions of the reinforcing material is on the order of 100 nm or less. While thermoplastic nanocomposites have been studied very widely, there are fewer studies concerning the effect of nanoparticles on thermoset systems. Low temperature cure thermoset systems are very important for many important applications. In this study, the processing, mechanical and thermal properties and reaction kinetics of carbon nanofiber (CNF) and/or carbon nanotubes (CNT) reinforced low temperature vinyl ester and epoxy nanocomposites were studied. In the first part, the processing challenge of incorporating CNFs into conventional fiber reinforced composites made by Vacuum infusion resin transfer molding (VARTM) was addressed by a new technique. The CNFs are pre-bound on the long fiber mats, instead of mixing them in the polymer resin, thereby eliminating several processing drawbacks. The resulting hybrid nanocomposites showed significant improvements in tensile, flexural and thermal properties. The effect of CNFs on the mold filling in VARTM was also studied and shown to follow the Darcy's law. In the second part, the effect of CNFs on the low temperature cure kinetics of vinyl ester and epoxy resins is studied using a thermal analysis technique, namely Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The effect of CNFs on the free radical polymerization of vinyl esters was found to be very complex as the CNFs interact with the various curing ingredients in the formulation. Specifically, the interaction effects of CNFs and the inhibitor were studied and a reaction mechanism was proposed to explain the observed phenomenon. The effect of surface modification of the carbon nanoparticles on the cure kinetics of wind-blade epoxy was studied. The surface functionalization reduced the activation energy of the epoxy reaction and was found to have an acceleration effect on the cure kinetics of epoxy resin at room temperature. In the final part, the preparation, properties and characterization of a thin film of carbon nanoparticles, also called a "nanopaper" was studied. Specifically, a new layer-by-layer multiparticle nanopaper was prepared and this layer-by-layer approach improved the mechanical properties of the stand alone nanopaper. The cure kinetics of epoxy resin in the presence of unmodified CNF paper and polyethyleneimine modified CNF paper were studied and modeled using an autocatalytic model. The nanopaper was also used as a functional coating in conventional fiber reinforced epoxy composites and improved several properties such as abrasion resistance and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness.

  2. High power direct methanol fuel cell with a porous carbon nanofiber anode layer

    Highlights: • This study demonstrates a novel porous carbon nanofiber anode (PNCF) layer. • PNFC anode layer DMFC presents power density of 23.0 mW cm−2. • This unit operates at room temperature and consumes low concentration of methanol. - Abstract: Three anode electrodes containing Pt–Ru Black as a catalyst were fabricated with a porous layer made with different carbon materials: carbon black (CB), carbon nanofiber (CNF) and a combination of both carbon materials (CB + CNF). The carbon-based porous layer was coated onto a carbon cloth with PTFE pre-treatment for delivering hydrophobic properties and applied in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Characterisation of electrochemical properties for three different anode electrodes was performed with cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at room temperature in a half-cell configuration. The evolution of the surface morphology of diffusion layer and electrodes was characterised by using variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). The electrochemical results indicate that electrode with CNF layer showed the highest current densities compared to CB and CB + CNF with the same catalyst loading. VP-SEM measurements show the network formation within the structure, which could facilitate the methanol mass transfer and improve the catalyst efficiency. The electrodes were applied to a single-cell DMFC, and the cell performance was experimentally investigated under passive operating mode and room temperature. A maximum power density of 23.0 mW cm−2 at a current density of 88.0 mA cm−2 with a 3 M dilute methanol solution was achieved. The results show that the electrodes with a CNF layer could improve the performance of DMFC as compared with commercially used CB and prove it’s potentially application in DMFC technology especially for portable power source applications due to several advantages as followings: operating at low concentration of methanol, operating at room temperature, low catalyst loading in anode and cathode, cheaper, less hazardous and no parasitic load

  3. Surface-Initiated Graft Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate from Chitin Nanofiber Macroinitiator under Dispersion Conditions

    Ryo Endo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface-initiated graft atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP of methyl methacrylate (MMA from self-assembled chitin nanofibers (CNFs was performed under dispersion conditions. Self-assembled CNFs were initially prepared by regeneration from a chitin ion gel with 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide using methanol; the product was then converted into the chitin nanofiber macroinitiator by reaction with ?-bromoisobutyryl bromide in a dispersion containing N,N-dimethylformamide. Surface-initiated graft ATRP of MMA from the initiating sites on the CNFs was subsequently carried out under dispersion conditions, followed by filtration to obtain the CNF-graft-polyMMA film. Analysis of the product confirmed the occurrence of the graft ATRP on the surface of the CNFs.

  4. Electrochemical behavior of activated carbon nanofiber-vanadium pentoxide composites for double-layer capacitors

    Mesopore-enriched activated carbon nanofiber (ACNF) mats are produced by incorporating vanadium(V) oxide (V2O5) into polyacrylonitrile (PAN) via electrospinning, and their electrochemical properties are investigated as an electrode in supercapacitors. The microstructures of the ACNFs (e.g., nanometer-size diameter, high specific surface area, narrow pore size distribution, and tunable porosity) are changed, and the textural parameters are found to affect the electrochemical properties significantly through the different V2O5 loadings and activation process. The V2O5/PAN-based ACNF electrodes with well-balanced micro/mesoporosity having an optimal pore range for effective double layer formation in an organic medium are expected to be useful electrode materials for supercapacitor applications

  5. Self-sensing of carbon nanofiber concrete columns subjected to reversed cyclic loading

    Civil infrastructures are generally a country's most expensive investment, and concrete is the most widely used material in the construction of civil infrastructures. During a structure's service life, concrete ages and deteriorates, leading to substantial loss of structural integrity and potentially resulting in catastrophic disasters such as highway bridge collapses. A solution for preventing such occurrences is the use of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for concrete structures containing carbon nanofibers (CNF). CNF concrete has many structural benefits. CNF restricts the growth of nanocracks in addition to yielding higher strength and ductility. Additionally, test results indicate a relationship between electrical resistance and concrete strain, which can be well utilized for SHM. A series of reinforced concrete (RC) columns were built and tested under a reversed cyclic loading using CNF as a SHM device. The SHM device detected and assessed the level of damage in the RC columns, providing a real-time health monitoring system for the structure's overall integrity

  6. Carbon nanofiber supported bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles for formic acid electrooxidation

    Qin, Yuan-Hang; Jiang, Yue; Niu, Dong-Fang; Zhang, Xin-Sheng; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Niu, Li; Yuan, Wei-Kang

    2012-10-01

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF) supported PdAu nanoparticles are synthesized with sodium citrate as the stabilizing agent and sodium borohydride as the reducing agent. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) characterization indicates that the synthesized PdAu particles are well dispersed on the CNF surface and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterization indicates that the alloying degree of the synthesized PdAu nanoparticles can be improved by adding tetrahydrofuran to the synthesis solution. The results of electrochemical characterization indicate that the addition of Au can promote the electrocatalytic activity of Pd/C catalyst for formic acid oxidation and the CNF supported high-alloying PdAu catalyst possesses better electrocatalytic activity and stability for formic acid oxidation than either the CNF supported low-alloying PdAu catalyst or the CNF supported Pd catalyst.

  7. Synthesis of highly dispersed and active palladium/carbon nanofiber catalyst for formic acid electrooxidation

    Qin, Yuan-Hang; Yue-Jiang; Yang, Hou-Hua; Zhang, Xin-Sheng; Zhou, Xing-Gui; Niu, Li; Yuan, Wei-Kang

    2011-05-01

    Highly dispersed and active palladium/carbon nanofiber (Pd/CNF) catalyst is synthesized by NaBH4 reduction with trisodium citrate as the stabilizing agent. The obtained Pd/CNF catalyst is characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the Pd nanoparticles with an average particle size of ca. 3.8 nm are highly dispersed on the CNF support even with a small ratio of citrate to Pd precursor, which is believed to be due to the pH adjustment of citrate stabilized colloidal Pd nanoparticles. The cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques show that the obtained Pd/CNF catalyst exhibits good catalytic activity and stability for the electrooxidation of formic acid.

  8. The strain sensing property of carbon nanofiber/glass microballoon epoxy nanocomposite

    This work reports the strain sensing property of a nanocomposite made from a free standing multi-scale structure that consisted of glass microballoons and carbon nanofibers. An epoxy system was infiltrated into the structure in order to fabricate a nanocomposite sensor. The electrical resistance of the sensor when subjected to a tensile strain was investigated. The change in electrical resistance of the sensor versus the applied strain was found to have linear and non-linear regions. In the linear region, the sensor exhibited a similar sensitivity to conventional resistance-type strain gages. A single equation that relates the change in electrical resistance to the applied strain for the linear and non-linear regions was developed. (paper)

  9. Damage detection and conductivity evolution in carbon nanofiber epoxy via electrical impedance tomography

    Utilizing electrically conductive nanocomposites for integrated self-sensing and health monitoring is a promising area of structural health monitoring (SHM) research wherein local changes in conductivity coincide with damage. In this research we conduct proof of concept investigations using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for damage detection by identifying conductivity changes and by imaging conductivity evolution in a carbon nanofiber (CNF) filled epoxy composite. CNF/epoxy is examined because fibrous composites can be manufactured with a CNF/epoxy matrix thereby enabling the entire matrix to become self-sensing. We also study the mechanisms of conductivity evolution in CNF/epoxy through electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) testing. The results of these tests indicate that thermal expansion is responsible for conductivity evolution in a CNF/epoxy composite. (paper)

  10. Transfer of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) while maintaining their alignment and impalefection functionality.

    Pearce, Ryan C; Railsback, Justin G; Anderson, Bryan D; Sarac, Mehmet F; McKnight, Timothy E; Tracy, Joseph B; Melechko, Anatoli V

    2013-02-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) are synthesized on Al 3003 alloy substrates by direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Chemically synthesized Ni nanoparticles were used as the catalyst for growth. The Si-containing coating (SiN(x)) typically created when VACNFs are grown on silicon was produced by adding Si microparticles prior to growth. The fiber arrays were transferred to PDMS by spin coating a layer on the grown substrates, curing the PDMS, and etching away the Al in KOH. The fiber arrays contain many fibers over 15 μm (long enough to protrude from the PDMS film and penetrate cell membranes) and SiN(x) coatings as observed by SEM, EDX, and fluorescence microscopy. The free-standing array in PDMS was loaded with pVENUS-C1 plasmid and human brain microcapillary endothelial (HBMEC) cells and was successfully impalefected. PMID:23281833

  11. A feasibility study of self-heating concrete utilizing carbon nanofiber heating elements

    This paper presents the development of an electric, self-heating concrete system that uses embedded carbon nanofiber paper as electric resistance heating elements. The proposed system utilizes the conductive properties of carbon fiber materials to heat a surface overlay of concrete with various admixtures to improve the concrete's thermal conductivity. The development and laboratory scale testing of the system were conducted for the various compositions of concrete containing, separately, carbon fiber, fly ash, and steel shavings as admixtures. The heating performances of these concrete mixtures with the carbon fiber heating element were experimentally obtained in a sub-freezing ambient environment in order to explore the use of such a system for deicing of concrete roadways. Analysis of electric power consumption, heating rate, and obtainable concrete surface temperatures under typical power loads was performed to evaluate the viability of a large scale implementation of the proposed heating system for roadway deicing applications. A cost analysis is presented to provide a comparison with traditional deicing methods, such as salting, and other integrated concrete heating systems. (technical note)

  12. A nucleation and growth model of vertically-oriented carbon nanofibers or nanotubes by plasma-enhanced catalytic chemical vapor deposition.

    Cojocaru, C S; Senger, A; Le Normand, F

    2006-05-01

    Carbon nanofibers are grown by direct current and hot filaments-activated catalytic chemical vapor deposition while varying the power of the hot filaments. Observations of these carbon nanofibers vertically oriented on a SiO2 (8 nm thick)/Si(100) substrate covered with Co nanoparticles (10-15 nm particle size) by Scanning Electron and Transmission Electron Microscopies show the presence of a graphitic "nest" either on the surface of the substrate or at the end of the specific nanofiber that does not encapsulate the catalytic particle. Strictly in our conditions, the activation by hot filaments is required to grow nanofibers with a C2H2 - H2 gas mixture, as large amounts of amorphous carbon cover the surface of the substrate without using hot filaments. From these observations as well as data of the literature, it is proposed that the nucleation of carbon nanofibers occurs through a complex process involving several steps: carbon concentration gradient starting from the catalytic carbon decomposition and diffusion from the surface of the catalytic nanoparticles exposed to the activated gas and promoted by energetic ionic species of the gas phase; subsequent graphitic condensation of a "nest" at the interface of the Co particle and substrate. The large concentration of highly reactive hydrogen radicals mainly provided by activation with hot filaments precludes further spreading out of this interfacial carbon nest over the entire surface of the substrate and thus selectively orientates the growth towards the condensation of graphene over facets that are perpendicular to the surface. Carbon nanofibers can then be grown within the well-known Vapor-Liquid-Solid process. Thus the effect of energetic ions and highly reactive neutrals like atomic hydrogen in the preferential etching of carbon on the edge of graphene shells and on the broadening of the carbon nanofiber is underlined. PMID:16792361

  13. Nitrogen Functionalization of CNFs and Application in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Arrigo, Rosa

    2009-01-01

    The need to develop highly selective and active heterogeneous catalysts has lead to search for new synthetic strategies which mimic the highly specific chemical structure encountered in bio-systems. For instance, the high coordinative capability of porphyrin-like structures can be exploited in the preparation of highly dispersed supported metal catalysts. Due to their incomparable feasibility towards chemical functionalization, nanostructured carbons represent an ideal organic substrate whose...

  14. Nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanofiber webs/sulfur composites as cathode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanofiber webs-sulfur composites (N-CNFWs/S) were synthesized for the first time with sulfur (S) encapsulated into nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanofiber webs (N-CNFWs) via a modified oxidative template route, carbonization-activation and thermal treatment. The composites were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetry (TG) measurements. The results show that sulfur is well dispersed and immobilized homogeneously in the micropores of nitrogen-doped porous carbon nanofiber webs (N-CNFWs) with high electrical conductivity, surface area and large pore volume. The electrochemical tests show that the N-CNFWs/S composites with 60 wt. % of S have a high initial discharge capacity of 1564 mA h g−1, a good cycling stability at the current density of 175 mA g−1, and excellent rate capability (reversible discharging capacity of above 400 mA h g−1 at 1600 mA g−1)

  15. Pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate as an alternative precursor for SiO{sub 2}-coated carbon nanofibers

    Barrena, M.I., E-mail: ibarrena@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Av. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gomez de Salazar, J.M.; Soria, A.; Matesanz, L. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Av. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    This work reported basically aims at understanding the extent of SiO{sub 2}-coated carbon nanofibers using two different sol-gel precursors for the silicate glass. The silicate precursors employed were tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate. The first route consisted in an acid hydrolysis and polycondensation of the TEOS and the second one in a polycondensation of the pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate. The techniques of Fourier Infra Red spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the materials obtained. Both kinds of SiO{sub 2} precursor can coat the CNF effectively. However, the use of pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate (faster gelation times and higher surface areas) can be considered a low-cost and facile alternative with respect to the use of TEOS, to obtain industrially silica-coated carbon nanofibers.

  16. Pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate as an alternative precursor for SiO2-coated carbon nanofibers

    This work reported basically aims at understanding the extent of SiO2-coated carbon nanofibers using two different sol-gel precursors for the silicate glass. The silicate precursors employed were tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate. The first route consisted in an acid hydrolysis and polycondensation of the TEOS and the second one in a polycondensation of the pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate. The techniques of Fourier Infra Red spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the materials obtained. Both kinds of SiO2 precursor can coat the CNF effectively. However, the use of pre-hydrolysed ethyl silicate (faster gelation times and higher surface areas) can be considered a low-cost and facile alternative with respect to the use of TEOS, to obtain industrially silica-coated carbon nanofibers.

  17. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Ni-Based Nanoparticles and Patterning for Carbon Nanofiber Growth

    Sarac, Mehmet Fahri

    This dissertation reviews a comprehensive set of research results comprised of three studies, which includes the synthesis of nickel (Ni) nanoparticles (NPs) and their conversion chemistry, methods for depositing them onto substrates, and catalysis of carbon nanofiber growth. The first part of the work is concerned with the synthesis of Ni NPs, dropcasting and growing them in alignment with carbon nanofibers along a silicon (Si) substrate. Following observed success of this step, Ni NPs were airbrushed across different substrates, attempting to observe differences while reporting the results of an extensive comparative analysis of the different substrates used. Here, it was observed that the Ni NPs had a tendency to have dendritic rather than spherical shapes, motivating an additional study of the cause of branching and how it can be controlled. All three portions of this study are presented and discussed in detail. In the first set of experiments, vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were created through ligand-stabilized Ni nanoparticle (NP) catalysts and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition; these NPs were used to allow growth of VACNFs in dense arrays. In the pregrowth heating process, the ligands are converted into graphitic shells that prevent agglomeration and coalescence of the catalyst NPs, resulting in a monodisperse VACNF size distribution. Meanwhile, VACNFs were grown from Ni NPs that had been airbrushed onto various substrates (silicon (Si), aluminum (Al), copper (Cu), and titanium (Ti)). Si micropowder was also used as a precursor for Si coatings formed in situ on VACNFs, causing rigidity. Growth of VACNFs on metal foils will facilitate applications that require thermal or electrical contact to the VACNFs, such as anode materials for Li-ion batteries and thermal interface materials. A related study focused on the synthesis of Ni3C1-x NPs, the control of branching in dendritic Ni3C1-x NPs and the effect of branching on the conversion into nickel phosphide were investigated. Ni3C1-x NPs were synthesized through thermolysis of nickel acetylacetonate, with oleylamine as a reducing agent and 1-octadecene (ODE) as the solvent. Trioctylephosphine (TOP) was added as ligand and inhibited the formation of dendritic shapes, as well as inhibiting the incorporation of carbon. This was found to create Ni NPs which were spherical, while comparable findings have been observed from the use of octadecane (ODA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as solvents, but these have been observed to have fewer, larger branches than when using ODE, while producing Ni rather than Ni3C 1-x NPs at 230 C. Incorporating carbon from TOPO or ODA in Ni NPs required higher temperatures, while conversion of the dendritic NPs through this approach led to several voids in branches (rather than larger single voids for the spherical NPs). These studies have generated important knowledge about the synthesis of Ni-based NPs and of their catalysis of VACNF growth. We have shown that ligands encapsulating Ni NPs have a critical role in preventing the NPs from agglomerating during the growth of VACNFs, giving a monodisperse VACNF diameter distribution. The ligands were converted into protective graphitic shells, but if the ligands are intentionally removed after deposition onto the substrate but before initiating VACNF growth, then a polydisperse VACNF diameter distribution are obtained, with a larger average diameter. We have also demonstrated VACNF growth on several metal substrates, where addition of Si micropowder allows the growth of Si-enriched coatings that make the VACNFs mechanically rigid. Recommendations for ongoing research include investigating the conversion chemistry of Ni NPs into nickel chalcogenides or other transition bimetallic NPs and to explore application for nanomaterials in catalysis, plasmonics, electronics, and medicine.

  18. Fabrication of Homogeneous Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube/ Poly (vinyl alcohol) Composite Nanofibers for Microwave Absorption Application

    Shoushtari A.M.; Salimbeygi G.; Nasouri K.; Haji A.

    2013-01-01

    Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) / sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) / multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) camposite nanofibers with various MWCNT contents (up to 10 wt%) were fabricated by electrospinning process and their microwave absorption properties were evaluated by a vector network analyzer in the frequency range of 8-12 GHz (X-band) at room temperature. The uniform, stable dispersion and well oriented MWCNT within the PVA matrix were achieved through using SDS as dispersing agent. The SEM ana...

  19. Fabrication, structure, and magnetic properties of electrospun carbon/cobalt ferrite (C/CoFe2O4) composite nanofibers

    Nilmoung, S.; Kidkhunthod, P.; Pinitsoontorn, S.; Rujirawat, S.; Yimnirun, R.; Maensiri, S.

    2015-04-01

    This work reports the fabrication and properties of carbon/cobalt ferrite (C/CoFe2O4) composite nanofibers by using electrospinning technique followed by carbonization process under mixed air and argon atmosphere. The as-prepared samples were characterized by means of thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. It was found that the structure of CoFe2O4 was cubic spinel with the variation of crystallite size between 22 and 54 nm depending on the magnetic source content. X-ray absorption near-edge spectra at the Fe (7,112 eV) and Co (7,709 eV) absorption K-edge were used to confirm the Fe3+ and Co2+ oxidation states of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles. The X-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicated that CoFe2O4 nanoparticles had a structure analogous to bulk-inverted spinel structure. All composite nanofibers exhibited ferromagnetic behavior related to the distribution of cations over tetrahedral and octahedral sites, whereas diamagnetic behavior was observed in pure carbon nanofibers. The magnetization was clearly enhanced with respect to the increase of magnetic source content, whereas the coercivity and the squareness ( M r/ M s) were dependent of crystallite size.

  20. Mechanical, thermal and morphological characterization of polycarbonate/oxidized carbon nanofiber composites produced with a lean 2-step manufacturing process.

    Lively, Brooks; Kumar, Sandeep; Tian, Liu; Li, Bin; Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-05-01

    In this study we report the advantages of a 2-step method that incorporates an additional process pre-conditioning step for rapid and precise blending of the constituents prior to the commonly used melt compounding method for preparing polycarbonate/oxidized carbon nanofiber composites. This additional step (equivalent to a manufacturing cell) involves the formation of a highly concentrated solid nano-nectar of polycarbonate/carbon nanofiber composite using a solution mixing process followed by melt mixing with pure polycarbonate. This combined method yields excellent dispersion and improved mechanical and thermal properties as compared to the 1-step melt mixing method. The test results indicated that inclusion of carbon nanofibers into composites via the 2-step method resulted in dramatically reduced ( 48% lower) coefficient of thermal expansion compared to that of pure polycarbonate and 30% lower than that from the 1-step processing, at the same loading of 1.0 wt%. Improvements were also found in dynamic mechanical analysis and flexural mechanical properties. The 2-step approach is more precise and leads to better dispersion, higher quality, consistency, and improved performance in critical application areas. It is also consistent with Lean Manufacturing principles in which manufacturing cells are linked together using less of the key resources and creates a smoother production flow. Therefore, this 2-step process can be more attractive for industry. PMID:21780388

  1. Imaging, spectroscopic, mechanical and biocompatibility studies of electrospun Tecoflex® EG 80A nanofibers and composites thereof containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Highlights: • This work suggested the efficient use of MWCNTs to impart high mechanical properties to nanofibers and while maintaining the toxicity of the materials. • The mechanical properties of the nanofibers can be improved by introducing 2% of MWCNTs, above this point the mechanical property is reduced in nanofibers fabricated from Tecoflex® EG 80A. • The presence of MWCNTs in the nanofibers reflecting the successful electrospining event can be ascertained by FT-IR, Raman, and TEM. • The nanofibers obtained while introducing MWCNTs represent no toxic behavior to cultured fibroblast. - Abstract: The present study discusses the design, development, and characterization of electrospun Tecoflex® EG 80A class of polyurethane nanofibers and the incorporation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to these materials. Scanning electron microscopy results confirmed the presence of polymer nanofibers, which showed a decrease in fiber diameter at 0.5% wt. and 1% wt. MWCNTs loadings, while transmission electron microscopy showed evidence of the MWCNTs embedded within the polymer matrix. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to elucidate the polymer-MWCNTs intermolecular interactions, indicating that the C–N and N–H bonds in polyurethanes are responsible for the interactions with MWCNTs. Furthermore, tensile testing indicated an increase in the Young's modulus of the nanofibers as the MWCNTs concentration was increased. Finally, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were seeded on the obtained nanofibers, demonstrating cell biocompatibility and proliferation. Therefore, the results indicate the successful formation of polyurethane nanofibers with enhanced mechanical properties, and demonstrate their biocompatibility, suggesting their potential application in biomedical areas

  2. Imaging, spectroscopic, mechanical and biocompatibility studies of electrospun Tecoflex{sup ®} EG 80A nanofibers and composites thereof containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Macossay, Javier, E-mail: jmacossay@utpa.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg TX 78539 (United States); Sheikh, Faheem A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg TX 78539 (United States); Nano-Bio Regenerative Medical Institute, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Cantu, Travis; Eubanks, Thomas M.; Salinas, M. Esther; Farhangi, Chakavak S.; Ahmad, Hassan [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg TX 78539 (United States); Hassan, M. Shamshi; Khil, Myung-seob [Department of Organic Materials and Fiber Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Maffi, Shivani K. [Regional Academic Health Center-Edinburg (E-RAHC), Medical Research Division, 1214 W. Schunior St, Edinburg TX 78541 (United States); Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center, 15355 Lambda Dr. San Antonio TX 78245 (United States); Kim, Hern [Energy and Environment Fusion Technology Center, Department of Energy and Biotechnology, Myongji University, Yongin Kyonggi-do 449-728 (Korea, Republic of); Bowlin, Gary l. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Memphis, Memphis TN 38152 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • This work suggested the efficient use of MWCNTs to impart high mechanical properties to nanofibers and while maintaining the toxicity of the materials. • The mechanical properties of the nanofibers can be improved by introducing 2% of MWCNTs, above this point the mechanical property is reduced in nanofibers fabricated from Tecoflex{sup ®} EG 80A. • The presence of MWCNTs in the nanofibers reflecting the successful electrospining event can be ascertained by FT-IR, Raman, and TEM. • The nanofibers obtained while introducing MWCNTs represent no toxic behavior to cultured fibroblast. - Abstract: The present study discusses the design, development, and characterization of electrospun Tecoflex{sup ®} EG 80A class of polyurethane nanofibers and the incorporation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to these materials. Scanning electron microscopy results confirmed the presence of polymer nanofibers, which showed a decrease in fiber diameter at 0.5% wt. and 1% wt. MWCNTs loadings, while transmission electron microscopy showed evidence of the MWCNTs embedded within the polymer matrix. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to elucidate the polymer-MWCNTs intermolecular interactions, indicating that the C–N and N–H bonds in polyurethanes are responsible for the interactions with MWCNTs. Furthermore, tensile testing indicated an increase in the Young's modulus of the nanofibers as the MWCNTs concentration was increased. Finally, NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were seeded on the obtained nanofibers, demonstrating cell biocompatibility and proliferation. Therefore, the results indicate the successful formation of polyurethane nanofibers with enhanced mechanical properties, and demonstrate their biocompatibility, suggesting their potential application in biomedical areas.

  3. Functional properties of electrospun NiO/RuO{sub 2} composite carbon nanofibers

    Wu Yongzhi [Healthcare and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Physics Department, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrated Science and Engineering, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260 (Singapore); Balakrishna, Rajiv [Healthcare and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Physics Department, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Reddy, M.V., E-mail: phymvv@nus.edu.sg [Physics Department, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Nair, A. Sreekumaran, E-mail: nniansn@nus.edu.sg [Healthcare and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Chowdari, B.V.R. [Physics Department, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Ramakrishna, S. [Healthcare and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Kind Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fabrication of carbon nanofibers with nickel-ruthenium composites by electrospinning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An interesting observation of increase in capacitance with increase in the number of cycles for supercapacitor applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Li ion battery testing showed a stable capacity ranging from 350 mAh g{sup -1} to 400 mAh g{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lower impedance with the incorporation of 15 wt% Ru precursor than those without Ru. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) nickel oxide/ruthenium oxide (NiO/RuO{sub 2})-carbon composite nanofibers (NiRu-C-NFs) were fabricated via electrospinning of a homogenous mixture of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and Ni/Ru salt precursors at different ratios followed by heat treatments. The 1D nanostructures of the composite material were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Rietveld refinement and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements. Li-cycling properties were evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic properties. The asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor studies were carried out with activated carbon as a cathode and NiRu-C-NFs composites as anodes in the cycling range, 0.005-3.0 V using 1 M LiPF{sub 6} (EC;DMC) electrolyte. NiRu-C-NFs fabricated from 5 wt% nickel (II) and 15 wt% ruthenium (III) precursors showed a capacitance up to {approx}60 F g{sup -1} after 30 cycles. Anodic Li-cycling studies of NiRu-C-NF-0 and NiRu-C-NF-2 composite samples showed a reversible capacity of 230 and 350 m Ahg{sup -1} at current rate of 72 mA g{sup -1} at the end of 40th cycle in the voltage range of 0.005-3.0 V. Electrochemical impedance studies (EIS) on NiRu-C-NFs showed lower impedance value for 15 wt% Ru than the bare sample.

  4. Electrospun carbon nanofibers/electrocatalyst hybrids as asymmetric electrodes for vanadium redox flow battery

    Wei, Guanjie; Fan, Xinzhuang; Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Chuanwei

    2015-05-01

    To improve the electrochemical activity of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based electrospun carbon nanofibers (ECNFs) toward vanadium redox couples, the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and Bi-based compound as electrocatalyst have been embedded in the ECNFs to make composite electrode, respectively. The morphology and electrochemical properties of pristine ECNFs, CNTs/ECNFs and Bi/ECNFs have been characterized. Among the three kinds of electrodes, the CNTs/ECNFs show best electrochemical activity toward VO2+/VO2+ redox couple, while the Bi/ECNFs present the best electrochemical activity toward V2+/V3+ redox couple. Furthermore, the high overpotential of hydrogen evolution on Bi/ECNFs makes the side-reaction suppressed. Because of the large property difference between the two composite electrodes, the CNTs/ECNFs and Bi/ECNFs are designed to act as positive and negative electrode for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB), respectively. It not only does improve the kinetics of two electrode reactions at the same time, but also reduce the kinetics difference between them. Due to the application of asymmetric electrodes, performance of the cell is improved greatly.

  5. Effect of carbon nanofiber addition in the mechanical properties and durability of cementitious materials

    Galao, O.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on recent work that is directed at studying the changes in the mechanical properties of Portland cement based mortars due to the addition of carbon nanofiber (CNF. Both flexural and compression strength has been determined and related to the CNF addition to the mix, to the curing time and to the porosity and density of the matrix. Also, corrosion of embedded steel rebars in CNF cement pastes exposed to carbonation and chloride attacks has been investigated. The increase in CNF addition implies higher corrosion intensity and higher levels of mechanical properties.En este artículo se han estudiado los cambios en las propiedades mecánicas de los morteros de cemento Portland debido a la adición de nanofibras de carbono (NFC. Se han determinado las resistencias a flexotracción y a compresión de los morteros en relación a la cantidad de NFC añadidas a la mezcla, al tiempo de curado y a la porosidad y densidad de los mismos. Además se han investigado los niveles de corrosión de barras de acero embebidas en pastas de cemento con NFC expuestos al ataque por carbonatación y por ingreso de cloruros. El aumento en el porcentaje de NFC añadido se traduce en un aumento la intensidad de corrosión registrada y una mejora de las propiedades mecánicas.

  6. Leidenfrost temperature increase for impacting droplets on carbon-nanofiber surfaces

    Nair, Hrudya; Tran, Tuan; van Houselt, Arie; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Droplets impacting on a superheated surface can either exhibit a contact boiling regime, in which they make direct contact with the surface and boil violently, or a film boiling regime, in which they remain separated from the surface by their own vapor. The transition from the contact to the film boiling regime depends not only on the temperature of the surface and kinetic energy of the droplet, but also on the size of the structures fabricated on the surface. Here we experimentally show that surfaces covered with carbon-nanofibers delay the transition to film boiling to much higher temperature compared to smooth surfaces. We present physical arguments showing that, because of the small scale of the carbon fibers, they are cooled by the vapor flow just before the liquid impact, thus permitting contact boiling up to much higher temperatures than on smooth surfaces. We also show that, as long as the impact is in the film boiling regime, the spreading factor of impacting droplets follows the same $\\We^{3/10}$ sc...

  7. A co-confined carbonization approach to aligned nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon nanofibers and its application as an adsorbent

    Chen, Aibing, E-mail: chen_ab@163.com [College of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Shijiazhuang 050018 (China); Liu, Chao [College of Gemmology and Material Technics, Shijiazhuang University of Economic, Huaian Road 136, Shijiazhuang 050031 (China); Yu, Yifeng; Hu, Yongqi; Lv, Haijun; Zhang, Yue; Shen, Shufeng [College of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Shijiazhuang 050018 (China); Zhang, Jian, E-mail: jzhang@nimte.ac.cn [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • MCNFs were synthesized by a co-confined carbonization method. • The diameter size of MCNFs with bimodal mesoporous structure can be modulated. • The obtained MCNFs manifest better adsorption capacity for SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and Cd{sup 2+}. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (MCNFs) with an aligned mesoporous structure were synthesized by a co-confined carbonization method using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as co-confined templates and ionic liquids as the precursor. The as-synthesized MCNFs with the diameter of 80–120 nm possessed a bulk nitrogen content of 5.3 wt% and bimodal mesoporous structure. The nitrogen atoms were mostly bound to the graphitic network in two forms, i.e. pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen, providing adsorption sites for acidic gases like SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. Cyclic experiments revealed a considerable stability of MCNFs over 20 runs of SO{sub 2} adsorption and 15 runs for CO{sub 2} adsorption. The MCNFs also have a preferable adsorption performance for Cd{sup 2+}.

  8. Holocellulose Nanofibers of High Molar Mass and Small Diameter for High-Strength Nanopaper.

    Galland, Sylvain; Berthold, Fredrik; Prakobna, Kasinee; Berglund, Lars A

    2015-08-10

    Wood cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) based on bleached pulp are different from the cellulose microfibrils in the plant cell wall in terms of larger diameter, lower cellulose molar mass, and modified cellulose topochemistry. Also, CNF isolation often requires high-energy mechanical disintegration. Here, a new type of CNFs is reported based on a mild peracetic acid delignification process for spruce and aspen fibers, followed by low-energy mechanical disintegration. Resulting CNFs are characterized with respect to geometry (AFM, TEM), molar mass (SEC), and polysaccharide composition. Cellulose nanopaper films are prepared by filtration and characterized by UV-vis spectrometry for optical transparency and uniaxial tensile tests. These CNFs are unique in terms of high molar mass and cellulose-hemicellulose core-shell structure. Furthermore, the corresponding nanopaper structures exhibit exceptionally high optical transparency and the highest mechanical properties reported for comparable CNF nanopaper structures. PMID:26151837

  9. Dynamic-mechanical and thermomechanical properties of cellulose nanofiber/polyester resin composites.

    Lavoratti, Alessandra; Scienza, Lisete Cristine; Zattera, Ademir José

    2016-01-20

    Composites of unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) and cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) obtained from dry cellulose waste of softwood (Pinus sp.) and hardwood (Eucalyptus sp.) were developed. The fiber properties and the influence of the CNFs in the dynamic-mechanical and thermomechanical properties of the composites were evaluated. CNFs with a diameter of 70-90 nm were obtained. Eucalyptus sp. has higher α-cellulose content than Pinus sp. fibers. The crystallinity of the cellulose pulps decreased after grinding. However, high values were still obtained. The chemical composition of the fibers was not significantly altered by the grinding process. Eucalyptus sp. CNF composites had water absorption close to the neat resin at 1 wt% filler. The dynamic-mechanical properties of Eucalyptus sp. CNFs were slightly increased and the thermal stability was improved. PMID:26572434

  10. Investigating the plasma chemistry for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes/nanofibres in an inductively coupled plasma-enhanced CVD system: the effect of processing parameters

    Mao, M; Bogaerts, A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A parameter study is carried out for an inductively coupled plasma used for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes or carbon nanofibers (CNTs/CNFs), by means of the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM). The influence of processing parameters including gas ratio for four different gas mixtures typically used for CNT/CNF growth (i.e., CH 4 /H 2, CH 4 /NH 3, C 2 H 2 /H 2 and C 2 H 2 /NH 3), ICP power (50~1000W), operating pressure (10mTorr~1Torr), bias power (0~1000W) and temperature of t...

  11. Free-Standing Thin Webs of Activated Carbon Nanofibers by Electrospinning for Rechargeable Li-O2 Batteries.

    Nie, Hongjiao; Xu, Chi; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Baoshan; Li, Xianfeng; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Huamin

    2016-01-27

    Free-standing activated carbon nanofibers (ACNF) were prepared through electrospinning combining with CO2 activation and then used for nonaqueous Li-O2 battery cathodes. As-prepared ACNF based cathode was loosely packed with carbon nanofibers complicatedly overlapped. Owing to some micrometer-sized pores between individual nanofibers, relatively high permeability of O2 across the cathode becomes feasible. Meanwhile, the mesopores introduced by CO2 activation act as additional nucleation sites for Li2O2 formation, leading to an increase in the density of Li2O2 particles along with a size decrease of the individual particles, and therefore, flake-like Li2O2 are preferentially formed. In addition, the free-standing structure of ACNF cathode eliminates the side reactions about PVDF. As a result, the Li-O2 batteries with ACNF cathodes showed increased discharge capacities, reduced overpotentials, and longer cycle life in the case of full discharge and charge operation. This provides a novel pathway for the design of cathodes for Li-O2 battery. PMID:26691321

  12. Fabrication and characterization of polylactic acid and polylactic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofibers through centrifugal spinning

    Patlan, Richard

    Biocompatible polymer nanofibers hold great potential in the biomedical engineering field. Their biodegradable nature and enhanced properties could help solve a wide array of health related problems, particularly in the areas of tissue regeneration, drug delivery, and biosensor design. The novel Forcespinning™ method allows the production of submicron fibers without many of the drawbacks found in electrospinning, while also providing a substantial increase in fiber production. The aim of the study was to utilize this method to fabricate non-woven nanofibrous mats composed of polylactic acid (PLA) and polylactic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite fibers. The morphology, thermal properties, and crystalline structure of the resulting nanofibers were then characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD).

  13. Nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with electrospun PdO-NiO composite nanofibers

    A glassy carbon electrode was modified with PdO-NiO composite nanofibers (PdO-NiO-NFs) and applied to the electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The PdO-NiO-NFs were synthesized by electrospinning and subsequent thermal treatment, and then characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Factors such as the composition and fraction of nanofibers, and of the applied potential were also studied. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity for H2O2 (583.43 μA · mM−1 · cm−2), a wide linear range (from 5.0 μM to 19 mM), a low detection limit (2.94 μM at an SNR of 3), good long term stability, and is resistant to fouling. (author)

  14. Novel interlayer made from Fe3C/carbon nanofiber webs for high performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    Huang, Jian-Qiu; Zhang, Biao; Xu, Zheng-Long; Abouali, Sara; Akbari Garakani, Mohammad; Huang, Jiaqiang; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2015-07-01

    A new freestanding Fe3C/carbon nanofiber (CNF) film is developed using a facile one-pot electrospinning method as an interlayer for high performance lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The interlayer placed between the separator and the sulfur cathode plays many synergistic roles, offering (i) a number of macropores within the nanofiber web to facilitate ion transport and electrolyte penetration, (ii) nitrogen-containing functional groups that entrap soluble polysulfides by strong interatomic attraction, and (iii) much enhanced electron/ion transfer due to the high electrical conductivity of the CNF web. The battery delivers an excellent specific discharge capacity of 893 mA h/g after 100 cycles, maintaining 76% of its initial capacity of 1177 mA h/g. These values are among the highest for those reported recently with similar nanocarbon-based interlayers in terms of rate capability and cyclic stability.

  15. Thermoelectric properties of carbon nanotube and nanofiber based ethylene-octene copolymer composites for thermoelectric devices, Journal of Nanomaterials

    Slobodian, P.; Říha, Pavel; Olejník, J.; Kovář, M.; Svoboda, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, August (2013). ISSN 1687-4110 Grant ostatní: TBU Zlin(CZ) iga/ft/2013/018; GA MŠk(CZ) EE.2.3.20.0104; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : CNF * carbon nanotubes * carbon nanofibers * power-factor * nanocomposites * behavior * network Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.611, year: 2013 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/2013/792875/

  16. Thermoelectric properties of carbon nanotube and nanofiber based ethylene-octene copolymer composites for thermoelectric devices, Journal of Nanomaterials

    Slobodian, P.; Říha, Pavel; Olejník, J.; Kovář, M.; Svoboda, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, August (2013). ISSN 1687-4110 Grant ostatní: TBU Zlin(CZ) iga/ft/2013/018; GA MŠk(CZ) EE.2.3.20.0104; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : CNF * carbon nanotubes * carbon nanofibers * power -factor * nanocomposites * behavior * network Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.611, year: 2013 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/2013/792875/

  17. Preparation of novel carbon microfiber/carbon nanofiber-dispersed polyvinyl alcohol-based nanocomposite material for lithium-ion electrolyte battery separator

    A novel nanocomposite polyvinyl alcohol precursor-based material dispersed with the web of carbon microfibers and carbon nanofibers is developed as lithium (Li)-ion electrolyte battery separator. The primary synthesis steps of the separator material consist of esterification of polyvinyl acetate to produce polyvinyl alcohol gel, ball-milling of the surfactant dispersed carbon micro-nanofibers, mixing of the milled micron size (∼ 500 nm) fibers to the reactant mixture at the incipience of the polyvinyl alcohol gel formation, and the mixing of hydrophobic reagents along with polyethylene glycol as a plasticizer, to produce a thin film of ∼ 25 μm. The produced film, uniformly dispersed with carbon micro-nanofibers, has dramatically improved performance as a battery separator, with the ion conductivity of the electrolytes (LiPF6) saturated film measured as 0.119 S-cm−1, approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of polyvinyl alcohol. The other primary characteristics of the produced film, such as tensile strength, contact angle, and thermal stability, are also found to be superior to the materials made of other precursors, including polypropylene and polyethylene, discussed in the literature. The method of producing the films in this study is novel, simple, environmentally benign, and economically viable. Highlights: ► A novel material as a potential Li-ion electrolyte battery separator is synthesized. ► Synthesis steps include esterification of polyvinyl acetate to produce PVA-gel. ► The film is in-situ incorporated (dispersed) with carbon micro and nanofibers. ► The produced film has improved performance as a battery separator

  18. Preparation of novel carbon microfiber/carbon nanofiber-dispersed polyvinyl alcohol-based nanocomposite material for lithium-ion electrolyte battery separator

    Sharma, Ajit K.; Khare, Prateek [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Singh, Jayant K., E-mail: jayantks@iitk.ac.in [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Verma, Nishith, E-mail: nishith@iitk.ac.in [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Center for Environmental Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2013-04-01

    A novel nanocomposite polyvinyl alcohol precursor-based material dispersed with the web of carbon microfibers and carbon nanofibers is developed as lithium (Li)-ion electrolyte battery separator. The primary synthesis steps of the separator material consist of esterification of polyvinyl acetate to produce polyvinyl alcohol gel, ball-milling of the surfactant dispersed carbon micro-nanofibers, mixing of the milled micron size (∼ 500 nm) fibers to the reactant mixture at the incipience of the polyvinyl alcohol gel formation, and the mixing of hydrophobic reagents along with polyethylene glycol as a plasticizer, to produce a thin film of ∼ 25 μm. The produced film, uniformly dispersed with carbon micro-nanofibers, has dramatically improved performance as a battery separator, with the ion conductivity of the electrolytes (LiPF{sub 6}) saturated film measured as 0.119 S-cm{sup −1}, approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of polyvinyl alcohol. The other primary characteristics of the produced film, such as tensile strength, contact angle, and thermal stability, are also found to be superior to the materials made of other precursors, including polypropylene and polyethylene, discussed in the literature. The method of producing the films in this study is novel, simple, environmentally benign, and economically viable. Highlights: ► A novel material as a potential Li-ion electrolyte battery separator is synthesized. ► Synthesis steps include esterification of polyvinyl acetate to produce PVA-gel. ► The film is in-situ incorporated (dispersed) with carbon micro and nanofibers. ► The produced film has improved performance as a battery separator.

  19. An inner filter effect based sensor of tetracycline hydrochloride as developed by loading photoluminescent carbon nanodots in the electrospun nanofibers

    Lin, Min; Zou, Hong Yan; Yang, Tong; Liu, Ze Xi; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The inner filter effect (IFE), which results from the absorption of the excitation or emission light by absorbers, has been employed as an alternative approach in sensing systems due to its flexibility and simplicity. In this work, highly photoluminescent carbon nanodots (CDs), which were simply prepared through a new one-step microwave synthesis route, were loaded in electrospun nanofibers, and the obtained nanofibers were then successfully applied to develop a fluorescent IFE-based visual sensor for tetracycline hydrochloride (Tc) sensing in milk. This developed visual sensor has high selectivity owing to the requirements of the spectral overlap between the CDs and Tc, showing high promise in sensing chemistry with an efficient response and economic effect.The inner filter effect (IFE), which results from the absorption of the excitation or emission light by absorbers, has been employed as an alternative approach in sensing systems due to its flexibility and simplicity. In this work, highly photoluminescent carbon nanodots (CDs), which were simply prepared through a new one-step microwave synthesis route, were loaded in electrospun nanofibers, and the obtained nanofibers were then successfully applied to develop a fluorescent IFE-based visual sensor for tetracycline hydrochloride (Tc) sensing in milk. This developed visual sensor has high selectivity owing to the requirements of the spectral overlap between the CDs and Tc, showing high promise in sensing chemistry with an efficient response and economic effect. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and additional figures (Fig. S1-S9). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08177g

  20. Preparation of novel carbon microfiber/carbon nanofiber-dispersed polyvinyl alcohol-based nanocomposite material for lithium-ion electrolyte battery separator.

    Sharma, Ajit K; Khare, Prateek; Singh, Jayant K; Verma, Nishith

    2013-04-01

    A novel nanocomposite polyvinyl alcohol precursor-based material dispersed with the web of carbon microfibers and carbon nanofibers is developed as lithium (Li)-ion electrolyte battery separator. The primary synthesis steps of the separator material consist of esterification of polyvinyl acetate to produce polyvinyl alcohol gel, ball-milling of the surfactant dispersed carbon micro-nanofibers, mixing of the milled micron size (~500 nm) fibers to the reactant mixture at the incipience of the polyvinyl alcohol gel formation, and the mixing of hydrophobic reagents along with polyethylene glycol as a plasticizer, to produce a thin film of ~25 ?m. The produced film, uniformly dispersed with carbon micro-nanofibers, has dramatically improved performance as a battery separator, with the ion conductivity of the electrolytes (LiPF6) saturated film measured as 0.119 S-cm(-1), approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of polyvinyl alcohol. The other primary characteristics of the produced film, such as tensile strength, contact angle, and thermal stability, are also found to be superior to the materials made of other precursors, including polypropylene and polyethylene, discussed in the literature. The method of producing the films in this study is novel, simple, environmentally benign, and economically viable. PMID:23827627

  1. Highly active and stable platinum catalyst supported on porous carbon nanofibers for improved performance of PEMFC

    Porous carbon nanofibers (PCNFs) were used as the support to prepare platinum (Pt) catalyst (Pt/PCNFs) for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. As a comparison, Pt supported on carbon black (Vulcan XC-72) (Pt/Vulcan) was also synthesized by the same ethylene glycol reduction method. Platinum was more uniformly deposited on PCNFs than that on the Vulcan XC-72. The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the resultant catalysts along with the commercial one (JM20) were investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) with a rotating disk electrode (RDE). The Pt/PCNFs exhibited much-enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability compared with the Pt/Vulcan and JM20. The mass activity (at 0.80 V) of Pt/PCNFs is 2.6 times higher and 20% higher than that of Pt/Vulcan and JM20, respectively; the Pt/PCNFs retained about 50% of ECSA whereas JM20 and Pt/Vulcan kept only 25% and 5% of ECSA, respectively, even after 1000 cycles. Furthermore, the single cell performance of Pt/PCNFs was superior to that of Pt/Vulcan and even better than JM20 during high current densities. The cross-section of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) showed that the Pt/PCNFs construct a loose three-dimensionally connected catalyst layer that is totally different from the tightly stacking catalyst layer composed of carbon black support. Thus, the mass transfer resistance is reduced and water drainage becomes easy when Pt/PCNFs were used as cathode catalyst. These results indicate PCNFs a promising candidate as catalyst supports for the enhancement of PEMFC performance

  2. High-capacity Li2Mn0.8Fe0.2SiO4/carbon composite nanofiber cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Zhang, Shu; Li, Ying; Xu, Guanjie; Li, Shuli; Lu, Yao; Toprakci, Ozan; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2012-09-01

    Li2MnSiO4 has been considered as a promising cathode material with an extremely high theoretically capacity of 332 mAh g-1. However, due to its low intrinsic conductivity and poor structural stability, only about half of the theoretical capacity has been realized in practice and the capacity decays rapidly during cycling. To realize the high capacity and improve the cycling performance, Li2Mn0.8Fe0.2SiO4/carbon composite nanofibers were prepared by the combination of iron doping and electrospinning. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electronic microscope were applied to characterize the Li2Mn0.8Fe0.2SiO4/carbon nanofibers. It was found that Li2Mn0.8Fe0.2SiO4 nanoparticles were embedded into continuous carbon nanofiber matrices, which formed free-standing porous mats that could be used as binder-free cathodes. The iron doping improved the conductivity and purity of the active material, and the carbon nanofiber matrix facilitated ion transfer and charge diffusion. As a result, Li2Mn0.8Fe0.2SiO4/carbon nanofiber cathodes showed promising improvement on reversible capacity and cycling performance.

  3. Size-selectivity and anomalous subdiffusion of nanoparticles through carbon nanofiber-based membranes

    A simulation is presented here that serves the dual functions of generating a nanoporous membrane replica and executing the Brownian motion of nanoparticles through the virtual membrane. Specifically, the concentration profile of a dilute solution of fluorescent particles in a stochastic and SiO2-coated carbon nanofiber (oxCNF), nanoporous membrane was simulated. The quality of the simulated profile was determined by comparing the results with experimental concentration profiles. The experimental concentration profiles were collected adjacent to the oxCNF membrane surface from time-lapse fluorescence microscopy images. The simulation proved ideal as an accurate predictor of particle diffusion-the simulated concentration profile merged with the experimental profiles at the inlet/exit surfaces of the oxCNF membrane. In particular, the oxCNF barrier was found to hinder the transport of 50 and 100 nm particles and transmembrane trajectories were indicative of anomalous subdiffusion; the diffusion coefficient was found to be a function of time and space

  4. Synthesis and electrochemical performance of carbon nanofiber-cobalt oxide composites

    Carbon nanofiber (CNF) supported cobalt oxide composites as high-capacity anode materials were prepared through a facile, effective method for potential use in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The effects of the calcining temperature on the crystallinity, grain size, specific surface area of Co3O4 and phase transformation from Co3O4 to CoO were studied in detail. Both the specific surface area and CNF content in CNF-cobalt oxide composites strongly affect the electrochemical performance of these series composites. The CNF-Co3O4 composite with 24.3% CNF pyrolyzed at 500 deg. C in Ar shows an excellent cycling performance, retaining a specific capacity of 881 mAh g-1 beyond 100 cycles. Homogeneous deposition and distribution of nanosized Co3O4 particles on the surface of CNF can stabilize the electronic and ionic conductivity as well as the morphology of Co3O4 phase, which may be the main reason for the markedly improved electrochemical performance

  5. Enhanced performance in dye-sensitized solar cells via carbon nanofibers-platinum composite counter electrodes.

    Poudel, Prashant; Zhang, Lifeng; Joshi, Prakash; Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Fong, Hao; Qiao, Qiquan

    2012-08-01

    A composite counter electrode (CE) made of electrospun carbon nanofibers (ECNs) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles has been demonstrated for the first time to improve the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The new ECN-Pt composite CE exhibited a more efficient electro-catalytic performance with lower charge transfer resistance (R(ct)), larger surface area, and faster reaction rate than those of conventional Pt. It reduced the overall series resistance (R(se)), decreased dark saturation current density (J(0)) and increased shunt resistance (R(sh)) of the DSCs, thereby leading to a higher fill factor (FF) and larger open circuit voltage (V(oc)). The reduced electron transport resistance (R(s)) and faster charge transfer rate in the CE led to a smaller overall cell series resistance (R(se)) in the ECN-Pt composite based DSCs. The DSCs based on an ECN-Pt CE achieved a η of ∼8%, which was improved over those of pure Pt or ECN based cells. PMID:22743819

  6. Three-Dimensional Force Sensing Device Using Carbon Nanofiber Polymer Composites: Design and Fabrication

    Chang, Fuh-Yu; Liu, Chia-Ming; Chen, Tse-Min; Chen, Chia-Ming; Lin, Yu-Hsien; Huang, Shu-Jiuan

    2012-06-01

    We propose an innovative three-dimensional force sensing device fabricated with carbon nanofiber (CNF) polymer composites. The device has four piezoresistive strain sensors made onto a polyimide substrate using surface patterning treatment and tilted-drop process with CNF polymer solutions. The proposed design and fabrication process is simpler than that of other three-dimensional force sensors and the device is suitable for mass production. The fabricated strain sensor properties using CNF polymer solutions with different composition ratios were investigated. An equation was derived using simple percolation theory to predict the conductivity of CNF polymer composites. The measured gauge factors were in the 4.84 to 17.68 range for CNF polymer composites with CNF 8.85-45.2 wt %. A programmable system on chip (PSoC) with built-in operational (OP) amplifier, analog-to-digital (AD) converter and multiplexer was used to develop a scanning and analyzing circuit for the three-dimensional force sensing device. The proposed integrated system was successfully applied to control a computer screen cursor.

  7. Polyaniline-carbon nanofiber composite by a chemical grafting approach and its supercapacitor application.

    Kotal, Moumita; Thakur, Awalendra K; Bhowmick, Anil K

    2013-09-11

    Unlike conventional routes by van der Waals forces, a facile and novel approach using covalent bonding is established in the present work to synthesize polyaniline (PANI)-grafted carbon nanofiber (CNF) composites as promising supercapacitors. For this purpose, toluenediisocyanate was initially functionalized to carboxylated CNF via amidation followed by reaction with excess aniline to form a urea derivative and residual aniline, which was subsequently polymerized and grafted with a urea derivative. Amidation of CNF (TCNF) and, consequently, the grafting of PANI on TCNF were verified by IR, Raman, 1H NMR, X-ray photoelectron, and UV-visible spectroscopic methods, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. Morphological analysis revealed uniform distribution of PANI on the surface of TCNF, indicating strong interaction between them. Electrochemical tests of the composite containing 6 wt % TCNF demonstrated efficient capacitance of ∼557 F g(-1) with a capacity retention of 86% of its initial capacitance even after 2000 charge-discharge cycles at a current density of 0.3 A g(-1), suggesting its superiority compared to the materials formed by van der Waals forces. The remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance showed the importance of the phenyl-substituted amide linkage in the development of a π-conjugated structure, which facilitated charge transfer and, consequently, made it attractive for efficient supercapacitors. PMID:23911041

  8. Relationship Between Structure and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of a Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Elastomeric Nanocomposite

    The tensile and dynamic mechanical properties of a nanocomposite, containing modified carbon nanofibers (MCNFs) homogenously dispersed in an elastomeric ethylene/propylene (EP) copolymer semicrystalline matrix (84.3 wt% P), have been correlated with the structure development. These properties were characterized by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction during stretching, dynamic mechanical analysis and X-ray analysis techniques over a wide temperature range. Upon sequential drawing, the tensile strength of the nanocomposite film was notably higher than that of the unfilled polymer even though both samples exhibited a similar amount of crystal fraction and the same degree of crystal orientation, revealing the effect of nanofiller reinforcement in the semicrystalline matrix. The mechanical spectra of the 10 wt% MCNF filled samples in both stretched and non-stretched states showed broadening of the elastic modulus at high temperatures, where the corresponding crystallinity index also decreased. It is conceivable that a significant fraction of chain orientation is induced in the vicinity of the nanofillers during stretching, and these stretched chains with reduced mobility significantly enhance the thermal mechanical properties

  9. Dielectric properties and conductivity of carbon nanofiber/semi-crystalline polymer composites

    The properties of semi-crystalline polymer nanocomposites are affected by the nanofillers directly and indirectly, as two phases, i.e., crystalline and amorphous, exist in the polymer. The effects of nanofillers on the two phases could be competitive. The dielectric properties and conductivity of carbon nanofibers (CNF)/semi-crystalline polymer nanocomposites are studied in this paper. CNF/polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites are prepared in experiment by melt blending. The resulting morphology and crystalline structure are characterized by means of differential scanning calorimetry, wide angle X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The PP nanocomposite containing 5 wt.% CNF exhibits a surprisingly high dielectric constant under wide sweep frequencies attended by low dielectric loss. Its dielectric constant is >600 under lower frequency, and remains >200 at a frequency of 4000 Hz. The electrical and thermal conductivities of the nanocomposites are studied, and enhancements are seen with increased CNF content. Theoretical analyses on the physical properties are carried out by applying the existing models. Research results indicate that a common commercial plastic with good comprehensive performance, which exhibited the potential for applications in advanced electronics, was obtained by a simple industry benign technique

  10. Hierarchically mesoporous CuO/carbon nanofiber coaxial shell-core nanowires for lithium ion batteries.

    Park, Seok-Hwan; Lee, Wan-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchically mesoporous CuO/carbon nanofiber coaxial shell-core nanowires (CuO/CNF) as anodes for lithium ion batteries were prepared by coating the Cu2(NO3)(OH)3 on the surface of conductive and elastic CNF via electrophoretic deposition (EPD), followed by thermal treatment in air. The CuO shell stacked with nanoparticles grows radially toward the CNF core, which forms hierarchically mesoporous three-dimensional (3D) coaxial shell-core structure with abundant inner spaces in nanoparticle-stacked CuO shell. The CuO shells with abundant inner spaces on the surface of CNF and high conductivity of 1D CNF increase mainly electrochemical rate capability. The CNF core with elasticity plays an important role in strongly suppressing radial volume expansion by inelastic CuO shell by offering the buffering effect. The CuO/CNF nanowires deliver an initial capacity of 1150?mAh?g(-1) at 100?mA?g(-1) and maintain a high reversible capacity of 772?mAh?g(-1) without showing obvious decay after 50?cycles. PMID:25944615

  11. Carbon Nanofiber Arrays: A Novel Tool for Microdelivery of Biomolecules to Plants

    Davern, Sandra M.; McKnight, Timothy E.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Shpak, Elena D.; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Jelenska, Joanna; Greenberg, Jean T.; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2016-01-01

    Effective methods for delivering bioprobes into the cells of intact plants are essential for investigating diverse biological processes. Increasing research on trees, such as Populus spp., for bioenergy applications is driving the need for techniques that work well with tree species. This report introduces vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) arrays as a new tool for microdelivery of labeled molecules to Populus leaf tissue and whole plants. We demonstrated that VACNFs penetrate the leaf surface to deliver sub-microliter quantities of solution containing fluorescent or radiolabeled molecules into Populus leaf cells. Importantly, VACNFs proved to be gentler than abrasion with carborundum, a common way to introduce material into leaves. Unlike carborundum, VACNFs did not disrupt cell or tissue integrity, nor did they induce production of hydrogen peroxide, a typical wound response. We show that femtomole to picomole quantities of labeled molecules (fluorescent dyes, small proteins and dextran), ranging from 0.5–500 kDa, can be introduced by VACNFs, and we demonstrate the use of the approach to track delivered probes from their site of introduction on the leaf to distal plant regions. VACNF arrays thus offer an attractive microdelivery method for the introduction of biomolecules and other probes into trees and potentially other types of plants. PMID:27119338

  12. Heterometal nanoparticles from Ru-based molecular clusters covalently anchored onto functionalized carbon nanotubes and nanofibers

    Deborah Vidick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Heterometal clusters containing Ru and Au, Co and/or Pt are anchored onto carbon nanotubes and nanofibers functionalized with chelating phosphine groups. The cluster anchoring yield is related to the amount of phosphine groups available on the nanocarbon surface. The ligands of the anchored molecular species are then removed by gentle thermal treatment in order to form nanoparticles. In the case of Au-containing clusters, removal of gold atoms from the clusters and agglomeration leads to a bimodal distribution of nanoparticles at the nanocarbon surface. In the case of Ru–Pt species, anchoring occurs without reorganization through a ligand exchange mechanism. After thermal treatment, ultrasmall (1–3 nm bimetal Ru–Pt nanoparticles are formed on the surface of the nanocarbons. Characterization by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM confirms their bimetal nature on the nanoscale. The obtained bimetal nanoparticles supported on nanocarbon were tested as catalysts in ammonia synthesis and are shown to be active at low temperature and atmospheric pressure with very low Ru loading.

  13. Polyaniline/carbon nanofiber and organic charge transfer complex based composite electrode for electroanalytical urea detection

    Das, Gautam; Yoon, Hyon Hee

    2015-06-01

    A composite electrode based on polyaniline coated modified carbon nanofiber (PANI-mCNF), tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) and urease (Ur) enzyme was evaluated as biosensor for urea detection. Homogeneous coating of PANI on the surface of mCNF was achieved by oxidative polymerization of anilium ion. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were used to analyze the structural and morphological characteristics of PANI-mCNF nanocomposite. The biosensor showed excellent electroactivity in neutral and basic medium. A linear response to urea in the concentration range of 0.5-8.4 mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.998, good sensitivity (2.84 A cm-2 mM-1) and a fast response time (ca. 4 s) was obtained for the biosensor. The minimum detection limit was found to be 3 M. The biosensor was stable and showed minimal loss in sensitivity, even after two months of storage. The amalgamation of the PANI and CNF synergistically enhances the performance of the biosensor for electroanalytical detection of urea.

  14. Bending actuation in a single-layer carbon-nanofiber/polypyrrole composite film and its fabrication

    Thin CNF/PPy composite single-layer films were produced by the electrophoretic deposition and polymerization process which was developed for this study. It was demonstrated that the films could generate a bending motion subjected to an actuating electric voltage even though they consisted of only single-layer. Carbon nanofiber and polypyrrole composite films were obtained from only one side of a working electrode. Several different CNF/PPy films were synthesized, as varying the CNF weight ratios from 3%, 5%, and 7% to 10%. Conductivity of pure PPy and CNF/PPy composite films were measured. Conductivity of the films is improved linearly from 77.9S/cm (pure PPy film) to 124.3 S/cm (10% CNF/PPy) as the CNF weight ratio increases. Adding CNF was effective for improving the conductivity of PPy. As results of electromechanical actuation tests with the films, it was noticed that the strain of the films was reduced a little as the CNF weight ratio increased. Bending motions were observed for both PPy and CNF/PPy films subjected to a voltage. The tip bending deflections was in the range of 0.5 mm to 2 mm. CNF/PPy films showed a great potential to be a good candidate for small light actuators

  15. Preparation of Surface Adsorbed and Impregnated Multi-walled Carbon Nanotube/Nylon-6 Nanofiber Composites and Investigation of their Gas Sensing Ability

    Velmurugan Thavasi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We have prepared electrospun Nylon-6 nanofibers via electrospinning, and adsorbed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs onto the surface of Nylon-6 fibers using Triton® X-100 to form a MWCNTs/Nylon-6 nanofiber composite. The dispersed MWCNTs have been found to be stable in hexafluoroisopropanol for several months without precipitation. A MWCNTs/Nylon-6 nanofiber composite based chemical sensor has demonstrated its responsiveness towards a wide range of solvent vapours at room temperature and only mg quantities of MWCNTs were expended. The large surface area and porous nature of the electrospun Nylon-6/MWCNT nanofibers facilitates greater analyte permeability. The experimental analysis has indicated that the dipole moment, functional group and vapour pressure of the analytes determine the magnitude of the responsiveness.

  16. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/carbon composite nanofiber absorber with enhanced microwave absorption performance

    Zhang, Ting [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Daqing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Yang, Ying [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu, E-mail: fykang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gu, Jialin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PAN/AAI/DMF solutions for electrospinning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/carbon composite nanofibers as microwave absorbers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave absorption performance has been much enhanced than pure carbon naonfibers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave absorption mechanisms have been discussed as a key point. - Abstract: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/carbon composite nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/acetyl acetone iron (AAI)/dimethyl formamide (DMF) solution, followed by stabilization and carbonization. SEM and TEM observations reveal that the fibers are lengthy and uniform, and are loaded with well-distributed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, which are evidenced by XRD. Electrical and magnetic properties of the samples were studied to show the effect of enhancement of electrical conductivity and magnetic hysteresis performance. Finally, the permittivity and permeability parameters were measured by a vector network analyzer, and the reflectivity loss was calculated based on Transmission Line Theory. Results show that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C composite nanofibers exhibit enhanced properties of microwave absorption as compared to those of pure carbon nanofibers by: decreasing reflectivity loss values; widening absorption width and improving performance in low frequency (2-5 GHz) absorption. Absorption properties can be tuned by changing AAI content, carbonization temperature, composite fiber/paraffin ratio and coating thickness. It is shown that with coating thickness of 5 mm and fiber/paraffin ratio of 5 wt.%, the bandwidth for reflection loss under -5 dB can reach a maximum of 12-13 GHz in the range of 2-18 GHz, accompanying with a minimum reflection loss of -40 to -45 dB, and preferred low frequency band absorption can also be obtained. The mechanisms for the enhanced absorption performance were briefly discussed. It is supposed that this kind of composite material is promising for resolving the problems of weak absorption in the low frequency range and narrow bandwidth absorption.

  17. Optimization of a porous carbon nanofiber layer for the membrane electrode assembly in DMFC

    Highlights: • Nano-materials carbon-based electrodes are able to improve the performance of the electrodes. • Thus, this study is statistically optimizing the preparation of a CNF support for anode. • Finally, this study obtains a high performance DMFC at 21.90 mW cm−2 after the optimization. - Abstract: The performance of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is strongly influenced by the components in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA), which include a membrane, anode and cathode. The use of nano-materials to improve the performance of fuel cells has attracted the interest of researchers. The incorporation of nano-materials into these carbon-based electrodes is able to improve the performance of the electrodes. The aim of this study is to determine and optimize the parameter effecting the preparation of a nano-structured anode for high power density DMFCs. The two parameters investigated in this study were the Nafion content and the carbon loading. Both the traditional one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) and the response surface methodology (RSM) optimization techniques were used to determine the optimum parameters. The results from the OFAT study indicated that the possible optimum levels for the Nafion content and carbon nanofiber (CNF) loading range from 2.7 to 3.5 mg cm−2 and 2.5 to 3.5 mg cm−2, respectively. A quadratic model was developed based on the RSM results, and an analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that the model provides a good fit to the experimental data. This result indicated that the developed model successfully predicted the response with good accuracy. The maximum power density (response) was predicted and experimentally validated using the optimum composition of a 3.04 mg cm−2 Nafion content and 2.91 mg cm−2 carbon loading. The model validation revealed that the experimental value obtained under the optimum conditions (21.90 mW cm−2) was in good agreement with the values predicted by the model (22.64 mW cm−2)

  18. Optimized electrospinning synthesis of iron-nitrogen-carbon nanofibers for high electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction in alkaline medium

    Yan, Xingxu; Liu, Kexi; Wang, Xiangqing; Wang, Tuo; Luo, Jun; Zhu, Jing

    2015-04-01

    To achieve iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) nanofibers with excellent electrocatalysis for replacing high-cost Pt-based catalysts in the cathodes of fuel cells and metal-air batteries, we have investigated and evaluated the effects of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) concentration and the proportion of iron to PAN, along with voltage and flow rate during the electrospinning process, and thus proposed three criteria to optimize these parameters for ideal nanofiber catalysts. The best half-wave potential of an optimized catalysts is 0.82 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode in an alkaline medium, which reaches the best range of the non-precious-metal catalysts reported and is very close to that of commercial Pt/C catalysts. Furthermore, the electron-transfer number of our catalysts is superior to that of the Pt/C, indicating the catalysts undergo a four-electron process. The durability of the optimized Fe-N-C nanofibers is also better than that of the Pt/C, which is attributed to the homogeneous distribution of the active sites in our catalysts.

  19. Electrospun polyamide 6/poly(allylamine hydrochloride) nanofibers functionalized with carbon nanotubes for electrochemical detection of dopamine.

    Mercante, Luiza A; Pavinatto, Adriana; Iwaki, Leonardo E O; Scagion, Vanessa P; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Mattoso, Luiz H C; Correa, Daniel S

    2015-03-01

    The use of nanomaterials as an electroactive medium has improved the performance of bio/chemical sensors, particularly when synergy is reached upon combining distinct materials. In this paper, we report on a novel architecture comprising electrospun polyamide 6/poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PA6/PAH) nanofibers functionalized with multiwalled carbon nanotubes, used to detect the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA). Miscibility of PA6 and PAH was sufficient to form a single phase material, as indicated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), leading to nanofibers with no beads onto which the nanotubes could adsorb strongly. Differential pulse voltammetry was employed with indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes coated with the functionalized nanofibers for the selective electrochemical detection of dopamine (DA), with no interference from uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) that are normally present in biological fluids. The response was linear for a DA concentration range from 1 to 70 ?mol L(-1), with detection limit of 0.15 ?mol L(-1) (S/N = 3). The concepts behind the novel architecture to modify electrodes can be potentially harnessed in other electrochemical sensors and biosensors. PMID:25644325

  20. A facile route for controlled alignment of carbon nanotube-reinforced, electrospun nanofibers using slotted collector plates

    G. R. Rakesh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A facile route for controlled alignment of electrospun multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT-reinforced Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA nanofibers using slotted collector geometries has been realized. The process is based on analytical predictions using electrostatic field analysis for envisaging the extent of alignment of the electrospun fibers on varied collector geometries. Both the experimental and theoretical studies clearly indicate that the introduction of an insulating region into a conductive collector significantly influences the electrostatic forces acting on a charged fiber. Among various collector geometries, rectangular slotted collectors with circular ends showed good fiber alignment over a large collecting area. The electrospun fibers produced by this process were characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Optical Microscopy. Effects of electrospinning time and slot widths on the fiber alignment have been analyzed. PVA-MWCNT nanofibers were found to be conducting in nature owing to the presence of reinforced MWCNTs in PVA matrix. The method can enable the direct integration of aligned nanofibers with controllable configurations, and significantly simplify the production of nanofibersbased devices.

  1. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanocoil Array Integrated on Carbon Nanofiber Paper for Supercapacitor Electrodes.

    Choi, Won Ho; Choi, Mi Jin; Bang, Jin Ho

    2015-09-01

    Integrating a nanostructured carbon array on a conductive substrate remains a challenging task that presently relies primarily on high-vacuum deposition technology. To overcome the problems associated with current vacuum techniques, we demonstrate the formation of an N-doped carbon array by pyrolysis of a polymer array that was electrochemically grown on carbon fiber paper. The resulting carbon array was investigated for use as a supercapacitor electrode. In-depth surface characterization results revealed that the microtextural properties, surface functionalities, and degree of nitrogen incorporated into the N-doped carbon array can be delicately controlled by manipulating carbonization temperatures. Furthermore, electrochemical measurements showed that subtle changes in these physical properties resulted in significant changes in the capacitive behavior of the N-doped carbon array. Pore structures and nitrogen/oxygen functional groups, which are favorable for charge storage, were formed at low carbonization temperatures. This result showed the importance of having a comprehensive understanding of how the surface characteristics of carbon affect its capacitive performance. When utilized as a substrate in a pseudocapacitive electrode material, the N-doped carbon array maximizes capacitive performance by simultaneously achieving high gravimetric and areal capacitances due to its large surface area and high electrical conductivity. PMID:26264641

  2. Graphene Folding in Si Rich Carbon Nanofibers for Highly Stable, High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes.

    Fei, Ling; Williams, Brian P; Yoo, Sang H; Kim, Jangwoo; Shoorideh, Ghazal; Joo, Yong Lak

    2016-03-01

    Silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs) wrapped by graphene in carbon nanofibers were obtained via electrospinning and subsequent thermal treatment. In this study, water-soluble poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) with low carbon yield is selected to make the process water-based and to achieve a high silicon yield in the composite. It was also found that increasing the amount of graphene helps keep the PVA fiber morphology after carbonization, while forming a graphene network. The fiber SEM and HRTEM images reveal that micrometer graphene is heavily folded into sub-micron scale fibers during electrospinning, while Si NPs are incorporated into the folds with nanospace in between. When applied to lithium-ion battery anodes, the Si/graphene/carbon nanofiber composites show a high reversible capacity of ?2300 mAh g(-1) at a charging rate of 100 mA/g and a stable capacity of 1191 mAh g(-1) at 1 A/g after more than 200 cycles. The interconnected graphene network not only ensures the excellent conductivity but also serves as a buffering matrix for the mechanic stress caused by volume change; the nanospace between Si NPs and folded graphene provides the space needed for volume expansion. PMID:26853163

  3. The Cellulose Nanofibers for Optoelectronic Conversion and Energy Storage

    Yongfeng Luo; Jianxiong Zhang; Xi Li; Chunrong Liao; Xianjun Li

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose widely exists in plant tissues. Due to the large pores between the cellulose units, the regular paper is nontransparent that cannot be used in the optoelectronic devices. But some chemical and physical methods such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) oxidation can be used to improve the pores scale between the cellulose units to reach nanometer level. The cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) have good mechanical strength, flexibility, thermostability, and low thermal expa...

  4. Hybrid Composite Materials Aluminum – Carbon Nanostructures

    Tatiana KOLTSOVA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated formation of carbon nanofibers grown by chemical deposition (CVD method using an acetylene-hydrogen mixture on the surface of micron-sized aluminum powder particles. To obtain uniform distribution of the carbon nanostructures on the particles we deposited nickel catalyst on the surface by spraying from the aqueous solution of nickel nitrate. It was found that increasing the time of the synthesis lowers the rate of growth of carbon nanostructures due to the deactivation of the catalyst. The Raman spectroscopy measurements confirm the presence of disordered carbon corresponding to CNFs in the specimen. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of aluminum carbide in the hot pressed samples. An aluminum composite material prepared using 1 wt.% CNFs obtained by uniaxial cold pressing and sintering showed 30 % increase in the hardness compared to pure aluminum, whereas the composites prepared by hot pressing showed 80 % increase in the hardness. Composite materials have satisfactory ductility. Thus, the aluminum based material reinforced with carbon nanostructures should be appropriate for creating high-strength and light compacts for aerospace and automotive applications and power engineering.

  5. Effect of Wrapped Carbon Nanotubes on Optical Properties, Morphology, and Thermal Stability of Electrospun Poly(vinyl alcohol) Composite Nanofibers

    Naoual Diouri; Mimouna Baitoul; Malik Maaza

    2013-01-01

    Electrospinning was used to elaborate poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers in the presence of embedded multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in surfactant and polymer. MWCNTs were dispersed in aqueous solution using both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as surfactant and Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). Changing the surfactant and polymer concentration reveals that the maximum dispersion achievable is corresponding to the mass ratios MWCNTs : SDS—1 : 5 and MWCNTs : SDS : PVP—1 : 5 : 0.6 in the presen...

  6. Electrical properties and shape-memory behavior of self-assembled carbon nanofiber nanopaper incorporated with shape-memory polymer

    The present paper studies the electrical and shape-memory behavior of self-assembled carbon nanofiber (CNF) nanopaper incorporated with shape-memory polymer (SMP). The morphology and structure of the self-assembled nanopapers were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A continuous and compact network was observed from the SEM images, which indicates that the CNF nanopaper could have highly conductive properties. The electrical conductivity of the CNF nanopaper was measured by the four-point probe method and its temperature coefficient effect was studied. Finally, the actuation of SMP was demonstrated by the electrical resistive heating of the CNF nanopaper

  7. Isolation and characterization of cellulose nanofibers from culinary banana peel using high-intensity ultrasonication combined with chemical treatment.

    Khawas, Prerna; Deka, Sankar C

    2016-02-10

    In the present study, culinary banana peel was explored as a source of raw material for production of cellulose nanofibers (CNFs). For isolation of CNFs, first the peel flour was subjected to different chemical treatments to eliminate non-cellulosic compounds. The obtained chemically treated cellulose fibers were then mechanically tailored and separated into nanofibers using high-intensity ultrasonication at different output power ranging from 0 to 1000W. The presences of nanofibers in all samples were confirmed by TEM. Increasing output power of ultrasonication reduced size of CNFs and generated more thinner and needle-like structure. SEM, FT-IR and XRD results indicated chemical treatment employed was effective in removing compounds other than cellulose fibers. Thermal analyses evinced the developed CNFs enhanced thermal properties which serve the purpose as an effective reinforcing material to be used as bionanocomposites. Hence, the production of CNFs from this underutilized agro-waste has potential application in commercial field that can add high value to culinary banana. PMID:26686170

  8. Catalytical growth of carbon nanotubes/fibers from nanocatalysts prepared by laser pulverization of nickel sulfate

    Dispersed nickel sulfate (NiSO4) microclusters on Si substrates were fragmented by pulsed excimer laser irradiation to serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube/nanofiber (CNT/CNF) growth. At proper fluences, NiSO4 clusters were pulverized into nanoparticles. The sizes of clusters/nanoparticles were found to be dependent on laser fluence and laser pulse number. By increasing the laser fluence from 100 to 300 mJ/cm2, the size of disintegrated particles decreased drastically from several micrometers to several nanometers. It was found that laser-induced disintegration of as-dispersed NiSO4 clusters was mainly due to physical fragmentation by transient thermal expansion/contraction. Thermal melting of nanoparticles in a multipulse regime was also suggested. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) was used for growth of CNTs from the pulsed-laser treated catalysts. For samples irradiated at 100 and 200 mJ/cm2, CNFs were dominant products. These CNFs grew radially out of big NiSO4 clusters, forming dendritic CNF bunches. For samples irradiated at 300 mJ/cm2, dense multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNFs) with uniform diameters were obtained. It is suggested that elemental Ni was formed through thermal decomposition of NiSO4 clusters/nanoparticles during HFCVD. The size and the shape of the Ni aggregation, which were determined by the initial size of NiSO4 clusters/nanoparticles, might affect the preference in the synthesis of CNTs or CNFs

  9. CoO-carbon nanofiber networks prepared by electrospinning as binder-free anode materials for lithium-ion batteries with enhanced properties

    Zhang, Ming; Uchaker, Evan; Hu, Shan; Zhang, Qifeng; Wang, Taihong; Cao, Guozhong; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-11-01

    CoOx-carbon nanofiber networks were prepared from cobalt(ii) acetate and polyacrylonitrile by an electrospinning method followed by thermal treatment. The XPS results demonstrated that the cobalt compound in CoOx-carbon obtained at 650 C was CoO rather than Co or Co3O4. The CoO nanoparticles with diameters of about 8 nm were homogeneously distributed in the matrix of the nanofibers with diameters of 200 nm. As binder-free anodes for lithium-ion batteries, the discharge capacities of such CoO-carbon (CoO-C) composite nanofiber networks increased with the pyrolysis and annealing temperature, and the highest value was 633 mA h g-1 after 52 cycles at a current density of 0.1 A g-1 when the CoO-C was obtained at 650 C. In addition, the rate capacities of the CoO-C obtained at 650 C were found to be higher than that of the sample annealed at a lower temperature and pure carbon nanofiber networks annealed at 650 C. The improved properties of CoO-C nanofiber networks were ascribed to nanofibers as the framework to keep the structural stability, and favorable mass and charge transport. The present study may provide a new strategy for the synthesis of binder-free anodes for lithium-ion batteries with excellent properties.CoOx-carbon nanofiber networks were prepared from cobalt(ii) acetate and polyacrylonitrile by an electrospinning method followed by thermal treatment. The XPS results demonstrated that the cobalt compound in CoOx-carbon obtained at 650 C was CoO rather than Co or Co3O4. The CoO nanoparticles with diameters of about 8 nm were homogeneously distributed in the matrix of the nanofibers with diameters of 200 nm. As binder-free anodes for lithium-ion batteries, the discharge capacities of such CoO-carbon (CoO-C) composite nanofiber networks increased with the pyrolysis and annealing temperature, and the highest value was 633 mA h g-1 after 52 cycles at a current density of 0.1 A g-1 when the CoO-C was obtained at 650 C. In addition, the rate capacities of the CoO-C obtained at 650 C were found to be higher than that of the sample annealed at a lower temperature and pure carbon nanofiber networks annealed at 650 C. The improved properties of CoO-C nanofiber networks were ascribed to nanofibers as the framework to keep the structural stability, and favorable mass and charge transport. The present study may provide a new strategy for the synthesis of binder-free anodes for lithium-ion batteries with excellent properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03931e

  10. Photocatalysis of sub-ppm limonene over multiwalled carbon nanotubes/titania composite nanofiber under visible-light irradiation

    Highlights: • A multiwalled carbon nanotube/titania composite nanofiber (MTCN) was synthesized. • Photocatalytic function of visible-activated MTCN was examined using tubular reactor. • MTCNs could be effectively used for the purification of sub-ppm gas-phase limonene. • The experimental results agreed well with Langmuir–Hinshelwood model. • Certain gas-phase intermediates were determined, but not for adsorbed intermediates. - Abstract: This study was conducted under visible-light exposure to investigate the photocatalytic characteristics of a multiwalled carbon nanotube/titania (TiO2) composite nanofiber (MTCN) using a continuous-flow tubular reactor. The MTCN was prepared by a sol–gel process, followed by an electrospinning technique. The photocatalytic decomposition efficiency for limonene on the MTCN was higher than those obtained from reference TiO2 nanofibers or P25 TiO2, and the experimental results agreed well with the Langmuir–Hinshelwood model. The CO concentrations generated during the photocatalysis did not reach levels toxic to humans. The mineralization efficiency for limonene on the MTCN was also higher than that for P25 TiO2. Moreover, the mineralization efficiency obtained using the MTCN increased steeply from 8.3 to 91.1% as the residence time increased from 7.8 to 78.0 s, compared to the increase in the decomposition efficiencies for limonene from 90.1 to 99.9%. Three gas-phase intermediates (methacrolein, acetic acid, and limonene oxide) were quantitatively determined for the photocatalysis for limonene over the MTCN, whereas only two intermediates (acetic acid and limonene oxide) were quantitatively determined over P25 TiO2. Other provisional gas-phase intermediates included cyclopropyl methyl ketone and 2-ethylbutanal

  11. Photocatalysis of sub-ppm limonene over multiwalled carbon nanotubes/titania composite nanofiber under visible-light irradiation

    Jo, Wan-Kuen, E-mail: wkjo@knu.ac.kr; Kang, Hyun-Jung

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • A multiwalled carbon nanotube/titania composite nanofiber (MTCN) was synthesized. • Photocatalytic function of visible-activated MTCN was examined using tubular reactor. • MTCNs could be effectively used for the purification of sub-ppm gas-phase limonene. • The experimental results agreed well with Langmuir–Hinshelwood model. • Certain gas-phase intermediates were determined, but not for adsorbed intermediates. - Abstract: This study was conducted under visible-light exposure to investigate the photocatalytic characteristics of a multiwalled carbon nanotube/titania (TiO{sub 2}) composite nanofiber (MTCN) using a continuous-flow tubular reactor. The MTCN was prepared by a sol–gel process, followed by an electrospinning technique. The photocatalytic decomposition efficiency for limonene on the MTCN was higher than those obtained from reference TiO{sub 2} nanofibers or P25 TiO{sub 2}, and the experimental results agreed well with the Langmuir–Hinshelwood model. The CO concentrations generated during the photocatalysis did not reach levels toxic to humans. The mineralization efficiency for limonene on the MTCN was also higher than that for P25 TiO{sub 2}. Moreover, the mineralization efficiency obtained using the MTCN increased steeply from 8.3 to 91.1% as the residence time increased from 7.8 to 78.0 s, compared to the increase in the decomposition efficiencies for limonene from 90.1 to 99.9%. Three gas-phase intermediates (methacrolein, acetic acid, and limonene oxide) were quantitatively determined for the photocatalysis for limonene over the MTCN, whereas only two intermediates (acetic acid and limonene oxide) were quantitatively determined over P25 TiO{sub 2}. Other provisional gas-phase intermediates included cyclopropyl methyl ketone and 2-ethylbutanal.

  12. A structural study and magnetic properties of electrospun carbon/manganese ferrite (C/MnFe2O4) composite nanofibers

    Kidkhunthod, Pinit; Nilmoung, Sukanya; Mahakot, Sompin; Rodporn, Somboonsub; Phumying, Santi; Maensiri, Santi

    2016-03-01

    Carbon/manganese ferrite (C/MnFe2O4) composite nanofibers were fabricated using electrospinning technique followed by carbonization process under mixed of air and argon atmosphere at 400, 600 and 800 °C, respectively. The prepared composite nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). After calcination at 800 °C, the composite nanofibers of C/MnFe2O4 were obtained with a mean diameter of nanofibers of approximately 700-800 nm. The structure of MnFe2O4 was successfully studied using XAS technique and was found to be cubic spinel with a coupling of Mn2/Mn3+ and Fe3+ oxidation states. All composite nanofibers exhibited ferromagnetic behavior especially after being calcined at 800 °C. This ferromagnetic properties were related to the distribution of cations over tetrahedral and octahedral sites as revealed by EXAFS results.

  13. A study of the physical properties of carbon nanofiber reinforced polypropylene composites

    Paleo Vieito, Antonio J.

    2012-01-01

    [Resumo]Os polímeros termoplásticos son coñecidos, en xeral, pola súa ampla empregabilidade en extrusión e moldeamento, cunha gran variedade de aplicacións tales como a embalaxe, os téxtiles e os compoñentes para a industria do automóbil. Unha tentativa de aumentar a súa aplicabilidade implica a incorporación de partículas nanométricas con propiedades eléctricas e mecánicas intrínsecas no interior da matriz termoplástica. Entre os diversos tipos de aditivos, as nanofibras de carbono, CNFs,...

  14. Processing, wear, and mechanical properties of polyethylene composites prepared with pristine and organosilane-treated carbon nanofibers

    Wood, Weston

    Polymers and nanocomposites have been increasingly used for tribological applications over the last few decades. In particular, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a high performance polymer with excellent strength, toughness, and wear resistance. Because of these properties, UHMWPE is an ideal material for a variety of applications including body armor, components of sporting goods such as skies and snowboards, and liners in total joint replacement. Though the toughness and wear resistance far exceed that of most other polymeric materials, there is a high demand for improving the tribological and mechanical properties of UHMWPE for many applications. The approach used in this work for improving such properties is through nanocomposite technology, specifically via the incorporation of carbon nanofibers. In order to obtain the full potential of nanocomposite technology, two critical issues need to be addressed: appropriate interactions between the filler and matrix and proper dispersion of the nano-reinforcement. These critical issues are particularly important for UHMWPE nanocomposites in that UHMWPE is an extremely viscous polymer and thus cannot be processed conventionally, typically resulting in dispersion issues far worse than that of other composite systems. Furthermore, UHMWPE is non-polar, so interactions between filler and matrix will be limited to Van der Waals forces for untreated nanofillers. Therefore, the research presented aims at solving these issues by using a paraffin-assisted processing method and applying appropriate surface treatment to the carbon nanofibers. Under optimized processing conditions, wear and mechanical properties of UHMWPE composites can be substantially improved.

  15. The effect of tin content to the morphology of Sn/carbon nanofiber and the electrochemical performance as anode material for lithium batteries

    By using electrospinning and carbonization, tin nanoparticles enwrapped in carbon nano-fibers (Sn/C) present high capacity and well cyclic performance. The precursor compositions of SnCl2 and polyacrylonitrile (SnCl2/PAN) have a significant effect on the crystal structure, morphology of Sn/C composites, and the electrochemical performance. Along with the increased concentration of tin in the precursors of SnCl2/PAN, the diameters of the carbonized Sn/C nanofibers are decreased. The samples of SnCl2/PAN with starting weight ratio 3:2 (Sn3Pan2), 1:1 (Sn1Pan1) and 2:3 (Sn2Pan3) present the initial discharge capacity 977.8, 1329.8, and 1137.0 mAh g?1, respectively. In the following cycles, the Sn/C nanofibers present high capacity and well cyclic performance. The sample Sn1Pan1 retains a charge capacity of 741.1 mAh g?1 (92% of the initial charge capacity) after 40 cycles. Because the nanoparticles of tin metal are enwrapped in carbon nanofibers, the volume change and aggregation of metal anode are decreased during charging and discharging processes.

  16. Single layers of WS2 nanoplates embedded in nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Yu, Sunmoon; Jung, Ji-Won; Kim, Il-Doo

    2015-07-01

    Single layers of WS2 nanoplates are uniformly embedded in nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (WS2@NCNFs) via a facile electrospinning method. Crystallization of the single-layered WS2 nanoplates and in situ nitrogen doping into the carbon nanofibers were simultaneously accomplished during a two-step heat treatment. The distinctive structure of the WS2@NCNFs enables outstanding electrochemical performances.Single layers of WS2 nanoplates are uniformly embedded in nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (WS2@NCNFs) via a facile electrospinning method. Crystallization of the single-layered WS2 nanoplates and in situ nitrogen doping into the carbon nanofibers were simultaneously accomplished during a two-step heat treatment. The distinctive structure of the WS2@NCNFs enables outstanding electrochemical performances. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section, SEM images of WS2 powder and ground WS2 powder, TEM image and SAED pattern of the WS2 powder, Raman spectra of the WS2 powder, CV curves of the WS2 powder, voltage profiles of the WS2 powder, schematic diagram of WS2@NCNFs undergoing lithium storage reactions, electrochemical performance of NCNFs, morphologies and EDS mapping of WS2@NCNFs after cycling, and a table of contributions of NCNFs to the specific capacity. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02425k

  17. Preparation of mesohollow and microporous carbon nanofiber and its application in cathode material for lithiumsulfur batteries

    Highlights: Mesohollow and microporous carbon fibers were prepared via electrospinning and carbonization. Sulfur (S) incorporated into the porous fibers by thermal heating in 60 wt.%, forming composite. S fills fully in the micropores and partially in the mesohollows of the carbon fibers. The composite shows high capacity and capacity retention as cathode material for LiS batteries. Mesohollow and microporous structure is effective in improving the property of S cathode. - Abstract: Mesohollow and microporous carbon nanofibers (MhMpCFs) were prepared by a coaxial electrospinning with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as outer and inner spinning solutions followed by a carbonization. The carbon fibers were thermal treated with sublimed sulfur to form S/MhMpCFs composite, which was used as cathode material for lithiumsulfur batteries. Electrochemical study shows that the S/MhMpCFs cathode material provides a maximum capacity of 815 mA h/g after several cycles of activation, and the capacity retains 715 mA h/g after 70 cycles, corresponding to a retention of 88%. The electrochemical property of the S/MhMpCFs composite is much superior than the S-incorporated solid carbon fibers prepared from electrospinning of single PAN. The mechanism of the enhanced electrochemical property of the S/MhMpCFs composite is discussed

  18. Preparation of mesohollow and microporous carbon nanofiber and its application in cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries

    Wu, Yuanhe; Gao, Mingxia, E-mail: gaomx@zju.edu.cn; Li, Xiang; Liu, Yongfeng; Pan, Hongge, E-mail: hgpan@zju.edu.cn

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • Mesohollow and microporous carbon fibers were prepared via electrospinning and carbonization. • Sulfur (S) incorporated into the porous fibers by thermal heating in 60 wt.%, forming composite. • S fills fully in the micropores and partially in the mesohollows of the carbon fibers. • The composite shows high capacity and capacity retention as cathode material for Li–S batteries. • Mesohollow and microporous structure is effective in improving the property of S cathode. - Abstract: Mesohollow and microporous carbon nanofibers (MhMpCFs) were prepared by a coaxial electrospinning with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as outer and inner spinning solutions followed by a carbonization. The carbon fibers were thermal treated with sublimed sulfur to form S/MhMpCFs composite, which was used as cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries. Electrochemical study shows that the S/MhMpCFs cathode material provides a maximum capacity of 815 mA h/g after several cycles of activation, and the capacity retains 715 mA h/g after 70 cycles, corresponding to a retention of 88%. The electrochemical property of the S/MhMpCFs composite is much superior than the S-incorporated solid carbon fibers prepared from electrospinning of single PAN. The mechanism of the enhanced electrochemical property of the S/MhMpCFs composite is discussed.

  19. Carbon and Binder-Free Air Electrodes Composed of Co3O4 Nanofibers for Li-Air Batteries with Enhanced Cyclic Performance

    Lee, Chan Kyu; Park, Yong Joon

    2015-08-01

    In this study, to fabricate a carbon free (C-free) air electrode, Co3O4 nanofibers were grown directly on a Ni mesh to obtain Co3O4 with a high surface area and good contact with the current collector (the Ni mesh). In Li-air cells, any C present in the air electrode promotes unwanted side reactions. Therefore, the air electrode composed of only Co3O4 nanofibers (i.e., C-free) was expected to suppress these side reactions, such as the decomposition of the electrolyte and formation of Li2CO3, which would in turn enhance the cyclic performance of the cell. As predicted, the Co3O4-nanofiber electrode successfully reduced the accumulation of reaction products during cycling, which was achieved through the suppression of unwanted side reactions. In addition, the cyclic performance of the Li-air cell was superior to that of a standard electrode composed of carbonaceous material.

  20. Influence of copper content on the electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation of CoχCuy alloy nanoparticles-decorated CNFs

    Ghouri, Zafar Khan; Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2015-11-01

    In this study, CoCu alloy nanoparticles-incorporated carbon nanofibers are introduced as effective non precious electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation in alkaline medium. The introduced electrocatalyst has been synthesized by simple and effective process; electrospinning. Typically, calcination, in nitrogen atmosphere, of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate, copper acetate and poly (vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The nanofibrous morphology and alloy structure have been confirmed by SEM, TEM and XRD analyses. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity indicates that copper content has strong influence, the alloy nanoparticles having the composition Cu5%Co95% showed distinct high performance; 100 times higher than other formulations. Overall, the introduced study revealed the veil about the distinct role of copper in enhancing the electrocatalytic activity of cobalt-based materials.

  1. Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Electrospun Composite Nanofibers

    Haji A.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Composite nanofibers containing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT were prepared by using electrospinning technique and hydrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms were carried out by a Sieverts apparatus at room temperature. The SEM analysis of the nanofibers revealed that the deformation of the nanofiber increases with increasing SWNT concentration. The diameter of neat nanofibers was below 200 nm and had smooth surface. The surface of the composite nanofibers was rough even by adding low quantity of SWNT. The hydrogen storage results showed an improvement in the adsorption capacity with increasing the SWNT content in composite nanofibers. These nanofibers were evacuated again to remove the adsorbed hydrogen at room temperature. Moreover, even though specific surface area and total pore volume were important factors for increasing the capacity of hydrogen adsorption. Finally, maximum adsorption capacity was 0.29 wt % in case of nanofibers with 10 wt % SWNT under 30 bar at 298 K.

  2. Si-Carbon Composite Nanofibers with Good scalability and Favorable Architecture for Highly Reversible Lithium Storage and Superb Kinetics

    We demonstrate a simple electrospinning for preparing Si-carbon composite Nanofiber (NF) in which aciniform aggregates of Si particles are well encased by amorphous carbon. The Si-carbon composite NF exhibit a significantly improved electrochemical performance with a high specific capacity of 1250 mAhg?1 and a superior cycling performance during 50 cycles at a rate of 0.2 C. More importantly, Si-carbon composite NF maintain about 70% of initial capacity at 0.2 C and an excellent cycling stability even at 25 times higher current density compared to the initial condition, proving that it has superb kinetics compared to ever reported Si or SiOx materials. The electrochemical superiority of Si-carbon composite NF can be attributed to amorphous carbon framework accommodating the inherent volume expansion of Si during lithiation as well as the enlarged contact area between active materials and conducting agent attributed to the morphological characteristics of its one dimensional (1D) nanostructure

  3. Mechanical and electromagnetic interference shielding Properties of poly(vinyl alcohol)/graphene and poly(vinyl alcohol)/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite nanofiber mats and the effect of Cu top-layer coating.

    Fujimori, Kazushige; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Kim, Han-Ki; Kim, Byoung-Suhk; Kim, Ick-Soo

    2013-03-01

    We report the mechanical property and electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/graphene and PVA/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite nanofibers prepared by electrospinning. The metal (Cu) was deposited on the resultant PVA composite nanofibers using metal deposition technique in order to improve the mechanical properties and EMI shielding properties. The resulting PVA composite nanofibers and Cu-deposited corresponding nanofibers were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Tensile tests were performed on the PVA/graphene and PVA/MWCNT composite nanofibers. The tensile strength of the PVA/graphene and PVA/MWCNT composite nanofibers was found to be 19.2 +/- 0.3 MPa at graphene content - 6.0 wt% and 12.2 +/- 0.2 MPa at MWCNT content - 3.0 wt%, respectively. The EMI SE of the Cu-deposited PVA/graphene composite nanofibers was significantly improved compared to pure PVA/graphene composite nanofibers, and also depended on the thickness of Cu metal layer deposited on the PVA composite nanofibers. PMID:23755586

  4. Carbon-Confined SnO2-Electrodeposited Porous Carbon Nanofiber Composite as High-Capacity Sodium-Ion Battery Anode Material.

    Dirican, Mahmut; Lu, Yao; Ge, Yeqian; Yildiz, Ozkan; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2015-08-26

    Sodium resources are inexpensive and abundant, and hence, sodium-ion batteries are promising alternative to lithium-ion batteries. However, lower energy density and poor cycling stability of current sodium-ion batteries prevent their practical implementation for future smart power grid and stationary storage applications. Tin oxides (SnO2) can be potentially used as a high-capacity anode material for future sodium-ion batteries, and they have the advantages of high sodium storage capacity, high abundance, and low toxicity. However, SnO2-based anodes still cannot be used in practical sodium-ion batteries because they experience large volume changes during repetitive charge and discharge cycles. Such large volume changes lead to severe pulverization of the active material and loss of electrical contact between the SnO2 and carbon conductor, which in turn result in rapid capacity loss during cycling. Here, we introduce a new amorphous carbon-coated SnO2-electrodeposited porous carbon nanofiber (PCNF@SnO2@C) composite that not only has high sodium storage capability, but also maintains its structural integrity while ongoing repetitive cycles. Electrochemical results revealed that this SnO2-containing nanofiber composite anode had excellent electrochemical performance including high-capacity (374 mAh g(-1)), good capacity retention (82.7%), and large Coulombic efficiency (98.9% after 100th cycle). PMID:26252051

  5. Immobilization of CoCl2 (cobalt chloride) on PAN (polyacrylonitrile) composite nanofiber mesh filled with carbon nanotubes for hydrogen production from hydrolysis of NaBH4 (sodium borohydride)

    Composite nanofiber sheets containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes and cobalt chloride dispersed in PAN (polyacrylonitrile) were produced by an electrospinning technique. The synthesized PAN/CoCl2/CNTs composite nanofiber was used as the catalyst for hydrogen production from the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride. FT-IR characterization showed that the pretreated CNTs possess different organic functional groups which help improve the compatibility between CNTs and PAN organic polymer. SEM (scanning electron microscopy), TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray technique) were used to characterize the composite nanofiber and it was found that CNTs can be coaxially dispersed into the PAN nanofiber. During the hydrolysis of NaBH4, this PAN/CoCl2/CNTs composite nanofiber exhibited higher catalytic activity compared to the composite without CNTs doping. Kinetic analysis of NaBH4 hydrolysis shows that the reaction of NaBH4 hydrolysis based on this catalyst can be ascribed to the first-order reaction and the activation energy of the catalyst was approximately 52.857 kJ/mol. Meanwhile, the composite nanofiber catalyst shows excellent stability and reusability in the recycling experiment. - Highlights: • Composite nanofiber sheets were prepared via electrospinning. • PAN (polyacrylonitrile)/CoCl2 (cobalt chloride)/CNTs (carbon nanotubes) nanofiber was used as the catalyst for hydrogen production. • CNTs can be coaxially dispersed into the PAN nanofiber. • PAN/CoCl2/CNTs composite nanofiber exhibited higher catalytic activity. • The composite nanofiber catalyst shows excellent stability and reusability

  6. Elastic and hierarchical porous carbon nanofibrous membranes incorporated with NiFe2O4 nanocrystals for highly efficient capacitive energy storage.

    Ge, Jianlong; Fan, Gang; Si, Yang; He, Jianxin; Kim, Hak-Yong; Ding, Bin; Al-Deyab, Salem S; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Yu, Jianyong

    2016-01-21

    Flexible membranes created from porous carbon nanofibers (CNFs) hold great promise in the next generation wearable energy storage devices, but challenges still remain due to the poor mechanical properties of porous carbon nanofibers. Here, we report a facile strategy to fabricate elastic and hierarchical porous CNF membranes with NiFe2O4 nanocrystals embedded via multicomponent electrospinning and nano-doping methods. Benefiting from the scattering effect of NiFe2O4 nanocrystals and graphitized carbon layers for the condensed stress, the resultant CNF membranes exhibit an enhanced elasticity with a bending radius <12 ?m, rapid recovery from the deformations, and a superior softness. Quantitative pore size distribution and fractal analysis reveal that the CNFs possessed tunable porous structures with a high surface area of 493 m(2) g(-1) and a pore volume of 0.31 cm(3) g(-1). Benefiting from the robust mechanical stability, hierarchical porous structures and good electrochemical properties, the NiFe2O4 doped CNF membranes demonstrate a high electrical capacitance of 343 F g(-1), and good reversibility with a cycling efficiency of 97.4% even after 10?000 cycles. The successful synthesis of elastic porous CNF membranes also provided a versatile platform for the design and development of functional CNF based materials for various applications. PMID:26731700

  7. Towards the control of the diameter of individualized single walled carbon nanotubes in CVD process at low temperature

    Tsareva, Svetlana [Institut Jean Lamour UMR 7819, CNRS - Universite de Lorraine, Parc de Saurupt, 54011 Nancy (France); Structure et Reactivite des Systemes Moleculaires Complexes UMR 7565, CNRS - Universite de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Devaux, Xavier [Institut Jean Lamour UMR 7819, CNRS - Universite de Lorraine, Parc de Saurupt, 54011 Nancy (France); Dossot, Manuel [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement UMR 7564, CNRS - Universite de Lorraine, 54602 Villers les Nancy (France)

    2012-12-15

    In the current work, we show that it is possible to favor the selective growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a narrow diameter distribution on supported catalyst particles with a broad size distribution. Carbon nanotubes were grown at 600 C on silicon substrates. The structure of carbon deposits was controlled by managing the carbon feedstock for adjusting the rate of carbon nanostructures formation on the surface of catalyst particles. Either carbon nanofibers (CNFs) carpets or isolated SWCNTs were obtained. With the fine tune of carbon feedstock, small isolated SWCNTs with a narrow diameter distribution were obtained by limiting the catalytic activity of the largest catalyst particles. HRTEM observations of nanotube embryos have suggested a possible mechanism of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) formation that can explain why the growth of MWCNTs with parallel walls seems to be more difficult than SWCNTs or CNFs at low temperature. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Electrodeposition of iron oxide nanorods on carbon nanofiber scaffolds as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Iron oxide film with spaced radial nanorods is formed on the VGCF (vapor-grown carbon nanofiber) scaffolds by means of anodic electrodeposition. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy show that the iron oxide film deposited on the VGCF surface is α-Fe2O3 and consists of spaced radial nanorods having 16-21 nm in diameter after annealing at 400 deg. C. Galvanostatic charge/discharge results indicate that the α-Fe2O3/VGCF anode (970 mAh g-1) has higher capacity than bare α-Fe2O3 anode (680 mAh g-1) at 10 C current discharge. VGCF scaffolds fabricated by electrophoretic deposition favor the electron conduction, and the spaced radial nanorods on VGCFs facilitate the migration of lithium ion from the electrolyte. Electrochemical reactions between α-Fe2O3 and lithium ion are therefore improved significantly by this tailored architecture.

  9. Local Structure Determination of Carbon/Nickel Ferrite Composite Nanofibers Probed by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Nilmoung, Sukunya; Kidkhunthod, Pinit; Maensiri, Santi

    2015-11-01

    Carbon/NiFe2O4 composite nanofibers have been successfully prepared by electrospinning method using a various concentration solution of Ni and Fe nitrates dispersed into polyacrylonitride (PAN) solution in N,N' dimethylformamide. The phase and mophology of PAN/NiFe2O4 composite samples were characterized and investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The magnetic properties of the prepared samples were measured at ambient temperature by a vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that all composite samples exhibit ferromagnetism. This could be local-structurally explained by the existed oxidation states of Ni2+ and Fe3+ in the samples. Moreover, local environments around Ni and Fe ions could be revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurement including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). PMID:26726677

  10. Lignin-derived electrospun carbon nanofiber mats with supercritically deposited Ag nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline fuel cells

    Highlights: • Electrospun carbon nanofiber mats were prepared from a natural product of lignin. • The freestanding mats were flexible with BET specific surface area of ∼583 m2/g. • The mats were surface-deposited with Ag nanoparticles via the scCO2 method. • Novel electrocatalytic systems of Ag/ECNFs exhibited high activities towards ORR. - Abstract: Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) (11, 15, and 25 wt.%) were deposited on the surface of the freestanding and mechanically flexible mats consisting of lignin-derived electrospun carbon nanofibers (ECNFs) by the supercritical CO2 method followed by the thermal treated at 180 °C. The electrochemical activity of Ag/ECNFs electrocatalyst systems towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was studied in 0.1 M KOH aqueous solution using the rotating disk/rotating ring disk electrode (RDE/RRDE) technique. The SEM, TEM, and XRD results indicated that, the spherical AgNPs were uniformly distributed on the ECNF surface with sizes in the range of 2-10 nm. The electrocatalytic results revealed that, all of the Ag/ECNFs systems exhibited high activity in ORR and demonstrated close-to-theoretical four-electron pathway. In particular, the mass activity of 15 wt.% Ag/ECNFs system was the highest (119 mA mg−1), exceeding that of HiSPEC 4100™ commercial Pt/C catalyst (98 mA mg−1). This study suggested that the lignin-derived ECNF mats surface-deposited with AgNPs would be promising as cost-effective and highly efficient electrocatalyst for ORR in alkaline fuel cells

  11. Carbon Nanotubes Produced from Ambient Carbon Dioxide for Environmentally Sustainable Lithium-Ion and Sodium-Ion Battery Anodes.

    Licht, Stuart; Douglas, Anna; Ren, Jiawen; Carter, Rachel; Lefler, Matthew; Pint, Cary L

    2016-03-23

    The cost and practicality of greenhouse gas removal processes, which are critical for environmental sustainability, pivot on high-value secondary applications derived from carbon capture and conversion techniques. Using the solar thermal electrochemical process (STEP), ambient CO2 captured in molten lithiated carbonates leads to the production of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at high yield through electrolysis using inexpensive steel electrodes. These low-cost CO2-derived CNTs and CNFs are demonstrated as high performance energy storage materials in both lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries. Owing to synthetic control of sp(3) content in the synthesized nanostructures, optimized storage capacities are measured over 370 mAh g(-1) (lithium) and 130 mAh g(-1) (sodium) with no capacity fade under durability tests up to 200 and 600 cycles, respectively. This work demonstrates that ambient CO2, considered as an environmental pollutant, can be attributed economic value in grid-scale and portable energy storage systems with STEP scale-up practicality in the context of combined cycle natural gas electric power generation. PMID:27163042

  12. Carbon Nanotubes Produced from Ambient Carbon Dioxide for Environmentally Sustainable Lithium-Ion and Sodium-Ion Battery Anodes

    2016-01-01

    The cost and practicality of greenhouse gas removal processes, which are critical for environmental sustainability, pivot on high-value secondary applications derived from carbon capture and conversion techniques. Using the solar thermal electrochemical process (STEP), ambient CO2 captured in molten lithiated carbonates leads to the production of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at high yield through electrolysis using inexpensive steel electrodes. These low-cost CO2-derived CNTs and CNFs are demonstrated as high performance energy storage materials in both lithium-ion and sodium-ion batteries. Owing to synthetic control of sp3 content in the synthesized nanostructures, optimized storage capacities are measured over 370 mAh g–1 (lithium) and 130 mAh g–1 (sodium) with no capacity fade under durability tests up to 200 and 600 cycles, respectively. This work demonstrates that ambient CO2, considered as an environmental pollutant, can be attributed economic value in grid-scale and portable energy storage systems with STEP scale-up practicality in the context of combined cycle natural gas electric power generation.

  13. Synthesis of Polyaniline (PANI) in Nano-Reaction Field of Cellulose Nanofiber (CNF), and Carbonization

    Yuki Kaitsuka; Noriko Hayashi; Tomoko Shimokawa; Eiji Togawa; Hiromasa Goto

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization of aniline in the presence of cellulose nano-fiber (CNF) is carried out. We used dried CNF, CNF suspension, and CNF treated by enzyme and ultra-sonification to obtain polyaniline (PANI)/CNF as a synthetic polymer/natural nano-polymer composite. The polymerization proceeds on the surface of CNF as a nano-reaction field. Resultant composites show extended effective π-conjugation length because CNF as a reaction field in molecular level produced polymer with expanded coil structur...

  14. Simple preparation of carbon nanofibers with graphene layers perpendicular to the length direction and the excellent li-ion storage performance.

    Li, Tao; Wei, Cheng; Wu, Yi-Min; Han, Fu-Dong; Qi, Yong-Xin; Zhu, Hui-Ling; Lun, Ning; Bai, Yu-Jun

    2015-03-11

    Sulfur-containing carbon nanofibers with the graphene layers approximately vertical to the fiber axis were prepared by a simple reaction between thiophene and sulfur at 550 C in stainless steel autoclaves without using any templates. The formation mechanism was discussed briefly, and the potential application as anode material for lithium-ion batteries was tentatively investigated. The carbon nanofibers exhibit a stable reversible capacity of 676.8 mAh/g after cycling 50 times at 0.1 C, as well as the capacities of 623.5, 463.2, and 365.8 mAh/g at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 C, respectively. The excellent electrochemical performance could be attributed to the effect of sulfur. On one hand, sulfur could improve the reversible capacity of carbon materials due to its high theoretical capacity; on the other hand, sulfur could promote the formation of the unique carbon nanofibers with the graphene layers perpendicular to the axis direction, favorable to shortening the Li-ion diffusion path. PMID:25706088

  15. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber/Molybdenum Disulfide Nanocomposites Derived from Bacterial Cellulose for High-Efficiency Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Lai, Feili; Miao, Yue-E; Huang, Yunpeng; Zhang, Youfang; Liu, Tianxi

    2016-02-17

    To remit energy crisis and environmental deterioration, non-noble metal nanocomposites have attracted extensive attention, acting as a fresh kind of cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In this work, hierarchically organized nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber/molybdenum disulfide (pBC-N/MoS2) nanocomposites were successfully prepared via the combination of in situ polymerization, high-temperature carbonization process, and hydrothermal reaction. Attributing to the uniform coating of polyaniline on the surface of bacterial cellulose, the nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber network acts as an excellent three-dimensional template for hydrothermal growth of MoS2 nanosheets. The obtained hierarchical pBC-N/MoS2 nanocomposites exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity for HER with small overpotential of 108 mV, high current density of 8.7 mA cm(-2) at η = 200 mV, low Tafel slope of 61 mV dec(-1), and even excellent stability. The greatly improved performance is benefiting from the highly exposed active edge sites of MoS2 nanosheets, the intimate connection between MoS2 nanosheets and the highly conductive nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers and the three-dimensional networks thus formed. Therefore, this work provides a novel strategy for design and application of bacterial cellulose and MoS2-based nanocomposites as cost-effective HER eletrocatalysts. PMID:26302501

  16. Carbon-Based Nano-Electro-Mechanical-Systems

    Kaul, A. B.; Khan, A. R.; Megerian, K. G.; Epp, L.; LeDuc, G.; Bagge, L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    We provide an overview of our work where carbon-based nanostructures have been applied to two-dimensional (2D) planar and three-dimensional (3D) vertically-oriented nano-electro-mechanical (NEM) switches. In the first configuration, laterally oriented single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were implemented for forming bridge-type 2D NEMS switches, where switching voltages were on the order of a few volts. In the second configuration, vertically oriented carbon nanofibers (CNFs) synthesized using plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD have been explored for their potential application in 3D NEMS. We have performed nanomechanical measurements on such vertically oriented tubes using nanoindentation to determine the mechanical properties of the CNFs. Electrostatic switching was demonstrated in the CNFs synthesized on refractory metallic nitride substrates, where a nanoprobe was used as the actuating electrode inside a scanning-electron-microscope. The switching voltages were determined to be in the tens of volts range and van der Waals interactions at these length scales appeared significant, suggesting such structures are promising for nonvolatile memory applications. A finite element model was also developed to determine a theoretical pull-in voltage which was compared to experimental results. XXXX The Complementary-Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) industry faces major obstacles to further miniaturization beyond the 22 nm integrated-circuit (IC) lithography node. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are among the materials being considered as viable candidates for overcoming some of the issues that arise from the downscaling of IC dimensions, which include electromigration encountered with Copper (Cu) interconnects, or high leakage currents that arise from gate dielectrics just a few nanometers (nm) in thickness. While CNTs are showing promise as interconnects due to their high current carrying ability, 1 as well as efficient heat transporting assemblies, 2 another area that is receiving intense interest is the application of CNTs in nano-electro-mechanical-systems (NEMS), as indicated by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).3 The physical isolation of conducting paths in NEMS reduces leakage currents and power dissipation, which are parameters difficult to constrain with increasingly miniaturized Si transistors with their short source-drain channel lengths or ultra-thin gate oxides. In addition, Si reverts to intrinsic behavior at low- and high-temperatures due to Fermi level shifting, which makes solid-state transistors in general more susceptible to thermal extremes. The underlying mechanical operation of NEMS structures is also suggestive of their inherent tolerance toward harsh thermal, as well as high radiation environments, which potentially enhances their ruggedness over solid-state transistors. In particular, carbon based nanostructures offer advantages due to their exceptional elasticity compared to inorganic nanowires4 for example, for extending their mechanical cycling longevity for NEMS applications. Such exceptional mechanical properties arise from the sp2 bonding character inherent to graphene from which many carbon-based nanostructures are derived, such as single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) or CNFs. The success of CNT based NEMS has already been validated in a variety of app 11. cat1. 0ns rangm. g fr om nanotweezers, 5 memory d ev1. ces, 6 nanore 1a ys, 7 8 an d resonators. 9 In th.I S paper, we provide an overview of our work in forming NEMS switches which are comprised of laterally oriented SWNTs suspended over pre-fabricated trenches based on two-dimensional (2D) planar technology, as well as vertically oriented CNFs which are under consideration for three-dimensional (3D) NEMS. 2. NEMS

  17. Carbon-Based Nano-Electro-Mechanical-Systems

    Kaul, A. B.; Khan, A. R.; Megerian, K. G.; Epp, L.; LeDuc, G.; Bagge, L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    We provide an overview of our work where carbon-based nanostructures have been applied to two-dimensional (2D) planar and three-dimensional (3D) vertically-oriented nano-electro-mechanical (NEM) switches. In the first configuration, laterally oriented single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were implemented for forming bridge-type 2D NEMS switches, where switching voltages were on the order of a few volts. In the second configuration, vertically oriented carbon nanofibers (CNFs) synthesized using plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD have been explored for their potential application in 3D NEMS. We have performed nanomechanical measurements on such vertically oriented tubes using nanoindentation to determine the mechanical properties of the CNFs. Electrostatic switching was demonstrated in the CNFs synthesized on refractory metallic nitride substrates, where a nanoprobe was used as the actuating electrode inside a scanning-electron-microscope. The switching voltages were determined to be in the tens of volts range and van der Waals interactions at these length scales appeared significant, suggesting such structures are promising for nonvolatile memory applications. A finite element model was also developed to determine a theoretical pull-in voltage which was compared to experimental results. XXXX The Complementary-Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) industry faces major obstacles to further miniaturization beyond the 22 nm integrated-circuit (IC) lithography node. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) are among the materials being considered as viable candidates for overcoming some of the issues that arise from the downscaling of IC dimensions, which include electromigration encountered with Copper (Cu) interconnects, or high leakage currents that arise from gate dielectrics just a few nanometers (nm) in thickness. While CNTs are showing promise as interconnects due to their high current carrying ability, 1 as well as efficient heat transporting assemblies, 2 another area that is receiving intense interest is the application of CNTs in nano-electro-mechanical-systems (NEMS), as indicated by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).3 The physical isolation of conducting paths in NEMS reduces leakage currents and power dissipation, which are parameters difficult to constrain with increasingly miniaturized Si transistors with their short source-drain channel lengths or ultra-thin gate oxides. In addition, Si reverts to intrinsic behavior at low- and high-temperatures due to Fermi level shifting, which makes solid-state transistors in general more susceptible to thermal extremes. The underlying mechanical operation of NEMS structures is also suggestive of their inherent tolerance toward harsh thermal, as well as high radiation environments, which potentially enhances their ruggedness over solid-state transistors. In particular, carbon based nanostructures offer advantages due to their exceptional elasticity compared to inorganic nanowires4 for example, for extending their mechanical cycling longevity for NEMS applications. Such exceptional mechanical properties arise from the sp2 bonding character inherent to graphene from which many carbon-based nanostructures are derived, such as single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) or CNFs. The success of CNT based NEMS has already been validated in a variety of app 11. cat1. 0ns rangm. g fr om nanotweezers, 5 memory d ev1. ces, 6 nanore 1a ys, 7 ·8 an d resonators. 9 In th.I S paper, we provide an overview of our work in forming NEMS switches which are comprised of laterally oriented SWNTs suspended over pre-fabricated trenches based on two-dimensional (2D) planar technology, as well as vertically oriented CNFs which are under consideration for three-dimensional (3D) NEMS. 2. NEMS

  18. Controllable synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) core-shell nanofibers with enhanced electrocatalytic activity

    Core-shell structured poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (PEDOT/MWCNTs) nanofibers were synthesized through an interfacial polymerization technique. The interfacial polymerization at a liquid-liquid interface allowed PEDOT to grow uniformly on the surface of MWCNTs due to the presence of π-π interactions between PEDOT and MWCNTs walls. The morphology, structure and composition of the as-prepared PEDOT/MWCNTs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). In addition, the electrocatalytic properties of PEDOT/MWCNTs toward redox reactions of magnolol, a widely used traditional Chinese medicine, were systematically investigated. The results showed that the PEDOT/MWCNTs nanofibers exhibited a distinctly higher activity for the detection of magnolol compared with those of pure MWCNTs and PEDOT. The remarkably enhanced activity for the nanofibers can be attributed to the unique configuration and synergistic contribution between PEDOT and MWCNTs. The presented method is a general, facile and green approach for the synthesis of polymer/CNTs nanofibers, which is significant for the development of high performance electrocatalysts for biosensing and fuel cell applications

  19. Preparation and electrochemical performance of hyper-networked Li4Ti5O12/carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets for a battery-supercapacitor hybrid system

    Hyper-networked Li4Ti5O12/carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets that contain both a faradaically rechargeable battery-type component, namely Li4Ti5O12, and a non-faradaically rechargeable supercapacitor-type component, namely N-enriched carbon, are prepared by electrospinning and their dual function as a negative electrode of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and a capacitor is tested for a new class of hybrid energy storage (denoted BatCap). An aqueous solution composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone, lithium hydroxide, titanium(IV) bis(ammonium-lactato)dihydroxide and ammonium persulfate is electrospun to obtain hyper-networked nanofiber sheets. Next, the sheets are exposed to pyrrole monomer vapor to prepare the polypyrrole-coated nanofiber sheets (PPy-HNS). The hyper-networked Li4Ti5O12/N-enriched carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets (LTO/C-HNS) are then obtained by a stepwise heat treatment of the PPy-HNS. The LTO/C-HNS deliver a specific capacity of 135 mAh g-1 at 4000 mA g-1 as a negative electrode for LIBs. In addition, potentiodynamic experiments are performed using a full cell with activated carbon (AC) as the positive electrode and LTO/C-HNS as the negative electrode to estimate the capacitance properties. This new asymmetric electrode system exhibits a high energy density of 91 W kg-1 and 22 W kg-1 at power densities of 50 W kg-1 and 4000 W kg-1, respectively, which are superior to the values observed for the AC||AC symmetric electrode system.

  20. In situ fabrication of Ni(OH)2 nanofibers on polypyrrole-based carbon nanotubes for high-capacitance supercapacitors

    Highlights: ► Facile surface decoration approach to highly porous Ni(OH)2/CNT composites. ► Polypyrrole-based CNTs form three-dimensional electron-transport channels. ► A high capacitance of 1118 F g−1 at 50 mA cm−2 is delivered. ► Ni(OH)2/CNT composites exhibit high discharge capability. - Abstract: Large-scale nickel hydroxide–carbon [Ni(OH)2/CNT] networks with three-dimensional electron-transport channels are synthesized via a facile and general surface-decoration approach, using polypyrrole-derived CNTs as the support. Flexible Ni(OH)2 nanofibers with a diameter of 5–10 nm and a length of 50–120 nm are intertwined and wrapped homogenously on carbon networks, leading to the formation of more complex networks. When used as supercapacitor electrodes, this designed architecture with large surface area, abundant pores and good electrical conductivity is very important in technology. It can promote the bulk accessibility of electrolyte OH− and diffusion rate within the redox phase. Consequently, an unusual specific capacitance of 1745 F g−1 can be obtained for Ni(OH)2/CNT composite at 30 mA cm−2. Even at a high rate (50 mA cm−2), the composite can also deliver a specific capacitance as high as 1118 F g−1, exhibiting the potential application for supercapacitors

  1. Amorphous flower-like molybdenum-sulfide-@-nitrogen-doped-carbon-nanofiber film for use in the hydrogen-evolution reaction.

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Libo; Guo, Yaxiao; Liu, Dong; You, Tianyan

    2016-06-15

    A novel amorphous flower-like molybdenum sulfides@nitrogen doped carbon nanofibers (MoSx@NCNFs) films are successfully synthesized by combining electrospinning, carbonization and a mild hydrothermal process. NCNFs, as a conductive substrate, can accelerate the electron transfer rate and depress the aggregation of MoSx nanoparticles. The resultant amorphous flower-like MoSx on NCNFs exposes abundant S(2-)/S2(2-) active edge sites which is of great importance for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalytic performance. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate the superior electrocatalytic activity of MoSx@NCNFs toward HER deriving from the synergistic effect between NCNFs and amorphous MoSx. The overpotential is only 137mV to reach the current density of 10mAcm(-2) with a Tafel slope of 41mVdecade(-1) at MoSx@NCNFs. Meanwhile, MoSx@NCNFs exhibits satisfactory long-time stability for HER. Noteworthy, the obtained composites show a free-standing structure which can be directly used as electrode materials. This work provides a feasible way to design promising noble-metal free electrocatalysts in the aspect of energy conversion. PMID:27015391

  2. Controllable growth of Prussian blue nanostructures on carboxylic group-functionalized carbon nanofibers and its application for glucose biosensing

    Glucose detection is very important in biological analysis, clinical diagnosis and the food industry, and especially for the routine monitoring of diabetes. This work presents an electrochemical approach to the detection of glucose based on Prussian blue (PB) nanostructures/carboxylic group-functionalized carbon nanofiber (FCNF) nanocomposites. The hybrid nanocomposites were constructed by growing PB onto the FCNFs. The obtained PB–FCNF nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mechanism of formation of PB–FCNF nanocomposites was investigated and is discussed in detail. The PB–FCNF modified glassy carbon electrode (PB–FCNF/GCE) shows good electrocatalysis toward the reduction of H2O2, a product from the reduction of O2 followed by glucose oxidase (GOD) catalysis of the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid. Further immobilizing GOD on the PB–FCNF/GCE, an amperometric glucose biosensor was achieved by monitoring the generated H2O2 under a relatively negative potential. The resulting glucose biosensor exhibited a rapid response of 5 s, a low detection limit of 0.5 μM, a wide linear range of 0.02–12 mM, a high sensitivity of 35.94 μA cm−2 mM−1, as well as good stability, repeatability and selectivity. The sensor might be promising for practical application. (paper)

  3. Controllable growth of Prussian blue nanostructures on carboxylic group-functionalized carbon nanofibers and its application for glucose biosensing.

    Wang, Li; Ye, Yinjian; Zhu, Haozhi; Song, Yonghai; He, Shuijian; Xu, Fugang; Hou, Haoqing

    2012-11-16

    Glucose detection is very important in biological analysis, clinical diagnosis and the food industry, and especially for the routine monitoring of diabetes. This work presents an electrochemical approach to the detection of glucose based on Prussian blue (PB) nanostructures/carboxylic group-functionalized carbon nanofiber (FCNF) nanocomposites. The hybrid nanocomposites were constructed by growing PB onto the FCNFs. The obtained PB-FCNF nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mechanism of formation of PB-FCNF nanocomposites was investigated and is discussed in detail. The PB-FCNF modified glassy carbon electrode (PB-FCNF/GCE) shows good electrocatalysis toward the reduction of H(2)O(2), a product from the reduction of O(2) followed by glucose oxidase (GOD) catalysis of the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid. Further immobilizing GOD on the PB-FCNF/GCE, an amperometric glucose biosensor was achieved by monitoring the generated H(2)O(2) under a relatively negative potential. The resulting glucose biosensor exhibited a rapid response of 5 s, a low detection limit of 0.5 μM, a wide linear range of 0.02-12 mM, a high sensitivity of 35.94 μA cm(-2) mM(-1), as well as good stability, repeatability and selectivity. The sensor might be promising for practical application. PMID:23090569

  4. Hollow nitrogen-containing core/shell fibrous carbon nanomaterials as support to platinum nanocatalysts and their TEM tomography study

    Zhou, Cuifeng; Liu, Zongwen; Du, Xusheng; Mitchell, David Richard Graham; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Yan, Yushan; Ringer, Simon

    2012-03-01

    Core/shell nanostructured carbon materials with carbon nanofiber (CNF) as the core and a nitrogen (N)-doped graphitic layer as the shell were synthesized by pyrolysis of CNF/polyaniline (CNF/PANI) composites prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline on CNFs. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared and Raman analyses indicated that the PANI shell was carbonized at 900°C. Platinum (Pt) nanoparticles were reduced by formic acid with catalyst supports. Compared to the untreated CNF/PANI composites, the carbonized composites were proven to be better supporting materials for the Pt nanocatalysts and showed superior performance as catalyst supports for methanol electrochemical oxidation. The current density of methanol oxidation on the catalyst with the core/shell nanostructured carbon materials is approximately seven times of that on the catalyst with CNF/PANI support. TEM tomography revealed that some Pt nanoparticles were embedded in the PANI shells of the CNF/PANI composites, which might decrease the electrocatalyst activity. TEM-energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping confirmed that the Pt nanoparticles in the inner tube of N-doped hollow CNFs could be accessed by the Nafion ionomer electrolyte, contributing to the catalytic oxidation of methanol.

  5. Micro porosity Development of Herringbone Carbon Nano fibers by RbOH Chemical Activation

    The influence of different activation conditions, including activating agent/CNFs ratio, activation temperature, and He flow rate, on the pore structure development of herringbone carbon nano fibers (CNFs) was studied. The best results of activated CNFs with larger specific surface area can be achieved using the following optimized factors: RbOH/CNFs ratio = 4/1, activation temperature = 900 degree C ,and a He flow rate = 850 ml/min. The optimization of these three factors leads to high CNFs micropore volume, being the surface area increased by a factor of 3 compared to the raw CNFs. It is important to note that only the creation of micropores (ultra micropores principally) took place, and meso pores were not generated if compared with raw CNFs

  6. Preparation and characterization of Li3V2(PO4)3 grown on carbon nanofiber as cathode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Bead-like nanocomposite Li3V2(PO4)3 (LVP) grown on carbon nanofiber (CNF) have been prepared by electrospinning and heat-treatment. The primary LVP crystals are squeezed together and grow outward because of the limitation of the reaction space for LVP precursors in PVP fiber, accompanying with the carbon nanofibers shrank in diameters. Compared with the traditional carbon-coated LVP, the combination of the “beads” (LVP nanoparticles) and the “string” (carbon fiber) are effective in conductivity and stability. A small amount of carbon content (5.27 wt%) in LVP/CNF is sufficient to enhance the rate performance and cycle ability. The initial discharge capacity of LVP/CNF is 196 mAh g−1 at 0.1 C, which is very close to the theoretical value (197 mAh g−1) of pure LVP in 3.0-4.8 V. In the long-term cycles at 20C-rate, LVP/CNF delivers the initial capacities of 127.5 mAh g−1, and remains 102.0 mAh g−1 at the 1000th cycle. Bead-like structure of LVP nanoparticles grown in carbon fibers is stable in thousands charge/discharge cycles at high current rate

  7. Effect of Carbon Nanofiber Heat Treatment on Physical Properties of Polymeric Nanocomposites—Part I

    Emel Yildiz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The definition of a nanocomposite material has broadened significantly to encompass a large variety of systems made of dissimilar components and mixed at the nanometer scale. The properties of nanocomposite materials also depend on the morphology, crystallinity, and interfacial characteristics of the individual constituents. In the current work, vapor-grown carbon nanofibers were subjected to varying heat-treatment temperatures. The strength of adhesion between the nanofiber and an epoxy (thermoset matrix was characterized by the flexural strength and modulus. Heat treatment to 1800C∘ demonstrated maximum improvement in mechanical properties over that of the neat resin, while heat-treatment to higher temperatures demonstrated a slight decrease in mechanical properties likely due to the elimination of potential bonding sites caused by the elimination of the truncated edges of the graphene layers. Both the electrical and thermal properties of the resulting nanocomposites increased in conjunction with the increasing heat-treatment temperature.

  8. A TiO2 Nanofiber-Carbon Nanotube-Composite Photoanode for Improved Efficiency in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Macdonald, Thomas J; Tune, Daniel D; Dewi, Melissa R; Gibson, Christopher T; Shapter, Joseph G; Nann, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    A light-scattering layer fabricated from electrospun titanium dioxide nanofibers (TiO2 -NFs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) formed a fiber-based photoanode. The nanocomposite scattering layer had a lawn-like structure and integration of carbon nanotubes into the NF photoanodes increased the power conversion efficiency from 2.9?% to 4.8?% under 1?Sun illumination. Under reduced light intensity (0.25?Sun), TiO2 -NF and TiO2 -NF/SWCNT-based DSSCs reached PCE values of up to 3.7?% and 6.6?%, respectively. PMID:26383499

  9. Synthesis of palladium/helical carbon nanofiber hybrid nanostructures and their application for hydrogen peroxide and glucose detection.

    Jia, Xueen; Hu, Guangzhi; Nitze, Florian; Barzegar, Hamid Reza; Sharifi, Tiva; Tai, Cheuk-Wai; Wågberg, Thomas

    2013-11-27

    We report on a novel sensing platform for H2O2 and glucose based on immobilization of palladium-helical carbon nanofiber (Pd-HCNF) hybrid nanostructures and glucose oxidase (GOx) with Nafion on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). HCNFs were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition process on a C60-supported Pd catalyst. Pd-HCNF nanocomposites were prepared by a one-step reduction free method in dimethylformamide (DMF). The prepared materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The Nafion/Pd-HCNF/GCE sensor exhibits excellent electrocatalytic sensitivity toward H2O2 (315 mA M(-1) cm(-2)) as probed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry. We show that Pd-HCNF-modified electrodes significantly reduce the overpotential and enhance the electron transfer rate. A linear range from 5.0 μM to 2.1 mM with a detection limit of 3.0 μM (based on the S/N = 3) and good reproducibility were obtained. Furthermore, a sensing platform for glucose was prepared by immobilizing the Pd-HCNFs and glucose oxidase (GOx) with Nafion on a glassy carbon electrode. The resulting biosensor exhibits a good response to glucose with a wide linear range (0.06-6.0 mM) with a detection limit of 0.03 mM and a sensitivity of 13 mA M(-1) cm(-2). We show that small size and homogeneous distribution of the Pd nanoparticles in combination with good conductivity and large surface area of the HCNFs lead to a H2O2 and glucose sensing platform that performs in the top range of the herein reported sensor platforms. PMID:24180258

  10. Factoring-in agglomeration of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for better prediction of their toxicity versus asbestos

    Murray Ashley R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon nanotubes (CNT and carbon nanofibers (CNF are allotropes of carbon featuring fibrous morphology. The dimensions and high aspect ratio of CNT and CNF have prompted the comparison with naturally occurring asbestos fibers which are known to be extremely pathogenic. While the toxicity and hazardous outcomes elicited by airborne exposure to single-walled CNT or asbestos have been widely reported, very limited data are currently available describing adverse effects of respirable CNF. Results Here, we assessed pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, oxidative stress markers and systemic immune responses to respirable CNF in comparison to single-walled CNT (SWCNT and asbestos. Pulmonary inflammatory and fibrogenic responses to CNF, SWCNT and asbestos varied depending upon the agglomeration state of the particles/fibers. Foci of granulomatous lesions and collagen deposition were associated with dense particle-like SWCNT agglomerates, while no granuloma formation was found following exposure to fiber-like CNF or asbestos. The average thickness of the alveolar connective tissue - a marker of interstitial fibrosis - was increased 28 days post SWCNT, CNF or asbestos exposure. Exposure to SWCNT, CNF or asbestos resulted in oxidative stress evidenced by accumulations of 4-HNE and carbonylated proteins in the lung tissues. Additionally, local inflammatory and fibrogenic responses were accompanied by modified systemic immunity, as documented by decreased proliferation of splenic T cells ex vivo on day 28 post exposure. The accuracies of assessments of effective surface area for asbestos, SWCNT and CNF (based on geometrical analysis of their agglomeration versus estimates of mass dose and number of particles were compared as predictors of toxicological outcomes. Conclusions We provide evidence that effective surface area along with mass dose rather than specific surface area or particle number are significantly correlated with toxicological responses to carbonaceous fibrous nanoparticles. Therefore, they could be useful dose metrics for risk assessment and management.

  11. Lithium-rich layered oxide nanoplate/carbon nanofiber composites exhibiting extremely large reversible lithium storage capacity

    Highlights: • We report a first example of 0.7Li2MnO3–0.3LiMO2 (LMO, M = Co, Ni, and Mn)/carbon composites. • Highly dispersed nanoplate-LMO/carbon nano fibers composites were successfully prepared. • Combination of ultracentrifugation material processing method and hydrothermal treatment. • A large discharge capacity of 326 mA h g−1(LMO) (228 mA h g−1(composite)) was obtained at 0.1 C. • The LMO/CNF composite maintained more than 70% of the initial capacity after 100 cycles at 1.0 C. - Abstract: Novel 0.7Li2MnO3–0.3LiMO2 (LMO, M = Co, Ni, and Mn) nanoplates were successfully synthesized on a carbon nanofiber (CNF) matrix using our original ultracentrifugation material processing method (UC treatment). The 2D dimension-controlled LMO nanoplates with a length of 100 nm on a side and a thickness of 5–10 nm coexist with CNF in the as-prepared composite owing to the application of an ultrahigh centrifugal force of 75,000G in combination with the hydrothermal method. This first-reported LMO nanoplate/CNF (70/30 by weight) composite exhibited an extremely large reversible capacity at 0.1 C of 326 mA h g−1, which is close to its theoretical value (327 mA h g−1). This high capacity is due to the hyper dispersed and highly crystalline LMO nanoplates entangled within the CNF matrix. The prepared LMO nanoplates are covered with a thin unidentified layer (2–5 nm in thickness). The composite shows a high capacity of ca. 240 mA h g−1 at 1 C as well as stable cycle performance, maintaining 70% of its initial capacity over 100 cycles

  12. Ultrasensitive Bisphenol A Field-Effect Transistor Sensor Using an Aptamer-Modified Multichannel Carbon Nanofiber Transducer.

    Kim, Sung Gun; Lee, Jun Seop; Jun, Jaemoon; Shin, Dong Hoon; Jang, Jyongsik

    2016-03-16

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a known endocrine-disrupting compound (EDC) that has a structure similar to that of the hormone estrogen. Even low concentrations of BPA are able to bind estrogen receptors, thereby inducing severe diseases such as reproductive disorders, chronic diseases, and various types of cancer. Despite such serious effects, the use of BPA remains widespread. Therefore, monitoring of both dietary and nondietary exposure to BPA is important for human healthcare. Herein, we present a field-effect transistor (FET) sensor using aptamer-modified multichannel carbon nanofibers (MCNFs) to detect BPA. The MCNFs are fabricated via single-nozzle electrospinning of two immiscible polymer solutions followed by thermal treatment in an inert atmosphere. The MCNFs are then oxidized using a solution of HNO3 and H2SO4 to introduce carboxyl groups on the surface of the fibers. The carboxyl-functionalized MCNFs (CMCNFs) are immobilized on an amine-functionalized electrode substrate by forming a covalent bond, and amine-functionalized BPA-binding aptamers are modified in the same manner on the CMCNFs. The resulting FET sensors exhibit a high sensitivity, as well as specificity toward BPA at an unprecedentedly low concentration of 1 fM. Furthermore, these sensors are stable and could be reused for repeated assays. PMID:26883578

  13. Synthesis and properties of SiNx coatings as stable fluorescent markers on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    Ryan Pearce

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The growth of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs in a catalytic dc ammonia/acetylene plasma process on silicon substrates is often accompanied by sidewall deposition of material that contains predominantly Si and N. In fluorescent microscopy experiments, whereby VACNFs are interfaced to cell and tissue cultures for a variety of applications, it was observed that this material is broadly fluorescent. In this paper, we provide insight into nature of these silicon/nitrogen in-situ coatings. We propose a potential mechanism for deposition of SiNx coating on the sidewalls of VACNFs during PECVD synthesis and explore the origin of the coating's fluorescence. It is most likely that the substrate reacts with process gases similar to reactive sputtering and chemical vapor deposition (CVD, forming silane and other silicon bearing compounds prior to isotropic deposition as a SiNx coating onto the VACNFs. The formation of Sinanoclusters (NCs is also implicated due to a combination of strong fluorescence and elemental analysis of the samples. These broadly luminescent fibers can prove useful as registry markers in fluorescent cellular studies and for tagging and tracing applications.

  14. PdCo alloy nanoparticle-embedded carbon nanofiber for ultrasensitive nonenzymatic detection of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite.

    Liu, Dong; Guo, Qiaohui; Zhang, Xueping; Hou, Haoqing; You, Tianyan

    2015-07-15

    PdCo alloy nanoparticle-embedded carbon nanofiber (PdCo/CNF) prepared by electrospinning and thermal treatment was employed as a high-performance platform for the determination of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. The as-obtained PdCo/CNF were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry were employed to investigate the electrochemical behaviors of the resultant biosensor. The proposed PdCo/CNF-based biosensor showed excellent analytical performances toward hydrogen peroxide (detection limit: 0.1 μM; linear range: 0.2 μM-23.5 mM) and nitrite (detection limit: 0.2 μM; linear range: 0.4-30 μM and 30-400 μM). The superior analytical properties could be attributed to the synergic effect and firmly embedment of well-dispersed PdCo alloy nanoparticles. These attractive electrochemical properties make this robust electrode material promising for the development of effective electrochemical sensors. PMID:25818356

  15. The development, fabrication, and material characterization of polypropylene composites reinforced with carbon nanofiber and hydroxyapatite nanorod hybrid fillers

    Liao CZ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheng Zhu Liao,1,2 Hoi Man Wong,3 Kelvin Wai Kwok Yeung,3 Sie Chin Tjong2 1Department of Materials Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 3Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Abstract: This study focuses on the design, fabrication, microstructural and property characterization, and biocompatibility evaluation of polypropylene (PP reinforced with carbon nanofiber (CNF and hydroxyapatite nanorod (HANR fillers. The purpose is to develop advanced PP/CNF–HANR hybrids with good mechanical behavior, thermal stability, and excellent biocompatibility for use as craniofacial implants in orthopedics. Several material-examination techniques, including X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, tensile tests, and impact measurement are used to characterize the microstructural, mechanical, and thermal properties of the hybrids. Furthermore, osteoblastic cell cultivation and colorimetric assay are also employed for assessing their viability on the composites. The CNF and HANR filler hybridization yields an improvement in Young's modulus, impact strength, thermal stability, and biocompatibility of PP. The PP/2% CNF–20% HANR hybrid composite is found to exhibit the highest elastic modulus, tensile strength, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. Keywords: nanocomposite, implant, cellular viability, mechanical behavior

  16. Preparation and electrochemical properties of RuO2-containing activated carbon nanofiber composites with hollow cores

    RuO2-containing activated carbon nanofibers with hollow cores (PMRu-ACNFs) are prepared through one-step electrospinning using polyacrylonitrile (PAN), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and ruthenium(III) acetylacetonate followed by thermal treatment. The porous PMRu-ACNF composites exhibit an improved morphological structure and textual properties due to the increased surface area, unique nanotexture, and presence of several functional groups such RuO2 in the ACNFs. Electrochemical measurements of PMRu-ACNF reveal a maximum specific capacitance of 180 Fg−1 and high energy densities of 20-14 Whkg−1 in the power density range of 400 to 10,000 W kg−1 in aqueous KOH electrolyte. In contrast, the ACNF electrodes show a lower specific capacitance and the energy density rapidly drops to 2 Whkg−1 at power densities of 4,000 Wkg−1. Therefore, the PMRu-ACNF composite electrodes may be more suitable as supercapacitors than regular ACNFs are, due to the synergistic effect between the electric double-layer capacitance of porous ACNFs and the pseudocapacitance of RuO2

  17. Curvature aided efficient axial field emission from carbon nanofiber-reduced graphene oxide superstructures on tungsten wire substrate

    Jha, Arunava; Roy, Rajarshi; Sen, Dipayan; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K.

    2016-03-01

    Field emission characteristics found in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and RGO based composite systems have always been an area of research interest mainly due to presence of prolific quasi aligned edges working as emitter sites. However, the specific role and extent of edge curvature geometry in RGO systems in regards to the enhancement of field emission has not discussed thoroughly prior to this work. In this work we demonstrate enhanced axial field emission due to top assembly of thin RGO layer over a quasi-vertically aligned carbon nanofiber thin film supported on a tungsten wire substrate. Furthermore, simulation analysis for our RGO based hybrid system using finite element modeling showed that two-stage local field amplification in RGO is responsible for the overall improvement of field emission characteristics. In support of our findings, a tentative explanation has been proposed based on the additional emission from RGO edges in between the CNF network resulting to the enhancement of axial field emission in the nanocomposite superstructure.

  18. Early Combination of Material Characteristics and Toxicology Is Useful in the Design of Low Toxicity Carbon Nanofiber

    Tore Syversen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an approach for the early combination of material characterization and toxicology testing in order to design carbon nanofiber (CNF with low toxicity. The aim was to investigate how the adjustment of production parameters and purification procedures can result in a CNF product with low toxicity. Different CNF batches from a pilot plant were characterized with respect to physical properties (chemical composition, specific surface area, morphology, surface chemistry as well as toxicity by in vitro and in vivo tests. A description of a test battery for both material characterization and toxicity is given. The results illustrate how the adjustment of production parameters and purification, thermal treatment in particular, influence the material characterization as well as the outcome of the toxic tests. The combination of the tests early during product development is a useful and efficient approach when aiming at designing CNF with low toxicity. Early quality and safety characterization, preferably in an iterative process, is expected to be efficient and promising for this purpose. The toxicity tests applied are preliminary tests of low cost and rapid execution. For further studies, effects such as lung inflammation, fibrosis and respiratory cancer are recommended for the more in-depth studies of the mature CNF product.

  19. Arrays of nanofibers composed of a TiC core and a carbon coating for sensitive electrochemical detection of hydrazine

    Arrays made from quasi-aligned nanofibers consisting of a TiC/C composite were produced directly on a titanium alloy substrate by a thermochemical process. Their morphology, structure and composition were characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The arrays were directly utilized as an electrode without further treatment and display high catalytic activity in terms of hydrazine oxidation. The low overpotential decreases gradually when increasing pH values from 5 to 10. The detection range is linear from 0.1 to 1,635 μM concentrations, and the detection limit is as low as 0.026 μM (S/N=3). The selectivity of the electrode and its general performance and stability are very good. The improved electrochemical properties of the new electrode are attributed to the synergic effect of the highly conducting TiC nanowire core and an abundant amount of edge-plane-like defects on the carbon shells. (author)

  20. Sensitive simultaneous determination of catechol and hydroquinone using a gold electrode modified with carbon nanofibers and gold nanoparticles

    A highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of catechol (CC) and hydroquinone (HQ) was fabricated by electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles onto carbon nanofiber film pre-cast on an Au electrode. Both CC and HQ cause a pair of quasi-reversible and well-defined redox peaks at the modified electrode in pH 7.0 solution. Simultaneously, the oxidation peak potentials of CC and HQ become separated by 112 mV. When simultaneously changing the concentrations of both CC and HQ, the response is linear between 9.0 μM and 1.50 mM. In the presence of 0.15 mM of the respective isomer, the electrode gives a linear response in the range from 5.0 to 350 μM, and from 9.0 to 500 μM for CC and HQ, respectively, and detection limits are 0.36 and 0.86 μM. The method was successfully examined for real sample analysis with high selectivity and sensitivity. (author)