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Sample records for cancer hela cells

  1. Proteomic Investigation into Betulinic Acid-Induced Apoptosis of Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Xiufeng YAN

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty dow...

  2. Effect of quercetin on radiosensitivity of human uterine cervix cancer HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the effects of Quercetin on radiosensitivity of human Uterine Cervix Cancer HeLa cells, MTT assay and clonogenic assay were performed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of Quercetin on the cells. Clonogenic assay was used to observe its effects on the radiosensitivity of the cells. MTT result shows that the inhibition of Quercetin on the cells is in the dose-dependent and time-dependent. And the clonogenic assay result shows that the effect of Quercetin on HeLa cells can be divided into two parts, one for the inhibition of HeLa cells and another for the induction of HeLa cell death. The other clonogenic assay result also shows Quercetin can decrease clonogenic survival rate of HeLa cells exposed to X rays. The study shows Quercetin might enhance the radiosensitivity of the HeLa cell line. And it may provide a useful evaluation to combination of ionizing radiation and Quercetin for cancer patients. (authors)

  3. Study of radiation sensitization of artesunate on human HeLa cells of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the radiosensitizing effects of artesunate on human HeLa cells of cervical cancer in vitro. Methods: Hela cells irradiated with 60Co γ-rays. The dose rate was 0.635 Gy/min and the radiation dose was 0, 1, 2, 4, 6 Gy, respectively. The anti-proliferation activities of artesunate on HeLa cells were evaluated with MTT assay, to determine the most appropriate drug concentration. The effect of radiosensitivity was observed by using clonogenic assay. The single-hit multi-target model was used to plot the HeLa cell's dose-survival curve, to calculate mean lethal dose, quasi-threshold dose and sensitization enhancement rate, and to evaluate its radiosensitization effect. The apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry (FCM) to further test the radiation sensitization of artesunate on HeLa cells. Results: The inhibition of artesunate on HeLa cells increased with concentration. In radiation group, the cell cloning efficiency were 91.67%, 82.02%, 58.06%, 25.01%, respectively, and in artesunate (2.0 μmol/L) + radiation group, the cell cloning efficiency were 74.93%, 60.53%, 22.38%, 5.05%. In radiation group and artesunate (2.0 μmol/L) + radiation group, the mean lethal dose (D0) was 2.95 and 2.07 Gy, respectively, while the qusai-threshold dose (Dq) were 2.01 and 1.24 Gy, respectively, and SER was 1.43. Compared with 2 and 6 Gy radiation group, the apoptosis rate of drug + radiation group increased from 12.26%, 40.08% to 22.71%, 59.92. Conclusions: The inhibiting effect of artesunate on HeLa cells is concentration-dependent. Artesunate has radiosensitizing effect on HeLa cells in vitro. (authors)

  4. HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced radioresistance of cervical cancer Hela cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), the key mediator of hypoxia signaling pathways, has been shown involved in hypoxia-induced radioresistance. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study demonstrated that both hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride could increase the radioresistance of human cervical cancer Hela cells. Meanwhile, ectopic expression of HIF-1 could enhance the resistance of Hela cells to radiation, whereas knocking-down of HIF-1 could increase the sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation in the presence of hypoxia. N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a new HIF-1 target gene identified in our lab, was found to be upregulated by hypoxia and radiation in a HIF-1-dependent manner. Overexpression of NDRG2 resulted in decreased sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation while silencing NDRG2 led to radiosensitization. Moreover, NDRG2 was proved to protect Hela cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and abolish radiation-induced upregulation of Bax. Taken together, these data suggest that both HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced tumor radioresistance and that NDRG2 acts downstream of HIF-1 to promote radioresistance through suppressing radiation-induced Bax expression. It would be meaningful to further explore the clinical application potential of HIF-1 and NDRG2 blockade as radiosensitizer for tumor therapy.

  5. HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced radioresistance of cervical cancer Hela cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Junye [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Zhang, Jing [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Wang, Xiaowu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Li, Yan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Chen, Yongbin; Li, Kangchu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Zhang, Jian [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Yao, Libo, E-mail: bioyao@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Guo, Guozhen, E-mail: guozhengg@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2010-07-15

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), the key mediator of hypoxia signaling pathways, has been shown involved in hypoxia-induced radioresistance. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study demonstrated that both hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride could increase the radioresistance of human cervical cancer Hela cells. Meanwhile, ectopic expression of HIF-1 could enhance the resistance of Hela cells to radiation, whereas knocking-down of HIF-1 could increase the sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation in the presence of hypoxia. N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a new HIF-1 target gene identified in our lab, was found to be upregulated by hypoxia and radiation in a HIF-1-dependent manner. Overexpression of NDRG2 resulted in decreased sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation while silencing NDRG2 led to radiosensitization. Moreover, NDRG2 was proved to protect Hela cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and abolish radiation-induced upregulation of Bax. Taken together, these data suggest that both HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced tumor radioresistance and that NDRG2 acts downstream of HIF-1 to promote radioresistance through suppressing radiation-induced Bax expression. It would be meaningful to further explore the clinical application potential of HIF-1 and NDRG2 blockade as radiosensitizer for tumor therapy.

  6. Knock-down of NDRG2 sensitizes cervical cancer Hela cells to cisplatin through suppressing Bcl-2 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NDRG2, a member of N-Myc downstream regulated gene family, plays some roles in cellular stress, cell differentiation and tumor suppression. We have found that NDRG2 expression in cervical cancer Hela cells increases significantly upon stimulation with cisplatin, the most popular chemotherapeutic agent currently used for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. This interesting phenomenon drove us to evaluate the role of NDRG2 in chemosensitivity of Hela cells. In the present study, RNA interference was employed to down-regulate NDRG2 expression in Hela cells. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect expression of NDRG2, Bcl-2 and Bax in cancer cells. Real-time PCR was applied to detect miR-15b and miR-16 expression levels. Drug sensitivity was determined with MTT assay. Cell cloning efficiency was evaluated by Colony-forming assay. Apoptotic cells were detected with annexin V staining and flow cytometry. In vitro drug sensitivity assay revealed that suppression of NDRG2 could sensitize Hela cells to cisplatin. Down-regulation of NDRG2 didn’t influence the colony-forming ability but promoted cisplatin-induced apoptosis of Hela cells. Inhibition of NDRG2 in Hela cells was accompanied by decreased Bcl-2 protein level. However, Bcl-2 mRNA level was not changed in Hela cells with down-regulation of NDRG2. Further study indicated that miR-15b and miR-16, two microRNAs targetting Bcl-2, were significantly up-regulated in NDRG2-suppressed Hela cells. These data suggested that down-regulation of NDRG2 could enhance sensitivity of Hela cells to cisplatin through inhibiting Bcl-2 protein expression, which might be mediated by up-regulating miR-15b and miR-16

  7. Effects of Smac gene over-expression on radiotherapeutic sensitivity of cervical cancer cell line HeLa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effects of extrinsic Smac gene transfection and its over-expression on radiotherapeutic sensitivity of cervical cancer cells, in order to explore a novel strategy for ameliorating radiotherapy of cervical cancer. Methods: After Smac gene was transferred into cells of cervical cancer cell line HeLa, the subclone cells were obtained by persistent G418 selection. Cellular Smac gene expression was determined by RT-PCR and Western blot. After treatment with X-ray irradiation, cellular growth activity in vitro was investigated by MTT colorimetry. Cellular apoptosis and its rate were determined by electron microscopy, Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide staining flow cytometry. Cellular Caspase-3 protein expression and its activity were assayed by Western blot and colorimetry. Results: RT-PCR and Western blot demonstrated that Smac mRNA and protein levels of HeLa/Smac cells, the selected subclone cells of cervical cancer cell line, were significantly higher than those of HeLa cells (P<0.01). After treated with 8 Gy X-ray irradiation, growth activity of HeLa/Smac cells reduced by 10.19%(P<0.01), as compared with that of HeLa cells. Partial HeLa/Smac cancer cells presented characteristic morphological changes of apoptosis under electron microscope, with an apoptosis rate of 16.4%, which was significantly higher than that of HeLa cells(6.2%, P<0.01). Compared with HeLa cells, Caspase-3 expression level in HeLa/Smac was improved significantly (P<0.01), while its activity was 3.42 times as much as that of HeLa cells (P<0.01). Conclusion: Stable transfection of extrinsic Smac gene and its over-expression in cervical cancer cell line could significantly enhance cellular caspase-3 expression and activity, ameliorate apoptosis-inducing effects of radiation on cancer cells, which would be a novel strategy to improve radiotherapeutic effects for cervical cancer. (authors)

  8. Dataset on the effects of CYB5D2 on the distribution of HeLa cervical cancer cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanyun; Shen, Yen Ting; Kapoor, Anil; Ojo, Diane; Wei, Fengxiang; De Melo, Jason; Lin, Xiaozeng; Wong, Nicholas; Yan, Judy; Tao, Lijian; Major, Pierre; Tang, Damu

    2016-03-01

    We have recently reported that CYB5D2 plays a role in suppression of cervical cancer tumorigenesis, "CYB5D2 displays tumor suppression activities towards cervical cancer" [1]. We provide the accompany data here describing the effects of CYB5D2 overexpression and addition of recombinant CYB5D2 on HeLa cell cycle distribution. Furthermore, we will present the conditions used to specifically determine CYB5D2 expression in primary cervical and cervical cancer tissues using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the patient cohort involved in assessing the CYB5D2 protein levels in primary cervical and cervical cancer tissues. PMID:26937452

  9. Dataset on the effects of CYB5D2 on the distribution of HeLa cervical cancer cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanyun; Shen, Yen Ting; Kapoor, Anil; Ojo, Diane; Wei, Fengxiang; De Melo, Jason; Lin, Xiaozeng; Wong, Nicholas; Yan, Judy; Tao, Lijian; Major, Pierre; Tang, Damu

    2016-01-01

    We have recently reported that CYB5D2 plays a role in suppression of cervical cancer tumorigenesis, “CYB5D2 displays tumor suppression activities towards cervical cancer” [1]. We provide the accompany data here describing the effects of CYB5D2 overexpression and addition of recombinant CYB5D2 on HeLa cell cycle distribution. Furthermore, we will present the conditions used to specifically determine CYB5D2 expression in primary cervical and cervical cancer tissues using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the patient cohort involved in assessing the CYB5D2 protein levels in primary cervical and cervical cancer tissues. PMID:26937452

  10. Anticancer activity of synthetic bis(indolyl)methane-ortho-biaryls against human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamsheena, Vellekkatt; Shilpa, Ganesan; Saranya, Jayaram; Harry, Nissy Ann; Lankalapalli, Ravi Shankar; Priya, Sulochana

    2016-03-01

    Bis(indolyl)methane appended biaryls were designed, synthesized and evaluated in human cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa) for their anticancer activities and compared against normal rat cardiac myoblasts (H9C2) cells. Compounds 1-12 were synthesized, with variations in one of the phenyl unit, in a single step by condensation of biaryl-2-carbaldehydes with indole in the presence of para-toluenesulfonic acid. Compound 1 exhibited a GI50 value of 11.000.707?M and the derivatives, compounds 4 and 11 showed a GI50 value of 8.330.416?M and 9.130.177?M respectively in HeLa cells and was found to be non-toxic to H9C2 cells up to 20?M. Furthermore, compounds 1, 4 and 11 induced caspase dependent cellular apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited the cell migration and downregulated the production of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in HeLa cells. PMID:26807764

  11. Radiosensitizing effect of artesunate on nude mice transplanted with HeLa cells of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the radiosensitization of artesunate on nude mouse transplanted with HeLa cells,and to explore its possible mechanisms. Methods: HeLa cells were inoculated into the nude mice to establish tumor model. Mice were randomly divided into 4 groups as blank control,artesunate group, radiation group and artesunate + radiation group when average volume of tumor were about 5 mm × 5 mm× 5 mm. During the term of treatment, the volume of tumors were measured every 2 days. After 14 days treatment, the mice were killed and tumor tissues were harvested for flow cytometry to detect the alteration of cell cycle. Meanwhile, the pathological change of the tumor tissue was observed with HE staining method, and the change of expression of cycle regulatory protein Cyclin B1, Cdc2 and Wee1 were detected by Western blot. Results: The growth of tumor was significantly inhibited by artesunate combined with radiation and its inhibition rate was 72.34%. Flow cytometry results showed that the percent of cells in G1 phase increased and G2 phase decreased in the artesunate + radiation group compared with those in irradiation group (t=4.41, 4.12, P<0.05). The expression level of Cyclin B1 was obviously increased while that of Wee1 decreased in the artesunate + radiation compared with irradiation group. There was no difference in the expression of Cdc2 among the four groups. Conclusions: Artesunate can dramatically increase the radiosensitivity of transplanted tumor of HeLa cells. The possible mechanism might be related to the decreasing G2 phase by regulating the expression of Cyclin B1 and Wee1. (authors)

  12. Study on the effect of artesunate combined with irradiation on DNA damage of HeLa and Siha cells of human cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the effect of artesunate combined with irradiation on DNA damage of HeLa and Siha cells of human cervical cancer, HeLa and Siha cells were cultured in vitro and exposed to different concentration of artesunate for 24 h and MTT assay was used to observe the inhibitory effect of different concentration of artesunate on the proliferation of HeLa and Siha cells. The cells were divided into 2 groups as the irradiated group and the union treatment group. Here it was set up four absorbed doses of 60Co ?-irradiation in each group with 0, 2, 4 and 6 Gy, and the DNA damage were detected by single cell gel electrophoresis assay. MTT analysis showed that the inhibition of artesunate on HeLa and Siha cells of cervical cancer was in concentration-dependent manners. Single cell gel electrophoresis showed that the DNA damage of HeLa cells treated with artesunate was more serious than that treated only with irradiation (P<0.05), but had no such effect on Siha cells. Artesunate can increase the radio-sensitivity of HeLa cells cervical cancer with p53 mutant, but has no such effect on wide type p53 cells. (authors)

  13. The effects of ionizing radiation combined with autophagy inducers or inhibitors or inhibitors on human cervical cancer hela cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect the effects of ionizing radiation combined with autophagy inhibitors and inducers on the proliferation of human cervical cancer cell line. Methods: MTT and flowcytometry (FCM) were used to detect the surviving and proliferation of human cervical cancer cells,and analysis of the relationship of dose-effect and time-effect was made. Results: With the increase of irradiation doses (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy) and the elongation of irradiation time (24, 48 and 72 h), the inhibiting effect of ionizing radiation on the proliferation of human cervical cancer cells increased (P< 0.05 or P< 0.01). The inhibiting effect of 6 Gy combined with autophagy inducer rapamycin on the proliferation of Hela cells weakened (P< 0.05). The inhibiting effects of 6 Gy combined with autophagy inhibitor 3-MA on the cell proliferation were higher than those in 6 Gy group (P< 0.05). Conclusion: Ionizing radiation combined with autophagy inducers can inhibit apoptosis in Hela cells, while the ionizing radiation combined with autophagy inhibitors can promote their apoptosis. (authors)

  14. Radiosensitization effect of folate-conjugated gold nanoparticles on HeLa cancer cells under orthovoltage superficial radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the high atomic number of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), they are known as new radiosensitizer agents for enhancing the efficiency of superficial radiotherapy techniques by increasing the dose absorbed in tumor cells wherein they can be accumulated selectively. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of various common low energy levels of orthovoltage x-rays and megavoltage ?-rays (Co-60) on enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of HeLa cancer cells in the presence of conjugated folate and non-conjugated (pegylated) GNPs. To achieve this, GNPs with an average diameter of 52nm were synthesized and conjugated to folic acid molecules. Pegylated GNPs with an average diameter of 47nm were also synthesized and used as non-conjugated folate GNPs. Cytotoxicity assay of the synthesized folate-conjugated and pegylated GNPs was performed using different levels of nanoparticle concentration incubated with HeLa cells for 24h. The radiosensitizing effect of both the conjugated and pegylated GNPs on the cells at a concentration of 50M was compared using MTT as well as clonogenic assays after exposing them to 2 Gy ionizing radiation produced by an orthovoltage x-ray machine at four different kVps and ?-rays of a Co-60 unit. Significant differences were noted among various irradiated groups with and without the folate conjugation, with an average dose enhancement factor (DEF) of 1.64 0.05 and 1.35 0.05 for the folate-conjugated and pegylated GNPs, respectively. The maximum DEF was obtained with the 180 kVp x-ray beam for both of the GNPs. Folate-conjugated GNPs can significantly enhance the cell killing potential of orthovoltage x-ray energies (especially at 180 kVp) in folate receptor-expressing cancer cells, such as HeLa, in superficial radiotherapy techniques. (paper)

  15. Radiosensitization effect of folate-conjugated gold nanoparticles on HeLa cancer cells under orthovoltage superficial radiotherapy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshgard, Karim; Hashemi, Bijan; Arbabi, Azim; Javad Rasaee, Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud

    2014-05-01

    Due to the high atomic number of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), they are known as new radiosensitizer agents for enhancing the efficiency of superficial radiotherapy techniques by increasing the dose absorbed in tumor cells wherein they can be accumulated selectively. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of various common low energy levels of orthovoltage x-rays and megavoltage γ-rays (Co-60) on enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of HeLa cancer cells in the presence of conjugated folate and non-conjugated (pegylated) GNPs. To achieve this, GNPs with an average diameter of 52 nm were synthesized and conjugated to folic acid molecules. Pegylated GNPs with an average diameter of 47 nm were also synthesized and used as non-conjugated folate GNPs. Cytotoxicity assay of the synthesized folate-conjugated and pegylated GNPs was performed using different levels of nanoparticle concentration incubated with HeLa cells for 24 h. The radiosensitizing effect of both the conjugated and pegylated GNPs on the cells at a concentration of 50 µM was compared using MTT as well as clonogenic assays after exposing them to 2 Gy ionizing radiation produced by an orthovoltage x-ray machine at four different kVps and γ-rays of a Co-60 unit. Significant differences were noted among various irradiated groups with and without the folate conjugation, with an average dose enhancement factor (DEF) of 1.64 ± 0.05 and 1.35 ± 0.05 for the folate-conjugated and pegylated GNPs, respectively. The maximum DEF was obtained with the 180 kVp x-ray beam for both of the GNPs. Folate-conjugated GNPs can significantly enhance the cell killing potential of orthovoltage x-ray energies (especially at 180 kVp) in folate receptor-expressing cancer cells, such as HeLa, in superficial radiotherapy techniques.

  16. Fucoxanthin induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer cell line HeLa via PI3K/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Guoliu; Lu, Qin; Zhao, Weidong; Du, Danli; Jin, Lijie; Liu, Yusheng

    2014-11-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is a malignant neoplasm arising from cells originating in the cervix uteri, among the top causes of death from cancer in women. In a gene expression profiling study of metabolic response to treatment, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway are associated with the development of CC. A common mechanism of Akt activation seen in cancer types is alterations in the upstream regulators of Akt such as phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), which is overexpressed in cervical cancer tissues, and leads to phosphorylation of Akt. Both PI3K and Akt inhibitors exist and may be therapeutically valuable. In the present study, we use MTT assay and western blot for the high-throughput screening to select specific inhibitors of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and then obtain fucoxanthin. Fucoxanthin is a water-soluble dietary fiber, taken from the unique slimy component of alginic cells. Various studies have pointed out that fucoxanthin is very effective for the treatment of cancer. Our results have shown that fucoxanthin induced a significant apoptosis of HeLa cells, compared with other candidates. After treatment with fucoxanthin for 24 h, the level of phosphorylation was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner, and the proteins of apoptotic markers were changed in HeLa cells. And fucoxanthin could suppress tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the mitochondrial signal transduction pathway maybe was involved in its mechanism and NF-?B activation was decreased after treatment with fucoxanthin. Therefore, fucoxanthin may be used as anti-cervical cancer drugs in the future. PMID:25113250

  17. The Ability to Survive Mitosis in the Presence of Microtubule Poisons Differs Significantly Between Human Nontransformed (RPE-1) and Cancer (U2OS, HeLa) Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, Daniela A; Rieder, Conly L

    2009-01-01

    We used live cell imaging to compare the fate of human nontransformed (RPE-1) and cancer (HeLa, U2OS) cells as they entered mitosis in nocodazole or taxol. In the same field, and in either drug, a cell in all lines could die in mitosis, exit mitosis and die within 10 h, or exit mitosis and survive ≥10 h. Relative to RPE-1 cells, significantly fewer HeLa or U2OS cells survived mitosis or remained viable after mitosis: in nocodazole concentrations that inhibit spindle microtubule assembly, or i...

  18. Role of PI3K/Akt/COX-2 pathway in the radiation resistance of human cervical cancer HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the role of PI3K/Akt/COX-2 pathway in the radiation resistance of human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Methods: The HeLa cells were cultured in vitro. Using Celecoxib in Hela cells or associated with LY294002 for 24 h, the cells were radiated by different doses of X-ray. The cell survival ratio was detected by clone formation. To calculate Dq , D0, SF2, SER, the cell survival curve was draw by one-hit multitarget model. The expression of pAkt, Akt, COX-2, Bad and pBad were detected by Western blot. The mRNA expression of COX-2 and Bad was detected by RT-PCR. Results: The Dq, D0, SF2 of Celecoxib or associated with LY294002 group was lower than those in radiation group. The pathway PI3K/Akt/COX-2 was activated by irradiation. Celecoxib inhibited the activation of PI3K/Akt/COX-2 for multitarget. Conclusions: The activation of PI3K/Akt/COX-2 signal transduction resulted in resistance of radiosensitization in HeLa cell. It was indicated that inhibiting PI3K/Akt/COX-2 pathway could improve the radiosensitivity of human cervical cancer HeLa cells. (authors)

  19. Effects of Tatariside G Isolated from Fagopyrum tataricum Roots on Apoptosis in Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common female carcinoma. Current therapies are often unsatisfactory, especially for advanced stage patients. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of tatariside G (TG on apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells and the possible mechanism of action involved. An MTT assay was employed to evaluate cell viability. Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry (FCM assays were used to detect cell apoptosis. The protein expression of phosphorylated JNK, P38, ERK and Akt and cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 was evaluated by western blot analysis. Additionally, the mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9 was measured by fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (FQ-RT-PCR. TG notably inhibited cell viability, enhanced the percentage of apoptotic cells, facilitated the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK proteins and caspase-3 and caspase-9 cracking, downregulated the phosphorylation level of Akt, and increased the loss of MMP and the mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9. TG-induced apoptosis is associated with activation of the mitochondrial death pathway. TG may be an effective candidate for chemotherapy against cervical cancer.

  20. Anthocyanins from Vitis coignetiae Pulliat Inhibit Cancer Invasion and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, but These Effects Can Be Attenuated by Tumor Necrosis Factor in Human Uterine Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Nan Lu; Won Sup Lee; Jeong Won Yun; Min Jeong Kim; Hye Jung Kim; Dong Chul Kim; Jae-Hoon Jeong; Yung Hyun Choi; Gon-Sup Kim; Chung Ho Ryu; Sung Chul Shin

    2013-01-01

    Recently we have demonstrated that anthocyanins from fruits of Vitis coignetiae Pulliat (AIMs) have anticancer effects. Here, we investigate the effects of AIMs on cell proliferation and invasion as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) which have been linked to cancer metastasis in human uterine cervical cancer HeLa cells. AIMs inhibited the invasion of HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner. AIMs inhibited MMP-9 expression in a dose-dependent manner. AIMs inhibited the motility of ...

  1. Inhibition of clathrin by pitstop 2 activates the spindle assembly checkpoint and induces cell death in dividing HeLa cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Charlotte M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During metaphase clathrin stabilises the mitotic spindle kinetochore(K-fibres. Many anti-mitotic compounds target microtubule dynamics. Pitstop 2™ is the first small molecule inhibitor of clathrin terminal domain and inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We investigated its effects on a second function for clathrin in mitosis. Results Pitstop 2 did not impair clathrin recruitment to the spindle but disrupted its function once stationed there. Pitstop 2 trapped HeLa cells in metaphase through loss of mitotic spindle integrity and activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint, phenocopying clathrin depletion and aurora A kinase inhibition. Conclusions Pitstop 2 is therefore a new tool for investigating clathrin spindle dynamics. Pitstop 2 reduced viability in dividing HeLa cells, without affecting dividing non-cancerous NIH3T3 cells, suggesting that clathrin is a possible novel anti-mitotic drug target.

  2. Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-?B activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-?B-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-?B activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

  3. Lanthanum citrate induces anoikis of Hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiange; Zheng, Xiaona; Ni, Jiazuan

    2009-11-28

    Some reports show that lanthanum, a rare earth element, induces apoptosis in certain cancer cells. In the present paper, we report the first observation of anoikis induced by lanthanum citrate (LaCit) in Hela cells at a concentration of 0.001-0.1 mmol/L after 48h-treatment. Before cell treatment, Hela cells were subjected to anoikis-resistant selection to remove anoikis-sensitive cells and ensure specificity of LaCit-induced anoikis. Anoikis was determined by Annexin/PI, AO/EB staining, cleavage of PARP and soft-agar colony forming assay. Further, findings of decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, the cleavage of caspase-9 and a dose-dependent increase expression of Bax were detected, suggesting that the intrinsic caspase pathway was involved in the anoikis induced by LaCit. In addition, activation of caspase-8 occurred later than that of caspase-9. LaCit also caused reorganization of actin cytoskeleton, and was accompanied by an increase in co-localization of F-actin with mitochondria, implying that both actin cytoskeleton and mitochondria may play important roles in LaCit -induced anoikis. PMID:19679391

  4. Non-thermal plasma inhibits human cervical cancer HeLa cells invasiveness by suppressing the MAPK pathway and decreasing matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yu, K. N.; Bao, Lingzhi; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. However, the mechanism underlying its biological effects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of NTP on the invasion of HeLa cells, and explored the possible mechanism. Our results showed that NTP exposure for 20 or 40 s significantly suppressed the migration and invasion of HeLa cells on the basis of matrigel invasion assay and wound healing assay, respectively. Moreover, NTP reduced the activity and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 enzyme. Western blot analysis indicated that NTP exposure effectively decreased phosphorylation level of both ERK1/2 and JNK, but not p38 MAPK. Furthermore, treatment with MAPK signal pathway inhibitors or NTP all exhibited significant depression of HeLa cells migration and MMP-9 expression. The result showed that NTP synergistically suppressed migration and MMP-9 expression in the presence of ERK1/2 inhibitor and JNK inhibitor, but not p38 MAPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings suggested that NTP exposure inhibited the migration and invasion of HeLa cells via down-regulating MMP-9 expression in ERK1/2 and JNK signaling pathways dependent manner. These findings provide hints to the potential clinical research and therapy of NTP on cervical cancer metastasis. PMID:26818472

  5. Non-thermal plasma inhibits human cervical cancer HeLa cells invasiveness by suppressing the MAPK pathway and decreasing matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yu, K. N.; Bao, Lingzhi; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. However, the mechanism underlying its biological effects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of NTP on the invasion of HeLa cells, and explored the possible mechanism. Our results showed that NTP exposure for 20 or 40 s significantly suppressed the migration and invasion of HeLa cells on the basis of matrigel invasion assay and wound healing assay, respectively. Moreover, NTP reduced the activity and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 enzyme. Western blot analysis indicated that NTP exposure effectively decreased phosphorylation level of both ERK1/2 and JNK, but not p38 MAPK. Furthermore, treatment with MAPK signal pathway inhibitors or NTP all exhibited significant depression of HeLa cells migration and MMP-9 expression. The result showed that NTP synergistically suppressed migration and MMP-9 expression in the presence of ERK1/2 inhibitor and JNK inhibitor, but not p38 MAPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings suggested that NTP exposure inhibited the migration and invasion of HeLa cells via down-regulating MMP-9 expression in ERK1/2 and JNK signaling pathways dependent manner. These findings provide hints to the potential clinical research and therapy of NTP on cervical cancer metastasis.

  6. Isolation of Melittin from Iranian Honey Bee Venom and Investigation of Its Effect on Proliferation of Cervical Cancer- HeLa Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Pooshang Bagheri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cervical cancer is the second prevalent cancer in developing countries and the sixth prevalent cancer in USA. Since conventional treatment methods are associated with detrimental side effects, searching for new drugs using natural ingredients is very important. Previous studies have shown that melittin (main component of honey bee venom has anticancer properties along with the effect on cell membrane and activation of apoptosis. In this study, inhibitory effects of melittin on the viability and proliferation of cervical cancer cell line (HeLa was investigated. Methods: Melittin was purified from honeybee venom using reversed-phase HPLC method. Then, biological activity of melittin was examined by hemolytic activity analysis on the red blood cells. In order to investigate whether melittin inhibits proliferation of HeLa cell, MTT assay was performed. HeLa cells were plated in a 96-well plate and treated with serially diluted concentrations of melittin for 12 and 24 hours. The viability of the cells was measured via MTT assay at 540nm. Results: Melittin showed a strong hemolytic activity (HD50=0.5 µg/ml which can be reduced by FBS(HD50=2 µg/ml. Results of MTT assay indicated that melittin shows cytotoxic effect on cervical cancer cells with IC50 = 1.2 ug/ml at 12h incubation period. Conclusion: In this study, biological activity of melittin and inhibitory effect of FBS on hemolysis were determined via hemolytic activity analysis. MTT assay indicated that melittin induced cytotoxic effects in a dose dependent manner on cervical cancer cells and it also revealed dependence on incubation time as well.

  7. Oleanolic Acid A-lactams Inhibit the Growth of HeLa, KB, MCF-7 and Hep-G2 Cancer Cell Lines at Micromolar Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk-Cwynar, Barbara; Ruszkowski, Piotr; Bobkiewicz-Kozlowska, Teresa; Zaprutko, Lucjusz

    2016-01-01

    Oleanolic acid ketones, oximes, lactams and nitriles were obtained. Complete spectral characterizations (IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, DEPT and MS) of the synthesized compounds are presented. The derivatives had oxo, hydroxyimino, lactam or nitrile functions at the C-3 position, an esterified or unmodified carboxyl group at the C- 17 location and, in some cases, an additional oxo function at the C-11 position. The new compounds were tested for cytotoxic activity on the HeLa, KB, MCF-7 and Hep-G2 cancer cell lines with the application of MTT [3-(4,5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] test. Among the tested compounds, some oximes and all lactams proved to be the most active cytotoxic agents. These triterpenes significantly inhibited the growth of the HeLa, KB, MCF-7 and Hep-G2 cancer cell lines at micromolar concentrations. PMID:26343139

  8. Structurally related ganoderic acids induce apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells: Involvement of oxidative stress and antioxidant protective system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ru-Ming; Li, Ying-Bo; Liang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Hui-Zhou; Xiao, Jian-Hui; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Ganoderic acids (GAs) produced by Ganoderma lucidum possess anticancer activities with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the role of oxidative stress in apoptotic process induced by GAs is still undefined. In this study, the effects of four structurally related GAs, i.e. GA-T, GA-Mk, and two deacetylated derivatives of GA-T (GA-T1 and GA-T2) on the antioxidant defense system and induced apoptosis in cervical cancer cells HeLa were investigated in vitro. Our results indicated that the tested GAs (5-40 μM) induced apoptotic cell death through mitochondrial membrane potential decrease and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Furthermore, GAs increased the generation of intracellular ROS and attenuated antioxidant defense system by decreasing glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities. The above effects were remarkably blocked by the exogenous antioxidants, i.e. N-acetylcysteine, catalase and diphenyleneiodonium chloride. The potency of the four GAs toward induced apoptosis, generation of ROS and suppression of antioxidant defense system was in the order of: GA-T > GA-Mk ≈ GA-T1 > GA-T2 in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that GAs induced mitochondria-dependent cell apoptosis in HeLa cells are mediated via enhancing oxidative stress and depressing antioxidant defense. Additionally, the acetylation of hydroxyl groups in GAs may contribute to their pro-oxidant activities and cytotoxicity, which is helpful to the development of novel chemotherapy agents. PMID:26282491

  9. The Effect of Coatings on the Affinity of Lanthanide Nanoparticles to MKN45 and HeLa Cancer Cells and Improvement in Photodynamic Therapy Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sawamura

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An improvement in photodynamic therapy (PDT efficiency against a human gastric cancer cell line (MKN45 with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA and lanthanide nanoparticles (LNPs is described. An endogenous photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX, biosynthesized from ALA and selectively accumulated in cancer cells, is sensitizable by the visible lights emitted from up-conversion LNPs, which can be excited by a near-infrared light. Ten kinds of surface modifications were performed on LNPs, NaYF4(Sc/Yb/Er and NaYF4(Yb/Tm, in an aim to distribute these irradiation light sources near cancer cells. Among these LNPs, only the amino-functionalized LNPs showed affinity to MKN45 and HeLa cancer cells. A PDT assay with MKN45 demonstrated that amino-modified NaYF4(Sc/Yb/Er gave rise to a dramatically enhanced PDT effect, reaching almost perfect lethality, whereas NaYF4(Yb/Tm-based systems caused little improvement in PDT efficiency. The improvement of PDT effect with the amino-modified NaYF4(Sc/Yb/Er is promising for a practical PDT against deep cancer cells that are reachable only by near-infrared lights.

  10. Thymoquinone-Loaded Nanostructured Lipid Carrier Exhibited Cytotoxicity towards Breast Cancer Cell Lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and Cervical Cancer Cell Lines (HeLa and SiHa)

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Keat Ng; Latifah Saiful Yazan; Li Hua Yap; Wan Abd Ghani Wan Nor Hafiza; Chee Wun How; Rasedee Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) has been shown to exhibit antitumor properties. Thymoquinone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (TQ-NLC) was developed to improve the bioavailability and cytotoxicity of TQ. This study was conducted to determine the cytotoxic effects of TQ-NLC on breast cancer (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and SiHa). TQ-NLC was prepared by applying the hot high pressure homogenization technique. The mean particle size of TQ-NLC was 35.66 0.1235?nm with a narr...

  11. Irradiation And Papillomavirus E2 Proteins On Hela Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to relatively high doses ionizing radiation activates cellular responses that impair cell survival. These responses, for which the p53 protein plays a central role, form the basis for cancer radiotherapy. However, the efficacy of radiation treatments on cell killing is often reduced as a consequence of the frequent inactivation of the p53 protein in cancer cells. Loss of p53 protein is associated with later stages of most human tumors and resistance to anticancer agents. Carcinomas are frequent malignant tumors in humans. The majority of cervical carcinomas are etiologically linked to the presence of HPV virus (Human Papillomavirus). In carcinoma tumor cells, as well as in their derived-cell lines such as HeLa cells, the p53 protein is generally not detected due to its degradation by the product of the HPV-associated oncogenic E6 gene. Another characteristic of HPV-positive cervical cancer cells is the loss of the regulatory viral E2 gene expression as a consequence of viral DNA integration into the cellular genome. Reintroduction of E2 expression in HeLa cells reactivates p53, due to a negative effect on the expression of E6 protein, with a concomitant arrest of cell proliferation at the phase G1 of the cell cycle and delay in cell division via the repression of E2F-target genes. To elucidate whether reactivation of p53 would improve the cell killing effect of ionizing radiation in cancer cells, we studied the combined effects of radiation and E2 expression on the cell cycle distribution in HeLa cells

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Exopolysaccharide from Aphanothece halaphytica (EPSAH) Induced Apoptosis in HeLa Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Yu; Xu, Shuya; Zhu, Dandan; Yang, Xuegan

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the pharmacological effect of the exopolysaccharides from Aphanothece halophytica GR02 (EPSAH) on the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line. HeLa cells were cultured in RPMI-1640-10% FBS medium containing with or without different concentrations of EPSAH. Cell viability was assessed by methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Cell apoptosis was elevated with Wright-Giemsa staining, AO/EB double staining, and DNA fragmentation assay. Apoptosis-associated mole...

  13. Reduced BCL2 and CCND1 mRNA expression in human cervical cancer HeLa cells treated with a combination of everolimus and paclitaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Ebru; Onen, H. Ilke; Menevse, Sevda

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Everolimus displays direct effects on growth and proliferation of cancer cells via inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein, which is known to be associated with drug resistance. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of everolimus, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel in terms of cell viability and mRNA expression levels of GRP78, CCND1, CASP2, and BCL2 genes. Material and methods HeLa cells were treated with different doses of everolimus, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel. Cell viability was assessed using MTT assay, and obtained dose response curves were used for the calculations of inhibitory concentration (IC) values. At the end of the treatment times with selected doses, RNA isolation and cDNA synthesis were performed. Finally, GRP78, CCND1, CASP2, and BCL2 genes mRNA expression levels were analysed using quantitative PCR. Results The IC50 value of everolimus was 0.9 µM for 24-hour treatment. Moreover, the IC50 value of gemcitabine and paclitaxel was found to be around 18.1 µM and 7.08 µM, respectively. Everolimus, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel treatments alone did not change the GRP78, CCND1, BCL2 and CASP2 mRNA expression levels significantly. However, combined treatment of everolimus and paclitaxel significantly reduced BCL2 and CCND1 mRNA expression (p 0.05). Conclusions Down-regulation of CCND1 and BCL2 expression may be an important mechanism by which everolimus increases the therapeutic window of paclitaxel in cervical cancers.

  14. UJI AKTIVITAS SITOTOKSIK EKSTRAK KULIT JERUK PURUT (Citrus hystrix) PADA SEL HeLa CERVICAL CANCER CELL LINE

    OpenAIRE

    Nathanael, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Citrus hystrix or know as kefir lime in Indonesia were not used as medicine. Kefir lime were more used as skin and body treatment rather as food composition. The research of cytotoxic effect on HeLa from ethanolic extract of kefir lime peels is never been done before, ethanolic extract of kefir lime peels were used on this research. The point of this research is to know the main compound that built ethanolic extract of kefir lime peels and to know the cytotoxic effect of ethanolic extract ...

  15. Non-thermal plasma inhibits human cervical cancer HeLa cells invasiveness by suppressing the MAPK pathway and decreasing matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Li; Yu, K. N.; Lingzhi Bao; Jie Shen; Cheng Cheng; Wei Han

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. However, the mechanism underlying its biological effects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of NTP on the invasion of HeLa cells, and explored the possible mechanism. Our results showed that NTP exposure for 20 or 40 s significantly suppressed the migration and invasion of HeLa cells on the basis of matrigel invasion assay and wound healing assay, respectively....

  16. 3?,23-isopropylidenedioxyolean-12-en-27-oic acid, a triterpene isolated from Aceriphyllum rossii, induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, So-Jung; Ki, Yo Sook; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Choi, Jung-Hye; Bae, Ki Hwan; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of 3alpha,23-isopropylidenedioxyolean-12-en-27-oic acid (IPA), an active compound isolated from Aceriphyllum rossii, on the apoptotic activity and the molecular mechanism of the action in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Treatment with IPA significantly increased externalization of phosphatidylserine residues and apoptotic DNA fragmentation as shown by Annexin V staining and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining, respectively. In addition, IPA induced the activations of caspase-8, -9, -3, and cleavage of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) in HeLa cells. Pretreatment with a specific caspase-8, -9, or -3 inhibitor neutralized the pro-apoptotic activity of IPA in HeLa cells. Furthermore, IPA was found to induce the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and the increased ratio of mitochondrial Bax/Bcl-2. Moreover, we demonstrated that IPA triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as shown by changes in cytosol-calcium level, activation of mu-calpain and caspase-12, and up-regulation of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and growth arrest DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153). IPA-induced apoptosis was substantially reduced in the presence of an intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA/AM. Taken together, these results suggest that both mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress contribute to IPA-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells. PMID:20823585

  17. Effect of Quercetin on radio-sensitivity of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the mechanism of Quercetin on radio-sensitivity of human Uterine Cervix Cancer HeLa cells, HeLa cells were cultured in different concentrations of Quercetin and different doses of irradiation. The clonogenic assay was used to observe the cell survival rate. The repair of DNA double-strand breaks and effect of Quercetin combination of radiation on the cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. The results show that the radio-sensitivity of Quercetin on HeLa cells was obvious and the unrepaired DSBs after irradiation increased, but did not decrease G2/M cell cycle arrest. From this it can be inferred that the effect on HeLa cell radio-sensitivity may be related to the inhibition of the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by Quercetin, but it dose not reveal a significant relation with the cell cycle and G2/M arrest. (authors)

  18. Biofabrication of Ag nanoparticles using Sterculia foetida L. seed extract and their toxic potential against mosquito vectors and HeLa cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one-step and eco-friendly process for the synthesis of silver-(protein-lipid) nanoparticles (Ag-PL NPs) (core–shell) has been developed using the seed extract from wild Indian Almond tree, Sterculia foetida (L.) (Sterculiaceae). The reaction temperature played a major role in controlling the size and shell formation of NPs. The amount of NPs synthesized and qualitative characterization was done by UV–vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. TEM studies exhibited controlled dispersity of spherical shaped NPs with an average size of 6.9 ± 0.2 nm. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed ‘fcc’ phase and crystallinity of the particles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to identify the protein–lipid (PL) bilayer that appears as a shell around the Ag core particles. The thermal stability of the Ag-PL NPs was examined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Further analysis was carried out by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), where the spectra provided evidence for the presence of proteins and lipid moieties ((2n-octylcycloprop-1-enyl)-octanoic acid (I)), and their role in synthesis and stabilization of Ag NPs. This is the first report of plant seed assisted synthesis of PL conjugated Ag NPs. These formed Ag-PL NPs showed potential mosquito larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti (L.), Anopheles stephensi Liston and Culex quinquefasciatus Say. These Ag-PL NPs can also act as promising agents in cancer therapy. They exhibited anti-proliferative activity against HeLa cancer cell lines and a promising toxicity was observed in a dose dependent manner. Toxicity studies were further supported by the cellular DNA fragmentation in the Ag-PL NPs treated HeLa cells. - Highlights: • Green synthesis of protein-lipid conjugated Ag NPs using S. foetida L. seed extract. • S. foetida seed extract acted as good reducing and stabilizing agent for Ag NPs. • XPS and FTIR confirm the biomolecules associated with Ag NPs. • Synthesized Ag NPs showed potential biological activities

  19. Biofabrication of Ag nanoparticles using Sterculia foetida L. seed extract and their toxic potential against mosquito vectors and HeLa cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekharreddy, Pala; Rani, Pathipati Usha, E-mail: usharani65@yahoo.com

    2014-06-01

    A one-step and eco-friendly process for the synthesis of silver-(protein-lipid) nanoparticles (Ag-PL NPs) (core–shell) has been developed using the seed extract from wild Indian Almond tree, Sterculia foetida (L.) (Sterculiaceae). The reaction temperature played a major role in controlling the size and shell formation of NPs. The amount of NPs synthesized and qualitative characterization was done by UV–vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. TEM studies exhibited controlled dispersity of spherical shaped NPs with an average size of 6.9 ± 0.2 nm. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed ‘fcc’ phase and crystallinity of the particles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to identify the protein–lipid (PL) bilayer that appears as a shell around the Ag core particles. The thermal stability of the Ag-PL NPs was examined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Further analysis was carried out by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), where the spectra provided evidence for the presence of proteins and lipid moieties ((2n-octylcycloprop-1-enyl)-octanoic acid (I)), and their role in synthesis and stabilization of Ag NPs. This is the first report of plant seed assisted synthesis of PL conjugated Ag NPs. These formed Ag-PL NPs showed potential mosquito larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti (L.), Anopheles stephensi Liston and Culex quinquefasciatus Say. These Ag-PL NPs can also act as promising agents in cancer therapy. They exhibited anti-proliferative activity against HeLa cancer cell lines and a promising toxicity was observed in a dose dependent manner. Toxicity studies were further supported by the cellular DNA fragmentation in the Ag-PL NPs treated HeLa cells. - Highlights: • Green synthesis of protein-lipid conjugated Ag NPs using S. foetida L. seed extract. • S. foetida seed extract acted as good reducing and stabilizing agent for Ag NPs. • XPS and FTIR confirm the biomolecules associated with Ag NPs. • Synthesized Ag NPs showed potential biological activities.

  20. CXCL10 enhances radiotherapy effects in HeLa cells through cell cycle redistribution

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ling-Lin; WANG, BI-QIONG; Chen, Lan-Lan; LUO, HUI-QUN; Wu, Jing-bo

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a crucial treatment for cervical cancer, the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide. In this study, we investigated the effects of CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) gene therapy combined with radiotherapy on cervical cancer using HeLa cells. TUNEL assay revealed that the apoptotic rate in the combined treatment of CXCL10 gene therapy and radiotherapy was greatly increased compared with that of CXCL10 or radiotherapy alone. Flow cytometry showed that CXCL10 overexp...

  1. Thymoquinone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier exhibited cytotoxicity towards breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and SiHa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wei Keat; Saiful Yazan, Latifah; Yap, Li Hua; Wan Nor Hafiza, Wan Abd Ghani; How, Chee Wun; Abdullah, Rasedee

    2015-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) has been shown to exhibit antitumor properties. Thymoquinone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (TQ-NLC) was developed to improve the bioavailability and cytotoxicity of TQ. This study was conducted to determine the cytotoxic effects of TQ-NLC on breast cancer (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and SiHa). TQ-NLC was prepared by applying the hot high pressure homogenization technique. The mean particle size of TQ-NLC was 35.66 0.1235?nm with a narrow polydispersity index (PDI) lower than 0.25. The zeta potential of TQ-NLC was greater than -30?mV. Polysorbate 80 helps to increase the stability of TQ-NLC. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that TQ-NLC has a melting point of 56.73C, which is lower than that of the bulk material. The encapsulation efficiency of TQ in TQ-NLC was 97.63 0.1798% as determined by HPLC analysis. TQ-NLC exhibited antiproliferative activity towards all the cell lines in a dose-dependent manner which was most cytotoxic towards MDA-MB-231 cells. Cell shrinkage was noted following treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with TQ-NLC with an increase of apoptotic cell population (P < 0.05). TQ-NLC also induced cell cycle arrest. TQ-NLC was most cytotoxic towards MDA-MB-231 cells. It induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the cells. PMID:25632388

  2. Dietary Flavonoids Sensitize HeLa Cells to Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Król

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available TRAIL is a promising candidate for cancer therapeutics that preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells. The combined treatment flavonoids with TRAIL might be promising as a chemoprevention and/or new therapy against malignant tumors. We examined the cytotoxic effect of dietary flavonoids in combination with TRAIL on HeLa cells. It was found that treatment with noncytotoxic concentration of some flavonoids significantly sensititizes to TRAIL induced death in HeLa cells. Our study demonstrated that flavone, apigenin and genistein markedly augmented TRAIL mediated cytotoxicity against HeLa, whereas kaempferol and quercetin produced no effect.

  3. Photodynamic Effects of Pterin on HeLa Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denofrio, M. Paula; Lorente, Carolina; Breitenbach, Thomas; Hatz, Sonja; Cabrerizo, Franco M.; Thomas, Andres H.; Ogilby, Peter Remsen

    2011-01-01

    cells (HeLa) and that these cells die upon UV-A irradiation of Ptr. Cell death was assessed using two tests: (1) the Rhodamine 123 fluorescence assay for mitochondrial viability and (2) the Trypan Blue assay for membrane integrity. The data suggest that, for Ptr-dependent photoinitiated cell death...

  4. Phorbol Esters from Jatropha Meal Triggered Apoptosis, Activated PKC-δ, Caspase-3 Proteins and Down-Regulated the Proto-Oncogenes in MCF-7 and HeLa Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahida Ahmad

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha meal produced from the kernel of Jatropha curcas Linn. grown in Malaysia contains phorbol esters (PEs. The potential benefits of PEs present in the meal as anticancer agent are still not well understood. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the cytotoxic effects and mode of actions of PEs isolated from Jatropha meal against breast (MCF-7 and cervical (HeLa cancer cell lines. Isolated PEs inhibited cells proliferation in a dose-dependent manner of both MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines with the IC50 of 128.6 ± 2.51 and 133.0 ± 1.96 µg PMA equivalents/mL respectively, while the values for the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA as positive control were 114.7 ± 1.73 and 119.6 ± 3.73 µg/mL, respectively. Microscopic examination showed significant morphological changes that resemble apoptosis in both cell lines when treated with PEs and PMA at IC50 concentration after 24 h. Flow cytometry analysis and DNA fragmentation results confirmed the apoptosis induction of PEs and PMA in both cell lines. The PEs isolated from Jatropha meal activated the PKC-δ and down-regulated the proto-oncogenes (c-Myc, c-Fos and c-Jun. These changes probably led to the activation of Caspase-3 protein and apoptosis cell death occurred in MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines upon 24 h treatment with PEs and PMA. Phorbol esters of Jatropha meal were found to be promising as an alternative to replace the chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy.

  5. Antiproliferative effects of some medicinal plants on HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceni?-Miloevi? Desanka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants maintain the health and vitality of individuals, and also have potential curative effect on various diseases, including cancer. In this study were investigated the antiproliferative effects of water extracts of previously obtained ethanolic dry extracts of three different medicinal plants (Echinacea angustifolia, Salvia officinalis and Melissa officinalis on cell lines derived from human cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa cells. The best cytotoxic activity (IC50 = 43.52 ?g/ml on HeLa cell lines was exhibited by Echinacea angustifolia. The extract of Salvia officinalis also showed a good cytotoxic activity against HeLa cell lines; the IC50 value was 70.41 ?g/ml. Melissa officinalis manifested a slightly weaker cytotoxic activity and an IC50 value of 122.22 ?g/ml. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 34021 i br. 175011

  6. Evaluation of the effects of paederus beetle extract and gamma irradiation on HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Samani; Ali Shabestani Monfared; Ebrahim Zabihi; Soraya Khafri; Maesoumeh Karimi; Haleh Akhavan Niaki

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s):Cervical cancer is a malignancy that is the second most common cause of death from cancer in women throughout the world. Paederus beetle (Paederus fuscipes) extract (PBE), contains bioactive compounds such as pederine which has cytotoxic properties and blocks DNA and protein synthesis at very low concentrations. In this investigation we tried to determine the effects co-treatment with PBE and gamma irradiation on HeLa cells. Materials and Methods: The viability of the cells was m...

  7. Condurango (Gonolobus condurango Extract Activates Fas Receptor and Depolarizes Mitochondrial Membrane Potential to Induce ROS-dependent Apoptosis in Cancer Cells in vitro CE-treatment on HeLa: a ROS-dependent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kausik Bishayee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Condurango (Gonolobus condurango extract is used by complementary and alternative medicine (CAM practitioners as a traditional medicine, including homeopathy, mainly for the treatment of syphilis. Condurango bark extract is also known to reduce tumor volume, but the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Methods: Using a cervical cancer cell line (HeLa as our model, the molecular events behind condurango extract’s (CE’s anticancer effect were investigated by using flow cytometry, immunoblotting and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Other included cell types were prostate cancer cells (PC3, transformed liver cells (WRL-68, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Results: Condurango extract (CE was found to be cytotoxic against target cells, and this was significantly deactivated in the presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS, suggesting that its action could be mediated through ROS generation. CE caused an increase in the HeLa cell population containing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA damage at the G zero/Growth 1 (G0/G1 stage. Further, CE increased the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and the fas receptor (FasR levels both at the ribonucleic acid (RNA and the protein levels, indicating that CE might have a cytotoxic mechanism of action. CE also triggered a sharp decrease in the expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB both at the RNA and the protein levels, a possible route to attenuation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2, and caused an opening of the mitochondrial membrane’s permeability transition (MPT pores, thus enhancing caspase activities. Conclusion: Overall, our results suggest possible pathways for CE mediated cytotoxicity in model cancer cells.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of exopolysaccharide from Aphanothece halaphytica (EPSAH) induced apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yu; Xu, Shuya; Zhu, Dandan; Yang, Xuegan

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the pharmacological effect of the exopolysaccharides from Aphanothece halophytica GR02 (EPSAH) on the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line. HeLa cells were cultured in RPMI-1640-10% FBS medium containing with or without different concentrations of EPSAH. Cell viability was assessed by methylthiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Cell apoptosis was elevated with Wright-Giemsa staining, AO/EB double staining, and DNA fragmentation assay. Apoptosis-associated molecules from cultured HeLa cells were quantified using Western blot analysis. Our results suggest that EPASH induces apoptosis in HeLa cells by targeting a master unfolded protein response (UPR) regulator Grp78. Grp78 further promotes the expression of CHOP and downregulates expression of survivin, which leads to activate mitochondria-mediated downstream molecules and p53-survivin pathway, resulting in caspase-3 activation and causing apoptosis. These findings provide important clues for further evaluating the potential potency of EPSAH for use in cancer therapy. PMID:24466342

  9. Methanol extract from Vietnamese Caesalpinia sappan induces apoptosis in HeLa cells

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Tran Manh, Hung; Nguyen Hai, Dang; Nguyen Tien, Dat.

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study evaluated the cytotoxic activity of extracts from Caesalpinia sappan heartwood against multiple cancer cell lines using an MTT cell viability assay. The cell death though induction of apoptosis was as indicated by DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 enzyme activation. RESULTS: A m [...] ethanol extract from C. sappan (MECS) showed cytotoxic activity against several of the cancer cell lines. The most potent activity exhibited by the MECS was against HeLa cells with an IC50value of 26.5??3.2 g/mL. Treatment of HeLa cells with various MECS concentrations resulted in growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis, as indicated by DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 enzyme activation. CONCLUSION: This study is the first report of the anticancer properties of the heartwood of C. sappan native to Vietnam. Our findings demonstrate that C. sappan heartwood may have beneficial applications in the field of anticancer drug discovery.

  10. Pro-apoptotic effect of new quinolone 7- ethyl 9-ethyl-6-oxo-6,9-dihydro[1,2,5]selenadiazolo [3,4-h]quinoline-7-carboxylate on cervical cancer cell line HeLa alone/with UVA irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantová, Soňa; Mrvová, Nataša; Hudec, Roman; Sedlák, Ján; Pánik, Miroslav; Milata, Viktor

    2016-06-01

    7- ethyl 9-ethyl-6-oxo-6,9-dihydro[1,2,5]selenadiazolo [3,4-h]quinoline-7-carboxylate (E2h) is a new synthetically prepared quinolone derivative, which in our primary study showed cytotoxic effects towards tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to examine the antiproliferative and apoptosis inducing activities of E2h towards human cervical cancer cell line HeLa with/without the presence of UVA irradiation. Further, the molecular mechanism involved in E2h-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells was investigated. Our results showed that both non-photoactivated and photoactivated E2h caused morphological changes and inhibited the cell growth of HeLa cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Irradiation increased the sensitivity of HeLa cells to E2h. Quinolone induced S and G2/M arrest and apoptosis in HeLa cells, as characterized by DNA fragmentation and flow cytometry. In addition, E2h elevated the level of reactive oxygen species and activated caspases 3. In conclusions, E2h alone/in combination with UVA irradiation induced apoptosis in HeLa cells through the ROS-mitochondrial/caspase 3-dependent pathway. PMID:26916084

  11. Growth regulation of HeLa cells by 1060 nm photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Living organisms are open systems dominated by electromagnetic interaction. An essential feature of a living system is its cybernetic process which imply their capability of adaptation and sensitivity to internal and external fluctuations. The experimental results show that coherent and incoherent light of 1060 nm wavelength influences the metabolic processes and consequently the proliferation of cancer cell cultures (HeLa). Light induced regulation of HeLa cell growth depends on the cell density, the state of the cell culture and the amount of light irradiation. Best proliferation inhibiting effects can be obtained by application of 200 J/m2 on HeLa cells in Lag-Phase and a typical cell density of 5.104 cells/cm2. Proceeding on the singlet oxygen hypothesis (KLIMA, H. et al.; 1990), it is shown mathematically that the dynamical behaviour of the NADH model is influenced by 1060 nm photons. Both, the experimental and the numerical results support our hypothesis: 1060 nm photons regulate the proliferation of HeLa cells. (author)

  12. Ethyl 2- [N-m-chlorobenzyl- (2'-methyl)] anilino-4-oxo-4,5-dihydrofuran-3-carboxylate (JOT01006) induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, An-Cheng; Lin, Tsung-Ping; Weng, Yueh-Shan; Ho, Yung-Tsuan; Lin, Hui-Ju; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2007-01-01

    Human cervical cancer is potentially lethal, and therefore the development of effective and tolerable therapeutic options is vital. In the present study, the in vitro effect of the synthetized compound JOT01006 (C21H20C1NO4) on human cervical epithelioid carcinoma cell line (HeLa) was examined. The results demonstrated that JOT01006 induced morphological changes and cytotoxicity (decreased the percentage of viable cells) in a dose-dependent manner. JOT01006 induced apoptosis which was analyzed by flow cytometric methods and confirmed by DAPI staining and DNA fragmentation analyzed by DNA gel electrophoresis. JOT01006 also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction before causing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress which was also confirmed by the increased levels of Grp78 and Gadd153. Western blotting was selected to demonstrate that JOT010006 promoted p53, Bak, PARP, caspase-3 levels and decreased the levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Our results also showed that JOT01006 also promoted caspase-12 production followed by apoptosis. The results also showed that JOT01006 inhibited the migration of HeLa cells potentially through inhibition of MMP-2 and -9. PMID:17695546

  13. In vitro studies on radiosensitization effect of glucose capped gold nanoparticles in photon and ion irradiation of HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harminder; Pujari, Geetanjali; Semwal, Manoj K.; Sarma, Asitikantha; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles are of great interest due to their potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. In the present work, we synthesized glucose capped gold nanoparticle (Glu-AuNP) for internalization in the HeLa cell line (human cervix cancer cells). The capping of glucose on Au nanoparticle was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The Glu-AuNP did not show any toxicity to the HeLa cell. The γ-radiation and carbon ion irradiation of HeLa cell with and without Glu-AuNP were performed to evaluate radiosensitization effects. The study revealed a significant reduction in radiation dose for killing the HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs as compared to the HeLa cells without Glu-AuNP. The Glu-AuNP treatment resulted in enhancement of radiation effect as evident from increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon ion irradiated HeLa cells.

  14. Dynamic friction measurements on living HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Colbert, Marie-Josée; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2008-03-01

    The interaction of cells with various interfaces, and especially man-made surfaces, is an active field of research. In our experiment we use a micropipette to measure both the friction and normal force as a cell slides across a surface. A thin substrate, coated with Poly-L-Lysine is brought into contact with a HeLa cell. The adjustable substrate motion is used to study the response of the cell at various normal forces and speeds. Analysis of the micropipette provides dynamic measurements of both the friction and normal force. With our novel setup we are able to probe the attachment/detachment process of living cells.

  15. ALG-2 knockdown in HeLa cells results in G2/M cell cycle phase accumulation and cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Berit Rahbek; la Cour, Peter Jonas Marstrand; Mollerup, Jens; Berchtold, Martin Werner

    2009-01-01

    downregulation induces accumulation of HeLa cells in the G2/M cell cycle phase and increases the amount of early apoptotic and dead cells. Caspase inhibition by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk attenuated the increase in the amount of dead cells following ALG-2 downregulation. Thus, our results indicate that...... ALG-2 has an anti-apoptotic function in HeLa cells by facilitating the passage through checkpoints in the G2/M cell cycle phase.......ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene-2 encoded protein) has been shown to be upregulated in a variety of human tumors questioning its previously assumed pro-apoptotic function. The aim of the present study was to obtain insights into the role of ALG-2 in human cancer cells. We show that ALG-2...

  16. Harmonizing HeLa cell cytoskeleton behavior by multi-Ti oxide phased nanostructure synthesized through ultrashort pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Chandramouli; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge about cancer cell behavior on heterogeneous nanostructures is relevant for developing a distinct biomaterial that can actuate cancer cells. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated a harmonized approach of forming multi Ti-oxide phases in a nanostructure (MTOP nanostructure) for its unique cancer cell controlling behavior.Conventionally, single phases of TiO2 are used for targeted therapy and as drug carrier systems.In this research, we have shown a biomaterial that can control HeLa cells diligently using a combination of TiO, Ti3O and TiO2 phases when compared to fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells.MTOP-nanostructures are generated by varying the ionization energy in the vapor plume of the ultrashort pulse laser; this interaction with the material allows accurate tuning and composition of phases within the nanostructure. In addition, the lattice spacing of MTOP-nanostructures was analyzed as shown by HR-TEM investigations. An FESEM investigation of MTOP-nanostructures revealed a greater reduction of HeLa cells relative to fibroblast cells. Altered cell adhesion was followed by modulation of HeLa cell architecture with a significant reduction of actin stress fibers.The intricate combination of MTOP-nanostructures renders a biomaterial that can precisely alter HeLa cell but not fibroblast cell behavior, filling a void in the research for a biomaterial to modulate cancer cell behavior.

  17. Three-dimensional printing of Hela cells for cervical tumor model in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing have enabled the direct assembly of cells and extracellular matrix materials to form in vitro cellular models for 3D biology, the study of disease pathogenesis and new drug discovery. In this study, we report a method of 3D printing for Hela cells and gelatin/alginate/fibrinogen hydrogels to construct in vitro cervical tumor models. Cell proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) protein expression and chemoresistance were measured in the printed 3D cervical tumor models and compared with conventional 2D planar culture models. Over 90% cell viability was observed using the defined printing process. Comparisons of 3D and 2D results revealed that Hela cells showed a higher proliferation rate in the printed 3D environment and tended to form cellular spheroids, but formed monolayer cell sheets in 2D culture. Hela cells in 3D printed models also showed higher MMP protein expression and higher chemoresistance than those in 2D culture. These new biological characteristics from the printed 3D tumor models in vitro as well as the novel 3D cell printing technology may help the evolution of 3D cancer study. (paper)

  18. In-Vitro Anticancer Activity of Ethanolic Extract of Cynodon dactylon Against HEP-2, HELA and MCF-7 Cell Lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanimozhi D

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of in-vitro anticancer activity of the ethanolicextract of Cynodon dactylon against HEP-2 laryngeal, HELA cervical and MCF-7 breast cancer celllines and it was compared with normal, Vero cell line using MTT assay showed a percentage of cellviability of 97 % at 0.078mg/ml which decrease with increase in concentration of extract. Anticanceractivity of ethanolic extract of Cynodon dactylon on HEP-2, HELA and MCF-7 cancer cell linesshowed pot...

  19. Berberine alters epigenetic modifications, disrupts microtubule network, and modulates HPV-18 E6-E7 oncoproteins by targeting p53 in cervical cancer cell HeLa: a mechanistic study including molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Santu Kumar; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Increased evidence of chemo-resistance, toxicity and carcinogenicity necessitates search for alternative approaches for determining next generation cancer therapeutics and targets. We therefore tested the efficacy of plant alkaloid berberine on human papilloma virus (HPV) -18 positive cervical cancer cell HeLa systematically-involving certain cellular, viral and epigenetic factors. We observed disruptions of microtubule network and changes in membrane topology due to berberine influx through confocal and atomic force microscopies (AFM). We examined nuclear uptake, internucleosomal DNA damages, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) alterations and cell migration assays to validate possible mode of cell death events. Analytical data on interactions of berberine with pBR322 through fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and gel migration assay strengthen berberine׳s biologically significant DNA binding abilities. We measured cellular uptake, DNA ploidy and DNA strand-breaks through fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). To elucidate epigenetic modifications, in support of DNA binding associated processes, if any, we conducted methylation-specific restriction enzyme (RE) assay, methylation specific-PCR (MSP) and expression studies of histone proteins. We also analyzed differential interactions and localization of cellular tumor suppressor p53 and viral oncoproteins HPV-18 E6-E7 through siRNA approach. We further made in-silico approaches to determine possible binding sites of berberine on histone proteins. Overall results indicated cellular uptake of berberine through cell membrane depolarization causing disruption of microtubule networks and its biological DNA binding abilities that probably contributed to epigenetic modifications. Results of modulation in p53 and viral oncoproteins HPV-18 E6-E7 by berberine further proved its potential as a promising chemotherapeutic agent in cervical cancer. PMID:25448308

  20. Metabolic switch in uterine cervix cancer: in vitro study of adenocarcinoma (HeLa) and squamous cell carcinoma (SiHa) cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Lídia Jorge Santos, 1989-

    2012-01-01

    O cancro é uma doença complexa que envolve numerosas alterações na fisiologia da célula que conduzem, em última instância, a tumores malignos. Os processos biológicos através dos quais as células normais são transformadas em células cancerígenas malignas têm sido alvo de vasta investigação durante várias décadas (Seyfried & Shelton, 2010). Existem seis alterações essenciais na fisiologia celular que estão na base do crescimento celular maligno e são a auto-suficiência em termos de sinais de c...

  1. Outcome of Treatment of Human HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells With Roscovitine Strongly Depends on the Dosage and Cell Cycle Status Prior to the Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wesierska-Gadek, J.; Borza, A.; Walzi, E.; Kryštof, Vladimír; Maurer, M.; Komina, O.; Wandl, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 5 (2009), s. 937-955. ISSN 0730-2312 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : APOPTOSIS * CELL CYCLE ARREST * CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASES Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.935, year: 2009

  2. In vitro studies on radiosensitization effect of glucose capped gold nanoparticles in photon and ion irradiation of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? Glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNPs) are synthesized for internalization in HeLa cells (cervical cancer cells). ? Internalization of Glu-AuNPs in HeLa cells is confirmed by cross section TEM of cells. ? Irradiation (by C ion or ?-rays) of HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs results in enhanced radiosensitization. ? There is about 30% reduction in radiation dose for 90% cell killing of HeLa cells, when internalized by Glu-AuNPs. ? The enhanced radiosensitization due to Glu-AuNPs is of interest for researchers in nanobiotechnology and radiation biology. -- Abstract: Noble metal nanoparticles are of great interest due to their potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. In the present work, we synthesized glucose capped gold nanoparticle (Glu-AuNP) for internalization in the HeLa cell line (human cervix cancer cells). The capping of glucose on Au nanoparticle was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The Glu-AuNP did not show any toxicity to the HeLa cell. The ?-radiation and carbon ion irradiation of HeLa cell with and without Glu-AuNP were performed to evaluate radiosensitization effects. The study revealed a significant reduction in radiation dose for killing the HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs as compared to the HeLa cells without Glu-AuNP. The Glu-AuNP treatment resulted in enhancement of radiation effect as evident from increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon ion irradiated HeLa cells

  3. In vitro studies on radiosensitization effect of glucose capped gold nanoparticles in photon and ion irradiation of HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Harminder; Pujari, Geetanjali [Radiation Biology Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Semwal, Manoj K. [Army Hospital (R and R), Delhi Cantonment, New Delhi 110010 (India); Sarma, Asitikantha [Radiation Biology Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Avasthi, Devesh Kumar, E-mail: dka@iuac.res.in [Radiation Biology Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNPs) are synthesized for internalization in HeLa cells (cervical cancer cells). ► Internalization of Glu-AuNPs in HeLa cells is confirmed by cross section TEM of cells. ► Irradiation (by C ion or γ-rays) of HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs results in enhanced radiosensitization. ► There is about 30% reduction in radiation dose for 90% cell killing of HeLa cells, when internalized by Glu-AuNPs. ► The enhanced radiosensitization due to Glu-AuNPs is of interest for researchers in nanobiotechnology and radiation biology. -- Abstract: Noble metal nanoparticles are of great interest due to their potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. In the present work, we synthesized glucose capped gold nanoparticle (Glu-AuNP) for internalization in the HeLa cell line (human cervix cancer cells). The capping of glucose on Au nanoparticle was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The Glu-AuNP did not show any toxicity to the HeLa cell. The γ-radiation and carbon ion irradiation of HeLa cell with and without Glu-AuNP were performed to evaluate radiosensitization effects. The study revealed a significant reduction in radiation dose for killing the HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs as compared to the HeLa cells without Glu-AuNP. The Glu-AuNP treatment resulted in enhancement of radiation effect as evident from increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon ion irradiated HeLa cells.

  4. Cloning of smac gene and its overexpression effects on radiosensitivity of HeLa cells to ?-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To clone smac gene and construct eukaryocytic expression vector pcDNA3.1/ smac. The smac gene was transfected into HeLa cells to explore the effects of over-expression of extrinsic smac gene on radiosensitivity to ?-rays of HeLa cells. Methods: The full-length smac gene was amplified from total RNA of HeLa cells by RTPCR. The RTPCR product was ligated with the vector pcDNA3.1 and sequenced. The correct pcDNA3.1/smac was transfected into HeLa cells. The expression of smac gene was tested by RTPCR and Western blot. The cellular growth inhibition rates were evaluated by MTT 48 horns after irradiation with different doses of ?-rays. Results: Recombinant eukaryocytic expression vector pcDNA3.1/smac was successfully constructed. RTPCR and Western blot results indicated that the expression of smac gene of HeLa/smac cells was significantly enhanced compared with the expression of smac gene of HeLa/pcDNA3.1 and HeLa cells. 48 hours after different doses of ?-ray irradiation was significantly higher in pcDNA3.1/smac transfected HeLa/smac cells than those of non-transfected HeLa cells or pcDNA3.1 transfected HeLa/pcDNA3.1 cells, inhabitation rates were 38.85%, 17.64% and 20.32%, respectively. Conclusions: smac gene was successfully cloned. Extrinsic smac gene over-expression could significantly enhance radiosensitivity to ?-ray of HeLa cells, which would herald a new approach to improve radiosensitivity of cervical cancer. (authors)

  5. From HeLa cell division to infectious diarrhoea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, J.; Osborne, M.P.; Spencer, A.J.; Warley, A. (Univ. of Birmingham (England))

    1990-09-01

    Hela S3 cells were grown in suspension both randomly and, synchronously using hydroxyurea which blocks cells at the G1/S interface. Cryosections were prepared, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray microanalysis. As cells moved into S and through M phases (Na) and (Cl) increased; both returned to normal levels upon re-entering G1 phase. The Na/K ratio was 1:1 in G1 phase. Infection of HeLa S3 cells in G1 phase with vaccinia virus resulted in no change in intracellular (Na). Infection of neonatal mice with murine rotavirus was localized to villus tip enterocytes and gave rise to diarrhoea which was maximal at 72h post-infection (p.i.). Diarrhoea was preceded by ischemia of villi (18-42h p.i.) and villus shortening (maximal at 42h p.i.), and was also coincident with a dramatic regrowth of villi. At 48h p.i. a proliferative zone of electron lucent cells was observed in villus base regions. Cryosections of infected gut, taken before, during, and after infection, together with corresponding age-matched controls, were freeze-dried and analysed by X-ray microanalysis. At 48h p.i. electron lucent villus base cells were shown to be more hydrated, and, to contain higher levels of both Na and Cl and lower levels of P, S, K and Mg than corresponding control cells. These studies increase confidence in the use of X-ray microanalysis in studying biological systems, provide some insight into the process of cell division, and constitute the basis of a new concept of diarrhoeal secretion.27 references.

  6. From HeLa cell division to infectious diarrhoea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hela S3 cells were grown in suspension both randomly and, synchronously using hydroxyurea which blocks cells at the G1/S interface. Cryosections were prepared, freeze-dried and analyzed by X-ray microanalysis. As cells moved into S and through M phases [Na] and [Cl] increased; both returned to normal levels upon re-entering G1 phase. The Na/K ratio was 1:1 in G1 phase. Infection of HeLa S3 cells in G1 phase with vaccinia virus resulted in no change in intracellular [Na]. Infection of neonatal mice with murine rotavirus was localized to villus tip enterocytes and gave rise to diarrhoea which was maximal at 72h post-infection (p.i.). Diarrhoea was preceded by ischemia of villi (18-42h p.i.) and villus shortening (maximal at 42h p.i.), and was also coincident with a dramatic regrowth of villi. At 48h p.i. a proliferative zone of electron lucent cells was observed in villus base regions. Cryosections of infected gut, taken before, during, and after infection, together with corresponding age-matched controls, were freeze-dried and analysed by X-ray microanalysis. At 48h p.i. electron lucent villus base cells were shown to be more hydrated, and, to contain higher levels of both Na and Cl and lower levels of P, S, K and Mg than corresponding control cells. These studies increase confidence in the use of X-ray microanalysis in studying biological systems, provide some insight into the process of cell division, and constitute the basis of a new concept of diarrhoeal secretion.27 references

  7. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A9-overexpressing HeLa cells is an appropriate tool to delineate the kinetic interplay between breast cancer resistance protein (BRCP) and UGT and to rapidly identify the glucuronide substrates of BCRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Xu, Beibei; Wu, Baojian; Yu, Rong; Hu, Ming

    2012-02-01

    The interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters leads to extensive metabolism and low bioavailability for flavonoids. To investigate the simplest interplay between one UDP-glucuronosyltransferase isoform and one efflux transporter in flavonoid disposition, engineered HeLa cells stably overexpressing UGT1A9 were developed, characterized, and further applied to investigate the metabolism of two model flavonoids (genistein and apigenin) and excretion of their glucuronides. The results indicated that the engineered HeLa cells overexpressing UGT1A9 rapidly excreted the glucuronides of genistein and apigenin. The kinetic characteristics of genistein or apigenin glucuronidation were similar with the use of UGT1A9 overexpressed in HeLa cells or the commercially available UGT1A9. Small interfering (siRNA)-mediated UGT1A9 silencing resulted in a substantial decrease in glucuronide excretion (>75%, p MRP) 2 and MRP3 did not affect excretion of flavonoid glucuronides. In conclusion, the engineered HeLa cells overexpressing UGT1A9 is an appropriate model to study the kinetic interplay between UGT1A9 and BCRP in the phase II disposition of flavonoids. This simple cell model should also be very useful to rapidly identify whether a phase II metabolite is the substrate of BCRP. PMID:22071170

  8. Study on effect of artemisinin combined with 60Co γ-ray on DNA damage in HeLa and SiHa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Artemisinin combined with 60Co γ-ray on DNA damage in HeLa and SiHa cells of human cervical cancer. Methods: Cell growth kinetics was evaluated by MTT assay to determine the most appropriate drug concentration. Effects of Artemisinin combined with 60Co γ-ray on DNA damage in HeLa and SiHa cells were detected by single cell gel electrophoresis. Results: With the concentration increased during the effect of Artemisinin, the HeLa and SiHa cells had higher inhibition on cell proliferation. The SCGE showed that:the comet cell analysis indexes (the comet cells ratio, Tail Length, Olive Tail Moment and Tail DNA%) there was no statistic difference in between the artemisinin group and the control group (P>0.05). With radiation in the same dose, the comet cell analysis indexes of Hela cells treated with both artermisinin and exposed to radiation were higher than that only exposed to radiation group(P0.05). Conclusion: Artemisinin can not induce DNA damage in both HeLa and SiHa cells, but it can make irradiated HeLa cells DNA damage to be aggravated and enhance HeLa cells' radiation sensitivity. However, Artemisinin has no radiosensitizing effect on SiHa cells. (authors)

  9. Radiosensitizing effect of Chitosan on HeLa and LN 18 brain tumor cells exposed to electron beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitosan has been widely used for multiple applications because it is a non-toxic biocompatible, biodegradable, and adsorptive material. A previous study has shown that low-molecular-weight chitosan (LMWC) exerts a cytotoxic effect on oral cancer cells. Although a higher concentration of LMWC in comparison to cisplatin was needed in order to kill cancer cells, it was relatively less cytotoxic to non-cancer cells. Some of the well known anticancer drugs have the property of sensitizing the cell to radiation, which will be more applicable during combination therapy of cancer. The present study was undertaken to find the radiosensitizing effect of chitosan on Hela and Brain tumor (LN18) cells against electron beam radiation (EBR). Both the cancer cell lines, Hela and LN 18 were treated with different concentration of chitosan (50 and 100 μg/ml) pre and post exposure to 4 Gy EBR. The percentage of cell viability, percentage of apoptosis and ssDNA damage in the treated cells were assessed by MTT assay, DNA diffusion assay and comet assay respectively. The obtained results showed 62.1315.08 and 65.2412.45 percent Hela and LN 18 viable cells at 24 hour after the exposure to 4 Gy EBR. The percentage of viability was found to be decreased in cells exposed to EBR in the presence of chitosan. Supporting to this, percentage of apoptotic cells was found to be more in treated groups (28.1314.34 and 25.1313.76) when compared with control (23.1911.07 and 20.7914.86). Treatment of HeLa and LN18 before and after the exposure of EBR showed significantly (P<0.05) more frequency of micronucleus and % of DNA damage than the 4 Gy EBR control group. These results conclude the sensitizing effect of chitosan on cancer cell line against EBR exposure. (author)

  10. Photodynamic Effect of Ni Nanotubes on an HeLa Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad Aziz, Muhammad; Fakhar-e-Alam, M.; Fatima, Mahvish; Shaheen, Fozia; Iqbal, Seemab; Atif, M.; Talha, Muhammad; Mansoor Ali, Syed; Afzal, Muhammad; Majid, Abdul; Shelih Al.Harbi, Thamir; Ismail, Muhammad; Wang, Zhiming M.; AlSalhi, M. S.; Alahmed, Z. A.

    2016-01-01

    Nickel nanomaterials are promising in the biomedical field, especially in cancer diagnostics and targeted therapy, due to their distinctive chemical and physical properties. In this experiment, the toxicity of nickel nanotubes (Ni NTs) were tested in an in vitro cervical cancer model (HeLa cell line) to optimize the parameters of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for their greatest effectiveness. Ni NTs were synthesized by electrodeposition. Morphological analysis and magnetic behavior were examined using a Scanning electron microscope (SEM), an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. Phototoxic and cytotoxic effects of nanomaterials were studied using the Ni NTs alone as well as in conjugation with aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA); this was performed both in the dark and under laser exposure. Toxic effects on the HeLa cell model were evaluated by a neutral red assay (NRA) and by detection of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Furthermore, 10–200 nM of Ni NTs was prepared in solution form and applied to HeLa cells in 96-well plates. Maximum toxicity of Ni NTs complexed with 5-ALA was observed at 100 J/cm2 and 200 nM. Up to 65–68% loss in cell viability was observed. Statistical analysis was performed on the experimental results to confirm the worth and clarity of results, with p-values = 0.003 and 0.000, respectively. Current results pave the way for a more rational strategy to overcome the problem of drug bioavailability in nanoparticulate targeted cancer therapy, which plays a dynamic role in clinical practice. PMID:26990435

  11. Photodynamic Effect of Ni Nanotubes on an HeLa Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad Aziz, Muhammad; Fakhar-E-Alam, M; Fatima, Mahvish; Shaheen, Fozia; Iqbal, Seemab; Atif, M; Talha, Muhammad; Mansoor Ali, Syed; Afzal, Muhammad; Majid, Abdul; Shelih Al Harbi, Thamir; Ismail, Muhammad; Wang, Zhiming M; AlSalhi, M S; Alahmed, Z A

    2016-01-01

    Nickel nanomaterials are promising in the biomedical field, especially in cancer diagnostics and targeted therapy, due to their distinctive chemical and physical properties. In this experiment, the toxicity of nickel nanotubes (Ni NTs) were tested in an in vitro cervical cancer model (HeLa cell line) to optimize the parameters of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for their greatest effectiveness. Ni NTs were synthesized by electrodeposition. Morphological analysis and magnetic behavior were examined using a Scanning electron microscope (SEM), an energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. Phototoxic and cytotoxic effects of nanomaterials were studied using the Ni NTs alone as well as in conjugation with aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA); this was performed both in the dark and under laser exposure. Toxic effects on the HeLa cell model were evaluated by a neutral red assay (NRA) and by detection of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Furthermore, 10-200 nM of Ni NTs was prepared in solution form and applied to HeLa cells in 96-well plates. Maximum toxicity of Ni NTs complexed with 5-ALA was observed at 100 J/cm2 and 200 nM. Up to 65-68% loss in cell viability was observed. Statistical analysis was performed on the experimental results to confirm the worth and clarity of results, with p-values = 0.003 and 0.000, respectively. Current results pave the way for a more rational strategy to overcome the problem of drug bioavailability in nanoparticulate targeted cancer therapy, which plays a dynamic role in clinical practice. PMID:26990435

  12. Growth inhibition of HeLa cell by internalization of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Gurin (BCG Tokyo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asahina Izumi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intravesical BCG immunotherapy is effective for preventing recurrence and progression in none muscle-invasive bladder cancer but the dosing schedule and duration of treatment remain empirical. The mechanisms by which intravesical BCG treatment mediates antitumor activity are currently poorly understood. Results HeLa cell infected with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Gurin(BCG Tokyo which were different multiplicity of infection(MOI. Proliferation of HeLa cell reduced in a dose-dependent manner by live BCG. The cytoplasm of the HeLa cell showed variety lysosomal stages by internalized and interacted BCG. Conclusion Proliferated Live BCG secreted the protein and depressed the growth of tumor. The possibility for clinical introduction of BCG therapy for carcinoma reported with review of literature.

  13. Proteomic analysis of effects by x-rays and heavy ion in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon ion therapy may be better against cancer than the effects of a photon beam. To investigate a biological advantage of carbon ion beam over X-rays, the radioresistant cell line HeLa cells were used. Radiation-induced changes in the biological processes were investigated post-irradiation at 1 h by a clinically relevant radiation dose (2 Gy X-ray and 2 Gy carbon beam). The differential expression proteins were collected for analysing biological effects. The radioresistant cell line Hela cells were used. In our study, the stable isotope labelling with amino acids (SILAC) method coupled with 2D-LC-LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry was applied to identity and quantify the differentially expressed proteins after irradiation. The Western blotting experiment was used to validate the data. A total of 123 and 155 significantly changed proteins were evaluated with treatment of 2 Gy carbon and X-rays after radiation 1 h, respectively. These deregulated proteins were found to be mainly involved in several kinds of metabolism processes through Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. The two groups perform different response to different types of irradiation. The radioresistance of the cancer cells treated with 2 Gy X-rays irradiation may be largely due to glycolysis enhancement, while the greater killing effect of 2 Gy carbon may be due to unchanged glycolysis and decreased amino acid metabolism

  14. Biophysical Interactions of Novel Oleic Acid Conjugate and its Anticancer Potential in HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Azmat Ali; Alanazi, Amer M; Jabeen, Mumtaz; Parvez, Mohammad Khalid; Pervez, Khalid; Wahab, Rizwan; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Chauhan, Arun

    2015-05-01

    Novel conjugate 2,6-Diisopropylphenol-Oleic acid (2,6P-OLA) has shown potent anticancer activity on various cancer cell lines (Khan et al. Lipids 47:973-986, 2012). In the present study, the protein-or/ and DNA-binding property of 2,6P-OLA was evaluated that could predict its potential toxic effect, in vitro. Preferential structural stability and interaction mechanism of 2,6P-OLA to human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was used as model molecules, employing fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) and circular dichroism (CD) methods. The binding and apoptotic activities of conjugate were determined on bacterial recombinant DNA, pBR322 and human cancer cell line, HeLa, respectively. FS studies showed a strong conjugate binding affinity to HSA with overall binding constant of K?=?7.66 (0.03)??10(2)M(-1). Higher concentration induced detectable changes in the CD spectrum of HSA. The conjugate complexation altered HSA secondary conformation by an increase in ?-helices and decrease in ?-sheets. Flourescence quenching studies with CT-DNA exhibited K?=?1.215??10(2)Lmol(-1) where 2,6P-OLA efficiently displaced the ethidium bromide (EtBr) bound DNA indicating its strong competition with EtBr for intercalation. Similarly, 2,6P-OLA was able to partially bind pBR322, resulting in decrease the intensity of EtBr gradually. The conjugate significantly reduced survival of HeLa cells. Morphological studies revealed altered cell morphology, suggesting apoptotic death of HeLa cells. Overall, our data shows that 2,6P-OLA bind well with both HSA and DNA and possessed anticancer activities. PMID:25638605

  15. MicroRNA-21 promotes cell proliferation and down-regulates the expression of programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNAs are involved in cancer-related processes. The microRNA-21(miR-21) has been identified as the only miRNA over-expressed in a wide variety of cancers, including cervical cancer. However, the function of miR-21 is unknown in cervical carcinomas. In this study, we found that the inhibition of miR-21 in HeLa cervical cancer cells caused profound suppression of cell proliferation, and up-regulated the expression of the tumor suppressor gene PDCD4. We also provide direct evidence that PDCD4-3'UTR is a functional target of miR-21 and that the 18 bp putative target site can function as the sole regulatory element in HeLa cells. These results suggest that miR-21 may play an oncogenic role in the cellular processes of cervical cancer and may serve as a target for effective therapies.

  16. MicroRNA-21 promotes cell proliferation and down-regulates the expression of programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Qing; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Hui [Key Laboratory of Gene Engineering of the Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Biocontrol, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Qu, Liang-Hu, E-mail: lssqlh@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Gene Engineering of the Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Biocontrol, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2009-10-23

    MicroRNAs are involved in cancer-related processes. The microRNA-21(miR-21) has been identified as the only miRNA over-expressed in a wide variety of cancers, including cervical cancer. However, the function of miR-21 is unknown in cervical carcinomas. In this study, we found that the inhibition of miR-21 in HeLa cervical cancer cells caused profound suppression of cell proliferation, and up-regulated the expression of the tumor suppressor gene PDCD4. We also provide direct evidence that PDCD4-3'UTR is a functional target of miR-21 and that the 18 bp putative target site can function as the sole regulatory element in HeLa cells. These results suggest that miR-21 may play an oncogenic role in the cellular processes of cervical cancer and may serve as a target for effective therapies.

  17. Evaluation of the effects of paederus beetle extract and gamma irradiation on HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Samani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Cervical cancer is a malignancy that is the second most common cause of death from cancer in women throughout the world. Paederus beetle (Paederus fuscipes extract (PBE, contains bioactive compounds such as pederine which has cytotoxic properties and blocks DNA and protein synthesis at very low concentrations. In this investigation we tried to determine the effects co-treatment with PBE and gamma irradiation on HeLa cells. Materials and Methods: The viability of the cells was measured by two methods: MTT and Colony assay. Results: We found that supplementing gamma irradiation therapy with PBE does not increase cell death and it might even interfere with its cytotoxicty at the concentrations below 0.1 ng/ml and the viability for irradiation vs irradiation + PBE was 37%: 60%.   Conclusion: This finding might be due to radioprotective effects of the very low doses of PBE against gamma radiation.

  18. FV peptide induces apoptosis in HEp 2 and HeLa cells: an insight into the mechanism of induction

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    Karthigayan S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study is an attempt to evaluate the antiproliferative potential of peptide (7.6 kDa from lionfish (Pterios volitans venom on cultured HEp2 and HeLa cells. Different dose of purified peptide (1, 2 and 4 ?g/ml at different time points (12, 24 and 36 hrs were tested for antiproliferative index of the peptide. Among them, 2 ?g/ml at 24 hrs was found to effectively inhibit cancer cell growth in vitro and did not cause any adverse effect on normal human lymphocytes. Apoptosis was examined by propidium iodide staining, confirmed by the expression of caspase-8 and caspase-3, down regulation of Bcl-2 expression and DNA fragmentation in treated cells, when compared to untreated HEp2 and HeLa cells. Thus fish venom peptide was found to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cell.

  19. FV peptide induces apoptosis in HEp 2 and HeLa cells: an insight into the mechanism of induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri Balasubashini, M; Karthigayan, S; Somasundaram, S T; Balasubramanian, T; Rukkumani, R; Menon, Venugopal P

    2006-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to evaluate the antiproliferative potential of peptide (7.6 kDa) from lionfish (Pterios volitans) venom on cultured HEp2 and HeLa cells. Different dose of purified peptide (1, 2 and 4 microg/ml) at different time points (12, 24 and 36 hrs) were tested for antiproliferative index of the peptide. Among them, 2 microg/ml at 24 hrs was found to effectively inhibit cancer cell growth in vitro and did not cause any adverse effect on normal human lymphocytes. Apoptosis was examined by propidium iodide staining, confirmed by the expression of caspase-8 and caspase-3, down regulation of Bcl-2 expression and DNA fragmentation in treated cells, when compared to untreated HEp2 and HeLa cells. Thus fish venom peptide was found to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cell. PMID:17137521

  20. Growth inhibition of HeLa cell by internalization of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Tokyo

    OpenAIRE

    Asahina Izumi; Mastumoto Sohkichi; Kitamura Akira

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Intravesical BCG immunotherapy is effective for preventing recurrence and progression in none muscle-invasive bladder cancer but the dosing schedule and duration of treatment remain empirical. The mechanisms by which intravesical BCG treatment mediates antitumor activity are currently poorly understood. Results HeLa cell infected with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin(BCG) Tokyo which were different multiplicity of infection(MOI). Proliferation of HeLa cell redu...

  1. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of Moringa oleifera Lam. callus and leaf extracts on Hela cells

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    Abbas Jafarain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are considerable attempts worldwide on herbal and traditional compounds to validate their use as anti-cancer drugs. Plants from Moringaceae family including Moringa oleifera possess several activities such as antitumor effect on tumor cell lines. In this study we sought to determine if callus and leaf extracts of M. oleifera possess any cytotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Ethanol-water (70-30 extracts of callus and leaf of M. oleifera were prepared by maceration method. The amount of phenolic compounds of the extracts was determined by Folin Ciocalteu method. The cytotoxicity of the extracts against Hela tumor cells was carried out using MTT assay. Briefly, cells were seeded in microplates and different concentrations of the extract were added. Cells were incubated for 48 h and their viability was evaluated by addition of tetrazolium salt solution. After 3 h medium was aspirated, dimethyl sulfoxide was added and absorbance was determined at 540 nm with an ELISA plate reader. Cytotoxicity was considered when more than 50% reduction on cell survival was observed. Results: Callus and leaf extracts of M. oleifera significantly decreased the viability of Hela cells in a concentration-dependent manner. However, leaf extract of M. oleifera were more potent than that of callus extract. Conclusion: As the content of phenolic compounds of leaf extract was higher than that of callus extract, it can be concluded that phenolic compounds are involved in the cytotoxicity of M. oleifera.

  2. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of Moringa oleifera Lam. callus and leaf extracts on Hela cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarain, Abbas; Asghari, Gholamreza; Ghassami, Erfaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are considerable attempts worldwide on herbal and traditional compounds to validate their use as anti-cancer drugs. Plants from Moringaceae family including Moringa oleifera possess several activities such as antitumor effect on tumor cell lines. In this study we sought to determine if callus and leaf extracts of M. oleifera possess any cytotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Ethanol-water (70-30) extracts of callus and leaf of M. oleifera were prepared by maceration method. The amount of phenolic compounds of the extracts was determined by Folin Ciocalteu method. The cytotoxicity of the extracts against Hela tumor cells was carried out using MTT assay. Briefly, cells were seeded in microplates and different concentrations of the extract were added. Cells were incubated for 48 h and their viability was evaluated by addition of tetrazolium salt solution. After 3 h medium was aspirated, dimethyl sulfoxide was added and absorbance was determined at 540 nm with an ELISA plate reader. Cytotoxicity was considered when more than 50% reduction on cell survival was observed. Results: Callus and leaf extracts of M. oleifera significantly decreased the viability of Hela cells in a concentration-dependent manner. However, leaf extract of M. oleifera were more potent than that of callus extract. Conclusion: As the content of phenolic compounds of leaf extract was higher than that of callus extract, it can be concluded that phenolic compounds are involved in the cytotoxicity of M. oleifera. PMID:25337524

  3. C1 Domain-Targeted Isophthalate Derivatives Induce Cell Elongation and Cell Cycle Arrest in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talman, Virpi; Tuominen, Raimo K.; Genns, Gustav Boije af; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Ekokoski, Elina

    2011-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG)-mediated signaling pathways, such as those mediated by protein kinase C (PKC), are central in regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. DAG-responsive C1 domains are therefore considered attractive drug targets. Our group has designed a novel class of compounds targeted to the DAG binding site within the C1 domain of PKC. We have previously shown that these 5-(hydroxymethyl)isophthalates modulate PKC activation in living cells. In this study we investigated their effects on HeLa human cervical cancer cell viability and proliferation by using standard cytotoxicity tests and an automated imaging platform with machine vision technology. Cellular effects and their mechanisms were further characterized with the most potent compound, HMI-1a3. Isophthalate derivatives with high affinity to the PKC C1 domain exhibited antiproliferative and non-necrotic cytotoxic effects on HeLa cells. The anti-proliferative effect was irreversible and accompanied by cell elongation. HMI-1a3 induced down-regulation of retinoblastoma protein and cyclins A, B1, D1, and E. Effects of isophthalates on cell morphology, cell proliferation and expression of cell cycle-related proteins were different from those induced by phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or bryostatin 1, but correlated closely to binding affinities. Therefore, the results strongly indicate that the effect is C1 domain-mediated. PMID:21629792

  4. Cytotoxic effect and radiation enhancement of artemisinin in uterine cervical carcinoma cell line HeLa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effect of Artemisinin on cervical carcinoma cell line HeLa. Methods: In order to measure the optimized effective time, cytotoxic effect of Artemisinin on HeLa cell line was investigated with MTT assay. The radiosensitization effect of different doses and different treatment duration of Artemisinin on HeLa cell line were evaluated by MTT test, the SER is 1.17 and radiosensitizing effect was measured with multi-target single hit model through SER of HeLa cell. Cell cycles in different groups were calculated by flow cytometry. Results: The 50% inhibition concentration of Artemisinin interacted with HeLa cells for 24 h is 600.19 nmol/ml, and for 48 h is 160.71 nmol/ml. The HeLa cells'surival ratio is 93.51%, 91.87%, and 87.28% after adding Atemisinin of 110.69 nmol/ml and 1 Gy radiation exposure. There are three groups: the chemotherapy only group, the radiotherapy only group and the combination group. The result of the cell cycles showed that cells in G2/M period decreased in the combination group. Conclusion: Artemisinin has radiosensitization effect on cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, whichshows dose and time dependent. Artemisinin can inhibit the G2/M block by ionizing radiation. (authors)

  5. Campylobacter jejuni cell lysates differently target mitochondria and lysosomes on HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, B; Campana, R; Luchetti, F; Arcangeletti, M; Betti, M; Cesarini, E; Ciacci, C; Vittoria, E; Galli, L; Papa, S; Baffone, W

    2014-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. The synthesis of cytolethal distending toxin appears essential in the infection process. In this work we evaluated the sequence of lethal events in HeLa cells exposed to cell lysates of two distinct strains, C. jejuni ATCC 33291 and C. jejuni ISS3. C. jejuni cell lysates (CCLys) were added to HeLa cell monolayers which were analysed to detect DNA content, death features, bcl-2 and p53 status, mitochondria/lysosomes network and finally, CD54 and CD59 alterations, compared to cell lysates of C. jejuni 11168H cdtA mutant. We found mitochondria and lysosomes differently targeted by these bacterial lysates. Death, consistent with apoptosis for C. jejuni ATCC 33291 lysate, occurred in a slow way (>48 h); concomitantly HeLa cells increase their endolysosomal compartment, as a consequence of toxin internalization besides a simultaneous and partial lysosomal destabilization. C. jejuni CCLys induces death in HeLa cells mainly via a caspase-dependent mechanism although a p53 lysosomal pathway (also caspase-independent) seems to appear in addition. In C. jejuni ISS3-treated cells, the p53-mediated oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components seems to be lost, inducing the deepest lysosomal alterations. Furthermore, CD59 considerably decreases, suggesting both a degradation or internalisation pathway. CCLys-treated HeLa cells increase CD54 expression on their surface, because of the action of lysate as its double feature of toxin and bacterial peptide. In conclusion, we revealed that C. jejuni CCLys-treated HeLa cells displayed different features, depending on the particular strain. PMID:24880782

  6. Knockdown of Wip1 Enhances Sensitivity to Radiation in HeLa Cells Through Activation of p38 MAPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Yong; Liu, Zhong-Shan; Qiu, Ling; Guo, Jie; Li, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Tie-Jun; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate the functional role and potential mechanism of wild-type p53-induced phosphatase (Wip1) in cervical cancer cell line HeLa cells, along with the effect of knockdown of Wip1 in combination with ?-irradiation on the HeLa cells. Expression of Wip1 was silenced or overexpressed. After transfection, cell viability was determined. Moreover, ?-irradiation and SB203580 were performed to explore the effect of colony formation and cell apoptosis. Likewise, protein expression levels of p38, p-p38, p53, and p-p53 were assessed in the presence or not of SB203580 and overexpression of Wip1. Both the mRNA and protein levels of Wip1 were significantly decreased by transfection with Wip1-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) but were significantly increased by transfection with pcDNA3.1-Wip1. Knockdown of Wip1 significantly decreased cell growth and colony formation ability and increased apoptotic rate. Additionally, better results were obtained by knockdown of Wip1 in combination with ?-irradiation. The protein expression levels of p-p38 (p?Wip1. However, application of SB203580 reversed the effects. Our study confirms the important roles of Wip1 in cervical cancer. Knockdown of Wip1 enhances sensitivity to radiation in HeLa cells by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis through activation of p38 MAPK. PMID:26351212

  7. Induction of apoptosis in HeLa cells by chloroform fraction of seed extracts of Nigella sativa

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    Alshatwi Ali A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer remains one of the most dreaded diseases causing an astonishingly high death rate, second only to cardiac arrest. The fact that conventional and newly emerging treatment procedures like chemotherapy, catalytic therapy, photodynamic therapy and radiotherapy have not succeeded in reverting the outcome of the disease to any drastic extent, has made researchers investigate alternative treatment options. The extensive repertoire of traditional medicinal knowledge systems from various parts of the world are being re-investigated for their healing properties. This study progresses in the direction of identifying component(s from Nigella sativa with anti cancer acitivity. In the present study we investigated the efficacy of Organic extracts of Nigella sativa seed powder for its clonogenic inhibition and induction of apoptosis in HeLa cancer cell. Results Methanolic, n-Hexane and chloroform extracts of Nigella sativa seedz effectively killed HeLa cells. The IC50 values of methanolic, n-hexane, and chloroform extracts of Nigella sativa were 2.28 μg/ml, 2.20 μg/ml and 0.41 ng/ml, respectively. All three extracts induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. Apoptosis was confirmed by DNA fragmentation, western blot and terminal transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin-end labeling (TUNEL assay. Conclusion Western Blot and TUNEL results suggested that Nigella sativa seed extracts regulated the expression of pro- and anti- apoptotic genes, indicating its possible development as a potential therapeutic agent for cervical cancer upon further investigation.

  8. Factors influencing the accumulation of tetraphenylphosphonium cation in HeLa cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Hiller, R.; Schaefer, A; Zibirre, R; Kaback, H R; Koch, G

    1984-01-01

    Exposure of HeLa cells to tetraphenylphosphonium cation (TPP+) results in a rapid accumulation intracellularly, and a steady-state level is reached within 10 min. Accumulation of [3H]TPP+ in HeLa cells is reduced under the following conditions: (i) after preincubation of cells in buffered saline or in medium containing two- to fourfold higher concentrations of amino acids, (ii) exposure to the alkylating agent L-1-tosylamido-2-phenyl-ethylchloromethyl ketone, (iii) ouabain-mediated inhibition...

  9. The Sensitivity of Hela Kyoto Cell Line Transfected with Sensor HyPer2 to Cisplatin

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    Belova A.S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to compare by means of MTT assay cytotoxic effect of cisplatin on the cells of HeLa Kyoto line and HeLa Kyoto line containing genetically-encoded sensor of hydrogen peroxide HyPer2 (HeLa Kyoto–HyPer2 line, and using staining by trypan blue to identify the doses of cisplatin causing cell death at different exposure time. Materials and Methods. A HeLa Kyoto cell line of human cervical carcinoma and HeLa Kyota line transfected with the cytoplasmic sensor of hydrogen peroxide (HeLa Kyoto–HyPer2 were used in the study. The analysis of cytotoxic and antiproliferative action of cisplatin in relation to the given cells was performed using MTT assay. Cell viability was determined after 24 h of incubation with the preparation at concentrations from 0 to 50 μmol/L, then within the period from 0 to 24 h with an interval of 2 h at concentration of IC50; and also after 2, 4, 6, 8 h at concentrations from 9.3 to 833.3 μmol/L a quantity of live and destructed cells was counted using staining by trypan blue. Results. After cisplatin expose the dose-response curves for cell viability of Hela Kyoto and HeLa Kyoto–HyPer2 cell lines were built according to MTT assay data. It was established that concentration of IC50 corresponding to the dose causing a loss of viability of 50% of cells is 1.3 times lower for HeLa Kyoto–HyPer2 compared to HeLa Kyoto. The results of staining by a vital agent trypan blue showed that inhibiting effects of cisplatin in concentration of IC50 by 24 h are mainly linked with the delay of cell division but not with their death. At concentrations up to 52 μmol/L damage of the membranes does not occur during 8 h, and at superhigh concentrations — 416.7 μmol/L — the damage is possible already 4 h after the exposure. Conclusion. Comparison of sensibility of the two cell lines to the effect of cisplatin showed that transfection of the cells with the fluorescent protein results in the increase of the sensitivity to cisplatin. When HeLa Kyoto–HyPer2 cells are exposed to the preparation at concentration of IC50 during 24 h, inhibition of cell division is observed; higher concentrations of the preparation cause increase of the number of dead cells and diminish the terms of their destruction.

  10. Proteasome inhibitor lactacystin enhances cisplatin cytotoxicity by increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ye; Li, Di; Zeng, Linchuan; Wang, Chunyan; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Yan; Yu, Yang; Liu, Shibing; Li, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is commonly used as a therapeutic agent, despite its known adverse side effects and the occurrence of drug resistance. The development of novel methods for combination therapy with cisplatin is required in order to circumvent these limitations of cisplatin alone. The proteasome inhibitor lactacystin (LAC) has been indicated to produce anti-tumor effects, and has previously been used as an antitumor agent in cancer treatment research; however, its effects in combination with cisplatin treatment are unknown. In the current study, the effects of LAC in combination with cisplatin treatment were investigated in HeLa human cervical cancer (HCC) cells. The results demonstrated that cisplatin treatment inhibited cell growth and induced cell apoptosis. HeLa cell exposure to cisplatin induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated apoptosis, and LAC treatment increased levels of cell apoptosis and the activation of caspase-3. Specifically, LAC treatment increased the cisplatin-induced expression of PDI, GRP78, CHOP, cleaved caspase-4 and cleaved caspase-3. Together, these data indicate that LAC is able to enhance cisplatin cytotoxicity by increasing ER stress-associated apoptosis in HeLa cells. PMID:25323748

  11. Acridine Orange Stain for Determining Intracellular Enteropathogens in HeLa Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miliotis, Marianne D.

    1991-01-01

    Green-fluorescent intracellular enteropathogenic bacteria were observed after infected HeLa cell monolayers were stained with acridine orange and counterstained with crystal violet at least 3 h after infection.

  12. Transfection of living HeLa cells with fluorescent poly-cytosine encapsulated Ag nanoclusters

    OpenAIRE

    Antoku, Yasuko; Hotta, Jun-ichi; Mizuno, Hideaki; Dickson, Robert M.; Hofkens, Johan; Vosch, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The fluorescence of silver clusters encapsulated by single stranded oligo-DNA (24 cytosine base pairs, C24:Agn) was used to monitor the transfection of this new silver/DNA fluorophore inside living HeLa cells. For this, the C24:Agn molecules were complexed with a commercially available transfection reagent Lipofectamine and the internalization of C24:Agn was followed with confocal fluorescence microscopy. Bright near-infrared fluorescence was observed from inside the transfected HeLa cells, w...

  13. Inhibitory Activity of Synthesized Acetylated Procyanidin B1 Analogs against HeLa S3 Cells Proliferation

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    Syuhei Okamoto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins, also known as condensed tannins and/or oligomeric flavonoids, occur in many edible plants and have various interesting biological activities. Previously, we reported a synthetic method for the preparation of various procyanidins in pure form and described their biological activities. Here, we describe the synthesis of procyanidin B1 acetylated analogs and discuss their inhibition activities against HeLa S3 cell proliferation. Surprisingly, the lower-unit acetylated procyanidin B1 strongly inhibited the proliferation of HeLa S3 cells. This molecule showed much stronger inhibitory activity than did epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG, green tea polyphenol, and dimeric compounds that included EGCG as a unit. This result suggests that the phenolic hydroxyl groups of the upper-units in flavan-3-ols are important for their inhibitory activity against cancer cell proliferation and that a hydrophobic lower unit dimer enhances this activity.

  14. Heterofucan from Sargassum filipendula Induces Apoptosis in HeLa Cells

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    Hugo Alexandre Oliveira Rocha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fucan is a term used to denominate a family of sulfated polysaccharides rich in sulfated L-fucose. Heterofucan SF-1.5v was extracted from the brown seaweed Sargassum filipendula by proteolytic digestion followed by sequential acetone precipitation. This fucan showed antiproliferative activity on Hela cells and induced apoptosis. However, SF-1.5v was not able to activate caspases. Moreover, SF-1.5v induced glycogen synthase kinase (GSK activation, but this protein is not involved in the heterofucan SF-1.5v induced apoptosis mechanism. In addition, ERK, p38, p53, pAKT and NFκB were not affected by the presence of SF-1.5v. We determined that SF-1.5v induces apoptosis in HeLa mainly by mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF into cytosol. In addition, SF-1.5v decreases the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and increased expression of apoptogenic protein Bax. These results are significant in that they provide a mechanistic framework for further exploring the use of SF-1.5v as a novel chemotherapeutics against human cervical cancer.

  15. Hyperthermia HeLa cell treatment with silica coated manganese oxide nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Villanueva, A; Alonso, JM; Rueda, T; Martínez, A; Crespo, P; Morales, MP; Fernandez, MA Gonzalez; Valdes, J; Rivero, G

    2009-01-01

    HeLa tumour cells incubated with ferromagnetic nanoparticles of manganese oxide perovskite La0.56(SrCa)0.22MnO3 were treated with a high frequency alternating magnetic field. The particles were previously coated with silica to improve their biocompatibility. The control assays made with HeLa tumour cells showed that cell survival and growth rate were not affected by the particle internalization in cells, or by the electromagnetic field on cells without nanoparticles. The application of an alternating electromagnetic field to cells incubated with this silica coated manganese oxide induced a significant cellular damage that finally lead to cell death by an apoptotic mechanism.

  16. Methanolic Extracts from Brown Seaweeds Dictyota cilliolata and Dictyota menstrualis Induce Apoptosis in Human Cervical Adenocarcinoma HeLa Cells

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    Dayanne Lopes Gomes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of the uterine cervix is the second most common female tumor worldwide, surpassed only by breast cancer. Natural products from seaweeds evidencing apoptotic activity have attracted a great deal of attention as new leads for alternative and complementary preventive or therapeutic anticancer agents. Here, methanol extracts from 13 species of tropical seaweeds (Rhodophytas, Phaeophyta and Chlorophyta collected from the Northeast of Brazil were assessed as apoptosis-inducing agents on human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa. All extracts showed different levels of cytotoxicity against HeLa cells; the most potent were obtained from the brown alga Dictyota cilliolata (MEDC and Dictyota menstrualis (MEDM. In addition, MEDC and MEDM also inhibits SiHa (cervix carcinoma cell proliferation. Studies with these two extracts using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that HeLa cells exposed to MEDM and MEDC exhibit morphological and biochemical changes that characterize apoptosis as shown by loss of cell viability, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine externalization, and sub-G1 cell cycle phase accumulation, also MEDC induces cell cycle arrest in cell cycle phase S. Moreover, the activation of caspases 3 and 9 by these extracts suggests a mitochondria-dependent apoptosis route. However, other routes cannot be ruled out. Together, these results point out the methanol extracts of the brown algae D. mentrualis and D. cilliolata as potential sources of molecules with antitumor activity.

  17. FRAKSINASI PROTEIN KAPANG LAUT Xylaria psidii KT30 DAN SITOTOKSISITASNYA TERHADAP SEL HeLa [Fractionation of Proteins of Marine Fungus Xylaria psidii KT30 and their Cytotoxicity against HeLa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mita Gebriella Inthe

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the most common cause of death for Indonesian women after human breast cancer. One of the efforts of cancer treatment is the utilization of natural compounds. One of the microorganisms having the potential as anticancer agent is endophytic fungi. Endophytic fungi from the marine habitat can be isolated from sea weeds, sea grasses, sponges, and mangroves. Xylaria psidii KT30, a marine fungus used in this study was isolated from red seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii. Xylaria psidii KT30 was cultivated in potato dextrose broth medium for nine days at room temperature 27-29°C in shaking condition. This study aimed to obtain protein fractions from X. psidii KT30 and determine their toxicity againt Chang and HeLa cells. The fractionation process was conducted using DEAE Sephadex A-50 column chromatography and the toxicity was determined by Brine Shrimp Lethality Test (BSLT. The metabolites excreted in the culture broth was extracted using 90% of ammonium sulphate. The extract was then tested for their toxicity against HeLa and Chang cells by Microculture Tetrazolium Technique (MTT assay.The results revealed that LC50 of the protein extract of X. psidii KT30 was 104.95 ppm and IC50 was 69.9 ppm. Based on the National Cancer Institute (NCI, this value showed moderate cytotoxicity against HeLa cells.

  18. Low voltage irreversible electroporation induced apoptosis in HeLa cells

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    Wei Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-voltage electric field pulses can make cell membrane electroporated irreversibly and eliminate malignant cells via necrosis. However, low-voltage is not efficient as that. Aims: This study determined the differential effects of high- and low-voltage electric field pulses on HeLa cells, when the power of low-voltage was enhanced by increasing quantity of pulses. Materials and Methods: Pulses electric fields with permanent frequency (1 Hz and pulse length (100 μs were performed on HeLa cells. Voltage and pulse sets (8 pulses/set were various during treatment. CCK-8 assay was used to detect cell viability. The quantitative determination of apoptosis and necrosis were performed by flow cytometry with Annexin V and PI staining. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the ultrastructure of HeLa cells. Caspase-3 and caspase-8, the enzymes in apoptotic pathway, were determined by western blot. Results: The data showed that low-voltage electric field pulses also could make cell irreversible electroporation (IRE and ablate HeLa cells effectively by induction of apoptosis. The ablating effect due to low-voltage treatments delivered with a greater number of pulses may be as satisfactory as high-voltage, or even preferable because it causes less necrosis and more apoptosis. Conclusions: IRE induced by low voltage with more pulses could ablate HeLa cells effectively as high voltage, and it was preferable that less necrosis and more apoptosis occurred under such condition.

  19. Toxicity of cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles against Escherichia coli and HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Toxic effect of CdS NPs on the growth and cell division in E. coli was studied. • CdS NPs affected cell surface topology and cell division. • Downregulation of both FtsZ and FtsQ was observed due to NPs exposure. • CdS NPs affected HeLa cell morphology with fragmented nuclei. • All such effects might be due to elevated oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The present study endeavours to assess the toxic effect of synthesized CdS nanoparticles (NPs) on Escherichia coli and HeLa cells. The CdS NPs were characterized by DLS, XRD, TEM and AFM studies and the average size of NPs was revealed as ∼3 nm. On CdS NPs exposure bacterial cells changed morphological features to filamentous form and damage of the cell surface was found by AFM study. The expression of two conserved cell division components namely ftsZ and ftsQ in E. coli was decreased both at transcriptional and translational levels upon CdS NPs exposure. CdS NPs inhibited proper cell septum formation without affecting the nucleoid segregation. Viability of HeLa cells declined with increasing concentration of CdS NPs and the IC50 value was found to be 4 μg/mL. NPs treated HeLa cells showed changed morphology with condensed and fragmented nuclei. Increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found both in E. coli and HeLa cells on CdS NPs exposure. The inverse correlation between declined cell viabilities and elevated ROS level suggested that oxidative stress seems to be the key event by which NPs induce toxicity both in E. coli and HeLa cells

  20. REST is up-regulated by epidermal growth factor in HeLa cells and inhibits apoptosis by influencing histone H3 acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiula, Monica; Carbonari, Gioia; Dattoli, Samantha D; Calienni, Maria; Bedini, Andrea; Spampinato, Santi

    2012-08-01

    REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) is a transcription factor that recruits histone deacetylases to silence gene transcription. REST appears to play a paradoxical role in cancer cells: it exhibits tumor suppressor activity or promotes tumorigenesis, depending upon the setting. The extracellular signaling molecules that control REST gene expression in cancer cells remain poorly understood. In this study, we report that REST expression in HeLa cells is elevated in cells exposed to epidermal growth factor or serum, whereas the rate of cell apoptosis is low. Apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal is significantly increased in HeLa cells treated with an antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (AS ODN) capable of down-regulating REST expression, whereas in HeLa cells transfected with a REST expressing plasmid, REST overexpression reduces the marked apoptosis caused, in absence of serum, by exposure to an anti-Fas receptor antibody imitating the Fas ligand activity plus PD 98059, a blocker of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. REST knockdown also reduces mRNA levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-X(L) whereas in HeLa cells overexpressing REST, the reduction of Bcl-X(L) mRNA caused by the anti-Fas receptor antibody plus PD 98059 is significantly decreased. Finally, we report that acetylation of histone H3 is increased in HeLa cells exposed to AS ODN or anti-Fas receptor antibody, whereas it is reduced in cells transfected with the REST expressing plasmid. Our findings indicate that REST is a novel gene regulated by EGF in HeLa cells that potentially contributes to the modulation of apoptosis via epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:22668508

  1. Comparison of rhinovirus A infection in human primary epithelial and HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Amineva, S. P.; Aminev, A. G.; Gern, J. E.; Palmenberg, A C

    2011-01-01

    HeLa cells are used to study the life cycles of many different viruses, including the human rhinoviruses (HRV) in the family Picornaviridae. Although the natural targets of HRV are human bronchial epithelial cells (hBE), it is generally more difficult to obtain and maintain the relevant primary cell cultures, relative to HeLa cells. Given that the HRV are now identified as a major cause of human asthma exacerbations, it becomes important to document how much of the virus biology learned from ...

  2. Evaluation of Antiproliferative Potential of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles on HeLa Human Cervical Tumor Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoriţa Diaconeasa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 nanoparticles as nanomaterials have promising biomedical applications. In this paper, the cytotoxicity induced by CONPs human cervical tumor cells was investigated. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using the precipitation method. The nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferation of HeLa human cervical tumor cells in a dose dependent manner but did not showed to be cytotoxic as analyzed by MTT assay. The administrated treatment decreased the HeLa cell viability cells from 100% to 65% at the dose of 100 μg/mL.

  3. Dynamic behavior of histone H1 microinjected into HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histone H1 was purified from bovine thymus and radiolabeled with tritium by reductive methylation or with 125I using chloramine-T. Red blood cell-mediated microinjection was then used to introduce the labeled H1 molecules into HeLa cells synchronized in S phase. The injected H1 molecules rapidly entered HeLa nuclei, and a number of tests indicate that their association with chromatin was equivalent to that of endogenous histone H1. The injected molecules copurified with HeLa cell nucleosomes, exhibited a half-life of ?100h, and were hyperphosphorylated at mitosis. When injected HeLa cells were fused with mouse 3T3 fibroblasts < 10% of the labeled H1 molecules migrated to mouse nuclei during the next 48 h. Despite their slow rate of migration between nuclei, the injected H1 molecules were evenly distributed on mouse and human genomes soon after mitosis of HeLa-3T3 heterokaryons. These results suggest that although most histone H1 molecules are stably associated with interphase chromatin, they undergo extensive redistribution after mitosis

  4. p150 ADAR1 isoform involved in maintenance of HeLa cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA-specific adenosine deaminase ADAR1 is ubiquitously expressed in a variety of mammalian cells and tissues. Although its physiological importance in non-nervous tissues has been confirmed by analysis of null mutation phenotypes, few endogenous editing substrates have been identified in numerous peripheral tissues and biological function of ADAR1 has not been fully understood. A conditional site-specific, ribozyme-based gene knock-down strategy was utilized to study the function of full-length isoform of ADAR1 (p150 protein) in HeLa cell. Double-stable HeLa cell lines were developed by transfecting HeLa Tet-On cells with a pTRE-derived plasmid that can express a hammerhead ribozyme against mRNA of p150 ADAR1 isoform under induction condition. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to measure the expression of p150 in selected cell clones. Cell proliferation was evaluated by means of MTT assay and growth curve analysis. Cellular morphological changes were observed under light microscope. Flow Cytometry was used for cell cycle analysis. Growth rate of cell transplants in BALB/c nude mice was also investigated. Both HeLa cell proliferation in vitro and the growth rate of transplanted HeLa cell-derived tumors in nude mice in vivo were significantly inhibited due to reduced expression of ADAR1 p150. Additionally, cell cycle analysis showed that cell progression from G1 phase to S phase was retarded in the ADAR1 p150 suppressed cells. Our results suggest that normal expression and functioning of p150 ADAR1 is essential for the maintenance of proper cell growth. The mechanisms underlying ADAR1's action might include both editing of currently unknown double-stranded RNAs and interacting with other cellular dsRNA-related processes

  5. p150 ADAR1 isoform involved in maintenance of HeLa cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yumei

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-specific adenosine deaminase ADAR1 is ubiquitously expressed in a variety of mammalian cells and tissues. Although its physiological importance in non-nervous tissues has been confirmed by analysis of null mutation phenotypes, few endogenous editing substrates have been identified in numerous peripheral tissues and biological function of ADAR1 has not been fully understood. Methods A conditional site-specific, ribozyme-based gene knock-down strategy was utilized to study the function of full-length isoform of ADAR1 (p150 protein in HeLa cell. Double-stable HeLa cell lines were developed by transfecting HeLa Tet-On cells with a pTRE-derived plasmid that can express a hammerhead ribozyme against mRNA of p150 ADAR1 isoform under induction condition. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting were performed to measure the expression of p150 in selected cell clones. Cell proliferation was evaluated by means of MTT assay and growth curve analysis. Cellular morphological changes were observed under light microscope. Flow Cytometry was used for cell cycle analysis. Growth rate of cell transplants in BALB/c nude mice was also investigated. Results Both HeLa cell proliferation in vitro and the growth rate of transplanted HeLa cell-derived tumors in nude mice in vivo were significantly inhibited due to reduced expression of ADAR1 p150. Additionally, cell cycle analysis showed that cell progression from G1 phase to S phase was retarded in the ADAR1 p150 suppressed cells. Conclusion Our results suggest that normal expression and functioning of p150 ADAR1 is essential for the maintenance of proper cell growth. The mechanisms underlying ADAR1's action might include both editing of currently unknown double-stranded RNAs and interacting with other cellular dsRNA-related processes.

  6. Caveolin-1 and CDC42 mediated endocytosis of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Bohmer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicine is a rapidly growing field in nanotechnology, which has great potential in the development of new therapies for numerous diseases. For example iron oxide nanoparticles are in clinical use already in the thermotherapy of brain cancer. Although it has been shown, that tumor cells take up these particles in vitro, little is known about the internalization routes. Understanding of the underlying uptake mechanisms would be very useful for faster and precise development of nanoparticles for clinical applications. This study aims at the identification of key proteins, which are crucial for the active uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles by HeLa cells (human cervical cancer as a model cell line. Cells were transfected with specific siRNAs against Caveolin-1, Dynamin 2, Flotillin-1, Clathrin, PIP5Kα and CDC42. Knockdown of Caveolin-1 reduces endocytosis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs and silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (SCIONs between 23 and 41%, depending on the surface characteristics of the nanoparticles and the experimental design. Knockdown of CDC42 showed a 46% decrease of the internalization of PEGylated SPIONs within 24 h incubation time. Knockdown of Dynamin 2, Flotillin-1, Clathrin and PIP5Kα caused no or only minor effects. Hence endocytosis in HeLa cells of iron oxide nanoparticles, used in this study, is mainly mediated by Caveolin-1 and CDC42. It is shown here for the first time, which proteins of the endocytotic pathway mediate the endocytosis of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in HeLa cells in vitro. In future studies more experiments should be carried out with different cell lines and other well-defined nanoparticle species to elucidate possible general principles.

  7. Desensitization of histamine H1 receptor-mediated inositol phosphate production in HeLa cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Bristow, D. R.; M. R. Zamani

    1993-01-01

    1. Histamine stimulated the accumulation of total [3H]-inositol phosphates (IPn) in control HeLa cells with an EC50 of 3.7 +/- 0.7 microM in the presence of 10 mM LiCl. The maximum response to histamine after 15 min incubation was 43 +/- 5% over basal accumulation and occurred at a concentration of 1 mM histamine. 2. The histamine-induced IPn production in HeLa cells was confirmed as H1 receptor-mediated, since the H1 antagonist mepyramine (10(-6) M) inhibited the histamine response (10(-4) M...

  8. Neutron activation analysis of antimony in chromatin and nucleoids of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antimony seems to be cancerogenic in men. In the present investigations we tried to find out if Sb+++ are also bound to the cell nucleus. HeLa cells were incubated with SbCl3 and after a 18 h incubation time cells were lysed and crude chromatin isolated. In this preparation Sb was determined by neutron activation analysis. From the same cell culture nucleoids were prepared by ultracentrifugation and also Sb detected in these structures. 12 refs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  9. Role of vesicles during adenovirus 2 internalization into HeLa cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, U

    1985-01-01

    In this investigation, the early period of adenovirus type 2 (Ad2)-HeLa cell interaction was analyzed by electron microscopy and biochemical techniques. Events observed in this period ranged from the disappearance of virions from the cell surface to their subsequent association with the cell nucleus. Destabilization of the virions attached to the intact cell was necessary for virions to escape from intracellular vesicles. Strong temperature dependence and rapid escape from a vesicular compart...

  10. Study of Paclitaxel-Treated HeLa Cells by Differential Electrical Impedance Flow Cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Julie; Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Rodriguez-Trujíllo, Romén; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the electrical investigation of paclitaxel-treated HeLa cells using a custom-made microfluidic biosensor for whole cell analysis in continuous flow. We apply the method of differential electrical impedance spectroscopy to treated HeLa cells in order to elucidate the changes in...... electrical properties compared with non-treated cells. We found that our microfluidic system was able to distinguish between treated and non-treated cells. Furthermore, we utilize a model for electrical impedance spectroscopy in order to perform a theoretical study to clarify our results. This study focuses...... on investigating the changes in the electrical properties of the cell membrane caused by the effect of paclitaxel. We observe good agreement between the model and the obtained results. This establishes the proof-of-concept for the application in cell drug therapy....

  11. A Novel Metabolite from Aspergillus ochraceus JGI 25 Showing Cytotoxicity to Hela Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadumane, Varalakshmi K; Venkat, Prerana; Pal, Anamika; Dharod, H; Shukla, Megha; Prashanthi, K

    2013-09-01

    This study aims at the isolation of filamentous fungi, extraction of metabolites, and evaluation of the cytotoxic properties on HeLa cells and normal human lymphocytes. We isolated fungi from the soil by serial dilution method. One of the isolates was chosen and identified as Aspergillus ochraceus Wilhelm (Trichocomaceae) by standard techniques. The metabolites were extracted using methanol. Different concentrations of the extract were evaluated for their potential anticancer activity on HeLa cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and the safety of the extract was checked on normal human lymphocytes. The extract was purified by chromatographic techniques like thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, and subjected to mass spectrometric analysis. The extract showed significant cytotoxic potential on HeLa cells at low concentrations with a half maximal inhibitory concentration value of nature, cytotoxic to HeLa cells, and appears to be a novel with anticancer potentials, which could be explored further for characterization of the active component. PMID:24403650

  12. Mechanism of aminoglycoside enhancement of Staphylococcus aureus adherence to HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Y; Kohada, A; Sugai, M; Suginaka, H

    1991-12-01

    There is enhanced adherence of Staphylococcus aureus to HeLa cells if the organism is grown in the presence of sub-lethal concentration of aminoglycosides. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of this enhancement. Cell surface components obtained by lysosaphin digestion under hypertonic conditions were examined for binding to HeLa cells. The components considered responsible for the adherence were recovered more from aminoglycoside treated cells than from control, benzylpenicillin or chloramphenicol treated cells. Using a contact angle measurement, the bacterial cell surface was found to be more hydrophobic after growing in the presence of some aminoglycosides, and hydrophilic which decreased adherence, after growing in the presence of benzylpenicillin and ofloxacin. Spectinomycin and kasugamycin, which are both aminoglycosides which do not cause misreading, failed to enhance adherence suggesting that misreading caused by aminoglycosides plays an important role in the enhancement of adherence. PMID:1816179

  13. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in personalized therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 ?g/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26604740

  14. Potentiation of Bleomycin Lethality in HeLa and V79 Cells by Bee Venom

    OpenAIRE

    Oršolić, Nada

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated possible growth-inhibiting effects of bee venom applied alone or in combination with a cytotoxic drug bleomycin on HeLa and V79 cells in vitro based on clone formation, cell counting, and apoptosis. Melittin, the key component of bee venom, is a potent inhibitor of calmodulin activity, and also a potent inhibitor cell growth and clonogenicity. Intracellular accumulation of melittin correlates with the cytotoxicity of antitumour agents. Previous studies indicated that s...

  15. The influence of hyperthermia on pH of lysosomes of cultured Hela cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HeLa cells in the logarithmic phase of growth were heated up to 42-43 deg C in the SHF field for 10 min. Then, after 30. 60 and 120 min pH of lysosomes was determined by neutral red. In 30 min, pH of lysosomes of heated cells decreased down to 5.51+-0.1 against 5.87+-0.07 in intact cells; in 120 min it reached the initial level

  16. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields induce poly(ADP-ribose) formation and non-apoptotic cell death in HeLa S3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Akiyama, Hidenori [Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Yano, Ken-ichi, E-mail: yanoken@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Priority Organization for Innovation and Excellence, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a new and unique means for life sciences. •Apoptosis was induced by nsPEF exposure in Jurkat cells. •No signs of apoptosis were detected in HeLa S3 cells exposed to nsPEFs. •Formation of poly(ADP-ribose) was induced in nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells. •Two distinct modes of cell death were activated by nsPEF in a cell-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have recently gained attention as effective cancer therapy owing to their potency for cell death induction. Previous studies have shown that apoptosis is a predominant mode of nsPEF-induced cell death in several cell lines, such as Jurkat cells. In this study, we analyzed molecular mechanisms for cell death induced by nsPEFs. When nsPEFs were applied to Jurkat cells, apoptosis was readily induced. Next, we used HeLa S3 cells and analyzed apoptotic events. Contrary to our expectation, nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells exhibited no molecular signs of apoptosis execution. Instead, nsPEFs induced the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), a hallmark of necrosis. PAR formation occurred concurrently with a decrease in cell viability, supporting implications of nsPEF-induced PAR formation for cell death. Necrotic PAR formation is known to be catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and PARP-1 in apoptotic cells is inactivated by caspase-mediated proteolysis. Consistently, we observed intact and cleaved forms of PARP-1 in nsPEF-exposed and UV-irradiated cells, respectively. Taken together, nsPEFs induce two distinct modes of cell death in a cell type-specific manner, and HeLa S3 cells show PAR-associated non-apoptotic cell death in response to nsPEFs.

  17. Glycans coated silver nanoparticles induces autophagy and necrosis in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarini, Elisa; Mariano, Stefania; Dini, Luciana

    2015-06-01

    This study reports the induction of autophagy by two concentrations (2×103 or 2×104 NPs/cell) of 30 nm sized β-D-Glucose- and β-D-Glucose/Sucrose-coated silver NanoParticles (AgNPs-G and AgNPs-GS respectively) in HeLa cells treated for 6, 12, 24 and 48 hrs. Cell viability was assessed by Neutral Red (NR) test and morphological evaluation. In addition ROS generation (NBT test) and induction of apoptosis/necrosis (Annexin V/Propidium Iodide-Annexin V/PI staining) and autophagy (Monodansylcadaverine-MDC staining) were evaluated. Cytotoxicity, ROS generation and morphology changes depend on NPs type and amount, and incubation time. As a general result, AgNPs-G are more toxic than AgNPs-GS. Moreover, the lowest AgNPs-GS concentration is ineffective on cell viability and ROS generation. Only 10% and 25% of viable HeLa cells were found at the end of incubation time in the presence of higher amount of AgNPs - G and AgNPs-GS respectively and in parallel ROS generation is induced. To elucidate the type of cell death, Annexin V/PI and MDC staining was performed. Interestingly, irrespective of coating type and NPs amount the percentage of apoptotic cells (Annexin V+/PI-) is similar to viable HeLa cells. At contrary, we observed a NPs amount dependent autophagy and necrosis induction. In fact, the lower amount of NPs induces autophagy (MDC+/PI- cells) whereas the higher one induces necrosis (Annexin V+/PI+ cells). Our findings suggest that AgNPs-induced cytotoxicity depends on AgNPs amount and type and provide preliminary evidence of induction of autophagy in HeLa cells cultured in the presence of AgNPs.

  18. TSPY potentiates cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by promoting cell cycle progression in HeLa and NIH3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TSPY is a repeated gene mapped to the critical region harboring the gonadoblastoma locus on the Y chromosome (GBY), the only oncogenic locus on this male-specific chromosome. Elevated levels of TSPY have been observed in gonadoblastoma specimens and a variety of other tumor tissues, including testicular germ cell tumors, prostate cancer, melanoma, and liver cancer. TSPY contains a SET/NAP domain that is present in a family of cyclin B and/or histone binding proteins represented by the oncoprotein SET and the nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1), involved in cell cycle regulation and replication. To determine a possible cellular function for TSPY, we manipulated the TSPY expression in HeLa and NIH3T3 cells using the Tet-off system. Cell proliferation, colony formation assays and tumor growth in nude mice were utilized to determine the TSPY effects on cell growth and tumorigenesis. Cell cycle analysis and cell synchronization techniques were used to determine cell cycle profiles. Microarray and RT-PCR were used to investigate gene expression in TSPY expressing cells. Our findings suggest that TSPY expression increases cell proliferation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Ectopic expression of TSPY results in a smaller population of the host cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Using cell synchronization techniques, we show that TSPY is capable of mediating a rapid transition of the cells through the G2/M phase. Microarray analysis demonstrates that numerous genes involved in the cell cycle and apoptosis are affected by TSPY expression in the HeLa cells. These data, taken together, have provided important insights on the probable functions of TSPY in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis

  19. Curcumin targeting the thioredoxin system elevates oxidative stress in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thioredoxin system, composed of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), thioredoxin (Trx), and NADPH, is ubiquitous in all cells and involved in many redox-dependent signaling pathways. Curcumin, a naturally occurring pigment that gives a specific yellow color in curry food, is consumed in normal diet up to 100 mg per day. This molecule has also been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Curcumin has numerous biological functions, and many of these functions are related to induction of oxidative stress. However, how curcumin elicits oxidative stress in cells is unclear. Our previous work has demonstrated the way by which curcumin interacts with recombinant TrxR1 and alters the antioxidant enzyme into a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator in vitro. Herein we reported that curcumin can target the cytosolic/nuclear thioredoxin system to eventually elevate oxidative stress in HeLa cells. Curcumin-modified TrxR1 dose-dependently and quantitatively transfers electrons from NADPH to oxygen with the production of ROS. Also, curcumin can drastically down-regulate Trx1 protein level as well as its enzyme activity in HeLa cells, which in turn remarkably decreases intracellular free thiols, shifting the intracellular redox balance to a more oxidative state, and subsequently induces DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, curcumin-pretreated HeLa cells are more sensitive to oxidative stress. Knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes HeLa cells to curcumin cytotoxicity, highlighting the physiological significance of targeting TrxR1 by curcumin. Taken together, our data disclose a previously unrecognized prooxidant mechanism of curcumin in cells, and provide a deep insight in understanding how curcumin works in vivo. -- Highlights: ► Curcumin induces oxidative stress by targeting the thioredoxin system. ► Curcumin-modified TrxR quantitatively oxidizes NADPH to generate ROS. ► Knockdown of TrxR1 augments curcumin's cytotoxicity in HeLa cells. ► Curcumin sensitizes HeLa cells to oxidative stress.

  20. Curcumin targeting the thioredoxin system elevates oxidative stress in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Wenqing; Zhang, Baoxin; Duan, Dongzhu [State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Wu, Jincai [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Fang, Jianguo, E-mail: fangjg@lzu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)

    2012-08-01

    The thioredoxin system, composed of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), thioredoxin (Trx), and NADPH, is ubiquitous in all cells and involved in many redox-dependent signaling pathways. Curcumin, a naturally occurring pigment that gives a specific yellow color in curry food, is consumed in normal diet up to 100 mg per day. This molecule has also been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Curcumin has numerous biological functions, and many of these functions are related to induction of oxidative stress. However, how curcumin elicits oxidative stress in cells is unclear. Our previous work has demonstrated the way by which curcumin interacts with recombinant TrxR1 and alters the antioxidant enzyme into a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator in vitro. Herein we reported that curcumin can target the cytosolic/nuclear thioredoxin system to eventually elevate oxidative stress in HeLa cells. Curcumin-modified TrxR1 dose-dependently and quantitatively transfers electrons from NADPH to oxygen with the production of ROS. Also, curcumin can drastically down-regulate Trx1 protein level as well as its enzyme activity in HeLa cells, which in turn remarkably decreases intracellular free thiols, shifting the intracellular redox balance to a more oxidative state, and subsequently induces DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, curcumin-pretreated HeLa cells are more sensitive to oxidative stress. Knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes HeLa cells to curcumin cytotoxicity, highlighting the physiological significance of targeting TrxR1 by curcumin. Taken together, our data disclose a previously unrecognized prooxidant mechanism of curcumin in cells, and provide a deep insight in understanding how curcumin works in vivo. -- Highlights: ► Curcumin induces oxidative stress by targeting the thioredoxin system. ► Curcumin-modified TrxR quantitatively oxidizes NADPH to generate ROS. ► Knockdown of TrxR1 augments curcumin's cytotoxicity in HeLa cells. ► Curcumin sensitizes HeLa cells to oxidative stress.

  1. Mitochondria-targeted superoxide dismutase (SOD2) regulates radiation resistance and radiation stress response in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as a mediator of ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage. Previous studies have indicated that MnSOD (SOD2) plays a critical role in protection against ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. In this study, we constructed two types of stable HeLa cell lines overexpressing SOD2, HeLa S3/SOD2 and T-REx HeLa/SOD2, to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the protection against radiation by SOD2. SOD2 overexpression in mitochondria enhanced the survival of HeLa S3 and T-REx HeLa cells following γ-irradiation. The levels of γH2AX significantly decreased in HeLa S3/SOD2 and T-REx HeLa/SOD2 cells compared with those in the control cells. MitoSoxTM Red assays showed that both lines of SOD2-expressing cells showed suppression of the superoxide generation in mitochondria. Furthermore, flow cytometry with a fluorescent probe (2',7'-dichlorofluorescein) revealed that the cellular levels of ROS increased in HeLa S3 cells during post-irradiation incubation, but the increase was markedly attenuated in HeLa S3/SOD2 cells. DNA microarray analysis revealed that, of 47,000 probe sets analyzed, 117 and 166 probes showed more than 2-fold changes after 5.5 Gy of γ-irradiation in control and HeLa S3/SOD2 cells, respectively. Pathway analysis revealed different expression profiles in irradiated control cells and irradiated SOD2-overexpressing cells. These results indicate that SOD2 protects HeLa cells against cellular effects of γ-rays through suppressing oxidative stress in irradiated cells caused by ROS generated in the mitochondria and through regulating the expression of genes which play a critical role in protection against ionizing radiation. (author)

  2. A class of DNA-binding peptides from wheat bud causes growth inhibition, G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgjo Kjell

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deproteinized DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells still contains a low-molecular weight peptidic fraction which can be dissociated by alkalinization of the medium. This fraction inhibits RNA transcription and tumor cell growth. Removal from DNA of normal cells causes amplification of DNA template activity. This effect is lower or absent in several cancer cell lines. Likewise, the amount of active peptides in cancer cell DNA extracts is lower than in DNA preparation of the corresponding normal cells. Such evidence, and their ubiquitous presence, suggests that they are a regulatory, conserved factor involved in the control of normal cell growth and gene expression. Results We report that peptides extracted from wheat bud chromatin induce growth inhibition, G2 arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis in HeLa cells. The growth rate is decreased in cells treated during the S phase only and it is accompanied by DNA damage and DNA synthesis inhibition. In G2 cells, this treatment induces inactivation of the CDK1-cyclin B1 complex and an increase of active chk1 kinase expression. Conclusion The data indicate that the chromatin peptidic pool inhibits HeLa cell growth by causing defective DNA replication which, in turn, arrests cell cycle progression to mitosis via G2 checkpoint pathway activation.

  3. A phthalide derivative isolated from endophytic fungi Pestalotiopsis photiniae induces G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C. [College of Life Science, Hebei University, Baoding (China); Yang, R.L. [Key Laboratory of Microbial Diversity Research and Application of Hebei Province, Baoding, China, Key Laboratory of Microbial Diversity Research and Application of Hebei Province, Baoding (China)

    2013-07-30

    MP [4-(3′,3′-dimethylallyloxy)-5-methyl-6-methoxyphthalide] was obtained from liquid culture of Pestalotiopsis photiniae isolated from the Chinese Podocarpaceae plant Podocarpus macrophyllus. MP significantly inhibited the proliferation of HeLa tumor cell lines. After treatment with MP, characteristic apoptotic features such as DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation were observed in DAPI-stained HeLa cells. Flow cytometry showed that MP induced G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Western blotting and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to investigate protein and mRNA expression. MP caused significant cell cycle arrest by upregulating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27{sup KIP1} protein and p21{sup CIP1} mRNA levels in HeLa cells. The expression of p73 protein was increased after treatment with various MP concentrations. mRNA expression of the cell cycle-related genes, p21{sup CIP1}, p16{sup INK4a} and Gadd45α, was significantly upregulated and mRNA levels demonstrated significantly increased translation of p73, JunB, FKHR, and Bim. The results indicate that MP may be a potential treatment for cervical cancer.

  4. A phthalide derivative isolated from endophytic fungi Pestalotiopsis photiniae induces G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available MP [4-(3′,3′-dimethylallyloxy-5-methyl-6-methoxyphthalide] was obtained from liquid culture of Pestalotiopsis photiniae isolated from the Chinese Podocarpaceae plant Podocarpus macrophyllus. MP significantly inhibited the proliferation of HeLa tumor cell lines. After treatment with MP, characteristic apoptotic features such as DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation were observed in DAPI-stained HeLa cells. Flow cytometry showed that MP induced G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Western blotting and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to investigate protein and mRNA expression. MP caused significant cell cycle arrest by upregulating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1 protein and p21CIP1 mRNA levels in HeLa cells. The expression of p73 protein was increased after treatment with various MP concentrations. mRNA expression of the cell cycle-related genes, p21CIP1 , p16INK4a and Gadd45α, was significantly upregulated and mRNA levels demonstrated significantly increased translation of p73, JunB, FKHR, and Bim. The results indicate that MP may be a potential treatment for cervical cancer.

  5. A phthalide derivative isolated from endophytic fungi Pestalotiopsis photiniae induces G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MP [4-(3′,3′-dimethylallyloxy)-5-methyl-6-methoxyphthalide] was obtained from liquid culture of Pestalotiopsis photiniae isolated from the Chinese Podocarpaceae plant Podocarpus macrophyllus. MP significantly inhibited the proliferation of HeLa tumor cell lines. After treatment with MP, characteristic apoptotic features such as DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation were observed in DAPI-stained HeLa cells. Flow cytometry showed that MP induced G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Western blotting and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to investigate protein and mRNA expression. MP caused significant cell cycle arrest by upregulating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1 protein and p21CIP1 mRNA levels in HeLa cells. The expression of p73 protein was increased after treatment with various MP concentrations. mRNA expression of the cell cycle-related genes, p21CIP1, p16INK4a and Gadd45α, was significantly upregulated and mRNA levels demonstrated significantly increased translation of p73, JunB, FKHR, and Bim. The results indicate that MP may be a potential treatment for cervical cancer

  6. The influence of pH on the excision of UV-photoproducts from HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excision of pyrimidine dimers with pH decreasing in UV irradiated HeLa cells can be depressed. This depression is independent of the UV dose within the investigated range. The excision capacity of the HeLa repair system from absolute amount of excised dimers is shown. (author)

  7. Buforin IIb induces endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ju Hye; Kim, Yu Jin; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Sun Chang; Cho, Ju Hyun

    2015-07-01

    Buforin IIb, a novel cell-penetrating anticancer peptide derived from histone H2A, has been reported to induce mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in tumor cells. However, increasing evidence suggests that endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria cooperate to signal cell death. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of buforin IIb-induced apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells by focusing on ER stress-mediated mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Two-dimensional PAGE coupled with MALDI-TOF and western blot analysis showed that buforin IIb treatment of HeLa cells resulted in upregulation of ER stress proteins. PBA (ER stress inhibitor) and BAPTA/AM (Ca(2+) chelator) pretreatment rescued viability of buforin IIb-treated cells through abolishing phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK. SP600125 (SAPK/JNK inhibitor) and SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) attenuated down-regulation of Bcl-xL/Bcl-2, mitochondrial translocation of Bax, and cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Taken together, our data suggest that the ER stress pathway has an important role in the buforin IIb-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. PMID:25958204

  8. Inhibition of protein synthesis in intact HeLa cells by Shigella dysenteriae 1 toxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, J.E.; Rothman, S W; Doctor, B P

    1980-01-01

    Shiga toxin purified to near homogeneity from cell lysates of Shigella dysenteriae 1 inhibited protein and deoxyribonucle acid syntheses in intact HeLa cells. Inhibition was dependent on toxin concentration and time of incubation. A minimal latent period of 30 min was observed with saturating doses of toxin. Ribonucleic acid synthesis, uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, and maintenance of intracellular K+ concentrations were not affected until well after maximal inhibition of protein and d...

  9. Transport of NaYF4:Er3+, Yb3+ up-converting nanoparticles into HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effective, simple and practically useful method to incorporate fluorescent nanoparticles inside live biological cells was developed. The internalization time and concentration dependence of a frequently used liposomal transfection factor (Lipofectamine 2000) was studied. A user friendly, one-step technique to obtain water and organic solvent soluble Er3+ and Yb3+ doped NaYF4 nanoparticles coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone was obtained. Structural analysis of the nanoparticles confirmed the formation of nanocrystals of the desired sizes and spectral properties. The internalization of NaYF4 nanoparticles in HeLa cervical cancer cells was determined at different nanoparticle concentrations and for incubation periods from 3 to 24 h. The images revealed a redistribution of nanoparticles inside the cell, which increases with incubation time and concentration levels, and depends on the presence of the transfection factor. The study identifies, for the first time, factors responsible for an effective endocytosis of the up-converting nanoparticles to HeLa cells. Thus, the method could be applied to investigate a wide range of future ‘smart’ theranostic agents. Nanoparticles incorporated into the liposomes appear to be very promising fluorescent probes for imaging real-time cellular dynamics. (paper)

  10. The Study of Cisplatin Effect on Hydrogen Peroxide and pH Level in HeLa Kyoto Cell Line Using Genetically-Encoded Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belova ?.S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to study the changes of hydrogen peroxide level and pH level in cytoplasm of cervical cancer cells HeLa Kyoto on cytotoxic exposure using genetically encoded sensors of hydrogen peroxide and pH. Materials and Methods. In the study we used two cell lines of human cervical cancer HeLa Kyoto containing in cytoplasm a genetically encoded sensor of hydrogen peroxide HyPer2 and a sensor pH HyPer2-C199S. To assess toxic effect of cisplatin on HeLa Kyoto cells we used a standard ??? assay. The changes of pH and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 level were determined using fluorescence microscopy by modification in proportion between fluorescence intensities at sensors excitation at two wavelengths: 500 and 420 nm (F500/F420. During the experiment the cells were kept in incubator at 37.0C in carbonate-free and serum-free medium ???. Cisplatin solution at final concentration corresponding to IC50 according to ??? assay was added directly in culture medium. MEM with no cisplatin added was used as a control medium. Results. Addition of cisplatin resulted in no changes in hydrogen peroxide and pH level in cytoplasm of HeLa Kyoto cells expressing corresponding sensors during the whole period of observation (20 min. Conclusion. The use of genetically encoded sensors enables to demonstrate cisplatin to have no effect on hydrogen peroxide and pH level in HeLa Kyoto cells.

  11. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects of nickel oxide nanoparticles in cultured HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to observe the cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects of nickel oxide nanoparticles on human cervix epithelioid carcinoma cell line (HeLa). Nickel oxide precursors were synthesized by an nickel sulphate-excess urea reaction in boiling aqueous solution. The synthesized NiO nanoparticles (< 200 nm) were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy techniques. For cytotoxicity experiments, HeLa cells were incubated in 50-500 micro g/ml NiO for 2, 6, 12 and 16 hours. The viable cells were counted with a haemacytometer using light microscopy. The cytotoxicity was observed low in 50-200 micro g/ml concentration for 16 h, but high in 400-500 micro g/ml concentration for 2-6 h. HeLa cells cytoplasm membrane was lysed and detached from the well surface in 400 micro g/ml concentration NiO nanoparticles. Double staining and M30 immunostaining were performed to quantify the number of apoptotic cells in culture on the basis of apoptotic cell nuclei scores. The apoptotic effect was observed 20% for 16 h incubation. (authors)

  12. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects of nickel oxide nanoparticles in cultured HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezban Ada

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe the cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects of nickel oxide nanoparticles on humancervix epithelioid carcinoma cell line (HeLa. Nickel oxide precursors were synthesized by an nickel sulphate-excess ureareaction in boiling aqueous solution. The synthesized NiO nanoparticles (<200 nm were investigated by X-ray diffractionanalysis and transmission electron microscopy techniques. For cytotoxicity experiments, HeLa cells were incubated in50-500 μg/mL NiO for 2, 6, 12 and 16 hours. The viable cells were counted with a haemacytometer using light microscopy.The cytotoxicity was observed low in 50-200 μg/mL concentration for 16 h, but high in 400-500 μg/mL concentration for2-6 h. HeLa cells' cytoplasm membrane was lysed and detached from the well surface in 400 μg/mL concentration NiOnanoparticles. Double staining and M30 immunostaining were performed to quantify the number of apoptotic cells in cultureon the basis of apoptotic cell nuclei scores. The apoptotic effect was observed 20% for 16 h incubation.

  13. Substitued (E-b-(benzoylacrylic acids suppressed survival of neoplastic human HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. JURANIC

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The bacteriostatic activity of some of alkyl substituted (E-b-(benzoylacrylic acids was shown earlier. The aim of this study was to investigate the antiproliferative action of 19 alkyl-, or halogeno-, or methoxy-, or acetamido- substituted (E-b-(benzoylacrylic acids, against human cervix carcinoma, HeLa, cells. Target HeLa cells were continuously treated with increasing concentrations of substituted (E-b-(benzoylacrylic acids during two days. The MTT test was used for assessment of the antiproliferative action of this group of compounds. Treatment of HeLa cells with 4-methyl-, 4-fluoro-, 4-chloro-, 4-bromo- and 4-methoxy- derivatives of (E-b-(benzoyl acrylic acid leads to the expression of cytostatic activity against HeLa cells (IC50 were in the range from 31-40 M. Their antiproliferative action was less than that of the basic compound (E-b-(benzoylacrylic acid whose IC50 was 28.5 M. The 3,4-dimethyl-, 2,4-dimethyl- and 2,5-dimethyl- derivatives as well as the 4-ethyl- and 3,4-dichloro- and 2,4-dichloro-derivatives, have stronger cytostatic activity than the correspoding monosubstituted and parent compound. Their IC50 were 18.5 M; 17.5 M; 17.0 mM; 17.5 M; 22.0 M and 18 M, respectively. The 4-iso-propyl- and 4-n-butyl-derivatives exerted higher cytostatic activity than the compounds with a lower number of methylene -CH2- groups in the substitutent. Their IC50 were 14.5 M and 6.5 M respectively. The 2,5-di-iso-propyl- and 4-tert-butyl-derivatives expressed the most strong antiproliferative action against the investigated HeLa cells, IC50 being 4.5 M and 5.5 M, respectively. The investigated compounds affected the survival of HeLa cells, expressing a strong structure-activity relationship of the Hansch type.

  14. Coxsackievirus B5 induced apoptosis of HeLa cells: Effects on p53 and SUMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5), a human enterovirus of the family Picornaviridae, is a frequent cause of acute and chronic human diseases. The pathogenesis of enteroviral infections is not completely understood, and the fate of the CVB5-infected cell has a pivotal role in this process. We have investigated the CVB5-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells and found that it happens by the intrinsic pathway by a mechanism dependent on the ubiquitin-proteasome system, associated with nuclear aggregation of p53. Striking redistribution of both SUMO and UBC9 was noted at 4 h post-infection, simultaneously with a reduction in the levels of the ubiquitin-ligase HDM2. Taken together, these results suggest that CVB5 infection of HeLa cells elicit the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis by MDM2 degradation and p53 activation, destabilizing protein sumoylation, by a mechanism that is dependent on a functional ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  15. A key inactivation factor of HeLa cell viability by a plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a plasma flow has been applied to medical treatment using effects of various kinds of stimuli such as chemical species, charged particles, heat, light, shock wave and electric fields. Among them, the chemical species are known to cause an inactivation of cell viability. However, the mechanisms and key factors of this event are not yet clear. In this study, we focused on the effect of H2O2 in plasma-treated culture medium because it is generated in the culture medium and it is also chemically stable compared with free radicals generated by the plasma flow. To elucidate the significance of H2O2, we assessed the differences in the effects of plasma-treated medium and H2O2-added medium against inactivation of HeLa cell viability. These two media showed comparable effects on HeLa cells in terms of the survival ratios, morphological features of damage processes, permeations of H2O2 into the cells, response to H2O2 decomposition by catalase and comprehensive gene expression. The results supported that among chemical species generated in a plasma-treated culture medium, H2O2 is one of the main factors responsible for inactivation of HeLa cell viability. (fast track communication)

  16. A key inactivation factor of HeLa cell viability by a plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Mayo; Johkura, Kohei

    2011-09-01

    Recently, a plasma flow has been applied to medical treatment using effects of various kinds of stimuli such as chemical species, charged particles, heat, light, shock wave and electric fields. Among them, the chemical species are known to cause an inactivation of cell viability. However, the mechanisms and key factors of this event are not yet clear. In this study, we focused on the effect of H2O2 in plasma-treated culture medium because it is generated in the culture medium and it is also chemically stable compared with free radicals generated by the plasma flow. To elucidate the significance of H2O2, we assessed the differences in the effects of plasma-treated medium and H2O2-added medium against inactivation of HeLa cell viability. These two media showed comparable effects on HeLa cells in terms of the survival ratios, morphological features of damage processes, permeations of H2O2 into the cells, response to H2O2 decomposition by catalase and comprehensive gene expression. The results supported that among chemical species generated in a plasma-treated culture medium, H2O2 is one of the main factors responsible for inactivation of HeLa cell viability.

  17. Automatic segmentation of HeLa cell images

    CERN Document Server

    Urban, Jan

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the possibilities for segmentation of cells from their background and each other in digital image were tested, combined and improoved. Lot of images with young, adult and mixture cells were able to prove the quality of described algorithms. Proper segmentation is one of the main task of image analysis and steps order differ from work to work, depending on input images. Reply for biologicaly given question was looking for in this work, including filtration, details emphasizing, segmentation and sphericity computing. Order of algorithms and way to searching for them was also described. Some questions and ideas for further work were mentioned in the conclusion part.

  18. Radioprotective effect of calorie restriction in Hela cells and SD rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the effect of low calorie metabolism on the survival of HeLa cells exposed to X-rays, and the influence of starvation on the antioxidative factors in the blood of rats after irradiation. Methods: MTT method was used to evaluate the impact of different concentration glucose on the proliferation of HeLa cells. Colony formation assay was employed to detect the influence of glucose (1, 5, 10 and 25 mmol/L) on radiosensitivity of HeLa cells. Flow cytometry assay was used to analyze distribution of cell cycle and apoptosis. 60 male SD rats were randomly divided into 6 groups with 10 rats each. Rats in every two groups were fed ad libitum, fasted for 24 h and fasted for 48 h, respectively. Rats in one group of each approach were respectively exposed to whole-body X-rays at 11 Gy. At 2 h after irradiation,all of rats were sacrificed and their venous blood was collected. Elisa kits were used to detect superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC). Results: An increased viability was observed in HeLa cells treated with the glucose at low concentration (<25 mmol/L), while HeLa cell growth was inhibited by glucose at doses of >25 mmol/L. Relevant to cells treated with 1 mmoL/L glucose, SERs (sensitive enhancement ratio) in cells exposed to 5, 10 and 25 mmol/L glucose were 1.07, 1.10 and 1.23,respectively. A reduction of G2/M and S arrests and apoptosis caused by 6 Gy X-ray irradiation were observed [(49.68 ±1.88)% and (35.54±1.45)% at G2/M phase, (16.88 ±1.22)% and (10.23 ±1.65)% at S phase, t=10.42, 5.61, P<0.05] and in the cells treated with 1 mmol/L glucose compared with cells treated with 25 mmol/L glucose [(25.50 ± 0.95)% and (7.56 ± 1.07)%, t=21.72, P<0.05].Without irradiation, calorie restriction exhibited a negligible influence on SOD and T-AOC in rats. However, after 11 Gy irradiation, compared with rats fed ad libitum, the levels of SOD and T-AOC were significantly increased in rats with calorie restriction (t=40.32, 42.78, P<0.05). Conclusions: Calorie restriction has a certain radioprotective effect in vivo and in vitro. (authors)

  19. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca2+ dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  20. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Lan, Bei; Cao, Youjia [Key Laboratory of Microbial Functional Genomics of Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); He, Hao, E-mail: haohe@tju.edu.cn [Ultrafast Laser Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Information Technology (Ministry of Education), College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Med-X Research Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-10-27

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca{sup 2+} dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  1. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yisen; Lan, Bei; He, Hao; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-10-01

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca2+ dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  2. C60-ToF SIMS imaging of frozen hydrated HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Piwowar, Alan M.; Keskin, Selda; Delgado, Melissa Ortiz; Shen, Kan; Hue, Jonathan J.; Lanekoff, Ingela; Andrew G. Ewing; Winograd, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Sample preparation continues to be a major challenge for secondary ion mass spectrometry studies of biological materials. Maintaining the native hydrated state of the material is important for preserving both chemical and spatial information. Here, we discuss a method which combines a sample wash and dry protocol discussed by Berman et al1 (1) followed by plunge freezing in liquid ethane for a frozen-hydrated analysis of mammalian cells (HeLa). This method allows for the removal of the growth...

  3. PMA synergistically enhances apicularen A-induced cytotoxicity by disrupting microtubule networks in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combination therapy is key to improving cancer treatment efficacy. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a well-known PKC activator, increases the cytotoxicity of several anticancer drugs. Apicularen A induces cytotoxicity in tumor cells through disrupting microtubule networks by tubulin down-regulation. In this study, we examined whether PMA increases apicularen A-induced cytotoxicity in HeLa cells. Cell viability was examined by thiazolyl blue tetrazolium (MTT) assays. To investigate apoptotic potential of apicularen A, DNA fragmentation assays were performed followed by extracting genomic DNA, and caspase-3 activity assays were performed by fluorescence assays using fluorogenic substrate. The cell cycle distribution induced by combination with PMA and apicularen A was examined by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide (PI). The expression levels of target proteins were measured by Western blotting analysis using specific antibodies, and α-tubulin mRNA levels were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). To examine the effect of combination of PMA and apicularen A on the microtubule architecture, α-tubulin protein and nuclei were visualized by immunofluorescence staining using an anti-α-tubulin antibody and PI, respectively. We found that apicularen A induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HeLa cells. PMA synergistically increased cytotoxicity and apoptotic sub-G1 population induced by apicularen A. These effects were completely blocked by the PKC inhibitors Ro31-8220 and Go6983, while caspase inhibition by Z-VAD-fmk did not prevent cytotoxicity. RNA interference using siRNA against PKCα, but not PKCβ and PKCγ, inhibited cytotoxicity induced by combination PMA and apicularen A. PMA increased the apicularen A-induced disruption of microtubule networks by further decreasing α- and β-tubulin protein levels in a PKC-dependent manner. These results suggest that the synergy between PMA and apicularen A is involved by PKCα activation and microtubule disruption, and that may inform the development of novel approaches to treat cancer

  4. Total Phenolic and Flavonoid Contents of Aqueous Extract of Stinging Nettle and In Vitro Antiproliferative Effect on Hela and BT-474 Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Fattahi, Sadegh; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Abedian, Zeinab; Pourbagher, Roghayeh; Motevalizadeh Ardekani, Ali; Mostafazadeh, Amrollah; Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh

    2014-01-01

    Phenolic compounds including flavonoids and phenolic acids are plants secondary metabolites. Due to their ability to act as antioxidant agents, there is a growing interest to use those components in traditional medicine for cancer prevention or treatment. The aim of this study was to measure the amounts of total phenolics and flavonoids as well as anti-proliferative effect of aqueous extract of Stinging nettle on BT-474 and Hela cell lines. The amounts of phenolics content and total flavonoid...

  5. The nonstructural protein NP1 of human bocavirus 1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Hela cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Bin; Cai, Yingyue; Li, Yongshu [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Li, Jingjing [College of Life Science, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002, Hubei (China); Liu, Kaiyu [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Li, Yi, E-mail: johnli2668@hotmail.com [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Bioengineering Department, Wuhan Bioengineering Institute, Wuhan 430415, Hubei (China); Yang, Yongbo, E-mail: yongboyang@mail.ccnu.edu.cn [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China)

    2013-05-25

    Human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV1) is a newly identified pathogen associated with human respiratory tract illnesses. Previous studies demonstrated that proteins of HBoV1 failed to cause cell death, which is considered as a possible common feature of bocaviruses. However, our work showed that the NP1 of HBoV1 induced apoptotic cell death in Hela cells in the absence of viral genome replication and expression of other viral proteins. Mitochondria apoptotic pathway was involved in the NP1-induced apoptosis that was confirmed by apoptotic characteristics including morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. We also demonstrated that the cell cycle of NP1-transfected Hela cells was transiently arrested at G2/M phase followed by rapid appearance of apoptosis and that the N terminal domain of NP1 was critical to its nuclear localization and function in apoptosis induction in Hela cells. These findings might provide alternative information for further study of mechanism of HBoV1 pathogenesis. - Highlights: ? NP1 protein of HBoV1 induced apoptosis in Hela cells was first reported. ? NP1 induced-apoptosis followed the cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. ? The NP1 induced-apoptosis was mediated by mitochondrion apoptotic pathway. ? N terminal of NP1 was critical for apoptosis induction and nuclear localization.

  6. The nonstructural protein NP1 of human bocavirus 1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Hela cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV1) is a newly identified pathogen associated with human respiratory tract illnesses. Previous studies demonstrated that proteins of HBoV1 failed to cause cell death, which is considered as a possible common feature of bocaviruses. However, our work showed that the NP1 of HBoV1 induced apoptotic cell death in Hela cells in the absence of viral genome replication and expression of other viral proteins. Mitochondria apoptotic pathway was involved in the NP1-induced apoptosis that was confirmed by apoptotic characteristics including morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. We also demonstrated that the cell cycle of NP1-transfected Hela cells was transiently arrested at G2/M phase followed by rapid appearance of apoptosis and that the N terminal domain of NP1 was critical to its nuclear localization and function in apoptosis induction in Hela cells. These findings might provide alternative information for further study of mechanism of HBoV1 pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► NP1 protein of HBoV1 induced apoptosis in Hela cells was first reported. ► NP1 induced-apoptosis followed the cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. ► The NP1 induced-apoptosis was mediated by mitochondrion apoptotic pathway. ► N terminal of NP1 was critical for apoptosis induction and nuclear localization

  7. Localization of the LRBA protein in the endomembrane system of HELA cells and primary mononuclear phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Martnez-Jaramillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Humoral deficiencies are the most common symptomatic disorders of the immune system, however, the genetic defects underlying these conditions remain unknown in more than 95% of the cases. Recently, five different studies described several autosomal recessive LRBA (encoding the lipopolysaccharide responsive beige-like anchor protein mutations in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia, immune dysregulation and/or gastropathy. Although previous studies have demonstrated the association of the human LRBA BEACH-WD domain with endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, some lysosomes, and clathrin-coated vesicles, the function of this protein is still unknown. The present study was aimed to investigate whether LRBA co-localizes with molecules involved in cellular trafficking. The expression of LAMP1, CD63, EEA1, Rab5, Rab7, and LRBA were evaluated in HeLa cells and mononuclear phagocytes by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Transferrin and LysoTracker were also included as additional endosome and lysosome markers, respectively. The co-localization analysis was performed using the ImageJ software through of the calculation of Pearsons coefficients and Manders thresholds. We observed the co-localization of LRBA with proteins implicated in vesicular trafficking, in both HeLa cells and mononuclear phagocytes. LRBA co-localized at a greater extend (>60% with the early endosome markers EEA1 and Rab5, and with the late endosome molecule Rab7 than with Lysosomes markers CD63 LAMP1, LysoTracker and the iron transport molecule Transferrin (15-47% in HeLa cells. In addition, there were higher percentages of co-localization of LRBA with endocytic vesicles in mononuclear phagocytes than in HeLa cells. Namely >72,8% of co-localization was for EEA1, Rab5, Rab7, and 41-67.9% was for LAMP1, CD63, LysoTracker and Transferrin in mononuclear phagocytes. No significant differences were observed in the percentages of co-localization among unstimulated and LPS-stimulated HeLa cells, with exception of transferrin that exhibited less frequency of co-localizaton with LRBA after LPS exposure. In mononuclear phagocytes w/o LPS, we observed similar results in co-localization percentages, only Rab5/LRBA presented minor co-localization after LPS -stimulation. Interestingly, LRBA seems to exhibit a wider distribution pattern in the cytosol that the other molecules evaluated in this study, both in mononuclear phagocytes and HeLa cells. On the other hand, the co-localization patterns of LRBA with the other molecules evaluated in both HeLa cells and mononuclear phagocytes, were found to be similar but very heterogeneous: the co-localization patterns of LRBA with LAMP1, CD63, LysoTracker and Transferrin was perinuclear whereas that with EEA1, Rab5 and Rab7 was observed throughout the cytosol without differences, independent of the LPS exposure. Taking together, LRBA co-localization was preferentially with molecules contained in early and late endosomes, and in a less degree with lysosomes. Despite of the heterogeneity, mononuclear phagocytes seems to be suitable as primary cells to study of intracellular localization of LRBA in immune cells. However, more studies are necessary to determine more precisely the LRBA interacting partners and establish its function in immune homeostasis.

  8. Detection of Clostridium difficile toxin with McCoy cell monolayers and cell suspensions and comparison with HeLa cell assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Maniar, A. C.; Chubb, H; Louie, T. J.; Williams, T. W.; Forsyth, W; Wilt, J C

    1984-01-01

    McCoy cell monolayers were compared with HeLa cell monolayers for the detection of Clostridium difficile toxin in 301 stool samples. Tests were positive (greater than or equal to 1/100 dilution) in 83 and 81 specimens tested with McCoy and HeLa cell monolayers, respectively. McCoy cell suspensions were compared with HeLa cell monolayers in 532 stool filtrates. Overall, 90 positive specimens were within one dilution and 432 filtrates were negative with either test, giving a correlation coeffic...

  9. PARP-1 is a key player in controlling apoptosis induced by high LET carbon ion beam and low LET gamma radiation in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARP-1 inhibitors have long been used as chemo-sensitizer or radio-sensitizer and specific PARP-1 inhibitors are also in clinical trial for the treatment of various cancers. PARP-1 is not only involved in DNA repair but also plays very complex role in induction of apoptosis in postirradiation condition. Our objective is to investigate role of PARP-1 in apoptosis triggered by high LET carbon ion beam (CIB) and low LET gamma. We have treated HeLa and PARP-1 knock down HeLa (Hsil) cells with various doses of CIB and gamma. We measured DNA damage by comet assay and various apoptotic parameters such as nuclear fragmentation, activation of caspase-3,8,9, AIF translocation etc. We observed higher DNA breaks and also higher apoptosis in HsiI cells compared with HeLa cells. Both CIB and gamma treatment results G2/M arrest but unlike gamma CIB makes S-phase delay, implicating that gamma and CIB triggers different pathway after DNA damage. Cell death by CIB or by gamma increased up on knocking down of PARP-1 but increase is higher for high LET CIB compared with low LET gamma. Furthermore, expression level of PARP-1 controls the intensity of overall apoptosis in cells in post-irradiation condition. So, combination of PARP-1 inhibition with high LET CIB could be a promising tool to combat cancer. (author)

  10. Combination Effect of Ethylacetate Extract of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. with Doxorubicin Againts HeLa Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Hasibuan, Poppy Anjelisa Z; Rosidah

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate the growth-inhibiting mediating effect of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. ethylacetate extract (PAE) in combination therapy with doxorubicin againts HeLa cell lines, to analyzed the apoptotic induction and expression of cyclin D1, Bcl2 and COX-2 (cyclooxigenase-2) proteins of HeLa cell lines after treatment of PAE. The cytotoxicity effects were determined by using MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromi...

  11. Monoolein-based cubosomes affect lipid profile in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Antonella; Murgia, Sergio; Putzu, Danilo; Meli, Valeria; Falchi, Angela Maria

    2015-10-01

    Monoolein-based cubosomes are promising drug delivery nanocarriers for theranostic purposes. Nevertheless, a small amount of research has been undertaken to investigate the impact of these biocompatible nanoparticles on cell lipid profile. The purpose of the present investigation was to explore changes in lipid components occurring in human carcinoma HeLa cells when exposed to short-term treatments (2 and 4h) with monoolein-based cubosomes stabilized by Pluronic F108 (MO/PF108). A combination of TLC and reversed-phase HPLC with DAD and ELSD detection was performed to analyze cell total fatty acid profile and levels of phospholipids, free cholesterol, triacylglycerols, and cholesteryl esters. The treatments with MO/PF108 cubosomes, at non-cytotoxic concentration (83?g/mL of MO), affected HeLa fatty acid profile, and a significant increase in the level of oleic acid 18:1 n-9 was observed in treated cells after lipid component saponification. Nanoparticle uptake modulated HeLa cell lipid composition, inducing a remarkable incorporation of oleic acid in the phospholipid and triacylglycerol fractions, whereas no changes were observed in the cellular levels of free cholesterol and cholesteryl oleate. Moreover, cell-based fluorescent measurements of intracellular membranes and lipid droplet content were assessed on cubosome-treated cells with an alternative technique using Nile red staining. A significant increase in the amount of the intracellular membranes and mostly in the cytoplasmic lipid droplets was detected, confirming that monoolein-based cubosome treatment influences the synthesis of intracellular membranes and accumulation of lipid droplets. PMID:26341749

  12. Uptake and fate of ouabain bound to HeLa cells. [/sup 3/H tracer study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J. S.; Brake, E. T.

    1977-01-01

    The first step in the pharmacologic interaction of a cardiac glycoside with cells is the binding of the drug to its specific surface receptor, an exteriorly oriented site of the Na/sup +/--K/sup +/ ATPase. The purpose of the study outlined was to follow a glycoside from its initial binding to its ultimate release from a sensitive cell, and in parallel studies to observe the recovery of the cells from glycoside intoxication. The glycoside used is /sup 3/H-ouabain, and the cells are from the S3 clone of HeLa. HeLa cells are used principally because of their intrinsic interest as a human cell type. In addition, having been cloned, they can be grown as a homogeneous population, which greatly simplifies the interpretation of the results. Finally, after pulse treatment with the drug, the cells can be returned to a complete medium with adequate supplies of serum, amino acids, vitamins, and energy sources. In this normal environment, not only can the short term physiologic responses be assessed but, with the growth requirements of the cells fulfilled, any recovery processes dependent on macromolecular-synthesis can also be observed.

  13. Human Papillomavirus E6 Knockdown Restores Adenovirus Mediated-estrogen Response Element Linked p53 Gene Transfer in HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajitani, Koji; Honda, Ken-Ichi; Terada, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Tomoyo; Sumi, Toshiyuki; Koyama, Masayasu; Ishiko, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    The p53 gene is inactivated by the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 protein in the majority of cervical cancers. Treatment of HeLa S3 cells with siRNA for HPV E6 permitted adenovirus-mediated transduction of a p53 gene linked to an upstream estrogen response element (ERE). Our previous study in non-siRNA treated HHUA cells, which are derived from an endometrial cancer and express estrogen receptor ?, showed enhancing effects of an upstream ERE on adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transduction. In HeLa S3 cells treated with siRNA for HPV E6, adenovirus-mediated transduction was enhanced by an upstream ERE linked to a p53 gene carrying a proline variant at codon 72, but not for a p53 gene with arginine variant at codon 72. Expression levels of p53 mRNA and Coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (CAR) mRNA after adenovirus-mediated transfer of an ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) were higher compared with those after non-ERE-linked p53 gene transfer in siRNA-treated HeLa S3 cells. Western blot analysis showed lower ?-tubulin levels and comparatively higher p53/?-tubulin or CAR /?-tubulin ratios in siRNA-treated HeLa S3 cells after adenovirus-mediated ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) transfer compared with those in non-siRNA-treated cells. Apoptosis, as measured by annexin V binding, was higher after adenovirus-mediated ERE-linked p53 gene (proline variant at codon 72) transfer compared with that after non-ERE-linked p53 gene transfer in siRNA-treated cells. PMID:26745067

  14. Total Phenolic and Flavonoid Contents of Aqueous Extract of Stinging Nettle and In Vitro Antiproliferative Effect on Hela and BT-474 Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Sadegh; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Abedian, Zeinab; Pourbagher, Roghayeh; Motevalizadeh Ardekani, Ali; Mostafazadeh, Amrollah; Akhavan-Niaki, Haleh

    2014-01-01

    Phenolic compounds including flavonoids and phenolic acids are plants secondary metabolites. Due to their ability to act as antioxidant agents, there is a growing interest to use those components in traditional medicine for cancer prevention or treatment. The aim of this study was to measure the amounts of total phenolics and flavonoids as well as anti-proliferative effect of aqueous extract of Stinging nettle on BT-474 and Hela cell lines. The amounts of phenolics content and total flavonoids were determined by folin ciocalteu and aluminium chloride methods, respectively. The free radical scavenging activity was measured by using diphenyl - picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). The reducing power of the extract was measured in the presence of potassium hexacyanoferrate and its antiproliferative activity was assessed on BT-474 and Hela cell lines using MTT assay. Total phenolic content was 322.941± 11.811 mg gallic acid/g extract. Total flavonoid content was 133.916±12.006 mg Catechin/g. The IC50 of DPPH radical was 1.2 mg/ ml and the reducing power was 218.9± 15.582 μg ascorbic acid/ g. Cell viability of BT-474 cells decreased to less than half of the control (no added extract) at the presence of 3 mg/ ml extract while no significant changes were detected for Hela cells at similar conditions. There was no significant difference in the percentage of surviving cells between consecutive days (day 1, 2 and 3) for both BT-474 and Hela cells (P>0.05). Although the relatively high amount of phenolic and flavonoid contents of the aqueous extract make this plant a promising candidate for diseases treatment; however, there is not a direct relationship between the amounts of these antioxidant components and the efficiency in in vitro cancer treatment. PMID:25035860

  15. Apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by a new targeting photosensitizer-based PDT via a mitochondrial pathway and ER stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li D

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Donghong Li,1 Lei Li,2 Pengxi Li,1 Yi Li,3 Xiangyun Chen1 1State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, The Second Department of Research Institute of Surgery, 2The First Department of Research Institute of Surgery, 3Cancer Center, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Photodynamic therapy (PDT is emerging as a viable treatment for many cancers. To decrease the cutaneous photosensitivity induced by PDT, many attempts have been made to search for a targeting photosensitizer; however, few reports describe the molecular mechanism of PDT mediated by this type of targeting photosensitizer. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of PDT induced by a new targeting photosensitizer (PS I, reported previously by us, on HeLa cells. Apoptosis is the primary mode of HeLa cell death in our system, and apoptosis occurs in a manner dependent on concentration, irradiation dose, and drug–light intervals. After endocytosis mediated by the folate receptor, PS I was primarily localized to the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER of HeLa cells. PS I PDT resulted in rapid increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production and Ca2+ concentration, both of which reached a peak nearly simultaneously at 15 minutes, followed by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential at 30 minutes, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytoplasm, downregulation of Bcl-2 expression, and upregulation of Bax expression. Meanwhile, activation of caspase-3, -9, and -12, as well as induction of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP and glucose-regulated protein (GRP78, in HeLa cells after PS I PDT was also detected. These results suggest that apoptosis of HeLa cells induced by PS I PDT is not only triggered by ROS but is also regulated by Ca2+ overload. Mitochondria and the ER serve as the subcellular targets of PS I PDT, the effective activation of which is responsible for PS I PDT-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. Keywords: folate-PEG-chlorin, folate receptor positive cells, cell death model, mechanism

  16. Immunotherapy: rAAV2 expressing interleukin-15 inhibits HeLa cell tumor growth in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Yu-Ting

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human interleukin-15 (hIL15 has anti-tumor activities, but it is not convenient for tumor treatment because of its short half-life. A gene therapy for mouse lung cancer using an adenovirus vector expressing IL15 has been reported. However, adenovirus vector-mediated gene therapy can provoke cellular toxicity and inflammatory reactions. The recombinant adenovirus-associated vector 2 (rAAV2 is safer due to minimal cellular toxicity and immune response. In order to demonstrate that gene therapy can be used safely and successfully for human cancer treatment, the rAAV2 expressing hIL15 gene (rAAV2-hIL15 is applied for human cervical cancer, HeLa cell, in this study. This study successfully demonstrates that rAAV2-hIL15 can express IL15 with bioactivities in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, our studies show that human cervical cancers are inhibited on animal model with rAAV2-hIL15 treatment and provide a safer and important reference for human cancer gene therapy.

  17. Histamine-induced inositol phosphate accumulation in HeLa cells: lithium sensitivity.

    OpenAIRE

    Bristow, D. R.; Arias-Montaño, J. A.; Young, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    1. In the presence of 10 mM Li+ the histamine-stimulated accumulation of [3H]-inositol monophosphates [( 3H]-IP1) in HeLa cells prelabelled with [3H]-inositol increased over 10-20 min to a plateau level, which was normally maintained up to 60 min. Levels of [3H]-inositol bis- and trisphosphates [( 3H]-IP2 and [3H]-IP3) initially increased rapidly but declined to near basal levels by 20 min. 2. The same pattern of histamine-induced [3H]-IP1 accumulation was observed in cells in which [3H]-inos...

  18. Spontaneous and radiation induced cell death in HeLa S3 human carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation biologists have classified radiation-induced cell death based on cell proliferative capacity to either mitotic or interphase death. Cytologists have revealed two morphologically and biochemically diverse forms of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis. While the knowledge of the former is already well exploited by radiologists, cell susceptibility to apoptosis and necrosis is still under investigation. We studied characteristics of spontaneous cell death, and dose dependence and time course of radiation-induced cell death of human uterine cervix epitheloid carcinoma HeLaS3 in culture. Cells were irradiated with 2-40 Gy of γ-rays. The effect on growth, viability, morphology and genomic DNA structure were followed 24-72 h after irradiation. Cell viability was evaluated by trypan-blue exclusion assay and cell morphology by in situ DNA staining with propidium iodide. Cell genomic DNA fragmentation pattern was determined by electrophoresis on 2% agarose gels. At all cell densities 25-35% cells were PI positive and their DNA was fragmented to a high molecular size (≥20 kbp), but the internucleosomal ladder was not observed. A significant decrease in viability to 33% was observed 72 h post 40 Gy irradiation. It corresponded to 55% of PI positive cells. A smear of smaller DNA fragments (0.1-1 kbp), 24 h after 10-20 Gy irradiation was considered as proof that the dominant form of radiation-induced cell death was necrosis. It was concluded that the dominant form of radiation-induced cell death in HeLaS3 population was necrosis and the radiation dose which caused 50% of cell death after 72 h (termed ND50) was between 30-40 Gy. (author)

  19. Electroporation of micro-droplet encapsulated HeLa cells in oil phase

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Kang

    2010-08-27

    Electroporation (EP) is a method widely used to introduce foreign genes, drugs or dyes into cells by permeabilizing the plasma membrane with an external electric field. A variety of microfluidic EP devices have been reported so far. However, further integration of prior and posterior EP processes turns out to be very complicated, mainly due to the difficulty of developing an efficient method for precise manipulation of cells in microfluidics. In this study, by means of a T-junction structure within a delicate microfluidic device, we encapsulated HeLa cells in micro-droplet of poration medium in oil phase before EP, which has two advantages: (i) precise control of cell-encapsulating droplets in oil phase is much easier than the control of cell populations or individuals in aqueous buffers; (ii) this can minimize the electrochemical reactions on the electrodes. Finally, we successfully introduced fluorescent dyes into the micro-droplet encapsulated HeLa cells in oil phase. Our results reflected a novel way to realize the integrated biomicrofluidic system for EP. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  20. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Y

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yanhong Zheng,1 Yunlan Tang,2 Zhirong Bao,1 Hui Wang,1 Feng Ren,1 Mingxiong Guo,2 Hong Quan,1 Changzhong Jiang11Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of the Ministry of Education and Center for Electronic Microscopy and Department of Physics, Wuhan University; 2College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Nanomaterials have an advantage in “personalized” therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 µg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy. Keywords: superparamagnetism, MRI/CT, chemoradiotherapy, intelligent nanoprobe

  1. Nuclear proteome analysis of cisplatin-treated HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Wei [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Institute of Hygiene, Zhejiang Academy of Medical Sciences, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310013 (China); Yan Chunlan; Gan Tieer; Chen Zhanghui [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Lu Xianghong [Department of Pharmacy, Lishui People' s Hospital, Lishui, Zhejiang 323000 (China); Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J. [Department of Basic Sciences, Division of Biochemistry, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Zhu Xinqiang, E-mail: zhuxq@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Yang Jun, E-mail: gastate@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China)

    2010-09-10

    Cisplatin has been widely accepted as one of the most efficient anticancer drugs for decades. However, the mechanisms for the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin are still not fully understood. Cisplatin primarily targets DNA, resulting in the formation of DNA double strand breaks and eventually causing cell death. In this study, we applied two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with LC-MS/MS to analyze the nuclear proteome of HeLa cells treated with cisplatin, in an effort to uncover new mechanistic clues regarding the cellular response to cisplatin. A total of 19 proteins were successfully identified, and these proteins are involved in a variety of basal metabolic and biological processes in cells, including biosynthesis, cell cycle, glycolysis and apoptosis. Six were related to the regulation of mRNA splicing, and we therefore asked whether the Fas gene might undergo alternative splicing following cisplatin treatment. This proved to be the case, as the splicing forms of Fas were modified in cisplatin-treated HeLa cells. This work provides novel information, from the perspective of the nuclear response, for understanding the cytotoxicity caused by cisplatin-induced DNA damage.

  2. Metabolism of HeLa cells revealed through autofluorescence lifetime upon infection with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryakina, Tatyana Yu.; Su, Pin-Tzu; Syu, Wan-Jr; Allen Chang, C.; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2012-10-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a sensitive technique in monitoring functional and conformational states of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD),main compounds participating in oxidative phosphorylation in cells. In this study, we have applied FLIM to characterize the metabolic changes in HeLa cells upon bacterial infection and made comparison with the results from the cells treated with staurosporine (STS), a well-known apoptosis inducer. The evolving of NADH's average autofluorescence lifetime during the 3 h after infection with enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC) or STS treatment has been observed. The ratio of the short and the long lifetime components' relative contributions of NADH increases with time, a fact indicating cellular metabolic activity, such as a decrease of oxidative phosphorylation over the course of infection, while opposite dynamics is observed in FAD. Being associated with mitochondria, FAD lifetimes and redox ratio could indicate heterogeneous mitochondrial function, microenvironment with bacterial infection, and further pathway to cell death. The redox ratios for both EHEC-infected and STS-treated HeLa cells have been observed and these observations also indicate possible apoptosis induced by bacterial infection.

  3. Nuclear proteome analysis of cisplatin-treated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisplatin has been widely accepted as one of the most efficient anticancer drugs for decades. However, the mechanisms for the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin are still not fully understood. Cisplatin primarily targets DNA, resulting in the formation of DNA double strand breaks and eventually causing cell death. In this study, we applied two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with LC-MS/MS to analyze the nuclear proteome of HeLa cells treated with cisplatin, in an effort to uncover new mechanistic clues regarding the cellular response to cisplatin. A total of 19 proteins were successfully identified, and these proteins are involved in a variety of basal metabolic and biological processes in cells, including biosynthesis, cell cycle, glycolysis and apoptosis. Six were related to the regulation of mRNA splicing, and we therefore asked whether the Fas gene might undergo alternative splicing following cisplatin treatment. This proved to be the case, as the splicing forms of Fas were modified in cisplatin-treated HeLa cells. This work provides novel information, from the perspective of the nuclear response, for understanding the cytotoxicity caused by cisplatin-induced DNA damage.

  4. Enhanced killing of irradiated HeLa cells in synchronous culture by hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitotically synchronized cultures of HeLa S-3 cells were subjected to the treatment of radiation (400 rad), hyperthermia (430C), and a combination of both at different phases of the division cycle. The radioresistance was most pronounced in the mid G-1 and late S phases, while thermal resistance was greatest in the early G-1 phase and steadily decreased as cells entered the S phase. Cells in the late S and early G-2 phases were found to be most sensitive to hyperthermia. The sequential treatment of radiation immediately followed by hyperthermia resulted in an enhanced cell killing throughout the cell cycle with a marked synergism occurring in cells in the late S phase. The age-response function of the combined treatment was more similar to that of the thermal age response

  5. Exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles increases Staphylococcusaureusinfection of HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Walker, Stephen. G.; Wang, Hong Zhan; Gondon, Chris; Brink, Peter; Guterman, Shoshana; Zawacki, Emma; Applebaum, Eliana; Rafailovich, Miriam; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel; Mironava, Tatsiana

    TiO2 is one of the most common nanoparticles in industry from food additives to energy generation. Even though TiO2 is also used as an anti-bacterial agent in combination with UV, we found that, in the absence of UV, exposure of HeLa cells to TiO2 nanoparticles largely increased their risk of bacterial invasion. HeLa cells cultured with low dosage rutile and anatase TiO2 nanoparticles (0.1 mg/ml) for 24 hrs prior to exposure to bacteria had 350% and 250% respectively more bacteria infected per cell. The increase was attributed to increased LDH leakage, and changes in the mechanical response of the cell membrane. On the other hand, macrophages exposed to TiO2 particles ingested 40% fewer bacteria, further increasing the risk of infection. In combination, these two factors raise serious concerns regarding the impact of exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles on the ability of organisms to resist bacterial infection.

  6. Methylation of DNA in HeLa cells after ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of DNA and its methylation were measured in HeLa cells after exposure to increasing doses of ultraviolet (uv). The extent of methylation relative to DNA synthesis increases in a dose dependent manner. Old and new DNA were spearated by gradient centrifugation and the effect of uv on the methylation of the two species was determined. Methylation of new DNA is affected more extensively than the methylation of old DNA by exposure to irradiation. The possible significant of aberrant methylation of DNA in potentiating uv induced damage is discussed

  7. Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation during uptake by HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Johnsen, H; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    use of a monoclonal antibody against phosphotyrosine, we showed that three classes of proteins are tyrosine phosphorylated: a triple band of 68, 66, and 64 kDa, a 97-kDa band, and a 140-kDa band. The phosphorylation could be detected by immunoblotting from 15 min after infection of HeLa cells. We...... phosphorylation colocalized with EBs. Sixteen hours after infection, EBs have reorganized to the replicating reticulate bodies, forming an inclusion. At this time, phosphorylation was seen as dotted spots in the periphery of the inclusion....

  8. Reductively labile PRINT particles for the delivery of doxorubicin to HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petros, Robby A; Ropp, Patricia A; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2008-04-16

    A Trojan horse PRINT particle composition was developed that incorporates a reductively labile cross-linker to achieve activated release of doxorubicin in vitro. Particles of discrete size and shape (cube side length = 2 micron) containing 30 wt % of a disulfide-based cross-linker and 2 wt % doxorubicin were synthesized. This PRINT composition was shown to release doxorubicin in response to a reducing environment as measured by flow cytometry and was found to be highly proficient at killing HeLa cells in vitro. PMID:18355010

  9. Yeast CUP1 protects HeLa cells against copper-induced stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an essential trace element, copper can be toxic in mammalian cells when present in excess. Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich proteins that avidly bind copper and thus play an important role in detoxification. YeastCUP1 is a member of the MT gene family. The aim of this study was to determine whether yeast CUP1 could bind copper effectively and protect cells against copper stress. In this study,CUP1 expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and copper content was detected by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Cellular viability was detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the cell cycle distribution of CUP1 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The data indicated that overexpression of yeast CUP1 in HeLa cells played a protective role against copper-induced stress, leading to increased cellular viability (P<0.05) and decreased ROS production (P<0.05). It was also observed that overexpression of yeast CUP1 reduced the percentage of G1 cells and increased the percentage of S cells, which suggested that it contributed to cell viability. We found that overexpression of yeast CUP1 protected HeLa cells against copper stress. These results offer useful data to elucidate the mechanism of the MT gene on copper metabolism in mammalian cells

  10. Yeast CUP1 protects HeLa cells against copper-induced stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.X. Xie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As an essential trace element, copper can be toxic in mammalian cells when present in excess. Metallothioneins (MTs are small, cysteine-rich proteins that avidly bind copper and thus play an important role in detoxification. Yeast CUP1 is a member of the MT gene family. The aim of this study was to determine whether yeast CUP1 could bind copper effectively and protect cells against copper stress. In this study, CUP1 expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and copper content was detected by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS was evaluated using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA assay. Cellular viability was detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the cell cycle distribution of CUP1 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The data indicated that overexpression of yeast CUP1 in HeLa cells played a protective role against copper-induced stress, leading to increased cellular viability (P<0.05 and decreased ROS production (P<0.05. It was also observed that overexpression of yeast CUP1 reduced the percentage of G1 cells and increased the percentage of S cells, which suggested that it contributed to cell viability. We found that overexpression of yeast CUP1 protected HeLa cells against copper stress. These results offer useful data to elucidate the mechanism of the MT gene on copper metabolism in mammalian cells.

  11. Yeast CUP1 protects HeLa cells against copper-induced stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, X.X. [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Shanghai (China); College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China); Ma, Y.F.; Wang, Q.S.; Chen, Z.L.; Liao, R.R.; Pan, Y.C. [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-12

    As an essential trace element, copper can be toxic in mammalian cells when present in excess. Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich proteins that avidly bind copper and thus play an important role in detoxification. YeastCUP1 is a member of the MT gene family. The aim of this study was to determine whether yeast CUP1 could bind copper effectively and protect cells against copper stress. In this study,CUP1 expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and copper content was detected by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Cellular viability was detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the cell cycle distribution of CUP1 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The data indicated that overexpression of yeast CUP1 in HeLa cells played a protective role against copper-induced stress, leading to increased cellular viability (P<0.05) and decreased ROS production (P<0.05). It was also observed that overexpression of yeast CUP1 reduced the percentage of G1 cells and increased the percentage of S cells, which suggested that it contributed to cell viability. We found that overexpression of yeast CUP1 protected HeLa cells against copper stress. These results offer useful data to elucidate the mechanism of the MT gene on copper metabolism in mammalian cells.

  12. Degradation of structurally characterized proteins injected into HeLa cells. Basic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-five proteins of known x-ray structure were labeled by chloramine-T radioiodination or by reaction with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and introduced into HeLa cells using red cell-mediated microinjection. Degradation rates of the injected proteins were then determined over the next 50 h by measuring the release of soluble isotope to the culture medium. Control experiments demonstrated that the measured rates were not compromised by proteolysis within RBCs, the presence of unfused RBCs, or degradation of protein released from RBCs to the medium. Degradation of some injected proteins was faster during the first 12 h after fusion than at later times, apparently a response of HeLa cells to trypsinization. However, all proteins exhibited first-order degradation rates between 24 and 48 h post injection. Except for seven proteins, stabilities measured during this interval were unaffected by the labeling procedure. Reductive methylation was used to choose among the seven discordant values, and half-lives for the 35 proteins ranged from 16 h for lysozyme to 214 h for yeast alcohol dehydrogenase. Since half-lives for six of the injected proteins closely match values obtained by in vivo measurements, we consider our estimates of the metabolic stabilities of the injected proteins to be generally accurate. Therefore, the half-lives obtained by microinjection should prove useful in the search for relationships between protein structure and intracellular stability

  13. Hyperthermia enhances the reactivation of irradiated adenovirus in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactivation of U.V.-irradiated adenovirus 2 in HeLa cells is enhanced 8 to 9 fold if the cells are given a brief hyperthermic shock before infection. Maximum reactivation is achieved by heating for 10 min at 45.5 deg C and with a delay of 36 h between heating and infection. The induction process requires protein synthesis only during the 3 h period immediately following heating; cycloheximide does not prevent the expression of enhanced reactivation if added to the cells after this time. Heat-enhanced reactivation exhibits properties similar in some respects to radiation-enhanced reactivation and indicates an increased capacity of the heated cells to tolerate DNA damage. (author)

  14. PVA engineered microcapsules for targeted delivery of camptothecin to HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbiati, Alice; Rocca, Blasco Morozzo della; Tabolacci, Claudio; Beninati, Simone; Desideri, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); Paradossi, Gaio, E-mail: paradossi@stc.uniroma2.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    Capsular microvectors are an important tool in the recent research field of nanomedicine to address a drug cargo for the therapeutic treatment of several pathologies. In this study we describe how the product of the conjugation of the polysaccharide chitosan with folate can be used as a coating of poly (vinyl alcohol), PVA, based microcapsules for an efficient targeting of HeLa cells. The influence of the coating on the bioadhesive properties of the vector and on its cargo capacity was also considered using camptothecin as an anticancer drug model. The coating strategy was finalized to exploit the good chemical versatility of PVA, used to form the shell of the vector. This study is a follow up of an investigation activity aiming to show the potentialities of PVA-shelled microcapsules or microbubbles as injectable microdevices supporting a theranostic approach for different types of tumour. Highlights: {yields}Coating of PVA-shelled microcapsules with chitosan-folate. {yields} Selective bioadhesion of microcapsules to HeLa Cells. {yields} Effective loading and release of camptothecin. {yields} In vitro anti-proliferative action of camptothecin loaded microcapsules.

  15. PVA engineered microcapsules for targeted delivery of camptothecin to HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capsular microvectors are an important tool in the recent research field of nanomedicine to address a drug cargo for the therapeutic treatment of several pathologies. In this study we describe how the product of the conjugation of the polysaccharide chitosan with folate can be used as a coating of poly (vinyl alcohol), PVA, based microcapsules for an efficient targeting of HeLa cells. The influence of the coating on the bioadhesive properties of the vector and on its cargo capacity was also considered using camptothecin as an anticancer drug model. The coating strategy was finalized to exploit the good chemical versatility of PVA, used to form the shell of the vector. This study is a follow up of an investigation activity aiming to show the potentialities of PVA-shelled microcapsules or microbubbles as injectable microdevices supporting a theranostic approach for different types of tumour. Highlights: →Coating of PVA-shelled microcapsules with chitosan-folate. → Selective bioadhesion of microcapsules to HeLa Cells. → Effective loading and release of camptothecin. → In vitro anti-proliferative action of camptothecin loaded microcapsules.

  16. Apoptosis induced by (di-isopropyloxyphoryl-Trp)2-Lys-OCH3 in K562 and HeLa cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Feng Liu; Shi-Ying Liu; Ping Xu; Zhen-Hua Xie; Guo-Ping Cai; Yu-Yang Jiang

    2008-03-01

    According to the method used in our laboratory, our group synthesized (DIPP-Trp)2-Lys-OCH3. It inhibited the proliferation of K562 and HeLa cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with an IC50 of 15.12 and 42.23 M, respectively. (DIPP-Trp)2-Lys-OCH3 induced a dose-dependent increase of the G2/M cell population in K562 cells, and S cell population in HeLa cells; the sub-G0 population increased dramatically in both cell lines as seen by PI staining experiments using a FACS Calibur Flow cytometer (BeckmanCoulter, USA). Phosphatidylserine could significantly translocate to the surface of the membrane in (DIPP-Trp)2-Lys-OCH3-treated K562 and HeLa cells. The increase of an early apoptotic population was observed in a dose-dependent manner by both annexin-FITC and PI staining. It was concluded that (DIPP-Trp)2-Lys-OCH3 not only induced cells to enter into apoptosis, but also affected the progress of the cell cycle. It may have arrested the K562 and HeLa cells in the G2/M, S phases, respectively. The apoptotic pathway was pulsed at this point, resulting in the treated cells entering into programmed cell death. (DIPP-Trp)2-Lys-OCH3 is a potential anticancer drug that intervenes in the signalling pathway.

  17. BLCAP arrests G1/S checkpoint and induces apoptosis through downregulation of pRb1 in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Zhang, Li; Qiu, Xiaoping; Zeng, Fanyu; Chen, Wen; An, Yuehui; Hu, Bicheng; Wu, Xufeng; Wu, Xinxing

    2016-05-01

    BLCAP (bladder cancer-associated protein) gene exhibited tumor suppressor function in different tumors and is regarded as a candidate tumor suppressor gene; however, the mechanism by which BLCAP exerts its function remains elusive. This study investigated the functional association between BLCAP and proliferation or apoptosis in cervical cancer cells, to identify the functional motifs of BLCAP. The BLCAP-shRNA expression vector based on pRNA-U6.1/Hygro plasmid was used to specifically inhibit BLCAP activity in HeLa cells. The optimal shRNA plasmid was selected to knock down BLCAP expression and the biological effects were investigated. The effects on cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometric or Annexin V-FITC staining analysis. The gene expression profiles of HeLa cells transfected with blcap-wt and BLCAP-shRNA were analyzed using human signal pathway gene Oligochips. The levels of protein expression and interaction of BLCAP with Rb1 proteins were determined by western blotting and Co-IP assays. The site-specific mutagenesis assay was used to identify amino acid residues important for BLCAP. Significantly differentially expressed genes were found by gene Oligo chips analysis. These genes were all correlated with proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis. The results of western blotting and Co-IP assays confirmed that overexpression of BLCAP could interact with Rb1 and inhibit Rb1 phosphorylation. Further investigation revealed that SAXX mutation in the key regions of BLCAP suppressed the function of BLCAP and significantly increased the level of phosphorylated Rb1 protein. Here our findings suggested that the functional association of BLCAP and Rb1 might play important roles in proliferation and apoptosis of HeLa cells. It suggested that BLCAP could be a novel therapeutic target for cervical cancer. PMID:26986503

  18. HeLa Based Cell Free Expression Systems for Expression of Plasmodium Rhoptry Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadavalli, Raghavendra; Sam-Yellowe, Tobili

    2015-01-01

    Malaria causes significant global morbidity and mortality. No routine vaccine is currently available. One of the major reasons for lack of a vaccine is the challenge of identifying suitable vaccine candidates. Malarial proteins expressed using prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell based expression systems are poorly glycosylated, generally insoluble and undergo improper folding leading to reduced immunogenicity. The wheat germ, rabbit reticulocyte lysate and Escherichia coli lysate cell free expression systems are currently used for expression of malarial proteins. However, the length of expression time and improper glycosylation of proteins still remains a challenge. We demonstrate expression of Plasmodium proteins in vitro using HeLa based cell free expression systems, termed "in vitro human cell free expression systems". The 2 HeLa based cell free expression systems transcribe mRNA in 75 min and 3 l of transcribed mRNA is sufficient to translate proteins in 90 min. The 1-step expression system is a transcription and translation coupled expression system; the transcription and co-translation occurs in 3 hr. The process can also be extended for 6 hr by providing additional energy. In the 2-step expression system, mRNA is first transcribed and then added to the translation mix for protein expression. We describe how to express malaria proteins; a hydrophobic PF3D7_0114100 Maurer's Cleft - 2 transmembrane (PfMC-2TM) protein, a hydrophilic PF3D7_0925900 protein and an armadillo repeats containing protein PF3D7_1361800, using the HeLa based cell free expression system. The proteins are expressed in micro volumes employing 2-step and 1-step expression strategies. An affinity purification method to purify 25 l of proteins expressed using the in vitro human cell free expression system is also described. Protein yield is determined by Bradford's assay and the expressed and purified proteins can be confirmed by western blotting analysis. Expressed recombinant proteins can be used for immunizations, immunoassays and protein sequencing. PMID:26131624

  19. Changes in the protein-synthesizing system of HeLa cells in culture in the presence of trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper studies the state of the protein-synthesizing system of HeLa cells in culture in the presence of certain trace elements. The cytopathic action of zinc, nickel, cobalt, cadmium, and fluorine was studied in the presence of maximal allowable concentrations adopted for liquid media. Thirty minutes before the end of incubation with the elements to be studied, (H 3)-uridine or (H 3)-leucine was added to the cultures of HeLa cells. The autoradiographic data showed that variation in the integral parameters of cell function as the level of synthesis of total fast-labeled RNA and total protein in fact do take place during incubation of the HeLa cell culture with trace elements

  20. Biostimulation of HeLa cells by low-intensity visible light. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autoradiographic experiments, performed with monolayer HeLa cells, show that the irradiation with He-Ne laser (d=100 J/m2) causes an increase in the number of S-phase cells connected with enhanced G1-S transition of a part of the population, as well as an increase in the grain count on the labelled nuclei connected with an enhancement of DNA synthesis in S-phase cells. The irradiation influences the proliferation rate of various subpopulations not in equal degree, as shown analysing the clone size distribution after the irradiation (D 10, 102, 103 J/m2). The stimulative effect of irradiation is most noticeable on the proliferation activity of the slowly growing subpopulations

  1. Turnover of ouabain-binding sites and plasma membrane proteins in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.S.; Will, P.C.; Proctor, W.R.; Brake, E.T.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the turnover of a specific molecule, inactivated by a specific drug, in the plasma membrane of a cloned cell line. The molecule, the Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport enzyme, was labeled with the inactivating ligand /sup 3/H-ouabain. The cell line was HeLa S/sub 3/ which binds ouabain tightly but not covalently. Although ouabain was used primarily as a marker to locate the transport enzyme, ouabain is also representative of an important class of drugs, the cardiac glycosides, and the manner in which such drugs are handled by cells is a matter of pharmacological interest. It is suggested that the polypeptides in the membrane-rich fraction are turning over at different rates, but that they appear to be internalized as particulates of membrane-bound vesicles. (HLW)

  2. Investigation of siRNA Nanoparticle Formation Using Mono-Cationic Detergents and Its Use in Gene Silencing in Human HeLa Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hideyoshi Harashima; Yuma Yamada; Ryosuke Suzuki

    2013-01-01

    The focus of recent research has been on the development of siRNA vectors to achieve an innovative gene therapy. Most of the conventional vectors are siRNA nanoparticles complexed with cationic polymers and liposomes, making it difficult to release siRNA. In this study, we report on the use of MCD, a quaternary ammonium salt detergent containing a long aliphatic chain (L-chain) as an siRNA complexation agent using human HeLa cells (a model cancer cell). We prepared siRNA nanoparticles using v...

  3. Combination Effect Of N-Hexane Extract Of Plectranthus Amboinicus (LOUR.) Spreng. With Doxorubicin Againts HeLa Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Rosidah; Hasibuan, Poppy Anjelisa Z

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the growth inhibiting effect of Plectranthus amboinicus, (Lour.) Spreng n-hexane extract (PAN) in combination with doxorubicin againts HeLa cell Lines, to observe the apoptotic induction and immunocytochemistry of HeLa cell Lines on cyclin D1, Bcl-2, and Cox-2 after treatment of PAN. The percentage viability of the cell were carried out by using MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay. The effect of apoptosis...

  4. Repair of radiation-induced DNA damage in thermotolerant and nonthermotolerant HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of heat exposure on the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage which inhibits the ability of nuclear DNA to undergo supercoiling changes was studied using the fluorescent halo assay in thermotolerant and nonthermotolerant (normal) cells. The assay utilizes an intercalating, fluorescent dye to unwind and rewind endogenous DNA supercoils. When HeLa cells are exposed to 17.3 Gy radiation the ability of DNA to be rewound into supercoils is completely inhibited. However, the ability of DNA to rewind is 70% restored by 30 min after irradiation. Both thermotolerant and normal cells exposed to 45 degrees C for 30 min prior to irradiation had a rewinding ability intermediate between control and unheated cells, but there was no restoration of rewinding ability up to 3 h postirradiation. Thus, when irradiation immediately followed heating, there was no difference between thermotolerant and normal cells. However, when various time intervals were imposed between heating and irradiation, a difference in the ability of the cells to recover from heat-induced alterations became apparent. In normal cells after 6 h of postheat incubation the cells' ability to restore DNA supercoiling was approximately the same as that of control cells, while in thermotolerant cells only 2 h was required to repair the ability to restore supercoiling at the same rate. The rate of repair of DNA remained correlated with relative nuclear protein content as measured by fluorescein isothiocyanate staining in both thermotolerant and normal cells, indicating a possible relationship between the two

  5. Cytotoxic Activity of Three South Sulawesi Medicinal Plant Extracts Used in the Treatment of HeLa Cell Line: Jati Putih (Gmelina arborea Roxb., Jati Belanda (Guazuma ulmifolia Lamk. and Lakkalakka (Curculigo orchioides Gaerth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUKMAN M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gmelina arborea Roxb, Guazuma ulmifolia Lamk and Curculigo orchioides Gaerth, the three plants frequently used in South Sulawesi for the treatment of cancerous diseases, have been selected to examine their action in cervical epithelial carcinoma. These extracts were assessed using HeLa cell cancer (Human cervix cancer and doxorubicin was used as the positive control. Data are presented as the dose that inhibited 50% control growth (IC50. Cytotoxic activity was measured using MTT colorimetric assay. Dose-dependent studies revealed IC50 of 113.61±0.12 μg/mL, 174.90±1.22 μg/mL and 126.05±2.43 μg/mL for eGA, eGU and eCO on HeLa cell cancer, respectively and correlated with treatment of cancer.

  6. The role of glutathione in the radiosensitive effect induced by treating HeLa cells with sanazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate radiosensitive effect of sanazole on HeLa cells and its relationship with glutathione (GSH). Methods: The anoxia model was made by inflow of nitrogen gas. The survival rate of HeLa cells was observed with method of colony formation after treatment with sanazole and 60Co γ irradiation. Radiosensitive effect was evaluated through measurement of sensitizing enhancement ratio (SER) resulted from single-target multi-hit model. The GSH content in these HeLa cells was determined by the tetra-oxypyrimidine UV-spectrophotometer method to explore the mechanism of radiosensitive effect. Results: SER was more than 1.4. The concentration of GSH decreased significantly with increasing concentration of sensitizer and dose of radiation, especially under anoxia condition. Conclusions: Sanazole has significant radiosensitive effect and decrease in GSH content resulted from combination with 60Co γ irradiation may be one of its radiosensitive mechanisms

  7. Overexpression of the BRIP1 ameliorates chemosensitivity to cisplatin by inhibiting Rac1 GTPase activity in cervical carcinoma HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Li, Hong; Zhang, Rui; Dang, Huimin; Sun, Ping; Zou, Lin; Zhang, Yongtong; Gao, Yanmei; Hu, Yuqin

    2016-03-01

    BRCA1-interacting protein 1 (BRIP1), a DNA-dependent ATPase and a DNA helicase, is critical for BRCA-associated DNA damage repair functions and may be associated with the tumourigenesis and aggressiveness of various cancers. Here, we constructed a BRIP1 recombinant plasmid, overexpressed it in a cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and found that ectopic expression of BRIP1 could remarkably enhance the antitumor activity of cisplatin, as demonstrated by decreased cell viability, colony formation and tumour xenografts' weight. Moreover, BRIP1 promoted cisplatin-mediated cell apoptosis and suppressed tumour angiogenesis. We also found that the synergistic inhibition effect of BRIP1 might be partially attributed to attenuation of Rac1 GTPase activation and that Rac1 GTPase re-activation could reverse the sensitizing effect induced by BRIP1. Our study suggested that up-regulation of BRIP1 could enhance chemosensitivity of HeLa cells to cisplatin through inhibiting Rac1 GTPase activation, and it provides a new insight into the essential role of BRIP1 in cervical cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26680099

  8. Evaluation of hela cell lineage response to β radiation from Holmium-166 embedded in ceramic seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Sarmento Valente

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the effects of β radiation of Ho-166 embedded in ceramic seeds on HeLa cells. Methodology consisted in the production of ceramic seeds with holmium-165 by sol-gel route. Chemical and physical characterizations of the seeds were performed. Subsequently, nuclear characterization was performed by gamma spectrometry. Experimental and theoretical activities were defined and initial dose rate were evaluated by MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee methodology. The seeds were placed in confluent culture flasks and remained for six radionuclide half-lives. Biological results were represented by a clean 6 mm diameter area around the seed where the tumour cells were killed. The initial dose rate was 15.5 Gy. h-1. The maximum absorbed dose was 591.3 Gy. The features of the Ho-166 seeds suggested that such ceramic seeds were suitable for high dose rate brachytherapy.

  9. LyGDI expression in HeLa cells increased its sensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: In order to confirm whether LyGDI has apoptotic signal transduction function and can increase the apoptotic rate of radiation-induced cell death, the lyGDI and mutant D19lyGDI gene, which constructed with the pCDNA3. 1 His A, were transfected into no-endogenous lyGDI HeLa cells. Methods Transient expressions of lyGDI and D19lyGDI in HeLa cells were analyzed by Western blot using anti-mono antibody of LyGDI and Xpress tag. Cell apoptosis was assayed with Annexin V-FITC apoptosis kit. To select stable clone, the transferred HeLa cells had been maintained in G418 medium for 3 weeks, then a cell line, which stably expressed LyGDI and mutant D19lyGDI, was selected. The selected cell line was irradiated with 12 Gy 60Co y-rays. Caspase-3 activity of the cells was determined by Western blot and cell viability by clone-forming assay after 48 hours post-irradiation culture. Results: Western blot and Annexin V-FITC apoptotic analysis revealed that lyGDI and D19lyGDI transient expressions in HeLa cells induced apoptosis; Caspase-3 activity measurement and clone-forming assay showed that lyGDI increased sensitivity to radiation-induced cell apoptosis. Conclusions: lyGDI performs function in apoptosis signal transduction, its expression in HeLa cells can increase the sensitivity to radiation-induced cell apoptosis. (authors)

  10. Cell Cycle Inhibition from Ethylacetate Extracts of Plectranthus amboinicus, (Lour.) Spreng.) Leaves on HeLa Cells Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Rosidah; Hasibuan, Poppy Anjelisa Z; Satria, Denny

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of ethylacetate extract (EAE) of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng.) leaves on cell cyle on HeLa cell lines. Methods: Analysis of cell cycle distribution was performed using flowcytometer and the data was analyzed using ModFit LT 3.0 program. Results: The EAE changes the accumulation of cell cycle phase from G0 -G1 phase (54.61%) to sub-G1 phase (69.73%). Conclusions: Based on the results, EAE is potential to be developed as co-chemoth...

  11. Flow cytometry evaluation of hela S3 cell death induced by γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the form of radiation-induced cell death together with its time-course and dose dependence is of interest for both radiation protection and radiotherapy. The most statistically relevant results are achieved by flow-cytometry which permits simultaneous analysis of several characteristics of a large number of cells. Using this technique we analyzed the effect of 60Co γ-irradiation on HeLa S3 human uterine cervix carcinoma cells' viability, morphology and genomic DNA. Cells were irradiated with 2-10 Gy and analyzed 2-72 h post-treatment. The cell membrane was stained with Annexin V-FITC and cellular DNA with propidium iodide. Forward and side light scattering and stain-induced fluorescence of 20,000 cells per sample were used to determine the form of the radiation-induced cell death and to quantify its extent. The dominant form of cell death was necrosis which was most pronounced 72 h postirradiation when 37 % of the cells were affected. (author)

  12. The influence of γ-irradiation in different modes on the isolated and united HeLa cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was shown that isolated and united HeLa cells in culture responded to single irradiation and repeated low dose irradiation by different ways. The effect on radiosensitivity was revealed in united cells only. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  13. Quantitative and qualitative effect of gH625 on the nanoliposome-mediated delivery of mitoxantrone anticancer drug to HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, Emiliana; Allard-Vannier, Emilie; Falanga, Annarita; Stiuso, Paola; Vitiello, Maria Teresa; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Galdiero, Stefania; Chourpa, Igor

    2015-07-01

    The present work investigates in vitro the delivery of the anticancer drug mitoxantrone (MTX) to HeLa cancer cells by means of polyethylene glycol (PEG) liposomes functionalized with the novel cell penetrating peptide gH625. This hydrophobic peptide enhances the delivery of doxorubicin (Doxo) to the cytoplasm of cancer cells, while the mechanism of this enhancement has not yet been understood. Here, in order to get a better insight into the role of gH625 on the mechanism of liposome-mediated drug delivery, we treated HeLa cells with liposomes functionalized with gH625 and loaded with MTX; functionalized and not liposome were characterized in terms of their physico-chemical properties and drug release kinetics. To quantify the MTX uptake and to study the subcellular drug distribution and interaction, we took advantage of the intrinsic fluorescence of MTX and of the fluorescence-based techniques like fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and confocal spectral imaging (CSI). FACS data confirmed that gH625 increases the total intracellular MTX content. CSI data indicated that when liposomes are decorated with gH625 an enhanced staining of the internalized drug is observed mainly in hydrophobic regions of the cytoplasm, where the increased presence of an oxidative metabolite of the drug is observed. The cytotoxicity on HeLa cell line was higher for functionalized liposomes within 4-6h of treatment. To summarise, the MTX delivery with gH625-decorated nanoliposomes enhances the quantity of both the intracellular drug and of its oxidative metabolite and contributes to higher anticancer efficacy of the drug at the delay of 4-6h. PMID:25891256

  14. Caveolae-mediated endocytosis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles in living Hela cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient intracellular delivery of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and unraveling the mechanism underlying the intracellular delivery are essential for advancing the applications of AuNPs toward in vivo imaging and therapeutic interventions. We employed fluorescence microscopy to investigate the internalization mechanism of small-size AuNPs by living Hela cells. Herein, we found that the caveolae-mediated endocytosis was the dominant pathway for the intracellular delivery of small-size AuNPs. The intracellular delivery was suppressed when we depleted the cholesterol with methyl-?-cyclodextrin (M?CD); in contrast, the sucrose that disrupts the formation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis did not block the endocytosis of AuNPs. Meanwhile, we examined the intracellular localization of AuNPs in endocytic vesicles by fluorescent colocalization. This work would provide a potential technique to study the intracellular delivery of small-size nanoparticles for biomedical applications. (paper)

  15. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl2 confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype

  16. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Nobutaka [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Ogawa, Ryohei, E-mail: ogawa@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Cui, Zheng-Guo [Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Morii, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akihiko [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Kanayama, Shinji; Yoneda, Yuko [New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Kondo, Takashi [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl{sub 2} confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype.

  17. Do altered activities of superoxide dismutases and the level of NF-kB modulate the effects of gamma radiation in HeLaS3 cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA NICIFOROVIC

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Most experimental models, including cell culture studies, have demon­strated that over-expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD in cells bearing a carcinoma phenotype has anti-proliferative and tumour suppression chara­cteristics. In contrast, when cervical carcinoma biopsies express MnSOD, there is a poor prognosis and resistance to radiation therapy. The results herein indicate that human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLaS3 cells have increased MnSOD activity (up to 50 % of the total SOD activity due to low expression of its repressor p53 and a high level of oxidative stress arising from the cell culture conditions. High MnSOD activity may be related to HeLaS3 cell radioresistance, illustrated by a high IC50 of 3.4 Gy and by a relatively high level of cell viability after gamma irradiation. In contrast to MnSOD activity, cytosolic CuZnSOD activity decreased after ionising radiation. The catalase (Cat activity was unchanged. IR also increa­sed the nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity. Such conditions lead to increased con­centrations of the superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and NO., which together may be responsible for the decreased expression of NF-kB and unaltered Cat ac­tivity. Therefore, the disturbed redox balance within HeLaS3 cells may be respon­sible for the cytotoxicity observed at higher irradiation doses. It could be concluded that inhibition of the CuZnSOD activity may be an important target for the selective killing of radioresistant cancer cells.

  18. Interaction of two mechanisms regulating alkali cations in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.S.; Vaughan, G.L.; Proctor, W.R.; Brake, E.T.

    1975-08-01

    The alkali cation content of HeLa cells is independent of culture density and of whether the cells are grown in suspension or attached to the culture vessel. With a cell doubling time of 28 hours, the cell K content turns over approximately once per hour. Following partial blockade of the alkali-cation transport system with ouabain, two distinct but interrelated mechanisms operate in the cellular response: (a) an increase in intracellular Na stimulates the pump so that the short-term alteration in electrolyte composition is less than would be expected from the fraction of pump sites inhibited, and (b) there is a cyclo-heximide-sensitive recovery in transport capacity reflecting a restoration of functional transport sites to their normal density on the cell surface. Experimental manipulations that mimic the effect of ouabain lead to a stimulation of transport, but they do not result in an increase in the number of ouabain-binding sites on the surface. The data are consistent with a four-to-six-hour turnover of transport sites at the surface, but there is no evicence for a specific induction of the transport system within this short-term recovery period. (auth)

  19. Yeast CUP1 protects HeLa cells against copper-induced stress

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    X.X., Xie; Y.F., Ma; Q.S., Wang; Z.L., Chen; R.R., Liao; Y.C., Pan.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As an essential trace element, copper can be toxic in mammalian cells when present in excess. Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich proteins that avidly bind copper and thus play an important role in detoxification. Yeast CUP1 is a member of the MT gene family. The aim of this study was to [...] determine whether yeast CUP1 could bind copper effectively and protect cells against copper stress. In this study, CUP1 expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and copper content was detected by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Cellular viability was detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the cell cycle distribution of CUP1 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The data indicated that overexpression of yeast CUP1 in HeLa cells played a protective role against copper-induced stress, leading to increased cellular viability (P

  20. Yeast CUP1 protects HeLa cells against copper-induced stress

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    X.X., Xie; Y.F., Ma; Q.S., Wang; Z.L., Chen; R.R., Liao; Y.C., Pan.

    Full Text Available As an essential trace element, copper can be toxic in mammalian cells when present in excess. Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich proteins that avidly bind copper and thus play an important role in detoxification. Yeast CUP1 is a member of the MT gene family. The aim of this study was to [...] determine whether yeast CUP1 could bind copper effectively and protect cells against copper stress. In this study, CUP1 expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and copper content was detected by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Cellular viability was detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the cell cycle distribution of CUP1 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The data indicated that overexpression of yeast CUP1 in HeLa cells played a protective role against copper-induced stress, leading to increased cellular viability (P

  1. DNA repair in HeLa Zh-63 cells after irradiation and action of chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In HeLa Zh-63 cells prelabelled with 3H-thymidine the repair of γ-ray-induced single-strand breaks in the nutrient medium and in the buffer proceeds with the same intensity. The process is inhibited with acriflavine, quinacrine and 2,4-dinitrophenol but not with caffeine. The repair of double-strand breaks of DNA in the nutrient medium is more complete than in the buffer. It is inhibited by acriflavine but not by caffeine. In cells pulse-labelled with 3H-thymidine after U.V.-irradiation and 7-bromomethylbenz-(α)anthracene (BMBA) treatment the nascent DNA has a low molecular weight (Msub(w)). In U.V.-irradiated cells during incubation Msub(w) restores to the control level. In BMBA-treated cells Msub(w) is not restored within the first 6 h, but 18-21 h later DNA of a normal Msub(w) is synthesized. After the action of γ-rays and 2-aminofluorene (AF) nascent DNA with a normal Msub(w) is synthesized. When a pulse label is introduced simultaneously with caffeine after γ-ray-irradiation and BMBA (but not U.V.-light or AF) treatment the Msub(w) of nascent DNA is less than in the case without caffeine. It is assumed to be due to fast post-replication repair (during pulse labelling) which is sensitive to caffeine. (author)

  2. Recycling of surface sialoglycoconjugates in HTC and HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface sialoglycoconjugates of HeLa and HTC cells were labeled with NaB[3H]4 after oxidation by NaIO4. The labeling procedure cleaves the sialic acids to a neuraminidase-sensitive 7-carbon derivative, 5-acetamido-3.5-dideoxy-L-arabino-heptulosonic acid, termed AcNeu7. After labeling, the radioactivity is lost from both cell types with biphasic kinetics. the half-time for the fast phase is about 4 to 5 h; the slow phase has a half-time of 100 to 200 h. About 30 h after labeling and at later times, approximately 30% of the cell-associated radioactivity is susceptible to removal by external neuraminidase, suggesting an exchange with an internal pool that is twice the size of the surface pool. An internal pool of relatively high specific activity compared to the surface was generated by labeling as above, following by a period of time to allow internalization and enzymatic removal of external neuraminidase-sensitive radioactivity. During subsequent reincubation in growth medium, the surface became relabeled from the internal pool, again reaching a 30% neuraminidase-sensitive plateau. The relabeling of the surface was confirmed by radioactivity measurements on isolated plasma membranes. [3H]AcNeu7 cannot be reutilized by these cells in the de novo membrane biosynthetic pathway. The argument is made that the labeled sialoglycoconjugates are recycling intact through the internal pool

  3. Identification and characterization of a DNA primase activity present in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel DNA primase activity has been identified in HeLa cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Such an activity has not been detected in mock-infected cells. The primase activity coeluted with a portion of HSV-1 DNA polymerase from single-stranded DNA agarose columns loaded with high-salt extracts derived from infected cells. This DNA primase activity could be distinguished from host HeLa cell DNA primase by several criteria. First, the pH optimum of the HSV primase was relatively broad and peaked at 8.2 to 8.7 pH units. Second, freshly isolated HSV DNA primase was less salt sensitive than the HeLa primase. Third, antibodies raised against individual peptides of the calf thymus DNA polymerase:primase complex cross-reacted with the HeLa primase but did not react with the HSV DNA primase. Fourth, freshly prepared HSV DNA primase appeared to be associated with the HSV polymerase, but after storage at 4 degree C for several weeks, the DNA primase separated from the viral DNA polymerase. This free DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 40 kilodaltons, whereas free HeLa DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 110 kilodaltons. On the basis of these data, the authors believe that the novel DNA primase activity in HSV-infected cells may be virus coded and that this enzyme represents a new and important function involved in the replication of HSV DNA

  4. Luotonin-A based quinazolinones cause apoptosis and senescence via HDAC inhibition and activation of tumor suppressor proteins in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Ramineni; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Gaikwad, Hanmant K; Janardhan, Sridhara; Bantu, Rajashaker; Nagarapu, Lingaiah; Sastry, G Narahari; Ganesh, A Raksha; Bhadra, Manikapal

    2015-04-13

    A series of novel quinazolinone hybrids were synthesized by employing click chemistry and evaluated for anti-proliferative activities against MCF-7, HeLa and K562 cell lines. Among these cell lines, HeLa cells were found to respond effectively to these quinazolinone hybrids with IC50 values ranging from 5.94 to 16.45 ?M. Some of the hybrids (4q, 4r, 4e, 4k, 4t, 4w) with promising anti-cancer activity were further investigated for their effects on the cell cycle distribution. FACS analysis revealed the G1 cell cycle arrest nature of these hybrids. Further to assess the senescence inducing ability of these compounds, a senescence associated ?-gal assay was performed. The senescence inducing nature of these compounds was supported by the effect of hybrid (4q) on p16 promoter activity, the marker for senescence. Moreover, cells treated with most effective compound (4q) show up-regulation of p53, p21 and down-regulation of HDAC-1, HDAC-2, HDAC-5 and EZH2 mRNA levels. Docking results suggest that, the triazole nitrogen showed Zn(+2) mediated interactions with the histidine residue of HDACs. PMID:25757092

  5. NF-κB plays a key role in microcystin-RR-induced HeLa cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Xuezhen; Fan, Huihui; Li, Shangchun; Xie, Ping

    2014-09-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are well-known cyanobacterial toxins produced in eutrophic waters and can act as potential carcinogens and have caused serious risk to human health. However, pleiotropic even paradoxical actions of cells exposure to MCs have been reported, and the mechanisms of MC-induced tumorigenesis and apoptosis are still unknown. In this study, we performed the first comprehensive in vitro investigation on carcinogenesis associated with nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and its downstream genes in HeLa cells (Human cervix adenocarcinoma cell line from epithelial cells) exposure to MC-RR. HeLa cells were treated with 0, 20, 40, 60, and 80 µg/mL MC-RR for 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. HeLa cells presented dualistic responses to different doses of MCs. CCK8 assay showed that MC-RR exposure evidently enhanced cell viability of HeLa cells at lower MCs doses. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that lower MCs doses promoted G1/S transition and cell proliferation while higher doses of MCs induced apoptosis, with a dose-dependent manner. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed that MC-RR could increase/decrease NF-κB activity at lower/higher MC-RR doses, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of NF-κB downstream target genes including c-FLIP, cyclinD1, c-myc, and c-IAP2 showed the same variation trend as NF-κB activity both at mRNA and protein levels, which were induced by lower doses of MC-RR and suppressed by higher doses. Our data verified for the first time that NF-κB pathway may mediate MC-induced cell proliferation and apoptosis and provided a better understanding of the molecular mechanism for potential carcinogenicity of MC-RR. PMID:24932741

  6. Radiosensitivity of polyamine-depleted HeLa cells and modulation by the aminothiol WR-1065

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiosensitivity of cultured HeLa cells was increased upon depletion of the natural cellular polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine through treatment of cultures with inhibitors of polyamine biosynthesis. This increased radiosensitivity was manifested as a decrease in the D0 and by the absence of a shoulder in the survival curves. However, our previous studies have shown that the initial yield of X-ray-induced DNA damage did not appear to be elevated in polyamine-depleted cells. In addition, polyamine-depleted cells exhibited markedly altered X-ray-induced changes in the distribution of cells in the phases of the cell cycle characterized by increased time of onset and lengthened duration of G2-phase delay. Addition of polyamines to cultures for short periods prior to irradiation restored normal radioresistence and reversed the anomalous features of the G2-phase delay profile. Polyamine supplementation experiments as well as studies in which combinations of inhibitors were employed to modulate specific polyamine levels suggest that spermidine may play a primary role in governing cellular radioresponsiveness. The radioprotective aminothiol WR-1065 protected normal and polyamine-depleted cells to a proportionately similar extent (protection factor of 2.4 and 2.8, respectively) but had no apparent ability to restore the shoulder or alter the G2-phase delay markedly in polyamine-depleted cells. The findings reported here extend our previous observations that polyamine depletion results in a compromised ability to respond to X irradiation and suggest that a defect in repair and/or the G2-phase delay response may be the determining factors. 34 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Uptake of [3H]ouabain from the cell surface into the lysosomal compartment of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]Ouabain specifically bound at sublethal concentrations to Na,K-ATPase on the surface of HeLa cells is taken up (internalized) by the cells at a rate of three membrane equivalents of labeled sites per generation. Immediately following a pulse label with the glycoside, codistribution of radioactivity with the surface marker 5'-nucleotidase is found in both conventional sucrose-gradient fractionation and in fractionation following a digitonin treatment. At appropriate concentrations digitonin increases the buoyant density of the HeLa surface membrane and solubilizes the lysosomal marker ?-hexosaminidase (Tulkens et al., 1974). After internalization, [3H]ouabain is also solubilized by digitonin. A shear analysis is described which shows internalized ouabain and ?-hexosaminidase to be codistributed in a particulate fraction that is homogeneous with respect to shear; extrapolation to zero-shear shows that little or none of either marker is found in the soluble fraction of the cytosol. Both markers are coreleased from the particulate fraction by osmotic shock. Although internalized ouabain is subsequently released from these cells with a half-time of about 70 hr, apparently by exocytosis, the shear sensitivity of the remaining cell-associated ouabain does not change for up to 72 hr. Thus ouabain (together with Na,K-ATPase.) appears to be taken up from the surface into a lysosomal compartment and, by at least one criterion, this compartment does not change its physical properties with time, i.e., does not ''age.''

  8. Axin is expressed in mitochondria and suppresses mitochondrial ATP synthesis in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jee-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Many recent studies have revealed that axin is involved in numerous cellular functions beyond the negative regulation of β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling. Previously, an association of ectopic axin with mitochondria was observed. In an effort to investigate the relationship between axin and mitochondria, we found that axin expression suppressed cellular ATP production, which was more apparent as axin expression levels increased. Also, mitochondrial expression of axin was observed using two axin-expressing HeLa cell models: doxycycline-inducible ectopic axin expression (HeLa-axin) and axin expression enhanced by long-term treatment with XAV939 (HeLa-XAV). In biochemical analysis, axin is associated with oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex IV and is involved in defects in the assembly of complex IV-containing supercomplexes. Functionally, axin expression reduced the activity of OXPHOS complex IV and the oxygen consumption rate (OCR), suggesting axin-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Subsequent studies using various inhibitors of Wnt signaling showed that the reduction in cellular ATP levels was weaker in cases of ICAT protein expression and treatment with iCRT3 or NSC668036 compared with XAV939 treatment, suggesting that XAV939 treatment affects ATP synthesis in addition to suppressing Wnt signaling activity. Axin-mediated regulation of mitochondrial function may be an additional mechanism to Wnt signaling for regulation of cell growth. PMID:26704260

  9. Synthesis of polyfunctionalized piperidone oxime ethers and their cytotoxicity on HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthiban, Paramasivam; Pallela, Ramjee; Kim, Se-Kwon; Park, Dong Ho; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2011-11-15

    A series of twenty 2,6-diarylpiperidin-4-one O-methyloximes were synthesized with fluoro/chloro/bromo/methyl/methoxy/ethoxy/isopropyl substituents on various positions of the phenyl at C-2 and C-6 in association with/without methyl substituent on the secondary amino group and methyl/ethyl/isopropyl substituents on the active methylene centers. Regardless of their substitution all compounds predominantly exist in the chair conformation except 3m, which adopts a twist-boat conformation. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antiproliferative activity against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell line. The cytotoxicity of the test compounds was determined by measuring the number of live cells after 24 h of treatment by MTT assay method. This preliminary SAR suggests some lead molecules 3c-f, 3j-k, 4d-g, and 4i with a scope of further structural optimization of the piperidone pharmacophore toward the development of anticancer drug synthesis. PMID:21983445

  10. Effect of X-irradiation of clonogenic HeLa cells on the genome mutation frequencies in their progenies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation of clonogenic Hela cells with 100-350 R doses results in the increase of general frequency of genome mutations from (20.7+-0.4)x10-2 up to (24.8+-0.4)x10-2-(31.9+-0.3)x10-2 on a cell per a generation. The increase occurs mainly at the expense of hyperploid mutants, whereas frequency of appearance of cells with reduced number of chromosomes (hypoploids) does not change reliably. For Hela culture, used in experiments, a very high heterogeneity of cells on DNA content in interfase nuclei and a very high level of spontaneous frequency of genome mutation are characteristical, that should be taken into account during the analysis of obtained results

  11. Measurement of Protein 53 Diffusion Coefficient in Live HeLa Cells Using Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS)

    OpenAIRE

    Harinibytaraya Sreenivasappa; Jun Kameoka; Chao-Kai Chou; Mien-Chie Hung; Sungmin Hong; Ying-Nai Wang; Hirohito Yamaguchi; Pei-Hsiang Tsou

    2010-01-01

    We have applied Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy (RICS) technique to characterize the dynamics of protein 53 (p53) in living cells before and after the treatment with DNA damaging agents. HeLa cells expressing Green Fluores-cent Protein (GFP) tagged p53 were incubated with and without DNA damaging agents, cisplatin or eptoposide, which are widely used as chemotherapeutic drugs. Then, the diffusion coefficient of GFP-p53 was determined by RICS and it was significantly reduced after the dr...

  12. A novel dithiocarbamate derivative induces cell apoptosis through p53-dependent intrinsic pathway and suppresses the expression of the E6 oncogene of human papillomavirus 18 in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Qi, Hongxue; Li, Xiaobo; Hou, Xueling; Lu, Xueying; Xiao, Xiangwen

    2015-06-01

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) exhibit a broad spectrum of antitumor activities, however, their molecular mechanisms of antitumor have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have synthesized a series of novel dithiocarbamate derivatives. These DTCs were examined for cytotoxic activities against five human cancer cell lines. In this study, one of dithiocarbamate (DTC1) with higher potential for HeLa cells was chosen to investigate molecular mechanisms for its anti-tumor activities. DTC1 could inhibit proliferation, and highly induce apoptosis in HeLa cells by activating caspase-3, -6 and -9; moreover, activities of caspase-3, -6 and -9 were inhibited by pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. Furthermore, DTC1 decreased the levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and increased expression of cytosol cytochrome c, Bak, Bax and p53 in a time-dependent manner but had no effect on the level of Rb. It was shown that DTC1 induced HeLa cells apoptosis through a p53-dependent pathway as tested by the wild type p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-?. Additionally, the relative expression of E6 and E7 were evaluated in HPV18-positive (HeLa cells) by real-time PCR and western blotting. The results firstly demonstrated that DTC1 suppressed both expression of E6 mRNA and E6 oncoprotein, but had no effect on the expression of E7 mRNA and protein in HPV18. Our results suggested that DTC1 may serve as novel chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cervical cancer and potential anti-HPV virus candidates that merit further studies. PMID:25772545

  13. Multiple signal transduction pathways in okadaic acid induced apoptosis in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okadaic acid (OA) is the major component of diarrhetic shell fish poisoning toxins and a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 and 2A. We investigated the signal transduction pathways involved in OA induced cell death in HeLa cells. OA induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis at IC50 of 100 nM. OA treatment resulted in time dependent increase in reactive oxygen species and depleted intracellular glutathione levels. Loss of mitochondrial membrane permeability led to translocation of bax, cytochrome-c and AIF from mitochondria to cytosol. The cells under fluorescence microscope showed typical apoptotic morphology with condensed chromatin, and nuclear fragmentation. We investigated the mitochondrial-mediated caspase cascade. The time dependent activation and cleavage of of bax, caspases-8, 10, 9, 3 and 7 was observed in Western blot analysis. In addition to caspase-dependent pathway AIF mediated caspase-independent pathway was involved in OA mediated cell death. OA also caused time dependent inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A activity and phosphorylation of p38 and p42/44 MAP kinases. Inhibitor studies with Ac-DEVO-CHO and Z-VAD-FMK could not prevent the phosphorylation of p38 and p42/44 MAP kinases. Our experiments with caspase inhibitors Ac-DEVD-CHO, Z-IETD-FMK and Z-VAD-FMK inhibited capsase-3, 8 cleavages but did not prevent OA-induced apoptosis and DNA fragmentation. Similarly, pretreatment with cyclosporin-A and N-acetylcysteine could not prevent the DNA fragmentation. In summary, the results of our study show that OA induces multiple signal transduction pathways acting either independently or simultaneously leading to apoptosis

  14. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition, antioxidant activity and toxicity of Peumus boldus water extracts on HeLa and Caco-2 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falé, P L; Amaral, F; Amorim Madeira, P J; Sousa Silva, M; Florêncio, M H; Frazão, F N; Serralheiro, M L M

    2012-08-01

    This work aimed to study the inhibition on acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), the antioxidant activity and the toxicity towards Caco-2 and HeLa cells of aqueous extracts of Peumus Boldus. An IC(50) value of 0.93 mg/mL, for AChE inhibition, and EC(50) of 18.7 μg/mL, for the antioxidant activity, was determined. This activity can be attributed to glycosylated flavonoid derivatives detected, which were the main compounds, although boldine and other aporphine derivatives were also present. No changes in the chemical composition or the biochemical activities were found after gastrointestinal digestion. Toxicity of P. boldus decoction gave an IC(50) value 0.66 mg/mL for HeLa cells, which caused significant changes in the cell proteome profile. PMID:22617353

  15. HeLa cell tumor response to 60Co, Cs-137, Cf-252 radiations and cisplatin chemotherapy in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Y; Feola, J M; Beach, J L

    1984-07-15

    HeLa cells were implanted into athymic nude mice from tissue culture and solid tumors established (HeLa cell tumor or HCT). Large cell numbers of 1 X 10(7) were required to obtain consistent and progressive growth, and tumor growth followed a Gompertzian mode. Irradiation studies were carried out using acute Cobalt-60 (60Co), low-dose-rate (LDR) Cs-137 and LDR Cf-252. Cf-252, a neutron-emitting radioisotope, produced an immediate tumor shrinkage and regression response after a dose of 279 cGy. Acute 60Co or LDR Cs-137 irradiation with 1000 cGy had little effect on the HCT. After a dose of 2000 cGy of 60Co radiation tumor shrinkage followed a latent period of approximately 5 days. Cisplatin had no effect on the HCT in nude mice in stationary or late exponential growth. PMID:6539162

  16. HeLa cell tumor response to 60Co, Cs-137, Cf-252 radiations and cisplatin chemotherapy in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HeLa cells were implanted into athymic nude mice from tissue culture and solid tumors established (HeLa cell tumor or HCT). Large cell numbers of 1 X 107 were required to obtain consistent and progressive growth, and tumor growth followed a Gompertzian mode. Irradiation studies were carried out using acute Cobalt-60 (60Co), low-dose-rate (LDR) Cs-137 and LDR Cf-252. Cf-252, a neutron-emitting radioisotope, produced an immediate tumor shrinkage and regression response after a dose of 279 cGy. Acute 60Co or LDR Cs-137 irradiation with 1000 cGy had little effect on the HCT. After a dose of 2000 cGy of 60Co radiation tumor shrinkage followed a latent period of approximately 5 days. Cisplatin had no effect on the HCT in nude mice in stationary or late exponential growth

  17. Fractionation of HeLa cell nuclear extracts reveals minor small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon chromatographic fractionation of HeLa cell nuclear extracts, small RNAs of 145 and 66/65 nucleotides, respectively, were detected that are distinct from the abundant small RNAs present in the extract. These RNAs are precipitated by antibodies directed against the trimethylguanosine cap structure, characteristic for small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) of the U type. The RNAs of 145 and 66/65 nucleotides appear to be associated with at least one of the proteins common to the major small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles U1 to U6, since they are specifically bound by anti-Sm antibodies. These criteria characterize the RNAs that are 145 and 66/65 nucleotides in length as U-type snRNAs. Upon gel filtration, the RNAs are found within particles of molecular weights ? 150,000 and 115,000 respectively. The RNA of 145 nucleotides represents a different minor snRNA, designated U11, whereas the RNA of 66/65 nucleotides may correspond to either mammalian U7 or U10 RNA

  18. Human papillomavirus 18 E6 inhibits phosphorylation of p53 expressed in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Amrendra K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In HPV infected cells p53 function is abrogated by E6 and even ectopically expressed p53 is unable to perform tumor suppressor functions. In addition to facilitating its degradation, E6 may also inhibit p53 transactivity, though the mechanisms are still poorly understood. It has been reported that inhibition of p300, an acetyltransferase responsible for p53 acetylation is inactivated by E6. Activation of overexpressed p53 to cause cell growth inhibition is facilitated by its phosphorylation. Previously, we reported that non-genotoxically overexpressed p53 in HeLa cells needs to be phosphorylated to perform its cell growth inhibitory functions. Since over expressed p53 by itself was not activated, we hypothesized an inhibitory role for E6. Results Majority of reports proposes E6 mediated degradation of p53 as a possible reason for its inactivation. However, results presented here for the first time demonstrate that overexpressed p53 is not directly associated with E6 and therefore free, yet it is not functionally active in HPV positive cells. Also, the stability of overexpressed p53 does not seem to be an issue because inhibition of proteasomal degradation did not increase the half-life of overexpressed p53, which is more than endogenous p53. However, inhibition of proteasomal degradation prevents the degradation of endogenous p53. These findings suggest that overexpressed p53 and endogenous p53 are differentially subjected to proteasomal degradation and the reasons for this discrepancy remain unclear. Our studies demonstrate that p53 over expression has no effect on anchorage independent cell-growth and E6 nullifies its cell growth inhibitory effect. E6 overexpression abrogates OA induced p53 occupancy on the p21 promoter and cell death as well. E6 did not decrease p53 protein but phospho-p53 level was significantly reduced. Conclusion We report for the first time that E6 de-activates p53 by inhibiting its phosphorylation. This prevents p53 binding to p21 promoter and thereby restraining its cell-growth inhibitory functions. Our study provides new evidence indicating that viral protein E6 inhibits p53 transactivity by mechanism independent of degradation pathway.

  19. Interaction of translationally controlled tumor protein with Apaf-1 is involved in the development of chemoresistance in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), alternatively called fortilin, is believed to be involved in the development of the chemoresistance of tumor cells against anticancer drugs such as etoposide, taxol, and oxaliplatin, the underlying mechanisms of which still remain elusive. Cell death analysis of TCTP-overexpressing HeLa cells was performed following etoposide treatment to assess the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Apoptotic pathway was analyzed through measuring the cleavage of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ), caspase activation, mitochondrial membrane perturbation, and cytochrome c release by flow cytometry and western blotting. To clarify the role of TCTP in the inhibition of apoptosome, in vitro apoptosome reconstitution and immunoprecipitation was used. Pull-down assay and silver staining using the variants of Apaf-1 protein was applied to identify the domain that is responsible for its interaction with TCTP. In the present study, we confirmed that adenoviral overexpression of TCTP protects HeLa cells from cell death induced by cytotoxic drugs such as taxol and etoposide. TCTP antagonized the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway following etoposide treatment, including mitochondrial membrane damage and resultant cytochrome c release, activation of caspase-9, and -3, and eventually, the cleavage of EGFR and PLC-γ. More importantly, TCTP interacts with the caspase recruitment domain (CARD) of Apaf-1 and is incorporated into the heptameric Apaf-1 complex, and that C-terminal cleaved TCTP specifically associates with Apaf-1 of apoptosome in apoptosome-forming condition thereby inhibiting the amplification of caspase cascade. TCTP protects the cancer cells from etoposide-induced cell death by inhibiting the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. Interaction of TCTP with Apaf-1 in apoptosome is involved in the molecular mechanism of TCTP-induced chemoresistance. These findings suggest that TCTP may serve as a therapeutic target for chemoresistance in cancer treatment

  20. Nuclear proteome analysis of benzo(a)pyrene-treated HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Chunlan; Chen Zhaojun; Li Huanrong; Zhang Guanglin [The First Affiliated Hospital, State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Li Feng [The First Renmin Hospital, Houma, Shanxi 043000 (China); Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J. [Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Zhu Xinqiang, E-mail: zhuxq@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Yang Jun, E-mail: gastate@zju.edu.cn [The First Affiliated Hospital, State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Department of Toxicology, Hangzhou Normal University School of Public Health, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036 (China)

    2012-03-01

    Previously, we employed a proteomics-based 2-D gel electrophoresis assay to show that exposure to 10 {mu}M benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) during a 24 h frame can lead to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing. To further expand our knowledge about the DNA damage response (DDR) induced by BaP, we investigated the nuclear protein expression profiles in HeLa cells treated with different concentrations of BaP (0.1, 1, and 10 {mu}M) using this proteomics-based 2-D gel electrophoresis assay. We found 125 differentially expressed proteins in BaP-treated cells compared to control cells. Among them, 79 (63.2%) were down-regulated, 46 (36.8%) were up-regulated; 8 showed changes in the 1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M BaP-treated groups, 2 in the 0.1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M BaP-treated groups, 4 in the 0.1 {mu}M and 1 {mu}M BaP-treated groups, and only one showed changes in all three groups. Fifty protein spots were chosen for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identification, and of these, 39 were identified, including subunits of the 26S proteasome and Annexin A1. The functions of some identified proteins were further examined and the results showed that they might be involved in BaP-induced DDR. Taken together, these data indicate that proteomics is a valuable approach in the study of environmental chemical-host interactions, and the identified proteins could provide new leads for better understanding BaP-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

  1. 18 S ribosomal RNA is degraded during ribosome maturation in irradiated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ionizing radiation (137Cs) on processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) were studied by pulse-labeling HeLa S3 cells with [3H]uridine immediately prior to irradiation. The 45 S rRNA precursor, and its two major daughter species, 28 and 18 S rRNA, were separated by gel electrophoresis and the extent of radiolabel incorporation into each was determined at various times after irradiation. This approach permitted kinetic analysis of processing of the 45 S rRNA which had been predominantly synthesized (radiolabeled) prior to irradiation. Since they both derive from the same 45 S pre-rRNA transcript, 28 and 18 S rRNA are produced with a stoichiometry of 1:1, as observed in control cells in the present studies. However, within 1 h following 10 Gy an altered stoichiometry of 28 S:18 S rRNA was apparent, reaching 1.6:1 by 5-7 h following irradiation. This alteration was also observed following the higher dose of 20 Gy, but not following exposures of 5 Gy or less. The 18 S portion of the 45 S pre-rRNA is transcribed prior to the 28 S portion. Consequently, an increase in the 28 S/18 S ratio can only be due to degradation of the 18 S species during or after processing. This alteration may represent a response to radiation-induced growth arrest, by reducing the number of newly synthesized ribosomes that would otherwise be required for cell propagation

  2. Nuclear proteome analysis of benzo(a)pyrene-treated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, we employed a proteomics-based 2-D gel electrophoresis assay to show that exposure to 10 μM benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) during a 24 h frame can lead to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing. To further expand our knowledge about the DNA damage response (DDR) induced by BaP, we investigated the nuclear protein expression profiles in HeLa cells treated with different concentrations of BaP (0.1, 1, and 10 μM) using this proteomics-based 2-D gel electrophoresis assay. We found 125 differentially expressed proteins in BaP-treated cells compared to control cells. Among them, 79 (63.2%) were down-regulated, 46 (36.8%) were up-regulated; 8 showed changes in the 1 μM and 10 μM BaP-treated groups, 2 in the 0.1 μM and 10 μM BaP-treated groups, 4 in the 0.1 μM and 1 μM BaP-treated groups, and only one showed changes in all three groups. Fifty protein spots were chosen for liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) identification, and of these, 39 were identified, including subunits of the 26S proteasome and Annexin A1. The functions of some identified proteins were further examined and the results showed that they might be involved in BaP-induced DDR. Taken together, these data indicate that proteomics is a valuable approach in the study of environmental chemical–host interactions, and the identified proteins could provide new leads for better understanding BaP-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis.

  3. Investigation of siRNA Nanoparticle Formation Using Mono-Cationic Detergents and Its Use in Gene Silencing in Human HeLa Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yuma; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Harashima, Hideyoshi, E-mail: harashima@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory for Molecular Design of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The focus of recent research has been on the development of siRNA vectors to achieve an innovative gene therapy. Most of the conventional vectors are siRNA nanoparticles complexed with cationic polymers and liposomes, making it difficult to release siRNA. In this study, we report on the use of MCD, a quaternary ammonium salt detergent containing a long aliphatic chain (L-chain) as an siRNA complexation agent using human HeLa cells (a model cancer cell). We prepared siRNA nanoparticles using various MCDs, and measured the diameters and zeta-potentials of the particles. The use of an MCD with a long L-chain resulted in the formation of a positively charged nanoparticle. In contrast, a negatively charged nanoparticle was formed when a MCD with a short L-chain was used. We next evaluated the gene silencing efficiency of the nanoparticles using HeLa cells expressing the luciferase protein. The results showed that the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles showed a higher gene silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000. We also found that the efficiency of gene silencing is a function of the length of the alkyl chain in MCD and zeta-potential of the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles. Such information provides another viewpoint for designing siRNA vectors.

  4. Investigation of siRNA Nanoparticle Formation Using Mono-Cationic Detergents and Its Use in Gene Silencing in Human HeLa Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of recent research has been on the development of siRNA vectors to achieve an innovative gene therapy. Most of the conventional vectors are siRNA nanoparticles complexed with cationic polymers and liposomes, making it difficult to release siRNA. In this study, we report on the use of MCD, a quaternary ammonium salt detergent containing a long aliphatic chain (L-chain) as an siRNA complexation agent using human HeLa cells (a model cancer cell). We prepared siRNA nanoparticles using various MCDs, and measured the diameters and zeta-potentials of the particles. The use of an MCD with a long L-chain resulted in the formation of a positively charged nanoparticle. In contrast, a negatively charged nanoparticle was formed when a MCD with a short L-chain was used. We next evaluated the gene silencing efficiency of the nanoparticles using HeLa cells expressing the luciferase protein. The results showed that the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles showed a higher gene silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000. We also found that the efficiency of gene silencing is a function of the length of the alkyl chain in MCD and zeta-potential of the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles. Such information provides another viewpoint for designing siRNA vectors

  5. Investigation of siRNA Nanoparticle Formation Using Mono-Cationic Detergents and Its Use in Gene Silencing in Human HeLa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyoshi Harashima

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of recent research has been on the development of siRNA vectors to achieve an innovative gene therapy. Most of the conventional vectors are siRNA nanoparticles complexed with cationic polymers and liposomes, making it difficult to release siRNA. In this study, we report on the use of MCD, a quaternary ammonium salt detergent containing a long aliphatic chain (L-chain as an siRNA complexation agent using human HeLa cells (a model cancer cell. We prepared siRNA nanoparticles using various MCDs, and measured the diameters and zeta-potentials of the particles. The use of an MCD with a long L-chain resulted in the formation of a positively charged nanoparticle. In contrast, a negatively charged nanoparticle was formed when a MCD with a short L-chain was used. We next evaluated the gene silencing efficiency of the nanoparticles using HeLa cells expressing the luciferase protein. The results showed that the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles showed a higher gene silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000. We also found that the efficiency of gene silencing is a function of the length of the alkyl chain in MCD and zeta-potential of the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles. Such information provides another viewpoint for designing siRNA vectors.

  6. Some structural differentiations in the HeLa cell: heavy bodies, annulate lamellae and cotte de maillet endoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Franke, Werner W.; Scheer, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    A small fraction of HeLa cells within an exponentially growing culture showed cisternal differentiations, such as cytoplasmic as well as intranuclear annulate lamellae and special smooth surfaced endoplasmic reticulum aggregates with a typical "Cotte de maillet" appearance. Additionally, clusters of dense granules were observed in the cytoplasm which were often associated with polysomes and strongly resembled the so-called "heavy bodies" known in particular in diverse oocytes. The functional ...

  7. Evaluation of biological activities of Physalis peruviana ethanol extracts and expression of Bcl-2 genes in HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Özgür Çakir; Murat Pekmez; Elif Çepni; Bilgin Candar; Kerem Fidan

    2014-01-01

    Physalis species are used in folk medicine for phytotherapeutic properties. The extracts of medicinal plants are known to possess cytotoxic and chemopreventative compounds. In this study we investigated antibacterial, antioxidant, DNA damage preventative properties of Physalis peruviana (golden berry) on leaf and shoot ethanol extracts and their effects on cytotoxicity of HeLa cells and expression of apoptotic pathway genes. Among the tested bacteria for antibacterial activity, maximum inhibi...

  8. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET – 290keV/μm) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows ∼ 28% reduction of 12C6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells

  9. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/?m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows 28% reduction of 12C6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  10. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post box-10502, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2013-07-18

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/{mu}m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows {approx} 28% reduction of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  11. Combination of cytokinin and auxin induces apoptosis, cell cycle progression arrest and blockage of the Akt pathway in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liwei; Liu, Peng; Guo, Guangqin; Wang, Li

    2015-07-01

    Plant cytokinins and auxins have recently been proposed as novel cancer therapies, which proceed via different mechanisms; however, their combined use has not been investigated. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to show that the cytokinin ortho-methoxytopolin-riboside (MeoTR) strongly inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells, the effect of which was synergistically enhanced by auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), while IAA demonstrated to have no cytotoxic effects on cells. MeoTR was found to activate intrinsic and extrinsic caspase-dependent pathways, and IAA potentiated this activation. In addition, these effects were blocked by Z-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (Z-VAD-FMK), a pan-specific-caspase-inhibitor. IAA increased the MeoTR- induced inhibition of B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and survivin, whereas IAA-only decreased Bcl-2 expression. MeoTR downregulated phosphorylated (p)-pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, p-Akt and p-glycogen synthase kinase 3β, the effect of which was more potent in combination with IAA, despite the weak effect of IAA alone. LY294002, an Akt-inhibitor, was able to increase the inhibition of p-Akt through MeoTR and combination treatment. IAA and MeoTR increased the proportion of cells in S phase independently. However, the combination treatment induced a further increase. In addition, IAA and MeoTR treatment downregulated protein levels of cyclin A, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and p-CDK2, and upregulated protein levels of p21 and p27. Furthermore, the combination treatment enhanced these effects, indicating that IAA potentiated the inhibitory effect of MeoTR on HeLa cells via cell cycle progression arrest and accumulation in S phase, coupled with the negative regulation of Bcl-2. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that treatment with these two phytohormones in combination, may offer a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of malignant cervical cancer. PMID:25738331

  12. Effects of DNA polymerase inhibitors on replicative and repair DNA synthesis in ultraviolet-irradiated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aphidicolin specifically inhibits eukaryotic DNA polymerase ?, while 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate (d2TTP) inhibits DNA polymerase ? and ? but not ?. 1-?-D-Arabinofuranosylcytosine 5'-triphosphate (araCTP) inhibits both DNA polymerase ? and ? although to a different extent. Here we measured the effects of these inhibitors on repair DNA synthesis of U.V.-irradiated HeLa cells by two different methods. Firstly, aphidicolin, 1-?-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (araC, a precursor of araCTP) and 2',3'-dideoxythimidine (d2Thd, a precursor of d2TTP) were added directly to the culture medium. In this case, aphidicolin and araC strongly inhibited replicative DNA synthesis of HeLa cells, and they also inhibited repair synthesis after U.V.-irradiation but to a much lesser extent. In contrast, high concentrations of d2Thd inhibited repair DNA synthesis to a higher extent than replicative DNA synthesis. Secondly, the active form of inhibitor, d2TTP, was microinjected directly into cytoplasm or nuclei or U.V.-irradiated HeLa cells. Microinjection of d2TTP effectively inhibited repair synthesis. The microinjection of d2TTP, into either cytoplasm or nucleus, strongly inhibited replicative synthesis. These results might indicate that multiple DNA polymerases are involved in repair synthesis as well as in replicative synthesis

  13. In vitro study of 5-aminolevulinic acid-based photodynamic therapy for apoptosis in human cervical HeLa cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    5-aminolevulanic acid (ALA), belonging among the promising second generation of sensitizers, was evaluated as an inducer of photodamage on HeLa (human cervical adenocarcinoma) cell line. A diode laser (635 nm) was used as a source for initiation of the photodynamic effect. We studied the influence of different incubation times, various concentrations of sensitizer, different irradiation doses and various combinations of sensitizer and light doses on the photodamage of HeLa cells. Viability of cells was determined by means of neutral red assay. The quantitative cellular uptake of ALA sensitizer was done by spectrophotometric measurements. No prominent cytotoxic or phototoxic effects on HeLa were observed due to sensitizer or light doses when studied independently of each other. However phototoxicity evoked by laser irradiated sensitizer was detected in HeLa cell line

  14. Two new neolignans from Patrinia scabra with potent cytotoxic activity against HeLa and MNK-45 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Lei; Yan, Guo-Qing; Wang, Ling-Yu; Ma, Wei; Wang, Kai-Jin; Li, Ning

    2013-10-01

    Two new neolignans, patrineolignan A (1) and patrineolignan B (2), together with seven known lignans, were isolated from the 90 % aqueous EtOH extract of the roots of Patrinia scabra. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data (HRESIMS, IR, 1D and 2D NMR) and comparison with literature data. The two new neolignans were evaluated in vitro for cytotoxic properties against human cervical carcinoma HeLa cell line and gastric carcinoma MNK-45 cell line using the microculture tetrazolium assay, and both 1 and 2 exhibited strongly cytotoxic activity against the two tumor cell lines. PMID:23737105

  15. Radiosensitizing effect of 2,4-dinitroimidazole-1-ethanol and its cytotoxicity in HeLa S3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using cultured HeLa S3 cells, the radiosensitizing and cytotoxic effects of newly synthesized derivatives of dinitroimidazole were investigated and compared with those of misonidazole. 2,4-dinitroimidazole-1-ethanol radiosensitized hypoxic cells selectively. At 5 mM misonidazole, the enhancement ratio was 1.95; with 0.5 mM 2,4-dinitroimidazole-1-ethanol, almost the same enhancement could be obtained. This indicates that the radiosensitizing effect of the latter agent was about 10 times greater than that of misonidazole. However, its cytotoxicity was twice that of misonidazole under hypoxic conditions and there was no apparent differential cytotoxicity to hypoxic and aerobic cells. (orig.)

  16. An evidence on G2/M arrest, DNA damage and caspase mediated apoptotic effect of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles on human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeyaraj, M. [Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Arun, R. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Sathishkumar, G. [Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); MubarakAli, D. [Central Inter-Disciplinary Research Facility, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute Campus, Pondicherry 607402 (India); Rajesh, M.; Sivanandhan, G.; Kapildev, G.; Manickavasagam, M. [Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Thajuddin, N. [Department of Microbiology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Ganapathi, A., E-mail: aganapathi2007@gmail.com [Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been synthesized using Podophyllum hexandrum L. • AuNPs induces the oxidative stress to cell death in human cervical carcinoma cells. • It activates the caspase-cascade to cellular death. • It is actively blocks G2/M phase of cell cycle. - Abstract: Current prospect of nanobiotechnology involves in the greener synthesis of nanostructured materials particularly noble metal nanoparticles for various biomedical applications. In this study, biologically (Podophyllum hexandrum L.) synthesized crystalline gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the size range between 5 and 35 nm were screened for its anticancereous potential against human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa). Stoichiometric proportion of the reaction mixture and conditions were optimized to attain stable nanoparticles with narrow size range. Different high throughput techniques like transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV–vis spectroscopy were adopted for the physio-chemical characterization of AuNPs. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study revealed that the water soluble fractions present in the plant extract solely influences the reduction of AuNPs. Sublimely, synthesized AuNPs exhibits an effective in vitro anticancer activity against HeLa cells via induction of cell cycle arrest and DNA damage. Furthermore, it was evidenced that AuNPs treated cells are undergone apoptosis through the activation of caspase cascade which subsequently leads to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby, this study proves that biogenic colloidal AuNPs can be developed as a promising drug candidature for human cervical cancer therapy.

  17. An evidence on G2/M arrest, DNA damage and caspase mediated apoptotic effect of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles on human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been synthesized using Podophyllum hexandrum L. • AuNPs induces the oxidative stress to cell death in human cervical carcinoma cells. • It activates the caspase-cascade to cellular death. • It is actively blocks G2/M phase of cell cycle. - Abstract: Current prospect of nanobiotechnology involves in the greener synthesis of nanostructured materials particularly noble metal nanoparticles for various biomedical applications. In this study, biologically (Podophyllum hexandrum L.) synthesized crystalline gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the size range between 5 and 35 nm were screened for its anticancereous potential against human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa). Stoichiometric proportion of the reaction mixture and conditions were optimized to attain stable nanoparticles with narrow size range. Different high throughput techniques like transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV–vis spectroscopy were adopted for the physio-chemical characterization of AuNPs. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study revealed that the water soluble fractions present in the plant extract solely influences the reduction of AuNPs. Sublimely, synthesized AuNPs exhibits an effective in vitro anticancer activity against HeLa cells via induction of cell cycle arrest and DNA damage. Furthermore, it was evidenced that AuNPs treated cells are undergone apoptosis through the activation of caspase cascade which subsequently leads to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby, this study proves that biogenic colloidal AuNPs can be developed as a promising drug candidature for human cervical cancer therapy

  18. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HeLa S3 cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-[35S]methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S3 cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S3 cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product

  19. Cell killing and division delay in asynchronous and synchronized HeLa cells irradiated with alpha particles or x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HeLa cells irradiated with a single or two split doses of α particles or X rays were observed with time-lapse photography or examined for their colony-forming ability. The cell cycle-dependent variation of cell killing and division delay were compared in synchronous and asynchronous cell populations. Cellular damage by α particles was manifested in the form of cessation of division, or death, rather than partial division which was predominant for X irradiation. The pattern of cell killing with α particles was similar to that found with X rays, in that high sensitivity was noted at or close to mitosis, while a resistant peak remained at late S but not in early G1. The pattern of division delay was similar for X rays and α particles during G2-M, with a maximum delay at mid G2 and no delay past the transition point, but differed during G1-S. During this period, division delay increased with cell age, whereas it showed a broad peak at G1-S boundary and a trough at late S for X rays. However, such was not the case for α particles

  20. Inhibition of autophagic flux by ROS promotes apoptosis during DTT-induced ER/oxidative stress in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xi-Yan; Yang, Xiao-Chun; Su, Jin; Kang, Jing-Song; Wu, Yao; Xue, Ya-Nan; Dong, Yu-Tong; Sun, Lian-Kun

    2016-06-01

    As targets for cancer therapy, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy are closely linked. However, the signaling pathways responsible for induction of autophagy in response to ER stress and its cellular consequences appear to vary with cell type and stimulus. In the present study, we showed that dithiothreitol (DTT) induced ER stress in HeLa cells in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. With increased ER stress, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production increased and autophagy flux, assessed by intracellular accumulation of LC3B-II and p62, was inhibited. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a classic antioxidant, exacerbated cell death induced by 3.2 mM of DTT, but attenuated that induced by 6.4 mM DTT. Low cytotoxic doses of DTT transiently activated c-JNU N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, whereas high dose of DTT persistently activated JNK and p38 and simultaneously reduced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity. Combined treatment with DTT and U0126, an inhibitor of ERK upstream activators mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase 1 and 2 (MEK1/2), blocked autophagy flux in HeLa cells. This effect was similar to that caused by a combination of DTT and chloroquine (CQ). These data suggested that insufficient autophagy was accompanied by increased ROS production during DTT-induced ER stress. ROS appeared to regulate MAPK signaling, switching from a pro-survival to a pro-apoptotic signal as ER stress increased. ERK inhibition by ROS during severe ER stress blocked autophagic flux. Impaired autophagic flux, in turn, aggravated ER stress, ultimately leading to cell death. Taken together, our data provide the first reported evidence that ROS may control cell fate through regulating the MAPK pathways and autophagic flux during DTT-induced ER/oxidative stress. PMID:27035858

  1. Development of electrochemical reporter assay using HeLa cells transfected with vector plasmids encoding various responsive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical assay using HeLa cell lines transfected with various plasmid vectors encoding SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase) as the reporter has been performed by using SECM (scanning electrochemical microscopy). The plasmid vector contains different responsive elements that include GRE (glucocorticoid response elements), CRE (cAMP responsive elements), or κB (binding site for NFκB (nuclear factor kappa B)) upstream of the SEAP sequence. The transfected HeLa cells were patterned on a culture dish in a 4 x 4 array of circles of diameter 300 μm by using the PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) stencil technique. The cellular array was first exposed to 100 ng mL-1 dexamethasone, 10 ng mL-1 forskolin, or 100 ng mL-1 TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor α) after which it was further cultured in an RPMI culture medium for 6 h. After incubation, the cellular array was soaked in a measuring solution containing 4.7 mM PAPP (p-aminophenylphosphate) at pH 9.5, following which electrochemical measurements were performed immediately within 40 min. The SECM method allows parallel evaluation of different cell lines transfected with pGRE-SEAP, pCRE-SEAP, and pNFκB-SEAP patterned on the same solid support for detection of the oxidation current of PAP (p-aminophenol) flux produced from only 300 HeLa cells in each stencil pattern. The results of the SECM method were highly sensitive as compared to those obtained from the conventional CL (chemiluminescence) protocol with at least 5 x 104 cells per well.

  2. Development of electrochemical reporter assay using HeLa cells transfected with vector plasmids encoding various responsive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiku, Hitoshi, E-mail: shiku@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Takeda, Michiaki; Murata, Tatsuya [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Akiba, Uichi; Hamada, Fumio [Graduate School of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, 1-1 Tegata gakuen-machi, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Matsue, Tomokazu, E-mail: matsue@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2009-04-27

    Electrochemical assay using HeLa cell lines transfected with various plasmid vectors encoding SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase) as the reporter has been performed by using SECM (scanning electrochemical microscopy). The plasmid vector contains different responsive elements that include GRE (glucocorticoid response elements), CRE (cAMP responsive elements), or {kappa}B (binding site for NF{kappa}B (nuclear factor kappa B)) upstream of the SEAP sequence. The transfected HeLa cells were patterned on a culture dish in a 4 x 4 array of circles of diameter 300 {mu}m by using the PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) stencil technique. The cellular array was first exposed to 100 ng mL{sup -1} dexamethasone, 10 ng mL{sup -1} forskolin, or 100 ng mL{sup -1} TNF-{alpha} (tumor necrosis factor {alpha}) after which it was further cultured in an RPMI culture medium for 6 h. After incubation, the cellular array was soaked in a measuring solution containing 4.7 mM PAPP (p-aminophenylphosphate) at pH 9.5, following which electrochemical measurements were performed immediately within 40 min. The SECM method allows parallel evaluation of different cell lines transfected with pGRE-SEAP, pCRE-SEAP, and pNF{kappa}B-SEAP patterned on the same solid support for detection of the oxidation current of PAP (p-aminophenol) flux produced from only 300 HeLa cells in each stencil pattern. The results of the SECM method were highly sensitive as compared to those obtained from the conventional CL (chemiluminescence) protocol with at least 5 x 10{sup 4} cells per well.

  3. Comprehensive High-Throughput RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Contamination of Multiple Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cell Lines with HeLa Cell Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Michael J.; Baddoo, Melody; Nanbo, Asuka; Xu, Miao; Puetter, Adriane

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an attempt to explore infectious agents associated with nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPCs), we employed our high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis pipeline, RNA CoMPASS, to investigate the presence of ectopic organisms within a number of NPC cell lines commonly used by NPC and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) researchers. Sequencing data sets from both CNE1 and HONE1 were found to contain reads for human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18). Subsequent real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis on a panel of NPC cell lines identified HPV-18 in CNE1 and HONE1 as well as three additional NPC cell lines (CNE2, AdAH, and NPC-KT). Further analysis of the chromosomal integration arrangement of HPV-18 in NPCs revealed patterns identical to those observed in HeLa cells. Clustering based on human single nucleotide variation (SNV) analysis of two separate HeLa cell lines and several NPC cell lines demonstrated two distinct clusters with CNE1, as well as HONE1 clustering with the two HeLa cell lines. In addition, duplex-PCR-based genotyping showed that CNE1, CNE2, and HONE1 do not have a HeLa cell-specific L1 retrotransposon insertion, suggesting that these three HPV-18+ NPC lines are likely products of a somatic hybridization with HeLa cells, which is also consistent with our RNA-seq-based gene level SNV analysis. Taking all of these findings together, we conclude that a widespread HeLa contamination may exist in many NPC cell lines, and authentication of these cell lines is recommended. Finally, we provide a proof of concept for the utility of an RNA-seq-based approach for cell authentication. IMPORTANCE Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines are important model systems for analyzing the complex life cycle and pathogenesis of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Using an RNA-seq-based approach, we found HeLa cell contamination in several NPC cell lines that are commonly used in the EBV and related fields. Our data support the notion that contamination resulted from somatic hybridization with HeLa cells, likely occurring at the point of cell line establishment. Given the rarity of NPCs, the long history of NPC cell lines, and the lack of rigorous cell line authentication, it is likely that the actual prevalence and impact of HeLa cell contamination on the EBV field might be greater. We therefore recommend cell line authentication prior to performing experiments using NPC cell lines to avoid inaccurate conclusions. The novel RNA-seq-based cell authentication approach reported here can serve as a comprehensive method for validating cell lines. PMID:24991015

  4. Evaluation of cytotoxicity of Moringa oleifera Lam. callus and leaf extracts on Hela cells

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas Jafarain; Gholamreza Asghari; Erfaneh Ghassami

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are considerable attempts worldwide on herbal and traditional compounds to validate their use as anti-cancer drugs. Plants from Moringaceae family including Moringa oleifera possess several activities such as antitumor effect on tumor cell lines. In this study we sought to determine if callus and leaf extracts of M. oleifera possess any cytotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Ethanol-water (70-30) extracts of callus and leaf of M. oleifera were prepared by maceration method...

  5. 3-(3-Hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-1,2,5-selenadiazole (G-1103), a novel combretastatin A-4 analog, induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis by disrupting tubulin polymerization in human cervical HeLa cells and fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Daiying; Guo, Dandan; Jiang, Xuewei; Guan, Qi; Qi, Huan; Xu, Jingwen; Li, Zengqiang; Yang, Fushan; Zhang, Weige; Wu, Yingliang

    2015-02-01

    Microtubule is a popular target for anticancer drugs. In this study, we describe the effect 3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-1,2,5-selenadiazole (G-1103), a newly synthesized analog of combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), showing a strong time- and dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect on human cervical cancer HeLa cells and human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. We demonstrated that the growth inhibitory effects of G-1103 in HeLa and HT-1080 cells were associated with microtubule depolymerization and proved that G-1103 acted as microtubule destabilizing agent. Furthermore, cell cycle analysis revealed that G-1103 treatment resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase in a time-dependent manner with subsequent apoptosis induction. Western blot analysis revealed that down-regulation of cdc25c and up-regulation of cyclin B1 was related with G2/M arrest in HeLa and HT-1080 cells treatment with G-1103. In addition, G-1103 induced HeLa cell apoptosis by up-regulating cleaved caspase-3, Fas, cleaved caspase-8 expression, which indicated that G-1103 induced HeLa cell apoptosis was mainly associated with death receptor pathway. However, G-1103 induced HT-1080 cell apoptosis by up-regulating cleaved caspase-3, Fas, cleaved caspase-8, Bax and cleaved caspase-9 expression and down-regulating anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 expression, which indicated that G-1103 induced HT-1080 cell apoptosis was associated with both mitochondrial and death receptor pathway. Taken together, all the data demonstrated that G-1103 exhibited its antitumor activity through disrupting the microtubule assembly, causing cell cycle arrest and consequently inducing apoptosis in HeLa and HT-1080 cells. Therefore, the novel compound G-1103 is a promising microtubule inhibitor that has great potentials for therapeutic treatment of various malignancies. PMID:25529822

  6. Gene expression responses of HeLa cells to chemical species generated by an atmospheric plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Response of HeLa cells to a plasma-irradiated medium was revealed by DNA microarray. • Gene expression pattern was basically different from that in a H2O2-added medium. • Prominently up-/down-regulated genes were partly shared by the two media. • Gene ontology analysis showed both similar and different responses in the two media. • Candidate genes involved in response to ROS were detected in each medium. - Abstract: Plasma irradiation generates many factors able to affect the cellular condition, and this feature has been studied for its application in the field of medicine. We previously reported that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was the major cause of HeLa cell death among the chemical species generated by high level irradiation of a culture medium by atmospheric plasma. To assess the effect of plasma-induced factors on the response of live cells, HeLa cells were exposed to a medium irradiated by a non-lethal plasma flow level, and their gene expression was broadly analyzed by DNA microarray in comparison with that in a corresponding concentration of 51 μM H2O2. As a result, though the cell viability was sufficiently maintained at more than 90% in both cases, the plasma-medium had a greater impact on it than the H2O2-medium. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed fundamentally different cellular responses between these two media. A larger population of genes was upregulated in the plasma-medium, whereas genes were downregulated in the H2O2-medium. However, a part of the genes that showed prominent differential expression was shared by them, including an immediate early gene ID2. In gene ontology analysis of upregulated genes, the plasma-medium showed more diverse ontologies than the H2O2-medium, whereas ontologies such as “response to stimulus” were common, and several genes corresponded to “response to reactive oxygen species.” Genes of AP-1 proteins, e.g., JUN and FOS, were detected and notably elevated in the plasma-medium. These results showed that the medium irradiated with a non-lethal level of plasma flow altered various gene expressions of HeLa cells by giving not only common effects with H2O2 but also some distinctive actions. This study suggests that in addition to H2O2, other chemical species able to affect the cellular responses exist in the plasma-irradiated medium and provide unique features for it, probably increasing the oxidative stress level

  7. Inhibition of X-ray induced DNA strand break repair in polyamine-depleted HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of HeLa cells with the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitors, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) or methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), results in, depending on the conditions, partial or complete depletion of the cellular polyamines: putrescine, spermidine and spermine. In this compromised state cells exhibited a distinct deficiency in repair of X-ray-induced DNA strand breaks. The half-time for return of normal DNA sedimentation following 1.6 Gy was 9.5 min for untreated control cells and 22, 32 and 50 min for cells treated with MGBG, DFMO+MGBG and DFMO, respectively. Normal repair kinetics were restored to these cells upon a short incubation in media containing all three polyamines. The rapid early phase of repair following higher X-ray doses (16 Gy) was also delayed in polyamine-depleted cells but later repair occurring 1-4 h post-irradiation, representing chromatin reconstitution, was apparently normal. (author)

  8. Adherence to HeLa cells, typing by killer toxins and susceptibility to antifungal agents of Candida dubliniensis strains Adeso a clulas HeLa, tipagem pelas toxinas "killer" e sensibilidade a antifngicos de cepas de Candida dubliniensis

    OpenAIRE

    Gismari Miranda da Silva; Fernando Ricardo Xavier da Silveira; Maria de Ftima Costa Pires

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adherence capability to HeLa cells, the susceptibility to killer toxins and the in vitro susceptibility to antifungal agents (eTest? method - AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden) of 9 Candida dubliniensis isolates recovered from HIV+ and AIDS patients. The adherence test was strongly positive for strain ATCC 777 and positive for all other strains. Typing by killer toxins revealed two different biotypes among the 9 isolates studied: 888 and 688. Only biotype 688...

  9. Lactoferrin and free secretory component of human milk inhibit the adhesion of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giugliano Loreny

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhoea caused by Escherichia coli is an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC is considered one of the major causes of diarrhoea in children living in developing countries. The ability of diarrhoeagenic strains of E. coli to adhere to and colonize the intestine is the first step towards developing the disease. EPEC strains adhere to enterocytes and HeLa cells in a characteristic pattern known as localized adherence. Many epidemiological studies of diarrhoea have shown that breast-feeding protects infants from intestinal infections. Both immunoglobulin and non-immunoglobulin elements of human milk are thought to contribute to the protection from diarrhoeal agents. Results The effects of human milk and its protein components on the localized adherence of EPEC were investigated. Non-immunoglobulin components of human milk responsible for the inhibition of EPEC adhesion to HeLa cells were isolated by chromatographic fractionation of human whey proteins. Besides secretory immunoglobulin A, which has been previously reported to affect the adhesion of EPEC, free secretory component (fSC and lactoferrin (Lf were isolated. Even in concentrations lower than those usually found in whole milk, fSC and Lf were able to inhibit the adhesion of EPEC. ?-lactalbumin was also isolated, but showed no activity on EPEC adhesion. Conclusions This study demonstrated that the immunoglobulin fraction, the free secretory component and lactoferrin of human milk inhibit EPEC adhesion to HeLa cells. These results indicate that fSC and Lf may be important non-specific defence factors against EPEC infections.

  10. Anomalous diffusion of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules on HeLa cells determined by single particle tracking.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, P R; Morrison, I E; Wilson, K. M.; Fernández, N; Cherry, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Single-particle tracking (SPT) was used to determine the mobility characteristics of MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class I molecules at the surface of HeLa cells at 22 degrees C and on different time scales. MHC class I was labeled using the Fab fragment of a monoclonal antibody (W6/32), covalently bound to either R-phycoerythrin or fluorescent microspheres, and the particles were tracked using high-sensitivity fluorescence imaging. Analysis of the data for a fixed time interval sugg...

  11. On the localization and transport of specific adenoviral mRNA-sequences in the late infected HeLa cell.

    OpenAIRE

    Mariman, E.; Hagebols, A M; Venrooij, W. van

    1982-01-01

    In the nucleus of HeLa cells late after infection with adenovirus type 2 mRNA-sequences which are processed via RNA splicing are attached to the nuclear matrix (Mariman et al., 1982). Although the mRNA, which codes for polypeptide IX, is not formed via splicing, about 70% of the non-polyadenylated pre-mRNA and the polyadenylated pIX mRNA are bound to the matrix structure, indicating that polyadenylation is performed while the RNA is associated with the matrix. Binding to the nuclear matrix se...

  12. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of pterostilbene and [Formula: see text]-methoxy pterostilbene Mannich base derivatives against Hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chongyang; Dong, Linpei; Wang, Shengchun; Wang, Qiuan

    2015-11-01

    Fourteen novel pterostilbene (1) and [Formula: see text]-methoxy pterostilbene (2) Mannich base derivatives (3-16) were synthesized via the microwave-assisted Mannich reaction of 1 or 2 with various secondary amines and formaldehyde. The regioselectivity of the reaction occurred preferentially at [Formula: see text] position of the B-ring of stilbene. The biological testing results showed that all the target compounds exhibit antiproliferative activity against Hela cells from [Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text]. Compounds 1-3, 7, 11-13, and 16 displayed higher (lower [Formula: see text] values) activity than the positive control cisplatin [Formula: see text]. PMID:26162533

  13. Mechanism of the radiosensitizing effect of low dose ionizing radiation in the HeLa cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitizing effect of preliminary irradiation (10 R) 2-3 min prior to applying the main dose of 490 R was studied on a HeLa cell culture. The overall dose, divided in this manner, was found to initially have the same stimulative effect as 10 R. The inhibitory action of the main dose showed only after 1.5-2.0 hr. The results on the radiosensitizing effect of preliminary irradiation with 10 R might be explained by the delayed action of a complex of adaptive responses. An examination of the dosage curve showed preliminary irradiation with 10 R to cause a decline in reparation processes

  14. Specific proteins synthesized during the viral lytic cycle in vaccinia virus-infected HeLa cells: analysis by high-resolution, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proteins synthesized in vaccinia-infected HeLa cells have been analyzed at different times after infection by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Vaccinia-infected cells present up to 198 polypeptides (138 acidic, isoelectric focusing; 60 basic, nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) not detected in control cells. Cells infected in the presence of cycloheximide show 81 additional polypeptides after cycloheximide removal, resulting in a total estimate of 279 proteins induced after vaccinia infection. The glycoproteins made at various time postinfection were also analyzed. At least 13 proteins labeled with [3H]glucosamine were detected in vaccinia-infected HeLa cells

  15. Low-level laser therapy: Effects on human face aged skin and cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezghani Sana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and excessive exposure to UV radiation leads to photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. Adequate protection of the skin against the deleterious effects of UV irradiation is essential. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT is a light source in the red to near-infrared range that has been accepted in a variety of medical applications. In this study, we explored the effect of LLLT in human face aged skin and the cell viability of HeLa cells exposed to UV radiation. We found that LLLT significantly reduced visible wrinkles and the loss of firmness of facial skin in aging subjects. Additionally, treatment of cultured HeLa cells with LLLT prior to or post UVA or UVB exposure significantly protected cells from UV-mediated cell death. All results showed the beneficial effects of LLLT on relieving signs of skin aging and its prevention and protection of the cell viability against UV-induced damage.

  16. Influence of He-Ne laser radiation on HeLa cell survival rate after gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monolayer of HeLa cells, at the stationary phase of growth, exposed to He-Ne laser radiation either 5 min or 60 min prior to gamma-irradiation (0.1-10 Gy; 6.75 Gy/min), or 5 min after irradiation has been investigated. With a 5-min interval between irradiation sessions (both sequences) the survival curves are virtually the same as those for gamma-irradiated cells only. With He-Ne laser radiation delivered 60 min before gamma-irradiation with doses exceeding 5 Gy, fraction of radioresistant cells is identified whose D0 is almost twice as thigh as D0 basic cell mass. A hypothesis is proposed that He-Ne laser the radiation activates, in some cells, the processes that promote the repair of radiation damages

  17. p38-NF-?B-promoted mitochondria-associated apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest in norcantharidin-treated HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiu; Li, Jian-Chun; Jiang, Yuan-Yuan; Xia, Ming-Yu; Tashiro, Shin-Ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Previous study proved that norcantharidin (NCTD) could exert its anticancer activity in a variety of malignant cell lines, including human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. In this study, we found that NCTD-activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK)-nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-?B) signaling pathway induced mitochondrial apoptotic pathway activation and G2/M cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells. NCTD-induced mitochondria-associated apoptosis was concomitant with the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (??(m)), translocation of Bax, down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression, and release of cytochrome c. NCTD-led G2/M cell-cycle arrest was associated with the up-regulated p21 and p-cdc25c expression and the down-regulated cyclin B and cdc2 expression. Treatment of the cells with p38 inhibitor SB203580 and NF-?B inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) showed that p38 functioned upstream of NF-?B, while augmented apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were induced in response to NCTD with NF-?B activation. Intriguingly, NF-?B had a negative feedback regulatory effect on p38 activation. Moreover, NCTD-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were significantly blocked by SB203580 and PDTC but not by pifithrin-? (p53 inhibitor). Therefore, p38-NF-?B induced mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and G2/M cell cycle arrest in NCTD-treated HeLa cells. PMID:23281704

  18. Evaluation of biological activities of Physalis peruviana ethanol extracts and expression of Bcl-2 genes in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Çakir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Physalis species are used in folk medicine for phytotherapeutic properties. The extracts of medicinal plants are known to possess cytotoxic and chemopreventative compounds. In this study we investigated antibacterial, antioxidant, DNA damage preventative properties of Physalis peruviana (golden berry on leaf and shoot ethanol extracts and their effects on cytotoxicity of HeLa cells and expression of apoptotic pathway genes. Among the tested bacteria for antibacterial activity, maximum inhibition zone was determined in Lactococcus lactis. The phenolic content was found higher in leaf extracts than shoot extracts. The antioxidant activity showed the highest TEAC values of the leaf (2 mg/mL and the shoot (0.5 mg/mL extracts as 0.291±0.04 and 0.192±0.015, respectively. In DNA damage prevention assay both leaf and shoot extracts, especially 30 and 20 µg/mL concentrations, exhibited significant protection against DNA damage-induced by hydroxyl radical generated by Fenton reaction. Our results suggest that leaf and shoot extracts possess cytotoxic effect on HeLa cells when applied as 100 µg/mL concentration. Also mRNA expression analysis showed the alteration of antiapoptotic genes, so the results suggest that P. peruviana ethanol extracts induce apoptotic cell death and should be investigated for identification of active compounds and their mechanisms of action.

  19. The fibrate decreases radiation sensitivity via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}-mediated superoxide dismutase induction in HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xianguang; An, Zhengzhe; Song, Hye Jin; Kim, Won Dong; Park, Woo Yoon [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seong Soon [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae Ran [Konkuk University College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The fibrates are ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} and used clinically as hypolipidemic drugs. The fibrates are known to cause peroxisome proliferation, enhance superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression and catalase activity. The antioxidant actions of the fibrates may modify radiation sensitivity. Here, we investigated the change of the radiation sensitivity in two cervix cancer cell lines in combination with fenofi brate (FF). Activity and protein expression of SOD were measured according to the concentration of FF. The mRNA expressions were measured by using real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Combined cytotoxic effect of FF and radiation was measured by using clonogenic assay. In HeLa cells total SOD activity was increased with increasing FF doses up to 30 {mu}M. In the other hand, the catalase activity was increased a little. As with activity the protein expression of SOD1 and SOD2 was increased with increasing doses of FF. The mRNAs of SOD1, SOD2, PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased with increasing doses of FF. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by radiation was decreased by preincubation with FF. The surviving fractions (SF) by combining FF and radiation was higher than those of radiation alone. In Me180 cells SOD and catalase activity were not increased with FF. Also, the mRNAs of SOD1, SOD2, and PPAR{alpha} were not increased with FF. However, the mRNA of PPAR{gamma} was increased with FF. FF can reduce radiation sensitivity by ROS scavenging via SOD induction in HeLa. SOD induction by FF is related with PPAR{alpha}.

  20. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  1. Radioadaptive response to the medium-mediated bystander induction of DNA strand breaks in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Numerous investigators have reported two cellular responses of importance at low doses that have a potential impact on the risk estimation of ionizing radiation. The radioadaptive response confers resistance to a subsequent dose by a low priming dose, while the bystander effect exaggerates the effect of small doses. The present study was conducted to examine the interaction of the radioadaptive response with the bystander effect in HeLa cells. The culture was irradiated with 0.5 to 8 Gy of 140 kVp X-rays and one hour later, the medium was taken, passed through a filter and transferred to the parallel culture of non-irradiated HeLa cells as non-targeted cells. After incubation for 30 min, the induced DNA damage was analyzed by the single cell gel-electrophoresis assay under alkaline or neutral conditions. The treatments resulted in a dose-dependent increase in tail moment under either conditions, indicating the induction of DNA single- and double-strand breaks. The clonogenic survival of non-irradiated cells was also reduced after they were cultured in the medium that was taken from irradiated cultures. Any change was not observed when the medium alone was irradiated. These results give the disputed evidence that certain genotoxic factor(s) released from irradiated cells into the culture medium can induce DNA strand breaks leading to cell death. It is also suggested that physical contact between irradiated and non-irradiated cells may not be required for the bystander effect. In adapted cells that were pre-exposed to 5 cGy of X-rays and cultured for 4 h beforehand, the yield of DNA strand breaks induced by X-rayed medium was reduced by about 50 %. The results, in conjunction with our early finding (Ikushima et al., 1996) suggest that the radioadaptive response resulting from such a low dose may diminish the bystander effect through an enhanced DNA repair function

  2. Apoptosis in HeLa cell exposed to different dose, dose-rate of 32P β-irradiation and the correlation with cell-killing efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to elucidate some aspects of the radiobiological basis of targeted radiotherapy in oncology, the apoptosis occurred have been studied in Hela cell lines after exposing to different doses and dose-rate radiation of 32P and the relationship between apoptosis occurred and the capacity of cell proliferation, which might be of help to the understanding of targeted radiotherapy. Asynchronous Hela cells were exposed to β radiation from 32P absorbed in filter papers which were put closely under culture dishes of growing monolayer of Hela cell. The radiation response characteristics to different dose, dose-rate and radiation time were evaluated through cell-proliferation assessed by the colony-forming assay, cell cycle perturbation studied by flow cytometry and quantity analysis of apoptosis analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Morphological and flow cytometry analysis showed a delayed apoptosis. The programmed cell death approached a plateau between 48-72h post-irradiation. Electron and fluorescence microscopic studies showed the presence of morphologically apoptotic cells. Single dose radiation showed a higher apoptosis ratio than multiple low dose radiation, which did not correlate with clonal-forming assay, suggesting apoptosis ratio at a near time point post-irradiation is not a convincing indicator of radiation efficacy in the current experimental setting

  3. Purification and characterization of the glycoprotein hormone α-subunit-like material secreted by HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protein secreted by HeLa cells that cross-reacts with antiserum developed against the α-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been purified approximately 30,000-fold from concentrated culture medium by organic solvent fractionation followed by ion exchange, gel filtration, and lectin affinity chromatography. The final preparation had a specific activity (by RIA) of 6.8 x 105 ng of α/mg of protein and appeared homogeneous by electrophoresis on reducing/denaturing polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE). Amino acid analysis indicated that HeLa-α had a composition very similar to that of the urinary hCG α-subunit. However, comparison of hCG-α and HeLa-α demonstrated that the tumor-associated subunit was not identical with its normal counterpart. The purified tumor protein had an apparent molecular weight greater than that of the urinary α-subunit when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, and this difference was even greater when a partially purified preparation was examined by an immunoblot technique (Western). Isoelectric focusing of the HeLa and hCG subunits demonstrated that the tumor protein had a lower pI. Immunoprecipitation and electrophoresis of α-subunit from HeLa cultures labeled with [3H]fucose indicated that the tumor subunit was fucosylated, whereas analysis of hCG-α hydrosylates by HPLC confirmed previous reports that the placental subunit does not contain fucose. The results indicate that, regardless of whether or not a single α-subunit gene is being expressed in both normal and neoplastic tissues, posttranslational modifications lead to a highly altered subunit in the tumor. The differences observed may be useful in diagnosing neoplastic vs hyperplastic conditions and may lend insight into the mechanism of ectopic hormone production by tumors

  4. Combination of aloe-emodin with radiation enhances radiation effects and improves differentiation in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinghua; Yuan, Yong; Chang, Pengyu; Li, Dawei; Liu, Zhiqiang; Qu, Yaqin

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of aloe-emodin (AE) on the radiosensitivity and differentiation of HeLa human cervical cancer cells. Cell proliferation was assessed in the HeLa cervical cancer cell line by a methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Radiosensitivity was determined by a colony‑forming assay. Flow cytometry was used for analysis of cell cycle distribution and apoptosis. The expression of γ-H2AX and cyclin B was assessed by western blotting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was measured by an ALP activity kit. It was demonstrated that AE inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, induced G2/M and S phase cell cycle arrest and enhanced the radiosensitivity of HeLa cells. The combination of AE and radiation induced apoptosis, upregulated cyclin B and γ-H2AX expression and further improved ALP activity compared with treatment with AE or radiation alone. AE enhanced the radiosensitivity of HeLa human cervical cancer cells in vitro, inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells, induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and, in combination with radiation, induced the apoptosis and improved the differentiation of HeLa cells. PMID:24920336

  5. Genistein promotes cell death of ethanol-stressed HeLa cells through the continuation of apoptosis or secondary necrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xin; Wang, Shan S.; Wong, Timothy Chung S.; Fung, Ming C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Apoptosis is a major target and treatment effect of multiple chemotherapeutical agents in cancer. A soybean isoflavone, genistein, is a well-studied chemopreventive agent and has been reported to potentiate the anticancer effect of some chemotherapeutics. However, its mechanistic basis of chemo-enhancement effect remains to be fully elucidated. Methods Apoptotic features of low concentration stressed cancer cells were studied by microscopic method, western blot, immunostai...

  6. The Effect of Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus rhamnosusCulture Supernatants on Expression of Autophagy Genes and HPV E6 and E7 Oncogenes in The HeLa Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevaseli, Elahe; Azam, Rosa; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad; Mazlomy, Mohammadali; Saffari, Mojtaba; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Daneshvar, Maryam; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism by which lactobacilli exert their cytotoxic effects on cervical cancer cells. In addition, we aimed to evalu- ate the effect of lactobacilli on the expression of human papilloma virus (HPV) onco- genes. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, using quantitative real-time polymer- ase chain reaction (PCR), we analyzed the expression of CASP3 and three autophagy genes [ATG14, BECN1 and alpha 2 catalytic subunit of AMPK (PRKAA2)] along with HPV18 E6 and E7 genes in HeLa cells before and after treatment with Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus culture supernatants. Results The expression of CASP3 and autophagy genes in HeLa cells was de- creased after treatment with lactobacilli culture supernatants. However, this de- crease was not significant for PRKAA2 when compared with controls. In addition, expression of HPV E6 was significantly decreased after treatment with lactobacilli culture supernatants. Conclusion Lactobacilli culture supernatants can decrease expression of ATG14 and BECN1 as well as the HPV E6 oncogene. It has been demonstrated that the main changes occurring during cervical carcinogenesis in cell machinery can be reversed by suppression of HPV oncogenes. Therefore, downregulation of HPV E6 by lacto- bacilli may have therapeutic potential for cervical cancer. As the role of autophagy in cancer is complicated, further work is required to clarify the link between downregula- tion of autophagy genes and antiproliferative effects exerted by lactobacilli. PMID:26862519

  7. Microinjection of ubiquitin: changes in protein degradation in HeLa cells subjected to heat-shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubiquitin was radiolabeled by reaction with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and introduced into HeLa cells using erythrocyte-mediated microinjection. The injected cells were then incubated at 45 degrees C for 5 min (reversible heat-shock) or for 30 min (lethal heat-shock). After either treatment, there were dramatic changes in the levels of ubiquitin conjugates. Under normal culture conditions, approximately 10% of the injected ubiquitin is linked to histones, 40% is found in conjugates with molecular weights greater than 25,000, and the rest is unconjugated. After heat-shock, the free ubiquitin pool and the level of histone-ubiquitin conjugates decreased rapidly, and high molecular weight conjugates predominated. Formation of large conjugates did not require protein synthesis; when analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the major conjugates did not co-migrate with heat-shock proteins before or after thermal stress. Concomitant with the loss of free ubiquitin, the degradation of endogenous proteins, injected hemoglobin, BSA, and ubiquitin was reduced in heat-shocked HeLa cells. After reversible heat-shock, the decrease in proteolysis was small, and both the rate of proteolysis and the size of the free ubiquitin pool returned to control levels upon incubation at 37 degrees C. In contrast, neither proteolysis nor free ubiquitin pools returned to control levels after lethal heat-shock. However, lethally heat-shocked cells degraded denatured hemoglobin more rapidly than native hemoglobin and ubiquitin-globin conjugates formed within them. Therefore, stabilization of proteins after heat-shock cannot be due to the loss of ubiquitin conjugation or inability to degrade proteins that form conjugates with ubiquitin

  8. Microinjection of ubiquitin: changes in protein degradation in HeLa cells subjected to heat-shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, N.; Rogers, S.; Rechsteiner, M.

    1987-03-01

    Ubiquitin was radiolabeled by reaction with /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and introduced into HeLa cells using erythrocyte-mediated microinjection. The injected cells were then incubated at 45 degrees C for 5 min (reversible heat-shock) or for 30 min (lethal heat-shock). After either treatment, there were dramatic changes in the levels of ubiquitin conjugates. Under normal culture conditions, approximately 10% of the injected ubiquitin is linked to histones, 40% is found in conjugates with molecular weights greater than 25,000, and the rest is unconjugated. After heat-shock, the free ubiquitin pool and the level of histone-ubiquitin conjugates decreased rapidly, and high molecular weight conjugates predominated. Formation of large conjugates did not require protein synthesis; when analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the major conjugates did not co-migrate with heat-shock proteins before or after thermal stress. Concomitant with the loss of free ubiquitin, the degradation of endogenous proteins, injected hemoglobin, BSA, and ubiquitin was reduced in heat-shocked HeLa cells. After reversible heat-shock, the decrease in proteolysis was small, and both the rate of proteolysis and the size of the free ubiquitin pool returned to control levels upon incubation at 37 degrees C. In contrast, neither proteolysis nor free ubiquitin pools returned to control levels after lethal heat-shock. However, lethally heat-shocked cells degraded denatured hemoglobin more rapidly than native hemoglobin and ubiquitin-globin conjugates formed within them. Therefore, stabilization of proteins after heat-shock cannot be due to the loss of ubiquitin conjugation or inability to degrade proteins that form conjugates with ubiquitin.

  9. An in-cell NMR study of monitoring stress-induced increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembram, Dambarudhar Shiba Sankar; Haremaki, Takahiro; Hamatsu, Jumpei; Inoue, Jin; Kamoshida, Hajime; Ikeya, Teppei; Mishima, Masaki; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Ito, Yutaka

    2013-09-01

    Recent developments in in-cell NMR techniques have allowed us to study proteins in detail inside living eukaryotic cells. The lifetime of in-cell NMR samples is however much shorter than that in culture media, presumably because of various stresses as well as the nutrient depletion in the anaerobic environment within the NMR tube. It is well known that Ca(2+)-bursts occur in HeLa cells under various stresses, hence the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration can be regarded as a good indicator of the healthiness of cells in NMR tubes. In this study, aiming at monitoring the states of proteins resulting from the change of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration during experiments, human calbindin D9k (P47M+C80) was used as the model protein and cultured HeLa cells as host cells. Time-resolved measurements of 2D (1)H-(15)N SOFAST-HMQC experiments of calbindin D9k (P47M+C80) in HeLa cells showed time-dependent changes in the cross-peak patterns in the spectra. Comparison with in vitro assignments revealed that calbindin D9k (P47M+C80) is initially in the Mg(2+)-bound state, and then gradually converted to the Ca(2+)-bound state. This conversion process initiates after NMR sample preparation. These results showed, for the first time, that cells inside the NMR tube were stressed, presumably because of cell precipitation, the lack of oxygen and nutrients, etc., thereby releasing Ca(2+) into cytosol during the measurements. The results demonstrated that in-cell NMR can monitor the state transitions of stimulated cells through the observation of proteins involved in the intracellular signalling systems. Our method provides a very useful tool for in situ monitoring of the "healthiness" of the cells in various in-cell NMR studies. PMID:23933251

  10. Confocal Raman imaging for cancer cell classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Evelien; Van Dorpe, Pol; Stakenborg, Tim; Liu, Chengxun; Lagae, Liesbet

    2014-05-01

    We propose confocal Raman imaging as a label-free single cell characterization method that can be used as an alternative for conventional cell identification techniques that typically require labels, long incubation times and complex sample preparation. In this study it is investigated whether cancer and blood cells can be distinguished based on their Raman spectra. 2D Raman scans are recorded of 114 single cells, i.e. 60 breast (MCF-7), 5 cervix (HeLa) and 39 prostate (LNCaP) cancer cells and 10 monocytes (from healthy donors). For each cell an average spectrum is calculated and principal component analysis is performed on all average cell spectra. The main features of these principal components indicate that the information for cell identification based on Raman spectra mainly comes from the fatty acid composition in the cell. Based on the second and third principal component, blood cells could be distinguished from cancer cells; and prostate cancer cells could be distinguished from breast and cervix cancer cells. However, it was not possible to distinguish breast and cervix cancer cells. The results obtained in this study, demonstrate the potential of confocal Raman imaging for cell type classification and identification purposes.

  11. Design and Synthesis of New Chacones Substituted with Azide/Triazole Groups and Analysis of Their Cytotoxicity Towards HeLa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. F. P. Villar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of new chalcones substituted with azide/triazole groups were designed and synthesized, and their cytotoxic activity was evaluated in vitro against the HeLa cell line. O-Alkylation, Claisen-Schmidt condensation and Cu(I-catalyzed cycloaddition of azides with terminal alkynes were applied in key steps. Fifteen compounds were tested against HeLa cells. Compound 8c was the most active molecule, with an IC50 value of 13.03 µM, similar to the value of cisplatin (7.37 µM.

  12. Deteco da citotoxicidade de materiais biocompatveis nas linhagens celulares MRC-5, HeLa e RC-IAL / MRC-5, HeLa and RC-IAL cell lines sensitivity for detection of cytotoxicity of biocompatible materials

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Aurea S., Cruz; Cristina A., Figueiredo; Cllia H. O., Martinez; Lus F. de, Salles Gomes.

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available A sensibilidade de uma linhagem celular diplide e duas heteroplides, para a deteco de citotoxicidade atravs do mtodo de difuso em camada de gar sobre culturas celulares, foi avaliada experimentalmente com soluo de cido ascrbico em diferentes concentraes e, na prtica, frente a 562 amos [...] tras de 21 diferentes materiais industriais enviados para anlise na Seo de Culturas Celulares do Instituto Adolfo Lutz. A linhagem celular heteroplide designada RC-IAL apresentou, em relao s linhagens MRC-5 e HeLa, maior sensibilidade porque revelou a presena de efeito citotxico nas menores concentraes utilizadas (10 e 25 ug/ml) do cido ascrbico e apresentou maior dimetro do halo citotxico em 15 amostras e igual dimetro em 16 das 43 amostras (7,6%) que resultaram positivas. Nas 43 amostras positivas, a linhagem MRC-5 no revelou citotoxicidade em 3 amostras de espuma e 1 de resina acrlica. O polivinilcloreto (PVC) e o polietileno, raramente revelaram positividade, enquanto plstico, algodo e resinas acrlicas revelaram citotoxicidade ao redor de 5%. Em vista dos resultados discutida a proposta da utilizao da linhagem RC-IAL e HeLa para a continuidade das futuras anlises solicitadas ao Instituto Adolfo Lutz Abstract in english The sensitivity of diploid and heteroploid cell lines for detection of cytotoxicity using the agar diffusion method on cell culture, was tested with ascorbic acid solution of different concentrations. A total of 562 samples of 21 various materials were tested. The heteroploid cell line, RC-IAL, show [...] ed in relation to the MRC-5 and HeLa cell lines, greater sensitivity because it showed the presence of cytotoxic effect with the lowest concentration used (10 and 25ug/ml) of ascorbic acid and showed greater diameter of cytotoxic halo in 15 samples and equal diameter in 16 of the 43 positive samples (7.6%). Out of 43 positive samples, the MRC-5 line did not show cytotoxicity in 3 sponge samples and 1 of acrylic resin. The PVC (polyvinylchloride) and polyethylene rarely showed positivity, while, the plastic, cotton and acrylic resin demonstrated cytotoxicity in about 5% of samples. We thus suggest the use of the RC-IAL and HeLa cell lines for continuation of this type of analysis at Adolfo Lutz Institute

  13. Gene expression responses of HeLa cells to chemical species generated by an atmospheric plasma flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Mayo, E-mail: yokoyama@plasma.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Johkura, Kohei, E-mail: kohei@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Department of Histology and Embryology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Sato, Takehiko, E-mail: sato@ifs.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Response of HeLa cells to a plasma-irradiated medium was revealed by DNA microarray. • Gene expression pattern was basically different from that in a H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-added medium. • Prominently up-/down-regulated genes were partly shared by the two media. • Gene ontology analysis showed both similar and different responses in the two media. • Candidate genes involved in response to ROS were detected in each medium. - Abstract: Plasma irradiation generates many factors able to affect the cellular condition, and this feature has been studied for its application in the field of medicine. We previously reported that hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was the major cause of HeLa cell death among the chemical species generated by high level irradiation of a culture medium by atmospheric plasma. To assess the effect of plasma-induced factors on the response of live cells, HeLa cells were exposed to a medium irradiated by a non-lethal plasma flow level, and their gene expression was broadly analyzed by DNA microarray in comparison with that in a corresponding concentration of 51 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. As a result, though the cell viability was sufficiently maintained at more than 90% in both cases, the plasma-medium had a greater impact on it than the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed fundamentally different cellular responses between these two media. A larger population of genes was upregulated in the plasma-medium, whereas genes were downregulated in the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium. However, a part of the genes that showed prominent differential expression was shared by them, including an immediate early gene ID2. In gene ontology analysis of upregulated genes, the plasma-medium showed more diverse ontologies than the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium, whereas ontologies such as “response to stimulus” were common, and several genes corresponded to “response to reactive oxygen species.” Genes of AP-1 proteins, e.g., JUN and FOS, were detected and notably elevated in the plasma-medium. These results showed that the medium irradiated with a non-lethal level of plasma flow altered various gene expressions of HeLa cells by giving not only common effects with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but also some distinctive actions. This study suggests that in addition to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, other chemical species able to affect the cellular responses exist in the plasma-irradiated medium and provide unique features for it, probably increasing the oxidative stress level.

  14. In vitro Evaluation of Cytotoxic Activities of Essential Oil from Moringa oleifera Seeds on HeLa, HepG2, MCF-7, CACO-2 and L929 Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Elsayed Ahmed; Sharaf-Eldin, Mahmoud A; Wadaan, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. (Moringaceae) is widely consumed in tropical and subtropical regions for their valuable nutritional and medicinal characteristics. Recently, extensive research has been conducted on leaf extracts of M. oleifera to evaluate their potential cytotoxic effects. However, with the exception of antimicrobial and antioxidant activities, little information is present on the cytotoxic activity of the essential oil obtained from M. oleifera seeds. Therefore, the present investigation was designed to investigate the potential cytotoxic activity of seed essential oil obtained from M. oleifera on HeLa, HepG2, MCF-7, CACO-2 and L929 cell lines. The different cell lines were subjected to increasing oil concentrations ranging from 0.15 to 1 mg/mL for 24h, and the cytotoxicity was assessed using MTT assay. All treated cell lines showed a significant reduction in cell viability in response to the increasing oil concentration. Moreover, the reduction depended on the cell line as well as the oil concentration applied. Additionally, HeLa cells were the most affected cells followed by HepG2, MCF-7, L929 and CACO-2, where the percentages of cell toxicity recorded were 76.1, 65.1, 59.5, 57.0 and 49.7%, respectively. Furthermore, the IC50 values obtained for MCF-7, HeLa and HepG2 cells were 226.1, 422.8 and 751.9 μg/mL, respectively. Conclusively, the present investigation provides preliminary results which suggest that seed essential oil from M. oleifera has potent cytotoxic activities against cancer cell lines. PMID:26107222

  15. Depletion of mitochondrial DNA by down-regulation of deoxyguanosine kinase expression in non-proliferating HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purine deoxyribonucleotides required for mitochondrial DNA replication are either imported from the cytosol or derived from phosphorylation of deoxyadenosine or deoxyguanosine catalyzed by mitochondrial deoxyguanosine kinase (DGUOK). DGUOK deficiency has been linked to mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes suggesting an important role for this enzyme in dNTP supply. We have generated HeLa cell lines with 20-30% decreased levels of DGUOK mRNA by the expression of small interfering RNAs directed towards the DGUOK mRNA. The cells with decreased expression of the enzyme showed similar levels of mtDNA as control cells when grown exponentially in culture. However, mtDNA levels rapidly decreased in the cells when cell cycle arrest was induced by serum starvation. DNA incorporation of 9-β-D-arabino-furanosylguanine (araG) was lower in the cells with decreased deoxyguanosine kinase expression, but the total rate of araG phosphorylation was increased in the cells. The increase in araG phosphorylation was shown to be due to increased expression of deoxycytidine kinase. In summary, our findings show that DGUOK is required for mitochondrial DNA replication in resting cells and that small changes in expression of this enzyme may cause mitochondrial DNA depletion. Our data also suggest that alterations in the expression level of DGUOK may induce compensatory changes in the expression of other nucleoside kinases

  16. Involvement of aldolase A in X-ray resistance of human HeLa and UVr-1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To find novel proteins involved in radio-resistance of human cells, we searched for nuclear proteins, whose expression levels alter after X-ray irradiation in HeLa cells, using agarose fluorescent two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis following mass spectrometry. We identified 6 proteins, whose levels were increased in nuclei 24 h after irradiation at 5 Gy, including aldolase A. Nuclear aldolase A levels increased twofold after the irradiation, however, total aldolase A levels did not change. When the expression of aldolase A was suppressed by its specific siRNA, sensitization of the suppressed cells to X-ray-induced cell death was observed. In addition, UVr-1 cells with higher aldolase A expression exhibited lower sensitivity to X-ray-induced cell death than the parental RSa cells with lower aldolase A expression. These results suggest that aldolase A may play a role in the radio-response of human cells, probably in nuclei, in addition to its glycolytic role in the cytosol

  17. An in-cell NMR study of monitoring stress-induced increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We performed time-resolved NMR observations of calbindin D9k in HeLa cells. •Stress-induced increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration was observed by in-cell NMR. •Calbindin D9k showed the state-transition from Mg2+- to Ca2+-bound state in cells. •We provide a useful tool for in situ monitoring of the healthiness of the cells. -- Abstract: Recent developments in in-cell NMR techniques have allowed us to study proteins in detail inside living eukaryotic cells. The lifetime of in-cell NMR samples is however much shorter than that in culture media, presumably because of various stresses as well as the nutrient depletion in the anaerobic environment within the NMR tube. It is well known that Ca2+-bursts occur in HeLa cells under various stresses, hence the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration can be regarded as a good indicator of the healthiness of cells in NMR tubes. In this study, aiming at monitoring the states of proteins resulting from the change of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration during experiments, human calbindin D9k (P47M + C80) was used as the model protein and cultured HeLa cells as host cells. Time-resolved measurements of 2D 1H–15N SOFAST–HMQC experiments of calbindin D9k (P47M + C80) in HeLa cells showed time-dependent changes in the cross-peak patterns in the spectra. Comparison with in vitro assignments revealed that calbindin D9k (P47M + C80) is initially in the Mg2+-bound state, and then gradually converted to the Ca2+-bound state. This conversion process initiates after NMR sample preparation. These results showed, for the first time, that cells inside the NMR tube were stressed, presumably because of cell precipitation, the lack of oxygen and nutrients, etc., thereby releasing Ca2+ into cytosol during the measurements. The results demonstrated that in-cell NMR can monitor the state transitions of stimulated cells through the observation of proteins involved in the intracellular signalling systems. Our method provides a very useful tool for in situ monitoring of the “healthiness” of the cells in various in-cell NMR studies

  18. Inducible HSP70 Antagonizes IL-1β Cytocidal Effects through Inhibiting NF-kB Activation via Destabilizing TAK1 in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiang; Yue, Ling; Song, JiYun; Wu, Qiuyue; Li, Na; Luo, Lan; Lan, Lei; Yin, Zhimin

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite several reports describing the HSP70-mediated cytoprotection against IL-1, the precise mechanism for this phenomenon remains to be determined. Methods/Principal Findings Here we used HeLa cells, a human epithelial carcinoma cell line, to evaluate the role of inducible HSP70 in response of IL-1β stimulation. We found that inducible HSP70 antagonized the cytotoxicity of IL-1β and improved the survival of HeLa cells. Further investigation demonstrated that increased expression level of inducible HSP70 reduced the complex of TAK1 and HSP90, and promoted the degradation of TAK1 protein via proteasome pathway. By overexpression and RNAi knockdown, we showed that inducible HSP70 modulated the NF-kB but not MAPKs signalings through influencing the stability of TAK1 protein in HeLa cells. Moreover, overexpression of HSP70 attenuated the production of iNOS upon IL-1β stimulation, validating that inducible HSP70 serves as a cytopretective factor to antagonize the cytocidal effects of IL-1β in HeLa cells. Conclusions/Significance Our observations provide evidence for a novel signaling mechanism involving HSP70, TAK1, and NF-κB in the response of IL-1β cytocidal effects. This research also provides insight into mechanisms by which HSP70 exerts its cytoprotective action upon toxic stimuli in tumor cells. PMID:23185533

  19. Subnanomolar antisense activity of phosphonate-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) conjugates delivered by cationic lipids to HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiraishi, Takehiko; Hamzavi, Ramin; Nielsen, Peter E

    2008-01-01

    oligomer. This modification of the PNA does not interfere with the nucleic acid target binding affinity based on thermal stability of the PNA/RNA duplexes. When delivered to cultured HeLa pLuc705 cells by Lipofectamine, the PNAs showed dose-dependent nuclear antisense activity in the nanomolar range as...... inferred from induced luciferase activity as a consequence of pre-mRNA splicing correction by the antisense-PNA. Antisense activity depended on the number of phosphonate moieties and the most potent hexa-bis-phosphonate-PNA showed at least 20-fold higher activity than that of an optimized PNA/DNA hetero...... of PNA oligomers rival that of siRNA and the results therefore emphasize that provided sufficient in vivo bioavailability of PNA can be achieved these molecules may be developed into potent gene therapeutic drugs....

  20. Synergistic interactions of saponins and monoterpenes in HeLa cells, Cos7 cells and in erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Florian; Wink, Michael

    2011-10-15

    In phytomedicine complex extracts consisting of phenolics, monoterpenes or saponins are traditionally used. It is often impossible to attribute the biological activity of an extract to one or few compounds. As an explanation of the superior activity of extracts, a synergistic effect of combinations of active compounds has been suggested. Since lipophilic monoterpenes or saponins targeting the biomembrane usually accompany polar polyphenols in phytomedical preparations, we decided to investigate their effect as single substances and in combination to gain further insight into potential synergistic effects of herbal medicine. Combinations of the monoterpenes α-pinene, thymol and menthol with the monodesmosidic saponins digitonin, aescin, glycyrrhizic acid and Quillaja saponin demonstrated strong synergistic activity. The IC(50) of haemolysis was lowered by a factor of 10-100 from 316μg/ml to 2μg/ml for aescin, 157μg/ml to 11μg/ml for Quillaja saponins and 20μg/ml to 3μg/ml for digitonin when combined with thymol. A similar significant synergistic cytotoxicity occurred both in HeLa and Cos7 cells by combining the α-pinene, thymol and menthol with the saponins. The IC(50) of glycyrrhizic acid was lowered by a factor 100 from around 300μg/ml to around 1-10μg/ml and the IC(50) of aescin, digitonin and Quillaja saponins about the factor 10. Monoterpenes and monodesmosidic saponins have a common target, the biomembrane, which is present in all animal, fungal and bacterial cells. Disturbance of membrane fluidity and permeability is the mode of action. This activity is non-specific which makes it extremely difficult for bacteria and fungi to develop resistance. This explains the overall success of these molecules as defence chemicals in the plant kingdom. The synergistic effect of combinations of saponins with monoterpenes opens a complete new field of possible applications in medicine to overcome resistance in multidrug resistant microbial and human cell. PMID:21968386

  1. Analysis of the factors in determining radiosensitivity in mammalian cells by using radio-sensitive and -resistant clones isolated from HeLa S3 cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The factors in determining radiosensitivity of cultured mammalian cells were analysed by using two clones each having different radiosensitivities. The radiosensitive clones were isolated from HeLa S3 cells by the N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-treatment, X-irradiation (200 R) and 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR)-visible light method. On the other hand, the radioresistant clone was isolated by single X-irradiation (2000 R) from MNNG-treated HeLa S3 cell population. The radiosensitivities expressed in D sub(o) and D sub(q) values were 110 and 140 R in radiosensitive SM-1a clone and 180 and 230 R in radioresistant RM-1b clone respectively. The biological and biochemical characteristics of both clones such as the distribution of chromosome numbers, formation and rejoining of single strand breaks in DNA caused by X-irradiation, non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH) and apparent total sulfhydryl (APSH) contents were measured. Among the characteristics analysed, different contents of NPSH in the cell were well correlated to their daiosensitivities among the original HeLa S3 cells, SM-1a and RM-1b clone. Additionally, it was found that the radioresistant L.P3 Co-3 cells isolated by Tsuboi et al. from the original mouse L.P3 cells by means of serial irradiation with 60Co γ-rays have more abundant NPSH than the original L.P3 cells. From these results, it can be concluded that the amount of NPSH play the main role in determining radiosensitivity in cultured mammalian cells. (auth.)

  2. Mapping and identification of interferon gamma-regulated HeLa cell proteins separated by immobilized pH gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, AC; Rossel Larsen, M; Roepstorff, P; Justesen, Just; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend

    1999-01-01

    magnitude of IFN-gamma responsive genes has been reported previously. Our goal is to identify and map IFN-gamma-regulated HeLa cell proteins to the two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with the immobilized pH gradient (IPG) two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE) system...

  3. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. I. Delayed inhibition of DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of HeLa S3 cells with 1 mM caffeine delays progression through G1 by 1.5 hours but causes no other detectable inhibition of cell progression; it sometimes results in a large stimulation of thymidine incorporation. When this concentration is applied to cells that have been irradiated with 1-krad doses of 220-kV x rays, there is a marked suppression of both the inhibition of DNA synthesis and G2 arrest induced by the radiation. Larger doses require higher concentrations of caffeine to suppress the inhibition of DNA synthesis. Delaying addition until the rate of synthesis is at its minimum (1.5 hours after irradiation with 1 krad) results in a slightly accelerated recovery of the rate. Treatment before or during irradiation is without effect on the inhibition. Removal of the caffeine as late as 6 hours after its addition at the time of irradiation results in a prompt inhibition in DNA synthesis that mimics that observed immediately after irradiation in the absence of caffeine. These findings raise the possibility that the depression in rate of DNA systhesis might not result from radiation damage introduced into the replicon initiation system, but rather may be an indirect consequence of damage residing elsewhere in the irradiated cell

  4. Modulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis by trimethyltin chloride in human tumour cells: Neuroblastoma SY5Y and cervix adenocarcinoma HeLa S3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physiological modifications of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) levels trigger and/or regulate a diversity of cellular activities (e.g. neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, muscular contraction, cell proliferation), while calcium overloads could result in cytotoxicity. Previously, we have shown that trimethyltin chloride (Me3SnCl; TMT) modulates calcium homeostasis in cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa S3) cells [Florea, A.-M., Dopp, E., Buesselberg, D., 2005. TMT induces elevated calcium transients in HeLa cells: types and levels of response. Cell Calcium 37, 252-258]. Here we compare [Ca2+]i-changes induced by trimethyltin chloride in neuroblastoma SY5Y and HeLa S3 cells using calcium-sensitive dyes (fluo-4/AM (fluo-4) and rhod-2/AM (rhod-2)) and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). TMT-induced calcium elevations in neuroblastoma SY5Y as well as in HeLa S3 cells. [Ca2+]i rose to a sustained plateau or to transient spikes. Overall, the detected averaged increase of the maximum calcium elevation were: 0.5 μM ∼125.6%; 5 μM ∼130.1%; 500 μM ∼145% in HeLa S3 cells and 0.5 μM ∼133.3%; 5 μM ∼136.1%; 500 μM ∼147.1% in neuroblastoma SY5Y cells. The calcium rise derived from internal stores did not significantly depend on the presence of calcium in the external solution: ∼109% (no calcium added) versus ∼117% (2 mM calcium; 5 μM TMT) in HeLa cells. This difference was similar in neuroblastoma SY5Y cells, were ∼127% versus ∼136% increase (5 μM TMT) were measured. Staining of calcium stores with rhod-2 showed a TMT-induced [Ca2+]i-decrease in the stores followed by an increase of the calcium concentration in the nuclei of the two cell lines tested. Our results suggest that toxic effects in human tumour cells after exposure to trimethyltin compounds might be due to an elevation of [Ca2+]i

  5. Cytotoxic effects of chloroform and hydroalcoholic extracts of aerial parts of Cuscuta chinensis and Cuscuta epithymum on Hela, HT29 and MDA-MB-468 tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    A. Jafarian; A. GHANNADI; B. Mohebi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that some species of Cuscuta possess anticancer activity on various cell lines. Due to the lack of detailed researches on the cytotoxic effects of Cuscuta chinensis and Cuscuta epithymum, the aim of the present study was to evaluate cytotoxic effects of chloroform and hydroalcoholic extracts of these plants on the human breast carcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-468), human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HT29) and human uterine cervical carcinoma (Hela). Using ma...

  6. Queuosine Biosynthesis Is Required for Sinorhizobium meliloti-Induced Cytoskeletal Modifications on HeLa Cells and Symbiosis with Medicago truncatula

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, Marta; Capela, Delphine; Poincloux, Renaud; Benmeradi, Nacer; Le Ru, Aurelie; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Batut, Jacques; Masson, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Rhizobia are symbiotic soil bacteria able to intracellularly colonize legume nodule cells and form nitrogen-fixing symbiosomes therein. How the plant cell cytoskeleton reorganizes in response to rhizobium colonization has remained poorly understood especially because of the lack of an in vitro infection assay. Here, we report on the use of the heterologous HeLa cell model to experimentally tackle this question. We observed that the model rhizobium Sinorhizobium meliloti, and other rhizobia as...

  7. Growth-dependent modulation of casein kinase II and its substrate nucleolin in primary human cell cultures and HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, H R; Issinger, O G

    1989-01-01

    We have previously provided evidence that casein kinase II (CKII) and its substrate nucleolin increase concomitantly during certain development stages during embryogenesis (Schneider et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 161, 733-738). We now show that during normal growth of primary cell cultures and He......La cells CKII activity is increased concomitant with cellular growth and that the activity declines when confluency is reached. Parallel to the CKII activity increase, nucleolin, which has been shown to be a potential substrate of CKII changes its phosphorylation status, reaching a maximum at the time when...

  8. Effect of misonidazole on formation of thymine base damage by gamma rays in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the radiosensitizer misonidazole on the formation of thymine base damage of the 5,6-dihydroxydihydro-thymine-type by gamma rays was measured under aerobic and hypoxic conditions. HeLa cells, prelabled with [3H-methyl]-thymidine, were suspended in phosphate buffered saline in the presence and absence of misonidazole. Concentrations up to 20 mM were used. The cell suspensions were irradiated at 12-140 with 60Co gamma rays. Dose response curves under aerobic and hypoxic conditions showed a much-depressed base damage formation under hypoxia, which was created by blowing a stream of nitrogen across the cell suspensions for 30 minutes on ice. The presence of higher concentrations of misonidazole decreased the formation of thymine based damage under aerobic conditions but had little or no detectable effect under hypoxia. It is concluded that an effect on the level of formation of thymine base damage is not primarily responsible for the radiosensitization of misonidazole under hypoxic conditions. 12 references, 3 figures

  9. A comparison of the growth of selected mycobacteria in HeLa, monkey kidney, and human amnion cells in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHEPARD, C C

    1958-02-01

    HeLa, monkey kidney, and human amnion cells in tissue cultures were compared as sites for the multiplication of strains of tubercle bacilli or original and reduced pathogenicity, and for several other species of mycobacteria capable of causing disease in humans. The arrangement of the pathogenic species inorder of their growth rates in HeLa cells was Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium balnei, and the "yellow bacillus," followed closely by the tubercle bacillus. This order was also correct for these species in monkey kidney and human amnion cells, and is the same as that seen in bacteriological media. The arrangement of the strains of tubercle bacilli in order of their growth rates in all three types of cells was: H37Rv, then R1Rv, and lastly H37Ra, which multiplied about as slowly as BCG. An INH-resistant strain grew about as rapidly as H37Rv. Growth of the pathogenic species occurred at about the same rates in HeLa and monkey kidney cells, but was distinctly slower in human amnion cells, which are less active metabolically. Irradiation of the cells in doses up to 5000 r did not affect the subsequent growth of mycobacteria in them. Preliminary experiments with human leprosy bacilli indicate that they can be introduced into these cells in high numbers and that the bacilli then persist for the life of the cells. PMID:13491759

  10. Development of Microelectrode Arrays Using Electroless Plating for CMOS-Based Direct Counting of Bacterial and HeLa Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsu, Kiichi; Ota, Shoko; Gamo, Kohei; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    The development of two new types of high-density, electroless plated microelectrode arrays for CMOS-based high-sensitivity direct bacteria and HeLa cell counting are presented. For emerging high-sensitivity direct pathogen counting, two technical challenges must be addressed. One is the formation of a bacteria-sized microelectrode, and the other is the development of a high-sensitivity and high-speed amperometry circuit. The requirement for microelectrode formation is that the gold microelectrodes are required to be as small as the target cell. By improving a self-aligned electroless plating technique, the dimensions of the microelectrodes on a CMOS sensor chip in this work were successfully reduced to 1.2 ?m 2.05 ?m. This is 1/20th of the smallest size reported in the literature. Since a bacteria-sized microelectrode has a severe limitation on the current flow, the amperometry circuit has to have a high sensitivity and high speed with low noise. In this work, a current buffer was inserted to mitigate the potential fluctuation. Three test chips were fabricated using a 0.6- ?m CMOS process: two with 1.2 ?m 2.05 ?m (1024 1024 and 4 4) sensor arrays and one with 6- ?m square (16 16) sensor arrays; and the microelectrodes were formed on them using electroless plating. The uniformity among the 1024 1024 electrodes arranged with a pitch of 3.6 ?m 4.45 ?m was optically verified. For improving sensitivity, the trenches on each microelectrode were developed and verified optically and electrochemically for the first time. Higher sensitivity can be achieved by introducing a trench structure than by using a conventional microelectrode formed by contact photolithography. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements obtained using the 1.2 ?m 2.05 ?m 4 4 and 6- ?m square 16 16 sensor array with electroless-plated microelectrodes successfully demonstrated direct counting of the bacteria-sized microbeads and HeLa cells. PMID:26561481

  11. Synchronization of HeLa cell cultures by inhibition of DNA polymerase alpha with aphidicolin.

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrali-Noy, G; Spadari, S; Miller-Faurès, A; Miller, A O; Kruppa, J; Koch, G

    1980-01-01

    Both the inhibitory effect of aphidicolin on the replicative alpha-polymerase and the reversibility of its action in vivo (Pedrali-Noy & Spadari, 1979, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 88, 1194-2002) allow the synchronization of cells in culture. Aphidicolin prevents G1 cells from entering the DNA synthetic period, blocks cells in "S" phase, allows G2, M and G1 cells to continue the cell cycle and to accumulate at the G1/S border. Aphidicolin is a more useful reagent than hydroxyurea and thymid...

  12. 3D printing of biomimetic microstructures for cancer cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Tina Qing; Qu, Xin; Liu, Justin; Chen, Shaochen

    2014-01-01

    To understand the physical behavior and migration of cancer cells, a 3D in vitro micro-chip in hydrogel was created using 3D projection printing. The micro-chip has a honeycomb branched structure, aiming to mimic 3D vascular morphology to test, monitor, and analyze differences in the behavior of cancer cells (i.e. HeLa) vs. non-cancerous cell lines (i.e. 10T1/2). The 3D Projection Printing system can fabricate complex structures in seconds from user-created designs. The fabricated microstruct...

  13. Cytotoxic effects of chloroform and hydroalcoholic extracts of aerial parts of Cuscuta chinensis and Cuscuta epithymum on Hela, HT29 and MDA-MB-468 tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarian, A; Ghannadi, A; Mohebi, B

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that some species of Cuscuta possess anticancer activity on various cell lines. Due to the lack of detailed researches on the cytotoxic effects of Cuscuta chinensis and Cuscuta epithymum, the aim of the present study was to evaluate cytotoxic effects of chloroform and hydroalcoholic extracts of these plants on the human breast carcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-468), human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HT29) and human uterine cervical carcinoma (Hela). Using maceration method, different extracts of aerial parts of C. chinensis and C. epithymum were prepared. Extraction was performed using chloroform and ethanol/water (70/30). Total phenolic contents of the extracts were determined according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Using MTT assay, the cytotoxic activity of the extracts against HT29, Hela and MDA-MB-468 tumor cells was evaluated. Extracts were considered cytotoxic when more than 50% reduction on cell survival was observed. The poly-phenolic content of the hydroalcoholic and chloroform extracts of C. chinensis and C. epithymum were 56.08 ± 4.11, 21.49 ± 2.00, 10.64 ± 0.86 and 4.81 ± 0.38, respectively. Our findings showed that the chloroform extracts of C. chinensis and C. epithyum significantly reduced the viability of Hela, HT-29 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Also, hydroalcoholic extracts of C. chinensis significantly decreased the viability of HT29, Hela and MDA-MB-468 cells. However, in the case of hydroalcoholic extracts of C. epithymum only significant decrease in the viability of MDA-MB-468 cells was observed (IC50 = 340 μg/ml). From these findings it can be concluded that C. chinensis and C. epithymum are good candidates for further study to find new possible cytotoxic agents. PMID:25657780

  14. Measurement of the lateral diffusion of human MHC class I molecules on HeLa cells by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching using a phycoerythrin probe.

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiou, George; Bahra, Sukhvinder S; Mackie, Alan R.; Wolfe, Caroline A; O'Shea, Paul; Ladha, Shab; Fernandez, Nelson; Cherry, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    The mobility of cell surface MHC class I molecules on HeLa cells was measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The probe used for these studies was the phycobiliprotein R-phycoerythrin coupled to Fab fragments of a monoclonal antibody specific for human monomorphic MHC class I molecules. It was found that the recovery curves could be equally well fitted by either a random diffusion model with an immobile component or by an anomalous diffusion model. In the latter case, th...

  15. Association to HeLa cells and surface behavior of exogenous gangliosides studied with a fluorescent derivative of GM1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cultured HeLa cells were incubated with pyrene-GM1/3H-radiolabeled GM1 ganglioside (1:4 M/M) mixtures for various times. The process of association of pyrene-GM1 with cells was qualitatively and quantitatively the same as that of 3H-GM1. The pyrene-GM1 and 3H-GM1 proportions in the various forms of association with cells were similar to that of the starting ganglioside mixture. After 2-h incubation, the association of ganglioside with cells was well established whereas almost no metabolic processing had occurred. During a 24-h incubation, pyrene- and 3H-GM1 underwent similar metabolic processing and gave rise to catabolic (GM2 and GM3) and anabolic (GDla) derivatives. Fluorescence spectroscopy experiments carried out with the excimer formation technique on subcellular fractions containing plasma membranes showed that exogenous ganglioside was, in part, associated with the cells in a micellar form removable by trypsin treatment, and in part inserted in a seemingly molecular dispersion. Addition of Ca2+ salts caused aggregation of the ganglioside, as indicated by the increase of the excimer:monomer fluorescence ratio. The phenomenon was Ca2+ concentration dependent (maximum at 10 mM), and subsequent addition of EDTA has no effect. The saccharide portion of exogenously incorporated pyrene-GM1 was available to interact with external ligands, as shown by its ability to bind cholera toxin whose addition reduced the collision rate among the ganglioside lipid moieties

  16. Analysis of Replication Foci and Replication Domains in HeLa Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ligasová, Anna; Malínský, Jan; Raška, Ivan; Koberna, Karel

    Lisboa : organizer, 2005. PB-09. [XLth Meeting of the Portuguese Society for Electron Microscopy and Cell Biology. 08.12.2005-09.12.2005, Lisboa] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/03/1121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  17. Dimethyl sulfoxide-caused changes in pro- and anti-angiogenic factor levels could contribute to an anti-angiogenic response in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ?im?ek, Ece; Aydemir, Esra Arslan; ?mir, Nilfer; Koak, Orhan; Kuruo?lu, Aykut; F??k?n, Kayahan

    2015-10-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is widely used in biological research as a general solvent. While it has been previously demonstrated that DMSO possesses a wide range of pharmacological effects, there is no published work regarding the effects of DMSO on pro-angiogenic factor levels. This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of DMSO on the levels of three pro-angiogenic factors released from HeLa cells in vitro. Cells were treated with two different and previously determined concentrations of DMSO. The cytotoxic effects of DMSO concentrations on HeLa cells were determined via MTT. Survival rates of DMSO-treated cells were determined by Invitrogen live/dead viability/cytotoxicity kit and trypan blue exclusion assay. Changes in the pro-angiogenic levels in media were evaluated by Cayman's Substance P Enzyme Immunoassay ELISA kit. Vascular endothelial growth factor ELISA kit and interferon gamma ELISA kit for substance P, VEGF and IFN? respectively. Changes in substance P levels were corrected by standard western blotting. Changes in VEGF and IFN? levels were corrected both by western blot and real time PCR. Treatment with 1.4 ?M DMSO caused a time-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation at 24, 48 and 72 h. 1.4 ?M DMSO caused a significant reduction in VEGF levels at 72 h of incubation and sharp increases in IFN? levels at both 48 and 72 h of incubation. According to real time PCR analyses, DMSO (1.4 ?M) exhibited an inhibitory effect on VEGF but acted as an augmenter of IFN? release on HeLa cells in vitro. This is the first report showing that the general solvent DMSO suppressed HeLa cell proliferation, decreased the levels of two pro-angiogenic factors (substance P and VEGF) and increased the release of an anti-angiogenic factor IFN? in vitro. PMID:26275957

  18. Reduced expression of the ICE-related protease CPP32 is associated with radiation-induced cisplatin resistance in HeLa cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Eichholtz-Wirth, H.; Stoetzer, O.; Marx, K.

    1997-01-01

    Low-dose fractionated gamma-irradiation (three cycles of 5 x 2 Gy) induced cisplatin resistance in HeLa cells. The drug resistance was modest (Rf of about 2) and stable, similar to that found previously in murine cells after irradiation. In the drug-resistant HeLa-C3 cells, flow cytometric analysis revealed a decreased number of apoptotic cells compared with the parental cells. Drug resistance was associated with considerably enhanced expression of the p53 suppressor protein in HeLa-C3 cells ...

  19. Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Potentials of Ganoderma lucidum and Curculigo pilosa on Human Cervical Adenocarcinoma Cell Line, HeLa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Ayorinde Babatunde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many African natural products have been hypothesized to have phytochemicals that makes them effective anti-tumour agents. This research study looks at two out of the numerous hypothesized medicinal plants-Curculigo pilosa and Ganoderma lucidum. Caspase-3, Neutral red and DNA fragmentation assays were carried out on HeLa cell lines cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM in (95% O2 + 5% CO2 at 35°C. The apoptotic, cytotoxic capacities and DNA fragmentation assays were carried out on the medicinal plants. Both plant samples were extracted in both organic (mixture of ethanol and ethylacetate in the ratio 50:50 and aqueous solution (mixture of methanol and distilled water in the ratio 70:30. It was observed that both plant samples had apoptotic effects but below 50% of comparative levels with the exception of the aqueous extract of Ganoderma lucidum which could pass as an antitumour agent (showing apoptotic effect above 50%. Conclusively, the aqueous extract of Ganoderma lucidum proves to be suitable for the development of an antitumour agent as shown by its apoptotic effect reported in this study.

  20. Study on the mutation spectrum of hprt gene in HeLa MR cell induced by γ-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal HeLa MR cells were irradiated by 60Co γ-ray in the dose range of 0∼8 Gy and the mutants of hprt gene were cloned in the 6-TG containing selective culture and assayed. Three natural spontaneous mutants and eighteen γ-ray induced hprt mutants were recovered. The mutation spectra of hprt exons in all of them were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using 8 pairs of hprt oligonucleotide primers to amplify hprt exons from cellular DNA extracts. The result showed that in the mutants induced by γ-ray, about 77.8% (14/18) of the hprt mutations were deleted, among which 2 were total deletion, the other 12 were partial deletion, and 22.2% (4/18), which did not show noticeable changes in the PCR pattern, were point mutation. The mutation degree of hprt exon deletion was found to be dependent on the irradiation dose. However, about 67%(2/3) point mutants and 33%(1/3) deleted mutants were showed in the natural mutants. Their mutation degree was far lower than that of the γ-ray induced mutants. These results might be beneficial for further study of the molecular mechanism of mutation induced by γ-ray irradiation as well as for the estimation of irradiation dose

  1. Loss of a putative tumor suppressor locus after gamma-ray-induced neoplastic transformation of HeLa x Skin fibroblast human cell hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nontumorigenic HeLa x skin fibroblast hybrid cell line, CGL1, can be induced to re-express HeLa tumor-associated cell surface antigen, p75-IAP (intestinal alkaline phosphatase), with resulting neoplastic transformation, by exposure to γ radiation. This has allowed the human hybrid system to be developed into a quantitative in vitro model for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of human cells. Recently, several γ-ray-induced IAP-expression mutants (GIMs) of the nontumorigenic HeLa x skin fibroblast hybrid CGL1 were isolated and all were tumorigenic when injected subcutaneously into nude mice. Control cell lines which were negative for p75-IAP (CONs) were also isolated from irradiated populations, and none were found to be tumorigenic. We have now begun to investigate the molecular basis of radiation-induced neoplastic transformation in this system by studying the potential genetic linkage between p75/IAP expression, tumorigenicity and damage to a putative tumor suppressor locus on fibroblast chromosome 11. Previous analysis of rare spontaneous segregants has indicated that this locus is involved in the regulation of tumorigenicity and in the expression of the HeLa tumor-associated cell surface marker intestinal alkaline phosphatase (p75-IAP) in this system. Therefore, analysis by restriction fragment length polymorphism and chromosome painting have been performed for chromosome 11, and for chromosome 13 as a control, for the p75/IAP-positive GIM and p75/IAP-negative CON cell lines. We report that in five of eight of the GIMs large-scale damage to the fibroblast chromosome 11's is evident (four GIMs have lost one complete copy of a fibroblast chromosome 11 heavily damaged). None of the CONs, however (0/5), have lost a complete copy of either fibroblast chromosome 11. No large-scale damage to the control chromosome 13's was detected in the GIMs or CONs. 49 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Instant Response of Live HeLa Cells to Static Magnetic Field and Its Magnetic Adaptation

    CERN Document Server

    Raja, Sufi O

    2014-01-01

    We report Static Magnetic Field (SMF) induced altered sub-cellular streaming, which retains even after withdrawal of the field. The observation is statistically validated by differential fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) studies in presence and absence of SMF, recovery rate being higher in presence of SMF. This instant magneto-sensing by live cells can be explained by inherent diamagnetic susceptibility of cells and alternatively by spin recombination, e.g., by the radical pair mechanism. These arguments are however insufficient to explain the retention of the SMF effect even after field withdrawal. Typically, a relaxation time scale at least of the order of minutes is observed. This long duration of the SMF effect can be explained postulating a field induced coherence that is followed by decoherence after the field withdrawal. A related observation is the emergence of enhanced magnetic susceptibility of cells after magnetic pre-incubation. This implies onset of a new spin equilibrium state a...

  3. Extracellular gentamicin reduces the activity of connexin hemichannels and interferes with purinergic Ca2+ signaling in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Vania A.; Retamal, Mauricio A.; Cea, Luis A.; Salas, José D.; Vargas, Aníbal A.; Verdugo, Christian A.; Jara, Oscar; Martínez, Agustín D.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction channels (GJCs) and hemichannels (HCs) are composed of protein subunits termed connexins (Cxs) and are permeable to ions and small molecules. In most organs, GJCs communicate the cytoplasm of adjacent cells, while HCs communicate the intra and extracellular compartments. In this way, both channel types coordinate physiological responses of cell communities. Cx mutations explain several genetic diseases, including about 50% of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. However, the possible involvement of Cxs in the etiology of acquired hearing loss remains virtually unknown. Factors that induce post-lingual hearing loss are diverse, exposure to gentamicin an aminoglycoside antibiotic, being the most common. Gentamicin has been proposed to block GJCs, but its effect on HCs remains unknown. In this work, the effect of gentamicin on the functional state of HCs was studied and its effect on GJCs was reevaluated in HeLa cells stably transfected with Cxs. We focused on Cx26 because it is the main Cx expressed in the cochlea of mammals where it participates in purinergic signaling pathways. We found that gentamicin applied extracellularly reduces the activity of HCs, while dye transfer across GJCs was not affected. HCs were also blocked by streptomycin, another aminoglycoside antibiotic. Gentamicin also reduced the adenosine triphosphate release and the HC-dependent oscillations of cytosolic free-Ca2+ signal. Moreover, gentamicin drastically reduced the Cx26 HC-mediated membrane currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Therefore, the extracellular gentamicin-induced inhibition of Cx HCs may adversely affect autocrine and paracrine signaling, including the purinergic one, which might partially explain its ototoxic effects. PMID:25237294

  4. Effects of activated aflatoxin B1 and caffeine on DNA replicon initiation in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afatoxin B1 (AFB1) is activated by a rat microsomal extract (S-9) to form a product that inhibits DNA synthesis in HeLa cells. At 10-7 M, AFB1 inhibited initiation of replicons, as shown in alkaline sucrose gradient profiles 30 min after incubation with the drug. Ninety minutes later, the profile of treated cells was similar to that of control, but 4 h later there was another effect on replicon initiation. At 10-6 M, the inhibition of initiation was greater than at 10-7 M and increased progressively. Four hours after removal of the drug, the gradient profile showed low amounts of radioactivity in all size classes of DNA. When cells were incubated in medium containing caffeine (2 mM) even as late as 60 min after incubation with AFB1, the inhibition of replicon initiation was prevented. If caffeine was later removed from the medium, replicon initiation was then inhibited. At 10-7 M or 10-6 M, AFB1 had little immediate effect on chain elongation, but at 10-5 M, the gradient profiles showed an accumulation of low molecular weight DNA molecules, with no radioactivity in the region of high molecular weight DNA, owing to a block to chain elongation; this was not affected by caffeine. These results suggest that AFB1 induces damage that changes the fonformation of chromatin so that initiation of new replicons cannot occur; in the presence of caffeine this change does not occur and DNA replication is not inhibited

  5. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Modulation of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans Initiation of HeLa 299 Cell-Associated Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Balbina J; Sigar, Ira M; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Halkyard, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Although herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), and type-2 (HSV-2), Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans co-habit the oral and genital mucosa, their interaction is poorly understood. We determined the effect HSV has on bacterial and/or fungal adherence, the initial step in biofilm formation. HeLa229 cells were infected with HSV-1 (KOS) gL86 or HSV-2 (KOS) 333gJ (-) at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 50 and 10. S. aureus (ATCC 25923) and/or C. albicans (yeast forms or germ tube forms) were co-incubated for 30 min (37 °C; 5 % CO2; 5:1 organism: HeLa cell ratio; n = 16) with virus-infected HeLa cells or uninfected HeLa cell controls. Post-incubation, the monolayers were washed (3x; PBS), lysed (RIPA), and the lysate plated onto Fungisel and/or mannitol salts agar for standard colony count. The level of HeLa-associated S. aureus was significantly decreased (P albicans yeast forms and germ tube approximately two-fold, respectively. The effect of S. aureus on germ tube and yeast form adherence to HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected cells was specific for the Candida phenotype tested. Our study suggests that HSV, while antagonist towards S. aureus adherence enhances Candida adherence. Furthermore, the combination of the three pathogens results in S. aureus adherence that is either unaffected, or partially restored depending on both the herpes viral species and the fungal phenotype present. PMID:26758707

  6. Oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction by TiO2 nanofibers in HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramkumar, Kunga Mohan; Manjula, Chinnasamy; GnanaKumar, Georgepeter; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Sekar, Thillai V.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Rajaguru, Palanisamy

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are increasingly being used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. The high aspect ratio of fibrous nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and TiO2 nanofibers (TiO2NFs), similar to the one used in this study makes them an attractive structural material and has...... attracted a lot of attention due to their possible negative health effects as suggested by their morphological similarities with asbestos. In the present study, therefore, toxicity of TiO2NFs was evaluated in human cervical adenocarcinoma HeLa cells. The TEM and XRD analyses showed that TiO2NFs used in this...... TiO2NF. TiO2NFs treatment to HeLa cells resulted in increased expression of proapoptotic proteins Bax with an increase in cytosolic Cytochrome-C and inhibition of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Our results revealed the potential mechanism of cellular effects of TiO2NFs....

  7. The cyclin B1 gene is actively transcribed during mitosis in HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sciortino, Selvaggia; Gurtner, Aymone; Manni, Isabella; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Dey, Anup; Sacchi, Ada; Ozato, Keiko; Piaggio, Giulia

    2001-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the expression level of the cyclin B1 gene plays a critical role in the progression through mitosis. Here we demonstrate that the transcriptional activity of the human cyclin B1 promoter, as well as the rate of gene transcription, is high during mitosis. Indeed, the cyclin B1 promoter maintains an open chromatin configuration at the mitotic stage. Consistent with this, we show that the cyclin B1 promoter is occupied and bound to NF-Y during mitosis in vivo. Our results pro...

  8. Cancer Stem Cell Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mission The Cancer Stem Cell Consortium is a self-assembled organization of intramural scientists at all levels of training with an interest in fundamental questions concerning stem cells, developmental biology, and cancer. We host scientific exchanges, w

  9. A new assay for invasion of HeLa 229 cells by Bordetella pertussis: effects of inhibitors, phenotypic modulation, and genetic alterations.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, C. K.; Roberts, A. L.; Finn, T M; Knapp, S; Mekalanos, J J

    1990-01-01

    Invasion and intracellular survival of Bordetella pertussis in HeLa 229 cells was studied by a new assay that utilizes polymyxin B instead of gentamicin to rapidly kill extracellular organisms. Invasion measured by this assay was time and temperature dependent and was inhibited by the microfilament drug cytochalasin D. The invasion process was also dependent on a functional vir locus (also known as bvg), the positive regulator of virulence gene expression in B. pertussis. Four spontaneous Vir...

  10. RGDS-functionalized polyethylene glycol hydrogel-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles enhance specific intracellular uptake by HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nazli C; Ergenc TI; Yar Y; Acar HY; Kizilel S

    2012-01-01

    © 2012 Nazli et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd. This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012:7 1903–1920 International Journal of Nanomedicine RGDS-functionalized polyethylene glycol hydrogel-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles enhance specific intracellular uptake by HeLa cells Caner Nazli1 Tugba Ipek Ergenc2 Yasemin Ya...

  11. Hypergravity signal transduction in HeLa cells with concomitant phosphorylation of proteins immunoprecipitated with anti-microtubule-associated protein antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumei, Yasuhiro; Whitson, Peggy A.; Sato, Atsushige; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that hypergravity (35g) stimulates the production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and decreases adenosine 3-prime,5-prime-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) levels in HeLa cells. It is proposed that IP3 and cAMP may act as second messengers in hypergravity signal transduction. Phosphorylation of microtubule-associated proteins in both the detergent-soluble and -insoluble fractions suggests that cytoskeletal structures may be influenced by gravity.

  12. The HeLa Documentary Film: An Engaging Writing and Culturally Relevant Assignment on Cell Division and Ethics for Nonscience Majors

    OpenAIRE

    Diann Jordan; Timetria Bonds

    2015-01-01

    Historically black institutions play a pivotal role in educating the next generation of scientists and engineers as well as promoting scientific literacy among all of its students. Students would like to have more culturally relevant assignments that reflect their life experiences as it relates to course content. We used the HeLa documentary film, "The Way of All Flesh Film," as an effective teaching tool in the first survey course of general biology to supplement our discussion on the cell ...

  13. Synthetic time series resembling human (HeLa) cell-cycle gene expression data and application to gene regulatory network discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, GHF; Hung, YS; Chang, C.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of gene regulatory network (GRN) discovery methods relies heavily on synthetic time series. However, synthetic data generated by traditional method deviate a lot from real data, making such evaluation questionable. Guiding by decaying sinusoids, we propose a new method that generates synthetic data resembling human (HeLa) cell-cycle gene expression data. Using the new synthetic data, a simple comparison between four GRN discovery methods reveals that Granger causality (GC) methods ...

  14. The Dynamin Chemical Inhibitor Dynasore Impairs Cholesterol Trafficking and Sterol-Sensitive Genes Transcription in Human HeLa Cells and Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Girard, Emmanuelle; Paul, Jean Louis; Fournier, Natalie; Beaune, Philippe,; Johannes, Ludger; Lamaze, Christophe; Védie, Benoît

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular transport of cholesterol contributes to the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis by mechanisms that are yet poorly defined. In this study, we characterized the impact of dynasore, a recently described drug that specifically inhibits the enzymatic activity of dynamin, a GTPase regulating receptor endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Dynasore strongly inhibited the uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in HeLa cells, and to a lower extent in human macrophages. In b...

  15. Pancreatic cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchicall...

  16. Thermal neutron-induced killing effect on HeLa cells modified by a new nucleic acid precursor with boron-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new 10B-containing nucleic acid precursor for neutron capture therapy, 5-carboranyluridine was used to increase the killing effect of thermal neutron beam of Kyoto University Reactor on HeLa S3 cells in vitro. The increase was calculated with four parameters of a linear-quadratic model on dose-survival curve, α, β, a mean inactivation dose (D) and a surviving fraction at 2 Gy irradiation (SF(2)). The results showed that this compound was taken in cells and probably accumulated on cell surface during the incubation of cells and increased the thermal neutron induced killing effect. (author)

  17. Cell phones and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer and cell phones; Do cell phones cause cancer? ... Several major studies show no link between cell phones and cancer at this time. However, since the information available is based on short-term studies, the impact of many years of ...

  18. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • As2O3 inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As2O3 is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As2O3 induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As2O3 on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As2O3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As2O3 treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As2O3 is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer

  19. Syzygium cumini inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines: a primary study

    OpenAIRE

    Barh, D; Viswanathan, G

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is common among women in the Indian subcontinent and the incidences and death rates are gradually increasing over the years. Several dietary phytochemicals have been reported to have growth inhibitory and apoptotic effect on HeLa and other cervical cell lines. In this study, using Hoechst 33342 staining, MTT, Annexin V-FLUOS/PI and TUNEL assays we demonstrated that Syzygium cumini extract inhibits the growth and induces apoptosis in HeLa and SiHa cervical cancer cell lines in ...

  20. Normal Cells, but Not Cancer Cells, Survive Severe Plk1 Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqi; Lei, Ming; Erikson, Raymond L.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the phenotype of depletion of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) using RNA interference (RNAi) and showed that p53 is stabilized in Plk1-depleted cancer cells. In this study, we further analyzed the Plk1 depletion-induced phenotype in both cancer cells and primary cells. The vector-based RNAi approach was used to evaluate the role of the p53 pathway in Plk1 depletion-induced apoptosis in cancer cells with different p53 backgrounds. Although DNA damage and cell death can occur independently of p53, p53-deficient cancer cells were much more sensitive to Plk1 depletion than cancer cells with functional p53. Next, the lentivirus-based RNAi approach was used to generate a series of Plk1 hypomorphs. In HeLa cells, two weak hypomorphs showed only slight G2/M arrest, a medium hypomorph arrested with 4N DNA content, followed later by apoptosis, and a strong Plk1 hypomorph underwent serious mitotic catastrophe. In well-synchronized HeLa cells, a medium level of Plk1 depletion caused a 2-h delay of mitotic progression, and a high degree of Plk1 depletion significantly delayed mitotic entry and completely blocked cells at mitosis. In striking contrast, normal hTERT-RPE1 and MCF10A cells were much less sensitive to Plk1 depletion than HeLa cells; no apparent cell proliferation defect or cell cycle arrest was observed after Plk1 depletion in these cells. Therefore, these data further support suggestions that Plk1 may be a feasible cancer therapy target. PMID:16507989

  1. Proteome-wide profiling of carbonylated proteins and carbonylation sites in HeLa cells under mild oxidative stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Hoffmann, Ralf; Fedorova, Maria

    2014-03-01

    A number of oxidative protein modifications have been well characterized during the past decade. Presumably, reversible oxidative posttranslational modifications (PTMs) play a significant role in redox signaling pathways, whereas irreversible modifications including reactive protein carbonyl groups are harmful, as their levels are typically increased during aging and in certain diseases. Despite compelling evidence linking protein carbonylation to numerous disorders, the underlying molecular mechanisms at the proteome remain to be identified. Recent advancements in analysis of PTMs by mass spectrometry provided new insights into the mechanisms of protein carbonylation, such as protein susceptibility and exact modification sites, but only for a limited number of proteins. Here we report the first proteome-wide study of carbonylated proteins including modification sites in HeLa cells for mild oxidative stress conditions. The analysis relied on our recent strategy utilizing mass spectrometry-based enrichment of carbonylated peptides after DNPH derivatization. Thus a total of 210 carbonylated proteins containing 643 carbonylation sites were consistently identified in three replicates. Most carbonylation sites (284, 44.2%) resulted from oxidation of lysine residues (aminoadipic semialdehyde). Additionally, 121 arginine (18.8%), 121 threonine (18.8%), and 117 proline residues (18.2%) were oxidized to reactive carbonyls. The sequence motifs were significantly enriched for lysine and arginine residues near carbonylation sites (10 residues). Gene Ontology analysis revealed that 80% of the carbonylated proteins originated from organelles, 50% enrichment of which was demonstrated for the nucleus. Moreover, functional interactions between carbonylated proteins of kinetochore/spindle machinery and centrosome organization were significantly enriched. One-third of the 210 carbonylated proteins identified here are regulated during apoptosis. PMID:24321318

  2. Evaluation and comparison of Hela, Hep2C and Vero cell lines sensitivity to polio vaccinal virus using micro and macro vaccine potency tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani, S.,

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Poliomyelitis, an acute viral infectious disease caused by poliovirus, still remains a public health problem in developing countries. Despite the global effort to eradicate polio, continuing the polio immunization with a potent and safe vaccine is essential. For accurate vaccine evaluation, three types of cell lines including Hela, Hep2C and Vero were evaluated and compared using two methods of polio vaccine potency tests (micro & macro. For cells comparison, five different batches from polio vaccines were tested and to develop the test, five variables including viruses, cells, serum, media and Co2 were studied. For validation, the titer of which has been well established as a working reference preparation (WRP was applied to control the accuracy and reproducibility of the testing system. Multiple comparisons were performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Tokey HDS and LSD. No significant differences were found between the potency of vaccine batches and between macro and micro methods. Reduction in cells sensitivity and potency of vaccines was found with increasing passage number. Significant differences were found between the sensitivity of the cell lines. The highest potency of polio vaccines was obtained using Hela cells (GMT in macro and micro test = 10 6.35; Hep2C cells were afterwards (GMT in macro= 10 6.01 and in micro test= 10 5.94; Vero cells were lowest (GMT in macro= 10 5.78 and in micro test= 10 5.72. So, the sensitivity and accuracy of the potency test for evaluation of the polio vaccine in immunization program in Iran will be assured using the Hela cell line with low passage number in macro and micro methods.

  3. Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Wieczorek; Jolanta Niewiarowska

    2009-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory gains increasingly greater significance in the world of medicine. Numerous findings of scientific research in vivo and in vitro indicate that it is the population of undifferentiated, self-renewing cells which is responsible for recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Similarly to normal stem cells, cancer stem cells (CSC) function in the environment of the other cells of the organism, called the niche, where they receive signals for differentiation and proliferation proc...

  4. Effect of vacuum and low-energy ion implantation on p53 and c-fos mRNA expression in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between gene expression and low-energy ion implantation has been studied. Because vacuum is prerequisite in low-energy ion implantation, mineral oil was used to protect cells from water evaporating. In this study, HeLa cells were implanted by low-energy ions (30 keV N+) at different doses, and p53 gene and c-fos gene were studied with real-time quantitative PCR. The result shows that gene expression changed obviously when cells were acted as vacuum control to the sample implanted 5 x 1014 ions/cm2. (authors)

  5. Study of cancer cell lines with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)/vibrational absorption (VA) spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uceda Otero, E. P.; Eliel, G. S. N.; Fonseca, E. J. S.; Hickmann, J. M.; Rodarte, R.; Barreto, E.; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we have used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) / vibrational absorption (VA) spectroscopy to study two cancer cell lines: the Henrietta Lacks (HeLa) human cervix carcinoma and 5637 human bladder carcinoma cell lines. Our goal is to experimentally investigate biochemical changes and......, three groups for the 5637 human bladder carcinoma cell line (5637A, 5637B and 5637C), and another one for the HeLa human cervix carcinoma cell line. The vibrational modes can be assigned to specific bands involving characteristic motions of the protein backbone. This work shows that infrared vibrational...

  6. Lethal Sectoring, genomic instability and cell cycle variation of HeLa S3 cells survived after alpha- and X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When cells with infinite growth ability are irradiated by radiation, survived cells occasionally yield cells without colony forming ability after several generations (lethal sectoring). The sectoring is the process to exclude cells with latent lethal damage, which results in the inhibition of cell cycle progression. Further, clonogen still having the infinite growth ability appears during the sectoring process and has genomic instability. The present study was conducted to compare these processes after irradiation of α- and X-ray. A time-lapse motion camera (1 picture/15 min) was used for microscopic recording of HeLa S3-9IV cells within a single scope (about 50 cells). They were irradiated by 0.45 Gy of α-ray (point source of 241Am, fluence rate 1.5 x 106/cm2/min, 0.3 Gy/min, LET=125 keV/μm) or 3 Gy of X-ray (200 kVp, 0.7 Gy/min), of which doses were equivalent to the survival rate of 0.2. The film recording was done for 30 and 150 hr before and after irradiation, respectively, from which the pedigree of individual cells was figured out by selection of surviving clonogen. Analysis of the pedigree of the survived cells revealed that there was an essential difference in the three processes, which was possibly based on the LET difference. (N.I.)

  7. Artemisinin derivative artesunate induces radiosensitivity in cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical cancer is the third most common type of cancer in women worldwide and radiotherapy remains its predominant therapeutic treatment. Artesunate (ART), a derivative of artemisinin, has shown radiosensitization effect in previous studies. However, such effects of ART have not yet been revealed for cervical cancer cells. The effect of ART on radiosensitivity of human cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and SiHa was assessed using the clonogenic assay. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis alterations were analyzed by flow cytometry. For in vivo study, HeLa or SiHa cells were inoculated into nude mice to establish tumors. Tissues from xenografts were obtained to detect the changes of microvessel density, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution. Microarray was used to analyze differentially expressed genes. ART increased the radiosensitivity of HeLa cells (SER = 1.43, P < 0.001) but not of SiHa cells. Apoptosis and the G2-M phase transition induced by X-ray irradiation (IR) were enhanced by ART via increased Cyclin B1 expression in HeLa cells. Tumor growth of xenografts from HeLa but not SiHa cells was significantly inhibited by irradiation combined with ART (tumor volume reduction of 72.34% in IR + ART group vs. 41.22% in IR group in HeLa cells and 48.79% in IR + ART group vs. 44.03% in IR alone group in SiHa cells). Compared with the irradiated group, cell apoptosis was increased and the G2/M cell cycle arrest was enhanced in the group receiving irradiation combined with ART. Furthermore, compared with radiation alone, X-ray irradiation plus ART affected the expression of 203 genes that function in multiple pathways including RNA transport, the spliceosome, RNA degradation and p53 signaling. ART potently abrogates the G2 checkpoint control in HeLa cells. ART can induce radiosensitivity of HeLa cells in vitro and in vivo

  8. HeLa Nucleic Acid Contamination in The Cancer Genome Atlas Leads to the Misidentification of Human Papillomavirus 18

    OpenAIRE

    Cantalupo, Paul G.; Katz, Joshua P; Pipas, James M.

    2015-01-01

    We searched The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database for viruses by comparing non-human reads present in transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) and whole-exome sequencing (WXS) data to viral sequence databases. Human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) is an etiologic agent of cervical cancer, and as expected, we found robust expression of HPV18 genes in cervical cancer samples. In agreement with previous studies, we also found HPV18 transcripts in non-cervical cancer samples, including those from the colon...

  9. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pine, Sharon R.; Blair Marshall; Lyuba Varticovski

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation p...

  10. Heat shock protein 90 mediates the apoptosis and autophage in nicotinic-mycoepoxydiene-treated HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yifei; Xiao, Shuyan; Chen, Junjie; Wang, Miaomiao; Zheng, Zhonghui; Song, Siyang; Zhang, Lianru

    2015-06-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a fascinating target for cancer therapy due to its significant role in the crossroad of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and regulation. Hsp90 inhibitors have the potential to be developed into anti-cancer drugs. Here, we identified nicotinic-mycoepoxydiene (NMD), a structurally novel compound as Hsp90 inhibitor to perform the anti-tumor activity. The compound selectively bound to the Hsp90 N-terminal domain, and degraded the Hsp90 client protein Akt. The degradation of Akt detained Bad in non-phosphorylation form. NMD-associated apoptosis was characterized by the formation of fragmented nuclei, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and the increased proportion of sub-G1 phase cells. Interestingly, the apoptosis was accompanied with autophagy, by exhibiting the increased expression of LC-3 and the decrease of lysosome pH value. Our findings provide a novel cellular mechanism by which Hsp90 inhibitor adjusts cell apoptosis and autophagy in vitro, suggesting that NMD not only has a potential to be developed into a novel anti-tumor pharmaceutical, but also exhibits a new mechanism in regulating cancer cell apoptosis and autophagy via Hsp90 inhibition. PMID:25948110

  11. Effects of natural flavones on membrane properties and citotoxicity of HeLa cells Efeitos de flavonas naturais em propriedades de membranas e em citotoxicidade de células HeLa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Herrerias

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether eupafolin and hispidulin, flavones extracted from Eupatorium littorale Cabrera, Asteraceae, have the ability to change properties of biological membranes and promote cytotoxic effects. Eupafolin (50-200 µM decreased approximately 30% the rate and total amplitude of valinomycin induced swelling and 60-100% the energy-dependent mitochondrial swelling. Moreover, eupafolin (200 µM reduced 35% the mitochondrial permeability transition, and hispidulin did not change this parameter in any of the doses tested. The evaluation of phase transition of DMPC liposomes with the probe DPH demonstrated that hispidulin and eupafolin affect gel and fluid phase. With mitochondrial membrane as model, hispidulin increased the polarization of fluorescence when used DPH-PA probe. Eupafolin and hispidulin (100 µM promoted a reduction of 40% in cellular viability of HeLa cells in 24 h. Our results suggest that eupafolin and hispidulin have cytotoxic effects that can be explained, in part, by alterations promoted on biological membranes properties and mitochondrial bioenergetics.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar se eupafolina e hispidulina, flavonas extraídas do Eupatorium littorale Cabrera, Asteraceae, possuíam a capacidade de alterar propriedades das membranas biológicas e promover efeitos citotóxicos. Eupafolina (50-200 µM reduziu em aproximadamente 30% a velocidade e amplitude do inchamento mitocondrial induzido por valinomicina e 60-100% o inchamento mitocondrial dependente de substrato. Além disso, eupafolina na dose de 200 µM reduziu a transição de permeabilidade mitocondrial em 35% entretanto, a hispidulina não alterou este parâmetro em todas as doses testadas. A avaliação da transição de fase dos lipossomas de DMPC com a sonda DPH demonstrou que ambas as flavonas afetam a fase gel e fluida. Quando lipossomas de membranas mitocondriais e a sonda DPH-PA foram utilizados, houve aumento da polarização de fluorescência promovido pela hispidulina. Eupafolina e hispidulina, na dose de 100 µM, promoveram 40% de redução da viabilidade de células HeLa em 24 h. Nossos resultados sugerem que eupafolina e hispidulina têm efeitos citotóxicos que podem ser explicados em parte pelas alterações promovidas por estas flavonas sobre propriedades de membranas biológicas e sobre a bioenergética mitocondrial.

  12. Activation of a nonexpressed hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase allele in mutant H23 HeLa cells by agents that inhibit DNA methylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ivarie, R; Morris, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    HeLA H23 cells are a mutant female human tumor cell line harboring defective hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT; IMP-pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8) as a result of a mutation that alters the isoelectric point of the enzyme (G. Milman, E. Lee, G. S. Changas, J. R. McLaughlin, and J. George, Jr., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 73:4589-4592, 1976). As shown by Milman et al. and confirmed by us here, rare HAT+ revertants arise spontaneously at 1.9 X 10(-8) frequency and...

  13. Accelerated onset of viral transcription in adenovirus-infected HeLa cells treated with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, T H; Milovanovic, Z Z; Babiss, L E; Fisher, P B

    1984-01-01

    When adenovirus type 5-infected HeLa cells were exposed to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate, short pulse-labeling with [3H]uridine in vivo and [3H]UTP incorporation by isolated nuclei in vitro were both consistent with a decreased latent period before initiation by RNA polymerase at early viral promoters. Acceleration was not dependent upon concurrent protein synthesis and could not be attributed to rapid entry of virus into the cell nucleus. 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate suppressed the transcription-delay phenotype of the E1a mutant, hr1, without restoring its ability to replicate. PMID:6717433

  14. Accelerated onset of viral transcription in adenovirus-infected HeLa cells treated with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate.

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, T H; Milovanovic, Z Z; Babiss, L E; Fisher, P B

    1984-01-01

    When adenovirus type 5-infected HeLa cells were exposed to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate, short pulse-labeling with [3H]uridine in vivo and [3H]UTP incorporation by isolated nuclei in vitro were both consistent with a decreased latent period before initiation by RNA polymerase at early viral promoters. Acceleration was not dependent upon concurrent protein synthesis and could not be attributed to rapid entry of virus into the cell nucleus. 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol...

  15. A modified computer-assisted colorimetric microtitre assay (MTT) to assess in vitro radiosensitivity of V79, CaSki, HeLa and WiDr cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non-clonogenic MTT assay, based on the reduction of a tetrazolium salt to a purple formazan precipitate by living cells, was modified and a new procedure of analysis proposed. X-ray survival curves were generated for V79, CaSki, WiDr and HeLa cells using the non-clonogenic and a standard clonogenic assay. The described assay is a feasible and reproducible technique for determination of cellular survival, which may be able to incorporate progression delay. The equivalence to a clonogenic survival assay could be proven. (author)

  16. ANTICANCER ACTIVITY OF PONGAMIA GLABRA V. SEED OIL EXTRACT AGAINST SELECTED HUMAN CANCER CELL LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinnasamy Arulvasu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Screening of the seed oil extract from Pongamia glabra V. (Fabaceae has been carried out for antiproliferative activity of cancer cells. The seed oil was extracted with methanol and then persuasive activity was tested on human cancer cell lines MCF-7 and HeLa. The cell growth inhibitory effects of seed oil extract was observed. The cell viability was assessed using trypan blue dye exclusion method and 3-(4, 5- Dimethyl thiazol-2yl-2, 5-dimethyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The IC50 value of the methanolic seed oil extract against MCF-7 and HeLa was found to be 6 mg/ml and 6 mg/ml respectively after 48 hours of incubation. The P.glabra seed oil extract increased the proportion of DNA fragmentation in MCF-7 and HeLa cancer cell lines. Moreover, the inhibitory effect is correlated with DNA fragmentation. These results suggest that the P.glabra seed oil extract has an inhibitory effect on human cancer cell lines MCF-7 and HeLa.

  17. Breast cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Thomas W.; Naylor, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumors are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to th...

  18. Breast cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    MatthewJNaylor

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to t...

  19. Low power ultrasound inhibits cell proliferation and invasion of human cancer cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Mfoumou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Applications of ultrasound in medicine for therapeutic purposes have been accepted, and they have several beneficial uses for many years. However, the outcome of low power ultrasound waves on cell proliferation, especially cell cycle progression and invasion as well as their associated genes on human breast and cervical cancer cells has not been investigated yet. Therefore, we examined the effect of low power ultrasound on BT20, BT20-E6/E7 and HeLa cell lines. Materials and Methods: BT20, BT20-E6/E7 and HeLa cell lines were used in this study. On the other hand, cell proliferation, cell cycle, and invasion assays were applied to study the effect of low ultrasound irradiation on these cell lines. Meanwhile, western blot was performed to study the expression patterns of some selected genes associated with this effect. Results: We found that low power ultrasound inhibits cell proliferation and provokes G0-G1 cell cycle arrest and reduction of S as well as an increase in the G2-M phase of HeLa cells in comparison with the untreated cells. This is accompanied by a down-regulation of Cdk-6 (cyclin dependent kinase which is a major control switch for the cell cycle. Moreover, low power ultrasound inhibits cell invasion and consequently down-regulates the expression of Id-1, caveolin, and EGF-R which are widely considered as main regulators of cell invasion and metastasis of human cancer. Conclusion: These results suggest that application of low power ultrasound on human breast and cervical cancer could be an effective method to reduce cell proliferation and invasion of these cancers.

  20. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. IV. Progression delays and enhanced cell killing at high caffeine concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of x-irradiated and unirradiated HeLa S3 cells to treatment with caffeine at concentrations between 1 and 10 nM has been examined with respect to both delay in progression through the cell generation cycle and enhancement of the expression of potentially lethal x-ray damage. Progression is delayed in a concentration-dependent fashion: the generation time is doubled at about 4 mM. The duration of G1 is lengthened, and the rate of DNA synthesis is reduced, although the kinetics are different in the two phases; the rate of DNA synthesis is usually unaffected at 1 or 2 mM, while there is no concentration threshold for the slowing of progression through G1. Progression through G2 appears to be unaffected by concentrations up to at least 10 mM. Killing of irradiated cells in G2 is somewhat greater after treatment with the higher caffeine concentrations than reported previously for 1 mM. Moreover, an additional mode of killing is observed in irradiated G1 cells which had been found previously to be only slightly affected by 1 mM caffeine; they suffer extensive killing at concentrations above 5 mM. The time-survival curves for irradiated, caffeine-treated G1 and G2 cells have characteristically different shapes. The dose-survival curves for cells treated with the higher caffeine concentrations display steeper terminal slopes and narrower shoulders

  1. Using HeLa cell stress response to introduce first year students to the scientific method, laboratory techniques, primary literature, and scientific writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendes, Karen K

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating scientific literacy into inquiry driven research is one of the most effective mechanisms for developing an undergraduate student's strength in writing. Additionally, discovery-based laboratories help develop students who approach science as critical thinkers. Thus, a three-week laboratory module for an introductory cell and molecular biology course that couples inquiry-based experimental design with extensive scientific writing was designed at Westminster College to expose first year students to these concepts early in their undergraduate career. In the module students used scientific literature to design and then implement an experiment on the effect of cellular stress on protein expression in HeLa cells. In parallel the students developed a research paper in the style of the undergraduate journal BIOS to report their results. HeLa cells were used to integrate the research experience with the Westminster College "Next Chapter" first year program, in which the students explored the historical relevance of HeLa cells from a sociological perspective through reading The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. In this report I detail the design, delivery, student learning outcomes, and assessment of this module, and while this exercise was designed for an introductory course at a small primarily undergraduate institution, suggestions for modifications at larger universities or for upper division courses are included. Finally, based on student outcomes suggestions are provided for improving the module to enhance the link between teaching students skills in experimental design and execution with developing student skills in information literacy and writing. PMID:25726932

  2. Global quantitative proteomics reveal up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress response proteins upon depletion of eIF5A in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Ajeet; Mandal, Swati; Park, Myung Hee

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation factor, eIF5A, is a translation factor essential for protein synthesis, cell growth and animal development. By use of a adenoviral eIF5A shRNA, we have achieved an effective depletion of eIF5A in HeLa cells and undertook in vivo comprehensive proteomic analyses to examine the effects of eIF5A depletion on the total proteome and to identify cellular pathways influenced by eIF5A. The proteome of HeLa cells transduced with eIF5A shRNA was compared with that of scramble shRNA-transduced counterpart by the iTRAQ method. We identified 972 proteins consistently detected in three iTRAQ experiments and 104 proteins with significantly altered levels (protein ratio ≥1.5 or ≤0.66, p-value ≤0.05) at 72 h and/or 96 h of Ad-eIF5A-shRNA transduction. The altered expression levels of key pathway proteins were validated by western blotting. Integration of functional ontology with expression data of the 104 proteins revealed specific biological processes that are prominently up- or down-regulated. Heatmap analysis and Cytoscape visualization of biological networks identified protein folding as the major cellular process affected by depletion of eIF5A. Our unbiased, quantitative, proteomic data demonstrate that the depletion of eIF5A leads to endoplasmic reticulum stress, an unfolded protein response and up-regulation of chaperone expression in HeLa cells. PMID:27180817

  3. Behavior of some enzymatic systems to the action of the cytostatic active EGlCP glucanic biopreparation upon HeLa neoplastic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gherghel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Interference of an autochthonous cytostatic active EGlCP glucanic biopreparation (in dose of 1.5 mg/mL with the activity of some key enzymes, involved in the development of active transmembranary transport, of the intermediary and energetic metabolism, as well as in cellular answer to the oxidative stress, of HeLa neoplastic cells has been investigated. The study revealed: the intensification of the membranary Na+-K+-ATP-ase, of the cellular Mg2+-ATP-ase, of the superoxide dismutase activities; the operating level attenuation of the of catalase, peroxidase, glutathion peroxidase, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase; the diminution of the malondialdehyde content. This functional interference with some cell enzymatic biomolecules has also induced the perturbation of the diverse membrane and metabolic processes, which was incompatible with the survival of HeLa tumoral cells The modulations of the cellular enzymatic equipment activity can be the consequences of the glucanic components direct (with the molecules of the miscellaneous enzymes or indirect interactions ( with membrane or genetic apparatus with some cell, subcell and molecular structures, implicated in the control and regulation of the biosynthesis and activity of the enzymatic biomolecules. The central element, which induces this enzymatic imbalance, appears to be the excess generation of the free radicals in the tumoral cells metabolism aggressed by glucanic constituents.

  4. Gastric Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Okumura, Tomoyuki; Wang, Timothy C.

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are defined as the unique subpopulation in the tumors that possess the ability to initiate tumor growth and sustain self-renewal as well as metastatic potential. Accumulating evidence in recent years strongly indicate the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors of a wide variety of organs. In this review, we will discuss the possible existence of a gastric cancer stem cell. Our recent data suggest that a subpopulation with a defined marker shows spheroid colony format...

  5. Liver Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Mikhail; Aiwu Ruth He

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the liver in adults. It is also the fifth most common solid cancer worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent research supports that liver cancer is a disease of adult stem cells. From the models of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis, there may be at least three distinct cell lineages with progenitor properties susceptible to neoplastic transformation. Identification of specific cell surface markers fo...

  6. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy,...

  7. Poly (ADP-ribose) is not involved in the rejoining of DNA breaks accumulated to high levels in u.v.-irradiated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.v. damage to the DNA of HeLa cells induces the polymerisation of ADP-ribose, but only if repair synthesis is inhibited so that incomplete repair sites (i.e., DNA breaks) accumulate to abnormally high levels. 3-Aminobenzamide greatly reduces the ADP-ribose polymerisation response. However, 3-aminobenzamide does not reduce the rate of rejoining of the accumulated breaks when the inhibition of repair synthesis is reversed. Therefore, rejoining of these DNA breaks (in constrast to the rejoining of other kinds of break) appears not to depend on activation of polynucleotide ligase by ADP-ribosylation. (author)

  8. Poly (ADP-ribose) is not involved in the rejoining of DNA breaks accumulated to high levels in u.v.-irradiated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.v. damage to the DNA of HeLa cells induces the polymerisation of ADP-ribose, but only if repair synthesis is inhibited so that incomplete repair sites (i.e., DNA breaks) accumulate to abnormally high levels. 3-Aminobenzamide greatly reduces the ADP-ribose polymerisation response. However, 3-aminobenzamide does not reduce the rate of rejoining of the accumulated breaks when the inhibition of repair synthesis is reversed. Therefore, rejoining of these DNA breaks (in contrast to the rejoining of other kinds of break) appears not to depend on activation of polynucleotide ligase by ADP-ribosylation

  9. Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Potentials of Ganoderma lucidum and Curculigo pilosa on Human Cervical Adenocarcinoma Cell Line, HeLa

    OpenAIRE

    James Ayorinde Babatunde; Odesanmi O. Selina; Samuel Titilola Aderonke; Tafida Mundi; Olubunmi A. Magbagbeola

    2013-01-01

    Many African natural products have been hypothesized to have phytochemicals that makes them effective anti-tumour agents. This research study looks at two out of the numerous hypothesized medicinal plants-Curculigo pilosa and Ganoderma lucidum. Caspase-3, Neutral red and DNA fragmentation assays were carried out on HeLa cell lines cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagles Medium (DMEM) in (95% O2 + 5% CO2) at 35°C. The apoptotic, cytotoxic capacities and DNA fragmentation assays were carried out...

  10. CXCL12 and [N33A]CXCL12 in 5637 and HeLa Cells: Regulating HER1 Phosphorylation via Calmodulin/Calcineurin

    OpenAIRE

    Rigo, Antonella; Gottardi, Michele; Damiani, Ernesto; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Ferrarini, Isacco; Mauri, Pierluigi; Vinante, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    In the human neoplastic cell lines 5637 and HeLa, recombinant CXCL12 elicited, as expected, downstream signals via both G-protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent pathways responsible for inducing a rapid and a late wave, respectively, of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In contrast, the structural variant [N33A]CXCL12 triggered no β-arrestin-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and signaled via G protein-dependent pathways alone. Both CXCL12 and [N33A]CXCL12, however, generated signals that transin...

  11. Effect of troglitazone on radiation sensitivity in cervix cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Zheng Zhe; Liu, Xian Guang; Song, Hye Jin; Choi, Chi Hwan; Kim, Won Dong; Park, Woo Yoon [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae Ran [Konkuk University College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Troglitazone (TRO) is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma} ) agonist. TRO has antiproliferative activity on many kinds of cancer cells via G1 arrest. TRO also increases Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} -superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and catalase. Cell cycle, and SOD and catalase may affect on radiation sensitivity. We investigated the effect of TRO on radiation sensitivity in cancer cells in vitro. Three human cervix cancer cell lines (HeLa, Me180, and SiHa) were used. The protein expressions of SOD and catalase, and catalase activities were measured at 2-10 {mu}M of TRO for 24 hours. Cell cycle was evaluated with flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. Cell survival by radiation was measured with clonogenic assay. By 5 {mu}M TRO for 24 hours, the mRNA, protein expression and activity of catalase were increased in all three cell lines. G0- G1 phase cells were increased in HeLa and Me180 by 5 {mu}M TRO for 24 hours, but those were not increased in SiHa. By pretreatment with 5 {mu}M TRO radiation sensitivity was increased in HeLa and Me180, but it was decreased in SiHa. In Me180, with 2 {mu}M TRO which increased catalase but not increased G0-G1 cells, radiosensitization was not observed. ROS produced by radiation was decreased with TRO. TRO increases radiation sensitivity through G0-G1 arrest or decreases radiation sensitivity through catalasemediated ROS scavenging according to TRO dose or cell types. The change of radiation sensitivity by combined with TRO is not dependent on the PPAR {gamma} expression level.

  12. Oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction by TiO2 nanofibers in HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramkumar, Kunga Mohan; Manjula, Chinnasamy; GnanaKumar, Georgepeter; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Sekar, Thillai V.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Rajaguru, Palanisamy

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are increasingly being used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. The high aspect ratio of fibrous nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and TiO2 nanofibers (TiO2NFs), similar to the one used in this study makes them an attractive structural material and has...... study are pure with uniform diameter of around 200 nm, and their length to width aspect ratio ranged between 5 and 15. Exposure of HeLa cells to TiO2NFs induced significant cytotoxicity even at doses as low as 2 ?g/ml. The intracellular uptake of TiO2NFs in cells was shown by Alizarin Red S (ARS......) labeled nanofibers. The mechanism of toxicity is mainly due to the induction of cellular oxidative stress, as revealed by elevated ROS levels, reduced antioxidant levels, and increased lipid peroxidation leading to apoptosis. The cell cycle analysis indicated G2/M cell cycle arrest in the cells exposed to...

  13. Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ampatziadis Michailidis, G.

    2010-01-01

    Review on the Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) theory. Topics include introduction on the stem cells and CSCs field. Moreover the CSCs are viewed under the blood malignancies and solid tumors (breast, brain, colorectal) classification.

  14. Azithromycin Synergistically Enhances Anti-Proliferative Activity of Vincristine in Cervical and Gastric Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuezhang; Zhang, Yuyan; Li, Yong; Hao, Xiujing; Liu, Xiaoming, E-mail: erc1080@gmail.com; Wang, Yujiong, E-mail: erc1080@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for the Conservation and Utilization of Special Biological Resources of Western China, Yinchuan 750021, Ningxia (China); College of Life Science, Ningxia University, Yinchuan 750021, Ningxia (China)

    2012-12-04

    In this study, the anti-proliferative and anticancer activity of azithromycin (AZM) was examined. In the presence of AZM, cell growth was inhibited more effectively in Hela and SGC-7901 cancer cells, relative to transformed BHK-21 cells. The respective 50% inhibition of cell growth (IC{sub 50}) values for Hela, SGC-7901 and BHK-21 were 15.66, 26.05 and 91.00 µg/mL at 72 h post incubation, indicative of a selective cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Cell apoptosis analysis using Hoechst nuclear staining and annexin V-FITC binding assay further demonstrated that AZM was capable of inducing apoptosis in both cancer cells and transformed cells. The apoptosis induced by AZM was partly through a caspase-dependent mechanism with an up-regulation of apoptotic protein cleavage PARP and caspase-3 products, as well as a down-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins, Mcl-1, bcl-2 and bcl-X1. More importantly, a combination of AZM and a low dose of the common anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent vincristine (VCR), produced a selectively synergistic effect on apoptosis of Hela and SGC-7901 cells, but not BHK-21 cells. In the presence of 12.50 μg/mL of VCR, the respective IC{sub 50} values of Hela, SGC-7901 and BHK-21 cells to AZM were reduced to 9.47 µg/mL, 8.43 µg/mL and 40.15 µg/mL at 72 h after the incubation, suggesting that the cytotoxicity of AZM had a selective anti-cancer effect on cancer over transformed cells in vitro. These results imply that AZM may be a potential anticancer agent for use in chemotherapy regimens, and it may minimize side effects via reduction of dosage and enhancing the effectiveness common chemotherapeutic drugs.

  15. Azithromycin Synergistically Enhances Anti-Proliferative Activity of Vincristine in Cervical and Gastric Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the anti-proliferative and anticancer activity of azithromycin (AZM) was examined. In the presence of AZM, cell growth was inhibited more effectively in Hela and SGC-7901 cancer cells, relative to transformed BHK-21 cells. The respective 50% inhibition of cell growth (IC50) values for Hela, SGC-7901 and BHK-21 were 15.66, 26.05 and 91.00 µg/mL at 72 h post incubation, indicative of a selective cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Cell apoptosis analysis using Hoechst nuclear staining and annexin V-FITC binding assay further demonstrated that AZM was capable of inducing apoptosis in both cancer cells and transformed cells. The apoptosis induced by AZM was partly through a caspase-dependent mechanism with an up-regulation of apoptotic protein cleavage PARP and caspase-3 products, as well as a down-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins, Mcl-1, bcl-2 and bcl-X1. More importantly, a combination of AZM and a low dose of the common anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent vincristine (VCR), produced a selectively synergistic effect on apoptosis of Hela and SGC-7901 cells, but not BHK-21 cells. In the presence of 12.50 μg/mL of VCR, the respective IC50 values of Hela, SGC-7901 and BHK-21 cells to AZM were reduced to 9.47 µg/mL, 8.43 µg/mL and 40.15 µg/mL at 72 h after the incubation, suggesting that the cytotoxicity of AZM had a selective anti-cancer effect on cancer over transformed cells in vitro. These results imply that AZM may be a potential anticancer agent for use in chemotherapy regimens, and it may minimize side effects via reduction of dosage and enhancing the effectiveness common chemotherapeutic drugs

  16. Synergic effect of human IL-21 gene transfer combined with γ-ray irradiation on the growth of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the combined effect of interleukin-21 gene transfer and ionizing radiation on the growth of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. Methods: Previously constructed Ad-IL-21 gene was amplified by infecting 293A cells and the titer was measured by TCID50 method. HeLa cells were transfected with Ad-IL-21 and then irradiated with 6 Gy 137Cs γ-rays. The cells were divided into 5 groups, including blank control, Ad-LacZ group, Ad-IL-21 group,radiation group and Ad-IL-21 combined with radiation group (combination group). The cell growth, cell cycle, apoptosis, and the expressions of IL-21 gene and protein in HeLa cells were detected. Results: Ad-IL-21 was successfully amplified and the titer of Ad-11.-21 was 9 × 1010 pfu/ml. Compared with Ad-IL-21 group and radiation group,the cell growth of combination group was significantly inhibited at 96 h after transfection (F=85.26, 72.98, P<0.05). The cells in combination group were arrested in G1 phase and decreased at S phase (F=36.69, 34.83, P<0.05), while the cellular apoptosis increased markedly (F=28.23, 25.57, Pcell growth. (authors)

  17. Prostate cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, SH; Frame, FM; Collins, AT

    2009-01-01

    Despite the discovery over 60 years ago by Huggins and Hodges 1 that prostate cancers respond to androgen deprivation therapy, hormone-refractory prostate cancer remains a major clinical challenge. There is now mounting evidence that solid tumours originate from undifferentiated stem cell-like cells coexisting within a heterogeneous tumour mass that drive tumour formation, maintain tumour homeostasis and initiate metastases. This review focuses upon current evidence for prostate cancer stem c...

  18. The modulation of radiosensitivity by combined treatment of selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS 398 and EGF receptor blocker AG 1478 in HeLa cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Seon Min; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, Joo Heon; Park, Mi Ja; Seong, In Ock [Eulji University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ki Mun; Chai, Gyu Yong [Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Selective inhibition of multiple molecular targets may improve the antitumor activity of radiation. Two specific inhibitors of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were combined with radiation on the HeLa cell line. To investigate cooperative mechanism with selective COX-2 inhibitor and EGFR blocker, in vitro experiments were done. Antitumor effect was obtained by growth inhibition and apoptosis analysis by annexin V-Flous method. Radiation modulation effects were determined by the clonogenic cell survival assay. Surviving fractions at 2 Gy (SF{sub 2}) and dose enhancement radio at a surviving fraction of 0.25 were evaluated. To investigate the mechanism of the modulation of radiosensitivity, the cell cycle analyses were done by flow cytometry. The bcl-2 and bax expressions were analyzed by western blot. A cooperative effect were observed on the apoptosis of the HeLa cell line when combination of the two drugs, AG 1478 and NS 398 with radiation at the lowest doses, apoptosis of 22.70% compare with combination of the one drug with radiation, apoptosis of 8.49%. In cell cycle analysis, accumulation of cell on G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase and decrement of S phase fraction was observed from 24 hours to 72 hours after treatment with radiation, AG 1478 and NS 398. The combination of NS 398 and AG 1478 enhanced radiosensitivity in a concentration-dependent manner in HeLa cells with dose enhancement ratios of 3.00 and SF{sub 2} of 0.12 but the combination of one drug with radiation was not enhanced radiosensitivity with dose enhancement ratios of 1.12 and SF2 of 0.68 ({rho} = 0.005). The expression levels of bcl-2 and bax were reduced when combined with AG 1478 and NS 398. Our results indicate that the selective COX-2 inhibitor and EGFR blocker combined with radiation have potential additive or cooperative effects on radiation treatment and may act through various mechanisms including direct inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, suppression of tumor cell cycle progression and inhibition of anti-apoptotic proteins.

  19. Growth inhibition of HeLa cells is a conserved feature of high-risk human papillomavirus E8^E2C proteins and can also be achieved by an artificial repressor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertey, Jasmin; Hurst, Jos; Straub, Elke; Schenker, Astrid; Iftner, Thomas; Stubenrauch, Frank

    2011-03-01

    Infections with certain human papillomaviruses (HPV), such as type 16 (HPV16), 18, or 31, are a necessary risk factor for the development of cervical cancer. Transcript analyses of several HPV revealed that the viral E2 gene encodes both the E2 regulator protein and the E8?E2C protein, which differ in their amino termini. Up to now, functional studies have focused on HPV31 E8?E2C and demonstrated that it is a potent repressor of viral transcription and replication. However, recent analyses of HPV16 genomes have suggested that E8?E2C proteins may differ in their activities. Therefore, we performed a comparative analysis of E8?E2C proteins of HPV16, -18, and -31. All E8?E2C proteins potently inhibited HPV E6/E7 oncogene promoters, and also displayed long-distance transcriptional-repression activities. Furthermore, the expression of all E8?E2C proteins inhibited the growth of HeLa cells. Expression of E8?E2C proteins rapidly increased the protein levels of the E6 and E7 targets p53 and p21, consistent with the repression of the endogenous HPV18 E6/E7 promoter. All E8?E2C proteins induced G(1) arrest more efficiently than E2 proteins and activated senescence markers. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the 31E8 domain can be functionally replaced by the KRAB repression domain derived from KOX1. The KRAB-E2C fusion protein possesses long-distance transcriptional-repression activity and inhibits the growth of HeLa cells comparably to E8?E2C. Taken together, our results suggest that the E8?E2C proteins of HPV16, -18, and -31 are highly conserved transcriptional repressors that inhibit the growth of HeLa cells by repression of E6/E7 transcription but do not have proapoptotic activities. PMID:21191025

  20. Design and fabrication of a microplatform for the proximity effect study of localized ELF-EMF on the growth of in vitro HeLa and PC-12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a platform technology with experimental results that show the scientists and biologists a way to rapidly investigate and analyze the biological effects of localized extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field (EMF) on living cells. The proximity effect of the localized ELF-EMF on living cells is revealed using the bio-compatible microplatform on which an on-glass inductive coil array, the source of the localized ELF-EMF in micro scale, is designed, fabricated and operated with a field strength of 1.2 0.1 mT at 60 Hz for cell culturing study. After a 72 h ELF-EMF exposure, HeLa (human cervical cancer) and PC-12 (rat pheochromocytoma) cells exhibit about 18.4% and 12.9% cell proliferation rate reduction, respectively. Furthermore, according to the presented dynamic model, the reduction of the proliferation can be attributed to the interference of signal transduction processes due to the tangential currents induced around the cells

  1. Cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Wieczorek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cell theory gains increasingly greater significance in the world of medicine. Numerous findings of scientific research in vivo and in vitro indicate that it is the population of undifferentiated, self-renewing cells which is responsible for recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Similarly to normal stem cells, cancer stem cells (CSC function in the environment of the other cells of the organism, called the niche, where they receive signals for differentiation and proliferation processes. Disorders in the signaling pathways between CSC and the niche that result from e.g. acquired oncogenic mutations may lead to uncontrolled proliferation of stem cells, gaining independence from the primary niche or settling a new microenvironment. CSC are identified on the basis of specific markers membrane proteins or cell enzymes. Methods based on the measurement of dye fluorescence (obtaining side population, SP or fluorescence of the fluorophore conjugated with a monoclonal antibody directed against the specific CSC marker are used for isolation. A different method obtains morphologically miscellaneous clones by single cell cloning: holo-, mero- and paraclones. Tumor forming assay in NOD/SCID mice is a standard in vivo test that confirms the stem character of isolated cells. However, this model may not fully reflect the complexity of cancer illnesses in human beings. Solving the mystery of oncogenesis, including the existence of cancer stem cells, is undoubtedly one of the priorities of contemporary medicine that should contribute to the improvement of cancer therapy.

  2. Functional interaction between hMYH and hTRADD in the TNF-α-mediated survival and death pathways of HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vy Tran, An Hue; Hahm, Soo-Hyun; Han, Se Hee [Department of Advanced Technology Fusion, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Ji Hyung [Department of Applied Bioscience, College of Life Science, CHA University, Gyeonggi-do 463-836 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Geon Tae [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States); Han, Ye Sun, E-mail: yshan@konkuk.ac.kr [College of Global Integrated Studies, Division of Interdisciplinary Studies, Konkuk University, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We determine the interaction between hMYH and hTRADD. • We examine changes in the level of hMYH–hTRADD interaction under TNF-α treatment. • hTRADD–hMYH association is involved in the nuclear translocation of NFκB. • hTRADD–hMYH complex influences the TNFR1–TRADD association. - Abstract: The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling pathway is a classical immune system pathway that plays a key role in regulating cell survival and apoptosis. The TNF receptor-associated death domain (TRADD) protein is recruited to the death domain of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1), where it interacts with TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-interacting protein (RIP) for the induction of apoptosis, necrosis, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation. In this study, we found that the human MutY homolog (hMYH) interacted with human TRADD (hTRADD) via the C-terminal domain of hMYH. Moreover, under conditions promoting TNF-α-induced cell death or survival in HeLa cells, this interaction was weakened or enhanced, respectively. The interaction between hMYH and hTRADD was important for signaling pathways mediated by TNF-α. Our results also suggested that the hTRADD–hMYH association was involved in the nuclear translocation of NFκB and formation of the TNFR1–TRADD complex. Thus, this study identified a novel mechanism through which the hMYH–hTRADD interaction may affect the TNF-α signaling pathway. Implications: In HeLa cells, the hTRADD–hMYH interaction functioned in both cell survival and apoptosis pathways following TNF-α stimulation.

  3. Functional interaction between hMYH and hTRADD in the TNF-α-mediated survival and death pathways of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We determine the interaction between hMYH and hTRADD. • We examine changes in the level of hMYH–hTRADD interaction under TNF-α treatment. • hTRADD–hMYH association is involved in the nuclear translocation of NFκB. • hTRADD–hMYH complex influences the TNFR1–TRADD association. - Abstract: The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling pathway is a classical immune system pathway that plays a key role in regulating cell survival and apoptosis. The TNF receptor-associated death domain (TRADD) protein is recruited to the death domain of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1), where it interacts with TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-interacting protein (RIP) for the induction of apoptosis, necrosis, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation. In this study, we found that the human MutY homolog (hMYH) interacted with human TRADD (hTRADD) via the C-terminal domain of hMYH. Moreover, under conditions promoting TNF-α-induced cell death or survival in HeLa cells, this interaction was weakened or enhanced, respectively. The interaction between hMYH and hTRADD was important for signaling pathways mediated by TNF-α. Our results also suggested that the hTRADD–hMYH association was involved in the nuclear translocation of NFκB and formation of the TNFR1–TRADD complex. Thus, this study identified a novel mechanism through which the hMYH–hTRADD interaction may affect the TNF-α signaling pathway. Implications: In HeLa cells, the hTRADD–hMYH interaction functioned in both cell survival and apoptosis pathways following TNF-α stimulation

  4. Targeting cyclin B1 inhibits proliferation and sensitizes breast cancer cells to taxol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclin B1, the regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), is essential for the transition from G2 phase to mitosis. Cyclin B1 is very often found to be overexpressed in primary breast and cervical cancer cells as well as in cancer cell lines. Its expression is correlated with the malignancy of gynecological cancers. In order to explore cyclin B1 as a potential target for gynecological cancer therapy, we studied the effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) on different gynecological cancer cell lines by monitoring their proliferation rate, cell cycle profile, protein expression and activity, apoptosis induction and colony formation. Tumor formation in vivo was examined using mouse xenograft models. Downregulation of cyclin B1 inhibited proliferation of several breast and cervical cancer cell lines including MCF-7, BT-474, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231 and HeLa. After combining cyclin B1 siRNA with taxol, we observed an increased apoptotic rate accompanied by an enhanced antiproliferative effect in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, control HeLa cells were progressively growing, whereas the tumor growth of HeLa cells pre-treated with cyclin B1 siRNA was strongly inhibited in nude mice, indicating that cyclin B1 is indispensable for tumor growth in vivo. Our data support the notion of cyclin B1 being essential for survival and proliferation of gynecological cancer cells. Concordantly, knockdown of cyclin B1 inhibits proliferation in vitro as well as in vivo. Moreover, targeting cyclin B1 sensitizes breast cancer cells to taxol, suggesting that specific cyclin B1 targeting is an attractive strategy for the combination with conventionally used agents in gynecological cancer therapy

  5. Regulated Necrosis in HeLa Cells Induced by ZnPc Photodynamic Treatment: A New Nuclear Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Soriano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a cancer treatment modality based on the administration of a photosensitizer (PS, which accumulates preferentially in tumor cells. Subsequent irradiation of the neoplastic area triggers a cascade of photochemical reactions that leads to the formation of highly reactive oxygen species responsible for cell inactivation. Photodynamic treatments in vitro are performed with the PS, zinc-phthalocyanine (ZnPc. The PS is near the plasma membrane during uptake and internalization. Inactivation clearly occurs by a necrotic process, manifested by nuclear pyknosis, negative TUNEL and Annexin V assays and non-relocation of cytochrome c. In contrast, by increasing the incubation time, ZnPc is accumulated in the Golgi apparatus and produces cell inactivation with characteristics of apoptosis and necrosis: TUNEL positive, relocated cytochrome c and negative Annexin V assay. This type of death produces a still undescribed granulated nuclear morphology, which is different from that of necrosis or apoptosis. This morphology is inhibited by necrostatin-1, a specific inhibitor of regulated necrosis.

  6. Breast cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MatthewJNaylor

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis, resistance to therapies and disease recurrence are significant hurdles to successful treatment of breast cancer. Identifying mechanisms by which cancer spreads, survives treatment regimes and regenerates more aggressive tumours are critical to improving patient survival. Substantial evidence gathered over the last 10 years suggests that breast cancer progression and recurrence is supported by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding how CSCs form and how they contribute to the pathology of breast cancer will greatly aid the pursuit of novel therapies targeted at eliminating these cells. This review will summarise what is currently known about the origins of breast CSCs, their role in disease progression and ways in which they may be targeted therapeutically.

  7. Photothermal therapy of cancer cells using novel hollow gold nanoflowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han J

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Han,1 Jinru Li,1 Wenfeng Jia,1 Liangming Yao,2 Xiaoqin Li,1 Long Jiang,1 Yong Tian21Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, 2Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: This article presents a new strategy for fabricating large gold nanoflowers (AuNFs that exhibit high biological safety under visible light and very strong photothermal cytotoxicity to HeLa cells under irradiation with near-infrared (NIR light. This particular type of AuNF was constructed using vesicles produced from a multiamine head surfactant as a template followed by depositing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and growing their crystallites on the surface of vesicles. The localized surface plasmon-resonance spectrum of this type of AuNF can be easily modulated to the NIR region by controlling the size of the AuNFs. When the size of the AuNFs increased, biosafety under visible light improved and cytotoxicity increased under NIR irradiation. Experiments in vitro with HeLa cells and in vivo with small mice have been carried out, with promising results. The mechanism for this phenomenon is based on the hypothesis that it is difficult for larger AuNFs to enter the cell without NIR irradiation, but they enter the cell easily at the higher temperatures caused by NIR irradiation. We believe that these effects will exist in other types of noble metallic NPs and cancer cells. In addition, the affinity between AuNPs and functional biomolecules, such as aptamers and biomarkers, will make this type of AuNF a good recognition device in cancer diagnosis and therapy.Keywords: HeLa cells, endocytosis, cytotoxicity, AuNFs, NIR, cancer therapy

  8. Effect of dihydroartemisinin on the cell cycle progress of irradiated human cervical cancer cell line and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the changes of cell cycle on cancer cells after dihydroartemisinin and X-ray irradiation. Methods: Human HeLa cells of cervical cancer with p53 mutation was used and human SiHa cells of cervical cancer with wild p53 was used as control. Flow cytometry was used to detect the effect of dihydroartemisinin (20 and 100 μmol/L) and irradiation (6 Gy)on cell cycle. Western blot was used to measure the levels of cell cycle protein. Results: G2 arrest was observed in irradiated HeLa cells, which the proportion of cells in G2 phase was increased from 14.45% to 73.58% after 6 Gy X-ray irradiation, but it was abrogated by dihydroartemisinin from 73. 58% to 48.31% in HeLa cells, and it had no change on the SiHa cells. The elevated Wee1 protein and the lowered Cyclin B1 protein were observed with the G2 arrest severity. The expression of radiation-induced Wee1 protein was suppressed and the Cyclin B1 protein was increased after dihydroartemisinin treatment, which was in accordance with the abrogation of radiation-induced G2 delay. Conclusions: The main effect of irradiation on cell cycle of p53 mutated HeLa cells is G2 arrest. Dihydroartemisinin could abrogate it, which is associated with the changes of Wee1 protein and Cyclin B1 protein. In Siha cells, the main effect of irradiation on cell cycle is G1 arrest, and dihydroartemisinin has no effect on it. (authors)

  9. Studies of the UVC-sensitivity of non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic human cell hybrids (HeLa x skin fibroblasts)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UVC-sensitivities of a non-tumorigenic and a tumorigenic human cell hybrid (HeLa x skin fibroblasts) are compared and contrasted. The tumorigenic cells differ from the non-tumorigenic cells in that they have lost one copy each of chromosomes 11 and 14. For exponentially growing cultures, the tumorigenic cells are considerably more resistant than the non-tumorigenic cells. For confluent cultures, the differential in photosensitivity is much less. Flow cytometric studies of cell cycle distributions of both exponentially growing and confluent cultures of these cells indicate that the differences in photosensitivity cannot be explained by differences in cell cycle distribution. Studies of the kinetics of potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) in confluent cultures of both cell lines indicate little or no recovery over the first 6h followed by an increase in survival over the next 12-24h. These data are consistent with previously published observations in human skin fibroblasts where the kinetics of PLDR reflected the kinetics of thymine dimer loss. The data are not consistent with 6-4 photoproducts being a potentially lethal lesion since such damage is rapidly repaired in human cells. (author)

  10. Expression analysis of SOX14 during retinoic acid induced neural differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells and assessment of the effect of its ectopic expression on SOXB members in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Jelena; Stanisavljevic, Danijela; Schwirtlich, Marija; Klajn, Andrijana; Marjanovic, Jelena; Stevanovic, Milena

    2014-01-01

    SOX14 is a member of the SOXB2 subgroup of transcription factors implicated in neural development. Although the first SOX14 gene in vertebrates was cloned and characterized more than a decade ago and its expression profile during development was revealed in various animal model systems, the role of this gene during neural development is largely unknown. In the present study we analyzed the expression of SOX14 in human NT2/D1 and mouse P19 pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. We demonstrated that it is expressed in both cell lines and upregulated during retinoic acid induced neural differentiation. We showed that SOX14 was expressed in both neuronal and non-neuronal differentiated derivatives, as revealed by immunocytochemistry. Since it was previously proposed that increased SOXB2 proteins level interfere with the activity of SOXB1 counteracting partners, we compared expression patterns of SOXB members during retinoic acid induction of embryonal carcinoma cells. We revealed that upregulation of SOX14 expression is accompanied by alterations in the expression patterns of SOXB1 members. In order to analyze the potential cross-talk between them, we generated SOX14 expression construct. The ectopic expression of SOX14 was demonstrated at the mRNA level in NT2/D1, P19 and HeLa cells, while an increased level of SOX14 protein was detected in HeLa cells only. By transient transfection experiments in HeLa cells we showed for the first time that ectopic expression of SOX14 repressed SOX1 expression, whereas no significant effect on SOX2, SOX3 and SOX21 was observed. Data presented here provide an insight into SOX14 expression during in vitro neural differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells and demonstrate the effect of its ectopic expression on protein levels of SOXB members in HeLa cells. Obtained results contribute to better understanding the role of one of the most conserved SOX proteins. PMID:24637840

  11. Silencing Bcl-2 Expression in Epithelial Cancer Cells Using “Smart” Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ling Lin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Short interfering RNA (siRNA targeted against anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein proved to knockdown its expression and trigger cancer cell death. We used degradable, pH-sensitive, comb-like [P(EAA-co-BMA-b-PNASI-g-P(HMA-co-TMAEMA] polymer to condense anti-Bcl-2 siRNA into “smart” particles, which proved to shuttle their cargo past the endosomal membrane and into the cytoplasm of HeLa and UM-SCC-17B cancer cells. HeLa and UM-SCC-17B cancer cells were treated with anti-Bcl-2 particles followed by quantifying Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels using qRT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. “Smart” anti-Bcl-2 particles selectively suppress Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels in HeLa cells by 50%–60% and 79%–81%, respectively. Similarly, “smart” anti-Bcl-2 particles inhibited Bcl-2 mRNA levels by 30%, 40%, and 20% upon incubation with UM-SCC-17B cancer cells for 48, 72, and 96 h, respectively. Bcl-2 protein expression in UM-SCC-17B cancer cells was inhibited by 30% after treatment for 72 h. Results show that pH-sensitive comb-like polymer complex anti-Bcl-2 siRNA forming “smart” nanoparticles that deliver their cargo into the cytoplasm of HeLa and UM-SCC-17B cancer cells causing Bcl-2 knockdown at the mRNA and protein levels.

  12. Silencing Bcl-2 Expression in Epithelial Cancer Cells Using “Smart” Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Ling; Jiang, Guohua; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Nör, Jacques E.; ElSayed, Mohamed E. H.

    2014-01-01

    Short interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted against anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein proved to knockdown its expression and trigger cancer cell death. We used degradable, pH-sensitive, comb-like [P(EAA-co-BMA)-b-PNASI-g-P(HMA-co-TMAEMA)] polymer to condense anti-Bcl-2 siRNA into “smart” particles, which proved to shuttle their cargo past the endosomal membrane and into the cytoplasm of HeLa and UM-SCC-17B cancer cells. HeLa and UM-SCC-17B cancer cells were treated with anti-Bcl-2 particles followed by quantifying Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels using qRT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. “Smart” anti-Bcl-2 particles selectively suppress Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels in HeLa cells by 50%–60% and 79%–81%, respectively. Similarly, “smart” anti-Bcl-2 particles inhibited Bcl-2 mRNA levels by 30%, 40%, and 20% upon incubation with UM-SCC-17B cancer cells for 48, 72, and 96 h, respectively. Bcl-2 protein expression in UM-SCC-17B cancer cells was inhibited by 30% after treatment for 72 h. Results show that pH-sensitive comb-like polymer complex anti-Bcl-2 siRNA forming “smart” nanoparticles that deliver their cargo into the cytoplasm of HeLa and UM-SCC-17B cancer cells causing Bcl-2 knockdown at the mRNA and protein levels. PMID:25229941

  13. Induction of mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in HeLa cells by bis-pyridinium oximes, a newly synthesized family of lipophilic biscations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocentini, S; Moreno, G; Petit, P X; Guggiari, M; Salet, C; Demerseman, P; Dodin, G

    1997-05-15

    When tested on HeLa cells, bis-pyridinium oximes (BPO), a family of newly synthesized molecules whose charged pyridinium moieties are linked by a linear polymethylene chain of variable length (N = 3 to 12) have been shown to possess an inhibitory effect on cell growth and finally to provoke cell death. BPO-affected cells displayed reduced mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP stores and were blocked in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Mitochondrial membrane potential, as assayed with the dye 3,3'-diexyloxacarbocyanine iodide [DiOC6(3)], increased in BPO-treated cells with time of exposure. Cell growth inhibition as well mitochondrial dysfunction were observed only with derivatives having a long polymethylene linking chain (N > or = 6). Furthermore, the concentration of the compound eliciting such effects was inversely related to the number of methylene groups in the linking chain. None of the BPO with N = 6 to 12 modified the mitochondrial DNA content, relative to the nuclear DNA content. In BPO (N = 8 and N = 12)-treated cells, chromatin fragmentation and internucleosomal DNA cleavage occurred massively, indicating that the death mode induced by these compounds is apoptosis. The possible pathway of action and the potential pharmacological interest of these compounds are discussed. PMID:9260882

  14. Fingerprints in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene research has shown that factors causing cancer, or carcinogens, may leave marks typical of each particular carcinogen (fingerprints) in the genotype of the cell. Radiation, for instance, may leave such fingerprints in a cancer cell. In particular, the discovery of a gene called p53 has yielded much new information on fingerprints. It has been discovered, for example, that toxic fungus and UV-radiation each leave fingerprints in the p53 gene. Based on the detection of fingerprints, it may be possible in the future to tell a cancer patient what factor had trigged the maglinancy

  15. Prostate cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Shi-Ming; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells have long been implicated in prostate glandular formation. The prostate undergoes regression after androgen deprivation and regeneration after testosterone replacement. Regenerative studies suggest that these cells are found in the proximal ducts and basal layer of the prostate. Many characteristics of prostate cancer indicate that it originates from stem cells. For example, the putative AR− status of prostate stem cells renders them inherently insensitive to androgen blockade ther...

  16. Cancer Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zuoren; Pestell, Timothy G.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation of cells within tumors with capabilities of self-renewal, differentiation, and tumorigenicity when transplanted into an animal host. A number of cell surface markers such as CD44, CD24, and CD133 are often used to identify and enrich CSCs. A regulatory network consisting of microRNAs and Wnt/?-catenin, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways controls the CSC properties. The clinical relevance of CSCs has been strengthened by emerging evidence, demonstrating that CSCs are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation treatment and that CSCs are very likely to be the origin of cancer metastasis. CSCs are believed to be an important target for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Herein we summarize the current understanding of CSCs, with a focus on the role of miRNA and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), and discuss the clinical application of targeting CSCs for cancer treatment. PMID:22981632

  17. Dose-Survival Curves for HeLa Cell Cultures using Thermal Neutrons and the B10(n, ?) Li7 Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of 250-kVp X-ray, thermal neutron irradiation and the thermal neutron capture reaction of boron-10, B10(n, ?)Li7, on the ability of HeLa cells to proliferate have been evaluated with multiple event dose-survival curves. The dose-survival data following thermal neutron irradiation for cultures containing 10 ?g of boron-10 per ml can be expressed by a single-event curve. Dose survival data having an inflection point are expressed as a composite curve consisting of a single-event and multiple-event fraction. The dose-survival data demonstrate a decreased radiosensitivity following dose fractionation or following irradiation in a nitrogen-carbon dioxide atmosphere. (author)

  18. The HeLa Documentary Film: An Engaging Writing and Culturally Relevant Assignment on Cell Division and Ethics for Nonscience Majors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diann Jordan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Historically black institutions play a pivotal role in educating the next generation of scientists and engineers as well as promoting scientific literacy among all of its students. Students would like to have more culturally relevant assignments that reflect their life experiences as it relates to course content. We used the HeLa documentary film, "The Way of All Flesh Film," as an effective teaching tool in the first survey course of general biology to supplement our discussion on the cell cycle and ethics in scientific studies. Over 90% of our students preferred this additional teaching method compared to a traditional lecture only. Furthermore, the exercise enhanced the students' writing, research, and critical thinking skills through the ethical implications of the film.

  19. Tailoring folic acid and methotrexate-attributed quantum dots for integrated cancer cell imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Mochamad Zakki; Chang, Jia-Yaw

    2016-03-01

    Potential application of folic acid and methotrexate-attributed AgInS2-ZnS quantum dots on both detection and therapeutic of cancer cell were intensively investigated on this study. In the initial step, the bright luminescent of QDs, with % QY up to 55.3, were synthesized with one-pot two-step process resulting narrow particle distribution and successfully transferred to water phase without significant effect on optical properties. The water-soluble AgInS2-ZnS quantum dots (QDs) encapsulated with oleylamine have been successfully prepared by ultrasonication assisting. Several aspect including QDs characterization, pH stability, ionic strength, and bonding properties were investigated to reach desired condition of water-soluble AgInS2-ZnS QDs. Folic acid was further conjugated to QDs for HeLa and MCF7 cancer cell imaging to performs the targeting capability. Moreover, folic acid is efficiently internalized into cell through the receptor-mediated endocytosis even when conjugated with a wide variety of molecules. Confocal imaging characterization further informs folic acid-conjugated AgInS2-ZnS QDs could most specific targeted to the human cervical (HeLa) cells. The therapeutic feature of QDs on HeLa cancer cell was conjugated by attributing methotrexate on the QDs, instead of folic acid, and the design could improve on inhibiting the cancer cell viability as well as its fluorescent intensity.

  20. AKT–THE MAMMALIAN TARGET OF RAPAMYCIN (MTOR PATHWAY INHIBITION INCREASES CERVICAL CANCER CELL CHEMOSENSITIVITY TO ACTIVE FORM OF IRINOTECAN (SN-38

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leri Septiani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the molecular pathway of the cytotoxic effect of SN-38 in human cervical cancer cell lines. Methods: Two human cervical cancer cell lines were treated with various concentrations of irinotecan for 24–72 hours and the sensitivity was analysed using the MTT assay. Apoptosis was further observed through microscopic examinations. The protein expression was determined using Western blot analysis. Results: CaSki cells demonstrated the highest sensitivity to SN-38, whereas HeLa cells showed the lowest. In cervical cancer cells, SN-38 induced apoptosis through an intrinsic- and extrinsic-pathways. In addition, we showed that SN-38 downregulated the phosphorylation of Akt-mTOR pathways in CaSki cells, but not in HeLa cells. Interestingly, in HeLa cells, which were more suggestive of a resistant phenotype, pre-treatment with LY294002 and rapamycin inhibited activation of Akt-mTOR signaling and significantly enhanced the sensitivity of HeLa cells to SN-38. Conclusions: Irinotecan exerts its anti-neoplastic effects on cervical cancer cells by inducing apoptosis through caspase-cascade. Inhibition of Akt-mTOR, LY294002 and rapamycin, which is targeted to Akt-mTOR pathways, may sensitize irinotecan-resistant cervical cancer cells.

  1. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. VII. Evidence that caffeine enhances expression of potentially lethal radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HeLa cells irradiated with 2 Gy of 220-kV X rays suffer a 60-70% loss of colony-forming ability which is increased to 90% by postirradiation treatment with 10 mM caffeine for 6 hr. The detailed postirradiation patterns of cell death and sister-cell fusion in such cultures and in cultures in which the colony-forming ability was brought to about the same level by treatment with a larger (4 Gy) X-ray dose alone or by longer (48 hr) treatment with 10 mM caffeine alone were recorded by time-lapse cinemicrography. Because the patterns of cell death and fusion differ radically in irradiated and in caffeine-treated cultures, the response of the additional cells killed by the combined treatment can be identified as X-ray induced rather than caffeine induced. The appearance of cultures after several days of incubation confirms the similarity of the post-treatment patterns of proliferation in cultures suffering enhanced killing to those occurring in cultures treated with larger doses of X rays alone. It is concluded that x rays do not sensitize cells to caffeine, but rather that caffeine enhanced the expression of potentially lethal radiation-induced damage

  2. Crude aqueous extracts of Pluchea indica (L. Less. inhibit proliferation and migration of cancer cells through induction of p53-dependent cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Jonathan J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pluchea indica (L. Less. (Asteraceae is a perennial shrub plant with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant medicinal properties. However, the anti-cancer properties of its aqueous extracts have not been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-proliferation, anti-migration, and pro-apoptotic properties of crude aqueous extracts of P. indica leaf and root on human malignant glioma cancer cells and human cervical cancer cells, and the underlying molecular mechanism. Methods GBM8401 human glioma cells and HeLa cervical carcinoma cells were treated with various concentrations of crude aqueous extracts of P. indica leaf and root and cancer cell proliferation and viability were measured by cell growth curves, trypan blue exclusions, and the tetrazolium reduction assay. Effects of the crude aqueous extracts on focus formation, migration, and apoptosis of cancer cells were studied as well. The molecular mechanism that contributed to the anti-cancer activities of crude aqueous extracts of P. indica root was also examined using Western blotting analysis. Results Crude aqueous extracts of P. indica leaf and root suppressed proliferation, viability, and migration of GBM8401 and HeLa cells. Treatment with crude aqueous extracts of P. indica leaf and root for 48 hours resulted in a significant 75% and 70% inhibition on proliferation and viability of GBM8401 and HeLa cancer cells, respectively. Crude aqueous extracts of P. indica root inhibited focus formation and promoted apoptosis of HeLa cells. It was found that phosphorylated-p53 and p21 were induced in GBM8401 and HeLa cells treated with crude aqueous extracts of P. indica root. Expression of phosphorylated-AKT was decreased in HeLa cells treated with crude aqueous extracts of P. indica root. Conclusion The in vitro anti-cancer effects of crude aqueous extracts of P. indica leaf and root indicate that it has sufficient potential to warrant further examination and development as a new anti-cancer agent.

  3. Stem Cells and Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem cell research has thrived over the last years due to their therapeutic and regenerative potential. Scientific breakthroughs in the field are immediately translated from the scientific journals to the mass media, which is not surprising as the characterisation of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the biology of stem cells is crucial for the treatment of degenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer. In the Molecular Oncology Unit at Ciemat we work to unravel the role of cancer stem cells in tumour development, and to find new antitumor therapies. (Author)

  4. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongtao [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Gao, Peng [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Zheng, Jie, E-mail: jiezheng54@126.com [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  5. Detection of Auger enhancement induced in HeLa cells labeled with iododeoxyuridine and irradiated with 150 kV X-rays. Effects of cysteamine and dimethylsulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the effects of cysteamine and dimethylsulfoxide on the lethality of iododeoxyuridine-labeled HeLa cells irradiated with 150 kV X-rays (effective energy was 48 keV) and compared with those irradiated with 60Co γ-rays. The protectable fraction was estimated form the regression lines for the reciprocal plots of the concentration of protectors, versus the degree of protection. The protectable fraction by cysteamine was 9.4% lower in iododeoxyuridine-labeled cells than in control cells when they were irradiated with X-rays, whereas no such difference was observed with dimethylsulfoxide. The slopes of the regression lines were steeper (i.e., more difficult to protect) for both protectors in iododeoxyuridine-labeled cells irradiated with X-rays. No such differences were observed in γ-irradiated cells. The cause for these differences are attributable to Auger enhancement. The results suggest that at least a portion of Auger enhancement is not protectable by cysteamine and is hard to be protected by both protectors cysteamine and dimethylsulfoxide. (orig.)

  6. Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aurelio Lorico; Eric Deutsch; Bo Lu; Shih-Hwa Chiou

    2011-01-01

    Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation of cells within tumors with capabilities of self-renewal, differentiation, and tumorigenicity when transplanted into an animal host. A number of cell surface markers such as CD44, CD24, and CD133 are often used to identify and enrich CSCs. A regulatory network consisting of microRNAs and Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways controls the CSC properties. The clinical relevance of CSCs has been strengthened by emerging evidence,...

  7. Mapping and identification of HeLa cell proteins separated by immobilized pH-gradient two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and construction of a two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, AC; Rossel Larsen, M; Roepstorff, P; Holm, A; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend

    1999-01-01

    improvements of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with immobilized pH gradients (IPG) compared to isoelectric focusing with carrier ampholytes, a highly reproducible method for examining global changes in HeLa cell protein expression due to different stimuli is now available. Therefore, we have initiated the...

  8. Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Khalek, Feras J. Abdul; Gallicano, G. Ian; Mishra, Lopa

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. Aggressive research in the last decade has led to a wealth of information about this disease; for example, we now know that more than 80% of sporadic colon tumors contain mutations in the Wnt and TGF? signaling pathways. The latest avenue of research is revealing the existence of and role for the cancer stem cell (CSC) model, which promotes the idea that malignancies originate from a small fraction ...

  9. The infiltration and functional regulation of eosinophils induced by TSLP promote the proliferation of cervical cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Liu, Li-Bing; Shang, Wen-Qing; Chang, Kai-Kai; Meng, Yu-Han; Mei, Jie; Yu, Jia-Jun; Li, Da-Jin; Li, Ming-Qing

    2015-08-10

    Cervical cancer is often associated with eosinophil (EOS) infiltration, but the source and the role of EOS are still largely unknown. Our previous work has established that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) can stimulate the growth of cervical cancer cell in an autocrine manner. Here, we report that EOS infiltration of the lesion site increased gradually with the progression of cervical cancer. The increase in TSLP secretion in HeLa and SiHa cells induced by hypoxia led to a high level of chemokine CCL17 production by HeLa and SiHa cells, and recruited more EOS to the cancer lesion. In addition, TSLP derived from HeLa and SiHa cells promoted proliferation, up-regulated the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13), and decreased the expression of CD80 and CD86 of EOS. Such educated EOS significantly promoted proliferation and restricted the apoptosis of cervical cancer cells, which was associated with the up-regulation of Ki-67, PCNA and Bcl-2, and the down-regulation of Fas and FasL in HeLa and SiHa cells. These results suggest that a high level of TSLP in cancer lesions mediated by hypoxia is an important regulator of the progression of cervical cancer by recruiting and licensing tumor-associated EOS to promote the growth of the cervical cancer cell itself. This provides a scientific basis on which potential therapeutic strategies could be targeted to cervical cancer, especially for patients with massive infiltrations of EOS. PMID:25979231

  10. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. III. enhancement of x-ray-induced killing during G2 arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of caffeine to enhance the expression of potentially lethal x-ray damage in HeLa S3 cells was examined as a function of the age of the cells in the generation cycle. Synchronous populations were irradiated at different times after mitotic collection and treated for various intervals with 1 mM caffeiene, which causes negligible killing of unirradiated cells. The response was thereby determined as a function of cell age at both the time of irradiation and the time of exposure to caffeine. The amount of cell killing depends strongly on when in the cycle caffeine is present and only weakly on when the cells are irradiated. If cells are irradiated in early G1, caffeine treatment enhances killing for 2 to 3 hr. No additional enhancement is observed until 16 to 17 hr postcollection, corresponding to G2; here they enter a second period of much greater sensitivity. Similarly, fluorodeoxyuridine resynchronized cells irradiated during S and treated with caffeine suffer no enhanced killing until they pass into this sensitive phase in G2, approximately 7 hr after release from the fluorodeoxyuridine block. The sensitive period appears to coincide with G2 arrest. The rate and extent of killing during this period are dependent upon the x-ray dose and the caffeine concentration. In the absence of caffeine, cells irradiated in G1 lose sensitivity to caffeine in about 9 hr; they do so faster in G2. It is concluded that the potentially lethal x-ray damage expressed on treatment with caffeine is retained for many hours in the presence of caffeine and is maximally manifested by G2-arrested cells

  11. Cytotoxic effects of essential oils from three Lippia gracilis Schauer genotypes on HeLa, B16, and MCF-7 cells and normal human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, J O; Fachin, A L; Rizo, W F; Jesus, H C R; Arrigoni-Blank, M F; Alves, P B; Marins, M A; França, S C; Blank, A F

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the chemical composition of the essential oils from three genotypes of Lippia gracilis Schauer (Verbenaceae) and investigate the cytotoxic activities of these oils. Essential oils were extracted from the leaves using a Clevenger-type apparatus, and chemical analysis was performed using a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector. 3T3, MRC5, B16, HeLa, and MCF-7 cell lines were used to study the in vitro cytotoxicity of the essential oils, and the level of cell death was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test with three replicates. The cytotoxic activity was expressed as the concentration that inhibited 50% of cell growth. The main compound in the essential oil of LGRA-106 was thymol (40.52%), while LGRA-109 and LGRA-201 contained 45.84 and 32.60% carvacrol, respectively, as their major compound. The essential oils of L. gracilis showed cytotoxic activity against both normal and tumor cells at concentrations below 100 μg/mL; this demonstrated the antitumor potential of these essential oils, which should be further investigated. PMID:24782082

  12. Studies on sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction by γ-irradiation and protective effect of L-cysteine in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of different doses of γ-irradiation on SCE induction in unifiliarly 5-bromo 2-deoxyuridine substituted DNA was studied in various phases of cell cycle. Changes in γ-irradiation induced SCE frequency was measured by post-irradiation treatment with antimutagen L-cysteine. Perturbation in cellular proliferation kinetics due to γ-irradiation and γ-irradiation plus L-cysteine was also studied. It was observed that γ-irradiation is an efficient inducer of SCE and is most effective in S phase. L-cysteine also causes SCE induction which is slightly higher than the spontaneous level of SCEs found in HeLa cells. However, post-irradiation addition of L-cysteine reduces SCE frequency in γ-irradiated cultures and this reduction is maximum in G1 phase irradiated cells. γ-irradiation delayed the mitosis considerably and this delay continued to increase with increasing doses. L-cysteine reduced the delay in cell cycle caused by γ-irradiation. (orig.)

  13. Low white blood cell count and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutropenia and cancer; Absolute neutrophil count and cancer; ANC and cancer ... A person with cancer can get a low white blood cell count from the cancer or from treatment for the cancer. Cancer may ...

  14. Evaluation of the Anti-proliferative Effects of Ophiocoma erinaceus Methanol Extract Against Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Baharara, Javad; Amini, Elaheh; Namvar, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Marine organisms provide appreciable source of novel bioactive compounds with pharmacological potential. There is little information in correlation with anti-cancer activities of brittle star. In the present study, anti-neoplastic efficacy of Ophiocoma erinaceus methanol extract against human cervical cancer cells was investigated. Methods: The HeLa cells were cultured and exposed to brittle star methanol extract for 24 and 48 hr. The anti-proliferative properties were examined by...

  15. Non-biased enrichment does not improve quantitative proteomic delineation of reovirus T3D-infected HeLa cell protein alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KevinM.Coombs

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry-based methods have allowed elucidation of alterations in complex proteomes, such as eukaryotic cells. Such studies have identified and measured relative abundances of thousands of host proteins after cells are infected with a virus. One of the potential limitations in such studies is that generally only the most abundant proteins are identified, leaving the deep richness of the cellular proteome largely unexplored. We differentially labeled HeLa cells with light and heavy stable isotopic forms of lysine and arginine (SILAC and infected cells with reovirus strain T3D. Cells were harvested at 24 hours post-infection. Heavy-labeled infected and light-labeled mock-infected cells were mixed together 1:1. Cells were then divided into cytosol and nuclear fractions and each fraction analyzed, both by standard 2D-HPLC/MS, and also after each fraction had been reacted with a random hexapeptide library (Proteominer® beads to attempt to enrich for low-abundance cellular proteins. A total of 2736 proteins were identified by 2 or more peptides at >99% confidence, of which 66 were significantly up-regulated and 67 were significantly down-regulated. Up-regulated proteins included those involved in antimicrobial and antiviral responses, GTPase activity, nucleotide binding, interferon signaling, and enzymes associated with energy generation. Down-regulated proteins included those involved in cell and biological adhesion, regulation of cell proliferation, structural molecule activity, and numerous molecular binding activities. Comparisons of the r2 correlations, degree of dataset overlap, and numbers of peptides detected suggest that non-biased enrichment approaches may not provide additional data to allow deeper quantitative and comparative mining of complex proteomes.

  16. Expression and transcriptional profiling of the LKB1 tumor suppressor in cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Chen, Hanxiang; Wang, Xiao; Zhao, Weiming; Chen, Jason J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the biological activities of LKB1, examine LKB1 protein expression and identify LKB1-regulated genes that may serve as therapeutic targets in cervical cancer. Methods Proliferation of cervical cancer HeLa cells expressing LKB1 was examined. LKB1 expression in normal cervical tissues and cervical cancers was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Gene expression profiles of cervical cancer HeLa cells stably expressing LKB1 were analyzed by microarray. Differentially expressed genes were analyzed using Gene Ontology (GO) terms and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) PATHWAY database. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to validate the microarray data. The expression of lipid phosphatase inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) was confirmed by western blotting. Results Expression of LKB1 inhibited HeLa cell proliferation and activated AMPK and was lost in more than 50% of cervical carcinomas. More than 200 genes were differentially expressed between HeLa cells with and without LKB1. Bioinformatics analysis with GO annotation indicated that LKB1 plays a role in receiving diverse stimuli and converting them into molecular signals. KEGG PATHWAY analysis showed that 8 pathways were significantly regulated. These include arginine and proline metabolism and inositol phosphate metabolism. The differential expression of 7 randomly selected genes was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, the steady-state level of INPP4B protein was up-regulated in LKB1-overexpressing cells. Conclusions This study establishes LKB1 as an important tumor suppressor in cervical cancer and sheds light on a novel signaling pathway regulated by LKB1. PMID:24792998

  17. Cytotoxicologic Studies of the Extracts of Iranian Juniperus Sabina and Platycladus Orientalis on Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Jafarian-Dehkordi

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isolation and identification of some potent anti-tumor compounds from medicinal plants, has motivated researchers to screen different parts of plant species for anti-tumor effects. It has been reported that several conifers posses cytotoxic activities on some human tumor cell lines. Methods: In this study male and female branchlets or fruits of two different species of Iranian conifers were collected from the northern parts of Iran and identified. Hydroalcoholic extracts of them were prepared by perculation. The cytotoxic effects of the extracts on three human tumor cell lines (Hela, KB, and MDA-MB-468 were determined. Different concentrations of extracts were added to cultured cells and incubated for 72 h. Cell survival was evaluated using MTT-based cytotoxicity assay. Cytotoxicity was considered when mor than 50% decrese was seen in cell survival. Results: Although the extracts from Platycladus orientalis significantly decreased Hela and MDA-MB-468 cell curvival, their effects were not considerable. Extracts from fruit and branchlets of male and female Juniperus sabina showed cytotoxic activities against Hela and MDA-MB-468 cells. Conclusion: It is concluded that extracts of J. sabin have cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. Keywords: Juniperus sabina, Platycladus orientalis, Cytotoxicity, MTT assay, Cancer cells.

  18. Rhenium tetrazolato complexes coordinated to thioalkyl-functionalised phenanthroline ligands: synthesis, photophysical characterisation, and incubation in live HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werrett, Melissa V; Wright, Phillip J; Simpson, Peter V; Raiteri, Paolo; Skelton, Brian W; Stagni, Stefano; Buckley, Alysia G; Rigby, Paul J; Massi, Massimiliano

    2015-12-21

    Three new complexes of formulation fac-[Re(CO)3(diim)L], where diim is either 1,10-phenanthroline or 1,10-phenanthroline functionalised at position 5 by a thioalkyl chain, and L is either a chloro or aryltetrazolato ancillary ligand, were synthesised and photophysically characterised. The complexes exhibit phosphorescent emission with maxima around 600 nm, originating from triplet metal-to-ligand charge transfer states with partially mixed ligand-to-ligand charge transfer character. The emission is relatively long-lived, within the 200-400 ns range, and with quantum yields of 2-4%. The complexes were trialed as cellular markers in live HeLa cells, along with two previously reported rhenium tetrazolato complexes bound to unsubstituted 1,10-phenanthroline. All five complexes exhibit good cellular uptake and non-specific perinuclear localisation. Upon excitation at 405 nm, the emission from the rhenium complexes could be clearly distinguished from autofluorescence, as demonstrated by spectral detection within the live cells. Four of the complexes did not appear to be toxic, however prolonged excitation could result in membrane blebbing. No major sign of photobleaching was detected upon multiple imaging on the same cell sample. PMID:26563409

  19. Radiosensitization of hypoxic HeLa S3 cells in vitro by a new type of radiosensitizer: spermine and spermidine amides with nitro groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, C.; Mori, T. (Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine); Nagao, Y.; Fujita, E. (Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. for Chemical Research); Asao, T.; Yasumoto, M. (Taiho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Tokushima (Japan))

    1983-11-01

    A new type of hypoxic cell sensitizer (FNT-series compounds) has been developed and tested on HeLa S3 cells. They have two nitrobenzoyl groups at both ends of the spermine or spermidine in their chemical structures. Their ability to sensitize hypoxic cells is greater than that of misonidazole. Among them, N/sup 1/,N/sup 10/-bis(4-nitrobenzoyl)-spermidine (FNT-1) was most effective. 1 mM FNT-1 gave a corrected enhancement ratio of 1.71 compared to 1.32 for the same concentration of misonidazole. Its electron affinity, in terms of the half-wave reduction potential, was -350 mV and higher than that of misonidazole (-395 mV). These FNT-series compounds are thought to interact with DNA in two ways; noncovalent linkage between the basic groups of the polyamine and highly acidic phosphate moieties of the nucleic acid and, secondly, the insertion of the nitrobenzoyl groups between base pairs of the DNA double helix. Since spermine and spermidine themselves did not show any sensitizing activities, it is suggested that the nitrobenzoyl groups which are introduced in spermine and spermidine, play an important role in sensitization.

  20. Radiosensitization of hypoxic HeLa S3 cells in vitro by a new type of radiosensitizer: spermine and spermidine amides with nitro groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of hypoxic cell sensitizer (FNT-series compounds) has been developed and tested on HeLa S3 cells. They have two nitrobenzoyl groups at both ends of the spermine or spermidine in their chemical structures. Their ability to sensitize hypoxic cells is greater than that of misonidazole. Among them, N1,N10-bis(4-nitrobenzoyl)-spermidine (FNT-1) was most effective. 1 mM FNT-1 gave a corrected enhancement ratio of 1.71 compared to 1.32 for the same concentration of misonidazole. Its electron affinity, in terms of the half-wave reduction potential, was -350 mV and higher than that of misonidazole (-395 mV). These FNT-series compounds are thought to interact with DNA in two ways; noncovalent linkage between the basic groups of the polyamine and highly acidic phosphate moieties of the nucleic acid and, secondly, the insertion of the nitrobenzoyl groups between base pairs of the DNA double helix. Since spermine and spermidine themselves did not show any sensitizing activities, it is suggested that the nitrobenzoyl groups which are introduced in spermine and spermidine, play an important role in sensitization. (author)

  1. Inhibition of proliferation of cervical and leukemic cancer cells by penicillin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aditya; Dahiya, Meetu; Anand, M T; Kumar, Sudhir

    2013-01-01

    Cancer, despite all the efforts, still causes one in five deaths worldwide. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy provide inadequate protection and instead affect normal cells along with cancer cells. The search for cancer cures from natural products (plants and animals) has been practice for over a decade and the use of purified chemical to treat cancer still continues. Several studies have been undertaken during last three decades to find the anti-cancerous property of various plant extract and toxins secreted by animals and micro-organism. These lead to the discovery of several promising molecule having anticancer activity, some of which are in clinical trial and may emerged to be a potential future drug in cancer therapy. In this study we have used penicillin to evaluate its anti-cancer activity. It shown significant effects at cellular and molecular levels against growth of HeLa and K562 cell lines. PMID:23679330

  2. The effect of lance geometry and carbon coating of silicon lances on propidium iodide uptake in lance array nanoinjection of HeLa 229 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, John W.; Lindstrom, Dallin L.; Hanks, Brad W.; Hope, Sandra; Jensen, Brian D.

    2016-04-01

    Connecting technology to biologic discovery is a core focus of non-viral gene therapy biotechnologies. One approach that leverages both the physical and electrical function of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in cellular engineering is a technology previously described as lance array nanoinjection (LAN). In brief, LAN consists of a silicon chip measuring 2 cm by 2 cm that has been etched to contain an array of 10 μm tall, solid lances that are spaced every 10 μm in a grid pattern. This array of lances is used to physically penetrate hundreds of thousands of cells simultaneously and to then electrically deliver molecular loads into cells. In this present work, two variables related to the microfabrication of the silicon lances, namely lance geometry and coating, are investigated. The purpose of both experimental variables is to assess these parameters’ effect on propidium iodide (PI), a cell membrane impermeable dye, uptake to injected HeLa 229 cells. For the lance geometry experimentation, three different microfabricated lance geometries were used which include a flat/narrow (FN, 1 μm diameter), flat/wide (FW, 2-2.5 μm diameter), and pointed (P, 1 μm diameter) lance geometries. From these tests, it was shown that the FN lances had a slightly better cell viability rate of 91.73% and that the P lances had the best PI uptake rate of 75.08%. For the lance coating experimentation, two different lances were fabricated, both silicon etched lances with some being carbon coated (CC) in a  cell viability and PI uptake rates. One exception to this is the comparison of CC/5V Pul and Si/5V Pul samples, where the CC/5V Pul samples had a cell viability rate 5% higher. Both outcomes were unexpected and reveal how to better optimize LAN parameters for future transfection experimentation.

  3. PEG-PHB-glutaminase nanoparticle inhibits cancer cell proliferation in vitro through glutamine deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Sureshbabu Ram Kumar; Deepak, Venkataraman; Nellaiah, Hariharan; Sundar, Krishnan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that L-glutaminase, a marine bacterial enzyme with a molecular weight of 37 kDa, inhibits cancer cell proliferation in vitro through glutamine deprivation. The concentration of the enzyme reducing the viability of HeLa cells to 50% was determined to be 12.5 ?g/mL; the function of L-glutaminase in controlling cell proliferation was further analysed by BrdU assays. To increase its stability and bioavailability, the enzyme was immobilized on polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) nanoparticles. A dented anatomy of the HeLa cells was observed under fluorescence and confocal microscopy when they were incubated with L-glutaminase and in glutamine-free medium, as also a 3-fold increase in caspase-3 activity was observed under the same conditions. Blebbed cytoplasm and shrunken nuclei were observed in treated cells under transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Finally, the influence of the enzyme on cell cycle and DNA damage was evaluated using flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation assays. The results confirmed significant damage to the DNA of HeLa cells incubated with L-glutaminase and in glutamine-free medium. These studies attest to the significant role played by L-glutaminase against proliferation in cancer cells through glutamine deprivation. PMID:25424834

  4. Metastatic renal cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    Targeted therapy is the treatment of choice in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) at most institutions although a combination of cytokine therapy and targeted therapy still is being investigated. Morphological size-based criteria (RECIST) has failed in monitoring the effect of...

  5. Traction forces of cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Peschetola, Valentina,; Laurent, Valrie; Duperray, Alain; Preziosi, Luigi; Ambrosi, Davide; Verdier, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Cell motility of cancer cells is a fundamental problem, and requires precise correlation between cell adhesive and rheological properties. The migration of cancer cells is studied in two dimensions, as cells are seeded onto functionnalized polyacrylamide gels. They migrate by developping focal adhesion sites and modulate their cytoskeleton dynamics by regulating actin and myosin. This research aims at understanding the forces developped by different cancer cells of moderate to high invasivene...

  6. Growth Suppression Induced by Downregulation of E6-AP Expression in Human Papillomavirus-Positive Cancer Cell Lines Depends on p53

    OpenAIRE

    Hengstermann, Arnd; D'silva, Michael A.; Kuballa, Petric; Butz, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix; Scheffner, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The ubiquitin-protein ligase E6-AP is utilized by the E6 oncoprotein of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) associated with cervical cancer to target the tumor suppressor p53 for degradation. Here, we report that downregulation of E6-AP expression by RNA interference results in both the accumulation of p53 and growth suppression of the HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and SiHa. In addition, HeLa cells, in which p53 expression was suppressed by RNA interference, are significantly less se...

  7. JWA is required for arsenic trioxide induced apoptosis in HeLa and MCF-7 cells via reactive oxygen species and mitochondria linked signal pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic trioxide, emerging as a standard therapy for refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia, induces apoptosis in a variety of malignant cell lines. JWA, a novel retinoic acid-inducible gene, is known to be involved in apoptosis induced by various agents, for example, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, N-4-hydroxy-phenyl-retinamide and arsenic trioxide. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying how JWA gene is functionally involved in apoptosis remain largely unknown. Herein, our studies demonstrated that treatment of arsenic trioxide produced apoptosis in HeLa and MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner and paralleled with increased JWA expression. JWA expression was dependent upon generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species induced by arsenic trioxide. Knockdown of JWA attenuated arsenic trioxide induced apoptosis, and was accompanied by significantly reduced activity of caspase-9, enhanced Bad phosphorylation and inhibited MEK1/2, ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylations. Arsenic trioxide induced loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential was JWA-dependent. These findings suggest that JWA may serve as a pro-apoptotic molecule to mediate arsenic trioxide triggered apoptosis via a reactive oxygen species and mitochondria-associated signal pathway

  8. Proteasome inhibitor lactacystin enhances cisplatin cytotoxicity by increasing endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated apoptosis in HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ye; Li, Di; ZENG, LINCHUAN; Wang, Chunyan; Zhang, Lili; Yan WANG; Yu, Yang(School of Physics & Material Science, Anhui University, Hefei, 230039, People's Republic of China); LIU, SHIBING; Li, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is commonly used as a therapeutic agent, despite its known adverse side effects and the occurrence of drug resistance. The development of novel methods for combination therapy with cisplatin is required in order to circumvent these limitations of cisplatin alone. The proteasome inhibitor lactacystin (LAC) has been indicated to produce anti-tumor effects, and has previously been used as an antitumor agent in cancer treatment research; however, its effects in combination with cisplati...

  9. Analysis of pre-rRNAs in heat-shocked HeLa cells allows identification of the upstream termination site of human polymerase I transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human rRNA precursors from normal or stressed HeLa cells were studied by S1 nuclease mapping of unlabeled RNA and by antisense RNase mapping of RNA from cells that had been labeled in vivo with [32P]PO4. Heating cells to 430C decreased the amount of newly synthesized rRNA to less than 5% of the control level and led to greater than 95% inhibition of transcription termination at a region 355 to 362 nucleotides downstream of the 3' end of 28S rRNA, with readthrough continuing into the next transcription unit. Heating of cells to 420C led to 60% inhibition of termination at this site; 50% of transcripts that extended into the nontranscribed spacer ended in a region 200 to 210 nucleotides upstream of the polymerase I (Pol I) initiation site. This is presumed to be the human upstream transcription termination site because of the absence of RNAs with a 5' end corresponding to this region, the location relative to the Pol 1 initiation site (which is similar to the location of upstream terminators in other species), and the fact that it is 15 to 25 nucleotides upstream of the sequence GGGTTGACC, which has an 8-of-9 base identify with the sequence 3' of the downstream termination site. Surprisingly, treatment of cells with sodium arsenite, which also leads to the induction of a stress response, did not inhibit termination. Pol I initiation was decreased to the same extent as termination, which lends support to the hypothesis that termination and initiation are coupled. Although termination was almost completely inhibited at 430C, the majority of the recently synthesized rRNAs were processed to have the correct 3' end of 28S. This finding suggests that 3'-end formation can involve an endonucleolytic cut and is not solely dependent on exonucleolytic trimming of correctly terminated rRNAs

  10. Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase in HeLa cells after prolonged growth in low K/sup +/ or ouabain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollack, L.R.; Tate, E.H.; Cook, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Effects of long-term, subtotal inhibition of Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport, either by growth of cells in sublethal concentrations of ouabain or in low-K/sup +/ medium, are described for HeLa cells. After prolonged growth in 2 x 10/sup -8/ M ouabain, the total number of ouabain molecules bound per cell increases by as much as a factor of three, mostly due to internalization of the drug. There is only about a 20% increase in ouabain-binding sites on the plasma membrane, representing a modest induction of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase. In contrast, after long-term growth in low K/sup +/ there can be a twofold or greater increase in ouabain binding per cell, and in this case the additional sites are located in the plasma membrane. The increase is reversible. To assess the corresponding transport changes, we have separately estimated the contributions of increased intracellular (Na/sup +/) and of transport capacity (number of transport sites) to transport regulation. During both induction and reversal, short-term regulation is achieved primarily by changes in (Na/sup +/). More slowly, long-term regulation is achieved by changes in the number of functional transporters in the plasma membrane as assessed by ouabain binding, V/sub max/ for transport, and specific phosphorylation. Parallel exposure of cryptic Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase activity with sodium dodecyl sulfate in the plasma membranes of both induced and control cells showed that the induction cannot be accounted for by an exposure of preexisting Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase in the plasma membrane. Analysis of the kinetics of reversal indicates that it may be due to a post-translational event.

  11. Singlet oxygen mediated DNA degradation by copper nanoparticles: potential towards cytotoxic effect on cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Tapas K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The DNA degradation potential and anti-cancer activities of copper nanoparticles of 4-5 nm size are reported. A dose dependent degradation of isolated DNA molecules by copper nanoparticles through generation of singlet oxygen was observed. Singlet oxygen scavengers such as sodium azide and Tris [hydroxyl methyl] amino methane were able to prevent the DNA degradation action of copper nanoparticles confirming the involvement of activated oxygen species in the degradation process. Additionally, it was observed that the copper nanoparticles are able to exert cytotoxic effect towards U937 and Hela cells of human histiocytic lymphoma and human cervical cancer origins, respectively by inducing apoptosis. The growth characteristics of U937 and Hela cells were studied applying various concentrations of the copper nanoparticles.

  12. Characterization of a novel Dp71 dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC) present in the nucleus of HeLa cells: Members of the nuclear DAPC associate with the nuclear matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dystrophin is an essential component in the assembly and maintenance of the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC), which includes members of the dystroglycan, syntrophin, sarcoglycan and dystrobrevin protein families. Distinctive complexes have been described in the cell membrane of different tissues and cultured cells. In this work, we report the identification and characterization of a novel DAPC present in the nuclei of HeLa cells, which contains dystrophin Dp71 as a key component. Using confocal microscopy and cell fractionation analyses, we found the presence of Dp71, β-sarcoglycan, β-dystroglycan, α- and β-syntrophin, α1- and β-dystrobrevin and nNOS in the nuclei of HeLa cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments that most of these proteins form a complex in the nuclear compartment. Next, we analyze the possible association of the nuclear DAPC with the nuclear matrix. We found the presence of Dp71, β-dystroglycan, nNOS, β-sarcoglycan, α/β syntrophin, α1-dystrobrevin and β-dystrobrevin in the nuclear matrix protein fractions and in situ nuclear matrix preparations from HeLa cells. Moreover, we found that Dp71, β-dystroglycan and β-dystrobrevin co-immunoprecipitated with the nuclear matrix proteins lamin B1 and actin. The association of members of the nuclear DAPC with the nuclear matrix indicates that they may work as scaffolding proteins involved in nuclear architecture

  13. Characterization of the Chlamydia trachomatis vacuole and its interaction with the host endocytic pathway in HeLa cells.

    OpenAIRE

    van Ooij, C; Apodaca, G; Engel, J

    1997-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis, an obligate intracellular parasite and a major human pathogen, invades eukaryotic host cells and replicates within a membrane-bound compartment (termed the vacuole or inclusion) in the cytoplasm of the host cell. In this report, we describe in detail the characteristics of the vacuole throughout the chlamydial life cycle in terms of the endocytic pathway, as determined by epifluorescent and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. By indirect immunofluorescence, the tran...

  14. Unusual expression of red fluorescence at M phase induced by anti-microtubule agents in HeLa cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda-Uezono, Asumi [Section of Oral Radiation Oncology, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan); Section of Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Maxillofacial and Neck Reconstruction, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan); Kaida, Atsushi [Section of Oral Radiation Oncology, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan); Michi, Yasuyuki; Harada, Kiyoshi [Section of Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Maxillofacial and Neck Reconstruction, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan); Hayashi, Yoshiki; Hayashi, Yoshio [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Miura, Masahiko, E-mail: masa.mdth@tmd.ac.jp [Section of Oral Radiation Oncology, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549 (Japan)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fucci visualizes cell cycle by green and red fluorescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plinabulin, induced unusual red fluorescence at M-phase in HeLa-Fucci cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The unusual pattern was followed by mitotic catastrophe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The unusual pattern may be an early indicator of cell death in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Plinabulin (NPI-2358) is a novel microtubule-depolymerizing agent. In HeLa cells, plinabulin arrests the cell-cycle at M phase and subsequently induces mitotic catastrophe. To better understand the effects on this compound on the cell-cycle, we used the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci), which normally enables G1 and S/G2/M cells to emit red and green fluorescence, respectively. When HeLa-Fucci cells were treated with 50 nM plinabulin, cells began to fluoresce both green and red in an unusual pattern; most cells exhibited the new pattern after 24 h of treatment. X-irradiation efficiently induced G2 arrest in plinabulin-treated cells and significantly retarded the emergence of the unusual pattern, suggesting that entering M phase is essential for induction of the pattern. By simultaneously visualizing chromosomes with GFP-histone H2B, we established that the pattern emerges after nuclear envelope breakdown but before metaphase. Pedigree assay revealed a significant relationship between the unusual expression and mitotic catastrophe. Nocodazole, KPU-133 (a more potent derivative of plinabulin), and paclitaxel also exerted similar effects. From these data, we conclude that the unusual pattern may be associated with dysregulation of late M phase-specific E3 ligase activity and mitotic catastrophe following treatment with anti-microtubule agents.

  15. Unusual expression of red fluorescence at M phase induced by anti-microtubule agents in HeLa cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Fucci visualizes cell cycle by green and red fluorescence. ► Plinabulin, induced unusual red fluorescence at M-phase in HeLa-Fucci cells. ► The unusual pattern was followed by mitotic catastrophe. ► The unusual pattern may be an early indicator of cell death in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Plinabulin (NPI-2358) is a novel microtubule-depolymerizing agent. In HeLa cells, plinabulin arrests the cell-cycle at M phase and subsequently induces mitotic catastrophe. To better understand the effects on this compound on the cell-cycle, we used the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci), which normally enables G1 and S/G2/M cells to emit red and green fluorescence, respectively. When HeLa-Fucci cells were treated with 50 nM plinabulin, cells began to fluoresce both green and red in an unusual pattern; most cells exhibited the new pattern after 24 h of treatment. X-irradiation efficiently induced G2 arrest in plinabulin-treated cells and significantly retarded the emergence of the unusual pattern, suggesting that entering M phase is essential for induction of the pattern. By simultaneously visualizing chromosomes with GFP-histone H2B, we established that the pattern emerges after nuclear envelope breakdown but before metaphase. Pedigree assay revealed a significant relationship between the unusual expression and mitotic catastrophe. Nocodazole, KPU-133 (a more potent derivative of plinabulin), and paclitaxel also exerted similar effects. From these data, we conclude that the unusual pattern may be associated with dysregulation of late M phase-specific E3 ligase activity and mitotic catastrophe following treatment with anti-microtubule agents.

  16. Detection of adenosine triphosphate in HeLa cell using capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence detection based on aptamer and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bi-Yun; Yao, Ming-Hao; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Wang, Chao-Yang; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Chen, Fang

    2016-04-01

    A method for ATP quantification based on dye-labeled aptamer/graphene oxide (aptamer/GO) using capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detecting technique has been established. In this method, the carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-labelled ATP aptamers were adsorbed onto the surface of GO, leading to the fluorescence quenching of FAM; after the incubation with a limited amount of ATP, stronger affinity between ATP aptamer and ATP resulted in the desorption of aptamers and the fluorescence restoration of FAM. Then, aptamer-ATP complex and excess of aptamer/GO and GO were separated and quantified by CE-LIF detection. It was shown that a linear relation was existing in the CE-LIF peak intensity of aptamer-ATP and ATP concentration in range of 10-700μM, the regression equation was F=1.50+0.0470C(ATP) (R(2)=0.990), and the limit of detection was 1.28μM (3S/N, n=5), which was one order magnitude lower than that of detection in solution by fluorescence method. The approach with excellent specificity and reproducibility has been successfully applied to detecting concentration of ATP in HeLa cell. PMID:26764106

  17. Localization of three human polypeptide GalNAc-transferases in HeLa cells suggests initiation of O-linked glycosylation throughout the Golgi apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röttger, S; White, J; Wandall, H H; Olivo, J C; Stark, A; Bennett, E P; Whitehouse, C; Berger, E G; Clausen, H; Nilsson, T

    O-glycosylation of proteins is initiated by a family of UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactos-aminyltransferases (GalNAc-T). In this study, we have localized endogenous and epitope-tagged human GalNAc-T1, -T2 and -T3 to the Golgi apparatus in HeLa cells by subcellular fractionation......, immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. We show that all three GalNAc-transferases are concentrated about tenfold in Golgi stacks over Golgi associated tubular-vesicular membrane structures. Surprisingly, we find that GalNAc-T1, -T2 and -T3 are present throughout the Golgi stack suggesting that initiation...... of O-glycosylation may not be restricted to the cis Golgi, but occur at multiple sites within the Golgi apparatus. GalNAc-T1 distributes evenly across the Golgi stack whereas GalNAc-T2 and -T3 reside preferentially on the trans side and in the medial part of the Golgi stack, respectively. Moreover...

  18. Production of a Novel Fucoidanase for the Green Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles by Streptomyces sp. and Its Cytotoxic Effect on HeLa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panchanathan Manivasagan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine actinobacteria-produced fucoidanases have received considerable attention as one of the major research topics in recent years, particularly for the medical exploitation of fucoidans and their degradation products. The present study describes the optimization and production of a novel fucoidanase for the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its biological applications. The production of fucoidanase was optimized using Streptomyces sp. The medium components were selected in accordance with the Plackett-Burman design and were further optimized via response surface methodology. The fucoidanase was statistically optimized with the most significant factors, namely wheat bran 3.3441 g/L, kelp powder 0.7041 g/L, and NaCl 0.8807 g/L, respectively. The biosynthesized gold nanoparticles were determined by UV-vis spectroscopy and were further characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the biosynthesized gold nanoparticles exhibited a dose-dependent cytotoxicity against HeLa cells and the inhibitory concentration (IC50 was found to be 350 µg/mL at 24 h and 250 µg/mL at 48 h. Therefore, the production of novel fucoidanase for the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles has comparatively rapid, less expensive and wide application to anticancer therapy in modern medicine.

  19. Resolution of the diadenosine 5',5'''-P1,P4-tetraphosphate binding subunit from a multiprotein form of HeLa cell DNA polymerase α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diadenosine 5',5'''-P1,P4-tetraphosphate (Ap4A) binding subunit has been resolved from a high molecular weight (640,000) multiprotein form of DNA polymerase α [deoxy-nucleoside triphosphate:DNA nucleotidyltransferase (DNA-directed), EC 2.7.7.7] from HeLa cells. The Ap4A binding activity copurifies with the DNA polymerizing activity during the course of purification. Hydrophobic chromatograpy on butylagarose resolves the Ap4A binding activity from the DNA polymerase. The Ap4A binding activity is protein in nature since the binding of Ap4A is abolished by treatment of the isolated binding activity with proteinase K but is insensitive to treatment with DNase or RNase. The molecular weight of the Ap4A binding protein, as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions or by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after photoaffinity labeling of the protein with [32P]Ap4A is 92,000 or 47,000. The binding activity of this protein is highly specific for Ap4A

  20. Fluoride-containing podophyllum derivatives exhibit antitumor activities through enhancing mitochondrial apoptosis pathway by increasing the expression of caspase-9 in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Ya-Xuan; Zhou, Chen; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Ling; Liang, Xin-Hua; Chen, Tao; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to provide sampling of halogen-containing aniline podophyllum derivatives and their mode of action with an in-depth comparison among fluorine, chloride and bromide for clarifying the important role and impact of fluorine substitution on enhancing antitumor activity, with an emphasis on the development of drug rational design for antitumor drug. The tumor cytotoxicity of fluoride-containing aniline podophyllum derivatives were in general improved by 10-100 times than those of the chloride and bromide-containing aniline podophyllum derivatives since fluoride could not only strongly solvated in protic solvents but also forms tight ion pairs in most aprotic solvents. When compared with chloride and bromide, the higher electronegativity fluoride substituted derivatives significantly enhanced mitochondrial apoptosis pathway by remarkably increasing the expression of caspase-9 in HeLa cells. The current findings would stimulate an enormous amount of research directed toward exploiting novel leading compounds based on podophyllum derivatives, especially for the fluoride-substituted structures with promising antitumor activity. PMID:26608216

  1. Doxorubicin loaded 17β-estradiol based SWNT dispersions for target specific killing of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Moumita; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of a 17β-estradiol based amphiphiles comprising of polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety linked through succinic acid that non-covalently dispersed (76%) the single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water. The superior exfoliation of carbon nanotubes was characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic studies. Significant stability of these SWNT dispersions was observed in the presence of protein in cell culture media and the nanohybrids were highly biocompatible toward mammalian cells. Anticancer drug doxorubicin loaded on these nanohybrids was selectively delivered within estrogen receptor rich cancer cells, MCF7 (breast cancer cell) and A549 (lung cancer cell). Microscopic studies showed the localization of doxorubicin within the cancer cell nucleus whereas no such localization was observed in ER negative cells. Both these ER positive cancer cells were killed by ∼3 fold higher efficiency than that of ER negative MDA-MB-231 (advanced breast cancer cell) and HeLa cells that are deprived of estrogen receptors. Thus, judiciously designed estradiol based nanohybrids proved to be excellent tool for SWNT dispersion and also for selectively killing of ER positive cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time non-covalently modified SWNTs by estradiol based amphiphilic dispersing agent have been used for selective killing of ER positive cancer cells by doxorubicin loaded on dispersed SWNTs. It holds immense promise to be exploited as a cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:26970825

  2. Automating ChIP-seq Experiments to Generate Epigenetic Profiles on 10,000 HeLa Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Berguet, Geoffrey; Hendrickx, Jan; Sabatel, Celine; Laczik, Miklos; Squazzo, Sharon; Mazon, Ignacio; Saxena, Rini; Pendeville, Helene; Poncelet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a technique of choice for studying protein-DNA interactions. ChIP-seq has been used for mapping protein-DNA interactions and allocating histones modifications. The procedure is tedious and time consuming, and one of the major limitations is the requirement for high amounts of starting material, usually millions of cells. Automation of chromatin immunoprecipitation assays is possible when the procedure is based ...

  3. Cancer-initiating cells derived from established cervical cell lines exhibit stem-cell markers and increased radioresistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lpez Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-initiating cells (CICs are proposed to be responsible for the generation of metastasis and resistance to therapy. Accumulating evidences indicates CICs are found among different human cancers and cell lines derived from them. Few studies address the characteristics of CICs in cervical cancer. We identify biological features of CICs from four of the best-know human cell lines from uterine cervix tumors. (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski, C-4 I. Methods Cells were cultured as spheres under stem-cell conditions. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CD34, CD49f and CD133 antigens and Hoechst 33342 staining to identify side population (SP. Magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied to enrich and purify populations used to evaluate tumorigenicity in nude mice. cDNA microarray analysis and in vitro radioresistance assay were carried out under standard conditions. Results CICs, enriched as spheroids, were capable to generate reproducible tumor phenotypes in nu-nu mice and serial propagation. Injection of 1 103 dissociated spheroid cells induced tumors in the majority of animals, whereas injection of 1 105 monolayer cells remained nontumorigenic. Sphere-derived CICs expressed CD49f surface marker. Gene profiling analysis of HeLa and SiHa spheroid cells showed up-regulation of CICs markers characteristic of the female reproductive system. Importantly, epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT transition-associated markers were found highly expressed in spheroid cells. More importantly, gene expression analysis indicated that genes required for radioresistance were also up-regulated, including components of the double-strand break (DSB DNA repair machinery and the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Dose-dependent radiation assay indicated indeed that CICs-enriched populations exhibit an increased resistance to ionizing radiation (IR. Conclusions We characterized a self-renewing subpopulation of CICs found among four well known human cancer-derived cell lines (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski and C-4 I and found that they express characteristic markers of stem cell, EMT and radioresistance. The fact that CICs demonstrated a higher degree of resistance to radiation than differentiated cells suggests that specific detection and targeting of CICs could be highly valuable for the therapy of tumors from the uterine cervix.

  4. Cancer-initiating cells derived from established cervical cell lines exhibit stem-cell markers and increased radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are proposed to be responsible for the generation of metastasis and resistance to therapy. Accumulating evidences indicates CICs are found among different human cancers and cell lines derived from them. Few studies address the characteristics of CICs in cervical cancer. We identify biological features of CICs from four of the best-know human cell lines from uterine cervix tumors. (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski, C-4 I). Cells were cultured as spheres under stem-cell conditions. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CD34, CD49f and CD133 antigens and Hoechst 33342 staining to identify side population (SP). Magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied to enrich and purify populations used to evaluate tumorigenicity in nude mice. cDNA microarray analysis and in vitro radioresistance assay were carried out under standard conditions. CICs, enriched as spheroids, were capable to generate reproducible tumor phenotypes in nu-nu mice and serial propagation. Injection of 1 × 103 dissociated spheroid cells induced tumors in the majority of animals, whereas injection of 1 × 105 monolayer cells remained nontumorigenic. Sphere-derived CICs expressed CD49f surface marker. Gene profiling analysis of HeLa and SiHa spheroid cells showed up-regulation of CICs markers characteristic of the female reproductive system. Importantly, epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) transition-associated markers were found highly expressed in spheroid cells. More importantly, gene expression analysis indicated that genes required for radioresistance were also up-regulated, including components of the double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair machinery and the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Dose-dependent radiation assay indicated indeed that CICs-enriched populations exhibit an increased resistance to ionizing radiation (IR). We characterized a self-renewing subpopulation of CICs found among four well known human cancer-derived cell lines (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski and C-4 I) and found that they express characteristic markers of stem cell, EMT and radioresistance. The fact that CICs demonstrated a higher degree of resistance to radiation than differentiated cells suggests that specific detection and targeting of CICs could be highly valuable for the therapy of tumors from the uterine cervix

  5. Coordinate turnover of nuclear and cytoplasmic histone messenger RNA following inhibition of DNA replication of HeLa S3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have examined the metabolism of human H4 histone mRNA in the nucleus and cytoplasm of HeLa S3 cells following inhibition of DNA synthesis to address the extent to which histone mRNA stability in these cellular compartments is coupled to DNA replication. The nuclear and cytoplasmic levels of histone mRNAs encoded by the pF0108A human H4 histone gene were determined by S1 nuclease analysis using a 32P-labeled probe that could distinguish pF0108A transcripts from those of other members of the H4 histone multigene family. Hydroxyurea treatment resulted within 15 min in a 75% reduction in the level of histone H4 mRNA in the nucleus, which corresponds to the 85% decrease observed for H4 histone mRNA in the cytoplasm. The kinetics of nuclear and cytoplasmic H4 mRNA turnover following hydroxyurea treatment were also similar. Northern blot analysis using a 32P-labeled mitochondrial cytochrome b probe indicated that the association of cytoplasmic RNA with the nuclear fraction was less than 0.5%. Treatment of cells with a protein synthesis inhibitor resulted in a 1.3-fold increase in nuclear H4 histone mRNA levels and a 1.5-fold increase of H4 mRNA in the cytoplasm after 45 min. Together, these results indicate that nuclear and cytoplasmic H4 histone mRNAs respond similarly to metabolic perturbations that influence message stability and that mechanisms operative in the turnover of histone mRNAs in the nucleus and cytoplasm may be similar

  6. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Research shows that smoking marijuana may help cancer cells grow. But there is no direct link between ...

  7. Taxol produced from endophytic fungi induces apoptosis in human breast, cervical and ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Chao; Sun, Yu-Ting; Sun, Chuan-Zhen; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Xiao-Hua; Zhao, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Currently, taxol is mainly extracted from the bark of yews; however, this method can not meet its increasing demand on the market because yews grow very slowly and are a rare and endangered species belonging to first- level conservation plants. Recently, increasing efforts have been made to develop alternative means of taxol production; microbe fermentation would be a very promising method to increase the production scale of taxol. To determine the activities of the taxol extracted from endophytic fungus N. sylviforme HDFS4-26 in inhibiting the growth and causing the apoptosis of cancer cells, on comparison with the taxol extracted from the bark of yew, we used cellular morphology, cell counting kit (CCK-8) assay, staining (HO33258/PI and Giemsa), DNA agarose gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry (FCM) analyses to determine the apoptosis status of breast cancer MCF-7 cells, cervical cancer HeLa cells and ovarian cancer HO8910 cells. Our results showed that the fungal taxol inhibited the growth of MCF-7, HeLa and HO8910 cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner. IC50 values of fungal taxol for HeLa, MCF-7 and HO8910 cells were 0.1-1.0 ?g/ml, 0.001-0.01 ?g/ml and 0.01- 0.1 ?g/ml, respectively. The fungal taxol induced these tumor cells to undergo apoptosis with typical apoptotic characteristics, including morphological changes for chromatin condensation, chromatin crescent formation, nucleus fragmentation, apoptotic body formation and G2/M cell cycle arrest. The fungal taxol at the 0.01-1.0 ?g/ ml had significant effects of inducing apoptosis between 24-48 h, which was the same as that of taxol extracted from yews. This study offers important information and a new resource for the production of an important anticancer drug by endofungus fermentation. PMID:25640339

  8. Nanoscopic exclusion between Rad51 and 53BP1 after ion irradiation in human HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindl, Judith; Drexler, Guido A.; Girst, Stefanie; Greubel, Christoph; Siebenwirth, Christian; Drexler, Sophie E.; Dollinger, Gnther; Friedl, Anna A.

    2015-12-01

    Many proteins involved in detection, signalling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) accumulate in large number in the vicinity of DSB sites, forming so called foci. Emerging evidence suggests that these foci are sub-divided in structural or functional domains. We use stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy to investigate localization of mediator protein 53BP1 and recombination factor Rad51 after irradiation of cells with low linear energy transfer (LET) protons or high LET carbon ions. With a resolution better than 100 nm, STED microscopy and image analysis using a newly developed analyzing algorithm, the reduced product of the differences from the mean, allowed us to demonstrate that with both irradiation types Rad51 occupies spherical regions of about 200 nm diameter. These foci locate within larger 53BP1 accumulations in regions of local 53BP1 depletion, similar to what has been described for the localization of Brca1, CtIP and RPA. Furthermore, localization relative to 53BP1 and size of Rad51 foci was not different after irradiation with low and high LET radiation. As expected, 53BP1 foci induced by low LET irradiation mostly contained one Rad51 focal structure, while after high LET irradiation, most foci contained >1 Rad51 accumulation.

  9. Immunotargeting of cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza P.; Gąbka-Buszek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Jakub; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a distinctive population of tumour cells that control tumour initiation, progression, and maintenance. Their influence is great enough to risk the statement that successful therapeutic strategy must target CSCs in order to eradicate the disease. Because cancer stem cells are highly resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, new tools to fight against cancer have to be developed. Expression of antigens such as ALDH, CD44, EpCAM, or CD133, which distinguish CSCs fr...

  10. NEU3 inhibitory effect of naringin suppresses cancer cell growth by attenuation of EGFR signaling through GM3 ganglioside accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Ayana; Kajiya, Natsuki; Oishi, Kazuki; Kamada, Yuko; Ikeda, Asami; Chigwechokha, Petros Kingstone; Kibe, Toshiro; Kishida, Michiko; Kishida, Shosei; Komatsu, Masaharu; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Naringin, which is one of the flavonoids contained in citrus fruits, is well known to possess various healthy functions to humans. It has been reported that naringin suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo, although the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, the roles of glycoconjugates, such as gangliosides, in cancer cells have been focused because of their regulatory effects of malignant phenotypes. Here, to clarify the roles of naringin in the negative-regulation of cancer cell growth, the alteration of glycoconjugates induced by naringin exposure and its significance on cell signaling were investigated. Human cancer cells, HeLa and A549, were exposed to various concentrations of naringin. Naringin treatment induced the suppression of cell growth toward HeLa and A549 cells accompanied with an increase of apoptotic cells. In naringin-exposed cells, GM3 ganglioside was drastically increased compared to the GM3 content prior to the treatment. Furthermore, naringin inhibited NEU3 sialidase, a GM3 degrading glycosidase. Similarly, NEU3 inhibition activities were also detected by other flavanone, such as hesperidin and neohesperidin dihydrocalcone, but their aglycones showed less inhibitions. Naringin-treated cancer cells showed suppressed EGFR and ERK phosphorylation levels. These results suggest a novel mechanism of naringin in the suppression of cancer cell growth through the alteration of glycolipids. NEU3 inhibitory effect of naringin induced GM3 accumulation in HeLa and A549 cells, leading the attenuation of EGFR/ERK signaling accompanied with a decrease in cell growth. PMID:27105818

  11. Prostate stem cells and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitin, Alexander Y.; Matoso, A; Roy-Burman, P

    2007-01-01

    Properties shared by neoplastic and stem cells indicate a possibility that somatic stem cells or transit-amplifying cells that have reacquired stem cell properties, particularly the ability for self-renewal, represent favorable targets for malignant transformation. In this review we discuss significance of the stem cell model for understanding prostate cancer pathogenesis and describe relevant studies in animals. It is proposed that dissemination of rare cancer stem ce...

  12. Confocal fluorescence microscopy: An ultra-sensitive tool used to evaluate intracellular antiretroviral nano-drug delivery in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Subhra; Zhou, You; Shibata, Annemarie; Destache, Christopher J.

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, confocal fluorescence microscopy has emerged as an ultra-sensitive tool for real-time study of nanoparticles (NPs) fate at the cellular-level. According to WHO 2007 report, Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is still one of the world's major health threats by claiming approximately 7,000 new infections daily worldwide. Although combination antiretroviral drugs (cARV) therapy has improved the life-expectancy of HIV-infected patients, routine use of high doses of cARV has serious health consequences and requires complete adherence to the regimen for success. Thus, our research goal is to fabricate long-acting novel cARV loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (cARV-NPs) as drug delivery system. However, important aspects of cARV-NPs that require special emphasis are their cellular-uptake, potency, and sustained drug release efficiency over-time. In this article, ultra-sensitive confocal microscopy is been used to evaluate the uptake and sustained drug release kinetics of cARV-NPs in HeLa cells. To evaluate with the above goal, instead of cARV-drug, Rhodamine6G dye (fluorescent dye) loaded NPs (Rho6G NPs) have been formulated. To correlate the Rhodamin6G release kinetics with the ARV release from NPs, a parallel HPLC study was also performed. The results obtained indicate that Rho6G NPs were efficiently taken up at low concentration (sustained for a minimum of 4 days of treatment. Therefore, high drug assimilation and sustained release properties of PLGA-NPs make them an attractive vehicle for cARV nano-drug delivery with the potential to reduce drug dosage as well as the number of drug administrations per month.

  13. Confocal fluorescence microscopy: An ultra-sensitive tool used to evaluate intracellular antiretroviral nano-drug delivery in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhra Mandal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, confocal fluorescence microscopy has emerged as an ultra-sensitive tool for real-time study of nanoparticles (NPs fate at the cellular-level. According to WHO 2007 report, Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS is still one of the worlds major health threats by claiming approximately 7,000 new infections daily worldwide. Although combination antiretroviral drugs (cARV therapy has improved the life-expectancy of HIV-infected patients, routine use of high doses of cARV has serious health consequences and requires complete adherence to the regimen for success. Thus, our research goal is to fabricate long-acting novel cARV loaded poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles (cARV-NPs as drug delivery system. However, important aspects of cARV-NPs that require special emphasis are their cellular-uptake, potency, and sustained drug release efficiency over-time. In this article, ultra-sensitive confocal microscopy is been used to evaluate the uptake and sustained drug release kinetics of cARV-NPs in HeLa cells. To evaluate with the above goal, instead of cARV-drug, Rhodamine6G dye (fluorescent dye loaded NPs (Rho6G NPs have been formulated. To correlate the Rhodamin6G release kinetics with the ARV release from NPs, a parallel HPLC study was also performed. The results obtained indicate that Rho6G NPs were efficiently taken up at low concentration (<500 ng/ml and that release was sustained for a minimum of 4 days of treatment. Therefore, high drug assimilation and sustained release properties of PLGA-NPs make them an attractive vehicle for cARV nano-drug delivery with the potential to reduce drug dosage as well as the number of drug administrations per month.

  14. Cancer, stem cell misplacement and cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The cell of origin of cancer as well as cancer stem cells is still a mystery. In a recent issue of JCMM, Wang et al. challenged the conventional somatic genetic mutation model of multi-stage carcinogenesis of breast cancer and proposed that ‘Invasive cancers are not necessary from preformed in situ tumours—an alternative way of carcinogenesis from misplaced stem cells’. If this stem cell misplacement theory could withstand future experimental evaluation, it may provide a paradigm shift in the...

  15. The mRNA decay factor tristetraprolin (TTP) induces senescence in human papillomavirus-transformed cervical cancer cells by targeting E6-AP ubiquitin ligase

    OpenAIRE

    Sanduja, Sandhya; Kaza, Vimala; Dan A. Dixon

    2009-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP) regulates expression of many cancer-associated and proinflammatory factors through binding AU-rich elements (ARE) in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) and facilitating rapid mRNA decay. Here we report on the ability of TTP to act in an anti-proliferative capacity in HPV18-positive HeLa cells by inducing ...

  16. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G1 phase preferred to proliferate during S/G2 phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G1 phase than in cells infected during S/G2 phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases

  17. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  18. Cellular uptake of 9-hydroxypheophorbide-? and its photoactivation to induce ER stress-related apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin Chul; Biswas, Raktim; Moon, Jeong Hwan; Chung, Phil Sang

    2014-01-01

    The 9-hydroxypheophorbide-? (9-HPbD) is a chlorophyll derivative and was found to be very effective for photodynamic therapy of tumor cells. The current study investigates uptake, retention, and intracellular localization of 9-HPbD by HeLa, human cervical cancer cells via fluorescence spectrophotometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy, and its photodynamic effect against human cervical carcinoma cell. HeLa cells exposed to 9-HPbD exhibited a linear uptake of photosensitizer during the first 12 h, and after removal of 9-HPbD, cell fluorescence was observed to decrease gradually over the next 12 h. Cells treated with 9-HPbD and stained with a panel of organelle-specific fluorescence probes (MitoTracker, LysoTracker, and ER-Tracker) revealed an intracellular fluorescence distribution restricted to cytoplasmic compartments with no detectable fluorescence in the nucleus. The 9-HPbD showed cytotoxicity effect against HeLa cells in 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) disruption and cellular calcium dynamics also showed a photoactivation followed by cell death. The apoptotic effect of 9-HPbD was confirmed by caspase 3 activity study and immunofluorescence study of caspase 12. Morphological observation through the transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy also confirmed that 9-HPbD can induce apoptosis in HeLa cells. Therefore, it can be concluded that maximum uptake and clearance time of 9-HPbD was 12 h with endoplasmic reticulum as the major organelle site in cellular uptake, and 9-HPbD can induce apoptosis in HeLa cells through ER stress-related pathways via activation of caspase 12. PMID:23649612

  19. Learning about Cancer by Studying Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Home Page Learning About Cancer by Studying Stem Cells By Sharon Reynolds Posted January 8, 2014 Normally, ... of them are exploring the process by studying stem cells. Modeling Early Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic cancer cells grown ...

  20. Targeting cancer stem cells in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishimoto T

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Takatsugu Ishimoto, Hideo Baba Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan Abstract: Gastric cancer (GC remains a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite the recent advance of anticancer drugs and the development of molecular-targeted drugs, the prognosis of patients with advanced GC remains poor, especially in Western countries, and is mainly implicated in tumor relapse and metastasis. Cancer stem cells are selectively capable of tumor initiation and implicated in tumor relapse and metastasis, thus governing the prognosis of GC patients. Recent investigations have indicated that gastric cancer stem cells (GCSCs are likely to be the most crucial target in GC treatments. Therefore, the identification of key molecules related to GCSCs is expected to contribute toward the extermination of GC. This review presents the current molecular-targeted therapies against GC according to recent clinical trials and the findings regarding GCSCs and their maintenance that will enable the development of novel therapeutic strategies for patients with GC. Keywords: molecular-targeted therapy, cancer stem cells, gastric cancer

  1. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Ande, Sudharsana R.; Wesselborg, Sebastian; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Los, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues...

  2. Detecção da citotoxicidade de materiais biocompatíveis nas linhagens celulares MRC-5, HeLa e RC-IAL MRC-5, HeLa and RC-IAL cell lines sensitivity for detection of cytotoxicity of biocompatible materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea S. Cruz

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available A sensibilidade de uma linhagem celular diplóide e duas heteroplóides, para a detecção de citotoxicidade através do método de difusão em camada de ágar sobre culturas celulares, foi avaliada experimentalmente com solução de ácido ascórbico em diferentes concentrações e, na prática, frente a 562 amostras de 21 diferentes materiais industriais enviados para análise na Seção de Culturas Celulares do Instituto Adolfo Lutz. A linhagem celular heteroplóide designada RC-IAL apresentou, em relação às linhagens MRC-5 e HeLa, maior sensibilidade porque revelou a presença de efeito citotóxico nas menores concentrações utilizadas (10 e 25 ug/ml do ácido ascórbico e apresentou maior diâmetro do halo citotóxico em 15 amostras e igual diâmetro em 16 das 43 amostras (7,6% que resultaram positivas. Nas 43 amostras positivas, a linhagem MRC-5 não revelou citotoxicidade em 3 amostras de espuma e 1 de resina acrílica. O polivinilcloreto (PVC e o polietileno, raramente revelaram positividade, enquanto plástico, algodão e resinas acrílicas revelaram citotoxicidade ao redor de 5%. Em vista dos resultados é discutida a proposta da utilização da linhagem RC-IAL e HeLa para a continuidade das futuras análises solicitadas ao Instituto Adolfo LutzThe sensitivity of diploid and heteroploid cell lines for detection of cytotoxicity using the agar diffusion method on cell culture, was tested with ascorbic acid solution of different concentrations. A total of 562 samples of 21 various materials were tested. The heteroploid cell line, RC-IAL, showed in relation to the MRC-5 and HeLa cell lines, greater sensitivity because it showed the presence of cytotoxic effect with the lowest concentration used (10 and 25ug/ml of ascorbic acid and showed greater diameter of cytotoxic halo in 15 samples and equal diameter in 16 of the 43 positive samples (7.6%. Out of 43 positive samples, the MRC-5 line did not show cytotoxicity in 3 sponge samples and 1 of acrylic resin. The PVC (polyvinylchloride and polyethylene rarely showed positivity, while, the plastic, cotton and acrylic resin demonstrated cytotoxicity in about 5% of samples. We thus suggest the use of the RC-IAL and HeLa cell lines for continuation of this type of analysis at Adolfo Lutz Institute

  3. The Effects of Zeolite X and Y on Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Azhana Ghazi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Zeolites are hydrated silicates of aluminium that have been very useful in many industry because of its microporous property, absorbance ability and ion exchange capacity. It is currently viewed as a potential adjuvant in cancer therapy due to its ability to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells. Research on natural zeolite clinoptilolite application as anticancer agent has been proven by others. However, the effect of other types of zeolite on cancer cells is still uncertain. This study is performed to determine the effects of zeolite X and Y on cancer cell lines proliferation in vitro. Cancer cell lines HeLa, AsPC-1 and 911 cells were cultured in designated medium treated with zeolite X and zeolite Y at the concentration of 5 mg/ml and 50 mg/ml. Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS concentrations were modified to 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%. After 72 hours incubation, the efficacy of zeolite to treat cancer cell lines were measured by means of cell viability test via MTT assay. Overall results showed that cancer cell lines cultivated in the medium treated with 50 mg/ml of zeolite X and 5% FBS exhibited the highest inhibition of cell proliferation and decrease in cell viability. This finding provides preliminary information in the study of determining the potential use of zeolite as anticancer agent for alternative or complementary therapy.

  4. Fenofibrate decreases radiation sensitivity via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α-mediated superoxide dismutase induction in HeLa cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xianguang; Jang, Seong Soon; An, Zhengzhe; Song, Hyejin; Kim, Won-Dong; Yu, Jae-Ran; Park, Woo-Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The fibrates are ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and used clinically as hypolipidemic drugs. The fibrates are known to cause peroxisome proliferation, enhance superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression and catalase activity. The antioxidant actions of the fibrates may modify radiation sensitivity. Here, we investigated the change of the radiation sensitivity in two cervix cancer cell lines in combination with fenofibrate (FF). Materials and Methods Activity ...

  5. Stimulation of poliovirus RNA synthesis and virus maturation in a HeLa cell-free in vitro translation-RNA replication system by viral protein 3CDpro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimmer Eckard

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Poliovirus protein 3CDpro possesses both proteinase and RNA binding activities, which are located in the 3Cpro domain of the protein. The RNA polymerase (3Dpol domain of 3CDpro modulates these activities of the protein. We have recently shown that the level of 3CDpro in HeLa cell-free in vitro translation-RNA replication reactions is suboptimal for efficient virus production. However, the addition of either 3CDpro mRNA or of purified 3CDpro protein to in vitro reactions, programmed with viral RNA, results in a 100-fold increase in virus yield. Mutational analyses of 3CDpro indicated that RNA binding by the 3Cpro domain and the integrity of interface I in the 3Dpol domain of the protein are both required for function. The aim of these studies was to determine the exact step or steps at which 3CDpro enhances virus yield and to determine the mechanism by which this occurs. Our results suggest that the addition of extra 3CDpro to in vitro translation RNA-replication reactions results in a mild enhancement of both minus and plus strand RNA synthesis. By examining the viral particles formed in the in vitro reactions on sucrose gradients we determined that 3CDpro has only a slight stimulating effect on the synthesis of capsid precursors but it strikingly enhances the maturation of virus particles. Both the stimulation of RNA synthesis and the maturation of the virus particles are dependent on the presence of an intact RNA binding site within the 3Cpro domain of 3CDpro. In addition, the integrity of interface I in the 3Dpol domain of 3CDpro is required for efficient production of mature virus. Surprisingly, plus strand RNA synthesis and virus production in in vitro reactions, programmed with full-length transcript RNA, are not enhanced by the addition of extra 3CDpro. Our results indicate that the stimulation of RNA synthesis and virus maturation by 3CDpro in vitro is dependent on the presence of a VPg-linked RNA template.

  6. Resveratrol interferes with AKT activity and triggers apoptosis in human uterine cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asselin Eric

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endometrial cancer is the fourth most prominent cancer among all feminine cancers in the Western world. Resveratrol, a natural anti-oxidant found in red wine emerging as a novel anticancer agent, exerts antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activity in various cancer cell types, but its effect on uterine cancer cells is poorly understood. At the molecular level, resveratrol has been reported to inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX expression and/or activity; in endometrial cancer cells, COX-2 is overexpressed and confers cellular resistance to apoptosis. The aim of the present study was to determine if resveratrol could exert anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity over uterine cancer cells upon inhibition of COX-2 expression and/or activity. Six different human uterine cancer cell lines were used as a model (HeLa, Hec-1A, KLE, RL95-2, Ishikawa and EN-1078D. Results and discussion High-dose of resveratrol triggered apoptosis in five out of six uterine cancer cell lines, as judged from Hoechst nuclear staining and effector caspase cleavage. In accordance, uterine cancer cell proliferation was decreased. Resveratrol also reduced cellular levels of the phosphorylated/active form of anti-apoptotic kinase AKT. Endogenous COX-2 protein levels were decreased, concomitant with a decrease in production of COX metabolites PGE2 and PGF2?, in each uterine cancer cell line expressing detectable levels of COX-1 and/or COX-2 in presence of resveratrol. Although COX expression was identified as a target of resveratrol in uterine cancer cells, inhibition of COX activity or exogenously added PGE2 did not modulate the effect of resveratrol on cellular proliferation. Conclusion High-dose of resveratrol exerts tumoricidal activity over uterine cancer cells and regulates COX expression. In these cells, resveratrol would not directly target COX activity, but possibly other enzymes involved in prostaglandin synthesis that act downstream of the COXs.

  7. Resveratrol interferes with AKT activity and triggers apoptosis in human uterine cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, milie; Van Themsche, Cline; Leblanc, Kim; Parent, Sophie; Lemoine, Pascal; Asselin, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the fourth most prominent cancer among all feminine cancers in the Western world. Resveratrol, a natural anti-oxidant found in red wine emerging as a novel anticancer agent, exerts antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic activity in various cancer cell types, but its effect on uterine cancer cells is poorly understood. At the molecular level, resveratrol has been reported to inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX) expression and/or activity; in endometrial cancer cells, COX-2 is overexpressed and confers cellular resistance to apoptosis. The aim of the present study was to determine if resveratrol could exert anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity over uterine cancer cells upon inhibition of COX-2 expression and/or activity. Six different human uterine cancer cell lines were used as a model (HeLa, Hec-1A, KLE, RL95-2, Ishikawa and EN-1078D). Results and discussion High-dose of resveratrol triggered apoptosis in five out of six uterine cancer cell lines, as judged from Hoechst nuclear staining and effector caspase cleavage. In accordance, uterine cancer cell proliferation was decreased. Resveratrol also reduced cellular levels of the phosphorylated/active form of anti-apoptotic kinase AKT. Endogenous COX-2 protein levels were decreased, concomitant with a decrease in production of COX metabolites PGE2 and PGF2?, in each uterine cancer cell line expressing detectable levels of COX-1 and/or COX-2 in presence of resveratrol. Although COX expression was identified as a target of resveratrol in uterine cancer cells, inhibition of COX activity or exogenously added PGE2 did not modulate the effect of resveratrol on cellular proliferation. Conclusion High-dose of resveratrol exerts tumoricidal activity over uterine cancer cells and regulates COX expression. In these cells, resveratrol would not directly target COX activity, but possibly other enzymes involved in prostaglandin synthesis that act downstream of the COXs. PMID:17044934

  8. Induction of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis by Morinda citrifolia (Noni) in human cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Banerjee, Ayan; Pathak, Suajta; Sharma, Chandresh; Singh, Neeta

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer in women and has a high mortality rate. Cisplatin, an antitumor agent, is generally used for its treatment. However, the administration of cisplatin is associated with side effects and intrinsic resistance. Morinda citrifolia (Noni), a natural plant product, has been shown to have anti-cancer properties. In this study, we used Noni, cisplatin, and the two in combination to study their cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing effects in cervical cancer HeLa and SiHa cell lines. We demonstrate here, that Noni/Cisplatin by themselves and their combination were able to induce apoptosis in both these cell lines. Cisplatin showed slightly higher cell killing as compared to Noni and their combination showed additive effects. The observed apoptosis appeared to be mediated particularly through the up-regulation of p53 and pro-apoptotic Bax proteins, as well as down- regulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, Bcl-XL proteins and survivin. Augmentation in the activity of caspase-9 and -3 was also observed, suggesting the involvement of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis for both Noni and Cisplatin in HeLa and SiHa cell lines. PMID:23534730

  9. Efflux Transport Characterization of Resveratrol Glucuronides in UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 Transfected HeLa Cells: Application of a Cellular Pharmacokinetic Model to Decipher the Contribution of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Li, Feng; Quan, Enxi; Dong, Dong; Wu, Baojian

    2016-04-01

    Resveratrol undergoes extensive metabolism to form biologically active glucuronides in humans. However, the transport mechanisms for resveratrol glucuronides are not fully established. Here, we aimed to characterize the efflux transport of resveratrol glucuronides using UGT1A1-overexpressing HeLa cells (HeLa1A1 cells), and to determine the contribution of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 4 to cellular excretion of the glucuronides. Two glucuronide isomers [i.e., resveratrol 3-O-glucuronide (R3G) and resveratrol 4'-O-glucuronide (R4'G)] were excreted into the extracellular compartment after incubation of resveratrol (1-100 μM) with HeLa1A1 cells. The excretion rate was linearly related to the level of intracellular glucuronide, indicating that glucuronide efflux was a nonsaturable process. MK-571 (a dual inhibitor of UGT1A1 and MRPs) significantly decreased the excretion rates of R3G and R4'G while increasing their intracellular levels. Likewise, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated silencing of MRP4 caused a significant reduction in glucuronide excretion but an elevation in glucuronide accumulation. Furthermore, β-glucuronidase expressed in the cells catalyzed the hydrolysis of the glucuronides back to the parent compound. A cellular pharmacokinetic model integrating resveratrol transport/metabolism with glucuronide hydrolysis/excretion was well fitted to the experimental data, allowing derivation of the efflux rate constant values in the absence or presence of shRNA targeting MRP4. It was found that a large percentage of glucuronide excretion (43%-46%) was attributed to MRP4. In conclusion, MRP4 participated in cellular excretion of R3G and R4'G. Integration of mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling with transporter knockdown was a useful method to derive the contribution percentage of an exporter to overall glucuronide excretion. PMID:26758854

  10. Eradicating cancer cells: struggle with a chameleon

    OpenAIRE

    Di, Jiabo; Boer, Tjitske Duiveman-de; Figdor, Carl G.; Torensma, Ruurd

    2011-01-01

    Eradication of cancer stem cells to abrogate tumor growth is a new treatment modality. However, like normal cells cancer cells show plasticity. Differentiated tumor stem cells can acquire stem cell properties when they gain access to the stem cell niche. This indicates that eradicating of stem cells (emptying of the niche) alone will not lead to eradication of the tumor. Treatment should be directed to cancer stem cells ànd more mature cancer cells.

  11. Laser heating of gold nanoparticles: photothermal cancer cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedyalkov, N. N.; Atanasov, P. A.; Toshkova, R. A.; Gardeva, E. G.; Yossifova, L. S.; Alexandrov, M. T.; Karashanova, D.

    2012-06-01

    In this work an application of gold nanoparticles in in-vitro photothermal cancer cell therapy is demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles with different diameters - 40, 100 and 200 nm are mixed with HeLa cancer cells. After incubation, the nanoparticles are found to be deposited on the cell's membrane or enter into the cells. Pulsed laser radiation at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG system is used to irradiate the samples. The experiments are performed at fluences in the range from 50 mJ/cm2 up to the established safety standard for medical lasers of 100 mJ/cm2. The cell viability as a function of the particle dimensions and laser fluence is estimated. The nanoparticles heating and cooling dynamics is traced by a numerical model based on heat diffusion equation combined with Mie theory for calculation of the optical properties of nanoparticles. The particle response to the nanosecond laser heating is investigated experimentally as gold colloids are irradiated at different fluences. The threshold fluences for particle's melting and boiling are defined. We show that at the presented fluence range the particles are decomposed into smaller fragments and even short irradiation time leads to decrease of cell viability.

  12. Aloe vera inhibits proliferation of human breast and cervical cancer cells and acts synergistically with cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Arif; Sharma, Chhavi; Khan, Saniyah; Shah, Kruti; Haque, Shafiul

    2015-01-01

    Many of the anti-cancer agents currently used have an origin in natural sources including plants. Aloe vera is one such plant being studied extensively for its diverse health benefits, including cancer prevention. In this study, the cytotoxic potential of Aloe vera crude extract (ACE) alone or in combination with cisplatin in human breast (MCF-7) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells was studied by cell viability assay, nuclear morphological examination and cell cycle analysis. Effects were correlated with modulation of expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and drug metabolism by RT-PCR. Exposure of cells to ACE resulted in considerable loss of cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, which was found to be mediated by through the apoptotic pathway as evidenced by changes in the nuclear morphology and the distribution of cells in the different phases of the cell cycle. Interestingly, ACE did not have any significant cytotoxicity towards normal cells, thus placing it in the category of safe chemopreventive agent. Further, the effects were correlated with the downregulation of cyclin D1, CYP 1A1, CYP 1A2 and increased expression of bax and p21 in MCF-7 and HeLa cells. In addition, low dose combination of ACE and cisplatin showed a combination index less than 1, indicating synergistic growth inhibition compared to the agents applied individually. In conclusion, these results signify that Aloe vera may be an effective anti-neoplastic agent to inhibit cancer cell growth and increase the therapeutic efficacy of conventional drugs like cispolatin. Thus promoting the development of plant-derived therapeutic agents appears warranted for novel cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25854386

  13. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cance...

  14. Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2-mediated transfer of the human superoxide-dismutase gene does not confer radioresistance on HeLa cervical carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The success rate of any therapeutic approach depends on the therapeutic window, which can be increased by either raising the resistance of the normal tissue without protecting the tumor cells or by sensitizing the tumor cells but not the normal cells. Two promising candidate genes for normal tissue protection against radiation-induced damage may be the copper-zinc (CuZnSOD) and manganese superoxide-dismutase genes (MnSOD). The recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV-2) offers attractive advantages over other vector systems: low immunogenicity, ability to infect dividing and non-dividing tissues and a low chance of insertional mutagenesis, due to extra-chromosomal localization. We report the production of novel rAAV-2-SOD vectors and the investigation of their modulating effects on HeLa-RC cells after irradiation. Material and methods: rAAV-2 vectors were cloned containing the human CuZnSOD or MnSOD as transgene and vector stocks were produced. In the initial experiments human cervix carcinoma (HeLa-RC) cells were chosen for their susceptibility to rAAV-2. On day 0, cells were seeded and transduced with the rAAV-2-SOD vectors. On day 3, cells were harvested, irradiated (0.5-8 Gy) and reseeded in different assays (FACS, SOD, MTT and colony assays). Results: Although >70% of all cells expressed SOD and significant amounts of functional SOD protein were detected, no radioprotective effect of SOD was observed after transduction of HeLa-RC cells. Conclusions: Novel rAAV-2-SOD vectors that could be produced at high titer, were able to efficiently infect cells and express the SOD genes. The absence of a radioprotective effect in HeLa-RC cancer cells indicates an additional safety feature and suggests that rAAV-mediated MnSOD overexpression might contribute to increasing the therapeutic index when applied for normal tissue protection

  15. Single cancer cell analysis on a chip

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yoonsun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells in blood may represent “a real time liquid biopsy” through the interrogation of single cancer cells thereby determining the outspread of their heterogeneity and guiding therapy. In this thesis, we focused on single cancer cell analysis downstream of the isolation of cancer cells from blood. We designed and developed various microfluidic devices for genetic and phenotypic characterization of single cancer cells. The limited DNA content in a single cell requires DNA amplification t...

  16. Head and Neck Cancer Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Nör, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Most cancers contain a small sub-population of cells that are endowed with self-renewal, multipotency, and a unique potential for tumor initiation. These properties are considered hallmarks of cancer stem cells. Here, we provide an overview of the field of cancer stem cells with a focus on head and neck cancers. Cancer stem cells are located in the invasive fronts of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) close to blood vessels (perivascular niche). Endothelial cell-initiated signalin...

  17. On the Stem Cell Origin of Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sell, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    In each major theory of the origin of cancer—field theory, chemical carcinogenesis, infection, mutation, or epigenetic change—the tissue stem cell is involved in the generation of cancer. Although the cancer type is identified by the more highly differentiated cells in the cancer cell lineage or hierarchy (transit-amplifying cells), the property of malignancy and the molecular lesion of the cancer exist in the cancer stem cell. In the case of teratocarcinomas, normal germinal stem cells have ...

  18. Expression of aggregative adherence to hela cells by Escherichia coli strains isolated from sick horses Expressão de aderência agregativa em células HeLa por amostras de E. coli isoladas de eqüinos doentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Alvim Liberatore

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The virulence attributes of 56 Escherichia coli strains isolated from sick horses (secretions of uterine cervices; gastrointestinal and lung fragments of necropsy; diarrheic feces, and tracheal washings was examined by determining their adherence pattern to HeLa cells and searching for the presence of virulence genes of the various E. coli pathotypes. Two non-adherent strains presented astA, which encodes the enteroaggregative E. coli heat-stable toxin. Twenty-seven strains (48.2% adhered to HeLa cells, 21 (77.8% of which presented the aggregative adherence pattern (AA that characterize the Enteroaggregative E. coli pathotype (EAEC. Nine of the strains presenting AA were isolated from secretions of uterine cervix, including one carrying virulence genes of the EAEC pathotype (aggR,aap,irp2, and pic. This is the first description of the AA phenotype amongst E. coli strains from sick horses. Such strains should be further evaluated regarding their potential role in the pathogenesis of diverse equine diseases and as reservoirs of human infections.Características de virulência de 56 amostras de Escherichia coli isoladas de eqüinos doentes (secreção de colo uterino, fragmentos de necrópsia do trato gastrointestinal e de pulmões, fezes diarréicas e lavado traqueal foram examinadas para determinar o padrão de aderência em células HeLa e pesquisar a presença de genes de virulência de vários patotipos de E. coli. Duas amostras não aderentes apresentaram astA, gene que codifica a toxina termo-estável de E. coli enteroagregativa. Das vinte e sete amostras (48,2% que aderiram a células HeLa, 21 (77,8% apresentaram o padrão de aderência agregativa (AA que caracteriza o patotipo de E. coli Enteroagregativa (EAEC. Nove destas amostras que apresentaram AA foram isoladas de secreção de colo uterino, incluindo uma que apresentava genes de virulência de patotipos de EAEC (aggR,aap,irp2 e pic. Esta é a primeira descrição do fenótipo AA em amostras de cavalos doentes. Estas amostras deverão ser melhor avaliadas em relação a sua potencial função na patogênese de diferentes doenças eqüinas, bem como à possibilidade destes animais representarem um reservatório de infecções humanas causadas por esta bactéria.

  19. Induction of Apoptosis by Green Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Through Activation of Caspase-3 and 9 in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharara, Javad; Ramezani, Tayebe; Divsalar, Adeleh; Mousavi, Marzieh; Seyedarabi, Arefeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs) are used in imaging and molecular diagnostic applications. As the development of a novel approach in the green synthesis of metal nanoparticles is of great importance and a necessity, a simple and safe method for the synthesis of GNPs using plant extracts of Zataria multiflora leaves was applied in this study and the results on GNPs’ anticancer activity against HeLa cells were reported. Methods: The GNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR, TEM, DLS and Zeta-potential measurements. In addition, the cellular up-take of nanoparticles was investigated using Dark Field Microscopy (DFM). Induction of apoptosis by high dose of GNPs in HeLa cells was assessed by MTT assay, Acridin orange, DAPI staining, Annexin V/PI double-labeling flow cytometry and caspase activity assay. Results: UV-visible spectroscopy results showed a surface plasmon resonance band for GNPs at 530 nm. FTIR results demonstrated an interaction between plant extract and nanoparticles. TEM images revealed different shapes for GNPs and DLS results indicated that the GNPs range in size from 10 to 42 nm. The Zeta potential values of the synthesized GNPs were between 30 to 50 Mev, indicating the formation of stable particles. As evidenced by MTT assay, GNPs inhibit proliferation of HeLa cells in dose-dependent GNPs and cytotoxicity of GNPs in Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell (BMSCs) was lower than cancerous cells. At nontoxic concentrations, the cellular up-take of the nanoparticles took place. Acridin orange and DAPI staining showed morphological changes in the cell’s nucleus due to apoptosis. Finally, caspase activity assay demonstrated HeLa cell’s apoptosis through caspase activation. Conclusion: The results showed that GNPs have the ability to induce apoptosis in HeLa cells.

  20. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine the cytoskeletal dynamics they chose magnetic twisting cytometry, where the spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads was measured, which is a measure for the cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics. The group of Katarina Wolf measured the stiffness of the cell nucleus because it is the largest and stiffest organelle, which may hinder the migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue [2]. They combined atomic force confocal microscopy for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness (the inverse of the compressibility) with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact as well as monitoring of the cell's fate. The dynamics of tissue topology such as the mixing of compartments during cancer invasion and metastasis were theoretically analyzed by Lance L Munn [3]. In particular, he presented a mathematical model of tissue repair and tumor growth based on collective cell migration that simulates a wide range of tumor behaviors using correct tissue compartmentalization and connectivity. In the future, the topological analysis could be helpful for tumor diagnosis or monitoring tumor therapy. The group of Cynthia A Reinhart-King analyzed how the topological guidance of a 3D tumor cell migration at an interface of collagen densities affects cell motility [4]. In particular, they mimicked the heterogeneities in density of the tumor stroma by preparing gels with an interface of high and low density collagen gels and investigated how this affects cell motility. The author's review paper details the effect of focal adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on cell motility and how this effect is driven by mechanical alterations of cells expressing FAK compared to cells with FAK knock-out [5]. In particular, it focused on mechanical properties regulated by FAK in comparison to the mechano-regulating protein vinculin. This article highlights that both focal adhesion proteins, vinculin and FAK synergize their functions to regulate the mechanical properties of cells such as sti

  1. Differential effects of class I isoform histone deacetylase depletion and enzymatic inhibition by belinostat or valproic acid in HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejligbjerg Marielle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone acetylation is an epigenetic modification involved in the regulation of gene expression, balanced by histone acetyl transferases and histone deacetylase (HDAC enzymes. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi induce growth arrest and cell death in transformed cells, and are currently in many clinical cancer trials. The transcriptional response to HDACi is complex, as is the response to HDAC isoform knockdown (KD. Here, we describe for the first time in a human cancer cell line, a transcriptional comparison of treatment by two structurally unrelated HDACi; belinostat and valproic acid with the KD of HDAC1, 2 and 3 isoforms. Results HDAC KD showed anti-proliferative effects, although to a lesser extent than HDACi treatment. Moreover, we found a 2-fold increased resistance of HDAC1 knockdown cells to belinostat, suggesting this isoenzyme as a selective target. While both HDACi treatment and individual class I HDAC KD produce significant transcriptional effects, three-times higher for HDACi, the gene-expression profiles of class I HDAC KD compared with that obtained by HDACi treatment exhibited less than 4% of altered genes in common between the two modes of inhibition. Further, cell-specific effects of HDAC KD are evident by comparison with a recent study in a different cell line. Conclusion The increased resistance to belinostat in response to HDAC1 depletion indicates the possibility of using this isoform as a predictive biomarker of response to HDACi treatment. Further, the transcriptional response to chemical inhibition of HDACs is very different from that of KD of individual class I HDAC isoforms. These data suggest that the anti-tumor effect of HDACi is indeed linked to class I inhibition, but may be more complex than simply targeting individual HDAC enzymes.

  2. The Prophylactic Effect of Probiotic Enterococcus lactis IW5 against Different Human Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nami, Yousef; Haghshenas, Babak; Haghshenas, Minoo; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus lactis IW5 was obtained from human gut and the potential probiotic characteristics of this organism were then evaluated. Results showed that this strain was highly resistant to low pH and high bile salt and adhered strongly to Caco-2 human epithelial colorectal cell lines. The supernatant of E. lactis IW5 strongly inhibited the growth of several pathogenic bacteria and decreased the viability of different cancer cells, such as HeLa, MCF-7, AGS, HT-29, and Caco-2. Conversely, E. l...

  3. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-gingerol in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, M L B; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-12-22

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26621832

  4. The experimental study of radionuclide imaging and treatment of cervical cancer mediated by hNIS gene transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of imaging and treatment of cervical cancer xenograft model using 131I mediated by hNIS gene transfection. Methods: The cervical cancer xenograft models were established with Hela-NIS( +) cells and Hela cells, respectively. Five Hela-NIS(+) xenograft models and five Hela xenograft models were dynamically imaged at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 20 h postinjection of 131I (7.4 MBq). Five Hela-NIS(+) xenograft models were imaged at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 20 and 25 h postinjection of 99TcmO4- (11.1 MBq). Twenty Hela-NIS(+) cervical cancer xenograft models were randomly divided into four groups: Three 131I treating groups and one control group. The therapeutic effects of 131I at three levels (74, 111, 148 MBq) were investigated following intraperitoneal injection. Results: Hela-NIS(+)human cervical cancer xenografts were established successfully in nude mice. The Hela-NIS(+) xenografts significantly accumulated radioactivity after intraperitoneal injection of 131I, and the radioactivity was persistently present until 20 h postinjection, but Hela xenografts had no radioactive accumulation. The T/B value of the Hela-NIS(+) xenografts reached 17.34 at 8 h postinjection. The imaging with 99TcmO4- showed that the radioactivity was persistently present in Hela-NIS(+) xenografts for almost 25 h. The Hela-NIS(+)xenografts shrinked after 131I treatment. The inhibition ratios of tumor growth in 111 MBq and 148 MBq groups were both significantly higher than that of 74 MBq group (t: 2.74-5.75, P131I and 99TcmO4- and could be treated successfully with 131I. 131I treatment mediated by hNIS gene transfection could be a promising cancer treatment method. (authors)

  5. Development of therapeutic Au-methylene blue nanoparticles for targeted photodynamic therapy of cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiashing; Hsu, Che-Hao; Huang, Chih-Chia; Chang, Po-Yang

    2015-01-14

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the cellular uptake of a photosensitizer (PS) combined with oxygen molecules and light at a specific wavelength to be able to trigger cancer cell death via the apoptosis pathway, which is less harmful and has less inflammatory side effect than necrosis. However, the traditional PDT treatment has two main deficiencies: the dark toxicity of the PS and the poor selectivity of the cellular uptake of PS between the target cells and normal tissues. In this work, methylene blue (MB), a known effective PS, combined with Au nanoparticles (NPs) was prepared using an intermolecular interaction between a polystyrene-alt-maleic acid (PSMA) layer on the Au NPs and MB. The Au@polymer/MB NPs produced a high quantum yield of singlet oxygen molecules, over 50% as much as that of free MB, when they were excited by a dark red light source at 660 nm, but without significant dark toxicity. Furthermore, transferrin (Tf) was conjugated on the Au@polymer/MB NPs via an EDC/NHS reaction to enhance the selectivity to HeLa cells compared to 3T3 fibroblasts. With a hand-held single laser treatment (32 mW/cm) for 4 min, the new Au@polymer/MB-Tf NPs showed a 2-fold enhancement of PDT efficiency toward HeLa cells over the use of free MB at 4 times dosage. Cellular staining examinations showed that the HeLa cells reacted with Au@polymer/MB-Tf NPs and the 660 nm light excitation triggered PDT, which caused the cells to undergo apoptosis ("programmed" cell death). We propose that applying this therapeutic Au@polymer/MB-Tf nanoagent is facile and safe for delivery and cancer cell targeting to simultaneously minimize side effects and accomplish a significant enhancement in photodynamic therapeutic efficiency toward next-generation nanomedicine development. PMID:25494339

  6. Radiobiological Response of Cervical Cancer Cell Line in Low Dose Region: Evidence of Low Dose Hypersensitivity (HRS) and Induced Radioresistance (IRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rabiraja; George, Daicy; Vijaykumar, T.S.; John, Subhashini

    2015-01-01

    Background Purpose of the present study was to examine the response of cervical cancer cell line (HeLa cell line) to low dose radiation using clonogenic assay and mathematical modeling of the low dose response by Joiners induced repair model. Materials and Methods Survival of HeLa cells following exposure to single and fractionated low doses of ? (gamma)-ray, 6 MV, and 15 MV photon was measured by clonogenic assay. Results HeLa cell line demonstrated marked low dose response consisting of an area of HRS and IRR in the dose region of <1 Gy. The two gradients of the low dose region (?s and ?r) were distinctly different with a transition dose (Dc) of 0.28-0.40 cGy. Conclusion HeLa cell line demonstrates marked HRS and IRR with distinct transition dose. This may form the biological basis of the clinical study to investigate the chemo potentiating effect of low dose radiation in cervical cancer. PMID:26266200

  7. Cancer Stem Cell Hypothesis: Implication for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Meiliana; Nurrani Mustika Dewi; Andi Wijaya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer is a disease of genomic instability, evasion of immune cells, and adaptation of the tumor cells to the changing environment. Genetic heterogeneity caused by tumors and tumor microenvironmental factors forms the basis of aggressive behavior of some cancer cell populations. CONTENT: Cancers arise in self-renewing cell populations and that the resulting cancers, like their normal organ counterparts, are composed of hierarchically organized cell populations. Self–renewing “...

  8. Proteomic analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianxiong He; Canhua Huang; Aiping Tong; Bin Chen; Zhi Zeng; Peng Zhang; Chunting Wang; Yuquan Wei

    2008-12-01

    Suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an orally administered histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) that has shown significant antitumour activity in a variety of tumour cells. To identify proteins involved in its antitumour activity, we utilized a proteomic approach to reveal protein expression changes in the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa following SAHA treatment. Protein expression profiles were analysed by 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein identification was performed on a MALDI-Q-TOF MS/MS instrument. As a result, a total of nine differentially expressed proteins were visualized by 2-DE and Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) staining. Further, all the changed proteins were positively identified via mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. Of these, PGAM1 was significantly downregulated in HeLa cells after treatment with SAHA. Moreover, PGAM1 has been proven to be downregulated in another cervical cancer cell line (CaSki) by western blot analysis. Together, using proteomic tools, we identified several differentially expressed proteins that underwent SAHA-induced apoptosis. These changed proteins may provide some clues to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying SAHA-induced apoptosis in cervical cancer.

  9. Lysophosphatidic Acid Inhibits Apoptosis Induced by Cisplatin in Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Yanxia; Yang, Ya; Wang, Ji; Li, Yi; Ma, Hongbing; Cai, Hui; Liu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Shufeng; Li, Zongfang; Zhang, Xiaozhi; Wang, Jiansheng; Liu, Rui; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Shi, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Ren, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) level has been found significantly increased in the serum of patients with ovarian, cervical, and colon cancers. LPA level in cervical cancer patients is significantly higher than in healthy controls. LPA receptors were found highly expressed in cervical cancer cells, suggesting LPA may play a role in the development of cervical cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of LPA on the apoptosis induced by cisplatin (DDP) in cervical cancer cell line and the underlying changes in signaling pathways. Our study found that cisplatin induced apoptosis of Hela cell through inhibiting expression of Bcl-2, upregulating the expression of Bax, Fas-L, and the enzyme activity of caspase-3 (p factor caused by cisplatin (p cancer cells and pointed to a possible sensitization scheme through combined administration of PI3K inhibitor and cisplatin for better treatment of cervical cancer patients, especially those with elevated LPA levels. PMID:26366416

  10. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    OpenAIRE

    Dagmara Jaworska; Wojciech Król; Ewelina Szliszka

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve th...

  11. Introduction of optical reporter gene into cancer and immune cells using lentiviral vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Joon; Le, Uyenchi N.; Moon, Sung Min; Heo, Young Jun; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon Soo [Schoole of Medicine, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    For some applications such as gene therapy or reporter gene imaging, a gene has to be introduced into the organism of interest. Adenoviral vectors are capable of transducing both replicating and non-dividing cells. The adenoviral vectors do not integrate their DNA into host DNA, but do lead to an immune response. Lentiviruses belong to the retrovirus family and are capable of infecting both dividing and non-dividing cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an example of a lentavirus. A disabled HIV virus has been developed and could be used for in vivo gene delivery. A portion of the viral genome which encodes for accessory proteins canbe deleted without affecting production of the vector and efficiency of infection. Lentiviral delivery into various rodent tissues shows sustained expression of the transgene of up to six months. Furthermore, there seems to be little or no immune response with these vectors. These lentiviral vectors hold significant promise for in vivo gene delivery. We constructed lentiviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc) and eGFP. Fluc-eGFP fusion gene was inserted into multiple cloning sites of pLentiM1.3 vector. Reporter gene (Fluc-eGFP) was designed to be driven by murine CMV promoter with enhanced efficacy of transgene expression as compared to human CMV promoter. We transfected pLenti1.3-Fluc into human cervix cancer cell line (HeLa) and murine T lymphocytes. We also constructed adenovirus encoding Fluc and transfected to HeLa and T cells. This LentiM1.3-Fluc was transfected into HeLa cells and murine T lymphocytes in vitro, showing consistent expression of eGFP under the fluorescence microscopy from the 2nd day of transfection. Firefly luciferase reporter gene was not expressed in immune cells when it is mediated by adenovirus. Lentivirus was validated as a useful vector for both immune and cancer cells.

  12. Introduction of optical reporter gene into cancer and immune cells using lentiviral vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For some applications such as gene therapy or reporter gene imaging, a gene has to be introduced into the organism of interest. Adenoviral vectors are capable of transducing both replicating and non-dividing cells. The adenoviral vectors do not integrate their DNA into host DNA, but do lead to an immune response. Lentiviruses belong to the retrovirus family and are capable of infecting both dividing and non-dividing cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an example of a lentavirus. A disabled HIV virus has been developed and could be used for in vivo gene delivery. A portion of the viral genome which encodes for accessory proteins canbe deleted without affecting production of the vector and efficiency of infection. Lentiviral delivery into various rodent tissues shows sustained expression of the transgene of up to six months. Furthermore, there seems to be little or no immune response with these vectors. These lentiviral vectors hold significant promise for in vivo gene delivery. We constructed lentiviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc) and eGFP. Fluc-eGFP fusion gene was inserted into multiple cloning sites of pLentiM1.3 vector. Reporter gene (Fluc-eGFP) was designed to be driven by murine CMV promoter with enhanced efficacy of transgene expression as compared to human CMV promoter. We transfected pLenti1.3-Fluc into human cervix cancer cell line (HeLa) and murine T lymphocytes. We also constructed adenovirus encoding Fluc and transfected to HeLa and T cells. This LentiM1.3-Fluc was transfected into HeLa cells and murine T lymphocytes in vitro, showing consistent expression of eGFP under the fluorescence microscopy from the 2nd day of transfection. Firefly luciferase reporter gene was not expressed in immune cells when it is mediated by adenovirus. Lentivirus was validated as a useful vector for both immune and cancer cells

  13. Ca2+-mediated potentiation of the swelling-induced taurine efflux from HeLa cells: On the role of calmodulin and novel protein kinase C isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falktoft, Birgitte; Lambert, Ian H.

    2004-01-01

    The present work sets out to investigate how Ca2+ regulates the volume-sensitive taurine-release pathway in HeLa cells. Addition of Ca2+-mobilizing agonists at the time of exposure to hypotonic NaCl medium augments the swelling-induced taurine release and subsequently accelerates the inactivation...... of the release pathway. The accelerated inactivation is not observed in hypotonic Ca2+-free or high-K+ media. Addition of Ca2+-mobilizing agonists also accelerates the regulatory volume decrease, which probably reflects activation of Ca2+-activated K+ channels. The taurine release from control cells...... and cells exposed to Ca2+ agonists is equally affected by changes in cell volume, application of DIDS and arachidonic acid, indicating that the volume-sensitive taurine leak pathway mediates the Ca2+-augmented taurine release. Exposure to Ca2+-mobilizing agonists prior to a hypotonic challenge also...

  14. Growth dynamics of cancer cell colonies and their comparison with noncancerous cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H.; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) growth dynamics of HeLa (cervix cancer) cell colonies was studied following both their growth front and the pattern morphology evolutions utilizing large population colonies exhibiting linearly and radially spreading fronts. In both cases, the colony profile fractal dimension was df=1.20±0.05 and the growth fronts displaced at the constant velocity 0.90±0.05 μm min-1. Colonies showed changes in both cell morphology and average size. As time increased, the formation of large cells at the colony front was observed. Accordingly, the heterogeneity of the colony increased and local driving forces that set in began to influence the dynamics of the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough colony fronts resulted in a roughness exponent α = 0.50±0.05, a growth exponent β = 0.32±0.04, and a dynamic exponent z=1.5±0.2. The validity of this set of scaling exponents extended from a lower cutoff lc≈60 μm upward, and the exponents agreed with those predicted by the standard Kardar-Parisi-Zhang continuous equation. HeLa data were compared with those previously reported for Vero cell colonies. The value of df and the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang-type 2D front growth dynamics were similar for colonies of both cell lines. This indicates that the cell colony growth dynamics is independent of the genetic background and the tumorigenic nature of the cells. However, one can distinguish some differences between both cell lines during the growth of colonies that may result from specific cooperative effects and the nature of each biosystem.