WorldWideScience

Sample records for butterfly eurema hecabe

  1. Multiple infection with Wolbachia inducing different reproductive manipulations in the butterfly Eurema hecabe.

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroki, Masato; Tagami, Yohsuke; Miura, Kazuki; Kato, Yoshiomi

    2004-01-01

    Wolbachia are rickettsial intracellular symbionts of arthropods and nematodes. In arthropods, they act as selfish genetic elements and manipulate host reproduction, including sex-ratio distortion and cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). Previous studies showed that infection of feminizing Wolbachia and CI Wolbachia sympatrically occurred in the butterfly Eurema hecabe. We demonstrate that feminization-infecting individuals can rescue sperm modified by CI-infecting males. Phylogenetic analysis re...

  2. Double trouble: combined action of meiotic drive and Wolbachia feminization in Eurema butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Peter; Cook, James M; Kageyama, Daisuke; Riegler, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Arthropod sex ratios can be manipulated by a diverse range of selfish genetic elements, including maternally inherited Wolbachia bacteria. Feminization by Wolbachia is rare but has been described for Eurema mandarina butterflies. In this species, some phenotypic and functional females, thought to be ZZ genetic males, are infected with a feminizing Wolbachia strain, wFem. Meanwhile, heterogametic WZ females are not infected with wFem. Here, we establish a quantitative PCR assay allowing reliable sexing in three Eurema species. Against expectation, all E. mandarina females, including wFem females, had only one Z chromosome that was paternally inherited. Observation of somatic interphase nuclei confirmed that W chromatin was absent in wFem females, but present in females without wFem. We conclude that the sex bias in wFem lines is due to meiotic drive (MD) that excludes the maternal Z and thus prevents formation of ZZ males. Furthermore, wFem lines may have lost the W chromosome or harbour a dysfunctional version, yet rely on wFem for female development; removal of wFem results in all-male offspring. This is the first study that demonstrates an interaction between MD and Wolbachia feminization, and it highlights endosymbionts as potentially confounding factors in MD of sex chromosomes. PMID:25948567

  3. Ecological correlates of polyphenism and gregarious roosting in the grass yellow butterfly Eurema elathea (Pieridae) / Correlatos ecológicos do polifenismo e dormitórios gregários da borboleta-amarela-da-grama Eurema elathea (Pieridae)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    A., Ruszczyk; P. C., Motta; R. L., Barros; A. M., Araújo.

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Adultos de Eurema elathea foram estudados semanalmente (1992-1994) em seis locais (dormitórios), ao redor de um fragmento de mata em uma fazenda e em dois locais na área urbana de Uberlândia, MG. Os machos foram classificados em seis categorias fenotípicas, as quais variam desde a presença de uma gr [...] ande e conspícua barra preta na margem interna dorsal da asa anterior (forma escura da estação úmida) até a ausência da barra (forma clara da estação seca). A massa corporal e a área da asa foram comparadas: formas diferentes mostraram médias similares. A abundância das borboletas e a freqüência das formas variaram conforme a umidade (chuvas). Na estação úmida, os indivíduos foram menos freqüentes e monomorficamente escuros, enquanto na seca, a população aumenta e as formas claras predominam. As taxas de recaptura e recrutamento são comparadas com outras borboletas que se agregam durante a noite. O potencial de dispersão foi similar entre os sexos e variou sazonalmente, sendo que a população é mais sedentária no período seco. O máximo tempo de residência registrado foi de 91 dias para uma fêmea e de 84 dias para um macho. A fração de indivíduos que se moveram de um sítio de descanso para outro foi similar em ambos os sexos e formas de machos, mas foi significativamente maior na fazenda em relação à área urbana. Da mesma forma, foi recapturada uma fração significativamente maior (21,3%) de borboletas marcadas na área urbana do que na fazenda (15,6%), sugerindo modificação comportamental para o sedentarismo nos indivíduos urbanos. São discutidas as forças seletivas que moldam o hábito de descanso gregário em E. elathea e em outras borboletas, e propõe-se uma estratégia protocooperativa de economia de energia. Abstract in english Eurema elathea adults were censused weekly (1992-1994) in six night-roosts around a forest fragment on a farm, and in two roosts in the urban area of Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Males were grouped in six phenotypic classes. These were based on a range between having a conspicuous wide black ba [...] r at the dorsal forewing inner margin (wet season dark morphs) and the absence of that bar (dry season light morphs). The body mass and wing area of co-occurring morphs were compared: differents morphs showed similar means. The abundance of butterflies and morph frequencies varied in close relation to humidity (rainfall). Individuals were infrequent and monomorphically dark in the wet season while light morphs predominated in dry periods when population peaked. A lower fraction of recaptured individuals and higher recruitment were recorded compared to other night-roosting butterflies. Dispersal potential was similar between the sexes and varied seasonally with a more sedentary population in dry periods. The maximum residence time recorded was 91 days for a female and 84 days for a male. The fraction of individuals that moved from one roosting site to another was similar in both sexes and male morphs, but significantly higher on the farm than in the urban area. Also, a significantly higher fraction (21.3%) of marked butterflies was recaptured in the urban area than on the farm (15.6%), suggesting a behavioral modification for sedentariness in the urban individuals. The selective forces shaping a gregarious roosting habit in E. elathea and other butterflies are discussed and a protocooperational strategy for saving energy is proposed.

  4. Butterfly diversity as a data base for the development plan of Butterfly Garden at Bosscha Observatory, Lembang, West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATI SURYATI SYAMSUDIN SUBAHAR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subahar TSS, Yuliana A (2010 Butterfly diversity as a data base for the development plan of Butterfly Garden at Bosscha Observatory, Lembang, West Java. Biodiversitas 11: 24-28. Change of land use and the increasing number of visitors to Bosscha area was one factor for the development plan of butterfly garden in the area. The objectives of this research were to examine butterfly diversity and its potential for development plan of butterfly garden. Butterfly diversity and its richness conducted by standard walk methods. Host plant and larval food plant was recorded during butterfly survey. Public perception on the development plan of butterfly garden was examined by questionnaire. The results showed that 26 species of butterfly was found in Bosscha area and Delias belisama belisama was the most dominant species. Public perceptions consider that the development plan of butterfly garden will give benefit to the community; not only providing new insight (40.41%, additional tourism object (23.97% and will gave aesthetical value (17.12%. Twelve local species should be considered for development plan of butterfly garden: Papilio agamemnon, P. demoleus, P. memnon, P. sarpedon, Delias belisama, Eurema hecabe, Danaus chrysippus, Argynis hiperbius, Cethosia penthesilea, Hypolimnas missipus, Melanitis phedima and Euthalia Adonijah. Host plant: Bougainvillea spectabilis, Citrus aurantium, Lantana camara, Macaranga tanarius and food plants: Citrus aurantium, Cosmos caudatus, Eupatorium inulifolium, Gomphrena globosa, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Lantana camara, and Tithonia diversifolia.

  5. Seasonal Variation in Diversity and Abundance of Butterfly at Sawanga Vithoba Lake Area District Amravati, Maharashtra India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Manwar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Butterflies are the best taxonomically studied groups of insects and are also good indicators of environmental changes. Because of their diversity, wide distribution, specificity to vegetation type, rapid response to perturbation, taxonomic tractability, statistically significant abundance and ease of sampling, they have been considered useful organisms to monitor environmental changes. The present work is result of a survey on butterfly fauna of Sawanga-Vithoba Lake region. For the observations of the species transect of 1 km long and 5 m wide was followed. Butterflies were primarily identified directly in the field or, following photography. Study was carried out for one year. Total 28 species of butterfly at Sawanga Vithoba lake area under five different families were observed. Most of the species were common. Two rare species were observed in this region. Butterfly exhibits seasonal variation in distribution of species at four stations of Sawanga Vithoba lake. In monsoon total number of species was more than in winter and summer. Few species of butterfly such as Papilio machaon (Linnaeus, Parnara guttata (Brener and Grey. Cepora nerissa (Fabricius, Pieris brassicae (Linnaeus, Junonia almana (Linnaeus, Junonia lemonias (Linnaeus, Phalanta phalantha (Drury and Acraea terpsicore were not observed in summer. Much similar species of butterfly are observed at four stations of Sawanga Vithoba Lake area. Species richness of few species such as Catochrysops strabo, Eurema hecabe (Linnaeus, Pseudozizeeria maha (Kollar is higher in all the seasons. Family Nymphalidae is the most represented family at Sawanga Vithoba lake region district Amravati.

  6. Presence and distribution of two sub-species of Eurema agave (Lepidoptera, Pieridae in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Cordoba-Alfaro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Austin (1992 reported Eurema a. agave (Cramer 1775 to the Caribbean of Costa Rica. However, he actually had found E. a. millerorum, described by Bousquets & Luis-Martinez (1987 for the Caribbean of Mexico. The presence of Eurema a. agave is confirmed on this paper with information of specimens collected in the Pacific and Atlantic slopes of Costa Rica. Aspects on distribution of both subspecies are included.

  7. Butterflies Diversity in Brawijaya University, Veteran, Jakarta and Velodrom Green Open Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Raisa Khairun Nisa'

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Butterflies have some roles in environmental as pollinator and bioindicator. Habitat is one of important factor to support butterflies growth. The aim of this research was to describe butterflies diversity in some green open spaces in Malang. Direct observations of butterflies diversity, vegetation structures and abiotic factors in Brawijaya University, Veteran, Jakarta and Velodrom Green Open Space were conducted on June 2012. Sampling was took place in each sites using cruising method in three times observation at 07.00, 11.00 a.m. and 3.30 p.m . Data were analyzed by statistical descriptive using Microsoft Excel 2007 and PAST. The result showed that butterflies composition in all sites dominated by Delias sp., Leptosia nina and Eurema venusta. The diversity index of all sites showed moderate rank that indicate communities equilibrium in environment was still good. In this case, Velodrom Green Open Space has the highest one of diversity index, it was about 2,199. Brawijaya University and Jakarta Green Open Space have a high similarity index based on Morisita Index. The highest abundance of butterflies was observed at 11.00-12.30 a.m. Delias sp. and Leptosia nina has temporal spread all day long, while Eurema venusta just in day light.

  8. Beautiful Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Mom

    2009-09-16

    Here are some websites about butterflies... blah blah blah Learn how to say butterfly in Spanish, French & German by going here... Butterfly in 300 languages Follow the instructions found on these pages... Life Cycles The Life Cycle--Caterpillars to Butterflies Look at life cycles found here... Missouri Botanical Garden-The Butterfly House & Education Center: The Butterfly School The Butterfly Site.com ...

  9. Biology and distribution of butterfly fauna of Hazara University, Garden Campus, Mansehra, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Perveen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The butterflies are beautiful creature of nature with great economic importance as pollinator as well as bio-indicator of environments. The present survey was conducted to determine the biology and distribution of butterfly fauna of Hazara University, Garden Campus, Mansehra, Pakistan during March-June 2012. The study area was divided into 3 quadrates, i.e., residential area, administration area and main campus. A total of 170 specimens were collected, 10 species were identified belonging to 3 different families and falling in 8 genera. The species were identified. The painted lady, Cynthia cardui (Linnaeus; blue pansy, Junonia orithya Linnaeus; and plain tiger, Danaus chrysippus (Linnaeus were belonging to family Nymphalidae. The lime butterfly, Papilio demoleus Linnaeus and com-mon mormon, P. polytes Linnaeus were belonging to family Papilionidae. The dark clouded yellow, Colias croceus (Geoffroy; common grass yellow, Eumera hecab (Linnaeus; Murree green-veined white, Pieris ajaka Moore; green-veined white, P. napi (Linnaeus and Bath white, Pontia daplidice (Linnaeus were belonging to family Pieridae. The body sizes of E. hecabe and J. orithya were minimum, i.e., 1.4 cm (n = 4 - 13, however, D. chrysippus was maximum, i.e., 2.5 cm (n = 1. The wingspan of E. hecabe was minimum, i.e., 3.7 cm (n = 4, however, P. polytes was maximum, i.e., 7.5 cm (n = 1. Proper preventive measures should be taken into consideration in order to minimize the natural habitat loss, as butterfly fauna is dependent upon proper environmental conditions.

  10. Presencia y distribución de dos sub-especies de Eurema agave (Lepidoptera, Pieridae) en Costa Rica / Presence and distribution of two sub-species of Eurema agave (Lepidoptera, Pieridae) in Costa Rica

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Jim, Cordoba-Alfaro; Luis Ricardo, Murillo-Hiller.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Austin (1992) reportó a Eurema a. agave (Cramer 1775) para el Caribe de Costa Rica; sin embargo, en realidad lo que encontró fue a E. a. millerorum descrita por Bousquets & Luis-Martinez (1987) para el Caribe mexicano. La presencia de Eurema a. agave es confirmada en este trabajo por especimenes rec [...] olectados en la vertiente Pacífica y Atlántica de Costa Rica. Además se detallan aspectos de la distribución de ambas subespecies. Abstract in english Austin (1992) reported Eurema a. agave (Cramer 1775) to the Caribbean of Costa Rica. However, he actually had found E. a. millerorum, described by Bousquets & Luis-Martinez (1987) for the Caribbean of Mexico. The presence of Eurema a. agave is confirmed on this paper with information of specimens co [...] llected in the Pacific and Atlantic slopes of Costa Rica. Aspects on distribution of both subspecies are included.

  11. Checklist of butterfly fauna of Kohat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Perveen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The butterflies play dual role, firstly as the pollinator, carries pollen from one flower to another and secondly their larvae act as the pest, injurious to various crops. Their 21 species were identified belonging to 3 different families from Kohat, Pakistan during September-December 2008. The reported families Namphalidae covered 33%, Papilionidae 10%, and Pieridae 57% biodiversity of butterflies of Kohat. In Namphalidae included: species belonging to subfamily Nymphalinae, Indian fritillary, Argynnis hyperbius Linnaeus; common castor, Ariadne merione (Cramer; painted lady, Cynthia cardui (Linnaeus; peacock pansy, Junonia almanac Linnaeus; blue pansy, J. orithya Linnaeus; common leopard, Phalantha phalantha (Drury; species belonging to subfamily Satyrinae, white edged rock brown, Hipparchia parisatis (Kollar. In Papilionidae included: subfamily Papilioninae, lime butterfly, Papilio demoleus Linnaeus and common mormon, Pa. polytes Linnaeus. In Pieridae included: subfamily Coliaclinae, dark clouded yellow, Colias croceus (Geoffroy; subfamily Coliadinae, lemon emigrant, Catopsilia pomona Fabricius; little orange tip, C. etrida Boisduval; blue spot arab,Colotis protractus Butler; common grass yellow, Eumera hecab (Linnaeus; common brimstone, Gonepteryx rhamni (Linnaeus; yellow orange tip, Ixias pyrene Linnaeus; subfamily Pierinae, pioneer white butterfly, Belenoi aurota Bingham; Murree green-veined white, Pieris ajaka Moore; large cabbage white, P. brassicae Linnaeus; green-veined white, P. napi (Linnaeus; small cabbage white, P. rapae Linnaeus. The wingspan of collected butterflies, minimum was 25 mm of C. etrida which was the smallest butterfly, however, maximum was 100 mm of P. demoleus and P. polytes which were the largest butterflies. A detail study is required for further exploration of butterflies' fauna of Kohat.

  12. Un posible complejo de especies gemelas en el género Eurema (Lepidoptera: Pieridae. I - Evidencias biológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno F. Liz Patricia

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available This research is a biological and ecological study of a polymorphic population of Eurema salome Felder similar to that previously described by Klots (1928 as composed by two different forms according to the wing color pattern of its males. The two supposed forms showed different host plant and specific color in both larva and adult stage. Host plant exchange experiment indicate that the two color forms are genetically determined rather than induced by the host plant or enviroment. These results suggest that the polymorphic populations studied is composed of two distinct species reproductively isolated rather than two polymorphic forms of the same species. We also speculate that host plant use played a crucial role in the initial diferentiation of these two species. We conclude that these species could be consider as sibbling species because of their significant morphological likeness.En este trabajo se realiza un estudio biológico y ecológico a una presunta población polimórfica de Eurema salome Felder, conformada por dos formas descritas por Klot Sen 1928 con base en el patrón de coloración alar de los machos. Se encontró que estas presuntas formas presentan diferentes plantas hospederas y características específicas de coloración tanto a nivel larvario como del adulto. Al realizar intercambio de hospederos se estableció que las características que diferencian las dos formas son heredadas genéticamente y no inducidas por condiciones de hospedero o medioambientales. A partir de estos resultados se plantea que la población en estudio probablemente no está conformada, como se pensó inicialmente, por dos formas de la especie E. salome Feld., sino por dos especies diferentes actualmente aisladas reproductivamente y cuya diferenciación se dio inicialmente a partir del hospedero. Dichas especies presentan un grado de semejanza morfológica tal que permite tratarlas como especies gemelas.

  13. Morphing Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciencenter

    2012-01-01

    In this activity, learners explore how nanosized structures can create brilliant color. Learners examine Blue Morpho butterflies in the light and discover what happens when they put a drop of alcohol on a butterfly's wing. Learners discover that some wings get their color from the nanoscale structures on the wings instead of pigments.

  14. Children's Butterfly Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maintained by the US Geological Survey (USGS), this modest site is a nice starting point for younger users interested in butterflies. All users, however, will enjoy the butterfly photo gallery, which offers pictures of common butterflies from around the world, organized by continent. The section currently contains thumbnail images of butterflies from Western Europe and Britain and North America, with sections on Central and South America and Asia. Other features at the site include a coloring page on the Monarch life cycle, an illustrated butterfly and moth life cycle, butterfly and moth FAQs, and a large collection of (annotated) related links.

  15. The Life of a Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan Greene

    2011-04-06

    What are the butterfly's stages of life? 1. The Life of a Butterfly Organizer 2. The Monarch Butterfly 3. Voicethread on Monarch Butterfly life cycle 4. A video on how Monarch Butterflies flock together after migrating. 5. Another video on the life cycle of the Monarch Buttefly. 6. A fun game where you catch the butterfly! Now you should know the stages of life for the butterfly! Come see me for project instructions. Hope you enjoyed! ...

  16. The Butterfly Conservatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web site, created to complement the museum's Butterfly Conservatory exhibit, looks at the butterflies that color our world. It includes an overview of butterfly anatomy, metamorphosis, defense mechanisms, evolution, and their role in ecology; as well as conservation efforts and the architecture of the exhibit's butterfly vivarium. There are movie clips and a Virtual Tour of the exhibit. Tips for how to cultivate a garden that attracts butterflies, an image library of nectar and host plants, and books and Web sites for further reference are also included.

  17. Graphene ``butterflies''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, G. L.; Mishchenko, A.; Gorbachev, R. V.; Ponomarenko, L. A.; Jalil, R.; Tu, J. S.; Woods, C. R.; Elias, D. C.; Novoselov, K. S.; Geim, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    By stacking different 2D crystals on top of each other, some astonishingly properties and new phenomena may be shown. Typically, when graphene is transferred onto atomically flat boron nitride substrate with a certain angel, a moire pattern may come into being. Within this superlattice structure, elections will rearrange themselves to make multiple clones of Dirac fermions. At higher field even more clones would be created, accordingly, the pattern of Hofstadter butterfly can turn out. Here, both of the resistive and capacitive measurements are used to research the Hofstadter spectrum experimentally. Resistive measurement shows the longitudinal conductivity has 1/B oscillations independent of carrier density, while the Hall Effect repeatedly changes its sign with B. Quantum capacitance measurement is employed to examine directly the density of states (DoS) in graphene superlattice devices and its evolution into a clear Hofstadter spectrum. In both case, self-similarity could be observed at the fractions where the magnetic sates begin to entwine, forming a Hofstadter-like pattern. While many more minigaps are observed in the capacitance measurement.

  18. Butterfly Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie

    2009-10-22

    In this project we will be learning about the life cycle of a butterfly and how the caterpillar becomes to be a butterfly. WHAT IS THE LIFE CYCLE OF A BUTTERFLY??? Subject: Science, Grade level:3rd and 4th Grade. Objective# 5-Describing life cycles of various animals to include incomplete and complete metamorphosis. In this project, I am going to show the students what an amazing and unique tranformation the a Caterpillar goes through and ...

  19. Lupine and Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula Rogers Huff

    2005-01-01

    In this two-part activity about the connection between the lupine plant and butterflies, learners first read "Miss Rumphius," a storybook about lupine by Barbara Cooney. Then learners plant their own seeds that can be transplanted into the wild. Learners discuss what plants need to grow. Next, learners review the butterfly life cycle and create a butterfly puppet that emerges from a pupa. Educators can also use this activity to introduce learners to endangered species (the Karner Blue butterfly is endangered in Wisconsin because of the decreased lupine population).

  20. Adaptation of Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBC Learn

    2010-10-07

    One of the bellwether species on the impact of climate change to our environment is the butterfly. Scientists say that warmer temperatures are affecting where butterflies live and breed, causing some species to migrate toward cooler climates near the earths poles. "Changing Planet" is produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation.

  1. Paint A Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    In this activity (under "Activities"), young learners choose a butterfly and then decorate it with different colors. Learners choose from three butterflies to decorate online, or can print out a blank one to color using markers or crayons. Use this activity to explore symmetry in nature.

  2. Butterflies of Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document talks about species and habits of Myanmar butterflies that were mentioned by the Nature and Wildlife Conservation Division of the Forest Department under the Ministry of Forestry in Myanmar

  3. Bonjour Papillon (Hello Butterfly).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Donald G.; Ogrydziak, Dan

    This story in French about a butterfly who talks to children is presented in comic-book style and is intended for use in a bilingual education setting. Words and expressions peculiar to the Franco-American idiom are marked and translated into standard French. The drawings are in black and white. (AMH)

  4. The Children's Butterfly Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    0000-00-00

    Images, life cycles, coloring pages, and well-designed teaching tools about butterflies are presented in a website with lots of photography. Five lessons are oriented around pollination. An interactive pollinator quiz allows users to pick appropriate pollinators for various flowers allowing discussions about pollinator ecology.

  5. Lorenz Attractor -- Butterfly Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Michael Cross, Cal Tech

    The "Butterfly Effect", or more technically the "sensitive dependence on initial conditions", is the essence of chaos. This is illustrated an applet of the Lorenz Attractor. The demonstration shows a graphical representation of the time variation of three variables X(t),Y(t) and Z(t), coupled by non-linear evolution equations.

  6. The real butterfly effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historical evidence is reviewed to show that what Ed Lorenz meant by the iconic phrase ‘the butterfly effect’ is not at all captured by the notion of sensitive dependence on initial conditions in low-order chaos. Rather, as presented in his 1969 Tellus paper, Lorenz intended the phrase to describe the existence of an absolute finite-time predicability barrier in certain multi-scale fluid systems, implying a breakdown of continuous dependence on initial conditions for large enough forecast lead times. To distinguish from ‘mere’ sensitive dependence, the effect discussed in Lorenz's Tellus paper is referred to as ‘the real butterfly effect’. Theoretical evidence for such a predictability barrier in a fluid described by the three-dimensional Navier–Stokes equations is discussed. Whilst it is still an open question whether the Navier–Stokes equation has this property, evidence from both idealized atmospheric simulators and analysis of operational weather forecasts suggests that the real butterfly effect exists in an asymptotic sense, i.e. for initial-time atmospheric perturbations that are small in scale and amplitude compared with (weather) scales of interest, but still large in scale and amplitude compared with variability in the viscous subrange. Despite this, the real butterfly effect is an intermittent phenomenon in the atmosphere, and its presence can be signalled a priori, and hence mitigated, by ensemble forecast methods. (invited article)

  7. Chasing the Hofstadter Butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Satija, Indubala

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the problem of self-similar properties of the Hofstadter butterfly spectrum, focusing on spectral as well as topological characteristics. In our studies involving all values of magnetic flux, we single out the most dominant hierarchy in the spectrum, which is found to be associated with an irrational number $\\zeta=2-\\sqrt{3}$. Characterizing an intrinsic frustration at smallest energy scale, this hidden quasicrystal encodes hierarchical set of topological quantum ...

  8. The State of the UK's Butterflies 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, R.; Brereton, T.M.; Asher, J.; Botham, M. S.; Middlebrook, I.; Roy, D B; Warren, M S

    2011-01-01

    This report summarises the findings of two world-leading citizen science projects: the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme, which involves weekly butterfly counts at over 1,000 sites, and Butterflies for the New Millennium, which has collated over six million butterfly sightings across the UK from thousands of members of the public.

  9. Atlas of North Dakota Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This impressive collection of butterfly photographs and distribution maps is provided by Dr. Ronald Royer of Minot State University, ND, in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center. The Butterfly Atlas is expanded and updated at the end of each butterfly season; 139 new species photos have recently been added. Species are conveniently grouped by family, and most species entries are now complete. In addition to one or more clear identification photographs, each species account includes common and scientific name, habitat information, larval food, adult flight dates, references, and a colorful range map detailing that species' occurrence in North Dakota. Beyond its utility as "the most accurate and most recent North Dakota county atlas data available anywhere," this site is a solid resource for butterfly enthusiasts and science educators everywhere.

  10. Mysteries of the Monarch Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    This radio broadcast describes the epic migration of monarch butterflies, who travel from North America to winter in the Oyamel (Balsa) forests west of Mexico City. It features an interview with the foremost researcher of monarchs, biologist Lincoln Brower, who explains that some generations pass before the butterflies return to Mexico, and points out the importance of protecting the Oyamel forests for the migration to continue. The broadcast is 8 minutes and 32 seconds in length.

  11. Butterfly larvae fool ants into mothering them

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS; )

    2008-01-03

    Danish researchers have found that in some areas in their country, beautiful blue Alcon butterflies fool ants into raising the butterfly larvae instead of their own, a report explains. The reason? The butterflies have developed an outer coating that mimics that of the ants.

  12. Extended season for northern butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Bengt

    2014-07-01

    Butterflies are like all insects in that they are temperature sensitive and a changing climate with higher temperatures might effect their phenology. Several studies have found support for earlier flight dates among the investigated species. A comparative study with data from a citizen science project, including 66 species of butterflies in Sweden, was undertaken, and the result confirms that most butterfly species now fly earlier during the season. This is especially evident for butterflies overwintering as adults or as pupae. However, the advancement in phenology is correlated with flight date, and some late season species show no advancement or have even postponed their flight dates and are now flying later in the season. The results also showed that latitude had a strong effect on the adult flight date, and most of the investigated species showed significantly later flights towards the north. Only some late flying species showed an opposite trend, flying earlier in the north. A majority of the investigated species in this study showed a general response to temperature and advanced their flight dates with warmer temperatures (on average they advanced their flight dates by 3.8 days/°C), although not all species showed this response. In essence, a climate with earlier springs and longer growing seasons seems not to change the appearance patterns in a one-way direction. We now see butterflies on the wings both earlier and later in the season and some consequences of these patterns are discussed. So far, studies have concentrated mostly on early season butterfly-plant interactions but also late season studies are needed for a better understanding of long-term population consequences.

  13. ESTUDIO DE LA COMUNIDAD DE LEPIDÓPTEROS DIURNOS EN ZONAS NATURALES Y SISTEMAS PRODUCTIVOS DEL MUNICIPIO DE CALOTO (CAUCA, COLOMBIA) / STUDY OF THE BUTTERFLY COMMUNITY IN NATURAL AND INTERVENED AREAS OF CALOTO (CAUCA, COLOMBIA)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Carolina, Millán-J.; Patricia, Chacón; Alan, Giraldo.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo primordial de conocer la diversidad de lepidópteros diurnos en zonas intervenidas de la vereda Morales (Caloto, Cauca), se realizaron muestreos en marzo de 2007 y abril de 2008, utilizando trampas Van Someren-Rydon, captura directa y visual. Se estudiaron 4 biotopos: bosque ripario, [...] cultivo de caña de azúcar, cafetal en policultivo y cerca viva. De 1594 individuos observados, se identificaron 90 especies de mariposas de seis familias; Nymphalidae con 60 especies de las subfamilias Nymphalinae (14), Charaxinae (6), Morphinae (2), Satyrinae (5), Heliconiinae (8), Ithomiinae (6), Danainae (3), Acraeinae (5), Limenitidinae (2), Biblidinae (5) y Melitaeinae (4); Pieridae (11 especies), Hesperiidae (6), Papilionidae (7), Lycaenidae (4) y Riodinidae (2). El 39% de la abundancia, incluyó especies generalistas y polífagas representadas por los géneros Anartia (144 individuos), Actinote (69), Caligo (14), Urbanus (72), Anteos (44), Phoebis (56) y Eurema (223), reconocidas por estar frecuentemente asociadas a zonas altamente intervenidas por el hombre. De lo anterior, se desprende que la presencia de la subfamilia Satyrinae (108 individuos) y del género Morpho (9), indica actividad de lepidópteros característicos de bosque conservado. En este mismo sentido, la alta abundancia de Ithomiinae (199 individuos) en cafetales de sombra alternado con siembra de plátano, indica que este policultivo ofrece un hábitat apropiado para esta subfamilia. Abstract in english Two sampling activities (March 2007 and April 2008) were carried out in the municipal rural settlement of Morales (Caloto-Cauca) in order to evaluate the day-butterfly diversity associated with four intervened biotopes: riparian forest, sugarcane plantations, coffee-plantain crop and natural fence. [...] The 1594 individuals were collected using Van Someren-Rydon traps, belonging to 90 species from six families; Nymphalidae with 60 species from the subfamilies Nymphalinae (14), Charaxinae (6), Morphinae (2), Satyrinae (5), Heliconiinae (8), Ithomiinae (6), Danainae (3), Acraeinae (5), Limenitidinae (2), Biblidinae (5) and Melitaeinae (4), Pieridae (11) Hesperiidae (6), Papilionidae (7), Lycaenidae (4) and Riodinidae (2). Additionally, 39% of the species were polyphagous and generalists, represented by the genera Anartia (144 individuals), Actinote (69), Caligo (14), Urbanus (72), Anteos (44), Phoebis (56) and Eurema (223). All these have been recognized as genera associated to anthropogenic intervened areas. The presence of the Satyrinae subfamily (108 individuals) and the Morpho genus (9 individuals) in the study zone, suggest the presence of high quality forest relicts. The abundance of Ithomiinae (199 individuals) in the shaded coffee-plantain crop indicates that this biotope offers a suitable habitat for this subfamily.

  14. Butterfly Tachyons in Vacuum String Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Matlock, Peter

    2002-01-01

    We use geometrical conformal field theory methods to investigate tachyon fluctuations about the butterfly projector state in Vacuum String Field Theory. We find that the on-shell condition for the tachyon field is equivalent to the requirement that the quadratic term in the string-field action vanish on shell. This further motivates the interpretation of the butterfly state as a D-brane. We begin a calculation of the tension of the butterfly, and conjecture that this will ma...

  15. Draw a Monarch Butterfly: Scientific Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Museum of Natural History

    2012-07-17

    Ivy Rutzky, a scientific assistant at the American Museum of Natural History, introduces an activity where learners create a scientific illustration of a monarch butterfly. Learners will discover why scientists prefer to use drawings rather than photographs, as well as learn about butterflies. Learners will practice their research, observation, and drawing skills. Learners are encouraged to follow up this activity by planting their own butterfly gardens.

  16. Butterfly valve torque prediction methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Motor-Operated Valve (MOV) Performance Prediction Program, the Electric Power Research Institute has sponsored the development of methodologies for predicting thrust and torque requirements of gate, globe, and butterfly MOVs. This paper presents the methodology that will be used by utilities to calculate the dynamic torque requirements for butterfly valves. The total dynamic torque at any disc position is the sum of the hydrodynamic torque, bearing torque (which is induced by the hydrodynamic force), as well as other small torque components (such as packing torque). The hydrodynamic torque on the valve disc, caused by the fluid flow through the valve, depends on the disc angle, flow velocity, upstream flow disturbances, disc shape, and the disc aspect ratio. The butterfly valve model provides sets of nondimensional flow and torque coefficients that can be used to predict flow rate and hydrodynamic torque throughout the disc stroke and to calculate the required actuation torque and the maximum transmitted torque throughout the opening and closing stroke. The scope of the model includes symmetric and nonsymmetric discs of different shapes and aspects ratios in compressible and incompressible fluid applications under both choked and nonchoked flow conditions. The model features were validated against test data from a comprehensive flowloop and in situ test program. These tests were designed to systematically address the effect of the following parameters on the required torque: valve size, disc shapes and disc aspect ratios, upstream elbow orientation and its proximity, and flow conditions. The applicability of the nondimensional coefficients to valves of different sizes was validated by performing tests on 42-in. valve and a precisely scaled 6-in. model. The butterfly valve model torque predictions were found to bound test data from the flow-loop and in situ testing, as shown in the examples provided in this paper

  17. Point of View: Students, Butterflies, and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey Marcus

    2005-11-01

    This article accounts one research scientist's interest in butterflies and his aversion to dealing with cancer with it hitting so close to home. Prefering to emphasize problem-solving skills rather than recall, this scientist finds himself studying the genetics underlying the formation of butterfly patterns. It is his goal for students to learn to make connections between disparate branches of science.

  18. The Butterfly Effect for Physics Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, James R.; Valentine, John H.

    2015-01-01

    A low-cost chaos dynamics lab is developed for quantitative demonstration of the butterfly effect using a magnetic pendulum. Chaotic motion is explored by recording magnetic time series. Students analyze the data in Excel® to investigate the butterfly effect as well as the reconstruction of the strange attractor using time delay plots. The lab…

  19. Minimum Cycle Covers of Butterfly and Benes Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert William

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Butterfly network is the most popular bounded-degree derivative of the hypercube network. The benes network consists of back-to-back butterflies. In this paper, we obtain the minimum vertex-disjoint cycle cover number for the odd dimensional butterfly networks and prove that it is not possible to find the same for the even dimensional butterfly networks and benes networks. Further we obtain the minimum edge-disjoint cycle cover number for butterfly networks.

  20. Butterfly Surveys in Southeastern North Dakota : 1997

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The main goal of this study was to conduct inventories of rare butterflies and skippers on a number of prairie and wetland sites in North Dakota. The goal of this...

  1. Butterfly Surveys in North Dakota : 1995

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The main goal of this study was to conduct inventories of rare butterflies and skippers on a number of prairie and wetland sites in North Dakota. The main goal of...

  2. From the Hofstadter to the Fibonacci butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Naumis, Gerardo G.; Lopez-Rodriguez, F. J.

    2006-01-01

    We show that the electronic spectrum of a tight-binding Hamiltonian defined in a quasiperiodic chain with an on-site potential given by a Fibonacci sequence, can be obtained as a superposition of Harper potentials. The electronic spectrum of the Harper equation is a fractal set, known as Hofstadter butterfly. Here we show that is possible to construct a similar butterfly for the Fibonacci potential just by adding harmonics to the Harper potential. As a result, the equations ...

  3. Germline transformation of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey M. Marcus; Ramos, Diane M.; Monteiro, Antónia

    2004-01-01

    Ecological and evolutionary theory has frequently been inspired by the diversity of colour patterns on the wings of butterflies. More recently, these varied patterns have also become model systems for studying the evolution of developmental mechanisms. A technique that will facilitate our understanding of butterfly colour-pattern development is germline transformation. Germline transformation permits functional tests of candidate gene products and of cis-regulatory regions, and provides a mea...

  4. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly Using interactivity to excite and educate children about butterflies and the National Museum of Play at The Strong's Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Lydia

    The National Museum of Play at The Strong's Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden is a tropical rainforest that allows visitors to step into the world of butterflies, but lacks a more comprehensive educational element to teach visitors additional information about butterflies. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly is a thesis project designed to enhance younger visitors' experience of the Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden with an interactive educational application that aligns with The Strong's mission of encouraging learning, creativity, and discovery. This was accomplished through a series of fun and educational games and animations, designed for use as a kiosk outside the garden and as a part of The Strong's website. Content, planning, and organization of this project has been completed through research and observation of the garden in the following areas: its visitors, butterflies, best usability practices for children, and game elements that educate and engage children. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly teaches users about the butterfly's life cycle, anatomy, and characteristics as well as their life in the Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden. Through the use of the design programs Adobe Illustrator, Flash, and After Effects; the programming language ActionScript3.0; a child-friendly user interface and design; audio elements and user takeaways, Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly appeals to children of all ages, interests, and learning styles. The project can be viewed at lydiapowers.com/Thesis/FlutterByButterfly.html

  5. Climate change, phenology, and butterfly host plant utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro-Cano, Jose A.; Karlsson, Bengt; Posledovich, Diana; Toftegaard, Tenna; Wiklund, Christer; Ehrlén, Johan; Gotthard, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of how species interactions are influenced by climate warming is paramount to understand current biodiversity changes. We review phenological changes of Swedish butterflies during the latest decades and explore potential climate effects on butterfly–host plant interactions using the Orange tip butterfly Anthocharis cardamines and its host plants as a model system. This butterfly has advanced its appearance dates substantially, and its mean flight date shows a positive correlation wi...

  6. Effects of herbicides on Behr's metalmark butterfly, a surrogate species for the endangered butterfly, Lange's metalmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange's metalmark butterfly, Apodemia mormo langei Comstock, is in danger of extinction due to loss of habitat caused by invasive exotic plants which are eliminating its food, naked stem buckwheat. Herbicides are being used to remove invasive weeds from the dunes; however, little is known about the potential effects of herbicides on butterflies. To address this concern we evaluated potential toxic effects of three herbicides on Behr's metalmark, a close relative of Lange's metalmark. First instars were exposed to recommended field rates of triclopyr, sethoxydim, and imazapyr. Life history parameters were recorded after exposure. These herbicides reduced the number of adults that emerged from pupation (24–36%). Each herbicide has a different mode of action. Therefore, we speculate that effects are due to inert ingredients or indirect effects on food plant quality. If these herbicides act the same in A. mormo langei, they may contribute to the decline of this species. - Highlights: ? We evaluated the effects of three herbicides on the butterfly, Behr's metalmark. ? These herbicides are used to control invasive weeds in butterfly habitat. ? The herbicides reduced adult butterfly emergence. - Herbicides are used to remove invasive weeds from butterfly habitat. Certain herbicides may be having a negative effect on butterflies.

  7. Cavitation noise from butterfly valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavitation in valves can produce levels of intense noise. It is possible to mathematically express a limit for a design level of cavitation noise in terms of the cavitation parameter sigma. Using the cavitation parameter or limit, it is then possible to calculate the flow conditions at which a design level of cavitation noise will occur. However, the intensity of cavitation increases with the upstream pressure and valve size at a constant sigma. Therefore, it is necessary to derive equations to correct or scale the cavitation limit for the effects of different upstream pressures and valve sizes. The following paper discusses and presents experimental data for the caviation noise limit as well as the cavitation limits of incipient, critical, incipient damage, and choking cavitation for butterfly valves. The main emphasis is on the design limit of caviation noise, and a noise level of 85 decibels was selected as the noise limit. Tables of data and scaling exponents are included for applying the design limits for the effects of upstream pressure and valve size. (orig.)

  8. Male-killing in African butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Saeed M. Hassan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Female-biased sex ratios occur in many insect species as a consequence of infection by maternally-inherited male-killing bacterial endosymbionts. In this paper, we revise the research conducted on the phenomenon of male-killing in African nymphalid butterflies, with special focus on the cases of Danaus chrysippus, Acraea encedon and Acraea encedana. The evolution of male-killing in each case was addressed, together with the phylogeny of male-killers that were identified from this group. Moreover, the potential impacts that male-killers might impose on the evolution of their butterfly hosts were thoroughly investigated. In the end of this review, we present a number of unanswered questions to be targeted by future research work on the male-killing in these butterflies.

  9. Hofstadter butterfly as Quantum phase diagram

    OpenAIRE

    Osadchy, D.; Avron, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Hofstadter butterfly is viewed as a quantum phase diagram with infinitely many phases, labelled by their (integer) Hall conductance, and a fractal structure. We describe various properties of this phase diagram: We establish Gibbs phase rules; count the number of components of each phase, and characterize the set of multiple phase coexistence.

  10. About the Monarch Butterfly Migration - Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    0000-00-00

    Very good set of information about monarch butterflies and monitoring their annual migration. Some of the graphics on the site are large and may require high-speed internet for quick access. Lots of good lesson plan ideas for highschool and undergraduate students. Ideas that can be expanded for graduate students. Good photographs and video.

  11. Raising Butterflies from Your Own Garden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howley-Pfeifer, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Describes how raising monarch, black swallowtail, and mourning cloak butterflies in a kindergarten class garden can provide opportunities for observation experiences. Includes detailed steps for instruction and describes stages of growth. Excerpts children's journal dictations to illustrate ways to support the discovery process. Describes related…

  12. An Opera Opportunity: Butterfly in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jeri

    1992-01-01

    This article describes a program of the Lyric Opera Company of Chicago (Illinois) that brought opera to the classroom of students with deafness in grades three through six. The four-session program explored vocabulary, music, story-telling, and Japanese culture and culminated in a student production of "Madame Butterfly." (JDD)

  13. Butterfly responses to prairie restoration through fire and grazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J.A.; Debinski, D.M.; Koford, R.R.; Miller, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    The development of land for modern agriculture has resulted in losses of native prairie habitat. The small, isolated patches of prairie habitat that remain are threatened by fire suppression, overgrazing, and invasion by non-native species. We evaluated the effects of three restoration practices (grazing only, burning only, and burning and grazing) on the vegetation characteristics and butterfly communities of remnant prairies. Total butterfly abundance was highest on prairies that were managed with burning and grazing and lowest on those that were only burned. Butterfly species richness did not differ among any of the restoration practices. Butterfly species diversity was highest on sites that were only burned. Responses of individual butterfly species to restoration practices were highly variable. In the best predictive regression model, total butterfly abundance was negatively associated with the percent cover of bare ground and positively associated with the percent cover of forbs. Canonical correspondence analysis revealed that sites with burned only and grazed only practices could be separated based on their butterfly community composition. Butterfly communities in each of the three restoration practices are equally species rich but different practices yield compositionally different butterfly communities. Because of this variation in butterfly species responses to different restoration practices, there is no single practice that will benefit all species or even all species within habitat-specialist or habitat-generalist habitat guilds. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 75 FR 10309 - Wisconsin Statewide Habitat Conservation Plan for Karner Blue Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ...additional conservation and protection of butterfly habitat, without the ``fear'' sometimes associated with government regulation. Management protocols have been refined, populations of butterflies have increased and others discovered,...

  15. Climate change, phenology, and butterfly host plant utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Cano, Jose A; Karlsson, Bengt; Posledovich, Diana; Toftegaard, Tenna; Wiklund, Christer; Ehrlén, Johan; Gotthard, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of how species interactions are influenced by climate warming is paramount to understand current biodiversity changes. We review phenological changes of Swedish butterflies during the latest decades and explore potential climate effects on butterfly-host plant interactions using the Orange tip butterfly Anthocharis cardamines and its host plants as a model system. This butterfly has advanced its appearance dates substantially, and its mean flight date shows a positive correlation with latitude. We show that there is a large latitudinal variation in host use and that butterfly populations select plant individuals based on their flowering phenology. We conclude that A. cardamines is a phenological specialist but a host species generalist. This implies that thermal plasticity for spring development influences host utilization of the butterfly through effects on the phenological matching with its host plants. However, the host utilization strategy of A. cardamines appears to render it resilient to relatively large variation in climate. PMID:25576283

  16. Illustrate the Butterfly Effect on the Chaos Rikitake system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousof Gholipour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This letter presents butterfly effect on a Chaos system. In this letter we want to briefly introduce Chaos Rikitake system and monitor the butterfly effect on this system. In chaos theory, the butterfly effect is the sensitive dependency on initial conditions. For this goal at the first we suppose initiation point and plot it, for base of work, later will apply small change on one item of initiation point and monitor behavior of Rikitake system. At the end we want to reclaim the famous lecture of Edward Lorenz in 1972 “Does the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas?”. The numerical simulations by use of MATLAB software are given to illustrate the butterfly effect on this system.

  17. On Random Linear Network Coding for Butterfly Network

    OpenAIRE

    Guang, Xuan; Fu, Fang-wei

    2010-01-01

    Random linear network coding is a feasible encoding tool for network coding, specially for the non-coherent network, and its performance is important in theory and application. In this letter, we study the performance of random linear network coding for the well-known butterfly network by analyzing the failure probabilities. We determine the failure probabilities of random linear network coding for the well-known butterfly network and the butterfly network with channel failu...

  18. Lounge Butterfly märgiti ära rahvusvaheliselt kõrgelt hinnatud erialaajakirjas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2011-01-01

    Ülevaade erialaajakirjas "Drinks International" ilmunud artiklist, mis hindab Lounge Butterfly'd paremuselt Baltimaade teiseks joogikohaks ning joogikoha rahvusvahelistel võistlustel auhindu noppinud barmenidest-omanikest

  19. From the Hofstadter to the Fibonacci butterfly

    CERN Document Server

    Naumis, G G; Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2006-01-01

    We show that the electronic spectrum of a tight-binding hamiltonian defined in a quasiperiodic chain with an on-site potential given by a Fibonacci sequence, can be obtained as a superposition of Harper potentials. The electronic spectrum of the Harper equation is a fractal set, known as Hofstadter butterfly. Here we show that is possible to construct a similar butterfly for the Fibonacci potential just by adding harmonics to the Harper potential. As a result, the equations in reciprocal space for the Fibonacci case have the form of a chain with a long range interaction between Fourier components. Then we explore the transformation between both spectra, and specifically the origin of energy gaps due to the analytical calculation of the components in reciprocal space of the potentials. We also calculate some localization properties by finding the correlator of each potential.

  20. Navigational mechanisms of migrating monarch butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, Steven M; Gegear, Robert J; Merlin, Christine

    2010-09-01

    Recent studies of the iconic fall migration of monarch butterflies have illuminated the mechanisms behind their southward navigation while using a time-compensated sun compass. Skylight cues, such as the sun itself and polarized light, are processed through both eyes and are probably integrated in the brain's central complex, the presumed site of the sun compass. Time compensation is provided by circadian clocks that have a distinctive molecular mechanism and that reside in the antennae. Monarchs might also use a magnetic compass because they possess two cryptochromes that have the molecular capability for light-dependent magnetoreception. Multiple genomic approaches are now being used with the aim of identifying navigation genes. Monarch butterflies are thus emerging as an excellent model organism in which to study the molecular and neural basis of long-distance migration. PMID:20627420

  1. Male-killing in African butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Sami Saeed M. Hassan; Eihab Idris

    2013-01-01

    Female-biased sex ratios occur in many insect species as a consequence of infection by maternally-inherited male-killing bacterial endosymbionts. In this paper, we revise the research conducted on the phenomenon of male-killing in African nymphalid butterflies, with special focus on the cases of Danaus chrysippus, Acraea encedon and Acraea encedana. The evolution of male-killing in each case was addressed, together with the phylogeny of male-killers that were identified from this group. Moreo...

  2. Navigational Mechanisms of Migrating Monarch Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Reppert, Steven M; Gegear, Robert J.; Merlin, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of the iconic fall migration of monarch butterflies have illuminated the mechanisms behind the navigation south, using a time-compensated sun compass. Skylight cues, such as the sun itself and polarized light, are processed through both eyes and likely integrated in the brain’s central complex, the presumed site of the sun compass. Time compensation is provided by circadian clocks that have a distinctive molecular mechanism and that reside in the antennae. Monarchs may also u...

  3. A magnetic compass aids monarch butterfly migration

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Patrick A; Gegear, Robert J.; Reppert, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Convincing evidence that migrant monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a magnetic compass to aid their fall migration has been lacking from the spectacular navigational capabilities of this species. Here we use flight simulator studies to show that migrants indeed possess an inclination magnetic compass to help direct their flight equatorward in the fall. The use of this inclination compass is light-dependent utilizing ultraviolet-A/blue light between 380 and 420?nm. Notably, the signi...

  4. Germline transformation of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Jeffrey M; Ramos, Diane M; Monteiro, Antónia

    2004-01-01

    Ecological and evolutionary theory has frequently been inspired by the diversity of colour patterns on the wings of butterflies. More recently, these varied patterns have also become model systems for studying the evolution of developmental mechanisms. A technique that will facilitate our understanding of butterfly colour-pattern development is germline transformation. Germline transformation permits functional tests of candidate gene products and of cis-regulatory regions, and provides a means of generating new colour-pattern mutants by insertional mutagenesis. We report the successful transformation of the African satyrid butterfly Bicyclus anynana with two different transposable element vectors, Hermes and piggyBac, each carrying EGFP coding sequences driven by the 3XP3 synthetic enhancer that drives gene expression in the eyes. Candidate lines identified by screening for EGFP in adult eyes were later confirmed by PCR amplification of a fragment of the EGFP coding sequence from genomic DNA. Flanking DNA surrounding the insertions was amplified by inverse PCR and sequenced. Transformation rates were 5% for piggyBac and 10.2% for Hermes. Ultimately, the new data generated by these techniques may permit an integrated understanding of the developmental genetics of colour-pattern formation and of the ecological and evolutionary processes in which these patterns play a role. PMID:15503989

  5. Germline transformation of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Jeffrey M; Ramos, Diane M; Monteiro, Antónia

    2004-08-01

    Ecological and evolutionary theory has frequently been inspired by the diversity of colour patterns on the wings of butterflies. More recently, these varied patterns have also become model systems for studying the evolution of developmental mechanisms. A technique that will facilitate our understanding of butterfly colour-pattern development is germline transformation. Germline transformation permits functional tests of candidate gene products and of cis-regulatory regions, and provides a means of generating new colour-pattern mutants by insertional mutagenesis. We report the successful transformation of the African satyrid butterfly Bicyclus anynana with two different transposable element vectors, Hermes and piggyBac, each carrying EGFP coding sequences driven by the 3XP3 synthetic enhancer that drives gene expression in the eyes. Candidate lines identified by screening for EGFP in adult eyes were later confirmed by PCR amplification of a fragment of the EGFP coding sequence from genomic DNA. Flanking DNA surrounding the insertions was amplified by inverse PCR and sequenced. Transformation rates were 5% for piggyBac and 10.2% for Hermes. Ultimately, the new data generated by these techniques may permit an integrated understanding of the developmental genetics of colour-pattern formation and of the ecological and evolutionary processes in which these patterns play a role. PMID:15503989

  6. Fractality of Hofstadter Butterfly in Specific Heat Oscillation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, L. P.; Xu, W. H.; Qin, M. P.; Xiang, T.

    2010-01-01

    We calculate thermodynamical properties of the Hofstadter model using a recently developed quantum transfer matrix method. We find intrinsic oscillation features in specific heat that manifest the fractal structure of the Hofstadter butterfly. We also propose experimental approaches which use specific heat as an access to detect the Hofstadter butterfly.

  7. Infrared detection based on localized modification of Morpho butterfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fangyu; Shen, Qingchen; Shi, Xindong; Li, Shipu; Wang, Wanlin; Luo, Zhen; He, Gufeng; Zhang, Peng; Tao, Peng; Song, Chengyi; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Di; Deng, Tao; Shang, Wen

    2015-02-01

    Inspired by butterflies an advanced detection and sensing system is developed. The hierarchical nanoarchitecture of Morpho butterfly wings is shown to facilitate the selective modification of such a structure, which results in a sensitive infrared response. These findings offer a new path both for detecting infrared photons and for generating nanostructured bimaterial systems for high-performance sensing platforms. PMID:25532496

  8. The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly’s Creative Push on Early Chinese Publishing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Li

    2012-01-01

    The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly, as an early Chinese popular literature important school, is a participant of early Chinese publishing industry who promoted early Chinese publishing industry development through creativities on publishing from four aspects such as publishing content creativity, graphic design creativity, marketing creativity and cross-media industry creativity.

  9. The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly’s Creative Push on Early Chinese Publishing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly, as an early Chinese popular literature important school, is a participant of early Chinese publishing industry who promoted early Chinese publishing industry development through creativities on publishing from four aspects such as publishing content creativity, graphic design creativity, marketing creativity and cross-media industry creativity.

  10. A butterfly algorithm for synthetic aperture radar

    OpenAIRE

    Demanet, Laurent; Ferrara, Matthew; Maxwell, Nicholas; Poulson, Jack; Ying, Lexing

    2011-01-01

    It is not currently known if it is possible to accurately form a synthetic aperture radar image from N data points in provable near-linear complexity, where accuracy is defined as the ?? error between the full O(N²) backprojection image and the approximate image. To bridge this gap, we present a backprojection algorithm with complexity O(log(1/?)N log N), with ? the tunable pixelwise accuracy. It is based on the butterfly scheme, which works for vastly more general oscillatory integral...

  11. Powers of Ten with the Blue Morpho Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    This lab, presented by the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network, introduces students to the concepts of scale and magnification using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image of a Blue Morpho butterfly wing. If educators do not have access to an SEM,  images is included with the activity. This lesson will prompt students to think about nanoscale, biomimicry, SEM technology, and measurement. Students will examine the nanostructures of the butterfly's wings using either the images or the SEM (if available). Included in this lab are: teacher guide, student worksheet, and an image of a Blue Morpho butterfly.

  12. Delayed population explosion of an introduced butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Carol L; Holdren, Cheryl E; Kulahci, Ipek G; Bonebrake, Timothy C; Inouye, Brian D; Fay, John P; McMillan, Ann; Williams, Ernest H; Ehrlich, Paul R

    2006-03-01

    1. The causes of lagged population and geographical range expansions after species introductions are poorly understood, and there are relatively few detailed case studies. 2. We document the 29-year history of population dynamics and structure for a population of Euphydryas gillettii Barnes that was introduced to the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA in 1977. 3. The population size remained low (geographical range of the species. 4. However, by 2002 the population increased dramatically to > 3000 individuals and covered approximately 70 ha, nearly all to the south of the original site. The direction of population expansion was the same as that of predominant winds. 5. By 2004, the butterfly's local distribution had retracted mainly to three habitat patches. It thus exhibited a 'surge/contraction' form of population growth. Searches within 15 km of the original site yielded no other new populations. 6. In 2005, butterfly numbers crashed, but all three habitat patches remained occupied. The populations within each patch did not decrease in the same proportions, suggesting independent dynamics that are characteristic of metapopulations. 7. We postulate that this behaviour results, in this species, in establishment of satellite populations and, given appropriate habitat structure, may result in lagged or punctuated expansions of introduced populations. PMID:16637999

  13. Checklist and Pollard Walk butterfly survey methods on public lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, R.A.; Austin, J.E.; Newton, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    Checklist and Pollard Walk butterfly survey methods were contemporaneously applied to seven public sites in North Dakota during the summer of 1995. Results were compared for effect of method and site on total number of butterflies and total number of species detected per hour. Checklist searching produced significantly more butterfly detections per hour than Pollard Walks at all sites. Number of species detected per hour did not differ significantly either among sites or between methods. Many species were detected by only one method, and at most sites generalist and invader species were more likely to be observed during checklist searches than during Pollard Walks. Results indicate that checklist surveys are a more efficient means for initial determination of a species list for a site, whereas for long-term monitoring the Pollard Walk is more practical and statistically manageable. Pollard Walk transects are thus recommended once a prairie butterfly fauna has been defined for a site by checklist surveys.

  14. Butterflies of Sanjay Gandhi National Park, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol P Patwardhan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sanjay Gandhi National Park (SGNP is spread over 103 sq km in Mumbai and Thane districts of Maharashtra, India. During the study I have sighted 142 species of butterflies with another 7 unconfirmed sightings. The butterflies recorded belong to Papilionidae (10 spp., Pieridae (17 spp, Lycaenidae (47 spp., Nymphalidae (40 spp. and Hesperiidae (28 spp.. The study emphasizes the importance of this park as a hotspot which is surrounded by 17 million people.

  15. Hitch-hiking parasitic wasp learns to exploit butterfly antiaphrodisiac

    OpenAIRE

    Huigens, M. E.; Pashalidou, F.G.; Qian, M.H.; Bukovinszky, T.; Smid, H.M.; Loon, J.J.A., van; Dicke, M.; Fatouros, N.E.

    2009-01-01

    Many insects possess a sexual communication system that is vulnerable to chemical espionage by parasitic wasps. We recently discovered that a hitch-hiking (H) egg parasitoid exploits the antiaphrodisiac pheromone benzyl cyanide (BC) of the Large Cabbage White butterfly Pieris brassicae. This pheromone is passed from male butterflies to females during mating to render them less attractive to conspecific males. When the tiny parasitic wasp Trichogramma brassicae detects the antiaphrodisiac, it ...

  16. Pollen Processing Behavior of Heliconius Butterflies: A Derived Grooming Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Hikl, Anna-laetitia; Krenn, Harald W.

    2011-01-01

    Pollen feeding behaviors Heliconius and Laparus (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) represent a key innovation that has shaped other life history traits of these neotropical butterflies. Although all flower visiting Lepidoptera regularly come in contact with pollen, only Heliconius and Laparus butterflies actively collect pollen with the proboscis and subsequently take up nutrients from the pollen grains. This study focused on the behavior of pollen processing and compared the movement patterns with p...

  17. A magnetic compass aids monarch butterfly migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Patrick A; Gegear, Robert J; Reppert, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Convincing evidence that migrant monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a magnetic compass to aid their fall migration has been lacking from the spectacular navigational capabilities of this species. Here we use flight simulator studies to show that migrants indeed possess an inclination magnetic compass to help direct their flight equatorward in the fall. The use of this inclination compass is light-dependent utilizing ultraviolet-A/blue light between 380 and 420?nm. Notably, the significance of light monarch studies. The antennae are important for the inclination compass because they appear to contain light-sensitive magnetosensors. For migratory monarchs, the inclination compass may serve as an important orientation mechanism when directional daylight cues are unavailable and may also augment time-compensated sun compass orientation for appropriate directionality throughout the migration. PMID:24960099

  18. Local and effective: Two projects of butterfly farming in Cambodia and Tanzania (Insecta: Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. van der Heyden

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Los proyectos "Banteay Srey Butterfly Centre" en Camboya (Asia y "Zanzibar Butterfly Centre" in Tanzania (África se describen como modelos de cría sostenible de mariposas en apoyo para comunidades locales.

  19. The Subversion of the Oriental Stereotype in M. Butterfly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songfeng Wen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is to examine the Oriental stereotype propagated by Giacomo Puccini’s Madame Butterfly and how it is subverted in David Henry Hwang’s M. Butterfly. Puccini portrays a docile, self-sacrificial Oriental woman who is totally submissive to and finally dies for her unworthy White lover. The opera’s popularity has perpetuated the stereotype of an ideal Oriental woman. In Hwang’s M. Butterfly, the stereotype of the ideal Oriental woman is subverted as the gender roles and the power structure of the Oriental woman and the Occidental man have been reversed. The White man, Gallimard, rather than a powerful sexual predator, is manipulated by his Oriental lover, a man masquerading woman, and finally dies for his Oriental lover. By analyzing the stereotype in Madame Butterfly and its subversion in M. Butterfly, it is hoped to reveal the insidiousness of stereotyping in understanding different cultures and peoples and it is also called for to rid people of stereotyping in cross-cultural communications.

  20. Development of linear flow rate control system for eccentric butter-fly valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butter-fly valves are advantageous over gate, globe, plug, and ball valves in a variety of installations, particularly in the large sizes. The purpose of this project development of linear flow rate control system for eccentric butter-fly valve (intelligent butter-fly valve system). The intelligent butter-fly valve system consist of a valve body, micro controller. The micro controller consist of torque control system, pressure censor, worm and worm gear and communication line etc. The characteristics of intelligent butter-fly valve system as follows: Linear flow rate control function. Digital remote control function. guard function. Self-checking function. (author)

  1. Does breathing disturb coordination in butterfly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, L; Chollet, D; Sanders, R

    2010-03-01

    This study quantified the effects of breathing compared to non-breathing and "race pace" on arm to leg coordination in the butterfly stroke. Twelve elite male swimmers swam at four paces: 400 m, 200 m, 100 m and 50 m. The arm and leg stroke phases were identified by video analysis to calculate the total time gap (TTG), which is the sum of T1 (hands' entry in the water/high point of first kick), T2 (beginning of the hands' backward movement/low point of first kick), T3 (hands' arrival in a vertical plane to the shoulders/high point of second kick) and T4 (hands' release from the water/low point of second kick). Two strokes with breathing were compared to two strokes with breath-holding. The TTG was greater with breathing (23.3% VS. 19%), showing less propulsive continuity between arm and leg actions (p<0.05). This was due to the shorter downward leg kick and longer arm catch and upward leg kick that led to longer glide time. Conversely, breathing leads to greater coupling between the hand exit and the end of leg propulsion, which was due to a shorter arm push phase to facilitate the head exit to breathe. PMID:20166004

  2. Selection on the wing in Heliconius butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens Virginie M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Asbtract To what extent population structure favours the establishment of new phenotypes within a species remains a fundamental question in evolutionary studies. By reducing gene flow, habitat fragmentation is a major factor shaping the genetic structuring of populations, favouring isolation of small populations in which drift may rapidly change frequencies of new variants. When these variants provide advantages to individuals, the combined effect of selection and drift can lead to rapid shifts in phenotypes. In a study published in BMC Genetics, Albuquerque de Moura et al. asked whether such a general pattern of population structure can be observed in Heliconius species, which could have strong implication in the evolution of colour pattern diversification in these butterflies. In this commentary we discuss the potential roles of these three processes (drift, selection and dispersal on the evolution of Heliconius wing patterns in regard to the findings of a common fine-scale population structure within the co-mimetic species H. melpomene and H. erato. Indeed, a general pattern of population subdivision in the history of these two species may have provoked the major phenotypical shifts observed in their wing colour patterns. The suggestion that coupled environmental pressures (counter-selection of dispersal and selection on co-evolved traits could be responsible for identical genetic differentiation profiles in H. erato and H. melpomene clearly merits further investigations using both detailed population genetic (including landscape genetic and ecological studies.

  3. A mosaic of chemical coevolution in a large blue butterfly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, David R; Als, Thomas Damm

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms of recognition are essential to the evolution of mutualistic and parasitic interactions between species. One such example is the larval mimicry that Maculinea butterfly caterpillars use to parasitize Myrmica ant colonies. We found that the greater the match between the surface chemistry of Maculinea alcon and two of its host Myrmica species, the more easily ant colonies were exploited. The geographic patterns of surface chemistry indicate an ongoing coevolutionary arms race between the butterflies and Myrmica rubra, which has significant genetic differentiation between populations, but not between the butterflies and a second, sympatric host, Myrmica ruginodis, which has panmictic populations. Alternative hosts may therefore provide an evolutionary refuge for a parasite during periods of counteradaptation by their preferred hosts.

  4. A mosaic of chemical coevolution in a large blue butterfly.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, David R; Als, Thomas D

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms of recognition are essential to the evolution of mutualistic and parasitic interactions between species. One such example is the larval mimicry that Maculinea butterfly caterpillars use to parasitize Myrmica ant colonies. We found that the greater the match between the surface chemistry of Maculinea alcon and two of its host Myrmica species, the more easily ant colonies were exploited. The geographic patterns of surface chemistry indicate an ongoing coevolutionary arms race between the butterflies and Myrmica rubra, which has significant genetic differentiation between populations, but not between the butterflies and a second, sympatric host, Myrmica ruginodis, which has panmictic populations. Alternative hosts may therefore provide an evolutionary refuge for a parasite during periods of counteradaptation by their preferred hosts. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Jan-4

  5. Host ant independent oviposition in the parasitic butterfly Maculinea alcon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, Matthias A; Nash, David Richard

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic Maculinea alcon butterflies can only develop in nests of a subset of available Myrmica ant species, so female butterflies have been hypothesized to preferentially lay eggs on plants close to colonies of the correct host ants. Previous correlational investigations of host-ant-dependent oviposition in this and other Maculinea species have, however, shown equivocal results, leading to a long-term controversy over support for this hypothesis. We therefore conducted a controlled field experiment to study the egg-laying behaviour of M. alcon. Matched potted Gentiana plants were set out close to host-ant nests and non-host-ant nests, and the number and position of eggs attached were assessed. Our results show no evidence for host-ant-based oviposition in M. alcon, but support an oviposition strategy based on plant characteristics. This suggests that careful management of host-ant distribution is necessary for conservation of this endangered butterfly.

  6. Fire creates host plant patches for monarch butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Kristen A.; Sharber, Wyatt V.

    2012-01-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) depend on the presence of host plants (Asclepias spp.) within their breeding range for reproduction. In the southern Great Plains, Asclepias viridis is a perennial that flowers in May and June, and starts to senesce by August. It is locally abundant and readily used by monarchs as a host plant. We evaluated the effects of summer prescribed fire on A. viridis and the use of A. viridis by monarch butterflies. Summer prescribed fire generated a newly emergent population of A. viridis that was absent in other areas. Pre-migrant monarch butterflies laid eggs on A. viridis in summer burned plots in late August and September, allowing adequate time for a new generation of adult monarchs to emerge and migrate south to their overwintering grounds. Thus, summer prescribed fire may provide host plant patches and/or corridors for pre-migrant monarchs during a time when host plant availability may be limited in other areas. PMID:22859559

  7. Numerical Analysis for Structural Safety Evaluation of Butterfly Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Myung-Seob; Yoon, Joon-Yong; Park, Han-Yung

    2010-06-01

    Butterfly valves are widely used in current industry to control the fluid flow. They are used for both on-off and throttling applications involving large flows at relatively low operating pressure especially in large size pipelines. For the industrial application of butterfly valves, it must be ensured that the valve could be used safety under the fatigue life and the deformations produced by the pressure of the fluid. In this study, we carried out the structure analysis of the body and the valve disc of the butterfly valve and the numerical simulation was performed by using ANSYS v11.0. The reliability of valve is evaluated under the investigation of the deformation, the leak test and the durability of the valve.

  8. AFM Study of Structure Influence on Butterfly Wings Coloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinara Sultanovna Dallaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the structural coloration of the butterfly Vanessa Atalanta wings and shows how the atomic force microscopy (AFM can be applied to the study of wings morphology and wings surface behavior under the temperature. The role of the wings morphology in colors was investigated. Different colors of wings have different topology and can be identified by them. AFM in semi-contact mode was used to study the wings surface. The wing surface area, which is close to the butterfly body, has shiny brown color and the peak of surface roughness is about 600 nm. The changing of morphology at different temperatures is shown.

  9. Inquiry Is Taking Flight Through Project Butterfly WINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betty A. Dunckel

    2008-01-01

    Project Butterfly WINGS (Winning Investigative Network for Great Science) is designed to foster adolescents' interest, understanding, and long-term involvement in science, as well as promote positive youth development. Through WINGS, students form a network of butterfly observers who progress from beginners to engaged citizen scientists. A series of cumulative activities, each with a life skill and science inquiry skill component, culminates in a final activity in which students create a custom research project on a topic that interests them. Their skills combine in a dynamic interplay to equip each participant with rich, life-enhancing experiences they can apply to other areas.

  10. Fueling the fall migration of the monarch butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Lincoln P; Fink, Linda S; Walford, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Monarch butterflies in eastern North America accumulate lipids during their fall migration to central Mexico, and use them as their energy source during a 5 month overwintering period. When and where along their migratory journey the butterflies accumulate these lipids has implications for the importance of fall nectar sources in North America. We analyzed the lipid content of 765 summer breeding and fall migrant monarch butterflies collected at 1 nectaring site in central Virginia over 4 years (1998-2001), and compared them with 16 additional published and unpublished datasets from other sites, dating back to 1941. Virginia migrants store significantly more lipid than summer butterflies, and show significant intraseason and between-year variation. None of the Virginia samples, and none of the historical samples, with one exception, had lipid levels comparable with those found in migrants that had reached Texas and northern Mexico. This evidence suggests that upon reaching Texas, the butterflies undergo a behavioral shift and spend more time nectaring. The one exceptional sample led us to the discovery that monarchs that form roosts along their migratory routes have higher lipid contents than monarchs collected while nectaring at flowers. We propose that for much of their journey monarchs are opportunistic migrants, and the variation within and between samples reflects butterflies' individual experiences. The stored lipids appear to be of less importance as fuel for the butterflies' migration than for their survival during their overwintering period, in part because soaring on favorable winds reduces the energetic cost of flying. The conservation of nectar plants in Texas and northern Mexico is crucial to sustaining the monarch's migratory spectacle, and nectar abundance throughout eastern North America is also important. As generalists in their selection of nectar sources and nectaring habitats, monarchs are unlikely to be affected by small changes in plant communities. Agricultural transformations of natural communities in the eastern United States and Great Plains, however, and especially the extensive planting of genetically modified herbicide-resistant soybeans and corn, may be changing the availability of nectar for monarchs and other pollinators. This new technology is eliminating virtually all forbs in and surrounding agricultural fields, including the monarch's larval hostplants (milkweeds) and native and nonnative nectar sources. To evaluate whether changes in nectar availability are altering the butterflies' ability to accumulate energy, we recommend that monarchs' lipid contents be assayed annually at sites throughout eastern North America. PMID:21672813

  11. Palaearctic butterfly ecology model for Oriental species conservation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fric, Zden?k; Pech, Pavel

    Hong Kong : Kadoorie Farm & Botainc Garden Corporation, 2007 - (Kendrick, R.), s. 63-69 ISBN 978-962-8869-49-7 R&D Projects: GA ?R GD206/03/H034; GA AV ?R KJB600070601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : palaearctic butterfly Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  12. Evolution of the Hofstadter butterfly in a tunable optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y?lmaz, F.; Ünal, F. Nur; Oktel, M. Ã.-.

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in realizing artificial gauge fields on optical lattices promise experimental detection of topologically nontrivial energy spectra. Self-similar fractal energy structures generally known as Hofstadter butterflies depend sensitively on the geometry of the underlying lattice, as well as the applied magnetic field. The recent demonstration of an adjustable lattice geometry [L. Tarruell, D. Greif, T. Uehlinger, G. Jotzu, and T. Esslinger, Nature (London) 483, 302 (2012), 10.1038/nature10871] presents a unique opportunity to study this dependence. In this paper, we calculate the Hofstadter butterflies that can be obtained in such an adjustable lattice and find three qualitatively different regimes. We show that the existence of Dirac points at zero magnetic field does not imply the topological equivalence of spectra at finite field. As the real-space structure evolves from the checkerboard lattice to the honeycomb lattice, two square-lattice Hofstadter butterflies merge to form a honeycomb lattice butterfly. This merging is topologically nontrivial, as it is accomplished by sequential closings of gaps. Ensuing Chern number transfer between the bands can be probed with the adjustable lattice experiments. We also calculate the Chern numbers of the gaps for qualitatively different spectra and discuss the evolution of topological properties with underlying lattice geometry.

  13. Reverse altitudinal cline in cold hardiness among Erebia butterflies.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, Pavel; Konvi?ka, Martin; Nedv?d, Old?ich

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 33, ?. 4 (2012), s. 251-258. ISSN 0143-2044 Grant ostatní: GA ?R(CZ) GAP505/10/1630; University of South Bohemia(CZ) 144/2010/100 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Alpine habitats * butterfly ecology * climate change Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.837, year: 2012

  14. Contrasting supercooling ability in lowland and mountain European Colias butterflies.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, P.; Nedv?d, Old?ich; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 49, ?. 1 (2014), s. 63-69. ISSN 0749-8004 Grant ostatní: GA ?R(CZ) GAP505/10/1630; GA JU(CZ) 144/2010/100 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : butterfly ecology * diapause * frost survival Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.367, year: 2013

  15. Becoming Butterflies: Making Metamorphosis Meaningful for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Rebecca M.; Baggett, Paige V.; Shaw, Edward L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Although butterflies are a common topic of study in many early childhood classrooms, integrating art production broadens the scope of the study and allows children to deepen their knowledge and understanding through creative self-expression. This article presents a set of integrated activities that focus on helping children fully grasp the process…

  16. MonarchBase: the monarch butterfly genome database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuai; Reppert, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is emerging as a model organism to study the mechanisms of circadian clocks and animal navigation, and the genetic underpinnings of long-distance migration. The initial assembly of the monarch genome was released in 2011, and the biological interpretation of the genome focused on the butterfly’s migration biology. To make the extensive data associated with the genome accessible to the general biological and lepidopteran communities, we established MonarchBase (available at http://monarchbase.umassmed.edu). The database is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates all available data associated with the monarch butterfly genome. Moreover, MonarchBase provides access to an updated version of genome assembly (v3) upon which all data integration is based. These include genes with systematic annotation, as well as other molecular resources, such as brain expressed sequence tags, migration expression profiles and microRNAs. MonarchBase utilizes a variety of retrieving methods to access data conveniently and for integrating biological interpretations. PMID:23143105

  17. Juvenile hormone regulation of longevity in the migratory monarch butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, W. S.; Tatar, M.

    2001-01-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) of eastern North America are well known for their long-range migration to overwintering roosts in south-central Mexico. An essential feature of this migration involves the exceptional longevity of the migrant adults; individuals persist from August/September to March while their summer counterparts are likely to live less than two months as adults. Migrant adults persist during a state of reproductive diapause in which both male and female reproductive development is arrested as a consequence of suppressed synthesis of juvenile hormone. Here, we describe survival in monarch butterflies as a function of the migrant syndrome. We show that migrant adults are longer lived than summer adults when each are maintained under standard laboratory conditions, that the longevity of migrant adults is curtailed by treatment with juvenile hormone and that the longevity of summer adults is increased by 100% when juvenile hormone synthesis is prevented by surgical removal of its source, the corpora allatum. Thus, monarch butterfly persistence through a long winter season is ensured in part by reduced ageing that is under endocrine regulation, as well as by the unique environmental properties of their winter roost sites. Phenotypic plasticity for ageing is an integral component of the monarch butterflies' migration-diapause syndrome. PMID:11749703

  18. Controlling the cavitation phenomenon of evolution on a butterfly valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of the phenomenon of cavitation in cavitation behavior requires knowledge of both plant and equipment working in the facility. This paper presents a diagram of cavitational behavior for a butterfly valve with a diameter of 100 mm at various openings, which was experimentally built. We proposed seven stages of evolution of the phenomenon of cavitation in the case of a butterfly valve. All these phases are characterized by pressure drop, noise and vibration at various flow rates and flow sections through the valve. The level of noise and vibration for the seven stages of development of the phenomenon of cavitation were measured simultaneously. The experimental measurements were comprised in a knowledge database used in training of a neural network of a neural flow controller that maintains flow rate constantly in the facility by changing the opening butterfly valve. A fuzzy position controller is used to access the valve open. This is the method proposed to provide operational supervision outside the cavitation for a butterfly valve.

  19. Vegetation associated with the occurrence of the Brenton blue butterfly

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    D.A., Edge; S.S., Cilliers; R.F., Terblanche.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Brenton blue butterfly, Orachrysops niobe (Trimen), is critically endangered and known only from one site near Knysna in the Western Cape province of South Africa, now proclaimed as the Brenton Blue Butterfly Reserve (BBBR). We have explored associations between vegetation types and the presence [...] of O. niobe's only host plant, Indigofera erecta (Thunb.), using Braun-Blanquet vegetation classification and ordination techniques as part of a broader research project at the BBBR. Positive correlations are demonstrated between the occurrence of I. erecta and certain thicket vegetation types dominated by Pterocelastrus tricuspidatus (candlewood trees). Ordinations using soil analysis and slope data have not detected significant environmental gradients influencing vegetation types. The high degree of vegetation heterogeneity at the BBBR appears to be driven in part by various disturbance histories. Historical ecological events at the site such as fire and megaherbivore impacts, and their role in sustaining the ideal habitat for I. erecta and O. niobe, are discussed. Management techniques for the BBBR such as controlled fires or the cutting of paths through the vegetation are evaluated and an optimum future management strategy is recommended. This is the most comprehensive vegetation study ever carried out at the habitat of an endangered butterfly in South Africa, and breaks new ground by using vegetation analysis to develop a well-informed management plan for conservation of this species. It has significance for the management of small sites where many such endangered butterflies occur.

  20. Improved bounds on the crossing number of butterfly network

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel, Paul D.; Rajan, Bharati; Rajasingh, Indra; Beulah, P. Vasanthi

    2013-01-01

    We draw the r-dimensional butterfly network with 1?/?44r+O(r2r) crossings which improves the previous estimate given by Cimikowski (1996). We also give a lower bound which matches the upper bound obtained in this paper.

  1. Risk assessment for adult butterflies exposed to the mosquito control pesticide naled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    A prospective risk assessment was conducted for adult butterflies potentially exposed to the mosquito control insecticide naled. Published acute mortality data, exposure data collected during field studies, and morphometric data (total surface area and fresh body weight) for adult butterflies were combined in a probabilistic estimate of the likelihood that adult butterfly exposure to naled following aerial applications would exceed levels associated with acute mortality. Adult butterfly exposure was estimated based on the product of (1) naled residues on samplers and (2) an exposure metric that normalized total surface area for adult butterflies to their fresh weight. The likelihood that the 10th percentile refined effect estimate for adult butterflies exposed to naled would be exceeded following aerial naled applications was 67 to 80%. The greatest risk would be for butterflies in the family Lycaenidae, and the lowest risk would be for those in the family Hesperidae, assuming equivalent sensitivity to naled. A range of potential guideline naled deposition levels is presented that, if not exceeded, would reduce the risk of adult butterfly mortality. The results for this risk assessment were compared with other risk estimates for butterflies, and the implications for adult butterflies in areas targeted by aerial naled applications are discussed.

  2. Virtual migration in tethered flying monarch butterflies reveals their orientation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Frost, Barrie J

    2002-07-23

    A newly developed flight simulator allows monarch butterflies to fly actively for up to several hours in any horizontal direction while their fall migratory flight direction can be continuously recorded. From these data, long segments of virtual flight paths of tethered, flying, migratory monarch butterflies were reconstructed, and by advancing or retarding the butterflies' circadian clocks, we have shown that they possess a time-compensated sun compass. Control monarchs on local time fly approximately southwest, those 6-h time-advanced fly southeast, and 6-h time-delayed butterflies fly in northwesterly directions. Moreover, butterflies flown in the same apparatus under simulated overcast in natural magnetic fields were randomly oriented and did not change direction when magnetic fields were rotated. Therefore, these experiments do not provide any evidence that monarch butterflies use a magnetic compass during migration. PMID:12107283

  3. Unsteady Flow and Force Control in Butterfly Take-off Flight

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Haibo; Li, Chengyu; Liang, Zongxian; Yun, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    In this work, high-resolution, high-speed videos of a Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) in take-off flight were obtained using a photogrammetry system. Using a 3D subdivision surface reconstruction methodology, the butterfly's body/wing deformation and kinematics were modeled and reconstructed from those videos. High fidelity simulations were then carried out in order to understand vortex formation in both near-field and far-field of butterfly wings and examine the associ...

  4. Virtual migration in tethered flying monarch butterflies reveals their orientation mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Frost, Barrie J.

    2002-01-01

    A newly developed flight simulator allows monarch butterflies to fly actively for up to several hours in any horizontal direction while their fall migratory flight direction can be continuously recorded. From these data, long segments of virtual flight paths of tethered, flying, migratory monarch butterflies were reconstructed, and by advancing or retarding the butterflies' circadian clocks, we have shown that they possess a time-compensated sun compass. Control monarchs on local time fly app...

  5. K+ Excretion: The Other Purpose for Puddling Behavior in Japanese Papilio Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the purpose of butterfly puddling, we measured the amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ that were absorbed or excreted during puddling by male Japanese Papilio butterflies through a urine test. All of the butterflies that sipped water with a Na+ concentration of 13 mM absorbed Na+ and excreted K+, although certain butterflies that sipped solutions with high concentrations of Na+ excreted Na+. According to the Na+ concentrations observed in naturally occurring water sources, water with a Na+ concentration of up to 10 mM appears to be optimal for the health of male Japanese Papilio butterflies. The molar ratio of K+ to Na+ observed in leaves was 43.94 and that observed in flower nectars was 10.93. The Na+ amount in 100 g of host plant leaves ranged from 2.11 to 16.40 mg, and the amount in 100 g of flower nectar ranged from 1.24 to 108.21 mg. Differences in host plants did not explain the differences in the frequency of puddling observed for different Japanese Papilio species. The amounts of Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ in the meconium of both male and female butterflies were also measured, and both males and females excreted more K+ than the other three ions. Thus, the fluid that was excreted by butterflies at emergence also had a role in the excretion of the excessive K+ in their bodies. The quantities of Na+ and K+ observed in butterfly eggs were approximately 0.50 ?g and 4.15 ?g, respectively; thus, female butterflies required more K+ than male butterflies. Therefore, female butterflies did not puddle to excrete K+. In conclusion, the purpose of puddling for male Papilio butterflies is not only to absorb Na+ to correct deficiencies but also to excrete excessive K+. PMID:25955856

  6. Adult diet affects lifespan and reproduction of the fruit-feeding butterfly Charaxes fulvescens

    OpenAIRE

    Molleman, Freerk; Ding, Jimin; Wang, Jane-Ling; Zwaan, Bas J.; Carey, James R.; Brakefield, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Fruit-feeding butterflies are among the longest lived Lepidoptera. While the use of pollen-derived amino acids by Heliconius butterflies has been interpreted as important for the evolution of extended lifespans, very little is known about the life-history consequences of frugivory. This issue is addressed by investigating effects of four adult diets (sugar, sugar with amino acids, banana, and moistened banana) on lifespan and reproduction in the fruit-feeding butterfly Charaxes fulvescens Aur...

  7. Green Roof Performance Towards Good Habitat for Butterflies in the Compact City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Hsueh Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban ecology is threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation due to increasing urbanization. Green roofs may act as habitats to compensate for loss of green space at the ground level. Here, we assessed greening variables of 11 green roofs for butterflies in Taipei City. Butterfly number, species, and richness on green roofs were lower than parks, but some less common species were observed on green roofs. The nectar plant area, number of nectar plant species and age of green roof were the main positive effectors of butterfly number. The height above ground of green roof had not impact on butterfly survival; supposed high rise buildings are spreading out over city that would be a potential good habitat for butterflies on skyscape. However, since the scale of green roofs was small in Taipei, we adopted a habitat suitability index (HSI method to determine optimal value of selected greening variables to attract more butterfly number on green roofs. HSI curves' findings suggested that achieving a nectar plant area of more than 25 m2 and not less than 10 nectar plant species would greatly benefit butterfly number; meanwhile, the age of green roof was higher than 38 months, butterfly number is expected to increase rapidly. We confirmed that carefully design green roof could play a good habitat for butterflies in Taipei city.

  8. Using Butterflies to Measure Biodiversity Health in Wazo Hill Restored Quarry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin Ngongolo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study butterflies were used in assessing re-vegetation as a way of biodiversity restoration at Wazo hill quarry. The Butterflies were used as indicator species because of their high sensitivity in ecosystems alteration. The study was done in two different areas each 4.8 acre, namely the re-vegetated and un-quarried areas. Butterfly sweep nets and Butterfly traps baited were used for Butterflies capturing. Thirty six (36 species of Butterflies were identified and voucher specimens were preserved in Kingupira Museum. Variation in species diversity was evaluated using diversity indices and tested using special t-test. Variation in Butterfly abundance in two study sites and in different habitats was determined using Kruskal-Wallis Test Statistic and Mann-Whitney U test statistic. The diversity of Butterflies was significant higher in re-vegetated site than in un-quarried site while the abundance difference in the two sites were insignificance The two sites varied in plants species diversity and level of succession, a condition attributed to variation in Butterfly diversity. The re-vegetated sites were recommended for aesthetic, education purposes and further studies on organisms.

  9. Multiple approaches to study color pattern evolution in butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M. Prudic

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The myriad colors and patterns on butterfly wings have caught the attention of biologists for well over a century. Today, with the advent of more sophisticated genetic and developmental tools, it is possible to identify and study the evolution of genes, gene networks, and the effect of the environment on the networks underlying wing color patterning. In addition, using molecular phylogenies and the comparative approach, it is possible to infer ancestral wing patterns, direction of evolutionary change, and occurrence of parallelism and convergence. Finally, the driving forces behind wing pattern evolution can be estimated using bioassay studies such as predator–prey and mate choice experiments. Here we review the different approaches to answer both proximate and ultimate questions about butterfly wing pattern evolution, and we highlight future research directions in a field that has the potential to become truly integrative.

  10. Butterfly genome reveals promiscuous exchange of mimicry adaptations among species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K; Walters, James R.; Briscoe, Adriana D.; Davey, John W.; Whibley, Annabel; Nadeau, Nicola J.; Zimin, Aleksey V.; Hughes, Daniel S. T.; Ferguson, Laura C.; Martin, Simon H.; Salazar, Camilo; Lewis, James J.; Adler, Sebastian; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Baker, Dean A.; Baxter, Simon W.; Chamberlain, Nicola L.; Chauhan, Ritika; Counterman, Brian A.; Dalmay, Tamas; Gilbert, Lawrence E.; Gordon, Karl; Heckel, David G.; Hines, Heather M.; Hoff, Katharina J.; Holland, Peter W.H.; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Jiggins, Francis M.; Jones, Robert T.; Kapan, Durrell D.; Kersey, Paul; Lamas, Gerardo; Lawson, Daniel; Mapleson, Daniel; Maroja, Luana S.; Martin, Arnaud; Moxon, Simon; Palmer, William J.; Papa, Riccardo; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Pauchet, Yannick; Ray, David A.; Rosser, Neil; Salzberg, Steven L.; Supple, Megan A.; Surridge, Alison; Tenger-Trolander, Ayse; Vogel, Heiko; Wilkinson, Paul A.; Wilson, Derek; Yorke, James A.; Yuan, Furong; Balmuth, Alexi L.; Eland, Cathlene; Gharbi, Karim; Thomson, Marian; Gibbs, Richard A.; Han, Yi; Jayaseelan, Joy C.; Kovar, Christie; Mathew, Tittu; Muzny, Donna M.; Ongeri, Fiona; Pu, Ling-Ling; Qu, Jiaxin; Thornton, Rebecca L.; Worley, Kim C.; Wu, Yuan-Qing; Linares, Mauricio; Blaxter, Mark L.; Constant, Richard H. ffrench; Joron, Mathieu; Kronforst, Marcus R.; Mullen, Sean P.; Reed, Robert D.; Scherer, Steven E.; Richards, Stephen; Mallet, James; McMillan, W. Owen; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionary importance of hybridization and introgression has long been debated1. We used genomic tools to investigate introgression in Heliconius, a rapidly radiating genus of neotropical butterflies widely used in studies of ecology, behaviour, mimicry and speciation2-5 . We sequenced the genome of Heliconius melpomene and compared it with other taxa to investigate chromosomal evolution in Lepidoptera and gene flow among multiple Heliconius species and races. Among 12,657 predicted genes for Heliconius, biologically important expansions of families of chemosensory and Hox genes are particularly noteworthy. Chromosomal organisation has remained broadly conserved since the Cretaceous, when butterflies split from the silkmoth lineage. Using genomic resequencing, we show hybrid exchange of genes between three co-mimics, H. melpomene, H. timareta, and H. elevatus, especially at two genomic regions that control mimicry pattern. Closely related Heliconius species clearly exchange protective colour pattern genes promiscuously, implying a major role for hybridization in adaptive radiation. PMID:22722851

  11. Elementary school pupils knowledge and attitudes toward butterflies and mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Fakin, Tine

    2012-01-01

    To avoid further loss of biodiversity we should radicly change our antropocentric attitude toward environment. The best way to do this is to instill positive attitudes toward nature to children in school. One of the factors that influences attitude toward nature/organisms is knowledge. The main aim of this study is to find out, whether there are differences in knowledge about, and attitudes toward the “unpopular” mosquito and “popular” butterfly among elementary school students. We focused on...

  12. Speciation in two neotropical butterflies: extending Haldane's rule

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, N.; Aiello, A.; Mallet, J.; POMIANKOWSKI, A.; Silberglied, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    Anartia fatima and A. amathea form a hybrid zone in Panama where F1 and back-cross hybrids are found. Crosses were carried out to determine the nature of any reproductive isolation between these two butterflies. A novel analysis demonstrated both strong assortative mating among the pure forms and an unusual example of Haldane's rule: F1 hybrid females (the heterogametic sex) from the cross A. amathea (female) multiplied by A. fatima (male) have a reduced tendency to mate. Historically, Haldan...

  13. Social benefits of ecotourism : the monarch butterfly reserve in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Monterrubio Cordero, Juan Carlos; Rodri?guez Mun?oz, Gregoria; Mendoza Ontiveros, Martha Marivel

    2013-01-01

    Ecotourism can contribute to both positive and negative socioeconomic impacts at the local level. However, ecotourism’s socioeconomic impacts have received limited scholarly attention in the context of developing countries. Based on qualitative interviews and observations, this paper looks at the socioeconomic benefits of ecotourism in a local community in the Monarch Butterfly Reserve in Mexico. It was found that ecotourism replaced most of the economic activities in the ...

  14. CLIMBER: Climatic niche characteristics of the butterflies in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Oliver; Harpke,Alexander; Wiemers, Martin; Settele, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Detailed information on species’ ecological niche characteristics that can be related to declines and extinctions is indispensable for a better understanding of the relationship between the occurrence and performance of wild species and their environment and, moreover, for an improved assessment of the impacts of global change. Knowledge on species characteristics such as habitat requirements is already available in the ecological literature for butterflies, but information about their climat...

  15. Biased learning affects mate choice in a butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Westerman, Erica L.; Hodgins-davis, Andrea; Dinwiddie, April; Monteiro, Anto?nia

    2012-01-01

    Early acquisition of mate preferences or mate-preference learning is associated with signal diversity and speciation in a wide variety of animal species. However, the diversity of mechanisms of mate-preference learning across taxa remains poorly understood. Using the butterfly Bicyclus anynana we uncover a mechanism that can lead to directional sexual selection via mate-preference learning: a bias in learning enhanced ornamentation, which is independent of preexisting mating biases. Naïve fe...

  16. Contest outcome in a territorial butterfly: the role of motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Martin; Olofsson, Martin; Wiklund, Christer

    2010-01-01

    In many butterfly species, males compete over areas advantageous for encountering females. Rules for contest settlement are, however, largely unknown and neither morphological nor physiological traits can reliably predict the contest outcome. Here, we test the hypothesis that contests are settled in accordance with a motivation asymmetry. We staged contests between males of Pararge aegeria and after removing the resident, the non-resident was allowed (i) either to interact with a non-receptiv...

  17. BUTTERFLIES OF UGANDA: MEMORIES OF A CHILD SOLDIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Van Zyl

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available "I was conceived in rape."[i] At least for this reviewer, this is one of the most powerful, hard-hitting opening lines of any book he has read to date. Moreover, from there this powerful text continues to hold the reader captive, and refuses to allow him or her to fall back in a slumber of indifference. [i] Opening line of Butterflies of Uganda.

  18. Ancient butterfly-ant symbiosis: direct evidence from Dominican amber

    OpenAIRE

    Devries, P. J.; Poinar, G. O.

    1997-01-01

    Although symbiotic association with ants is pervasive in the butterfly families Lycaenidae and Riodinidae the age of these symbioses has never been estimated explicitly. Here we report the first known fossil riodinid caterpillar. This fossil can be dated minimally between 15 and 20 Ma old, and confidently placed in the extant genus Theope. Differing little from modern day Theope, this fossil from Dominican amber provides direct evidence that secretory and acoustical organs used by modern cate...

  19. Monarch butterfly migration in North America: Controversy and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, S B

    1987-05-01

    The monarch butterfly is the most spectacular example of insect migration known. Monarchs are threatened by the destruction of their over-wintering sites in Mexico, California and elsewhere, and many efforts are being made to conserve these sites. However, a controversial recent suggestion, that some monarch populations may not migrate at all, has jeopardized some of these efforts. This article assesses the evidence for and against the new suggestion. PMID:21227836

  20. Quantum Reality, Complex Numbers and the Meteorological Butterfly Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Tn

    2004-01-01

    A not-too-technical version of the paper: "A Granular Permutation-based Representation of Complex Numbers and Quaternions: Elements of a Realistic Quantum Theory" - Proc. Roy. Soc.A (2004) 460, 1039-1055. The phrase "meteorological butterfly effect" is introduced to illustrate, not the familiar loss of predictability in low-dimensional chaos, but the much less familiar and much more radical paradigm of the finite-time predictability horizon, associated with upscale transfer ...

  1. United Kingdom Butterfly Monitoring Scheme annual report 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Botham, M. S.; Brereton, T. M.; Middlebrook, I.; Cruickshanks, K. L.; Harrower, C; Beckmann, B; Roy, D

    2010-01-01

    Highlights: Wet and windy weather with low sunshine levels caused problems for most butterfly species. The year ranked as the second worst in the 33-year series and the sorst since 1981. 12 species had their worst year, with continued declines for Small Tortoiseshells and some of our most threatened species, including several of the fritillaries. There was a noticeable absence of migrants after several good years. On the positive side it was good year for some of the Brons including Ringlet a...

  2. Developing sustainable software solutions for bioinformatics by the “ Butterfly” paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeshan Ahmed; Saman Zeeshan; Thomas Dandekar

    2014-01-01

    Software design and sustainable software engineering are essential for the long-term development of bioinformatics software. Typical challenges in an academic environment are short-term contracts, island solutions, pragmatic approaches and loose documentation. Upcoming new challenges are big data, complex data sets, software compatibility and rapid changes in data representation. Our approach to cope with these challenges consists of iterative intertwined cycles of development (“ Butterfly...

  3. Morphological outcomes of gynandromorphism in Lycaeides butterflies (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahner, Joshua P; Lucas, Lauren K; Wilson, Joseph S; Forister, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    The genitalia of male insects have been widely used in taxonomic identification and systematics and are potentially involved in maintaining reproductive isolation between species. Although sexual selection has been invoked to explain patterns of morphological variation in genitalia among populations and species, developmental plasticity in genitalia likely contributes to observed variation but has been rarely examined, particularly in wild populations. Bilateral gynandromorphs are individuals that are genetically male on one side of the midline and genetically female on the other, while mosaic gynandromorphs have only a portion of their body developing as the opposite sex. Gynandromorphs might offer unique insights into developmental plasticity because individuals experience abnormal cellular interactions at the genitalic midline. In this study, we compare the genitalia and wing patterns of gynandromorphic Anna and Melissa blue butterflies, Lycaeides anna (Edwards) (formerly L. idas anna) and L. melissa (Edwards) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae), to the morphology of normal individuals from the same populations. Gynandromorph wing markings all fell within the range of variation of normal butterflies; however, a number of genitalic measurements were outliers when compared with normal individuals. From these results, we conclude that the gynandromorphs' genitalia, but not wing patterns, can be abnormal when compared with normal individuals and that the gynandromorphic genitalia do not deviate developmentally in a consistent pattern across individuals. Finally, genetic mechanisms are considered for the development of gynandromorphism in Lycaeides butterflies. PMID:25843591

  4. Predator mimicry, not conspicuousness, explains the efficacy of butterfly eyespots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bona, Sebastiano; Valkonen, Janne K; López-Sepulcre, Andrés; Mappes, Johanna

    2015-05-01

    Large conspicuous eyespots on butterfly wings have been shown to deter predators. This has been traditionally explained by mimicry of vertebrate eyes, but recently the classic eye-mimicry hypothesis has been challenged. It is proposed that the conspicuousness of the eyespot, not mimicry, is what causes aversion due to sensory biases, neophobia or sensory overloads. We conducted an experiment to directly test whether the eye-mimicry or the conspicuousness hypothesis better explain eyespot efficacy. We used great tits (Parus major) as model predator, and tested their reaction towards animated images on a computer display. Birds were tested against images of butterflies without eyespots, with natural-looking eyespots, and manipulated spots with the same contrast but reduced resemblance to an eye, as well as images of predators (owls) with and without eyes. We found that mimetic eyespots were as effective as true eyes of owls and more efficient in eliciting an aversive response than modified, less mimetic but equally contrasting eyespots. We conclude that the eye-mimicry hypothesis explains our results better than the conspicuousness hypothesis and is thus likely to be an important mechanism behind the evolution of butterfly eyespots. PMID:25854889

  5. Hofstadter butterflies in nonlinear Harper lattices, and their optical realizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ubiquitous Hofstadter butterfly describes a variety of systems characterized by incommensurable periodicities, ranging from Bloch electrons in magnetic fields and the quantum Hall effect to cold atoms in optical lattices and more. Here, we introduce nonlinearity into the underlying (Harper) model and study the nonlinear spectra and the corresponding extended eigenmodes of nonlinear quasiperiodic systems. We show that the spectra of the nonlinear eigenmodes form deformed versions of the Hofstadter butterfly and demonstrate that the modes can be classified into two families: nonlinear modes that are a 'continuation' of the linear modes of the system and new nonlinear modes that have no counterparts in the linear spectrum. Finally, we propose an optical realization of the linear and nonlinear Harper models in transversely modulated waveguide arrays, where these Hofstadter butterflies can be observed. This work is relevant to a variety of other branches of physics beyond optics, such as disorder-induced localization in ultracold bosonic gases, localization transition processes in disordered lattices, and more.

  6. Rhabdom evolution in butterflies: insights from the uniquely tiered and heterogeneous ommatidia of the Glacial Apollo butterfly, Parnassius glacialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Atsuko; Awata, Hiroko; Wakakuwa, Motohiro; Takemura, Shin-ya; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-09-01

    The eye of the Glacial Apollo butterfly, Parnassius glacialis, a 'living fossil' species of the family Papilionidae, contains three types of spectrally heterogeneous ommatidia. Electron microscopy reveals that the Apollo rhabdom is tiered. The distal tier is composed exclusively of photoreceptors expressing opsins of ultraviolet or blue-absorbing visual pigments, and the proximal tier consists of photoreceptors expressing opsins of green or red-absorbing visual pigments. This organization is unique because the distal tier of other known butterflies contains two green-sensitive photoreceptors, which probably function in improving spatial and/or motion vision. Interspecific comparison suggests that the Apollo rhabdom retains an ancestral tiered pattern with some modification to enhance its colour vision towards the long-wavelength region of the spectrum. PMID:22628477

  7. Field Based Learning About Butterfly Diversity in School Garden-A Case Study From Puducherry, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalsomy Poyyamoli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Butterflies are essential components for well functioning of ecosystems due to their key roles as pollinators and as indicators of ecosystem health. Butterflies are also beloved by public as well as young students and children, who are largely unaware that many species are threatened or endangered. The main objectives of field based education for butterfly conservation were to create knowledge, interest and necessary skills to investigate and, identify the butterfly species and conserve its diversity in school gardens. For butterfly survey the census technique method was taught to the students to investigate the diversity of butterflies during the field trips. During the field trip a total of 34 butterfly species, belonging to 4 families, were recorded with standard literature and colour photographs. The Nymphalidae family was the dominant species found in school gardens. The study concluded that the young students must be given the chance to investigate, engage with and experience nature in order to appreciate and be motivated to conserve and protect these fascinating insects at local level. The conservation of our natural biological resources will be dependent upon future generations. This field based learning program inspired to identify and conserve the butterfly diversity within the school gardens.

  8. Cardenolide fingerprint of monarch butterflies reared on common milkweed,Asclepias syriaca L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, S B; Cockrell, B J; Brower, L P

    1989-03-01

    Monarch butterfly,Danaus plexippus (L.), larvae were collected during August 1983 from the common milkweed,Asclepias syriaca L., across its extensive North American range from North Dakota, east to Vermont, and south to Virginia. This confirms that the late summer distribution of breeding monarchs in eastern North America coincides with the range of this extremely abundant milkweed resource. Plant cardenolide concentrations, assayed by spectrophotometry in 158 samples from 27 collection sites, were biased towards plants with low cardenolide, and ranged from 4 to 229 ?g/ 0.1 g dry weight, with a mean of 50 ?g/0.1 g. Monarch larvae reared on these plants stored cardenolides logarithmically, and produced 158 adults with a normally distributed concentration range from 0 to 792 ?g/0. l g dry butterfly, with a mean of 234 ?g/0.1 g. Thus butterflies increased the mean plant cardenolide concentration by 4.7. The eastern plants and their resultant butterflies had higher cardenolide concentrations than those from the west, and in some areas monarchs sequestered more cardenolide from equivalent plants. Plants growing in small patches had higher cardenolide concentrations than those in larger patches, but this did not influence butterfly concentration. However, younger plants and those at habitat edges had higher cardenolide concentrations than either older, shaded, or open habitat plants, and this did influence butterfly storage. There were no apparent topographical differences reflected in the cardenolides of plants and butterflies. Twenty-eight cardenolides were recognized by thin-layer chromatography, with 27 in plants and 21 in butterflies. Butterflies stored cardenolides within the more polar 46% of the plantR d range, these being sequestered in higher relative concentrations than they occurred in the plants. By comparison with published TLC cardenolide mobilities, spots 3, 4, 9, 16, 24 or 25, 26, and 27, may be the cardenolides syrioside, uzarin, syriobioside, syriogenin, uzarigenin, labriformidin, and labriformin, respectively. Cochromatography with cardenolide standards indicated that desglucosyrioside did not occur in the plants but did occur in 70% of the butterflies, and aspecioside was in 99% of the plants and 100% of the butterflies. The polar aspecioside was the single most concentrated and diagnostic cardenolide in both plants and butterflies. ButterflyR d values were dependent on those of the plant, and both showed remarkable uniformity over the range of areas sampled. Thus contrary to previous reports,A. syriaca has a biogeographically consistent cardenolide fingerprint pattern. The ecological implications of this for understanding the monarch's annual migration cycle are significant. PMID:24271887

  9. Controlling public speaking jitters: making the butterflies fly in formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Hannah; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Nearly every person who has been asked to give a speech or who has volunteered to make a presentation to a group of strangers develops fear and anxiety prior to the presentation. Most of us, the authors included, start hyperventilating, our pulse quickens, and we feel a little weak in the knees. We grab the lectern and our knuckles turn white as we hold on for dear life. This is a normal response that everyone experiences. However, this stress can be controlled and made manageable by understanding the stress response cycle and practicing a few techniques that calm those butterflies flying around in the pit of your stomach. PMID:25807629

  10. Interrelation Between Some Butterflies and Plant Associations (Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Özdemir

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The butterfly fauna in Ordu province (N-Turkey was determined in this study. Their relations with the phytosociological associations found in the zone were evaluated and the Lepidoptera taxa in these units were presented. The numbers of determined taxa in each plant association are Castanea-Carpinus-Corylus (23, Fagus orientalis, Carpinus betulus and Picea orientalis Mixed Forest Zone (23, Subalpine Zone (Rhododendron luteum-Vaccinium myrtillus (25, Lower Alpine Zone (Festuca lazistanica ssp. giresunica (20, Mid-alpine Zone (Festuca lazistanica ssp. giresunica (13. Fifteen taxa are new for Ordu province.

  11. Butterfly eyespot serial homology: enter the Hox genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hombría James

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hox genes modify serial homology patterns in many organisms, exemplified in vertebrates by modification of the axial skeleton and in arthropods by diversification of the body segments. Butterfly wing eyespots also appear in a serial homologous pattern that, in certain species, is subject to local modification. A paper in EvoDevo reports the Hox gene Antp is the earliest known gene to have eyespot-specific expression; however, not all Lepidoptera express Antp in eyespots, suggesting some developmental flexibility. See research article: http://www.evodevojournal.com/content/2/1/9

  12. Illuminating the circadian clock in monarch butterfly migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froy, Oren; Gotter, Anthony L; Casselman, Amy L; Reppert, Steven M

    2003-05-23

    Migratory monarch butterflies use a time-compensated Sun compass to navigate to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. Here, we report that constant light, which disrupts circadian clock function at both the behavioral and molecular levels in monarchs, also disrupts the time-compensated component of flight navigation. We further show that ultraviolet light is important for flight navigation but is not required for photic entrainment of circadian rhythms. Tracing these distinct light-input pathways into the brain should aid our understanding of the clock-compass mechanisms necessary for successful migration. PMID:12764200

  13. Change in a butterfly community on a gradually overgrowing site.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ko?íková, Lenka; ?anády, A.; Panigaj, L.

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 45, ?. 5 (2014), s. 391-398. ISSN 1067-4136 Grant ostatní: Slovak Scientific Grant Agency VEGA(SK) 1/0434/03; Slovak Scientific Grant Agency VEGA(SK) 1/0477/10; Slovak Scientific Grant Agency VEGA(SK) 1/1025/12; Internal Research Grants(SK) I-10-001-00-F-VVGS; Internal Research Grants(SK) VVGS-PF-2012-19 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : butterflies * monitoring * water pan traps Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.386, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1134%2FS1067413614050087

  14. Temporal occurrence of two morpho butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): influence of weather and food resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Geraldo; Nascimento, André Rangel; Malinov, Ivan Konstantinov; Diniz, Ivone R

    2014-04-01

    The seasonality of fruit-feeding butterflies is very well known. However, few studies have analyzed the influence of climatic variables and resource availability on the temporal distributions of butterflies. Morpho helenor achillides (C. Felder and R. Felder 1867) and Morpho menelaus coeruleus (Perry 1810) (Nymphalidae) were used as models to investigate the influences of climatic factors and food resources on the temporal distribution of these Morphinae butterflies. These butterflies were collected weekly from January 2005 to December 2006 in the Parque Nacional de Brasília (PNB). In total, 408 individuals were collected, including 274 of M. helenor and 134 of M. menelaus. The relative abundance of the two species was similar in 2005 (n = 220) and 2006 (n = 188). Of the variables considered, only the relative humidity and resource availability measured in terms of phenology of zoochorous fruits of herbaceous plants explained a large proportion of the variation in the abundance of these butterflies. Both of the explanatory variables were positively associated with the total abundance of individuals and with the abundances of M. helenor and M. menelaus considered separately. The phenology of anemochorous fruits was negatively associated with butterfly abundance. The temporal distribution of the butterflies was better predicted by the phenology of the zoochorous fruits of herbaceous plants than by the climatic predictors. PMID:24495483

  15. Metallic butterfly wing scales superstructures with high surface-enhancement properties for optical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Jiajun; Tan, Yongwen

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a method for replicating natural butterfly wing scales using a variety of metals for state-of-the-art applications requiring high surface-enhancement properties. During the past decade, three dimensional (3D) sub-micrometer structures have attracted considerable attention for optical applications. These 3D subwavelength metallic structures are, however, difficult to prepare. By contrast, the 3D superstructures of butterfly wing scales, with more than 175 000 morphologies, are efficiently engineered by nature. Natural butterfly wing scales feature 3D sub-micrometer structure

  16. Unsteady Flow and Force Control in Butterfly Take-off Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Haibo; Liang, Zongxian; Yun, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    In this work, high-resolution, high-speed videos of a Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) in take-off flight were obtained using a photogrammetry system. Using a 3D subdivision surface reconstruction methodology, the butterfly's body/wing deformation and kinematics were modeled and reconstructed from those videos. High fidelity simulations were then carried out in order to understand vortex formation in both near-field and far-field of butterfly wings and examine the associated aerodynamic performance. A Cartesian grid based sharp interface immersed boundary solver was used to handle such flows in all their complexity.

  17. The effect of forest ski-pistes on butterfly assemblages in the Alps.

    OpenAIRE

    Balletto, Emilio; Rolando, Antonio; Passerin D Entreves, Pietro; Palestrini, Claudia; Negro, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    1. The abandonment of man-made pastures below the tree line is favouring natural reforestation in the European Alps. As such, the creation of forest ski-pistes might, paradoxically, be beneficial to butterflies. This study is the first to focus on the effects of forest ski-pistes on butterfly assemblages (Lepidoptera, Rhopalocera). 2. We sampled both butterflies and flowers on ski-pistes, in adjacent forests and in the nearest pastures at three sites in the Aosta Valley (north-western Italian...

  18. Rapid diversification associated with ecological specialization in Neotropical Adelpha butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Emily R; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Sorenson, Michael D; Hill, Ryan I; Briscoe, Adriana D; Willmott, Keith R; Mullen, Sean P

    2015-05-01

    Rapid diversification is often associated with morphological or ecological adaptations that allow organisms to radiate into novel niches. Neotropical Adelpha butterflies, which comprise over 200 species and subspecies, are characterized by extraordinary breadth in host plant use and wing colour patterns compared to their closest relatives. To examine the relationship between phenotypic and species diversification, we reconstructed the phylogenetic history of Adelpha and its temperate sister genus Limenitis using genomewide restriction-site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing. Despite a declining fraction of shared markers with increasing evolutionary distance, the RAD-Seq data consistently generated well-supported trees using a variety of phylogenetic methods. These well-resolved phylogenies allow the identification of an ecologically important relationship with a toxic host plant family, as well as the confirmation of widespread, convergent wing pattern mimicry throughout the genus. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that evolutionary innovations in both larvae and adults have permitted the colonization of novel host plants and fuelled adaptive diversification within this large butterfly radiation. PMID:25809206

  19. Reverse altitudinal cline in cold hardiness among Erebia butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, Pavel; Konvicka, Martin; Nedved, Oldrich

    2012-01-01

    There is strong evidence for a shifting of range boundaries by many temperate butterfly species to higher altitudes and latitudes. Climate change represents a potential threat to mountain fauna. Nevertheless, information on ecophysiological limits of individual species is scarce. We studied the lower thermal limits of four species representing the prevailingly mountain Holarctic butterfly genus Erebia. We measured the cold tolerance of hibernating larvae, namely the supercooling point (SCP) and the lower lethal temperature (LLT). Three mountain species were freeze avoiding, with various levels of SCP (-8 to -22 degree C), and LLT close to SCP. The only exception was lowland E. medusa, whose caterpillars were freeze tolerant with LLT (-21 degree C) slightly below its SCP (-17 degree C). Surprisingly, LLT was highest in the alpine E. tyndarus and lowest in E. medusa inhabiting lower altitudes with higher mean winter temperatures. We explain the observed reversed altitudinal cline in cold hardiness by the buffering function of snow cover in the hibernacula of caterpillars that is strong at high mountains but irregular, unpredictable and thus unreliable in lowlands. PMID:22987236

  20. Effect of hand paddles and parachute on butterfly coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Thiago; Barroso, Renato; Barbosa, Augusto Carvalho; Salgueiro, Diego Fortes de Souza; Colantonio, Emilson; Júnior, Orival Andries

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of hand paddles, parachute and hand paddles plus parachute on the inter-limb coordination of butterfly swimming. Thirteen male swimmers were evaluated in four random maximal intensity conditions: without equipment, with hand paddles, with parachute and with hand paddles + parachute. Arm and leg stroke phases were identified by 2D video analysis to calculate the total time gap (T1: time between hands' entry in the water and high break-even point of the first undulation; T2: time between the beginning of the hand's backward movement and low break-even point of the first undulation; T3: time between the hand's arrival in a vertical plane to the shoulders and high break-even point of the second undulation; T4: time between the hand's release from the water and low break-even point of the second undulation). The swimming velocity was reduced and T1, T2 and T3 increased in parachute and hand paddles + parachute. No changes were observed in T4. Total time gap decreased in parachute and hand paddles + parachute. It is concluded that hand paddles do not influence the arm-to-leg coordination in butterfly, while parachute and hand paddles + parachute do change it, providing a greater propulsive continuity. PMID:25583184

  1. Effects of structural flexibility of wings in flapping flight of butterfly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to clarify the effects of structural flexibility of wings of a butterfly in flapping flight. For this purpose, a dynamics model of a butterfly is derived by Lagrange’s method, where the butterfly is considered as a rigid multi-body system. The panel method is employed to simulate the flow field and the aerodynamic forces acting on the wings. The mathematical model is validated by the agreement of the numerical result with the experimentally measured data. Then, periodic orbits of flapping-of-wings flights are parametrically searched in order to fly the butterfly models. Almost periodic orbits are found, but they are unstable. Deformation of the wings is modeled in two ways. One is bending and its effect on the aerodynamic forces is discussed. The other is passive wing torsion caused by structural flexibility. Numerical simulations demonstrate that flexible torsion reduces the flight instability. (paper)

  2. Two new butterfly records for Peru: Orophila cardases cardases and Pedaliodes garlaczi (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alfredo Cerdeña

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report to Peru, for the first time, two butterfly species, Orophila cardases cardases (Hewitson, 1869 and Pedaliodes garlaczi Pyrcz & Cerdeña, 2013, based on specimens collected in the Tabaconas-Namballe National Sanctuary and neighboring areas.

  3. The vegetation of three localities of the threatened butterfly species Chrysoritis aureus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Terblanche

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The butterfly Chrysoritis aureus—previously known as Poecilmitis aureus before the new combination was designated by Heath (1997 —is considered to be Rare in the Red Data book of butterflies (Henning & Henning 1989 and the updated list of the Red Data book of butterfly species (Henning & Henning 1995. C.R. Barrett and F. Coetzee discovered Chrysoritis aureus on Christmas Day 1959 on a rocky slope below the water tower near the Natal road of Heidelberg in Gauteng (Pringle et al. 1994. During 1983, Chrysoritis aureus was added to the protected wild animal list of the former Transvaal under Ordinance 12, since the type locality had been the only known area where the butterfly ocurred (De Wet 1987. G.A. Henning found another locality near Greylingstad (Pringle et al. 1994.

  4. A quantitative study of butterfly assemblages from different biotopes at the Langebaan Peninsula / Phillip Daniël Brummer.

    OpenAIRE

    Brummer, Phillip Daniël

    2009-01-01

    Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) comprises a fairly well-studied invertebrate taxon. The body of knowledge that has been acquired, especially on butterflies, allows for more convincing assessments of the significance of species distributions, for example assessments of rarity and endemism. In spite of their taxonomically well-known status, little is known about the different ranges and limiting factors controlling habitat specificity amongst species at a local scale. Aiming at ensuring ...

  5. Evolution and Mechanism of Spectral Tuning of Blue-Absorbing Visual Pigments in Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Wakakuwa, Motohiro; Terakita, Akihisa; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Stavenga, Doekele G; Shichida, Yoshinori; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    The eyes of flower-visiting butterflies are often spectrally highly complex with multiple opsin genes generated by gene duplication, providing an interesting system for a comparative study of color vision. The Small White butterfly, Pieris rapae, has duplicated blue opsins, PrB and PrV, which are expressed in the blue (?max?=?453 nm) and violet receptors (?max?=?425 nm), respectively. To reveal accurate absorption profiles and the molecular basis of the spectral tuning of these visu...

  6. The enigmatic fast leaflet rotation in Desmodium motorium: Butterfly mimicry for defense?

    OpenAIRE

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2013-01-01

    I propose that the enigmatic leaflet movements in elliptical circles every few minutes of the Indian telegraph (semaphore) plant Desmodium motorium ( = D. gyrans = Hedysarum gyrans = Codariocalyx motorius), which has intrigued scientists for centuries, is a new type of butterfly or general winged arthropod mimicry by this plant. Such leaflet movement may deceive a passing butterfly searching for an un-occupied site suitable to deposit its eggs, that the plant is already occupied. It may also ...

  7. Warning Color Changes in Response to Food Deprivation in the Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly, Battus philenor

    OpenAIRE

    Pegram, Kimberly V.; Nahm, Alexandra C.; Ronald L. Rutowski

    2013-01-01

    Predation on distasteful animals should favor warning coloration that is relatively conspicuous and phenotypically invariable. However, even among similarly colored individuals there can be variation in their warning signals. In butterflies, individual differences in larval feeding history could cause this variation. The warning signal of the pipevine swallowtail butterfly, Battus philenor L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) consists of both a blue iridescent patch and pigmentbased orange spots on...

  8. Does Dietary Restriction Reduce Life Span in Male Fruit-feeding Butterflies?

    OpenAIRE

    Molleman, Freerk; Ding, Jimin; Boggs, Carol L.; Carey, James R.; Arlet, Ma?gorzata E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Male life history and resource allocation is not frequently studied in aging and life span research. Here we verify that males of long-lived fruit-feeding butterfly species have reduced longevity on restricted diets (Beck 2007 Oecologia), in contrast to the common finding of longevity extension in dietary restriction experiments in Drosophila and some other organisms. Males of some of the most long-lived species of fruit-feeding butterflies were collected from Kibale Fores...

  9. Do forest ski-pistes represent a habitat gain for butterflies?

    OpenAIRE

    Balletto, Emilio; Rolando, Antonio; Passerin D Entreves, Pietro; Palestrini, Claudia; Negro, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    The abandonment of man-made pastures below the tree line is favouring natural reforestation in the European Alps. As a consequence, although the development of ski areas has severely disturbed the environment in the Alps, the creation of forest ski-pistes might, paradoxically, be beneficial to butterflies, which are predominantly open-habitat species. This study is the first to focus on the effects of forest ski-pistes on butterfly assemblages (Lepidoptera, Rhopalocera). We sampled both butte...

  10. Antennal circadian clocks coordinate sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies#

    OpenAIRE

    Merlin, Christine; Gegear, Robert J.; Reppert, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    During their fall migration, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a time-compensated sun compass to aid navigation to their overwintering grounds in central Mexico. It has been assumed that the circadian clock that provides time compensation resides in the brain, although this assumption has never been examined directly. Here we show that the antennae are necessary for proper time-compensated sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies, that antennal ...

  11. Defining behavioral and molecular differences between summer and migratory monarch butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Kanginakudru Sriramana; Casselman Amy; Gegear Robert J; Zhu Haisun; Reppert Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In the fall, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) undergo a magnificent long-range migration. In contrast to spring and summer butterflies, fall migrants are juvenile hormone deficient, which leads to reproductive arrest and increased longevity. Migrants also use a time-compensated sun compass to help them navigate in the south/southwesterly direction en route for Mexico. Central issues in this area are defining the relationship between juvenile ho...

  12. Reconstructing Seasonal Range Expansion of the Tropical Butterfly, Heliconius charithonia, into Texas Using Historical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Márcio Zikán

    2010-01-01

    While butterfly responses to climate change are well studied, detailed analyses of the seasonal dynamics of range expansion are few. Therefore, the seasonal range expansion of the butterfly Heliconius charithonia L. (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) was analyzed using a database of sightings and collection records dating from 1884 to 1992 from Texas. First and last sightings for each year were noted, and residency time calculated, for each collection locality. To test whether sighting dates were a c...

  13. Butterfly abundance in a warming climate: patterns in space and time are not congruent

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac, Nick J.B; Girardello, Marco; Brereton, Tom M.; Roy, David B.

    2011-01-01

    We present a model of butterfly abundance on transects in England. The model indicates a significant role for climate, but the direction of association is counter to expectation: butterfly population density is higher on sites with a cooler climate. However, the effect is highly heterogeneous, with one in five species displaying a net positive association. We use this model to project the population-level effects of climate warming for the year 2080, using a medium emissions scenario. The res...

  14. Performance Evaluation of Camb Biopesticides to Control Cabbage Butterfly (Pieris brassicae) in Cauliflower Crop

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Usman Zafar; Idrees Ahmad Nasir; Ahmed Ali Shahid; Muhammad Sarwar Rahi; Sheikh Riazuddin

    2002-01-01

    CAMB Bt. based and fungus based biopesticides, commercial Bt. formulation from mycogen and a new chemical pesticide Methoxyfenozide (RH2485-240SC) were tested on cauliflower field against cabbage butterfly (Pieris brassicae). All pesticides successfully controlled the population of cabbage butterfly in cauliflower crop. The efficacy against I to V instar larvae and field stability of CAMB Bt. biopesticide was better than chemical and other biopesticides. So, CAMB Bt. can be safely recommended...

  15. Butterflies of the high-altitude Atacama Desert: habitat use and conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Despland, Emma

    2014-01-01

    The butterfly fauna of the high-altitude desert of Northern Chile, though depauperate, shows high endemism, is poorly known and is of considerable conservation concern. This study surveys butterflies along the Andean slope between 2400 and 5000 m asl (prepuna, puna and Andean steppe habitats) as well as in high and low-altitude wetlands and in the neoriparian vegetation of agricultural sites. We also include historical sightings from museum records. We compare abundances between altitudes, be...

  16. A Simulation Study of Mutations in the Genetic Regulatory Hierarchy for Butterfly Eyespot Focus Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Jeffrey M.; Evans, Travis M.

    2008-01-01

    The color patterns on the wings of butterflies have been an important model system in evolutionary developmental biology. A recent computational model tested genetic regulatory hierarchies hypothesized to underlie the formation of butterfly eyespot foci (Evans and Marcus, 2006). The computational model demonstrated that one proposed hierarchy was incapable of reproducing the known patterns of gene expression associated with eyespot focus determination in wild-type butterflies, but that two slightly modified alternative hierarchies were capable of reproducing all of the known gene expressions patterns. Here we extend the computational models previously implemented in Delphi 2.0 to two mutants derived from the squinting bush brown butterfly (Bicyclus anynana). These two mutants, comet and Cyclops, have aberrantly shaped eyespot foci that are produced by different mechanisms. The comet mutation appears to produce a modified interaction between the wing margin and the eyespot focus that results in a series of comet-shaped eyespot foci. The Cyclops mutation causes the failure of wing vein formation between two adjacent wing-cells and the fusion of two adjacent eyespot foci to form a single large elongated focus in their place. The computational approach to modeling pattern formation in these mutants allows us to make predictions about patterns of gene expression, which are largely unstudied in butterfly mutants. It also suggests a critical experiment that will allow us to distinguish between two hypothesized genetic regulatory hierarchies that may underlie all butterfly eyespot foci. PMID:18586070

  17. Non-target effects of clothianidin on monarch butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecenka, Jacob R.; Lundgren, Jonathan G.

    2015-04-01

    Monarch butterflies ( Danaus plexippus) frequently consume milkweed in and near agroecosystems and consequently may be exposed to pesticides like neonicotinoids. We conducted a dose response study to determine lethal and sublethal doses of clothianidin using a 36-h exposure scenario. We then quantified clothianidin levels found in milkweed leaves adjacent to maize fields. Toxicity assays revealed LC10, LC50, and LC90 values of 7.72, 15.63, and 30.70 ppb, respectively. Sublethal effects (larval size) were observed at 1 ppb. Contaminated milkweed plants had an average of 1.14 ± 0.10 ppb clothianidin, with a maximum of 4 ppb in a single plant. This research suggests that clothianidin could function as a stressor to monarch populations.

  18. The genetics of monarch butterfly migration and warning colouration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuai; Zhang, Wei; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Hsu, Jeremy; Haeger, Juan Fernández; Zalucki, Myron P; Altizer, Sonia; de Roode, Jacobus C; Reppert, Steven M; Kronforst, Marcus R

    2014-10-16

    The monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is famous for its spectacular annual migration across North America, recent worldwide dispersal, and orange warning colouration. Despite decades of study and broad public interest, we know little about the genetic basis of these hallmark traits. Here we uncover the history of the monarch's evolutionary origin and global dispersal, characterize the genes and pathways associated with migratory behaviour, and identify the discrete genetic basis of warning colouration by sequencing 101 Danaus genomes from around the globe. The results rewrite our understanding of this classic system, showing that D. plexippus was ancestrally migratory and dispersed out of North America to occupy its broad distribution. We find the strongest signatures of selection associated with migration centre on flight muscle function, resulting in greater flight efficiency among migratory monarchs, and that variation in monarch warning colouration is controlled by a single myosin gene not previously implicated in insect pigmentation. PMID:25274300

  19. The genetics of monarch butterfly migration and warning coloration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuai; Zhang, Wei; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Hsu, Jeremy; Haeger, Juan Fernández; Zalucki, Myron P.; Altizer, Sonia; de Roode, Jacobus C.; Reppert, Steven M.; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2014-01-01

    The monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is famous for its spectacular annual migration across North America, recent worldwide dispersal, and orange warning coloration. Despite decades of study and broad public interest, we know little about the genetic basis of these hallmark traits. By sequencing 101 monarch genomes from around the globe, we uncover the history of the monarch's evolutionary origin and global dispersal, characterize the genes and pathways associated with migratory behavior, and identify the discrete genetic basis of warning coloration. The results rewrite our understanding of this classic system, showing that D. plexippus was ancestrally migratory and dispersed out of North America to occupy its broad distribution. We find the strongest signatures of selection associated with migration center on flight muscle function, resulting in greater flight efficiency among migratory monarchs, and that variation in monarch warning coloration is controlled by a single myosin gene not previously implicated in insect pigmentation. PMID:25274300

  20. The pheromone system of the male danaine butterfly, Idea leuconoe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, S; Nishida, R

    1996-03-01

    Male Idea leuconoe butterflies release a complex mixture of volatiles from their pheromone glands (hairpencils) during courtship. The pheromone components geranyl methyl thioether (2), viridifloric beta-lactone (3) and 6-hydroxy-4-dodecanolide (10) have been synthesized for the first time. Therefore, the structural assignment of these new natural products could be proved. Related 7-hydroxy-5-alkanoides are also present in the extract. The volatiles are embedded in a lipidic, matrix with more than 150 components. This matrix consists of alkanes, alkenes, 2,5-dialkyltetrahydrofurans, secondary alkanols and alkenols as well as alkanones and alkenones. Several regioisomers of the oxidized hydrocarbons occur. The elucidation of double bond positions has been performed by MS using DMDS adducts. PMID:8733612

  1. Butterfly (Rhopalocera fauna of Maharashtra Nature Park, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raut, N. B.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mumbai, one of the largest metro cities in the world, holds rich biodiversity in few green fragmented naturalor manmade habitats. One such habitat is the Maharashtra Nature Park (MNP. MNP is located in a highly polluted areaof Mumbai; this was a dumping ground for nearly 26 years. In 1983, it was restored into a semi-natural forest with theinitial technical inputs from World Wide Fund for Nature-India (WWF-India. Presently, this nature park supports a richbiodiversity but lacks proper documentation. Such information is essential as the park serves as an important study areafor many schools, college students and for many nature lovers. Previous documentation has reported 38 butterfly speciesfrom the park. The present study carried out from June 2005 to November 2005 has documented 53 species belonging tofive families from MNP.

  2. Width of Sunspot Generating Zone and Reconstruction of Butterfly Diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, V G; 10.1007/s11207-010-9665-6

    2010-01-01

    Based on the extended Greenwich-NOAA/USAF catalogue of sunspot groups it is demonstrated that the parameters describing the latitudinal width of the sunspot generating zone (SGZ) are closely related to the current level of solar activity, and the growth of the activity leads to the expansion of SGZ. The ratio of the sunspot number to the width of SGZ shows saturation at a certain level of the sunspot number, and above this level the increase of the activity takes place mostly due to the expansion of SGZ. It is shown that the mean latitudes of sunspots can be reconstructed from the amplitudes of solar activity. Using the obtained relations and the group sunspot numbers by Hoyt and Schatten (1998), the latitude distribution of sunspot groups ("the Maunder butterfly diagram") for the 18th and the first half of the 19th centuries is reconstructed and compared with historical sunspot observations.

  3. Borboletas (Lepidoptera) ameaçadas de extinção em Minas Gerais, Brasil Butterflies (Lepidoptera) considered as threatened in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Mirna M Casagrande; Olaf H. H Mielke; Keith S Brown Jr

    1998-01-01

    The twenty species of butterflies (diurnal Lepidoptera) considered as threatened in the Minas Gerais (by statute) are described and discussed in relation to distribution, appearance and known records.

  4. Butterfly-shaped distribution of SiNx precipitates in multi-crystalline Si for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianyong; Prakash, Ronit Roneel; Jiptner, Karolin; Chen, Jun; Miyamura, Yoshiji; Harada, Hirofumi; Kakimoto, Koichi; Ogura, Atsushi; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    This paper concerns the precipitation mechanism of SiNx impurities in multi-crystalline silicon grown with a directional solidification system. A butterfly-shaped precipitate region was found across the middle part of ingot. These precipitates showed filament-like and fiber-like shapes of several micrometers in diameter and up to several millimeters in length. These two types of precipitates exist in different areas, forming three distribution zones in the butterfly region. The precipitate growth periodically stopped at the last stage of the butterfly formation. A non-uniform convection flow model was proposed to explain the precipitation behavior at the butterfly.

  5. Arm to leg coordination in elite butterfly swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, D; Seifert, L; Boulesteix, L; Carter, M

    2006-04-01

    This study proposed the use of four time gaps to assess arm-to-leg coordination in the butterfly stroke at increasing race paces. Fourteen elite male swimmers swam at four velocities corresponding to the appropriate paces for, respectively, the 400-m, 200-m, 100-m, and 50-m events. The different stroke phases of the arm and leg were identified by video analysis and then used to calculate four time gaps (T1: time gap between entry of the hands in the water and the high break-even point of the first undulation; T2: time gap between the beginning of the hands' backward movement and the low break-even point of the first undulation; T3: time gap between the hands' arrival in a vertical plane to the shoulders and the high break-even point of the second undulation; T4: time gap between the hands' release from the water and the low break-even point of the second undulation), the values of which described the changing relationship of arm to leg movements over an entire stroke cycle. With increases in pace, elite swimmers increased the stroke rate, the relative duration of the arm pull, the recovery and the first downward movement of the legs, and decreased the stroke length, the relative duration of the arm catch phase and the body glide with arms forward (measured by T2), until continuity in the propulsive actions was achieved. Whatever the paces, the T1, T3, and T4 values were close to zero and revealed a high degree of synchronisation at key motor points of the arm and leg actions. This new method to assess butterfly coordination could facilitate learning and coaching by situating the place of the leg undulation in relation with the arm stroke. PMID:16572376

  6. The role of the North Atlantic Oscillation in controlling U.K. butterfly population size and phenology

    OpenAIRE

    Westgarth-Smith, Angus R; Roy, David B; Scholze, Martin; Tucker, Allan; Sumpter, John P.

    2012-01-01

    1. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) exerts considerable control on U.K. weather. This study investigates the impact of the NAO on butterfly abundance and phenology using 34 years of data from the U.K. Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS).

  7. Diversity and community structure of butterfly of Arignar Anna Zoological Park, Chennai, Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, T; Sekar, M; Manimozhi, A; Baskar, N; Archunan, G

    2011-03-01

    Investigation was carried out on the diversity of butterfly fauna in selected localities of conservation and breeding center of Arignar Anna Zoological Park (AAZP), Chennai, Tamil Nadu. Atotal of 56 species were recorded, 15 of them belonged to Pieridae, 12 Nymphalidae, 9 Satyridae, 8 Papilionidae, 7 Danaidae, 3 Lycaenidae and 1 species each belonged to the families Acraeidae and Hesperidae. Qualitatively and quantitatively Pieridae family were comparatively dominant than that of other families. The notable addition to the 25 more species listed during this observation were compared to previous field survey. Comparison of butterfly species distribution between the different localities revealed that butterfly species richness was higher at mountain region with 52 species and lowest of 25 species at public visiting areas. Visitor's activities may be that reason for effects on butterfly distribution and lack of vegetation. Each five endemic and protected species (i.e. endangered) listed under the Wildlife (Protection)Act were highlighted greater conservation importances of the AAZP. It is suggest that butterfly species diversity generally increase with increase in vegetation and declines with the increase in disturbance. PMID:21882656

  8. How Many Butterflies Are There in a City of Circa Half a Million People?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Ramírez-Restrepo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization poses severe threats to biodiversity; thus, there is an urge to understand urban areas and their biological, physical, and social components if we aim to integrate sustainable practices as part of their processes. Among urban wildlife groups, butterflies have been used as biological indicators due to their high sensitivity to environmental changes. In this study, we estimated the number of butterflies that live within a neotropical medium-sized city (Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico using a robust interpolation procedure (ordinary kriging. Our calculations added an average of 1,077,537 (± SE 172 butterfly individuals that dwelt in Xalapa in the surveyed space and time. The interpolation procedures showed to be robust and reliable, and up to some extent conservative. Thus, our results suggest that there are at least 1.8 butterfly individuals per capita in Xalapa. Notably, higher butterfly abundances tended to be recorded near highly vegetated areas and along city borders. Besides providing the basis for further ecological studies, our results will contribute to the crucial need of scientific data that is lacking, but critically important, for adequate urban management and planning, as well as environmental education.

  9. Similarity and difference among rainforest fruit-feeding butterfly communities in Central and South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, Philip J; Alexander, Laura G; Chacon, Isidro A; Fordyce, James A

    2012-03-01

    1. Documenting species abundance distributions in natural environments is critical to ecology and conservation biology. Tropical forest insect faunas vary in space and time, and these partitions can differ in their contribution to overall species diversity. 2. In the Neotropics, the Central American butterfly fauna is best known in terms of general natural history, but butterfly community diversity is best documented by studies on South American fruit-feeding butterflies. Here, we present the first long-term study of fruit-feeding nymphalid species diversity from Central America and provide a unique comparison between Central and South American butterfly communities. 3. This study used 60 months of sampling among multiple spatial and temporal partitions to assess species diversity in a Costa Rican rainforest butterfly community. Abundance distributions varied significantly at the species and higher taxonomic group levels, and canopy and understorey samples were found to be composed of distinct species assemblages. 4. Strong similarities in patterns of species diversity were found between this study and one from Ecuador; yet, there was an important difference in how species richness was distributed in vertical space. In contrast to the Ecuadorian site, Costa Rica had significantly higher canopy richness and lower understorey richness. 5. This study affirms that long-term sampling is vital to understanding tropical insect species abundance distributions and points to potential differences in vertical structure among Central and South American forest insect communities that need to be explored. PMID:22092379

  10. Genomic tools and cDNA derived markers for butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, Alexie; Joron, Mathieu; McMillan, W Owen; Blaxter, Mark L; Jiggins, Chris D

    2005-08-01

    The Lepidoptera have long been used as examples in the study of evolution, but some questions remain difficult to resolve due to a lack of molecular genetic data. However, as technology improves, genomic tools are becoming increasingly available to tackle unanswered evolutionary questions. Here we have used expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to develop genetic markers for two Müllerian mimic species, Heliconius melpomene and Heliconius erato. In total 1363 ESTs were generated, representing 330 gene objects in H. melpomene and 431 in H. erato. User-friendly bioinformatic tools were used to construct a nonredundant database of these putative genes (available at http://www.heliconius.org), and annotate them with blast similarity searches, InterPro matches and Gene Ontology terms. This database will be continually updated with EST sequences for the Papilionideae as they become publicly available, providing a tool for gene finding in the butterflies. Alignments of the Heliconius sequences with putative homologues derived from Bombyx mori or other public data sets were used to identify conserved PCR priming sites, and develop 55 markers that can be amplified from genomic DNA in both H. erato and H. melpomene. These markers will be used for comparative linkage mapping in Heliconius and will have applications in other phylogenetic and genomic studies in the Lepidoptera. PMID:16029486

  11. Butterfly patterns in a sheared lamellar-system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, P. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Zipfel, J.; Richtering, W. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    A technologically important extension of `classical` scattering techniques is to investigate soft-matter systems under non-equilibrium conditions. Shear flow is known to have a profound influence on the structure and orientation of complex fluids like thermotropic or lyotropic liquid-crystals, colloidal and polymeric solutions. There is a fundamental interest in understanding the microscopic structure and dynamics of such complex fluids as the macroscopic material properties might change with the application of an external perturbation like shear. The following example illustrates a recent study of the influence of shear on the structure of a lyotropic lamellar phase. Results using a cone-and-plate and the ILL Couette type shear-cell were obtained by rheo-small-angle light scattering (rheo-SALS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) at D11. Because of the broad range of momentum transfer Q available at D11 a characteristic butterfly-pattern with a scattering peak revealing both the structure and the supramolecular structure of the system could be detected at very low Q. (author). 5 refs.

  12. Monarch butterfly migration and parasite transmission in eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Rebecca A; Oberhauser, Karen S; De Roode, Jacobus C; Altizer, Sonia M

    2011-02-01

    Seasonal migration occurs in many animal systems and is likely to influence interactions between animals and their parasites. Here, we focus on monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) and a protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha) to investigate how host migration affects infectious disease processes. Previous work showed that parasite prevalence was lower among migratory than nonmigratory monarch populations; two explanations for this pattern are that (1) migration allows animals to periodically escape contaminated habitats (i.e., migratory escape), and (2) long-distance migration weeds out infected animals (i.e., migratory culling). We combined field-sampling and analysis of citizen science data to examine spatiotemporal trends of parasite prevalence and evaluate evidence for these two mechanisms. Analysis of within-breeding-season variation in eastern North America showed that parasite prevalence increased from early to late in the breeding season, consistent with the hypothesis of migratory escape. Prevalence was also positively related to monarch breeding activity, as indexed by larval density. Among adult monarchs captured at different points along the east coast fall migratory flyway, parasite prevalence declined as monarchs progressed southward, consistent with the hypothesis of migratory culling. Parasite prevalence was also lower among monarchs sampled at two overwintering sites in Mexico than among monarchs sampled during the summer breeding period. Collectively, these results indicate that seasonal migration can affect parasite transmission in wild animal populations, with implications for predicting disease risks for species with threatened migrations. PMID:21618914

  13. Monarch butterfly orientation: missing pieces of a magnificent puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower

    1996-01-01

    From late August to early September, millions of adult monarch butterflies of the eastern North American population cease reproducing, become highly gregarious and begin migrating southwards. By mid-October, they migrate through central Texas into Mexico where they follow the Sierra Madre Oriental across the Tropic of Cancer. They then shift direction westwards towards the Transverse Neovolcanic Belt of mountains where they overwinter without breeding. A rapid exodus northwards occurs at the spring equinox, and by early April both sexes reach the Gulf Coast states where the females lay eggs on the resurgent spring milkweed (Asclepias) flora and die. Adults of the new generation continue the migration to the northernmost breeding range, arriving by early June. Two or more short-lived breeding generations are produced over the summer, spread eastwards across the Appalachian Mountains and, by September, the autumn migration is again under way. This paper presents a new hypothesis that the orientation of adult monarchs undergoes a continual clockwise shifting throughout the 3-5 generations, rotating by 360 in the course of the year. This hypothesis is consistent with the timing of arrivals and the relative abundances of the successive generations of monarchs throughout eastern North America, with the directions of movement of their spring, summer and autumn generations, and with the timing of their arrival at the overwintering area in central Mexico. PMID:9317405

  14. Fractional quantum Hall effect in Hofstadter butterflies of Dirac fermions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazaryan, Areg; Chakraborty, Tapash; Pietiläinen, Pekka

    2015-05-13

    We report on the influence of a periodic potential on the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) states in monolayer graphene. We have shown that for two values of the magnetic flux per unit cell (one-half and one-third flux quantum) an increase of the periodic potential strength results in a closure of the FQHE gap and appearance of gaps due to the periodic potential. In the case of one-half flux quantum this causes a change of the ground state and consequently the change of the momentum of the system in the ground state. While there is also crossing between low-lying energy levels for one-third flux quantum, the ground state does not change with the increase of the periodic potential strength and is always characterized by the same momentum. Finally, it is shown that for one-half flux quantum the emergent gaps are due entirely to the electron-electron interaction, whereas for the one-third flux quantum per unit cell these are due to both non-interacting electrons (Hofstadter butterfly pattern) and the electron-electron interaction. PMID:25894009

  15. The Nation and the Subaltern in Yvonne Vera's Butterfly Burning

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Obi, Nwakanma.

    Full Text Available Yvonne Vera's death in 2005 brought to a tragic close the career of one of Zimbabwe's, indeed Africa's, more engaging contemporary writers. But her powerful novel, Butterfly Burning continues to mirror an aspect of Vera's enduring concern: the place of African women in the context of power both with [...] in the colonial and the postcolonial moments. This image of the "woman in shadows" also resonates in the kernel of the subaltern subject in Spivak's essay, "Can the Subaltern Speak?" I draw from Spivak's canonical essay, but simply as a critique of its notion of the burdened subjectivity of the colonized reified in the widow's self-immolation, and seen as a problematic condition of representation-a form of impotent silence. In contrast, I suggest that Vera's Phephelaphi directs our attention by a votive suicide that speaks. This essay thus proceeds from a re-reading of the discourse of subalternity to situate Yvonne Vera's novel as an act primarily of resistance against the situation of patriarchal enclosure under colonialism.

  16. Flow characteristics and performance evaluation of butterfly valves using numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The industrial butterfly valves have been applied to various fields that transport fluid in volume, especially water supply and drainage pipeline for flow control. The butterfly valves in various shapes are manufactured, but a fitting performance comparison is not made up. For this reason, we carried out numerical analysis of some kind of butterfly valves for water supply and drainage pipeline using commercial CFD code FLUENT, and made a comparative study of these results. Also, the flow coefficient, the loss coefficient, and pressure distribution of valves according to valve opening rate were compared each other and the influence of these design variables on valve performance were checked over. Through flow around the valve disk, such as pressure distribution, flow pattern, velocity vectors, and form of vortex, we grasped flow characteristics.

  17. The Innovation Butterfly Managing Emergent Opportunities and Risks During Distributed Innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson Jr , Edward G

    2012-01-01

    Product and service innovations are the result of mutually interacting creative and coordination tasks within a system that has to balance technical decisions, marketplace taste, personnel management, and stakeholder commitment. The constituent elements of such systems are often scattered across multiple firms and across the globe and constitute a complex system consisting of many interacting parts. In the spirit of the "butterfly effect", metaphorically describing the sensitivity to initials conditions of chaotic systems, this book builds an argument that "innovation butterflies" can, in the short term, take up significant amounts of effort and sap efficiencies within individual innovation projects. Such "innovation butterflies" can be prompted by external forces such as government legislation or unexpected spikes in the price of basic goods (such as oil), unexpected shifts in market tastes, or from a company manager’s decisions or those of its competitors. Even the smallest change, the smallest disruption...

  18. Diversity pattern of Butterfly Lepidoptera (Papilio demoleus in Union Council Koaz Bahram Dheri Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAROON

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In ecosystem the butterflies ply dual role as pollinators, silk producers and indicators of environmental quality. The present study was conducted in Union Council Koaz Bahram Dehri during the period July 2012 to August 2012. The collection of butterflies was done randomly by using the sweep net. A total of 32 specimens of Papilio demoleus were collected from different villages of the said area. The high number of specimen was collected from Aratt Kally (21.88%. The wing span is 9.8±0.40 cm and body length 2.9±0.16 cm. From the present investigation it was concluded that the Papilio demoleus species is common in Union Council Koaz Bahram Dehri. The area has rich fauna of butterflies and recommended further studies.

  19. Ultrastructure of antennal sensilla of four skipper butterflies in Parnara sp. and Pelopidas sp. (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangqun, Yuan; Ke, Gao; Feng, Yuan; Yalin, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Most species of Parnara and Pelopidas (Hesperiidae) are important pests of rice. In this study, the antennal morphology, types of sensilla, and their distribution of four skipper butterflies, including Parnara guttata (Bremer & Grey), Pa. bada (Moore), Pelopidas mathias (Fabricius) and Pe. agna (Moore), were observed using a scanning electron microscope. Six distinct morphological types of sensilla were found on the antennae of all of these species: sensilla squamiformia, sensilla trichodea, sensilla chaetica, sensilla auricillica, sensilla coeloconica, and Böhm sensilla. The sensilla trichodea are the most abundant sensilla among the four skipper butterflies, and the sensilla auricillica are confirmed on the antennae of butterflies for the second time. In addition, the possible functions of these sensilla are discussed in the light of previously reported lepidopteran insects, which may provide useful information for further study of the function of these antennal sensilla and for related pests control by applying sex pheromones. PMID:24843250

  20. Use of fruit bait traps for monitoring of butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer B. Hughes

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available There exists great interest in using fruit-feeding adult nymphalid butterflies to monitor changes in tropical forest ecosystems. We intensively sampled the butterfly fauna of mid-elevation tropical moist forest in southern Costa Rica with fruit bait traps to address a series of practical issues concerning the development of a robust, efficient sampling program. Variation in the number of captures and escapes of butterflies at the traps was better explained by the time of day than by the age of bait. Species’ escape rates varied widely, suggesting that short term, less intensive surveys aimed at determining presence or absence of species may be biased. Individuals did not appear to become "trap-happy" or to recognize the traps as food sources. Considering the tradeoff between numbers of traps and frequency of trap servicing, the most efficient sampling regime appears to be baiting and sampling the traps once every other day.

  1. Butterfly Classification by HSI and RGB Color Models Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Grajales-Múnera

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims the classification of Butterfly species through the implementation of Neural Networks and Image Processing. A total of 9 species of Morpho genre which has blue as a characteristic color are processed. For Butterfly segmentation we used image processing tools such as: Binarization, edge processing and mathematical morphology. For data processing RGB values are obtained for every image which are converted to HSI color model to identify blue pixels and obtain the data to the proposed Neural Networks: Back-Propagation and Perceptron. For analysis and verification of results confusion matrix are built and analyzed with the results of neural networks with the lowest error levels. We obtain error levels close to 1% in classification of some Butterfly species.

  2. A wing expressed sequence tag resource for Bicyclus anynana butterflies, an evo-devo model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Jonathan D

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Butterfly wing color patterns are a key model for integrating evolutionary developmental biology and the study of adaptive morphological evolution. Yet, despite the biological, economical and educational value of butterflies they are still relatively under-represented in terms of available genomic resources. Here, we describe an Expression Sequence Tag (EST project for Bicyclus anynana that has identified the largest available collection to date of expressed genes for any butterfly. Results By targeting cDNAs from developing wings at the stages when pattern is specified, we biased gene discovery towards genes potentially involved in pattern formation. Assembly of 9,903 ESTs from a subtracted library allowed us to identify 4,251 genes of which 2,461 were annotated based on BLAST analyses against relevant gene collections. Gene prediction software identified 2,202 peptides, of which 215 longer than 100 amino acids had no homology to any known proteins and, thus, potentially represent novel or highly diverged butterfly genes. We combined gene and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP identification by constructing cDNA libraries from pools of outbred individuals, and by sequencing clones from the 3' end to maximize alignment depth. Alignments of multi-member contigs allowed us to identify over 14,000 putative SNPs, with 316 genes having at least one high confidence double-hit SNP. We furthermore identified 320 microsatellites in transcribed genes that can potentially be used as genetic markers. Conclusion Our project was designed to combine gene and sequence polymorphism discovery and has generated the largest gene collection available for any butterfly and many potential markers in expressed genes. These resources will be invaluable for exploring the potential of B. anynana in particular, and butterflies in general, as models in ecological, evolutionary, and developmental genetics.

  3. The Lycaenid Central Symmetry System: Color Pattern Analysis of the Pale Grass Blue Butterfly Zizeeria maha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Masaki; Taira, Wataru; Hiyama, Atsuki; Otaki, Joji M

    2015-06-01

    The nymphalid groundplan has been proposed to explain diverse butterfly wing color patterns. In this model, each symmetry system is composed of a core element and a pair of paracore elements. The development of this elemental configuration has been explained by the induction model for positional information. However, the diversity of color patterns in other butterfly families in relation to the nymphalid groundplan has not been thoroughly examined. Here, we examined aberrant color pattern phenotypes of a lycaenid butterfly, Zizeeria maha, from mutagenesis and plasticity studies as well as from field surveys. In several mutants, the third and fourth spot arrays were coordinately positioned much closer to the discal spot in comparison to the normal phenotype. In temperature-shock types, the third and fourth array spots were elongated inwardly or outwardly from their normal positions. In field-caught spontaneous mutants, small black spots were located adjacent to normal black spots. Analysis of these aberrant phenotypes indicated that the spots belonging to the third and fourth arrays are synchronously changeable in position and shape around the discal spot. Thus, these arrays constitute paracore elements of the central symmetry system of the lycaenid butterflies, and the discal spot comprises the core element. These aberrant phenotypes can be explained by the black-inducing signals that propagate from the prospective discal spot, as predicted by the induction model. These results suggest the existence of long-range developmental signals that cover a large area of a wing not only in nymphalid butterflies, but also in lycaenid butterflies. PMID:26003977

  4. Preparation of bionic nanostructures from butterfly wings and their low reflectivity of ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z. W.; Niu, S. C.; Li, W.; Ren, L. Q.

    2013-06-01

    This letter presents a bionic study on Parnassius butterfly wings with a prominent ultraviolet (UV)-selective antireflection effect. An accurate SiO2 inverse replica of the nanostructure with a unique optical function from butterfly wings is prepared in multiscale by combining a sol-gel process and subsequent selective etching. It is found that the original nanostructures of biotemplate are well inherited and the excellent UV-antireflection function could be modulated by tunable parameters such as the replica spacing, width, distribution, and shape as well as formation.

  5. Graphene quantum dot on boron nitride: Dirac cone replica and Hofstadter butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizhova, L. A.; Libisch, F.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-10-01

    Graphene flakes placed on hexagonal boron nitride feature in the presence of a magnetic field a complex electronic structure due to a hexagonal moiré potential resulting from the van der Waals interaction with the substrate. The slight lattice mismatch gives rise to a periodic supercell potential. Zone folding is expected to create replicas of the original Dirac cone and Hofstadter butterflies. Our large-scale tight-binding simulation reveals an unexpected coexistence of a relativistic and nonrelativistic Landau level structure. The presence of the zeroth Landau level and its associated butterfly is shown to be the unambiguous signature for the occurrence of the Dirac cone replica.

  6. Performance Evaluation of Camb Biopesticides to Control Cabbage Butterfly (Pieris brassicae in Cauliflower Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Usman Zafar

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available CAMB Bt. based and fungus based biopesticides, commercial Bt. formulation from mycogen and a new chemical pesticide Methoxyfenozide (RH2485-240SC were tested on cauliflower field against cabbage butterfly (Pieris brassicae. All pesticides successfully controlled the population of cabbage butterfly in cauliflower crop. The efficacy against I to V instar larvae and field stability of CAMB Bt. biopesticide was better than chemical and other biopesticides. So, CAMB Bt. can be safely recommended for pest management strategies against Lepidopteral pests on vegetables with no harmful effects on its predators as in case with chemical pesticides.

  7. Impact of duplicate gene copies on phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates in butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liswi Saif W

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase in availability of genomic sequences for a wide range of organisms has revealed gene duplication to be a relatively common event. Encounters with duplicate gene copies have consequently become almost inevitable in the context of collecting gene sequences for inferring species trees. Here we examine the effect of incorporating duplicate gene copies evolving at different rates on tree reconstruction and time estimation of recent and deep divergences in butterflies. Results Sequences from ultraviolet-sensitive (UVRh, blue-sensitive (BRh, and long-wavelength sensitive (LWRh opsins,EF-1? and COI were obtained from 27 taxa representing the five major butterfly families (5535 bp total. Both BRh and LWRh are present in multiple copies in some butterfly lineages and the different copies evolve at different rates. Regardless of the phylogenetic reconstruction method used, we found that analyses of combined data sets using either slower or faster evolving copies of duplicate genes resulted in a single topology in agreement with our current understanding of butterfly family relationships based on morphology and molecules. Interestingly, individual analyses of BRh and LWRh sequences also recovered these family-level relationships. Two different relaxed clock methods resulted in similar divergence time estimates at the shallower nodes in the tree, regardless of whether faster or slower evolving copies were used, with larger discrepancies observed at deeper nodes in the phylogeny. The time of divergence between the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus and the queen D. gilippus (15.3–35.6 Mya was found to be much older than the time of divergence between monarch co-mimic Limenitis archippus and red-spotted purple L. arthemis (4.7–13.6 Mya, and overlapping with the time of divergence of the co-mimetic passionflower butterflies Heliconius erato and H. melpomene (13.5–26.1 Mya. Our family-level results are congruent with recent estimates found in the literature and indicate an age of 84–113 million years for the divergence of all butterfly families. Conclusion These results are consistent with diversification of the butterfly families following the radiation of angiosperms and suggest that some classes of opsin genes may be usefully employed for both phylogenetic reconstruction and divergence time estimation.

  8. Timpanoplastía con injerto en mariposa / Tympanoplasty with butterfly graft

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Iván, González Y; Cristian, Lara M; Marcela, Castillo F.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available La timpanoplastía es una cirugía frecuente para el otorrino. El año 1998 el Dr Eavey presenta la técnica de injerto en mariposa, la que es avalada posteriormente por varios autores y se afirma que es una técnica eficiente, con menor tiempo quirúrgico y mejor confort para el paciente. Se trata de un [...] estudio prospectivo realizado en el Hospital Dr. Sofera del Río entre los meses de septiembre 2005 a febrero 2006. En el que se realizó esta técnica a 5 pacientes obteniendo como resultado anatómico cierre de la perforación en 4 pacientes y una extrusión del injerto en í paciente post supuración ótica. En cuanto al resultado auditivo la mejoría promedio de los PTP aéreos fue de 15,64 dB. Se concluye que esta técnica presenta las ventajas descritas en la literatura, y se deben realizar estudios sucesivos para determinar qué pacientes se benefician mejor de esta técnica comparándolas con las técnicas tradicionales Abstract in english Tympanoplasty is a frequent surgery for the otolaringologist. In 1998 Dr. Eavey presents the technique of butterfly gran, which is later supported by several authors and it is considered an efficient technique, with less surgical time and better comfort for the patient. It is a prospective study mad [...] e at Dr. Sofera del Rio Hospital between the months of September 2005 and February 2006, where this technique was applied to 5 patients, obtaining as anatomical result the closing of the perforation in 4 patients and an extrusion of the graft in 1 patient post otic supuration. In relation to the auditive result the average improvement of the air PTP's was 15,64 dB. It is concluded that this technique presents the advantages described in the literature, and successive studies must be made to determine which patients obtain a better benefit from this technique as compared to the traditional techniques

  9. Timpanoplastía con injerto en mariposa Tympanoplasty with butterfly graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván González Y

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available La timpanoplastía es una cirugía frecuente para el otorrino. El año 1998 el Dr Eavey presenta la técnica de injerto en mariposa, la que es avalada posteriormente por varios autores y se afirma que es una técnica eficiente, con menor tiempo quirúrgico y mejor confort para el paciente. Se trata de un estudio prospectivo realizado en el Hospital Dr. Sofera del Río entre los meses de septiembre 2005 a febrero 2006. En el que se realizó esta técnica a 5 pacientes obteniendo como resultado anatómico cierre de la perforación en 4 pacientes y una extrusión del injerto en í paciente post supuración ótica. En cuanto al resultado auditivo la mejoría promedio de los PTP aéreos fue de 15,64 dB. Se concluye que esta técnica presenta las ventajas descritas en la literatura, y se deben realizar estudios sucesivos para determinar qué pacientes se benefician mejor de esta técnica comparándolas con las técnicas tradicionalesTympanoplasty is a frequent surgery for the otolaringologist. In 1998 Dr. Eavey presents the technique of butterfly gran, which is later supported by several authors and it is considered an efficient technique, with less surgical time and better comfort for the patient. It is a prospective study made at Dr. Sofera del Rio Hospital between the months of September 2005 and February 2006, where this technique was applied to 5 patients, obtaining as anatomical result the closing of the perforation in 4 patients and an extrusion of the graft in 1 patient post otic supuration. In relation to the auditive result the average improvement of the air PTP's was 15,64 dB. It is concluded that this technique presents the advantages described in the literature, and successive studies must be made to determine which patients obtain a better benefit from this technique as compared to the traditional techniques

  10. Does Skipping a Meal Matter to a Butterfly's Appearance? Effects of Larval Food Stress on Wing Morphology and Color in Monarch Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Haley; Solensky, Michelle J.; Satterfield, Dara A.; Davis, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    In animals with complex life cycles, all resources needed to form adult tissues are procured at the larval stage. For butterflies, the proper development of wings involves synthesizing tissue during metamorphosis based on the raw materials obtained by larvae. Similarly, manufacture of pigment for wing scales also requires resources acquired by larvae. We conducted an experiment to test the effects of food deprivation in the larval stage on multiple measures of adult wing morphology and colora...

  11. Use of the butterflies like bio-indicators of the habitat type and their biodiversity in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is the result of the study of Colombian butterflies, across an altitudinal range between 250 and 3000 m, whose primary objective was to describe the local distributions of a community of butterflies in three different leinds of ecosystems: primary forest (BP), secondary forest (BS), and disturbed zones (ZP). These descriptions took under consideration environmental parameters and gradients, such as: altitude, climate and how the vegetation had been changed. At the same time, based on observations and captures of butterflies, the seasonality of several species, their daily activity cycles, and micro habitat fidelity were described

  12. Comparative population genetics of mimetic Heliconius butterflies in an endangered habitat; Brazil's Atlantic Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Márcio Z

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brazil's Atlantic Forest is a biodiversity hotspot endangered by severe habitat degradation and fragmentation. Habitat fragmentation is expected to reduce dispersal among habitat patches resulting in increased genetic differentiation among populations. Here we examined genetic diversity and differentiation among populations of two Heliconius butterfly species in the northern portion of Brazil's Atlantic Forest to estimate the potential impact of habitat fragmentation on population connectivity in butterflies with home-range behavior. Results We generated microsatellite, AFLP and mtDNA sequence data for 136 Heliconius erato specimens from eight collecting locations and 146 H. melpomene specimens from seven locations. Population genetic analyses of the data revealed high levels of genetic diversity in H. erato relative to H. melpomene, widespread genetic differentiation among populations of both species, and no evidence for isolation-by-distance. Conclusions These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the extensive habitat fragmentation along Brazil's Atlantic Forest has reduced dispersal of Heliconius butterflies among neighboring habitat patches. The results also lend support to the observation that fine-scale population genetic structure may be common in Heliconius. If such population structure also exists independent of human activity, and has been common over the evolutionary history of Heliconius butterflies, it may have contributed to the evolution of wing pattern diversity in the genus.

  13. Adult sex ratio in the Parnassius mnemosyne butterfly: Effects of survival, migration, and water.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlašánek, Petr; Hauck, D.; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Ro?. 55, ?. 3 (2009), s. 233-252. ISSN 1565-9801 R&D Projects: GA ?R GD206/08/H044; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : butterfly conservation * effective population size * Jolly-Seber Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.725, year: 2009

  14. Will the Butterfly Cipher keep your Network Data secure? Developments in Computer Encryption

    OpenAIRE

    Hinze-hoare, Vita

    2006-01-01

    This paper explains the recent developments in security and encryption. The Butterfly cipher and quantum cryptography are reviewed and compared. Examples of their relative uses are discussed and suggestions for future developments considered. In addition application to network security together with a substantial review of classification of encryption systems and a summary of security weaknesses are considered.

  15. "A Dance with the Butterflies:" A Metamorphosis of Teaching and Learning through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a web-based collaborative project called "A Dance with the Butterflies" that applied the brain-based research of the Center for Applied Special Technologies (CAST) and principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to Pre-K-4 science curriculum. Learning experiences were designed for students to invoke the Recognition,…

  16. The lycaenid butterfly Polyommatus icarus uses a duplicated blue opsin to see green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison-Mangus, Marilou P; Briscoe, Adriana D; Zaccardi, Guillermo; Knüttel, Helge; Kelber, Almut

    2008-02-01

    The functional significance of gene duplication is rarely addressed at the level of animal behavior. Butterflies are excellent models in this regard because they can be trained and the use of their opsin-based visual pigments in color vision can be assessed. In the present study, we demonstrate that the lycaenid Polyommatus icarus uses its duplicate blue (B2) opsin, BRh2, in conjunction with its long-wavelength (LW) opsin, LWRh, to see color in the green part of the light spectrum extending up to 560 nm. This is in contrast to butterflies in the genus Papilio, which use duplicate LW opsins to discriminate colors in the long-wavelength range. We also found that P. icarus has a heterogeneously expressed red filtering pigment and red-reflecting ommatidia in the ventral eye region. In behavioural tests, the butterflies could not discriminate colors in the red range (570-640 nm). This finding is significant because we have previously found that the nymphalid butterfly Heliconius erato has filter-pigment mediated color vision in the long wavelength range. Our results suggest that lateral filtering pigments may not always influence color vision in insects. PMID:18203991

  17. Photonic Crystal Structure and Coloration of Wing Scales of Butterflies Exhibiting Selective Wavelength Iridescence.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mika, Filip; Mat?jková-Plšková, J.; Jiwajinda, S.; Dechkrong, P.; Shiojiri, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 5, ?. 5 (2012), s. 754-771. ISSN 1996-1944 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : butterfly scale * structure color * natural photonic crystal * E. mulciber * S. charonda * C. ataxus * T. aeacus Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 2.247, year: 2012

  18. Functional constraints on the evolution of long butterfly proboscides: lessons from Neotropical skippers (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, J A S; Morawetz, L; Warren, A D; Krenn, H W

    2015-01-01

    Extremely long proboscides are rare among butterflies outside of the Hesperiidae, yet representatives of several genera of skipper butterflies possess proboscides longer than 50 mm. Although extremely elongated mouthparts can be regarded as advantageous adaptations to gain access to nectar in deep-tubed flowers, the scarcity of long-proboscid butterflies is a phenomenon that has not been adequately accounted for. So far, the scarceness was explained by functional costs arising from increased flower handling times caused by decelerated nectar intake rates. However, insects can compensate for the negative influence of a long proboscis through changes in the morphological configuration of the feeding apparatus. Here, we measured nectar intake rates in 34 species representing 21 Hesperiidae genera from a Costa Rican lowland rainforest area to explore the impact of proboscis length, cross-sectional area of the food canal and body size on intake rate. Long-proboscid skippers did not suffer from reduced intake rates due to their large body size and enlarged food canals. In addition, video analyses of the flower-visiting behaviour revealed that suction times increased with proboscis length, suggesting that long-proboscid skippers drink a larger amount of nectar from deep-tubed flowers. Despite these advantages, we showed that functional costs of exaggerated mouthparts exist in terms of longer manipulation times per flower. Finally, we discuss the significance of scaling relationships on the foraging efficiency of butterflies and why some skipper taxa, in particular, have evolved extremely long proboscides. PMID:25682841

  19. Habitat use of the endangered butterfly Euphydryas maturna and forestry in Central Europe.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Freese, A.; Beneš, Ji?í; Bolz, R.; ?ížek, Old?ich; Dolek, M.; Geyer, A.; Gros, P.; Konvi?ka, Martin; Liegl, A.; Stettmer, C.

    2006-01-01

    Ro?. 9, ?. 4 (2006), s. 388-397. ISSN 1367-9430 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA526/04/0417 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : butterfly conservation * coppicing * forest pasture Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.926, year: 2006

  20. Tracking multi-generational colonization of the breeding grounds by monarch butterflies in eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D T Tyler; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Martin, Tara G; Hobson, Keith A; Wunder, Michael B; Norris, D Ryan

    2013-10-01

    Insect migration may involve movements over multiple breeding generations at continental scales, resulting in formidable challenges to their conservation and management. Using distribution models generated from citizen scientist occurrence data and stable-carbon and -hydrogen isotope measurements, we tracked multi-generational colonization of the breeding grounds of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America. We found that monarch breeding occurrence was best modelled with geographical and climatic variables resulting in an annual breeding distribution of greater than 12 million km(2) that encompassed 99% occurrence probability. Combining occurrence models with stable isotope measurements to estimate natal origin, we show that butterflies which overwintered in Mexico came from a wide breeding distribution, including southern portions of the range. There was a clear northward progression of monarchs over successive generations from May until August when reproductive butterflies began to change direction and moved south. Fifth-generation individuals breeding in Texas in the late summer/autumn tended to originate from northern breeding areas rather than regions further south. Although the Midwest was the most productive area during the breeding season, monarchs that re-colonized the Midwest were produced largely in Texas, suggesting that conserving breeding habitat in the Midwest alone is insufficient to ensure long-term persistence of the monarch butterfly population in eastern North America. PMID:23926146

  1. Functional constraints on the evolution of long butterfly proboscides: lessons from Neotropical skippers (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, J A S; Morawetz, L; Warren, A D; Krenn, H W

    2015-03-01

    Extremely long proboscides are rare among butterflies outside of the Hesperiidae, yet representatives of several genera of skipper butterflies possess proboscides longer than 50 mm. Although extremely elongated mouthparts can be regarded as advantageous adaptations to gain access to nectar in deep-tubed flowers, the scarcity of long-proboscid butterflies is a phenomenon that has not been adequately accounted for. So far, the scarceness was explained by functional costs arising from increased flower handling times caused by decelerated nectar intake rates. However, insects can compensate for the negative influence of a long proboscis through changes in the morphological configuration of the feeding apparatus. Here, we measured nectar intake rates in 34 species representing 21 Hesperiidae genera from a Costa Rican lowland rainforest area to explore the impact of proboscis length, cross-sectional area of the food canal and body size on intake rate. Long-proboscid skippers did not suffer from reduced intake rates due to their large body size and enlarged food canals. In addition, video analyses of the flower-visiting behaviour revealed that suction times increased with proboscis length, suggesting that long-proboscid skippers drink a larger amount of nectar from deep-tubed flowers. Despite these advantages, we showed that functional costs of exaggerated mouthparts exist in terms of longer manipulation times per flower. Finally, we discuss the significance of scaling relationships on the foraging efficiency of butterflies and why some skipper taxa, in particular, have evolved extremely long proboscides. PMID:25682841

  2. Butterfly Species Richness Patterns in Canada: Energy, Heterogeneity, and the Potential Consequences of Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy T. Kerr

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The distributions of most pollinator species are poorly documented despite their importance in providing ecosystem services. While these and other organisms are threatened by many aspects of the human enterprise, anthropogenic climate change is potentially the most severe threat to pollinator biodiversity. Mounting evidence demonstrates that there have already been biotic responses to the relatively small climate changes that have occurred this century. These include wholesale shifts of relatively well-documented butterfly and bird species in Europe and North America. Although studies of such phenomena are supported by circumstantial evidence, their findings are also consistent with predictions derived from current models of spatial patterns of species richness. Using new GIS methods that are highly precise and accurate, I document spatial patterns of Canadian butterfly diversity. These are strongly related to contemporary climate and particularly to potential evapotranspiration. An even more noteworthy finding is the fact that, for the first time, habitat heterogeneity, measured as the number of land cover types in each study unit, is proven to be an equally strong predictor of butterfly richness in a region where energy alone was thought to be the best predictor of diversity. Although previous studies reveal similar relationships between energy and diversity, they fail to detect the powerful link between richness and habitat heterogeneity. The butterflies of Canada provide a superb baseline for studying the effects of climate on contemporary patterns of species richness and comprise the only complete pollinator taxon for which this sort of analysis is currently possible.

  3. A Quantitative Postweld Shift Measurement and Compensation Technique in Butterfly Laser Module Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Tsai, Ying-Chien; Kuang, Jao-Hwa; Hung, Yu-Sin; Cheng, Wood-Hi

    2008-09-01

    A quantitative postweld shift (PWS) measurement and compensation technique employing a high-magnification camera with image capturing system (HMCICS) in butterfly-type laser module packages is investigated. The results show that the direction and magnitude of the fiber alignment shifts induced by the PWS in laser-welded butterfly-type laser module packaging can be quantitatively determined and compensated. The measured coupling powers in laser module packages after welding and compensation were clearly confirmed the measured fiber shifts that determined by the translational and rotational parameters. Therefore, the fiber shifts due to the PWS could be realigned back closer to their original optimum position after applying welding compensation, and hence the coupling powers loss due to the PWS could be regained. In comparison with previous studies of the PWS compensation by the well-known mechanical adjustment through a qualitative estimation technique, this HMCICS technique has successfully provided the mechanical adjustment through a quantitative compensation to the effect of the PWS on the fiber alignment shifts in butterfly-type laser module packages. The reliable butterfly-type laser modules with high yield used in lightwave transmission systems can be developed and fabricated.

  4. Butterflies of the high-altitude Atacama Desert: habitat use and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despland, Emma

    2014-01-01

    The butterfly fauna of the high-altitude desert of Northern Chile, though depauperate, shows high endemism, is poorly known and is of considerable conservation concern. This study surveys butterflies along the Andean slope between 2400 and 5000 m asl (prepuna, puna and Andean steppe habitats) as well as in high and low-altitude wetlands and in the neoriparian vegetation of agricultural sites. We also include historical sightings from museum records. We compare abundances between altitudes, between natural and impacted sites, as well as between two sampling years with different precipitation regimes. The results confirm high altitudinal turnover and show greatest similarity between wetland and slope faunas at similar altitudes. Results also underscore vulnerability to weather fluctuations, particularly in the more arid low-altitude sites, where abundances were much lower in the low precipitation sampling season and several species were not observed at all. Finally, we show that some species have shifted to the neoriparian vegetation of the agricultural landscape, whereas others were only observed in less impacted habitats dominated by native plants. These results suggest that acclimation to novel habitats depends on larval host plant use. The traditional agricultural environment can provide habitat for many, but not all, native butterfly species, but an estimation of the value of these habitats requires better understanding of butterfly life history strategies and relationships with host plants. PMID:25309583

  5. The All-Ones Problem for Binomial Trees, Butterfly and Benes Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Manuel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The all-ones problem is an NP-complete problem introduced by Sutner [11], with wide applicationsin linear cellular automata. In this paper, we solve the all-ones problem for some of the widelystudied architectures like binomial trees, butterfly, and benes networks.

  6. Tracking multi-generational colonization of the breeding grounds by monarch butterflies in eastern North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D. T. Tyler; Wassenaar, Leonard I.; Martin, Tara G.; Hobson, Keith A.; Wunder, Michael B.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Insect migration may involve movements over multiple breeding generations at continental scales, resulting in formidable challenges to their conservation and management. Using distribution models generated from citizen scientist occurrence data and stable-carbon and -hydrogen isotope measurements, we tracked multi-generational colonization of the breeding grounds of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America. We found that monarch breeding occurrence was best modelled with geographical and climatic variables resulting in an annual breeding distribution of greater than 12 million km2 that encompassed 99% occurrence probability. Combining occurrence models with stable isotope measurements to estimate natal origin, we show that butterflies which overwintered in Mexico came from a wide breeding distribution, including southern portions of the range. There was a clear northward progression of monarchs over successive generations from May until August when reproductive butterflies began to change direction and moved south. Fifth-generation individuals breeding in Texas in the late summer/autumn tended to originate from northern breeding areas rather than regions further south. Although the Midwest was the most productive area during the breeding season, monarchs that re-colonized the Midwest were produced largely in Texas, suggesting that conserving breeding habitat in the Midwest alone is insufficient to ensure long-term persistence of the monarch butterfly population in eastern North America. PMID:23926146

  7. Checkerspot Butterflies, Science, and Conservation Policy: A Grassroots View of Nitrogen Overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, S. B.

    2009-12-01

    Educating policy makers and the general public about the global “Nitrogen Overdose” has proved challenging because of the complexities of the global nitrogen cycle and its effect on terrestrial, freshwater, estuarine, and marine ecosystems. In this presentation, I present my grassroots experience as a scientist who transitioned into a scientist/activist, working with elected officials, regulators, private industry, activist groups, and the general public, to conserve the rare, beautiful, and charismatic Bay checkerspot butterfly in the San Francisco Bay Area. The butterfly is threatened by atmospheric nitrogen deposition (5-20 kg-N/ha/year) that enriches nutrient poor soils derived from serpentinite rock. This eutrophication allows nitrophilous grasses to invade and displace the dazzling wildflower displays that provide essential food and nectar for the butterfly. Over the past 25 years, I have been involved in all phases of the conservation of this ecosystem, drawing on long-term scientific investigations (literally hundreds of papers by dozens of researchers) on the population dynamics and conservation of the butterfly, and the biogeochemistry of the serpentine grassland ecosystem. Publication of a 1999 paper on N-deposition impacts on the butterfly led to consultations with government agencies and a powerplant company, and development of precedent setting N-deposition mitigation through habitat acquisition and grazing management. This process has evolved into a regional-scale Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) that is nearing completion in 2010. A key to the success of this ongoing endeavor is education about biodiversity and N-deposition. Field-tours during spring wildflower season put diverse groups of people in direct contact with the obvious beauty of the ecosystem, creating an opening to learning about the complexities of N-deposition, the population biology of the butterfly, and the convoluted conservation history of the sites. Informal tours have developed into a docent program that led more than 1500 people to the site over the past 4 years, including targeted tours for elected officials, decision makers, land managers, and scientists. Outreach has also included more than a dozen articles in local, regional, and national press, television spots, public presentations (Kiwanis, garden clubs, local conferences), and behind the scenes work in policy development for the HCP. When political decisions on the HCP are finalized in the next year, there will be a cadre of educated people, motivated by first hand experience with the ecosystem, to support final approval and implementation of a rigorous plan that will secure the butterfly, numerous imperiled plants, and the entire flower-filled ecosystem. The experience provides a case study and model of how effective grassroots action by concerned scientists can make a difference.

  8. Low power reconfigurable FP-FFT core with an array of folded DA butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beulet Paul, Augusta Sophy; Raju, Srinivasan; Janakiraman, Raja

    2014-12-01

    A variable length (32 ~ 2,048), low power, floating point fast Fourier transform (FP-FFT) processor is designed and implemented using energy-efficient butterfly elements. The butterfly elements are implemented using distributed arithmetic (DA) algorithm that eliminates the power-consuming complex multipliers. The FFT computations are scheduled in a quasi-parallel mode with an array of 16 butterflies. The nodes of the data flow graph (DFG) of the FFT are folded to these 16 butterflies for any value of N by the control unit. Register minimization is also applied after folding to decrease the number of scratch pad registers to (log 2 N - 1) × 16. The real and imaginary parts of the samples are represented by 32-bit single-precision floating point notation to achieve high precision in the results. Thus, each sample is represented using 64 bits. Twiddle factor ROM size is reduced by 25% using the symmetry of the twiddle factors. Reconfigurability based on the sample size is achieved by the control unit. This distributed floating point arithmetic (DFPA)-based design of FFT processor implemented in 45-nm process occupies an area of 0.973 mm2 and dissipates a power of 68 mW at an operating frequency of 100 MHz. When compared with FFT processor designed in the same technology with multiplier-based butterflies, this design shows 33% less area and 38% less power. The throughput for 2,048-point FFT is 222 KS/s and the energy spent per FFT is 7.4 to 14 nJ for 64 to 2,048 points being one among the most energy-efficient FFT processors.

  9. Defining behavioral and molecular differences between summer and migratory monarch butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanginakudru Sriramana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the fall, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus undergo a magnificent long-range migration. In contrast to spring and summer butterflies, fall migrants are juvenile hormone deficient, which leads to reproductive arrest and increased longevity. Migrants also use a time-compensated sun compass to help them navigate in the south/southwesterly direction en route for Mexico. Central issues in this area are defining the relationship between juvenile hormone status and oriented flight, critical features that differentiate summer monarchs from fall migrants, and identifying molecular correlates of behavioral state. Results Here we show that increasing juvenile hormone activity to induce summer-like reproductive development in fall migrants does not alter directional flight behavior or its time-compensated orientation, as monitored in a flight simulator. Reproductive summer butterflies, in contrast, uniformly fail to exhibit directional, oriented flight. To define molecular correlates of behavioral state, we used microarray analysis of 9417 unique cDNA sequences. Gene expression profiles reveal a suite of 40 genes whose differential expression in brain correlates with oriented flight behavior in individual migrants, independent of juvenile hormone activity, thereby molecularly separating fall migrants from summer butterflies. Intriguing genes that are differentially regulated include the clock gene vrille and the locomotion-relevant tyramine beta hydroxylase gene. In addition, several differentially regulated genes (37.5% of total are not annotated. We also identified 23 juvenile hormone-dependent genes in brain, which separate reproductive from non-reproductive monarchs; genes involved in longevity, fatty acid metabolism, and innate immunity are upregulated in non-reproductive (juvenile-hormone deficient migrants. Conclusion The results link key behavioral traits with gene expression profiles in brain that differentiate migratory from summer butterflies and thus show that seasonal changes in genomic function help define the migratory state.

  10. Low-intensity agricultural landscapes in Transylvania support high butterfly diversity: implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Jacqueline; Dorresteijn, Ine; Hanspach, Jan; Fust, Pascal; Rakosy, László; Fischer, Joern

    2014-01-01

    European farmland biodiversity is declining due to land use changes towards agricultural intensification or abandonment. Some Eastern European farming systems have sustained traditional forms of use, resulting in high levels of biodiversity. However, global markets and international policies now imply rapid and major changes to these systems. To effectively protect farmland biodiversity, understanding landscape features which underpin species diversity is crucial. Focusing on butterflies, we addressed this question for a cultural-historic landscape in Southern Transylvania, Romania. Following a natural experiment, we randomly selected 120 survey sites in farmland, 60 each in grassland and arable land. We surveyed butterfly species richness and abundance by walking transects with four repeats in summer 2012. We analysed species composition using Detrended Correspondence Analysis. We modelled species richness, richness of functional groups, and abundance of selected species in response to topography, woody vegetation cover and heterogeneity at three spatial scales, using generalised linear mixed effects models. Species composition widely overlapped in grassland and arable land. Composition changed along gradients of heterogeneity at local and context scales, and of woody vegetation cover at context and landscape scales. The effect of local heterogeneity on species richness was positive in arable land, but negative in grassland. Plant species richness, and structural and topographic conditions at multiple scales explained species richness, richness of functional groups and species abundances. Our study revealed high conservation value of both grassland and arable land in low-intensity Eastern European farmland. Besides grassland, also heterogeneous arable land provides important habitat for butterflies. While butterfly diversity in arable land benefits from heterogeneity by small-scale structures, grasslands should be protected from fragmentation to provide sufficiently large areas for butterflies. These findings have important implications for EU agricultural and conservation policy. Most importantly, conservation management needs to consider entire landscapes, and implement appropriate measures at multiple spatial scales. PMID:25058307

  11. Take-off performance under optimal and suboptimal thermal conditions in the butterfly Pararge aegeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwaerts, Koen; Van Dyck, Hans

    2004-11-01

    Realized fitness in a fluctuating environment depends on the capacity of an ectothermic organism to function at different temperatures. Flying heliotherms like butterflies use flight for almost all activities like mate location, foraging and host plant searching and oviposition. Several studies tested the importance of ambient temperature, thermoregulation and butterfly activity. Here, we test the influence of variation in flight morphology in interaction with differences in body temperature on locomotor performance, which has not been thoroughly examined so far. Take-off free flight performance was tested at two different body temperatures in males and females of the speckled wood butterfly Pararge aegeria. We found that both males and females accelerated faster at the optimal body temperature compared to the suboptimal one. The multivariate analyses showed significant sex-specific contributions of flight morphology, body temperature treatment and feeding load to explain variation in acceleration performance. Female and male butterflies with a large relative thorax (i.e. flight muscle investment) mass and large, slender wings (i.e. aspect ratio) accelerated fast at optimal temperature. However, high aspect ratio individuals accelerated slowly at suboptimal temperature. Females of low body mass accelerated fast at optimal, but slowly at suboptimal body temperature. In males, there was an interaction effect between body and relative thorax mass: light males with high relative thorax mass had higher performance than males with a low relative thorax mass. In addition, relative distance to the centre of forewing area was positively related to acceleration at both temperatures in males. Males and females with higher feeding loads had lower levels of acceleration. Finally, males that were able to accelerate fast under both temperatures, had a highly significantly heavier relative thorax, lower body and abdomen mass. More generally, this study shows that the significance of butterfly flight morphology in terms of flight performance is at least partially dependent on body temperature. PMID:15309609

  12. The taxonomy, biogeography and conservation of the myrmecophilous Chrysoritis butterflies (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. van Hamburg

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The relevance and integration of scientific knowledge to conservation management of the locally popular and highly endemic butterfly genus Chrysoritis are investigated within the research fields of taxonomy and biogeography. The butterfly genus Chrysoritis contains at least 41 species endemic to South Africa. The taxonomy of Chrysoritis has reached a state where revisions could easily result in a plethora of names between “lumping and splitting”. In practice, the state of the taxonomy of these butterflies on species level may alter their conservation priority. The two most species rich species groups in Chrysoritis have different centres of endemism, however, a butterfly atlas becomes a necessity to reveal more about their biogeography. There is an absence of butterfly species lists in many of our National Parks and Nature Reserves. Legislation should facilitate rather than limit the valuable role of the amateur lepidopterist to add distribution records. In turn, the amateur lepidopterists should adapt and make an effort to explore unknown localities, apart from monitoring butterflies at their well-known localities. The red listing of localised butterflies in South Africa, including a number of Chrysoritis species, is in need of an urgent review in the light of the most recent IUCN categories. A species such as Chrysoritis dicksoni should be protected by law - but at its known localities. The scenario that real conservation action is only needed if the last known locality of a butterfly is threatened, should be abolished. A paradigm shift to conserve the metapopulations of the highly endemic Chrysoritis genus and not merely a few of its species as items that appear on lists, seems necessary.

  13. Building a DNA Barcode Reference Library for the True Butterflies (Lepidoptera) of Peninsula Malaysia: What about the Subspecies?

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, John-james; Sing, Kong-wah; Sofian-azirun, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to build a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies of Peninsula Malaysia and assess the value of attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records. A new DNA barcode library was constructed with butterflies from the Museum of Zoology, University of Malaya collection. The library was analysed in conjunction with publicly available DNA barcodes from other Asia-Pacific localities to test the ability of the DNA barcodes to discriminate species and su...

  14. DNA barcodes and cryptic species of skipper butterflies in the genus Perichares in Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, John M.; Janzen, Daniel H.; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Hallwachs, Winnie; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2008-01-01

    DNA barcodes can be used to identify cryptic species of skipper butterflies previously detected by classic taxonomic methods and to provide first clues to the existence of yet other cryptic species. A striking case is the common geographically and ecologically widespread neotropical skipper butterfly Perichares philetes (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae), described in 1775, which barcoding splits into a complex of four species in Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG) in northwestern Costa Rica. Thre...

  15. Chasing Migration Genes: A Brain Expressed Sequence Tag Resource for Summer and Migratory Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Haisun; Casselman, Amy; Reppert, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) undergo a spectacular fall migration. In contrast to summer butterflies, migrants are juvenile hormone (JH) deficient, which leads to reproductive diapause and increased longevity. Migrants also utilize time-compensated sun compass orientation to help them navigate to their overwintering grounds. Here, we describe a brain expressed sequence tag (EST) resource to identify genes involved in migratory behaviors. A brain EST library was constr...

  16. Structure, function, and self-assembly of single network gyroid (I4132) photonic crystals in butterfly wing scales

    OpenAIRE

    Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Osuji, Chinedum O.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Noh, Heeso; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec; Dufresne, Eric R.; Prum, Richard O.

    2010-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional biophotonic nanostructures produce the vivid structural colors of many butterfly wing scales, but their exact nanoscale organization is uncertain. We used small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) on single scales to characterize the 3D photonic nanostructures of five butterfly species from two families (Papilionidae, Lycaenidae). We identify these chitin and air nanostructures as single network gyroid (I4132) photonic crystals. We describe their optical function from SAXS...

  17. On-Chip Implementation of Pipeline Digit-Slicing Multiplier-Less Butterfly for Fast Fourier Transform Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Yazan S. Algnabi; Rozita Teymourzadeh; Masuri Othman; Md. S. Islam; Mok V. Hong

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: The need for wireless communication has driven the communication systems to high performance. However, the main bottleneck that affects the communication capability is the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which is the core of most modulators. Approach: This study presented on-chip implementation of pipeline digit-slicing multiplier-less butterfly for FFT structure. The approach taken; in order to reduce computation complexity in butterfly, digit-slicing mul...

  18. The enigmatic fast leaflet rotation in Desmodium motorium: butterfly mimicry for defense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2013-06-01

    I propose that the enigmatic leaflet movements in elliptical circles every few minutes of the Indian telegraph (semaphore) plant Desmodium motorium ( = D. gyrans = Hedysarum gyrans = Codariocalyx motorius), which has intrigued scientists for centuries, is a new type of butterfly or general winged arthropod mimicry by this plant. Such leaflet movement may deceive a passing butterfly searching for an un-occupied site suitable to deposit its eggs, that the plant is already occupied. It may also attract insectivorous birds, reptiles or arthropods to the plant because it looks as if it is harboring a potential prey and while they patrol there, they can find insects or other invertebrates that indeed attack the plant. The possibility that diurnal mammalian herbivores may also be deterred by these movements should not be dismissed. PMID:23603964

  19. QCD in magnetic fields: from Hofstadter's butterfly to the phase diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Endrodi, G

    2014-01-01

    I revisit the problem of a charged particle on a two-dimensional lattice immersed in a constant (electro)magnetic field, and discuss the energy spectrum - Hofstadter's butterfly - from a new, quantum field theoretical perspective. In particular, I point out that there is an intricate interplay between a) the structure of the butterfly at low magnetic flux, b) the absence of asymptotic freedom in QED and c) the enhancement of the quark condensate by a magnetic field at zero temperature. I proceed to discuss the response of the QCD condensate to the magnetic field at nonzero temperatures in four space-time dimensions, present the resulting phase diagram and compare it to low-energy model predictions.

  20. The electronic spectrum of a quasiperiodic potential: From the Hofstadter butterfly to the Fibonacci chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumis, Gerardo G. [Departamento de Fisica-Qumica, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: naumis@fisica.unam.mx; Lopez-Rodriguez, F.J. [Departamento de Fisica-Qumica, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-05-01

    We show that an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian, defined in a quasiperiodic chain with an on-site potential given by a Fibonacci sequence, can be obtained using a superposition of Harper potentials. Since the spectrum of the Harper equation as a function of the magnetic flux is a fractal set, known as the Hofstadter butterfly, we follow the transformation of the butterfly to a new one that contains the Fibonacci potential and related approximants. As a result, the equation in reciprocal space for the Fibonacci case has the form of a chain with long range interaction between Fourier components. Then, the structure of the resulting spectrum is analyzed by calculating the components in reciprocal space of the related potentials. As an application, the correlator of each potential and some localization properties are obtained.

  1. Comparative losses of British butterflies, birds, and plants and the global extinction crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J A; Telfer, M G; Roy, D B; Preston, C D; Greenwood, J J D; Asher, J; Fox, R; Clarke, R T; Lawton, J H

    2004-03-19

    There is growing concern about increased population, regional, and global extinctions of species. A key question is whether extinction rates for one group of organisms are representative of other taxa. We present a comparison at the national scale of population and regional extinctions of birds, butterflies, and vascular plants from Britain in recent decades. Butterflies experienced the greatest net losses, disappearing on average from 13% of their previously occupied 10-kilometer squares. If insects elsewhere in the world are similarly sensitive, the known global extinction rates of vertebrate and plant species have an unrecorded parallel among the invertebrates, strengthening the hypothesis that the natural world is experiencing the sixth major extinction event in its history. PMID:15031508

  2. The electronic spectrum of a quasiperiodic potential: From the Hofstadter butterfly to the Fibonacci chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian, defined in a quasiperiodic chain with an on-site potential given by a Fibonacci sequence, can be obtained using a superposition of Harper potentials. Since the spectrum of the Harper equation as a function of the magnetic flux is a fractal set, known as the Hofstadter butterfly, we follow the transformation of the butterfly to a new one that contains the Fibonacci potential and related approximants. As a result, the equation in reciprocal space for the Fibonacci case has the form of a chain with long range interaction between Fourier components. Then, the structure of the resulting spectrum is analyzed by calculating the components in reciprocal space of the related potentials. As an application, the correlator of each potential and some localization properties are obtained

  3. The electronic spectrum of a quasiperiodic potential: from the Hofstadter butterfly to the Fibonacci chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumis, Gerardo

    2008-03-01

    We show that the electronic spectrum of a tigth-binding Hamiltonian defined in a quasiperiodic chain with an on-site potential given by a Fibonacci sequence, can be obtained as a superposition of Harper potentials. Since the spectrum of the Harper equation as a function of the magnetic flux is a fractal set, known as Hofstadter butterfly, here we show that is possible to follow the transformation of the butterfly to a new one that contains the Fibonacci potential and related approximants. As a result, the equation in reciprocal space for the Fibonacci case has the form of a chain with long range interaction between Fourier components. Then we explore the transformation between both spectra, and specially the origin of energy gaps due to the analytical calculation of the components in reciprocal space of the related potentials. As an application, we calculate the correlator of each potential, which allows to obtain some of the localization properties.

  4. The butterflies of Turquino National Park, Sierra Maestra, Cuba (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núñez, R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Between February and November 2011, we conducted a species inventory, created a natural history database and a made a first approach to the composition and structure of the butterfly communities present at several vegetation types in the Turquino National Park. The inventory included 83 species, 29 of them endemic. We recorded 57 species (18 endemic in transects along main vegetation pathways. In disturbed vegetation, species richness was higher (48 and abundance was better distributed, but the proportion of endemism was lower (23%. Species richness decreased and the dominance and proportion of endemism increased with altitude. Numbers of species and the proportions of endemism at natural habitats sampled were: 19 and 58% for evergreen forest, 10 and 60% for rainforest, eight and 100% for cloud forest, and four and 100% for the elfin thicket. Flowers of 27 plants were recorded as nectar sources for 30 butterfly species, and host plants were recorded for nine species.

  5. Antennal circadian clocks coordinate sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Christine; Gegear, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    During their fall migration, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a time-compensated sun compass to aid navigation to their overwintering grounds in central Mexico. It has been assumed that the circadian clock that provides time compensation resides in the brain, although this assumption has never been examined directly. Here we show that the antennae are necessary for proper time-compensated sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies, that antennal clocks exist in monarchs, and that they likely provide the primary timing mechanism for sun compass orientation. These unexpected findings pose a novel function for the antennae and open a new line of investigation into clock-compass connections that may extend widely to other insects that use this orientation mechanism. PMID:19779201

  6. Antennal circadian clocks coordinate sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Christine; Gegear, Robert J; Reppert, Steven M

    2009-09-25

    During their fall migration, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a time-compensated Sun compass to aid navigation to their overwintering grounds in central Mexico. It has been assumed that the circadian clock that provides time compensation resides in the brain, although this assumption has never been examined directly. Here, we show that the antennae are necessary for proper time-compensated Sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies, that antennal clocks exist in monarchs, and that they likely provide the primary timing mechanism for Sun compass orientation. These unexpected findings pose a novel function for the antennae and open a new line of investigation into clock-compass connections that may extend widely to other insects that use this orientation mechanism. PMID:19779201

  7. Phylogenetic studies of ribosomal RNA variation in higher moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera: Ditrysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, S J; Friedlander, T P; Martin, J A; Pashley, D P

    1992-12-01

    The selection of exemplars has been shown both theoretically and empirically to affect tree topology, but the importance of the number and nature of taxa used to represent higher taxonomic lineages in molecular studies is rarely stressed. In our rRNA study of higher moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera: Ditrysia), the selection of different exemplars and outgroups caused major tree rearrangements. We also examined the effectiveness with which conserved rRNA regions track the diversification of Lepidoptera. Homoplasy is as prevalent at the few variable sites of conserved regions (18E, 18J, 28F) as at the many variable sites of a more rapidly evolving region (28B). Finally, 28B sequence variation differs qualitatively among lepidopteran superfamilies of presumed comparable age, the Papilionoidea (true butterflies) and Noctuoidea (cutworm moths and relatives). PMID:1342947

  8. Variable Length Floating Point FFT Processor Using Radix-22 Butterfly Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Augusta Sophy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A mixed radix, floating point FFT processor is designed using radix-2 and radix-22 butterfly elements, adapting a pipelined architecture for a variable length of 128/512/2048. The single-path delay feedback (SDF architecture is employed to exploit the symmetry in signal flow graph of FFT algorithm. Area minimization has been achieved for the reconfigurable FFT processor by using pipelining and higher radix butterfly structures. (radix-22. Then area power trade off is done with parallel mixed radix processing blocks, to achieve better throughput. A reconfigurable architecture has been achieved by bypassing certain processing blocks while keeping the other blocks functional through control mechanism. The proposed design is implemented in 45nm technology and the synthesis results show a silicon area of 4.7mm2 and a power consumption of 152mw at 50MHz and 208.5mw at 100MHz.

  9. Carbohydrate chelation in neutral aqueous solution: the threo-tetritolato-Pd(4) butterfly motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allscher, Thorsten; Klüfers, Peter

    2012-08-20

    Alditols ("sugar alcohols", "glycitols") form palladium(II) complexes in neutral aqueous solution if they can provide the threitol partial structure. This requirement excludes erythritol, ribitol, and allitol when applied to the common tetritols, pentitols, and hexitols. The remaining alditols are able to arrange their threo-tetraol-O(4) pattern to an almost planar rhomb, to which four Pd(II) N(2) (N(2) =bidentate nitrogen ligand) centres bind in a butterfly-shaped Pd(4) motif. Bridging is the exclusive bonding mode of the four alkoxido donors. In contrast to the butterfly complexes, all alditols are able to form a species at a pH intermediate between neutrality and the stronger alkaline conditions of non-bridging diolato-palladium(II) binding, namely, the ?-triolato bonding mode. A Pd(2) (?-triolato) unit shows the middle O atom of a propanetriolato fragment as a bridging ligator, with the lateral O atoms binding in the terminal mode. PMID:22786800

  10. Compounded effects of climate change and habitat alteration shift patterns of butterfly diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Forister, Matthew L.; Mccall, Andrew C.; Sanders, Nathan J.; Fordyce, James A.; Thorne, James H.; O’brien, Joshua; Waetjen, David P.; Shapiro, Arthur M.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change and habitat destruction have been linked to global declines in vertebrate biodiversity, including mammals, amphibians, birds, and fishes. However, invertebrates make up the vast majority of global species richness, and the combined effects of climate change and land use on invertebrates remain poorly understood. Here we present 35 years of data on 159 species of butterflies from 10 sites along an elevational gradient spanning 0–2,775 m in a biodiversity hotspot, the Sierra Ne...

  11. Assessing the conservation status of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly (Pseudophilotes sinaicus)

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Katy

    2013-01-01

    Arid environments are resource-limited, with scarcity of water the key limiting factor for plants and their associated fauna. Consequentially bottom-up forces often control food webs, influencing the whole system through high levels of competition. The Sinai Baton Blue butterfly, Pseudophilotes sinaicus, is Critically Endangered, with a tiny endemic distribution in the St Katherine Protectorate, South Sinai, an arid environment. Its range is restricted to that of its sole host plant, the near...

  12. A Novel No-Equilibrium Chaotic System with Multiwing Butterfly Attractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Fadhil Rahma; Jafari, Sajad; Pham, Viet-Thanh; Volos, Christos; Wang, Xiong

    Discovering unknown features of no-equilibrium systems with hidden strange attractors is an attractive research topic. This paper presents a novel no-equilibrium chaotic system that is constructed by using a state feedback controller. Interestingly, the new system can exhibit multiwing butterfly attractors. Moreover, a new chaotic system with an infinite number of equilibrium points, which can generate multiscroll attractors, is also proposed by applying the introduced methodology.

  13. Butterfly, seedling, sapling and tree diversity and composition in a fire-affected Bornean rainforest

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, D. F. R.; Priadjati, A.; Suryokusumo, B. K.; Menken, S. B. J.

    2006-01-01

    Fire-affected forests are becoming an increasingly important component of tropical landscapes. The impact of wildfires on rainforest communities is, however, poorly understood. In this study the density, species richness and community composition of seedlings, saplings, trees and butterflies were assessed in unburned and burned forest following the 1997/98 El Nino Southern Oscillation burn event in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. More than half a year after the fires, sapling and tree densities i...

  14. Butterflies (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea) of the "Baixada Santista" region, coastal São Paulo, southeastern Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ronaldo Bastos, Francini; Marcelo, Duarte; Olaf Hermann Hendrik, Mielke; Astrid, Caldas; André Victor Lucci, Freitas.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Borboletas (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea e Hesperioidea) da região da Baixada Santista, litoral de São Paulo (SE Brasil). Uma lista com 538 espécies de borboletas registradas na Baixada Santista é apresentada. Foram seguidos os protocolos amostrais padronizados (i.e. redes entomológicas). Armadilhas c [...] om iscas foram instaladas para coleta de espécies frugívoras. Dados de literatura e coleções entomológicas também foram considerados nas estimativas de riqueza de espécies. A riqueza de espécies registrada na Baixada Santista representa cerca de 16% da fauna de borboletas do Brasil, e 34% da fauna de borboletas do Estado de São Paulo. A presente lista contém um número consideravelmente alto de espécies em comparação com outras listas de biomas similares mais ao sul, como Blumenau em Santa Catarina, e Maquiné no Rio Grande do Sul. Abstract in english Butterflies (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea) of the "Baixada Santista" region, coastal São Paulo, southeastern Brazil. A list with 538 species of butterflies recorded in the Baixada Santista, São Paulo ( SE Brazil) is presented. Standard sampling protocols (i.e. with entomological nets) [...] were followed. Baited traps were installed for fruit feeding species. Data from the literature and entomological collections were also considered in the total estimated species richness. The species richness recorded in the Baixada Santista region represents about 16% of the Brazilian butterfly fauna, and 34% of the known butterfly fauna for the state of São Paulo. The present list contains an appreciably higher number of species in comparison to other lists from similar biomes farther south, such as Blumenau in Santa Catarina, and Maquiné in Rio Grande do Sul.

  15. Graphene quantum dot on boron nitride: Dirac cone replica and Hofstadter butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Chizhova, L. A.; Libisch, F.; Burgdo?rfer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene flakes placed on hexagonal boron nitride feature in the presence of a magnetic field a complex electronic structure due to a hexagonal moir\\'e potential resulting from the van der Waals interaction with the substrate. The slight lattice mismatch gives rise to a periodic supercell potential. Zone folding is expected to create replica of the original Dirac cone and Hofstadter butterflies. Our large-scale tight binding simulation reveals an unexpected coexistence of a ...

  16. Parasitism cost of living in a high quality habitat in the bog fritillary butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Choutt, Julie; Turlure, Camille; Baguette, Michel; Schtickzelle, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Habitat quality and the impact of natural enemies might profoundly affect metapopulation dynamics and viability. However, their relative impact has usually been considered independently. Here we address the question of how caterpillar habitat quality and parasitism prevalence interact to shape habitat selection in the bog fritillary butterfly Boloria eunomia, parasitized at the caterpillar stage by a specialist wasp, Cotesia euno- miae. We first classified habitat quality by relating caterpil...

  17. Female Behaviour Drives Expression and Evolution of Gustatory Receptors in Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Briscoe, Adriana D.; Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Kozak, Krzysztof M.; Walters, James R.; Yuan, Furong; Jamie, Gabriel A.; Simon H. Martin; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K.; Ferguson, Laura C.; Mallet, James; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2013-01-01

    Secondary plant compounds are strong deterrents of insect oviposition and feeding, but may also be attractants for specialist herbivores. These insect-plant interactions are mediated by insect gustatory receptors (Grs) and olfactory receptors (Ors). An analysis of the reference genome of the butterfly Heliconius melpomene, which feeds on passion-flower vines (Passiflora spp.), together with whole-genome sequencing within the species and across the Heliconius phylogeny has permitted an unprece...

  18. [Clinal variation in populations of the common blue butterfly Polyommatus icarus rott. (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Geographical trends in variation of wing pattern characters of the common blue butterfly Polyommatus icarus Rott. have been established. Peripheral populations were shown to be more rich and diverse phenotypically than those of the central parts of the species range. Phenotypic diversity of the populations increased from the center to the periphery of the range. The range boundaries were characterized by strong fluctuations of frequencies of wing pattern phenotypes. Hybrid areas were found on the part of the range examined. PMID:16161626

  19. Ultrastructure of antennal sensilla of four skipper butterflies in Parnara sp. and Pelopidas sp. (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Xiangqun, Yuan; Ke, Gao; Feng, Yuan; Yalin, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Most species of Parnara and Pelopidas (Hesperiidae) are important pests of rice. In this study, the antennal morphology, types of sensilla, and their distribution of four skipper butterflies, including Parnara guttata (Bremer & Grey), Pa. bada (Moore), Pelopidas mathias (Fabricius) and Pe. agna (Moore), were observed using a scanning electron microscope. Six distinct morphological types of sensilla were found on the antennae of all of these species: sensilla squamiformia, sensilla trichodea, ...

  20. Ten species in one: DNA barcoding reveals cryptic species in the neotropical skipper butterfly Astraptes fulgerator

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, Paul D. N.; Penton, Erin H.; Burns, John M.; Janzen, Daniel H.; Hallwachs, Winnie

    2004-01-01

    Astraptes fulgerator, first described in 1775, is a common and widely distributed neotropical skipper butterfly (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae). We combine 25 years of natural history observations in northwestern Costa Rica with morphological study and DNA barcoding of museum specimens to show that A. fulgerator is a complex of at least 10 species in this region. Largely sympatric, these taxa have mostly different caterpillar food plants, mostly distinctive caterpillars, and somewhat different eco...

  1. Impact of grazing management on hibernating caterpillars of the butterfly Melitaea cinxia in calcareous grasslands

    OpenAIRE

    Noordwijk, C. G. E.; Flierman, D. E.; Remke, E.; Wallis Vries, M. F.; Berg, M. P.

    2012-01-01

    Semi-natural grasslands are increasingly grazed by large herbivores for nature conservation purposes. For many insects such grazing is essential for the conservation of their habitat, but at the same time, populations decrease at high grazing intensity. We hypothesised that grazing management may cause increased butterfly mortality, especially for life-stages with low mobility, such as hibernating caterpillars. To test this, we measured the effect of sheep grazing on overwinter larval surviva...

  2. A model for population dynamics of the mimetic butterfly Papilio polytes in the Sakishima Islands, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimura, Toshio; Fujihashi, Yuta; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2014-11-21

    We present a mathematical model for population dynamics of the mimetic swallowtail butterfly Papilio polytes in the Sakishima Islands, Japan. The model includes four major variables, that is, population densities of three kinds of butterflies (two female forms f. cyrus, f. polytes and the unpalatable butterfly Pachliopta aristolochiae) and their predator. It is well-known that the non-mimic f. cyrus resembles and attracts the male most, and the mimic f. polytes mimics the model butterfly P. aristolochiae. Based on experimental evidence, we assume that two forms f. cyrus and f. polytes interact under intraspecific competition for resources including the male, and the growth rate of f. cyrus is higher than that of f. polytes. We further assume that both the benefit of mimicry for the mimic f. polytes and the cost for the model are dependent on their relative frequencies, i.e. the motality of the mimic by predation decreases with increase in frequency of the model, while the motality of the model increases as the frequency of the mimic increases. Taking the density-dependent effect through carrying capacity into account, we set up a model system consisting of three ordinary differential equations (ODEs), analyze it mathematically and provide computer simulations that confirm the analytical results. Our results reproduce field records on population dynamics of P. polytes in the Miyako-jima Island. They also explain the positive dependence of the relative abundance (RA) of the mimic on the advantage index (AI) of the mimicry in the Sakishima Islands defined in Section 2. PMID:25036440

  3. The Redder the Better: Wing Color Predicts Flight Performance in Monarch Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Andrew K.; Chi, Jean; Bradley, Catherine; Altizer, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    The distinctive orange and black wings of monarchs (Danaus plexippus) have long been known to advertise their bitter taste and toxicity to potential predators. Recent work also showed that both the orange and black coloration of this species can vary in response to individual-level and environmental factors. Here we examine the relationship between wing color and flight performance in captive-reared monarchs using a tethered flight mill apparatus to quantify butterfly flight speed, duration a...

  4. Monarch butterflies cross the Appalachians from the west to recolonize the east coast of North America

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Nathan G.; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Hobson, Keith A; Norris, D. Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Each spring, millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrate from overwintering sites in Mexico to recolonize eastern North America. However, few monarchs are found along the east coast of the USA until mid-summer. Brower (Brower, L. P. 1996 J. Exp. Biol. 199, 93–103.) proposed that east coast recolonization is accomplished by individuals migrating from the west over the Appalachians, but to date no evidence exists to support this hypothesis. We used hydrogen (?D) and carbon (?...

  5. Extreme Heterogeneity in Parasitism Despite Low Population Genetic Structure among Monarch Butterflies Inhabiting the Hawaiian Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, Amanda A.; de Roode, Jacobus C; Altizer, Sonia; Bartel, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Host movement and spatial structure can strongly influence the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases, with limited host movement potentially leading to high spatial heterogeneity in infection. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) are best known for undertaking a spectacular long-distance migration in eastern North America; however, they also form non-migratory populations that breed year-round in milder climates such as Hawaii and other tropical locations. Prior work showed an invers...

  6. Tracking multi-generational colonization of the breeding grounds by monarch butterflies in eastern North America

    OpenAIRE

    Flockhart, D. T. Tyler; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Martin, Tara G; Hobson, Keith A; Wunder, Michael B.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Insect migration may involve movements over multiple breeding generations at continental scales, resulting in formidable challenges to their conservation and management. Using distribution models generated from citizen scientist occurrence data and stable-carbon and -hydrogen isotope measurements, we tracked multi-generational colonization of the breeding grounds of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America. We found that monarch breeding occurrence was best modelled wit...

  7. Natal origins of migratory monarch butterflies at wintering colonies in Mexico: New isotopic evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Wassenaar, Leonard I; Hobson, Keith A

    1998-01-01

    Each year, millions of monarch butterflies from eastern North America migrate to overwinter in 10–13 discrete colonies located in the Oyamel forests of central Mexico. For decades efforts to track monarch migration have relied on observations and tag-recapture methods, culminating with the discovery of the wintering colonies in 1975. Monarch tag returns from Mexico, however, are few and primarily from two accessible colonies, and therefore tag-recapture techniques have not quantified natal ...

  8. Impact of Bt corn pollen on monarch butterfly populations: A risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Mark K.; Hellmich, Richard L; Stanley-Horn, Diane E.; Karen S. Oberhauser; Pleasants, John M.; Mattila, Heather R.; BLAIR D. SIEGFRIED; Dively, Galen P.

    2001-01-01

    A collaborative research effort by scientists in several states and in Canada has produced information to develop a formal risk assessment of the impact of Bt corn on monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) populations. Information was sought on the acute toxic effects of Bt corn pollen and the degree to which monarch larvae would be exposed to toxic amounts of Bt pollen on its host plant, the common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca, found in and around cornfields. Expression of Cry proteins, the act...

  9. Convergent Evolution in the Genetic Basis of Müllerian Mimicry in Heliconius Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Baxter, Simon W.; Papa, Riccardo; Chamberlain, Nicola; Humphray, Sean J.; Joron, Mathieu; Morrison, Clay; ffrench-Constant, Richard H; McMillan, W Owen; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2008-01-01

    The neotropical butterflies Heliconius melpomene and H. erato are Müllerian mimics that display the same warningly colored wing patterns in local populations, yet pattern diversity between geographic regions. Linkage mapping has previously shown convergent red wing phenotypes in these species are controlled by loci on homologous chromosomes. Here, AFLP bulk segregant analysis using H. melpomene crosses identified genetic markers tightly linked to two red wing-patterning loci. These markers we...

  10. Photonic Crystal Structure of Butterfly Wing Scales Exhibiting Selective Wavelength Iridescence.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mat?jková-Plšková, J.; Mika, Filip; Jiwajinda, S.; Dechkrong, P.; Svidenská, S.; Shiojiri, M.

    Praha : Czechoslovak Microscopy Society, 2014. ISBN 978-80-260-6720-7. [International Microscopy Congres /18./. Praha (CZ), 07.09.2014-12.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : butterfly wing * coloration * SEM * TEM * photonic crystal structure Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  11. Polarization-sensitive color in butterfly scales: polarization conversion from ridges with reflecting elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Tang, Yiwen; Meng, Jinsong; Wang, Ge; Zhou, Han; Fan, Tongxiang; Zhang, Di

    2014-11-01

    Polarization-sensitive color originates from polarization-dependent reflection or transmission, exhibiting abundant light information, including intensity, spectral distribution, and polarization. A wide range of butterflies are physiologically sensitive to polarized light, but the origins of polarized signal have not been fully understood. Here we systematically investigate the colorful scales of six species of butterfly to reveal the physical origins of polarization-sensitive color. Microscopic optical images under crossed polarizers exhibit their polarization-sensitive characteristic, and micro-structural characterizations clarify their structural commonality. In the case of the structural scales that have deep ridges, the polarization-sensitive color related with scale azimuth is remarkable. Periodic ridges lead to the anisotropic effective refractive indices in the parallel and perpendicular grating orientations, which achieves form-birefringence, resulting in the phase difference of two different component polarized lights. Simulated results show that ridge structures with reflecting elements reflect and rotate the incident p-polarized light into s-polarized light. The dimensional parameters and shapes of grating greatly affect the polarization conversion process, and the triangular deep grating extends the outstanding polarization conversion effect from the sub-wavelength period to the period comparable to visible light wavelength. The parameters of ridge structures in butterfly scales have been optimized to fulfill the polarization-dependent reflection for secret communication. The structural and physical origin of polarization conversion provides a more comprehensive perspective on the creation of polarization-sensitive color in butterfly wing scales. These findings show great potential in anti-counterfeiting technology and advanced optical material design. PMID:25401892

  12. Low-Intensity Agricultural Landscapes in Transylvania Support High Butterfly Diversity: Implications for Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Loos, Jacqueline; Dorresteijn, Ine; Hanspach,Jan; Fust, Pascal; Rakosy, László; Fischer, Joern

    2014-01-01

    European farmland biodiversity is declining due to land use changes towards agricultural intensification or abandonment. Some Eastern European farming systems have sustained traditional forms of use, resulting in high levels of biodiversity. However, global markets and international policies now imply rapid and major changes to these systems. To effectively protect farmland biodiversity, understanding landscape features which underpin species diversity is crucial. Focusing on butterflies, we ...

  13. Wnt signaling underlies evolution and development of the butterfly wing pattern symmetry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Arnaud; Reed, Robert D

    2014-11-15

    Most butterfly wing patterns are proposed to be derived from a set of conserved pattern elements known as symmetry systems. Symmetry systems are so-named because they are often associated with parallel color stripes mirrored around linear organizing centers that run between the anterior and posterior wing margins. Even though the symmetry systems are the most prominent and diverse wing pattern elements, their study has been confounded by a lack of knowledge regarding the molecular basis of their development, as well as the difficulty of drawing pattern homologies across species with highly derived wing patterns. Here we present the first molecular characterization of symmetry system development by showing that WntA expression is consistently associated with the major basal, discal, central, and external symmetry system patterns of nymphalid butterflies. Pharmacological manipulations of signaling gradients using heparin and dextran sulfate showed that pattern organizing centers correspond precisely with WntA, wingless, Wnt6, and Wnt10 expression patterns, thus suggesting a role for Wnt signaling in color pattern induction. Importantly, this model is supported by recent genetic and population genomic work identifying WntA as the causative locus underlying wing pattern variation within several butterfly species. By comparing the expression of WntA between nymphalid butterflies representing a range of prototypical symmetry systems, slightly deviated symmetry systems, and highly derived wing patterns, we were able to infer symmetry system homologies in several challenging cases. Our work illustrates how highly divergent morphologies can be derived from modifications to a common ground plan across both micro- and macro-evolutionary time scales. PMID:25196151

  14. Factors affecting road mortality and the suitability of road verges for butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Sko?rka, Piotr; Lenda, Magdalena; Moron?, Dawid; Kalarus, Konrad; Tryjanowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Little is known of the impact of roads on insect mortality. This is a significant gap, because road verges are regarded as an important tool for insect conservation. In this study, we investigated which factors affect the number of roadkills in grassland butterflies and, simultaneously, the species composition and abundance on road verges. We established sixty transects, two hundred metres long, on roads in farmland areas and with differing traffic volume. Each transect consisted ...

  15. “Darwin’s butterflies”? DNA barcoding and the radiation of the endemic Caribbean butterfly genus Calisto (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Sourakov

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The genus Calisto Hübner, 1823 is the only member of the diverse, global subfamily Satyrinae found in the West Indies, and by far the richest endemic Caribbean butterfly radiation. Calisto species occupy an extremely diverse array of habitats, suggestive of adaptive radiation on the scale of other classic examples such as the Galápagos or Darwin’s finches. However, a reliable species classification is a key requisite before further evolutionary or ecological research. An analysis of 111 DNA ‘barcodes’ (655 bp of the mitochondrial gene COI from 29 putative Calisto species represented by 31 putative taxa was therefore conducted to elucidate taxonomic relationships among these often highly cryptic and confusing taxa. The sympatric, morphologically and ecologically similar taxa C. confusa Lathy, 1899 and C. confusa debarriera Clench, 1943 proved to be extremely divergent, and we therefore recognize Calisto debarriera stat. n. as a distinct species, with Calisto neiba Schwartz et Gali, 1984 as a junior synonym syn. n. Species status of certain allopatric, morphologically similar sister species has been confirmed: Calisto hysius (Godart, 1824 (including its subspecies C. hysius aleucosticha Correa et Schwartz, 1986, stat. n., and its former subspecies C. batesi Michener, 1943 showed a high degree of divergence (above 6% and should be considered separate species. Calisto lyceius Bates, 1935/C. crypta Gali, 1985/C. franciscoi Gali, 1985 complex, also showed a high degree of divergence (above 6%, confirming the species status of these taxa. In contrast, our data suggest that the Calisto grannus Bates, 1939 species complex (including Calisto grannus dilemma González, 1987, C. grannus amazona González, 1987, stat. n., C. grannus micrommata Schwartz et Gali, 1984, stat. n., C. grannus dystacta González, 1987, stat. n., C. grannus phoinix González, 1987, stat. n., C. grannus sommeri Schwartz et Gali, 1984, stat. n., and C. grannus micheneri Clench, 1944, stat. n. should be treated as a single polytypic species, as genetic divergence among sampled populations representing these taxa is low (and stable morphological apomorphies are absent. A widely-distributed pest of sugar cane, Calisto pulchella Lathy, 1899 showed higher diversification among isolated populations (3.5% than expected, hence supporting former separation of this species into two taxa (pulchella and darlingtoni Clench, 1943, of which the latter might prove to be a separate species rather than subspecies. The taxonomic revisions presented here result in Calisto now containing 34 species and 17 subspecies. Three species endemic to islands other than Hispaniola appear to be derived lineages of various Hispaniolan clades, indicating ancient dispersal events from Hispaniola to Puerto Rico, Cuba, and Jamaica. Overall, the degree of intrageneric and intraspecific divergence within Calisto suggests a long and continuous diversification period of 4–8 Myr. The maximum divergence within the genus (ca. 13.3% is almost equivalent to the maximum divergence of Calisto from the distant pronophiline relative Auca Hayward, 1953 from the southern Andes (14.1% and from the presumed closest relative Eretris Thieme, 1905 (14.4%, suggesting that the genus began to diversify soon after its split from its continental sister taxon. In general, this ‘barcode’ divergence corresponds to the high degree of morphological and ecological variation found among major lineages within the genus.

  16. Application of source-receptor models to determine source areas of biological components (pollen and butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alarcón

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The source-receptor models allow the establishment of relationships between a receptor point (sampling point and the probable source areas (regions of emission through the association of concentration values at the receptor point with the corresponding atmospheric back-trajectories, and, together with other techniques, to interpret transport phenomena on a synoptic scale. These models are generally used in air pollution studies to determine the areas of origin of chemical compounds measured at a sampling point, and thus be able to target actions to reduce pollutants. However, until now, few studies have applied these types of models to describe the source areas of biological organisms. In Catalonia there are very complete records of pollen (data from the Xarxa Aerobiològica de Catalunya, Aerobiology Network of Catalonia and butterflies (data from the Catalan Butterfly Monitoring Scheme, a biological material that is also liable to be transported long distances and whose areas of origin could be interesting to know. This work presents the results of the use of the Seibert et al. model applied to the study of the source regions of: (1 certain pollen of an allergic nature, observed in Catalonia and the Canary Islands, and (2 the migratory butterfly Vanessa cardui, observed in Catalonia. Based on the results obtained we can corroborate the suitability of these models to determine the area of origin of several species, both chemical and biological, therefore expanding the possibilities of applying the original model to the wider field of Aerobiology.

  17. Reward and non-reward learning of flower colours in the butterfly Byasa alcinous (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandori, Ikuo; Yamaki, Takafumi

    2012-09-01

    Learning plays an important role in food acquisition for a wide range of insects. To increase their foraging efficiency, flower-visiting insects may learn to associate floral cues with the presence (so-called reward learning) or the absence (so-called non-reward learning) of a reward. Reward learning whilst foraging for flowers has been demonstrated in many insect taxa, whilst non-reward learning in flower-visiting insects has been demonstrated only in honeybees, bumblebees and hawkmoths. This study examined both reward and non-reward learning abilities in the butterfly Byasa alcinous whilst foraging among artificial flowers of different colours. This butterfly showed both types of learning, although butterflies of both sexes learned faster via reward learning. In addition, females learned via reward learning faster than males. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first empirical data on the learning speed of both reward and non-reward learning in insects. We discuss the adaptive significance of a lower learning speed for non-reward learning when foraging on flowers.

  18. Evolution and mechanism of spectral tuning of blue-absorbing visual pigments in butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakakuwa, Motohiro; Terakita, Akihisa; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Stavenga, Doekele G; Shichida, Yoshinori; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    The eyes of flower-visiting butterflies are often spectrally highly complex with multiple opsin genes generated by gene duplication, providing an interesting system for a comparative study of color vision. The Small White butterfly, Pieris rapae, has duplicated blue opsins, PrB and PrV, which are expressed in the blue (?(max)?=?453 nm) and violet receptors (?(max)?=?425 nm), respectively. To reveal accurate absorption profiles and the molecular basis of the spectral tuning of these visual pigments, we successfully modified our honeybee opsin expression system based on HEK293s cells, and expressed PrB and PrV, the first lepidopteran opsins ever expressed in cultured cells. We reconstituted the expressed visual pigments in vitro, and analysed them spectroscopically. Both reconstituted visual pigments had two photointerconvertible states, rhodopsin and metarhodopsin, with absorption peak wavelengths 450 nm and 485 nm for PrB and 420 nm and 482 nm for PrV. We furthermore introduced site-directed mutations to the opsins and found that two amino acid substitutions, at positions 116 and 177, were crucial for the spectral tuning. This tuning mechanism appears to be specific for invertebrates and is partially shared by other pierid and lycaenid butterfly species. PMID:21124838

  19. Measuring and modelling optical scattering and the colour quality of white pierid butterfly scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, S M; Vukusic, P; Hallam, B

    2009-08-17

    Colouration in butterfly wings is due to the interaction of light with a covering of scales on both wing surfaces. A combination of nanostructure in the scales, which reflect or scatter light, and absorption from chemical pigments in the scales and wing substrate create the final colour appearance. We compared the wing scale morphology of the pierid butterfly Pieris rapae (Small White) to the reflectance spectra from its wings. Its wing scales contain a dense array of pterin pigment beads. A positive correlation between bead-array density and wing reflectance, at wavelengths where the pigment does not absorb, was identified and characterised. We observed, however, that light scatter from these beads does not account for all of the broadband light scatter observed from the wings. The rest of the scale structure plays an important role in achieving high light scatter. Furthermore, combining the underlying scattering and absorption mechanisms within the butterfly scales enabled us to quantify the optical characteristics of the samples using CIELab colour theory. PMID:19687951

  20. Behavioural mimicry in flight path of Batesian intraspecific polymorphic butterfly Papilio polytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tasuku; Imafuku, Michio

    2015-06-22

    Batesian mimics that show similar coloration to unpalatable models gain a fitness advantage of reduced predation. Beyond physical similarity, mimics often exhibit behaviour similar to their models, further enhancing their protection against predation by mimicking not only the model's physical appearance but also activity. In butterflies, there is a strong correlation between palatability and flight velocity, but there is only weak correlation between palatability and flight path. Little is known about how Batesian mimics fly. Here, we explored the flight behaviour of four butterfly species/morphs: unpalatable model Pachliopta aristolochiae, mimetic and non-mimetic females of female-limited mimic Papilio polytes, and palatable control Papilio xuthus. We demonstrated that the directional change (DC) generated by wingbeats and the standard deviation of directional change (SDDC) of mimetic females and their models were smaller than those of non-mimetic females and palatable controls. Furthermore, we found no significant difference in flight velocity among all species/morphs. By showing that DC and SDDC of mimetic females resemble those of models, we provide the first evidence for the existence of behavioural mimicry in flight path by a Batesian mimic butterfly. PMID:26041360

  1. Butterfly scales as bionic templates for complex ordered nanophotonic materials: A pathway to biomimetic plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakši?, Zoran; Panteli?, Dejan; Sarajli?, Milija; Savi?-Ševi?, Svetlana; Matovi?, Jovan; Jelenkovi?, Branislav; Vasiljevi?-Radovi?, Dana; ?ur?i?, Sre?ko; Vukovi?, Slobodan; Pavlovi?, Vladimir; Buha, Jelena; La?kovi?, Vesna; Labudovi?-Borovi?, Milica; ?ur?i?, Božidar

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we propose a possible use of butterfly scales as templates for ordered 2D or 3D nanophotonic materials, with complexity not easily reproducible by conventional micro/nanofabrication methods. Functionalization through laminar nanocompositing is utilized to impart novel properties to the biological scaffold. An extremely wide variability of butterfly scale forms, shapes, sizes and fine structures is observed in nature, many of them already possessing peculiar optical properties. Their nanophotonic functionalization ensures a large choice of forms and functions, including enhanced light localization, light and plasmon waveguiding and general metamaterial behavior, to mention a few. We show that one is able to achieve a combination of plasmonics and bionics, resulting in functionalities seldom if ever met in nature. As an illustration we have analyzed the photonic properties of the nanostructured scales on the wings of Purple Emperor butterflies Apatura ilia, Apatura iris and Sasakia charonda. Their intricate nanometer-sized structures produce remarkable ultraviolet-blue iridescence, spectrally and directionally narrow. We present our analysis of their plasmonic/nanophotonic functionalization including preliminary calculations and initial experimental results. As a simple example, we used radiofrequent sputtering to produce nanoaperture-based plasmonic structures at a fraction of the cost and necessary engineering efforts compared to the conventional top-down methods. We conclude that the described pathway to biomimetic plasmonics offers potentials for significant expansion of the nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic material toolbox.

  2. Characterization of complete mitochondrial genome of the skipper butterfly, Celaenorrhinus maculosus (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Hao, Jiasheng; Zhao, Huabin

    2013-10-01

    Abstract The skipper butterfly, Celaenorrhinus maculosus (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae), is a small butterfly species that is widely distributed in Taiwan and mainland China. In this work, we sequenced and characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of the butterfly. The circular genome of 15,282?bp in length contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and a non-coding AT-rich region. Overall base composition of the complete mt genome was 33.97% A, 39.90% T, 12.38% C and 7.75% G, with an AT bias of 79.87%. All protein-coding genes start with an ATN codon, and terminate with the typical stop codon TAA or a single T. The non-coding AT-rich region is 331?bp in length, including a 18?bp poly-T stretch and a microsatellite-like (TA)7 element. The genome sequence is useful for future studies of phylogenetics, molecular evolution, conservation genetics and agricultural control. PMID:24102602

  3. Fukushima's biological impacts: the case of the pale grass blue butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Wataru; Nohara, Chiyo; Hiyama, Atsuki; Otaki, Joji M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the surrounding area, we studied the pale grass blue butterfly Zizeeria maha, the most common butterfly in Japan. We here review our important findings and their implications. We found forewing size reduction, growth retardation, high mortality rates, and high abnormality rates in the field and reared samples. The abnormality rates observed in September 2011 were higher than those observed in May 2011 in almost all localities, implying transgenerational accumulation of genetic damage. Some of the abnormal traits in the F1 generation were inherited by the F2 generation. In a particular cross, the F2 abnormality rate scored 57%. The forewing size reduction and high mortality and abnormality rates were reproduced in external and internal exposure experiments conducted in our laboratory using Okinawa larvae. We observed the possible real-time evolution of radiation resistance in the Fukushima butterflies, which, in retrospect, indicates that field sampling attempts at the very early stages of such accidents are required to understand the ecodynamics of polluted regions. We propose, as the postulates of pollutant-induced biological impacts, that the collection of phenotypic data from the field and their relevant reproduction in the laboratory should be the basis of experimental design to demonstrate the biological effects of environmental pollutants and to investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects. PMID:25124816

  4. Fluid drag reduction and efficient self-cleaning with rice leaf and butterfly wing bioinspired surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Gregory D; Bhushan, Bharat

    2013-09-01

    Researchers are continually inspired by living nature to solve complex challenges. For example, unique surface characteristics of rice leaves and butterfly wings combine the shark skin (anisotropic flow leading to low drag) and lotus leaf (superhydrophobic and self-cleaning) effects, producing the so-called rice and butterfly wing effect. In this paper, we present an overview of rice leaf and butterfly wing fluid drag and self-cleaning studies. In addition, we examine two other promising aquatic surfaces in nature known for such properties, including fish scales and shark skin. Morphology, drag, self-cleaning, contact angle, and contact angle hysteresis data are presented to understand the role of wettability, viscosity, and velocity. Liquid repellent coatings are utilized to recreate or combine various effects. Discussion is provided along with conceptual models describing the role of surface structures related to low drag, self-cleaning, and antifouling properties. Modeling provides design guidance when developing novel low drag and self-cleaning surfaces for applications in the medical, marine, and industrial fields. PMID:23884183

  5. Lack of genetic differentiation between monarch butterflies with divergent migration destinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Justine I; Pierce, Amanda A; Barribeau, Seth M; Sternberg, Eleanore D; Mongue, Andrew J; De Roode, Jacobus C

    2012-07-01

    Monarch butterflies are best known for their spectacular annual migration from eastern North America to Mexico. Monarchs also occur in the North American states west of the Rocky Mountains, from where they fly shorter distances to the California Coast. Whether eastern and western North American monarchs form one genetic population or are genetically differentiated remains hotly debated, and resolution of this debate is essential to understand monarch migration patterns and to protect this iconic insect species. We studied the genetic structure of North American migratory monarch populations, as well as nonmigratory populations in Hawaii and New Zealand. Our results show that eastern and western migratory monarchs form one admixed population and that monarchs from Hawaii and New Zealand have genetically diverged from North American butterflies. These findings suggest that eastern and western monarch butterflies maintain their divergent migrations despite genetic mixing. The finding that eastern and western monarchs form one genetic population also suggests that the conservation of overwintering sites in Mexico is crucial for the protection of monarchs in both eastern and western North America. PMID:22574833

  6. The ancestral circadian clock of monarch butterflies: role in time-compensated sun compass orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, S M

    2007-01-01

    The circadian clock has a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, which contributes to navigation to the overwintering grounds. The location of circadian clock cells in monarch brain has been identified in the dorsolateral protocerebrum (pars lateralis); these cells express PERIOD, TIMELESS, and a Drosophila-like cryptochrome designated CRY1. Monarch butterflies, like all other nondrosophilid insects examined so far, express a second cry gene (designated insect CRY2) that encodes a vertebrate-like CRY that is also expressed in pars lateralis. An ancestral circadian clock mechanism has been defined in monarchs, in which CRY1 functions as a blue light photoreceptor for photic entrainment, whereas CRY2 functionswithin the clockwork as themajor transcriptional repressor of an intracellular negative transcriptional feedback loop. A CRY1-staining neural pathway has been identified that may connect the circadian (navigational) clock to polarized light input important for sun compass navigation, and a CRY2-positive neural pathway has been discovered that may communicate circadian information directly from the circadian clock to the central complex, the likely site of the sun compass. The monarch butterfly may thus use the CRY proteins as components of the circadian mechanism and also as output molecules that connect the clock to various aspects of the sun compass apparatus. PMID:18419268

  7. Co-gradient variation in growth rate and development time of a broadly distributed butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Madeleine; Sunnucks, Paul; Norgate, Melanie; Murray, Neil; Kearney, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Widespread species often show geographic variation in thermally-sensitive traits, providing insight into how species respond to shifts in temperature through time. Such patterns may arise from phenotypic plasticity, genetic adaptation, or their interaction. In some cases, the effects of genotype and temperature may act together to reduce, or to exacerbate, phenotypic variation in fitness-related traits across varying thermal environments. We find evidence for such interactions in life-history traits of Heteronympha merope, a butterfly distributed across a broad latitudinal gradient in south-eastern Australia. We show that body size in this butterfly is negatively related to developmental temperature in the laboratory, in accordance with the temperature-size rule, but not in the field, despite very strong temperature gradients. A common garden experiment on larval thermal responses, spanning the environmental extremes of H. merope's distribution, revealed that butterflies from low latitude (warmer climate) populations have relatively fast intrinsic growth and development rates compared to those from cooler climates. These synergistic effects of genotype and temperature across the landscape (co-gradient variation) are likely to accentuate phenotypic variation in these traits, and this interaction must be accounted for when predicting how H. merope will respond to temperature change through time. These results highlight the importance of understanding how variation in life-history traits may arise in response to environmental change. Without this knowledge, we may fail to detect whether organisms are tracking environmental change, and if they are, whether it is by plasticity, adaptation or both. PMID:24743771

  8. Mysterious coloring: structural origin of color mixing for two breeds of Papilio butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiang-Yang

    2011-05-01

    The structural origin of the coloration mechanisms and related extraordinary optical properties of the wing scales of two breeds of Papilio butterflies, namely, Papilio ulysses and Papilio blumei, are explored. The precise ordered biophotonic nanostructures of the wing scales are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Despite their structural similarities, the two breeds of Papilio butterflies do not exhibit any analogy in their optical performances. When illuminated with UV-Vis light, P. ulysses gives rise to two reflection peaks: one is from concavities, and the other is from ridges. These two spectral peaks shift their positions under different illumination angles (normal and 45° incident light). In contrast, the spectra for the green scales of P. blumei give one broad reflection peak, and the peak remains the same under normal and 45° incident light. The optical microscopy images indicate that the cap-shaped concavities on P. blumei's wing scales generate an abnormal bicolor reflection with a strong polarization effect. Both of these two breeds of butterflies take advantage of color mixing strategy: the blue color of P. ulysses is mixed by the colors reflected from concavities and ridges; the green color of P. blumei is produced by the biocolor reflection from concavities. The differences of their coloration mixing mechanisms and optical performances are due to the variations of their nanostructures. The investigation of the color mixing mechanisms of these biologically photonic nanostructures may offer a convenient way for fabricating optical devices based on biomimicry. PMID:21643177

  9. Magnetic resonance butterfly coils: Design and application for hyperpolarized 13C studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Frijia, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pig models enables cardiac metabolism assessment and provides a powerful tool for heart physiology studies, although the low molar concentration of derivate metabolites gives rise to technological limitations in terms of data quality. The design of dedicated coils capable of providing large field of view with high Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) data is of fundamental importance. This work presents magnetostatic simulations and tests of two butterfly coils with different geometries, both designed for 13C hyperpolarized studies of pig heart with a clinical 3T scanner. In particular, the paper provides details of the design, modeling, construction and application of the butterfly style coils. While both coils could be successfully employed in single configuration (linear mode), the second prototype was used to design a quadrature surface coil constituted by the butterfly and a circular loop both in receive (RX) mode while using a birdcage coil as transmitter (TX). The performance of this coils configuration was compared with the single TX/RX birdcage coil, in order to verify the advantage of the proposed configuration over the volume coil throughout the volume of interest for cardiac imaging in pig. Experimental SNR-vs-depth profiles, extracted from the [1-13C]acetate phantom chemical shift image (CSI), permitted to highlight the performance of the proposed coils configuration. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. On-Chip Implementation of Pipeline Digit-Slicing Multiplier-Less Butterfly for Fast Fourier Transform Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan S. Algnabi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The need for wireless communication has driven the communication systems to high performance. However, the main bottleneck that affects the communication capability is the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, which is the core of most modulators. Approach: This study presented on-chip implementation of pipeline digit-slicing multiplier-less butterfly for FFT structure. The approach taken; in order to reduce computation complexity in butterfly, digit-slicing multiplierless single constant technique was utilized in the critical path of Radix-2 Decimation In Time (DIT FFT structure. The proposed design focused on the trade-off between the speed and active silicon area for the chip implementation. The new architecture was investigated and simulated with MATLAB software. The Verilog HDL code in Xilinx ISE environment was derived to describe the FFT Butterfly functionality and was downloaded to Virtex II FPGA board. Consequently, the Virtex-II FG456 Proto board was used to implement and test the design on the real hardware. Results: As a result, from the findings, the synthesis report indicates the maximum clock frequency of 549.75 MHz with the total equivalent gate count of 31,159 is a marked and significant improvement over Radix 2 FFT butterfly. In comparison with the conventional butterfly architecture, design that can only run at a maximum clock frequency of 198.987 MHz and the conventional multiplier can only run at a maximum clock frequency of 220.160 MHz, the proposed system exhibits better results. The resulting maximum clock frequency increases by about 276.28% for the FFT butterfly and about 277.06% for the multiplier. Conclusion: It can be concluded that on-chip implementation of pipeline digit-slicing multiplier-less butterfly for FFT structure is an enabler in solving problems that affect communications capability in FFT and possesses huge potentials for future related works and research areas.

  11. Buried hurts and colliding dreams in Yvonne Vera’s Butterfly Burning = Feridas escondidas e sonhos conflitantes em Butterfly Burning de Yvonne Vera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Gagiano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabwean author Yvonne Vera’s Butterfly Burning (1998 depicts anintense and tragically concluded love relationship between a middle-aged colonised male labourer, Fumbatha, and an idealistic and much younger woman, Phephelaphi. The context is the ghetto adjoining the city of Bulawayo in late colonial Southern Rhodesia. The articleemploys the concepts of genealogies and of transmodernity to delineate Vera’s reinscription of colonised African men and women in her illocutionary, densely poetic account of the growth of modernity in Africa, tragic because (despite similar, buried hurts theprotagonists’ dreams are at odds.O romance Butterfly Burning (1998, da autora zimbabuana Yvonne Veramostra o relacionamento amoroso, intenso e trágico, entre Fumbatha, um trabalhador colonizado de meia idade, e Phephelaphi, uma mulher jovem e idealista. O contexto do enredo é o gueto perto da cidade de Bulawayo na ex-colônia da Rodésia do Sul. O artigo emprega os conceitos de genealogias e da transmodernidade para delinear as re-inscrições dos africanos e africanas colonizados em sua narração ilocucionária, profundamente poética, do desenvolvimento da modernidade na África. É também trágica (apesar da semelhança dasferidas escondidas pela não-coincidência dos sonhos dos protagonistas.

  12. Characterisation and expression of microRNAs in developing wings of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius melpomene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathjen Tina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heliconius butterflies are an excellent system for studies of adaptive convergent and divergent phenotypic traits. Wing colour patterns are used as signals to both predators and potential mates and are inherited in a Mendelian manner. The underlying genetic mechanisms of pattern formation have been studied for many years and shed light on broad issues, such as the repeatability of evolution. In Heliconius melpomene, the yellow hindwing bar is controlled by the HmYb locus. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that have key roles in many biological processes, including development. miRNAs could act as regulators of genes involved in wing development, patterning and pigmentation. For this reason we characterised miRNAs in developing butterfly wings and examined differences in their expression between colour pattern races. Results We sequenced small RNA libraries from two colour pattern races and detected 142 Heliconius miRNAs with homology to others found in miRBase. Several highly abundant miRNAs were differentially represented in the libraries between colour pattern races. These candidates were tested further using Northern blots, showing that differences in expression were primarily due to developmental stage rather than colour pattern. Assembly of sequenced reads to the HmYb region identified hme-miR-193 and hme-miR-2788; located 2380 bp apart in an intergenic region. These two miRNAs are expressed in wings and show an upregulation between 24 and 72 hours post-pupation, indicating a potential role in butterfly wing development. A search for miRNAs in all available H. melpomene BAC sequences (~ 2.5 Mb did not reveal any other miRNAs and no novel miRNAs were predicted. Conclusions Here we describe the first butterfly miRNAs and characterise their expression in developing wings. Some show differences in expression across developing pupal stages and may have important functions in butterfly wing development. Two miRNAs were located in the HmYb region and were expressed in developing pupal wings. Future work will examine the expression of these miRNAs in different colour pattern races and identify miRNA targets among wing patterning genes.

  13. The role of the North Atlantic Oscillation in controlling U.K. butterfly population size and phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgarth-Smith, Angus R; Roy, David B; Scholze, Martin; Tucker, Allan; Sumpter, John P

    2012-06-01

    1. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) exerts considerable control on U.K. weather. This study investigates the impact of the NAO on butterfly abundance and phenology using 34 years of data from the U.K. Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS).2. The study uses a multi-species indicator to show that the NAO does not affect overall U.K. butterfly population size. However, the abundance of bivoltine butterfly species, which have longer flight seasons, were found to be more likely to respond positively to the NAO compared with univoltine species, which show little or a negative response.3. A positive winter NAO index is associated with warmer weather and earlier flight dates for Anthocharis cardamines (Lepidoptera: Pieridae), Melanargia galathea (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae), Aphantopus hyperantus (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae), Pyronia tithonus (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae), Lasiommata megera (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) and Polyommatus icarus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae). In bivoltine species, the NAO affects the phenology of the first generation, the timing of which indirectly controls the timing of the second generation.4. The NAO influences the timing of U.K. butterfly flight seasons more strongly than it influences population size. PMID:22879687

  14. Synthesis of naturally cross-linked polycrystalline ZrO2 hollow nanowires using butterfly as templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? Naturally cross-linked ZrO2 nanotubes with ?2.4 ?m in length, ?35 nm in diameter and ?12 nm in wall thickness was synthesized via the selection of suitable butterfly bio-templates followed by heat processing. ? The contractions, which are main defects of the former hard-template method based on butterflies, are well controlled with the help of the surface tension effect. ? The achieved hollow ZrO2 nanowires suggest a new optional approach that uses bio-templates in fabricating and designing nano systems. - Abstract: Butterfly wing skeleton is a widely used hard-template in recent years for fabricating photonic crystal structures. However, the smallest construction units for the most species of butterflies are commonly larger than ?50 nm, which greatly hinders their applications in designing much smaller functional parts down to real “nano scale”. This work indicates, however, that hollow ZrO2 nanowires with ?2.4 ?m in length, ?35 nm in diameter and ?12 nm in wall thickness can be synthesized via the selection of suitable butterfly bio-templates followed by heat processing. Especially, the successful fabrication of these naturally cross-linked ZrO2 nanotubes suggests a new optional approach in fabricating assembled nano systems.

  15. Synthesis of naturally cross-linked polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} hollow nanowires using butterfly as templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yu, E-mail: chenyu_8323@csu.edu.cn [School of Physics Science and Electronics Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Gu Jiajun, E-mail: gujiajun@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhu Shenmin; Su Huilan [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang Di, E-mail: zhangdi@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Feng Chuanliang [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhuang Leyan [Measurement Center of Anti-Counterfeiting Technical Products, Shanghai (China)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Naturally cross-linked ZrO{sub 2} nanotubes with {approx}2.4 {mu}m in length, {approx}35 nm in diameter and {approx}12 nm in wall thickness was synthesized via the selection of suitable butterfly bio-templates followed by heat processing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contractions, which are main defects of the former hard-template method based on butterflies, are well controlled with the help of the surface tension effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The achieved hollow ZrO{sub 2} nanowires suggest a new optional approach that uses bio-templates in fabricating and designing nano systems. - Abstract: Butterfly wing skeleton is a widely used hard-template in recent years for fabricating photonic crystal structures. However, the smallest construction units for the most species of butterflies are commonly larger than {approx}50 nm, which greatly hinders their applications in designing much smaller functional parts down to real 'nano scale'. This work indicates, however, that hollow ZrO{sub 2} nanowires with {approx}2.4 {mu}m in length, {approx}35 nm in diameter and {approx}12 nm in wall thickness can be synthesized via the selection of suitable butterfly bio-templates followed by heat processing. Especially, the successful fabrication of these naturally cross-linked ZrO{sub 2} nanotubes suggests a new optional approach in fabricating assembled nano systems.

  16. Structure, function, and self-assembly of single network gyroid (I4132) photonic crystals in butterfly wing scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranathan, Vinodkumar; Osuji, Chinedum O; Mochrie, Simon G J; Noh, Heeso; Narayanan, Suresh; Sandy, Alec; Dufresne, Eric R; Prum, Richard O

    2010-06-29

    Complex three-dimensional biophotonic nanostructures produce the vivid structural colors of many butterfly wing scales, but their exact nanoscale organization is uncertain. We used small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) on single scales to characterize the 3D photonic nanostructures of five butterfly species from two families (Papilionidae, Lycaenidae). We identify these chitin and air nanostructures as single network gyroid (I4(1)32) photonic crystals. We describe their optical function from SAXS data and photonic band-gap modeling. Butterflies apparently grow these gyroid nanostructures by exploiting the self-organizing physical dynamics of biological lipid-bilayer membranes. These butterfly photonic nanostructures initially develop within scale cells as a core-shell double gyroid (Ia3d), as seen in block-copolymer systems, with a pentacontinuous volume comprised of extracellular space, cell plasma membrane, cellular cytoplasm, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) membrane, and intra-SER lumen. This double gyroid nanostructure is subsequently transformed into a single gyroid network through the deposition of chitin in the extracellular space and the degeneration of the rest of the cell. The butterflies develop the thermodynamically favored double gyroid precursors as a route to the optically more efficient single gyroid nanostructures. Current approaches to photonic crystal engineering also aim to produce single gyroid motifs. The biologically derived photonic nanostructures characterized here may offer a convenient template for producing optical devices based on biomimicry or direct dielectric infiltration. PMID:20547870

  17. Importance of vegetation analysis in the conservation management of the endangered butterfly Aloeides dentatis dentatis (Swierstra (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Deutschlander

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of the vegetation of the Ruimsig Entomological Reserve, Gauteng, South Africa revealed four plant communities one of which could be subdivided into two subcommunities and variants. The extensive climax stage of the vegetation represented by the Themeda triandra - Trachypogon spicatus grassland was found to be too dense and tall to support the butterfly Aloeides dentatis dentatis and the host ant Lepisiota capensis (Mayr. A degraded phase caused by succession in an area where pipes have been laid was found to be ideal habitat for both ant and butterfly. This vegetation also contained adequate numbers of the food plant Hermannia depressa. A serai community with tall- growing Hyparrhenia hirta was also found to be an unsuitable habitat for the butterfly. The identification of the preferred ideal habitat for the host ant and butterfly resulted in the compilation of a conservation management strategy that ensured the survival of the rare and endangered butterfly.

  18. HSP70 expression in the copper butterfly Lycaena tityrus across altitudes and temperatures.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karl, I.; SØrensen, Jesper Givskov

    2009-01-01

    The ability to express heat-shock proteins (HSP) under thermal stress is an essential mechanism for ectotherms to cope with unfavourable conditions. In this study, we investigate if Copper butterflies originating from different altitudes and/or being exposed to different rearing and induction temperatures show differences in HSP70 expression. HSP70 expression increased substantially at the higher rearing temperature in low-altitude butterflies, which might represent an adaptation to occasionally occurring heat spells. On the other hand, high-altitude butterflies showed much less plasticity in response to rearing temperatures, and overall seem to rely more on genetically fixed thermal stress resistance. Whether the latter indicates a higher vulnerability of high-altitude populations to global warming needs further investigation. HSP70 expression increased with both colder and warmer induction temperatures.

  19. Butterfly bones under a pli sky: the folds without organs in the Régis Bonvicino’s collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Floriani Petry

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to handle the operations on the worlds of meaning articulated in Jean-Luc Nancy - The sense of the world - with considerations of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari on How do you make yourself a body without organs. With this French philosophers, we aimed to establish the connections between meaning, truth and desert through the poetic experience of Régis Bonvicino, especially in some books like Butterfly Bones, Sky-Eclipse, the Cosmos and remorse, and Orphan page to articulate a proposal for a policy maximum of life. Questioning the meaning adopted by the natural or real, the goal of this paper is go thought the images of bones of butterfly, borboflores, florbelhas, flormigas, the image of panapaná - a collection of butterflies – seeking the possibility of adopting the attitude of creating for ourselves a Body without Organs.

  20. Statistical Analysis of Extreme Climatic Indices to Determine Environmental Change in Former and Present Karner Blue Butterfly Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Gomezdelcampo, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Karner Blue butterfly is a federally endangered species that once was widely distributed throughout 12 states along the northern part of the United States and Ontario, Canada. Now it only exists in seven states. Many factors are considered to have affected the extinction of this species and this study examines the effect of climate change on the persistence of the Karner Blue butterfly. Five sites were selected to study the effect of climate change. Three sites currently have a Karner Blue population (Allegan, MI, Fort McCoy, WI, and Saratoga, NY) and two sites the Karner Blue has disappeared (Oak Openings, OH, and Pinery, Ontario). Daily climate data from the 1950s to 2005 were used for calculating 13 extreme climatic indices related to precipitation and temperature. The data were broken into two time periods (pre-1984 and post-1984) to analyze how those indices have changed since the butterfly disappeared from the two sites. Statistical analyses including t-tests and ANOVA were used to compare these indices within two time periods among five sites. The results showed that different indices have changed differently among the five sites. The number of extreme hot days and number of extreme cold days per year have a statistically significant change in the sites where the Karner Blue butterfly disappeared. The precipitation-related indices do not show a statistically significant different trend among the five sites. Temperature seems to have more of an effect on the existence of the Karner Blue butterfly. Furthermore, butterfly population size and lake effects are also important factors that cannot be neglected. Larger populations seem to have better chances to survive during a dramatic climate change event.

  1. Chasing Migration Genes: A Brain Expressed Sequence Tag Resource for Summer and Migratory Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haisun; Casselman, Amy; Reppert, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) undergo a spectacular fall migration. In contrast to summer butterflies, migrants are juvenile hormone (JH) deficient, which leads to reproductive diapause and increased longevity. Migrants also utilize time-compensated sun compass orientation to help them navigate to their overwintering grounds. Here, we describe a brain expressed sequence tag (EST) resource to identify genes involved in migratory behaviors. A brain EST library was constructed from summer and migrating butterflies. Of 9,484 unique sequences, 6068 had positive hits with the non-redundant protein database; the EST database likely represents ?52% of the gene-encoding potential of the monarch genome. The brain transcriptome was cataloged using Gene Ontology and compared to Drosophila. Monarch genes were well represented, including those implicated in behavior. Three genes involved in increased JH activity (allatotropin, juvenile hormone acid methyltransfersase, and takeout) were upregulated in summer butterflies, compared to migrants. The locomotion-relevant turtle gene was marginally upregulated in migrants, while the foraging and single-minded genes were not differentially regulated. Many of the genes important for the monarch circadian clock mechanism (involved in sun compass orientation) were in the EST resource, including the newly identified cryptochrome 2. The EST database also revealed a novel Na+/K+ ATPase allele predicted to be more resistant to the toxic effects of milkweed than that reported previously. Potential genetic markers were identified from 3,486 EST contigs and included 1599 double-hit single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 98 microsatellite polymorphisms. These data provide a template of the brain transcriptome for the monarch butterfly. Our “snap-shot” analysis of the differential regulation of candidate genes between summer and migratory butterflies suggests that unbiased, comprehensive transcriptional profiling will inform the molecular basis of migration. The identified SNPs and microsatellite polymorphisms can be used as genetic markers to address questions of population and subspecies structure. PMID:18183285

  2. COLOMBIAN BUTTERFLIES (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONOIDEA) ATTRACTED TO TREE EXUDATES / MARIPOSAS COLOMBIANAS ATRAÍDAS POR EXUDACIONES DE CORTEZAS DE ÁRBOLES (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONOIDEA)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Julián A., Salazar-E..

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se publica una lista preliminar de especies de mariposas frugívoras, que se alimentan de exudados segregados por las cortezas de siete especies de árboles existentes en varias regiones de Colombia. Adicionalmente, se suministran datos de los tipos de secreciones, composición, hábitos [...] de las mariposas y de otros insectos que comparten dicho fenómeno. Abstract in english A preliminary checklist is presented of fruit-feeding butterflies that visit the exudation of seven species of trees observed in several zones of Colombia. Additional data on secretion types, composition, butterfly behavior and the other insects sharing the same phenomena are included. [...

  3. Butterfly Species Diversity of Bir-Billing Area of Dhauladhar Range of Western Himalayas in Northern India

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeeta Chandel; Vijay Kumar; Bhagwati Prashad Sharma; Reetu Patiyal

    2013-01-01

    The present study of butterfly species diversity was carried out in the Bir-Biling area of Dhauladhar Range of the Western Himalayas in Northern India. The study was done since April 2012 to March 2013, throughout the year during the routine field visits to Bir-Billing. A total of 50 butterfly species were recorded from the study areas which belonge to five families i.e. Nymphalidae, Pieridae, Papilionidae, Lycaenidae and Hesperiidae and 39 genera. The Nymphalidae family was the most dominant...

  4. Does skipping a meal matter to a butterfly's appearance? Effects of larval food stress on wing morphology and color in monarch butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Haley; Solensky, Michelle J; Satterfield, Dara A; Davis, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    In animals with complex life cycles, all resources needed to form adult tissues are procured at the larval stage. For butterflies, the proper development of wings involves synthesizing tissue during metamorphosis based on the raw materials obtained by larvae. Similarly, manufacture of pigment for wing scales also requires resources acquired by larvae. We conducted an experiment to test the effects of food deprivation in the larval stage on multiple measures of adult wing morphology and coloration of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus), a species in which long-distance migration makes flight efficiency critical. In a captive setting, we restricted food (milkweed) from late-stage larvae for either 24 hrs or 48 hrs, then after metamorphosis we used image analysis methods to measure forewing surface area and elongation (length/width), which are both important for migration. We also measured the brightness of orange pigment and the intensity of black on the wing. There were correlations between several wing features, including an unexpected association between wing elongation and melanism, which will require further study to fully understand. The clearest effect of food restriction was a reduction in adult wing size in the high stress group (by approximately 2%). Patterns observed for other wing traits were ambiguous: monarchs in the low stress group (but not the high) had less elongated and paler orange pigmentation. There was no effect on wing melanism. Although some patterns obtained in this study were unclear, our results concerning wing size have direct bearing on the monarch migration. We show that if milkweed is limited for monarch larvae, their wings become stunted, which could ultimately result in lower migration success. PMID:24695643

  5. Dynamic digestive physiology of a female reproductive organ in a polyandrous butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakke, Melissa S; Deutsch, Aaron B; Meslin, Camille; Clark, Nathan L; Morehouse, Nathan I

    2015-05-15

    Reproductive traits experience high levels of selection because of their direct ties to fitness, often resulting in rapid adaptive evolution. Much of the work in this area has focused on male reproductive traits. However, a more comprehensive understanding of female reproductive adaptations and their relationship to male characters is crucial to uncover the relative roles of sexual cooperation and conflict in driving co-evolutionary dynamics between the sexes. We focus on the physiology of a complex female reproductive adaptation in butterflies and moths: a stomach-like organ in the female reproductive tract called the bursa copulatrix that digests the male ejaculate (spermatophore). Little is known about how the bursa digests the spermatophore. We characterized bursa proteolytic capacity in relation to female state in the polyandrous butterfly Pieris rapae. We found that the virgin bursa exhibits extremely high levels of proteolytic activity. Furthermore, in virgin females, bursal proteolytic capacity increases with time since eclosion and ambient temperature, but is not sensitive to the pre-mating social environment. Post copulation, bursal proteolytic activity decreases rapidly before rebounding toward the end of a mating cycle, suggesting active female regulation of proteolysis and/or potential quenching of proteolysis by male ejaculate constituents. Using transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, we report identities for nine proteases actively transcribed by bursal tissue and/or expressed in the bursal lumen that may contribute to observed bursal proteolysis. We discuss how these dynamic physiological characteristics may function as female adaptations resulting from sexual conflict over female remating rate in this polyandrous butterfly. PMID:25994634

  6. Testing species distribution models across space and time: high latitude butterflies and recent warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Anne; LeRoux, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To quantify whether species distribution models (SDMs) can reliably forecast species distributions under observed climate change. In particular, to test whether the predictive ability of SDMs depends on species traits or the inclusion of land cover and soil type, and whether distributional changes at expanding range margins can be predicted accurately. Location. Finland. Methods. Using 10-km resolution butterfly atlas data from two periods, 1992–1999 (t1) and 2002–2009 (t2), with a significant between-period temperature increase, we modelled the effects of climatic warming on butterfly distributions with boosted regression trees (BRTs) and generalized additive models (GAMs). We evaluated model performance by using the split-sample approach with data from t1 ("non-independent validation"), and then compared model projections based on data from t1 with species’ observed distributions in t2 ("independent validation"). We compared climate-only SDMs to SDMs including land cover, soil type, or both. Finally,we related model performance to species traits and compared observed and predicted distributional shifts at northern range margins. Results. SDMs showed fair to good model fits when modelling butterfly distributions under climate change. Model performance was lower with independent compared to non-independent validation and improved when land cover and soil type variables were included, compared to climate-only models. SDMs performed less well for highly mobile species and for species with long flight seasons and large ranges. When forecasting changes at northern range margins, correlations between observed and predicted range shifts were predominantly low. Main conclusions. SDMs accurately describe current distributions of most species, yet their performance varies with species traits and the inclusion of land cover and soil type variables. Moreover, their ability to predict range shifts under climate change is limited, especially at the expanding edge. More tests with independent validations are needed to fully understand the predictive potential of SDMs across taxa and biomes.

  7. Toward reconstructing the evolution of advanced moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera: Ditrysia: an initial molecular study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hausmann Axel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mega-diverse insect order Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths; 165,000 described species, deeper relationships are little understood within the clade Ditrysia, to which 98% of the species belong. To begin addressing this problem, we tested the ability of five protein-coding nuclear genes (6.7 kb total, and character subsets therein, to resolve relationships among 123 species representing 27 (of 33 superfamilies and 55 (of 100 families of Ditrysia under maximum likelihood analysis. Results Our trees show broad concordance with previous morphological hypotheses of ditrysian phylogeny, although most relationships among superfamilies are weakly supported. There are also notable surprises, such as a consistently closer relationship of Pyraloidea than of butterflies to most Macrolepidoptera. Monophyly is significantly rejected by one or more character sets for the putative clades Macrolepidoptera as currently defined (P P ? 0.005, and nearly so for the superfamily Drepanoidea as currently defined (P Separate analyses of mostly synonymous versus non-synonymous character sets revealed notable differences (though not strong conflict, including a marked influence of compositional heterogeneity on apparent signal in the third codon position (nt3. As available model partitioning methods cannot correct for this variation, we assessed overall phylogeny resolution through separate examination of trees from each character set. Exploration of "tree space" with GARLI, using grid computing, showed that hundreds of searches are typically needed to find the best-feasible phylogeny estimate for these data. Conclusion Our results (a corroborate the broad outlines of the current working phylogenetic hypothesis for Ditrysia, (b demonstrate that some prominent features of that hypothesis, including the position of the butterflies, need revision, and (c resolve the majority of family and subfamily relationships within superfamilies as thus far sampled. Much further gene and taxon sampling will be needed, however, to strongly resolve individual deeper nodes.

  8. EST analysis of male accessory glands from Heliconius butterflies with divergent mating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Richard G

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heliconius butterflies possess a remarkable diversity of phenotypes, physiologies, and behaviors that has long distinguished this genus as a focal taxon in ecological and evolutionary research. Recently Heliconius has also emerged as a model system for using genomic methods to investigate the causes and consequences of biological diversity. One notable aspect of Heliconius diversity is a dichotomy in mating systems which provides an unusual opportunity to investigate the relationship between sexual selection and the evolution of reproductive proteins. As a first step in pursuing this research, we report the generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs from the male accessory gland of H. erato and H. melpomene, species representative of the two mating systems present in the genus Heliconius. Results We successfully sequenced 933 ESTs clustering into 371 unigenes from H. erato and 1033 ESTs clustering into 340 unigenes from H. melpomene. Results from the two species were very similar. Approximately a third of the unigenes showed no significant BLAST similarity (E-value -5 to sequences in GenBank's non-redundant databases, indicating that a large proportion of novel genes are expressed in Heliconius male accessory glands. In both species only a third of accessory gland unigenes were also found among genes expressed in wing tissue. About 25% of unigenes from both species encoded secreted proteins. This includes three groups of highly abundant unigenes encoding repetitive proteins considered to be candidate seminal fluid proteins; proteins encoded by one of these groups were detected in H. erato spermatophores. Conclusion This collection of ESTs will serve as the foundation for the future identification and evolutionary analysis of male reproductive proteins in Heliconius butterflies. These data also represent a significant advance in the rapidly growing collection of genomic resources available in Heliconius butterflies. As such, they substantially enhance this taxon as a model system for investigating questions of ecological, phenotypic, and genomic diversity.

  9. Cryptochromes Define a Novel Circadian Clock Mechanism in Monarch Butterflies That May Underlie Sun Compass Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haisun; Sauman, Ivo; Yuan, Quan; Casselman, Amy; Emery-Le, Myai; Emery, Patrick; Reppert, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    The circadian clock plays a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, a process that is important for successful navigation. We therefore evaluated the monarch clockwork by focusing on the functions of a Drosophila-like cryptochrome (cry), designated cry1, and a vertebrate-like cry, designated cry2, that are both expressed in the butterfly and by placing these genes in the context of other relevant clock genes in vivo. We found that similar temporal patterns of clock gene expression and protein levels occur in the heads, as occur in DpN1 cells, of a monarch cell line that contains a light-driven clock. CRY1 mediates TIMELESS degradation by light in DpN1 cells, and a light-induced TIMELESS decrease occurs in putative clock cells in the pars lateralis (PL) in the brain. Moreover, monarch cry1 transgenes partially rescue both biochemical and behavioral light-input defects in cryb mutant Drosophila. CRY2 is the major transcriptional repressor of CLOCK:CYCLE-mediated transcription in DpN1 cells, and endogenous CRY2 potently inhibits transcription without involvement of PERIOD. CRY2 is co-localized with clock proteins in the PL, and there it translocates to the nucleus at the appropriate time for transcriptional repression. We also discovered CRY2-positive neural projections that oscillate in the central complex. The results define a novel, CRY-centric clock mechanism in the monarch in which CRY1 likely functions as a blue-light photoreceptor for entrainment, whereas CRY2 functions within the clockwork as the transcriptional repressor of a negative transcriptional feedback loop. Our data further suggest that CRY2 may have a dual role in the monarch butterfly's brain—as a core clock element and as an output that regulates circadian activity in the central complex, the likely site of the sun compass. PMID:18184036

  10. The landscape matrix modifies the effect of habitat fragmentation in grassland butterflies.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Öckinger, E.; Bergman, K.-O.; Franzén, M.; Kadlec, Tomáš; Krauss, J.; Kuussaari, M.; Pöyry, J.; Smith, H. G.; Steffan-Dewenter, I.; Bommarco, R.

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 27, ?. 1 (2012), s. 121-131. ISSN 0921-2973 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Grant ostatní: Czech Department of the Environment(CZ) VaV/620/1/03; Grant Foundation(CZ) IGA FZP 429200131123114 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biodiversity * butterflies * connectivity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.897, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10980-011-9686-z?LI=true#

  11. Immature stages of the butterfly Diaethria clymena janeira (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Biblidinae)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Eduardo P., Barbosa; Lucas A., Kaminski; André V. L., Freitas.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The immature stages (egg, larva, and pupa) morphology, larval and oviposition behavior, and host plant of the "eighty-eight" butterfly Diaethria clymena janeira (C. Felder, 1862) are described. Eggs are laid singly under leaf, and have pronounced vertical ribs ending up in a crown. Larvae of early i [...] nstars construct stick-like frass chains where they rest when not feeding. Late instars are green with reduced body scoli and long branched head scoli. Pupae are entirely green, and pupation occurs on the upper leaf surface. In general, morphology and behavior of immature stages are similar to those of related species in the tribe Callicorini.

  12. The lycaenid butterfly Polyommatus icarus uses a duplicated blue opsin to see green

    OpenAIRE

    Sison-mangus, Marilou S.; Briscoe, Adriana D.; Zaccardi, Guillermo; Knu?ttel, Helge; Kelber, Almut

    2008-01-01

    The functional significance of gene duplication is rarely addressed at the level of animal behavior. Butterflies are excellent models in this regard because they can be trained and the use of their opsin-based visual pigments in color vision can be assessed. In the present study, we demonstrate that the lycaenid Polyommatus icarus uses its duplicate blue (B2) opsin, BRh2, in conjunction with its long-wavelength (LW) opsin, LWRh, to see color in the green part of the light spectrum extending u...

  13. Effectiveness of birds, butterflies, dragonflies, damselflies and invertebrates as indicators of freshwater ecological integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chama, Lackson; Siachoono, Stanford

    2015-04-01

    Human activities such as mining and agriculture are among the major threats to biodiversity globally. Discharges from these activities have been shown to negatively affect ecological processes, leading to ecosystem degradation and species loss across biomes. Freshwater systems have been shown to be particularly vulnerable, as discharges tend to spread rapidly here than in other ecosystems. Hence, there is need to routinely monitor the quality of these systems if impacts of discharges from human activities are to be minimised. Besides the use of conventional laboratory techniques, several studies have recently shown that organisms such as birds, butterflies, dragonflies, damselflies and invertebrates are also good indicators of ecological integrity and should therefore be used as alternatives to monitoring the quality of various ecosystems. However, most of these studies have only studied one or two of these organisms against ecosystem health, and it remains unclear whether all of them respond similarly to changes in different drivers of environmental change. We investigated the response of the diversity of birds, butterflies, dragonflies, damselflies and invertebrates to changing water quality along the Kafue River in Zambia. Sampling was done at 13 different sampling points stretching over a distance of 60Km along the river. At each point, both the diversity of each organism and the water quality were assessed. Water quality was determined by testing its temperature, pH, redox, electrical conductivity, turbidity and copper parameters. We then tested how the diversity of each organism responded to changes in these water parameters. All water parameters varied significantly across sampling points. The diversity of birds and damselflies remained unaffected by any of the water parameters used. However, the diversity of butterflies reduced with increasing pH, turbidity and copper, albeit it remained unaffected by other water parameters. The diversity of dragonflies reduced with increasing redox, electrical conductivity and turbidity, but remained unaffected by other water parameters. The diversity of invertebrates reduced with increasing redox and copper, but remained unaffected by other water parameters. Generally, these results suggest that these organisms, especially butterflies, dragonflies and invertebrates can indeed be used as indicators of changing water quality and ecological integrity in particular. However, their use is limited to specific, rather than, all water parameters. Therefore, the decision as to which organisms to use should largely depend on which water quality parameters are to be tested. Key words: temperature; pH; redox; electrical conductivity; turbidity; copper

  14. Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea) from two forest fragments in northern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Bonfantti, D.; Di Mare, R. A.; Giovenardi, R.

    2009-01-01

    Aiming to contribute to the knowledge concerning diversity of the butterflies in the Atlantic Rainforest ofthe state of Rio Grande do Sul, a systematic survey was carried out in the city of Frederico Westphalen from November2006 to June 2007, in two sampling localities. The total sampling efforts was 80 h, in which 1.785 samples wererecorded, distributed in 161 species. From the latter, 51.57 % (83) belongs to the Nymphalidae family, Hesperiidae20.49 % (33), Pieridae 8.69 % (14), Riodinidae 6...

  15. Timed surveys and transect walks as comparable methods for monitoring butterflies in small plots.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kadlec, Tomáš; Tropek, Robert; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 16, ?. 2 (2012), s. 275-280. ISSN 1366-638X R&D Projects: GA ?R GD206/08/H044; GA ?R GAP505/10/2167; GA MŠk LC06073 Grant ostatní: GA ?R(CZ) GD206/08/H049; University of South Bohemia(CZ) SGA2008/005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : butterfly counting * Lepidoptera * insect sampling Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.801, year: 2012 http://www. springerlink .com/content/42u273615487212p/fulltext.pdf

  16. A CFD study of the flow field and aerodynamic torque on a triple-offset butterfly valve used in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triple-offset butterfly valve is one advanced kind of butterfly valve. It is potential in nuclear power plants because of its advantages in high temperature and high pressure occasions. There are few papers on performance of triple-offset butterfly valve. This paper is intended to predict the performance of a triple-offset butterfly valve used in a nuclear power plant using computational fluid dynamics. The flow field and aerodynamic torque on the triple-offset butterfly valve were studied at six different disk positions from 90deg to 20deg (where 90deg is in the full open position). The selected six different disk positions indicated a stroke. The flow fields were predicted using the k-epsilon renormalization group theory (RNG) turbulence model. The computational results were obtained using CFX 12. The flow field is illustrated using velocity contours and disk pressure profiles, illustrating the effects of the disk position. Some results of flow field are compared to those of symmetric disk butterfly valve which have been validated by test results. Based on the flow field, valve resistance coefficient and aerodynamic torque coefficient with the disk positions are obtained, providing a better understanding of the performance of the triple-offset butterfly valve throughout a stroke. (author)

  17. Effect of different mowing regimes on butterflies and diurnal moths on road verges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valtonen, A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In northern and central Europe road verges offer alternative habitats for declining plant and invertebrate species of semi-natural grasslands. The quality of road verges as habitats depends on several factors, of which the mowing regime is one of the easiest to modify. In this study we compared the Lepidoptera communities on road verges that underwent three different mowing regimes regarding the timing and intensity of mowing; mowing in mid-summer, mowing in late summer, and partial mowing (a narrow strip next to the road. A total of 12,174 individuals and 107 species of Lepidoptera were recorded. The mid-summer mown verges had lower species richness and abundance of butterflies and lower species richness and diversity of diurnal moths compared to the late summer and partially mown verges. By delaying the annual mowing until late summer or promoting mosaic-like mowing regimes, such as partial mowing, the quality of road verges as habitats for butterflies and diurnal moths can be improved.

  18. Transcriptome analysis reveals novel patterning and pigmentation genes underlying Heliconius butterfly wing pattern variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hines Heather M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heliconius butterfly wing pattern diversity offers a unique opportunity to investigate how natural genetic variation can drive the evolution of complex adaptive phenotypes. Positional cloning and candidate gene studies have identified a handful of regulatory and pigmentation genes implicated in Heliconius wing pattern variation, but little is known about the greater developmental networks within which these genes interact to pattern a wing. Here we took a large-scale transcriptomic approach to identify the network of genes involved in Heliconius wing pattern development and variation. This included applying over 140 transcriptome microarrays to assay gene expression in dissected wing pattern elements across a range of developmental stages and wing pattern morphs of Heliconius erato. Results We identified a number of putative early prepattern genes with color-pattern related expression domains. We also identified 51 genes differentially expressed in association with natural color pattern variation. Of these, the previously identified color pattern “switch gene” optix was recovered as the first transcript to show color-specific differential expression. Most differentially expressed genes were transcribed late in pupal development and have roles in cuticle formation or pigment synthesis. These include previously undescribed transporter genes associated with ommochrome pigmentation. Furthermore, we observed upregulation of melanin-repressing genes such as ebony and Dat1 in non-melanic patterns. Conclusions This study identifies many new genes implicated in butterfly wing pattern development and provides a glimpse into the number and types of genes affected by variation in genes that drive color pattern evolution.

  19. Two lactones in the androconial scent of the lycaenid butterfly Celastrina argiolus ladonides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ômura, Hisashi; Yakumaru, Kazuhisa; Honda, Keiichi; Itoh, Takao

    2013-04-01

    Male adult butterflies of many species have characteristic odors originating from the disseminating organs known as androconia. Despite the fact that androconia exist in several species, there have been few investigations on adult scents from the lycaenid species. Celastrina argiolus ladonides (Lycaenidae) is a common species in Eurasia. We have reported that male adults of this species emit a faint odor, and the major components causing this odor have been newly found in the Insecta. By using field-caught individuals, we determined the chemical nature and location of this odor in the butterfly. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses revealed that two lactone compounds, lavender lactone and ?-decalactone, are present in the extracts of males but absent in those of the females. On an average, approximately 50 ng of each compound was found per male. Chiral GC analyses performed using enantiomerically pure standards revealed that the natural lavender lactone was a mixture of two enantiomers with an R/ S ratio of 32:68, whereas the natural ?-decalactone contained only the R-enantiomer. When the analyses were conducted using different parts—forewings, hindwings, and body—of three males, the lactones were more abundantly found on the forewings and hindwings than on the body. Microscopic observation of the wings demonstrated that battledore scales known as androconia are scattered on the upper surface of both the wings of C. argiolus ladonides males. These results indicate that the specialized scales on the wings of males serve as scent-disseminating organs.

  20. From global change to a butterfly flapping: biophysics and behaviour affect tropical climate change impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonebrake, Timothy C; Boggs, Carol L; Stamberger, Jeannie A; Deutsch, Curtis A; Ehrlich, Paul R

    2014-10-22

    Difficulty in characterizing the relationship between climatic variability and climate change vulnerability arises when we consider the multiple scales at which this variation occurs, be it temporal (from minute to annual) or spatial (from centimetres to kilometres). We studied populations of a single widely distributed butterfly species, Chlosyne lacinia, to examine the physiological, morphological, thermoregulatory and biophysical underpinnings of adaptation to tropical and temperate climates. Microclimatic and morphological data along with a biophysical model documented the importance of solar radiation in predicting butterfly body temperature. We also integrated the biophysics with a physiologically based insect fitness model to quantify the influence of solar radiation, morphology and behaviour on warming impact projections. While warming is projected to have some detrimental impacts on tropical ectotherms, fitness impacts in this study are not as negative as models that assume body and air temperature equivalence would suggest. We additionally show that behavioural thermoregulation can diminish direct warming impacts, though indirect thermoregulatory consequences could further complicate predictions. With these results, at multiple spatial and temporal scales, we show the importance of biophysics and behaviour for studying biodiversity consequences of global climate change, and stress that tropical climate change impacts are likely to be context-dependent. PMID:25165769

  1. Design of Butterfly-Shaped Rectangular Microstrip Patch Antenna for ISM-band Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swatantra kumar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The fastest growth in the demand for wireless communication and information transfer using handsets and personal communication (PCS devices has created the need for major advancements of antenna design as a fundamental part of any wireless systems. This paper presents the designs of ISM band antenna for communication at 2.45Ghz.One of the antenna is Rectangular Microstrip Patch Antenna(RMPA and Second one is Slit Slotted Rectangular Microstrip Patch Antenna(SSRMPA.Basic property of both the antenna like simulated design, Return loss, directivity, Radiation Pattern and bandwidth are discussed. This work shows that Return Loss of Antenna in Slotted Patch is decreased about 142.66% which is also a great deal in antenna designing system, Bandwidth of designed antenna is also increased by 1.74%,Electric filed distribution is increased by 725v/m in Butterfly-Shaped Slotted Design ,Butterfly-Shaped Slotted Rectangular Microstrip Patch Antenna also reduces the size of antenna which is always a basic need of Patch antenna design system.

  2. Latitudinal distribution of soft X-ray flares and dispairty in butterfly diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, K. K.; Yellaiah, G.; Hiremath, K. M.

    2015-04-01

    We present statistical analysis of about 63000 soft X-ray flare (class?C) observed by geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) during the period 1976-2008. Class wise occurrence of soft X-ray (SXR) flare is in declining trend since cycle 21. The distribution pattern of cycle 21 shows the transit of hemispheric dominance of flare activity from northern to southern hemisphere and remains there during cycle 22 and 23. During the three cycles, 0-100, 21-300 latitude belts in southern hemisphere (SH) and 31-400 latitude belt in northern hemisphere (NH) are mightier. The 11-200 latitude belt of both hemisphere is mightiest. Correlation coefficient between consecutive latitude appears to be increasing from equator to poleward in northern hemisphere whereas pole to equatorward in southern hemisphere. Slope of the regression line fitted with asymmetry time series of daily flare counts is negative in all three cycles for different classes of flares. The yearly asymmetry curve fitted by a sinusoidal function varies from 5.6 to 11 years period and depends upon the intensity of flare. Variation, of curve fitted with wings of butterfly diagram, from first to second order polynomial suggests that latitudinal migration of flare activity varies from cycle to cycle, northern to southern hemisphere. The variation in slope of the butterfly wing of different flare class indicates the non uniform migration of flare activity.

  3. Host plant use among closely related Anaea butterfly species (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Charaxinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QUEIROZ J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a great number of Charaxinae (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae species in the tropics whose larvae feed on several plant families. However the genus Anaea is almost always associated with Croton species (Euphorbiaceae. This work describes patterns of host plant use by immature and adult abundance on different vertical strata of sympatric Anaea species in a forest of Southeastern Brazil. Quantitative samples of leaves were taken in April/1999 and May/2000 to collect eggs and larvae of four Anaea species on C.alchorneicarpus, C. floribundus and C. salutaris in a semideciduous forest. Sampled leaves were divided into three classes of plant phenological stage: saplings, shrubs and trees. The results showed that the butterfly species are segregating in host plant use on two scales: host plant species and plant phenological stages. C. alchorneicarpus was used by only one Anaea species, whereas C. floribundus was used by three species and C. salutaris by four Anaea species. There was one Anaea species concentrated on sapling, another on sapling/shrub and two others on shrub/tree leaves. Adults of Anaea were more frequent at canopy traps but there were no differences among species caught in traps at different vertical positions. This work supplements early studies on host plant use among Charaxinae species and it describes how a guild of closely related butterfly species may be organized in a complex tropical habitat.

  4. The redder the better: wing color predicts flight performance in monarch butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Andrew K; Chi, Jean; Bradley, Catherine; Altizer, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    The distinctive orange and black wings of monarchs (Danaus plexippus) have long been known to advertise their bitter taste and toxicity to potential predators. Recent work also showed that both the orange and black coloration of this species can vary in response to individual-level and environmental factors. Here we examine the relationship between wing color and flight performance in captive-reared monarchs using a tethered flight mill apparatus to quantify butterfly flight speed, duration and distance. In three different experiments (totaling 121 individuals) we used image analysis to measure body size and four wing traits among newly-emerged butterflies prior to flight trials: wing area, aspect ratio (length/width), melanism, and orange hue. Results showed that monarchs with darker orange (approaching red) wings flew longer distances than those with lighter orange wings in analyses that controlled for sex and other morphometric traits. This finding is consistent with past work showing that among wild monarchs, those sampled during the fall migration are darker in hue (redder) than non-migratory monarchs. Together, these results suggest that pigment deposition onto wing scales during metamorphosis could be linked with traits that influence flight, such as thorax muscle size, energy storage or metabolism. Our results reinforce an association between wing color and flight performance in insects that is suggested by past studies of wing melansim and seasonal polyphenism, and provide an important starting point for work focused on mechanistic links between insect movement and color. PMID:22848463

  5. Extreme heterogeneity in parasitism despite low population genetic structure among monarch butterflies inhabiting the Hawaiian Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Amanda A; de Roode, Jacobus C; Altizer, Sonia; Bartel, Rebecca A

    2014-01-01

    Host movement and spatial structure can strongly influence the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases, with limited host movement potentially leading to high spatial heterogeneity in infection. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) are best known for undertaking a spectacular long-distance migration in eastern North America; however, they also form non-migratory populations that breed year-round in milder climates such as Hawaii and other tropical locations. Prior work showed an inverse relationship between monarch migratory propensity and the prevalence of the protozoan parasite, Ophryocystis elektroscirrha. Here, we sampled monarchs from replicate sites within each of four Hawaiian Islands to ask whether these populations show consistently high prevalence of the protozoan parasite as seen for monarchs from several other non-migratory populations. Counter to our predictions, we observed striking spatial heterogeneity in parasite prevalence, with infection rates per site ranging from 4-85%. We next used microsatellite markers to ask whether the observed variation in infection might be explained by limited host movement and spatial sub-structuring among sites. Our results showed that monarchs across the Hawaiian Islands form one admixed population, supporting high gene flow among sites. Moreover, measures of individual-level genetic diversity did not predict host infection status, as might be expected if more inbred hosts harbored higher parasite loads. These results suggest that other factors such as landscape-level environmental variation or colonization-extinction processes might instead cause the extreme heterogeneity in monarch butterfly infection observed here. PMID:24926796

  6. The monarch butterfly genome yields insights into long-distance migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuai; Merlin, Christine; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We present the draft 273 Mb genome of the migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) and a set of 16, 866 protein-coding genes. Orthology properties suggest that the Lepidoptera are the fastest evolving insect order yet examined. Compared to the silkmoth Bombyx mori, the monarch genome shares prominent similarity in orthology content, microsynteny, and protein family sizes. The monarch genome reveals: a vertebrate-like opsin whose existence in insects is widespread; a full repertoire of molecular components for the monarch circadian clockwork; all members of the juvenile hormone biosynthetic pathway whose regulation shows unexpected sexual dimorphism; additional molecular signatures of oriented flight behavior; microRNAs that are differentially expressed between summer and migratory butterflies; monarch-specific expansions of chemoreceptors potentially important for long-distance migration; and a variant of the sodium/potassium pump that underlies a valuable chemical defense mechanism. The monarch genome enhances our ability to better understand the genetic and molecular basis of long-distance migration. PMID:22118469

  7. Populations of Monarch butterflies with different migratory behaviors show divergence in wing morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altizer, Sonia; Davis, Andrew K

    2010-04-01

    The demands of long-distance flight represent an important evolutionary force operating on the traits of migratory species. Monarchs are widespread butterflies known for their annual migrations in North America. We examined divergence in wing morphology among migratory monarchs from eastern and western N. America, and nonmigratory monarchs in S. Florida, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, and Hawaii. For the three N. American populations, we also examined monarchs reared in four common environment experiments. We used image analysis to measure multiple traits including forewing area and aspect ratio; for laboratory-reared monarchs we also quantified body area and wing loading. Results showed wild monarchs from all nonmigratory populations were smaller than those from migratory populations. Wild and captive-reared eastern monarchs had the largest and most elongated forewings, whereas monarchs from Puerto Rico and Costa Rica had the smallest and roundest forewings. Eastern monarchs also had the largest bodies and high measures of wing loading, whereas western and S. Florida monarchs had less elongated forewings and smaller bodies. Among captive-reared butterflies, family-level effects provided evidence that genetic factors contributed to variation in wing traits. Collectively, these results support evolutionary responses to long-distance flight in monarchs, with implications for the conservation of phenotypically distinct wild populations. PMID:20067519

  8. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in the monarch butterfly using zinc-finger nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Christine; Beaver, Lauren E.; Taylor, Orley R.; Wolfe, Scot A.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of reverse-genetic tools in “nonmodel” insect species with distinct biology is critical to establish them as viable model systems. The eastern North American monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), whose genome is sequenced, has emerged as a model to study animal clocks, navigational mechanisms, and the genetic basis of long-distance migration. Here, we developed a highly efficient gene-targeting approach in the monarch using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), engineered nucleases that generate mutations at targeted genomic sequences. We focused our ZFN approach on targeting the type 2 vertebrate-like cryptochrome gene of the monarch (designated cry2), which encodes a putative transcriptional repressor of the monarch circadian clockwork. Co-injections of mRNAs encoding ZFNs targeting the second exon of monarch cry2 into “one nucleus” stage embryos led to high-frequency nonhomologous end-joining-mediated, mutagenic lesions in the germline (up to 50%). Heritable ZFN-induced lesions in two independent lines produced truncated, nonfunctional CRY2 proteins, resulting in the in vivo disruption of circadian behavior and the molecular clock mechanism. Our work genetically defines CRY2 as an essential transcriptional repressor of the monarch circadian clock and provides a proof of concept for the use of ZFNs for manipulating genes in the monarch butterfly genome. Importantly, this approach could be used in other lepidopterans and “nonmodel” insects, thus opening new avenues to decipher the molecular underpinnings of a variety of biological processes. PMID:23009861

  9. Deciphering the evolution of birdwing butterflies 150 years after Alfred Russel Wallace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condamine, Fabien L; Toussaint, Emmanuel F A; Clamens, Anne-Laure; Genson, Gwenaelle; Sperling, Felix A H; Kergoat, Gael J

    2015-01-01

    One hundred and fifty years after Alfred Wallace studied the geographical variation and species diversity of butterflies in the Indomalayan-Australasian Archipelago, the processes responsible for their biogeographical pattern remain equivocal. We analysed the macroevolutionary mechanisms accounting for the temporal and geographical diversification of the charismatic birdwing butterflies (Papilionidae), a major focus of Wallace's pioneering work. Bayesian phylogenetics and dating analyses of the birdwings were conducted using mitochondrial and nuclear genes. The combination of maximum likelihood analyses to estimate biogeographical history and diversification rates reveals that diversity-dependence processes drove the radiation of birdwings, and that speciation was often associated with founder-events colonizing new islands, especially in Wallacea. Palaeo-environment diversification models also suggest that high extinction rates occurred during periods of elevated sea level and global warming. We demonstrated a pattern of spatio-temporal habitat dynamics that continuously created or erased habitats suitable for birdwing biodiversity. Since birdwings were extinction-prone during the Miocene (warmer temperatures and elevated sea levels), the cooling period after the mid-Miocene climatic optimum fostered birdwing diversification due to the release of extinction. This also suggests that current global changes may represent a serious conservation threat to this flagship group. PMID:26133078

  10. Food plant derived disease tolerance and resistance in a natural butterfly-plant-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Eleanore D; Lefèvre, Thierry; Li, James; de Castillejo, Carlos Lopez Fernandez; Li, Hui; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2012-11-01

    Organisms can protect themselves against parasite-induced fitness costs through resistance or tolerance. Resistance includes mechanisms that prevent infection or limit parasite growth while tolerance alleviates the fitness costs from parasitism without limiting infection. Although tolerance and resistance affect host-parasite coevolution in fundamentally different ways, tolerance has often been ignored in animal-parasite systems. Where it has been studied, tolerance has been assumed to be a genetic mechanism, unaffected by the host environment. Here we studied the effects of host ecology on tolerance and resistance to infection by rearing monarch butterflies on 12 different species of milkweed food plants and infecting them with a naturally occurring protozoan parasite. Our results show that monarch butterflies experience different levels of tolerance to parasitism depending on the species of milkweed that they feed on, with some species providing over twofold greater tolerance than other milkweed species. Resistance was also affected by milkweed species, but there was no relationship between milkweed-conferred resistance and tolerance. Chemical analysis suggests that infected monarchs obtain highest fitness when reared on milkweeds with an intermediate concentration, diversity, and polarity of toxic secondary plant chemicals known as cardenolides. Our results demonstrate that environmental factors-such as interacting species in ecological food webs-are important drivers of disease tolerance. PMID:23106703

  11. For whom the bells toll: Demography of the last population of the butterfly Euphydryas maturna in the Czech Republic.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvi?ka, Martin; ?ížek, Old?ich; Filipová, L.; Fric, Zden?k; Beneš, Ji?í; K?upka, M.; Záme?ník, J.; Do?kalová, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Ro?. 60, ?. 5 (2005), s. 551-557. ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA526/04/0417 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : butterfly conservation * dynamics metapopulation * mark-release-recapture Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.240, year: 2005

  12. Fruit-feeding butterflies in the Atlantic Forest at Serra do Tabuleiro State Park, Santa Catarina State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Corso

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fruit-feeding butterflies are used in ecological studies following standardized sampling protocols because they are easily collected using traps baited with food. This trait, and the fact that their populations respond rapidly to changes in habitat, make them good biological indicators. The goal of this study is to present a list of fruit-feeding butterfly species, including morphological and ecological characteristics of this group, for the Atlantic Forest of Serra do Tabuleiro State Park (Santa Catarina, to improve the knowledge about the butterflies from this region. Six field expeditions were carried out between November 2009 and August 2010. Twenty-five bait traps were used, which remained active for ten days and were checked every 48 h to replace the bait and collect individuals. Twenty species and 331 individuals were captured, which belonged to three subfamilies: Biblidinae, Charaxinae and Satyrinae. The study added eleven new species to the already existing list of the Atlantic Forest butterflies of Santa Catarina.

  13. Teaching Spanish Caribbean History through "In the Time of the Butterflies": The Novel and the Showtime Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Elizabeth Coonrod

    2006-01-01

    This manuscript presents a proposal for teaching Latino Caribbean heritage using as principal focus the novel and film "In the Time of the Butterflies." It discusses terms of literary works and their readings, the foundation of a Spanish caste system, African immigration, and political and economic aspects affecting Dominican American identity and…

  14. Why Small Is Beautiful: Wing Colour Is Free from Thermoregulatory Constraint in the Small Lycaenid Butterfly, Polyommatus icarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyser, Rien; Breuker, Casper J.; Hails, Rosemary S.; Dennis, Roger L. H.; Shreeve, Tim G.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the roles of wing melanisation, weight, and basking posture in thermoregulation in Polyommatus Icarus, a phenotypically variable and protandrous member of the diverse Polyommatinae (Lycaenidae). Under controlled experimental conditions, approximating to marginal environmental conditions for activity in the field (= infrequent flight, long duration basking periods), warming rates are maximised with fully open wings and maximum body temperatures are dependent on weight. Variation in wing melanisation within and between sexes has no effect on warming rates; males and females which differ in melanisation had similar warming rates. Posture also affected cooling rates, consistent with cooling being dependent on convective heat loss. We hypothesise that for this small sized butterfly, melanisation has little or no effect on thermoregulation. This may be a factor contributing to the diversity of wing colours in the Polyommatinae. Because of the importance of size for thermoregulation in this small butterfly, requirements for attaining a suitable size to confer thermal stability in adults may also be a factor influencing larval feeding rates, development time and patterns of voltinism. Our findings indicate that commonly accepted views of the importance of melanisation, posture and size to thermoregulation, developed using medium and large sized butterflies, are not necessarily applicable to small sized butterflies. PMID:25923738

  15. Why Small Is Beautiful: Wing Colour Is Free from Thermoregulatory Constraint in the Small Lycaenid Butterfly, Polyommatus icarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyser, Rien; Breuker, Casper J; Hails, Rosemary S; Dennis, Roger L H; Shreeve, Tim G

    2015-01-01

    We examined the roles of wing melanisation, weight, and basking posture in thermoregulation in Polyommatus Icarus, a phenotypically variable and protandrous member of the diverse Polyommatinae (Lycaenidae). Under controlled experimental conditions, approximating to marginal environmental conditions for activity in the field (= infrequent flight, long duration basking periods), warming rates are maximised with fully open wings and maximum body temperatures are dependent on weight. Variation in wing melanisation within and between sexes has no effect on warming rates; males and females which differ in melanisation had similar warming rates. Posture also affected cooling rates, consistent with cooling being dependent on convective heat loss. We hypothesise that for this small sized butterfly, melanisation has little or no effect on thermoregulation. This may be a factor contributing to the diversity of wing colours in the Polyommatinae. Because of the importance of size for thermoregulation in this small butterfly, requirements for attaining a suitable size to confer thermal stability in adults may also be a factor influencing larval feeding rates, development time and patterns of voltinism. Our findings indicate that commonly accepted views of the importance of melanisation, posture and size to thermoregulation, developed using medium and large sized butterflies, are not necessarily applicable to small sized butterflies. PMID:25923738

  16. A case of multiple sclerosis with multi-ring-like and butterfly-like enhancement on computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of multiple sclerosis in which CT showed multiple ring-like enhancement and butterfly-like distribution of a low density area with marginal enhancement. The latter finding is found in other demyelinating disorders but is less common in tumors or abscesses. Therefore, it seems to have some diagnostic value in multiple sclerosis. (author)

  17. Establishment of a Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus, Lepidoptera: Danaidae) Cell Line and its Susceptibility to Insect Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cell line from the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus designated BCIRL-DP-AM/JG was established from adult ovaries. The cell line consisted mainly of round cells and took a prolonged period of time in the growth medium ExCell 401 containing 10% fetal bovine serum and antibiotics before it could be...

  18. Red & black or black & white? Phylogeny of the Araschnia butterflies (Lepidoptera : Nymphalidae) and evolution of seasonal polyphenism.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fric, Zden?k; Konvi?ka, Martin; Zrzavý, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Ro?. 17, ?. 2 (2004), s. 265-278. ISSN 1010-061X R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA6141102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Biogeography * butterfly wing pattern Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.893, year: 2004

  19. From Caterpillar to Butterfly: A Window for Looking into Students' Ideas about Life Cycle and Life Forms of Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinici, Ayhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was a qualitative analysis of high school students' ideas about life cycle and life forms of the butterfly. For this purpose, open-ended questions and drawing methods were applied to 194 high school students from the ninth to eleventh grades and 14 to 16 years of age in Erzurum, Turkey. Students' drawings were categorised…

  20. The last population of the Woodland Brown butterfly (Lopinga achine) in the Czech Republic: habitat use, demography and site management.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvi?ka, Martin; Novák, J.; Beneš, Ji?í; Fric, Zden?k; Bradley, J.; Keil, P.; Hr?ek, J.; Chobot, K.; Marhoul, P.

    2008-01-01

    Ro?. 12, ?. 5 (2008), s. 549-560. ISSN 1366-638X R&D Projects: GA ?R GA526/04/0417; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : butterfly conservation * canopy * forest ground flora Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2008

  1. Aphids indirectly increase virulence and transmission potential of a monarch butterfly parasite by reducing defensive chemistry of a shared food plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roode, Jacobus C; Rarick, Rachel M; Mongue, Andrew J; Gerardo, Nicole M; Hunter, Mark D

    2011-05-01

    Parasites and hosts live in communities consisting of many interacting species, but few studies have examined how communities affect parasite virulence and transmission. We studied a food web consisting of two species of milkweed, two milkweed herbivores (monarch butterfly and oleander aphid) and a monarch butterfly-specific parasite. We found that the presence of aphids increased the virulence and transmission potential of the monarch butterfly's parasite on one milkweed species. These increases were associated with aphid-induced decreases in the defensive chemicals of milkweed plants. Our experiment suggests that aphids can indirectly increase the virulence and transmission potential of monarch butterfly parasites, probably by altering the chemical composition of a shared food plant. These results indicate that species that are far removed from host-parasite interactions can alter such interactions through cascading indirect effects in the food web. As such, indirect effects within ecological communities may drive the dynamics and evolution of parasites. PMID:21375682

  2. Plants and butterflies of a small urban preserve in the Central Valley of Costa Rica

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Kenji, Nishida; Ichiro, Nakamura; Carlos O, Morales.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Por ser el área más poblada del país, el valle Central de Costa Rica perdió su hábitat natural; lo poco que queda ha sido alterado en grados variados. Sin embargo, se han realizado algunos estudios para evaluar la necesidad de conservación en esta área. Se presentan inventarios preliminares de plant [...] as, mariposas y polillas diurnas de la Reserva Ecológica Leonelo Oviedo (RELO); una pequeña reserva de bosque húmedo premontano en del campus de la Universidad de Costa Rica, ubicado en la parte urbanizada del valle. Las mariposas diurnas son uno de los mejores bio-indicadores de la salud del hábitat, porque son muy sensibles a los cambios del ambiente y están estrechamente ligadas a la flora local. Se presenta también una descripción de los caracteres físicos y la historia de la RELO, con ilustraciones. Se identificaron aproximadamente 432 especies de ca. 334 géneros en 113 familias de plantas. Sin embargo, solamente 57% de ellas son especies nativas del bosque húmedo premontano de la región; el resto son especies exóticas o introducidas en su mayoría desde tierras bajas. Se han registrado más de 200 especies de mariposas diurnas en seis familias, incluyendo Hesperiidae. Abstract in english Costa Rica’s most populated area, the Central valley, has lost much of its natural habitat, and the little that remains has been altered to varying degrees. Yet few studies have been conducted to assess the need for conservation in this area. We present preliminary inventories of plants, butterflies [...] , and day-flying moths of the Reserva Ecológica Leonelo Oviedo (RELO), a small Premontane Moist Forest preserve within the University of Costa Rica campus, located in the urbanized part of the valley. Butterflies are one of the best bio-indicators of a habitat’s health, because they are highly sensitive to environmental changes and are tightly linked to the local flora. A description of the RELO’s physical features and its history is also presented with illustrations. Approximately 432 species of ca. 334 genera in 113 families of plants were identified. However, only 57 % of them represent species native to the Premontane Moist Forest of the region; the rest are either exotic or species introduced mostly from lowland. More than 200 species of butterflies in six families, including Hesperiidae, have been recorded. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (Suppl. 1): 31-67. Epub 2009 November 30.

  3. Butterfly effect: understanding and mitigating the local consequences of climate change impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Butterfly Effect is the notion that tiny differences in initial conditions are amplified in the evolution of a dynamic system and directly affect the eventual outcome. In 1963 mathematician and meteorologist Edward Lorenz proposed that the flapping of a butterfly's wing would cause a disturbance that becomes exponentially amplified so as to eventually affect large-scale atmospheric motion. This was to illustrate the 'sensitive dependence on initial conditions'; sensitivity also true in affecting the extent of damages experienced as a result of climate change. In a climate change context, The Butterfly Effect suggests the local consequences of climate change impacts will depend on their interaction with the economic, environmental, institutional, technological and demographic attributes unique to a city or region. It is this mix of factors that will determine the extent, both positively and negatively, to which climate change will be experienced locally. For a truly effective climate change response, it is imperative that regional risk assessments and adaptation strategies take into account not only the projected impacts but the full range of flow-on implications of those impacts and their sensitivity factors. Understanding of the sensitivity factors that will amplify or mitigate climate change impacts and implications enables government and business leaders to calculate the likely extent of localised damages if no adaptation is undertaken. This allows ino adaptation is undertaken. This allows industries and communities to evaluate the likely significance of a particular impact and to consider how to adjust or counter the sensitivity factor to build resilience and reduce vulnerability. Thus, it also assists in the local prioritisation of issues and responses. Such a strategic response can also mean the required adaptation measures may be less extensive and thereby require less cost and time to implement. This paper discusses the flow-on implications of Australia's projected climate change impacts and their relevant sensitivity factors. Sensitivity factors include local dependence on resource-based industries, population and demographics, infrastructure resilience and capacity, emergency response capacity, institutional capacity and community information, skills and knowledge. To illustrate the flow-on effects of an extreme event, the paper also applies this discussion framework to the recent experience of Newcastle and the Hunter Valley in New South Wales, which encountered the 'once in a generation storm' on the Queens' Birthday 2007. The paper also builds on the research project, a national vulnerability assessment for all Australian settlements, undertaken by this author for the Australian Greenhouse Office during 2006

  4. Stability of Patterns of Behavior in the Butterfly Technique of the Elite Swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louro, Hugo; Silva, António J.; Anguera, Teresa; Marinho, Daniel A.; Oliveira, Conceição; Conceição, Ana; Campaniço, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find patterns in the butterfly swimming technique, with an adaptation of the Behavioral Observation System Tech. This, as an instrument for ad-hoc qualitative analysis, enables the study of the stability of the technical implementation. When used in the training of swimmers, analysis can reduce the variability of behavioral tuning swimming technique. Through the analysis of temporal patterns (T-pattern) and a sequence of five cycles running at hand maximum speed, the behavior of four technical Portuguese elite swimmers, with a record of 259 alphanumeric codes and a total of 160 configurations, were studied. The structure of the original instrument, based on a mixed system of categories and formats Field, can record technical features, observed during the execution of hand cycles. The validity was ensured through the index of intra-observer reliability (95%) and inter-observer accuracy (96%). To detect patterns in each swimmer, the Theme 5.0 software was used, which allowed to identify the stable structures of technical performance within a critical interval of time (p <0.05) - t-patterns. The patterns were different, adjusting to the characteristics of technical implementation of the swimmers. It was found that the swimmer can create settings with different levels of structure complexity, depending on the implementation of changes within the hand cycle. Variations of codes in each configuration obtained using the SOCTM, allowed determining the differences between swimmers. However, the records showed a clear behavioral similarity when comparing the result with a general pattern of the butterfly technique. The potential quality of this instrument seems to be important due to the patterns obtained from a temporal sequence. Key points The patterns were different, adjusting to the characteristics of technical implementation of the swimmers. The swimmer can make settings with different levels of structure complexity, depending on the implementation of changes within the hand cycle. Variations of codes in each configuration obtained using the SOCTM, allowed determining the differences between swimmers. The records showed a clear behavioral similarity when comparing the result with a general pattern of the butterfly technique. The potential quality of this instrument seems to be important due to the patterns obtained from a temporal sequence. PMID:24149384

  5. Immature stages of the Brazilian crescent butterfly Ortilia liriope (Cramer) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    PL, Silva; NP, Oliveira; EP, Barbosa; Y, Okada; LA, Kaminski; AVL, Freitas.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We provide the first information on the morphology of the immature stages (egg, larva, and pupa), oviposition and larval behavior, and host plant, for the Brazilian crescent butterfly Ortilia liriope (Cramer), based on material from Santarém Municipality, Pará State, Northern Brazil. Females of O. l [...] iriope lay eggs in clusters. After hatching, larvae eat the exochorion and remain gregarious in all but the final instar. The host plant recorded in the study site is Justicia sp. (Acanthaceae). Despite the scarcity of data on the immature stages of Neotropical Melitaeini, we can already say that some morphological and behavioral traits observed in the immature stages of O. liriope are also present in all known genera in this tribe.

  6. Finite element modeling of the radiative properties of Morpho butterfly wing scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejdoubi, A; Andraud, C; Berthier, S; Lafait, J; Boulenguez, J; Richalot, E

    2013-02-01

    With the aim of furthering the explanation of iridescence in Morpho butterflies, we developed an optical model based on the finite-element (FE) method, taking more accurately into account the exact morphology of the wing, origin of iridescence. We modeled the photonic structure of a basal scale of the Morpho rhetenor wing as a three-dimensional object, infinite in one direction, with a shape copied from a TEM image, and made out of a slightly absorbing dielectric material. Periodic boundary conditions were used in the FE method to model the wing periodic structure and perfectly matched layers permitted the free-space scattering computation. Our results are twofold: first, we verified on a simpler structure, that our model yields the same result as the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA), and second, we demonstrated that it is necessary to assume an absorption gradient in the true structure, to account for experimental reflectivity measured on a real wing. PMID:23496546

  7. Magnetisation oscillations, boundary conditions and the Hofstadter butterfly in graphene flakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang; Brada, Matej; Kusmartsev, Feodor V. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University (United Kingdom); Mele, Eugene J. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    New quantum oscillations in the magnetization of graphene flakes induced by magnetic fields, which depend on the shape of the flake, are described. At small values of the field they are due to the Aharonov-Bohm effect and with increasing field they are transformed into dHvA oscillations. The specific form of the dHvA oscillations is analyzed in terms of their energy spectrum, which has a form of Hofstadter's butterfly. Numerical results using a lattice tight-binding model and a continuum Dirac equation are presented and compared. Possible experiments to investigate the quantum oscillations in Moire and graphene anti-dot superlattices are discussed. (copyright 2014 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Selection on male sex pheromone composition contributes to butterfly reproductive isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacquet, P M B; Brattström, O; Wang, H-L; Allen, C E; Löfstedt, C; Brakefield, P M; Nieberding, C M

    2015-04-01

    Selection can facilitate diversification by inducing character displacement in mate choice traits that reduce the probability of maladaptive mating between lineages. Although reproductive character displacement (RCD) has been demonstrated in two-taxa case studies, the frequency of this process in nature is still debated. Moreover, studies have focused primarily on visual and acoustic traits, despite the fact that chemical communication is probably the most common means of species recognition. Here, we showed in a large, mostly sympatric, butterfly genus, a strong pattern of recurrent RCD for predicted male sex pheromone composition, but not for visual mate choice traits. Our results suggest that RCD is not anecdotal, and that selection for divergence in male sex pheromone composition contributed to reproductive isolation within the Bicyclus genus. We propose that selection may target olfactory mate choice traits as a more common sensory modality to ensure reproductive isolation among diverging lineages than previously envisaged. PMID:25740889

  9. Ten species in one: DNA barcoding reveals cryptic species in the neotropical skipper butterfly Astraptes fulgerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Paul D N; Penton, Erin H; Burns, John M; Janzen, Daniel H; Hallwachs, Winnie

    2004-10-12

    Astraptes fulgerator, first described in 1775, is a common and widely distributed neotropical skipper butterfly (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae). We combine 25 years of natural history observations in northwestern Costa Rica with morphological study and DNA barcoding of museum specimens to show that A. fulgerator is a complex of at least 10 species in this region. Largely sympatric, these taxa have mostly different caterpillar food plants, mostly distinctive caterpillars, and somewhat different ecosystem preferences but only subtly differing adults with no genitalic divergence. Our results add to the evidence that cryptic species are prevalent in tropical regions, a critical issue in efforts to document global species richness. They also illustrate the value of DNA barcoding, especially when coupled with traditional taxonomic tools, in disclosing hidden diversity. PMID:15465915

  10. Magnetisation oscillations, boundary conditions and the Hofstadter butterfly in graphene flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New quantum oscillations in the magnetization of graphene flakes induced by magnetic fields, which depend on the shape of the flake, are described. At small values of the field they are due to the Aharonov-Bohm effect and with increasing field they are transformed into dHvA oscillations. The specific form of the dHvA oscillations is analyzed in terms of their energy spectrum, which has a form of Hofstadter's butterfly. Numerical results using a lattice tight-binding model and a continuum Dirac equation are presented and compared. Possible experiments to investigate the quantum oscillations in Moire and graphene anti-dot superlattices are discussed. (copyright 2014 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea from two forest fragments in northern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonfantti, D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to contribute to the knowledge concerning diversity of the butterflies in the Atlantic Rainforest ofthe state of Rio Grande do Sul, a systematic survey was carried out in the city of Frederico Westphalen from November2006 to June 2007, in two sampling localities. The total sampling efforts was 80 h, in which 1.785 samples wererecorded, distributed in 161 species. From the latter, 51.57 % (83 belongs to the Nymphalidae family, Hesperiidae20.49 % (33, Pieridae 8.69 % (14, Riodinidae 6.83 % (11, Papilionidae 6.21 % (10, Lycaenidae 6.21 % (10.Regarding the sampled species, 79.50 % (128 were recorded at both studied sites.

  12. Two short mass-loss events that unveil the binary heart of Minkowski's Butterfly Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Castro-Carrizo, A; Bujarrabal, V; Chesneau, O; Cox, P; Bachiller, R

    2012-01-01

    Studying the appearance and properties of bipolar winds is critical to understand the stellar evolution from the AGB to the planetary nebula (PN) phase. Many uncertainties exist regarding the presence and role of binary stellar systems, mainly due to the deficit of conclusive observational evidences. We investigate the extended equatorial distribution around the early bipolar planetary nebula M 2-9 ("Minkowski's Butterfly Nebula") to gather new information on the mechanism of the axial ejections. Interferometric millimeter observations of molecular emission provide the most comprehensive view of the equatorial mass distribution and kinematics in early PNe. Here we present subarcsecond angular-resolution observations of the 12CO J=2-1 line and continuum emission with the Plateau de Bure interferometer. The data reveal two ring-shaped and eccentric structures at the equatorial basis of the two coaxial optical lobes. The two rings were formed during short mass-loss episodes (~ 40 yr), separated by ~ 500 yr. Thei...

  13. Deformation and concentration fluctuations under stretching in a polymer network with free chains. The ''butterfly'' effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering gives access to concentration fluctuations of mobile labeled polymer chains embedded in a polymer network. At rest they appear progressively larger than for random mixing, with increasing ratio. Under uniaxial stretching, they decrease towards ideal mixing along the direction perpendicular to stretching, and can grow strongly along the parallel one, including the zero scattering vector q limit. This gives rise to intensity contours with double-winged patterns, in the shape of the figure '8', or of 'butterfly'. Random crosslinking and end-linking of monodisperse chains have both been studied. The strength of the 'butterfly' effect increases with the molecular weight of the free chains, the crosslinking ratio, the network heterogeneity, and the elongation ratio. Eventually, the signal collapses on an 'asymptotic' function I(q), of increasing correlation length with the elongation ratio. Deformation appears heterogeneous, maximal for soft areas, where the mobile chains localize preferentially. This could be due to spontaneous fluctuations, or linked to frozen fluctuations of the crosslink density. However, disagreement with the corresponding theoretical expressions makes it necessary to account for the spatial correlations of crosslink density, and their progressive unscreening as displayed by the asymptotic behavior. Networks containing pending labeled chains and free labeled stars lead to more precise understanding of the diffusion of free species and the heterogeneity of the deformation. It seems that the latter occurs even without diffusion for heterogeneous enough networks. In extreme cases (of the crosslinking parameters), the spatial correlations display on apparent fractal behavior, of dimensions 2 to 2.5, which is discussed here in terms of random clusters. 200 refs., 95 figs., 21 tabs., 10 appends

  14. STABILITY OF PATTERNS OF BEHAVIOR IN THE BUTTERFLY TECHNIQUE OF THE ELITE SWIMMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Louro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find patterns in the butterfly swimming technique, with an adaptation of the Behavioral Observation System Tech. This, as an instrument for ad-hoc qualitative analysis, enables the study of the stability of the technical implementation. When used in the training of swimmers, analysis can reduce the variability of behavioral tuning swimming technique. Through the analysis of temporal patterns (T-pattern and a sequence of five cycles running at hand maximum speed, the behavior of four technical Portuguese elite swimmers, with a record of 259 alphanumeric codes and a total of 160 configurations, were studied. The structure of the original instrument, based on a mixed system of categories and formats Field, can record technical features, observed during the execution of hand cycles. The validity was ensured through the index of intra-observer reliability (95% and inter-observer accuracy (96%. To detect patterns in each swimmer, the Theme 5.0 software was used, which allowed to identify the stable structures of technical performance within a critical interval of time (p <0.05 - t-patterns. The patterns were different, adjusting to the characteristics of technical implementation of the swimmers. It was found that the swimmer can create settings with different levels of structure complexity, depending on the implementation of changes within the hand cycle. Variations of codes in each configuration obtained using the SOCTM, allowed determining the differences between swimmers. However, the records showed a clear behavioral similarity when comparing the result with a general pattern of the butterfly technique. The potential quality of this instrument seems to be important due to the patterns obtained from a temporal sequence

  15. Integer quantum Hall effect and Hofstadter's butterfly spectra in three-dimensional metals in external periodic modulations

    CERN Document Server

    Koshino, M; Koshino, Mikito; Aoki, Hideo

    2003-01-01

    We propose that Hofstadter's butterfly accompanied by quantum Hall effect that is similar to those predicted to occur in 3D tight-binding systems by Koshino {\\it et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 86}, 1062 (2001)] can be realized in an entirely different system -- 3D metals applied with weak external periodic modulations (e.g., acoustic waves). Namely, an effect of two periodic potentials interferes with Landau's quantization due to an applied magnetic field $\\Vec{B}$, resulting generally in fractal energy gaps as a function of the tilting angle of $\\Vec{B}$, for which the accompanying quantized Hall tensors are computed. The phenomenon arises from the fact that, while the present system has a different physical origin for the butterfly from the 3D tight-binding systems, the mathematical forms are remarkably equivalent.

  16. An experimental displacement and over 50 years of tag-recoveries show that monarch butterflies are not true navigators

    OpenAIRE

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Derbyshire, Rachael; Stalleicken, Julia; Mouritsen, Ole Ø.; Frost, Barrie J.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) breeding in eastern North America are famous for their annual fall migration to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. However, the mechanisms they use to successfully reach these sites remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether monarchs are true navigators who can determine their location relative to their final destination using both a “compass” and a “map”. Using flight simulators, we recorded the orientation of wild-caught monarchs in so...

  17. Electromagnetic characterization of millimetre-scale replicas of the gyroid photonic crystal found in the butterfly Parides sesostris

    OpenAIRE

    Pouya, C.; Vukusic, P.

    2012-01-01

    We have used three-dimensional stereolithography to synthetically replicate the gyroid photonic crystal (PC) structure that occurs naturally in the butterfly Parides sesostris. We have experimentally characterized the transmission response of this structure in the microwave regime at two azimuthal angles (?) over a comprehensive range of polar angles (?). We have modelled its electromagnetic response using the finite-element method (FEM) and found excellent agreement with experimental data....

  18. Conservation potential of abandoned military areas matches that of established reserves: Plants and butterflies in the Czech Republic.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    ?ížek, O.; Vrba, Pavel; Beneš, Ji?í; Hrázský, Z.; Koptík, J.; Ku?era, T.; Marhoul, P.; Záme?ník, J.; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 8, ?. 1 (2013), e53124. ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP505/10/2167 Grant ostatní: MŽP(CZ) SP/2D3/153/08; MŽP(CZ) VaV620/2/03; GA J?U(CZ) 144/2010/100 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : butterflies * millitary areas * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  19. Experimental Examination of Intraspecific Density-Dependent Competition during the Breeding Period in Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus)

    OpenAIRE

    Flockhart, D. T. Tyler; Martin, Tara G.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    A central goal of population ecology is to identify the factors that regulate population growth. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America re-colonize the breeding range over several generations that result in population densities that vary across space and time during the breeding season. We used laboratory experiments to measure the strength of density-dependent intraspecific competition on egg laying rate and larval survival and then applied our results to density est...

  20. Diurnal behavior and habitat preferences of Erebia aethiops, an aberrant lowland species of a mountain butterfly clade.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slámová, Irena; Kle?ka, Jan; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Ro?. 24, ?. 3 (2011), s. 230-246. ISSN 0892-7553 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073; GA ?R GD206/08/H044; GA ?R GAP505/10/2248 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : butterfly activity * habitat preferences * diurnal behavior Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2011

  1. Ultrastructure of antennal sensilla of four skipper butterflies in Parnara sp. and Pelopidas sp. (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xiangqun; Gao, Ke; Yuan, Feng; Zhang, Yalin

    2014-01-01

    Most species of Parnara and Pelopidas (Hesperiidae) are important pests of rice. In this study, the antennal morphology, types of sensilla, and their distribution of four skipper butterflies, including Parnara guttata (Bremer & Grey), Pa. bada (Moore), Pelopidas mathias (Fabricius) and Pe. agna (Moore), were observed using a scanning electron microscope. Six distinct morphological types of sensilla were found on the antennae of all of these species: sensilla squamiformia, sensilla trichodea, ...

  2. Community Structure of Skipper Butterflies (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae) along Elevational Gradients in Brazilian Atlantic Forest Reflects Vegetation Type Rather than Altitude

    OpenAIRE

    Carneiro, Eduardo; Mielke, Olaf Hermann Hendrik; Casagrande, Mirna Martins; Fiedler, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Species turnover across elevational gradients has matured into an important paradigm of community ecology. Here, we tested whether ecological and phylogenetic structure of skipper butterfly assemblages is more strongly structured according to altitude or vegetation type along three elevation gradients of moderate extent in Serra do Mar, Southern Brazil. Skippers were surveyed along three different mountain transects, and data on altitude and vegetation type of every collection site were recor...

  3. Effect of larval food stress on male adult behaviour,morphology and reproductive investment in the butterfly Pararge aegeria

    OpenAIRE

    Vande Velde, Lesley; Schtickzelle, Nicolas; Dyck, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Males of several animals increase their reproductive success by territorial behaviour. In butterflies, males may defend a territory (i.e., territorial perching tactic), but this is assumed to be an energetically costly way to locate mates. Limitations of the energy budget may affect fight performance, and may, consequently, force males to adopt an alternative non-territorial searching behaviour (i.e., patrolling tactic) to maximize reproductive success. In this study, we tested to what extent...

  4. Does the surrounding landscape heterogeneity affect the butterflies of insular grassland reserves? A contrast between composition and configuration.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlancarová, Jana; Beneš, Ji?í; Kristýnek, M.; Kepka, P.; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 18, ?. 1 (2014), s. 1-12. ISSN 1366-638X R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP505/10/2167 Grant ostatní: GA JU(CZ) 114/2012/P; GA JU(CZ) 144/2010/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : butterfly communities * calcareous grasslands * GIS Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.789, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10841-013-9607-3#

  5. Migratory Connectivity of the Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus): Patterns of Spring Re-Colonization in Eastern North America

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Nathan G.; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Keith A. Hobson; Norris, D. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Each year, millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrate up to 3000 km from their overwintering grounds in central Mexico to breed in eastern North America. Malcolm et al. (1993) articulated two non-mutually exclusive hypotheses to explain how Monarchs re-colonize North America each spring. The ‘successive brood’ hypothesis proposes that monarchs migrate from Mexico to the Gulf Coast, lay eggs and die, leaving northern re-colonization of the breeding range to subsequent gener...

  6. An updated and annotated checklist of the larger butterflies (Papilionoidea) of Trinidad, West Indies: Papilionidae, Pieridae and Nymphalidae

    OpenAIRE

    Cock, Matthew J.W.

    2014-01-01

    A revised checklist for the butterfly families Papilionidae, Pieridae and Nymphalidae of Trinidad (Trinidad and Tobago) is presented, bringing nomenclature in line with modern usage, indicating synonyms from earlier lists and adding new records since the last checklist was published in 1970. Migrant and vagrant species are provisionally recognised, and records considered incorrect are discussed. The checklist includes 204 species: 15 Papilionidae, 29 Pieridae and 160 Nymphalidae. The only tax...

  7. Determinants of species richness in generalist and specialist Mediterranean butterflies: the negative synergistic forces of climate and habitat change.

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanescu, Constantino; Carnicer, Jofre; Pen?uelas, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Although it is well established that butterfly richness is affected by climate and human factors (e.g. habitat disturbance and degradation) at different spatial scales, the drivers behind these changes vary greatly according to the geographical region and the ecology of the species concerned. It is essential that this variation be understood if trends in diversity are to be predicted with any degree of confidence under a scenario of global change. Here we examine patterns of butterfl...

  8. Effects of changing climate on species diversification in tropical forest butterflies of the genus Cymothoe (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Velzen, R., van; Wahlberg, N.; Sosef, M.S.M.; Bakker, F. T.

    2013-01-01

    Extant clades may differ greatly in their species richness, suggesting differential rates of species diversification. Based on phylogenetic trees, it is possible to identify potential correlates of such differences. Here, we examine species diversification in a clade of 82 tropical African forest butterfly species (Cymothoe), together with its monotypic sister genus Harma. Our aim was to test whether the diversification of the Harma–Cymothoe clade correlates with end-Miocene global cooling an...

  9. Multi-generational long-distance migration of insects: studying the painted lady butterfly in the Western Palaearctic

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanescu, Constantí; Páramo, Ferran; Åkesson, Susanne; Alarcón, Marta; Ávila, Anna; Brereton, Tom; Carnicer, Jofre; Louis F. Cassar; Fox, Richard; Heliölä, Janne; Hill, Jane K.; Hirneisen, Norbert; Kjellén, Nils; Kühn, Elisabeth; Kuussaari, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Long-range, seasonal migration is a widespread phenomenon among insects, allowing them to track and exploit abundant but ephemeral resources over vast geographical areas. However, the basic patterns of how species shift across multiple locations and seasons are unknown in most cases, even though migrant species comprise an important component of the temperate-zone biota. The painted lady butterfly Vanessa cardui is such an example; a cosmopolitan continuously-brooded species which migrates ea...

  10. Chemical mimicry and host specificity in the butterfly Maculinea rebeli, a social parasite of Myrmica ant colonies

    OpenAIRE

    Akino, T.; Knapp, J. J.; Thomas, J. A.; Elmes, G. W.

    1999-01-01

    Although it has always been assumed that chemical mimicry and camouflage play a major role in the penetration of ant societies by social parasites, this paper provides the first direct evidence for such a mechanism between the larvae of the parasitic butterfly Maculinea rebeli and its ant host Myrmica schencki. In the wild, freshly moulted fourth-instar caterpillars, which have no previous contact with ants, appear to be recognized as ant larvae by foraging Myrmica workers, which return them ...

  11. Conservation Potential of Abandoned Military Areas Matches That of Established Reserves: Plants and Butterflies in the Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Cizek, Oldrich; Vrba, Pavel; Benes, Jiri; Hrazsky, Zaboj; Koptik, Jiri; Kucera, Tomas; Marhoul, Pavel; Zamecnik, Jaroslav; Konvicka, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Military training generates frequent and irregular disturbance followed by succession, resulting in fine-scaled mosaics of ecological conditions in military training areas (MTAs). The awareness that MTAs may represent important biodiversity sanctuaries is increasing recently. Concurrently, changes in military doctrine are leading to abandonment of many MTAs, which are being brought under civilian administration and opened for development. We surveyed vascular plants in 43 and butterflies in 4...

  12. Replication of butterfly wing and natural lotus leaf structures by nanoimprint on silica sol-gel films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An original and low cost method for the fabrication of patterned surfaces bioinspired from butterfly wings and lotus leaves is presented. Silica-based sol-gel films are thermally imprinted from elastomeric molds to produce stable structures with superhydrophobicity values as high as 160 deg. water contact angle. The biomimetic surfaces are demonstrated to be tuned from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic by annealing between 200 deg. C and 500 deg. C

  13. Mariposas de Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea, Hesperioidea) / Butterflies of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea, Hesperioidea)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    RICARDO, GIÜVENARDI; ROCCO ALFREDO, DI MARE; OLAF HERMANN, HENDRIK MIELKE; MIRNA MARTINS, CASAGRANDE; EDUARDO, CARNEIRO.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Para inferir sobre el conocimiento acumulado de la diversidad de mariposas (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea, Hesperioidea) de Rio Grande do Sul, fueron consultados los estudios relacionados con bionomía, taxonomía e inventarios forestales; se encontraron un total de 832 especies y subespecies de mariposa [...] s. Después de 1970, los artículos publicados que tratan de mariposas aumentaron casi exponencialmente, y los inventarios de mariposas desde 1990, simultáneamente, también muestran un crecimiento. La familia más rica fue Hesperiidae con 357 (42,90%) especies y subespecies, seguido por Nymphalidae con 227 (27,28%), Lycaenidae con 94 (1l,30%), Riodinidae con 80 (9,62%), Pieridae con 43 (5,17%) y Papilionidae con 31 (3,73%). Entre las regiones fisiográficas, la Depressao Central presentó 495 (59,50%) especies e subespécies registradas (mayor riqueza) y la Ladera Superior del Nordeste presentó 17 (2,04%) especies y subespecies (menor riqueza). La distribución de inventarios muestra que en Río Grande do Sul aún existen áreas que carecen de información sobre mariposas. Abstract in english To infer on the accumulated knowledge of butterfly diversity of (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea, Hesperioidea) from Rio Grande do Sul, we consulted studies related to bionomics, taxonomy and forest inventories; a total of 832 species and subspecies of butterflies have been recorded. After of 1970 butter [...] flies studies increased almost exponentially, and the inventory the butterflies from 1990, the same time also showed an increase. Hesperiidae was the richest family, with 357 (42.90%) species and subspecies, followed by Nymphalidae with 227 (27.28%), Lycaenidae with 94 (11.30%), Riodinidae with 80 (9.62%), Pieridae with 43 (5.17%) and Papilionidae with 31 (3.73%). Amongst the physiographic regions, the Depressao Central presented 495 (59.50%) species and subspecies (larger richness) and the Encosta Superior do Nordeste 17 (2.04%) species and subspecies (lower richness). The distribution of inventories shows that there are still areas lacking butterfly data in Rio Grande do Sul.

  14. Sugar receptor response of the food-canal taste sensilla in a nectar-feeding swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takashi A.; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Seta, Kazuaki; Imaeda, Daisuke; Ozaki, Mamiko

    2009-03-01

    The feeding behavior in nectar-feeding insects is triggered by a sugar-receptor response in contact chemosensilla. The contact chemosensilla are distributed not only on tarsi and the outside of the proboscis but also on the inside of the food canal in Lepidoptera. Although the chemosensilla inside the food canal are assumed to detect sweet taste during the passage of nectar through the food canal, their electrophysiological function has received little attention. In the nectar-feeding Asian swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae), we found 15- to 30-?m-long sensilla neatly lined up along the inside galea wall, which forms the food canal in the proboscis. The receptor neurons of these sensilla responded to sucrose. We hypothesized that starch and sucrose compete with each other for a taste receptor site on the sensilla. When we added starch and sucrose to the food-canal sensilla, the electrophysiological responses of food-canal sensilla were inhibited in parallel with the food-sucking behavior of the butterflies. These results suggest that the food-canal sensilla are involved in the behavioral control of nectar-sucking in this butterfly species.

  15. Biologically inspired flexible quasi-single-mode random laser: An integration of Pieris canidia butterfly wing and semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cih-Su; Chang, Tsung-Yuan; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2014-10-01

    Quasi-periodic structures of natural biomaterial membranes have great potentials to serve as resonance cavities to generate ecological friendly optoelectronic devices with low cost. To achieve the first attempt for the illustration of the underlying principle, the Pieris canidia butterfly wing was embedded with ZnO nanoparticles. Quite interestingly, it is found that the bio-inspired quasi-single-mode random laser can be achieved by the assistance of the skeleton of the membrane, in which ZnO nanoparticles act as emitting gain media. Such unique characteristics can be interpreted well by the Fabry-Perot resonance existing in the window-like quasi-periodic structure of butterfly wing. Due to the inherently promising flexibility of butterfly wing membrane, the laser action can still be maintained during the bending process. Our demonstrated approach not only indicates that the natural biological structures can provide effective scattering feedbacks but also pave a new avenue towards designing bio-controlled photonic devices.

  16. Thermoregulation and spectral selectivity of the tropical butterfly Prepona meander: a remarkable example of temperature auto-regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, S.

    2005-04-01

    In butterflies favouring direct absorption of solar energy through their wings, the absorption by the black areas situated at the wing bases provides the body with the most part of the exogenous energy. For the studied butterfly (Archeoprepona meander), absorption is very high over the whole solar spectrum (?˜0.95). This absorption is due to both the dendritic structure of the scales and the melanin pigments. In the infrared range, the absorptivity reveals two strong peaks at 3 ?m and 6 ?m and then remains more or less constant at a relatively high value (˜0.4) up to 25 ?m. This situation contains the outline for a remarkable self-regulation phenomenon of the radiative balance, allowing the stabilization of temperature in the survival area of the butterfly. The first absorption peak, centred on 3 ?m, i.e. between the solar irradiance and the thermal emission spectra, is not involved in the radiative balance at these temperatures. However, the second, on the edge of the emission spectrum, plays a key role as a thermal regulator. Its marginal situation is such that, according to the wing temperature, it overlaps or not the emission spectrum, modifying the collector efficiency, and thus the temperature.

  17. A FIB/TEM study of butterfly crack formation and white etching area (WEA) microstructural changes under rolling contact fatigue in 100Cr6 bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterflies are microscopic damage features forming at subsurface material imperfections induced during rolling contact fatigue (RCF) in rolling element bearings. Butterflies can lead to degradation of the load bearing capacity of the material by their associated cracks causing premature spalling failures. Recently, butterfly formation has been cited to be related to a premature failure mode in wind turbine gearbox bearings; white structure flaking (WSF). Butterflies consist of cracks with surrounding microstructural change called ‘white etching area’ (WEA) forming wings that revolve around their initiators. The formation mechanisms of butterflies in bearing steels have been studied over the last 50 years, but are still not fully understood. This paper presents a detailed microstructural analysis of a butterfly that has initiated from a void in standard 100Cr6 bearing steel under rolling contact fatigue on a laboratory two-roller test rig under transient operating conditions. Analysis was conducted using focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, 3D reconstruction and transmission electron microscopy (STEM/TEM) methods. FIB tomography revealed an extensive presence of voids/cavities immediately adjacent to the main crack on the non-WEA side and at the crack tip. This provides evidence for a void/cavity coalescence mechanism for the butterfly cracks formation. Spherical M3C carbide deformation and dissolution as part of the microstructural change in WEA were observed in both FIB and STEM/TEM analyses, where TEM analyses also revealed the formation of superfine nano-grains (3–15 nm diameter) intersecting a dissolving spherical M3C carbide. This is evidence of the early formation of nano-grains associated with the WEA formation mechanism

  18. A FIB/TEM study of butterfly crack formation and white etching area (WEA) microstructural changes under rolling contact fatigue in 100Cr6 bearing steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.-H., E-mail: martin.evans@soton.ac.uk [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Walker, J.C.; Ma, C.; Wang, L.; Wood, R.J.K. [National Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS), University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    Butterflies are microscopic damage features forming at subsurface material imperfections induced during rolling contact fatigue (RCF) in rolling element bearings. Butterflies can lead to degradation of the load bearing capacity of the material by their associated cracks causing premature spalling failures. Recently, butterfly formation has been cited to be related to a premature failure mode in wind turbine gearbox bearings; white structure flaking (WSF). Butterflies consist of cracks with surrounding microstructural change called ‘white etching area’ (WEA) forming wings that revolve around their initiators. The formation mechanisms of butterflies in bearing steels have been studied over the last 50 years, but are still not fully understood. This paper presents a detailed microstructural analysis of a butterfly that has initiated from a void in standard 100Cr6 bearing steel under rolling contact fatigue on a laboratory two-roller test rig under transient operating conditions. Analysis was conducted using focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, 3D reconstruction and transmission electron microscopy (STEM/TEM) methods. FIB tomography revealed an extensive presence of voids/cavities immediately adjacent to the main crack on the non-WEA side and at the crack tip. This provides evidence for a void/cavity coalescence mechanism for the butterfly cracks formation. Spherical M{sub 3}C carbide deformation and dissolution as part of the microstructural change in WEA were observed in both FIB and STEM/TEM analyses, where TEM analyses also revealed the formation of superfine nano-grains (3–15 nm diameter) intersecting a dissolving spherical M{sub 3}C carbide. This is evidence of the early formation of nano-grains associated with the WEA formation mechanism.

  19. The application of life history information to the conservation management of Chrysoritis butterflies (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. van Hamburg

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their intricate life histories and the unique wing patterns and colouring the butterflies of the genus Chrysoritis are of significant conservation and aesthetic value. This
    overview probes into practical examples of butterfly life history research applicable to environmental management of this relatively well-known invertebrate group in South Africa. Despite the pioneer work on life histories of Chrysoritis in the past, more should be done to understand the life history of the butterflies in the wild, especially their natural host plants and the behaviour of adults and larvae. A system of voucher specimens of host plants should be introduced in South Africa. Although various host plant species in nature are used by the members of Chrysoritis, including the Chrysoritis chrysaor group, the choice of these in nature by each species is significant for conservation management and in the case of Chrysoritis aureus perhaps even as a specific characteristic.
    A revision of the ant genus Crematogaster will benefit the conservation management of Chrysoritis species since some of these ant species may consist of a number of species
    with much more restricted distributions than previously thought. Rigorous quantified tudies of population dynamics of Chrysoritis butterflies are absent and the introduction
    of such studies will benefit conservation management of these localised butterflies extensively.

  20. Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea visiting flowers in the Botanical Garden of the Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Barros de Morais

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban environments, such as parks and gardens, may offer many alimentary resources, besides shelter and favorable conditions, for butterfly survival. This study aimed to make an inventory of butterflies visiting flowers in the Botanical Garden of the Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM. From March 2006 to March 2007, the floral visitors were observed weekly for 2h. After 108 hours’ observations, 1114 visits by 39 butterfly species, associated with 43 plant species (21 families, were confirmed. Among the butterflies, Nymphalidae had the highest richness of species (S= 18, followed by Hesperiidae (S= 8, Pieridae (S= 7, Papilionidae (S= 4 and Lycaenidae (S= 2. The pierid Phoebis philea philea was the most frequent species (188 visits, followed by hesperiids Urbanus proteus proteus (100, U. teleus (73 and the nymphalid Heliconius erato phyllis (71. Lantana camara (Verbenaceae, Eupatorium laevigatum (Asteraceae, Russelia equisetiformis (Scrophulariaceae and Stachytarpheta cayennensis (Verbenaceae were the most visited plants. The Botanical Garden of UFSM is an example of an urban park that seems to provide floral resources for the feeding of many butterfly species, being also a potential refuge for species from forest areas nearby.

  1. Mapping Topoclimate and Microclimate in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, S. B.

    2006-12-01

    Overwintering monarch butterflies in Mexico select areas of the high elevation Oyamel fir -pine forest providing a canopy that protects them from extremes of cold, heat, sun, and wind. These exacting microclimatic conditions are found in relatively small areas of forest with appropriate topography and canopy cover. The major goal of this investigation is to map topoclimatic and microclimatic conditions within the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve by combining temperature monitoring (iButton Thermochrons), hemispherical canopy photography, multiple regression, and GIS modeling. Temperature measurements included base weather stations and arrays of Thermochrons (on the north-side of trees at 2m height) across local topographic and canopy cover gradients. Topoclimatic models of minimum temperatures included topographic position, slope, and elevation, and predicted that thermal belts on slopes and cold air drainage into canyons create local minimum temperature gradients of 2°C. Topoclimatic models of maximum temperatures models included elevation, topographic position, and relative solar exposure, with local gradients of 3°C. These models, which are independent of forest canopy structure, were then projected across the entire region. Forest canopy structure, including direct and diffuse solar radiation, was assessed with hemispherical photography at each Thermochron site. Canopy cover affected minimum temperatures primarily on the calmest, coldest nights. Maximum temperatures were predicted by direct radiation below the canopy. Fine- scale grids (25 m spacing) at three overwintering sites characterized effects of canopy gaps and edges on temperature and wind exposure. The effects of temperature variation were considered for lipid loss rates, ability to take flight, and freezing mortality. Lipid loss rates were estimated by measured hourly temperatures. Many of the closed canopy sites allowed for substantial lipid reserves at the end of the season (March 15), but increases in average temperature could effectively deplete lipids by that time. The large influence of canopy cover on daytime maximum temperatures demonstrates that forest thinning directly reduces habitat suitability. Monarchs' flight behavior under warmer conditions suggests that daytime temperatures drive the dynamics of monarch distribution within colonies. Thinning also decreases nighttime minimum temperatures, and increases wind exposure. These results create a basis for quantitative understanding of the combinations of topography and forest structure that provide high quality overwintering habitat.

  2. Distrofia em forma-de-borboleta: relato de caso Butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Leonardo Cruvinel Isaac

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam um caso de distrofia macular em forma-de-borboleta, diagnosticado em paciente do sexo masculino, apresentando concomitante atrofia do epitélio pigmentado da retina e perda visual central em um dos olhos. Os achados relatados contrariam conceitos inicialmente disponíveis de curso sempre benigno da doença. A lesão característica e bem delimitada no pólo posterior e a angiofluoresceinografia, permitiram estabelecer o diagnóstico. Descreve-se ainda, pela primeira vez, os achados da distrofia em forma-de-borboleta à tomografia de coerência óptica.The authors present a case of butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy diagnosed in a male patient, with retinal pigmented epithelium atrophy and central visual acuity decrease in one of the eyes. The evolution of this case was not benign as described in previous reports. A well-defined lesion located in the posterior pole of both eyes associated with fluorescein angiography allowed the diagnosis of this pattern dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography was performed, showing the aspects of the pathology, for the first time.

  3. Distrofia em forma-de-borboleta: relato de caso / Butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy: case report

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    David Leonardo Cruvinel, Isaac; Rodrigo Almeida Vieira, Santos; Marcos, Ávila.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam um caso de distrofia macular em forma-de-borboleta, diagnosticado em paciente do sexo masculino, apresentando concomitante atrofia do epitélio pigmentado da retina e perda visual central em um dos olhos. Os achados relatados contrariam conceitos inicialmente disponíveis de curs [...] o sempre benigno da doença. A lesão característica e bem delimitada no pólo posterior e a angiofluoresceinografia, permitiram estabelecer o diagnóstico. Descreve-se ainda, pela primeira vez, os achados da distrofia em forma-de-borboleta à tomografia de coerência óptica. Abstract in english The authors present a case of butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy diagnosed in a male patient, with retinal pigmented epithelium atrophy and central visual acuity decrease in one of the eyes. The evolution of this case was not benign as described in previous reports. A well-defined lesion located in [...] the posterior pole of both eyes associated with fluorescein angiography allowed the diagnosis of this pattern dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography was performed, showing the aspects of the pathology, for the first time.

  4. Loss of migratory behaviour increases infection risk for a butterfly host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, Dara A; Maerz, John C; Altizer, Sonia

    2015-02-22

    Long-distance animal migrations have important consequences for infectious disease dynamics. In some cases, migration lowers pathogen transmission by removing infected individuals during strenuous journeys and allowing animals to periodically escape contaminated habitats. Human activities are now causing some migratory animals to travel shorter distances or form sedentary (non-migratory) populations. We focused on North American monarch butterflies and a specialist protozoan parasite to investigate how the loss of migratory behaviours affects pathogen spread and evolution. Each autumn, monarchs migrate from breeding grounds in the eastern US and Canada to wintering sites in central Mexico. However, some monarchs have become non-migratory and breed year-round on exotic milkweed in the southern US. We used field sampling, citizen science data and experimental inoculations to quantify infection prevalence and parasite virulence among migratory and sedentary populations. Infection prevalence was markedly higher among sedentary monarchs compared with migratory monarchs, indicating that diminished migration increases infection risk. Virulence differed among parasite strains but was similar between migratory and sedentary populations, potentially owing to high gene flow or insufficient time for evolutionary divergence. More broadly, our findings suggest that human activities that alter animal migrations can influence pathogen dynamics, with implications for wildlife conservation and future disease risks. PMID:25589600

  5. Population genetic structure and Wolbachia infection in an endangered butterfly, Zizina emelina (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae), in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Y; Hirai, N; Tanikawa, T; Yago, M; Ishii, M

    2015-04-01

    Zizina emelina (de l'Orza) is listed on Japan's Red Data List as an endangered species because of loss of its principal food plant and habitat. We compared parts of the mitochondrial and nuclear genes of this species to investigate the level of genetic differentiation among the 14 extant populations. We also examined infection of the butterfly with the bacterium Wolbachia to clarify the bacterium's effects on the host population's genetic structure. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA analyses revealed that haplotype composition differed significantly among most of the populations, and the fixation index F ST was positively correlated with geographic distance. In addition, we found three strains of Wolbachia, one of which was a male killer; these strains were prevalent in several populations. There was linkage between some host mitochondrial haplotypes and the three Wolbachia strains, although no significant differences were found in a comparison of host mitochondrial genetic diversity with nuclear genetic diversity in Wolbachia-infected or -uninfected populations. These genetic analyses and Wolbachia infection findings show that Z. emelina has little migratory activity and that little gene flow occurs among the current populations. PMID:25499047

  6. Genome-wide evidence for speciation with gene flow in Heliconius butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Simon H.; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K.; Nadeau, Nicola J.; Salazar, Camilo; Walters, James R.; Simpson, Fraser; Blaxter, Mark; Manica, Andrea; Mallet, James; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2013-01-01

    Most speciation events probably occur gradually, without complete and immediate reproductive isolation, but the full extent of gene flow between diverging species has rarely been characterized on a genome-wide scale. Documenting the extent and timing of admixture between diverging species can clarify the role of geographic isolation in speciation. Here we use new methodology to quantify admixture at different stages of divergence in Heliconius butterflies, based on whole-genome sequences of 31 individuals. Comparisons between sympatric and allopatric populations of H. melpomene, H. cydno, and H. timareta revealed a genome-wide trend of increased shared variation in sympatry, indicative of pervasive interspecific gene flow. Up to 40% of 100-kb genomic windows clustered by geography rather than by species, demonstrating that a very substantial fraction of the genome has been shared between sympatric species. Analyses of genetic variation shared over different time intervals suggested that admixture between these species has continued since early in speciation. Alleles shared between species during recent time intervals displayed higher levels of linkage disequilibrium than those shared over longer time intervals, suggesting that this admixture took place at multiple points during divergence and is probably ongoing. The signal of admixture was significantly reduced around loci controlling divergent wing patterns, as well as throughout the Z chromosome, consistent with strong selection for Müllerian mimicry and with known Z-linked hybrid incompatibility. Overall these results show that species divergence can occur in the face of persistent and genome-wide admixture over long periods of time. PMID:24045163

  7. Evolutionary dynamics of rDNA clusters on chromosomes of moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Petr; Sahara, Ken; Yoshido, Atsuo; Marec, Frantisek

    2010-03-01

    We examined chromosomal distribution of major ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs), clustered in the nucleolar organizer regions (NORs), in 18 species of moths and butterflies using fluorescence in situ hybridization with a codling moth (Cydia pomonella) 18S rDNA probe. Most species showed one or two rDNA clusters in their haploid karyotype but exceptions with 4-11 clusters also occurred. Our results in a compilation with previous data revealed dynamic evolution of rDNA distribution in Lepidoptera except Noctuoidea, which showed a highly uniform rDNA pattern. In karyotypes with one NOR, interstitial location of rDNA prevailed, whereas two-NOR karyotypes showed mostly terminally located rDNA clusters. A possible origin of the single interstitial NOR by fusion between two NOR-chromosomes with terminal rDNA clusters lacks support in available data. In some species, spreading of rDNA to new, mostly terminal chromosome regions was found. The multiplication of rDNA clusters without alteration of chromosome numbers rules out chromosome fissions as a major mechanism of rDNA expansion. Based on rDNA dynamics in Lepidoptera and considering the role of ordered nuclear architecture in karyotype evolution, we propose ectopic recombination, i.e., homologous recombination between repetitive sequences of non-homologous chromosomes, as a primary motive force in rDNA repatterning. PMID:19921441

  8. Color change of Blue butterfly wing scales in an air – Vapor ambient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photonic crystals are periodic dielectric nanocomposites, which have photonic band gaps that forbid the propagation of light within certain frequency ranges. The optical response of such nanoarchitectures on chemical changes in the environment is determined by the spectral change of the reflected light, and depends on the composition of the ambient atmosphere and on the nanostructure characteristics. We carried out reflectance measurements on closely related Blue lycaenid butterfly males possessing so-called “pepper-pot” type photonic nanoarchitecture in their scales covering their dorsal wing surfaces. Experiments were carried out changing the concentration and nature of test vapors while monitoring the spectral variations in time. All the tests were done with the sample temperature set at, and below the room temperature. The spectral changes were found to be linear with the increasing of concentration and the signal amplitude is higher at lower temperatures. The mechanism of reflectance spectra modification is based on capillary condensation of the vapors penetrating in the nanostructure. These structures of natural origin may serve as cheap, environmentally free and biodegradable sensor elements. The study of these nanoarchitectures of biologic origin could be the source of various new bioinspired systems.

  9. Plant Fertilization Interacts with Life History: Variation in Stoichiometry and Performance in Nettle-Feeding Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audusseau, Hélène; Kolb, Gundula; Janz, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Variation in food stoichiometry affects individual performance and population dynamics, but it is also likely that species with different life histories should differ in their sensitivity to food stoichiometry. To address this question, we investigated the ability of the three nettle-feeding butterflies (Aglais urticae, Polygonia c-album, and Aglais io) to respond adaptively to induced variation in plant stoichiometry in terms of larval performance. We hypothesized that variation in larval performance between plant fertilization treatments should be functionally linked to species differences in host plant specificity. We found species-specific differences in larval performance between plant fertilization treatments that could not be explained by nutrient limitation. We showed a clear evidence of a positive correlation between food stoichiometry and development time to pupal stage and pupal mass in A. urticae. The other two species showed a more complex response. Our results partly supported our prediction that host plant specificity affects larval sensitivity to food stoichiometry. However, we suggest that most of the differences observed may instead be explained by differences in voltinism (number of generations per year). We believe that the potential of some species to respond adaptively to variation in plant nutrient content needs further attention in the face of increased eutrophication due to nutrient leakage from human activities. PMID:25932628

  10. Gene flow persists millions of years after speciation in Heliconius butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kronforst Marcus R

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hybridization, or the interbreeding of two species, is now recognized as an important process in the evolution of many organisms. However, the extent to which hybridization results in the transfer of genetic material across the species boundary (introgression remains unknown in many systems, as does the length of time after initial divergence that the species boundary remains porous to such gene flow. Results Here I use genome-wide genotypic and DNA sequence data to show that there is introgression and admixture between the melpomene/cydno and silvaniform clades of the butterfly genus Heliconius, groups that separated from one another as many as 30 million generations ago. Estimates of historical migration based on 523 DNA sequences from 14 genes suggest unidirectional gene flow from the melpomene/cydno clade into the silvaniform clade. Furthermore, genetic clustering based on 520 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs identified multiple individuals of mixed ancestry showing that introgression is on-going. Conclusion These results demonstrate that genomes can remain porous to gene flow very long after initial divergence. This, in turn, greatly expands the evolutionary potential afforded by introgression. Phenotypic and species diversity in a wide variety of organisms, including Heliconius, have likely arisen from introgressive hybridization. Evidence for continuous gene flow over millions of years points to introgression as a potentially important source of genetic variation to fuel the evolution of novel forms.

  11. In the Time of the Butterflies: Rewriting Dominican History through the Demythologization of the Mirabal Sisters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vansan Gonçalves

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to investigate the narration of historical facts under new perspectives through the novel In the Time of the Butterflies, from the Dominican-American writer Julia Alvarez. The choice of the mentioned novel is due to the fact that it enables the observation of the manners the concepts of identity, memory and representation interact to portray new representations of a determined people by the interpretation of historical facts. Throughout the article it will be analyzed the strategies Alvarez employs to narrate new versions of facts related to the period regarded as the “Trujillo era”, a totalitarian dictatorship which took place in the Dominican Republic between 1930 and 1961. It will be studied the process used by the author to promote the demythologization of the Mirabal sisters, martyrs of the struggle against the regime who, when launched to mythic status, were historically distanced from Dominicans. Post-colonial and postmodern concepts, as presented by theorists bell hooks, Priyamvada Gopal and Stuart Hall will be applied to the analysis of historical representation through the perspective of traditionally silenced groups. Linda Hutcheon’s definitions of “facts” and “events” will also be approached to observe the way the novel provides new readings of historical facts.

  12. Protein detection in spermatids and spermatozoa of the butterfly Euptoieta hegesia (Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Mancini

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to detect protein components in both sperm types of the butterfly Euptoieta hegesia. These spermatozoa possess complex extracellular structures for which the composition and functional significance are still unclear. In the apyrene sperm head, the proteic cap presented an external ring and an internal dense content; basic proteins were detected only in external portions. In the tail, the paracrystalline core of mitochondrial derivatives and the axoneme are rich in proteins. The extratesticular spermatozoa are covered by a proteic coat, which presented two distinct layers. In eupyrene spermatozoa, acrosome and nucleus were negatively stained, probably because of their high compaction. In the tail, there is no paracrystalline core and the axoneme presented a very specific reaction for basic proteins. The lacinate and reticular appendages are composed of cylindrical sub-units and presented a light reaction to E-PTA and a strong reaction to tannic acid. A complex proteic coat also covers the extratesticular spermatozoa. We found similarities between both extratesticular coats, indicating a possible common origin. Both spermatozoon types are rich in proteins, especially the eupyrene appendages and the extratesticular coats. We believe that both coats are related to the sperm maturation and capacitation processes.

  13. National valuation of monarch butterflies indicates an untapped potential for incentive-based conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Loomis, John B.; Ries, Leslie; Oberhauser, Karen; Semmens, Darius; Semmens, Brice; Butterfield, Bruce; Bagstad, Ken; Goldstein, Josh; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Mattsson, Brady; Thogmartin, Wayne E.

    2013-01-01

    The annual migration of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) has high cultural value and recent surveys indicate monarch populations are declining. Protecting migratory species is complex because they cross international borders and depend on multiple regions. Understanding how much, and where, humans place value on migratory species can facilitate market-based conservation approaches. We performed a contingent valuation study of monarchs to understand the potential for such approaches to fund monarch conservation. The survey asked U.S. respondents about the money they would spend, or have spent, growing monarch-friendly plants, and the amount they would donate to monarch conservation organizations. Combining planting payments and donations, the survey indicated U.S. households valued monarchs as a total one-time payment of $4.78–$6.64 billion, levels similar to many endangered vertebrate species. The financial contribution of even a small percentage of households through purchases or donations could generate new funding for monarch conservation through market-based approaches.

  14. Biosynthesis of cathodoluminescent zinc oxide replicas using butterfly (Papilio paris) wing scales as templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papilio paris butterflies have an iridescent blue color patch on their hind wings which is visible over a wide viewing angle. Optical and scanning electron microscopy observations of scales from the wings show that the blue color scales have very different microstructure to the matt black ones which also populate the wings. Scanning electron micrographs of the blue scales show that their surfaces comprise a regular two-dimensional array of concavities. By contrast the matt black scales have fine, sponge-like structure, between the ridges and the cross ribs in the scales. Using both types of scale as bio-templates, we obtain zinc oxide (ZnO) replicas of the microstructures of the original scales. Room temperature (T = 300 K) cathodoluminescence spectra of these ZnO replicas have also been studied. Both spectra show a similar sharp near-band-edge emission, but have different green emission, which we associate with the different microstructures of the ZnO replicas

  15. The evolution of alternative parasitic life histories in large blue butterflies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Thomas Damm; Vila, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Large blue (Maculinea) butterflies are highly endangered throughout the Palaearctic region, and have been the focus of intense conservation research. In addition, their extraordinary parasitic lifestyles make them ideal for studies of life history evolution. Early instars consume flower buds of specific host plants, but later instars live in ant nests where they either devour the brood (predators), or are fed mouth-to-mouth by the adult ants (cuckoos). Here we present the phylogeny for the group, which shows that it is a monophyletic clade nested within Phengaris, a rare Oriental genus whose species have similar life histories. Cuckoo species are likely to have evolved from predatory ancestors. As early as five million years ago, two Maculinea clades diverged, leading to the different parasitic strategies seen in the genus today. Contrary to current belief, the two recognized cuckoo species show little genetic divergence and are probably a single ecologically differentiated species. On the other hand, some ofthe predatory morphospecies exhibit considerable genetic divergence and may contain cryptic species. These findings have important implications for conservation and reintroduction efforts.

  16. Dealing with the hidden unphysical constraint and the butterfly effect in spectrum computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Sun, Weiguo; Fu, Jia; Fan, Qunchao; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang; Feng, Hao; Li, Huidong

    2013-05-01

    Since the order in the diatomic potential (or vibrational energy) expansion may be different from state to state, the algebraic method (AM) proposed by Sun et al. (J Mol Spectrosc 2002; 215: 93-105) is modified to adapt to the individual nature of different energy expansions by changing an original fixed order to a flexible one. The modified AM with a flexible order can be used to deal with the possible “butterfly effect” that may happen in spectroscopic computations, and it is applied to study the full vibrational spectra {E?} and the dissociation energies De for L7i2-2?g+, K2-3?g, Cs2-3?g+, KLi-X?, and RbCs-X? electronic states. The results not only reproduce the known experimental vibrational energies, but also correctly predict the dissociation energies and all unknown energies that have not been obtained for these electronic states using the original AM. These facts demonstrate that the modified AM are good for many more diatomic systems by using the proper order of each corresponding diatomic state.

  17. Dynamics of F-actin prefigure the structure of butterfly wing scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, April; Null, Ryan; Pizzano, Maria; Chuong, Lisa; Leigh Krup, Alexis; Ee Tan, Hwei; Patel, Nipam H

    2014-08-15

    The wings of butterflies and moths consist of dorsal and ventral epidermal surfaces that give rise to overlapping layers of scales and hairs (Lepidoptera, "scale wing"). Wing scales (average length ~200 µm) are homologous to insect bristles (macrochaetes), and their colors create the patterns that characterize lepidopteran wings. The topology and surface sculpture of wing scales vary widely, and this architectural complexity arises from variations in the developmental program of the individual scale cells of the wing epithelium. One of the more striking features of lepidopteran wing scales are the longitudinal ridges that run the length of the mature (dead) cell, gathering the cuticularized scale cell surface into pleats on the sides of each scale. While also present around the periphery of other insect bristles and hairs, longitudinal ridges in lepidopteran wing scales gain new significance for their creation of iridescent color through microribs and lamellae. Here we show the dynamics of the highly organized F-actin filaments during scale cell development, and present experimental manipulations of actin polymerization that reveal the essential role of this cytoskeletal component in wing scale elongation and the positioning of longitudinal ribs. PMID:24930704

  18. Genetic Factors and Host Traits Predict Spore Morphology for a Butterfly Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus C. de Roode

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus throughout the world are commonly infected by the specialist pathogen Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (OE. This protozoan is transmitted when larvae ingest infectious stages (spores scattered onto host plant leaves by infected adults. Parasites replicate internally during larval and pupal stages, and adult monarchs emerge covered with millions of dormant spores on the outsides of their bodies. Across multiple monarch populations, OE varies in prevalence and virulence. Here, we examined geographic and genetic variation in OE spore morphology using clonal parasite lineages derived from each of four host populations (eastern and western North America, South Florida and Hawaii. Spores were harvested from experimentally inoculated, captive-reared adult monarchs. Using light microscopy and digital image analysis, we measured the size, shape and color of 30 replicate spores per host. Analyses examined predictors of spore morphology, including parasite source population and clone, parasite load, and the following host traits: family line, sex, wing area, and wing color (orange and black pigmentation. Results showed significant differences in spore size and shape among parasite clones, suggesting genetic determinants of morphological variation. Spore size also increased with monarch wing size, and monarchs with larger and darker orange wings tended to have darker colored spores, consistent with the idea that parasite development depends on variation in host quality and resources. We found no evidence for effects of source population on variation in spore morphology. Collectively, these results provide support for heritable variation in spore morphology and a role for host traits in affecting parasite development.

  19. Revisiting the Andean butterfly Eryphanis zolvizora group (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae: one or several species?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Blandin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eryphanis zolvizora (Hewitson, 1877 is a rare Andean endemic butterfly, described from Bolivia, which has been historically classified either as a unique species, or as part of a group of three allopatric species from Bolivia, Ecuador and Colombia. In this paper, the group is revised using more than 200 specimens housed in 34 European, and North and South American public and private collections. For the first time, the presence of the group in Western Ecuador and Venezuela is confirmed, and important data on Peruvian populations are provided. In some populations, individual variations of genitalia are observed. Nevertheless, male genitalia allow the distinction of four geographical groups. Considering also habitus characters, eight taxa are distinguished and considered to be subspecies, of which five are new: Eryphanis zolvizora inca ssp. nov., Eryphanis zolvizora chachapoya ssp. nov., Eryphanis zolvizora casagrande ssp. nov.., Eryphanis zolvizora reyi ssp. nov., and Eryphanis zolvizora isabelae ssp. nov.  In the present state of knowledge, these taxa are allopatric, except for a possible geographic overlap in central Peru, where data are insufficient to prove sympatry. The “several subspecies vs. several species” dilemma is discussed, considering its impact for conservation action and policies.

  20. Signal design and courtship presentation coincide for highly biased delivery of an iridescent butterfly mating signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas E; Zeil, Jochen; Kemp, Darrell J

    2015-01-01

    Sensory drive theory contends that signaling systems should evolve to optimize transmission between senders and intended receivers, while minimizing visibility to eavesdroppers where possible. In visual communication systems, the high directionality afforded by iridescent coloration presents underappreciated avenues for mediating this trade-off. This hypothesis predicts functional links between signal design and presentation such that visual conspicuousness is maximized only under ecologically relevant settings and/or to select audiences. We addressed this prediction using Hypolimnas bolina, a butterfly in which males possess ultraviolet markings on their dorsal wing surfaces with a narrow angular reflectance function. Males bearing brighter dorsal markings are increasingly attractive to females, but also likely more conspicuous to predators. Our data indicate that, during courtship (and given the ritualized wingbeat dynamics at these times), males position themselves relative to females in such a way as to simultaneously maximize three components of known or putative signal conspicuousness: brightness, area, and iridescent flash. This suggests that male signal design and display have coevolved for the delivery of an optimally conspicuous signal to courted females. More broadly, these findings imply a potential signaling role for iridescence itself, and pose a novel example for how signal design may coevolve with the behavioral context of display. PMID:25328995

  1. A simple and effective approach towards biomimetic replication of photonic structures from butterfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Di; Chen, Zhixin; Gu, Jiajun; Li, Wenfei; Jiang, Haibo; Zhou, Gang

    2009-08-01

    A general sonochemical process is reported for the replication of photonic structures from Morpho butterfly wings in several hours. By selecting appropriate precursors, we can achieve exact replications of photonic structures in a variety of transparent metal oxides, such as titania, tin oxide and silica. The exact replications at the micro- and nanoscales were characterized by a combination of FE-SEM, TEM, EDX and Raman measurements. The optical properties of the replicas were investigated by using reflectance spectroscopy, and it was found that the interesting chromaticity of the reflected light could be adjusted simply by tuning the replica materials. An ultrasensitive SnO(2)-based chemical sensor was prepared from the SnO(2) replica. The sensor has a sensitivity of 35.3-50 ppm ethanol at 300 degrees C, accompanied by a rapid response and recovery (around 8-15 s), owing to its large surface area and photonic structure. Thus, this process could be developed to produce photonic structural ceramics which could be used in many passive and active infrared devices, especially high performance optical components and sensors. PMID:19597248

  2. Discordant timing between antennae disrupts sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Patrick A; Merlin, Christine; Gegear, Robert J; Reppert, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    To navigate during their long-distance migration, monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a time-compensated sun compass. The sun compass timing elements reside in light-entrained circadian clocks in the antennae. Here we show that either antenna is sufficient for proper time compensation. However, migrants with either antenna painted black (to block light entrainment) and the other painted clear (to permit light entrainment) display disoriented group flight. Remarkably, when the black-painted antenna is removed, re-flown migrants with a single, clear-painted antenna exhibit proper orientation behaviour. Molecular correlates of clock function reveal that period and timeless expression is highly rhythmic in brains and clear-painted antennae, while rhythmic clock gene expression is disrupted in black-painted antennae. Our work shows that clock outputs from each antenna are processed and integrated together in the monarch time-compensated sun compass circuit. This dual timing system is a novel example of the regulation of a brain-driven behaviour by paired organs. PMID:22805565

  3. Natal origins of migratory monarch butterflies at wintering colonies in Mexico: new isotopic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenaar, L I; Hobson, A

    1998-12-22

    Each year, millions of monarch butterflies from eastern North America migrate to overwinter in 10-13 discrete colonies located in the Oyamel forests of central Mexico. For decades efforts to track monarch migration have relied on observations and tag-recapture methods, culminating with the discovery of the wintering colonies in 1975. Monarch tag returns from Mexico, however, are few and primarily from two accessible colonies, and therefore tag-recapture techniques have not quantified natal origins or distinctiveness among monarch populations at wintering sites. Such information would be invaluable in the conservation of the monarch and its migration phenomenon since the wintering sites currently are threatened by habitat alteration. Here we show that stable hydrogen (deltaD) and carbon (delta13C) isotope ratios of wintering monarchs can be used to evaluate natal origins on the summer breeding range. Stable-hydrogen and carbon isotopic values of 597 wintering monarchs from 13 wintering roost sites were compared with isotopic patterns measured in individuals at natal sites across their breeding range over a single migration cycle. We determined that all monarch wintering colonies were composed of individuals originating mainly from the Midwest, United States, thereby providing evidence for a panmictic model of wintering colony composition. However, two colonies showed more northerly origins, suggesting possible priority colonies for conservation efforts. PMID:9860986

  4. Monarch butterflies cross the Appalachians from the west to recolonize the east coast of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan G; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Hobson, Keith A; Norris, D Ryan

    2011-02-23

    Each spring, millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrate from overwintering sites in Mexico to recolonize eastern North America. However, few monarchs are found along the east coast of the USA until mid-summer. Brower (Brower, L. P. 1996 J. Exp. Biol. 199, 93-103.) proposed that east coast recolonization is accomplished by individuals migrating from the west over the Appalachians, but to date no evidence exists to support this hypothesis. We used hydrogen (?D) and carbon (?(13)C) stable isotope measurements to estimate natal origins of 90 monarchs sampled from 17 sites along the eastern United States coast. We found the majority of monarchs (88%) originated in the mid-west and Great Lakes regions, providing, to our knowledge, the first direct evidence that second generation monarchs born in June complete a (trans-) longitudinal migration across the Appalachian mountains. The remaining individuals (12%) originated from parents that migrated directly from the Gulf coast during early spring. Our results provide evidence of a west to east longitudinal migration and provide additional rationale for conserving east coast populations by identifying breeding sources. PMID:20630891

  5. A realistic assessment of the indicator potential of butterflies and other charismatic taxonomic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Erica; Murphy, Dennis D

    2009-10-01

    Charismatic groups of animals and plants often are proposed as sentinels of environmental status and trends. Nevertheless, many claims that a certain taxonomic group can provide more-general information on environmental quality are not evaluated critically. To address several of the many definitions of indicator species, we used butterflies to explore in some detail the attributes that affect implementation of indicators generically. There probably are few individual species, or sets of species, that can serve as scientifically valid, cost-effective measures of the status or trend of an environmental phenomenon that is difficult to measure directly. Nevertheless, there are species with distributions, abundances, or demographic characteristics that are responsive to known environmental changes. In this context, single or multiple species can serve as indicators when targets are defined explicitly, ecological relationships between the target and the putative indicators are well understood, and data are sufficient to differentiate between deterministic and stochastic responses. Although these situations exist, they are less common than might be apparent from an extensive and often confounded literature on indicators. Instead, the public appeal of charismatic groups may be driving much of their acclaim as indicators. The same taxon may not be appropriate for marketing a general conservation mission and for drawing strong inference about specific environmental changes. To provide insights into the progress of conservation efforts, it is essential to identify scientific and practical criteria for selection and application of indicators and then to examine whether a given taxonomic group meets those criteria. PMID:19459893

  6. Trophic cascades: linking ungulates to shrub-dependent birds and butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Teichman, Kristine; Nielsen, Scott E; Roland, Jens

    2013-11-01

    1. Studies demonstrating trophic cascades through the loss of top-down regulatory processes in productive and biologically diverse terrestrial ecosystems are limited. 2. Elk Island National Park, Alberta and surrounding protected areas have a wide range of ungulate density due to the functional loss of top predators, management for high ungulate numbers and variable hunting pressure. This provides an ideal setting for studying the effects of hyper-abundant ungulates on vegetation and shrub-dependent bird and butterfly species. 3. To examine the cascading effects of high ungulate density, we quantified vegetation characteristics and abundances of yellow warbler Dendroica petechia and Canadian tiger swallowtail Papilio canadensis under different ungulate density in and around Elk Island National Park. 4. Using Structural Equation Models we found that ungulate density was inversely related to shrub cover, whereas shrub cover was positively related to yellow warbler abundance. In addition, chokecherry Prunus virginiana abundance was inversely related to browse impact but positively related to P. canadensis abundance. 5. These results demonstrate a cascade resulting from hyper-abundant ungulates on yellow warblers and Canadian tiger swallowtails through reductions in shrub cover and larval host plant density. The combined effect of the functional loss of top predators and management strategies that maintain high ungulate numbers can decouple top-down regulation of productive temperate ecosystems. PMID:23800226

  7. Secondary Defense Chemicals in Milkweed Reduce Parasite Infection in Monarch Butterflies, Danaus plexippus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowler, Camden D; Leon, Kristoffer E; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2015-06-01

    In tri-trophic systems, herbivores may benefit from their host plants in fighting parasitic infections. Plants can provide parasite resistance in two contrasting ways: either directly, by interfering with the parasite, or indirectly, by increasing herbivore immunity or health. In monarch butterflies, the larval diet of milkweed strongly influences the fitness of a common protozoan parasite. Toxic secondary plant chemicals known as cardenolides correlate strongly with parasite resistance of the host, with greater cardenolide concentrations in the larval diet leading to lower parasite growth. However, milkweed cardenolides may covary with other indices of plant quality including nutrients, and a direct experimental link between cardenolides and parasite performance has not been established. To determine if the anti-parasitic activity of milkweeds is indeed due to secondary chemicals, as opposed to nutrition, we supplemented the diet of infected and uninfected monarch larvae with milkweed latex, which contains cardenolides but no nutrients. Across three experiments, increased dietary cardenolide concentrations reduced parasite growth in infected monarchs, which consequently had longer lifespans. However, uninfected monarchs showed no differences in lifespan across treatments, confirming that cardenolide-containing latex does not increase general health. Our results suggest that cardenolides are a driving force behind plant-derived resistance in this system. PMID:25953502

  8. Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUWARNO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Suwarno (2010 Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons. Biodiversitas 11: 19-23. The population dynamic of Papilio polytes L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons was investigated in the citrus orchard in Tasek Gelugor, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Population of immature stages of P. polytes was observed alternate day from January to March 2006 (dry season, DS, from April to July 2006 (secondary wet season, SWS, and from October to December 2006 (primary wet season, PWS. The population dynamics of the immature stages of P. polytes varied between seasons. The immature stages of P. polytes are more abundance and significantly different in the PWS than those of the DS and the SWS. The larval densities in all seasons decreased with progressive development of the instar stages. Predators and parasitoids are the main factor in regulating the population abundance of immature stages of P. polytes. There were positive correlations between the abundance of immature stages of P. polytes and their natural enemies abundance in each season. Ooencyrtus papilioni Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae is the most egg parasitoid. Oxyopes quadrifasciatus L. Koch. and O. elegans L. Koch. (Araneae: Oxyopidae are the main predators in the young larvae, meanwhile Sycanus dichotomus Stal. (Heteroptera: Reduviidae, Calotes versicolor Fitzinger (Squamata: Agamidae, birds and praying mantis attacked the older larvae.

  9. POPULATION SURVEY AND FLIGHT BEHAVIOR OF BUTTERFLIES (LEPIDOPTERA IN A FOREST PORTION IN SÃO SEPÉ, RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maína Roman

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze lepidopterous insects with diurnal habits (butterflies associated with a native forest portion. Eight traps with bananas installed at 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 m above soil surface were used. Samplings were obtained on a weekly basis from December 2005 to December 2006 in the county of São Sepé, RS. The faunistic indices represented by frequency, constancy, abundance and dominance were analyzed. Height of flight and species diversity were also evaluated. A total of 737 individuals of the Nymphalidae family were collected, which were classified into six subfamilies, 16 genus and 21 species. The most representative species were: Euptychia sp., Hamadryas feronia, Taygetis ypthima, Epiphile huebneri, Biblis hyperia, Taygetis sp.1 and Praepedaliodes phanias. The diversity indices of Shannon and Margalef indicate greater diversity at the height of 4.0 m and lower diversity at the height of 1.0 m, showing relative abundance as an important parameter in determining diversity. About 70% of the collected species were characterized as frequent, common, non-dominant and of accidental occurrence. Hamadryas feronia and Euptychia sp. were constant, dominant and very frequent. The species Euptychia sp. and Taygetis ypthima had height of flight close to the soil surface.

  10. Effects of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling on Hofstadter’s butterfly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the effect of Rashba spin-orbit coupling on the Hofstadter spectrum of a two-dimensional tight-binding electron system in a perpendicular magnetic field. We obtain the generalized coupled Harper spin-dependent equations which include the Rashba spin-orbit interaction and solve for the energy spectrum and spin polarization. We investigate the effect of spin-orbit coupling on the fractal energy spectrum and the spin polarization for some characteristic states as a function of the magnetic flux ? and the spin-orbit coupling parameter. We characterize the complexity of the fractal geometry of the spin-dependent Hofstadter butterfly with the correlation dimension and show that it grows quadratically with the amplitude of the spin-orbit coupling. We study some ground state properties and the spin polarization shows a fractal-like behavior as a function of ?, which is demonstrated with the exponent close to unity of the decaying power spectrum of the spin polarization. Some degree of spin localization or distribution around + 1 or - 1, for small spin-orbit coupling, is found with the determination of the entropy function as a function of the spin-orbit coupling. The excited states show a more extended (uniform) distribution of spin states. (paper)

  11. Hofstadter butterflies and magnetically induced band-gap quenching in graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2013-01-01

    We study graphene antidot lattices (GALs) in magnetic fields. Using a tight-binding model and a recursive Green's function technique that we extend to deal with periodic structures, we calculate Hofstadter butterflies of GALs. We compare the results to those obtained in a simpler gapped graphene model. A crucial difference emerges in the behavior of the lowest Landau level, which in a gapped graphene model is independent of magnetic field. In stark contrast to this picture, we find that in GALs the band gap can be completely closed by applying a magnetic field. While our numerical simulations can only be performed on structures much smaller than can be experimentally realized, we find that the critical magnetic field for which the gap closes can be directly related to the ratio between the cyclotron radius and the neck width of the GAL. In this way, we obtain a simple scaling law for extrapolation of our results to more realistically sized structures and find resulting quenching magnetic fields that should bewell within reach of experiments.

  12. Mimicry in Heliconius and Ithomiini butterflies: The profound consequences of an adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prey populations have evolved multiple strategies to escape predation. Camouflage is a strategy resting on avoiding detection by potential predators, whereas aposematism relies on advertising chemical defences with conspicuous warning signals. While camouflaged phenotypes are subject to negative frequency-dependent selection, aposematic preys are under positive frequency-dependence, where the efficiency of a signal increases with its own local abundance. Because of his “strength-in-number” effect, multiple chemically-defended species exposed to the same suite of predators gain a selective advantage from converging on the same warning signals. Convergence in warning signals is called Müllerian mimicry. Here, we review the results of recent genetic and ecological research on two well-studied groups of neotropical Müllerian mimetic butterflies, the genus Heliconius and the tribe Ithomiini, which advertise their unpalatability through conspicuous wing colour patterns. Mimicry represents a major adaptation in these groups, where the effects of selection extend well beyond mere phenotypic resemblance. Selection acts on other traits used as mating cues, on the genetic architecture of colour pattern and even on the ecological niche of species. The origin of mimicry itself and the coexistence of multiple mimicry patterns are well understood, but the ultimate drivers of mimicry diversity remain unclear.

  13. The evolution of alternative parasitic life histories in large blue butterflies.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Thomas D; Vila, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Large blue (Maculinea) butterflies are highly endangered throughout the Palaearctic region, and have been the focus of intense conservation research. In addition, their extraordinary parasitic lifestyles make them ideal for studies of life history evolution. Early instars consume flower buds of specific host plants, but later instars live in ant nests where they either devour the brood (predators), or are fed mouth-to-mouth by the adult ants (cuckoos). Here we present the phylogeny for the group, which shows that it is a monophyletic clade nested within Phengaris, a rare Oriental genus whose species have similar life histories. Cuckoo species are likely to have evolved from predatory ancestors. As early as five million years ago, two Maculinea clades diverged, leading to the different parasitic strategies seen in the genus today. Contrary to current belief, the two recognized cuckoo species show little genetic divergence and are probably a single ecologically differentiated species. On the other hand, some ofthe predatory morphospecies exhibit considerable genetic divergence and may contain cryptic species. These findings have important implications for conservation and reintroduction efforts. Udgivelsesdato: 2004-Nov-18

  14. Flavonoid sequestration by the common blue butterfly Polyommatus icarus: quantitative intraspecific variation in relation to larval hostplant, sex and body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, F; Proksch, P; Fiedler, K

    2001-10-01

    Common blue butterflies (Polyommatus icarus) sequester flavonoids from their larval food and store these pigments as part of their adult wing colouration. Insects were reared on 10 different diets to assess effects of host plants on variation in flavonoid sequestration in this moderately polyphagous butterfly. Rearing experiments revealed an unexpectedly large gradient in flavonoid richness, ranging from individuals with high flavonoid loads (reared on inflorescences of Medicago sativa, Trifolium repens, T. pratense) to butterflies which contained almost no such pigments (fed with foliage of M. sativa or Robinia pseudoacacia). Flavonoid sequestration was much more effective from natural hostplants than from experimentally offered diets which would not be accepted in the field. Female butterflies on average sequestered almost 60% more flavonoids than males. This sex difference was more pronounced on natural than on experimental diets. Flavonoid load was significantly and positively related to dry mass and forewing length as two important fitness correlates of butterflies. This correlation was particularly strong on experimental diets (i.e. under constraining conditions for development). On natural hostplants, in contrast, when butterflies generally were flavonoid-rich, no clear relationship between flavonoid load and size or mass emerged. Our analytical data are consistent with field results according to which females rich in UV-absorbing flavonoid wing pigments are more attractive to mate-searching males. In P. icarus, flavonoid richness might therefore increase visibility (by more effective sensory stimulation of the visual system), but could also confer information about the feeding history, and thus ontogenetically determined 'quality' of a potential mate. PMID:11445289

  15. High Andean butterflies from southern Peru, I. Dry puna Satyrinae, with the description of two new taxa and three new records from Peru (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alfredo Cerdeña

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first part of a series of contributions to the knowledge of the high Andean butterfly fauna in southern Peru. In this work the butterfly species of the subfamily Satyrinae present in the dry puna of Peru are reviewed. A new species, Pampasatyrus gorkyi sp. nov. and a new subspecies Argyrophorus lamna cuzcoensis ssp. nov. are described from the department Cusco, Peru. Three species are recorded for the first time for Peru, Argyrophorus gustavi Staudinger, Faunula euripides (Weymer and Faunula eleates (Weymer previously reported from Chile and Bolivia. Ecological and biogeographical data are provided.

  16. From the Phylogeny of the Satyrinae Butterflies to the Systematics of Euptychiina (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): History, Progress and Prospects

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    MA, Marín; C, Peña; AVL, Freitas; N, Wahlberg; SI, Uribe.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We review the various proposals of evolutionary and classification schemes for Satyrinae and particularly Euptychiina butterflies, assessing progress and prospects of research for the group. Among the highlights is the proposal to include Morphini, Brassolini and Amathusiini as part of Satyrinae. Al [...] though it is clear that this hypothesis requires further investigation, phylogenetic studies recently conducted recover this clade as part of Satyrinae with high support. The phylogenetic analyses for Euptychiina carried out to date recover the monophyly of the group and have identified a variety of genera as non-monophyletic. Further work is necessary to resolve the position of the subtribe and the evolutionary relationships of several genera.

  17. From the phylogeny of the Satyrinae butterflies to the systematics of Euptychiina (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): history, progress and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, M.A.; Uribe, S.I., E-mail: mamarin0@bt.unal.edu.c [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin (Colombia). Grupo de Investigacion en Sistematica Molecular; Pena, C. [Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima (Peru). Museo de Historia Natural; Freitas, A.V.L. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IB/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biologia Animal e Museu de Zoologia; Wahlberg, N. [University of Turku (Finland). Dept. of Biology. Lab. of Genetics

    2011-01-15

    We review the various proposals of evolutionary and classification schemes for Satyrinae and particularly Euptychiina butterflies, assessing progress and prospects of research for the group. Among the highlights is the proposal to include Morphini, Brassolini and Amathusiini as part of Satyrinae. Although it is clear that this hypothesis requires further investigation, phylogenetic studies recently conducted recover this clade as part of Satyrinae with high support. The phylogenetic analyses for Euptychiina carried out to date recover the monophyly of the group and have identified a variety of genera as non-monophyletic. Further work is necessary to resolve the position of the subtribe and the evolutionary relationships of several genera. (author)

  18. Multilocus species trees show the recent adaptive radiation of the mimetic heliconius butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Krzysztof M; Wahlberg, Niklas; Neild, Andrew F E; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K; Mallet, James; Jiggins, Chris D

    2015-05-01

    Müllerian mimicry among Neotropical Heliconiini butterflies is an excellent example of natural selection, associated with the diversification of a large continental-scale radiation. Some of the processes driving the evolution of mimicry rings are likely to generate incongruent phylogenetic signals across the assemblage, and thus pose a challenge for systematics. We use a data set of 22 mitochondrial and nuclear markers from 92% of species in the tribe, obtained by Sanger sequencing and de novo assembly of short read data, to re-examine the phylogeny of Heliconiini with both supermatrix and multispecies coalescent approaches, characterize the patterns of conflicting signal, and compare the performance of various methodological approaches to reflect the heterogeneity across the data. Despite the large extent of reticulate signal and strong conflict between markers, nearly identical topologies are consistently recovered by most of the analyses, although the supermatrix approach failed to reflect the underlying variation in the history of individual loci. However, the supermatrix represents a useful approximation where multiple rare species represented by short sequences can be incorporated easily. The first comprehensive, time-calibrated phylogeny of this group is used to test the hypotheses of a diversification rate increase driven by the dramatic environmental changes in the Neotropics over the past 23 myr, or changes caused by diversity-dependent effects on the rate of diversification. We find that the rate of diversification has increased on the branch leading to the presently most species-rich genus Heliconius, but the change occurred gradually and cannot be unequivocally attributed to a specific environmental driver. Our study provides comprehensive comparison of philosophically distinct species tree reconstruction methods and provides insights into the diversification of an important insect radiation in the most biodiverse region of the planet. PMID:25634098

  19. Sexual coevolution of spermatophore envelopes and female genital traits in butterflies: Evidence of male coercion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Signa are sclerotized structures located on the inner wall of the corpus bursa of female Lepidoptera whose main function is tearing open spermatophores. The sexually antagonistic coevolution (SAC hypothesis proposes that the thickness of spermatophore envelopes has driven the evolution of the females signa; this idea is based in the fact that in many lepidopterans female sexual receptivity is at least partially controlled by the volume of ejaculate remaining in the corpus bursa. According to the SAC hypothesis, males evolved thick spermatophore envelopes to delay the post-mating recovery of female sexual receptivity thus reducing sperm competition; in response, females evolved signa for breaking spermatophore envelopes faster, gaining access to the resources contained in them and reducing their intermating intervals; the evolution of signa, in turn, favored the evolution of even thicker spermatophore envelopes, and so on. We tested two predictions of the SAC hypothesis with comparative data on the thickness of spermatophore envelopes of eleven species of Heliconiinae butterflies. The first prediction is that the spermatophore envelopes of polyandrous species with signa will be thicker than those of monandrous species without signa. In agreement with this prediction, we found that the spermatophore envelopes of a polyandrous Heliconius species with signa are thicker than those of two monandrous Heliconius species without signa. The second prediction is that in some species with signa males could enforce monandry in females by evolving “very thick” spermatophore envelopes, in these species we predict that their spermatophore envelopes will be thicker than those of their closer polyandrous relatives with signa. In agreement with this prediction, we found that in two out of three comparisons, spermatophore envelopes of monandrous species with signa have thicker spermatophore envelopes than their closer polyandrous relatives with signa. Thus, our results support the idea that selective pressures arising from sexually antagonistic interactions have been important in the evolution of spermatophore envelopes, female signa and female mating patterns.

  20. Signatures of selection in loci governing major colour patterns in Heliconius butterflies and related species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joron Mathieu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-coding change is one possible genetic mechanism underlying the evolution of adaptive wing colour pattern variation in Heliconius butterflies. Here we determine whether 38 putative genes within two major Heliconius patterning loci, HmYb and HmB, show evidence of positive selection. Ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide changes (? were used to test for selection, as a means of identifying candidate genes within each locus that control wing pattern. Results Preliminary analyses using 454 transcriptome and Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC sequences from three Heliconius species highlighted a cluster of genes within each region showing relatively higher rates of sequence evolution. Other genes within the region appear to be highly constrained, and no ? estimates exceeded one. Three genes from each locus with the highest average pairwise ? values were amplified from additional Heliconius species and races. Two selected genes, fizzy-like (HmYb and DALR (HmB, were too divergent for amplification across species and were excluded from further analysis. Amongst the remaining genes, HM00021 and Kinesin possessed the highest background ? values within the HmYb and HmB loci, respectively. After accounting for recombination, these two genes both showed evidence of having codons with a signature of selection, although statistical support for this signal was not strong in any case. Conclusions Tests of selection reveal a cluster of candidate genes in each locus, suggesting that weak directional selection may be occurring within a small region of each locus, but coding changes alone are unlikely to explain the full range of wing pattern diversity. These analyses pinpoint many of the same genes believed to be involved in the control of colour patterning in Heliconius that have been identified through other studies implementing different research methods.

  1. Quantitative analysis of changes in movement behaviour within and outside habitat in a specialist butterfly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dyck Hans

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dispersal between habitat patches is a key process in the functioning of (metapopulations. As distance between suitable habitats increases, the ongoing process of habitat fragmentation is expected to generate strong selection pressures on movement behaviour. This leads to an increase or decrease of dispersal according to its cost relative to landscape structure. To limit the cost of dispersal in an increasingly hostile matrix, we predict that organisms would adopt special dispersal behaviour between habitats, which are different from movements associated with resource searching in suitable habitats. Results Here we quantified the movement behaviour of the bog fritillary butterfly (Proclossiana eunomia by (1 assessing perceptual range, the distance to which the habitat can be perceived, and (2 tracking and parameterizing movement behaviour within and outside habitat (parameters were move length and turning angles distributions. Results are three-fold. (1 Perceptual range was Conclusion The perceptual range being lower than the distance between habitat patches in the study area, P. eunomia likely perceives these habitat networks as fragmented, and must locate suitable habitats while dispersing across the landscape matrix. Such a constraint means that dispersal entails costs, and that selection pressure should favour behaviours that limit these costs. Indeed, our finding that dispersal movements in the matrix are straighter than resource searching movements within habitat supports the prediction of simulation studies that adopting straight movements for dispersal reduces its costs in fragmented landscapes. Our results support the mounting evidence that dispersal in fragmented landscapes evolved towards the use of specific movement behaviour, different from explorative searching movements within habitat.

  2. Variation in two phases of post-winter development of a butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålhandske, S; Gotthard, K; Posledovich, D; Leimar, O

    2014-12-01

    The temporal aspects of life cycle characteristics, such as diapause development, are under strong selection in seasonal environments. Fine-tuning of the life cycle may be particularly important to match the phenology of potential mates and resources as well as for optimizing abiotic conditions at eclosion. Here, we experimentally study the spring phenology of the orange tip butterfly, Anthocharis cardamines, by analysing post-winter pupal development in three populations along a latitudinal cline in each of Sweden and the United Kingdom. These countries differ substantially in their seasonal temperature profile. By repeatedly recording pupal weights, we established that post-winter development has two separate phases, with a more rapid weight loss in the second phase than in the first, likely corresponding to a ramping up of the rate of development. Variation in the duration of the first phase contributed more strongly than the second phase to the differences in phenology between the localities and sexes. We found that insects from Sweden had a faster overall rate of development than those from the United Kingdom, which is consistent with countergradient variation, as Sweden is colder during the spring than the United Kingdom. Similar trends were not observed at the within-country scale, however. A cogradient pattern was found within Sweden, with populations from the north developing more slowly, and there was no clear latitudinal trend within the United Kingdom. In all localities, males developed faster than females. Our results point to the importance of variation in the progression of post-winter development for spring phenology. PMID:25345727

  3. Habitat fragmentation impacts mobility in a common and widespread woodland butterfly: do sexes respond differently?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergerot Benjamin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theory predicts a nonlinear response of dispersal evolution to habitat fragmentation. First, dispersal will be favoured in line with both decreasing area of habitat patches and increasing inter-patch distances. Next, once these inter-patch distances exceed a critical threshold, dispersal will be counter-selected, unless essential resources no longer co-occur in compact patches but are differently scattered; colonization of empty habitat patches or rescue of declining populations are then increasingly overruled by dispersal costs like mortality risks and loss of time and energy. However, to date, most empirical studies mainly document an increase of dispersal associated with habitat fragmentation. We analyzed dispersal kernels for males and females of the common, widespread woodland butterfly Pararge aegeria in highly fragmented landscape, and for males in landscapes that differed in their degree of habitat fragmentation. Results The male and female probabilities of moving were considerably lower in the highly fragmented landscapes compared to the male probability of moving in fragmented agricultural and deciduous oak woodland landscapes. We also investigated whether, and to what extent, daily dispersal distance in the highly fragmented landscape was influenced by a set of landscape variables for both males and females, including distance to the nearest woodland, area of the nearest woodland, patch area and abundance of individuals in the patch. We found that daily movement distance decreased with increasing distance to the nearest woodland in both males and females. Daily distances flown by males were related to the area of the woodland capture site, whereas no such effect was observed for females. Conclusion Overall, mobility was strongly reduced in the highly fragmented landscape, and varied considerably among landscapes with different spatial resource distributions. We interpret the results relative to different cost-benefit ratios of movements in fragmented landscapes.

  4. Conservatism and novelty in the genetic architecture of adaptation in Heliconius butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, B; Whibley, A; Poul, Y L; Navarro, N; Martin, A; Baxter, S; Shah, A; Gilles, B; Wirth, T; McMillan, W O; Joron, M

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of adaptive traits has been at the centre of modern evolutionary biology since Fisher; however, evaluating how the genetic architecture of ecologically important traits influences their diversification has been hampered by the scarcity of empirical data. Now, high-throughput genomics facilitates the detailed exploration of variation in the genome-to-phenotype map among closely related taxa. Here, we investigate the evolution of wing pattern diversity in Heliconius, a clade of neotropical butterflies that have undergone an adaptive radiation for wing-pattern mimicry and are influenced by distinct selection regimes. Using crosses between natural wing-pattern variants, we used genome-wide restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) genotyping, traditional linkage mapping and multivariate image analysis to study the evolution of the architecture of adaptive variation in two closely related species: Heliconius hecale and H. ismenius. We implemented a new morphometric procedure for the analysis of whole-wing pattern variation, which allows visualising spatial heatmaps of genotype-to-phenotype association for each quantitative trait locus separately. We used the H. melpomene reference genome to fine-map variation for each major wing-patterning region uncovered, evaluated the role of candidate genes and compared genetic architectures across the genus. Our results show that, although the loci responding to mimicry selection are highly conserved between species, their effect size and phenotypic action vary throughout the clade. Multilocus architecture is ancestral and maintained across species under directional selection, whereas the single-locus (supergene) inheritance controlling polymorphism in H. numata appears to have evolved only once. Nevertheless, the conservatism in the wing-patterning toolkit found throughout the genus does not appear to constrain phenotypic evolution towards local adaptive optima. PMID:25806542

  5. Synaptic organization in the lamina of the superposition eye of a skipper butterfly, Parnara guttata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohigashi, M; Tominaga, Y

    1999-05-24

    The first optic neuropil of the compound eye, the lamina, of the skipper butterfly Parnara guttata, was examined by light microscopy after Golgi-impregnation and by electron microscopy (EM) to clarify the cellular and synaptic organization. In the lamina, five different types of lamina neurons (L neurons) were characterized by using Golgi-impregnation. By EM, each cartridge was found to contain all nine receptor axons from an ommatidium, five L neurons, and a few putative centrifugal elements. Axons from photoreceptors (retinula cells) R2, R3, R4, R6, R7, and R8 terminate as short visual fibers (svfs) in the lamina cartridge. Those from R1, R5, and R9 penetrate the lamina and terminate in the medulla as long visual fibers (lvfs). In the cartridges, the synaptic contacts were formed from svfs onto L neurons, from the lvfs of R1 and/or R5 to the lvf of R9 and L neurons, and from the lvf of R9 to L neurons. The putative centrifugal fibers also make synapses to svfs and L neurons. At the most distal level of the cartridge, one of the centrifugal fibers containing dense-core vesicles makes presynaptic contacts to the putative long collaterals of the L neuron. A novel characteristic feature of this lamina is that svfs of R3 and R7 and the lvfs of R1 or R5 have long collaterals extending into neighboring cartridges. Presynaptic contacts were confirmed in such long collaterals from the svf. These results imply that receptor axons provide direct intercartridge connections as well as providing indirect connections to neighboring cartridges by way of their input upon L neurons. PMID:10331583

  6. Uncovering patterns of spring migration in the monarch butterfly using stable isotopes and demographic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, R.; Miller, N.; Wassenaar, L.; Hobson, K.

    2010-12-01

    Each spring, millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrate up to 3000 km from central Mexico to re-colonize eastern North America. However, despite centuries of research, the patterns of re-colonization are not well understood. We combined stable-hydrogen (?D) and -carbon (?13C) isotope measurements with demographic models to test (1) whether individuals sampled in the northern part of the breeding range in the Great Lakes originate directly from Mexico or are second generation individuals born in the southern US and (2) to estimate whether populations on the eastern seaboard migrate longitudinally over the Appalachians or originate directly from the Gulf Coast. In the Great Lakes, we found that the majority of individuals were second-generation monarchs born in the Gulf Coast and Central regions of the US. However, 25% individuals originated directly from Mexico and we estimated that these individuals produced the majority of offspring born in the Great Lakes region during June. On the eastern seaboard, we found the majority of monarchs (88%) originated in the mid-west and Great Lakes regions, providing the first direct evidence that second generation monarchs born in June complete a (trans-) longitudinal migration across the Appalachian mountains. The remaining individuals (12%) originated from parents that migrated directly from the Gulf coast during early spring. Our results demonstrate how stable isotopes, when combined with ecological data, can provide insights into patterns of connectivity in migratory insects that have been impossible to test using conventional techniques. The migration patterns presented here have important implications for predicting future changes in population size and for developing effective conservation plans for this species.

  7. 980-nm 14-pin butterfly module dual-channel CW QW semiconductor laser for pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yun; Yan, Changling; Qu, Yi; Li, Hui; Wang, Yuxia; Gao, Xin; Qiao, Zhongliang; Li, Mei; Qu, Bowen; Lu, Peng; Bo, Baoxue

    2010-10-01

    Nowadays, with its mature progress, the 790 nm - 1000 nm wavelength semiconductor laser is widely used in the fields of laser machining, laser ranging, laser radar, laser imaging, laser anti-counterfeit, biomedical and etc. Best of all, the 980 nm wavelength laser has its widespread application in the pumping source of Er3+ -doped fiber amplifier, optic fiber gyroscopes and other devices. The output wavelength of the fiber amplifier which takes the 980 nm wavelength laser as its pumping source is between 1060 nm and 1550 nm. This type of laser has its extremely wide range of applications in optical communication and other fields. Moreover, some new application domains keep constantly being developed. The semiconductor laser with the dual-channel ridge wave guide and the 980 nm emission wavelength is presented in this paper. In our work, we fabricated Lasers with the using of multi-quantum well (MQW) wafer grew by MBE, and the PL-wavelength of the MQW was 970 nm. The standard photofabrication method and the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching technology are adopted in the process of making dual-channel ridge wave guide with the width of 4 ?m and height of 830 nm. In the state of continuous work at room temperature, the laser could output the single mode beam of 70 mW stably under the current of 100 mA. The threshold current of the laser diode is 17 mA and the slope efficiency is 0.89 W/A. The 3 dB spectrum bandwidth of the laser beam is 0.2 nm. This laser outputs its beam by a pigtail fiber on which Bragg grating for frequency stabilization is carved. The laser diode, the tail fiber, and the built-in refrigeration and monitoring modules are sealed in a 14-pin butterfly packaging. It can be used directly as the pumping source of Er3+ - doped fiber amplifier or optic fiber gyroscopes.

  8. Phenotypic plasticity in opsin expression in a butterfly compound eye complements sex role reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animals often display phenotypic plasticity in morphologies and behaviors that result in distinct adaptations to fluctuating seasonal environments. The butterfly Bicyclus anynana has two seasonal forms, wet and dry, that vary in wing ornament brightness and in the identity of the sex that performs the most courting and choosing. Rearing temperature is the cue for producing these alternative seasonal forms. We hypothesized that, barring any developmental constraints, vision should be enhanced in the choosy individuals but diminished in the non-choosy individuals due to physiological costs. As a proxy of visual performance we measured eye size, facet lens size, and sensitivity to light, e.g., the expression levels of all opsins, in males and females of both seasonal forms. Results We found that B. anynana eyes displayed significant sexual dimorphism and phenotypic plasticity for both morphology and opsin expression levels, but not all results conformed to our prediction. Males had larger eyes than females across rearing temperatures, and increases in temperature produced larger eyes in both sexes, mostly via increases in facet number. Ommatidia were larger in the choosy dry season (DS males and transcript levels for all three opsins were significantly lower in the less choosy DS females. Conclusions Opsin level plasticity in females, and ommatidia size plasticity in males supported our visual plasticity hypothesis but males appear to maintain high visual function across both seasons. We discuss our results in the context of distinct sexual and natural selection pressures that may be facing each sex in the wild in each season.

  9. Heat shock protein 70 gene family in the Glanville fritillary butterfly and their response to thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shiqi; Ahola, Virpi; Shu, Chang; Xu, Chongren; Wang, Rongjiang

    2015-02-10

    Temperature variation in the environment is a great challenge to organisms. Induction of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is a common genetic mechanism to cope with thermal stress. The Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) is a model species in population and evolutionary biology, and its behavior and life history are greatly influenced by ambient temperature. We cloned and sequenced the full coding sequences of seven hsp70 genes from the Glanville fritillary. Of those genes, McHsc70-1 and McHsc70-2 were identified as heat shock cognate 70 (hsc70), of which the latter located in endoplasmic reticulum. We analyzed the expression patterns of different hsp70s under various thermal stresses using quantitative PCR. Heat shock at 40°C for 2h induced high expression of McHsp70-1, McHsp70-2 and McHsc70-2. Only McHsc70-2 had a small increase after cold shock at 0°C for 2h. Acclimation at 35°C for three days before heat shock reduced expression of McHsp70 after heat shock. The maximum mRNA level of McHsp70s was reached in the first 2h after the heat shock. This study uncovers the complexity of the hsp70 system, and provides the valuable information for further temperature-related research in the Glanville fritillary butterfly. PMID:25433328

  10. Electromagnetic characterization of millimetre-scale replicas of the gyroid photonic crystal found in the butterfly Parides sesostris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouya, C; Vukusic, P

    2012-10-01

    We have used three-dimensional stereolithography to synthetically replicate the gyroid photonic crystal (PC) structure that occurs naturally in the butterfly Parides sesostris. We have experimentally characterized the transmission response of this structure in the microwave regime at two azimuthal angles (?) over a comprehensive range of polar angles (?). We have modelled its electromagnetic response using the finite-element method (FEM) and found excellent agreement with experimental data. Both theory and experiment show a single relatively broad transmission minimum at normal incidence (? = 0°) that comprises several narrow band resonances which separate into clearly identifiable stop-bands at higher polar angles. We have identified the specific effective geometric planes within the crystal, and their associated periodicities that give rise to each of these stop-bands. Through extensive theoretical FEM modelling of the gyroid PC structure, using varying filling fractions of material and air, we have shown that a gyroid PC with material volume fraction of 40 per cent is appropriate for optimizing the reflected bandwidth at normal incidence (for a refractive index contrast of 1.56). This is the same gyroid PC material volume fraction used by the butterfly P. sesostris itself to produce its green structurally coloured appearance. This infers further optimization of this biological PC beyond that of its lattice constant alone. PMID:24098849

  11. An experimental displacement and over 50 years of tag-recoveries show that monarch butterflies are not true navigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtisen, Henrik; Derbyshirec, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) breeding in eastern North America are famous for their annual fall migration to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. However, the mechanisms they use to successfully reach these sites remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether monarchs are true navigators who can determine their location relative to their final destination using both a “compass” and a “map”. Using flight simulators, we recorded the orientation of wild-caught monarchs in southwestern Ontario and found that individuals generally flew in a southwest direction toward the wintering grounds. When displaced 2,500 km to the west, the same individuals continued to fly in a general southwest direction, suggesting that monarchs use a simple vector-navigation strategy (i.e., use a specific compass bearing without compensating for displacement). Using over 5 decades of field data, we also show that the directional concentration and the angular SD of recoveries from tagged monarchs largely conformed to two mathematical models describing the directional distribution of migrants expected under a vector-navigation strategy. A third analysis of tagged recoveries shows that the increasing directionality of migration from north to south is largely because of the presence of geographic barriers that guide individuals toward overwintering sites. Our work suggests that monarchs breeding in eastern North America likely combine simple orientation mechanisms with geographic features that funnel them toward Mexican overwintering sites, a remarkable achievement considering that these butterflies weigh less than a gram and travel thousands of kilometers to a site they have never seen.

  12. Molecular cloning and expression in vitro of a carboxylesterase gene from the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shiqi; Shu, Chang; Xu, Chongren; Wang, Rongjiang

    2013-07-25

    Carboxylesterase (EC 3.1.1.1) is a member of the carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE) superfamily, which is widely distributed in animals, plants and microorganisms. This enzyme has been known to be associated with insecticide resistance and detoxification. Although CCEs have been extensively studied in insects, including lepidopterans, the research on butterflies, a major subgroup in Lepidoptera, is still poor. In the present study, we cloned a CCE gene (McCCE1) from the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia, Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae). The full-length cDNA encoding McCCE1 was 1786 bp, containing a 1641 bp open reading frame encoding 546 amino acids, a 38 bp 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), and a 107 bp 3'-UTR with a poly(A) tail. The functionally conserved amino acids in McCCE1 shared the 55% identity with the cytoplasmic esterase CCE017a in Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), which has been associated with detoxification. Assays in vitro showed that the recombinant McCCE1 could hydrolyze ?- and ?-naphthyl acetate. Thus, the present study adds to the body of knowledge concerning the detoxification of pesticides by lepidopterans. PMID:23603019

  13. Thermoresponsive Photonic Crystal: Synergistic Effect of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-acrylic Acid and Morpho Butterfly Wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongdong; Yu, Huanan; Xu, Qun; Xu, Guiheng; Wang, Kaixi

    2015-04-29

    In this work, we report a simple method to fabricate smart polymers engineered with hierarchical photonic structures of Morpho butterfly wing to present high performance that are capable of color tunability over temperature. The materials were assembled by combining functional temperature responsivity of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-acrylic acid (PNIPAm-co-AAc) with the biological photonic crystal (PC) structure of Morpho butterfly wing, and then the synergistic effect between the functional polymer and the natural PC structure was created. Their cooperativity is instantiated in the phase transition of PNIPAm-co-AAc (varying with the change of temperature) that can alter the nanostructure of PCs, which further leads to the reversible spectrum response property of the modified hierarchical photonic structures. The cost-effective biomimetic technique presented here highlights the bright prospect of fabrication of more stimuli-responsive functional materials via coassembling smart polymers and biohierarchical structures, and it will be an important platform for the development of nanosmart biomaterials. PMID:25859786

  14. Why do cryptic species tend not to co-occur? A case study on two cryptic pairs of butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vod?, Raluca; Dapporto, Leonardo; Dinc?, Vlad; Vila, Roger

    2015-01-01

    As cryptic diversity is being discovered, mostly thanks to advances in molecular techniques, it is becoming evident that many of these taxa display parapatric distributions in mainland and that they rarely coexist on islands. Genetic landscapes, haplotype networks and ecological niche modeling analyses were performed for two pairs of non-sister cryptic butterfly species, Aricia agestis-A. cramera and Polyommatus icarus-P. celina (Lycaenidae), to specifically assess non-coexistence on western Mediterranean islands, and to test potential causes producing such chequered distribution patterns. We show that the morphologically and ecologically equivalent pairs of species do not coexist on any of the studied islands, although nearly all islands are colonized by one of them. According to our models, the cryptic pairs displayed marked climatic preferences and 'precipitation during the driest quarter' was recovered as the most important climatic determinant. However, neither dispersal capacity, nor climatic or ecological factors fully explain the observed distributions across particular sea straits, and the existence of species interactions resulting in mutual exclusion is suggested as a necessary hypothesis. Given that the studied species are habitat generalists, feeding on virtually unlimited resources, we propose that reproductive interference, together with climatic preferences, sustain density-dependent mechanisms like "founder takes all" and impede coexistence on islands. Chequered distributions among cryptic taxa, both sister and non-sister, are common in butterflies, suggesting that the phenomenon revealed here could be important in determining biodiversity patterns. PMID:25692577

  15. DNA barcodes and cryptic species of skipper butterflies in the genus Perichares in Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, John M.; Janzen, Daniel H.; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Hallwachs, Winnie; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2008-01-01

    DNA barcodes can be used to identify cryptic species of skipper butterflies previously detected by classic taxonomic methods and to provide first clues to the existence of yet other cryptic species. A striking case is the common geographically and ecologically widespread neotropical skipper butterfly Perichares philetes (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae), described in 1775, which barcoding splits into a complex of four species in Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG) in northwestern Costa Rica. Three of the species are new, and all four are described. Caterpillars, pupae, and foodplants offer better distinguishing characters than do adults, whose differences are mostly average, subtle, and blurred by intraspecific variation. The caterpillars of two species are generalist grass-eaters; of the other two, specialist palm-eaters, each of which feeds on different genera. But all of these cryptic species are more specialized in their diet than was the morphospecies that held them. The four ACG taxa discovered to date belong to a panneotropical complex of at least eight species. This complex likely includes still more species, whose exposure may require barcoding. Barcoding ACG hesperiid morphospecies has increased their number by nearly 10%, an unexpectedly high figure for such relatively well known insects. PMID:18436645

  16. DNA barcodes and cryptic species of skipper butterflies in the genus Perichares in Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, John M; Janzen, Daniel H; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Hallwachs, Winnie; Hebert, Paul D N

    2008-04-29

    DNA barcodes can be used to identify cryptic species of skipper butterflies previously detected by classic taxonomic methods and to provide first clues to the existence of yet other cryptic species. A striking case is the common geographically and ecologically widespread neotropical skipper butterfly Perichares philetes (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae), described in 1775, which barcoding splits into a complex of four species in Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG) in northwestern Costa Rica. Three of the species are new, and all four are described. Caterpillars, pupae, and foodplants offer better distinguishing characters than do adults, whose differences are mostly average, subtle, and blurred by intraspecific variation. The caterpillars of two species are generalist grass-eaters; of the other two, specialist palm-eaters, each of which feeds on different genera. But all of these cryptic species are more specialized in their diet than was the morphospecies that held them. The four ACG taxa discovered to date belong to a panneotropical complex of at least eight species. This complex likely includes still more species, whose exposure may require barcoding. Barcoding ACG hesperiid morphospecies has increased their number by nearly 10%, an unexpectedly high figure for such relatively well known insects. PMID:18436645

  17. On the nonlinear on-off dynamics of a butterfly valve actuated by an induced electromotive force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwuimy, C. A. Kitio; Ramakrishnan, S.; Nataraj, C.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we study the nonlinear dynamics of a butterfly valve actuated by the induced electromotive force (emf) of a permanent magnet, with a focus on the on-off dynamics of the valve and its nonlinear response under ambient perturbation. The complex interplay between the electromagnetic, hydrodynamic and mechanical forces leads to a fundamentally multiphysical, nonlinear dynamical model for the problem. First, we analyze the stability of the on-off conditions in terms of three critical dynamical parameters - the actuating DC voltage, inlet velocity and the opening angle. Next, the response of the system to perturbations around the equilibrium points is studied in terms of the frequency response using the method of multiple scales. Finally, evidence of fractality is established using Melnikov analysis and a plot of the basins of attraction. The results reported in the article, in addition to being of fundamental theoretical interest, are expected to impact practical design considerations of electromechanical butterfly valves. For a voltage ve>vc, theoretically, the system may undergo bifurcations into the physically infeasible domain ?>?m (beyond the physical boundary). Practically however, this jump cannot be realized due to the stopper in the plunger. In other words, the valve will completely close the pipe under this condition, leading to catastrophic behavior. For a voltage velubrication.

  18. Morphological Characters Are Compatible with Mitogenomic Data in Resolving the Phylogeny of Nymphalid Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea: Nymphalidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qing-Hui; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yun-Liang; Hao, Jia-Sheng; Yang, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Nymphalidae is the largest family of butterflies with their phylogenetic relationships not adequately approached to date. The mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of 11 new nymphalid species were reported and a comparative mitogenomic analysis was conducted together with other 22 available nymphalid mitogenomes. A phylogenetic analysis of the 33 species from all 13 currently recognized nymphalid subfamilies was done based on the mitogenomic data set with three Lycaenidae species as the outgroups. The mitogenome comparison showed that the eleven new mitogenomes were similar with those of other butterflies in gene content and order. The reconstructed phylogenetic trees reveal that the nymphalids are made up of five major clades (the nymphaline, heliconiine, satyrine, danaine and libytheine clades), with sister relationship between subfamilies Cyrestinae and Biblidinae, and most likely between subfamilies Morphinae and Satyrinae. This whole mitogenome-based phylogeny is generally congruent with those of former studies based on nuclear-gene and mitogenomic analyses, but differs considerably from the result of morphological cladistic analysis, such as the basal position of Libytheinae in morpho-phylogeny is not confirmed in molecular studies. However, we found that the mitogenomic phylogeny established herein is compatible with selected morphological characters (including developmental and adult morpho-characters). PMID:25860387

  19. Dispersal and gene flow in the rare, parasitic Large Blue butterfly Maculinea arion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Line Vej; Andersen, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Dispersal is crucial for gene flow and often determines the long-term stability of meta-populations, particularly in rare species with specialized life cycles. Such species are often foci of conservation efforts because they suffer disproportionally from degradation and fragmentation of their habitat. However, detailed knowledge of effective gene flow through dispersal is often missing, so that conservation strategies have to be based on mark-recapture observations that are suspected to be poor predictors of long-distance dispersal. These constraints have been especially severe in the study of butterfly populations, where microsatellite markers have been difficult to develop. We used eight microsatellite markers to analyse genetic population structure of the Large Blue butterfly Maculinea arion in Sweden. During recent decades, this species has become an icon of insect conservation after massive decline throughout Europe and extinction in Britain followed by reintroduction of a seed population from the Swedish island of Öland. We find that populations are highly structured genetically, but that gene flow occurs over distances 15 times longer than the maximum distance recorded from mark-recapture studies, which can only be explained by maximum dispersal distances at least twice as large as previously accepted. However, we also find evidence that gaps between sites with suitable habitat exceeding ~20km induce genetic erosion that can be detected from bottleneck analyses. Although further work is needed, our results suggest that M. arion can maintain fully functional metapopulations when they consist of optimal habitat patches that are no further apart than ~10km.

  20. Trends in Deforestation and Forest Degradation after a Decade of Monitoring in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    VIDAL, OMAR; LÓPEZ-GARCÍA, JOSÉ; RENDÓN-SALINAS, EDUARDO

    2014-01-01

    We used aerial photographs, satellite images, and field surveys to monitor forest cover in the core zones of the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Mexico from 2001 to 2012. We used our data to assess the effectiveness of conservation actions that involved local, state, and federal authorities and community members (e.g., local landowners and private and civil organizations) in one of the world’s most iconic protected areas. From 2001 through 2012, 1254 ha were deforested (i.e., cleared areas had monarch reserve, particularly from 2007 to 2012. Those efforts, together with the decade-long financial support from Mexican and international philanthropists and businesses to create local alternative-income generation and employment, resulted in the decrease of large-scale illegal logging from 731 ha affected in 2005–2007 to none affected in 2012, although small-scale logging is of growing concern. However, dire regional social and economic problems remain, and they must be addressed to ensure the reserve’s long-term conservation. The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) overwintering colonies in Mexico—which engage in one of the longest known insect migrations—are threatened by deforestation, and a multistakeholder, regional, sustainable-development strategy is needed to protect the reserve. PMID:24001209

  1. An experimental displacement and over 50 years of tag-recoveries show that monarch butterflies are not true navigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Derbyshire, Rachael; Stalleicken, Julia; Mouritsen, Ole Ø; Frost, Barrie J; Norris, D Ryan

    2013-04-30

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) breeding in eastern North America are famous for their annual fall migration to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. However, the mechanisms they use to successfully reach these sites remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether monarchs are true navigators who can determine their location relative to their final destination using both a "compass" and a "map". Using flight simulators, we recorded the orientation of wild-caught monarchs in southwestern Ontario and found that individuals generally flew in a southwest direction toward the wintering grounds. When displaced 2,500 km to the west, the same individuals continued to fly in a general southwest direction, suggesting that monarchs use a simple vector-navigation strategy (i.e., use a specific compass bearing without compensating for displacement). Using over 5 decades of field data, we also show that the directional concentration and the angular SD of recoveries from tagged monarchs largely conformed to two mathematical models describing the directional distribution of migrants expected under a vector-navigation strategy. A third analysis of tagged recoveries shows that the increasing directionality of migration from north to south is largely because of the presence of geographic barriers that guide individuals toward overwintering sites. Our work suggests that monarchs breeding in eastern North America likely combine simple orientation mechanisms with geographic features that funnel them toward Mexican overwintering sites, a remarkable achievement considering that these butterflies weigh less than a gram and travel thousands of kilometers to a site they have never seen. PMID:23569228

  2. Delving into Delias Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pireridae): fine-scale biogeography, phylogenetics and systematics of the world’s largest butterfly genus.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, C. J.; Matos Maravi, Pavel F.; Beheregaray, L. B.

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 40, ?. 5 (2013), s. 881-893. ISSN 0305-0270 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : butterflies * DEC model * historical biogeography Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 4.969, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jbi.12040/pdf

  3. Stepwise evolution of resistance to toxic cardenolides via genetic substitutions in the Na+/K+ -ATPase of milkweed butterflies (lepidoptera: Danaini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschenka, Georg; Fandrich, Steffi; Sander, Nils; Wagschal, Vera; Boppré, Michael; Dobler, Susanne

    2013-09-01

    Despite the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) being famous for its adaptations to the defensive traits of its milkweed host plants, little is known about the macroevolution of these traits. Unlike most other animal species, monarchs are largely insensitive to cardenolides, because their target site, the sodium pump (Na(+)/K(+) -ATPase), has evolved amino acid substitutions that reduce cardenolide binding (so-called target site insensitivity, TSI). Because many, but not all, species of milkweed butterflies (Danaini) are associated with cardenolide-containing host plants, we analyzed 16 species, representing all phylogenetic lineages of milkweed butterflies, for the occurrence of TSI by sequence analyses of the Na(+)/K(+) -ATPase gene and by enzymatic assays with extracted Na(+)/K(+) -ATPase. Here we report that sensitivity to cardenolides was reduced in a stepwise manner during the macroevolution of milkweed butterflies. Strikingly, not all Danaini typically consuming cardenolides showed TSI, but rather TSI was more strongly associated with sequestration of toxic cardenolides. Thus, the interplay between bottom-up selection by plant compounds and top-down selection by natural enemies can explain the evolutionary sequence of adaptations to these toxins. PMID:24033181

  4. The Effect of Military Training Activity on Eastern Lupine and the Karner Blue Butterfly at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark A.; Turner, Monica G.; Rusch, Donald H.

    2002-01-01

    The US Department of Defense (DOD) manages over 10.1 million ha of land, much of which is used for training military personnel. However, vast sections receive little or no use, and military lands have become refuges for many species. At Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, USA, populations of the endangered Karner blue butterfly ( Lycaeides melissa samuelis) are found in oak and pine barren communities where wild lupine ( Lupinus perennis), a perennial forb required by Karner blue butterfly larvae, still occurs. Oak and pine barren communities are disturbance-dependent, and the barrens ecosystems in the Midwest have declined in extent by 98% because of fire suppression, succession, and habitat fragmentation. We studied the effects of disturbance by military manuever training on the density of lupine and Karner blue butterfly at Fort McCoy. We also wanted to determine whether military training activity could enhance Karner blue butterfly habitat. At locations where tracked vehicles had driven through lupine patches, the abundance of lupine and nectar-producing plants was greater in the median strip between vehicle ruts than in vehicle ruts or 5 m outside the vehicle ruts. The proportion of lupine stems with Karner blue butterfly larvae feeding sign (the ratio of stems fed upon to stems examined) was greater in areas where military vehicles had traveled than where they had not. The proportion of lupine stems with feeding sign and lupine stem density was also positively related to the occurrence of prior bivouacs and fires caused by military munitions. Shrub and forest canopy abundance were lower in areas traveled by tracked vehicles. At the scale of the lupine patch, lupine abundance and the proportion of lupine stems with feeding sign were positively correlated with military training activities, suggesting that maintenance of lupine habitat can be achieved in concert with military training.

  5. / Revision of the butterfly genus Forsterinaria Gray, 1973 (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Satyrinae)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Carlos, Peña; Gerardo, Lamas.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una revisión taxonómica de las mariposas satírinas neotropicales incluidas en el género Forsterinaria Gray, 1973, comprendiendo una discusión de la clasificación y distribución geográfica de sus especies componentes, ilustraciones de los adultos de todos los taxones y de sus genitalias m [...] asculinas, así como descripciones de 12 especies y dos subespecies nuevas: Forsterinaria antje sp. n., F. coipa sp. n., F. enjuerma sp. n., F. falcata sp. n., F. guaniloi sp. n., F. itatiaia sp. n., F. pallida sp. n., F. pallida aurita ssp. n., F. pichita sp. n., F. pilosa sp. n., F. punctata sp. n., F. pyrczi sp. n., F. rotunda sp. n. y F. rustica glendita ssp. n. Euptychia stelligera Butler y E. fabiana Butler son considerados sinónimos (syn. n.) de Forsterinaria quantius (Godart). Euptychia magdalena Hayward y E. pseudonecys Strand son considerados sinónimos (syn. n.) de F. inornata (C. Felder & R. Felder) y F. necys (Godart), respectivamente. Se designa lectotipos para 14 taxones nominales. Se reconoce un total de 23 especies. Se ofrece una clave para la identificación de todos los taxones. Abstract in english A taxonomic review of the Neotropical satyrine butterfly genus Forsterinaria Gray is presented herein, including a discussion of the classification and geographical distribution of its component species, illustrations of the adults of all taxa and the male genitalia of all species, and descriptions [...] of 12 new species and two new subspecies: Forsterinaria antje sp. n., F. coipa sp. n., F. enjuerma sp. n., F. falcata sp. n., F. guaniloi sp. n., F. itatiaia sp. n., F. pallida sp. n., F. pallida aurita ssp. n., F. pichita sp. n., F. pilosa sp. n., F. punctata sp. n., F. pyrczi sp. n., F. rotunda sp. n., and F. rustica glendita ssp. n. Euptychia stelligera Butler, and E. fabiana Butler are sunk as synonyms (syn. n.) of Forsterinaria quantius (Godart). Euptychia magdalena Hayward, and E. pseudonecys Strand are sunk as synonyms (syn. n.) of F. inornata (C. Felder & R. Felder), and F. necys (Godart), respectively. Lectotypes are designated for 14 nominal taxa. A total of 23 species are recognized. A key for the identification of all taxa is presented.

  6. Phylogeography and genetic diversity of a widespread Old World butterfly, Lampides boeticus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce Naomi E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary genetics provides a rich theoretical framework for empirical studies of phylogeography. Investigations of intraspecific genetic variation can uncover new putative species while allowing inference into the evolutionary origin and history of extant populations. With a distribution on four continents ranging throughout most of the Old World, Lampides boeticus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae is one of the most widely distributed species of butterfly. It is placed in a monotypic genus with no commonly accepted subspecies. Here, we investigate the demographic history and taxonomic status of this widespread species, and screen for the presence or absence of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia. Results We performed phylogenetic, population genetic, and phylogeographic analyses using 1799 bp of mitochondrial sequence data from 57 specimens collected throughout the species' range. Most of the samples (>90% were nearly genetically identical, with uncorrected pairwise sequence differences of 0 – 0.5% across geographic distances > 9,000 km. However, five samples from central Thailand, Madagascar, northern Australia and the Moluccas formed two divergent clades differing from the majority of samples by uncorrected pairwise distances ranging from 1.79 – 2.21%. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that L. boeticus is almost certainly monophyletic, with all sampled genes coalescing well after the divergence from three closely related taxa included for outgroup comparisons. Analyses of molecular diversity indicate that most L. boeticus individuals in extant populations are descended from one or two relatively recent population bottlenecks. Conclusion The combined analyses suggest a scenario in which the most recent common ancestor of L. boeticus and its sister taxon lived in the African region approximately 7 Mya; extant lineages of L. boeticus began spreading throughout the Old World at least 1.5 Mya. More recently, expansion after population bottlenecks approximately 1.4 Mya seem to have displaced most of the ancestral polymorphism throughout its range, though at least two early-branching lineages still persist. One of these lineages, in northern Australia and the Moluccas, may have experienced accelerated differentiation due to infection with the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia, which affects reproduction. Examination of a haplotype network suggests that Australia has been colonized by the species several times. While there is little evidence for the existence of morphologically cryptic species, these results suggest a complex history affected by repeated dispersal events.

  7. Measuring the Meaning of Words in Contexts: An automated analysis of controversies about Monarch butterflies, Frankenfoods, and stem cells

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2009-01-01

    Co-words have been considered as carriers of meaning across different domains in studies of science, technology, and society. Words and co-words, however, obtain meaning in sentences, and sentences obtain meaning in their contexts of use. At the science/society interface, words can be expected to have different meanings: the codes of communication that provide meaning to words differ on the varying sides of the interface. Furthermore, meanings and interfaces may change over time. Given this structuring of meaning across interfaces and over time, we distinguish between metaphors and diaphors as reflexive mechanisms that facilitate the translation between contexts. Our empirical focus is on three recent scientific controversies: Monarch butterflies, Frankenfoods, and stem-cell therapies. This study explores new avenues that relate the study of co-word analysis in context with the sociological quest for the analysis and processing of meaning.

  8. Hormigas como plagas potenciales en tres criaderos de mariposas del suroccidente de Colombia / Ants as potential pest of butterflies in three rearing in the southwest of Colombia

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    María Catalina, Sanabria-Blandón; Patricia, Chacón de Ulloa.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La fauna de hormigas asociada con la zoocría de mariposas en los departamentos de Valle del Cauca y Quindío (Colombia), se colectó por captura manual en tres ambientes (mariposario, vivero y laboratorio). De 125 muestras se extrajeron 779 hormigas, pertenecientes a cinco subfamilias, 18 géneros y 24 [...] especies. El mayor número de especies se registró en el área de laboratorio (17), seguido por vivero (16) y mariposario (13). No se encontraron diferencias significativas (Chi² = 6.019, g.l.= 10, P>0.75), al evaluar la preferencia de las hormigas por un ambiente, sin embargo se observaron tendencias de esta manera: Wasmannia auropunctata (50%), Linepithema sp. (47%), Monomorium floricola (40%) fueron las más importantes en el laboratorio, mientras que en el mariposario fueron Linepithema humile (42%), Camponotus novogranadensis (39%) y Paratrechina longiconis (37.5%) y en el vivero W. auropunctata (37.5%) y P. longicornis (37.5%). Algunas de estas hormigas son reconocidas como vagabundas y plagas urbanas, lo que podría considerarse como un riesgo potencial para las actividades de zoocría de mariposas. En el presente estudio se propuso conocer las especies de hormigas que se asocian con tres criaderos de mariposas localizados en el suroccidente colombiano. Abstract in english The ant fauna associated to the butterflies rearing in the departments of Cauca Valley and Quindio (Colombia) was studied. The ants were collected using manual capture method in three different environments (butterfly garden, nursery and laboratory). 779 ants were extracted from 125 samples, which b [...] elonged to five sub-families, 18 genera and 24 species. The greatest number of species were registered at the laboratory (17), followed by nursery (16) and butterfly garden (13). There weren't any significant differences (Chi2 = 6.019, d.f.= 10, P> 0.75), in assessing the preference of ants for some environment, however some trends were observed, on this way: at the lab Wasmannia auropunctata (50%), Linepithema sp. (47%), Monomorium floricola (40%) were the most important species, while at the butterfly garden were Linepithema humile (42%), Camponotus novogranadensis (39%) and Paratrechina longiconis (37.5%) and W. auropunctata (37.5%) and P. longicornis (37.5%) at the nursery. Some of these ants have been recognized as tramp ants and urban pests, which could be considerate as a potential risk for butterfly rearing activities. In this research, we expected recognize the ants species associated in three butterflies rearing located in the southwest of Colombia.

  9. Hormigas como plagas potenciales en tres criaderos de mariposas del suroccidente de Colombia Ants as potential pest of butterflies in three rearing in the southwest of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Catalina Sanabria-Blandón

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La fauna de hormigas asociada con la zoocría de mariposas en los departamentos de Valle del Cauca y Quindío (Colombia, se colectó por captura manual en tres ambientes (mariposario, vivero y laboratorio. De 125 muestras se extrajeron 779 hormigas, pertenecientes a cinco subfamilias, 18 géneros y 24 especies. El mayor número de especies se registró en el área de laboratorio (17, seguido por vivero (16 y mariposario (13. No se encontraron diferencias significativas (Chi² = 6.019, g.l.= 10, P>0.75, al evaluar la preferencia de las hormigas por un ambiente, sin embargo se observaron tendencias de esta manera: Wasmannia auropunctata (50%, Linepithema sp. (47%, Monomorium floricola (40% fueron las más importantes en el laboratorio, mientras que en el mariposario fueron Linepithema humile (42%, Camponotus novogranadensis (39% y Paratrechina longiconis (37.5% y en el vivero W. auropunctata (37.5% y P. longicornis (37.5%. Algunas de estas hormigas son reconocidas como vagabundas y plagas urbanas, lo que podría considerarse como un riesgo potencial para las actividades de zoocría de mariposas. En el presente estudio se propuso conocer las especies de hormigas que se asocian con tres criaderos de mariposas localizados en el suroccidente colombiano.The ant fauna associated to the butterflies rearing in the departments of Cauca Valley and Quindio (Colombia was studied. The ants were collected using manual capture method in three different environments (butterfly garden, nursery and laboratory. 779 ants were extracted from 125 samples, which belonged to five sub-families, 18 genera and 24 species. The greatest number of species were registered at the laboratory (17, followed by nursery (16 and butterfly garden (13. There weren't any significant differences (Chi2 = 6.019, d.f.= 10, P> 0.75, in assessing the preference of ants for some environment, however some trends were observed, on this way: at the lab Wasmannia auropunctata (50%, Linepithema sp. (47%, Monomorium floricola (40% were the most important species, while at the butterfly garden were Linepithema humile (42%, Camponotus novogranadensis (39% and Paratrechina longiconis (37.5% and W. auropunctata (37.5% and P. longicornis (37.5% at the nursery. Some of these ants have been recognized as tramp ants and urban pests, which could be considerate as a potential risk for butterfly rearing activities. In this research, we expected recognize the ants species associated in three butterflies rearing located in the southwest of Colombia.

  10. The composition of cuticular compounds indicates body parts, sex and age in the model butterfly Bicyclus anynana (Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StéphanieHeuskin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemical communication in insects’ sexual interactions is well-known to involve olfaction of volatile compounds called sex pheromones. In theory, sexual chemical communication may also involve chemicals with low or no volatility exchanged during precopulatory gustatory contacts. Yet, knowledge on this latter type of chemicals is so far mostly restricted to the Drosophila fly model. Here we provide the most comprehensive characterization to date of the cuticular chemical profile, including both volatile and non-volatile compounds, of a model butterfly, Bicyclus anynana. First, we characterized the body distribution of 103 cuticular lipids, mostly alkanes and methyl-branched alkanes, by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Second, we developed a multivariate statistical approach to cope with such complex chemical profiles and showed that variation in the presence or abundance of a subset of the cuticular lipids indicated body parts, and traits involved in B. anynana mate choice, namely sex and age. Third, we identified the chemical structure of the 20 most indicative compounds, which were on average more abundant (1346.4 ± 1994.6 ng; mean ± SD than other, likely less indicative, compounds (225.9 ± 507.2 ng; mean ± SD. Fourth, we showed that wings and legs displayed most of the chemical information found on the entire body of the butterflies. Fifth, we showed that non-random gustatory contacts occurred between specific male and female body parts during courtship. The body parts mostly touched by the conspecific displayed the largest between-sex differentiation in cuticular composition. Altogether, the large diversity of cuticular lipids in B. anynana, which exceeds the one of Drosophila flies, and its non-random distribution and evaluation across individuals, together suggest that gustatory information is likely exchanged during sexual interactions in Lepidoptera.

  11. Community structure of skipper butterflies (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae) along elevational gradients in Brazilian Atlantic forest reflects vegetation type rather than altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Eduardo; Mielke, Olaf Hermann Hendrik; Casagrande, Mirna Martins; Fiedler, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Species turnover across elevational gradients has matured into an important paradigm of community ecology. Here, we tested whether ecological and phylogenetic structure of skipper butterfly assemblages is more strongly structured according to altitude or vegetation type along three elevation gradients of moderate extent in Serra do Mar, Southern Brazil. Skippers were surveyed along three different mountain transects, and data on altitude and vegetation type of every collection site were recorded. NMDS ordination plots were used to assess community turnover and the influence of phylogenetic distance between species on apparent community patterns. Ordinations based on ecological similarity (Bray-Curtis index) were compared to those based on phylogenetic distance measures (MPD and MNTD) derived from a supertree. In the absence of a well-resolved phylogeny, various branch length transformation methods were applied together with four different null models, aiming to assess if results were confounded by low-resolution trees. Species composition as well as phylogenetic community structure of skipper butterflies were more prominently related to vegetation type instead of altitude per se. Phylogenetic distances reflected spatial community patterns less clearly than species composition, but revealed a more distinct fauna of monocot feeders associated with grassland habitats, implying that historical factors have played a fundamental role in shaping species composition across elevation gradients. Phylogenetic structure of community turned out to be a relevant additional tool which was even superior to identify faunal contrasts between forest and grassland habitats related to deep evolutionary splits. Since endemic skippers tend to occur in grassland habitats in the Serra do Mar, inclusion of phylogenetic diversity may also be important for conservation decisions. PMID:25272004

  12. Stable Heliconius butterfly hybrid zones are correlated with a local rainfall peak at the edge of the Amazon basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Neil; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K; Mallet, James

    2014-12-01

    Multilocus clines between Müllerian mimetic races of Heliconius butterflies provide a classic example of the maintenance of hybrid zones and their importance in speciation. Concordant hybrid zones in the mimics Heliconius erato and H. melpomene in northern Peru were carefully documented in the 1980s, and this prior work now permits a historical analysis of the movement or stasis of the zones. Previous work predicted that these zones might be moving toward the Andes due to selective asymmetry. Extensive deforestation and climate change might also be expected to affect the positions and widths of the hybrid zones. We show that the positions and shapes of these hybrid zones have instead remained remarkably stable between 1985 and 2012. The stability of this interaction strongly implicates continued selection, rather than neutral mixing following secondary contact. The stability of cline widths and strong linkage disequilibria (gametic correlation coefficients Rmax = 0.35-0.56 among unlinked loci) over 25 years suggest that mimetic selection pressures on each color pattern locus have remained approximately constant (s ? 0.13-0.40 per locus in both species). Exceptionally high levels of precipitation at the edge of the easternmost Andes may act as a population density trough for butterflies, trapping the hybrid zones at the foot of the mountains, and preventing movement. As such, our results falsify one prediction of the Pleistocene Refugium theory: That the ranges of divergent species or subspecies should be centered on regions characterized by maxima of rainfall, with hybrid zones falling in more arid regions between them. PMID:25311415

  13. Field evidence and model predictions of butterfly-mediated apparent competition between gentian plants and red ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. A.; Elmes, G. W.; Clarke, R. T.; Kim, K. G.; Munguira, M. L.; Hochberg, M. E.

    1997-11-01

    In recent spatial models describing interactions among a myrmecophilous butterfly Maculinea rebeli, a gentian Gentiana cruciata and two competing species of Myrmica ant, we predicted that apparent competition should exist between gentians (the food of young M. rebeli caterpillars) and Myrmica schencki, which supports M. rebeli in its final instar. Here we extend and quantify model predictions about the nature of this phenomenon, and relate them to ecological theory. We predict that: (i) Within sites supporting the butterfly, fewer M. schencki colonies occur in sub-areas containing gentians than in identical habitat lacking this plant. (ii) Where G. cruciata and M. schencki do co-exist, the ant colonies will be less than half the size of those living > 1.5 m from gentians; (iii) The turnover of M. schencki colonies will be much greater than that of other Myrmica species in nest sites situated within 1.5 m of a gentian. All three predictions were supported in the field on 3-6 sites in two mountain ranges, although the exact strength of the apparent competition differed from some model predictions. Field data were also consistent with predictions about apparent mutualisms between gentians and other ants. We suggest that apparent competition is likely to arise in any system in which a specialist enemy feeds sequentially on two or more species during its life-cycle, as occurs in many true parasite-host interactions. We also predict that more complex patterns involving other Myrmica species and G. cruciata occur in our system, with apparent competition existing between them in some sub-areas of a site being balanced by apparent mutualism between them in other sub-areas.

  14. Protected species of butterflies (Lepidoptera in the National Nature Park “Velyky Lug”

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    ?. K. Goloborodko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Velyky Lug is a unique natural complex which has a large biogeographical, ecological, environmental, historical and recreational value. The National Nature Park “Velyky Lug” was only created as recently as 2006.The park is located in Zaporizhzhya region, 15–18 km south of the city Zaporizhzhya, within the limits of floodplain area of the Dnepr river, which broadens to a width of over 20 kmbetween Bilen’ke and Vasilivka (north-eastern part of the Kakhovskoe reservoir. This enormous expansion of the floodplain (about 80,000 ha which is situated between the Dnepr river and its tributary the Kins’ka was in historical times was called the Kin’ski Floodplain or Great Meadow. In modern times this territory is almost completely flooded by the waters of the Kakhovskoe reservoir. Remnants of natural habitats have been preserved along the river banks – in the form of little valleys and ravines which extend all the shore and also islands which appeared in 1956 when the reservoir was flooded. The overall area of the park “Velyky Lug” is 16,756 ha. Within the territory of the park “Velyky Lug” we have recorded 27 species of Lepidoptera which have various levels of conservation status. The taxonomical structure of the complex varies and included representatives of all basic families of moth and day butterflies which have species that are protected by law. In a taxonomical relation this complex is formed by the representatives of 11 families (Zygaenidae, Saturniidae, Sphingidae, Noctuidae, Arctiidae, Hesperiidae, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Nymphalidae, Satyridae, Lycaenidae. Zoogeographical analysis of the species that are protected in the territory of the park can be classified into 5 basic groups (Palearctic – 26%, Pontokazach – 26%, Mediterranean– 22%, Eurosiberian – 15%, European – 11%. Analysis of the biotopic advantages of the protected Lepidoptera species present in the territory of the park showed representatives from all 6 ecological groups which are included in the Lepidoptera fauna of Central Europe. The ecological structure appears highly interesting: xerothermophilous-1 – 46%, mesophilous-1 – 18%, xerothermophilous-2 – 15%, mesophilous-2 – 11%, hygrophilous – 4%, ubiquitous – 4%. Analysis of modern threats to the existence of Lepidoptera within park area reveals the following factors: erosion of the shores of Kakhovskoe reservoir, overgrazing by live-stock, recreational overload and artificial afforestation. Most species (45% that are protected in the territory of the park and included in the IUCN Red List have status of vulnerable (VU. Hylis hyppophaes (Esper, [1793] is the only species of conservation importance in the park which has expanded its range in Ukraine in the last 50 years. One of main terms of conditions for the survival of rare and vanishing species, including Lepidoptera, is creation of national red lists (for example, Red Book of Ukraine. 29% species of Lepidoptera, included in the Red Book of Ukraine have been recorded in the territory of the “Velyky Lug” park. Analysis of the categories of these species confirms that Zygaena laeta (Hübner, 1790 alone is classified as a vanishing species on the Ukrainian level, the others being classified as vulnerable (53% and rare (41%. Among the species included in the Red Book of Ukraine, those for which the park has special significance on account of the stability and high numbers of their populations within the park are – Acherontia atropos (Linnaeus, 1758, Zerynthia polyxena ([Denis et Schiffermüller, 1775] and Plebeius pylaon (Fisher von Waldheim, 1832.

  15. Ecological genetics and evolution of the Large Blue butterfly – consequences of an extraordinary lifecycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Line Vej

    2010-01-01

    The large blue butterflies (genus Maculinea) have received much attention from both scientists and the general public. The reason for this is their highly specialized life cycle that depends on the dual presence of a species specific larval food-plant and host-ant. The genus consists of at least six species, which are all confined to grasslands. This habitat type has declined rapidly in the last century, and all Maculinea species are locally threatened in large parts of their distribution ranges. Appropriate future conservation of these species requires detailed knowledge on their complex life cycles. Moreover, this knowledge allows studies of the origin and evolution of specific life history traits, and for this purpose a well resolved phylogeny is essential. The phylogentic relationship between Maculinea and its sister genus Phengaris has been disputed due to conflicting results from molecular and morphological datasets. By including additional taxa and genetic markers to the existing molecular dataset, I improved the molecular phylogeny of the Glaucopsyche section where the two genera are placed, and find high support for Maculinea being a monophyletic clade. The relationships within Maculinea species have also been unclear. Many subspecies have been described, due to variation in the wing pattern of imagos, but also due to differences in larval food-plant or host-ant. In particular, three species (M. teleius, M. nausithous and M. arion) harbour high genetic variation, suggesting the presence of cryptic species or isolated populations with limited gene flow. I investigated the geographical distribution of evolutionary lineages within M. arion. The distribution range of M. arion covers most of the Palaearctic region, in which three distinct genetic lineages were recovered. While the distribution of individuals at the continental scale is likely to reflect historical processes, the distribution at the regional and landscape scale also reflects contemporary processes. In a world where natural habitats are rapidly disappearing, a species ability to disperse plays a critical role in population viability – both in terms of colonizing new suitable habitats and by enabling gene flow among neighbouring populations. I estimated the effective dispersal of M. arion, which is considered a sedentary species. Interestingly, gene flow occurs over distances 15 times further than the maximum recorded dispersal distance, however this depends on the presence of interconnected sites. Habitat loss often leads to reductions in population sizes and increasing isolation of populations. Remaining populations will consequently be more vulnerable to stochastic demographic and environmental effects. Furthermore, the lack of gene flow will increase the impact of genetic drift and bottlenecks and can lead to genetically impoverished and inbred populations. We studied an isolated population of M. arion that recently went through a drastic reduction in population size. While the population is genetically less diverse than extant populations that are part of functioning population networks, our time series analysis of natural history collection specimens show that this pattern is due to historical rather than recent influences.

  16. The study of population dynamics by the Jolly – Seber method in the butterflies (Insecta, Lepidoptera: Hesprioidea et Papilionoidea ???????? ???????? ??????????? ??????? ?????? – ?????? ?? ??????? ????? ?????????? ??????????? (Insecta, Lepidoptera: Hesprioidea et Papilionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbach Vyacheslav

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mark-release-recapture techniques were used to study seasonal dynamics in five butterfly species. The absolute numbers and rate of elimination and replenishment process in the populations were estimated by the Jolly-Seber method. The experience of field investigations and analysis of the experimental data are summarized and the way of optimizing the model parameters in MS Excel are suggested in this paper.????? ??????? ? ?????????? ???????? ???????????? ??? ???????? ???????? ???????? ???? ????? ??????? ???????. ?????????? ??????????? ? ??? ????????? ?????????? ? ?????????? ????????? ????????? ??????? ?????? – ??????. ? ?????? ??????? ???? ??????? ???????????? ? ????????? ?????????? ???????. ?????????? ?????? ??????????? ????????? ?????????? ? ????? MS Excel.

  17. Microsatellite markers for the large blue butterflies Maculinea nausithous and Maculinea alcon (Lepidoptera : Lycaenidae) and their amplification in other Maculinea species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeisset, I; Als, Thomas Damm

    2005-01-01

    We developed microsatellite markers for Maculinea nausithous and Maculinea alcon, two of five species of endangered large blue butterflies found in Europe. Two separate microsatellite libraries were constructed. Eleven markers were developed for M. nausithous and one for M. alcon. The primers were tested on both species as well as on the three other European Maculinea species. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 14. These markers will be useful tools for population genetic studies of Maculinea species.

  18. Specialized ommatidia of the polarization-sensitive dorsal rim area in the eye of monarch butterflies have non-functional reflecting tapeta

    OpenAIRE

    Labhart, Thomas; Baumann, Franziska; Bernard, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    Many insects exploit sky light polarization for navigation or cruising-course control. The detection of polarized sky light is mediated by the ommatidia of a small specialized part of the compound eye: the dorsal rim area (DRA). We describe the morphology and fine structure of the DRA in monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus). The DRA consists of approximately 100 ommatidia forming a narrow ribbon along the dorsal eye margin. Each ommatidium contains two types of photoreceptor with mutually o...

  19. Food-plant niche selection rather than the presence of ant nests explains oviposition patterns in the myrmecophilous butterfly genus Maculinea.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, J.A.; Elmes, G.W.

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that the socially parasitic butterfly Maculinea alcon detects ant odours before ovipositing on initial larval food plants near colonies of its obligate ant host Myrmica ruginodis. It has also been suggested that overcrowding on food plants near M. ruginodis is avoided by an ability to detect high egg loads, resulting in a switch to selecting plants near less suitable ant species. If confirmed, this hypothesis (H1) would have serious implications for the application of cu...

  20. Are female monarch butterflies declining in eastern North America? Evidence of a 30-year change in sex ratios at Mexican overwintering sites

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Andrew K.; Rendón-Salinas, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Every autumn the entire eastern North American population of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) undergoes a spectacular migration to overwintering sites in the mountains of central Mexico, where they form massive clusters and can number in the millions. Since their discovery, these sites have been extensively studied, and in many of these studies, monarchs were captured and sexes recorded. In a recent effort to compile the sex ratio data from these published records, a surprising trend wa...

  1. How life history affects threat status: Requirements of two Onobrychis-feeding lycaenid butterflies, Polyommatus damon and Polyommatus thersites, in the Czech Republic.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlancarová, Jana; Bedná?ová, B.; Beneš, Ji?í; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 67, ?. 6 (2012), s. 1175-1185. ISSN 0006-3088 Grant ostatní: GA ?R(CZ) GAP505/10/1630; University of South Bohemia(CZ) 144/2010/100 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : butterfly conservation * farmland landscape * grazing Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.506, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/article/10.2478%2Fs11756-012-0109-7?LI=true#page-1

  2. Generalist-specialist continuum and life history traits of Central European butterflies (Lepidoptera) – are we missing a part of the picture?.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barto?ová, Alena; Beneš, Ji?í; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 111, ?. 4 (2014), s. 543-553. ISSN 1210-5759 R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP505/10/2167 Grant ostatní: GA JU(CZ) 650/3115 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Lepidoptera * Czech butterflies * life history traits Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.076, year: 2013 http://www.eje.cz/pdfs/eje/2014/04/12.pdf

  3. Some ecological factors influencing the breeding success of the Brenton Blue butterfly, Orachrysops niobe (Trimen (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Edge

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The Brenton Blue butterfly, Orachrysops niobe (Trimen, 1862 (Lepidoptera:Lycaenidae, is endemic to the southern Cape and is currently listed as Endangered. This study looks at some of the key ecological factors influencing the breeding success of the species—host plant abundance and condition, nectar sources, climate/ microclimate, and vegetation management techniques. The adult butterfly population was monitored over an entire breeding season; host plants were identified and individually monitored; and egg counts were done. This enabled the effects of a number of different management techniques to be evaluated (burning, cutting, physical removal of invasive elements, and combinations thereof. A fivefold increase in the population of O. niobe was observed over the breeding season. This increase was positively correlated to a similar increase in host plant abundance in the areas where cutting and physical removal of invasive elements was practiced. Burning, by contrast, appeared to have a negative impact on host plant and butterfly abundance over the same period. Impacts of other factors such as climate, nectar sources and the natural strength of the second brood are discussed. A hypothesis, of megaherbivore activity as the principal historical disturbance mechanism promoting locally favourable conditions for O. niobe to establish and maintain colonies, is proposed. Recommendations for reserve management and future research are made.

  4. Highly conserved gene order and numerous novel repetitive elements in genomic regions linked to wing pattern variation in Heliconius butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halder Georg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With over 20 parapatric races differing in their warningly colored wing patterns, the butterfly Heliconius erato provides a fascinating example of an adaptive radiation. Together with matching races of its co-mimic Heliconius melpomene, H. erato also represents a textbook case of Müllerian mimicry, a phenomenon where common warning signals are shared amongst noxious organisms. It is of great interest to identify the specific genes that control the mimetic wing patterns of H. erato and H. melpomene. To this end we have undertaken comparative mapping and targeted genomic sequencing in both species. This paper reports on a comparative analysis of genomic sequences linked to color pattern mimicry genes in Heliconius. Results Scoring AFLP polymorphisms in H. erato broods allowed us to survey loci at approximately 362 kb intervals across the genome. With this strategy we were able to identify markers tightly linked to two color pattern genes: D and Cr, which were then used to screen H. erato BAC libraries in order to identify clones for sequencing. Gene density across 600 kb of BAC sequences appeared relatively low, although the number of predicted open reading frames was typical for an insect. We focused analyses on the D- and Cr-linked H. erato BAC sequences and on the Yb-linked H. melpomene BAC sequence. A comparative analysis between homologous regions of H. erato (Cr-linked BAC and H. melpomene (Yb-linked BAC revealed high levels of sequence conservation and microsynteny between the two species. We found that repeated elements constitute 26% and 20% of BAC sequences from H. erato and H. melpomene respectively. The majority of these repetitive sequences appear to be novel, as they showed no significant similarity to any other available insect sequences. We also observed signs of fine scale conservation of gene order between Heliconius and the moth Bombyx mori, suggesting that lepidopteran genome architecture may be conserved over very long evolutionary time scales. Conclusion Here we have demonstrated the tractability of progressing from a genetic linkage map to genomic sequence data in Heliconius butterflies. We have also shown that fine-scale gene order is highly conserved between distantly related Heliconius species, and also between Heliconius and B. mori. Together, these findings suggest that genome structure in macrolepidoptera might be very conserved, and show that mapping and positional cloning efforts in different lepidopteran species can be reciprocally informative.

  5. ITS2 secondary structure improves phylogeny estimation in a radiation of blue butterflies of the subgenus Agrodiaetus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae: Polyommatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current molecular phylogenetic studies of Lepidoptera and most other arthropods are predominantly based on mitochondrial genes and a limited number of nuclear genes. The nuclear genes, however, generally do not provide sufficient information for young radiations. ITS2 , which has proven to be an excellent nuclear marker for similarly aged radiations in other organisms like fungi and plants, is only rarely used for phylogeny estimation in arthropods, although universal primers exist. This is partly due to difficulties in the alignment of ITS2 sequences in more distant taxa. The present study uses ITS2 secondary structure information to elucidate the phylogeny of a species-rich young radiation of arthropods, the butterfly subgenus Agrodiaetus. One aim is to evaluate the efficiency of ITS2 to resolve the phylogeny of the subgenus in comparison with COI , the most important mitochondrial marker in arthropods. Furthermore, we assess the use of compensatory base changes in ITS2 for the delimitation of species and discuss the prospects of ITS2 as a nuclear marker for barcoding studies. Results In the butterfly family Lycaenidae, ITS2 secondary structure enabled us to successfully align sequences of different subtribes in Polyommatini and produce a Profile Neighbour Joining tree of this tribe, the resolution of which is comparable to phylogenetic trees obtained with COI+COII . The subgenus Agrodiaetus comprises 6 major clades which are in agreement with COI analyses. A dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA traced the origin of most Agrodiaetus clades to separate biogeographical areas in the region encompassing Eastern Anatolia, Transcaucasia and Iran. Conclusions With the inclusion of secondary structure information, ITS2 appears to be a suitable nuclear marker to infer the phylogeny of young radiations, as well as more distantly related genera within a diverse arthropod family. Its phylogenetic signal is comparable to the mitochondrial marker COI . Compensatory base changes are very rare within Polyommatini and cannot be used for species delimitation. The implementation of secondary structure information into character-based phylogenetic methods is suggested to further improve the versatility of this marker in phylogenetic studies.

  6. Sound production and hearing in the blue cracker butterfly Hamadryas feronia (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae) from Venezuela.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yack, J E; Otero, L D

    2000-01-01

    Certain species of Hamadryas butterflies are known to use sounds during interactions with conspecifics. We have observed the behaviour associated with sound production and report on the acoustic characteristics of these sounds and on the anatomy and physiology of the hearing organ in one species, Hamadryas feronia, from Venezuela. Our observations confirm previous reports that males of this species will take flight from their tree perch when they detect a passing conspecific (male or female) and, during the chase, produce clicking sounds. Our analyses of both hand-held males and those flying in the field show that the sounds are short (approximately 0.5 s) trains of intense (approximately 80-100 dB SPL at 10 cm) and brief (2-3 ms) double-component clicks, exhibiting a broad frequency spectrum with a peak energy around 13-15 kHz. Our preliminary results on the mechanism of sound production showed that males can produce clicks using only one wing, thus contradicting a previous hypothesis that it is a percussivemechanism. The organ of hearing is believed to be Vogel's organ, which is located at the base of the forewing subcostal and cubital veins. Vogel's organ consists of a thinned region of exoskeleton (the tympanum) bordered by a rigid chitinous ring; associated with its inner surface are three chordotonal sensory organs and enlarged tracheae. The largest chordotonal organ attaches to a sclerite positioned near the center of the eardrum and possesses more than 110 scolopidial units. The two smaller organs attach to the perimeter of the membrane. Extracellular recordings from the nerve branch innervating the largest chordotonal organ confirm auditory sensitivity with a threshold of 68 dB SPL at the best frequency of 1.75 kHz. Hence, the clicks with peak energy around 14 kHz are acoustically mismatched to the best frequencies of the ear. However, the clicks are broad-banded and even at 1-2 kHz, far from the peak frequency, the energy is sufficient such that the butterflies can easily hear each other at the close distances at which they interact (less than 30 cm). In H. feronia, Vogel's organ meets the anatomical and functional criteria for being recognized as a typical insect tympanal ear. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Dec

  7. Environmental effects on the shape variation of male ultraviolet patterns in the Brimstone butterfly ( Gonepteryx rhamni, Pieridae, Lepidoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechá?ek, Pavel; Stella, David; Keil, Petr; Kleisner, Karel

    2014-12-01

    The males of the Brimstone butterfly ( Gonepteryx rhamni) have ultraviolet pattern on the dorsal surfaces of their wings. Using geometric morphometrics, we have analysed correlations between environmental variables (climate, productivity) and shape variability of the ultraviolet pattern and the forewing in 110 male specimens of G. rhamni collected in the Palaearctic zone. To start with, we subjected the environmental variables to principal component analysis (PCA). The first PCA axis (precipitation, temperature, latitude) significantly correlated with shape variation of the ultraviolet patterns across the Palaearctic. Additionally, we have performed two-block partial least squares (PLS) analysis to assess co-variation between intraspecific shape variation and the variation of 11 environmental variables. The first PLS axis explained 93 % of variability and represented the effect of precipitation, temperature and latitude. Along this axis, we observed a systematic increase in the relative area of ultraviolet colouration with increasing temperature and precipitation and decreasing latitude. We conclude that the shape variation of ultraviolet patterns on the forewings of male Brimstones is correlated with large-scale environmental factors.

  8. Spatial distribution, territoriality and sound production by tropical cryptic butterflies (Hamadryas, Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): implications for the "industrial melanism" debate

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Julián, Monge-Nájera; Francisco, Hernández; María Isabel, González; Javier, Soley; José, Araya; Stefano, Zolla.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Las Hamadryas son mariposas neotropicales que emiten sonido y pasan mucho tiempo posadas en árboles, donde son crípticas. Se estudió cinco especies en Costa Rica y Panama. Cada especie tiene una altura característica para posarse. Se posaron menos del lado sur de los árboles y evitaron las partes so [...] leadas en días calurosos. Los machos dejaron su percha para volar hacia otras Hamadryas y hacia "mariposas" de cartón. Cuando se retiró los machos de los árboles éstos fueron tomados con mucha mayor frecuencia por otros machos. La mayoría de las interacciones aéreas de H. feronia se dieron entre las 13:00 y las 15:00 h y fueron más frecuentes en la estación lluviosa. De noche, los machos compartían los árboles. El sonido característico del grupo es producido por venas modificadas en las alas delanteras. Abstract in english Neotropical butterflies of the genus Hamadryas, noted by the emission of sound, spend much time perching on trees and are believed to be cryptically patterned and colored with respect to tree trunks and branches they use as perching sites, but the subject had not been studied previously. This paper [...] describes spatial distribution, territoriality and sound production in five species, under natural conditions: Hamadryas amphinome (Lucas, 1853), H. februa (Godart, 1824), H. feronia (Fruhstorfer, 1916), H. glauconome (Bates, 1864) and H. guatemalena (Bates, 1864). Tree characteristics and use by butterflies were recorded under natural conditions in open habitats (grassland thinly covered with trees) in Costa Rica and Panama, avoiding the problems that affected previous natural selection studies in Biston betularia (the "industrial melanism" moth). Males perched on the trees and used them as courting territories. The butterflies perched more often on some individual trees, and did not use others. The general tree bark ("background") color tended to match wing coloration, while presence of food, position of trees along flight routes, tree size, bark texture, and lichen cover were not associated with the frequency of perching on the trees. Most individuals that perched in the study sites were males. Species differed in perching height and populations of H. februa perched at the same heights in both countries; H. feronia moves to higher perches near day's end. The relative use of branches and trunks is not related to the time of day but reflects the typical perching height of each species. The northern side of trees is less used and cardinal side distribution is independent of time of day. Perches exposed to direct sunlight are less used in hot days. All species perch with the head downwards. Perching males frequently fly towards other Hamadryas as well as towards tethered cardboard models. Trees with experimentally removed males were taken by newcomers 32 times more often than trees with resident males. Each marked H. feronia male was seen perching on 1-4 trees daily, without difference between seasons, and each tree used had a minimum daily mean of 1.5 perching butterflies. Most H. feronia interactions occur from 13:00 through 15:00 hours and are more frequent in the rainy season. At night males share perches. Sound emission was studied by using non-destructive experimental methods (N=858) and with a scanning electron microscope. Both sexes emit sound and the sound apparatus, located in the forewing, is percussive, not stridulatory. At the end of the upward wingstroke, the wings are clapped and modified r-m1-2 veins meet at a speed of approximately 1420 mm/s, producing the characteristic clicks. Wingbeat frequency of free-flying individuals is 20-29 Hz. There is some wing deformation during movement. Clicks last a mean of 1.38 ms with mean intervals of 43.74 ms and the component frequencies concentrate around 2.4 kHz, matching Hamadryas hearing capacity and being appropriate for the acoustic conditions of habitat. The swollen Sc vein is present exclusively in Hamadryas; has a serpentine structure inside and probably acts as resonance box. Growth of the sound apparat

  9. Production of triterpenoid anti-cancer compound taraxerol in Agrobacterium-transformed root cultures of butterfly pea (Clitoria ternatea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Swasti S; Rout, Kedar K; Chand, Pradeep K

    2012-10-01

    Independent transformed root somaclones (rhizoclones) of butterfly pea (Clitoria ternatea L.) were established using explant co-cultivation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Rhizoclones capable of sustained growth were maintained under low illumination in auxin-free agar-solidified MS medium through subcultures at periodic intervals. Integration of T(L)-DNA rolB gene in the transformed rhizoclone genome was verified by Southern blot hybridization, and the transcript expression of T(R)-DNA ags and man2 genes was ascertained by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The major compound isolated and purified from the transformed root extracts was identified as the pentacyclic triterpenoid compound taraxerol using IR, (1)H-NMR, and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. The taraxerol yield in cultured hairy roots, as quantified by HPTLC analysis, was up to 4-fold on dry weight basis compared to that in natural roots. Scanning of bands from cultured transformed roots and natural roots gave super-imposable spectra with standard taraxerol, suggesting a remarkable homology in composition. To date, this is the first report claiming production of the cancer therapeutic phytochemical taraxerol in genetically transformed root cultures as a viable alternative to in vivo roots of naturally occurring plant species. PMID:22843061

  10. A combined genetic-morphometric analysis unravels the complex biogeographical history of Polyommatus icarus and Polyommatus celina common blue butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinc?, Vlad; Dapporto, Leonardo; Vila, Roger

    2011-09-01

    Widespread species have the potential to reveal large-scale biogeographical patterns, as well as responses to environmental changes possibly unique to habitat generalists. This study presents a continental-scale phylogeographical analysis of Polyommatus icarus, one of the most common Palaearctic butterflies, and the morphologically and ecologically similar Polyommatus celina, a recently discovered cryptic species. By combining data from mitochondrial [cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] and nuclear [internal transcribed spacer (ITS2)] molecular markers with geometric morphometrics, we document a complex phylogeographical history for the two species. Despite morphological similarities, the genetic divergence between these two species is high (more than 5% at COI) and they are not sister species. For the first time, we show that P. celina occurs not only in North Africa but also in Europe, where it inhabits several west Mediterranean islands, as well as large parts of Iberia, where it occurs in parapatry with P. icarus. The two species appear to completely exclude each other on islands, but we provide morphological and molecular evidence that introgression occurred in the Iberian Peninsula. We discovered strongly diverged lineages that seem to represent relict populations produced by past range expansions and contractions: Crete and Iberian isolates for P. icarus, Balearics-Sardinia and Sicily-Lipari for P. celina. This study shows that a combined genetic-morphometric approach can shed light on cryptic diversity while providing the necessary resolution to reconstruct a fine-scale phylogeographical history of species at both spatial and temporal levels. PMID:21883579

  11. Warning signals are seductive: relative contributions of color and pattern to predator avoidance and mate attraction in Heliconius butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Susan D; Briscoe, Adriana D; Reed, Robert D

    2014-12-01

    Visual signaling in animals can serve many uses, including predator deterrence and mate attraction. In many cases, signals used to advertise unprofitability to predators are also used for intraspecific communication. Although aposematism and mate choice are significant forces driving the evolution of many animal phenotypes, the interplay between relevant visual signals remains little explored. Here, we address this question in the aposematic passion-vine butterfly Heliconius erato by using color- and pattern-manipulated models to test the contributions of different visual features to both mate choice and warning coloration. We found that the relative effectiveness of a model at escaping predation was correlated with its effectiveness at inducing mating behavior, and in both cases wing color was more predictive of presumptive fitness benefits than wing pattern. Overall, however, a combination of the natural (local) color and pattern was most successful for both predator deterrence and mate attraction. By exploring the relative contributions of color versus pattern composition in predation and mate preference studies, we have shown how both natural and sexual selection may work in parallel to drive the evolution of specific animal color patterns. PMID:25200939

  12. In the monarch butterfly the juvenile hormone effect upon immune response depends on the immune marker and is sex dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Contreras-Garduño

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In insects, juvenile hormone (JH decreases or has any effect upon the phenoloxidase (PO activity, and favors or decreases the Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs expression. Although there is no information about the differential effect of such hormone, two possibilities are that it depends on (a the immune marker recorded and (b sexual differences. Here, three commonly used immune markers, Phenoloxidase (PO, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and lytic activity, were measured 3, 6 and 24 hours after administration of methoprene (JHa, an analog of juvenile hormone in male and female monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus. At 3 and 6 h post-JHa administration, the PO activity increased in females but it only increased at 3 h in males, whereas H2O2 levels increased only in females at 3 h. For the remaining times the JHa had a null effect on POand H2O2. On the other hand, the JHa had a null effect for lytic activity in both sexes at 3, 6 and 24 h. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a positive effect of a JHa onPOand H2O2 and suggests that this effect is sex dependent.

  13. Sexual cooperation and conflict in butterflies: a male-transferred anti-aphrodisiac reduces harassment of recently mated females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, J; Borg-Karlson, A K; Wiklund, C

    2000-01-01

    Sexual selection theory predicts that the different selection pressures on males and females result in sexual conflict. However, in some instances males and females share a common interest which could lead to sexual cooperation. In the pierid butterfly Pieris napi the male and the recently mated female share a common interest in reducing female harassment by other males soon after mating. Here we show that P. napi males transfer an anti-aphrodisiac to the female at mating, methyl-salicylate (MeS), which is a volatile substance which mated females emit when courted and which makes males quickly abandon them. A 13C-labelling experiment demonstrated that only males synthesize MeS. The effect of this antiaphrodisiac is so strong that most males will refrain from mating with virgin females to whom MeS has been artificially applied. In P. napi, males also transfer nutrients to females at mating. This increases female fecundity and longevity and so females benefit from remating. Hence, sexual cooperation gradually turns to conflict. Future research is required to reveal which sex controls the gradual decrease in the MeS titre which is necessary for allowing mated females to regain attractiveness and remate. PMID:10972120

  14. Spatial distribution, territoriality and sound production by tropical cryptic butterflies (Hamadryas, Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: implications for the "industrial melanism" debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Monge-Nájera

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Neotropical butterflies of the genus Hamadryas, noted by the emission of sound, spend much time perching on trees and are believed to be cryptically patterned and colored with respect to tree trunks and branches they use as perching sites, but the subject had not been studied previously. This paper describes spatial distribution, territoriality and sound production in five species, under natural conditions: Hamadryas amphinome (Lucas, 1853, H. februa (Godart, 1824, H. feronia (Fruhstorfer, 1916, H. glauconome (Bates, 1864 and H. guatemalena (Bates, 1864. Tree characteristics and use by butterflies were recorded under natural conditions in open habitats (grassland thinly covered with trees in Costa Rica and Panama, avoiding the problems that affected previous natural selection studies in Biston betularia (the "industrial melanism" moth. Males perched on the trees and used them as courting territories. The butterflies perched more often on some individual trees, and did not use others. The general tree bark ("background" color tended to match wing coloration, while presence of food, position of trees along flight routes, tree size, bark texture, and lichen cover were not associated with the frequency of perching on the trees. Most individuals that perched in the study sites were males. Species differed in perching height and populations of H. februa perched at the same heights in both countries; H. feronia moves to higher perches near day's end. The relative use of branches and trunks is not related to the time of day but reflects the typical perching height of each species. The northern side of trees is less used and cardinal side distribution is independent of time of day. Perches exposed to direct sunlight are less used in hot days. All species perch with the head downwards. Perching males frequently fly towards other Hamadryas as well as towards tethered cardboard models. Trees with experimentally removed males were taken by newcomers 32 times more often than trees with resident males. Each marked H. feronia male was seen perching on 1-4 trees daily, without difference between seasons, and each tree used had a minimum daily mean of 1.5 perching butterflies. Most H. feronia interactions occur from 13:00 through 15:00 hours and are more frequent in the rainy season. At night males share perches. Sound emission was studied by using non-destructive experimental methods (N=858 and with a scanning electron microscope. Both sexes emit sound and the sound apparatus, located in the forewing, is percussive, not stridulatory. At the end of the upward wingstroke, the wings are clapped and modified r-m1-2 veins meet at a speed of approximately 1420 mm/s, producing the characteristic clicks. Wingbeat frequency of free-flying individuals is 20-29 Hz. There is some wing deformation during movement. Clicks last a mean of 1.38 ms with mean intervals of 43.74 ms and the component frequencies concentrate around 2.4 kHz, matching Hamadryas hearing capacity and being appropriate for the acoustic conditions of habitat. The swollen Sc vein is present exclusively in Hamadryas; has a serpentine structure inside and probably acts as resonance box. Growth of the sound apparatus may be checked by its effect on flight capacity, physiological costs and ecological reasons. All Hamadryas have a membrane, shaped as an elongated cupola, in the costal cell, that acts as ear. A second and smaller ear has four chambers and may detect predatory bats when the insects are perching at night. Field observations showed that Hamadryas spp. emit audible clicks when approached by potential predators, to defend territories from other Hamadryas and in at least one species also during courtship. Severe wing damage, common in wild Hamadryas almost never affects the section with the sound mechanism. A review of the literature shows that more than 50 species of lepidopterans (11 families emit sound audible to humans and suggests that sound mechanisms evolved several times. In general, lepidopteran sound is used basically as a warning to predators and

  15. Anatomical basis of sun compass navigation II: the neuronal composition of the central complex of the monarch butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Stanley; Florman, Jeremy; Asokaraj, Surainder; El Jundi, Basil; Reppert, Steven M

    2013-02-01

    Each fall, eastern North American monarch butterflies in their northern range undergo a long-distance migration south to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. Migrants use a time-compensated sun compass to determine directionality during the migration. This compass system uses information extracted from sun-derived skylight cues that is compensated for time of day and ultimately transformed into the appropriate motor commands. The central complex (CX) is likely the site of the actual sun compass, because neurons in this brain region are tuned to specific skylight cues. To help illuminate the neural basis of sun compass navigation, we examined the neuronal composition of the CX and its associated brain regions. We generated a standardized version of the sun compass neuropils, providing reference volumes, as well as a common frame of reference for the registration of neuron morphologies. Volumetric comparisons between migratory and nonmigratory monarchs substantiated the proposed involvement of the CX and related brain areas in migratory behavior. Through registration of more than 55 neurons of 34 cell types, we were able to delineate the major input pathways to the CX, output pathways, and intrinsic neurons. Comparison of these neural elements with those of other species, especially the desert locust, revealed a surprising degree of conservation. From these interspecies data, we have established key components of a conserved core network of the CX, likely complemented by species-specific neurons, which together may comprise the neural substrates underlying the computations performed by the CX. PMID:22886450

  16. Frugivorous butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae in Irmao Teodoro Luis Botanical Garden, Capao do Leao, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Madruga Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In Rio Grande do Sul, there’s a lack of systematic information on frugivorous butterflies. This paper aimed survey the guild at Irmao Teodoro Luis Botanical Garden, an environment characterized by ecological tension between the semideciduous seasonal forest and the pioneer formations. The collections were made in three areas, each one containing five modified Van Someren-Rydon traps, baited with fermented banana. The traps remained on the field for six consecutive days per month, from September 2010 to August 2011. Within 10.800 hours of sampling effort, 453 individuals were recorded, distributed into 16 species, 15 genera, and 3 Nymphalidae subfamilies. Satyrinae was the richest and most abundant one, and two species from this group are very frequent and dominant. Richness rates indicated between 78% and 93% of the reported fauna, the species accumulation curve matches these values, and the diversity was 2.02 (H’. Prepona pylene Hewitson, [1854] and Archaeoprepona demophoon (Hübner, [1814] constitute new records for the Southern Coast of the state.

  17. Coexpression of three middle wavelength-absorbing visual pigments in sexually dimorphic photoreceptors of the butterfly Colias erate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yuri; Awata, Hiroko; Wakakuwa, Motohiro; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Stavenga, Doekele G; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-12-01

    The tiered ommatidia of the Eastern Pale Clouded yellow butterfly, Colias erate, contain nine photoreceptor cells, four of which contribute their rhabdomeral microvilli to the distal tier of the rhabdom. We analyzed the visual pigments and spectral sensitivities of these distal photoreceptors in both sexes of Colias erate. A subset of photoreceptor cells expresses a newly discovered middle wavelength-absorbing opsin, Colias erate Blue (CeB), in addition to two previously described middle wavelength-absorbing opsins, CeV1 and CeV2. The other photoreceptors either coexpress CeV1 and CeV2, or exclusively express a short wavelength-absorbing opsin, CeUV, or a long wavelength-absorbing opsin, CeL. Males and females have the same visual pigment expression patterns, but the photoreceptor spectral sensitivities are sexually dimorphic. The photoreceptors coexpressing three middle wavelength-absorbing opsins are broad-blue receptors in males, but in females they are narrow-blue receptors. Those with CeV1 and CeV2 are violet receptors in females, while they are shouldered-blue receptors in males. The sexual dimorphism in spectral sensitivity is caused by a sex-specific distribution of fluorescent pigment that functions as a spectral filter. PMID:22972231

  18. Maternal effects, flight versus fecundity trade-offs, and offspring immune defence in the Speckled Wood butterfly, Pararge aegeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hails Rosemary S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal condition can generate resource-related maternal effects through differential egg provisioning, and can greatly affect offspring performance. In the present study, the speckled wood butterfly Pararge aegeria (L. was used to investigate whether (after controlling for egg size maternal age, and increased flight during the oviposition period, resulted in changes in egg provisioning and whether this contributed to variation in offspring performance, i early in development (egg stage and early post-hatching development, and ii later in larval development after being exposed to the model viral pathogen system; the baculovirus Autographa californica multinucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV. Results Age-related changes in maternal egg provisioning were observed to influence egg stage development only. Flight-induced changes in maternal egg provisioning had direct consequences for offspring growth and survival across each life stage from egg to adulthood; offspring from forced flight mothers had lower larval masses and longer development times. Offspring with lower larval masses also had reduced survival after exposure to the viral pathogen. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that a change in maternal provisioning as a result of increased flight during the oviposition period has the potential to exert non-genetic cross-generational fitness effects in P. aegeria. This could have important consequences for population dynamics, particularly in fragmented anthropogenic landscapes.

  19. The anatomy of a 'suture zone' in Amazonian butterflies: a coalescent-based test for vicariant geographic divergence and speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K; Lamas, Gerardo; Simpson, Fraser; Mallet, James

    2010-10-01

    Attempts by biogeographers to understand biotic diversification in the Amazon have often employed contemporary species distribution patterns to support particular theories, such as Pleistocene rainforest refugia, rather than to test among alternative hypotheses. Suture zones, narrow regions where multiple contact zones and hybrid zones between taxa cluster, have been seen as evidence for past expansion of whole biotas that have undergone allopatric divergence in vicariant refuges. We used coalescent analysis of mutilocus sequence data to examine population split times in 22 pairs of geminate taxa in ithomiine and heliconiine butterflies. We test a hypothesis of simultaneous divergence across a suture zone in NE Peru. Our results reveal a scattered time course of diversification in this suture zone, rather than a tight cluster of split times. Additionally, we find rapid diversification within some lineages such as Melinaea contrasting with older divergence within lineages such as the Oleriina (Hyposcada and Oleria). These results strongly reject simple vicariance as a cause of the suture zone. At the same time, observed lineage effects are incompatible with a series of geographically coincident vicariant events which should affect all lineages similarly. Our results suggest that Pleistocene climatic forcing cannot readily explain this Peruvian suture zone. Lineage-specific biological traits, such as characteristic distances of gene flow or varying rates of parapatric divergence, may be of greater importance. PMID:20819158

  20. A butterfly's chemical key to various ant forts: intersection-odour or aggregate-odour multi-host mimicry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C.; Steiner, Florian M.; Höttinger, Helmut; Nikiforov, Alexej; Mistrik, Robert; Schafellner, Christa; Baier, Peter; Christian, Erhard

    Deception is a crucial yet incompletely understood strategy of social parasites. In central Europe, the Mountain Alcon Blue, Maculinea rebeli, a highly endangered butterfly, parasitises several Myrmica ant species. Caterpillars gain access to host nests probably by faking the ants' odour. We analysed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry data of body surface hydrocarbons of pre-adoption and hibernated larvae of Maculinea rebeli and of their host species Myrmica sabuleti and M. schencki. Data were ordinated by different methods, based on similarities in the relative quantities of compounds between chromatograms. The two Myrmica species exhibit species-specific profiles. The Maculinea rebeli pre-adoption larva has a complex profile that simultaneously contains species-specific substances of the two investigated host species. This evidence leads to the interpretation that, in central Europe, Maculinea rebeli is predisposed for multi-host use by the chemical signature of its pre-adoption larva. The Maculinea rebeli larva clearly does not rely on an ``intersection-odour'' of compounds common to all host ant species, but synthesises an ``aggregate-odour'' containing specific compounds of each of the investigated hosts. We term this previously unknown chemical strategy ``aggregate-odour multi-host mimicry''.

  1. Increasing frequency of low summer precipitation synchronizes dynamics and compromises metapopulation stability in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Ayco J M; Mononen, Tommi; Hanski, Ilkka

    2015-05-01

    Climate change is known to shift species' geographical ranges, phenologies and abundances, but less is known about other population dynamic consequences. Here, we analyse spatio-temporal dynamics of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) in a network of 4000 dry meadows during 21 years. The results demonstrate two strong, related patterns: the amplitude of year-to-year fluctuations in the size of the metapopulation as a whole has increased, though there is no long-term trend in average abundance; and there is a highly significant increase in the level of spatial synchrony in population dynamics. The increased synchrony cannot be explained by increasing within-year spatial correlation in precipitation, the key environmental driver of population change, or in per capita growth rate. On the other hand, the frequency of drought during a critical life-history stage (early larval instars) has increased over the years, which is sufficient to explain the increasing amplitude and the expanding spatial synchrony in metapopulation dynamics. Increased spatial synchrony has the general effect of reducing long-term metapopulation viability even if there is no change in average metapopulation size. This study demonstrates how temporal changes in weather conditions can lead to striking changes in spatio-temporal population dynamics. PMID:25854888

  2. Milkweed (Gentianales: Apocynaceae): a farmscape resource for increasing parasitism of stink bugs (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) and providing nectar to insect pollinators and monarch butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, P G; Carpenter, J E

    2014-04-01

    In peanut-cotton farmscapes in Georgia, the stink bugs Nezara viridula (L.) and Chinavia hilaris (Say) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) and the leaffooted bug, Leptoglossus phyllopus (L.) (Hemiptera: Coreidae), disperse at crop-to-crop interfaces to feed on bolls in cotton. The main objective of this study was to determine whether insecticide-free tropical milkweed (Asclepias curassavica L.), a nectar-producing plant, can increase parasitism of these bugs by Trichopoda pennipes (F.) (Diptera: Tachinidae) and provide nectar to monarch butterflies and insect pollinators in these farmscapes. Peanut-cotton plots with and without flowering milkweed plants were established in 2009 and 2010. Adult T. pennipes, monarch butterflies, honey bees, and native insect pollinators readily fed on floral nectar of milkweed. Monarch larvae feeding on milkweed vegetation successfully developed into pupae. In 2009, N. viridula was the primary host of T. pennipes in cotton, and parasitism of this pest by the parasitoid was significantly higher in milkweed cotton (61.6%) than in control cotton (13.3%). In 2010, parasitism of N. viridula, C. hilaris, and L. phyllopus by T. pennipes was significantly higher in milkweed cotton (24.0%) than in control cotton (1.1%). For both years of the study, these treatment differences were not owing to a response by the parasitoid to differences in host density, because density of hosts was not significantly different between treatments. In conclusion, incorporation of milkweed in peanut-cotton plots increased stink bug parasitism in cotton and provided nectar to insect pollinators and monarch butterflies. PMID:24763094

  3. Measuring the species occurrence and relative abundance in faunal studies: a case study of Finnish butterflies (Lepidoptera: Hesperioidea, Papilionoidea ?????? ????????????? ? ?????????????? ?????? ????? ? ?????????????? ????????????? ?? ??????? ??????? ??????? ????????? (Lepidoptera: Hesperioidea, Papilionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbach Vyacheslav

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Any faunal study in addition to the list of species assumes an evaluation of their occurrence and abundance. These estimates are usually subjective. We propose to unify the methods, using 10-point logarithmic scale. As an example, the results of day butterfly counts in Finland (1991–2011 were used. All the species were differentiated according to the occurrence in 10x10 km squares and relative abundance. Stochasticity in the distribution of the empirical frequencies can be reduced by fitting to a theoretical model.??????????? ?????????????? ???????????? ?????? ??????????? ?????? ????? ???????????? ?????? ???? ????????????? ??????????, ? ????????? ?? ????????????? ? ??????. ????? ?????? ?????? ???????????. ?? ?????????? ????????????? ????????, ????????? 10-???????? ??????????????? ?????. ? ???????? ??????? ???????????? ?????? ?????? ??????? ??????? ? ????????? ?? 1991–2011 ????. ??? ???? ???? ???????????????? ?? ????????????? ? ?????????????? ??????. ?????????????? ? ?????????????? ????? ????????? ????????? ???????????? ?????? ??? ????????????? ??????.

  4. Maculinea alcon exploits Myrmica aloba in Portugal : unusual host ant species of a myrmecophilous butterfly in a peripheral region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnaldo, P.S.; Wynhoff, I.

    2011-01-01

    Larvae of the obligate myrmecophilous social parasite Maculinea alcon (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) were found exclusively using Myrmica aloba (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) ant hosts in NE-Portugal. This is the first record of the host ant usage of any Maculinea species in Portugal, and of any Maculinea using M. aloba nests. These results on such peripheral European populations confirm that knowledge of the local host ant species is crucial for the successful protection of these endangered butterflies, and vital for examining the evolution of such interactions

  5. LISTADO DE ESPECIES DE LAS MARIPOSAS DIURNAS (HESPERIOIDEA Y PAPILIONOIDEA) DE ARCABUCO (BOYACÁ, COLOMBIA) / LIST OF DIURNAL BUTTERFLY (HESPERIOIDEA Y PAPILIONOIDEA) SPECIES FROM ARCABUCO (BOYACÁ, COLOMBIA)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Hannier, Pulido-B; Dumar Ariel, Parrales.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se compila el primer listado taxonómico para las especies de mariposas diurnas (Hesperioidea y Papilionoidea) del municipio de Arcabuco, Boyacá. El listado se elaboró a partir de colectas realizadas por los autores durante los años 2006-2010 y la revisión de importantes colecciones en Colombia. Se r [...] egistra un total de 142 especies. Abstract in english The first taconomic list of diurnal butterfly (Hesperioidea and Papilionoidea) species from the Arcabuco municipality, Boyacá. The list was made from specimens collected by the authors from 2006 to 2010, and the revision of important Entomological Collections in Colombia. A total of 142 species are [...] recorded in this list.

  6. ¿Las cercas vivas ayudan a la conservación de la diversidad de mariposas en paisajes agropecuarios?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Diego Enrique, Tobar L; Muhammad, Ibrahim.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En Centro América, los paisajes agropecuarios mantienen diferentes formas de cobertura arbórea como árboles dispersos, cercas vivas, fragmentos de bosque, bosques ribereños, que pueden generar hábitats apropiados para la conservación de la biodiversidad. El presente estudio caracterizó la composició [...] n, riqueza y abundancia de mariposas en dos tipos de cercas vivas presentes en un paisaje dominado por pasturas en el Pacifico Central de Costa Rica. Se seleccionaron un total de cinco cercas vivas por cada tipo de cerca (simples y multiestrato), donde se establecieron franjas de 120x5m que fueron recorridos por espacio de una hora durante dos días/hábitat. Se registró un total de 2 782 individuos, pertenecientes a 75 especies de mariposas. Las especies más abundantes fueron: Anartia fatima, Eurema daría, E. nise, Hermeuptychia hermes, Junonia evarete y Phoebis philea. Las cercas vivas multiestrato presentaron una mayor riqueza y abundancia de especies de mariposas que las cercas vivas simples. Las cercas vivas multiestrato pueden ayudar a mantener el 56% de las especies encontradas en los bosques secundarios y ribereños. Este tipo de cerca viva pueden jugar un papel importante para la conservación de mariposas en áreas de producción pecuaria, y su beneficio está influenciado por el tipo manejo que realizan los productores. Abstract in english Do live fences help conserve butterfly diversity in agricultural landscapes? In Central America, natural forests have been transformed into agriculture production areas, generating forest fragmentation, desertification, erosion and loss of biodiversity, among other concerns. Different tree cover com [...] positions are kept on these agricultural landscapes, including scattered trees in pastures, live fences, fragments of secondary forests, and riparian forests. These can help in biodiversity conservation because they generate shelter, feeding and reproduction areas, among others. We studied the composition, richness and abundance of diurnal butterflies on two types of live fences in a landscape where pastures are predominant in Costa Rica’s Central Pacific Region. Transects (120x5m) were observed for an hour (two days/habitat) in five multi-strata fences (with several plant species, strata and canopy width) and five simple fences (with smaller and pruned trees). A total of 2 782 butterflies were observed (75 species). The most abundant species were Anartia fatima, Eurema daria, Eurema nise, Hermeuptychia hermes, Junonia evarete and Phoebis philea. Multi-strata fences had more species and can help maintain 56% of the total species observed in secondary and riparian forests. This type of live fence can play an important role in butterfly conservation in livestock areas, and its benefits are influenced by the manner in which farmers manage their land. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (1): 447-463. Epub 2010 March 01.

  7. ¿Las cercas vivas ayudan a la conservación de la diversidad de mariposas en paisajes agropecuarios?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Enrique Tobar L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En Centro América, los paisajes agropecuarios mantienen diferentes formas de cobertura arbórea como árboles dispersos, cercas vivas, fragmentos de bosque, bosques ribereños, que pueden generar hábitats apropiados para la conservación de la biodiversidad. El presente estudio caracterizó la composición, riqueza y abundancia de mariposas en dos tipos de cercas vivas presentes en un paisaje dominado por pasturas en el Pacifico Central de Costa Rica. Se seleccionaron un total de cinco cercas vivas por cada tipo de cerca (simples y multiestrato, donde se establecieron franjas de 120x5m que fueron recorridos por espacio de una hora durante dos días/hábitat. Se registró un total de 2 782 individuos, pertenecientes a 75 especies de mariposas. Las especies más abundantes fueron: Anartia fatima, Eurema daría, E. nise, Hermeuptychia hermes, Junonia evarete y Phoebis philea. Las cercas vivas multiestrato presentaron una mayor riqueza y abundancia de especies de mariposas que las cercas vivas simples. Las cercas vivas multiestrato pueden ayudar a mantener el 56% de las especies encontradas en los bosques secundarios y ribereños. Este tipo de cerca viva pueden jugar un papel importante para la conservación de mariposas en áreas de producción pecuaria, y su beneficio está influenciado por el tipo manejo que realizan los productores.Do live fences help conserve butterfly diversity in agricultural landscapes? In Central America, natural forests have been transformed into agriculture production areas, generating forest fragmentation, desertification, erosion and loss of biodiversity, among other concerns. Different tree cover compositions are kept on these agricultural landscapes, including scattered trees in pastures, live fences, fragments of secondary forests, and riparian forests. These can help in biodiversity conservation because they generate shelter, feeding and reproduction areas, among others. We studied the composition, richness and abundance of diurnal butterflies on two types of live fences in a landscape where pastures are predominant in Costa Rica’s Central Pacific Region. Transects (120x5m were observed for an hour (two days/habitat in five multi-strata fences (with several plant species, strata and canopy width and five simple fences (with smaller and pruned trees. A total of 2 782 butterflies were observed (75 species. The most abundant species were Anartia fatima, Eurema daria, Eurema nise, Hermeuptychia hermes, Junonia evarete and Phoebis philea. Multi-strata fences had more species and can help maintain 56% of the total species observed in secondary and riparian forests. This type of live fence can play an important role in butterfly conservation in livestock areas, and its benefits are influenced by the manner in which farmers manage their land. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (1: 447-463. Epub 2010 March 01.

  8. Phylogenetics and biogeography of a spectacular Old World radiation of butterflies: the subtribe Mycalesina (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrini

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    Torres Elizabeth

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Butterflies of the subtribe Mycalesina (Nymphalidae: Satyrinae are important model organisms in ecology and evolution. This group has radiated spectacularly in the Old World tropics and presents an exciting opportunity to better understand processes of invertebrate rapid radiations. However, the generic-level taxonomy of the subtribe has been in a constant state of flux, and relationships among genera are unknown. There are six currently recognized genera in the group. Mycalesis, Lohora and Nirvanopsis are found in the Oriental region, the first of which is the most speciose genus among mycalesines, and extends into the Australasian region. Hallelesis and Bicyclus are found in mainland Africa, while Heteropsis is primarily Madagascan, with a few species in Africa. We infer the phylogeny of the group with data from three genes (total of 3139 bp and use these data to reconstruct events in the biogeographic history of the group. Results The results indicate that the group Mycalesina radiated rapidly around the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Basal relationships are unresolved, but we recover six well-supported clades. Some species of Mycalesis are nested within a primarily Madagascan clade of Heteropsis, while Nirvanopsis is nested within Lohora. The phylogeny suggests that the group had its origin either in Asia or Africa, and diversified through dispersals between the two regions, during the late Oligocene and early Miocene. The current dataset tentatively suggests that the Madagascan fauna comprises two independent radiations. The Australasian radiation shares a common ancestor derived from Asia. We discuss factors that are likely to have played a key role in the diversification of the group. Conclusions We propose a significantly revised classification scheme for Mycalesina. We conclude that the group originated and radiated from an ancestor that was found either in Asia or Africa, with dispersals between the two regions and to Australasia. Our phylogeny paves the way for further comparative studies on this group that will help us understand the processes underlying diversification in rapid radiations of invertebrates.

  9. Biogeographic and diversification patterns of Neotropical Troidini butterflies (Papilionidae support a museum model of diversity dynamics for Amazonia

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    Condamine Fabien L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The temporal and geographical diversification of Neotropical insects remains poorly understood because of the complex changes in geological and climatic conditions that occurred during the Cenozoic. To better understand extant patterns in Neotropical biodiversity, we investigated the evolutionary history of three Neotropical swallowtail Troidini genera (Papilionidae. First, DNA-based species delimitation analyses were conducted to assess species boundaries within Neotropical Troidini using an enlarged fragment of the standard barcode gene. Molecularly delineated species were then used to infer a time-calibrated species-level phylogeny based on a three-gene dataset and Bayesian dating analyses. The corresponding chronogram was used to explore their temporal and geographical diversification through distinct likelihood-based methods. Results The phylogeny for Neotropical Troidini was well resolved and strongly supported. Molecular dating and biogeographic analyses indicate that the extant lineages of Neotropical Troidini have a late Eocene (33–42?Ma origin in North America. Two independent lineages (Battus and Euryades?+?Parides reached South America via the GAARlandia temporary connection, and later became extinct in North America. They only began substantive diversification during the early Miocene in Amazonia. Macroevolutionary analysis supports the “museum model” of diversification, rather than Pleistocene refugia, as the best explanation for the diversification of these lineages. Conclusions This study demonstrates that: (i current Neotropical biodiversity may have originated ex situ; (ii the GAARlandia bridge was important in facilitating invasions of South America; (iii colonization of Amazonia initiated the crown diversification of these swallowtails; and (iv Amazonia is not only a species-rich region but also acted as a sanctuary for the dynamics of this diversity. In particular, Amazonia probably allowed the persistence of old lineages and contributed to the steady accumulation of diversity over time with constant net diversification rates, a result that contrasts with previous studies on other South American butterflies.

  10. Speciation via floral heterochrony and presumed mycorrhizal host switching of endemic butterfly orchids on the Azorean archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Richard M; Rudall, Paula J; Bidartondo, Martin I; Cozzolino, Salvatore; Tranchida-Lombardo, Valentina; Carine, Mark A; Moura, Mónica

    2014-06-01

    • Premise of the study: Most orchid species native to the Macaronesian islands reflect immigration from western Europe or North Africa followed by anagenesis. The only putative exception is the butterfly orchids (Platanthera) of the Azores, where three species apparently reflect at least one cladogenetic speciation event. This multidisciplinary study explores the origin, speciation, phenotypic, and genotypic cohesion of these Azorean species and their mainland relatives.• Methods: Plants of Platanthera from 30 localities spanning all nine Azorean islands were compared with those of four continental European relatives for 38 morphometric characters; substantial subsets were also analyzed for plastid microsatellites, and for nrITS of both the orchids and their mycorrhizae.• Key results: Although the three Azorean and four mainland species are all readily distinguished morphometrically using several floral characters, and hybridization appears rare, divergence in ITS and especially plastid sequences is small. Despite occupying similar laurisilva habitats, the Azorean species differ radically in the identities and diversity of their mycorrhizal partners; specialism apparently increases rarity.• Conclusions: Although morphological evidence suggests two invasions of the islands from NW Africa and/or SW Europe, ITS data imply only one. As the molecular data are unable to distinguish among the potential mainland ancestors, two scenarios of relationship are explored that imply different ancestors. Both scenarios require both anagenetic and cladogenetic speciation events, involving homoplastic shifts in overall flower size and (often substantial) changes in the relative dimensions of individual floral organs. Limited genotypic divergence among the three species compared with greater phenotypic divergence suggests comparatively recent speciation. Mycorrhizae may be the most critical factor dictating the respective ecological tolerances, and thus the relative frequencies, of these species. The recent IUCN Red-List amalgamation of Azorean Platanthera taxa into a single species urgently requires reappraisal, as P. micrantha is an excellent indicator species of seminatural laurisilva forest and P. azorica is arguably Europe's rarest orchid. PMID:24907253

  11. Changing habitat associations of a thermally constrained species, the silver-spotted skipper butterfly, in response to climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Zoe G; Wilson, Robert J; Coles, Sophie; Thomas, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    1. The impact of climate change on the distribution, abundance, phenology and ecophysiology of species is already well documented, whereas the influence of climate change on habitat choice and utilization has received little attention. Here we report the changing habitat associations of a thermally constrained grassland butterfly, Hesperia comma, over 20 years. 2. Between 1982 and 2001-2, the optimum percentage of bare ground within habitat used for egg-laying shifted from 41% to 21%. 3. Egg-laying rates are temperature-dependent and females actively adjust microhabitat usage in response to temperature variations; relatively warmer host plants are chosen or oviposition at low ambient temperatures, and cooler host plants at high ambient temperatures. 4. Climate warming has increased the availability of thermally suitable habitat for H. comma at the cool, northern edge of the species' distribution, therefore increasing: (a) egg-laying rate and potentially the realized rate of population increase; (b) effective area of habitat patches as more microhabitats within a given vegetation fragment are now suitable for egg-laying; (c) buffering of populations against environmental variation as eggs are laid within a wider range of microhabitats; and (d) the number of habitat patches in the landscape that are currently available for colonization (including the use of more northerly facing aspects; Thomas et al., Nature, 2001, 411, 577-581). 5. Conservationists often assume the habitat requirements of a species to be constant, and manage habitats to maintain these conditions. For many species, these requirements are likely to change in response to climate warming, and care must be taken not to manage habitats based on outdated prescriptions. PMID:16903062

  12. Migratory connectivity of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus): patterns of spring re-colonization in eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan G; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Hobson, Keith A; Norris, D Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Each year, millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrate up to 3000 km from their overwintering grounds in central Mexico to breed in eastern North America. Malcolm et al. (1993) articulated two non-mutually exclusive hypotheses to explain how Monarchs re-colonize North America each spring. The 'successive brood' hypothesis proposes that monarchs migrate from Mexico to the Gulf Coast, lay eggs and die, leaving northern re-colonization of the breeding range to subsequent generations. The 'single sweep' hypothesis proposes that overwintering monarchs continue to migrate northward after arriving on the Gulf coast and may reach the northern portion of the breeding range, laying eggs along the way. To examine these hypotheses, we sampled monarchs throughout the northern breeding range and combined stable-hydrogen isotopes (?D) to estimate natal origin with wing wear scores to differentiate between individuals born in the current vs. previous year. Similar to Malcolm et al. (1993), we found that the majority of the northern breeding range was re-colonized by the first generation of monarchs (90%). We also estimated that a small number of individuals (10%) originated directly from Mexico and, therefore adopted a sweep strategy. Contrary to Malcolm et al. (1993), we found that 62% of monarchs sampled in the Great Lakes originated from the Central U.S., suggesting that this region is important for sustaining production in the northern breeding areas. Our results provide new evidence of re-colonization patterns in monarchs and contribute important information towards identifying productive breeding regions of this unique migratory insect. PMID:22427813

  13. Age-specific life table of swallowtail butterfly Papilio demoleus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUWARNO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Suwarno. 2012. Age-specific life table of swallowtail butterfly Papilio demoleus (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons. Biodiversitas 13: 28-33. Age-specific life table of Papilio demoleus L. in dry and wet seasons was investigated in the Tasek Gelugor, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Development of P. demoleus was observed from January to March 2006 (dry season, DS, April to July 2006 (secondary wet season, SWS, and October to December 2006 (primary wet season, PWS. Survivorship of P. demoleus in the DS was lower than in the SWS and in the PWS. The mortality (qx of the fifth instar larvae P. demoleus in all seasons was higher than in other stages. Predators, parasitoids, and rainfall were the most important factors of mortality in immature stages of P. demoleus. Predators caused the highest mortality in all stages of P. demoleus, except the pupal stage. Predation in the DS (94.39% was higher than in the SWS (90.88% and PWS (84.04% but no significantly different among the seasons. Meanwhile there was significantly different of mortality caused by parasitoids and the rain among the seasons. Spiders were the important mortality agent in the eggs and young larvae, meanwhile in the older larvae were S. dichotomus and Podisus sp. Ooencyrtus papilioni and Pteromalus puparum were the important parasitoids for the eggs and pupae of P. demoleus, respectively. In summary, the season influenced the survivorship of P. demoleus in citrus plantation. P. demoleus had the highest survival in the wet primary season (PWS, while the lowest survival was observed in the dry season (DS.

  14. Variation in wing characteristics of monarch butterflies during migration: Earlier migrants have redder and more elongated wings

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    Satterfield Dara A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The migration of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus in North America has a number of parallels with long-distance bird migration, including the fact that migratory populations of monarchs have larger and more elongated forewings than residents. These characteristics likely serve to optimize flight performance in monarchs, as they also do with birds. A question that has rarely been addressed thus far in birds or monarchs is if and how wing characteristics vary within a migration season. Individuals with superior flight performance should migrate quickly, and/or with minimal stopovers, and these individuals should be at the forefront of the migratory cohort. Conversely, individuals with poor flight performance and/or low endurance would be more likely to fall behind, and these would comprise the latest migrants. Here we examined how the wing morphology of migrating monarchs varies to determine if wing characteristics of early migrants differ from late migrants. We measured forewing area, elongation (length/width, and redness, which has been shown to predict flight endurance in monarchs. Based on a collection of 75 monarchs made one entire season (fall 2010, results showed that the earliest migrants (n = 20 in this cohort had significantly redder and more elongated forewings than the latest migrants (n = 17. There was also a non-significant tendency for early migrants to have larger forewing areas. These results suggest that the pace of migration in monarchs is at least partly dependent on the properties of their wings. Moreover, these data also raise a number of questions about the ultimate fate of monarchs that fall behind

  15. Preliminary investigation on the effects of biological and synthetic insecticides on large white butterfly (Pieris brassicae L. larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kloko?ar-Šmit Zlata D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Control of cabbage pests is oriented towards the use of efficient but high-risk insecticides, some of them being endocrine disruptors. Biopesticides are more environment-friendly, operator-and consumers-safe, but they have low initial toxicity, low efficacy to advanced larval stages, and they require certain knowledge of pest and host biology. In our laboratory experiments we have investigated the effects of formulated synthetic pyrethroid cypermethrin (0.3 l/ha and biological products - formulations based on Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (2 and 3/ha and Spinosad (0.1 l/ha - on large white butterfly (Pieris brassicae L. larvae-instars 2, 3, 4 and 5. The effect of insecticides was inversely proportional to larval instars. Btk effect could be improved if tank-mixed with cypermethrin. The mixing of ready-made products allows a reduction 3 and 6 times compared with the recommended dose, still obtaining satisfactory results. Rate of leaf damage was reduced when tank mixtures were used. Use of two products in mixture would be of significance especially for control of advanced late instars late in season, when Btk action alone is insufficient. Spinosad was effective in inducing mortality and reducing leaf damage by all larval instars, therefore we assume that the dose could be reduced. Feeding rate and mortality are equally important parameters when assessing biopesticide efficacy. This strategy should also reduce the possibility of inducing resistance in pest population. It also tends to reduce the residues in commodities and is good solution in production of hygienic and health safe food.

  16. Role of forest conservation in lessening land degradation in a temperate region: the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo-Delgado, Lilia; López-García, José; Alcántara-Ayala, Irasema

    2014-06-01

    With international concern about the rates of deforestation worldwide, particular attention has been paid to Latin America. Forest conservation programmes in Mexico include Payment for Environmental Services (PES), a scheme that has been successfully introduced in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve. To seek further evidence of the role of PES in lessening land degradation processes in a temperate region, the conservation state of the Cerro Prieto ejido within the Reserve was assessed by an analysis of changes in vegetation cover and land-use between 1971 and 2013. There were no changes in the total forest surface area, but the relative proportions of the different classes of cover density had changed. In 1971, closed and semi-closed forest occupied 247.81 ha and 5.38 ha, 82.33% and 1.79% of the total area of the ejido, respectively. By 2013, closed forest had decreased to 230.38 ha (76.54% of the ejido), and semi-closed cover was 17.23 ha (5.72% of the ejido), suggesting that some semi-closed forest had achieved closed status. The final balance between forest losses and recovery was: 29.63 ha were lost, whereas 13.72 ha were recovered. Losses were mainly linked to a sanitation harvest programme to control the bark beetle Scolytus mundus. Ecotourism associated with forest conservation in the Cerro Prieto ejido has been considered by inhabitants as a focal alternative for economic development. Consequently, it is essential to develop a well-planned and solidly structured approach based on social cohesion to foster a community-led sustainable development at local level. PMID:24332200

  17. A asa da borboleta e a nanotecnologia: cor estrutural / The butterfly wing and the nanotechnology: structural color

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Odilio B.G., Assis.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cores estruturais são aquelas geradas como resultado da interferência construtiva da difração em uma grade ou em estruturas com certa ordenação nanométrica. A cor estrutural difere da cor química (encontrada na maioria dos seres vivos) pela ausência de pigmentos, sendo resultado apenas de efeitos ót [...] icos superficiais. As asas das borboletas são os melhores exemplos de geradoras de cores estruturais e com o advento da microscopia, o detalhamento dessas estruturas permitiu elevar o conhecimento do fenômeno assim como com o recentemente avanço da nanotecnologia, as primeiras reproduções artificiais dessas estruturas foram obtidas com potenciais aplicações em diversos campos. Neste artigo apresentamos as principais diferenças entre uma cor química e uma estrutural, do ponto de vista físico, com um formalismo bastante simples mostrando que conceitos óticos básicos podem explicar, ainda que de forma simplificada, a geração de cor estrutural. Abstract in english Structural colors are those generated as a result of constructive interference from a diffraction grade or from nanometric ordered structures. The structural color differs from chemical color (found in the majority of living beings) by having no pigments or colorants, but as a result of optical surf [...] ace effects. The butterfly wings are the best examples of structural color's generator and, with microscopic observations, details of these structures were described and the knowledge of this phenomenon increased. With the advances of the nanotechnology, the first ones artificial replications of these structures were attained with potential application in several technological fields. In this paper the main differences between chemical and structural color, from the physical point of view, are presented by using a quite simple formalism, though sufficient enough to explain the main optical concepts involved in the structural color generation.

  18. Contrasting genetic structure of rear edge and continuous range populations of a parasitic butterfly infected by Wolbachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricelli Dario

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climatic oscillations are among the long-term factors shaping the molecular features of animals and plants and it is generally supposed that the rear edges (i.e., the low-latitude limits of distribution of any given specialised species situated closer to glacial refugia are vital long-term stores of genetic diversity. In the present study, we compared the genetic structure of several populations of an endangered and obligate myrmecophilous butterfly (Maculinea arion from two distinct and geographically distant parts of its European distribution (i.e., Italy and Poland, which fully represent the ecological and morphological variation occurring across the continent. Results We sequenced the COI mitochondrial DNA gene (the ‘barcoding gene’ and the EF-1? nuclear gene and found substantial genetic differentiation among M. arion Italian populations in both markers. Eleven mtDNA haplotypes were present in Italy. In contrast, almost no mtDNA polymorphisms was found in the Polish M. arion populations, where genetic differentiation at the nuclear gene was low to moderate. Interestingly, the within-population diversity levels in the EF-1? gene observed in Italy and in Poland were comparable. The genetic data did not support any subspecies divisions or any ecological specialisations. All of the populations studied were infected with a single strain of Wolbachia and our screening suggested 100% prevalence of the bacterium. Conclusions Differences in the genetic structure of M. arion observed in Italy and in Poland may be explained by the rear edge theory. Although we were not able to pinpoint any specific evolutionarily significant units, we suggest that the Italian peninsula should be considered as a region of special conservation concern and one that is important for maintaining the genetic diversity of M. arion in Europe. The observed pattern of mtDNA differentiation among the populations could not be explained by an endosymbiotic infection.

  19. Butterfly pollination in Pteroglossa (Orchidaceae, Orchidoideae): a comparative study on the reproductive biology of two species of a Neotropical genus of Spiranthinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansarin, Emerson R; Ferreira, Alessandro W C

    2015-05-01

    Spiranthinae orchids are known for being self-compatible and offering nectar as a reward. Although data on their pollinators are scarce, members of this tribe are mostly pollinated by bees, hummingbirds and moths. Some of them even reproduce through facultative self-pollination. Nothing is known about the pollinators and reproduction system in Pteroglossa. Based on records on flowering phenology, floral morphology, reward production, pollinators and breeding system, this paper aims to study the reproductive biology of two Pteroglossa spp. Both species offer nectar as a resource and are pollinated exclusively by diurnal Lepidoptera at the studied areas. Nectar is produced by two glandular nectaries, and is stored in a spur. Pollinaria possess a ventrally adhesive viscidium that is deposited on the basal portion of butterfly proboscides. Both species are self-compatible but pollinator-dependent. The reproductive success is low when compared to other Spiranthinae. Although no evident mechanical barrier to avoid self-pollination or geitonogamy was identified, the erratic behavior of the butterflies, with their infrequent visits to only one flower per inflorescence, contributes to an increased fruit set produced through cross-pollination. The presence of ventrally adhesive viscidia in Spiranthinae is responsible for greater pollinator diversity when compared to bee-pollinated Goodyerinae with dorsally adhesive viscidia, adapted to attach to bee mouthparts. PMID:25762403

  20. Impactos potenciais das mudanças propostas no Código Florestal Brasileiro sobre as borboletas / Potential impacts of the proposed Brazilian Forest Act on native butterflies

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    André Victor Lucci, Freitas.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho discute como as mudanças propostas no Código Florestal Brasileiro podem afetar as borboletas do Brasil. Conforme exposto, os impactos principais estão na redução das matas ciliares (com consequente perda de conectividade) e nas alterações maiores nas amplas áreas de florestas de altitu [...] de. Adicionalmente, alterações na paisagem regional, com redução das áreas de proteção permanentes (APPS) e conversão de topos de morros, por exemplo, podem refletir em profundas mudanças nas assembleias de borboletas já severamente modificadas por quase 500 anos de desmatamento e degradação dos habitats do Brasil. Abstract in english This paper discusses how the proposed changes in the Brazilian Forest Act could affect native butterflies. As showed, the main impacts include the reduction in the riparian forests (with consequent loss of connectivity) and the major changes that could take place in the large areas of montane forest [...] . Moreover, changes in the regional landscape, with the reduction of permanently protected areas (Brazilian APPs) and the destruction of hilltop habitats could markedly affect extant butterfly assemblages, which have been severely modified in the past 500 years of deforestation and degradation in all Brazilian habitats.

  1. El turismo como instrumento de política ambiental en el Santuario de la Mariposa Monarca El Rosario / Tourism as an environmental policy instrument in El Rosario Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Susana, Esquivel-Ríos; Graciela, Cruz-Jiménez; Cecilia, Cadena-Inostroza; Lilia, Zizumbo-Villarreal.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available La política ambiental en México se implemento como un mecanismo para frenar el deterioro en áreas naturales como la Reserva de la Biosfera de la Mariposa Monarca, sin embargo, se cuestiona su eficacia debido al continuo deterioro, la pérdida de bosques, la mortandad de la mariposa, y la disminución [...] de mantos freáticos; todo esto acentuado por el turismo masivo. Esto es consecuencia de las dificultades de implementación de la política ambiental y de los actores que participan en ella. El análisis se realizó bajo el enfoque de Redes de Política Pública. La principal conclusión es que existe una limitada coordinación interinstitucional y esto dificulta la comunicación y acuerdo entre actores. Abstract in english The environmental policy in Mexico was implemented as a mechanism to slow down the deterioration of natural areas; such is the case of the monarch butterfly biosphere reserve, in which its efficacy is questioned because of the permanent deterioration, reflected on the loss of woods, mortality of the [...] butterflies and depletion of aquifers, stressed by massive tourism. This is the consequence of the difficulties in the implementation and participating actors. The analysis was carried out from the approach of the Networks of Public Policy. The main conclusion is that there is limited inter-institutional coordination, which makes communication and agreement between actors difficult.

  2. Mechanistic elucidation of the stepwise formation of a tetranuclear manganese pinned butterfly cluster via N-N bond cleavage, hydrogen atom transfer, and cluster rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clifton R; Gau, Michael R; Baglia, Regina A; McWilliams, Sean F; Zdilla, Michael J

    2014-12-31

    A mechanistic pathway for the formation of the structurally characterized manganese-amide-hydrazide pinned butterfly complex, Mn4(?3-PhN-NPh-?(3)N,N')2(?-PhN-NPh-?(2)-N,N')(?-NHPh)2L4 (L = THF, py), is proposed and supported by the use of labeling studies, kinetic measurements, kinetic competition experiments, kinetic isotope effects, and hydrogen atom transfer reagent substitution, and via the isolation and characterization of intermediates using X-ray diffraction and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The data support a formation mechanism whereby bis[bis(trimethylsilyl)amido]manganese(II) (Mn(NR2)2, where R = SiMe3) reacts with N,N'-diphenylhydrazine (PhNHNHPh) via initial proton transfer, followed by reductive N-N bond cleavage to form a long-lived Mn(IV) imido multinuclear complex. Coordinating solvents activate this cluster for abstraction of hydrogen atoms from an additional equivalent of PhNHNHPh resulting in a Mn(II)phenylamido dimer, Mn2(?-NHPh)2(NR2)2L2. This dimeric complex further assembles in fast steps with two additional equivalents of PhNHNHPh replacing the terminal silylamido ligands with ?(1)-hydrazine ligands to give a dimeric Mn2(?-NHPh)2(PhN-NHPh)2L4 intermediate, and finally, the addition of two additional equivalents of Mn(NR2)2 and PhNHNHPh gives the pinned butterfly cluster. PMID:25424971

  3. Reconstructing eight decades of genetic variation in an isolated Danish population of the large blue butterfly Maculinea arion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Line V; Nielsen, Per S

    2011-01-01

    Background Fragmentation of terrestrial ecosystems has had detrimental effects on metapopulations of habitat specialists. Maculinea butterflies have been particularly affected because of their specialized lifecycles, requiring both specific food-plants and host-ants. However, the interaction between dispersal, effective population size, and long-term genetic erosion of these endangered butterflies remains unknown. Using non-destructive sampling, we investigated the genetic diversity of the last extant population of M. arion in Denmark, which experienced critically low numbers in the 1980s. Results Using nine microsatellite markers, we show that the population is genetically impoverished compared to nearby populations in Sweden, but less so than monitoring programs suggested. Ten additional short repeat microsatellites were used to reconstruct changes in genetic diversity and population structure over the last 77 years from museum specimens. We also tested amplification efficiency in such historical samples as a function of repeat length and sample age. Low population numbers in the 1980s did not affect genetic diversity, but considerable turnover of alleles has characterized this population throughout the time-span of our analysis. Conclusions Our results suggest that M. arion is less sensitive to genetic erosion via population bottlenecks than previously thought, and that managing clusters of high quality habitat may be key for long-term conservation

  4. Variability of Lepidoptera communities (moths and butterflies) along an altitudinal gradient of peat bogs from the T?ebo? Basin up to the Bohemian Forest (South Bohemia, Central Europe).

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaroš, Josef; Spitzer, Karel; Zikmundová, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 20, ?. 2 (2014), s. 55-95. ISSN 1211-7420 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : moths and butterflies * peatlands * communities Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour http://www.npsumava.cz/gallery/27/8381-sg_20_2_jarosetal.pdf

  5. Wing pattern diversity in Brassolini butterflies (Nymphalidae, Satyrinae) / Diversidade de padrao das asas em Brassolini (Nymphalidae, Satyrinae)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Carla Maria, Penz; Neda, Mohammadi.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo descreve e compara os diversos padrões de coloração dorsal e ventral das borboletas da tribo Brassolini. Com o objetivo de demarcar os elementos do padrão de base dos ninfalídeos (‘pattern elements of the nymphalid ground plan’), 33 espécies são ilustradas. De maneira geral, o número de [...] elementos-padrão identificados na face ventral é maior do que o da face dorsal em ambas as asas, e a asa anterior contém um número maior de elementos visíveis do que a posterior. Os elementos da face dorsal são mais largos e difusos, e também mais difíceis de identificar devido à usual coloração de fundo marrom escuro dos brassolíneos. Espécies que apresentam coloração de fundo clara serviram como guia para a nossa interpretação de que a superfície dorsal das asas apresenta um número reduzido de elementos-padrão, especialmente a da asa posterior. Faixas ou manchas coloridas que geralmente aparecem na superfície dorsal estão aparentemente associadas com elementos-padrão específicos, e apresentam correspondência com faixas que aparecem na face ventral. Estas faixas (‘trailing bands’) se alastram a partir da borda de certos elementos e constituem uma característica predominante da coloração dorsal dos brassolíneos. Nós propomos um padrão de base para os brassolíneos que é subordinado ao dos ninfalídeos, e utilizamos a filogenia do grupo para interpretar alguns aspectos da variação de elementos-padrão da superfície ventral. As variações de padrão e cor que resultam em dimorfismo sexual e mimetismo são discutidas. Abstract in english This study describes and compares the diverse dorsal and ventral wing color patterns of Brassolini butterflies. Thirty-three species are illustrated, where pattern elements of the nymphalid ground plan are labeled in color. In general, a larger number of pattern elements can be identified on the ven [...] tral than on the dorsal surface of both wings, and the forewing has a larger number of discernible pattern elements than the hind wing. The dorsal elements are broad, diffuse, and more difficult to identify against the typically brown brassoline wing background color. Species with a light colored dorsal background served as a guide for our proposal that fewer pattern elements are present dorsally, particularly on the hind wing. Colorful bands or markings generally present on the dorsal surface seem to be associated with specific pattern elements and have correspondence to the ventral pattern. We refer to these as trailing bands, and they constitute a predominant feature of the brassoline dorsal coloration. We propose a subordinate groundplan for brassolines and interpret some of the ventral pattern variation in light of their phylogeny. Dorsal color pattern variation that leads to sexual dimorphism and mimetic resemblance are also discussed.

  6. Informatização de coleções utilizando um sistema de informações geográficas (SIG: um protótipo desenvolvido para a coleção de lepidoptera do Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade Federal do Paraná The informatization of collections usino a geographic information system (GIS: a prototype developed for the butterflies' collection of the "Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade Federal do Paraná"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Roxo Coutinho Dutra

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a prototype, which was developed using an ARC/INFO software, for the informatization of Butterflies' Collection of the "Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade Federal do Paraná".

  7. Informatização de coleções utilizando um sistema de informações geográficas (SIG): um protótipo desenvolvido para a coleção de lepidoptera do Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade Federal do Paraná The informatization of collections usino a geographic information system (GIS): a prototype developed for the butterflies' collection of the "Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade Federal do Paraná"

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Roxo Coutinho Dutra; Marcelo Antunes Araújo

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a prototype, which was developed using an ARC/INFO software, for the informatization of Butterflies' Collection of the "Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade Federal do Paraná".

  8. Selection and Validation of Reference Genes for qRT-PCR Expression Analysis of Candidate Genes Involved in Olfactory Communication in the Butterfly Bicyclus anynana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Alok; Baumlé, Véronique; Amelot, Gaël; Nieberding, Caroline M.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a technique widely used to quantify the transcriptional expression level of candidate genes. qRT-PCR requires the selection of one or several suitable reference genes, whose expression profiles remain stable across conditions, to normalize the qRT-PCR expression profiles of candidate genes. Although several butterfly species (Lepidoptera) have become important models in molecular evolutionary ecology, so far no study aimed at identifying reference genes for accurate data normalization for any butterfly is available. The African bush brown butterfly Bicyclus anynana has drawn considerable attention owing to its suitability as a model for evolutionary ecology, and we here provide a maiden extensive study to identify suitable reference gene in this species. We monitored the expression profile of twelve reference genes: eEF-1?, FK506, UBQL40, RpS8, RpS18, HSP, GAPDH, VATPase, ACT3, TBP, eIF2 and G6PD. We tested the stability of their expression profiles in three different tissues (wings, brains, antennae), two developmental stages (pupal and adult) and two sexes (male and female), all of which were subjected to two food treatments (food stress and control feeding ad libitum). The expression stability and ranking of twelve reference genes was assessed using two algorithm-based methods, NormFinder and geNorm. Both methods identified RpS8 as the best suitable reference gene for expression data normalization. We also showed that the use of two reference genes is sufficient to effectively normalize the qRT-PCR data under varying tissues and experimental conditions that we used in B. anynana. Finally, we tested the effect of choosing reference genes with different stability on the normalization of the transcript abundance of a candidate gene involved in olfactory communication in B. anynana, the Fatty Acyl Reductase 2, and we confirmed that using an unstable reference gene can drastically alter the expression profile of the target candidate genes. PMID:25793735

  9. Comprehensive microarray-based analysis for stage-specific larval camouflage pattern-associated genes in the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futahashi Ryo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body coloration is an ecologically important trait that is often involved in prey-predator interactions through mimicry and crypsis. Although this subject has attracted the interest of biologists and the general public, our scientific knowledge on the subject remains fragmentary. In the caterpillar of the swallowtail butterfly Papilio xuthus, spectacular changes in the color pattern are observed; the insect mimics bird droppings (mimetic pattern as a young larva, and switches to a green camouflage coloration (cryptic pattern in the final instar. Despite the wide variety and significance of larval color patterns, few studies have been conducted at a molecular level compared with the number of studies on adult butterfly wing patterns. Results To obtain a catalog of genes involved in larval mimetic and cryptic pattern formation, we constructed expressed sequence tag (EST libraries of larval epidermis for P. xuthus, and P. polytes that contained 20,736 and 5,376 clones, respectively, representing one of the largest collections available in butterflies. A comparison with silkworm epidermal EST information revealed the high expression of putative blue and yellow pigment-binding proteins in Papilio species. We also designed a microarray from the EST dataset information, analyzed more than five stages each for six markings, and confirmed spatial expression patterns by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Hence, we succeeded in elucidating many novel marking-specific genes for mimetic and cryptic pattern formation, including pigment-binding protein genes, the melanin-associated gene yellow-h3, the ecdysteroid synthesis enzyme gene 3-dehydroecdysone 3b-reductase, and Papilio-specific genes. We also found many cuticular protein genes with marking specificity that may be associated with the unique surface nanostructure of the markings. Furthermore, we identified two transcription factors, spalt and ecdysteroid signal-related E75, as genes expressed in larval eyespot markings. This finding suggests that E75 is a strong candidate mediator of the hormone-dependent coordination of larval pattern formation. Conclusions This study is one of the most comprehensive molecular analyses of complicated morphological features, and it will serve as a new resource for studying insect mimetic and cryptic pattern formation in general. The wide variety of marking-associated genes (both regulatory and structural genes identified by our screening indicates that a similar strategy will be effective for understanding other complex traits.

  10. Mariposas en un bosque de niebla andino periurbano en el valle de Aburrá, Colombia / Butterflies of an Andean periurban cloud forest in the Aburrá valley, Colombia

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Mario A., Marín; Carlos Federico, Álvarez; Carlos E., Giraldo; Tomasz W., Pyrcz; Sandra I., Uribe; Roger, Vila.

    Full Text Available La deforestación alrededor de grandes concentraciones urbanas usualmente crea un paisaje fragmentado con reducidas áreas naturales. El estudio de la biodiversidad en estos remanentes provee herramientas útiles para el diseño de estrategias de conservación que permiten maximizar la persistencia de la [...] diversidad local y favorecen su conectividad. Inventarios focalizados en grupos taxonómicos particulares, han sido propuestos como un mecanismo útil que permite una aproximación al conocimiento del estado de la biodiversidad en un área determinada, siendo las mariposas uno de los grupos taxonómicos más empleados para este tipo de estudios. En el presente trabajo se estudió la diversidad y composición de la comunidad de mariposas del bosque de niebla de la reserva El Romeral ubicada al suroccidente de la ciudad de Medellín, en el valle de Aburrá, Colombia. Se registraron 75 especies de 5 familias de mariposas, un número mayor que las registradas en bosques similares asociados a zonas periurbanas. Además, El Romeral sólo comparte un 50% de las especies con la principal área forestal periurbana ubicada al oriente del valle, indicando que cada uno de los remanentes de bosque circundantes a la ciudad puede tener una composición única de especies, siendo complementarias y útiles para la conservación a nivel regional Abstract in english Deforestation around large urban centers usually creates a fragmented landscape with reduced natural areas. Biodiversity studies in these forest remnants provide useful tools for designing conservation strategies that maximize the persistence of local diversity and promote their connectivity. Invent [...] ories focused on particular taxa have been proposed as a useful mechanism that allows a better knowledge of the state of biodiversity in a given area, the butterflies are one of the taxonomic groups more frequently used for these studies. In this paper, we study the diversity and composition of the butterfly community in the cloud forest of the reserve El Romeral located southwest of the Medellín City in the Aburrá Valley, Colombia. We recorded 75 species belonging to 5 butterfly families, more than recorded for similar forests associated with periurban areas. El Romeral shares only 50% of the species with the main periurban forest located east of the valley, indicating that each of the surrounding forest remnants of the city may have a unique composition of species being complementary and useful for regional conservation.

  11. Biotic Interaction in Space and Time : The Social Parasitic Butterfly Malculinea alcon and its Hosts as Model System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Andreas Kelager

    2015-01-01

    The obligate socially parasitic Alcon Blue butterfly (Maculinea alcon) uses the Marsh Gentian (Gentiana pneumonanthe) as its initial host plant, on which caterpillars develop during the first larval instars. In the last larval stage, M. alcon lives as a brood parasite in colonies of specific Myrmica host ants by using chemical and acoustic mimicry to coerce the ant workers to feed and nurture the caterpillar preferentially over their own brood. Maculinea alcon is thus an extreme dietary specialist as absence of just one of the hosts precludes presence of the butterfly and as a result it is highly sensitive to the ongoing environmental change caused by humans. The main drivers for its decline are changed land-use and associated habitat loss or fragmentation, and (in more recent times) drainage, increased eutrophication and lack of appropriate management, but future climate change may further enhance the risk of extinction. Maculinea alcon is selected as an umbrella for conservation and numerous aspects of its biology has been studied extensively. This thesis explores the spatio-temporal impact of the tight biotic dependence in this tritrophic interaction system and integrates the large body of research with novel methods such as spatial population genetics and macroecological modelling. The results presented in this PhD thesis suggest that inclusion of biotic interactions in macrecological models may completely alter predictions of species’ response to environmental change. The cross-methodological approaches offer new insight into the conservation of Maculinea alcon and thus aid the future management of this unique butterfly. In chapter I we found two syntopic populations of M. alcon to be genetically differentiated caused by their host plant flower phenology, not differences in host ant use as expected, and is an example of a genetic barrier operating on a temporal scale rather than spatial. In chapter II, we developed habitat suitability models for M. alcon and G. pneumonanthe potentially useful in locating undocumented populations and for improving management of them at the landscape scale. In chapter III, we integrated a model from chapter II but did not find an effect of landscapes resistance on gene flow between populations, independent of geographic distance. Instead our study showed that populations of Maculinea alcon are likely very sensitive to both past and current anthropogenic change and that conservation should focus on preserving or establishing functional network of habitats to support viable metapopulations. In chapter IV, we found that the suitability of M. alcon in Europe is likely to be geographically stable because of its tight dependence on the climatically stable hosts, contrary to what strict climate-based model suggests. In appendix I is a draft argument to uplist the red status of M. alcon in Denmark to Endangered (EN) from Vulnerable (VU) based on temporal trends in distribution data for the butterfly and its host plant.

  12. The endangered butterfly Charonias theano (Boisduval) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae): current status, threats and its rediscovery in the state of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    AVL, Freitas; LA, Kaminski; CA, Iserhard; EP, Barbosa; OJ, Marini Filho.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The pierid Charonias theano (Boisduval), an endangered butterfly species, has been rarely observed in nature, and has not been recorded in the state of São Paulo in the last 50 years despite numerous efforts to locate extant colonies. Based on museum specimens and personal information, C. theano was [...] known from 26 sites in southeastern and southern Brazil. Recently, an apparently viable population was recorded in a new locality, at Serra do Japi, Jundiaí, São Paulo, with several individuals observed during two weeks in April, 2011. The existence of this population at Serra do Japi is an important finding, since this site represents one of the few large forested protected areas where the species could potentially persist not only in the state of São Paulo, but within its entire historical distribution.

  13. In vitro metabolism of a linear furanocoumarin (8-methoxypsoralen, xanthotoxin) by mixed-function oxidases of larvae of black swallowtail butterfly and fall armyworm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were made of the comparative in vitro metabolism of (14C)xanthotoxin and(14C)aldrin by homogenate preparations of midguts and bodies (carcass minus digestive tract and head) of last-stage larvae of the black swallowtail butterfly (Papilio polyxenes Fabr.) and the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith)). The two substrates were metabolized by 10,000g supernatant microsomal preparations from both species. Evidence gained through the use of a specific inhibitor and cofactor indicated that mixed-function microsomal oxidases were major factors in the metabolism and that the specific activity of this enzyme system was considerably higher in midgut preparations from P. polyxenes than in similar preparations from S. frugiperda. Aldrin was metabolized 3-4 times faster by P. polyxenes, and xanthotoxin 6-6.5 times faster

  14. Ecological niches in sequential generations of eastern North American monarch butterflies (Lepidoptera: Danaidae): the ecology of migration and likely climate change implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalden, Rebecca V; Oberhauser, Karen; Peterson, A Townsend

    2007-12-01

    Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus L.) show a series of range shifts during their breeding season. Using ecological niche modeling, we studied the environmental context of these shifts by identifying the ecological conditions that monarchs use in successive summer months. Monarchs use a consistent ecological regimen through the summer, but these conditions contrast strikingly with those used during the winter. Hence, monarchs exhibit niche-following among sequential breeding generations but niche-switching between the breeding and overwintering stages of their annual cycle. We projected their breeding ecological niche onto monthly future climate scenarios, which indicated northward shifts, particularly at the northern extreme of their summer movements, over the next 50 yrs; if both monarchs and their milkweed host plants cannot track these changing climates, monarchs could lose distributional area during critical breeding months. PMID:18284764

  15. In vitro metabolism of a linear furanocoumarin (8-methoxypsoralen, xanthotoxin) by mixed-function oxidases of larvae of black swallowtail butterfly and fall armyworm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bull, D.L.

    1986-04-01

    Studies were made of the comparative in vitro metabolism of (/sup 14/C)xanthotoxin and(/sup 14/C)aldrin by homogenate preparations of midguts and bodies (carcass minus digestive tract and head) of last-stage larvae of the black swallowtail butterfly (Papilio polyxenes Fabr.) and the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith)). The two substrates were metabolized by 10,000g supernatant microsomal preparations from both species. Evidence gained through the use of a specific inhibitor and cofactor indicated that mixed-function microsomal oxidases were major factors in the metabolism and that the specific activity of this enzyme system was considerably higher in midgut preparations from P. polyxenes than in similar preparations from S. frugiperda. Aldrin was metabolized 3-4 times faster by P. polyxenes, and xanthotoxin 6-6.5 times faster.

  16. The influence of eastern North American autumnal migrant monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus L.) on continuously breeding resident monarch populations in southern Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Amy; Brower, Lincoln P

    2009-07-01

    In Florida, the eastern North American population of the monarch butterfly exhibits geographic variability in population structure and dynamics. This includes the occurrence of migrants throughout the peninsula during the autumnal migration, occasional overwintering clusters that form along the Gulf Coast, remigrants from Mexico that breed in north-central Florida during the spring, and what have been assumed to be year-round, resident breeding populations in southern Florida. The work reported here focused on two monarch populations west of Miami and addressed four questions: Are there permanent resident populations of monarchs in southern Florida? Do these breed continuously throughout the year? Do they receive northern monarchs moving south during the autumn migration? Do they receive overwintered monarchs returning via Cuba or the Yucatan during the spring remigration from the Mexican overwintering area? Monthly collections and counts of spermatophores in the bursa copulatrices of females established that a resident population of continuously breeding monarchs exists year-round in southern Florida. It was determined through cardenolide fingerprinting that most of the butterflies had bred on the local southern Florida milkweed species, Asclepias curassavica. During the autumn migration period, however, some monarchs had fed on the northern milkweed, Asclepias syriaca. It appears that instead of migrating to Mexico, these individuals travel south through peninsular Florida, break diapause, mate with and become incorporated into the resident breeding populations. None of the monarchs captured in spring had the A. syriaca cardenolide fingerprint, which is evidence against the southern Florida populations receiving overwintered remigrants from Cuba, Central America or Mexico. PMID:19579046

  17. Development, survival, and phenotypic plasticity in anthropogenic landscapes: trade-offs between offspring quantity and quality in the nettle-feeding peacock butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serruys, Mélanie; Van Dyck, Hans

    2014-10-01

    Habitats selected for development may have important fitness consequences. This is relevant within the framework of niche shifts in human-dominated landscapes. Currently, the peacock butterfly (Aglais io) occurs ubiquitously, covering many habitat types, whereas its distribution used to be much more restricted. Indeed, its host plant (stinging nettle Urtica dioica) was limited to natural forest gaps on relatively nitrogen-rich soil, but due to land use changes and eutrophication, host plants are now quasi-omnipresent in Western Europe. In order to assess the impact of specific anthropogenic habitat types on host plant quality and environmental conditions for phenotypic trait values, an experiment was conducted in woodlands, field margins, and urban gardens. Larval development was studied in field enclosures, and adult traits were analyzed to test predicted effects of warmer and more nitrogen-rich conditions in field margins compared to woodlands and urban gardens. Survival to the adult stage was highest in woodlands and lowest in field margins, and whilst development time did not differ amongst habitat types, butterflies that developed in field margins were larger and had higher lipid content and wing loadings than conspecifics from woodlands and urban gardens. Nettles in field margins provided warmer microclimates. However, and contrary to predictions, the nitrogen level within host plant leaves was highest in woodlands. Hence, anthropogenic landscapes may pose a conflict for choosing what is ultimately the best breeding habitat, as survival was highest in woodlands (followed by urban gardens), but adults with highest fitness predictions were produced in field margins (and secondarily urban gardens). PMID:25015122

  18. COLOMBIAN BUTTERFLIES XII NOTES ON SOME TERRITORIAL PERCHING SITES OF ARCAS IMPERIALIS (CRAMER) IN COLOMBIA (LEPIDOPTERA: LYCAENIDAE) / MARIPOSAS COLOMBIANAS XII NOTAS SOBRE ALGUNOS POSADEROS TERRITORIALES DE ARCAS IMPERIALIS (CRAMER) EN COLOMBIA (LEPIDOPTERA: LYCAENIDAE)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Julián A., Salazar-E..

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Los hábitos territoriales del eumaeini Arcas imperialis (Cramer, 1775) son observados en algunos lugares ubicados en diversas regiones del occidente (Alto Río Garrapatas, Valle), centro (Riosucio-Irra, Caldas, Risaralda) y oriente de Colombia (Puerto Leguizamo, Putumayo). Los machos son activos desp [...] ués del medio día, posados alertas en espera de posibles rivales o de otras especies de mariposas que invadan sus territorios. Se dan datos sobre su nomenclatura histórica. Abstract in english The territorial habits of the hairstreak butterfly Arcas imperialis (Cramer, 1775) is described in some sites located in western (upper Garrapatas river, Valle), central (Riosucio-Irra Caldas, Risaralda) and eastern zones (Puerto Leguizamo, Putumayo) of Colombia. Males are active after midday, perch [...] ed in alertness awaiting possible rivals or other butterfly species that invade their territories. Data on historical nomenclature is provided.

  19. Borboletas (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea e Hesperioidea) de Matas Paludosas e Matas de Restinga da Planície Costeira da região Sul do Brasil / Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea) from Swamp forests and Restinga forests at the southern Brazilian Coastal Plain

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juliane, Bellaver; Cristiano Agra, Iserhard; Jessie Pereira dos, Santos; Ana Kristina, Silva; Márcio, Torres; Ricardo Russo, Siewert; Alfred, Moser; Helena Piccoli, Romanowski.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo elaborar uma lista de espécies de borboletas de Matas Paludosas e de Restingas da Planície Costeira do Rio Grande do Sul e de Santa Catarina contribuindo para o conhecimento da fauna de borboletas da Mata Atlântica. Foram compilados dados obtidos com amostragens real [...] izadas através de duas técnicas de coleta (armadilha com isca atrativa e rede entomológica) nos anos de 2005 e 2011. Com um esforço amostral de 10.920 horas com armadilhas e de 360 horas-rede foram encontradas 225 espécies de borboletas nos dois ambientes, distribuídas em seis famílias e 19 subfamílias. Vinte e cinco espécies são registros novos ainda não publicados para o Rio Grande do Sul e 35 espécies são novos registros para a Mata Atlântica do Rio Grande do Sul, sendo seis Nymphalidae, dez Hesperiidae, doze Lycaenidae e sete Riodinidae. Os resultados gerados no presente estudo são fundamentais para o conhecimento e conservação dos táxons estudados bem como dos ambientes aos quais estão associados. Abstract in english This paper presents a butterfly species list of Swamp and Resting forests in the Coastal Plain of Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina States aiming to contribute to the knowledge of butterflies for these environments in the Atlantic Forest. Data compilation was obtained through inventories carried [...] out in the years 2005 and 2011 with two sampling protocols (bait traps and butterfly nets). After 10.920 trap-hours and 360 net-hours 225 species of butterflies were recorded belonging to six families and 19 subfamilies. Twenty-five species are new records for the Rio Grande do Sul State and 35 species are new records for the Atlantic Forest in Rio Grande do Sul, with six Nymphalidae, ten Hesperiidae, twelve Lycaenidae and seven Riodinidae. The results obtained in the present study are fundamental for the knowledge and conservation of the taxa studied and to their associated habitats.

  20. Borboletas (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea e Hesperioidea) de um parque urbano em Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil / Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea) from an urban park in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Glória Ramos, Soares; Andréa Aparecida Paiva de, Oliveira; André Roberto Melo, Silva.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fragmentos urbanos de mata, como parques e praças, oferecem recursos alimentares, sobretudo abrigo e condições favoráveis para a permanência de borboletas. Este estudo fornece um inventário de borboletas e também a observação das plantas visitadas por indivíduos adultos em um pequeno parque urbano, [...] Parque Municipal Américo Renê Giannetti, Belo Horizonte, estado de Minas Gerais. Amostrou-se uma área de 18,2 ha no período de dezembro/2006 à dezembro/2007, com o auxilio de rede entomológica e armadilhas com frutos fermentados. Foram registrados 165 indivíduos de 78 espécies, distribuídos nas seguintes famílias: Nymphalidae - 46 spp., Hesperiidae - 10 spp., Lycaenidae - sete spp., Pieridae - sete spp., Riodinidae - cinco spp. e Papilionidae - três spp. Entre as plantas visitadas observou-se que a com maior atratividade foi Lantana camara (Verbenaceae), um arbusto com flores de cores vibrantes, destacada como fonte usual de néctar e pólen. As borboletas encontradas indicaram a importância da manutenção de áreas verdes urbanas, proporcionando condições favoráveis para a permanência de borboletas, mesmo em ambientes antrópicos. Abstract in english Urban forest fragments, such as parks and squares provide food resources, shelter, and favorable conditions for the maintenance of butterflies. This study provides an inventory of butterflies and observations of plants visited by adults in a small urban park, the Américo Renê Giannetti Municipal cit [...] y park, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State. We sampled an area of 18.2 ha from December 2006 to December 2007 with entomological net and traps baited with fermented fruits. We recorded 165 individuals belonging to 78 species, as follows: 46 spp. of Nymphalidae; 10 spp. of Hesperiidae, seven spp. of Lycaenidae, seven spp. of Pieridae, five spp. of Riodinidae; and three species of Papilionidae. Between the plants visited the more attractive was Lantana camara (Verbenaceae), a shrub with flowers of vibrant colors and common source of nectar and pollen. The butterflies recorded show the importance of maintenance of urban green areas, providing favorable conditions for the permanence of butterflies, even in anthropic environments.