WorldWideScience

Sample records for butterfly eurema hecabe

  1. Multiple infection with Wolbachia inducing different reproductive manipulations in the butterfly Eurema hecabe.

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroki, Masato; Tagami, Yohsuke; Miura, Kazuki; Kato, Yoshiomi

    2004-01-01

    Wolbachia are rickettsial intracellular symbionts of arthropods and nematodes. In arthropods, they act as selfish genetic elements and manipulate host reproduction, including sex-ratio distortion and cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). Previous studies showed that infection of feminizing Wolbachia and CI Wolbachia sympatrically occurred in the butterfly Eurema hecabe. We demonstrate that feminization-infecting individuals can rescue sperm modified by CI-infecting males. Phylogenetic analysis re...

  2. Feminization of genetic males by a symbiotic bacterium in a butterfly, Eurema hecabe (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroki, Masato; Kato, Yoshiomi; Kamito, Takehiko; Miura, Kazuki

    2002-03-01

    Wolbachia are symbiotic bacteria found in many arthropods and filarian nematodes. They often manipulate the reproduction of host arthropods. In the present study, female-biased sex-ratio distortion in the butterfly Eurema hecabe was investigated. Breeding experiments showed that this distorted sex ratio is maternally inherited. When treated with tetracycline, adult females of the thelygenic line produced male progeny only. After PCR using Wolbachia-specific primers for the ftsZ gene a positive result was seen in the thelygenic females, but not in male progeny from tetracycline-treated females, or individuals from a Tokyo population with normal sex ratio and reproduction. Cytological observations showed that thelygenic females lack the sex chromatin body (W chromosome). The results strongly suggest that the sex-ratio distortion in E. hecabe is due to feminization of genetic males by Wolbachia.

  3. Butterfly diversity as a data base for the development plan of Butterfly Garden at Bosscha Observatory, Lembang, West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATI SURYATI SYAMSUDIN SUBAHAR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subahar TSS, Yuliana A (2010 Butterfly diversity as a data base for the development plan of Butterfly Garden at Bosscha Observatory, Lembang, West Java. Biodiversitas 11: 24-28. Change of land use and the increasing number of visitors to Bosscha area was one factor for the development plan of butterfly garden in the area. The objectives of this research were to examine butterfly diversity and its potential for development plan of butterfly garden. Butterfly diversity and its richness conducted by standard walk methods. Host plant and larval food plant was recorded during butterfly survey. Public perception on the development plan of butterfly garden was examined by questionnaire. The results showed that 26 species of butterfly was found in Bosscha area and Delias belisama belisama was the most dominant species. Public perceptions consider that the development plan of butterfly garden will give benefit to the community; not only providing new insight (40.41%, additional tourism object (23.97% and will gave aesthetical value (17.12%. Twelve local species should be considered for development plan of butterfly garden: Papilio agamemnon, P. demoleus, P. memnon, P. sarpedon, Delias belisama, Eurema hecabe, Danaus chrysippus, Argynis hiperbius, Cethosia penthesilea, Hypolimnas missipus, Melanitis phedima and Euthalia Adonijah. Host plant: Bougainvillea spectabilis, Citrus aurantium, Lantana camara, Macaranga tanarius and food plants: Citrus aurantium, Cosmos caudatus, Eupatorium inulifolium, Gomphrena globosa, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Lantana camara, and Tithonia diversifolia.

  4. Diversity in structural ultraviolet coloration among female sulphur butterflies (Coliadinae, Pieridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutowski, Ronald L; Macedonia, Joseph M; Kemp, Darrell J; Taylor-Taft, Laura

    2007-09-01

    In some species of sulphur butterflies (Pieridae: Coliadinae) females as well as males display bright structural reflectance on their dorsal wing surfaces, although comparatively little attention has been paid to this coloration in females. We examined the spectral properties of female dorsal coloration and scale structure in three species of sulphurs for which published images show bright UV reflectance in females: the Neotropical Anteos clorinde and two species of Indo-Australian Eurema, E. hecabe and E. candida. In A. clorinde and E. hecabe, female UV reflectance is iridescent and produced by thin film interference in a system of ridges and lamellae, as it is in conspecific males. Female A. clorinde exhibit the same spatial distribution and chromaticity of UV reflectance as seen in males, but the UV reflectance in female E. hecabe is much smaller in area compared to that of conspecific males and is both less bright and less chromatic than observed in males. In contrast, UV reflectance in E. candida females is diffuse, and arises from a lack of pterin pigments in the wings, which permits a broad-band scattered reflection to be seen. This is the mechanism that is known to produce bright UV reflectance in females of the confamilial whites. Our results highlight the diversity of UV reflectances and underlying mechanisms in sulphurs and suggest multiple evolutionary pathways leading to this diversity in female sulphur butterflies. PMID:18089107

  5. Butterflies Diversity in Brawijaya University, Veteran, Jakarta and Velodrom Green Open Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Raisa Khairun Nisa'

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Butterflies have some roles in environmental as pollinator and bioindicator. Habitat is one of important factor to support butterflies growth. The aim of this research was to describe butterflies diversity in some green open spaces in Malang. Direct observations of butterflies diversity, vegetation structures and abiotic factors in Brawijaya University, Veteran, Jakarta and Velodrom Green Open Space were conducted on June 2012. Sampling was took place in each sites using cruising method in three times observation at 07.00, 11.00 a.m. and 3.30 p.m . Data were analyzed by statistical descriptive using Microsoft Excel 2007 and PAST. The result showed that butterflies composition in all sites dominated by Delias sp., Leptosia nina and Eurema venusta. The diversity index of all sites showed moderate rank that indicate communities equilibrium in environment was still good. In this case, Velodrom Green Open Space has the highest one of diversity index, it was about 2,199. Brawijaya University and Jakarta Green Open Space have a high similarity index based on Morisita Index. The highest abundance of butterflies was observed at 11.00-12.30 a.m. Delias sp. and Leptosia nina has temporal spread all day long, while Eurema venusta just in day light.

  6. Biology and distribution of butterfly fauna of Hazara University, Garden Campus, Mansehra, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Perveen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The butterflies are beautiful creature of nature with great economic importance as pollinator as well as bio-indicator of environments. The present survey was conducted to determine the biology and distribution of butterfly fauna of Hazara University, Garden Campus, Mansehra, Pakistan during March-June 2012. The study area was divided into 3 quadrates, i.e., residential area, administration area and main campus. A total of 170 specimens were collected, 10 species were identified belonging to 3 different families and falling in 8 genera. The species were identified. The painted lady, Cynthia cardui (Linnaeus; blue pansy, Junonia orithya Linnaeus; and plain tiger, Danaus chrysippus (Linnaeus were belonging to family Nymphalidae. The lime butterfly, Papilio demoleus Linnaeus and com-mon mormon, P. polytes Linnaeus were belonging to family Papilionidae. The dark clouded yellow, Colias croceus (Geoffroy; common grass yellow, Eumera hecab (Linnaeus; Murree green-veined white, Pieris ajaka Moore; green-veined white, P. napi (Linnaeus and Bath white, Pontia daplidice (Linnaeus were belonging to family Pieridae. The body sizes of E. hecabe and J. orithya were minimum, i.e., 1.4 cm (n = 4 - 13, however, D. chrysippus was maximum, i.e., 2.5 cm (n = 1. The wingspan of E. hecabe was minimum, i.e., 3.7 cm (n = 4, however, P. polytes was maximum, i.e., 7.5 cm (n = 1. Proper preventive measures should be taken into consideration in order to minimize the natural habitat loss, as butterfly fauna is dependent upon proper environmental conditions.

  7. Checklist of butterfly fauna of Kohat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Perveen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The butterflies play dual role, firstly as the pollinator, carries pollen from one flower to another and secondly their larvae act as the pest, injurious to various crops. Their 21 species were identified belonging to 3 different families from Kohat, Pakistan during September-December 2008. The reported families Namphalidae covered 33%, Papilionidae 10%, and Pieridae 57% biodiversity of butterflies of Kohat. In Namphalidae included: species belonging to subfamily Nymphalinae, Indian fritillary, Argynnis hyperbius Linnaeus; common castor, Ariadne merione (Cramer; painted lady, Cynthia cardui (Linnaeus; peacock pansy, Junonia almanac Linnaeus; blue pansy, J. orithya Linnaeus; common leopard, Phalantha phalantha (Drury; species belonging to subfamily Satyrinae, white edged rock brown, Hipparchia parisatis (Kollar. In Papilionidae included: subfamily Papilioninae, lime butterfly, Papilio demoleus Linnaeus and common mormon, Pa. polytes Linnaeus. In Pieridae included: subfamily Coliaclinae, dark clouded yellow, Colias croceus (Geoffroy; subfamily Coliadinae, lemon emigrant, Catopsilia pomona Fabricius; little orange tip, C. etrida Boisduval; blue spot arab,Colotis protractus Butler; common grass yellow, Eumera hecab (Linnaeus; common brimstone, Gonepteryx rhamni (Linnaeus; yellow orange tip, Ixias pyrene Linnaeus; subfamily Pierinae, pioneer white butterfly, Belenoi aurota Bingham; Murree green-veined white, Pieris ajaka Moore; large cabbage white, P. brassicae Linnaeus; green-veined white, P. napi (Linnaeus; small cabbage white, P. rapae Linnaeus. The wingspan of collected butterflies, minimum was 25 mm of C. etrida which was the smallest butterfly, however, maximum was 100 mm of P. demoleus and P. polytes which were the largest butterflies. A detail study is required for further exploration of butterflies' fauna of Kohat.

  8. Un posible complejo de especies gemelas en el género Eurema (Lepidoptera: Pieridae. I - Evidencias biológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno F. Liz Patricia

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available This research is a biological and ecological study of a polymorphic population of Eurema salome Felder similar to that previously described by Klots (1928 as composed by two different forms according to the wing color pattern of its males. The two supposed forms showed different host plant and specific color in both larva and adult stage. Host plant exchange experiment indicate that the two color forms are genetically determined rather than induced by the host plant or enviroment. These results suggest that the polymorphic populations studied is composed of two distinct species reproductively isolated rather than two polymorphic forms of the same species. We also speculate that host plant use played a crucial role in the initial diferentiation of these two species. We conclude that these species could be consider as sibbling species because of their significant morphological likeness.En este trabajo se realiza un estudio biológico y ecológico a una presunta población polimórfica de Eurema salome Felder, conformada por dos formas descritas por Klot Sen 1928 con base en el patrón de coloración alar de los machos. Se encontró que estas presuntas formas presentan diferentes plantas hospederas y características específicas de coloración tanto a nivel larvario como del adulto. Al realizar intercambio de hospederos se estableció que las características que diferencian las dos formas son heredadas genéticamente y no inducidas por condiciones de hospedero o medioambientales. A partir de estos resultados se plantea que la población en estudio probablemente no está conformada, como se pensó inicialmente, por dos formas de la especie E. salome Feld., sino por dos especies diferentes actualmente aisladas reproductivamente y cuya diferenciación se dio inicialmente a partir del hospedero. Dichas especies presentan un grado de semejanza morfológica tal que permite tratarlas como especies gemelas.

  9. Adult butterfly anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon Murphy (Earth's Birthday Project; Program Development)

    1998-01-01

    The butterfly can fly around using its wings and sees where it is going through its eyes. The spiracles allow the butterfly to breathe and the legs are what it uses to walk or crawl around on. The antennae help the butterfly know where it is going. The proboscis is what the butterfly uses to drink nectar from flowers.

  10. The Life of a Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan Greene

    2011-04-06

    What are the butterfly's stages of life? 1. The Life of a Butterfly Organizer 2. The Monarch Butterfly 3. Voicethread on Monarch Butterfly life cycle 4. A video on how Monarch Butterflies flock together after migrating. 5. Another video on the life cycle of the Monarch Buttefly. 6. A fun game where you catch the butterfly! Now you should know the stages of life for the butterfly! Come see me for project instructions. Hope you enjoyed! ...

  11. The Butterfly Conservatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This companion Web site to the Butterfly Conservatory exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History offers a virtual respite from winter. Visitors can explore the museum's living collection of tropical butterflies with Butterfly Cams and the Virtual Tour feature. Butterfly Cams includes live Web casts from the conservatory as well as three pre-recorded movie clips, including one of a zebra longwing butterfly emerging from its chrysalis. Virtual Tour offers a 360 degree view of the exhibit (not in real time). The Web site also include a butterfly FAQs page, a guide to planting a butterfly garden, and three downloadable backgrounds. Even without pictures, the FAQs page is worth a visit for the interesting topics it covers.

  12. Exploring Structures: Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-18

    In this activity, learners investigate how some butterfly wings get their color. Learners compare Buttercup and Blue Morpho butterflies and discover what happens when they shine light at each of them. Learners discover that some wings get their color from the nanoscale structures on the wings instead of pigments.

  13. A Curious Cash Crop: Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This BioBulletin Web site takes an in-depth look at butterfly farms. The site includes text, videos and photographs. The Introduction explains how butterfly farms can provide a small-scale economic alternative to the logging of tropical rain forests. Birdwing Butterflies provides a detailed look at butterflies in general, and the birdwing butterfly in particular. New Guinea Success Story profiles the successful 20-year-old butterfly ranching program in Papua, New Guinea. What Is a Butterfly Farm? looks at the process of raising butterflies and the many reasons why doing so makes good sense. Wanted, Dead or Alive: The Butterfly Trade examines the growing international market for butterflies and the international CITES treaty (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora).

  14. Butterflies of Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document talks about species and habits of Myanmar butterflies that were mentioned by the Nature and Wildlife Conservation Division of the Forest Department under the Ministry of Forestry in Myanmar

  15. Butterflies of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    For those with a budding interest in lepidoptery (the study of butterflies), this fine online resource presented by the USGS's Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center will be worth checking out. Currently, the site covers the butterfly species and populations throughout the United States and northern Mexico, with a section on Canada planned for the future. By utilizing the interactive map, visitors can click on any state to find out which butterflies inhabit any given area. After doing so, visitors can view photographs of the adult and larva of each species, and learn more about their distribution across each state and the entire United States as well. Visitors can even get more detailed information by looking at individualized checklists that detail which species have been reported at the county level throughout the country. The site also includes answers to commonly asked questions about butterflies and moths, such as What's the difference between a moth and a butterfly? and material on how to rear butterflies and moths.

  16. Draw a Monarch Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    This OLogy activity helps kids to learn about scientific illustrations by walking them through the steps for drawing a monarch butterfly. The activity begins by introducing kids to the importance of scientific illustration and why scientists prefer drawings to photographs. A photograph of a monarch and a printable monarch butterfly outline are included. In addition, students need color photographs, other research materials, paper, an eraser, and a variety of pencils. The process of creating the scientific illustration is broken down into five steps: researching, developing observational skills, tracing, filling in the illustration, and doing the background. Notes about how to research and plant a butterfly garden are included for a follow-up activity.

  17. The State of the UK's Butterflies 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, R.; Brereton, T. M.; Asher, J.; Botham, M. S.; Middlebrook, I.; Roy, D. B.; Warren, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarises the findings of two world-leading citizen science projects: the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme, which involves weekly butterfly counts at over 1,000 sites, and Butterflies for the New Millennium, which has collated over six million butterfly sightings across the UK from thousands of members of the public.

  18. In search of butterfly origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, S J; Pashley, D P

    1995-09-01

    To determine the sister taxon to butterflies, the relationships among the macrolepidopteran superfamilies were investigated using sequence data from the ND1 gene of mitochondrial DNA. Both sequence data and translated amino acids were used. We examined how different models of amino acid evolution (nonadditive) affected the inference of tree topology. We then added previously published sequence data from the 18S and 28S subunits of ribosomal RNA. In most analyses, regardless of data type and treatment, the Hedyloidea is either the sister taxon to butterflies or derived within the butterfly clade. These molecular results are compared to a reanalysis of morphological characteristics. The reanalysis of morphology agrees with Minet's 1991 hypothesis of hedyloid relationships. Analysis of combined molecular and morphology data supports the hypothesis that hedylids are the sister group to butterflies. Scott's hypothesis that hawk moths (Sphingidae) are the sister taxon to butterflies is discounted. PMID:8845961

  19. A Parallel Butterfly Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Poulson, Jack; Demanet, Laurent; Maxwell, Nicholas; Ying, Lexing

    2014-01-01

    The butterfly algorithm is a fast algorithm which approximately evaluates a discrete analogue of the integral transform $\\int_{\\mathbb{R}^d} K(x,y) g(y) dy$ at large numbers of target points when the kernel, $K(x,y)$, is approximately low-rank when restricted to subdomains satisfying a certain simple geometric condition. In $d$ dimensions with $O(N^d)$ quasi-uniformly distributed source and target points, when each appropriate submatrix of $K$ is approximately rank-$r$, the running time of th...

  20. Structural color of butterflies: The case of Papilio butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Beom-Jin; Park, Jung Ok; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2013-03-01

    The term ``structural color'' is often used to describe color produced by a material possessing periodic variations in refractive index, which is commonly observed in many species of butterflies. Papilio butterflies commonly have multilayered bowl structures on their wing scales but the resulting colorations are different each other. Papilio ulysses has blue colored wing and Papilio palinurus shows green coloration on its wing, while Papilio blumei has green coloration on the wing scales but display a blue colored tail. We investigated the structures of the scale on the wings of Papilio butterflies using focused ion beam milling and analyzed the structural origin of the structural color from each Papilio butterfly. The coloration mechanism was attributed to the combination of the multilayer reflection from different feature size coupled with additive color mixing.

  1. Atlas of North Dakota Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This impressive collection of butterfly photographs and distribution maps is provided by Dr. Ronald Royer of Minot State University, ND, in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center. The Butterfly Atlas is expanded and updated at the end of each butterfly season; 139 new species photos have recently been added. Species are conveniently grouped by family, and most species entries are now complete. In addition to one or more clear identification photographs, each species account includes common and scientific name, habitat information, larval food, adult flight dates, references, and a colorful range map detailing that species' occurrence in North Dakota. Beyond its utility as "the most accurate and most recent North Dakota county atlas data available anywhere," this site is a solid resource for butterfly enthusiasts and science educators everywhere.

  2. Mysteries of the Monarch Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    This radio broadcast describes the epic migration of monarch butterflies, who travel from North America to winter in the Oyamel (Balsa) forests west of Mexico City. It features an interview with the foremost researcher of monarchs, biologist Lincoln Brower, who explains that some generations pass before the butterflies return to Mexico, and points out the importance of protecting the Oyamel forests for the migration to continue. The broadcast is 8 minutes and 32 seconds in length.

  3. Monarch Watch: Planting a Butterfly Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Planting a Butterfly Garden website from Monarch Watch is a great introductory resource for teachers interested in starting an educational butterfly garden at their school. This site provides several useful information pages including Good Nectar Sources and lists of Larval Host Plants organized both by butterfly and by plant. The site also features a simple step-by-step teacher's guide written by a teacher from Maryland who planned and planted a butterfly garden at her middle school.

  4. Butterfly larvae fool ants into mothering them

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS; )

    2008-01-03

    Danish researchers have found that in some areas in their country, beautiful blue Alcon butterflies fool ants into raising the butterfly larvae instead of their own, a report explains. The reason? The butterflies have developed an outer coating that mimics that of the ants.

  5. Hofstadter butterflies of carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Nemec, N; Nemec, Norbert; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2006-01-01

    The electronic spectrum of a two-dimensional square lattice in a perpendicular magnetic field has become known as Hofstadter butterfly[1]. We have calculated quasi one-dimensional analogons of the Hofstadter butterfly for carbon nanotubes (CNTs). For the case of single wall CNTs, it is straightforward to implement magnetic fields parallel to the tube axis by means of zone-folding in the graphene reciprocal lattice. We have also studied perpendicular magnetic fields which, in contrast to the parallel case, lead to a much richer, \\textit{pseudofractal} spectrum. Moreover, we have investigated magnetic fields piercing double wall CNTs and found strong signatures of inter-wall interaction in the resulting Hofstadter butterfly spectrum. Ubiquitous to all perpendicular magnetic field spectra is the presence cusp-catastrophes at specific values of energy and magnetic field. Resolving the density of states along the tube circumference allows to recognize snake states already predicted for non-uniform magnetic fields ...

  6. Extended season for northern butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Bengt

    2014-07-01

    Butterflies are like all insects in that they are temperature sensitive and a changing climate with higher temperatures might effect their phenology. Several studies have found support for earlier flight dates among the investigated species. A comparative study with data from a citizen science project, including 66 species of butterflies in Sweden, was undertaken, and the result confirms that most butterfly species now fly earlier during the season. This is especially evident for butterflies overwintering as adults or as pupae. However, the advancement in phenology is correlated with flight date, and some late season species show no advancement or have even postponed their flight dates and are now flying later in the season. The results also showed that latitude had a strong effect on the adult flight date, and most of the investigated species showed significantly later flights towards the north. Only some late flying species showed an opposite trend, flying earlier in the north. A majority of the investigated species in this study showed a general response to temperature and advanced their flight dates with warmer temperatures (on average they advanced their flight dates by 3.8 days/°C), although not all species showed this response. In essence, a climate with earlier springs and longer growing seasons seems not to change the appearance patterns in a one-way direction. We now see butterflies on the wings both earlier and later in the season and some consequences of these patterns are discussed. So far, studies have concentrated mostly on early season butterfly-plant interactions but also late season studies are needed for a better understanding of long-term population consequences.

  7. Simultaneous brightness contrast of foraging Papilio butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Kinoshita, Michiyo; Takahashi, Yuki; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the sense of brightness in the foraging Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus. We presented two red discs of different intensity on a grey background to butterflies, and trained them to select one of the discs. They were successfully trained to select either a high intensity or a low intensity disc. The trained butterflies were tested on their ability to perceive brightness in two different protocols: (i) two orange discs of different intensity presented ...

  8. Draw a Monarch Butterfly: Scientific Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Museum of Natural History

    2012-07-17

    Ivy Rutzky, a scientific assistant at the American Museum of Natural History, introduces an activity where learners create a scientific illustration of a monarch butterfly. Learners will discover why scientists prefer to use drawings rather than photographs, as well as learn about butterflies. Learners will practice their research, observation, and drawing skills. Learners are encouraged to follow up this activity by planting their own butterfly gardens.

  9. Adaptive Growth Decisions in Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl Gotthard (Stockholm University; )

    2008-03-01

    Caterpillars have a great capacity for rapid weight gain, but to reap the benefits of this capacity, larvae must be able to survive in a hostile environment and emerge as adults at the right time of year. In this article, I review examples of growth decisions in butterfly larvae that can be viewed as adaptations for optimized growth performance. These include sex-specific growth decisions that lead to protandry and sexual size dimorphism, fine-tuning of growth in response to photoperiod and temperature, development of alternative larval morphs that mimic the plant structures they feed on, and the peculiar growth patterns of lycenid butterflies that manipulate ants and grow as cuckoos inside ant nests. I conclude that growth of an individual can be seen as the sum of several environmentally dependent decisions, which may influence the growth trajectory by changes in physiology, behavior, and morphology.

  10. Butterfly valve torque prediction methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the Motor-Operated Valve (MOV) Performance Prediction Program, the Electric Power Research Institute has sponsored the development of methodologies for predicting thrust and torque requirements of gate, globe, and butterfly MOVs. This paper presents the methodology that will be used by utilities to calculate the dynamic torque requirements for butterfly valves. The total dynamic torque at any disc position is the sum of the hydrodynamic torque, bearing torque (which is induced by the hydrodynamic force), as well as other small torque components (such as packing torque). The hydrodynamic torque on the valve disc, caused by the fluid flow through the valve, depends on the disc angle, flow velocity, upstream flow disturbances, disc shape, and the disc aspect ratio. The butterfly valve model provides sets of nondimensional flow and torque coefficients that can be used to predict flow rate and hydrodynamic torque throughout the disc stroke and to calculate the required actuation torque and the maximum transmitted torque throughout the opening and closing stroke. The scope of the model includes symmetric and nonsymmetric discs of different shapes and aspects ratios in compressible and incompressible fluid applications under both choked and nonchoked flow conditions. The model features were validated against test data from a comprehensive flowloop and in situ test program. These tests were designed to systematically address the effect of the following parameters on the required torque: valve size, disc shapes and disc aspect ratios, upstream elbow orientation and its proximity, and flow conditions. The applicability of the nondimensional coefficients to valves of different sizes was validated by performing tests on 42-in. valve and a precisely scaled 6-in. model. The butterfly valve model torque predictions were found to bound test data from the flow-loop and in situ testing, as shown in the examples provided in this paper

  11. Hofstadter butterflies of bilayer graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Nemec, N; Nemec, Norbert; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the electronic spectrum of bilayer graphene in perpendicular magnetic fields non-perturbatively. To accomodate arbitrary displacements between the two layers, we apply a periodic gauge based on singular flux vortices of phase $2\\pi$. The resulting Hofstadter-like butterfly plots show a reduced symmetry, depending on the relative position of the two layers against each other. The split of the zero-energy relativistic Landau level differs by one order of magnitude between Bernal- and non-Bernal stacking.

  12. Butterflies on the Stretched Horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Susskind, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I return to the question of what kind of perturbations on Alice's side of an Einstein-Rosen bridge can send messages to Bob as he enters the horizon at the other end. By definition "easy" operators do not activate messages and "hard" operators do, but there are no clear criteria to identify the difference between easy and hard. In this paper I argue that the difference is related to the time evolution of a certain measure of computational complexity, associated with the stretched horizon of Alice's black hole. The arguments suggest that the AMPSS commutator argument is more connected with butterflies than with firewalls.

  13. Biophotonics: Blue butterflies feel the heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambles, J. R.

    2012-03-01

    Bio-inspired by the nano-architectures of iridescent Morpho butterfly scales, scientists have demonstrated a highly sensitive infrared detector that can efficiently upconvert mid-infrared radiation to visible iridescence changes.

  14. Vision, pigments and structural colouration of butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Pirih, Primoz?

    2011-01-01

    Vision, body colouration and the visual environment of an animal may be tuned to each other. This thesis aims at connecting the three entities by studying insect vision, physiological optics of butterfly eyes and optics of butterfly wing colouration. Vision is an imaging sense, used for finding food, avoiding predators, seeing mates and rivals. Many insects detect colour and polarisation of light. Body colouration may serve to conceal or reveal, or to communicate territoriality and gene q...

  15. Life Cycle of a Monarch Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    0000-00-00

    Video of the larval, pupal and adult stages of the monarch butterfly. Pupation and eclosion are shown clearly. Audio is poor, containing uneccessary sound track. Includes suggestions for a lesson plan although it cannot be immediately used as a stand alone. This resource provides a good example of integrating technology into the study of insects with a middle school or high school class. Video footage of monarch butterflies is of maderate quality.

  16. The butterfly effect for physics laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, James R.; Valentine, John H.

    2015-03-01

    A low-cost chaos dynamics lab is developed for quantitative demonstration of the butterfly effect using a magnetic pendulum. Chaotic motion is explored by recording magnetic time series. Students analyze the data in Excel® to investigate the butterfly effect as well as the reconstruction of the strange attractor using time delay plots. The lab exercise is suitable for junior-level modern physics laboratories, or as an extension to traditional first-year laboratories exploring pendulum motion.

  17. Bioenergetical and biomechanical characterisation of butterfly stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Tiago M.

    2005-01-01

    The Biophysical study of swimming is one of the major interests of the sport sciences investigators. However, there is a lack of investigation trying to understand the relationships established between the bioenergetical and biomechanical variables, especially in butterfly stroke. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis was to conduct a bioenergetical and biomechanical characterizations of the butterfly stroke, understanding the relationships established between those two domains. In this thesi...

  18. The Return of the Blue Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Anabela

    2014-05-01

    The Return of the Blue Butterfly The English writer Charles Dickens once wrote: "I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free". But are they really? The work that I performed with a group of students from 8th grade, had a starting point of climate change and the implications it has on ecosystems. Joining the passion I have for butterflies, I realized that they are also in danger of extinction due to these climatic effects. Thus, it was easy to seduce my students wanting to know more. Luckily I found Dr. Paula Seixas Arnaldo, a researcher at the University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, who has worked on butterflies and precisely investigated this issue. Portugal is the southern limit of butterfly-blue (Phengaris alcon), and has been many years in the red book of endangered species. Butterfly-blue is very demanding of their habitat, and disappears very easily if ideal conditions are not satisfied. Increased fragmentation of landscapes and degradation of suitable habitats, are considered the greatest challenges of the conservation of Phengaris butterfly in Portugal. In recent decades, climate change has also changed butterfly-blue spatial distribution with a movement of the species northward to colder locations, and dispersion in latitude. Butterflies of Europe must escape to the North because of the heat. Dr. Paula Seixas Arnaldo and her research team began a project, completed in December 2013, wanted to preserve and restore priority habitats recognized by the European Union to help species in danger of disappearing with increasing temperature. The blue butterfly is extremely important because it is a key indicator of the quality of these habitats. In the field, the butterflies are monitored to collect all possible data in order to identify the key species. Butterflies start flying in early July and cease in late August. Mating takes about an hour and occurs in the first days of life. The gentian-peat (Gentiana pneumonanthe) serves as the host plant for laying eggs. Each female lays an average of 60 eggs. Larva must grow in a plant near an anthill of Myrmica aloba species. This is important because butterfly larvae are myrmecophilous, living with ants that feed the butterfly larvae for 11 months, because the ants think the butterfly larvae are ant larvae. In early summer the larvae pupate in the nest of ants. Before expanding their wings, they have to leave quickly to avoid being killed by ants when the ants discover have been deceived. My students became aware of this research; we studied and prepared in order to carry out fieldwork. Thus students learn the content and curricular in a scientifically fun way, first with group work in the classroom with my guidance and in a second stage carry knowledge to the field under the guidance of Dra Paula Seixas Arnaldo. We know where we started ... where we arrives is success!

  19. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly Using interactivity to excite and educate children about butterflies and the National Museum of Play at The Strong's Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Lydia

    The National Museum of Play at The Strong's Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden is a tropical rainforest that allows visitors to step into the world of butterflies, but lacks a more comprehensive educational element to teach visitors additional information about butterflies. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly is a thesis project designed to enhance younger visitors' experience of the Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden with an interactive educational application that aligns with The Strong's mission of encouraging learning, creativity, and discovery. This was accomplished through a series of fun and educational games and animations, designed for use as a kiosk outside the garden and as a part of The Strong's website. Content, planning, and organization of this project has been completed through research and observation of the garden in the following areas: its visitors, butterflies, best usability practices for children, and game elements that educate and engage children. Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly teaches users about the butterfly's life cycle, anatomy, and characteristics as well as their life in the Dancing Wings Butterfly Garden. Through the use of the design programs Adobe Illustrator, Flash, and After Effects; the programming language ActionScript3.0; a child-friendly user interface and design; audio elements and user takeaways, Flutter-by Interactive Butterfly appeals to children of all ages, interests, and learning styles. The project can be viewed at lydiapowers.com/Thesis/FlutterByButterfly.html

  20. Do monarch butterflies use polarized skylight for migratory orientation?

    OpenAIRE

    Stalleicken, J.; Mukhida, M.; Labhart, T.; Wehner, R.; Frost, B.; Mouritsen, H.

    2005-01-01

    To test if migratory monarch butterflies use polarized light patterns as part of their time-compensated sun compass, we recorded their virtual flight paths in a flight simulator while the butterflies were exposed to patches of naturally polarized blue sky, artificial polarizers or a sunny sky. In addition, we tested butterflies with and without the polarized light detectors of their compound eye being occluded. The monarchs' orientation responses suggested that the butterflies did not use the...

  1. Effects of herbicides on Behr's metalmark butterfly, a surrogate species for the endangered butterfly, Lange's metalmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange's metalmark butterfly, Apodemia mormo langei Comstock, is in danger of extinction due to loss of habitat caused by invasive exotic plants which are eliminating its food, naked stem buckwheat. Herbicides are being used to remove invasive weeds from the dunes; however, little is known about the potential effects of herbicides on butterflies. To address this concern we evaluated potential toxic effects of three herbicides on Behr's metalmark, a close relative of Lange's metalmark. First instars were exposed to recommended field rates of triclopyr, sethoxydim, and imazapyr. Life history parameters were recorded after exposure. These herbicides reduced the number of adults that emerged from pupation (24–36%). Each herbicide has a different mode of action. Therefore, we speculate that effects are due to inert ingredients or indirect effects on food plant quality. If these herbicides act the same in A. mormo langei, they may contribute to the decline of this species. - Highlights: ? We evaluated the effects of three herbicides on the butterfly, Behr's metalmark. ? These herbicides are used to control invasive weeds in butterfly habitat. ? The herbicides reduced adult butterfly emergence. - Herbicides are used to remove invasive weeds from butterfly habitat. Certain herbicides may be having a negative effect on butterflies.

  2. Male-killing in African butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Saeed M. Hassan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Female-biased sex ratios occur in many insect species as a consequence of infection by maternally-inherited male-killing bacterial endosymbionts. In this paper, we revise the research conducted on the phenomenon of male-killing in African nymphalid butterflies, with special focus on the cases of Danaus chrysippus, Acraea encedon and Acraea encedana. The evolution of male-killing in each case was addressed, together with the phylogeny of male-killers that were identified from this group. Moreover, the potential impacts that male-killers might impose on the evolution of their butterfly hosts were thoroughly investigated. In the end of this review, we present a number of unanswered questions to be targeted by future research work on the male-killing in these butterflies.

  3. Becoming a Butterfly: Reading and Writing about the Life Cycle of a Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In this lesson students will read the informational text The Life Cycle of a Butterfly by Lisa Trumbauer in order to understand the 4 stages of a butterfly's life. Students will use elements of nonfiction, such as photographs and diagrams, to aid in their understanding of the text. They will create a graphic organizer and use it to produce an informative piece of writing that illustrates what they have learned through their reading.

  4. Monarch Butterflies: Spirits of Loved Ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    The study of the beautiful monarch butterfly lends itself to a vast array of subject matter, and offers the opportunity to meet a large and varied number of standards and objectives for many grade levels. Art projects featuring monarchs may include many cross-curricular units such as math (symmetry and number graphing), science (adaptation and…

  5. About the Monarch Butterfly Migration - Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    0000-00-00

    Very good set of information about monarch butterflies and monitoring their annual migration. Some of the graphics on the site are large and may require high-speed internet for quick access. Lots of good lesson plan ideas for highschool and undergraduate students. Ideas that can be expanded for graduate students. Good photographs and video.

  6. Climate change, phenology, and butterfly host plant utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Cano, Jose A; Karlsson, Bengt; Posledovich, Diana; Toftegaard, Tenna; Wiklund, Christer; Ehrlén, Johan; Gotthard, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of how species interactions are influenced by climate warming is paramount to understand current biodiversity changes. We review phenological changes of Swedish butterflies during the latest decades and explore potential climate effects on butterfly-host plant interactions using the Orange tip butterfly Anthocharis cardamines and its host plants as a model system. This butterfly has advanced its appearance dates substantially, and its mean flight date shows a positive correlation with latitude. We show that there is a large latitudinal variation in host use and that butterfly populations select plant individuals based on their flowering phenology. We conclude that A. cardamines is a phenological specialist but a host species generalist. This implies that thermal plasticity for spring development influences host utilization of the butterfly through effects on the phenological matching with its host plants. However, the host utilization strategy of A. cardamines appears to render it resilient to relatively large variation in climate. PMID:25576283

  7. MonarchBase: the monarch butterfly genome database

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Shuai; Reppert, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is emerging as a model organism to study the mechanisms of circadian clocks and animal navigation, and the genetic underpinnings of long-distance migration. The initial assembly of the monarch genome was released in 2011, and the biological interpretation of the genome focused on the butterfly’s migration biology. To make the extensive data associated with the genome accessible to the general biological and lepidopteran communities, we established Mo...

  8. Metamorphosis of a Butterfly-Associated Bacterial Community

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, Tobin J.; Mcmillan, W. Owen; Fierer, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Butterflies are charismatic insects that have long been a focus of biological research. They are also habitats for microorganisms, yet these microbial symbionts are little-studied, despite their likely importance to butterfly ecology and evolution. In particular, the diversity and composition of the microbial communities inhabiting adult butterflies remain uncharacterized, and it is unknown how the larval (caterpillar) and adult microbiota compare. To address these knowledge gaps, we used Ill...

  9. A magnetic compass aids monarch butterfly migration

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Patrick A.; Gegear, Robert J.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Convincing evidence that migrant monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a magnetic compass to aid their fall migration has been lacking from the spectacular navigational capabilities of this species. Here we use flight simulator studies to show that migrants indeed possess an inclination magnetic compass to help direct their flight equatorward in the fall. The use of this inclination compass is light-dependent utilizing ultraviolet-A/blue light between 380 and 420?nm. Notably, the signi...

  10. Navigational Mechanisms of Migrating Monarch Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Reppert, Steven M.; Gegear, Robert J.; Merlin, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of the iconic fall migration of monarch butterflies have illuminated the mechanisms behind the navigation south, using a time-compensated sun compass. Skylight cues, such as the sun itself and polarized light, are processed through both eyes and likely integrated in the brain’s central complex, the presumed site of the sun compass. Time compensation is provided by circadian clocks that have a distinctive molecular mechanism and that reside in the antennae. Monarchs may also u...

  11. Disruptive sexual selection in Colias eurytheme butterflies.

    OpenAIRE

    Sappington, T. W.; Taylor, O. R.

    1990-01-01

    Sexual selection on male pheromone composition in Colias eurytheme (Pieridae) butterflies has the remarkable effect of increasing the variability of this trait. Sexual selection on important traits is generally thought to have a strong stabilizing effect on intraspecific variation of those characters. In this species, however, the male courtship pheromone is highly variable in the relative proportions of its three chemical constituents. Stabilization and/or canalization of this polygenic char...

  12. Life Cycles for Frogs and Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miss King

    2009-09-17

    Students will learn about life cycles for FROGS and BUTTERFLIES and then complete a worksheet. HERE'S A RIDDLE TO GET YOU STARTED! Q: What kind of frog lives in a tree house? A: A tree frog! A POEM ABOUT A FROG LIFE CYCLE! Five Little Tadpoles (Poem) Five little tadpoles swimming near the shore. The first one said, ?Let?s swim some more.? The second one said, ?Let?s rest awhile.? The third ...

  13. Wolbachia: invasion biology in South pacific butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Elizabeth A; O'Neill, Scott L

    2007-03-20

    Wolbachia ensdosymbionts are well known for their ability to manipulate the population biology and development of their hosts. One of the less studied outcomes of Wolbachia infection with this symbiont is the selective killing of male embryos. Recent work on butterflies living on different South Pacific islands is beginning to help us understand the complexity of the co-evolutionary interactions between these partners. PMID:17371764

  14. Butterfly valve of all rubber lining type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The valves used for the circulating water pipes for condensers in nuclear and thermal power stations have become large with the increase of power output, and their specifications have become strict. The materials for the valves change from cast iron to steel plate construction. To cope with sea water corrosion, rubber lining has been applied to the internal surfaces of valve boxes, and the build-up welding of stainless steel has been made on the edges of valves. However, recently it is desired to develop butterfly valves, of which the whole valve disks are lined with hard rubber. For the purpose of confirming the performance of large bore valves, a 2600 mm bore butterfly valve of all rubber lining type was used, and the opening and closing test of 1100 times was carried out by applying thermal cycle and pressure difference and using artifical sea water. Also the bending test of hard rubber lining was performed with test pieces. Thus, it was confirmed that the butterfly valves of all rubber lining type have the performance exceeding that of the valves with build-up welding. The course of development of the valves of all rubber lining type, the construction and the items of confirmation by tests of these valves, and the tests of the valve and the hard rubber lining described above are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. The "butterfly" suture technique for meniscal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Taner; Bostan, Bora; Erdem, Mehmet; Asci, Murat; Sen, Cengiz; Kelestemur, Mehmet Halidun

    2011-03-01

    One of the important factors effecting meniscal healing is the strength of primary fixation obtained by repairing technique. From this perspective, it is important to choose the technique ensuring a higher primary fixation strength for meniscal repairs. We described a new technique for meniscal repair called "butterfly" technique using Viper device and hypothesized that high primary fixation strength can be obtained with this technique. The study was performed on calve knees. Full-thickness longitudinal tears 2 cm in length and 3 mm medial from the periphery were created in corpora of medial menisci of 14 calves. After creating tears, menisci were divided into two equal groups. In Group 1, two vertical loop sutures 1 cm apart were placed using a Viper device. Whereas in Group 2, tears were repaired using "butterfly" sutures. The mean load to failure was 156.3 ± 13.1 and 186 ± 15.8 N in Group 1 and 2, respectively (p = 0.002). The fixation strength in Group 2 was significantly higher than in Group 1. We suggest that, using Viper device and all-inside "butterfly" suturing techniques, meniscal ruptures with appropriate locations can be repaired with higher primary fixation strength. PMID:20617326

  16. Comparisons of some Andean Butterfly Faunas Comparisons of some Andean Butterfly Faunas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovanitz William

    1945-04-01

    Full Text Available Observations of the butterfly fauna at significant points along the top of the Andean mountain chain from near Venezuela in Colombia to central Ecuador in comparable ecologic niches has brought out some interesting facts concerning the sub-ecological prererences of the species and their mtercombination in building up the fauna of a particular region. Observations of the butterfly fauna at significant points along the top of the Andean mountain chain from near Venezuela in Colombia to central Ecuador in comparable ecologic niches has brought out some interesting facts concerning the sub-ecological prererences of the species and their mtercombination in building up the fauna of a particular region.

  17. Metamorphosis of a butterfly-associated bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Tobin J; McMillan, W Owen; Fierer, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Butterflies are charismatic insects that have long been a focus of biological research. They are also habitats for microorganisms, yet these microbial symbionts are little-studied, despite their likely importance to butterfly ecology and evolution. In particular, the diversity and composition of the microbial communities inhabiting adult butterflies remain uncharacterized, and it is unknown how the larval (caterpillar) and adult microbiota compare. To address these knowledge gaps, we used Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from internal bacterial communities associated with multiple life stages of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato. We found that the leaf-chewing larvae and nectar- and pollen-feeding adults of H. erato contain markedly distinct bacterial communities, a pattern presumably rooted in their distinct diets. Larvae and adult butterflies host relatively small and similar numbers of bacterial phylotypes, but few are common to both stages. The larval microbiota clearly simplifies and reorganizes during metamorphosis; thus, structural changes in a butterfly's bacterial community parallel those in its own morphology. We furthermore identify specific bacterial taxa that may mediate larval and adult feeding biology in Heliconius and other butterflies. Although male and female Heliconius adults differ in reproductive physiology and degree of pollen feeding, bacterial communities associated with H. erato are not sexually dimorphic. Lastly, we show that captive and wild individuals host different microbiota, a finding that may have important implications for the relevance of experimental studies using captive butterflies. PMID:24466308

  18. The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly’s Creative Push on Early Chinese Publishing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly, as an early Chinese popular literature important school, is a participant of early Chinese publishing industry who promoted early Chinese publishing industry development through creativities on publishing from four aspects such as publishing content creativity, graphic design creativity, marketing creativity and cross-media industry creativity.

  19. The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly’s Creative Push on Early Chinese Publishing Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Li

    2012-01-01

    The School of Mandarin Duck and Butterfly, as an early Chinese popular literature important school, is a participant of early Chinese publishing industry who promoted early Chinese publishing industry development through creativities on publishing from four aspects such as publishing content creativity, graphic design creativity, marketing creativity and cross-media industry creativity.

  20. Congruence and Diversity of Butterfly-Host Plant Associations at Higher Taxonomic Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer-paris, Jose? R.; Sa?nchez-mercado, Ada; Viloria, A?ngel L.; Donaldson, John

    2013-01-01

    We aggregated data on butterfly-host plant associations from existing sources in order to address the following questions: (1) is there a general correlation between host diversity and butterfly species richness?, (2) has the evolution of host plant use followed consistent patterns across butterfly lineages?, (3) what is the common ancestral host plant for all butterfly lineages? The compilation included 44,148 records from 5,152 butterfly species (28.6% of worldwide species of Papilionoidea)...

  1. A butterfly algorithm for synthetic aperture radar

    OpenAIRE

    Demanet, Laurent; Ferrara, Matthew; Maxwell, Nicholas; Poulson, Jack; Ying, Lexing

    2011-01-01

    It is not currently known if it is possible to accurately form a synthetic aperture radar image from N data points in provable near-linear complexity, where accuracy is defined as the ?? error between the full O(N²) backprojection image and the approximate image. To bridge this gap, we present a backprojection algorithm with complexity O(log(1/?)N log N), with ? the tunable pixelwise accuracy. It is based on the butterfly scheme, which works for vastly more general oscillatory integral...

  2. Forward flight of swallowtail butterfly with simple flapping motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiroto [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 60 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Shimoyama, Isao, E-mail: isao@i.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Mechano-Informatics, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Unlike other flying insects, the wing motion of swallowtail butterflies is basically limited to flapping because their fore wings partly overlap their hind wings, structurally restricting the feathering needed for active control of aerodynamic force. Hence, it can be hypothesized that the flight of swallowtail butterflies is realized with simple flapping, requiring little feedback control of the feathering angle. To verify this hypothesis, we fabricated an artificial butterfly mimicking the wing motion and wing shape of a swallowtail butterfly and analyzed its flights using images taken with a high-speed video camera. The results demonstrated that stable forward flight could be realized without active feathering or feedback control of the wing motion. During the flights, the artificial butterfly's body moved up and down passively in synchronization with the flapping, and the artificial butterfly followed an undulating flight trajectory like an actual swallowtail butterfly. Without feedback control of the wing motion, the body movement is directly affected by change of aerodynamic force due to the wing deformation; the degree of deformation was determined by the wing venation. Unlike a veinless wing, a mimic wing with veins generated a much higher lift coefficient during the flapping flight than in a steady flow due to the large body motion.

  3. Forward flight of swallowtail butterfly with simple flapping motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlike other flying insects, the wing motion of swallowtail butterflies is basically limited to flapping because their fore wings partly overlap their hind wings, structurally restricting the feathering needed for active control of aerodynamic force. Hence, it can be hypothesized that the flight of swallowtail butterflies is realized with simple flapping, requiring little feedback control of the feathering angle. To verify this hypothesis, we fabricated an artificial butterfly mimicking the wing motion and wing shape of a swallowtail butterfly and analyzed its flights using images taken with a high-speed video camera. The results demonstrated that stable forward flight could be realized without active feathering or feedback control of the wing motion. During the flights, the artificial butterfly's body moved up and down passively in synchronization with the flapping, and the artificial butterfly followed an undulating flight trajectory like an actual swallowtail butterfly. Without feedback control of the wing motion, the body movement is directly affected by change of aerodynamic force due to the wing deformation; the degree of deformation was determined by the wing venation. Unlike a veinless wing, a mimic wing with veins generated a much higher lift coefficient during the flapping flight than in a steady flow due to the large body motion.

  4. Relationships between energetic, stroke determinants, and velocity in butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Tiago M.; Keskinen, K. L.; Fernandes, R. J.; Colac?o, P.; Carmo, C.; Vilas-boas, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between the bioenergetical and the biomechanical variables (stroke parameters), through a range of swimming velocities, in butterfly stroke. Three male and one female butterflier of international level were submitted to an incremental set of 200-m butterfly swims. The starting velocity was 1.18 m(.)s(-1) for the males and 1.03 m(.)s(-1) for the female swimmer. Thereafter, the velocity was increased by 0.05 m(.)s(-1) after each swim un...

  5. Photonic nanoarchitectures of biologic origin in butterflies and beetles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photonic nanoarchitectures occurring in butterflies and beetles, which produce structural color in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum by the selective reflection of light, are investigated under the aspect of being used as possible 'blueprints' for artificial, bioinspired nanoarchitectures. The role of order and disorder and of regularity/irregularity in photonic nanoarchitectures of biologic origin is discussed. Three recent case studies are briefly reviewed for butterflies (Albulina metallica, Cyanophrys remus, Troides magellanus) and three for beetles (Hoeplia coerulea, Chrysochroa vittata, Charidotella egregia). The practical realization of bioinspired artificial structures is discussed for the A. metallica butterfly and for the C. vittata beetle.

  6. Photonic nanoarchitectures of biologic origin in butterflies and beetles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biro, L.P., E-mail: biro@mfa.kfki.h [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary)

    2010-05-25

    Photonic nanoarchitectures occurring in butterflies and beetles, which produce structural color in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum by the selective reflection of light, are investigated under the aspect of being used as possible 'blueprints' for artificial, bioinspired nanoarchitectures. The role of order and disorder and of regularity/irregularity in photonic nanoarchitectures of biologic origin is discussed. Three recent case studies are briefly reviewed for butterflies (Albulina metallica, Cyanophrys remus, Troides magellanus) and three for beetles (Hoeplia coerulea, Chrysochroa vittata, Charidotella egregia). The practical realization of bioinspired artificial structures is discussed for the A. metallica butterfly and for the C. vittata beetle.

  7. Karyotypic diversity and speciation in Agrodiaetus butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandul, Nikolai P; Lukhtanov, Vladimir A; Pierce, Naomi E

    2007-03-01

    That chromosomal rearrangements may play an important role in maintaining postzygotic isolation between well-established species is part of the standard theory of speciation. However, little evidence exists on the role of karyotypic change in speciation itself--in the establishment of reproductive barriers between previously interbreeding populations. The large genus Agrodiaetus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) provides a model system to study this question. Agrodiaetus butterflies exhibit unusual interspecific diversity in chromosome number, from n= 10 to n= 134; in contrast, the majority of lycaenid butterflies have n= 23/24. We analyzed the evolution of karyotypic diversity by mapping chromosome numbers on a thoroughly sampled mitochondrial phylogeny of the genus. Karyotypic differences accumulate gradually between allopatric sister taxa, but more rapidly between sympatric sister taxa. Overall, sympatric sister taxa have a higher average karyotypic diversity than allopatric sister taxa. Differential fusion of diverged populations may account for this pattern because the degree of karyotypic difference acquired between allopatric populations may determine whether they will persist as nascent biological species in secondary sympatry. This study therefore finds evidence of a direct role for chromosomal rearrangements in the final stages of animal speciation. Rapid karyotypic diversification is likely to have contributed to the explosive speciation rate observed in Agrodiaetus, 1.6 species per million years. PMID:17348919

  8. Hot Dog and Butterfly, Nereidum Montes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Some of the pictures returned from Mars by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft show features that--at a glance--resemble familiar, non-geological objects on Earth. For example, the picture above at the left shows several low, relatively flat-topped hills (mesas) on the floor of a broad valley among the mountains of the Nereidum Montes region, northeast of Argyre Planitia. One of the mesas seen here looks like half of a butterfly (upper subframe on right). Another hill looks something like a snail or a hot dog wrapped and baked in a croissant roll (lower subframe on right). These mesas were formed by natural processes and are most likely the eroded remnants of a formerly more extensive layer of bedrock. In the frame on the left, illumination is from the upper left and the scene covers an area 2.7 km (1.7 miles) wide by 6.8 km (4.2 miles) high. The 'butterfly' is about 800 meters (875 yards) in length and the 'hot dog' is about 1 km (0.62 miles) long. Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  9. Interactions between butterfly scales and unsteady flows during flapping flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robert; Lang, Amy

    2008-11-01

    Recent research has shown that the highly flexible wings of butterflies in flapping flight develop vortices along their leading and trailing edges. Butterfly scales (approximately 100 microns) have a shingled pattern and extend into the boundary layer. These scales could play a part in controlling separation in this 3-dimensional complex flow field. Biomimetic applications of butterfly scales may aid in the development of flapping wing micro air vehicles. In this study, we observed that the orientation of the scales may relate to the local flow field, and might move or shift during flight. Monarch butterflies were trained to fly in a low speed smoke tunnel for visualization. Scales were removed from the leading and trailing edges and specimens were photographed at 500 frames per second. Variation in flapping pattern and flight fitness are discussed.

  10. Fire creates host plant patches for monarch butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Baum, Kristen A.; Sharber, Wyatt V.

    2012-01-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) depend on the presence of host plants (Asclepias spp.) within their breeding range for reproduction. In the southern Great Plains, Asclepias viridis is a perennial that flowers in May and June, and starts to senesce by August. It is locally abundant and readily used by monarchs as a host plant. We evaluated the effects of summer prescribed fire on A. viridis and the use of A. viridis by monarch butterflies. Summer prescribed fire generated a newly emerge...

  11. Female butterflies prefer males bearing bright iridescent ornamentation

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Darrell J.

    2007-01-01

    Butterflies are among nature's most colourful animals, and provide a living showcase for how extremely bright, chromatic and iridescent coloration can be generated by complex optical mechanisms. The gross characteristics of male butterfly colour patterns are understood to function for species and/or sex recognition, but it is not known whether female mate choice promotes visual exaggeration of this coloration. Here I show that females of the sexually dichromatic species Hypolimnas bolina pref...

  12. Hofstadter butterflies of carbon nanotubes: Pseudofractality of the magnetoelectronic spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Nemec, Norbert; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2006-01-01

    The electronic spectrum of a two-dimensional square lattice in a perpendicular magnetic field has become known as the Hofstadter butterfly [Hofstadter, Phys. Rev. B 14, 2239 (1976).]. We have calculated quasi-one-dimensional analogs of the Hofstadter butterfly for carbon nanotubes (CNTs). For the case of single-wall CNTs, it is straightforward to implement magnetic fields parallel to the tube axis by means of zone folding in the graphene reciprocal lattice. We have also stud...

  13. Effect of experimental selective logging on tropical butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Ot

    2001-01-01

    I investigatedegd the effects of an experimental selective logging regime on the assemblage of fruit-feeding butterflies in replicated experimental plots in the Chiquibul Forest, Belize. Over a 12-month period, I caught 1187 individuals of 49 species using fruit-baited traps. Selective logging at densities of six stems per ha 3 years before the study had little effect on butterfly species richness, the abundance of individual species, or the shape of species-abundance distributions. There was...

  14. Checklist of butterfly fauna of Kohat, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Farzana Perveen; Ayaz Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    The butterflies play dual role, firstly as the pollinator, carries pollen from one flower to another and secondly their larvae act as the pest, injurious to various crops. Their 21 species were identified belonging to 3 different families from Kohat, Pakistan during September-December 2008. The reported families Namphalidae covered 33%, Papilionidae 10%, and Pieridae 57% biodiversity of butterflies of Kohat. In Namphalidae included: species belonging to subfamily Nymphalinae, Indian fritillar...

  15. Pollen Processing Behavior of Heliconius Butterflies: A Derived Grooming Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Hikl, Anna-laetitia; Krenn, Harald W.

    2011-01-01

    Pollen feeding behaviors Heliconius and Laparus (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) represent a key innovation that has shaped other life history traits of these neotropical butterflies. Although all flower visiting Lepidoptera regularly come in contact with pollen, only Heliconius and Laparus butterflies actively collect pollen with the proboscis and subsequently take up nutrients from the pollen grains. This study focused on the behavior of pollen processing and compared the movement patterns with p...

  16. Unconventional lift-generating mechanisms in free-flying butterflies.

    OpenAIRE

    Srygley, Rb; Thomas, Al

    2002-01-01

    Flying insects generate forces that are too large to be accounted for by conventional steady-state aerodynamics. To investigate these mechanisms of force generation, we trained red admiral butterflies, Vanessa atalanta, to fly freely to and from artificial flowers in a wind tunnel, and used high-resolution, smoke-wire flow visualizations to obtain qualitative, high-speed digital images of the air flow around their wings. The images show that free-flying butterflies use a variety of unconventi...

  17. Hitch-hiking parasitic wasp learns to exploit butterfly antiaphrodisiac

    OpenAIRE

    Huigens, M. E.; Pashalidou, F. G.; Qian, M. H.; Bukovinszky, T.; Smid, H. M.; Loon, J. J. A.; Dicke, M.; Fatouros, N. E.

    2009-01-01

    Many insects possess a sexual communication system that is vulnerable to chemical espionage by parasitic wasps. We recently discovered that a hitch-hiking (H) egg parasitoid exploits the antiaphrodisiac pheromone benzyl cyanide (BC) of the Large Cabbage White butterfly Pieris brassicae. This pheromone is passed from male butterflies to females during mating to render them less attractive to conspecific males. When the tiny parasitic wasp Trichogramma brassicae detects the antiaphrodisiac, it ...

  18. Liquid-intake flow around the tip of butterfly proboscis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Lee, Seung Chul; Kim, Bo Heum

    2014-05-01

    Butterflies drink liquid through a slender proboscis using a large pressure gradient induced by the systaltic operation of a muscular pump inside their head. Although the proboscis is a naturally well-designed coiled micro conduit for liquid uptake and deployment, it has been regarded as a simple straw connected to the muscular pump. There are few studies on the transport of liquid food in the proboscis of a liquid-feeding butterfly. To understand the liquid-feeding mechanism in the proboscis of butterflies, the intake flow around the tip of the proboscis was investigated in detail. In this study, the intake flow was quantitatively visualized using a micro-PIV (particle image velocimetry) velocity field measurement technique. As a result, the liquid-feeding process consists of an intake phase, an ejection phase and a rest phase. When butterflies drink pooled liquid, the liquid is not sucked into the apical tip of the proboscis, but into the dorsal linkage aligned longitudinally along the proboscis. To analyze main characteristics of the intake flow around a butterfly proboscis, a theoretical model was established by assuming that liquid is sucked into a line sink whose suction rate linearly decreases proximally. In addition, the intake flow around the tip of a female mosquito?s proboscis which has a distinct terminal opening was also visualized and modeled for comparison. The present results would be helpful to understand the liquid-feeding mechanism of a butterfly. PMID:24512912

  19. A magnetic compass aids monarch butterfly migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Patrick A; Gegear, Robert J; Reppert, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Convincing evidence that migrant monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a magnetic compass to aid their fall migration has been lacking from the spectacular navigational capabilities of this species. Here we use flight simulator studies to show that migrants indeed possess an inclination magnetic compass to help direct their flight equatorward in the fall. The use of this inclination compass is light-dependent utilizing ultraviolet-A/blue light between 380 and 420?nm. Notably, the significance of light monarch studies. The antennae are important for the inclination compass because they appear to contain light-sensitive magnetosensors. For migratory monarchs, the inclination compass may serve as an important orientation mechanism when directional daylight cues are unavailable and may also augment time-compensated sun compass orientation for appropriate directionality throughout the migration. PMID:24960099

  20. Structurally assisted blackness in butterfly scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukusic, P; Sambles, J R; Lawrence, C R

    2004-05-01

    Surfaces of low reflectance are ubiquitous in animate systems. They form essential components of the visual appearance of most living species and can explicitly influence other biological functions such as thermoregulation. The blackness associated with all opaque surfaces of low reflectivity has until now been attributed to strongly absorbing pigmentation alone. Our present study challenges this assumption, demonstrating that in addition to the requirement of absorbing pigmentation, complex nano-structures contribute to the low reflectance of certain natural surfaces. We describe preliminary findings of an investigation into the nature of the black regions observed on the dorsal wings of several Lepidoptera. Specifically, we quantify the optical absorption associated with black wing regions on the butterfly Papilio ulysses and find that the nanostructure of the wing scales of these regions contributes significantly to their black appearance. PMID:15252994

  1. Local and effective: Two projects of butterfly farming in Cambodia and Tanzania (Insecta: Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. van der Heyden

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Los proyectos "Banteay Srey Butterfly Centre" en Camboya (Asia y "Zanzibar Butterfly Centre" in Tanzania (África se describen como modelos de cría sostenible de mariposas en apoyo para comunidades locales.

  2. Field Based Learning About Butterfly Diversity in School Garden-A Case Study From Puducherry, India

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalsomy Poyyamoli; Ramadoss Alexandar

    2012-01-01

    Butterflies are essential components for well functioning of ecosystems due to their key roles as pollinators and as indicators of ecosystem health. Butterflies are also beloved by public as well as young students and children, who are largely unaware that many species are threatened or endangered. The main objectives of field based education for butterfly conservation were to create knowledge, interest and necessary skills to investigate and, identify the butterfly species and conserve its d...

  3. Butterfly inclusions in Van Schrieck masterpieces. Techniques and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, S.; Boulenguez, J.; Menu, M.; Mottin, B.

    2008-07-01

    Dutch painter Otto Marseus Van Schrieck (1619 1678) is famous for his invention of “sottobosco”. These specific still-life paintings are characterized by the presence of various living organisms (mainly insects and plants) directly on the canvas. We will focus our attention on the painting kept in the museum of Grenoble, France, where a real butterfly is pasted on the canvas. The actual butterfly is a common Nymphalidae, Inachis io, presented in a static position on the dorsal side, without any perspective, compared to the neighboring butterflies. The colors of this butterfly are mainly due to pigments, melanin (black to brown) and ommochromes (yellow, orange, red) often in granules configuration that introduce scattering of light superimposed to the classical selective absorption, except in the ocelli of the hind wings where the blue coloration is due to interferential effects. The nearly perfect refraction index equality between the varnish and the chitin, the main constituent of the butterfly wings, deeply affects its colors. This leads the artist to a final intervention in some parts of the wings, revealed by microscope observation.

  4. The Subversion of the Oriental Stereotype in M. Butterfly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songfeng Wen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is to examine the Oriental stereotype propagated by Giacomo Puccini’s Madame Butterfly and how it is subverted in David Henry Hwang’s M. Butterfly. Puccini portrays a docile, self-sacrificial Oriental woman who is totally submissive to and finally dies for her unworthy White lover. The opera’s popularity has perpetuated the stereotype of an ideal Oriental woman. In Hwang’s M. Butterfly, the stereotype of the ideal Oriental woman is subverted as the gender roles and the power structure of the Oriental woman and the Occidental man have been reversed. The White man, Gallimard, rather than a powerful sexual predator, is manipulated by his Oriental lover, a man masquerading woman, and finally dies for his Oriental lover. By analyzing the stereotype in Madame Butterfly and its subversion in M. Butterfly, it is hoped to reveal the insidiousness of stereotyping in understanding different cultures and peoples and it is also called for to rid people of stereotyping in cross-cultural communications.

  5. Does breathing disturb coordination in butterfly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, L; Chollet, D; Sanders, R

    2010-03-01

    This study quantified the effects of breathing compared to non-breathing and "race pace" on arm to leg coordination in the butterfly stroke. Twelve elite male swimmers swam at four paces: 400 m, 200 m, 100 m and 50 m. The arm and leg stroke phases were identified by video analysis to calculate the total time gap (TTG), which is the sum of T1 (hands' entry in the water/high point of first kick), T2 (beginning of the hands' backward movement/low point of first kick), T3 (hands' arrival in a vertical plane to the shoulders/high point of second kick) and T4 (hands' release from the water/low point of second kick). Two strokes with breathing were compared to two strokes with breath-holding. The TTG was greater with breathing (23.3% VS. 19%), showing less propulsive continuity between arm and leg actions (p<0.05). This was due to the shorter downward leg kick and longer arm catch and upward leg kick that led to longer glide time. Conversely, breathing leads to greater coupling between the hand exit and the end of leg propulsion, which was due to a shorter arm push phase to facilitate the head exit to breathe. PMID:20166004

  6. Selection on the wing in Heliconius butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens Virginie M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Asbtract To what extent population structure favours the establishment of new phenotypes within a species remains a fundamental question in evolutionary studies. By reducing gene flow, habitat fragmentation is a major factor shaping the genetic structuring of populations, favouring isolation of small populations in which drift may rapidly change frequencies of new variants. When these variants provide advantages to individuals, the combined effect of selection and drift can lead to rapid shifts in phenotypes. In a study published in BMC Genetics, Albuquerque de Moura et al. asked whether such a general pattern of population structure can be observed in Heliconius species, which could have strong implication in the evolution of colour pattern diversification in these butterflies. In this commentary we discuss the potential roles of these three processes (drift, selection and dispersal on the evolution of Heliconius wing patterns in regard to the findings of a common fine-scale population structure within the co-mimetic species H. melpomene and H. erato. Indeed, a general pattern of population subdivision in the history of these two species may have provoked the major phenotypical shifts observed in their wing colour patterns. The suggestion that coupled environmental pressures (counter-selection of dispersal and selection on co-evolved traits could be responsible for identical genetic differentiation profiles in H. erato and H. melpomene clearly merits further investigations using both detailed population genetic (including landscape genetic and ecological studies.

  7. The Effect of Wing Scales on Monarch Butterfly Flight Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Angela; Jones, Robert; Lang, Amy

    2010-11-01

    Recent research has shown that the highly flexible wings of butterflies in flapping flight develop vortices along their leading and trailing edges. Butterfly scales (approximately 100 microns in length) have a shingled pattern and extend into the boundary layer. These scales, which make up approximately 3% of the body weight or less, could play a part in controlling separation and vortex formation in this unsteady, three-dimensional complex flow field. A better understanding of this mechanism may lead to bio-inspired applications for flapping wing micro-air vehicles. In this study, the flight performance of Monarch (Danaus plexippus) butterflies with and without scales was analyzed. Scales were removed from the upper and lower wing surfaces and specimens were videotaped at 600 frames per second. Variation in flapping patterns and flight fitness were observed.

  8. Fire creates host plant patches for monarch butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Kristen A; Sharber, Wyatt V

    2012-12-23

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) depend on the presence of host plants (Asclepias spp.) within their breeding range for reproduction. In the southern Great Plains, Asclepias viridis is a perennial that flowers in May and June, and starts to senesce by August. It is locally abundant and readily used by monarchs as a host plant. We evaluated the effects of summer prescribed fire on A. viridis and the use of A. viridis by monarch butterflies. Summer prescribed fire generated a newly emergent population of A. viridis that was absent in other areas. Pre-migrant monarch butterflies laid eggs on A. viridis in summer burned plots in late August and September, allowing adequate time for a new generation of adult monarchs to emerge and migrate south to their overwintering grounds. Thus, summer prescribed fire may provide host plant patches and/or corridors for pre-migrant monarchs during a time when host plant availability may be limited in other areas. PMID:22859559

  9. Analysis, synchronization and circuit design of a novel butterfly attractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Ihsan; Moroz, Irene M.; Vaidyanathan, Sundarapandian

    2014-09-01

    This research paper introduces a novel three-dimensional autonomous system, whose dynamics support periodic and chaotic butterfly attractors as certain parameters vary. A special case of this system, exhibiting reflectional symmetry, is amenable to analytical and numerical analysis. Qualitative properties of the new chaotic system are discussed in detail. Adaptive control laws are derived to achieve global chaotic synchronization of the new chaotic system with unknown parameters. Furthermore, a novel electronic circuit realization of the new chaotic system is presented, examined and realized using Orcad-PSpice program and physical components. The proposed novel butterfly chaotic attractor is very useful for the deliberate generation of chaos in applications.

  10. Fueling the fall migration of the monarch butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Lincoln P; Fink, Linda S; Walford, Peter

    2006-12-01

    Monarch butterflies in eastern North America accumulate lipids during their fall migration to central Mexico, and use them as their energy source during a 5 month overwintering period. When and where along their migratory journey the butterflies accumulate these lipids has implications for the importance of fall nectar sources in North America. We analyzed the lipid content of 765 summer breeding and fall migrant monarch butterflies collected at 1 nectaring site in central Virginia over 4 years (1998-2001), and compared them with 16 additional published and unpublished datasets from other sites, dating back to 1941. Virginia migrants store significantly more lipid than summer butterflies, and show significant intraseason and between-year variation. None of the Virginia samples, and none of the historical samples, with one exception, had lipid levels comparable with those found in migrants that had reached Texas and northern Mexico. This evidence suggests that upon reaching Texas, the butterflies undergo a behavioral shift and spend more time nectaring. The one exceptional sample led us to the discovery that monarchs that form roosts along their migratory routes have higher lipid contents than monarchs collected while nectaring at flowers. We propose that for much of their journey monarchs are opportunistic migrants, and the variation within and between samples reflects butterflies' individual experiences. The stored lipids appear to be of less importance as fuel for the butterflies' migration than for their survival during their overwintering period, in part because soaring on favorable winds reduces the energetic cost of flying. The conservation of nectar plants in Texas and northern Mexico is crucial to sustaining the monarch's migratory spectacle, and nectar abundance throughout eastern North America is also important. As generalists in their selection of nectar sources and nectaring habitats, monarchs are unlikely to be affected by small changes in plant communities. Agricultural transformations of natural communities in the eastern United States and Great Plains, however, and especially the extensive planting of genetically modified herbicide-resistant soybeans and corn, may be changing the availability of nectar for monarchs and other pollinators. This new technology is eliminating virtually all forbs in and surrounding agricultural fields, including the monarch's larval hostplants (milkweeds) and native and nonnative nectar sources. To evaluate whether changes in nectar availability are altering the butterflies' ability to accumulate energy, we recommend that monarchs' lipid contents be assayed annually at sites throughout eastern North America. PMID:21672813

  11. Airspeed adjustment and lipid reserves in migratory Neotropical butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerodynamic theory predicts that migrant fliers should reduce their speed of flight as endogenous energy reserves are gradually consumed. This prediction was tested for butterfly species that engage in annual rainy season migrations through central Panama. Direct airspeed measurements together wit...

  12. MONARCH BUTTERFLIES AND BT CORN: REPLACING HOOPLA WITH SCIENCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proven methods of risk assessment were used by a consortium of scientists to investigate the potential impact of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn pollen on the monarch butterfly. Toxicity of Bt corn pollen and larval exposure to harmful levels of pollen were investigated. Research indicates that the...

  13. Iteradensovirus from the Monarch Butterfly, Danaus plexippus plexippus

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Qian; Tijssen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The 5,006-nucleotide (nt)-long genome of a new virus from monarch butterfly pupae was cloned and sequenced. It was flanked by inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) of 239 nt with 163-nt hairpins. The monosense genome with three open reading frames is typical of the genus Iteradensovirus in the subfamily Densovirinae of the family Parvoviridae.

  14. Iteradensovirus from the Monarch Butterfly, Danaus plexippus plexippus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qian; Tijssen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The 5,006-nucleotide (nt)-long genome of a new virus from monarch butterfly pupae was cloned and sequenced. It was flanked by inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) of 239 nt with 163-nt hairpins. The monosense genome with three open reading frames is typical of the genus Iteradensovirus in the subfamily Densovirinae of the family Parvoviridae. PMID:24744339

  15. MONARCH BUTTERFLIES AND BT CORN POLLEN: PHENOLOGY AND MOVEMENT CONSIDERATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proven methods of risk assessment were used by a consortium of scientists to investigate the potential impact of Bt corn pollen on the monarch butterfly. Toxicity of Bt corn pollen and larval exposure to harmful levels of pollen were investigated. Research indicates that the potential risk to monarc...

  16. Coevolutionary race continues: butterfly larval adaptation to plant trichomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathcke, B J; Poole, R W

    1975-01-17

    Plant trichomes can act as efjective defenses against herbivores, but at least one species of ithomiid butterfly, Mechanitis isthmia, has evolved a unique adaptation for avoiding the trichomes on its spiny Solanum hosts. The larvae are gregarious all together they spin a fine silk scaffolding over the tops of the spines on which they can crawl and feed in safety. PMID:17736541

  17. Historical demography of Müllerian mimicry in the neotropical Heliconius butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Flanagan, N. S.; Tobler, A.; Davison, A.; Pybus, O. G.; Kapan, D. D.; Planas, S.; Linares, M.; Heckel, D.; Mcmillan, W. O.

    2004-01-01

    We compare the historical demographies of two Müllerian comimetic butterfly species: Heliconius erato and Heliconius melpomene. These species show an extensive parallel geographic divergence in their aposematic wing phenotypes. Recent studies suggest that this coincident mosaic results from simultaneous demographic processes shaped by extrinsic forces over Pleistocene climate fluctuations. However, DNA sequence variation at two rapidly evolving unlinked nuclear loci, Mannose phosphate isomer...

  18. Contrasting supercooling ability in lowland and mountain European Colias butterflies.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, P.; Nedv?d, Old?ich; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 49, ?. 1 (2014), s. 63-69. ISSN 0749-8004 Grant ostatní: GA ?R(CZ) GAP505/10/1630; GA JU(CZ) 144/2010/100 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : butterfly ecology * diapause * frost survival Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.367, year: 2013

  19. Controlling the cavitation phenomenon of evolution on a butterfly valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of the phenomenon of cavitation in cavitation behavior requires knowledge of both plant and equipment working in the facility. This paper presents a diagram of cavitational behavior for a butterfly valve with a diameter of 100 mm at various openings, which was experimentally built. We proposed seven stages of evolution of the phenomenon of cavitation in the case of a butterfly valve. All these phases are characterized by pressure drop, noise and vibration at various flow rates and flow sections through the valve. The level of noise and vibration for the seven stages of development of the phenomenon of cavitation were measured simultaneously. The experimental measurements were comprised in a knowledge database used in training of a neural network of a neural flow controller that maintains flow rate constantly in the facility by changing the opening butterfly valve. A fuzzy position controller is used to access the valve open. This is the method proposed to provide operational supervision outside the cavitation for a butterfly valve.

  20. Palaearctic butterfly ecology model for Oriental species conservation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fric, Zden?k; Pech, Pavel

    Hong Kong : Kadoorie Farm & Botainc Garden Corporation, 2007 - (Kendrick, R.), s. 63-69 ISBN 978-962-8869-49-7 R&D Projects: GA ?R GD206/03/H034; GA AV ?R KJB600070601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : palaearctic butterfly Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  1. Young Scientists Explore Butterflies and Moths. Book 4 Primary Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Linda

    Designed to present interesting facts about science and to heighten the curiosity of primary age students, this book contains activities about the natural world and numerous black and white illustrations. The activities focus on butterflies and moths and their stages of development. The first section contains exercises on recognizing insect body…

  2. Risk assessment for adult butterflies exposed to the mosquito control pesticide naled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    A prospective risk assessment was conducted for adult butterflies potentially exposed to the mosquito control insecticide naled. Published acute mortality data, exposure data collected during field studies, and morphometric data (total surface area and fresh body weight) for adult butterflies were combined in a probabilistic estimate of the likelihood that adult butterfly exposure to naled following aerial applications would exceed levels associated with acute mortality. Adult butterfly exposure was estimated based on the product of (1) naled residues on samplers and (2) an exposure metric that normalized total surface area for adult butterflies to their fresh weight. The likelihood that the 10th percentile refined effect estimate for adult butterflies exposed to naled would be exceeded following aerial naled applications was 67 to 80%. The greatest risk would be for butterflies in the family Lycaenidae, and the lowest risk would be for those in the family Hesperidae, assuming equivalent sensitivity to naled. A range of potential guideline naled deposition levels is presented that, if not exceeded, would reduce the risk of adult butterfly mortality. The results for this risk assessment were compared with other risk estimates for butterflies, and the implications for adult butterflies in areas targeted by aerial naled applications are discussed.

  3. Unsteady Flow and Force Control in Butterfly Take-off Flight

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Haibo; Li, Chengyu; Liang, Zongxian; Yun, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    In this work, high-resolution, high-speed videos of a Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) in take-off flight were obtained using a photogrammetry system. Using a 3D subdivision surface reconstruction methodology, the butterfly's body/wing deformation and kinematics were modeled and reconstructed from those videos. High fidelity simulations were then carried out in order to understand vortex formation in both near-field and far-field of butterfly wings and examine the associ...

  4. Virtual migration in tethered flying monarch butterflies reveals their orientation mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Frost, Barrie J.

    2002-01-01

    A newly developed flight simulator allows monarch butterflies to fly actively for up to several hours in any horizontal direction while their fall migratory flight direction can be continuously recorded. From these data, long segments of virtual flight paths of tethered, flying, migratory monarch butterflies were reconstructed, and by advancing or retarding the butterflies' circadian clocks, we have shown that they possess a time-compensated sun compass. Control monarchs on local time fly app...

  5. Hofstadter butterfly and integer quantum Hall effect in three dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Koshino, M; Kuroki, K; Kagoshima, S; Osada, T

    2000-01-01

    For a three-dimensional lattice in magnetic fields we have shown that the hopping along the third direction, which normally tends to smear out the Landau quantization gaps, can rather give rise to a fractal energy spectram akin to Hofstadter's butterfly when a criterion, found here by mapping the problem to two dimensions, is fulfilled by anisotropic (quasi-one-dimensional) systems. In 3D the angle of the magnetic field plays the role of the field intensity in 2D, so that the butterfly can occur in much smaller fields. The mapping also enables us to calculate the Hall conductivity, in terms of the topological invariant in the Kohmoto-Halperin-Wu's formula, where each of $\\sigma_{xy}, \\sigma_{zx}$ is found to be quantized.

  6. Spin transitions in graphene butterflies at an integer filling factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazaryan, Areg; Chakraborty, Tapash

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments on the role of electron-electron interactions in fractal Dirac systems have revealed a host of interesting effects, in particular, the unique nature of the magnetic field dependence of butterfly gaps in graphene. The novel gap structure recently observed in the integer quantum Hall effect is quite intriguing [G. L. Yu et al., Nat. Phys. 10, 525 (2014), 10.1038/nphys2979], where one observes a suppression of the ferromagnetic state at one value of the commensurable flux but a reentrant ferromagnetic state at another. In our present work we introduce the magnetic translation symmetry in the integer quantum Hall effect regime and consider the interplay between the electron-electron interaction and the periodic potential. In this approach, we explain the underlying physical processes that can lead to such a unique behavior of the butterfly gaps as observed in that system where we invoke the spin-flip transitions in the ground state.

  7. Butterfly eyespot serial homology: enter the Hox genes

    OpenAIRE

    Hombría James

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hox genes modify serial homology patterns in many organisms, exemplified in vertebrates by modification of the axial skeleton and in arthropods by diversification of the body segments. Butterfly wing eyespots also appear in a serial homologous pattern that, in certain species, is subject to local modification. A paper in EvoDevo reports the Hox gene Antp is the earliest known gene to have eyespot-specific expression; however, not all Lepidoptera express Antp in eyespots, suggesting s...

  8. Juvenile hormone regulation of longevity in the migratory monarch butterfly.

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, W. S.; Tatar, M.

    2001-01-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) of eastern North America are well known for their long-range migration to overwintering roosts in south-central Mexico. An essential feature of this migration involves the exceptional longevity of the migrant adults; individuals persist from August/September to March while their summer counterparts are likely to live less than two months as adults. Migrant adults persist during a state of reproductive diapause in which both male and female reproductive d...

  9. Social benefits of ecotourism : the monarch butterfly reserve in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Monterrubio Cordero, Juan Carlos; Rodri?guez Mun?oz, Gregoria; Mendoza Ontiveros, Martha Marivel

    2013-01-01

    Ecotourism can contribute to both positive and negative socioeconomic impacts at the local level. However, ecotourism’s socioeconomic impacts have received limited scholarly attention in the context of developing countries. Based on qualitative interviews and observations, this paper looks at the socioeconomic benefits of ecotourism in a local community in the Monarch Butterfly Reserve in Mexico. It was found that ecotourism replaced most of the economic activities in the ...

  10. Phylogenetic Codivergence Supports Coevolution of Mimetic Heliconius Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyal Cuthill, Jennifer; Charleston, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The unpalatable and warning-patterned butterflies Heliconius erato and Heliconius melpomene provide the best studied example of mutualistic Müllerian mimicry, thought–but rarely demonstrated–to promote coevolution. Some of the strongest available evidence for coevolution comes from phylogenetic codivergence, the parallel divergence of ecologically associated lineages. Early evolutionary reconstructions suggested codivergence between mimetic populations of H. erato and H. melpomene, and t...

  11. What initiates speciation in passion-vine?butterflies?

    OpenAIRE

    Mcmillan, W. Owen; Jiggins, Chris D.; Mallet, James

    1997-01-01

    Studies of the continuum between geographic races and species provide the clearest insights into the causes of speciation. Here we report on mate choice and hybrid viability experiments in a pair of warningly colored butterflies, Heliconius erato and Heliconius himera, that maintain their genetic integrity in the face of hybridization. Hybrid sterility and inviability have been unimportant in the early stages of speciation of these two Heliconius. We find no evidence of reduced fecundity, egg...

  12. Wing patterning gene redefines the mimetic history of Heliconius butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Hines, Heather M.; Counterman, Brian A.; Papa, Riccardo; Albuquerque Moura, Priscila; Cardoso, Marcio Z.; Linares, Mauricio; Mallet, James; Reed, Robert D.; Jiggins, Chris D.; Kronforst, Marcus R.; Mcmillan, W. Owen

    2011-01-01

    The mimetic butterflies Heliconius erato and Heliconius melpomene have undergone parallel radiations to form a near-identical patchwork of over 20 different wing-pattern races across the Neotropics. Previous molecular phylogenetic work on these radiations has suggested that similar but geographically disjunct color patterns arose multiple times independently in each species. The neutral markers used in these studies, however, can move freely across color pattern boundaries, and therefore migh...

  13. CLIMBER: Climatic niche characteristics of the butterflies in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Oliver; Harpke, Alexander; Wiemers, Martin; Settele, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Detailed information on species’ ecological niche characteristics that can be related to declines and extinctions is indispensable for a better understanding of the relationship between the occurrence and performance of wild species and their environment and, moreover, for an improved assessment of the impacts of global change. Knowledge on species characteristics such as habitat requirements is already available in the ecological literature for butterflies, but information about their clim...

  14. CLIMBER: Climatic niche characteristics of the butterflies in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Oliver; Harpke, Alexander; Wiemers, Martin; Settele, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Detailed information on species’ ecological niche characteristics that can be related to declines and extinctions is indispensable for a better understanding of the relationship between the occurrence and performance of wild species and their environment and, moreover, for an improved assessment of the impacts of global change. Knowledge on species characteristics such as habitat requirements is already available in the ecological literature for butterflies, but information about their clim...

  15. High genetic load in an old isolated butterfly population

    OpenAIRE

    Mattila, Anniina L. K.; Duplouy, Anne; Kirjokangas, Malla; Lehtonen, Rainer; Rastas, Pasi; Hanski, Ilkka

    2012-01-01

    We investigated inbreeding depression and genetic load in a small (Ne ? 100) population of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), which has been completely isolated on a small island [Pikku Tytärsaari (PT)] in the Baltic Sea for at least 75 y. As a reference, we studied conspecific populations from the well-studied metapopulation in the Åland Islands (ÅL), 400 km away. A large population in Saaremaa, Estonia, was used as a reference for estimating genetic diversity and Ne....

  16. Butterfly survival on an isolated island by improved grip

    OpenAIRE

    Duplouy, Anne; Hanski, Ilkka

    2013-01-01

    On small isolated islands, natural selection is expected to reduce the dispersal capacity of organisms, as short distances do not require a high rate of dispersal, which might lead to accidental emigration from the population. In addition, individuals foregoing the high cost of maintaining flight capacity may instead allocate resources to other functions. However, in butterflies and many other insects, flight is necessary not only for dispersal but also for most other activities. A weakly fly...

  17. BUTTERFLIES OF UGANDA: MEMORIES OF A CHILD SOLDIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Van Zyl

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available "I was conceived in rape."[i] At least for this reviewer, this is one of the most powerful, hard-hitting opening lines of any book he has read to date. Moreover, from there this powerful text continues to hold the reader captive, and refuses to allow him or her to fall back in a slumber of indifference. [i] Opening line of Butterflies of Uganda.

  18. Eco-evolutionary spatial dynamics in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Hanski, Ilkka A.

    2011-01-01

    Demographic population dynamics, gene flow, and local adaptation may influence each other and lead to coupling of ecological and evolutionary dynamics, especially in species inhabiting fragmented heterogeneous environments. Here, I review long-term research on eco-evolutionary spatial dynamics in the Glanville fritillary butterfly inhabiting a large network of approximately 4,000 meadows in Finland. The metapopulation persists in a balance between frequent local extinctions and recolonization...

  19. Immune response is energetically costly in white cabbage butterfly pupae.

    OpenAIRE

    Freitak, Dalial; Ots, Indrek; Vanatoa, Alo; Ho?rak, Peeter

    2003-01-01

    Parasite-driven coevolution has led hosts to develop a complicated and potentially costly defence machinery, consisting mainly of the immune system. Despite the evidence for the trade-offs between immune function and life-history traits, it is still obscure how the costs of using and maintaining the immune function are paid. We tested whether immune challenge is energetically costly for white cabbage butterfly (Pieris brassicae L.) diapausing pupa. Individuals challenged with nylon implant ra...

  20. A fast butterfly algorithm for generalized Radon transforms

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jingwei; Fomel, Sergey; Demanet, Laurent; Ying, Lexing

    2012-01-01

    Generalized Radon transforms, such as the hyperbolic Radon transform, cannot be implemented as efficiently in the frequency domain as convolutions, thus limiting their use in seismic data processing. We have devised a fast butterfly algorithm for the hyperbolic Radon transform. The basic idea is to reformulate the transform as an oscillatory integral operator and to construct a blockwise low-rank approximation of the kernel function. The overall structure follows the Fourier integral operator...

  1. Discrimination of flying mimetic, passion-vine butterflies Heliconius

    OpenAIRE

    Srygley, R. B.; Ellington, C. P.

    1999-01-01

    Wing-beat frequency and the degree of asymmetry in wing motion were more similar among mimics than among sister species of passion-vine butterflies in the genus Heliconius. Asymmetry in wing motion is not attributed to lift production, and serves as the first clear example of a mimetic behavioural signal for a flying organism. Because the similarities in wing motion are too subtle for humans to observe with the naked eye, they serve as a previously unexplored mimetic signal.

  2. Polarisation-dependent colour vision in Papilio butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Kelber, Almut; Thunell, Christel; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2001-01-01

    Butterflies of the genus Papilio have polarisation-sensitive photoreceptors in all regions of the eye, and different spectral types of receptor are sensitive to different e-vector orientations. We have studied the consequences of this eye design for colour vision in behavioural tests and find that Papilio spp. see false colours due to the polarisation of light. They discriminate between vertically and horizontally polarised light of the same colour in the contexts of oviposition and feeding. ...

  3. What can sown wildflower strips contribute to butterfly conservation?: an example from a Swiss lowland agricultural landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Haaland, Christine; Bersier, Louis-fe?lix

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare butterfly abundances and diversity between wildflower strips and extensively used meadows to identify which butterfly species can be supported by establishing wildflower strips. Butterflies were recorded along transects during one season in twenty-five sown wildflower strips and eleven extensively used meadows in a Swiss lowland agricultural landscape (600 ha). In total 1,669 butterflies of 25 species were observed (25 in the strips, 18 in meadows). ...

  4. Predator mimicry, not conspicuousness, explains the efficacy of butterfly eyespots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bona, Sebastiano; Valkonen, Janne K; López-Sepulcre, Andrés; Mappes, Johanna

    2015-05-01

    Large conspicuous eyespots on butterfly wings have been shown to deter predators. This has been traditionally explained by mimicry of vertebrate eyes, but recently the classic eye-mimicry hypothesis has been challenged. It is proposed that the conspicuousness of the eyespot, not mimicry, is what causes aversion due to sensory biases, neophobia or sensory overloads. We conducted an experiment to directly test whether the eye-mimicry or the conspicuousness hypothesis better explain eyespot efficacy. We used great tits (Parus major) as model predator, and tested their reaction towards animated images on a computer display. Birds were tested against images of butterflies without eyespots, with natural-looking eyespots, and manipulated spots with the same contrast but reduced resemblance to an eye, as well as images of predators (owls) with and without eyes. We found that mimetic eyespots were as effective as true eyes of owls and more efficient in eliciting an aversive response than modified, less mimetic but equally contrasting eyespots. We conclude that the eye-mimicry hypothesis explains our results better than the conspicuousness hypothesis and is thus likely to be an important mechanism behind the evolution of butterfly eyespots. PMID:25854889

  5. MonarchBase: the monarch butterfly genome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuai; Reppert, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is emerging as a model organism to study the mechanisms of circadian clocks and animal navigation, and the genetic underpinnings of long-distance migration. The initial assembly of the monarch genome was released in 2011, and the biological interpretation of the genome focused on the butterfly's migration biology. To make the extensive data associated with the genome accessible to the general biological and lepidopteran communities, we established MonarchBase (available at http://monarchbase.umassmed.edu). The database is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates all available data associated with the monarch butterfly genome. Moreover, MonarchBase provides access to an updated version of genome assembly (v3) upon which all data integration is based. These include genes with systematic annotation, as well as other molecular resources, such as brain expressed sequence tags, migration expression profiles and microRNAs. MonarchBase utilizes a variety of retrieving methods to access data conveniently and for integrating biological interpretations. PMID:23143105

  6. Hofstadter butterflies in nonlinear Harper lattices, and their optical realizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ubiquitous Hofstadter butterfly describes a variety of systems characterized by incommensurable periodicities, ranging from Bloch electrons in magnetic fields and the quantum Hall effect to cold atoms in optical lattices and more. Here, we introduce nonlinearity into the underlying (Harper) model and study the nonlinear spectra and the corresponding extended eigenmodes of nonlinear quasiperiodic systems. We show that the spectra of the nonlinear eigenmodes form deformed versions of the Hofstadter butterfly and demonstrate that the modes can be classified into two families: nonlinear modes that are a 'continuation' of the linear modes of the system and new nonlinear modes that have no counterparts in the linear spectrum. Finally, we propose an optical realization of the linear and nonlinear Harper models in transversely modulated waveguide arrays, where these Hofstadter butterflies can be observed. This work is relevant to a variety of other branches of physics beyond optics, such as disorder-induced localization in ultracold bosonic gases, localization transition processes in disordered lattices, and more.

  7. Hofstadter butterflies in nonlinear Harper lattices, and their optical realizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manela, Ofer; Segev, Mordechai; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Kip, Detlef

    2010-05-01

    The ubiquitous Hofstadter butterfly describes a variety of systems characterized by incommensurable periodicities, ranging from Bloch electrons in magnetic fields and the quantum Hall effect to cold atoms in optical lattices and more. Here, we introduce nonlinearity into the underlying (Harper) model and study the nonlinear spectra and the corresponding extended eigenmodes of nonlinear quasiperiodic systems. We show that the spectra of the nonlinear eigenmodes form deformed versions of the Hofstadter butterfly and demonstrate that the modes can be classified into two families: nonlinear modes that are a 'continuation' of the linear modes of the system and new nonlinear modes that have no counterparts in the linear spectrum. Finally, we propose an optical realization of the linear and nonlinear Harper models in transversely modulated waveguide arrays, where these Hofstadter butterflies can be observed. This work is relevant to a variety of other branches of physics beyond optics, such as disorder-induced localization in ultracold bosonic gases, localization transition processes in disordered lattices, and more.

  8. Species-specific color-pattern modifications of butterfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Joji M; Yamamoto, Haruhiko

    2004-02-01

    We have previously shown that the systemic injection of sodium tungstate, a general protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) inhibitor, efficiently produces characteristic color-pattern modifications on the wings of the Painted Lady butterfly, Vanessa cardui. By using this method in the present study, we analyzed modification patterns of six species of Japanese butterflies. Whereas in Vanessa indica the black spots on the forewings reduced in size in response to the treatment, in Lycaena phlaeas the morphologically similar black spots enlarged in size. However, the metallic blue spots on the forewings of V. indica did enlarge in size, showing different behavior even within a single wing surface. The response patterns of Ypthima argus differed markedly from those of other species in that ectopic color-pattern elements were created. Colias erate showed minor modifications that coincidentally resembled the natural color-pattern of a closely related species, Colias palaeno. Through a comprehensive literature search, we confirmed the existence of naturally occurring aberrant color patterns with close similarities to the experimentally induced phenocopies in each of the modified species. Our results point out the possibility that a hypothetical transduction pathway with a PTPase for the scale-cell differentiation globally coordinates the wing-wide color-pattern development in butterflies. PMID:15008850

  9. CLIMBER: Climatic niche characteristics of the butterflies in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Oliver; Harpke, Alexander; Wiemers, Martin; Settele, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Detailed information on species' ecological niche characteristics that can be related to declines and extinctions is indispensable for a better understanding of the relationship between the occurrence and performance of wild species and their environment and, moreover, for an improved assessment of the impacts of global change. Knowledge on species characteristics such as habitat requirements is already available in the ecological literature for butterflies, but information about their climatic requirements is still lacking. Here we present a unique dataset on the climatic niche characteristics of 397 European butterflies representing 91% of the European species (see Appendix). These characteristics were obtained by combining detailed information on butterfly distributions in Europe (which also led to the 'Distribution Atlas of Butterflies in Europe') and the corresponding climatic conditions. The presented dataset comprises information for the position and breadth of the following climatic niche characteristics: mean annual temperature, range in annual temperature, growing degree days, annual precipitation sum, range in annual precipitation and soil water content. The climatic niche position is indicated by the median and mean value for each climate variable across a species' range, accompanied by the 95% confidence interval for the mean and the number of grid cells used for calculations. Climatic niche breadth is indicated by the standard deviation and the minimum and maximum values for each climatic variable across a species' range. Database compilation was based on high quality standards and the data are ready to use for a broad range of applications. It is already evident that the information provided in this dataset is of great relevance for basic and applied ecology. Based on the species temperature index (STI, i.e. the mean temperature value per species), the community temperature index (CTI, i.e. the average STI value across the species in a community) was recently adopted as an indicator of climate change impact on biodiversity by the pan-European framework supporting the Convention on Biological Diversity (Streamlining European Biodiversity Indicators 2010) and has already been used in several scientific publications. The application potential of this database ranges from theoretical aspects such as assessments of past niche evolution or analyses of trait interdependencies to the very applied aspects of measuring, monitoring and projecting historical, ongoing and potential future responses to climate change using butterflies as an indicator. PMID:24478578

  10. El Niño and other determinants of butterfly migrations in a Neotropical wet forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    What factors regulate insect populations and their movement in the tropics? We censused butterflies flying across the Panama Canal at Barro Colorado Island (BCI) for 16 years to address two questions. What environmental factors determine the date on which the number of migrating butterflies peaked...

  11. Field Based Learning About Butterfly Diversity in School Garden-A Case Study From Puducherry, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalsomy Poyyamoli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Butterflies are essential components for well functioning of ecosystems due to their key roles as pollinators and as indicators of ecosystem health. Butterflies are also beloved by public as well as young students and children, who are largely unaware that many species are threatened or endangered. The main objectives of field based education for butterfly conservation were to create knowledge, interest and necessary skills to investigate and, identify the butterfly species and conserve its diversity in school gardens. For butterfly survey the census technique method was taught to the students to investigate the diversity of butterflies during the field trips. During the field trip a total of 34 butterfly species, belonging to 4 families, were recorded with standard literature and colour photographs. The Nymphalidae family was the dominant species found in school gardens. The study concluded that the young students must be given the chance to investigate, engage with and experience nature in order to appreciate and be motivated to conserve and protect these fascinating insects at local level. The conservation of our natural biological resources will be dependent upon future generations. This field based learning program inspired to identify and conserve the butterfly diversity within the school gardens.

  12. Toxicity of "Bacillus thuringiensis var. Kurstaki" to the Painted Lady Butterfly, Vanessa cardui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalter, Richard; Nadal, Gerard; Kincaid, Dwight

    2000-01-01

    Reports the effects of Bacillus thuringiensis var. Kurstaki (BT), which is highly toxic, to a non-target lepidopteran, the Painted Lady butterfly. Indicates that BT kills some Painted Lady butterfly larvae at the lowest dilution tested after 48 hours. (ASK)

  13. Phase Diagram for the Hofstadter butterfly and integer quantum Hall effect in three dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Koshino, M; Osada, T; Kuroki, K; Kagoshima, S

    2001-01-01

    We give a perspective on the Hofstadter butterfly (fractal energy spectrum in magnetic fields), which we have shown to arise specifically in three-dimensional(3D) systems in our previous work. (i) We first obtain the `phase diagram' on a parameter space of the transfer energies and the magnetic field for the appearance of Hofstadter's butterfly spectrum in anisotropic crystals in 3D. (ii) We show that the orientation of the external magnetic field can be arbitrary to have the 3D butterfly. (iii) We show that the butterfly is beyond the semiclassical description. (iv) The required magnetic field for a representative organic metal is estimated to be modest ($\\sim 40$ T) if we adopt higher Landau levels for the butterfly. (v) We give a simpler way of deriving the topological invariants that represent the quantum Hall numbers (i.e., two Hall conductivity in 3D, $\\sigma_{xy}, \\sigma_{zx}$, in units of $e^2/h$).

  14. Opsin clines in butterflies suggest novel roles for insect photopigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Francesca D; Yuan, Furong; Savage, Wesley K; Bernard, Gary D; Mullen, Sean P; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2015-02-01

    Opsins are ancient molecules that enable animal vision by coupling to a vitamin-derived chromophore to form light-sensitive photopigments. The primary drivers of evolutionary diversification in opsins are thought to be visual tasks related to spectral sensitivity and color vision. Typically, only a few opsin amino acid sites affect photopigment spectral sensitivity. We show that opsin genes of the North American butterfly Limenitis arthemis have diversified along a latitudinal cline, consistent with natural selection due to environmental factors. We sequenced single nucleotide (SNP) polymorphisms in the coding regions of the ultraviolet (UVRh), blue (BRh), and long-wavelength (LWRh) opsin genes from ten butterfly populations along the eastern United States and found that a majority of opsin SNPs showed significant clinal variation. Outlier detection and analysis of molecular variance indicated that many SNPs are under balancing selection and show significant population structure. This contrasts with what we found by analysing SNPs in the wingless and EF-1 alpha loci, and from neutral amplified fragment length polymorphisms, which show no evidence of significant locus-specific or genome-wide structure among populations. Using a combination of functional genetic and physiological approaches, including expression in cell culture, transgenic Drosophila, UV-visible spectroscopy, and optophysiology, we show that key BRh opsin SNPs that vary clinally have almost no effect on spectral sensitivity. Our results suggest that opsin diversification in this butterfly is more consistent with natural selection unrelated to spectral tuning. Some of the clinally varying SNPs may instead play a role in regulating opsin gene expression levels or the thermostability of the opsin protein. Lastly, we discuss the possibility that insect opsins might have important, yet-to-be elucidated, adaptive functions in mediating animal responses to abiotic factors, such as temperature or photoperiod. PMID:25371434

  15. A Genetic Linkage Map of the Mimetic Butterfly Heliconius melpomene

    OpenAIRE

    Jiggins, Chris D.; Mavarez, Jesus; Beltra?n, Margarita; Mcmillan, W. Owen; Johnston, J. Spencer; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2005-01-01

    Heliconius melpomene is a mimetic butterfly that exhibits great geographic variation in color pattern. We present here a genetic linkage map based on analysis of genetic markers in 73 individuals from a single F2 family, offspring of a cross between H. m. cythera from western Ecuador and H. m. melpomene from French Guiana. A novel “three-step method” is described for the analysis of dominant markers in an F2 cross, using outbred parental strains and taking advantage of the lack of crossin...

  16. Change in a butterfly community on a gradually overgrowing site.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ko?íková, Lenka; ?anády, A.; Panigaj, L.

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 45, ?. 5 (2014), s. 391-398. ISSN 1067-4136 Grant ostatní: Slovak Scientific Grant Agency VEGA(SK) 1/0434/03; Slovak Scientific Grant Agency VEGA(SK) 1/0477/10; Slovak Scientific Grant Agency VEGA(SK) 1/1025/12; Internal Research Grants(SK) I-10-001-00-F-VVGS; Internal Research Grants(SK) VVGS-PF-2012-19 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : butterflies * monitoring * water pan traps Subject RIV: EH - Ecology , Behaviour Impact factor: 0.386, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1134%2FS1067413614050087

  17. Controlling public speaking jitters: making the butterflies fly in formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Hannah; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Nearly every person who has been asked to give a speech or who has volunteered to make a presentation to a group of strangers develops fear and anxiety prior to the presentation. Most of us, the authors included, start hyperventilating, our pulse quickens, and we feel a little weak in the knees. We grab the lectern and our knuckles turn white as we hold on for dear life. This is a normal response that everyone experiences. However, this stress can be controlled and made manageable by understanding the stress response cycle and practicing a few techniques that calm those butterflies flying around in the pit of your stomach. PMID:25807629

  18. Interrelation Between Some Butterflies and Plant Associations (Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Özdemir

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The butterfly fauna in Ordu province (N-Turkey was determined in this study. Their relations with the phytosociological associations found in the zone were evaluated and the Lepidoptera taxa in these units were presented. The numbers of determined taxa in each plant association are Castanea-Carpinus-Corylus (23, Fagus orientalis, Carpinus betulus and Picea orientalis Mixed Forest Zone (23, Subalpine Zone (Rhododendron luteum-Vaccinium myrtillus (25, Lower Alpine Zone (Festuca lazistanica ssp. giresunica (20, Mid-alpine Zone (Festuca lazistanica ssp. giresunica (13. Fifteen taxa are new for Ordu province.

  19. Hofstadter butterfly and integer quantum Hall effect in three dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Koshino, M.; Aoki, H.; Kuroki, K.; Kagoshima, S.; Osada, T.

    2000-01-01

    For a three-dimensional lattice in magnetic fields we have shown that the hopping along the third direction, which normally tends to smear out the Landau quantization gaps, can rather give rise to a fractal energy spectram akin to Hofstadter's butterfly when a criterion, found here by mapping the problem to two dimensions, is fulfilled by anisotropic (quasi-one-dimensional) systems. In 3D the angle of the magnetic field plays the role of the field intensity in 2D, so that th...

  20. Direct and indirect responses of tallgrass prairie butterflies to prescribed burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J.A.; Koford, R.R.; Debinski, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    Fire is an important tool in the conservation and restoration of tallgrass prairie ecosystems. We investigated how both the vegetation composition and butterfly community of tallgrass prairie remnants changed in relation to the elapsed time (in months) since prescribed fire. Butterfly richness and butterfly abundance were positively correlated with the time since burn. Habitat-specialist butterfly richness recovery time was greater than 70 months post-fire and habitat-specialist butterfly abundance recovery time was approximately 50 months post-fire. Thus, recovery times for butterfly populations after prescribed fires in our study were potentially longer than those previously reported. We used Path Analysis to evaluate the relative contributions of the direct effect of time since fire and the indirect effects of time since fire through changes in vegetation composition on butterfly abundance. Path models highlighted the importance of the indirect effects of fire on habitat features, such as increases in the cover of bare ground. Because fire return intervals on managed prairie remnants are often less than 5 years, information on recovery times for habitat-specialist insect species are of great importance. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  1. The predominance of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the butterfly Morpho peleides before and after metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingming; Lin, Don S; Bolewicz, Linda; Connor, William E

    2006-03-01

    We hypothesized that the polyunsaturated fatty acids of the butterfly were probably derived from the diet and that there might be a great loss of body fat during metamorphosis. To substantiate these hypotheses, we analyzed the fatty acid composition and content of the diet, the larva, and the butterfly Morpho peleides. Both the diet and the tissues of the larva and butterfly had a high concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In the diet, linolenic acid accounted for 19% and linoleic acid for 8% of total fatty acids. In the larva, almost 60% of the total fatty acids were polyunsaturated: linolenic acid predominated at 42% of total fatty acids, and linoleic acid was at 17%. In the butterfly, linolenic acid represented 36% and linoleic acid represented 11% of total fatty acids. The larva had a much higher total fatty acid content than the butterfly (20.2 vs. 6.9 mg). Our data indicate that the transformation from larva to butterfly during metamorphosis drastically decreased the total fatty acid content. There was bioenhancement of polyunsaturated fatty acids from the diet to the larva and butterfly. This polyunsaturation of membranes may have functional importance in providing membrane fluidity useful in flight. PMID:16322637

  2. Larval starvation reduces responsiveness to feeding stimuli and does not affect feeding preferences in a butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl, Tobias; Fischer, Klaus

    2012-07-01

    It is commonly assumed that holometabolic insects such as Lepidoptera rely primarily on larval storage reserves for reproduction. Recent studies though have documented a prominent role of adult-derived carbohydrates for butterfly reproduction. Moreover, a few studies have shown that adult butterflies may also benefit from adult-derived amino acids, at least when larval storage reserves are reduced. Given that in holometabolous insects larval deficiencies are carried over into the adult stage, reduced storage reserves have the potential to modulate adult feeding preferences and responses in order to allow for a successful compensation. We tested this hypothesis here in the fruit-feeding butterfly Bicyclus anynana using larval food stress to manipulate storage reserves. Alcohols (methanol, ethanol, butanol, propanol), sugars (maltose, glucose, fructose, sucrose), and acetic acid acted as feeding stimuli, while butterflies did not respond to other substances such as amino acids, yeast, salts, or vitamins. Contrary to expectations, stressed butterflies showed a weaker response than controls to several feeding stimuli. In preference tests, butterflies preferred sugar solutions containing proline, arginine, glutamic acid, acetic acid, or ethanol over plain sugar solutions, but discriminated against salts. However, there were no general differences among starved and control butterflies. We conclude that larval food-stress does not elicit compensatory feeding behavior such as a stronger preference for amino acids or other essential nutrients in B. anynana. Instead, the stress imposed by a period of starvation yielded negative effects. PMID:22634044

  3. Aerodynamic effect of hind-wing tails on a gliding swallowtail butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Haecheon; Park, Hyungmin; Bae, Kisoo; Jeon, Woo-Pyung

    2006-11-01

    In butterfly flight, the relationship between wing morphology and gliding performance have been one of the major concerns. The hind-wing tails, observed in most swallowtail butterfly, have been also conjectured to promote the gliding ability of butterfly. In this study, the aerodynamic role of hind-wing tails in gliding swallowtail butterfly is experimentally investigated using butterfly models with and without tails. The butterfly models are copied from a dried specimen of real swallowtail butterfly, Papilio Ulysses. Varying the attack angle, we measure the lift, drag and pitching moment for both models, and visualize the flow fields using an array of smoke wires at the attack angle of 20^o. With the tails, the lift and drag increase by about 10 ˜20% and 5%, respectively, at the attack angles higher than 15^o, which results in the increase of lift-to-drag ratio in a wide range of attack angles. Also, with the tails, the nose-down pitching moment increases more rapidly with increasing attack angle, indicating the enhanced longitudinal static stability by the tails. From visualization, it is found that strong vortical structures are drawn closer to the upper wing surface by the tails.

  4. Are bovine pericardium underlay xenograft and butterfly inlay autograft efficient for transcanal tympanoplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dorlodot, Clotilde; De Bie, Gersende; Deggouj, Naima; Decat, Monique; Gérard, Jean-Marc

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the success rate and the surgical procedure of two different transcanal myringoplasty techniques using the Tutopatch(®) (Tutogen Medical, Inc., Alachua, FL, USA), a xenograft produced from bovine pericardium or the butterfly, an inlay tragal cartilage autograft. This is a retrospective study. We studied all cases of transcanal myringoplasty with Tutopatch and butterfly, performed by the same surgeon between April 2005 and May 2013. Perforations were secondary to chronic otitis media without cholesteatoma, perforation post ventilation tube or trauma. They were not exceeding one-third of the tympanic membrane surface for the Tutopatch and one quarter for the butterfly. We evaluated the anatomical success rate, complications and postoperative hearing results in both techniques. A total of 106 myringoplasties were performed: 66 with Tutopatch and 40 with butterfly with a mean follow-up of 16.5 and 5.2 months, respectively. Successful closure rates of Tutopatch and butterfly were 75.8% (P < 0.0001) and 85.0% (P < 0.0001), respectively. Myringitis controlled with topical antibiotics treatment occurred in 8 (12.1%) and 5 (12.5%) cases. Eighty percent of patients with Tutopatch had a mean residual air-bone gap within 10 dB, compared to 85.0% in patients with butterfly. When anatomically feasible, a transcanal approach myringoplasty with a Tutopatch(®) graft or butterfly appears to provide good anatomical and functional results. We show that both techniques provide good anatomical and functional results. The butterfly has the advantage to use an autograft, which is surgically easier because it does not require tympanomeatal flap elevation. We recommend the butterfly technique for non-marginal perforation not exceeding one quarter of the tympanic membrane after excision of the perforation edge and Tutopatch for bigger perforation or when standard autografts are not available. Myringitis is the only described complication without specific incidence. PMID:24337878

  5. Species richness and trait composition of butterfly assemblages change along an altitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leingärtner, Annette; Krauss, Jochen; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2014-06-01

    Species richness patterns along altitudinal gradients are well-documented ecological phenomena, yet very little data are available on how environmental filtering processes influence the composition and traits of butterfly assemblages at high altitudes. We have studied the diversity patterns of butterfly species at 34 sites along an altitudinal gradient ranging from 600 to 2,000 m a.s.l. in the National Park Berchtesgaden (Germany) and analysed traits of butterfly assemblages associated with dispersal capacity, reproductive strategies and developmental time from lowlands to highlands, including phylogenetic analyses. We found a linear decline in butterfly species richness along the altitudinal gradient, but the phylogenetic relatedness of the butterfly assemblages did not increase with altitude. Compared to butterfly assemblages at lower altitudes, those at higher altitudes were composed of species with larger wings (on average 9%) which laid an average of 68% more eggs. In contrast, egg maturation time in butterfly assemblages decreased by about 22% along the altitudinal gradient. Further, butterfly assemblages at higher altitudes were increasingly dominated by less widespread species. Based on our abundance data, but not on data in the literature, population density increased with altitude, suggesting a reversed density-distribution relationship, with higher population densities of habitat specialists in harsh environments. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for significant shifts in the composition of butterfly assemblages and for the dominance of different traits along the altitudinal gradient. In our study, these changes were mainly driven by environmental factors, whereas phylogenetic filtering played a minor role along the studied altitudinal range. PMID:24668013

  6. Effects of spatial heterogeneity on butterfly species richness in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Simonson, S.E.; Stohlgren, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated butterfly responses to plot-level characteristics (plant species richness, vegetation height, and range in NDVI [normalized difference vegetation index]) and spatial heterogeneity in topography and landscape patterns (composition and configuration) at multiple spatial scales. Stratified random sampling was used to collect data on butterfly species richness from seventy-six 20 ?? 50 m plots. The plant species richness and average vegetation height data were collected from 76 modified-Whittaker plots overlaid on 76 butterfly plots. Spatial heterogeneity around sample plots was quantified by measuring topographic variables and landscape metrics at eight spatial extents (radii of 300, 600 to 2,400 m). The number of butterfly species recorded was strongly positively correlated with plant species richness, proportion of shrubland and mean patch size of shrubland. Patterns in butterfly species richness were negatively correlated with other variables including mean patch size, average vegetation height, elevation, and range in NDVI. The best predictive model selected using Akaike's Information Criterion corrected for small sample size (AICc), explained 62% of the variation in butterfly species richness at the 2,100 m spatial extent. Average vegetation height and mean patch size were among the best predictors of butterfly species richness. The models that included plot-level information and topographic variables explained relatively less variation in butterfly species richness, and were improved significantly after including landscape metrics. Our results suggest that spatial heterogeneity greatly influences patterns in butterfly species richness, and that it should be explicitly considered in conservation and management actions. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. Unsteady Flow and Force Control in Butterfly Take-off Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Haibo; Liang, Zongxian; Yun, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    In this work, high-resolution, high-speed videos of a Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) in take-off flight were obtained using a photogrammetry system. Using a 3D subdivision surface reconstruction methodology, the butterfly's body/wing deformation and kinematics were modeled and reconstructed from those videos. High fidelity simulations were then carried out in order to understand vortex formation in both near-field and far-field of butterfly wings and examine the associated aerodynamic performance. A Cartesian grid based sharp interface immersed boundary solver was used to handle such flows in all their complexity.

  8. Butterfly (Lepidoptera: Insecta Diversity from Different Sites of Jhagadia, Ankleshwar, District-Bharuch, Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lepidoptera is a large order of insects that includes moths and butterflies. Lepidoptera is the second largest order in the class Insecta. Some of the butterfly species were identified as indicators of disturbance in any area. The present study conducted in three sites of taluka Jhagadia, Ankleshwar, District-Bharuch, Gujarat. In the present study a total of 484 individuals belonging to 58 species of 9 families were identified. Among which Pieridae was found to be the most dominant family. The area of study having rich diversity of butterflies, therefore it should be of great importance for conservation.

  9. Applications of butterfly interconnection networks in the real transform-based optical information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, DeGui; He, Li-Ming; Wang, Na-Xin; Xu, Mai; Liang, Guodong; Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Jing-Hui

    1994-06-01

    This paper proposes new optical butterfly interconnection network constructions based on the butterfly signal-flow diagrams for performing 1D and 2D fast Walsh-Hadamard transforms. We build the optical butterfly interconnection network hardware systems by using the binary phase diffraction gratings and masks. The systems are simple, regular in constructions, and easily implemented by means of gratings and masks. They relate directly optical processing with mathematical calculation, and are conveniently controlled and adjusted. These important characteristics have been verified by computer simulation.

  10. Hofstadter's butterfly in a two-dimensional lattice consisting of two sublattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper's equations for simple and complex two-dimensional lattices subject to a magnetic field have been derived in the tight-binding approximation. In our derivation we do not neglect the influence of the magnetic field on the electron eigenfunctions and eigenvalues in isolated atoms. Using a variational procedure for finding eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, we have self-consistently obtained Hofstadter's butterflies. Even for a simple square lattice Hofstadter's butterfly differs from the butterfly obtained in the case in which the influence of the magnetic field on the electron eigenvalues and eigenfunctions in isolated atoms is not taken into account

  11. Butterfly survival on an isolated island by improved grip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplouy, Anne; Hanski, Ilkka

    2013-01-01

    On small isolated islands, natural selection is expected to reduce the dispersal capacity of organisms, as short distances do not require a high rate of dispersal, which might lead to accidental emigration from the population. In addition, individuals foregoing the high cost of maintaining flight capacity may instead allocate resources to other functions. However, in butterflies and many other insects, flight is necessary not only for dispersal but also for most other activities. A weakly flying individual would probably do worse and have an elevated rather than reduced probability of accidental emigration. Here, we report results consistent with the hypothesis that a butterfly population on an isolated island, instead of having lost its flight capacity, has evolved better grip to resist the force of wind and to avoid being blown off the island. Our study suggests that local adaptation has occurred in this population in spite of its very small size (Ne ? 100), complete isolation, low genetic variation and high genetic load. PMID:23445946

  12. Effect of hand paddles and parachute on butterfly coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Thiago; Barroso, Renato; Barbosa, Augusto Carvalho; Salgueiro, Diego Fortes de Souza; Colantonio, Emilson; Júnior, Orival Andries

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of hand paddles, parachute and hand paddles plus parachute on the inter-limb coordination of butterfly swimming. Thirteen male swimmers were evaluated in four random maximal intensity conditions: without equipment, with hand paddles, with parachute and with hand paddles + parachute. Arm and leg stroke phases were identified by 2D video analysis to calculate the total time gap (T1: time between hands' entry in the water and high break-even point of the first undulation; T2: time between the beginning of the hand's backward movement and low break-even point of the first undulation; T3: time between the hand's arrival in a vertical plane to the shoulders and high break-even point of the second undulation; T4: time between the hand's release from the water and low break-even point of the second undulation). The swimming velocity was reduced and T1, T2 and T3 increased in parachute and hand paddles + parachute. No changes were observed in T4. Total time gap decreased in parachute and hand paddles + parachute. It is concluded that hand paddles do not influence the arm-to-leg coordination in butterfly, while parachute and hand paddles + parachute do change it, providing a greater propulsive continuity. PMID:25583184

  13. Origin of Retroreflection from a Wing of the Morpho Butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, Makoto; Zhu, Dong; Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2011-05-01

    We have performed detailed angular and spectroscopic measurements on a typical species of Morpho butterflies, Morpho rhetenor, and have found that the butterfly wing shows characteristic retroreflection in a blue region, when light is incident around 10--30\\circ inclined from the normal to the scales on the wing. Various angular and spectroscopic measurements such as detector and sample rotations, and ?--2? scan are tested, and apart from an inclusive method of ?--? scan, the sample rotation method is found to be the most appropriate to characterize its optical properties. In order to investigate the origin of the retroreflection, non-standard finite-difference time-domain method is applied and alternate shelf structure is found to be responsible for it. Its optical characteristics are more intuitively understood by two simple models, destructive interference between two units of one-sided shelf structure and two inversely inclined multilayers, although such models are not complete in a strict sense. The presence of retroreflection in this type of animal will be extremely beneficial to show their colors clearly without specular reflection that has no color selectivity.

  14. Comparing organic farming and land sparing: optimizing yield and butterfly populations at a landscape scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Jenny A; Kunin, William E; Thomas, Chris D; Benton, Tim G; Gabriel, Doreen

    2010-11-01

    Organic farming aims to be wildlife-friendly, but it may not benefit wildlife overall if much greater areas are needed to produce a given quantity of food. We measured the density and species richness of butterflies on organic farms, conventional farms and grassland nature reserves in 16 landscapes. Organic farms supported a higher density of butterflies than conventional farms, but a lower density than reserves. Using our data, we predict the optimal land-use strategy to maintain yield whilst maximizing butterfly abundance under different scenarios. Farming conventionally and sparing land as nature reserves is better for butterflies when the organic yield per hectare falls below 87% of conventional yield. However, if the spared land is simply extra field margins, organic farming is optimal whenever organic yields are over 35% of conventional yields. The optimal balance of land sparing and wildlife-friendly farming to maintain production and biodiversity will differ between landscapes. PMID:20825453

  15. Descend towards unimodality: butterfly loss in Czechia changes a major macroecological pattern.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvi?ka, Martin; Fric, Zden?k; Beneš, Ji?í; ?ížek, Old?ich; Záme?ník, J.

    Sofia : Pensoft, 2005 - (Kühn, E.; Feldmann, R.; Thomas, J.; Settele, J.), s. 88-88 ISBN 954-642-247-9 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : butterfly Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  16. The vegetation of three localities of the threatened butterfly species Chrysoritis aureus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. F. Terblanche

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The butterfly Chrysoritis aureus—previously known as Poecilmitis aureus before the new combination was designated by Heath (1997 —is considered to be Rare in the Red Data book of butterflies (Henning & Henning 1989 and the updated list of the Red Data book of butterfly species (Henning & Henning 1995. C.R. Barrett and F. Coetzee discovered Chrysoritis aureus on Christmas Day 1959 on a rocky slope below the water tower near the Natal road of Heidelberg in Gauteng (Pringle et al. 1994. During 1983, Chrysoritis aureus was added to the protected wild animal list of the former Transvaal under Ordinance 12, since the type locality had been the only known area where the butterfly ocurred (De Wet 1987. G.A. Henning found another locality near Greylingstad (Pringle et al. 1994.

  17. Synergistic effects of combining morphological and molecular data in resolving the phylogeny of butterflies and skippers

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Braby, Michael F.; Brower, Andrew V. Z.; Jong, Rienk; Lee, Ming-min; Nylin, So?ren; Pierce, Naomi E.; Sperling, Felix A. H.; Vila, Roger; Warren, Andrew D.; Zakharov, Evgueni

    2005-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among major clades of butterflies and skippers have long been controversial, with no general consensus even today. Such lack of resolution is a substantial impediment to using the otherwise well studied butterflies as a model group in biology. Here we report the results of a combined analysis of DNA sequences from three genes and a morphological data matrix for 57 taxa (3258 characters, 1290 parsimony informative) representing all major lineages from the three putat...

  18. Cryptochromes Define a Novel Circadian Clock Mechanism in Monarch Butterflies That May Underlie Sun Compass Navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Haisun; Sauman, Ivo; Yuan, Quan; Casselman, Amy; Emery-le, Myai; Emery, Patrick; Reppert, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    The circadian clock plays a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, a process that is important for successful navigation. We therefore evaluated the monarch clockwork by focusing on the functions of a Drosophila-like cryptochrome (cry), designated cry1, and a vertebrate-like cry, designated cry2, that are both expressed in the butterfly and by placing these genes in the context of other releva...

  19. Modeling current and future potential wintering distributions of eastern North American monarch butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Oberhauser, Karen; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2003-01-01

    Monarch butterflies overwinter in restricted areas in montane oyamel fir forests in central Mexico with specific microclimates that allow the butterflies to survive for up to 5 months. We use ecological niche modeling (ENM) to identify areas adequate for overwintering monarch colonies under both current and future climate scenarios. The ENM approach permits testing and validation of model predictivity, and yields quantitative, testable predictions regarding likely future climate change effect...

  20. Antennal circadian clocks coordinate sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies#

    OpenAIRE

    Merlin, Christine; Gegear, Robert J.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    During their fall migration, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a time-compensated sun compass to aid navigation to their overwintering grounds in central Mexico. It has been assumed that the circadian clock that provides time compensation resides in the brain, although this assumption has never been examined directly. Here we show that the antennae are necessary for proper time-compensated sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies, that antennal ...

  1. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus L.) use a magnetic compass for navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Etheredge, Jason A.; Perez, Sandra M.; Taylor, Orley R.; Jander, Rudolf

    1999-01-01

    Fall migratory monarch butterflies, tested for their directional responses to magnetic cues under three conditions, amagnetic, normal, and reversed magnetic fields, showed three distinct patterns. In the absence of a magnetic field, monarchs lacked directionality as a group. In the normal magnetic field, monarchs oriented to the southwest with a group pattern typical for migrants. When the horizontal component of the magnetic field was reversed, the butterflies oriented to the northeast. In c...

  2. Defining behavioral and molecular differences between summer and migratory monarch butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Kanginakudru Sriramana; Casselman Amy; Gegear Robert J; Zhu Haisun; Reppert Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In the fall, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) undergo a magnificent long-range migration. In contrast to spring and summer butterflies, fall migrants are juvenile hormone deficient, which leads to reproductive arrest and increased longevity. Migrants also use a time-compensated sun compass to help them navigate in the south/southwesterly direction en route for Mexico. Central issues in this area are defining the relationship between juvenile ho...

  3. The benefit of being a social butterfly: communal roosting deters predation

    OpenAIRE

    Finkbeiner, Susan D.; Briscoe, Adriana D.; Reed, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Aposematic passion-vine butterflies from the genus Heliconius form communal roosts on a nightly basis. This behaviour has been hypothesized to be beneficial in terms of information sharing and/or anti-predator defence. To better understand the adaptive value of communal roosting, we tested these two hypotheses in field studies. The information-sharing hypothesis was addressed by examining following behaviour of butterflies departing from natural roosts. We found no evidence of roost mates fol...

  4. Standardised methods for the GMO monitoring of butterflies and moths: the whys and hows

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Andreas; Theißen, Bernhard; Dolek, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) are correlated with many biotic and abiotic characteristics of the environment, and are widely accepted as relevant protection goals. Adverse effects on butterflies and moths through genetically modified (GM) crops have been demonstrated, by both insect-resistant and herbicide-tolerant events. Thus, Lepidoptera are considered suitable bio-indicators for monitoring the potential adverse effects due to the cultivation of GM crops, and guidelines were develope...

  5. Tracking butterfly movements with harmonic radar reveals an effect of population age on movement distance

    OpenAIRE

    Ovaskainen, Otso; Smith, Alan D.; Osborne, Juliet L.; Reynolds, Don R.; Carreck, Norman L.; Martin, Andrew P.; Niitepo?ld, Kristjan; Hanski, Ilkka

    2008-01-01

    We used harmonic radar to track freely flying Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) females within an area of 30 ha. Butterflies originated from large and continuous populations in China and Estonia, and from newly established or old (> 5 years) small local populations in a highly fragmented landscape in Finland. Caterpillars were raised under common garden conditions and unmated females were tested soon after eclosion. The reconstructed flight paths for 66 individuals comprised a ...

  6. Do forest ski-pistes represent a habitat gain for butterflies?

    OpenAIRE

    Balletto, Emilio; Rolando, Antonio; Passerin D Entreves, Pietro; Palestrini, Claudia; Negro, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    The abandonment of man-made pastures below the tree line is favouring natural reforestation in the European Alps. As a consequence, although the development of ski areas has severely disturbed the environment in the Alps, the creation of forest ski-pistes might, paradoxically, be beneficial to butterflies, which are predominantly open-habitat species. This study is the first to focus on the effects of forest ski-pistes on butterfly assemblages (Lepidoptera, Rhopalocera). We sampled both butte...

  7. Exaggeration and suppression of iridescence: the evolution of two-dimensional butterfly structural colours

    OpenAIRE

    Wickham, Shelley; Large, Maryanne C. J.; Poladian, Leon; Jermiin, Lars S.

    2005-01-01

    Many butterfly species possess ‘structural’ colour, where colour is due to optical microstructures found in the wing scales. A number of such structures have been identified in butterfly scales, including three variations on a simple multi-layer structure. In this study, we optically characterize examples of all three types of multi-layer structure, as found in 10 species. The optical mechanism of the suppression and exaggeration of the angle-dependent optical properties (iridescence) of ...

  8. Hofstadter's butterfly energy spectrum of ultracold fermions on the two-dimensional triangular optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the energy spectrum of ultracold fermionic atoms on the two-dimensional triangular optical lattice subjected to a perpendicular effective magnetic field, which can be realized with laser beams. We derive the generalized Harper's equations and numerically solve them, then we obtain the Hofstadter's butterfly-like energy spectrum, which has a novel fractal structure. The observability of the Hofstadter's butterfly spectrum is also discussed

  9. Time-Varying Wing-Twist Improves Aerodynamic Efficiency of Forward Flight in Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Lingxiao; Hedrick, Tyson L.; Mittal, Rajat

    2013-01-01

    Insect wings can undergo significant chordwise (camber) as well as spanwise (twist) deformation during flapping flight but the effect of these deformations is not well understood. The shape and size of butterfly wings leads to particularly large wing deformations, making them an ideal test case for investigation of these effects. Here we use computational models derived from experiments on free-flying butterflies to understand the effect of time-varying twist and camber on the aerodynamic per...

  10. Extinction and biogeography in the Caribbean: new evidence from a fossil riodinid butterfly in Dominican amber.

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Jason P. W.; Robbins, Robert K.; Harvey, Donald J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a new species of extinct riodinid butterfly, Voltinia dramba, from Oligo-Miocene Dominican amber (15-25 Myr ago). This appears to be the first butterfly to be taxonomically described from amber, and the first adult riodinid fossil. The series of five specimens represents probably the best-preserved fossil record for any lepidopteran. The phenomenon of extant Voltinia females ovipositing on arboreal epiphytes probably explains the discovery of multiple female V. dramba specimens in...

  11. Reconstructing Seasonal Range Expansion of the Tropical Butterfly, Heliconius charithonia, into Texas Using Historical Records

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Ma?rcio Zika?n

    2010-01-01

    While butterfly responses to climate change are well studied, detailed analyses of the seasonal dynamics of range expansion are few. Therefore, the seasonal range expansion of the butterfly Heliconius charithonia L. (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) was analyzed using a database of sightings and collection records dating from 1884 to 1992 from Texas. First and last sightings for each year were noted, and residency time calculated, for each collection locality. To test whether sighting dates were a c...

  12. Phase Diagram for the Hofstadter butterfly and integer quantum Hall effect in three dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Koshino, M.; Aoki, H.; Osada, T.; Kuroki, K.; Kagoshima, S.

    2001-01-01

    We give a perspective on the Hofstadter butterfly (fractal energy spectrum in magnetic fields), which we have shown to arise specifically in three-dimensional(3D) systems in our previous work. (i) We first obtain the `phase diagram' on a parameter space of the transfer energies and the magnetic field for the appearance of Hofstadter's butterfly spectrum in anisotropic crystals in 3D. (ii) We show that the orientation of the external magnetic field can be arbitrary to have th...

  13. Crystal geometry and structural peculiarities of butterfly martensite formed under magnetic field action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Position of the habitus plane and orientation ratios of butterfly martensite formed under pulsed magnetic field action in the 24Kh2N22 low-carbon chronium-nickel steel is determined. Basic crystallographic characteristics of the butterfly martensite formed in the magnetic field and under cooling without field action coincide. A slight difference of the martensite prepared in both cases is observed only in the internal structure

  14. Replication of polypyrrole with photonic structures from butterfly wings as biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? Polypyrrole (PPy) with photonic structures from butterfly wings was synthesized based on a two-step templating and in situ polymerization process. ? The hierarchical structures down to nanometer level were kept in the resultant PPy replicas. ? The PPy replicas exhibit brilliant color due to Bragg diffraction through its ordered periodic structures. ? The PPy replicas showed a much higher biological activity compared with common PPy powders as a biosensor. - Abstract: Polypyrrole (PPy) with photonic crystal structures were synthesized from Morpho butterfly wings using a two-step templating process. In the first step photonic crystal SiO2 butterfly wings were synthesized from Morpho butterfly wings and in the second step the SiO2 butterfly wings were used as templates for the replication of PPy butterfly wings using an in situ polymerization method. The SiO2 templates were then removed from the PPy butterfly wings using a HF solution. The hierarchical structures down to the nanometer level, especially the photonic crystal structures, were retained in the final PPy replicas, as evidenced directly by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The optical properties of the resultant PPy replicas were investigated using reflectance spectroscopy and the PPy replicas exhibit brilliant color due to Bragg diffraction through its ordered periodic structures. The preliminaperiodic structures. The preliminary biosensing application was investigated and it was found that the PPy replicas showed a much higher biological activity compared with PPy powders through their response to dopamine (DA), probably due to the hierarchical structures as well as controlled porosity inherited from Morpho butterfly wings. It is expected that our strategy will open up new avenues for the synthesis of functional polymers with photonic crystal structures, which may form applications as biosensors.

  15. Competitions hatch butterfly attractors in foreign exchange markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yu Ying

    2005-03-01

    Chaos in foreign exchange markets is a common issue of concern in the study of economic dynamics. In this work, we mainly investigate the competition effect on chaos in foreign exchange markets. As one of the main economic structures in the globalization process, competition between two target exchange rates with the same base currency forms a simple competitive exchange rate relation, where each exchange rate follows the chaotic model of De Grauwe (Exchange Rate Theory-Chaotic Models of Foreign Exchange Markets, Blackwell, Oxford, Cambridge, MA, 1993). The main discovery is, while each exchange rate is in its non-chaotic parameter regions, the effect of competition will “hatch” butterfly-like chaotic attractors in the competitive market. The positive Lyapunov exponent in the market explains the reason why chaos occurs.

  16. The genetics of monarch butterfly migration and warning colouration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuai; Zhang, Wei; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Hsu, Jeremy; Haeger, Juan Fernández; Zalucki, Myron P; Altizer, Sonia; de Roode, Jacobus C; Reppert, Steven M; Kronforst, Marcus R

    2014-10-16

    The monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is famous for its spectacular annual migration across North America, recent worldwide dispersal, and orange warning colouration. Despite decades of study and broad public interest, we know little about the genetic basis of these hallmark traits. Here we uncover the history of the monarch's evolutionary origin and global dispersal, characterize the genes and pathways associated with migratory behaviour, and identify the discrete genetic basis of warning colouration by sequencing 101 Danaus genomes from around the globe. The results rewrite our understanding of this classic system, showing that D. plexippus was ancestrally migratory and dispersed out of North America to occupy its broad distribution. We find the strongest signatures of selection associated with migration centre on flight muscle function, resulting in greater flight efficiency among migratory monarchs, and that variation in monarch warning colouration is controlled by a single myosin gene not previously implicated in insect pigmentation. PMID:25274300

  17. Evolution of dominance mechanisms at a butterfly mimicry supergene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Poul, Yann; Whibley, Annabel; Chouteau, Mathieu; Prunier, Florence; Llaurens, Violaine; Joron, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic dominance in polymorphic loci may respond to selection; however, the evolution of dominance in complex traits remains a puzzle. We analyse dominance at a wing-patterning supergene controlling local mimicry polymorphism in the butterfly Heliconius numata. Supergene alleles are associated with chromosomal inversion polymorphism, defining ancestral versus derived alleles. Using controlled crosses and the new procedure, Colour Pattern Modelling, allowing whole-wing pattern comparisons, we estimate dominance coefficients between alleles. Here we show strict dominance in sympatry favouring mimicry and inconsistent dominance throughout the wing between alleles from distant populations. Furthermore, dominance among derived alleles is uncoordinated across wing-pattern elements, producing mosaic heterozygous patterns determined by a hierarchy in colour expression. By contrast, heterozygotes with an ancestral allele show complete, coordinated dominance of the derived allele, independently of colours. Therefore, distinct dominance mechanisms have evolved in association with supergene inversions, in response to strong selection on mimicry polymorphism. PMID:25429605

  18. A butterfly shaped alveolar hemorrhage caused by cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciledag, Aydin; Karnak, Demet; Kayacan, Oya

    2010-07-01

    Abstract. We report here a 35 year-old immunocompetent male, with a fulminantly lethal diffuse alveolar hemorrhage caused by CMV pneumonia. The patient was admitted with fever, rust colored sputum and exertional dyspnea. A chest x-ray revealed bilateral alveolar infiltration in a butterfly pattern. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed which revealed alveolar hemorrhage. Microscopic findings of the lavage fluid revealed large numbers of erythrocytes and hemosiderin-laden macrophages. The patient did not improve with empiric antibiotic treatment. High CMV IgG and IgM titers were found in the serum. The patient died from respiratory failure after detection of inclusion bodies on BAL before initiation of antiviral therapy. PMID:21073064

  19. Arm to leg coordination in elite butterfly swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, D; Seifert, L; Boulesteix, L; Carter, M

    2006-04-01

    This study proposed the use of four time gaps to assess arm-to-leg coordination in the butterfly stroke at increasing race paces. Fourteen elite male swimmers swam at four velocities corresponding to the appropriate paces for, respectively, the 400-m, 200-m, 100-m, and 50-m events. The different stroke phases of the arm and leg were identified by video analysis and then used to calculate four time gaps (T1: time gap between entry of the hands in the water and the high break-even point of the first undulation; T2: time gap between the beginning of the hands' backward movement and the low break-even point of the first undulation; T3: time gap between the hands' arrival in a vertical plane to the shoulders and the high break-even point of the second undulation; T4: time gap between the hands' release from the water and the low break-even point of the second undulation), the values of which described the changing relationship of arm to leg movements over an entire stroke cycle. With increases in pace, elite swimmers increased the stroke rate, the relative duration of the arm pull, the recovery and the first downward movement of the legs, and decreased the stroke length, the relative duration of the arm catch phase and the body glide with arms forward (measured by T2), until continuity in the propulsive actions was achieved. Whatever the paces, the T1, T3, and T4 values were close to zero and revealed a high degree of synchronisation at key motor points of the arm and leg actions. This new method to assess butterfly coordination could facilitate learning and coaching by situating the place of the leg undulation in relation with the arm stroke. PMID:16572376

  20. Tracking climate impacts on the migratory monarch butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipkin, Elise F.; Ries, Leslie; Reeves, Rick; Regetz, James; Oberhauser, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the impacts of climate on migratory species is complicated by the fact that these species travel through several climates that may be changing in diverse ways throughout their complete migratory cycle. Most studies are not designed to tease out the direct and indirect effects of climate at various stages along the migration route. We assess the impacts of spring and summer climate conditions on breeding monarch butterflies, a species that completes its annual migration cycle over several generations. No single, broad-scale climate metric can explain summer breeding phenology or the substantial year-to-year fluctuations observed in population abundances. As such, we built a Poisson regression model to help explain annual arrival times and abundances in the Midwestern United States. We incorporated the climate conditions experienced both during a spring migration/breeding phase in Texas as well as during subsequent arrival and breeding during the main recruitment period in Ohio. Using data from a state-wide butterfly monitoring network in Ohio, our results suggest that climate acts in conflicting ways during the spring and summer seasons. High spring precipitation in Texas is associated with the largest annual population growth in Ohio and the earliest arrival to the summer breeding ground, as are intermediate spring temperatures in Texas. On the other hand, the timing of monarch arrivals to the summer breeding grounds is not affected by climate conditions within Ohio. Once in Ohio for summer breeding, precipitation has minimal impacts on overall abundances, whereas warmer summer temperatures are generally associated with the highest expected abundances, yet this effect is mitigated by the average seasonal temperature of each location in that the warmest sites receive no benefit of above average summer temperatures. Our results highlight the complex relationship between climate and performance for a migrating species and suggest that attempts to understand how monarchs will be affected by future climate conditions will be challenging.

  1. An updated comprehensive annotated list of the butterflies (Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera) occurring at Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge Complex Stutsman County, North Dakota 1995-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Ron

    1996-01-01

    A project to produce a comprehensive, site-specific butterfly list that could serve as a basis for future monitoring of butterfly populations and as an aid in making management decisions for the area.

  2. An updated comprehensive annotated list of the butterflies (Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera) occuring at Sullys Hill National Game Preserve Benson County, North Dakota 1995-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Ron

    1996-01-01

    A project to produce a comprehensive, site-specific butterfly list that could serve as a basis for future monitoring of butterfly populations and as an aid in making management decisions for the area.

  3. Quantifying relationships between bird and butterfly community shifts and environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debinski, Diane M; Vannimwegen, Ron E; Jakubauskas, Mark E

    2006-02-01

    Quantifying the manner in which ecological communities respond during a time of decreasing precipitation is a first step in understanding how they will respond to longer-term climate change. Here we coupled analysis of interannual variability in remotely sensed data with analyses of bird and butterfly community changes in montane meadow communities of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Landsat satellite imagery was used to classify these meadows into six types along a hydrological gradient. The northern portion of the ecosystem, or Gallatin region, has smaller mean patch sizes separated by ridges of mountains, whereas the southern portion of the ecosystem, or Teton region, has much larger patches within the Jackson Hole valley. Both support a similar suite of butterfly and bird species. The Gallatin region showed more overall among-year variation in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) when meadow types were pooled within regions, perhaps because the patch sizes are smaller on average. Bird and butterfly communities showed significant relationships relative to meadow type and NDVI. We identified several key species that are tightly associated with specific meadow types along the hydrological gradient. Comparing taxonomic groups, fewer birds showed specific habitat affinities than butterflies, perhaps because birds are responding to differences in habitat structure among meadow types and using the landscape at a coarser scale than the butterflies. Comparing regions, the Teton region showed higher predictability of community assemblages as compared to the Gallatin region. The Gallatin region exhibited more significant temporal trends with respect to butterflies. Butterfly communities in wet meadows showed a distinctive shift along the hydrological gradient during a drought period (1997-2000). These results imply that the larger Teton meadows will show more predictable (i.e., static) species-habitat associations over the long term, but that the smaller Gallatin meadows may be an area that will exhibit the effects of global climate change faster. PMID:16705987

  4. Comparison of Trends in Habitat and Resource Selection by the Spanish Festoon, Zerynthia rumina, and the Whole Butterfly Community in a Semi-Arid Mediterranean Ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa-hueso, Rau?l; La Puente Ranea, Daniel; Viejo, Jose? Luis

    2014-01-01

    Butterfly community and single species based approaches were taken to establish conservation priorities within a nature reserve in Central Spain. In this study, patch type (sclerophyllous, halophilous, or disturbed), potential herbaceous nectar availability, potential woody plant nectar availability, total nectar availability, and two approximations to plant diversity (herbaceous and woody plant diversity) were evaluated as variables that account for adult butterfly density. Butterfly communi...

  5. Rapid morphological radiation and convergence among races of the butterfly Heliconius erato inferred from patterns of mitochondrial DNA evolution.

    OpenAIRE

    Brower, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The neotropical Heliconius butterflies are famous examples of Müllerian mimicry, due to the diverse array of shared, brightly colored wing patterns that advertise the butterflies' unpalatability. The parallel geographical variation in these patterns within several widespread species has been invoked to support the controversial Pleistocene refugium hypothesis of tropical diversification. However, in no Heliconius species have either evolutionary rates or relationships among geographical race...

  6. Tracking butterfly movements with harmonic radar reveals an effect of population age on movement distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaskainen, Otso; Smith, Alan D.; Osborne, Juliet L.; Reynolds, Don R.; Carreck, Norman L.; Martin, Andrew P.; Niitepõld, Kristjan; Hanski, Ilkka

    2008-01-01

    We used harmonic radar to track freely flying Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) females within an area of 30 ha. Butterflies originated from large and continuous populations in China and Estonia, and from newly established or old (> 5 years) small local populations in a highly fragmented landscape in Finland. Caterpillars were raised under common garden conditions and unmated females were tested soon after eclosion. The reconstructed flight paths for 66 individuals comprised a total distance of 51 km with high spatial resolution. Butterflies originating from large continuous populations and from old local populations in Finland exhibited similar movement behaviors, whereas butterflies originating from newly established local populations in the fragmented landscape in Finland moved significantly more than the others. There was no difference in the lengths of individual flight bouts, but the new-population females flew more frequently, resulting in longer daily movement tracks. The flight activity of all individuals was affected by environmental conditions, peaking at 19–23°C (depending on population type), in the early afternoon, and during calm weather. Butterflies from all population types showed a strong tendency to follow habitat edges between the open study area and the neighboring woodlands. PMID:19060191

  7. Extinction and biogeography in the Caribbean: new evidence from a fossil riodinid butterfly in Dominican amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jason P W; Robbins, Robert K; Harvey, Donald J

    2004-04-22

    We describe a new species of extinct riodinid butterfly, Voltinia dramba, from Oligo-Miocene Dominican amber (15-25 Myr ago). This appears to be the first butterfly to be taxonomically described from amber, and the first adult riodinid fossil. The series of five specimens represents probably the best-preserved fossil record for any lepidopteran. The phenomenon of extant Voltinia females ovipositing on arboreal epiphytes probably explains the discovery of multiple female V. dramba specimens in amber. Voltinia dramba appears to be one of many extinct butterfly species on Hispaniola. The northwestern Mexican distribution of the explicitly hypothesized sister species, the extant V. danforthi, supports the hypothesis that V. dramba reached Hispaniola by the 'proto-Greater Antillean arc', dating the divergence of V. dramba and V. danforthi to 40-50 Myr ago. This date is contemporaneous with the oldest known butterfly fossils, and implies a more ancient date of origin for many of the higher-level butterfly taxa than is often conceded. PMID:15255097

  8. Importance of vegetation analysis in the conservation management of the endangered butterfly Aloeides dentatis dentatis (Swierstra (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S Deutschlander

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of the vegetation of the Ruimsig Entomological Reserve, Gauteng, South Africa revealed four plant communities one of which could be subdivided into two subcommunities and variants. The extensive climax stage of the vegetation represented by the Themeda triandra - Trachypogon spicatus grassland was found to be too dense and tall to support the butterfly Aloeides dentatis dentatis and the host ant Lepisiota capensis (Mayr. A degraded phase caused by succession in an area where pipes have been laid was found to be ideal habitat for both ant and butterfly. This vegetation also contained adequate numbers of the food plant Hermannia depressa. A serai community with tall- growing Hyparrhenia hirta was also found to be an unsuitable habitat for the butterfly. The identification of the preferred ideal habitat for the host ant and butterfly resulted in the compilation of a conservation management strategy that ensured the survival of the rare and endangered butterfly.

  9. Monarch butterfly orientation: missing pieces of a magnificent puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower

    1996-01-01

    From late August to early September, millions of adult monarch butterflies of the eastern North American population cease reproducing, become highly gregarious and begin migrating southwards. By mid-October, they migrate through central Texas into Mexico where they follow the Sierra Madre Oriental across the Tropic of Cancer. They then shift direction westwards towards the Transverse Neovolcanic Belt of mountains where they overwinter without breeding. A rapid exodus northwards occurs at the spring equinox, and by early April both sexes reach the Gulf Coast states where the females lay eggs on the resurgent spring milkweed (Asclepias) flora and die. Adults of the new generation continue the migration to the northernmost breeding range, arriving by early June. Two or more short-lived breeding generations are produced over the summer, spread eastwards across the Appalachian Mountains and, by September, the autumn migration is again under way. This paper presents a new hypothesis that the orientation of adult monarchs undergoes a continual clockwise shifting throughout the 3-5 generations, rotating by 360 in the course of the year. This hypothesis is consistent with the timing of arrivals and the relative abundances of the successive generations of monarchs throughout eastern North America, with the directions of movement of their spring, summer and autumn generations, and with the timing of their arrival at the overwintering area in central Mexico. PMID:9317405

  10. DNA barcodes identify Central Asian Colias butterflies (Lepidoptera, Pieridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiho, Juha; Ståhls, Gunilla

    2013-12-30

    A majority of the known Colias species (Lepidoptera: Pieridae, Coliadinae) occur in the mountainous regions of Central-Asia, vast areas that are hard to access, rendering the knowledge of many species limited due to the lack of extensive sampling. Two gene regions, the mitochondrial COI 'barcode' region and the nuclear ribosomal protein RpS2 gene region were used for exploring the utility of these DNA markers for species identification. A comprehensive sampling of COI barcodes for Central Asian Colias butterflies showed that the barcodes facilitated identification of most of the included species. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on parsimony and Neighbour-Joining recovered most species as monophyletic entities. For the RpS2 gene region species-specific sequences were registered for some of the included Colias spp. Nevertheless, this gene region was not deemed useful as additional molecular 'barcode'. A parsimony analysis of the combined COI and RpS2 data did not support the current subgeneric classification based on morphological characteristics. PMID:24453557

  11. Coldness triggers northward flight in remigrant monarch butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Patrick A; Reppert, Steven M

    2013-03-01

    Each fall, eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrate from their northern range to their overwintering grounds in central Mexico. Fall migrants are in reproductive diapause, and they use a time-compensated sun compass to navigate during the long journey south. Eye-sensed directional cues from the daylight sky (e.g., the horizontal or azimuthal position of the sun) are integrated in the sun compass in the midbrain central complex region. Sun compass output is time compensated by circadian clocks in the antennae so that fall migrants can maintain a fixed flight direction south. In the spring, the same migrants remigrate northward to the southern United States to initiate the northern leg of the migration cycle. Here we show that spring remigrants also use an antenna-dependent time-compensated sun compass to direct their northward flight. Remarkably, fall migrants prematurely exposed to overwintering-like coldness reverse their flight orientation to the north. The temperature microenvironment at the overwintering site is essential for successful completion of the migration cycle, because without cold exposure, aged migrants continue to orient south. Our discovery that coldness triggers the northward flight direction in spring remigrants solves one of the long-standing mysteries of the monarch migration. PMID:23434279

  12. Biogeography and systematics of Aricia butterflies (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sañudo-Restrepo, Claudia P; Dinc?, Vlad; Talavera, Gerard; Vila, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Butterflies of the Aricia species group represent a paradigm of unresolved taxonomy, both at the genus and species levels. We studied phylogenetic relationships, biogeography, and systematics based on genetic--nuclear and mitochondrial--and morphometric--external (wings) and internal (genitalia) - data. We show that Aricia is a monophyletic genus comprising the taxa Pseudoaricia, Ultraaricia and Umpria, which are here considered junior synonyms of Aricia. The taxa allous, inhonora, issekutzi, mandzhuriana, myrmecias and transalaica, which have often been raised to species rank, are shown to probably represent subspecies or synonyms. We show that montensis is likely a good species that is sister to all A. artaxerxes populations across the Palearctic region. The species A. anteros and A. morronensis are shown to display deep intraspecific divergences and they may harbor cryptic species. We also discovered that A. cramera and A. agestis exhibit a pattern of mutual exclusion on islands, and a parapatric distribution in mainland with a narrow contact zone where potential hybrids were detected. The lack of a prezygotic barrier that prevents their coexistence could explain this phenomenon. This study will hopefully contribute to the stability of the systematics of Aricia, a group with potential for the study of the link between speciation and biogeography. PMID:23099146

  13. Reflections on Lupus 2013: butterflies, wolves and prophecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzler, Mj

    2013-10-01

    The recently concluded Tenth International Congress on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) held in Buenos Aires was a resounding success. This overview summarizes some of the origins of the First International Congress held in Calgary, Canada in 1986, predictions offered by past Congress Presidents, and a perspective on the trends in autoantibody testing, which remains one of the key approaches to the early and accurate diagnosis of SLE. The last few decades have witnessed a remarkable proliferation of new diagnostic technologies including addressable laser bead immunoassays and, more recently, chemiluminescence and lateral flow technologies that could find a clinical niche in point-of-care diagnostics. Against the backdrop of these constantly emerging technologies, indirect immunofluorescence has remained the platform of choice for many laboratories and diagnosticians. The notion that autoantibodies are pathogenic has been challenged by evidence that some autoantibodies are protective, some may have catalytic capacity while others may be neutral or have no function at all. The latter notion of functionless or "junk" autoantibodies needs to be taken under some advisement, because there was a time when a great proportion of the human genome was considered to include "junk DNA". The butterfly as a symbol of hope and progress in SLE research over the past 27 years since the First International Congress on SLE is almost certainly to be even more appropriate when future Congresses are held in Geneva (2015), Melbourne (2017) and eventually one in 2050. PMID:23989735

  14. Biased learning affects mate choice in a butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Erica L; Hodgins-Davis, Andrea; Dinwiddie, April; Monteiro, Antónia

    2012-07-01

    Early acquisition of mate preferences or mate-preference learning is associated with signal diversity and speciation in a wide variety of animal species. However, the diversity of mechanisms of mate-preference learning across taxa remains poorly understood. Using the butterfly Bicyclus anynana we uncover a mechanism that can lead to directional sexual selection via mate-preference learning: a bias in learning enhanced ornamentation, which is independent of preexisting mating biases. Naïve females mated preferentially with wild-type males over males with enhanced wing ornamentation, but females briefly exposed to enhanced males mated significantly more often with enhanced males. In contrast, females exposed to males with reduced wing ornamentation did not learn to prefer drab males. Thus, we observe both a learned change of a preexisting mating bias, and a bias in ability to learn enhanced male ornaments over reduced ornaments. Our findings demonstrate that females are able to change their preferences in response to a single social event, and suggest a role for biased learning in the evolution of visual sexual ornamentation. PMID:22689980

  15. The Nation and the Subaltern in Yvonne Vera's Butterfly Burning

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Obi, Nwakanma.

    Full Text Available Yvonne Vera's death in 2005 brought to a tragic close the career of one of Zimbabwe's, indeed Africa's, more engaging contemporary writers. But her powerful novel, Butterfly Burning continues to mirror an aspect of Vera's enduring concern: the place of African women in the context of power both with [...] in the colonial and the postcolonial moments. This image of the "woman in shadows" also resonates in the kernel of the subaltern subject in Spivak's essay, "Can the Subaltern Speak?" I draw from Spivak's canonical essay, but simply as a critique of its notion of the burdened subjectivity of the colonized reified in the widow's self-immolation, and seen as a problematic condition of representation-a form of impotent silence. In contrast, I suggest that Vera's Phephelaphi directs our attention by a votive suicide that speaks. This essay thus proceeds from a re-reading of the discourse of subalternity to situate Yvonne Vera's novel as an act primarily of resistance against the situation of patriarchal enclosure under colonialism.

  16. Monarch butterfly migration and parasite transmission in eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Rebecca A; Oberhauser, Karen S; De Roode, Jacobus C; Altizer, Sonia M

    2011-02-01

    Seasonal migration occurs in many animal systems and is likely to influence interactions between animals and their parasites. Here, we focus on monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) and a protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha) to investigate how host migration affects infectious disease processes. Previous work showed that parasite prevalence was lower among migratory than nonmigratory monarch populations; two explanations for this pattern are that (1) migration allows animals to periodically escape contaminated habitats (i.e., migratory escape), and (2) long-distance migration weeds out infected animals (i.e., migratory culling). We combined field-sampling and analysis of citizen science data to examine spatiotemporal trends of parasite prevalence and evaluate evidence for these two mechanisms. Analysis of within-breeding-season variation in eastern North America showed that parasite prevalence increased from early to late in the breeding season, consistent with the hypothesis of migratory escape. Prevalence was also positively related to monarch breeding activity, as indexed by larval density. Among adult monarchs captured at different points along the east coast fall migratory flyway, parasite prevalence declined as monarchs progressed southward, consistent with the hypothesis of migratory culling. Parasite prevalence was also lower among monarchs sampled at two overwintering sites in Mexico than among monarchs sampled during the summer breeding period. Collectively, these results indicate that seasonal migration can affect parasite transmission in wild animal populations, with implications for predicting disease risks for species with threatened migrations. PMID:21618914

  17. Use of fruit bait traps for monitoring of butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer B. Hughes

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available There exists great interest in using fruit-feeding adult nymphalid butterflies to monitor changes in tropical forest ecosystems. We intensively sampled the butterfly fauna of mid-elevation tropical moist forest in southern Costa Rica with fruit bait traps to address a series of practical issues concerning the development of a robust, efficient sampling program. Variation in the number of captures and escapes of butterflies at the traps was better explained by the time of day than by the age of bait. Species’ escape rates varied widely, suggesting that short term, less intensive surveys aimed at determining presence or absence of species may be biased. Individuals did not appear to become "trap-happy" or to recognize the traps as food sources. Considering the tradeoff between numbers of traps and frequency of trap servicing, the most efficient sampling regime appears to be baiting and sampling the traps once every other day.

  18. Butterfly Classification by HSI and RGB Color Models Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E. Grajales-Múnera

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims the classification of Butterfly species through the implementation of Neural Networks and Image Processing. A total of 9 species of Morpho genre which has blue as a characteristic color are processed. For Butterfly segmentation we used image processing tools such as: Binarization, edge processing and mathematical morphology. For data processing RGB values are obtained for every image which are converted to HSI color model to identify blue pixels and obtain the data to the proposed Neural Networks: Back-Propagation and Perceptron. For analysis and verification of results confusion matrix are built and analyzed with the results of neural networks with the lowest error levels. We obtain error levels close to 1% in classification of some Butterfly species.

  19. Diversity pattern of Butterfly Lepidoptera (Papilio demoleus in Union Council Koaz Bahram Dheri Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAROON

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In ecosystem the butterflies ply dual role as pollinators, silk producers and indicators of environmental quality. The present study was conducted in Union Council Koaz Bahram Dehri during the period July 2012 to August 2012. The collection of butterflies was done randomly by using the sweep net. A total of 32 specimens of Papilio demoleus were collected from different villages of the said area. The high number of specimen was collected from Aratt Kally (21.88%. The wing span is 9.8±0.40 cm and body length 2.9±0.16 cm. From the present investigation it was concluded that the Papilio demoleus species is common in Union Council Koaz Bahram Dehri. The area has rich fauna of butterflies and recommended further studies.

  20. Butterfly arch: a device for precise controlling of the upper molars in three planes of space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkerdar, Alireza

    2013-05-01

    Intra-oral appliances such as transpalatal arch and Nance appliance fail to resist against forces that tend to loosen the anchorage. The infirmity arises due to the long lever arm and the mesial force that is perpendicular to the long axis of the appliance. The butterfly arch is presented here as an intra-oral appliance that withstands the mesially directed forces with a mechanism that puts strain on a stiff wire along its long axis. The unique shape of the butterfly arch is advantageous in maximum anchorage cases, cases in which arch width preservation is critical and cases with a vertical growth pattern. With the aid of the butterfly arch, clinical concerns such as patient cooperation, wearing extra-oral appliances, complicated mechanics in extraction cases and control of the arch length, arch width and vertical dimension would be greatly diminished. PMID:25512748

  1. Butterfly Arch: A Device for Precise Controlling of the Upper Molars in Three Planes of Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Nikkerdar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-oral appliances such as transpalatal arch and Nance appliance fail to resist against forces that tend to loosen the anchorage. The infirmity arises due to the long lever arm and the mesial force that is perpendicular to the long axis of the appliance. The butterfly arch is presented here as an intra-oral appliance that withstands the mesially directed forces with a mechanism that puts strain on a stiff wire along its long axis. The unique shape of the butterfly arch is advantageous in maximum anchorage cases, cases in which arch width preservation is critical and cases with a vertical growth pattern. With the aid of the butterfly arch, clinical concerns such as patient cooperation, wearing extra-oral appliances, complicated mechanics in extraction cases and control of the arch length, arch width and vertical dimension would be greatly diminished.

  2. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the structural pattern responsible for the iridescence of Morpho butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Radwanul Hasan; Diewald, Silvia; Leuthold, Juerg; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2013-06-17

    Morpho butterflies are well-known for their iridescence originating from nanostructures in the scales of their wings. These optical active structures integrate three design principles leading to the wide angle reflection: alternating lamellae layers, "Christmas tree" like shape, and offsets between neighboring ridges. We study their individual effects rigorously by 2D FEM simulations of the nanostructures of the Morpho sulkowskyi butterfly and show how the reflection spectrum can be controlled by the design of the nanostructures. The width of the spectrum is broad (? 90 nm) for alternating lamellae layers (or "brunches") of the structure while the "Christmas tree" pattern together with a height offset between neighboring ridges reduces the directionality of the reflectance. Furthermore, we fabricated the simulated structures by e-beam lithography. The resulting samples mimicked all important optical features of the original Morpho butterfly scales and feature the intense blue iridescence with a wide angular range of reflection. PMID:23787623

  3. Structural analysis of eyespots: dynamics of morphogenic signals that govern elemental positions in butterfly wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otaki Joji M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To explain eyespot colour-pattern determination in butterfly wings, the induction model has been discussed based on colour-pattern analyses of various butterfly eyespots. However, a detailed structural analysis of eyespots that can serve as a foundation for future studies is still lacking. In this study, fundamental structural rules related to butterfly eyespots are proposed, and the induction model is elaborated in terms of the possible dynamics of morphogenic signals involved in the development of eyespots and parafocal elements (PFEs based on colour-pattern analysis of the nymphalid butterfly Junonia almana. Results In a well-developed eyespot, the inner black core ring is much wider than the outer black ring; this is termed the inside-wide rule. It appears that signals are wider near the focus of the eyespot and become narrower as they expand. Although fundamental signal dynamics are likely to be based on a reaction-diffusion mechanism, they were described well mathematically as a type of simple uniformly decelerated motion in which signals associated with the outer and inner black rings of eyespots and PFEs are released at different time points, durations, intervals, and initial velocities into a two-dimensional field of fundamentally uniform or graded resistance; this produces eyespots and PFEs that are diverse in size and structure. The inside-wide rule, eyespot distortion, structural differences between small and large eyespots, and structural changes in eyespots and PFEs in response to physiological treatments were explained well using mathematical simulations. Natural colour patterns and previous experimental findings that are not easily explained by the conventional gradient model were also explained reasonably well by the formal mathematical simulations performed in this study. Conclusions In a mode free from speculative molecular interactions, the present study clarifies fundamental structural rules related to butterfly eyespots, delineates a theoretical basis for the induction model, and proposes a mathematically simple mode of long-range signalling that may reflect developmental mechanisms associated with butterfly eyespots.

  4. Impact of duplicate gene copies on phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates in butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liswi Saif W

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase in availability of genomic sequences for a wide range of organisms has revealed gene duplication to be a relatively common event. Encounters with duplicate gene copies have consequently become almost inevitable in the context of collecting gene sequences for inferring species trees. Here we examine the effect of incorporating duplicate gene copies evolving at different rates on tree reconstruction and time estimation of recent and deep divergences in butterflies. Results Sequences from ultraviolet-sensitive (UVRh, blue-sensitive (BRh, and long-wavelength sensitive (LWRh opsins,EF-1? and COI were obtained from 27 taxa representing the five major butterfly families (5535 bp total. Both BRh and LWRh are present in multiple copies in some butterfly lineages and the different copies evolve at different rates. Regardless of the phylogenetic reconstruction method used, we found that analyses of combined data sets using either slower or faster evolving copies of duplicate genes resulted in a single topology in agreement with our current understanding of butterfly family relationships based on morphology and molecules. Interestingly, individual analyses of BRh and LWRh sequences also recovered these family-level relationships. Two different relaxed clock methods resulted in similar divergence time estimates at the shallower nodes in the tree, regardless of whether faster or slower evolving copies were used, with larger discrepancies observed at deeper nodes in the phylogeny. The time of divergence between the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus and the queen D. gilippus (15.3–35.6 Mya was found to be much older than the time of divergence between monarch co-mimic Limenitis archippus and red-spotted purple L. arthemis (4.7–13.6 Mya, and overlapping with the time of divergence of the co-mimetic passionflower butterflies Heliconius erato and H. melpomene (13.5–26.1 Mya. Our family-level results are congruent with recent estimates found in the literature and indicate an age of 84–113 million years for the divergence of all butterfly families. Conclusion These results are consistent with diversification of the butterfly families following the radiation of angiosperms and suggest that some classes of opsin genes may be usefully employed for both phylogenetic reconstruction and divergence time estimation.

  5. Preparation of bionic nanostructures from butterfly wings and their low reflectivity of ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z. W.; Niu, S. C.; Li, W.; Ren, L. Q.

    2013-06-01

    This letter presents a bionic study on Parnassius butterfly wings with a prominent ultraviolet (UV)-selective antireflection effect. An accurate SiO2 inverse replica of the nanostructure with a unique optical function from butterfly wings is prepared in multiscale by combining a sol-gel process and subsequent selective etching. It is found that the original nanostructures of biotemplate are well inherited and the excellent UV-antireflection function could be modulated by tunable parameters such as the replica spacing, width, distribution, and shape as well as formation.

  6. Performance Evaluation of Camb Biopesticides to Control Cabbage Butterfly (Pieris brassicae in Cauliflower Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Usman Zafar

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available CAMB Bt. based and fungus based biopesticides, commercial Bt. formulation from mycogen and a new chemical pesticide Methoxyfenozide (RH2485-240SC were tested on cauliflower field against cabbage butterfly (Pieris brassicae. All pesticides successfully controlled the population of cabbage butterfly in cauliflower crop. The efficacy against I to V instar larvae and field stability of CAMB Bt. biopesticide was better than chemical and other biopesticides. So, CAMB Bt. can be safely recommended for pest management strategies against Lepidopteral pests on vegetables with no harmful effects on its predators as in case with chemical pesticides.

  7. Dual leading-edge vortex structure for flow over a simplified butterfly model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y.; Wang, J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The dye visualization experiments show that a dual leading-edge vortex (LEV) structure exists on the suction side of a simplified butterfly model of Papilio ulysses at ? = 8°-12°. Furthermore, the results of particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement indicate that the axial velocity of the primary (outer) vortex core reaches the lower extreme value while a transition from a "wake-like" to a "jet-like" axial velocity profile occurs. The work reveals for the first time the existence of dual LEV structure on the butterfly-like forward-sweep wing configuration.

  8. Inferring the Provenance of an Alien Species with DNA Barcodes: The Neotropical Butterfly Dryas iulia in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Noah A.; Pradhan, Ashman; Gonzalez, Rebecca M.; Morban, Emely Z.; Zhen, Erica W.; Sakchoowong, Watana; Lohman, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The Neotropical butterfly Dryas iulia has been collected from several locations in Thailand and Malaysia since 2007, and has been observed breeding in the wild, using introduced Passiflora foetida as a larval host plant. The butterfly is bred by a butterfly house in Phuket, Thailand, for release at weddings and Buddhist ceremonies, and we hypothesized that this butterfly house was the source of wild, Thai individuals. We compared wing patterns and COI barcodes from two, wild Thai populations with individuals obtained from this butterfly house. All Thai individuals resemble the subspecies D. iulia modesta, and barcodes from wild and captive Thai specimens were identical. This unique, Thai barcode was not found in any of the 30 specimens sampled from the wild in the species' native range, but is most similar to specimens from Costa Rica, where many exporting butterfly farms are located. These data implicate the butterfly house as the source of Thailand's wild D. iulia populations, which are currently so widespread that eradication efforts are unlikely to be successful. PMID:25119899

  9. Role of photonic-crystal-type structures in the thermal regulation of a Lycaenid butterfly sister species pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biró, L P; Bálint, Zs; Kertész, K; Vértesy, Z; Márk, G I; Horváth, Z E; Balázs, J; Méhn, D; Kiricsi, I; Lousse, V; Vigneron, J-P

    2003-02-01

    One of the possible functions of the photonic-crystal structure found on the wing scales of some butterflies is investigated. The optical and electron microscopic investigation of two male butterflies-blue (colored) and brown (discolored)-representing a sister species pair and originating from different altitudes, revealed that the blue color can be attributed unambiguously to the fine, spongelike medium, called "pepper-pot structure," present between the ridges and the cross ribs in the scales of the colored butterfly. Only traces of this structure can be found on the scales of the discolored butterfly. Other physical measurements, mainly optical reflectivity, transmission, and thermal measurements, are correlated with structural data and simulation results. The thermal measurements reveal that under identical illumination conditions the high-altitude butterfly reaches a temperature 1.3-1.5 times the temperature reached by the low-altitude butterfly. This is attributed to the photonic-crystal-like behavior of the pepper-pot structure, which significantly reduces the penetration of light with wavelength in the blue region of the spectrum into the body of the scales. This sheds some light on the adaptation that enhances the survival chance of the butterfly in a cold environment rich in blue and UV radiation. PMID:12636715

  10. Eco-evolutionary spatial dynamics in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanski, Ilkka A

    2011-08-30

    Demographic population dynamics, gene flow, and local adaptation may influence each other and lead to coupling of ecological and evolutionary dynamics, especially in species inhabiting fragmented heterogeneous environments. Here, I review long-term research on eco-evolutionary spatial dynamics in the Glanville fritillary butterfly inhabiting a large network of approximately 4,000 meadows in Finland. The metapopulation persists in a balance between frequent local extinctions and recolonizations. The genetic spatial structure as defined by neutral markers is much more coarse-grained than the demographic spatial structure determined by the fragmented habitat, yet small-scale spatial structure has important consequences for the dynamics. I discuss three examples of eco-evolutionary spatial dynamics. (i) Extinction-colonization metapopulation dynamics influence allele frequency changes in the phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) gene, which leads to strong associations between genetic variation in Pgi and dispersal, recolonization, and local population dynamics. (ii) Inbreeding in local populations increases their risk for extinction, whereas reciprocal effects between inbreeding, population size, and emigration represent likely eco-evolutionary feedbacks. (iii) Genetically determined female oviposition preference for two host plant species exhibits a cline paralleling a gradient in host plant relative abundances, and host plant preference of dispersing females in relation to the host plant composition of habitat patches influences immigration (gene flow) and recolonization (founder events). Eco-evolutionary spatial dynamics in heterogeneous environments may not lead to directional evolutionary changes unless the environment itself changes, but eco-evolutionary dynamics may contribute to the maintenance of genetic variation attributable to fluctuating selection in space and time. PMID:21788506

  11. Timpanoplastía con injerto en mariposa / Tympanoplasty with butterfly graft

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Iván, González Y; Cristian, Lara M; Marcela, Castillo F.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available La timpanoplastía es una cirugía frecuente para el otorrino. El año 1998 el Dr Eavey presenta la técnica de injerto en mariposa, la que es avalada posteriormente por varios autores y se afirma que es una técnica eficiente, con menor tiempo quirúrgico y mejor confort para el paciente. Se trata de un [...] estudio prospectivo realizado en el Hospital Dr. Sofera del Río entre los meses de septiembre 2005 a febrero 2006. En el que se realizó esta técnica a 5 pacientes obteniendo como resultado anatómico cierre de la perforación en 4 pacientes y una extrusión del injerto en í paciente post supuración ótica. En cuanto al resultado auditivo la mejoría promedio de los PTP aéreos fue de 15,64 dB. Se concluye que esta técnica presenta las ventajas descritas en la literatura, y se deben realizar estudios sucesivos para determinar qué pacientes se benefician mejor de esta técnica comparándolas con las técnicas tradicionales Abstract in english Tympanoplasty is a frequent surgery for the otolaringologist. In 1998 Dr. Eavey presents the technique of butterfly gran, which is later supported by several authors and it is considered an efficient technique, with less surgical time and better comfort for the patient. It is a prospective study mad [...] e at Dr. Sofera del Rio Hospital between the months of September 2005 and February 2006, where this technique was applied to 5 patients, obtaining as anatomical result the closing of the perforation in 4 patients and an extrusion of the graft in 1 patient post otic supuration. In relation to the auditive result the average improvement of the air PTP's was 15,64 dB. It is concluded that this technique presents the advantages described in the literature, and successive studies must be made to determine which patients obtain a better benefit from this technique as compared to the traditional techniques

  12. Does Skipping a Meal Matter to a Butterfly's Appearance? Effects of Larval Food Stress on Wing Morphology and Color in Monarch Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Haley; Solensky, Michelle J.; Satterfield, Dara A.; Davis, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    In animals with complex life cycles, all resources needed to form adult tissues are procured at the larval stage. For butterflies, the proper development of wings involves synthesizing tissue during metamorphosis based on the raw materials obtained by larvae. Similarly, manufacture of pigment for wing scales also requires resources acquired by larvae. We conducted an experiment to test the effects of food deprivation in the larval stage on multiple measures of adult wing morphology and colora...

  13. Use of the butterflies like bio-indicators of the habitat type and their biodiversity in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is the result of the study of Colombian butterflies, across an altitudinal range between 250 and 3000 m, whose primary objective was to describe the local distributions of a community of butterflies in three different leinds of ecosystems: primary forest (BP), secondary forest (BS), and disturbed zones (ZP). These descriptions took under consideration environmental parameters and gradients, such as: altitude, climate and how the vegetation had been changed. At the same time, based on observations and captures of butterflies, the seasonality of several species, their daily activity cycles, and micro habitat fidelity were described

  14. Tracking multi-generational colonization of the breeding grounds by monarch butterflies in eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D T Tyler; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Martin, Tara G; Hobson, Keith A; Wunder, Michael B; Norris, D Ryan

    2013-10-01

    Insect migration may involve movements over multiple breeding generations at continental scales, resulting in formidable challenges to their conservation and management. Using distribution models generated from citizen scientist occurrence data and stable-carbon and -hydrogen isotope measurements, we tracked multi-generational colonization of the breeding grounds of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America. We found that monarch breeding occurrence was best modelled with geographical and climatic variables resulting in an annual breeding distribution of greater than 12 million km(2) that encompassed 99% occurrence probability. Combining occurrence models with stable isotope measurements to estimate natal origin, we show that butterflies which overwintered in Mexico came from a wide breeding distribution, including southern portions of the range. There was a clear northward progression of monarchs over successive generations from May until August when reproductive butterflies began to change direction and moved south. Fifth-generation individuals breeding in Texas in the late summer/autumn tended to originate from northern breeding areas rather than regions further south. Although the Midwest was the most productive area during the breeding season, monarchs that re-colonized the Midwest were produced largely in Texas, suggesting that conserving breeding habitat in the Midwest alone is insufficient to ensure long-term persistence of the monarch butterfly population in eastern North America. PMID:23926146

  15. Paradox of the drinking-straw model of the butterfly proboscis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chen-Chih; Monaenkova, Daria; Beard, Charles E; Adler, Peter H; Kornev, Konstantin G

    2014-06-15

    Fluid-feeding Lepidoptera use an elongated proboscis, conventionally modeled as a drinking straw, to feed from pools and films of liquid. Using the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus (Linnaeus), we show that the inherent structural features of the lepidopteran proboscis contradict the basic assumptions of the drinking-straw model. By experimentally characterizing permeability and flow in the proboscis, we show that tapering of the food canal in the drinking region increases resistance, significantly hindering the flow of fluid. The calculated pressure differential required for a suction pump to support flow along the entire proboscis is greater than 1 atm (~101 kPa) when the butterfly feeds from a pool of liquid. We suggest that behavioral strategies employed by butterflies and moths can resolve this paradoxical pressure anomaly. Butterflies can alter the taper, the interlegular spacing and the terminal opening of the food canal, thereby controlling fluid entry and flow, by splaying the galeal tips apart, sliding the galeae along one another, pulsing hemolymph into each galeal lumen, and pressing the proboscis against a substrate. Thus, although physical construction of the proboscis limits its mechanical capabilities, its functionality can be modified and enhanced by behavioral strategies. PMID:24920837

  16. Effects of Cry1Ab-Expressing Corn Anthers on the Movement of Monarch Butterfly Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies have shown that anthers from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn, Zea mays L., do not pose a significant risk to the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus (L.). However, adverse effects (decreased feeding and weight) have been detected after 4 days of exposure in the laboratory to a high density ...

  17. Comparative population genetics of mimetic Heliconius butterflies in an endangered habitat; Brazil's Atlantic Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Márcio Z

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brazil's Atlantic Forest is a biodiversity hotspot endangered by severe habitat degradation and fragmentation. Habitat fragmentation is expected to reduce dispersal among habitat patches resulting in increased genetic differentiation among populations. Here we examined genetic diversity and differentiation among populations of two Heliconius butterfly species in the northern portion of Brazil's Atlantic Forest to estimate the potential impact of habitat fragmentation on population connectivity in butterflies with home-range behavior. Results We generated microsatellite, AFLP and mtDNA sequence data for 136 Heliconius erato specimens from eight collecting locations and 146 H. melpomene specimens from seven locations. Population genetic analyses of the data revealed high levels of genetic diversity in H. erato relative to H. melpomene, widespread genetic differentiation among populations of both species, and no evidence for isolation-by-distance. Conclusions These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the extensive habitat fragmentation along Brazil's Atlantic Forest has reduced dispersal of Heliconius butterflies among neighboring habitat patches. The results also lend support to the observation that fine-scale population genetic structure may be common in Heliconius. If such population structure also exists independent of human activity, and has been common over the evolutionary history of Heliconius butterflies, it may have contributed to the evolution of wing pattern diversity in the genus.

  18. Genome Sequence of a Novel Iflavirus from mRNA Sequencing of the Butterfly Heliconius erato

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Gilbert; Macias-mun?oz, Aide; Briscoe, Adriana D.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of a novel iflavirus strain recovered from the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato. The coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the iflavirus genome was 8,895 nucleotides in length, encoding a polyprotein that was 2,965 amino acids long.

  19. Genome Sequence of a Novel Iflavirus from mRNA Sequencing of the Butterfly Heliconius erato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Muñoz, Aide; Briscoe, Adriana D.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of a novel iflavirus strain recovered from the neotropical butterfly Heliconius erato. The coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the iflavirus genome was 8,895 nucleotides in length, encoding a polyprotein that was 2,965 amino acids long. PMID:24831145

  20. The lycaenid butterfly Polyommatus icarus uses a duplicated blue opsin to see green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison-Mangus, Marilou P; Briscoe, Adriana D; Zaccardi, Guillermo; Knüttel, Helge; Kelber, Almut

    2008-02-01

    The functional significance of gene duplication is rarely addressed at the level of animal behavior. Butterflies are excellent models in this regard because they can be trained and the use of their opsin-based visual pigments in color vision can be assessed. In the present study, we demonstrate that the lycaenid Polyommatus icarus uses its duplicate blue (B2) opsin, BRh2, in conjunction with its long-wavelength (LW) opsin, LWRh, to see color in the green part of the light spectrum extending up to 560 nm. This is in contrast to butterflies in the genus Papilio, which use duplicate LW opsins to discriminate colors in the long-wavelength range. We also found that P. icarus has a heterogeneously expressed red filtering pigment and red-reflecting ommatidia in the ventral eye region. In behavioural tests, the butterflies could not discriminate colors in the red range (570-640 nm). This finding is significant because we have previously found that the nymphalid butterfly Heliconius erato has filter-pigment mediated color vision in the long wavelength range. Our results suggest that lateral filtering pigments may not always influence color vision in insects. PMID:18203991

  1. Will the Butterfly Cipher keep your Network Data secure? Developments in Computer Encryption

    OpenAIRE

    Hinze-hoare, Vita

    2006-01-01

    This paper explains the recent developments in security and encryption. The Butterfly cipher and quantum cryptography are reviewed and compared. Examples of their relative uses are discussed and suggestions for future developments considered. In addition application to network security together with a substantial review of classification of encryption systems and a summary of security weaknesses are considered.

  2. The relationship between total cholinesterase activity and mortality in four butterfly species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, Timothy A

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between total cholinesterase activity (TChE) and mortality in four butterfly species (great southern white [Ascia monuste], common buckeye [Junonia coenia], painted lady [Vanessa cardui], and julia butterflies [Dryas julia]) was investigated. Acute contact toxicity studies were conducted to evaluate the response (median lethal dose [LD50] and TChE) of the four species following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide naled. The LD50 for these butterflies ranged from 2.3 to 7.6 µg/g. The average level of TChE inhibition associated with significant mortality ranged from 26 to 67%, depending on the species. The lower bounds of normal TChE activity (2 standard deviations less than the average TChE for reference butterflies) ranged from 8.4 to 12.3 µM/min/g. As a percentage of the average reference TChE activity for the respective species, the lower bounds were similar to the inhibition levels associated with significant mortality, indicating there was little difference between the dose resulting in significant TChE inhibition and that resulting in mortality. PMID:22740147

  3. Inbreeding uncovers fundamental differences in the genetic load affecting male and female fertility in a butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Saccheri, Ilik J.; Lloyd, Hywel D.; Helyar, Sarah J.; Brakefield, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    Inbreeding depression is most pronounced for traits closely associated with fitness. The traditional explanation is that natural selection eliminates deleterious mutations with additive or dominant effects more effectively than recessive mutations, leading to directional dominance for traits subject to strong directional selection. Here we report the unexpected finding that, in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, male sterility contributes disproportionately to inbreeding depression for fitness (...

  4. Revisiting urban refuges: Changes of butterfly and burnet fauna in Prague reserves over three decades.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kadlec, T.; Beneš, Ji?í; Jarošík, Vojt?ch; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Ro?. 85, ?. 1 (2008), s. 1-11. ISSN 0169-2046 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : butterfly conservation * reserve design * species loss Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.953, year: 2008

  5. Checkerspot Butterflies, Science, and Conservation Policy: A Grassroots View of Nitrogen Overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, S. B.

    2009-12-01

    Educating policy makers and the general public about the global “Nitrogen Overdose” has proved challenging because of the complexities of the global nitrogen cycle and its effect on terrestrial, freshwater, estuarine, and marine ecosystems. In this presentation, I present my grassroots experience as a scientist who transitioned into a scientist/activist, working with elected officials, regulators, private industry, activist groups, and the general public, to conserve the rare, beautiful, and charismatic Bay checkerspot butterfly in the San Francisco Bay Area. The butterfly is threatened by atmospheric nitrogen deposition (5-20 kg-N/ha/year) that enriches nutrient poor soils derived from serpentinite rock. This eutrophication allows nitrophilous grasses to invade and displace the dazzling wildflower displays that provide essential food and nectar for the butterfly. Over the past 25 years, I have been involved in all phases of the conservation of this ecosystem, drawing on long-term scientific investigations (literally hundreds of papers by dozens of researchers) on the population dynamics and conservation of the butterfly, and the biogeochemistry of the serpentine grassland ecosystem. Publication of a 1999 paper on N-deposition impacts on the butterfly led to consultations with government agencies and a powerplant company, and development of precedent setting N-deposition mitigation through habitat acquisition and grazing management. This process has evolved into a regional-scale Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) that is nearing completion in 2010. A key to the success of this ongoing endeavor is education about biodiversity and N-deposition. Field-tours during spring wildflower season put diverse groups of people in direct contact with the obvious beauty of the ecosystem, creating an opening to learning about the complexities of N-deposition, the population biology of the butterfly, and the convoluted conservation history of the sites. Informal tours have developed into a docent program that led more than 1500 people to the site over the past 4 years, including targeted tours for elected officials, decision makers, land managers, and scientists. Outreach has also included more than a dozen articles in local, regional, and national press, television spots, public presentations (Kiwanis, garden clubs, local conferences), and behind the scenes work in policy development for the HCP. When political decisions on the HCP are finalized in the next year, there will be a cadre of educated people, motivated by first hand experience with the ecosystem, to support final approval and implementation of a rigorous plan that will secure the butterfly, numerous imperiled plants, and the entire flower-filled ecosystem. The experience provides a case study and model of how effective grassroots action by concerned scientists can make a difference.

  6. Defining behavioral and molecular differences between summer and migratory monarch butterflies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanginakudru Sriramana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the fall, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus undergo a magnificent long-range migration. In contrast to spring and summer butterflies, fall migrants are juvenile hormone deficient, which leads to reproductive arrest and increased longevity. Migrants also use a time-compensated sun compass to help them navigate in the south/southwesterly direction en route for Mexico. Central issues in this area are defining the relationship between juvenile hormone status and oriented flight, critical features that differentiate summer monarchs from fall migrants, and identifying molecular correlates of behavioral state. Results Here we show that increasing juvenile hormone activity to induce summer-like reproductive development in fall migrants does not alter directional flight behavior or its time-compensated orientation, as monitored in a flight simulator. Reproductive summer butterflies, in contrast, uniformly fail to exhibit directional, oriented flight. To define molecular correlates of behavioral state, we used microarray analysis of 9417 unique cDNA sequences. Gene expression profiles reveal a suite of 40 genes whose differential expression in brain correlates with oriented flight behavior in individual migrants, independent of juvenile hormone activity, thereby molecularly separating fall migrants from summer butterflies. Intriguing genes that are differentially regulated include the clock gene vrille and the locomotion-relevant tyramine beta hydroxylase gene. In addition, several differentially regulated genes (37.5% of total are not annotated. We also identified 23 juvenile hormone-dependent genes in brain, which separate reproductive from non-reproductive monarchs; genes involved in longevity, fatty acid metabolism, and innate immunity are upregulated in non-reproductive (juvenile-hormone deficient migrants. Conclusion The results link key behavioral traits with gene expression profiles in brain that differentiate migratory from summer butterflies and thus show that seasonal changes in genomic function help define the migratory state.

  7. Synergistic effects of combining morphological and molecular data in resolving the phylogeny of butterflies and skippers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Braby, Michael F; Brower, Andrew V Z; de Jong, Rienk; Lee, Ming-Min; Nylin, Sören; Pierce, Naomi E; Sperling, Felix A H; Vila, Roger; Warren, Andrew D; Zakharov, Evgueni

    2005-08-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among major clades of butterflies and skippers have long been controversial, with no general consensus even today. Such lack of resolution is a substantial impediment to using the otherwise well studied butterflies as a model group in biology. Here we report the results of a combined analysis of DNA sequences from three genes and a morphological data matrix for 57 taxa (3258 characters, 1290 parsimony informative) representing all major lineages from the three putative butterfly super-families (Hedyloidea, Hesperioidea and Papilionoidea), plus out-groups representing other ditrysian Lepidoptera families. Recently, the utility of morphological data as a source of phylogenetic evidence has been debated. We present the first well supported phylogenetic hypothesis for the butterflies and skippers based on a total-evidence analysis of both traditional morphological characters and new molecular characters from three gene regions (COI, EF-1alpha and wingless). All four data partitions show substantial hidden support for the deeper nodes, which emerges only in a combined analysis in which the addition of morphological data plays a crucial role. With the exception of Nymphalidae, the traditionally recognized families are found to be strongly supported monophyletic clades with the following relationships: (Hesperiidae+(Papilionidae+(Pieridae+(Nymphalidae+(Lycaenidae+Riodinidae))))). Nymphalidae is recovered as a monophyletic clade but this clade does not have strong support. Lycaenidae and Riodinidae are sister groups with strong support and we suggest that the latter be given family rank. The position of Pieridae as the sister taxon to nymphalids, lycaenids and riodinids is supported by morphology and the EF-1alpha data but conflicted by the COI and wingless data. Hedylidae are more likely to be related to butterflies and skippers than geometrid moths and appear to be the sister group to Papilionoidea+Hesperioidea. PMID:16048773

  8. Dispersal-related life-history trade-offs in a butterfly metapopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanski, Ilkka; Saastamoinen, Marjo; Ovaskainen, Otso

    2006-01-01

    1. Recent studies on butterflies have documented apparent evolutionary changes in dispersal rate in response to climate change and habitat change. These studies often assume a trade-off between dispersal rate (or flight capacity) and reproduction, which is the rule in wing-dimorphic species but might not occur equally in wing-monomorphic species such as butterflies. 2. To investigate the relationship between dispersal rate and fecundity in the Glanville fritillary butterfly Melitaea cinxia we recorded lifetime individual movements, matings, ovipositions, and maximal life span in a large (32 x 26 m) population cage in the field. Experimental material was obtained from 20 newly established and 20 old local populations within a large metapopulation in the Aland Islands in Finland. 3. Females of the Glanville fritillary from newly established populations are known to be more dispersive in the field, and in the cage they showed significantly greater mobility, mated earlier, and laid more egg clutches than females from old populations. The dispersive females from new populations exhibited no reduced lifetime fecundity in the cage, but they had a shorter maximal life span than old-population females. 4. These results challenge the dispersal-fecundity trade-off for nonmigratory butterflies but instead suggest a physiological trade-off between high metabolic performance and reduced maximal life span. High metabolic performance may explain high rates of dispersal and oviposition in early life. 5. In fragmented landscapes, an ecological trade-off exists between being more dispersive and hence spending more time in the landscape matrix vs. having more time for reproduction in the habitat. We estimate with a dispersal model parameterized for the Glanville fritillary that the lifetime egg production is 4% smaller on average in the more dispersive butterflies in a representative landscape, with much variation depending on landscape structure in the neighbourhood of the natal patch, from--26 to 45% in the landscape analysed in this paper. PMID:16903046

  9. Time-varying wing-twist improves aerodynamic efficiency of forward flight in butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lingxiao; Hedrick, Tyson L; Mittal, Rajat

    2013-01-01

    Insect wings can undergo significant chordwise (camber) as well as spanwise (twist) deformation during flapping flight but the effect of these deformations is not well understood. The shape and size of butterfly wings leads to particularly large wing deformations, making them an ideal test case for investigation of these effects. Here we use computational models derived from experiments on free-flying butterflies to understand the effect of time-varying twist and camber on the aerodynamic performance of these insects. High-speed videogrammetry is used to capture the wing kinematics, including deformation, of a Painted Lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui) in untethered, forward flight. These experimental results are then analyzed computationally using a high-fidelity, three-dimensional, unsteady Navier-Stokes flow solver. For comparison to this case, a set of non-deforming, flat-plate wing (FPW) models of wing motion are synthesized and subjected to the same analysis along with a wing model that matches the time-varying wing-twist observed for the butterfly, but has no deformation in camber. The simulations show that the observed butterfly wing (OBW) outperforms all the flat-plate wings in terms of usable force production as well as the ratio of lift to power by at least 29% and 46%, respectively. This increase in efficiency of lift production is at least three-fold greater than reported for other insects. Interestingly, we also find that the twist-only-wing (TOW) model recovers much of the performance of the OBW, demonstrating that wing-twist, and not camber is key to forward flight in these insects. The implications of this on the design of flapping wing micro-aerial vehicles are discussed. PMID:23341923

  10. Low power reconfigurable FP-FFT core with an array of folded DA butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beulet Paul, Augusta Sophy; Raju, Srinivasan; Janakiraman, Raja

    2014-12-01

    A variable length (32 ~ 2,048), low power, floating point fast Fourier transform (FP-FFT) processor is designed and implemented using energy-efficient butterfly elements. The butterfly elements are implemented using distributed arithmetic (DA) algorithm that eliminates the power-consuming complex multipliers. The FFT computations are scheduled in a quasi-parallel mode with an array of 16 butterflies. The nodes of the data flow graph (DFG) of the FFT are folded to these 16 butterflies for any value of N by the control unit. Register minimization is also applied after folding to decrease the number of scratch pad registers to (log 2 N - 1) × 16. The real and imaginary parts of the samples are represented by 32-bit single-precision floating point notation to achieve high precision in the results. Thus, each sample is represented using 64 bits. Twiddle factor ROM size is reduced by 25% using the symmetry of the twiddle factors. Reconfigurability based on the sample size is achieved by the control unit. This distributed floating point arithmetic (DFPA)-based design of FFT processor implemented in 45-nm process occupies an area of 0.973 mm2 and dissipates a power of 68 mW at an operating frequency of 100 MHz. When compared with FFT processor designed in the same technology with multiplier-based butterflies, this design shows 33% less area and 38% less power. The throughput for 2,048-point FFT is 222 KS/s and the energy spent per FFT is 7.4 to 14 nJ for 64 to 2,048 points being one among the most energy-efficient FFT processors.

  11. Experimental analysis of the liquid-feeding mechanism of the butterfly Pieris rapae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Chul; Kim, Bo Heum; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-06-01

    The butterfly Pieirs rapae drinks liquid using a long proboscis. A high pressure gradient is induced in the proboscis when cibarial pump muscles contract. However, liquid feeding through the long proboscis poses a disadvantage of high flow resistance. Hence, butterflies may possess special features to compensate for this disadvantage and succeed in foraging. The main objective of this study is to analyze the liquid-feeding mechanism of butterflies. The systaltic motion of the cibarial pump organ was visualized using the synchrotron X-ray imaging technique. In addition, an ellipsoidal pump model was established based on synchrotron X-ray micro-computed tomography. To determine the relationship between the cyclic variation of the pump volume and the liquid-feeding flow, velocity fields of the intake flow at the tip of the proboscis were measured using micro-particle image velocimetry. Reynolds and Womersley numbers of liquid-feeding flow in the proboscis were ~1.40 and 0.129, respectively. The liquid-feeding flow could be characterized as a quasi-steady state laminar flow. Considering these results, we analyzed the dimensions of the feeding apparatus on the basis of minimum energy consumption during the liquid-feeding process. The relationship between the proboscis and the cibarial pump was determined when minimum energy consumption occurs. As a result, the volume of the cibarial pump is proportional to the cube of the radius of the proboscis. It seems that the liquid-feeding system of butterflies and other long-proboscid insects follow the cube relationship. The present results provide insights into the feeding strategies of liquid-feeding butterflies. PMID:24625646

  12. Wolbachia endosymbiont infection in two Indian butterflies and female-biased sex ratio in the Red Pierrot, Talicada nyseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankola, Kunal; Brueckner, Dorothea; Puttaraju, H P

    2011-12-01

    The maternally inherited obligate bacteria Wolbachia is known to infect various lepidopteran insects. However, so far only a few butterfly species harbouring this bacterium have been thoroughly studied. The current study aims to identify the infection status of these bacteria in some of the commonly found butterfly species in India. A total of nine butterfly species belonging to four different families were screened using PCR with Wolbachia-specific wsp and ftsZ primers. The presence of the Wolbachia super group 'B' in the butterflies Red Pierrot, Talicada nyseus (Guerin) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) and Blue Mormon, Papilio polymnestor Cramer (Papilionidae), is documented for the first time in India. The study also gives an account on the lifetime fecundity and female-biased sex ratio in T. nyseus, suggesting a putative role for Wolbachia in the observed female-biased sex ratio distortion. PMID:22116282

  13. The taxonomy, biogeography and conservation of the myrmecophilous Chrysoritis butterflies (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. van Hamburg

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The relevance and integration of scientific knowledge to conservation management of the locally popular and highly endemic butterfly genus Chrysoritis are investigated within the research fields of taxonomy and biogeography. The butterfly genus Chrysoritis contains at least 41 species endemic to South Africa. The taxonomy of Chrysoritis has reached a state where revisions could easily result in a plethora of names between “lumping and splitting”. In practice, the state of the taxonomy of these butterflies on species level may alter their conservation priority. The two most species rich species groups in Chrysoritis have different centres of endemism, however, a butterfly atlas becomes a necessity to reveal more about their biogeography. There is an absence of butterfly species lists in many of our National Parks and Nature Reserves. Legislation should facilitate rather than limit the valuable role of the amateur lepidopterist to add distribution records. In turn, the amateur lepidopterists should adapt and make an effort to explore unknown localities, apart from monitoring butterflies at their well-known localities. The red listing of localised butterflies in South Africa, including a number of Chrysoritis species, is in need of an urgent review in the light of the most recent IUCN categories. A species such as Chrysoritis dicksoni should be protected by law - but at its known localities. The scenario that real conservation action is only needed if the last known locality of a butterfly is threatened, should be abolished. A paradigm shift to conserve the metapopulations of the highly endemic Chrysoritis genus and not merely a few of its species as items that appear on lists, seems necessary.

  14. Comparing the response of birds and butterflies to vegetation-based mountain ecotones using boundary detection approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Rafi; Levanoni, Oded; Banker, Eran; Pe'er, Guy; Kark, Salit

    2013-01-01

    Mountains provide an opportunity to examine changes in biodiversity across environmental gradients and areas of transition (ecotones). Mountain ecotones separate vegetation belts. Here, we aimed to examine whether transition areas for birds and butterflies spatially correspond with ecotones between three previously described altitudinal vegetation belts on Mt. Hermon, northern Israel. These include the Mediterranean Maquis, xero-montane open forest and Tragacanthic mountain steppe vegetation belts. We sampled the abundance of bird and butterfly species in 34 sampling locations along an elevational gradient between 500 and 2200 m. We applied wombling, a boundary-detection technique, which detects rapid changes in a continuous variable, in order to locate the transition areas for bird and butterfly communities and compare the location of these areas with the location of vegetation belts as described in earlier studies of Mt. Hermon. We found some correspondence between the areas of transition of both bird and butterfly communities and the ecotones between vegetation belts. For birds and butterflies, important transitions occurred at the lower vegetation ecotone between Mediterranean maquis and the xero-montane open forest vegetation belts, and between the xero-montane open forest and the mountain steppe Tragacanthic belts. While patterns of species turnover with elevation were similar for birds and butterflies, the change in species richness and diversity with elevation differed substantially between the two taxa. Birds and butterflies responded quite similarly to the elevational gradient and to the shift between vegetation belts in terms of species turnover rates. While the mechanisms generating these patterns may differ, the resulting areas of peak turnover in species show correspondence among three different taxa (plants, birds and butterflies). PMID:23505472

  15. Chasing Migration Genes: A Brain Expressed Sequence Tag Resource for Summer and Migratory Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Haisun; Casselman, Amy; Reppert, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) undergo a spectacular fall migration. In contrast to summer butterflies, migrants are juvenile hormone (JH) deficient, which leads to reproductive diapause and increased longevity. Migrants also utilize time-compensated sun compass orientation to help them navigate to their overwintering grounds. Here, we describe a brain expressed sequence tag (EST) resource to identify genes involved in migratory behaviors. A brain EST library was constr...

  16. Persistence of pierisin-1 activities in the adult cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, during storage after killing

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Yasuko; Matsushima-hibiya, Yuko; Nakano, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Iwabuchi, Kikuo; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2007-01-01

    Crude extracts from larvae, pupae and adults of cabbage white butterflies, Pieris rapae and Pieris brassicae, and green-veined butterfly, Pieris napi, have an ability to induce apoptosis in the human cancer cell lines. As apoptosis inducing protein, pierisin-1 and -2 have been isolated from pupae of P. rapae and P. brassicae, respectively, and shown to exhibit DNA ADP-ribosylating activity. Although the highest activity was detected in the late phase of larvae and early phase of pupae, certai...

  17. DNA barcodes and cryptic species of skipper butterflies in the genus Perichares in Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, John M.; Janzen, Daniel H.; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Hallwachs, Winnie; Hebert, Paul D. N.

    2008-01-01

    DNA barcodes can be used to identify cryptic species of skipper butterflies previously detected by classic taxonomic methods and to provide first clues to the existence of yet other cryptic species. A striking case is the common geographically and ecologically widespread neotropical skipper butterfly Perichares philetes (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae), described in 1775, which barcoding splits into a complex of four species in Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG) in northwestern Costa Rica. Thre...

  18. Building a DNA Barcode Reference Library for the True Butterflies (Lepidoptera) of Peninsula Malaysia: What about the Subspecies?

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, John-james; Sing, Kong-wah; Sofian-azirun, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to build a DNA barcode reference library for the true butterflies of Peninsula Malaysia and assess the value of attaching subspecies names to DNA barcode records. A new DNA barcode library was constructed with butterflies from the Museum of Zoology, University of Malaya collection. The library was analysed in conjunction with publicly available DNA barcodes from other Asia-Pacific localities to test the ability of the DNA barcodes to discriminate species and su...

  19. The importance of vegetation height and flower abundance for Swedish butterfly species in semi-natural grasslands

    OpenAIRE

    Lo?fqvist, Zandra

    2014-01-01

    Changed management of semi-natural grasslands is thought to be one important factor for explaining the decline of butterfly populations in Sweden and the rest of Europe. This study explores how vegetation height, variation in vegetation height and flower abundance can help predict the occurrence of butterfly species in semi-natural grasslands in southern Sweden. My study is based on data collected by a national environmental monitoring programme (NILS) during 2006-2010. Generalized linear mod...

  20. Wing scale microstructures and nanostructures in butterflies--natural photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértesy, Z; Bálint, Zs; Kertész, K; Vigneron, J P; Lousse, V; Biró, L P

    2006-10-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the correlation between structural colour and scale morphology in butterflies. Detailed correlations between blue colour and structure were investigated in three lycaenid subfamilies, which represent a monophylum in the butterfly family Lycaenidae (Lepidoptera): the Coppers (Lycaeninae), the Hairstreaks (Theclinae) and the Blues (Polyommatinae). Complex investigations such as spectral measurements and characterization by means of light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy enabled us to demonstrate that: (i) a wide array of nanostructures generate blue colours; (ii) monophyletic groups use qualitatively similar structures; and (iii) the hue of the blue colour is characteristic for the microstructure and nanostructure of the body of the scales. PMID:17100919

  1. Significant effects of Pgi genotype and body reserves on lifespan in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saastamoinen, Marjo; Ikonen, Suvi; Hanski, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with a particular variant of the gene phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) have been shown to have superior dispersal capacity and fecundity in the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), raising questions about the mechanisms that maintain polymorphism in this gene in the field. Here, we investigate how variation in the Pgi genotype affects female and male life history under controlled conditions. The most striking effect is the longer lifespan of genotypes with high dispersal capacity, especially in non-reproducing females. Butterflies use body reserves for somatic maintenance and reproduction, but different resources (in thorax versus abdomen) are used under dissimilar conditions, with some interactions with the Pgi genotype. These results indicate life-history trade-offs that involve resource allocation and genotype×environment interactions, and these trade-offs are likely to contribute to the maintenance of Pgi polymorphism in the natural populations. PMID:19129143

  2. The butterflies of Turquino National Park, Sierra Maestra, Cuba (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núñez, R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Between February and November 2011, we conducted a species inventory, created a natural history database and a made a first approach to the composition and structure of the butterfly communities present at several vegetation types in the Turquino National Park. The inventory included 83 species, 29 of them endemic. We recorded 57 species (18 endemic in transects along main vegetation pathways. In disturbed vegetation, species richness was higher (48 and abundance was better distributed, but the proportion of endemism was lower (23%. Species richness decreased and the dominance and proportion of endemism increased with altitude. Numbers of species and the proportions of endemism at natural habitats sampled were: 19 and 58% for evergreen forest, 10 and 60% for rainforest, eight and 100% for cloud forest, and four and 100% for the elfin thicket. Flowers of 27 plants were recorded as nectar sources for 30 butterfly species, and host plants were recorded for nine species.

  3. The electronic spectrum of a quasiperiodic potential: From the Hofstadter butterfly to the Fibonacci chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian, defined in a quasiperiodic chain with an on-site potential given by a Fibonacci sequence, can be obtained using a superposition of Harper potentials. Since the spectrum of the Harper equation as a function of the magnetic flux is a fractal set, known as the Hofstadter butterfly, we follow the transformation of the butterfly to a new one that contains the Fibonacci potential and related approximants. As a result, the equation in reciprocal space for the Fibonacci case has the form of a chain with long range interaction between Fourier components. Then, the structure of the resulting spectrum is analyzed by calculating the components in reciprocal space of the related potentials. As an application, the correlator of each potential and some localization properties are obtained

  4. The significance of moment-of-inertia variation in flight manoeuvres of butterflies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to understand the role that changes in body moment of inertia might play during flight manoeuvres of insects. High-speed, high-resolution videogrammetry is used to quantify the trajectory and body conformation of Painted Lady butterflies during flight manoeuvres; the 3D kinematics of the centre of masses of the various body parts of the insect is determined experimentally. Measurements of the mass properties of the insect are used to parameterize a simple flight dynamics model of the butterfly. Even though the mass of the flapping wings is small compared to the total mass of the insect, these experiments and subsequent analysis indicate that changes in moment of inertia during flight are large enough to influence the manoeuvres of these insects. (communication)

  5. Vanessa cardui adipokinetic hormone (Vanca-AKH) in butterflies and a moth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köllisch, Gabriele V; Verhaert, Peter D; Hoffmann, Klaus H

    2003-06-01

    Small neuropeptides of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone (AKH/RPCH) family regulate energy metabolism in insects. Within lepidopterans, the nonapeptide Manduca sexta AKH (Manse-AKH) represents a widely occurring AKH, whereas the decapeptide Helze-HrTH (at first isolated from Heliothis zea) seems to be restricted to moths. Here we show that Vanca-AKH, a non-amidated undecapeptide which we recently found in the painted lady butterfly, Vanessa cardui, is also present in the retrocerebral complex of several other butterflies (Danaus plexippus, Precis coenia, Aglais urticae) and a moth (Spodoptera frugiperda). This study also demonstrates the power of modern nano-electrospray-quadrupole TOF tandem mass spectrometry in the sequence confirmation of peptides from minute amounts of small neuropeptides. PMID:12781830

  6. The significance of moment-of-inertia variation in flight manoeuvres of butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T; Zheng, L; Hedrick, T; Mittal, R

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the role that changes in body moment of inertia might play during flight manoeuvres of insects. High-speed, high-resolution videogrammetry is used to quantify the trajectory and body conformation of Painted Lady butterflies during flight manoeuvres; the 3D kinematics of the centre of masses of the various body parts of the insect is determined experimentally. Measurements of the mass properties of the insect are used to parameterize a simple flight dynamics model of the butterfly. Even though the mass of the flapping wings is small compared to the total mass of the insect, these experiments and subsequent analysis indicate that changes in moment of inertia during flight are large enough to influence the manoeuvres of these insects. PMID:23092976

  7. Anti-fouling properties of microstructured surfaces bio-inspired by rice leaves and butterfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Gregory D; Theiss, Andrew; Bhushan, Bharat; Lee, Stephen C

    2014-04-01

    Material scientists often look to biology for new engineering solutions to materials science problems. For example, unique surface characteristics of rice leaves and butterfly wings combine the shark skin (antifouling) and lotus leaf (self-cleaning) effects, producing the so-called rice and butterfly wing effect. In this paper, we study antifouling properties of four microstructured surfaces inspired by rice leaves and fabricated with photolithography and hot embossing techniques. Anti-biofouling effectiveness is determined with bioassays using Escherichia coli whilst inorganic fouling with simulated dirt particles. Antifouling data are presented to understand the role of surface geometrical features resistance to fouling. Conceptual modeling provides design guidance when developing novel antifouling surfaces for applications in the medical, marine, and industrial fields. PMID:24491339

  8. Non-random dispersal in the butterfly Maniola jurtina: implications for metapopulation models.

    OpenAIRE

    Conradt, L.; Bodsworth, E. J.; Roper, T. J.; Thomas, C. D.

    2000-01-01

    The dispersal patterns of animals are important in metapopulation ecology because they affect the dynamics and survival of populations. Theoretical models assume random dispersal but little is known in practice about the dispersal behaviour of individual animals or the strategy by which dispersers locate distant habitat patches. In the present study, we released individual meadow brown butterflies (Maniola jurtina) in a non-habitat and investigated their ability to return to a suitable habita...

  9. Reduced variability in range-edge butterfly populations over three decades of climate warming

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, Tom H.; Roy, David B.; Brereton, Tom; Thomas, Jeremy A.

    2012-01-01

    Populations at the high latitude edge of species' geographical ranges are thought to show larger interannual population fluctuations, with subsequent higher local extinction risk, than those within the 'core' climatic range. As climate envelopes shift northward under climate warming, however, we would expect populations to show dampened variability. We test this hypothesis using annual abundance indices from 19 butterfly species across 79 British monitoring sites between 1976 and 2009, a peri...

  10. Photonic Crystal Structure of Butterfly Wing Scales Exhibiting Selective Wavelength Iridescence.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mat?jková-Plšková, J.; Mika, Filip; Jiwajinda, S.; Dechkrong, P.; Svidenská, S.; Shiojiri, M.

    Praha : Czechoslovak Microscopy Society, 2014. ISBN 978-80-260-6720-7. [International Microscopy Congres /18./. Praha (CZ), 07.09.2014-12.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : butterfly wing * coloration * SEM * TEM * photonic crystal structure Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  11. Allee effects: empirical analyses of wild British butterfly populations and theoretical implications for population synchrony

    OpenAIRE

    Dooley, Claire; Bonsall, Michael; Oliver, Tom

    2014-01-01

    An Allee effect is a density-dependent process that can be responsible for the extinction of small populations. This thesis focuses on the detection of Allee effects, along with other density-dependent processes, and their influence on population synchrony. In chapter 2 I investigate the spatial variation in influential density-dependent processes and density-independent weather factors for the large skipper butterfly Ochlodes sylvanus across its British range. I find both qualitative and qua...

  12. Characterisation and expression of microRNAs in developing wings of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius melpomene

    OpenAIRE

    Surridge, Alison K.; Lopez-gomollon, Sara; Moxon, Simon; Maroja, Luana S.; Rathjen, Tina; Nadeau, Nicola J.; Dalmay, Tamas; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Heliconius butterflies are an excellent system for studies of adaptive convergent and divergent phenotypic traits. Wing colour patterns are used as signals to both predators and potential mates and are inherited in a Mendelian manner. The underlying genetic mechanisms of pattern formation have been studied for many years and shed light on broad issues, such as the repeatability of evolution. In Heliconius melpomene, the yellow hindwing bar is controlled by the HmYb locus. ...

  13. Tracking multi-generational colonization of the breeding grounds by monarch butterflies in eastern North America

    OpenAIRE

    Flockhart, D. T. Tyler; Wassenaar, Leonard I.; Martin, Tara G.; Hobson, Keith A.; Wunder, Michael B.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Insect migration may involve movements over multiple breeding generations at continental scales, resulting in formidable challenges to their conservation and management. Using distribution models generated from citizen scientist occurrence data and stable-carbon and -hydrogen isotope measurements, we tracked multi-generational colonization of the breeding grounds of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America. We found that monarch breeding occurrence was best modelled wit...

  14. Discordant timing between antennae disrupts sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, Patrick A.; Merlin, Christine; Gegear, Robert J.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    To navigate during their long-distance migration, monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a time-compensated sun compass. The sun compass timing elements reside in light-entrained circadian clocks in the antennae. Here we show that either antenna is sufficient for proper time compensation. However, migrants with either antenna painted black (to block light entrainment) and the other painted clear (to permit light entrainment) display disoriented group flight. Remarkably, when the black-pai...

  15. Genetic Factors and Host Traits Predict Spore Morphology for a Butterfly Pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Roode, Jacobus C.; Davis, Andrew K.; Sonia Altizer; Sander, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) throughout the world are commonly infected by the specialist pathogen Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (OE). This protozoan is transmitted when larvae ingest infectious stages (spores) scattered onto host plant leaves by infected adults. Parasites replicate internally during larval and pupal stages, and adult monarchs emerge covered with millions of dormant spores on the outsides of their bodies. Across multiple monarch populations, OE varies in prevalence an...

  16. Extreme Heterogeneity in Parasitism Despite Low Population Genetic Structure among Monarch Butterflies Inhabiting the Hawaiian Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, Amanda A.; Roode, Jacobus C.; Altizer, Sonia; Bartel, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Host movement and spatial structure can strongly influence the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases, with limited host movement potentially leading to high spatial heterogeneity in infection. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) are best known for undertaking a spectacular long-distance migration in eastern North America; however, they also form non-migratory populations that breed year-round in milder climates such as Hawaii and other tropical locations. Prior work showed an invers...

  17. Monarch butterflies cross the Appalachians from the west to recolonize the east coast of North America

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Nathan G.; Wassenaar, Leonard I.; Hobson, Keith A.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Each spring, millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrate from overwintering sites in Mexico to recolonize eastern North America. However, few monarchs are found along the east coast of the USA until mid-summer. Brower (Brower, L. P. 1996 J. Exp. Biol. 199, 93–103.) proposed that east coast recolonization is accomplished by individuals migrating from the west over the Appalachians, but to date no evidence exists to support this hypothesis. We used hydrogen (?D) and carbon (?...

  18. The monarch butterfly genome yields insights into long-distance migration

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Shuai; Merlin, Christine; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    We present the draft 273 Mb genome of the migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) and a set of 16, 866 protein-coding genes. Orthology properties suggest that the Lepidoptera are the fastest evolving insect order yet examined. Compared to the silkmoth Bombyx mori, the monarch genome shares prominent similarity in orthology content, microsynteny, and protein family sizes. The monarch genome reveals: a vertebrate-like opsin whose existence in insects is widespread; a full repertoire of m...

  19. Natal origins of migratory monarch butterflies at wintering colonies in Mexico: New isotopic evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Wassenaar, Leonard I.; Hobson, Keith A.

    1998-01-01

    Each year, millions of monarch butterflies from eastern North America migrate to overwinter in 10–13 discrete colonies located in the Oyamel forests of central Mexico. For decades efforts to track monarch migration have relied on observations and tag-recapture methods, culminating with the discovery of the wintering colonies in 1975. Monarch tag returns from Mexico, however, are few and primarily from two accessible colonies, and therefore tag-recapture techniques have not quantified natal ...

  20. Impact of Bt corn pollen on monarch butterfly populations: A risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Mark K.; Hellmich, Richard L.; Stanley-horn, Diane E.; Oberhauser, Karen S.; Pleasants, John M.; Mattila, Heather R.; Siegfried, Blair D.; Dively, Galen P.

    2001-01-01

    A collaborative research effort by scientists in several states and in Canada has produced information to develop a formal risk assessment of the impact of Bt corn on monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) populations. Information was sought on the acute toxic effects of Bt corn pollen and the degree to which monarch larvae would be exposed to toxic amounts of Bt pollen on its host plant, the common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca, found in and around cornfields. Expression of Cry proteins, the act...

  1. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in the monarch butterfly using zinc-finger nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Merlin, Christine; Beaver, Lauren E.; Taylor, Orley R.; Wolfe, Scot A.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of reverse-genetic tools in “nonmodel” insect species with distinct biology is critical to establish them as viable model systems. The eastern North American monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), whose genome is sequenced, has emerged as a model to study animal clocks, navigational mechanisms, and the genetic basis of long-distance migration. Here, we developed a highly efficient gene-targeting approach in the monarch using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), engineered nuclease...

  2. The Redder the Better: Wing Color Predicts Flight Performance in Monarch Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Andrew K.; Chi, Jean; Bradley, Catherine; Altizer, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    The distinctive orange and black wings of monarchs (Danaus plexippus) have long been known to advertise their bitter taste and toxicity to potential predators. Recent work also showed that both the orange and black coloration of this species can vary in response to individual-level and environmental factors. Here we examine the relationship between wing color and flight performance in captive-reared monarchs using a tethered flight mill apparatus to quantify butterfly flight speed, duration a...

  3. Directional selection on cold tolerance does not constrain plastic capacity in a butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Franke Kristin; Dierks Anneke; Fischer Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Organisms may respond to environmental change by means of genetic adaptation, phenotypic plasticity or both, which may result in genotype-environment interactions (G x E) if genotypes differ in their phenotypic response. We here specifically target the latter source of variation (i.e. G x E) by comparing plastic responses among lines of the tropical butterfly Bicyclus anynana that had been selected for increased cold tolerance and according controls. Our main aim here was ...

  4. Multiple recent co-options of Optix associated with novel traits in adaptive butterfly wing radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background While the ecological factors that drive phenotypic radiations are often well understood, less is known about the generative mechanisms that cause the emergence and subsequent diversification of novel features. Heliconius butterflies display an extraordinary diversity of wing patterns due in part to mimicry and sexual selection. Identifying the genetic drivers of this crucible of evolution is now within reach, as it was recently shown that cis-regulatory variation of the optix transcription factor explains red pattern differences in the adaptive radiations of the Heliconius melpomene and Heliconius erato species groups. Results Here, we compare the developmental expression of the Optix protein across a large phylogenetic sample of butterflies and infer that its color patterning role originated at the base of the neotropical passion-vine butterfly clade (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Tribe: Heliconiini), shortly predating multiple Optix-driven wing pattern radiations in the speciose Heliconius and Eueides genera. We also characterize novel Optix and Doublesex expression in the male-specific pheromone wing scales of the basal heliconiines Dryas and Agraulis, thus illustrating that within the Heliconinii lineage, Optix has been evolutionarily redeployed in multiple contexts in association with diverse wing features. Conclusions Our findings reveal that the repeated co-option of Optix into various aspects of wing scale specification was associated with multiple evolutionary novelties over a relatively short evolutionary time scale. In particular, the recruitment of Optix expression in colored scale cell precursors was a necessary condition to the explosive diversification of passion-vine butterfly wing patterns. The novel deployment of a gene followed by spatial modulation of its expression in a given cell type could be a common mode of developmental innovation for triggering phenotypic radiations. PMID:24499528

  5. Pollen Preference for Psychotria sp. is Not Learned in the Passion Flower Butterfly, Heliconius erato

    OpenAIRE

    Salcedo, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Heliconius butterflies are known to maximize fitness by feeding on pollen from Gurania sp. and Psiguria sp. (Cucurbitales: Curcurbitaceae), and Psychotria sp. (Gentianales: Rubiaceae). This specialization involves specific physical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations including efficient search strategies in the forest to locate pollen host plants, pollen removal, and pollen external digestion. Reducing pollen host plant search time is crucial to out-compete other flower visitors and to...

  6. A Conserved Supergene Locus Controls Colour Pattern Diversity in Heliconius Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Joron, M.; Papa, R.; Beltran, M.; Chamberlain, N.; Mavarez, J.; Baxter, S.; Abanto, M.; Bermingham, E.; Humphray, S. J.; Rogers, J.; Beasley, H.; Barlow, K.; Ffrench-constant, R. H.; Mallet, J.; Mcmillan, W. O.

    2006-01-01

    We studied whether similar developmental genetic mechanisms are involved in both convergent and divergent evolution. Mimetic insects are known for their diversity of patterns as well as their remarkable evolutionary convergence, and they have played an important role in controversies over the respective roles of selection and constraints in adaptive evolution. Here we contrast three butterfly species, all classic examples of Mullerian mimicry. We used a genetic linkage map to show that a locu...

  7. Convergent Evolution in the Genetic Basis of Müllerian Mimicry in Heliconius Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Baxter, Simon W.; Papa, Riccardo; Chamberlain, Nicola; Humphray, Sean J.; Joron, Mathieu; Morrison, Clay; Ffrench-constant, Richard H.; Mcmillan, W. Owen; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2008-01-01

    The neotropical butterflies Heliconius melpomene and H. erato are Müllerian mimics that display the same warningly colored wing patterns in local populations, yet pattern diversity between geographic regions. Linkage mapping has previously shown convergent red wing phenotypes in these species are controlled by loci on homologous chromosomes. Here, AFLP bulk segregant analysis using H. melpomene crosses identified genetic markers tightly linked to two red wing-patterning loci. These markers w...

  8. Dissecting comimetic radiations in Heliconius reveals divergent histories of convergent butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Quek, Swee-peck; Counterman, Brian A.; Albuquerque Moura, Priscila; Cardoso, Marcio Z.; Marshall, Charles R.; Mcmillan, W. Owen; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2010-01-01

    Mimicry among Heliconius butterflies provides a classic example of coevolution but unresolved relationships among mimetic subspecies have prevented examination of codiversification between species. We present amplified fragment length polymorphism and mtDNA datasets for the major comimetic races of Heliconius erato and H. melpomene. The AFLP data reveal unprecedented resolution, clustering samples by geography and race in both species. Our results show that, although H. erato and H. melpomene...

  9. Hybrid speciation in Heliconius butterflies? A review and critique of the evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Brower, Andrew V. Z.

    2010-01-01

    The evidence supporting the recent hypothesis of a homoploid hybrid origin for the butterfly species Heliconius heurippa is evaluated. Data from selective breeding experiments, mate-choice studies, and a wide variety of DNA markers are reviewed, and an alternative hypothesis for the origin of the species and its close relatives is proposed. A scenario of occasional red wing-pattern mutations in peripheral populations of Heliconius cydno with subsequent adaptive convergence towards sympatric m...

  10. Genomic architecture of adaptive color pattern divergence and convergence in Heliconius butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Supple, Megan A.; Hines, Heather M.; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K.; Lewis, James J.; Nielsen, Dahlia M.; Lavoie, Christine; Ray, David A.; Salazar, Camilo; Mcmillan, W. Owen; Counterman, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the genetic changes driving adaptive variation in natural populations is key to understanding the origins of biodiversity. The mosaic of mimetic wing patterns in Heliconius butterflies makes an excellent system for exploring adaptive variation using next-generation sequencing. In this study, we use a combination of techniques to annotate the genomic interval modulating red color pattern variation, identify a narrow region responsible for adaptive divergence and convergence in Heli...

  11. Partial Complementarity of the Mimetic Yellow Bar Phenotype in Heliconius Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Maroja, Luana S.; Alschuler, Rebecca; Mcmillan, W. Owen; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2012-01-01

    Heliconius butterflies are an excellent system for understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic change. Here we document surprising diversity in the genetic control of a common phenotype. Two disjunct H. erato populations have each recruited the Cr and/or Sd loci that control similar yellow hindwing patterns, but the alleles involved partially complement one another indicating either multiple origins for the patterning alleles or developmental drift in genetic control of similar patterns. We...

  12. Comparative population genetics of a mimicry locus among hybridizing Heliconius butterfly species

    OpenAIRE

    Chamberlain, N. L.; Hill, R. I.; Baxter, S. W.; Jiggins, C. D.; Kronforst, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    The comimetic Heliconius butterfly species pair, H. erato and H. melpomene, appear to use a conserved Mendelian switch locus to generate their matching red wing patterns. Here we investigate whether H. cydno and H. pachinus, species closely related to H. melpomene, use this same switch locus to generate their highly divergent red and brown color pattern elements. Using an F2 intercross between H. cydno and H. pachinus, we first map the genomic positions of two novel red/brown wing pattern ele...

  13. The Studies on Diurnal Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera in Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University Terzio?lu Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Zobar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to determine lepidopteran species on Terzio?lu Campus during March 2005–April 2007. We surveyed Rhopalocera butterflies in Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Terzio?lu Campus, in Çanakkale, Turkey. In this study, total of 44 species belonging to to Papilionidae (4, Nymphalidae (23, Pieridae (8, Lycaenidae (4 and Hesperiidae (5, were identified. The most abundant species throughout the campus are Pieris brassicae, P. rapae, P. napi, Colias crocea, Iphiclides podalirius, and Melanargia larissa.

  14. Fitness Costs of Thermal Reaction Norms for Wing Melanisation in the Large White Butterfly (Pieris brassicae)

    OpenAIRE

    Chaput-bardy, Audrey; Ducatez, Simon; Legrand, Delphine; Baguette, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The large white butterfly, Pieris brassicae, shows a seasonal polyphenism of wing melanisation, spring individuals being darker than summer individuals. This phenotypic plasticity is supposed to be an adaptive response for thermoregulation in natural populations. However, the variation in individuals’ response, the cause of this variation (genetic, non genetic but inheritable or environmental) and its relationship with fitness remain poorly known. We tested the relationships between thermal...

  15. Assessing the conservation status of the Sinai Baton Blue butterfly (Pseudophilotes sinaicus)

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Katy

    2013-01-01

    Arid environments are resource-limited, with scarcity of water the key limiting factor for plants and their associated fauna. Consequentially bottom-up forces often control food webs, influencing the whole system through high levels of competition. The Sinai Baton Blue butterfly, Pseudophilotes sinaicus, is Critically Endangered, with a tiny endemic distribution in the St Katherine Protectorate, South Sinai, an arid environment. Its range is restricted to that of its sole host plant, the near...

  16. A candidate locus for variation in dispersal rate in a butterfly metapopulation

    OpenAIRE

    Haag, Christoph R.; Saastamoinen, Marjo; Marden, James H.; Hanski, Ilkka

    2005-01-01

    Frequent extinctions of local populations in metapopulations create opportunities for migrant females to establish new populations. In a metapopulation of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), more mobile individuals are more likely to establish new populations, especially in habitat patches that are poorly connected to existing populations. Here we show that flight metabolic rate and the frequency of a specific allele of the metabolic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase (pgi) wer...

  17. Molecular-Level Variation Affects Population Growth in a Butterfly Metapopulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hanski, Ilkka; Saccheri, Ilik

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of natural populations are thought to be dominated by demographic and environmental processes with little influence of intraspecific genetic variation and natural selection, apart from inbreeding depression possibly reducing population growth in small populations. Here we analyse hundreds of well-characterised local populations in a large metapopulation of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), which persists in a balance between stochastic local extinctio...

  18. Significant effects of Pgi genotype and body reserves on lifespan in the Glanville fritillary butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Saastamoinen, Marjo; Ikonen, Suvi; Hanski, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with a particular variant of the gene phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) have been shown to have superior dispersal capacity and fecundity in the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), raising questions about the mechanisms that maintain polymorphism in this gene in the field. Here, we investigate how variation in the Pgi genotype affects female and male life history under controlled conditions. The most striking effect is the longer lifespan of genotypes with high dispersa...

  19. Life history of the Glanville fritillary butterfly in fragmented versus continuous landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Duplouy, Anne; Ikonen, Suvi; Hanski, Ilkka

    2013-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation threaten the long-term viability of innumerable species of plants and animals. At the same time, habitat fragmentation may impose strong natural selection and lead to evolution of life histories with possible consequences for demographic dynamics. The Baltic populations of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) inhabit regions with highly fragmented habitat (networks of small dry meadows) as well as regions with extensive continuous habitat (calcar...

  20. The plasticity and geography of host use and the diversification of butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Slove Davidson, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Our world is changing rapidly and factors like urbanisation, changed agricultural practices and climate change are causing losses in butterfly diversity. It is therefore of importance to understand the source of their diversity. Given the remarkable diversity of herbivorous insects compared to their non-herbivorous sister groups, changes in host use have been implicated as a promoter of speciation. This thesis looks at geographical aspects of host range evolution and the plasticity of host us...

  1. Monitoring of the eggs of the Karkloof blue butterfly, Orachrysops ariadne, for its conservation management

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Adrian J.; Louw, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    The Endangered Orachrysops ariadne (Butler 1898) (Karkloof blue butterfly) is endemic to the Endangered Moist Midlands Grassland in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and is extant at four sites. The results from the monitoring of the eggs laid by O. ariadne in a grassland area that is frequently burnt by poor rural people to ensure that palatable grass is available to their livestock, suggested the implementation of management interventions (fencing and firebreak burning) to prevent the local exti...

  2. Butterfly, seedling, sapling and tree diversity and composition in a fire-affected Bornean rainforest

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, D. F. R.; Priadjati, A.; Suryokusumo, B. K.; Menken, S. B. J.

    2006-01-01

    Fire-affected forests are becoming an increasingly important component of tropical landscapes. The impact of wildfires on rainforest communities is, however, poorly understood. In this study the density, species richness and community composition of seedlings, saplings, trees and butterflies were assessed in unburned and burned forest following the 1997/98 El Nino Southern Oscillation burn event in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. More than half a year after the fires, sapling and tree densities i...

  3. Shotgun assembly of the complete mitochondrial genome of the neotropical cracker butterfly Hamadryas epinome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cally, Sébastien; Lhuillier, Emeline; Iribar, Amaia; Garzón-Orduña, Ivonne; Coissac, Eric; Murienne, Jérôme

    2014-10-16

    Abstract The complete mitochondrial genome of the cracker butterfly Hamadryas epinome (C. Felder and R. Felder, 1867) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Biblidinae) has been sequenced using a genome-skimming approach on an Illumina Hiseq 2000 platform. The mitochondrial genome of H. epinome was determined to be 15,207?bp long and presents an organization similar to other Ditrysia mitogenomes. A non-coding poly-AT region of uncertain length is present at position 6180. PMID:25319307

  4. Hydro-acoustic excitation at low frequencies of industrial pipe systems by cavitating butterfly valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavitating valves induce important vibrations at low frequencies in pipe systems. In this note a model is developed in order to characterize the hydro-acoustic behavior of the cavitating valves. This model is based on the transfer matrix theory. This theory can be deduced from the linearization of the Navier-Stokes equations. The experimental identification and validation of the model is made by testing a cavitating butterfly valve. (author). 5 figs., 7 refs

  5. Butterfly Catastrophe for Fronts in a Three-Component Reaction-Diffusion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirilus-Bruckner, Martina; Doelman, Arjen; van Heijster, Peter; Rademacher, Jens D. M.

    2015-02-01

    We study the dynamics of front solutions in a three-component reaction-diffusion system via a combination of geometric singular perturbation theory, Evans function analysis, and center manifold reduction. The reduced system exhibits a surprisingly complicated bifurcation structure including a butterfly catastrophe. Our results shed light on numerically observed accelerations and oscillations and pave the way for the analysis of front interactions in a parameter regime where the essential spectrum of a single front approaches the imaginary axis asymptotically.

  6. Trail Marking by Caterpillars of the Silverspot Butterfly Dione Juno Huascuma

    OpenAIRE

    Pescador-rubio, Alfonso; Stanford-camargo, Sergio G.; Pa?ez-gerardo, Luis E.; Rami?rez-reyes, Alberto J.; Ibarra-jime?nez, Rene? A.; Fitzgerald, Terrence D.

    2011-01-01

    A pheromone is implicated in the trail marking behavior of caterpillars of the nymphalid silverspot butterfly, Dione juno huascuma (Reakirt) (Lepidoptera: Heliconiinae) that feed gregariously on Passiflora (Malpighiales: Passifloraceae) vines in Mexico. Although they mark pathways leading from one feeding site to another with silk, this study shows that the silk was neither adequate nor necessary to elicit trail following behavior. Caterpillars marked trails with a long-lived pheromone that w...

  7. Grain boundaries and coincidence site lattices in the corneal nanonipple structure of the Mourning Cloak butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ken C.; Erb, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    In this study the highly ordered corneal nanonipple structure observed on the Mourning Cloak butterfly (Nymphalis antiopa) is analyzed with a particular emphasis on the high-angle grain-boundary-like defects that are observed between individual nanonipple crystals. It is shown that these grain boundaries are generated by rows of topological coordination defects, which create very specific misorientations between adjacent crystals. These specific orientations form coincidence site lattices, wh...

  8. Compounded effects of climate change and habitat alteration shift patterns of butterfly diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Forister, Matthew L.; Mccall, Andrew C.; Sanders, Nathan J.; Fordyce, James A.; Thorne, James H.; O’brien, Joshua; Waetjen, David P.; Shapiro, Arthur M.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change and habitat destruction have been linked to global declines in vertebrate biodiversity, including mammals, amphibians, birds, and fishes. However, invertebrates make up the vast majority of global species richness, and the combined effects of climate change and land use on invertebrates remain poorly understood. Here we present 35 years of data on 159 species of butterflies from 10 sites along an elevational gradient spanning 0–2,775 m in a biodiversity hotspot, the Sierra Ne...

  9. Butterflies (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea) of the "Baixada Santista" region, coastal São Paulo, southeastern Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ronaldo Bastos, Francini; Marcelo, Duarte; Olaf Hermann Hendrik, Mielke; Astrid, Caldas; André Victor Lucci, Freitas.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Borboletas (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea e Hesperioidea) da região da Baixada Santista, litoral de São Paulo (SE Brasil). Uma lista com 538 espécies de borboletas registradas na Baixada Santista é apresentada. Foram seguidos os protocolos amostrais padronizados (i.e. redes entomológicas). Armadilhas c [...] om iscas foram instaladas para coleta de espécies frugívoras. Dados de literatura e coleções entomológicas também foram considerados nas estimativas de riqueza de espécies. A riqueza de espécies registrada na Baixada Santista representa cerca de 16% da fauna de borboletas do Brasil, e 34% da fauna de borboletas do Estado de São Paulo. A presente lista contém um número consideravelmente alto de espécies em comparação com outras listas de biomas similares mais ao sul, como Blumenau em Santa Catarina, e Maquiné no Rio Grande do Sul. Abstract in english Butterflies (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea) of the "Baixada Santista" region, coastal São Paulo, southeastern Brazil. A list with 538 species of butterflies recorded in the Baixada Santista, São Paulo ( SE Brazil) is presented. Standard sampling protocols (i.e. with entomological nets) [...] were followed. Baited traps were installed for fruit feeding species. Data from the literature and entomological collections were also considered in the total estimated species richness. The species richness recorded in the Baixada Santista region represents about 16% of the Brazilian butterfly fauna, and 34% of the known butterfly fauna for the state of São Paulo. The present list contains an appreciably higher number of species in comparison to other lists from similar biomes farther south, such as Blumenau in Santa Catarina, and Maquiné in Rio Grande do Sul.

  10. Ten species in one: DNA barcoding reveals cryptic species in the neotropical skipper butterfly Astraptes fulgerator

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, Paul D. N.; Penton, Erin H.; Burns, John M.; Janzen, Daniel H.; Hallwachs, Winnie

    2004-01-01

    Astraptes fulgerator, first described in 1775, is a common and widely distributed neotropical skipper butterfly (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae). We combine 25 years of natural history observations in northwestern Costa Rica with morphological study and DNA barcoding of museum specimens to show that A. fulgerator is a complex of at least 10 species in this region. Largely sympatric, these taxa have mostly different caterpillar food plants, mostly distinctive caterpillars, and somewhat different eco...

  11. [Clinal variation in populations of the common blue butterfly Polyommatus icarus rott. (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Geographical trends in variation of wing pattern characters of the common blue butterfly Polyommatus icarus Rott. have been established. Peripheral populations were shown to be more rich and diverse phenotypically than those of the central parts of the species range. Phenotypic diversity of the populations increased from the center to the periphery of the range. The range boundaries were characterized by strong fluctuations of frequencies of wing pattern phenotypes. Hybrid areas were found on the part of the range examined. PMID:16161626

  12. Male-derived butterfly anti-aphrodisiac mediates induced indirect plant defense

    OpenAIRE

    Fatouros, N. E.; Broekgaarden, C.; Bukovinszkine-kiss, G.; Loon, J. J. A.; Mumm, R.; Huigens, M. E.; Dicke, M.; Hilker, M.

    2008-01-01

    Plants can recruit parasitic wasps in response to egg deposition by herbivorous insects–a sophisticated indirect plant defense mechanism. Oviposition by the Large Cabbage White butterfly Pieris brassicae on Brussels sprout plants induces phytochemical changes that arrest the egg parasitoid Trichogramma brassicae. Here, we report the identification of an elicitor of such an oviposition-induced plant response. Eliciting activity was present in accessory gland secretions released by mated fema...

  13. An expanded set of photoreceptors in the Eastern Pale Clouded Yellow butterfly, Colias erate

    OpenAIRE

    Pirih, Primoz?; Arikawa, Kentaro; Stavenga, Doekele G.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the spectral and polarisation sensitivities of photoreceptors of the butterfly Colias erate by using intracellular electrophysiological recordings and stimulation with light pulses. We developed a method of response waveform comparison (RWC) for evaluating the effective intensity of the light pulses. We identified one UV, four violet-blue, two green and two red photoreceptor classes. We estimated the peak wavelengths of four rhodopsins to be at about 360, 420, 460 and 560 nm. The ...

  14. Sculpted-multilayer optical effects in two species of Papilio butterfly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wing-scale microstructures associated with two species of Papilio butterfly are described and characterized. Despite close similarities in their structures, they do not exhibit analogous optical effects. With Papilio palinurus, deep modulations in its multilayering create bicolor reflectivity with strong polarization effects, and this leads to additive color mixing in certain visual systems. In contrast to this, Papilio ulysses features shallow multilayer modulation that produces monocolor reflectivity without significant polarization effects

  15. Sculpted-multilayer optical effects in two species of Papilio butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukusic, P; Sambles, R; Lawrence, C; Wakely, G

    2001-03-01

    The wing-scale microstructures associated with two species of Papilio butterfly are described and characterized. Despite close similarities in their structures, they do not exhibit analogous optical effects. With Papilio palinurus, deep modulations in its multilayering create bicolor reflectivity with strong polarization effects, and this leads to additive color mixing in certain visual systems. In contrast to this, Papilio ulysses features shallow multilayer modulation that produces monocolor reflectivity without significant polarization effects. PMID:18357096

  16. Light-Induced Hofstadter's Butterfly Spectrum of Ultracold Atoms on the Two-Dimensional Kagomé Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the energy spectrum of ultracold atoms on the two-dimensional Kagomé optical lattice under an effective magnetic field, which can be realized with laser beams. We derive the generalized Harper's equations from the Schrödinger equation. The energy spectrum with a fractal band structure is obtained by numerically solving the generalized Harper's equations. We analyze the properties of the Hofstadter's butterfly spectrum and discuss its observability

  17. The biological impacts of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the pale grass blue butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    Hiyama, Atsuki; Nohara, Chiyo; Kinjo, Seira; Taira, Wataru; Gima, Shinichi; Tanahara, Akira; Otaki, Joji M.

    2012-01-01

    The collapse of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant caused a massive release of radioactive materials to the environment. A prompt and reliable system for evaluating the biological impacts of this accident on animals has not been available. Here we show that the accident caused physiological and genetic damage to the pale grass blue Zizeeria maha, a common lycaenid butterfly in Japan. We collected the first-voltine adults in the Fukushima area in May 2011, some of which showed relative...

  18. SPECIFIC MANAGEMENT AND LEADING METHODS APPLIED TO BUTTERFLY TOURISM FOR 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Alecu, Eugenia; Ionita?, Simona Mihaela; Bratosin, Aurelian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper are explained the most important management elements for managers and employees of a tour operator agency. The study showed in a concrete and realistic manner how a manager of a tour operator agency can lead, control, predict and determine the prospects utilizing a specific management method called dashboard. Given the competition in the field of tourism, Butterfly Tourism is trying to manage its business in a professional manner and offer attractive packages and favorable price...

  19. Identification of Butterfly (Lepidoptera; Rhopalocera Fauna of Gokçeada and Bozcaada, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Okyar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the butterflies of Gökçeada and Bozcaada in Turkey. As a result, a total of 61 Lepidoptera species in the two islands was recorded. Of these, species 45 were found in Gökçeada and 16 species were found in Bozcaada. Additionally, it was appeared that 13 species for Gökçeada and all of the 16 species for Bozcaada were the first records.

  20. Identification of Butterfly (Lepidoptera; Rhopalocera) Fauna of Gokçeada and Bozcaada, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Okyar, Z.; Aktac, N.

    2006-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the butterflies of Gökçeada and Bozcaada in Turkey. As a result, a total of 61 Lepidoptera species in the two islands was recorded. Of these, species 45 were found in Gökçeada and 16 species were found in Bozcaada. Additionally, it was appeared that 13 species for Gökçeada and all of the 16 species for Bozcaada were the first records.

  1. Wnt signaling underlies evolution and development of the butterfly wing pattern symmetry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Arnaud; Reed, Robert D

    2014-11-15

    Most butterfly wing patterns are proposed to be derived from a set of conserved pattern elements known as symmetry systems. Symmetry systems are so-named because they are often associated with parallel color stripes mirrored around linear organizing centers that run between the anterior and posterior wing margins. Even though the symmetry systems are the most prominent and diverse wing pattern elements, their study has been confounded by a lack of knowledge regarding the molecular basis of their development, as well as the difficulty of drawing pattern homologies across species with highly derived wing patterns. Here we present the first molecular characterization of symmetry system development by showing that WntA expression is consistently associated with the major basal, discal, central, and external symmetry system patterns of nymphalid butterflies. Pharmacological manipulations of signaling gradients using heparin and dextran sulfate showed that pattern organizing centers correspond precisely with WntA, wingless, Wnt6, and Wnt10 expression patterns, thus suggesting a role for Wnt signaling in color pattern induction. Importantly, this model is supported by recent genetic and population genomic work identifying WntA as the causative locus underlying wing pattern variation within several butterfly species. By comparing the expression of WntA between nymphalid butterflies representing a range of prototypical symmetry systems, slightly deviated symmetry systems, and highly derived wing patterns, we were able to infer symmetry system homologies in several challenging cases. Our work illustrates how highly divergent morphologies can be derived from modifications to a common ground plan across both micro- and macro-evolutionary time scales. PMID:25196151

  2. Brain composition in Godyris zavaleta, a diurnal butterfly, Reflects an increased reliance on olfactory information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stephen H; Ott, Swidbert R

    2015-04-15

    Interspecific comparisons of brain structure can inform our functional understanding of brain regions, identify adaptations to species-specific ecologies, and explore what constrains adaptive changes in brain structure, and coevolution between functionally related structures. The value of such comparisons is enhanced when the species considered have known ecological differences. The Lepidoptera have long been a favored model in evolutionary biology, but to date descriptions of brain anatomy have largely focused on a few commonly used neurobiological model species. We describe the brain of Godyris zavaleta (Ithomiinae), a member of a subfamily of Neotropical butterflies with enhanced reliance on olfactory information. We demonstrate for the first time the presence of sexually dimorphic glomeruli within a distinct macroglomerular complex (MGC) in the antennal lobe of a diurnal butterfly. This presents a striking convergence with the well-known moth MGC, prompting a discussion of the potential mechanisms behind the independent evolution of specialized glomeruli. Interspecific analyses across four Lepidoptera further show that the relative size of sensory neuropils closely mirror interspecific variation in sensory ecology, with G. zavaleta displaying levels of sensory investment intermediate between the diurnal monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), which invests heavily in visual neuropil, and night-flying moths, which invest more in olfactory neuropil. We identify several traits that distinguish butterflies from moths, and several that distinguish D. plexippus and G. zavaleta. Our results illustrate that ecological selection pressures mold the structure of invertebrate brains, and exemplify how comparative analyses across ecologically divergent species can illuminate the functional significance of variation in brain structure. J. Comp. Neurol. 523:869-891, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25400217

  3. Structural Safety Analysis Based on Seismic Service Conditions for Butterfly Valves in a Nuclear Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Sang-Uk Han; Dae-Gyun Ahn; Myeong-Gon Lee; Kwon-Hee Lee; Seung-Ho Han

    2014-01-01

    The structural integrity of valves that are used to control cooling waters in the primary coolant loop that prevents boiling within the reactor in a nuclear power plant must be capable of withstanding earthquakes or other dangerous situations. In this study, numerical analyses using a finite element method, that is, static and dynamic analyses according to the rigid or flexible characteristics of the dynamic properties of a 200A butterfly valve, were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. An e...

  4. Noise caused by cavitating Butterfly and Monovar Valves. Effects of cavitation on acoustic sources; numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study of the effects of cavitation was carried out through an analysis of cavitating Butterfly and Monovar valves. For each variation case, the nature of the dominant source is determined in relation to frequency. Once the parameters of the cavitation zone are identified, a three-zone model is used in order to pinpoint the acoustic sources with cavitation. In order to determine acoustic sources, we present a numerical simulation using a bubbles population. (authors)

  5. Noise caused by cavitating Butterfly and Monovar Valves. Effects of cavitation on acoustic sources; numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassis, H. [Enit, Belvedere - Tunis (Tunisia); Lauro, J.F.; Boyer, A.; Dueymes, E.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study of the effects of cavitation was carried out through an analysis of cavitating Butterfly and Monovar valves. For each variation case, the nature of the dominant source is determined in relation to frequency. Once the parameters of the cavitation zone are identified, a three-zone model is used in order to pinpoint the acoustic sources with cavitation. In order to determine acoustic sources, we present a numerical simulation using a bubbles population. (authors). 13 refs.

  6. Life-history consequenses of host plant choice in the comma butterfly

    OpenAIRE

    So?derlind, Lina

    2012-01-01

    There is much evidence that herbivory is a key innovation for the tremendous success of insect. In this thesis I have investigated different aspects of host plant utilization and phenotypic plasticity using the polyphagous comma butterfly, Polygonia c-album. Even though external conditions affect a phenotypic plastic response, the outcome is often influenced by a genetic background which may differ among populations. In Paper I we suspected the genetic background to seasonal polymorphism to b...

  7. Functional morphology of the feeding apparatus and evolution of proboscis length in metalmark butterflies (Lepidoptera: Riodinidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Anne-sophie Bauder, Julia; Handschuh, Stephan; Metscher, Brian Douglas; Krenn, Harald Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of the anatomical costs of extremely long proboscid mouthparts can contribute to the understanding of the evolution of form and function in the context of insect feeding behaviour. An integrative analysis of expenses relating to an exceptionally long proboscis in butterflies includes all organs involved in fluid feeding, such as the proboscis plus its musculature, sensilla, and food canal, as well as organs for proboscis movements and the suction pump for fluid uptake. In the pr...

  8. “Darwin’s butterflies”? DNA barcoding and the radiation of the endemic Caribbean butterfly genus Calisto (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Satyrinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Sourakov

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The genus Calisto Hübner, 1823 is the only member of the diverse, global subfamily Satyrinae found in the West Indies, and by far the richest endemic Caribbean butterfly radiation. Calisto species occupy an extremely diverse array of habitats, suggestive of adaptive radiation on the scale of other classic examples such as the Galápagos or Darwin’s finches. However, a reliable species classification is a key requisite before further evolutionary or ecological research. An analysis of 111 DNA ‘barcodes’ (655 bp of the mitochondrial gene COI from 29 putative Calisto species represented by 31 putative taxa was therefore conducted to elucidate taxonomic relationships among these often highly cryptic and confusing taxa. The sympatric, morphologically and ecologically similar taxa C. confusa Lathy, 1899 and C. confusa debarriera Clench, 1943 proved to be extremely divergent, and we therefore recognize Calisto debarriera stat. n. as a distinct species, with Calisto neiba Schwartz et Gali, 1984 as a junior synonym syn. n. Species status of certain allopatric, morphologically similar sister species has been confirmed: Calisto hysius (Godart, 1824 (including its subspecies C. hysius aleucosticha Correa et Schwartz, 1986, stat. n., and its former subspecies C. batesi Michener, 1943 showed a high degree of divergence (above 6% and should be considered separate species. Calisto lyceius Bates, 1935/C. crypta Gali, 1985/C. franciscoi Gali, 1985 complex, also showed a high degree of divergence (above 6%, confirming the species status of these taxa. In contrast, our data suggest that the Calisto grannus Bates, 1939 species complex (including Calisto grannus dilemma González, 1987, C. grannus amazona González, 1987, stat. n., C. grannus micrommata Schwartz et Gali, 1984, stat. n., C. grannus dystacta González, 1987, stat. n., C. grannus phoinix González, 1987, stat. n., C. grannus sommeri Schwartz et Gali, 1984, stat. n., and C. grannus micheneri Clench, 1944, stat. n. should be treated as a single polytypic species, as genetic divergence among sampled populations representing these taxa is low (and stable morphological apomorphies are absent. A widely-distributed pest of sugar cane, Calisto pulchella Lathy, 1899 showed higher diversification among isolated populations (3.5% than expected, hence supporting former separation of this species into two taxa (pulchella and darlingtoni Clench, 1943, of which the latter might prove to be a separate species rather than subspecies. The taxonomic revisions presented here result in Calisto now containing 34 species and 17 subspecies. Three species endemic to islands other than Hispaniola appear to be derived lineages of various Hispaniolan clades, indicating ancient dispersal events from Hispaniola to Puerto Rico, Cuba, and Jamaica. Overall, the degree of intrageneric and intraspecific divergence within Calisto suggests a long and continuous diversification period of 4–8 Myr. The maximum divergence within the genus (ca. 13.3% is almost equivalent to the maximum divergence of Calisto from the distant pronophiline relative Auca Hayward, 1953 from the southern Andes (14.1% and from the presumed closest relative Eretris Thieme, 1905 (14.4%, suggesting that the genus began to diversify soon after its split from its continental sister taxon. In general, this ‘barcode’ divergence corresponds to the high degree of morphological and ecological variation found among major lineages within the genus.

  9. Butterfly scales as bionic templates for complex ordered nanophotonic materials: A pathway to biomimetic plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakši?, Zoran; Panteli?, Dejan; Sarajli?, Milija; Savi?-Ševi?, Svetlana; Matovi?, Jovan; Jelenkovi?, Branislav; Vasiljevi?-Radovi?, Dana; ?ur?i?, Sre?ko; Vukovi?, Slobodan; Pavlovi?, Vladimir; Buha, Jelena; La?kovi?, Vesna; Labudovi?-Borovi?, Milica; ?ur?i?, Božidar

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we propose a possible use of butterfly scales as templates for ordered 2D or 3D nanophotonic materials, with complexity not easily reproducible by conventional micro/nanofabrication methods. Functionalization through laminar nanocompositing is utilized to impart novel properties to the biological scaffold. An extremely wide variability of butterfly scale forms, shapes, sizes and fine structures is observed in nature, many of them already possessing peculiar optical properties. Their nanophotonic functionalization ensures a large choice of forms and functions, including enhanced light localization, light and plasmon waveguiding and general metamaterial behavior, to mention a few. We show that one is able to achieve a combination of plasmonics and bionics, resulting in functionalities seldom if ever met in nature. As an illustration we have analyzed the photonic properties of the nanostructured scales on the wings of Purple Emperor butterflies Apatura ilia, Apatura iris and Sasakia charonda. Their intricate nanometer-sized structures produce remarkable ultraviolet-blue iridescence, spectrally and directionally narrow. We present our analysis of their plasmonic/nanophotonic functionalization including preliminary calculations and initial experimental results. As a simple example, we used radiofrequent sputtering to produce nanoaperture-based plasmonic structures at a fraction of the cost and necessary engineering efforts compared to the conventional top-down methods. We conclude that the described pathway to biomimetic plasmonics offers potentials for significant expansion of the nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic material toolbox.

  10. Fluid drag reduction and efficient self-cleaning with rice leaf and butterfly wing bioinspired surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Gregory D.; Bhushan, Bharat

    2013-08-01

    Researchers are continually inspired by living nature to solve complex challenges. For example, unique surface characteristics of rice leaves and butterfly wings combine the shark skin (anisotropic flow leading to low drag) and lotus leaf (superhydrophobic and self-cleaning) effects, producing the so-called rice and butterfly wing effect. In this paper, we present an overview of rice leaf and butterfly wing fluid drag and self-cleaning studies. In addition, we examine two other promising aquatic surfaces in nature known for such properties, including fish scales and shark skin. Morphology, drag, self-cleaning, contact angle, and contact angle hysteresis data are presented to understand the role of wettability, viscosity, and velocity. Liquid repellent coatings are utilized to recreate or combine various effects. Discussion is provided along with conceptual models describing the role of surface structures related to low drag, self-cleaning, and antifouling properties. Modeling provides design guidance when developing novel low drag and self-cleaning surfaces for applications in the medical, marine, and industrial fields.

  11. X-ray Tomography and Chemical Imaging within Butterfly Wing Scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rainbow like color of butterfly wings is associated with the internal and surface structures of the wing scales. While the photonic structure of the scales is believed to diffract specific lights at different angle, there is no adequate probe directly answering the 3-D structures with sufficient spatial resolution. The NSRRC nano-transmission x-ray microscope (nTXM) with tens nanometers spatial resolution is able to image biological specimens without artifacts usually introduced in sophisticated sample staining processes. With the intrinsic deep penetration of x-rays, the nTXM is capable of nondestructively investigating the internal structures of fragile and soft samples. In this study, we imaged the structure of butterfly wing scales in 3-D view with 60 nm spatial resolution. In addition, synchrotron-radiation-based Fourier transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy was employed to analyze the chemical components with spatial information of the butterfly wing scales. Based on the infrared spectral images, we suggest that the major components of scale structure were rich in protein and polysaccharide

  12. Pierisins and CARP-1: ADP-ribosylation of DNA by ARTCs in butterflies and shellfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae, and related species possess a previously unknown ADP-ribosylating toxin, guanine specific ADP-ribosyltransferase. This enzyme toxin, known as pierisin, consists of enzymatic N-terminal domain and receptor-binding C-terminal domain, or typical AB-toxin structure. Pierisin efficiently transfers an ADP-ribosyl moiety to the N(2) position of the guanine base of dsDNA. Receptors for pierisin are suggested to be the neutral glycosphingolipids, globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), and globotetraosylceramide (Gb4). This DNA-modifying toxin exhibits strong cytotoxicity and induces apoptosis in various human cell lines, which can be blocked by Bcl-2. Pierisin also produces detrimental effects on the eggs and larvae of the non-habitual parasitoids. In contrast, a natural parasitoid of the cabbage butterfly, Cotesia glomerata, was resistant to this toxin. The physiological role of pierisin in the butterfly is suggested to be a defense factor against parasitization by wasps. Other type of DNA ADP-ribosyltransferase is present in certain kinds of edible clams. For example, the CARP-1 protein found in Meretrix lamarckii consists of an enzymatic domain without a possible receptor-binding domain. Pierisin and CARP-1 are almost fully non-homologous at the amino acid sequence level, but other ADP-ribosyltransferases homologous to pierisin are present in different biological species such as eubacterium Streptomyces. Possible diverse physiological roles of the DNA ADP-ribosyltransferases are discussed. PMID:25033755

  13. Mysterious coloring: structural origin of color mixing for two breeds of Papilio butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Ying-Ying; Liu, Xiang-Yang

    2011-05-01

    The structural origin of the coloration mechanisms and related extraordinary optical properties of the wing scales of two breeds of Papilio butterflies, namely, Papilio ulysses and Papilio blumei, are explored. The precise ordered biophotonic nanostructures of the wing scales are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Despite their structural similarities, the two breeds of Papilio butterflies do not exhibit any analogy in their optical performances. When illuminated with UV-Vis light, P. ulysses gives rise to two reflection peaks: one is from concavities, and the other is from ridges. These two spectral peaks shift their positions under different illumination angles (normal and 45° incident light). In contrast, the spectra for the green scales of P. blumei give one broad reflection peak, and the peak remains the same under normal and 45° incident light. The optical microscopy images indicate that the cap-shaped concavities on P. blumei's wing scales generate an abnormal bicolor reflection with a strong polarization effect. Both of these two breeds of butterflies take advantage of color mixing strategy: the blue color of P. ulysses is mixed by the colors reflected from concavities and ridges; the green color of P. blumei is produced by the biocolor reflection from concavities. The differences of their coloration mixing mechanisms and optical performances are due to the variations of their nanostructures. The investigation of the color mixing mechanisms of these biologically photonic nanostructures may offer a convenient way for fabricating optical devices based on biomimicry. PMID:21643177

  14. Reward and non-reward learning of flower colours in the butterfly Byasa alcinous (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandori, Ikuo; Yamaki, Takafumi

    2012-09-01

    Learning plays an important role in food acquisition for a wide range of insects. To increase their foraging efficiency, flower-visiting insects may learn to associate floral cues with the presence (so-called reward learning) or the absence (so-called non-reward learning) of a reward. Reward learning whilst foraging for flowers has been demonstrated in many insect taxa, whilst non-reward learning in flower-visiting insects has been demonstrated only in honeybees, bumblebees and hawkmoths. This study examined both reward and non-reward learning abilities in the butterfly Byasa alcinous whilst foraging among artificial flowers of different colours. This butterfly showed both types of learning, although butterflies of both sexes learned faster via reward learning. In addition, females learned via reward learning faster than males. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first empirical data on the learning speed of both reward and non-reward learning in insects. We discuss the adaptive significance of a lower learning speed for non-reward learning when foraging on flowers.

  15. On-Chip Implementation of Pipeline Digit-Slicing Multiplier-Less Butterfly for Fast Fourier Transform Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan S. Algnabi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The need for wireless communication has driven the communication systems to high performance. However, the main bottleneck that affects the communication capability is the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, which is the core of most modulators. Approach: This study presented on-chip implementation of pipeline digit-slicing multiplier-less butterfly for FFT structure. The approach taken; in order to reduce computation complexity in butterfly, digit-slicing multiplierless single constant technique was utilized in the critical path of Radix-2 Decimation In Time (DIT FFT structure. The proposed design focused on the trade-off between the speed and active silicon area for the chip implementation. The new architecture was investigated and simulated with MATLAB software. The Verilog HDL code in Xilinx ISE environment was derived to describe the FFT Butterfly functionality and was downloaded to Virtex II FPGA board. Consequently, the Virtex-II FG456 Proto board was used to implement and test the design on the real hardware. Results: As a result, from the findings, the synthesis report indicates the maximum clock frequency of 549.75 MHz with the total equivalent gate count of 31,159 is a marked and significant improvement over Radix 2 FFT butterfly. In comparison with the conventional butterfly architecture, design that can only run at a maximum clock frequency of 198.987 MHz and the conventional multiplier can only run at a maximum clock frequency of 220.160 MHz, the proposed system exhibits better results. The resulting maximum clock frequency increases by about 276.28% for the FFT butterfly and about 277.06% for the multiplier. Conclusion: It can be concluded that on-chip implementation of pipeline digit-slicing multiplier-less butterfly for FFT structure is an enabler in solving problems that affect communications capability in FFT and possesses huge potentials for future related works and research areas.

  16. Characterisation and expression of microRNAs in developing wings of the neotropical butterfly Heliconius melpomene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathjen Tina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heliconius butterflies are an excellent system for studies of adaptive convergent and divergent phenotypic traits. Wing colour patterns are used as signals to both predators and potential mates and are inherited in a Mendelian manner. The underlying genetic mechanisms of pattern formation have been studied for many years and shed light on broad issues, such as the repeatability of evolution. In Heliconius melpomene, the yellow hindwing bar is controlled by the HmYb locus. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that have key roles in many biological processes, including development. miRNAs could act as regulators of genes involved in wing development, patterning and pigmentation. For this reason we characterised miRNAs in developing butterfly wings and examined differences in their expression between colour pattern races. Results We sequenced small RNA libraries from two colour pattern races and detected 142 Heliconius miRNAs with homology to others found in miRBase. Several highly abundant miRNAs were differentially represented in the libraries between colour pattern races. These candidates were tested further using Northern blots, showing that differences in expression were primarily due to developmental stage rather than colour pattern. Assembly of sequenced reads to the HmYb region identified hme-miR-193 and hme-miR-2788; located 2380 bp apart in an intergenic region. These two miRNAs are expressed in wings and show an upregulation between 24 and 72 hours post-pupation, indicating a potential role in butterfly wing development. A search for miRNAs in all available H. melpomene BAC sequences (~ 2.5 Mb did not reveal any other miRNAs and no novel miRNAs were predicted. Conclusions Here we describe the first butterfly miRNAs and characterise their expression in developing wings. Some show differences in expression across developing pupal stages and may have important functions in butterfly wing development. Two miRNAs were located in the HmYb region and were expressed in developing pupal wings. Future work will examine the expression of these miRNAs in different colour pattern races and identify miRNA targets among wing patterning genes.

  17. Checkerspot Butterflies as Charismatic Media Stars: Getting the Word Out From the Grassroots on Global Nitrogen Overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, S. B.

    2007-12-01

    Getting the word out to the general public about the global "nitrogen overdose" has proved challenging because of the complexities of the global nitrogen cycle and the insidious nature of cumulative effects on ecosystems. This presentation recounts successful media outreach efforts to bring attention to the nitrogen issue, using the threatened Bay checkerspot butterfly as a "charismatic" focal species and victim. The butterfly is threatened by atmospheric nitrogen deposition that enriches nutrient poor soils derived from serpentinite rock an allows nitrophilous grasses to invade and displace the dazzling wildflower displays that the butterfly depends on. Over the past decade, public and media outreach have resulted in numerous articles in local, regional, and national print media, and extensive TV and radio coverage of the reintroduction of the butterfly into restored habitat in 2007. The grassroots media strategy has several elements of success, including: 1) the public's (and journalists') love of butterflies and wildflowers; 2) field tours to dramatically illustrate the effects of N-deposition; 3) time-tested soundbites, humor, and amiable relationships with journalists; 4) careful fact checking; and 5) political outreach. Through these efforts, journalists effectively told relatively complex stories in creative approachable ways that have educated the public about the nitrogen pollution issue.

  18. The role of power line rights-of-way as an alternative habitat for declined mire butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensu, Terhi; Komonen, Atte; Hiltula, Outi; Päivinen, Jussi; Saari, Veli; Kotiaho, Janne S

    2011-10-01

    Habitat loss is one of the greatest threats for biodiversity. In Finland, two thirds of natural mires have been drained for silviculture, which transforms open wetlands into dense forests. However, vegetation management of power line rights-of-way (ROW) maintain the drained mires as open areas. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the power line ROW vegetation management on butterfly abundance, species richness and community structure by comparing the managed power line ROWs to unmanaged drained control sites and to natural mires. The species richness or abundance of mire butterflies did not differ between the power line ROWs and natural mires. In contrast, both species richness and abundance of butterflies was low on the unmanaged control sites. Tree canopy cover had a negative effect on mire butterflies and this is most likely related to changes in microclimate. The results indicate that the active vegetation removal in the power line ROWs maintain alternative habitats for mire butterflies; yet, the power line ROWs cannot substitute the natural mires. PMID:21664036

  19. Synthesis of naturally cross-linked polycrystalline ZrO2 hollow nanowires using butterfly as templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? Naturally cross-linked ZrO2 nanotubes with ?2.4 ?m in length, ?35 nm in diameter and ?12 nm in wall thickness was synthesized via the selection of suitable butterfly bio-templates followed by heat processing. ? The contractions, which are main defects of the former hard-template method based on butterflies, are well controlled with the help of the surface tension effect. ? The achieved hollow ZrO2 nanowires suggest a new optional approach that uses bio-templates in fabricating and designing nano systems. - Abstract: Butterfly wing skeleton is a widely used hard-template in recent years for fabricating photonic crystal structures. However, the smallest construction units for the most species of butterflies are commonly larger than ?50 nm, which greatly hinders their applications in designing much smaller functional parts down to real “nano scale”. This work indicates, however, that hollow ZrO2 nanowires with ?2.4 ?m in length, ?35 nm in diameter and ?12 nm in wall thickness can be synthesized via the selection of suitable butterfly bio-templates followed by heat processing. Especially, the successful fabrication of these naturally cross-linked ZrO2 nanotubes suggests a new optional approach in fabricating assembled nano systems.

  20. Synthesis of naturally cross-linked polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} hollow nanowires using butterfly as templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yu, E-mail: chenyu_8323@csu.edu.cn [School of Physics Science and Electronics Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Gu Jiajun, E-mail: gujiajun@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhu Shenmin; Su Huilan [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang Di, E-mail: zhangdi@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Feng Chuanliang [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhuang Leyan [Measurement Center of Anti-Counterfeiting Technical Products, Shanghai (China)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Naturally cross-linked ZrO{sub 2} nanotubes with {approx}2.4 {mu}m in length, {approx}35 nm in diameter and {approx}12 nm in wall thickness was synthesized via the selection of suitable butterfly bio-templates followed by heat processing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contractions, which are main defects of the former hard-template method based on butterflies, are well controlled with the help of the surface tension effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The achieved hollow ZrO{sub 2} nanowires suggest a new optional approach that uses bio-templates in fabricating and designing nano systems. - Abstract: Butterfly wing skeleton is a widely used hard-template in recent years for fabricating photonic crystal structures. However, the smallest construction units for the most species of butterflies are commonly larger than {approx}50 nm, which greatly hinders their applications in designing much smaller functional parts down to real 'nano scale'. This work indicates, however, that hollow ZrO{sub 2} nanowires with {approx}2.4 {mu}m in length, {approx}35 nm in diameter and {approx}12 nm in wall thickness can be synthesized via the selection of suitable butterfly bio-templates followed by heat processing. Especially, the successful fabrication of these naturally cross-linked ZrO{sub 2} nanotubes suggests a new optional approach in fabricating assembled nano systems.

  1. HSP70 expression in the copper butterfly Lycaena tityrus across altitudes and temperatures.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karl, I.; SØrensen, Jesper Givskov

    2009-01-01

    The ability to express heat-shock proteins (HSP) under thermal stress is an essential mechanism for ectotherms to cope with unfavourable conditions. In this study, we investigate if Copper butterflies originating from different altitudes and/or being exposed to different rearing and induction temperatures show differences in HSP70 expression. HSP70 expression increased substantially at the higher rearing temperature in low-altitude butterflies, which might represent an adaptation to occasionally occurring heat spells. On the other hand, high-altitude butterflies showed much less plasticity in response to rearing temperatures, and overall seem to rely more on genetically fixed thermal stress resistance. Whether the latter indicates a higher vulnerability of high-altitude populations to global warming needs further investigation. HSP70 expression increased with both colder and warmer induction temperatures.

  2. Butterfly Species Diversity of Bir-Billing Area of Dhauladhar Range of Western Himalayas in Northern India

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeeta Chandel; Vijay Kumar; Bhagwati Prashad Sharma; Reetu Patiyal

    2013-01-01

    The present study of butterfly species diversity was carried out in the Bir-Biling area of Dhauladhar Range of the Western Himalayas in Northern India. The study was done since April 2012 to March 2013, throughout the year during the routine field visits to Bir-Billing. A total of 50 butterfly species were recorded from the study areas which belonge to five families i.e. Nymphalidae, Pieridae, Papilionidae, Lycaenidae and Hesperiidae and 39 genera. The Nymphalidae family was the most dominant...

  3. COLOMBIAN BUTTERFLIES (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONOIDEA) ATTRACTED TO TREE EXUDATES / MARIPOSAS COLOMBIANAS ATRAÍDAS POR EXUDACIONES DE CORTEZAS DE ÁRBOLES (LEPIDOPTERA: PAPILIONOIDEA)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Julián A., Salazar-E..

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish En este trabajo se publica una lista preliminar de especies de mariposas frugívoras, que se alimentan de exudados segregados por las cortezas de siete especies de árboles existentes en varias regiones de Colombia. Adicionalmente, se suministran datos de los tipos de secreciones, composición, hábitos [...] de las mariposas y de otros insectos que comparten dicho fenómeno. Abstract in english A preliminary checklist is presented of fruit-feeding butterflies that visit the exudation of seven species of trees observed in several zones of Colombia. Additional data on secretion types, composition, butterfly behavior and the other insects sharing the same phenomena are included. [...

  4. Butterfly Species Diversity of Bir-Billing Area of Dhauladhar Range of Western Himalayas in Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Chandel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study of butterfly species diversity was carried out in the Bir-Biling area of Dhauladhar Range of the Western Himalayas in Northern India. The study was done since April 2012 to March 2013, throughout the year during the routine field visits to Bir-Billing. A total of 50 butterfly species were recorded from the study areas which belonge to five families i.e. Nymphalidae, Pieridae, Papilionidae, Lycaenidae and Hesperiidae and 39 genera. The Nymphalidae family was the most dominant family in the study area having 32 species and followed by Lycaenidae family with 7 species.

  5. Does skipping a meal matter to a butterfly's appearance? Effects of larval food stress on wing morphology and color in monarch butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Haley; Solensky, Michelle J; Satterfield, Dara A; Davis, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    In animals with complex life cycles, all resources needed to form adult tissues are procured at the larval stage. For butterflies, the proper development of wings involves synthesizing tissue during metamorphosis based on the raw materials obtained by larvae. Similarly, manufacture of pigment for wing scales also requires resources acquired by larvae. We conducted an experiment to test the effects of food deprivation in the larval stage on multiple measures of adult wing morphology and coloration of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus), a species in which long-distance migration makes flight efficiency critical. In a captive setting, we restricted food (milkweed) from late-stage larvae for either 24 hrs or 48 hrs, then after metamorphosis we used image analysis methods to measure forewing surface area and elongation (length/width), which are both important for migration. We also measured the brightness of orange pigment and the intensity of black on the wing. There were correlations between several wing features, including an unexpected association between wing elongation and melanism, which will require further study to fully understand. The clearest effect of food restriction was a reduction in adult wing size in the high stress group (by approximately 2%). Patterns observed for other wing traits were ambiguous: monarchs in the low stress group (but not the high) had less elongated and paler orange pigmentation. There was no effect on wing melanism. Although some patterns obtained in this study were unclear, our results concerning wing size have direct bearing on the monarch migration. We show that if milkweed is limited for monarch larvae, their wings become stunted, which could ultimately result in lower migration success. PMID:24695643

  6. EST analysis of male accessory glands from Heliconius butterflies with divergent mating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Richard G

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heliconius butterflies possess a remarkable diversity of phenotypes, physiologies, and behaviors that has long distinguished this genus as a focal taxon in ecological and evolutionary research. Recently Heliconius has also emerged as a model system for using genomic methods to investigate the causes and consequences of biological diversity. One notable aspect of Heliconius diversity is a dichotomy in mating systems which provides an unusual opportunity to investigate the relationship between sexual selection and the evolution of reproductive proteins. As a first step in pursuing this research, we report the generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs from the male accessory gland of H. erato and H. melpomene, species representative of the two mating systems present in the genus Heliconius. Results We successfully sequenced 933 ESTs clustering into 371 unigenes from H. erato and 1033 ESTs clustering into 340 unigenes from H. melpomene. Results from the two species were very similar. Approximately a third of the unigenes showed no significant BLAST similarity (E-value -5 to sequences in GenBank's non-redundant databases, indicating that a large proportion of novel genes are expressed in Heliconius male accessory glands. In both species only a third of accessory gland unigenes were also found among genes expressed in wing tissue. About 25% of unigenes from both species encoded secreted proteins. This includes three groups of highly abundant unigenes encoding repetitive proteins considered to be candidate seminal fluid proteins; proteins encoded by one of these groups were detected in H. erato spermatophores. Conclusion This collection of ESTs will serve as the foundation for the future identification and evolutionary analysis of male reproductive proteins in Heliconius butterflies. These data also represent a significant advance in the rapidly growing collection of genomic resources available in Heliconius butterflies. As such, they substantially enhance this taxon as a model system for investigating questions of ecological, phenotypic, and genomic diversity.

  7. Testing species distribution models across space and time: high latitude butterflies and recent warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Anne; LeRoux, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To quantify whether species distribution models (SDMs) can reliably forecast species distributions under observed climate change. In particular, to test whether the predictive ability of SDMs depends on species traits or the inclusion of land cover and soil type, and whether distributional changes at expanding range margins can be predicted accurately. Location. Finland. Methods. Using 10-km resolution butterfly atlas data from two periods, 1992–1999 (t1) and 2002–2009 (t2), with a significant between-period temperature increase, we modelled the effects of climatic warming on butterfly distributions with boosted regression trees (BRTs) and generalized additive models (GAMs). We evaluated model performance by using the split-sample approach with data from t1 ("non-independent validation"), and then compared model projections based on data from t1 with species’ observed distributions in t2 ("independent validation"). We compared climate-only SDMs to SDMs including land cover, soil type, or both. Finally,we related model performance to species traits and compared observed and predicted distributional shifts at northern range margins. Results. SDMs showed fair to good model fits when modelling butterfly distributions under climate change. Model performance was lower with independent compared to non-independent validation and improved when land cover and soil type variables were included, compared to climate-only models. SDMs performed less well for highly mobile species and for species with long flight seasons and large ranges. When forecasting changes at northern range margins, correlations between observed and predicted range shifts were predominantly low. Main conclusions. SDMs accurately describe current distributions of most species, yet their performance varies with species traits and the inclusion of land cover and soil type variables. Moreover, their ability to predict range shifts under climate change is limited, especially at the expanding edge. More tests with independent validations are needed to fully understand the predictive potential of SDMs across taxa and biomes.

  8. Life history of the Glanville fritillary butterfly in fragmented versus continuous landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplouy, Anne; Ikonen, Suvi; Hanski, Ilkka

    2013-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation threaten the long-term viability of innumerable species of plants and animals. At the same time, habitat fragmentation may impose strong natural selection and lead to evolution of life histories with possible consequences for demographic dynamics. The Baltic populations of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) inhabit regions with highly fragmented habitat (networks of small dry meadows) as well as regions with extensive continuous habitat (calcareous alvar grasslands). Here, we report the results of common garden studies on butterflies originating from two highly fragmented landscapes (FL) in Finland and Sweden and from two continuous landscapes (CL) in Sweden and Estonia, conducted in a large outdoor cage (32 by 26 m) and in the laboratory. We investigated a comprehensive set of 51 life-history traits, including measures of larval growth and development, flight performance, and adult reproductive behavior. Seventeen of the 51 traits showed a significant difference between fragmented versus CL. Most notably, the growth rate of postdiapause larvae and several measures of flight capacity, including flight metabolic rate, were higher in butterflies from fragmented than CL. Females from CL had shorter intervals between consecutive egg clutches and somewhat higher life-time egg production, but shorter longevity, than females from FL. These results are likely to reflect the constant opportunities for oviposition in females living in continuous habitats, while the more dispersive females from FL allocate more resources to dispersal capacity at the cost of egg maturation rate. This study supports theoretical predictions about small population sizes and high rate of population turnover in fragmented habitats selecting for increased rate of dispersal, but the results also indicate that many other life-history traits apart from dispersal are affected by the degree of habitat fragmentation. PMID:24455144

  9. Monitoring of the eggs of the Karkloof blue butterfly, Orachrysops ariadne, for its conservation management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian J. Armstrong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Endangered Orachrysops ariadne (Butler 1898 (Karkloof blue butterfly is endemic to the Endangered Moist Midlands Grassland in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, and is extant at four sites. The results from the monitoring of the eggs laid by O. ariadne in a grassland area that is frequently burnt by poor rural people to ensure that palatable grass is available to their livestock, suggested the implementation of management interventions (fencing and firebreak burning to prevent the local extinction of the butterfly. The number of eggs at the monitoring site declined dramatically between 2002 and 2003 and fluctuated after the management interventions were initiated properly in 2008, but had nearly reached the target number of 250 by 2013. An index count method for the monitoring of O. ariadne eggs at the other three known colonies, where plant invasion rather than uncontrolled burning is a major threat, was developed and shown to be efficient with regard to time relative to the number of eggs sampled. The host ant Camponotus natalensis (F. Smith 1858 (Natal sugar ant was found to be present in all the host-plant patches at one colony site, indicating that all host-plant patches are likely to be breeding areas for the butterfly. Invasive plant control at and appropriate burning of the habitat of O. ariadne should assist in ensuring the survival of these colonies. Conservation implications: Adaptive monitoring and management of threatened endemic invertebrates and their habitats may be crucial for their continued survival. The development of efficient methods for the monitoring of such species is required where resources are limited, as threats to the species may cause sudden and irreversible declines in population size.

  10. Toward reconstructing the evolution of advanced moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera: Ditrysia: an initial molecular study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hausmann Axel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mega-diverse insect order Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths; 165,000 described species, deeper relationships are little understood within the clade Ditrysia, to which 98% of the species belong. To begin addressing this problem, we tested the ability of five protein-coding nuclear genes (6.7 kb total, and character subsets therein, to resolve relationships among 123 species representing 27 (of 33 superfamilies and 55 (of 100 families of Ditrysia under maximum likelihood analysis. Results Our trees show broad concordance with previous morphological hypotheses of ditrysian phylogeny, although most relationships among superfamilies are weakly supported. There are also notable surprises, such as a consistently closer relationship of Pyraloidea than of butterflies to most Macrolepidoptera. Monophyly is significantly rejected by one or more character sets for the putative clades Macrolepidoptera as currently defined (P P ? 0.005, and nearly so for the superfamily Drepanoidea as currently defined (P Separate analyses of mostly synonymous versus non-synonymous character sets revealed notable differences (though not strong conflict, including a marked influence of compositional heterogeneity on apparent signal in the third codon position (nt3. As available model partitioning methods cannot correct for this variation, we assessed overall phylogeny resolution through separate examination of trees from each character set. Exploration of "tree space" with GARLI, using grid computing, showed that hundreds of searches are typically needed to find the best-feasible phylogeny estimate for these data. Conclusion Our results (a corroborate the broad outlines of the current working phylogenetic hypothesis for Ditrysia, (b demonstrate that some prominent features of that hypothesis, including the position of the butterflies, need revision, and (c resolve the majority of family and subfamily relationships within superfamilies as thus far sampled. Much further gene and taxon sampling will be needed, however, to strongly resolve individual deeper nodes.

  11. Radiations of mycalesine butterflies and opening up their exploration of morphospace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakefield, Paul M

    2010-12-01

    The African butterfly Bicyclus anynana is an emerging model in evo-devo and eco-evo-devo. Much has been learned about the development, genetics, and evolution of wing eyespot patterns and about how seasonal polyphenism in this species provides an adaptive response to the wet-dry environments it inhabits. Recent work is also examining the role of male secondary sexual traits, the wing scent brushes, and associated sex pheromones in mate choice and sexual selection. However, B. anynana is but one member of a spectacular radiation amounting to some 250 extant species in the subtribe Mycalesina in the Old World tropics. Therefore, it is appropriate timing to consider whether the experimental work on a single species can help in analyzing pattern and process in the spectacular expansion of this whole clade of mycalesine butterflies. The most recent molecular phylogenetics (Kodandaramaiah et al. 2010 ) underpins the occurrence of several parallel geographical radiations on the African mainland, on Madagascar, and in Asia. Expansions of the mycalesine butterflies into more seasonal environments may have occurred in tandem with those of their larval host plants, the grasses, around 25 million years ago. This article examines how the findings from multidisciplinary work on B. anynana could be the basis for a comparative approach to unravel the processes of adaptation and speciation that have yielded patterns of occupancy of trait space in the mycalesines. The parallel nature of radiations in at least three geographical regions provides exceptional power for such an analysis. I argue that research on B. anynana has provided an invaluable backbone for such an endeavor by revealing candidate suites of traits involved in adaptation to new ecological opportunities and in the evolution of reproductive isolation. PMID:21043782

  12. Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea) from two forest fragments in northern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Bonfantti, D.; Di Mare, R. A.; Giovenardi, R.

    2009-01-01

    Aiming to contribute to the knowledge concerning diversity of the butterflies in the Atlantic Rainforest ofthe state of Rio Grande do Sul, a systematic survey was carried out in the city of Frederico Westphalen from November2006 to June 2007, in two sampling localities. The total sampling efforts was 80 h, in which 1.785 samples wererecorded, distributed in 161 species. From the latter, 51.57 % (83) belongs to the Nymphalidae family, Hesperiidae20.49 % (33), Pieridae 8.69 % (14), Riodinidae 6...

  13. Bioinspired micrograting arrays mimicking the reverse color diffraction elements evolved by the butterfly Pierella luna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Grant; Kolle, Mathias; Kim, Philseok; Khan, Mughees; Muñoz, Philip; Mazur, Eric; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-11-01

    Recently, diffraction elements that reverse the color sequence normally observed in planar diffraction gratings have been found in the wing scales of the butterfly Pierella luna. Here, we describe the creation of an artificial photonic material mimicking this reverse color-order diffraction effect. The bioinspired system consists of ordered arrays of vertically oriented microdiffraction gratings. We present a detailed analysis and modeling of the coupling of diffraction resulting from individual structural components and demonstrate its strong dependence on the orientation of the individual miniature gratings. This photonic material could provide a basis for novel developments in biosensing, anticounterfeiting, and efficient light management in photovoltaic systems and light-emitting diodes. PMID:25288730

  14. The lycaenid butterfly Polyommatus icarus uses a duplicated blue opsin to see green

    OpenAIRE

    Sison-mangus, Marilou S.; Briscoe, Adriana D.; Zaccardi, Guillermo; Knu?ttel, Helge; Kelber, Almut

    2008-01-01

    The functional significance of gene duplication is rarely addressed at the level of animal behavior. Butterflies are excellent models in this regard because they can be trained and the use of their opsin-based visual pigments in color vision can be assessed. In the present study, we demonstrate that the lycaenid Polyommatus icarus uses its duplicate blue (B2) opsin, BRh2, in conjunction with its long-wavelength (LW) opsin, LWRh, to see color in the green part of the light spectrum extending u...

  15. Butterfly hysteresis loop at nonzero bias field in antiferromagnetic molecular rings: cooling by adiabatic magnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, O; Koch, R; Schromm, S; Müller, P; Bernt, I; Saalfrank, R W

    2002-12-01

    At low temperatures, the magnetization of the molecular ferric wheel NaFe6 exhibits a step at a critical field B(c) due to a field-induced level crossing. By means of high-field torque magnetometry we observed a hysteretic behavior at the level crossing with a characteristic butterfly shape which is analyzed in terms of a dissipative two-level model. Several unusual features were found. The nonzero bias field of the level crossing suggests the possibility of cooling by adiabatic magnetization. PMID:12484964

  16. Hofstadter butterflies and quantized Hall conductance in quasi-one dimensional organic conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiao-Shan

    2014-09-01

    We explore the structure of the energy spectra of quasi-one dimensional organic conductors subjected to the field-induced spin-density-wave (FISDW) state. We show that the structure of the energy spectra can exhibit Hofstadter butterfly, which is generally believed to appear in two dimensional systems. The phenomenon of the quantized Hall conductance due to FISDW is also investigated. We find that the Hall number L, which is defined by L = ?xy/(e2/h), coincides with the number described by FISDW order parameter. The sign reversal of the quantized Hall conductance is discussed theoretically.

  17. The landscape matrix modifies the effect of habitat fragmentation in grassland butterflies.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Öckinger, E.; Bergman, K.-O.; Franzén, M.; Kadlec, Tomáš; Krauss, J.; Kuussaari, M.; Pöyry, J.; Smith, H. G.; Steffan-Dewenter, I.; Bommarco, R.

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 27, ?. 1 (2012), s. 121-131. ISSN 0921-2973 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Grant ostatní: Czech Department of the Environment(CZ) VaV/620/1/03; Grant Foundation(CZ) IGA FZP 429200131123114 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biodiversity * butterflies * connectivity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.897, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10980-011-9686-z?LI=true#

  18. A case of multiple sclerosis with multi-ring-like and butterfly-like enhancement on computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of multiple sclerosis in which CT showed multiple ring-like enhancement and butterfly-like distribution of a low density area with marginal enhancement. The latter finding is found in other demyelinating disorders but is less common in tumors or abscesses. Therefore, it seems to have some diagnostic value in multiple sclerosis. (author)

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Commensalibacter papalotli MX01, a Symbiont Identified from the Guts of Overwintering Monarch Butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Servi?n-garciduen?as, Luis E.; Sa?nchez-quinto, Andre?s; Marti?nez-romero, Esperanza

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Commensalibacter papalotli strain MX01, isolated from the intestines of an overwintering monarch butterfly. The 2,332,652-bp AT-biased genome of C. papalotli MX01 is the smallest genome for a member of the Acetobacteraceae family and provides the first evidence of plasmids in Commensalibacter.

  20. Establishment of a Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus, Lepidoptera: Danaidae) Cell Line and its Susceptibility to Insect Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cell line from the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus designated BCIRL-DP-AM/JG was established from adult ovaries. The cell line consisted mainly of round cells and took a prolonged period of time in the growth medium ExCell 401 containing 10% fetal bovine serum and antibiotics before it could be...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Commensalibacter papalotli MX01, a Symbiont Identified from the Guts of Overwintering Monarch Butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E; Sánchez-Quinto, Andrés; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Commensalibacter papalotli strain MX01, isolated from the intestines of an overwintering monarch butterfly. The 2,332,652-bp AT-biased genome of C. papalotli MX01 is the smallest genome for a member of the Acetobacteraceae family and provides the first evidence of plasmids in Commensalibacter. PMID:24604647

  2. Phylogenetic relationships of true butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea) inferred from COI, 16S rRNA and EF-1? sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man Il; Wan, Xinlong; Kim, Min Jee; Jeong, Heon Cheon; Ahn, Neung-Ho; Kim, Ki-Gyoung; Han, Yeon Soo; Kim, Iksoo

    2010-11-01

    The molecular phylogenetic relationships among true butterfly families (superfamily Papilionoidea) have been a matter of substantial controversy; this debate has led to several competing hypotheses. Two of the most compelling of those hypotheses involve the relationships of (Nymphalidae + Lycaenidae) + (Pieridae + Papilionidae) and (((Nymphalidae + Lycaenidae) + Pieridae) + Papilionidae). In this study, approximately 3,500 nucleotide sequences from cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI), 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA), and elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1?) were sequenced from 83 species belonging to four true butterfly families, along with those of three outgroup species belonging to three lepidopteran superfamilies. These sequences were subjected to phylogenetic reconstruction via Bayesian Inference (BI), Maximum Likelihood (ML), and Maximum Parsimony (MP) algorithms. The monophyletic Pieridae and monophyletic Papilionidae evidenced good recovery in all analyses, but in some analyses, the monophylies of the Lycaenidae and Nymphalidae were hampered by the inclusion of single species of the lycaenid subfamily Miletinae and the nymphalid subfamily Danainae. Excluding those singletons, all phylogenetic analyses among the four true butterfly families clearly identified the Nymphalidae as the sister to the Lycaenidae and identified this group as a sister to the Pieridae, with the Papilionidae identified as the most basal linage to the true butterfly, thus supporting the hypothesis: (Papilionidae + (Pieridae + (Nymphalidae + Lycaenidae))). PMID:20853063

  3. Life history traits and threat status: a comparative study of two Onobrychis-feeding lycaenid butterflies in SE Czech Republic.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlancarová, J.; Ne?asová, B.; Hula, V.; Konvi?ka, Martin

    Praha : Czech University of Life Sciences, 2009. s. 216-216. ISBN 978-80-213-1961-5. [European Congress of Conservation Biology /2./. 01.09.2009-05.09.2009, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : butterflies Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  4. Fruit-feeding butterflies in the Atlantic Forest at Serra do Tabuleiro State Park, Santa Catarina State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Corso

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fruit-feeding butterflies are used in ecological studies following standardized sampling protocols because they are easily collected using traps baited with food. This trait, and the fact that their populations respond rapidly to changes in habitat, make them good biological indicators. The goal of this study is to present a list of fruit-feeding butterfly species, including morphological and ecological characteristics of this group, for the Atlantic Forest of Serra do Tabuleiro State Park (Santa Catarina, to improve the knowledge about the butterflies from this region. Six field expeditions were carried out between November 2009 and August 2010. Twenty-five bait traps were used, which remained active for ten days and were checked every 48 h to replace the bait and collect individuals. Twenty species and 331 individuals were captured, which belonged to three subfamilies: Biblidinae, Charaxinae and Satyrinae. The study added eleven new species to the already existing list of the Atlantic Forest butterflies of Santa Catarina.

  5. Case of multiple sclerosis with multi-ring-like and butterfly-like enhancement on computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Takehiko; Nagao, Hideo; Sano, Nozomi; Habara, Shinji; Takahashi, Mitsugi; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Beppu, Keiko; Shoda, Takaaki

    1985-01-01

    We report a case of multiple sclerosis in which CT showed multiple ring-like enhancement and butterfly-like distribution of a low density area with marginal enhancement. The latter finding is found in other demyelinating disorders but is less common in tumors or abscesses. Therefore, it seems to have some diagnostic value in multiple sclerosis. (author).

  6. Application of hydraulic network analysis to motor operated butterfly valves in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the application of hydraulic network analysis to evaluate the performance of butterfly valves in nuclear power plant applications. Required actuation torque for butterfly valves in high-flow applications is often dictated by peak dynamic torque. The peak dynamic torque, which occurs at some intermediate disc position, requires accurate evaluation of valve flow rate and pressure drop throughout the valve stroke. Valve flow rate and pressure drop are significantly affected by the valve flow characteristics and the hydraulic system characteristics, such as pumping capability, piping resistances, single and parallel flow paths, system hydrostatic pressure, and the location of the motor-operated valve (MOV) within the system. A hydraulic network analysis methodology that addresses the effect of these parameters on the MOV performance is presented. The methodology is based on well-established engineering principles. The application of this methodology requires detailed characteristics of both the MOV and the hydraulic system in which it is installed. The valve characteristics for this analysis can be obtained by flow testing or from the valve manufacturer. Even though many valve users, valve manufacturers, and engineering standards have recognized the importance of performing these analyses, none has provided a detailed procedure for doing so

  7. From global change to a butterfly flapping: biophysics and behaviour affect tropical climate change impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonebrake, Timothy C; Boggs, Carol L; Stamberger, Jeannie A; Deutsch, Curtis A; Ehrlich, Paul R

    2014-10-22

    Difficulty in characterizing the relationship between climatic variability and climate change vulnerability arises when we consider the multiple scales at which this variation occurs, be it temporal (from minute to annual) or spatial (from centimetres to kilometres). We studied populations of a single widely distributed butterfly species, Chlosyne lacinia, to examine the physiological, morphological, thermoregulatory and biophysical underpinnings of adaptation to tropical and temperate climates. Microclimatic and morphological data along with a biophysical model documented the importance of solar radiation in predicting butterfly body temperature. We also integrated the biophysics with a physiologically based insect fitness model to quantify the influence of solar radiation, morphology and behaviour on warming impact projections. While warming is projected to have some detrimental impacts on tropical ectotherms, fitness impacts in this study are not as negative as models that assume body and air temperature equivalence would suggest. We additionally show that behavioural thermoregulation can diminish direct warming impacts, though indirect thermoregulatory consequences could further complicate predictions. With these results, at multiple spatial and temporal scales, we show the importance of biophysics and behaviour for studying biodiversity consequences of global climate change, and stress that tropical climate change impacts are likely to be context-dependent. PMID:25165769

  8. Compounded effects of climate change and habitat alteration shift patterns of butterfly diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forister, Matthew L; McCall, Andrew C; Sanders, Nathan J; Fordyce, James A; Thorne, James H; O'Brien, Joshua; Waetjen, David P; Shapiro, Arthur M

    2010-02-01

    Climate change and habitat destruction have been linked to global declines in vertebrate biodiversity, including mammals, amphibians, birds, and fishes. However, invertebrates make up the vast majority of global species richness, and the combined effects of climate change and land use on invertebrates remain poorly understood. Here we present 35 years of data on 159 species of butterflies from 10 sites along an elevational gradient spanning 0-2,775 m in a biodiversity hotspot, the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Northern California. Species richness has declined at half of the sites, with the most severe reductions at the lowest elevations, where habitat destruction is greatest. At higher elevations, we observed clear upward shifts in the elevational ranges of species, consistent with the influence of global warming. Taken together, these long-term data reveal the interacting negative effects of human-induced changes on both the climate and habitat available to butterfly species in California. Furthermore, the decline of ruderal, disturbance-associated species indicates that the traditional focus of conservation efforts on more specialized and less dispersive species should be broadened to include entire faunas when estimating and predicting the effects of pervasive stressors. PMID:20133854

  9. Structural safety analysis based on seismic service conditions for butterfly valves in a nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Uk; Ahn, Dae-Gyun; Lee, Myeong-Gon; Lee, Kwon-Hee; Han, Seung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The structural integrity of valves that are used to control cooling waters in the primary coolant loop that prevents boiling within the reactor in a nuclear power plant must be capable of withstanding earthquakes or other dangerous situations. In this study, numerical analyses using a finite element method, that is, static and dynamic analyses according to the rigid or flexible characteristics of the dynamic properties of a 200A butterfly valve, were performed according to the KEPIC MFA. An experimental vibration test was also carried out in order to verify the results from the modal analysis, in which a validated finite element model was obtained via a model-updating method that considers changes in the in situ experimental data. By using a validated finite element model, the equivalent static load under SSE conditions stipulated by the KEPIC MFA gave a stress of 135?MPa that occurred at the connections of the stem and body. A larger stress of 183 MPa was induced when we used a CQC method with a design response spectrum that uses 2% damping ratio. These values were lower than the allowable strength of the materials used for manufacturing the butterfly valve, and, therefore, its structural safety met the KEPIC MFA requirements. PMID:24955416

  10. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in the monarch butterfly using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Christine; Beaver, Lauren E; Taylor, Orley R; Wolfe, Scot A; Reppert, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    The development of reverse-genetic tools in "nonmodel" insect species with distinct biology is critical to establish them as viable model systems. The eastern North American monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), whose genome is sequenced, has emerged as a model to study animal clocks, navigational mechanisms, and the genetic basis of long-distance migration. Here, we developed a highly efficient gene-targeting approach in the monarch using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), engineered nucleases that generate mutations at targeted genomic sequences. We focused our ZFN approach on targeting the type 2 vertebrate-like cryptochrome gene of the monarch (designated cry2), which encodes a putative transcriptional repressor of the monarch circadian clockwork. Co-injections of mRNAs encoding ZFNs targeting the second exon of monarch cry2 into "one nucleus" stage embryos led to high-frequency nonhomologous end-joining-mediated, mutagenic lesions in the germline (up to 50%). Heritable ZFN-induced lesions in two independent lines produced truncated, nonfunctional CRY2 proteins, resulting in the in vivo disruption of circadian behavior and the molecular clock mechanism. Our work genetically defines CRY2 as an essential transcriptional repressor of the monarch circadian clock and provides a proof of concept for the use of ZFNs for manipulating genes in the monarch butterfly genome. Importantly, this approach could be used in other lepidopterans and "nonmodel" insects, thus opening new avenues to decipher the molecular underpinnings of a variety of biological processes. PMID:23009861

  11. Extreme heterogeneity in parasitism despite low population genetic structure among monarch butterflies inhabiting the Hawaiian Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Amanda A; de Roode, Jacobus C; Altizer, Sonia; Bartel, Rebecca A

    2014-01-01

    Host movement and spatial structure can strongly influence the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases, with limited host movement potentially leading to high spatial heterogeneity in infection. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) are best known for undertaking a spectacular long-distance migration in eastern North America; however, they also form non-migratory populations that breed year-round in milder climates such as Hawaii and other tropical locations. Prior work showed an inverse relationship between monarch migratory propensity and the prevalence of the protozoan parasite, Ophryocystis elektroscirrha. Here, we sampled monarchs from replicate sites within each of four Hawaiian Islands to ask whether these populations show consistently high prevalence of the protozoan parasite as seen for monarchs from several other non-migratory populations. Counter to our predictions, we observed striking spatial heterogeneity in parasite prevalence, with infection rates per site ranging from 4-85%. We next used microsatellite markers to ask whether the observed variation in infection might be explained by limited host movement and spatial sub-structuring among sites. Our results showed that monarchs across the Hawaiian Islands form one admixed population, supporting high gene flow among sites. Moreover, measures of individual-level genetic diversity did not predict host infection status, as might be expected if more inbred hosts harbored higher parasite loads. These results suggest that other factors such as landscape-level environmental variation or colonization-extinction processes might instead cause the extreme heterogeneity in monarch butterfly infection observed here. PMID:24926796

  12. Transcriptome analysis reveals novel patterning and pigmentation genes underlying Heliconius butterfly wing pattern variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hines Heather M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heliconius butterfly wing pattern diversity offers a unique opportunity to investigate how natural genetic variation can drive the evolution of complex adaptive phenotypes. Positional cloning and candidate gene studies have identified a handful of regulatory and pigmentation genes implicated in Heliconius wing pattern variation, but little is known about the greater developmental networks within which these genes interact to pattern a wing. Here we took a large-scale transcriptomic approach to identify the network of genes involved in Heliconius wing pattern development and variation. This included applying over 140 transcriptome microarrays to assay gene expression in dissected wing pattern elements across a range of developmental stages and wing pattern morphs of Heliconius erato. Results We identified a number of putative early prepattern genes with color-pattern related expression domains. We also identified 51 genes differentially expressed in association with natural color pattern variation. Of these, the previously identified color pattern “switch gene” optix was recovered as the first transcript to show color-specific differential expression. Most differentially expressed genes were transcribed late in pupal development and have roles in cuticle formation or pigment synthesis. These include previously undescribed transporter genes associated with ommochrome pigmentation. Furthermore, we observed upregulation of melanin-repressing genes such as ebony and Dat1 in non-melanic patterns. Conclusions This study identifies many new genes implicated in butterfly wing pattern development and provides a glimpse into the number and types of genes affected by variation in genes that drive color pattern evolution.

  13. Independent inheritance of preference and performance in hybrids between host races of Mitoura butterflies (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forister, Matthew L

    2005-05-01

    Divergent natural selection contributes to reproductive isolation among populations adapting to different habitats or resources if hybrids between populations are intermediate in phenotype and suffer an associated, environmentally dependent reduction in fitness. This prediction was tested using two host races of Mitoura butterflies. Thirty-five F1 hybrid and parental lines were created, larvae were raised on the two host plants, and oviposition preferences were assayed in choice arenas. Larvae from both reciprocal hybrid crosses suffered a host-specific reduction in performance: when reared on incense cedar, hybrid survival was approximately 30% less than the survival of pure lines of the cedar-associated host race. The performance of hybrid larvae reared on the other host, MacNab cypress, was not reduced relative to parental genotypes. Females from both reciprocal hybrid crosses preferred to oviposit on incense cedar, the same host that resulted in the reduced survival of hybrid larvae. Thus, dominance is implicated in the inheritance of traits involved in both preference and performance, which do not appear to be genetically linked in Mitoura butterflies. Gene flow between host races may be reduced because the correlation between preference and performance that was previously described in parental populations is essentially broken by hybridization. PMID:16136812

  14. Host plant use among closely related Anaea butterfly species (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Charaxinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QUEIROZ J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a great number of Charaxinae (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae species in the tropics whose larvae feed on several plant families. However the genus Anaea is almost always associated with Croton species (Euphorbiaceae. This work describes patterns of host plant use by immature and adult abundance on different vertical strata of sympatric Anaea species in a forest of Southeastern Brazil. Quantitative samples of leaves were taken in April/1999 and May/2000 to collect eggs and larvae of four Anaea species on C.alchorneicarpus, C. floribundus and C. salutaris in a semideciduous forest. Sampled leaves were divided into three classes of plant phenological stage: saplings, shrubs and trees. The results showed that the butterfly species are segregating in host plant use on two scales: host plant species and plant phenological stages. C. alchorneicarpus was used by only one Anaea species, whereas C. floribundus was used by three species and C. salutaris by four Anaea species. There was one Anaea species concentrated on sapling, another on sapling/shrub and two others on shrub/tree leaves. Adults of Anaea were more frequent at canopy traps but there were no differences among species caught in traps at different vertical positions. This work supplements early studies on host plant use among Charaxinae species and it describes how a guild of closely related butterfly species may be organized in a complex tropical habitat.

  15. Fitness Costs of Thermal Reaction Norms for Wing Melanisation in the Large White Butterfly (Pieris brassicae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput-Bardy, Audrey; Ducatez, Simon; Legrand, Delphine; Baguette, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The large white butterfly, Pieris brassicae, shows a seasonal polyphenism of wing melanisation, spring individuals being darker than summer individuals. This phenotypic plasticity is supposed to be an adaptive response for thermoregulation in natural populations. However, the variation in individuals’ response, the cause of this variation (genetic, non genetic but inheritable or environmental) and its relationship with fitness remain poorly known. We tested the relationships between thermal reaction norm of wing melanisation and adult lifespan as well as female fecundity. Butterflies were reared in cold (18°C), moderate (22°C), and hot (26°C) temperatures over three generations to investigate variation in adult pigmentation and the effects of maternal thermal environment on offspring reaction norms. We found a low heritability in wing melanisation (h2?=?0.18). Rearing families had contrasted thermal reaction norms. Adult lifespan of males and females from highly plastic families was shorter in individuals exposed to hot developmental temperature. Also, females from plastic families exhibited lower fecundity. We did not find any effect of maternal or grand-maternal developmental temperature on fitness. This study provides new evidence on the influence of phenotypic plasticity on life history-traits’ evolution, a crucial issue in the context of global change. PMID:24587196

  16. The biological impacts of ingested radioactive materials on the pale grass blue butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, Chiyo; Hiyama, Atsuki; Taira, Wataru; Tanahara, Akira; Otaki, Joji M.

    2014-05-01

    A massive amount of radioactive materials has been released into the environment by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, but its biological impacts have rarely been examined. Here, we have quantitatively evaluated the relationship between the dose of ingested radioactive cesium and mortality and abnormality rates using the pale grass blue butterfly, Zizeeria maha. When larvae from Okinawa, which is likely the least polluted locality in Japan, were fed leaves collected from polluted localities, mortality and abnormality rates increased sharply at low doses in response to the ingested cesium dose. This dose-response relationship was best fitted by power function models, which indicated that the half lethal and abnormal doses were 1.9 and 0.76 Bq per larva, corresponding to 54,000 and 22,000 Bq per kilogram body weight, respectively. Both the retention of radioactive cesium in a pupa relative to the ingested dose throughout the larval stage and the accumulation of radioactive cesium in a pupa relative to the activity concentration in a diet were highest at the lowest level of cesium ingested. We conclude that the risk of ingesting a polluted diet is realistic, at least for this butterfly, and likely for certain other organisms living in the polluted area.

  17. HIGH SPEED BUTTERFLY ARCHITECTURE FOR CIRCULAR CONVOLUTION USING FNT WITH PARTIAL PRODUCT MULTIPLIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HEMALATHA BANDARI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents high speed butterfly architecture for circular convolution based on FNT using partial product multipliers. FNT is ideally suited to digital computation requiring the order of N log N additions, subtractions and bit shifts, but no multiplications. In addition to being efficient, the FNT implementation is exact with no round off errors. Binary arithmetic permits the exact computation of FNT. This technique involves arithmetic in a binary code orresponding to the simplest one of a set of code translations from the normal binary representation of each integer in the ring of integer. In the first stage normal binary numbers are converted intotheir diminished-1 representation using code conversion (CC. Then butterfly operation (BO is carried out to perform FNT and IFNT where the point wise multiplication is performed using modulo 2n+1 partial product multipliers. Thus modulo 2n+1 additions are avoided in the final stages of FNT and IFNT and hence execution delay is reduced compared to circular convolution done with FFT and DFT. This architecture has better throughput and involves less hardware complexity.

  18. Diversity Dynamics in Nymphalidae Butterflies: Effect of Phylogenetic Uncertainty on Diversification Rate Shift Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Carlos; Espeland, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The species rich butterfly family Nymphalidae has been used to study evolutionary interactions between plants and insects. Theories of insect-hostplant dynamics predict accelerated diversification due to key innovations. In evolutionary biology, analysis of maximum credibility trees in the software MEDUSA (modelling evolutionary diversity using stepwise AIC) is a popular method for estimation of shifts in diversification rates. We investigated whether phylogenetic uncertainty can produce different results by extending the method across a random sample of trees from the posterior distribution of a Bayesian run. Using the MultiMEDUSA approach, we found that phylogenetic uncertainty greatly affects diversification rate estimates. Different trees produced diversification rates ranging from high values to almost zero for the same clade, and both significant rate increase and decrease in some clades. Only four out of 18 significant shifts found on the maximum clade credibility tree were consistent across most of the sampled trees. Among these, we found accelerated diversification for Ithomiini butterflies. We used the binary speciation and extinction model (BiSSE) and found that a hostplant shift to Solanaceae is correlated with increased net diversification rates in Ithomiini, congruent with the diffuse cospeciation hypothesis. Our results show that taking phylogenetic uncertainty into account when estimating net diversification rate shifts is of great importance, as very different results can be obtained when using the maximum clade credibility tree and other trees from the posterior distribution. PMID:25830910

  19. Anatomical basis of sun compass navigation I: the general layout of the monarch butterfly brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Stanley; Reppert, Steven M

    2012-06-01

    Each fall, eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a time-compensated sun compass to migrate to their overwintering grounds in central Mexico. The sun compass mechanism involves the neural integration of skylight cues with timing information from circadian clocks to maintain a constant heading. The neuronal substrates for the necessary interactions between compass neurons in the central complex, a prominent structure of the central brain, and circadian clocks are largely unknown. To begin to unravel these neural substrates, we performed 3D reconstructions of all neuropils of the monarch brain based on anti-synapsin labeling. Our work characterizes 21 well-defined neuropils (19 paired, 2 unpaired), as well as all synaptic regions between the more classically defined neuropils. We also studied the internal organization of all major neuropils on brain sections, using immunocytochemical stainings against synapsin, serotonin, and ?-aminobutyric acid. Special emphasis was placed on describing the neuroarchitecture of sun-compass-related brain regions and outlining their homologies to other migratory species. In addition to finding many general anatomical similarities to other insects, interspecies comparison also revealed several features that appear unique to the monarch brain. These distinctive features were especially apparent in the visual system and the mushroom body. Overall, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the brain anatomy of the monarch butterfly that will ultimately aid our understanding of the neuronal processes governing animal migration. PMID:22473804

  20. Immediate and delayed effects of radiation on the genetic endowment of the butterfly, Acraea horta L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupae of the butterfly Acraea horta were irradiated with X or gamma rays with doses of 3 000 R, 7 000 R and 15 000 R. Even after the highest doses most of the pupae remained vital, butterflies emerged, and a proportion of them mated and produced offspring. The consequences for the offspring of the irradiated pupae were increased mortality, especially mortality of the eggs, decreased vitality, infertility in some cases, and various morphological abnormalities. The genetic nature of the morphological abnormalities could not be analysed, as some of the affected individuals did not breed, and other abnormalities proved not to be heritable. As a result of decreased virtality and increased mortality the offspring of the more heavily irradiated pupae died out after two (in the case of doses of 15 000 R) or three (in the case of doses of 7 000 R) post-irradiation generations. Some of the offspring of pupae receiving 3 000 R were capable of breeding indefinitely. Morphological abnormalities and increased mortality occured in the second and third post-irradiation generations (as well as in the first), after the previous one or two generations appeared to be completely normal and viable. This was not due to segregation of recessive mutations, but seems to be expressions of a delayed effect of the damage caused to the genotype by the radiation. The possible mechanism of such a delayed effect of the radiation is briefly discussed

  1. Dynamic testing of POSI-SEAL motor-operated butterfly valves using strain gages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilities operating nuclear power plants recognize that the correct functioning of all motor-operated valves, and particularly those in safety-related systems, is of paramount importance. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued Generic Letter 89-10 relative to this concern. Operability must be demonstrated under design-basis conditions. In order to demonstrate operability of motor-operated butterfly valves, the valve stem torque must be determined. The valve stem torque is a function of seat material, stem packing, stem bearing friction, and hydrodynamic lift and drag. The total valve operating hydrodynamic torque can be predicted using the valve manufacturer's data and the differential pressure. In order to validate the valve manufacturer's data, the actual total valve hydrodynamic torque is measured using strain gages mounted directly on the valve stem. This paper presents the results of comparing the predicted total valve operating hydrodynamic torque with the actual total valve operating hydrodynamic torque for six POSI-SEAL Class 150 high performance butterfly valves

  2. Effect of different mowing regimes on butterflies and diurnal moths on road verges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valtonen, A.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In northern and central Europe road verges offer alternative habitats for declining plant and invertebrate species of semi-natural grasslands. The quality of road verges as habitats depends on several factors, of which the mowing regime is one of the easiest to modify. In this study we compared the Lepidoptera communities on road verges that underwent three different mowing regimes regarding the timing and intensity of mowing; mowing in mid-summer, mowing in late summer, and partial mowing (a narrow strip next to the road. A total of 12,174 individuals and 107 species of Lepidoptera were recorded. The mid-summer mown verges had lower species richness and abundance of butterflies and lower species richness and diversity of diurnal moths compared to the late summer and partially mown verges. By delaying the annual mowing until late summer or promoting mosaic-like mowing regimes, such as partial mowing, the quality of road verges as habitats for butterflies and diurnal moths can be improved.

  3. Bioinspired fabrication of magneto-optic hierarchical architecture by hydrothermal process from butterfly wing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a green solution to incorporate nano-Fe3O4 into the hierarchical architecture of a natural butterfly wing, thus obtaining unique magneto-optic nanocomposites with otherwise unavailable photonic features. Morphological characterization and Fourier Transform Infrared-Raman Spectroscope measurements indicate the assembly of Fe3O4 nanocrystallites. The magnetic and optical responses of Fe3O4/wing show a coupling effect between the biological structure and magnetic material. The saturation magnetization and coercivity values of the as-prepared magneto-optic architecture varied with change of subtle structure. Such a combination of nano-Fe3O4 and natural butterfly wing might create novel magneto-optic properties, and the relevant ideas could inspire the investigation of magneto-optical devices. - Highlights: ? We develop a green, easy controlled hydrothermal process to synthesize magnetite hierarchical architecture. ? The optical response of Fe3O4/wing exhibits a coupling effect between the structure and material. ? The saturation magnetization value is mediated by shape anisotropy and the stress of different subtle structure, which has provided unique insights into studying the mysterious magnetic property of magnetite.

  4. Spectral selectivity of 3D magnetophotonic crystal film fabricated from single butterfly wing scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenhong; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Wang; Yang, Qingqing; Zhang, Di; Chen, Zhixin

    2014-05-01

    3D magnetophotonic crystal (3D-MPC) film is an excellent platform for tailoring the magneto-optical response of magnetic materials. However, its fabrication is a great challenge due to the limitation of commonly used artificial synthesis methods. Inspired by the unique structures of biospecies, we hereby manipulate the pristine single wing scales of Morpho didius precisely and successfully fabricate Fe3O4 films with photonic structure. The synthesis strategy involves the fabrication of Fe2O3 film from a single wing scale using an improved sol-gel method followed by a subsequent reduction. The intrinsic hierarchical photonic structures as well as the anisotropic optical properties of the pristine butterfly wing scale have been retained in the obtained Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 films. When investigated under an external magnetic field, a spectral blue shift about 43 nm is observed in the designated orientation of the Fe3O4 film, which is useful for the design and creation of novel magnetic-optical modulator devices. Furthermore, these single scales can be used as building blocks to fabricate designable and more complicated assembled nano systems. This biomimetic technique combined with the variety of structures of butterfly wing scales provides an effective approach to produce magneto-photonic films with desired structure, paving a new way for theoretical research and practical applications.3D magnetophotonic crystal (3D-MPC) film is an excellent platform for tailoring the magneto-optical response of magnetic materials. However, its fabrication is a great challenge due to the limitation of commonly used artificial synthesis methods. Inspired by the unique structures of biospecies, we hereby manipulate the pristine single wing scales of Morpho didius precisely and successfully fabricate Fe3O4 films with photonic structure. The synthesis strategy involves the fabrication of Fe2O3 film from a single wing scale using an improved sol-gel method followed by a subsequent reduction. The intrinsic hierarchical photonic structures as well as the anisotropic optical properties of the pristine butterfly wing scale have been retained in the obtained Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 films. When investigated under an external magnetic field, a spectral blue shift about 43 nm is observed in the designated orientation of the Fe3O4 film, which is useful for the design and creation of novel magnetic-optical modulator devices. Furthermore, these single scales can be used as building blocks to fabricate designable and more complicated assembled nano systems. This biomimetic technique combined with the variety of structures of butterfly wing scales provides an effective approach to produce magneto-photonic films with desired structure, paving a new way for theoretical research and practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM, optical image of ground scale, XRD of the magnetite with butterfly wing structure. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00477a

  5. Differences in the Aerobic Capacity of Flight Muscles between Butterfly Populations and Species with Dissimilar Flight Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhamäki, Virve; Wolfram, Joy; Jokitalo, Eija; Hanski, Ilkka; Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat loss and climate change are rapidly converting natural habitats and thereby increasing the significance of dispersal capacity for vulnerable species. Flight is necessary for dispersal in many insects, and differences in dispersal capacity may reflect dissimilarities in flight muscle aerobic capacity. In a large metapopulation of the Glanville fritillary butterfly in the Åland Islands in Finland, adults disperse frequently between small local populations. Individuals found in newly established populations have higher flight metabolic rates and field-measured dispersal distances than butterflies in old populations. To assess possible differences in flight muscle aerobic capacity among Glanville fritillary populations, enzyme activities and tissue concentrations of the mitochondrial protein Cytochrome-c Oxidase (CytOx) were measured and compared with four other species of Nymphalid butterflies. Flight muscle structure and mitochondrial density were also examined in the Glanville fritillary and a long-distance migrant, the red admiral. Glanville fritillaries from new populations had significantly higher aerobic capacities than individuals from old populations. Comparing the different species, strong-flying butterfly species had higher flight muscle CytOx content and enzymatic activity than short-distance fliers, and mitochondria were larger and more numerous in the flight muscle of the red admiral than the Glanville fritillary. These results suggest that superior dispersal capacity of butterflies in new populations of the Glanville fritillary is due in part to greater aerobic capacity, though this species has a low aerobic capacity in general when compared with known strong fliers. Low aerobic capacity may limit dispersal ability of the Glanville fritillary. PMID:24416122

  6. Egg size-number trade-off and a decline in oviposition site choice quality: Female Pararge aegeria butterflies pay a cost of having males present at oviposition

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbs, M.; Lace, L. A.; Jones, M. J.; Moore, A. J.

    2005-01-01

    Once mated, the optimal strategy for females of the monandrous butterfly, Pararge aegeria, is to avoid male contact and devote as much time as possible to ovipositing, as there is little advantage for females to engage in multiple matings. In other butterfly species the presence of males during egg laying has been shown to affect aspects of oviposition behavior and it has been suggested that repeated interference from males has the potential to reduce reproductive output. The aim of this stud...

  7. Population Dynamics of Cabbage Butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and Cabbage Aphids (Brevicoryne brassicae) on Five Cultivars of Cauliflower at Peshawar

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Younas; Mohammad Naeem; Abdur Raqib; Shah Masud

    2004-01-01

    The studies on population dynamics of Cabbage butterfly and Cabbage aphids on different Cultivars of cauliflower namely Snowball, Snowdrift, Tropical, Pioneer and Meigettsal were carried out at the Research Farm of Entomology Section, Agricultural Research Institute Tarnab Peshawar. Cabbage butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and aphids (Bravicoryne brassicae) were recorded as the major insect pests of Cauliflower crop at ARI, Tarnab, Peshawar. None of the 5 Cultivars was found completely resistant ...

  8. Germination and seedlings development of the butterfly pea as influenced salinity Germinação e desenvolvimento de plântulas de cunhã em função da salinidade

    OpenAIRE

    João Domingos Rodrigues; Mariana Barros de Almeida; Elizabeth Orika Ono; Ana Elisa Oliveira dos Santos; Claudio Mistura; Ana Júlia de Brito Araújo

    2011-01-01

    The Butterfly pea (Clitoria ternatea L.) has proven to be one of the forage species, among tropical legumes with potential for cultivation in the semiarid region, both for rotational grazing, protein bank, green forage, hay. In this context, this aimed evaluate the salt stress effects on germination and seedling vigor of the Butterfly pea. The work was conducted at the Seeds Laboratory and at the Nursery Department of Technology and Social Sciences, University of Bahia State, the city of Juaz...

  9. Mosquito control insecticides: a probabilistic ecological risk assessment on drift exposures of naled, dichlorvos (naled metabolite) and permethrin to adult butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, T C; Rand, G M

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive probabilistic terrestrial ecological risk assessment (ERA) was conducted to characterize the potential risk of mosquito control insecticide (i.e., naled, it's metabolite dichlorvos, and permethrin) usage to adult butterflies in south Florida by comparing the probability distributions of environmental exposure concentrations following actual mosquito control applications at labeled rates from ten field monitoring studies with the probability distributions of butterfly species response (effects) data from our laboratory acute toxicity studies. The overlap of these distributions was used as a measure of risk to butterflies. The long-term viability (survival) of adult butterflies, following topical (thorax/wings) exposures was the environmental value we wanted to protect. Laboratory acute toxicity studies (24-h LD50) included topical exposures (thorax and wings) to five adult butterfly species and preparation of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs). The ERA indicated that the assessment endpoint of protection, of at least 90% of the species, 90% of the time (or the 10th percentile from the acute SSDs) from acute naled and permethrin exposures, is most likely not occurring when considering topical exposures to adults. Although the surface areas for adulticide exposures are greater for the wings, exposures to the thorax provide the highest potential for risk (i.e., SSD 10th percentile is lowest) for adult butterflies. Dichlorvos appeared to present no risk. The results of this ERA can be applied to other areas of the world, where these insecticides are used and where butterflies may be exposed. Since there are other sources (e.g., agriculture) of pesticides in the environment, where butterfly exposures will occur, the ERA may under-estimate the potential risks under real-world conditions. PMID:25261815

  10. Plants and butterflies of a small urban preserve in the Central Valley of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nishida

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Costa Rica’s most populated area, the Central valley, has lost much of its natural habitat, and the little that remains has been altered to varying degrees. Yet few studies have been conducted to assess the need for conservation in this area. We present preliminary inventories of plants, butterflies, and day-flying moths of the Reserva Ecológica Leonelo Oviedo (RELO, a small Premontane Moist Forest preserve within the University of Costa Rica campus, located in the urbanized part of the valley. Butterflies are one of the best bio-indicators of a habitat’s health, because they are highly sensitive to environmental changes and are tightly linked to the local flora. A description of the RELO’s physical features and its history is also presented with illustrations. Approximately 432 species of ca. 334 genera in 113 families of plants were identified. However, only 57 % of them represent species native to the Premontane Moist Forest of the region; the rest are either exotic or species introduced mostly from lowland. More than 200 species of butterflies in six families, including Hesperiidae, have been recorded. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (Suppl. 1: 31-67. Epub 2009 November 30.Por ser el área más poblada del pa?s, el valle Central de Costa Rica perdió su h?bitat natural; lo poco que queda ha sido alterado en grados variados. Sin embargo, se han realizado algunos estudios para evaluar la necesidad de conservación en esta área. Se presentan inventarios preliminares de plantas, mariposas y polillas diurnas de la Reserva Ecológica Leonelo Oviedo (RELO; una pequeña reserva de bosque húmedo premontano en del campus de la Universidad de Costa Rica, ubicado en la parte urbanizada del valle. Las mariposas diurnas son uno de los mejores bio-indicadores de la salud del hábitat, porque son muy sensibles a los cambios del ambiente y están estrechamente ligadas a la flora local. Se presenta también una descripción de los caracteres físicos y la historia de la RELO, con ilustraciones. Se identificaron aproximadamente 432 especies de ca. 334 géneros en 113 familias de plantas. Sin embargo, solamente 57% de ellas son especies nativas del bosque húmedo premontano de la región; el resto son especies exóticas o introducidas en su mayoría desde tierras bajas. Se han registrado más de 200 especies de mariposas diurnas en seis familias, incluyendo Hesperiidae.

  11. Plants and butterflies of a small urban preserve in the Central Valley of Costa Rica

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Kenji, Nishida; Ichiro, Nakamura; Carlos O, Morales.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Costa Rica | Language: English Abstract in spanish Por ser el área más poblada del país, el valle Central de Costa Rica perdió su hábitat natural; lo poco que queda ha sido alterado en grados variados. Sin embargo, se han realizado algunos estudios para evaluar la necesidad de conservación en esta área. Se presentan inventarios preliminares de plant [...] as, mariposas y polillas diurnas de la Reserva Ecológica Leonelo Oviedo (RELO); una pequeña reserva de bosque húmedo premontano en del campus de la Universidad de Costa Rica, ubicado en la parte urbanizada del valle. Las mariposas diurnas son uno de los mejores bio-indicadores de la salud del hábitat, porque son muy sensibles a los cambios del ambiente y están estrechamente ligadas a la flora local. Se presenta también una descripción de los caracteres físicos y la historia de la RELO, con ilustraciones. Se identificaron aproximadamente 432 especies de ca. 334 géneros en 113 familias de plantas. Sin embargo, solamente 57% de ellas son especies nativas del bosque húmedo premontano de la región; el resto son especies exóticas o introducidas en su mayoría desde tierras bajas. Se han registrado más de 200 especies de mariposas diurnas en seis familias, incluyendo Hesperiidae. Abstract in english Costa Rica’s most populated area, the Central valley, has lost much of its natural habitat, and the little that remains has been altered to varying degrees. Yet few studies have been conducted to assess the need for conservation in this area. We present preliminary inventories of plants, butterflies [...] , and day-flying moths of the Reserva Ecológica Leonelo Oviedo (RELO), a small Premontane Moist Forest preserve within the University of Costa Rica campus, located in the urbanized part of the valley. Butterflies are one of the best bio-indicators of a habitat’s health, because they are highly sensitive to environmental changes and are tightly linked to the local flora. A description of the RELO’s physical features and its history is also presented with illustrations. Approximately 432 species of ca. 334 genera in 113 families of plants were identified. However, only 57 % of them represent species native to the Premontane Moist Forest of the region; the rest are either exotic or species introduced mostly from lowland. More than 200 species of butterflies in six families, including Hesperiidae, have been recorded. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (Suppl. 1): 31-67. Epub 2009 November 30.

  12. High specialisation in the pollination system of Mandevilla tenuifolia (J.C. Mikan) Woodson (Apocynaceae) drives the effectiveness of butterflies as pollinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, L D A; Quirino, Z G M; Machado, I C

    2014-09-01

    Butterfly pollination in the tropics is considered somewhat effective or solely effective in a few plant species. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Mandevilla tenuifolia (Apocynaceae), which has floral attributes associated with psychophily, has strategies adapted to pollination by butterflies, restricting other floral visitors and making these insects act as efficient pollinators. We analysed the floral and reproductive biology of M. tenuifolia, as well as the frequency and efficiency of its flower visitors. M. tenuifolia is an herb whose flowers have strong herkogamy and secondary pollen presentation on the style head, which corresponds to 60.4% of pollen on the anthers. Flower longevity and the long period of receptivity of the stigmatic region associated with the large amount of pollen removed in the first visits suggest that flowers remain functionally female during part of anthesis. Butterflies, mainly of the families Nymphalidae and Pieridae, are the only pollinators of M. tenuifolia. Despite being self-compatible, M. tenuifolia depends on biotic vectors for fruit production. A non-significant difference in fruit set between controlled treatments and natural conditions suggests that the pollinators are efficient. The inclination resulting from the landing of butterflies on flowers, together with flower morphology, guiding the insect proboscis inside the floral tube, as well as the frequency and efficiency of butterfly visits, are evidence of the close relationship between butterflies and M. tenuifolia, and also of the efficiency of these insects as pollinators. PMID:24628969

  13. Enhanced sensitivity in a butterfly gyroscope with a hexagonal oblique beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dingbang; Cao, Shijie; Hou, Zhanqiang; Chen, Zhihua; Wang, Xinghua; Wu, Xuezhong

    2015-04-01

    A new approach to improve the performance of a butterfly gyroscope is developed. The methodology provides a simple way to improve the gyroscope's sensitivity and stability, by reducing the resonant frequency mismatch between the drive and sense modes. This method was verified by simulations and theoretical analysis. The size of the hexagonal section oblique beam is the major factor that influences the resonant frequency mismatch. A prototype, which has the appropriately sized oblique beam, was fabricated using precise, time-controlled multilayer pre-buried masks. The performance of this prototype was compared with a non-tuned gyroscope. The scale factor of the prototype reaches 30.13 mV/ ?/s, which is 15 times larger than that obtained from the non-tuned gyroscope. The bias stability of the prototype is 0.8 ?/h, which is better than the 5.2 ?/h of the non-tuned devices.

  14. Selection on male sex pheromone composition contributes to butterfly reproductive isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacquet, P M B; Brattström, O; Wang, H-L; Allen, C E; Löfstedt, C; Brakefield, P M; Nieberding, C M

    2015-04-01

    Selection can facilitate diversification by inducing character displacement in mate choice traits that reduce the probability of maladaptive mating between lineages. Although reproductive character displacement (RCD) has been demonstrated in two-taxa case studies, the frequency of this process in nature is still debated. Moreover, studies have focused primarily on visual and acoustic traits, despite the fact that chemical communication is probably the most common means of species recognition. Here, we showed in a large, mostly sympatric, butterfly genus, a strong pattern of recurrent RCD for predicted male sex pheromone composition, but not for visual mate choice traits. Our results suggest that RCD is not anecdotal, and that selection for divergence in male sex pheromone composition contributed to reproductive isolation within the Bicyclus genus. We propose that selection may target olfactory mate choice traits as a more common sensory modality to ensure reproductive isolation among diverging lineages than previously envisaged. PMID:25740889

  15. Two short mass-loss events that unveil the binary heart of Minkowski's Butterfly Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Castro-Carrizo, A; Bujarrabal, V; Chesneau, O; Cox, P; Bachiller, R

    2012-01-01

    Studying the appearance and properties of bipolar winds is critical to understand the stellar evolution from the AGB to the planetary nebula (PN) phase. Many uncertainties exist regarding the presence and role of binary stellar systems, mainly due to the deficit of conclusive observational evidences. We investigate the extended equatorial distribution around the early bipolar planetary nebula M 2-9 ("Minkowski's Butterfly Nebula") to gather new information on the mechanism of the axial ejections. Interferometric millimeter observations of molecular emission provide the most comprehensive view of the equatorial mass distribution and kinematics in early PNe. Here we present subarcsecond angular-resolution observations of the 12CO J=2-1 line and continuum emission with the Plateau de Bure interferometer. The data reveal two ring-shaped and eccentric structures at the equatorial basis of the two coaxial optical lobes. The two rings were formed during short mass-loss episodes (~ 40 yr), separated by ~ 500 yr. Thei...

  16. Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea from two forest fragments in northern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonfantti, D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to contribute to the knowledge concerning diversity of the butterflies in the Atlantic Rainforest ofthe state of Rio Grande do Sul, a systematic survey was carried out in the city of Frederico Westphalen from November2006 to June 2007, in two sampling localities. The total sampling efforts was 80 h, in which 1.785 samples wererecorded, distributed in 161 species. From the latter, 51.57 % (83 belongs to the Nymphalidae family, Hesperiidae20.49 % (33, Pieridae 8.69 % (14, Riodinidae 6.83 % (11, Papilionidae 6.21 % (10, Lycaenidae 6.21 % (10.Regarding the sampled species, 79.50 % (128 were recorded at both studied sites.

  17. A candidate locus for variation in dispersal rate in a butterfly metapopulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Christoph R; Saastamoinen, Marjo; Marden, James H; Hanski, Ilkka

    2005-01-01

    Frequent extinctions of local populations in metapopulations create opportunities for migrant females to establish new populations. In a metapopulation of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), more mobile individuals are more likely to establish new populations, especially in habitat patches that are poorly connected to existing populations. Here we show that flight metabolic rate and the frequency of a specific allele of the metabolic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase (pgi) were both highest in newly established, isolated populations. Furthermore, genotypes with this pgi allele had elevated flight metabolic rates. These results suggest that genetic variation in pgi or a closely linked locus has a direct effect on flight metabolism, dispersal rate, and thereby on metapopulation dynamics in this species. These results also contribute to an emerging understanding of the mechanisms by which population turnover in heterogeneous landscapes may maintain genetic and phenotypic variation across populations. PMID:16271968

  18. External Morphology of Adult Citrus Butterfly, Papilio memnon (Linnaeus, 1758) and Seasonal Abundance of the Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexual dimorphism is obvious in Papilio memnon. The female adult resembles that of Papilio polytes another citrus butterfly species. However, marked difference is observed in the size and red spots on the base of the forewing. The adult male P. memnon is blue black in colour and red spots are present on the base of the underside of both for and hind wings. The win span of sexes ranges from 120mm to 150mm. The breeding season is from end of June to early part of January, the peak being in the month of November. The recorded diagnostic external features of this studied species are described supported by scaled photographs. Seasonal abundance of this species is also mentioned. It is learnt through the internet that a mounted specimen of this species fetched $2.95 in Malaysia. It is therefore concluded that successful rearing of this species in captivity could be of benefit to the country.

  19. Ten species in one: DNA barcoding reveals cryptic species in the neotropical skipper butterfly Astraptes fulgerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Paul D N; Penton, Erin H; Burns, John M; Janzen, Daniel H; Hallwachs, Winnie

    2004-10-12

    Astraptes fulgerator, first described in 1775, is a common and widely distributed neotropical skipper butterfly (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae). We combine 25 years of natural history observations in northwestern Costa Rica with morphological study and DNA barcoding of museum specimens to show that A. fulgerator is a complex of at least 10 species in this region. Largely sympatric, these taxa have mostly different caterpillar food plants, mostly distinctive caterpillars, and somewhat different ecosystem preferences but only subtly differing adults with no genitalic divergence. Our results add to the evidence that cryptic species are prevalent in tropical regions, a critical issue in efforts to document global species richness. They also illustrate the value of DNA barcoding, especially when coupled with traditional taxonomic tools, in disclosing hidden diversity. PMID:15465915

  20. Magnetisation oscillations, boundary conditions and the Hofstadter butterfly in graphene flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New quantum oscillations in the magnetization of graphene flakes induced by magnetic fields, which depend on the shape of the flake, are described. At small values of the field they are due to the Aharonov-Bohm effect and with increasing field they are transformed into dHvA oscillations. The specific form of the dHvA oscillations is analyzed in terms of their energy spectrum, which has a form of Hofstadter's butterfly. Numerical results using a lattice tight-binding model and a continuum Dirac equation are presented and compared. Possible experiments to investigate the quantum oscillations in Moire and graphene anti-dot superlattices are discussed. (copyright 2014 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Creation of effective magnetic fields in optical lattices The Hofstadter butterfly for cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Jaksch, D

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of neutral atoms in a 2D optical lattice which traps two distinct internal states of the atoms in different columns. Two Raman lasers are used to coherently transfer atoms from one internal state to the other, thereby causing hopping between the different columns. By adjusting the laser parameters appropriately we can induce a non vanishing phase of particles moving along a closed path on the lattice. This phase is proportional to the enclosed area and we thus simulate a magnetic flux through the lattice. This setup is described by a Hamiltonian identical to the one for electrons on a lattice subject to a magnetic field and thus allows us to study this equivalent situation under very well defined controllable conditions. We consider the limiting case of huge magnetic fields -- which is not experimentally accessible for electrons in metals -- where a fractal band structure, the Hofstadter butterfly, characterizes the system.

  2. Online postwelding shift compensation in butterfly laser module packages based on welding spot distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hao; Wang, Xin; Qiang, Wenyi

    2009-12-01

    Postwelding shift (PWS) is the dominant barrier to having high packaging yields. Previous investigation revealed that the PWS in butterfly laser diode module packaging could be mitigated by properly choosing weld process parameters such as welding sequence, clip design, pulse shape, and so on. We study the effect of the distance between the front (first) and the rear (second) welding spots numerically by the finite element method with a more realistic physics-based laser welding model. A novel PWS online measurement system based on the ultra-high-precision laser displacement meter is established to experimentally validate the effect of welding spot distance. Results from both methods are compared. Finally, we show that the influence of welding spot distance can be used to compensate PWS to some extent, if a proper welding spot distance is employed.

  3. Bi-directional triplexer with butterfly MMI coupler using SU-8 polymer waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareš, David; Je?ábek, Vít?zslav; Prajzler, Václav

    2015-01-01

    We report about a design of a bi-directional planar optical multiplex/demultiplex filter (triplexer) for the optical part of planar hybrid WDM bi-directional transceiver in fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) PON applications. The triplex lightwave circuit is based on the Epoxy Novolak Resin SU-8 waveguides on the silica-on-silicon substrate with Polymethylmethacrylate cladding layer. The triplexer is comprised of a linear butterfly concept of multimode interference (MMI) coupler separating downstream optical signals of 1490 nm and 1550 nm. For the upstream channel of 1310 nm, an additional directional coupler (DC) is used to add optical signal of 1310 nm propagating in opposite direction. The optical triplexer was designed and optimized using beam propagation method. The insertion losses, crosstalk attenuation, and extinction ratio for all three inputs/outputs were investigated. The intended triplexer was designed using the parameters of the separated DC and MMI filter to approximate the idealized direct connection of both devices.

  4. Finite element modeling of the radiative properties of Morpho butterfly wing scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejdoubi, A.; Andraud, C.; Berthier, S.; Lafait, J.; Boulenguez, J.; Richalot, E.

    2013-02-01

    With the aim of furthering the explanation of iridescence in Morpho butterflies, we developed an optical model based on the finite-element (FE) method, taking more accurately into account the exact morphology of the wing, origin of iridescence. We modeled the photonic structure of a basal scale of the Morpho rhetenor wing as a three-dimensional object, infinite in one direction, with a shape copied from a TEM image, and made out of a slightly absorbing dielectric material. Periodic boundary conditions were used in the FE method to model the wing periodic structure and perfectly matched layers permitted the free-space scattering computation. Our results are twofold: first, we verified on a simpler structure, that our model yields the same result as the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA), and second, we demonstrated that it is necessary to assume an absorption gradient in the true structure, to account for experimental reflectivity measured on a real wing.

  5. Magnetisation oscillations, boundary conditions and the Hofstadter butterfly in graphene flakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang; Brada, Matej; Kusmartsev, Feodor V. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University (United Kingdom); Mele, Eugene J. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    New quantum oscillations in the magnetization of graphene flakes induced by magnetic fields, which depend on the shape of the flake, are described. At small values of the field they are due to the Aharonov-Bohm effect and with increasing field they are transformed into dHvA oscillations. The specific form of the dHvA oscillations is analyzed in terms of their energy spectrum, which has a form of Hofstadter's butterfly. Numerical results using a lattice tight-binding model and a continuum Dirac equation are presented and compared. Possible experiments to investigate the quantum oscillations in Moire and graphene anti-dot superlattices are discussed. (copyright 2014 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Critical Incident Analysis and the Semiosphere: The Curious Case of the Spitting Butterfly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Hodge

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In January 2007, media outlets across Australia reported the local court decision Police v Rose. Mr Rose pleaded guilty and the presiding magistrate recorded no conviction. This event sparked a ‘butterfly effect’ that culminated in legislative amendments changing the make-up of the body responsible for oversight of judges in New South Wales. Key players failed to observe the doctrine of the separation of powers; while others called for its observation.   None of this would have been foreseeable to Mr Rose or the two transit officers on the night he was detained. This paper uses complexity theory and digital media analysis to locate flashpoints around which critical incidents occur; and what the unexpected flow-on effects reveal about the host society.

  7. Critical Incident Analysis and the Semiosphere: The Curious Case of the Spitting Butterfly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Hodge

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In January 2007, media outlets across Australia reported the local court decision Police v Rose. Mr Rose pleaded guilty and the presiding magistrate recorded no conviction. This event sparked a ‘butterfly effect’ that culminated in legislative amendments changing the make-up of the body responsible for oversight of judges in New South Wales. Key players failed to observe the doctrine of the separation of powers; while others called for its observation.   None of this would have been foreseeable to Mr Rose or the two transit officers on the night he was detained. This paper uses complexity theory and digital media analysis to locate flashpoints around which critical incidents occur; and what the unexpected flow-on effects reveal about the host society.

  8. Phenotypic plasticity in the range-margin population of the lycaenid butterfly Zizeeria maha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otaki Joji M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many butterfly species have been experiencing the northward range expansion and physiological adaptation, probably due to climate warming. Here, we document an extraordinary field case of a species of lycaenid butterfly, Zizeeria maha, for which plastic phenotypes of wing color-patterns were revealed at the population level in the course of range expansion. Furthermore, we examined whether this outbreak of phenotypic changes was able to be reproduced in a laboratory. Results In the recently expanded northern range margins of this species, more than 10% of the Z. maha population exhibited characteristic color-pattern modifications on the ventral wings for three years. We physiologically reproduced similar phenotypes by an artificial cold-shock treatment of a normal southern population, and furthermore, we genetically reproduced a similar phenotype after selective breeding of a normal population for ten generations, demonstrating that the cold-shock-induced phenotype was heritable and partially assimilated genetically in the breeding line. Similar genetic process might have occurred in the previous and recent range-margin populations as well. Relatively minor modifications expressed in the tenth generation of the breeding line together with other data suggest a role of founder effect in this field case. Conclusions Our results support the notion that the outbreak of the modified phenotypes in the recent range-margin population was primed by the revelation of plastic phenotypes in response to temperature stress and by the subsequent genetic process in the previous range-margin population, followed by migration and temporal establishment of genetically unstable founders in the recent range margins. This case presents not only an evolutionary role of phenotypic plasticity in the field but also a novel evolutionary aspect of range expansion at the species level.

  9. Rural aquaculture as a sustainable alternative for forest conservation in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, José; Manzo-Delgado, Lilia L; Alcántara-Ayala, Irasema

    2014-06-01

    Forest conservation plays a significant role in environmental sustainability. In Mexico only 8.48 million ha of forest are used for conservation of biodiversity. Payment for Environmental Services in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve, one of the most important national protected areas, contributes to the conservation of these forests. In the Reserve, production of rainbow trout has been important for the rural communities who need to conserve the forest cover in order to maintain the hibernation cycle of the butterfly. Aquaculture is a highly productive activity for these protected areas, since it harnesses the existing water resources. In this study, changes from 1999 to 2012 in vegetation and land-use cover in the El Lindero basin within the Reserve were evaluated in order to determine the conservation status and to consider the feasibility of aquaculture as a means of sustainable development at community level. Evaluation involved stereoscopic interpretation of digital aerial photographs from 1999 to 2012 at 1:10,000 scale, comparative analysis by orthocorrected mosaics and restitution on the mosaics. Between 1999 and 2012, forested land recovered by 28.57 ha (2.70%) at the expense of non-forested areas, although forest degradation was 3.59%. Forest density increased by 16.87%. In the 46 ha outside the Reserve, deforestation spread by 0.26%, and land use change was 0.11%. The trend towards change in forest cover is closely related to conservation programmes, particularly payment for not extracting timber, reforestation campaigns and surveillance, whose effects have been exploited for the development of rural aquaculture; this is a new way to improve the socio-economic status of the population, to avoid logging and to achieve environmental sustainability in the Reserve. PMID:24582304

  10. Restricted within-habitat movement and time-constrained egg laying of female Maculinea rebeli butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korösi, Adám; Orvössy, Noémi; Batáry, Péter; Kövér, Szilvia; Peregovits, László

    2008-05-01

    The movement of butterflies within habitat patches is usually assumed to be random, although few studies have shown this unambiguously. In the case of the highly specialized genus Maculinea, two contradictory hypotheses exist to explain the movement and distribution of imagos within patches: (1) due to the high spatial variance of survival rates among caterpillars, the "risk-spreading" hypothesis predicts that females will tend to make linear flight paths in order to maximize their net displacement and scatter the eggs as widely as possible; and (2) recent mark-release-recapture (MRR) data suggest that within-habitat displacement of some Maculinea species is constrained and that adults may establish home ranges. We tested both hypothesis by analysing the movement pattern of individuals. We also investigated whether egg laying is time constrained, which would enhance the trade-off between flying and egg laying. Thirty females of Maculinea rebeli (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) were tracked within a single population in Central Hungary. Their egg-laying behaviour and individual patterns of movement were recorded, and the latter were compared with random walk model predictions. The population was also sampled by MRR to estimate survival rates, and four non-mated, freshly eclosed females were dissected to assess their potential egg load. Net squared displacement of females was significantly lower than predicted by the random walk model and declined continuously after the 15th move. The ratio of net displacement and cumulative move length decreased with the number of moves, supporting the hypothesis that Maculinea butterflies establish home ranges. We found that low survival and a low rate of egg laying prevented females from laying their potential number of eggs within their lifespan. Time limitation increased the cost of movement, providing another possible explanation for the restricted movement of females. PMID:18305965

  11. Molecular-level variation affects population growth in a butterfly metapopulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanski, Ilkka; Saccheri, Ilik

    2006-05-01

    The dynamics of natural populations are thought to be dominated by demographic and environmental processes with little influence of intraspecific genetic variation and natural selection, apart from inbreeding depression possibly reducing population growth in small populations. Here we analyse hundreds of well-characterised local populations in a large metapopulation of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia), which persists in a balance between stochastic local extinctions and recolonisations in a network of 4,000 discrete habitat patches. We show that the allelic composition of the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) has a significant effect on the growth of local populations, consistent with previously reported effects of allelic variation on flight metabolic performance and fecundity in the Glanville fritillary and Colias butterflies. The strength and the sign of the molecular effect on population growth are sensitive to the ecological context (the area and spatial connectivity of the habitat patches), which affects genotype-specific gene flow and the influence of migration on the dynamics of local populations. The biological significance of the results for Pgi is underscored by lack of any association between population growth and allelic variation at six other loci typed in the same material. In demonstrating, to our knowledge for the first time, that molecular variation in a candidate gene affects population growth, this study challenges the perception that differential performance of individual genotypes, leading to differential fitness, is irrelevant to population dynamics. These results also demonstrate that the spatial configuration of habitat and spatial dynamics of populations contribute to maintenance of Pgi polymorphism in this species. PMID:16620151

  12. Deformation and concentration fluctuations under stretching in a polymer network with free chains. The ''butterfly'' effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering gives access to concentration fluctuations of mobile labeled polymer chains embedded in a polymer network. At rest they appear progressively larger than for random mixing, with increasing ratio. Under uniaxial stretching, they decrease towards ideal mixing along the direction perpendicular to stretching, and can grow strongly along the parallel one, including the zero scattering vector q limit. This gives rise to intensity contours with double-winged patterns, in the shape of the figure '8', or of 'butterfly'. Random crosslinking and end-linking of monodisperse chains have both been studied. The strength of the 'butterfly' effect increases with the molecular weight of the free chains, the crosslinking ratio, the network heterogeneity, and the elongation ratio. Eventually, the signal collapses on an 'asymptotic' function I(q), of increasing correlation length with the elongation ratio. Deformation appears heterogeneous, maximal for soft areas, where the mobile chains localize preferentially. This could be due to spontaneous fluctuations, or linked to frozen fluctuations of the crosslink density. However, disagreement with the corresponding theoretical expressions makes it necessary to account for the spatial correlations of crosslink density, and their progressive unscreening as displayed by the asymptotic behavior. Networks containing pending labeled chains and free labeled stars lead to more precise understanding of the diffusion of free species and the heterogeneity of the deformation. It seems that the latter occurs even without diffusion for heterogeneous enough networks. In extreme cases (of the crosslinking parameters), the spatial correlations display on apparent fractal behavior, of dimensions 2 to 2.5, which is discussed here in terms of random clusters. 200 refs., 95 figs., 21 tabs., 10 appends

  13. Host plant choice in the comma butterfly-larval choosiness may ameliorate effects of indiscriminate oviposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberale-Stille, Gabriella; Söderlind, Lina; Janz, Niklas; Nylin, Sören

    2014-08-01

    In most phytophagous insects, the larval diet strongly affects future fitness and in species that do not feed on plant parts as adults, larval diet is the main source of nitrogen. In many of these insect-host plant systems, the immature larvae are considered to be fully dependent on the choice of the mothers, who, in turn, possess a highly developed host recognition system. This circumstance allows for a potential mother-offspring conflict, resulting in the female maximizing her fecundity at the expense of larval performance on suboptimal hosts. In two experiments, we aimed to investigate this relationship in the polyphagous comma butterfly, Polygonia c-album, by comparing the relative acceptance of low- and medium-ranked hosts between females and neonate larvae both within individuals between life stages, and between mothers and their offspring. The study shows a variation between females in oviposition acceptance of low-ranked hosts, and that the degree of acceptance in the mothers correlates with the probability of acceptance of the same host in the larvae. We also found a negative relationship between stages within individuals as there was a higher acceptance of lower ranked hosts in females who had abandoned said host as a larva. Notably, however, neonate larvae of the comma butterfly did not unconditionally accept to feed from the least favorable host species even when it was the only food source. Our results suggest the possibility that the disadvantages associated with a generalist oviposition strategy can be decreased by larval participation in host plant choice. PMID:24006353

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome recovered from the gut metagenome of overwintering monarch butterflies, Danaus plexippus (L.) (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Danainae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2014-12-01

    We present a 15,314?bp mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence from monarch butterflies overwintering in Mexico. The complete mitogenome was generated by next generation sequencing techniques and was reconstructed by iterative assembly of reads from a metagenomic study of pooled butterfly gut DNA. The mitogenome codes for 13 putative protein coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, the large and small rRNA genes, and contains the A?+?T-rich sequence corresponding to the control region. The consensus sequence presented here has a depth of coverage of 142-fold and only three putative single nucleotide polymorphisms could be detected. The recovered D. plexippus mitogenome represents the second analyzed for the subfamily Danainae and accordingly, the closest available sequenced mitogenome was found to be the one corresponding to Euploea mulciber (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Danainae). PMID:23834084

  15. Tight-binding electrons on triangular and kagome lattices under staggered modulated magnetic fields: quantum Hall effects and Hofstadter butterflies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the tight-binding models of electrons on a two-dimensional triangular lattice and kagome lattice under staggered modulated magnetic fields. Such fields have two components: a uniform-flux part with strength ?, and a staggered-flux part with strength ??. Various properties of the Hall conductances and Hofstadter butterflies are studied. When ? is fixed, variation of ?? leads to the quantum Hall transitions and Chern numbers of Landau subbands being redistributed between neighboring pairs. The energy spectra with nonzero ??s have similar fractal structures but quite different energy gaps compared with the original Hofstadter butterflies of ?? = 0. Moreover, the fan-like structure of Landau levels in the low magnetic field region is also modified appreciably by ??.

  16. Examining monophyly in a large radiation of Madagascan butterflies (Lepidoptera: Satyrinae: Mycalesina) based on mitochondrial DNA data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, E; Lees, D C; Vane-Wright, R I; Kremen, C; Leonard, J A; Wayne, R K

    2001-09-01

    The satyrine butterfly subtribe Mycalesina has undergone one of the more spectacular evolutionary radiations of butterflies in the Old World tropics. Perhaps the most phenotypically pronounced diversification of the group has occurred in the Malagasy region, where 68 currently recognized species are divided among five genera. Here, we report the results of phylogenetic analyses of sequence data from the cytochrome c oxidase II and cytochrome b mitochondrial genes, for a total of 54 mycalesine taxa, mostly from Madagascar. These molecular data complement an existing data set based on male morphological characters. The molecular results support the suggestion from morphology that three of the five Malagasy genera are paraphyletic and support the monophyly of at least three major morphological clades. Novel hypotheses of terminal taxon pairs are generated by the molecular data. Dense taxon sampling appears to be crucial for elucidating phylogenetic relationships within this large radiation. A potentially complex scenario for the origin of Malagasy mycalesines is proposed. PMID:11527471

  17. Diversity, Ecology and Herbivory of Hairstreak Butterflies (Theclinae) Associated with the Velvet Tree, Miconia calvescens in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Badenes-pe?e?rez, F. R.; Alfaro-alpi?i?zar, M. A.; Johnson, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    Larvae of three species of hairstreak butterflies in the subfamily Theclinae (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) were found feeding on developing inflorescences, flower buds, and immature fruits of the velvet tree, Miconia calvescens DC. (Myrtales: Melastomataceae) in Costa Rica. Erora opisena (Druce), Parrhasius polibetes (Cramer), and Temecla paron (Godman and Salvin) were studied in association with M. calvescens, an uncommon tree in its natural range in the neotropics and a target for biocontrol as...

  18. Effect of Tree-Fall Gaps on Fruit-Feeding Nymphalid Butterfly Assemblages in a Peruvian Rain Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Pardonnet, Sylvia; Beck, Harald; Milberg, Per; Bergman, Karl-olof

    2013-01-01

    One of the main natural disturbances that affects the structure of rain forests is treefalls, frequently resulting in gaps. Tree-fall gaps can bring drastic changes in environmental conditions compared with the undisturbed understory. We investigated the effect of tree-fall gaps on fruit-feeding butterfly (Nymphalidae) species assemblages in an undisturbed lowland rain forest in southeastern Peru. We used fruit-baited traps suspended 2 m above ground in 15 tree-fall gaps ranging in area from...

  19. Conservation potential of abandoned military areas matches that of established reserves: Plants and butterflies in the Czech Republic.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    ?ížek, O.; Vrba, Pavel; Beneš, Ji?í; Hrázský, Z.; Koptík, J.; Ku?era, T.; Marhoul, P.; Záme?ník, J.; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 8, ?. 1 (2013), e53124. ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP505/10/2167 Grant ostatní: MŽP(CZ) SP/2D3/153/08; MŽP(CZ) VaV620/2/03; GA J?U(CZ) 144/2010/100 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : butterflies * millitary areas * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  20. Does the surrounding landscape heterogeneity affect the butterflies of insular grassland reserves? A contrast between composition and configuration.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlancarová, Jana; Beneš, Ji?í; Kristýnek, M.; Kepka, P.; Konvi?ka, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 18, ?. 1 (2014), s. 1-12. ISSN 1366-638X R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP505/10/2167 Grant ostatní: GA JU(CZ) 114/2012/P; GA JU(CZ) 144/2010/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : butterfly communities * calcareous grasslands * GIS Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.789, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10841-013-9607-3#

  1. Experimental Examination of Intraspecific Density-Dependent Competition during the Breeding Period in Monarch Butterflies (Danaus plexippus)

    OpenAIRE

    Flockhart, D. T. Tyler; Martin, Tara G.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    A central goal of population ecology is to identify the factors that regulate population growth. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) in eastern North America re-colonize the breeding range over several generations that result in population densities that vary across space and time during the breeding season. We used laboratory experiments to measure the strength of density-dependent intraspecific competition on egg laying rate and larval survival and then applied our results to density est...

  2. Trends in Deforestation and Forest Degradation after a Decade of Monitoring in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal, Omar; Lo?pez-garci?a, Jose?; Rendo?n-salinas, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We used aerial photographs, satellite images, and field surveys to monitor forest cover in the core zones of the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Mexico from 2001 to 2012. We used our data to assess the effectiveness of conservation actions that involved local, state, and federal authorities and community members (e.g., local landowners and private and civil organizations) in one of the world’s most iconic protected areas. From 2001 through 2012, 1254 ha were deforested (i.e., cleared...

  3. Migratory Connectivity of the Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus): Patterns of Spring Re-Colonization in Eastern North America

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Nathan G.; Wassenaar, Leonard I.; Hobson, Keith A.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Each year, millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrate up to 3000 km from their overwintering grounds in central Mexico to breed in eastern North America. Malcolm et al. (1993) articulated two non-mutually exclusive hypotheses to explain how Monarchs re-colonize North America each spring. The ‘successive brood’ hypothesis proposes that monarchs migrate from Mexico to the Gulf Coast, lay eggs and die, leaving northern re-colonization of the breeding range to subsequent gener...

  4. Community Structure of Skipper Butterflies (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae) along Elevational Gradients in Brazilian Atlantic Forest Reflects Vegetation Type Rather than Altitude

    OpenAIRE

    Carneiro, Eduardo; Mielke, Olaf Hermann Hendrik; Casagrande, Mirna Martins; Fiedler, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Species turnover across elevational gradients has matured into an important paradigm of community ecology. Here, we tested whether ecological and phylogenetic structure of skipper butterfly assemblages is more strongly structured according to altitude or vegetation type along three elevation gradients of moderate extent in Serra do Mar, Southern Brazil. Skippers were surveyed along three different mountain transects, and data on altitude and vegetation type of every collection site were recor...

  5. Estimating the relative fitness of local adaptive peaks: the aerodynamic costs of flight in mimetic passion-vine butterflies Heliconius

    OpenAIRE

    Srygley, R. B.; Ellington, C. P.

    1999-01-01

    In a related paper, we demonstrated that mimetic Heliconius butterflies have converged in wing-beat frequency and degree of asymmetry in the wing motion, whereas sister species are dissimilar in these same traits. Warning signals of sympatric, distasteful species converge in evolutionary models in order to educate their predators more efficiently that the signal is associated with unprofitable prey. Barring other constraints, the behaviours of the different co-mimetic pairs should ultimately ...

  6. Highly conserved gene order and numerous novel repetitive elements in genomic regions linked to wing pattern variation in Heliconius butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Papa, Riccardo; Morrison, Clayton M.; Walters, James R.; Counterman, Brian A.; Chen, Rui; Halder, Georg; Ferguson, Laura; Ffrench-constant, Richard; Kapan, Durrell D.; Jiggins, Chris D.; Chamberlain, Nicola L.; Reed, Robert D.; Mcmillan, William O.

    2008-01-01

    Background: With over 20 parapatric races differing in their warningly colored wing patterns, the butterfly Heliconius erato provides a fascinating example of an adaptive radiation. Together with matching races of its co-mimic Heliconius melpomene, H. erato also represents a textbook case of Müllerian mimicry, a phenomenon where common warning signals are shared amongst noxious organisms. It is of great interest to identify the specific genes that control the mimetic wing patterns of H. erat...

  7. Comparing the Response of Birds and Butterflies to Vegetation-Based Mountain Ecotones Using Boundary Detection Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Kent, Rafi; Levanoni, Oded; Banker, Eran; Pe’er, Guy; Kark, Salit

    2013-01-01

    Mountains provide an opportunity to examine changes in biodiversity across environmental gradients and areas of transition (ecotones). Mountain ecotones separate vegetation belts. Here, we aimed to examine whether transition areas for birds and butterflies spatially correspond with ecotones between three previously described altitudinal vegetation belts on Mt. Hermon, northern Israel. These include the Mediterranean Maquis, xero-montane open forest and Tragacanthic mountain steppe vegetation ...

  8. Differences in the Aerobic Capacity of Flight Muscles between Butterfly Populations and Species with Dissimilar Flight Abilities

    OpenAIRE

    Rauhama?ki, Virve; Wolfram, Joy; Jokitalo, Eija; Hanski, Ilkka; Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat loss and climate change are rapidly converting natural habitats and thereby increasing the significance of dispersal capacity for vulnerable species. Flight is necessary for dispersal in many insects, and differences in dispersal capacity may reflect dissimilarities in flight muscle aerobic capacity. In a large metapopulation of the Glanville fritillary butterfly in the Åland Islands in Finland, adults disperse frequently between small local populations. Individuals found in newly es...

  9. An experimental displacement and over 50 years of tag-recoveries show that monarch butterflies are not true navigators

    OpenAIRE

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Derbyshire, Rachael; Stalleicken, Julia; Mouritsen, Ole Ø.; Frost, Barrie J.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) breeding in eastern North America are famous for their annual fall migration to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. However, the mechanisms they use to successfully reach these sites remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether monarchs are true navigators who can determine their location relative to their final destination using both a “compass” and a “map”. Using flight simulators, we recorded the orientation of wild-caught monarchs in so...

  10. Vertical settling and radial segregation of large dust grains in the circumstellar disk of the Butterfly Star

    OpenAIRE

    Gra?fe, Christian; Wolf, Sebastian; Guilloteau, Stephane; Dutrey, Anne; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Pontoppidan, Klaus; Sauter, Ju?rgen

    2013-01-01

    Context: Circumstellar disks are considered to be the environment for the formation of planets. The growth of dust grains in these disks is the first step in the core accretion-gas capture planet formation scenario. Indicators and evidence of disk evolution can be traced in spatially resolved images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) of these objects. Aims: We develop a model for the dust phase of the edge-on oriented circumstellar disk of the Butterfly Star which ...

  11. Adult nutrition and butterfly fitness: effects of diet quality on reproductive output, egg composition, and egg hatching success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Klaus H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Lepidoptera it was historically believed that adult butterflies rely primarily on larval-derived nutrients for reproduction and somatic maintenance. However, recent studies highlight the complex interactions between storage reserves and adult income, and that the latter may contribute significantly to reproduction. Effects of adult diet were commonly assessed by determining the number and/or size of the eggs produced, whilst its consequences for egg composition and offspring viability were largely neglected (as is generally true for insects. We here specifically focus on these latter issues by using the fruit-feeding tropical butterfly Bicyclus anynana, which is highly dependent on adult-derived carbohydrates for reproduction. Results Adult diet of female B. anynana had pronounced effects on fecundity, egg composition and egg hatching success, with butterflies feeding on the complex nutrition of banana fruit performing best. Adding vitamins and minerals to a sucrose-based diet increased fecundity, but not offspring viability. All other groups (plain sucrose solution, sucrose solution enriched with lipids or yeast had a substantially lower fecundity and egg hatching success compared to the banana group. Differences were particularly pronounced later in life, presumably indicating the depletion of essential nutrients in sucrose-fed females. Effects of adult diet on egg composition were not straightforward, indicating complex interactions among specific compounds. There was some evidence that total egg energy and water content were related to hatching success, while egg protein, lipid, glycogen and free carbohydrate content did not seem to limit successful development. Conclusion The patterns shown here exemplify the complexity of reproductive resource allocation in B. anynana, and the need to consider egg composition and offspring viability when trying to estimate the effects of adult nutrition on fitness in this butterfly and other insects.

  12. Adult nutrition and butterfly fitness: effects of diet quality on reproductive output, egg composition, and egg hatching success

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann Klaus H; Lorenz Matthias W; Geister Thorin L; Fischer Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background In the Lepidoptera it was historically believed that adult butterflies rely primarily on larval-derived nutrients for reproduction and somatic maintenance. However, recent studies highlight the complex interactions between storage reserves and adult income, and that the latter may contribute significantly to reproduction. Effects of adult diet were commonly assessed by determining the number and/or size of the eggs produced, whilst its consequences for egg composition and ...

  13. Spectral butterfly, mixed Dirac-Schr\\"odinger fermion behavior and topological states in armchair uniaxial strained graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Roman-taboada, Pedro; Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2014-01-01

    An exact mapping of the tight-binding Hamiltonian for a graphene's nanoribbon under any armchair uniaxial strain into an effective one-dimensional system is presented. As an application, for a periodic modulation we have found a gap opening at the Fermi level and a complex fractal spectrum, akin to the Hofstadter butterfly resulting from the Harper model. The latter can be explained by the commensurability or incommensurability nature of the resulting effective potential. Wh...

  14. Multi-generational long-distance migration of insects: studying the painted lady butterfly in the Western Palaearctic

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanescu, Constanti?; Pa?ramo, Ferran; A?kesson, Susanne; Alarco?n, Marta; A?vila, Anna; Brereton, Tom; Carnicer, Jofre; Cassar, Louis F.; Fox, Richard; Helio?la?, Janne; Hill, Jane K.; Hirneisen, Norbert; Kjelle?n, Nils; Ku?hn, Elisabeth; Kuussaari, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Long-range, seasonal migration is a widespread phenomenon among insects, allowing them to track and exploit abundant but ephemeral resources over vast geographical areas. However, the basic patterns of how species shift across multiple locations and seasons are unknown in most cases, even though migrant species comprise an important component of the temperate-zone biota. The painted lady butterfly Vanessa cardui is such an example; a cosmopolitan continuously-brooded species which migrates ea...

  15. Wolbachia Infections Mimic Cryptic Speciation in Two Parasitic Butterfly Species, Phengaris teleius and P. nausithous (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Ritter, Sylvia; Michalski, Stefan G.; Settele, Josef; Wiemers, Martin; Fric, Zdenek F.; Sielezniew, Marcin; S?as?ic?, Martina; Rozier, Yves; Durka, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Deep mitochondrial divergence within species may result from cryptic speciation, from phylogeographic isolation or from endosymbiotic bacteria like Wolbachia that manipulate host reproduction. Phengaris butterflies are social parasites that spend most of their life in close relationship with ants. Previously, cryptic speciation has been hypothesised for two Phengaris species based on divergent mtDNA sequences. Since Phengaris species are highly endangered, the existence of cryptic species wou...

  16. Estimation of habitat quality based on plant community, and effects of isolation in a network of butterfly habitat patches

    OpenAIRE

    Sawchik, J.; Dufre?ne, Marc; Lebrun, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Minimum viable site networks are crucial for many threatened species but their design is always a difficult procedure. The present study investigated methods to estimate habitat quality of patches, in an ecological network for five butterfly species (Brenthis ino, Clossiana selene, Lycaena helle, Lycaena hippothoe, Proclossiana eunomia) inhabiting wet meadows. Abundance predictions were performed on the basis of botanical relevés with a multiple-species approach combining canonical correspon...

  17. [Butterfly diversity and faunal characteristics on the south slope of Taibai Mountain, Shaanxi Province of Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ke; Fang, Li-Jun; Shang, Su-Qin; Zhang, Ya-Lin

    2013-06-01

    An investigation was conducted on the butterflies on the south slope of Taibai Mountain from April to October, 2009, with their diversity index, evenness index, dominance index, and species richness calculated and analyzed. A total of 126 species were recorded, belonging to 77 genera and 5 families. Nymphalidae had the highest diversity index (3.3621) and species richness (9.9363), and Pieridae had the highest dominance index (0.0573) and evenness index (0.8352). The genera and species were most abundant in June-August, the diversity index was the highest in July (3.4094), and the species richness was the highest in August (10.7). The bio-geographic component analysis of 124 species (other 2 species were not identified) showed that the widely distributed species were most abundant (51 species), occupying 40.5% of the total, followed by Palaearctic species (41 species), occupying 32.5%, and Oriental species were the least (32 species), occupying 25.4%, which suggested that Taibai Mountain could be the transitional area of Palearctic and Oriental regions. The comparative analysis of the butterfly diversity and faunal characteristics on the south and north slopes of Taibai Mountain showed that there were 85 shared species, and the similarity coefficient was 62.0%, indicating that the butterfly fauna had definite difference between the two slopes though they were geographically in proximity. PMID:24066540

  18. Stress-induced color-pattern modifications and evolution of the Painted Lady butterflies Vanessa cardui and Vanessa kershawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Joji M

    2007-08-01

    It has been proposed that phenotypic plasticity and genetic assimilation through natural selection partly determine the direction of divergent selection that eventually results in speciation. To elucidate a process of butterfly color-pattern evolution and speciation in the light of this hypothesis, morphological and physiological differences between a pair of sister species, the Painted Lady butterfly Vanessa cardui and the Australian Painted Lady butterfly Vanessa kershawi, were investigated. Ten different traits of wing color-pattern were indicated, most of which concerned the darker coloration of V. kershawi, with the notable exception of the blue foci at the center of the black focal elements only in V. kershawi. Differences in behavior and life history between the two species appeared to be minimal, but importantly, V. kershawi tends to prefer a "stressful" arid environment. The experimental treatment of pupae of V. cardui either by low temperature or by injection of thapsigargin, a stress-inducing chemical, readily produced individuals with the darker coloration and the blue foci as a result of a general stress response. These stress-induced color-pattern modifications were considered to be the revelation of phenotypic plasticity in V. cardui. Taken together, I propose that the ancestral species of V. kershawi had similar phenotypic plasticity. Natural selection exploited this plasticity and shaped the present V. kershawi as an independent species, whose specific color-pattern traits are by-products of this adaptation process. PMID:18217488

  19. A FIB/TEM study of butterfly crack formation and white etching area (WEA) microstructural changes under rolling contact fatigue in 100Cr6 bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterflies are microscopic damage features forming at subsurface material imperfections induced during rolling contact fatigue (RCF) in rolling element bearings. Butterflies can lead to degradation of the load bearing capacity of the material by their associated cracks causing premature spalling failures. Recently, butterfly formation has been cited to be related to a premature failure mode in wind turbine gearbox bearings; white structure flaking (WSF). Butterflies consist of cracks with surrounding microstructural change called ‘white etching area’ (WEA) forming wings that revolve around their initiators. The formation mechanisms of butterflies in bearing steels have been studied over the last 50 years, but are still not fully understood. This paper presents a detailed microstructural analysis of a butterfly that has initiated from a void in standard 100Cr6 bearing steel under rolling contact fatigue on a laboratory two-roller test rig under transient operating conditions. Analysis was conducted using focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, 3D reconstruction and transmission electron microscopy (STEM/TEM) methods. FIB tomography revealed an extensive presence of voids/cavities immediately adjacent to the main crack on the non-WEA side and at the crack tip. This provides evidence for a void/cavity coalescence mechanism for the butterfly cracks formation. Spherical M3C carbide deformation and dissolution as part of the microstructural change in WEA were observed in both FIB and STEM/TEM analyses, where TEM analyses also revealed the formation of superfine nano-grains (3–15 nm diameter) intersecting a dissolving spherical M3C carbide. This is evidence of the early formation of nano-grains associated with the WEA formation mechanism

  20. The application of life history information to the conservation management of Chrysoritis butterflies (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. van Hamburg

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their intricate life histories and the unique wing patterns and colouring the butterflies of the genus Chrysoritis are of significant conservation and aesthetic value. This
    overview probes into practical examples of butterfly life history research applicable to environmental management of this relatively well-known invertebrate group in South Africa. Despite the pioneer work on life histories of Chrysoritis in the past, more should be done to understand the life history of the butterflies in the wild, especially their natural host plants and the behaviour of adults and larvae. A system of voucher specimens of host plants should be introduced in South Africa. Although various host plant species in nature are used by the members of Chrysoritis, including the Chrysoritis chrysaor group, the choice of these in nature by each species is significant for conservation management and in the case of Chrysoritis aureus perhaps even as a specific characteristic.
    A revision of the ant genus Crematogaster will benefit the conservation management of Chrysoritis species since some of these ant species may consist of a number of species
    with much more restricted distributions than previously thought. Rigorous quantified tudies of population dynamics of Chrysoritis butterflies are absent and the introduction
    of such studies will benefit conservation management of these localised butterflies extensively.

  1. Preliminary characterization of iron-containing material and of neuronal assembles responsive to magnetic stimulation in the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, A.; Barrera, J.; Rizi, A.; Urrutia, J.; Gutierrez, G.

    2007-05-01

    Migration is a common process among animal groups. Most of the biological events underlying migratory behavior are yet unknown. This is especially true for the neural mechanisms and the sensory information used by migratory species to define their routes. Hence, the present work aimed at demonstrating that the Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) may use magnetic cues to define their route of migration by mapping neuronal assembles responsive to magnetic stimuli. Because research conducted in other insect species suggests that magnetite-based receptors may transduce the magnetic information into neuronal codes, we also evaluated the presence of magnetite in the body of the monarch butterfly. Our electron microscopy results demonstrate that the butterfly's head, abdomen and thorax contain iron particles of about 1-5 mm in diameter. Accordingly, Prussian blue histochemical techniques revealed the presence of abundant ferric deposits in diverse regions of the nervous system and the ventral abdomen. In contrast, the thoracic segments have only a few deposits. Finally, magneto metric measures concord with the morphological results. With regard to the mapping of the neuronal assembles responsive to magnetic stimuli, we were able to revealed c-fos immunoreactivity in groups of neurons located in the retina, lamina, lobula and deutero-cerebrum in butterflies subjected to magnetic stimuli. In sum, we believe that our results provide preliminary evidence supporting the existence of 1) a neural pathway capable of processing magnetic information in the monarch butterfly and 2) the presence of magnetite-like material in the various segments of its body.

  2. Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea visiting flowers in the Botanical Garden of the Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Barros de Morais

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban environments, such as parks and gardens, may offer many alimentary resources, besides shelter and favorable conditions, for butterfly survival. This study aimed to make an inventory of butterflies visiting flowers in the Botanical Garden of the Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM. From March 2006 to March 2007, the floral visitors were observed weekly for 2h. After 108 hours’ observations, 1114 visits by 39 butterfly species, associated with 43 plant species (21 families, were confirmed. Among the butterflies, Nymphalidae had the highest richness of species (S= 18, followed by Hesperiidae (S= 8, Pieridae (S= 7, Papilionidae (S= 4 and Lycaenidae (S= 2. The pierid Phoebis philea philea was the most frequent species (188 visits, followed by hesperiids Urbanus proteus proteus (100, U. teleus (73 and the nymphalid Heliconius erato phyllis (71. Lantana camara (Verbenaceae, Eupatorium laevigatum (Asteraceae, Russelia equisetiformis (Scrophulariaceae and Stachytarpheta cayennensis (Verbenaceae were the most visited plants. The Botanical Garden of UFSM is an example of an urban park that seems to provide floral resources for the feeding of many butterfly species, being also a potential refuge for species from forest areas nearby.

  3. Comparison of trends in habitat and resource selection by the Spanish Festoon, Zerynthia rumina, and the whole butterfly community in a semiarid Mediterranean ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Hueso, Raúl; de la Puente Ranea, Daniel; Viejo, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Butterfly community and single species based approaches were taken to establish conservation priorities within a nature reserve in Central Spain. In this study, patch type (sclerophyllous, halophilous, or disturbed), potential herbaceous nectar availability, potential woody plant nectar availability, total nectar availability, and two approximations to plant diversity (herbaceous and woody plant diversity) were evaluated as variables that account for adult butterfly density. Butterfly communities in the reserve, which consist mostly of generalist species, were denser in relatively wet areas dominated by halophilous vegetation. Diversity did not significantly vary between ecologically different transects. Total nectar availability correlated with higher butterfly densities within both undisturbed and disturbed areas, which could be primarily explained by the lack of water typical of semiarid Mediterranean climates, where fresh, nectariferous vegetation is scarce. Woody plants were also found to be important sources of nectar and shelter. In the dryer sclerophyllous sites, adult butterfly density was best explained by herbaceous plant diversity, suggesting better quality of available resources. The endangered specialist Zerynthia rumina (L.) (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) was only present at the sclerophyllous sites. Its density was very low in all sampled transects, excluding one relatively isolated transect with high larval hostplant density. In contrast to the community-based approach, density of Z. rumina adults is better explained by the density of its larval hostplant than by nectar availability, a trend previously described for other sedentary species. Management strategies for protecting insect-rich areas should consider the specific ecological requirements of endangered species. PMID:25373198

  4. Mapping Topoclimate and Microclimate in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, S. B.

    2006-12-01

    Overwintering monarch butterflies in Mexico select areas of the high elevation Oyamel fir -pine forest providing a canopy that protects them from extremes of cold, heat, sun, and wind. These exacting microclimatic conditions are found in relatively small areas of forest with appropriate topography and canopy cover. The major goal of this investigation is to map topoclimatic and microclimatic conditions within the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve by combining temperature monitoring (iButton Thermochrons), hemispherical canopy photography, multiple regression, and GIS modeling. Temperature measurements included base weather stations and arrays of Thermochrons (on the north-side of trees at 2m height) across local topographic and canopy cover gradients. Topoclimatic models of minimum temperatures included topographic position, slope, and elevation, and predicted that thermal belts on slopes and cold air drainage into canyons create local minimum temperature gradients of 2°C. Topoclimatic models of maximum temperatures models included elevation, topographic position, and relative solar exposure, with local gradients of 3°C. These models, which are independent of forest canopy structure, were then projected across the entire region. Forest canopy structure, including direct and diffuse solar radiation, was assessed with hemispherical photography at each Thermochron site. Canopy cover affected minimum temperatures primarily on the calmest, coldest nights. Maximum temperatures were predicted by direct radiation below the canopy. Fine- scale grids (25 m spacing) at three overwintering sites characterized effects of canopy gaps and edges on temperature and wind exposure. The effects of temperature variation were considered for lipid loss rates, ability to take flight, and freezing mortality. Lipid loss rates were estimated by measured hourly temperatures. Many of the closed canopy sites allowed for substantial lipid reserves at the end of the season (March 15), but increases in average temperature could effectively deplete lipids by that time. The large influence of canopy cover on daytime maximum temperatures demonstrates that forest thinning directly reduces habitat suitability. Monarchs' flight behavior under warmer conditions suggests that daytime temperatures drive the dynamics of monarch distribution within colonies. Thinning also decreases nighttime minimum temperatures, and increases wind exposure. These results create a basis for quantitative understanding of the combinations of topography and forest structure that provide high quality overwintering habitat.

  5. A BUTTERFLY-SHAPED 'PAPILLON' NEBULA YIELDS SECRETS OF MASSIVE STAR BIRTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA Hubble Space Telescope view of a turbulent cauldron of starbirth, called N159, taking place 170,000 light-years away in our satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Torrential stellar winds from hot newborn massive stars within the nebula sculpt ridges, arcs, and filaments in the vast cloud, which is over 150 light-years across. A rare type of compact ionized 'blob' is resolved for the first time to be a butterfly-shaped or 'Papillon' (French for 'butterfly') nebula, buried in the center of the maelstrom of glowing gases and dark dust. The unprecedented details of the structure of the Papillon, itself less than 2 light-years in size (about 2 arcseconds in the sky), are seen in the inset. A possible explanation of this bipolar shape is the outflow of gas from massive stars (over 10 times the mass of our sun) hidden in the central absorption zone. Such stars are so hot that their radiation pressure halts the infall of gas and directs it away from the stars in two opposite directions. Presumably, a dense equatorial disk formed by matter still trying to fall in onto the stars focuses the outstreaming matter into the bipolar directions. This observation is part of a search for young massive stars in the LMC. Rare are the cases where we can see massive stars so early after their birth. The red in this true-color image is from the emission of hydrogen and the yellow from high excitation ionized oxygen. The picture was taken on September 5, 1998 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The Hubble observations of the Papillon nebula were conducted by the European astronomers Mohammad Heydari-Malayeri (Paris Observatory, France) and co-investigators Michael Rosa (Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility, European Southern Observatory, Germany), Vassilis Charmandaris (Paris Observatory), Lise Deharveng (Marseille Observatory, France), and Hans Zinnecker (Astrophysical Institute, Potsdam, Germany). Their work is submitted for publication in the European journal Astronomy and Astrophysics. Credit: M. Heydari-Malayeri (Paris Observatory) and NASA/ESA

  6. Behavioral and life-history evidence for interspecific competition in the larvae of two heliconian butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, Carolina; Borges, Simone Silva; Rodrigues, Daniela; Moreira, Gilson Rudinei Pires

    2013-10-01

    Interspecific competition in herbivorous insects remains a controversial issue. To date, many studied systems have not met assumptions of the traditional competition theory, and a new paradigm has been emerging. We examined the behavioral and life-history consequences of common host plant use of Heliconius erato and Dryas iulia (Nymphalidae) in relation to Passiflora suberosa (Passifloraceae). Larvae of the former use the apical portion of this host; the latter is presumably able to explore all plant parts. We assessed host use pattern in relation to leaf age, when reared either alone ( D. iulia) or together ( D. iulia and H. erato). Larval feeding choice tests with respect to leaf age were performed, and performance was recorded. Observations were made to assess antagonistic behavior of H. erato and D. iulia towards each other, if any. Similarly to H. erato, D. iulia fed on the young leaves significantly more than the mature ones; larvae were not induced to prefer mature leaves. First instars of H. erato used only the apical parts of P. suberosa and displayed aggressive behavior towards D. iulia, which moved to the lower shoot portions. Larval mortality and development time of both species significantly increased when reared together; such performance costs were more pronounced in D. iulia than H. erato. Our study gathers evidences that use of P. suberosa by these heliconian butterflies represent a case of competitive exclusion resulting in niche differentiation, where costs are higher for D. iulia than H. erato.

  7. Heritability of flight and resting metabolic rates in the Glanville fritillary butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, A L K; Hanski, I

    2014-08-01

    Dispersal capacity is a key life-history trait especially in species inhabiting fragmented landscapes. Evolutionary models predict that, given sufficient heritable variation, dispersal rate responds to natural selection imposed by habitat loss and fragmentation. Here, we estimate phenotypic variance components and heritability of flight and resting metabolic rates (RMRs) in an ecological model species, the Glanville fritillary butterfly, in which flight metabolic rate (FMR) is known to correlate strongly with dispersal rate. We modelled a two-generation pedigree with the animal model to distinguish additive genetic variance from maternal and common environmental effects. The results show that FMR is significantly heritable, with additive genetic variance accounting for about 40% of total phenotypic variance; thus, FMR has the potential to respond to selection on dispersal capacity. Maternal influences on flight metabolism were negligible. Heritability of flight metabolism was context dependent, as in stressful thermal conditions, environmentally induced variation dominated over additive genetic effects. There was no heritability in RMR, which was instead strongly influenced by maternal effects. This study contributes to a mechanistic understanding of the evolution of dispersal-related traits, a pressing question in view of the challenges posed to many species by changing climate and fragmentation of natural habitats. PMID:24909057

  8. Loss of migratory behaviour increases infection risk for a butterfly host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, Dara A; Maerz, John C; Altizer, Sonia

    2015-02-22

    Long-distance animal migrations have important consequences for infectious disease dynamics. In some cases, migration lowers pathogen transmission by removing infected individuals during strenuous journeys and allowing animals to periodically escape contaminated habitats. Human activities are now causing some migratory animals to travel shorter distances or form sedentary (non-migratory) populations. We focused on North American monarch butterflies and a specialist protozoan parasite to investigate how the loss of migratory behaviours affects pathogen spread and evolution. Each autumn, monarchs migrate from breeding grounds in the eastern US and Canada to wintering sites in central Mexico. However, some monarchs have become non-migratory and breed year-round on exotic milkweed in the southern US. We used field sampling, citizen science data and experimental inoculations to quantify infection prevalence and parasite virulence among migratory and sedentary populations. Infection prevalence was markedly higher among sedentary monarchs compared with migratory monarchs, indicating that diminished migration increases infection risk. Virulence differed among parasite strains but was similar between migratory and sedentary populations, potentially owing to high gene flow or insufficient time for evolutionary divergence. More broadly, our findings suggest that human activities that alter animal migrations can influence pathogen dynamics, with implications for wildlife conservation and future disease risks. PMID:25589600

  9. National valuation of monarch butterflies indicates an untapped potential for incentive-based conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffendorfer, Jay E.; Loomis, John B.; Ries, Leslie; Oberhauser, Karen; Semmens, Darius; Semmens, Brice; Butterfield, Bruce; Bagstad, Ken; Goldstein, Josh; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Mattsson, Brady; Thogmartin, Wayne E.

    2013-01-01

    The annual migration of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) has high cultural value and recent surveys indicate monarch populations are declining. Protecting migratory species is complex because they cross international borders and depend on multiple regions. Understanding how much, and where, humans place value on migratory species can facilitate market-based conservation approaches. We performed a contingent valuation study of monarchs to understand the potential for such approaches to fund monarch conservation. The survey asked U.S. respondents about the money they would spend, or have spent, growing monarch-friendly plants, and the amount they would donate to monarch conservation organizations. Combining planting payments and donations, the survey indicated U.S. households valued monarchs as a total one-time payment of $4.78–$6.64 billion, levels similar to many endangered vertebrate species. The financial contribution of even a small percentage of households through purchases or donations could generate new funding for monarch conservation through market-based approaches.

  10. Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUWARNO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Suwarno (2010 Population dynamic of the swallowtail butterfly, Papilio polytes (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons. Biodiversitas 11: 19-23. The population dynamic of Papilio polytes L. (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae in dry and wet seasons was investigated in the citrus orchard in Tasek Gelugor, Pulau Pinang, Malaysia. Population of immature stages of P. polytes was observed alternate day from January to March 2006 (dry season, DS, from April to July 2006 (secondary wet season, SWS, and from October to December 2006 (primary wet season, PWS. The population dynamics of the immature stages of P. polytes varied between seasons. The immature stages of P. polytes are more abundance and significantly different in the PWS than those of the DS and the SWS. The larval densities in all seasons decreased with progressive development of the instar stages. Predators and parasitoids are the main factor in regulating the population abundance of immature stages of P. polytes. There were positive correlations between the abundance of immature stages of P. polytes and their natural enemies abundance in each season. Ooencyrtus papilioni Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae is the most egg parasitoid. Oxyopes quadrifasciatus L. Koch. and O. elegans L. Koch. (Araneae: Oxyopidae are the main predators in the young larvae, meanwhile Sycanus dichotomus Stal. (Heteroptera: Reduviidae, Calotes versicolor Fitzinger (Squamata: Agamidae, birds and praying mantis attacked the older larvae.

  11. Protein detection in spermatids and spermatozoa of the butterfly Euptoieta hegesia (Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Mancini

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to detect protein components in both sperm types of the butterfly Euptoieta hegesia. These spermatozoa possess complex extracellular structures for which the composition and functional significance are still unclear. In the apyrene sperm head, the proteic cap presented an external ring and an internal dense content; basic proteins were detected only in external portions. In the tail, the paracrystalline core of mitochondrial derivatives and the axoneme are rich in proteins. The extratesticular spermatozoa are covered by a proteic coat, which presented two distinct layers. In eupyrene spermatozoa, acrosome and nucleus were negatively stained, probably because of their high compaction. In the tail, there is no paracrystalline core and the axoneme presented a very specific reaction for basic proteins. The lacinate and reticular appendages are composed of cylindrical sub-units and presented a light reaction to E-PTA and a strong reaction to tannic acid. A complex proteic coat also covers the extratesticular spermatozoa. We found similarities between both extratesticular coats, indicating a possible common origin. Both spermatozoon types are rich in proteins, especially the eupyrene appendages and the extratesticular coats. We believe that both coats are related to the sperm maturation and capacitation processes.

  12. Protein detection in spermatids and spermatozoa of the butterfly Euptoieta hegesia (Lepidoptera)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Karina, Mancini; Heidi, Dolder.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Argentina | Language: English Abstract in english This study was undertaken to detect protein components in both sperm types of the butterfly Euptoieta hegesia. These spermatozoa possess complex extracellular structures for which the composition and functional significance are still unclear. In the apyrene sperm head, the proteic cap presented an e [...] xternal ring and an internal dense content; basic proteins were detected only in external portions. In the tail, the paracrystalline core of mitochondrial derivatives and the axoneme are rich in proteins. The extratesticular spermatozoa are covered by a proteic coat, which presented two distinct layers. In eupyrene spermatozoa, acrosome and nucleus were negatively stained, probably because of their high compaction. In the tail, there is no paracrystalline core and the axoneme presented a very specific reaction for basic proteins. The lacinate and reticular appendages are composed of cylindrical sub-units and presented a light reaction to E-PTA and a strong reaction to tannic acid. A complex proteic coat also covers the extratesticular spermatozoa. We found similarities between both extratesticular coats, indicating a possible common origin. Both spermatozoon types are rich in proteins, especially the eupyrene appendages and the extratesticular coats. We believe that both coats are related to the sperm maturation and capacitation processes.

  13. Serotonin-induced mate rejection in the female cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae crucivora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Yoshiaki; Fukano, Yuya; Watanabe, Kenta; Ozawa, Gaku; Sasaki, Ken

    2011-11-01

    Virgin female cabbage butterflies, Pieris rapae crucivora, accept and mate with courting males, whereas mated females reject them and assume the "mate refusal posture". This study tested whether the biogenic amines, serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA), and octopamine (OA), were responsible for this change in behavior. The results showed that 2-3-day-old virgin females fed with 5HT rejected courting males significantly more frequently compared with controls fed on sucrose. In contrast, the proportions of courting males rejected by virgin females fed with either DA or OA did not differ from sucrose-fed controls. Oral application of each amine resulted in significantly increased levels of the amine applied (or its metabolite) in the brain. The results strongly suggest that 5HT or a 5HT metabolite may be responsible for the post-mating change in behavioral response of 2-3-day-old virgin females to courting males. Similar effects of 5HT treatment were observed in 6-8-day-old virgin females, but in this case the results were only marginally different from the controls, suggesting that the effect may decline with increasing female age.

  14. Population genomics of parallel hybrid zones in the mimetic butterflies, H. melpomene and H. erato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Mayté; Salazar, Patricio; Counterman, Brian; Medina, Jose Alejandro; Ortiz-Zuazaga, Humberto; Morrison, Anna; Papa, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid zones can be valuable tools for studying evolution and identifying genomic regions responsible for adaptive divergence and underlying phenotypic variation. Hybrid zones between subspecies of Heliconius butterflies can be very narrow and are maintained by strong selection acting on color pattern. The comimetic species, H. erato and H. melpomene, have parallel hybrid zones in which both species undergo a change from one color pattern form to another. We use restriction-associated DNA sequencing to obtain several thousand genome-wide sequence markers and use these to analyze patterns of population divergence across two pairs of parallel hybrid zones in Peru and Ecuador. We compare two approaches for analysis of this type of data—alignment to a reference genome and de novo assembly—and find that alignment gives the best results for species both closely (H. melpomene) and distantly (H. erato, ?15% divergent) related to the reference sequence. Our results confirm that the color pattern controlling loci account for the majority of divergent regions across the genome, but we also detect other divergent regions apparently unlinked to color pattern differences. We also use association mapping to identify previously unmapped color pattern loci, in particular the Ro locus. Finally, we identify a new cryptic population of H. timareta in Ecuador, which occurs at relatively low altitude and is mimetic with H. melpomene malleti. PMID:24823669

  15. Wing colors of Chrysozephyrus butterflies (Lepidoptera; Lycaenidae): ultraviolet reflection by males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imafuku, Michio; Hirose, Yukihiro; Takeuchi, Tsuyoshi

    2002-02-01

    Wing colors of the four species of Chrysozephyrus butterflies were analyzed by a spectrophotometer. As the dorsal wing surface of males showed a strong reflectance when the specimen was tilted, measurements were made by the tilting method. The dorsal wing surface of males which appears green to the human eye reflected UV (315-350 nm) as well as green light (530-550 nm). The reflectance rate of UV to visible green light varied among species with a higher rate for C. hisamatsusanus and C. ataxus, and a lower rate for C. smaragdinus and C. brillantinus. The peak wavelength and the peak height did not shift when the specimen was exposed to direct sunlight at least for 16 hr. Artificial removal of scales by scratching the wing surface decreased reflectance. Blue marks on the forewings of C. brillantinus, C. hisamatsusanus and C. ataxus females reflected UV to visible light of short wavelength, and orange marks on the dorsal surface of the forewing and the ventral surface of the hindwing of C. samaragdinus females showed a higher reflectance at longer wavelengths. PMID:12012780

  16. Reinforcement of pre-zygotic isolation and karyotype evolution in Agrodiaetus butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhtanov, Vladimir A; Kandul, Nikolai P; Plotkin, Joshua B; Dantchenko, Alexander V; Haig, David; Pierce, Naomi E

    2005-07-21

    The reinforcement model of evolution argues that natural selection enhances pre-zygotic isolation between divergent populations or species by selecting against unfit hybrids or costly interspecific matings. Reinforcement is distinguished from other models that consider the formation of reproductive isolation to be a by-product of divergent evolution. Although theory has shown that reinforcement is a possible mechanism that can lead to speciation, empirical evidence has been sufficiently scarce to raise doubts about the importance of reinforcement in nature. Agrodiaetus butterflies (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) exhibit unusual variability in chromosome number. Whereas their genitalia and other morphological characteristics are largely uniform, different species vary considerably in male wing colour, and provide a model system to study the role of reinforcement in speciation. Using comparative phylogenetic methods, we show that the sympatric distribution of 15 relatively young sister taxa of Agrodiaetus strongly correlates with differences in male wing colour, and that this pattern is most likely the result of reinforcement. We find little evidence supporting sympatric speciation: rather, in Agrodiaetus, karyotypic changes accumulate gradually in allopatry, prompting reinforcement when karyotypically divergent races come into contact. PMID:16034417

  17. Mechanisms of macroevolution: polyphagous plasticity in butterfly larvae revealed by RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Paz Celorio-Mancera, Maria; Wheat, Christopher W; Vogel, Heiko; Söderlind, Lina; Janz, Niklas; Nylin, Sören

    2013-10-01

    Transcriptome studies of insect herbivory are still rare, yet studies in model systems have uncovered patterns of transcript regulation that appear to provide insights into how insect herbivores attain polyphagy, such as a general increase in expression breadth and regulation of ribosomal, digestion- and detoxification-related genes. We investigated the potential generality of these emerging patterns, in the Swedish comma, Polygonia c-album, which is a polyphagous, widely-distributed butterfly. Urtica dioica and Ribes uva-crispa are hosts of P. c-album, but Ribes represents a recent evolutionary shift onto a very divergent host. Utilizing the assembled transcriptome for read mapping, we assessed gene expression finding that caterpillar life-history (i.e. 2nd vs. 4th-instar regulation) had a limited influence on gene expression plasticity. In contrast, differential expression in response to host-plant identified genes encoding serine-type endopeptidases, membrane-associated proteins and transporters. Differential regulation of genes involved in nucleic acid binding was also observed suggesting that polyphagy involves large scale transcriptional changes. Additionally, transcripts coding for structural constituents of the cuticle were differentially expressed in caterpillars in response to their diet indicating that the insect cuticle may be a target for plant defence. Our results state that emerging patterns of transcript regulation from model species appear relevant in species when placed in an evolutionary context. PMID:23952264

  18. Signal design and courtship presentation coincide for highly biased delivery of an iridescent butterfly mating signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas E; Zeil, Jochen; Kemp, Darrell J; Rodriguez, R; Lenormand, T

    2015-01-01

    Sensory drive theory contends that signaling systems should evolve to optimize transmission between senders and intended receivers, while minimizing visibility to eavesdroppers where possible. In visual communication systems, the high directionality afforded by iridescent coloration presents underappreciated avenues for mediating this trade-off. This hypothesis predicts functional links between signal design and presentation such that visual conspicuousness is maximized only under ecologically relevant settings and/or to select audiences. We addressed this prediction using Hypolimnas bolina, a butterfly in which males possess ultraviolet markings on their dorsal wing surfaces with a narrow angular reflectance function. Males bearing brighter dorsal markings are increasingly attractive to females, but also likely more conspicuous to predators. Our data indicate that, during courtship (and given the ritualized wingbeat dynamics at these times), males position themselves relative to females in such a way as to simultaneously maximize three components of known or putative signal conspicuousness: brightness, area, and iridescent flash. This suggests that male signal design and display have coevolved for the delivery of an optimally conspicuous signal to courted females. More broadly, these findings imply a potential signaling role for iridescence itself, and pose a novel example for how signal design may coevolve with the behavioral context of display. PMID:25328995

  19. Color change of Blue butterfly wing scales in an air – Vapor ambient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kertész, Krisztián, E-mail: kertesz.krisztian@ttk.mta.hu [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Centre for Natural Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, PO Box 49, Hungary(http://www.nanotechnology.hu) (Hungary); Piszter, Gábor [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Centre for Natural Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, PO Box 49, Hungary(http://www.nanotechnology.hu) (Hungary); Jakab, Emma [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Centre for Natural Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, PO Box 17 (Hungary); Bálint, Zsolt [Hungarian Natural History Museum, Baross utca 13, H-1088 Budapest (Hungary); Vértesy, Zofia; Biró, László Péter [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Centre for Natural Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, PO Box 49, Hungary(http://www.nanotechnology.hu) (Hungary)

    2013-09-15

    Photonic crystals are periodic dielectric nanocomposites, which have photonic band gaps that forbid the propagation of light within certain frequency ranges. The optical response of such nanoarchitectures on chemical changes in the environment is determined by the spectral change of the reflected light, and depends on the composition of the ambient atmosphere and on the nanostructure characteristics. We carried out reflectance measurements on closely related Blue lycaenid butterfly males possessing so-called “pepper-pot” type photonic nanoarchitecture in their scales covering their dorsal wing surfaces. Experiments were carried out changing the concentration and nature of test vapors while monitoring the spectral variations in time. All the tests were done with the sample temperature set at, and below the room temperature. The spectral changes were found to be linear with the increasing of concentration and the signal amplitude is higher at lower temperatures. The mechanism of reflectance spectra modification is based on capillary condensation of the vapors penetrating in the nanostructure. These structures of natural origin may serve as cheap, environmentally free and biodegradable sensor elements. The study of these nanoarchitectures of biologic origin could be the source of various new bioinspired systems.

  20. Limited performance of DNA barcoding in a diverse community of tropical butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Marianne; Hill, Ryan I; Willmott, Keith R; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K; Brower, Andrew V Z; Mallet, James; Jiggins, Chris D

    2007-11-22

    DNA 'barcoding' relies on a short fragment of mitochondrial DNA to infer identification of specimens. The method depends on genetic diversity being markedly lower within than between species. Closely related species are most likely to share genetic variation in communities where speciation rates are rapid and effective population sizes are large, such that coalescence times are long. We assessed the applicability of DNA barcoding (here the 5' half of the cytochrome c oxidase I) to a diverse community of butterflies from the upper Amazon, using a group with a well-established morphological taxonomy to serve as a reference. Only 77% of species could be accurately identified using the barcode data, a figure that dropped to 68% in species represented in the analyses by more than one geographical race and at least one congener. The use of additional mitochondrial sequence data hardly improved species identification, while a fragment of a nuclear gene resolved issues in some of the problematic species. We acknowledge the utility of barcodes when morphological characters are ambiguous or unknown, but we also recommend the addition of nuclear sequence data, and caution that species-level identification rates might be lower in the most diverse habitats of our planet. PMID:17785265

  1. Distrofia em forma-de-borboleta: relato de caso / Butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy: case report

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    David Leonardo Cruvinel, Isaac; Rodrigo Almeida Vieira, Santos; Marcos, Ávila.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Os autores apresentam um caso de distrofia macular em forma-de-borboleta, diagnosticado em paciente do sexo masculino, apresentando concomitante atrofia do epitélio pigmentado da retina e perda visual central em um dos olhos. Os achados relatados contrariam conceitos inicialmente disponíveis de curs [...] o sempre benigno da doença. A lesão característica e bem delimitada no pólo posterior e a angiofluoresceinografia, permitiram estabelecer o diagnóstico. Descreve-se ainda, pela primeira vez, os achados da distrofia em forma-de-borboleta à tomografia de coerência óptica. Abstract in english The authors present a case of butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy diagnosed in a male patient, with retinal pigmented epithelium atrophy and central visual acuity decrease in one of the eyes. The evolution of this case was not benign as described in previous reports. A well-defined lesion located in [...] the posterior pole of both eyes associated with fluorescein angiography allowed the diagnosis of this pattern dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography was performed, showing the aspects of the pathology, for the first time.

  2. Rejection of host plant by larvae of cabbage butterfly: Diet-dependent sensitivity to an antifeedant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, J A; Huang, X P

    1995-04-01

    Garden nasturtium,Tropaeolum majus (Tropaeolaceae), is an acceptable host plant for the cabbage butterfly,Pieris rapae. Eggs are readily laid on the plant and hatching larvae feed and develop into normal pupae and adults. However, when second- to fifth-instar larvae were transferred from cabbage to nasturtium, they refused to feed and starved to death. Similar results were obtained when larvae were transferred from other host plants to nasturtium. However, larvae that were reared on nasturtium readily accepted cabbage as a new host plant. We have demonstrated the presence of strong antifeedants in nasturtium foliage and identified the most prominent active compound as chlorogenic acid. However, larvae reared on nasturtium had limited sensitivity, and larvae reared on a wheat germ diet were completely insensitive to the antifeedants. Larvae apparently develop sensitivity to the deterrent as a result of feeding on other host plants, whereas continuous exposure to the deterrent causes habituation or suppression of sensitivity development. The results demonstrate that dietary experience can dramatically affect the response of an insect to a potentially antifeedant compound in a plant. PMID:24234177

  3. Identification of host-plant chemicals stimulating oviposition by swallowtail butterfly,Papilio protenor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, K

    1990-02-01

    The ovipositional response of a Rutaceae-feeding papilionid butterfly,Papilio protenor, toCitrus host plants was evoked by the synergistic action ofL-(-)-stachydrine,D-(-)-quinic acid, (-)-synephrine, andL-(-)-proline that characterize the chemical compositions of the leaves and epicarp ofCitrus plants (C. natsudaidai andC. unshiu). The stimulatory activity of their mixture was enhanced by the addition of flavanone glycosides, naringin and hesperidin, which coexist in these plants and have previously been demonstrated to serve as oviposition stimulants. However, sugars such as sucrose, glucose, and inositols, which abound in plant tissues, exerted no effect on egg-laying by the females. On the other hand, chlorogenic acid present in the leaves of another host plant,Fagara ailanthoides, was found to act as an excellent synergist. However, there existed significant qualitative dissimilarities between the chemical compositions of the leaves ofC. unshiu andF. ailanthoides. This strongly suggests thatP. protenor is likely to utilize different categories of compounds as chemical cues in recognizing each plant as a host. PMID:24263493

  4. Biosynthesis of cathodoluminescent zinc oxide replicas using butterfly (Papilio paris) wing scales as templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papilio paris butterflies have an iridescent blue color patch on their hind wings which is visible over a wide viewing angle. Optical and scanning electron microscopy observations of scales from the wings show that the blue color scales have very different microstructure to the matt black ones which also populate the wings. Scanning electron micrographs of the blue scales show that their surfaces comprise a regular two-dimensional array of concavities. By contrast the matt black scales have fine, sponge-like structure, between the ridges and the cross ribs in the scales. Using both types of scale as bio-templates, we obtain zinc oxide (ZnO) replicas of the microstructures of the original scales. Room temperature (T = 300 K) cathodoluminescence spectra of these ZnO replicas have also been studied. Both spectra show a similar sharp near-band-edge emission, but have different green emission, which we associate with the different microstructures of the ZnO replicas

  5. Hofstadter butterflies and magnetically induced band-gap quenching in graphene antidot lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2013-01-01

    We study graphene antidot lattices (GALs) in magnetic fields. Using a tight-binding model and a recursive Green's function technique that we extend to deal with periodic structures, we calculate Hofstadter butterflies of GALs. We compare the results to those obtained in a simpler gapped graphene model. A crucial difference emerges in the behavior of the lowest Landau level, which in a gapped graphene model is independent of magnetic field. In stark contrast to this picture, we find that in GALs the band gap can be completely closed by applying a magnetic field. While our numerical simulations can only be performed on structures much smaller than can be experimentally realized, we find that the critical magnetic field for which the gap closes can be directly related to the ratio between the cyclotron radius and the neck width of the GAL. In this way, we obtain a simple scaling law for extrapolation of our results to more realistically sized structures and find resulting quenching magnetic fields that should bewell within reach of experiments.

  6. Spectral butterfly, mixed Dirac-Schrödinger fermion behavior, and topological states in armchair uniaxial strained graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Taboada, Pedro; Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2014-11-01

    An exact mapping of the tight-binding Hamiltonian for a graphene nanoribbon under any armchair uniaxial strain into an effective one-dimensional system is presented. As an application, for a periodic modulation we have found a gap opening at the Fermi level and a complex fractal spectrum, akin to the Hofstadter butterfly resulting from the Harper model. The latter can be explained by the commensurability or incommensurability nature of the resulting effective potential. When compared with the zig-zag uniaxial periodic strain, the spectrum shows much bigger gaps, although in general the states have a more extended nature. For a special critical value of the strain amplitude and wavelength, a gap is open. At this critical point, the electrons behave as relativistic Dirac fermions in one direction, while, in the other direction, a nonrelativistic Schrödinger behavior is observed. Also, some topological states were observed which have the particularity of not being completely edge states since they present some amplitude in the bulk. However, these are edge states of the effective system due to a reduced dimensionality through decoupling. These states also present the fractal Chern beating observed recently in quasiperiodic systems.

  7. Hormonal control of pupal coloration in the painted lady butterfly Vanessa cardui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Akira; Kometani, Miwako; Yamamoto, Kazuaki; Tsujimura, Yuki; Motomura, Megumi; Kitazawa, Chisato; Endo, Katsuhiko

    2009-06-01

    Pupae of the painted lady butterfly Vanessa cardui exhibit pupal color polyphenism consisting of white, dark and intermediate types. We investigated environmental factors affecting pupal coloration and the physiological mechanisms underlying the control of pupal color polyphenism in this species. Over 80% of larvae reared at 16 degrees C developed into pupae of dark types, whereas over 82% of larvae at 32 degrees C developed into pupae of white types irrespective of long/short-day photoperiod conditions. When mature larvae reared at 32 degrees C were ligatured between thoracic and abdominal parts at three different pharate pupal stages, all of the head-thoracic parts developed into white pupae regardless of pupal stage, but all abdominal parts ligatured at the early pharate pupal stage only developed into dark pupae. These results indicate that temperature during larval stages is an important element affecting pupal coloration as an environmental cue in V. cardui, and that a factor(s) inducing white pupae is released from head-thoracic parts under conditions of high temperature. Additionally, when ligatured abdomens destined to develop into dark pupae were treated with crude extracts prepared from the central nervous system, all of the ligatured abdomens developed into white pupae at a level dependent on dose and pupal stage. These results suggest that the factor inducing white pupae is a key molecule controlling pupal color polyphenism in V. cardui. PMID:19192481

  8. The evolution of alternative parasitic life histories in large blue butterflies.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Thomas D; Vila, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Large blue (Maculinea) butterflies are highly endangered throughout the Palaearctic region, and have been the focus of intense conservation research. In addition, their extraordinary parasitic lifestyles make them ideal for studies of life history evolution. Early instars consume flower buds of specific host plants, but later instars live in ant nests where they either devour the brood (predators), or are fed mouth-to-mouth by the adult ants (cuckoos). Here we present the phylogeny for the group, which shows that it is a monophyletic clade nested within Phengaris, a rare Oriental genus whose species have similar life histories. Cuckoo species are likely to have evolved from predatory ancestors. As early as five million years ago, two Maculinea clades diverged, leading to the different parasitic strategies seen in the genus today. Contrary to current belief, the two recognized cuckoo species show little genetic divergence and are probably a single ecologically differentiated species. On the other hand, some ofthe predatory morphospecies exhibit considerable genetic divergence and may contain cryptic species. These findings have important implications for conservation and reintroduction efforts. Udgivelsesdato: 2004-Nov-18

  9. The evolution of alternative parasitic life histories in large blue butterflies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Thomas Damm; Vila, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Large blue (Maculinea) butterflies are highly endangered throughout the Palaearctic region, and have been the focus of intense conservation research. In addition, their extraordinary parasitic lifestyles make them ideal for studies of life history evolution. Early instars consume flower buds of specific host plants, but later instars live in ant nests where they either devour the brood (predators), or are fed mouth-to-mouth by the adult ants (cuckoos). Here we present the phylogeny for the group, which shows that it is a monophyletic clade nested within Phengaris, a rare Oriental genus whose species have similar life histories. Cuckoo species are likely to have evolved from predatory ancestors. As early as five million years ago, two Maculinea clades diverged, leading to the different parasitic strategies seen in the genus today. Contrary to current belief, the two recognized cuckoo species show little genetic divergence and are probably a single ecologically differentiated species. On the other hand, some ofthe predatory morphospecies exhibit considerable genetic divergence and may contain cryptic species. These findings have important implications for conservation and reintroduction efforts.

  10. Diversification of the silverspot butterflies (Nymphalidae) in the Neotropics inferred from multi-locus DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massardo, Darli; Fornel, Rodrigo; Kronforst, Marcus; Gonçalves, Gislene Lopes; Moreira, Gilson Rudinei Pires

    2015-01-01

    The tribe Heliconiini (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) is a diverse group of butterflies distributed throughout the Neotropics, which has been studied extensively, in particular the genus Heliconius. However, most of the other lineages, such as Dione, which are less diverse and considered basal within the group, have received little attention. Basic information, such as species limits and geographical distributions remain uncertain for this genus. Here we used multilocus DNA sequence data and the geographical distribution analysis across the entire range of Dione in the Neotropical region in order to make inferences on the evolutionary history of this poorly explored lineage. Bayesian time-tree reconstruction allows inferring two major diversification events in this tribe around 25mya. Lineages thought to be ancient, such as Dione and Agraulis, are as recent as Heliconius. Dione formed a monophyletic clade, sister to the genus Agraulis. Dione juno, D. glycera and D. moneta were reciprocally monophyletic and formed genetic clusters, with the first two more close related than each other in relation to the third. Divergence time estimates support the hypothesis that speciation in Dione coincided with both the rise of Passifloraceae (the host plants) and the uplift of the Andes. Since the sister species D. glycera and D. moneta are specialized feeders on passion-vine lineages that are endemic to areas located either within or adjacent to the Andes, we inferred that they co-speciated with their host plants during this vicariant event. PMID:25300455

  11. Distrofia em forma-de-borboleta: relato de caso Butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Leonardo Cruvinel Isaac

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam um caso de distrofia macular em forma-de-borboleta, diagnosticado em paciente do sexo masculino, apresentando concomitante atrofia do epitélio pigmentado da retina e perda visual central em um dos olhos. Os achados relatados contrariam conceitos inicialmente disponíveis de curso sempre benigno da doença. A lesão característica e bem delimitada no pólo posterior e a angiofluoresceinografia, permitiram estabelecer o diagnóstico. Descreve-se ainda, pela primeira vez, os achados da distrofia em forma-de-borboleta à tomografia de coerência óptica.The authors present a case of butterfly-shaped pattern dystrophy diagnosed in a male patient, with retinal pigmented epithelium atrophy and central visual acuity decrease in one of the eyes. The evolution of this case was not benign as described in previous reports. A well-defined lesion located in the posterior pole of both eyes associated with fluorescein angiography allowed the diagnosis of this pattern dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography was performed, showing the aspects of the pathology, for the first time.

  12. Composite organic-inorganic butterfly scales: Production of photonic structures with atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillot, Davy P.; Deparis, Olivier; Welch, Victoria; Wagner, Brent K.; Vigneron, Jean Pol; Summers, Christopher J.

    2008-09-01

    Recent advances in the photonics and optics industries have produced great demand for ever more sophisticated optical devices, such as photonic crystals. However, photonic crystals are notoriously difficult to manufacture. Increasingly, therefore, researchers have turned towards naturally occurring photonic structures for inspiration and a wide variety of elaborate techniques have been attempted to copy and harness biological processes to manufacture artificial photonic structures. Here, we describe a simple, direct process for producing an artificial photonic device by using a naturally occurring structure from the wings of the butterfly Papilio blumei as a template and low-temperature atomic layer deposition of TiO2 to create a faithful cast of the structure. The optical properties of the organic-inorganic diffraction structures produced are assessed by normal-incidence specular reflectance and found to be well described by multilayer computation method using a two-dimensional photonic crystal model. Depending on the structural integrity of the initially sealed scale, it was found possible not only to replicate the outer but also the inner and more complex surfaces of the structure, each resulting in distinct multicolor optical behavior as revealed by experimental and theoretical data. In this paper, we also explore tailoring the process to design composite skeleton architectures with desired optical properties and integrated multifunctional (mechanical, thermal, optical, fluidic) properties.

  13. Color change of Blue butterfly wing scales in an air – Vapor ambient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photonic crystals are periodic dielectric nanocomposites, which have photonic band gaps that forbid the propagation of light within certain frequency ranges. The optical response of such nanoarchitectures on chemical changes in the environment is determined by the spectral change of the reflected light, and depends on the composition of the ambient atmosphere and on the nanostructure characteristics. We carried out reflectance measurements on closely related Blue lycaenid butterfly males possessing so-called “pepper-pot” type photonic nanoarchitecture in their scales covering their dorsal wing surfaces. Experiments were carried out changing the concentration and nature of test vapors while monitoring the spectral variations in time. All the tests were done with the sample temperature set at, and below the room temperature. The spectral changes were found to be linear with the increasing of concentration and the signal amplitude is higher at lower temperatures. The mechanism of reflectance spectra modification is based on capillary condensation of the vapors penetrating in the nanostructure. These structures of natural origin may serve as cheap, environmentally free and biodegradable sensor elements. The study of these nanoarchitectures of biologic origin could be the source of various new bioinspired systems.

  14. Flavonoid sequestration by the common blue butterfly Polyommatus icarus: quantitative intraspecific variation in relation to larval hostplant, sex and body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, F; Proksch, P; Fiedler, K

    2001-10-01

    Common blue butterflies (Polyommatus icarus) sequester flavonoids from their larval food and store these pigments as part of their adult wing colouration. Insects were reared on 10 different diets to assess effects of host plants on variation in flavonoid sequestration in this moderately polyphagous butterfly. Rearing experiments revealed an unexpectedly large gradient in flavonoid richness, ranging from individuals with high flavonoid loads (reared on inflorescences of Medicago sativa, Trifolium repens, T. pratense) to butterflies which contained almost no such pigments (fed with foliage of M. sativa or Robinia pseudoacacia). Flavonoid sequestration was much more effective from natural hostplants than from experimentally offered diets which would not be accepted in the field. Female butterflies on average sequestered almost 60% more flavonoids than males. This sex difference was more pronounced on natural than on experimental diets. Flavonoid load was significantly and positively related to dry mass and forewing length as two important fitness correlates of butterflies. This correlation was particularly strong on experimental diets (i.e. under constraining conditions for development). On natural hostplants, in contrast, when butterflies generally were flavonoid-rich, no clear relationship between flavonoid load and size or mass emerged. Our analytical data are consistent with field results according to which females rich in UV-absorbing flavonoid wing pigments are more attractive to mate-searching males. In P. icarus, flavonoid richness might therefore increase visibility (by more effective sensory stimulation of the visual system), but could also confer information about the feeding history, and thus ontogenetically determined 'quality' of a potential mate. PMID:11445289

  15. Positive selection of a duplicated UV-sensitive visual pigment coincides with wing pigment evolution in Heliconius butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Briscoe, Adriana D.; Bybee, Seth M.; Bernard, Gary D.; Yuan, Furong; Sison-mangus, Marilou P.; Reed, Robert D.; Warren, Andrew D.; Llorente-bousquets, Jorge; Chiao, Chuan-chin

    2010-01-01

    The butterfly Heliconius erato can see from the UV to the red part of the light spectrum with color vision proven from 440 to 640 nm. Its eye is known to contain three visual pigments, rhodopsins, produced by an 11-cis-3-hydroxyretinal chromophore together with long wavelength (LWRh), blue (BRh) and UV (UVRh1) opsins. We now find that H. erato has a second UV opsin mRNA (UVRh2)—a previously undescribed duplication of this gene among Lepidoptera. To investigate its evolutionary origin, we sc...

  16. Butterfly hysteresis loop at non-zero bias field in antiferromagnetic molecular rings cooling by adiabatic magnetization

    CERN Document Server

    Waldmann, O; Schromm, S; Müller, P; Bernt, I; Saalfrank, R W

    2002-01-01

    At low temperatures, the magnetization of the molecular ferric wheel NaFe$_6$ exhibits a step at a critical field $B_c$ due to a field-induced level-crossing. By means of high-field torque magnetometry we observed a hysteretic behavior at the level-crossing with a characteristic butterfly shape which is analyzed in terms of a dissipative two-level model. Several unusual features were found. The non-zero bias field of the level-crossing suggests the possibility of cooling by adiabatic magnetization.

  17. Butterfly hysteresis loop at non-zero bias field in antiferromagnetic molecular rings: cooling by adiabatic magnetization

    OpenAIRE

    Waldmann, O.; Koch, R.; Schromm, S.; Mu?ller, P.; Bernt, I.; Saalfrank, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    At low temperatures, the magnetization of the molecular ferric wheel NaFe$_6$ exhibits a step at a critical field $B_c$ due to a field-induced level-crossing. By means of high-field torque magnetometry we observed a hysteretic behavior at the level-crossing with a characteristic butterfly shape which is analyzed in terms of a dissipative two-level model. Several unusual features were found. The non-zero bias field of the level-crossing suggests the possibility of cooling by ...

  18. From the phylogeny of the Satyrinae butterflies to the systematics of Euptychiina (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): history, progress and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the various proposals of evolutionary and classification schemes for Satyrinae and particularly Euptychiina butterflies, assessing progress and prospects of research for the group. Among the highlights is the proposal to include Morphini, Brassolini and Amathusiini as part of Satyrinae. Although it is clear that this hypothesis requires further investigation, phylogenetic studies recently conducted recover this clade as part of Satyrinae with high support. The phylogenetic analyses for Euptychiina carried out to date recover the monophyly of the group and have identified a variety of genera as non-monophyletic. Further work is necessary to resolve the position of the subtribe and the evolutionary relationships of several genera. (author)

  19. From the phylogeny of the Satyrinae butterflies to the systematics of Euptychiina (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): history, progress and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, M.A.; Uribe, S.I., E-mail: mamarin0@bt.unal.edu.c [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin (Colombia). Grupo de Investigacion en Sistematica Molecular; Pena, C. [Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima (Peru). Museo de Historia Natural; Freitas, A.V.L. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (IB/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biologia Animal e Museu de Zoologia; Wahlberg, N. [University of Turku (Finland). Dept. of Biology. Lab. of Genetics

    2011-01-15

    We review the various proposals of evolutionary and classification schemes for Satyrinae and particularly Euptychiina butterflies, assessing progress and prospects of research for the group. Among the highlights is the proposal to include Morphini, Brassolini and Amathusiini as part of Satyrinae. Although it is clear that this hypothesis requires further investigation, phylogenetic studies recently conducted recover this clade as part of Satyrinae with high support. The phylogenetic analyses for Euptychiina carried out to date recover the monophyly of the group and have identified a variety of genera as non-monophyletic. Further work is necessary to resolve the position of the subtribe and the evolutionary relationships of several genera. (author)

  20. Mariposas de Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea, Hesperioidea) / Butterflies of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea, Hesperioidea)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    RICARDO, GIÜVENARDI; ROCCO ALFREDO, DI MARE; OLAF HERMANN, HENDRIK MIELKE; MIRNA MARTINS, CASAGRANDE; EDUARDO, CARNEIRO.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Para inferir sobre el conocimiento acumulado de la diversidad de mariposas (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea, Hesperioidea) de Rio Grande do Sul, fueron consultados los estudios relacionados con bionomía, taxonomía e inventarios forestales; se encontraron un total de 832 especies y subespecies de mariposa [...] s. Después de 1970, los artículos publicados que tratan de mariposas aumentaron casi exponencialmente, y los inventarios de mariposas desde 1990, simultáneamente, también muestran un crecimiento. La familia más rica fue Hesperiidae con 357 (42,90%) especies y subespecies, seguido por Nymphalidae con 227 (27,28%), Lycaenidae con 94 (1l,30%), Riodinidae con 80 (9,62%), Pieridae con 43 (5,17%) y Papilionidae con 31 (3,73%). Entre las regiones fisiográficas, la Depressao Central presentó 495 (59,50%) especies e subespécies registradas (mayor riqueza) y la Ladera Superior del Nordeste presentó 17 (2,04%) especies y subespecies (menor riqueza). La distribución de inventarios muestra que en Río Grande do Sul aún existen áreas que carecen de información sobre mariposas. Abstract in english To infer on the accumulated knowledge of butterfly diversity of (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea, Hesperioidea) from Rio Grande do Sul, we consulted studies related to bionomics, taxonomy and forest inventories; a total of 832 species and subspecies of butterflies have been recorded. After of 1970 butter [...] flies studies increased almost exponentially, and the inventory the butterflies from 1990, the same time also showed an increase. Hesperiidae was the richest family, with 357 (42.90%) species and subspecies, followed by Nymphalidae with 227 (27.28%), Lycaenidae with 94 (11.30%), Riodinidae with 80 (9.62%), Pieridae with 43 (5.17%) and Papilionidae with 31 (3.73%). Amongst the physiographic regions, the Depressao Central presented 495 (59.50%) species and subspecies (larger richness) and the Encosta Superior do Nordeste 17 (2.04%) species and subspecies (lower richness). The distribution of inventories shows that there are still areas lacking butterfly data in Rio Grande do Sul.

  1. Multifunctional ZnO interfaces with hierarchical micro- and nanostructures: bio-inspiration from the compound eyes of butterflies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Sha; Yang, Yefeng; Jin, Yizheng; Huang, Jingyun; Zhao, Binghui; Ye, Zhizhen [Zhejiang University, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hangzhou (China)

    2010-07-15

    Multifunctional zinc oxide (ZnO) interfaces were fabricated by utilizing the technique of low-temperature metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The ZnO interfacial material exhibit antiwetting, antireflectance, and photonic properties derived from the unique hierarchical micro- and nanostructures of the compound eye of the butterflies. We demonstrate that the fabrication of the multifunctional interfaces by using biotemplates can be applied to other materials, such as Pt. Our study provides an excellent example to obtain multifunctional interfaces by learning from nature. (orig.)

  2. The Politics of Gender: Feminist Implications of Gender Inversions from M. Butterfly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilin LI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The issue of gender has been discussed in terms of postcolonial feminism as a political tool, and the intervention of race makes the problem more complicated. The Chinese-American playwright David Henry Hwang makes a self-conscious move and inverts the gender identities of his characters Gallimard and Song. This paper analyzes the inversions and the corresponding implications from various viewpoints: the stereotype and fetishism, the problem of discourse power, and Homi Bhabha’s theory of the third space and Woolf’s androgyny vision. Oriental women have long been fetishized into a stereotype; they are depicted as submissive and passive, and are silenced by the double pressure from race and sex. In M. Butterfly, the stereotype is crushed by gender obscurity and inversion, and the articulation power is handed over to a person in the “third space” with hybrid identity. This masquerade can be seen as a process of self seeking and re-identification, in which Hwang installs his philosophy in feminism and provides his method for females, especially Oriental females, and this paper recovers the philosophy and exploration his contribution to postcolonial feminism in detail.
    Key words: Gender Inversion; M. Butterfly; Stereotype; Discourse Power; Third Space; Androgyny

    Resumé: La question de genre a été discutée en termes du féminisme postcolonial comme un outil politique, et l'intervention de la race rend le problème plus compliqué. Le dramaturge sino-américain David Henry Hwang fait une démarche de conscience de soi et inverse les identités de genre de ses personnages Gallimard et Song. Cet article analyse les interversions et les implications correspondantes des points de vue différents: le stéréotype et le fétichisme, le problème du pouvoir de discours, la théorie du troisième espace d'Homi Bhabha et la vision androgyne de Woolf. Les femmes orientales ont longtemps été fétichisée dans un stéréotype; elles sont dépeintes comme soumises et passives, et sont réduites au silence par la double pression de la race et du sexe. Dans Madame Papillon, le stéréotype est écrasé par l'obscurité et l'interversion des sexes et le pouvoir d'articulation est remis à une personne dans le "troisième espace" avec l'identité hybride. Cette mascarade peut être vue comme un processus de recherche de soi et de ré-identification, dans lequel Hwang installe sa philosophie dans le féminisme et fournit sa méthode pour les femmes, en particulier les femmes orientales, et cet article reprend la philosophie et l'exploration de sa contribution au féminisme postcolonial en détail.
    Mots-clés: Interversion Des Sexes; Madame Papillon; StÉRÉOtype; Puissance de Discours; TroisiÈMe Espace; Androgynie

  3. Signatures of selection in loci governing major colour patterns in Heliconius butterflies and related species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joron Mathieu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-coding change is one possible genetic mechanism underlying the evolution of adaptive wing colour pattern variation in Heliconius butterflies. Here we determine whether 38 putative genes within two major Heliconius patterning loci, HmYb and HmB, show evidence of positive selection. Ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide changes (? were used to test for selection, as a means of identifying candidate genes within each locus that control wing pattern. Results Preliminary analyses using 454 transcriptome and Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC sequences from three Heliconius species highlighted a cluster of genes within each region showing relatively higher rates of sequence evolution. Other genes within the region appear to be highly constrained, and no ? estimates exceeded one. Three genes from each locus with the highest average pairwise ? values were amplified from additional Heliconius species and races. Two selected genes, fizzy-like (HmYb and DALR (HmB, were too divergent for amplification across species and were excluded from further analysis. Amongst the remaining genes, HM00021 and Kinesin possessed the highest background ? values within the HmYb and HmB loci, respectively. After accounting for recombination, these two genes both showed evidence of having codons with a signature of selection, although statistical support for this signal was not strong in any case. Conclusions Tests of selection reveal a cluster of candidate genes in each locus, suggesting that weak directional selection may be occurring within a small region of each locus, but coding changes alone are unlikely to explain the full range of wing pattern diversity. These analyses pinpoint many of the same genes believed to be involved in the control of colour patterning in Heliconius that have been identified through other studies implementing different research methods.

  4. Does the DNA barcoding gap exist? – a case study in blue butterflies (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiedler Konrad

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA barcoding, i.e. the use of a 648 bp section of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I, has recently been promoted as useful for the rapid identification and discovery of species. Its success is dependent either on the strength of the claim that interspecific variation exceeds intraspecific variation by one order of magnitude, thus establishing a "barcoding gap", or on the reciprocal monophyly of species. Results We present an analysis of intra- and interspecific variation in the butterfly family Lycaenidae which includes a well-sampled clade (genus Agrodiaetus with a peculiar characteristic: most of its members are karyologically differentiated from each other which facilitates the recognition of species as reproductively isolated units even in allopatric populations. The analysis shows that there is an 18% overlap in the range of intra- and interspecific COI sequence divergence due to low interspecific divergence between many closely related species. In a Neighbour-Joining tree profile approach which does not depend on a barcoding gap, but on comprehensive sampling of taxa and the reciprocal monophyly of species, at least 16% of specimens with conspecific sequences in the profile were misidentified. This is due to paraphyly or polyphyly of conspecific DNA sequences probably caused by incomplete lineage sorting. Conclusion Our results indicate that the "barcoding gap" is an artifact of insufficient sampling across taxa. Although DNA barcodes can help to identify and distinguish species, we advocate using them in combination with other data, since otherwise there would be a high probability that sequences are misidentified. Although high differences in DNA sequences can help to identify cryptic species, a high percentage of well-differentiated species has similar or even identical COI sequences and would be overlooked in an isolated DNA barcoding approach.

  5. Uncovering patterns of spring migration in the monarch butterfly using stable isotopes and demographic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, R.; Miller, N.; Wassenaar, L.; Hobson, K.

    2010-12-01

    Each spring, millions of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrate up to 3000 km from central Mexico to re-colonize eastern North America. However, despite centuries of research, the patterns of re-colonization are not well understood. We combined stable-hydrogen (?D) and -carbon (?13C) isotope measurements with demographic models to test (1) whether individuals sampled in the northern part of the breeding range in the Great Lakes originate directly from Mexico or are second generation individuals born in the southern US and (2) to estimate whether populations on the eastern seaboard migrate longitudinally over the Appalachians or originate directly from the Gulf Coast. In the Great Lakes, we found that the majority of individuals were second-generation monarchs born in the Gulf Coast and Central regions of the US. However, 25% individuals originated directly from Mexico and we estimated that these individuals produced the majority of offspring born in the Great Lakes region during June. On the eastern seaboard, we found the majority of monarchs (88%) originated in the mid-west and Great Lakes regions, providing the first direct evidence that second generation monarchs born in June complete a (trans-) longitudinal migration across the Appalachian mountains. The remaining individuals (12%) originated from parents that migrated directly from the Gulf coast during early spring. Our results demonstrate how stable isotopes, when combined with ecological data, can provide insights into patterns of connectivity in migratory insects that have been impossible to test using conventional techniques. The migration patterns presented here have important implications for predicting future changes in population size and for developing effective conservation plans for this species.

  6. The molecular basis of melanism and mimicry in a swallowtail butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, P B; Behnecke, B; ffrench-Constant, R H

    2000-05-18

    Melanism in Lepidoptera, either industrial or in mimicry, is one of the most commonly cited examples of natural selection [1] [2]. Despite extensive studies of the frequency and maintenance of melanic genes in insect populations [1] [2], there has been little work on the underlying molecular mechanisms. Nowhere is butterfly melanism more striking than in the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) of North America [3] [4] [5]. In this species, females can be either yellow (wild type) or black (melanic). The melanic form is a Batesian mimic of the distasteful Pipevine Swallowtail (Battus philenor), which is also black in overall color. Melanism in P. glaucus is controlled by a single Y-linked (female) black gene [6]. Melanic females, therefore, always have melanic daughters. Black melanin replaces the background yellow in melanic females. Here, we show that the key enzyme involved is N-beta-alanyl-dopamine-synthase (BAS), which shunts dopamine from the melanin pathway into the production of the yellow color pigment papiliochrome and also provides products for cuticle sclerotization. In melanic females, this enzyme is suppressed, leading to abnormal melanization of a formerly yellow area, and wing scale maturation is also delayed in the same area. This raises the possibility that either reduced BAS activity itself is preventing scale sclerotization (maturation) or, in contrast, that the delay in scale maturation precludes expression of BAS at the correct stage. Together, these data show how changes in expression of a single gene product could result in multiple wing color phenotypes. The implications for the genetic control of mimicry in other Lepidoptera are discussed. PMID:10837223

  7. Timing major conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in species relationships of Polygonia butterflies (Nymphalidae: Nymphalini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Andrew D

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in estimating species relationships is an increasingly common finding in animals. Usually this is attributed to incomplete lineage sorting, but recently the possibility has been raised that hybridization is important in generating such phylogenetic patterns. Just how widespread ancient and/or recent hybridization is in animals and how it affects estimates of species relationships is still not well-known. Results We investigate the species relationships and their evolutionary history over time in the genus Polygonia using DNA sequences from two mitochondrial gene regions (COI and ND1, total 1931 bp and four nuclear gene regions (EF-1?, wingless, GAPDH and RpS5, total 2948 bp. We found clear, strongly supported conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences in estimating species relationships in the genus Polygonia. Nodes at which there was no conflict tended to have diverged at the same time when analyzed separately, while nodes at which conflict was present diverged at different times. We find that two species create most of the conflict, and attribute the conflict found in Polygonia satyrus to ancient hybridization and conflict found in Polygonia oreas to recent or ongoing hybridization. In both examples, the nuclear gene regions tended to give the phylogenetic relationships of the species supported by morphology and biology. Conclusion Studies inferring species-level relationships using molecular data should never be based on a single locus. Here we show that the phylogenetic hypothesis generated using mitochondrial DNA gives a very different interpretation of the evolutionary history of Polygonia species compared to that generated from nuclear DNA. We show that possible cases of hybridization in Polygonia are not limited to sister species, but may be inferred further back in time. Furthermore, we provide more evidence that Haldane's effect might not be as strong a process in preventing hybridization in butterflies as has been previously thought.

  8. Fine structures of wing scales in Sasakia charonda butterflies as photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejková-Plskova, J; Shiojiri, S; Shiojiri, M

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the microstructure of scales in the wings of male Sasakia charonda charonda butterflies by scanning electron microscopy with the aid of optical microscopy. Six types of scales are identified: B1, W1 and R1 in brown background yellow spots and red spots, respectively; B2 in iridescent purple-blue and W2 in white pearl, both of which characterize the male and B3 in the wing edges. The B1, W1 and R1 scales are almost the same in structure and the B2 and W2 scales are almost the same. The difference among the B, W and R scales is in species and content of pigment. The B1, W1 and R1 scales have only two layers of cuticle lapped on the ridges. In contrast with them, the B2 and W2 scales have seven multilayers of cuticle piled on the ridge. The multiple interference of light that occurs among these cuticle layers, spaced with air layers, generates the significant iridescence of the B2 and W2 scales. Thus, the characteristic purple-blue of the male wings is ascribed to the combination of the structural and chemical colouration in the B2 scales with melanin. The photonic crystals of these scales may be applicable to fine light manipulators such as reflection elements in laser diodes. B3 has many holes between the ridges and no multilayers of cuticle on the ridges. These structures may play any role in aerodynamically easy flight and/or in drainage of wet wings. PMID:19903230

  9. High-throughput reproduction of the Morpho butterfly's specific high contrast blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akira; Murase, Junichi; Yonezawa, Masaru; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Shibuya, Takuto; Sasaki, Mitsuo; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Noguchi, Shunji; Akai-kasaya, Megumi; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2012-04-01

    Some species of the blue Morpho butterfly have a mysterious physical feature of strucural color, because it has both high reflectivity (>60%) and a single color in too wide angular range (> +/- 40° from the normal), which are contradicting with each other in consideration of the interference phenomena. We have recently proven the principle of the mystery by extracting the physical essence, and emulating the nano-structures using nano-fabrication techniques. The essence was special combination of regular and irregular structures at nanometer scale. Such artificial structural color was found to concern wide applications, because the Morpho-color can produce a single color without pigment in wide angular range with high reflectivity. Also it makes colors impossible by pigment, and is resistant to fading due to chemical change over longtime. However, we must overcome several "death valleys" for wide industrial applications. One of the most serious problems was extremely low throughput in the fabrication process of nano-patterning by the conventional lithography. This difficulty was solved by use of the nano-imprinting technique. However, from the practical viewpoint, the enlargement of the mold area for nano-imprinting process was essential. This problem was found to be solved using the laser fabrication and electroforming processes. Nevertheless, to reproduce the clear blue contrast of the Morpho-color, a blackening treatment at the film interface was found to be necessary. The blackening processes and conditions by use of absorbing layers were then estimated and successfully applied to reproduce the clear contrast of the Morpho-blue, which has been confirmed by the optical measurement of the reflectivity.

  10. Multilocus species trees show the recent adaptive radiation of the mimetic heliconius butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Krzysztof M; Wahlberg, Niklas; Neild, Andrew F E; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K; Mallet, James; Jiggins, Chris D

    2015-05-01

    Müllerian mimicry among Neotropical Heliconiini butterflies is an excellent example of natural selection, associated with the diversification of a large continental-scale radiation. Some of the processes driving the evolution of mimicry rings are likely to generate incongruent phylogenetic signals across the assemblage, and thus pose a challenge for systematics. We use a data set of 22 mitochondrial and nuclear markers from 92% of species in the tribe, obtained by Sanger sequencing and de novo assembly of short read data, to re-examine the phylogeny of Heliconiini with both supermatrix and multispecies coalescent approaches, characterize the patterns of conflicting signal, and compare the performance of various methodological approaches to reflect the heterogeneity across the data. Despite the large extent of reticulate signal and strong conflict between markers, nearly identical topologies are consistently recovered by most of the analyses, although the supermatrix approach failed to reflect the underlying variation in the history of individual loci. However, the supermatrix represents a useful approximation where multiple rare species represented by short sequences can be incorporated easily. The first comprehensive, time-calibrated phylogeny of this group is used to test the hypotheses of a diversification rate increase driven by the dramatic environmental changes in the Neotropics over the past 23 myr, or changes caused by diversity-dependent effects on the rate of diversification. We find that the rate of diversification has increased on the branch leading to the presently most species-rich genus Heliconius, but the change occurred gradually and cannot be unequivocally attributed to a specific environmental driver. Our study provides comprehensive comparison of philosophically distinct species tree reconstruction methods and provides insights into the diversification of an important insect radiation in the most biodiverse region of the planet. PMID:25634098

  11. Conservatism and novelty in the genetic architecture of adaptation in Heliconius butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, B; Whibley, A; Poul, Y L; Navarro, N; Martin, A; Baxter, S; Shah, A; Gilles, B; Wirth, T; McMillan, W O; Joron, M

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of adaptive traits has been at the centre of modern evolutionary biology since Fisher; however, evaluating how the genetic architecture of ecologically important traits influences their diversification has been hampered by the scarcity of empirical data. Now, high-throughput genomics facilitates the detailed exploration of variation in the genome-to-phenotype map among closely related taxa. Here, we investigate the evolution of wing pattern diversity in Heliconius, a clade of neotropical butterflies that have undergone an adaptive radiation for wing-pattern mimicry and are influenced by distinct selection regimes. Using crosses between natural wing-pattern variants, we used genome-wide restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) genotyping, traditional linkage mapping and multivariate image analysis to study the evolution of the architecture of adaptive variation in two closely related species: Heliconius hecale and H. ismenius. We implemented a new morphometric procedure for the analysis of whole-wing pattern variation, which allows visualising spatial heatmaps of genotype-to-phenotype association for each quantitative trait locus separately. We used the H. melpomene reference genome to fine-map variation for each major wing-patterning region uncovered, evaluated the role of candidate genes and compared genetic architectures across the genus. Our results show that, although the loci responding to mimicry selection are highly conserved between species, their effect size and phenotypic action vary throughout the clade. Multilocus architecture is ancestral and maintained across species under directional selection, whereas the single-locus (supergene) inheritance controlling polymorphism in H. numata appears to have evolved only once. Nevertheless, the conservatism in the wing-patterning toolkit found throughout the genus does not appear to constrain phenotypic evolution towards local adaptive optima. PMID:25806542

  12. Enemy-free space and habitat-specific host specialization in a butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund, Christer; Friberg, Magne

    2008-08-01

    The majority of herbivorous insects have relatively specialized food habits. This suggests that specialization has some advantage(s) over generalization. Traditionally, feeding specialization has been thought to be linked to digestive or other food-related physiological advantages, but recent theory suggests that generalist natural enemies of herbivorous insects can also provide a major selective pressure for restricted host plant range. The European swallowtail butterfly Papilio machaon utilizes various plants in the Apiaceae family as hosts, but is an ecological specialist being monophagous on Angelica archangelica in southern Sweden. This perennial monocarp grows in three seaside habitat types: (1) on the barren rocky shore in the absence of any surrounding vegetation, (2) on the rocky shore with some surrounding vegetation, and (3) on species-rich meadows. The rocky shore habitat harbors few invertebrate generalist predators, whereas a number of invertebrate predators abound in the meadowland habitat. Here, we test the importance of enemy-free space for feeding specialization in Papilio machaon by assessing survival of larvae placed by hand on A. archangelica in each of the three habitat types, and by assessing the habitat-specificity of adult female egg-laying behavior by recording the distribution of eggs laid by free-flying adult females among the three habitat types. Larval survival was substantially higher in the rocky shore habitat than in the meadowland and significantly higher on host plants without surrounding vegetation on the rocky shore. Eggs laid by free-flying females were found in all three habitat types, but were significantly more frequent in the rocky shore habitat, suggesting that females prefer to lay eggs in the habitat type where offspring survival is highest. These results show that larval survivorship on the same host plant species can be strongly habitat-specific, and suggest that enemy-free space is an underlying factor that drives feeding specialization in Papilio machaon. PMID:18607636

  13. Aerial ultra-low-volume application of naled: impact on nontarget imperiled butterfly larvae (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri) and efficacy against adult mosquitoes (Aedes taeniorhynchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, H; Hribar, L J; Daniels, J C; Feken, M A; Brock, C; Trager, M D

    2010-12-01

    We assessed the exposure and acute toxicity of naled, applied aerially as an ultra-low-volume spray for mosquito control, on late instar larvae of the Miami blue (Cyclargus thomasi bethunebakeri) (Comstock and Huntington 1943) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae), an imperiled South Florida butterfly. We concurrently evaluated the control efficacy against caged adult female salt-marsh mosquitoes (Aedes taeniorhynchus) (Wiedemann 1821) (Diptera: Culicidae). This 3-yr study was conducted in north Key Largo (Monroe County, FL) beginning in 2006. The field trials incorporated 15 sampling stations: nine in the target spray zone, three in the spray drift zone at varying distances from the target zone, and three in the control zone not subjected to naled spray drift. A total of six field spray trials were completed, three at an altitude of 30.5 m (100 feet), and three at 45.7 m (150 feet). For all trials, the ultra-low-volume application of Trumpet EC insecticide (78% naled) at a rate of 54.8 ml/ha (0.75 fl. oz/acre) was effective in killing caged adult mosquitoes in the target zone. Butterfly larvae survival was significantly reduced in the spray zone compared with drift and control zones. Analysis of insecticide residue data revealed that the mortality of the late instar butterfly larvae was a result of exposure to excess residues of naled. Additional research is needed to determine mitigation strategies that can limit exposure of sensitive butterflies to naled while maintaining mosquito control efficacy. PMID:22182563

  14. Delving into Delias Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pireridae): fine-scale biogeography, phylogenetics and systematics of the world’s largest butterfly genus.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller, C. J.; Matos Maravi, Pavel F.; Beheregaray, L. B.

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 40, ?. 5 (2013), s. 881-893. ISSN 0305-0270 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : butterflies * DEC model * historical biogeography Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 4.969, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jbi.12040/pdf

  15. Resource availability, matrix quality, microclimate, and spatial pattern as predictors of patch use by the Karner blue butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundel, R.; Pavlovic, N.B.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of which aspects of habitat quality and habitat spatial arrangement best account for variation in a species' distribution can guide management for organisms such as the Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis), a federally endangered subspecies inhabiting savannas of Midwest and Eastern United States. We examined the extent to which three sets of predictors, (1) larval host plant (Lupinus perennis, wild lupine) availability, (2) characteristics of the matrix surrounding host plant patches, and (3) factors affecting a patch's thermal environment, accounted for variation in lupine patch use by Karner blues at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Indiana and Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, USA. Each predictor set accounted for 7-13% of variation in patch occupancy by Karner blues at both sites and in larval feeding activity among patches at Indiana Dunes. Patch area, an indicator of host plant availability, was an exception, accounting for 30% of variation in patch occupancy at Indiana Dunes. Spatially structured patterns of patch use across the landscape accounted for 9-16% of variation in patch use and explained more variation in larval feeding activity than did spatial autocorrelation between neighboring patches. Because of this broader spatial trend across sites, a given management action may be more effective in promoting patch use in some portions of the landscape than in others. Spatial trend, resource availability, matrix quality, and microclimate, in general, accounted for similar amounts of variation in patch use and each should be incorporated into habitat management planning for the Karner blue butterfly.

  16. Trends in deforestation and forest degradation after a decade of monitoring in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Omar; López-García, José; Rendón-Salinas, Eduardo

    2014-02-01

    We used aerial photographs, satellite images, and field surveys to monitor forest cover in the core zones of the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Mexico from 2001 to 2012. We used our data to assess the effectiveness of conservation actions that involved local, state, and federal authorities and community members (e.g., local landowners and private and civil organizations) in one of the world's most iconic protected areas. From 2001 through 2012, 1254 ha were deforested (i.e., cleared areas had monarch reserve, particularly from 2007 to 2012. Those efforts, together with the decade-long financial support from Mexican and international philanthropists and businesses to create local alternative-income generation and employment, resulted in the decrease of large-scale illegal logging from 731 ha affected in 2005-2007 to none affected in 2012, although small-scale logging is of growing concern. However, dire regional social and economic problems remain, and they must be addressed to ensure the reserve's long-term conservation. The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) overwintering colonies in Mexico-which engage in one of the longest known insect migrations-are threatened by deforestation, and a multistakeholder, regional, sustainable-development strategy is needed to protect the reserve. PMID:24001209

  17. An experimental displacement and over 50 years of tag-recoveries show that monarch butterflies are not true navigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Derbyshire, Rachael; Stalleicken, Julia; Mouritsen, Ole Ø; Frost, Barrie J; Norris, D Ryan

    2013-04-30

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) breeding in eastern North America are famous for their annual fall migration to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. However, the mechanisms they use to successfully reach these sites remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether monarchs are true navigators who can determine their location relative to their final destination using both a "compass" and a "map". Using flight simulators, we recorded the orientation of wild-caught monarchs in southwestern Ontario and found that individuals generally flew in a southwest direction toward the wintering grounds. When displaced 2,500 km to the west, the same individuals continued to fly in a general southwest direction, suggesting that monarchs use a simple vector-navigation strategy (i.e., use a specific compass bearing without compensating for displacement). Using over 5 decades of field data, we also show that the directional concentration and the angular SD of recoveries from tagged monarchs largely conformed to two mathematical models describing the directional distribution of migrants expected under a vector-navigation strategy. A third analysis of tagged recoveries shows that the increasing directionality of migration from north to south is largely because of the presence of geographic barriers that guide individuals toward overwintering sites. Our work suggests that monarchs breeding in eastern North America likely combine simple orientation mechanisms with geographic features that funnel them toward Mexican overwintering sites, a remarkable achievement considering that these butterflies weigh less than a gram and travel thousands of kilometers to a site they have never seen. PMID:23569228

  18. An experimental displacement and over 50 years of tag-recoveries show that monarch butterflies are not true navigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtisen, Henrik; Derbyshirec, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) breeding in eastern North America are famous for their annual fall migration to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. However, the mechanisms they use to successfully reach these sites remain poorly understood. Here, we test whether monarchs are true navigators who can determine their location relative to their final destination using both a “compass” and a “map”. Using flight simulators, we recorded the orientation of wild-caught monarchs in southwestern Ontario and found that individuals generally flew in a southwest direction toward the wintering grounds. When displaced 2,500 km to the west, the same individuals continued to fly in a general southwest direction, suggesting that monarchs use a simple vector-navigation strategy (i.e., use a specific compass bearing without compensating for displacement). Using over 5 decades of field data, we also show that the directional concentration and the angular SD of recoveries from tagged monarchs largely conformed to two mathematical models describing the directional distribution of migrants expected under a vector-navigation strategy. A third analysis of tagged recoveries shows that the increasing directionality of migration from north to south is largely because of the presence of geographic barriers that guide individuals toward overwintering sites. Our work suggests that monarchs breeding in eastern North America likely combine simple orientation mechanisms with geographic features that funnel them toward Mexican overwintering sites, a remarkable achievement considering that these butterflies weigh less than a gram and travel thousands of kilometers to a site they have never seen.

  19. Dispersal and gene flow in the rare, parasitic Large Blue butterfly Maculinea arion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Line Vej; Andersen, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Dispersal is crucial for gene flow and often determines the long-term stability of meta-populations, particularly in rare species with specialized life cycles. Such species are often foci of conservation efforts because they suffer disproportionally from degradation and fragmentation of their habitat. However, detailed knowledge of effective gene flow through dispersal is often missing, so that conservation strategies have to be based on mark-recapture observations that are suspected to be poor predictors of long-distance dispersal. These constraints have been especially severe in the study of butterfly populations, where microsatellite markers have been difficult to develop. We used eight microsatellite markers to analyse genetic population structure of the Large Blue butterfly Maculinea arion in Sweden. During recent decades, this species has become an icon of insect conservation after massive decline throughout Europe and extinction in Britain followed by reintroduction of a seed population from the Swedish island of Öland. We find that populations are highly structured genetically, but that gene flow occurs over distances 15 times longer than the maximum distance recorded from mark-recapture studies, which can only be explained by maximum dispersal distances at least twice as large as previously accepted. However, we also find evidence that gaps between sites with suitable habitat exceeding ~20km induce genetic erosion that can be detected from bottleneck analyses. Although further work is needed, our results suggest that M. arion can maintain fully functional metapopulations when they consist of optimal habitat patches that are no further apart than ~10km.

  20. Why do cryptic species tend not to co-occur? A case study on two cryptic pairs of butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vod?, Raluca; Dapporto, Leonardo; Dinc?, Vlad; Vila, Roger

    2015-01-01

    As cryptic diversity is being discovered, mostly thanks to advances in molecular techniques, it is becoming evident that many of these taxa display parapatric distributions in mainland and that they rarely coexist on islands. Genetic landscapes, haplotype networks and ecological niche modeling analyses were performed for two pairs of non-sister cryptic butterfly species, Aricia agestis-A. cramera and Polyommatus icarus-P. celina (Lycaenidae), to specifically assess non-coexistence on western Mediterranean islands, and to test potential causes producing such chequered distribution patterns. We show that the morphologically and ecologically equivalent pairs of species do not coexist on any of the studied islands, although nearly all islands are colonized by one of them. According to our models, the cryptic pairs displayed marked climatic preferences and 'precipitation during the driest quarter' was recovered as the most important climatic determinant. However, neither dispersal capacity, nor climatic or ecological factors fully explain the observed distributions across particular sea straits, and the existence of species interactions resulting in mutual exclusion is suggested as a necessary hypothesis. Given that the studied species are habitat generalists, feeding on virtually unlimited resources, we propose that reproductive interference, together with climatic preferences, sustain density-dependent mechanisms like "founder takes all" and impede coexistence on islands. Chequered distributions among cryptic taxa, both sister and non-sister, are common in butterflies, suggesting that the phenomenon revealed here could be important in determining biodiversity patterns. PMID:25692577

  1. DNA barcodes and cryptic species of skipper butterflies in the genus Perichares in Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, John M; Janzen, Daniel H; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Hallwachs, Winnie; Hebert, Paul D N

    2008-04-29

    DNA barcodes can be used to identify cryptic species of skipper butterflies previously detected by classic taxonomic methods and to provide first clues to the existence of yet other cryptic species. A striking case is the common geographically and ecologically widespread neotropical skipper butterfly Perichares philetes (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae), described in 1775, which barcoding splits into a complex of four species in Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG) in northwestern Costa Rica. Three of the species are new, and all four are described. Caterpillars, pupae, and foodplants offer better distinguishing characters than do adults, whose differences are mostly average, subtle, and blurred by intraspecific variation. The caterpillars of two species are generalist grass-eaters; of the other two, specialist palm-eaters, each of which feeds on different genera. But all of these cryptic species are more specialized in their diet than was the morphospecies that held them. The four ACG taxa discovered to date belong to a panneotropical complex of at least eight species. This complex likely includes still more species, whose exposure may require barcoding. Barcoding ACG hesperiid morphospecies has increased their number by nearly 10%, an unexpectedly high figure for such relatively well known insects. PMID:18436645

  2. Accounting for habitat when considering climate: has the niche of the Adonis blue butterfly changed in the UK?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Rory S; Hails, Rosemary S; Thomas, Jeremy A

    2014-04-01

    The dramatic recovery of three species of grassland specialist butterfly threatened with extinction at their high latitude range limits in the 1980s has been attributed to two factors: increased grazing on calcareous grassland sites and warmer air temperatures. Both result in the warming of soil surface temperatures, favourable to the larvae of these species. We address the influence of both of these factors on the habitat usage of the butterfly Polyommatus bellargus, undergoing recovery at its northern range edge. We test the hypothesis that the larval niche of P. bellargus has become less constrained in the past three decades, whilst controlling for changes in habitat structure. Once habitat change has been accounted for we find no evidence for a broadening of the larval niche of P. bellargus. Further, we show that coincident with the recovery of P. bellargus there have been drastic reductions in average turf height across UK chalk grasslands, but changes in air temperature have been highly variable. We conclude that changes to soil surface temperatures caused by reducing turf heights will have been a more consistent influence than air temperature increases, and so habitat improvements through increased grazing will have been the major driver of recovery in P. bellargus. We consider the need to account for changes in habitat when exploring the impacts of recent climate change on local habitats in thermophilous species, and emphasise the continued importance of habitat management to support such species under variable local climates. PMID:24414235

  3. Butterfly magnetization in YBa2Cu3-xFexO7-y: Correlation with the microstructure and the macrostructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The butterfly anomaly in the critical current density (J) of a large number of YBa2Cu3-xFexO7-y samples is investigated as a function of the magnetic field (0?H?60 kOe), the field sweep rate (2 Oe/s?dH/dt?103 Oe/s), the temperature (T?55 K), the dimensions of the specimens (10-2 mm?R?0.6 mm), and their microstructures. The magnitude and the shape of the central peak of J(H) depend strongly on the size of the specimen, but only weakly on its microstructure. Despite the differences in the defect structures of the various samples, their current densities tend towards the same value for R?50 ?m, Tm2, with Hm2 denoting the field of the second maximum of the hysteresis cycle. The latter field generally decreases with the defect concentration (nef) and provides an excellent characterization of the pinning properties of the material. At low concentration, the pinning force increases with nef, while the pinning barriers decreases. The butterfly effect is consistent with the collective creep theory in the field region around Hm2. This field marks a crossover between small and large bundle pinning regimes. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Reconstructing eight decades of genetic variation in an isolated Danish population of the large blue butterfly Maculinea arion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boomsma Jacobus J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragmentation of terrestrial ecosystems has had detrimental effects on metapopulations of habitat specialists. Maculinea butterflies have been particularly affected because of their specialized lifecycles, requiring both specific food-plants and host-ants. However, the interaction between dispersal, effective population size, and long-term genetic erosion of these endangered butterflies remains unknown. Using non-destructive sampling, we investigated the genetic diversity of the last extant population of M. arion in Denmark, which experienced critically low numbers in the 1980s. Results Using nine microsatellite markers, we show that the population is genetically impoverished compared to nearby populations in Sweden, but less so than monitoring programs suggested. Ten additional short repeat microsatellites were used to reconstruct changes in genetic diversity and population structure over the last 77 years from museum specimens. We also tested amplification efficiency in such historical samples as a function of repeat length and sample age. Low population numbers in the 1980s did not affect genetic diversity, but considerable turnover of alleles has characterized this population throughout the time-span of our analysis. Conclusions Our results suggest that M. arion is less sensitive to genetic erosion via population bottlenecks than previously thought, and that managing clusters of high quality habitat may be key for long-term conservation.

  5. Why Do Cryptic Species Tend Not to Co-Occur? A Case Study on Two Cryptic Pairs of Butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vod?, Raluca; Dapporto, Leonardo; Dinc?, Vlad; Vila, Roger

    2015-01-01

    As cryptic diversity is being discovered, mostly thanks to advances in molecular techniques, it is becoming evident that many of these taxa display parapatric distributions in mainland and that they rarely coexist on islands. Genetic landscapes, haplotype networks and ecological niche modeling analyses were performed for two pairs of non-sister cryptic butterfly species, Aricia agestis-A. cramera and Polyommatus icarus—P. celina (Lycaenidae), to specifically assess non-coexistence on western Mediterranean islands, and to test potential causes producing such chequered distribution patterns. We show that the morphologically and ecologically equivalent pairs of species do not coexist on any of the studied islands, although nearly all islands are colonized by one of them. According to our models, the cryptic pairs displayed marked climatic preferences and ‘precipitation during the driest quarter’ was recovered as the most important climatic determinant. However, neither dispersal capacity, nor climatic or ecological factors fully explain the observed distributions across particular sea straits, and the existence of species interactions resulting in mutual exclusion is suggested as a necessary hypothesis. Given that the studied species are habitat generalists, feeding on virtually unlimited resources, we propose that reproductive interference, together with climatic preferences, sustain density-dependent mechanisms like “founder takes all” and impede coexistence on islands. Chequered distributions among cryptic taxa, both sister and non-sister, are common in butterflies, suggesting that the phenomenon revealed here could be important in determining biodiversity patterns. PMID:25692577

  6. Heat shock protein 70 gene family in the Glanville fritillary butterfly and their response to thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shiqi; Ahola, Virpi; Shu, Chang; Xu, Chongren; Wang, Rongjiang

    2015-02-10

    Temperature variation in the environment is a great challenge to organisms. Induction of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is a common genetic mechanism to cope with thermal stress. The Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia) is a model species in population and evolutionary biology, and its behavior and life history are greatly influenced by ambient temperature. We cloned and sequenced the full coding sequences of seven hsp70 genes from the Glanville fritillary. Of those genes, McHsc70-1 and McHsc70-2 were identified as heat shock cognate 70 (hsc70), of which the latter located in endoplasmic reticulum. We analyzed the expression patterns of different hsp70s under various thermal stresses using quantitative PCR. Heat shock at 40°C for 2h induced high expression of McHsp70-1, McHsp70-2 and McHsc70-2. Only McHsc70-2 had a small increase after cold shock at 0°C for 2h. Acclimation at 35°C for three days before heat shock reduced expression of McHsp70 after heat shock. The maximum mRNA level of McHsp70s was reached in the first 2h after the heat shock. This study uncovers the complexity of the hsp70 system, and provides the valuable information for further temperature-related research in the Glanville fritillary butterfly. PMID:25433328

  7. Over-expression of Ultrabithorax alters embryonic body plan and wing patterns in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaoling; Hrycaj, Steven; Podlaha, Ondrej; Popadic, Aleksandar; Monteiro, Antónia

    2014-10-15

    In insects, forewings and hindwings usually have different shapes, sizes, and color patterns. A variety of RNAi experiments across insect species have shown that the hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) is necessary to promote hindwing identity. However, it remains unclear whether Ubx is sufficient to confer hindwing fate to forewings across insects. Here, we address this question by over-expressing Ubx in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana using a heat-shock promoter. Ubx whole-body over-expression during embryonic and larvae development led to body plan changes in larvae but to mere quantitative changes to adult morphology, respectively. Embryonic heat-shocks led to fused segments, loss of thoracic and abdominal limbs, and transformation of head limbs to larger appendages. Larval heat-shocks led to reduced eyespot size in the expected homeotic direction, but neither additional eyespots nor wing shape changes were observed in forewings as expected of a homeotic transformation. Interestingly, Ubx was found to be expressed in a novel, non-characteristic domain - in the hindwing eyespot centers. Furthermore, ectopic expression of Ubx on the pupal wing activated the eyespot-associated genes spalt and Distal-less, known to be directly repressed by Ubx in the fly?s haltere and leg primordia, respectively, and led to the differentiation of black wing scales. These results suggest that Ubx has been co-opted into a novel eyespot gene regulatory network, and that it is capable of activating black pigmentation in butterflies. PMID:25169193

  8. Phylogeography and genetic diversity of a widespread Old World butterfly, Lampides boeticus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce Naomi E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary genetics provides a rich theoretical framework for empirical studies of phylogeography. Investigations of intraspecific genetic variation can uncover new putative species while allowing inference into the evolutionary origin and history of extant populations. With a distribution on four continents ranging throughout most of the Old World, Lampides boeticus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae is one of the most widely distributed species of butterfly. It is placed in a monotypic genus with no commonly accepted subspecies. Here, we investigate the demographic history and taxonomic status of this widespread species, and screen for the presence or absence of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia. Results We performed phylogenetic, population genetic, and phylogeographic analyses using 1799 bp of mitochondrial sequence data from 57 specimens collected throughout the species' range. Most of the samples (>90% were nearly genetically identical, with uncorrected pairwise sequence differences of 0 – 0.5% across geographic distances > 9,000 km. However, five samples from central Thailand, Madagascar, northern Australia and the Moluccas formed two divergent clades differing from the majority of samples by uncorrected pairwise distances ranging from 1.79 – 2.21%. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that L. boeticus is almost certainly monophyletic, with all sampled genes coalescing well after the divergence from three closely related taxa included for outgroup comparisons. Analyses of molecular diversity indicate that most L. boeticus individuals in extant populations are descended from one or two relatively recent population bottlenecks. Conclusion The combined analyses suggest a scenario in which the most recent common ancestor of L. boeticus and its sister taxon lived in the African region approximately 7 Mya; extant lineages of L. boeticus began spreading throughout the Old World at least 1.5 Mya. More recently, expansion after population bottlenecks approximately 1.4 Mya seem to have displaced most of the ancestral polymorphism throughout its range, though at least two early-branching lineages still persist. One of these lineages, in northern Australia and the Moluccas, may have experienced accelerated differentiation due to infection with the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia, which affects reproduction. Examination of a haplotype network suggests that Australia has been colonized by the species several times. While there is little evidence for the existence of morphologically cryptic species, these results suggest a complex history affected by repeated dispersal events.

  9. Population sex ratio and dispersal in experimental, two-patch metapopulations of butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trochet, Audrey; Legrand, Delphine; Larranaga, Nicolas; Ducatez, Simon; Calvez, Olivier; Cote, Julien; Clobert, Jean; Baguette, Michel

    2013-09-01

    1. Sex-biased dispersal, that is, the difference in dispersal between males and females, is thought to be the consequence of any divergent evolutionary responses between sexes. In anisogamous species, asymmetry in parental investment may lead to sexual conflict, which entails male-male competition (for sexual partner access), female-female competition (for feeding or egg-laying habitat patches) and/or male-female competition (antagonistic co-evolution). 2. As competition is one of the main causes of dispersal evolution, intra- and intersexual competition should have strong consequences on sex-biased dispersal. However, very few experimental studies, if any, have simultaneously addressed the effect of biased sex ratio on (i) each dispersal stage (emigration, transience, immigration), (ii) the dispersal phenotype and (iii) the colonization success of new habitat in order to fully separate the effects of varying male and female density. 3. Here, we used the Metatron, a unique experimental system composed of 48 interconnected enclosed patches dedicated to the study of dispersal in meta-ecosystems, to investigate the effect of sex ratio on dispersal in a butterfly. We created six populations with three different sex ratios in pairs of patches and recorded individual movements in these simple metapopulations. 4. Emigration was higher when the proportion of males was higher, and individuals reached the empty patch at a higher rate when the sex ratio in the departure patch was balanced. Males had a better dispersal success than females, which had a lower survival rate during dispersal and after colonization. We also showed that sex and wing size are major components of the dispersal response. 5. We did not observe sex-biased dispersal; our results thus suggest that female harassment by males and male-male competition might be more important mechanisms for the dispersal of females and males, than the search for a mating partner. Furthermore, the demonstration of a differential mortality between males and females during dispersal provides causal hypotheses of the evolution of sex-biased dispersal. PMID:23600890

  10. Why do the ithomiines (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae) aggregate? Notes on a butterfly pocket in central Brazil Por que os Ithomiinae (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae) se agregam? Observações sobre um bolsão de borboletas no Brasil central

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Carlos E. G.; Ísis Meri Medri; Ana Karina Moreyra Salcedo

    2008-01-01

    This study provides information on the species composition and the number of butterflies in different phases of an ithomiine aggregation during the 2004 dry season in central Brazil, and tests some hypotheses concerning the pocket formation. The results obtained suggest that ithomiine pockets constitute primarily an adaptation of butterflies to the adverse climatic conditions of the dry season, such as high temperatures and low air relative humidity, rather than the occurrence of large concen...

  11. Unravelling the annual cycle in a migratory animal: breeding-season habitat loss drives population declines of monarch butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D T Tyler; Pichancourt, Jean-Baptiste; Norris, D Ryan; Martin, Tara G

    2014-06-01

    Threats to migratory animals can occur at multiple periods of the annual cycle that are separated by thousands of kilometres and span international borders. Populations of the iconic monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) of eastern North America have declined over the last 21 years. Three hypotheses have been posed to explain the decline: habitat loss on the overwintering grounds in Mexico, habitat loss on the breeding grounds in the United States and Canada, and extreme weather events. Our objectives were to assess population viability, determine which life stage, season and geographical region are contributing the most to population dynamics and test the three hypotheses that explain the observed population decline. We developed a spatially structured, stochastic and density-dependent periodic projection matrix model that integrates patterns of migratory connectivity and demographic vital rates across the annual cycle. We used perturbation analysis to determine the sensitivity of population abundance to changes in vital rate among life stages, seasons and geographical regions. Next, we compared the singular effects of each threat to the full model where all factors operate concurrently. Finally, we generated predictions to assess the risk of host plant loss as a result of genetically modified crops on current and future monarch butterfly population size and extinction probability. Our year-round population model predicted population declines of 14% and a quasi-extinction probability (5% within a century. Monarch abundance was more than four times more sensitive to perturbations of vital rates on the breeding grounds than on the wintering grounds. Simulations that considered only forest loss or climate change in Mexico predicted higher population sizes compared to milkweed declines on the breeding grounds. Our model predictions also suggest that mitigating the negative effects of genetically modified crops results in higher population size and lower extinction risk. Recent population declines stem from reduction in milkweed host plants in the United States that arise from increasing adoption of genetically modified crops and land-use change, not from climate change or degradation of forest habitats in Mexico. Therefore, reducing the negative effects of host plant loss on the breeding grounds is the top conservation priority to slow or halt future population declines of monarch butterflies in North America. PMID:24903085

  12. Hormigas como plagas potenciales en tres criaderos de mariposas del suroccidente de Colombia Ants as potential pest of butterflies in three rearing in the southwest of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Catalina Sanabria-Blandón

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La fauna de hormigas asociada con la zoocría de mariposas en los departamentos de Valle del Cauca y Quindío (Colombia, se colectó por captura manual en tres ambientes (mariposario, vivero y laboratorio. De 125 muestras se extrajeron 779 hormigas, pertenecientes a cinco subfamilias, 18 géneros y 24 especies. El mayor número de especies se registró en el área de laboratorio (17, seguido por vivero (16 y mariposario (13. No se encontraron diferencias significativas (Chi² = 6.019, g.l.= 10, P>0.75, al evaluar la preferencia de las hormigas por un ambiente, sin embargo se observaron tendencias de esta manera: Wasmannia auropunctata (50%, Linepithema sp. (47%, Monomorium floricola (40% fueron las más importantes en el laboratorio, mientras que en el mariposario fueron Linepithema humile (42%, Camponotus novogranadensis (39% y Paratrechina longiconis (37.5% y en el vivero W. auropunctata (37.5% y P. longicornis (37.5%. Algunas de estas hormigas son reconocidas como vagabundas y plagas urbanas, lo que podría considerarse como un riesgo potencial para las actividades de zoocría de mariposas. En el presente estudio se propuso conocer las especies de hormigas que se asocian con tres criaderos de mariposas localizados en el suroccidente colombiano.The ant fauna associated to the butterflies rearing in the departments of Cauca Valley and Quindio (Colombia was studied. The ants were collected using manual capture method in three different environments (butterfly garden, nursery and laboratory. 779 ants were extracted from 125 samples, which belonged to five sub-families, 18 genera and 24 species. The greatest number of species were registered at the laboratory (17, followed by nursery (16 and butterfly garden (13. There weren't any significant differences (Chi2 = 6.019, d.f.= 10, P> 0.75, in assessing the preference of ants for some environment, however some trends were observed, on this way: at the lab Wasmannia auropunctata (50%, Linepithema sp. (47%, Monomorium floricola (40% were the most important species, while at the butterfly garden were Linepithema humile (42%, Camponotus novogranadensis (39% and Paratrechina longiconis (37.5% and W. auropunctata (37.5% and P. longicornis (37.5% at the nursery. Some of these ants have been recognized as tramp ants and urban pests, which could be considerate as a potential risk for butterfly rearing activities. In this research, we expected recognize the ants species associated in three butterflies rearing located in the southwest of Colombia.

  13. Measuring the Meaning of Words in Contexts: An automated analysis of controversies about Monarch butterflies, Frankenfoods, and stem cells

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2009-01-01

    Co-words have been considered as carriers of meaning across different domains in studies of science, technology, and society. Words and co-words, however, obtain meaning in sentences, and sentences obtain meaning in their contexts of use. At the science/society interface, words can be expected to have different meanings: the codes of communication that provide meaning to words differ on the varying sides of the interface. Furthermore, meanings and interfaces may change over time. Given this structuring of meaning across interfaces and over time, we distinguish between metaphors and diaphors as reflexive mechanisms that facilitate the translation between contexts. Our empirical focus is on three recent scientific controversies: Monarch butterflies, Frankenfoods, and stem-cell therapies. This study explores new avenues that relate the study of co-word analysis in context with the sociological quest for the analysis and processing of meaning.

  14. From the Phylogeny of the Satyrinae Butterflies to the Systematics of Euptychiina (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae): History, Progress and Prospects

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    MA, Marín; C, Peña; AVL, Freitas; N, Wahlberg; SI, Uribe.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english We review the various proposals of evolutionary and classification schemes for Satyrinae and particularly Euptychiina butterflies, assessing progress and prospects of research for the group. Among the highlights is the proposal to include Morphini, Brassolini and Amathusiini as part of Satyrinae. Al [...] though it is clear that this hypothesis requires further investigation, phylogenetic studies recently conducted recover this clade as part of Satyrinae with high support. The phylogenetic analyses for Euptychiina carried out to date recover the monophyly of the group and have identified a variety of genera as non-monophyletic. Further work is necessary to resolve the position of the subtribe and the evolutionary relationships of several genera.

  15. A design of triplexer based on a 2×2 butterfly MMI coupler and a directional coupler using silicon waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dung Truong, Cao; Anh Tran, Tuan; Han Tran, Duc

    2014-02-01

    A novel ultra-compact triplexer is designed by basing it on a combination of a 2×2 generalized interference-multimode interference (GI-MMI) coupler. The MMI is formed into linear butterfly shape and a directional coupler using silicon rib waveguides. Firstly, the 2×2 MMI coupler is designed to separate the wavelength 1490 nm into one port and wavelengths of 1310 nm and 1550 nm into another port. Then a directional coupler is used to drop wavelengths of 1310 nm and 1550 nm to output ports individually. Numerical simulations with three-dimensional Beam Propagation Method (BPM) are utilized to design and optimize the operation of the proposed triplexer.

  16. Glass scales on the wing of the swordtail butterfly Graphium sarpedon act as thin film polarizing reflectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Matsushita, Atsuko; Arikawa, Kentaro; Leertouwer, Hein L; Wilts, Bodo D

    2012-02-15

    The wings of the swordtail butterfly Graphium sarpedon (the Common Bluebottle) have blue/green-colored patches that are covered on the underside by two types of scales: white and glass scales. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the white scales are classically structured: the upper lamina, with prominent ridges and large open windows, is well separated by trabeculae from a flat, continuous lower lamina. In the glass scales, the upper lamina, with inconspicuous ridges and windows, is almost flat and closely apposed to the equally flat lower lamina. The glass scales thus approximate ideal thin films, in agreement with the observation that they reflect light directionally and are iridescent. Reflectance and transmittance spectra measured from the glass scales with a microspectrophotometer agree with spectra calculated for an ideal non-absorbing thin film. Imaging scatterometry of single, isolated glass scales demonstrated that the reflected light can be strongly polarized, indicating that they function as polarizing reflectors. PMID:22279073

  17. Structure elucidation and biological activity of an unusual adipokinetic hormone from corpora cardiaca of the butterfly, Vanessa cardui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köllisch, G V; Lorenz, M W; Kellner, R; Verhaert, P D; Hoffmann, K H

    2000-09-01

    A structurally unusual member of the adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone peptide family was isolated from corpora cardiaca of the painted lady butterfly, Vanessa cardui. Its primary structure was assigned by Edman degradation and nano-electrospray-time-of-flight mass spectrometry as pQLTFTSSWGGK (Vac-AKH). Vac-AKH represents the first 11mer and the first nonamidated peptide in this family. The peptide shows significant adipokinetic activity in adult specimens of V. cardui. Injection of 10 pmol of synthetic Vac-AKH into 4-day-old decapitated males resulted in an approximately 150% increase of hemolymph lipids after 90 min. Half maximal adipokinetic activity was achieved with about 0. 1 pmol of Vac-AKH. During a 2-h incubation of corpora cardiaca/corpora allata complexes in medium containing 50 mM KCl, significant amounts of Vac-AKH were released from the glands. PMID:10951209

  18. A hierarchical perspective on the diversity of butterfly species' responses to weather in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nice, Chris C; Forister, Matthew L; Gompert, Zachariah; Fordyce, James A; Shapiro, Arthur M

    2014-08-01

    An important and largely unaddressed issue in studies of biotic-abiotic relationships is the extent to which closely related species, or species living in similar habitats, have similar responses to weather. We addressed this by applying a hierarchical, Bayesian analytical framework to a long-term data set for butterflies which allowed us to simultaneously investigate responses of the entire fauna and individual species. A small number of variables had community-level effects. In particular, higher total annual snow depth had a positive effect on butterfly occurrences, while spring minimum temperature and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) sea-surface variables for April-May had negative standardized coefficients. Our most important finding was that variables with large impacts at the community-level did not necessarily have a consistent response across all species. Species-level responses were much more similar to each other for snow depth compared to the other variables with strong community effects. This variation in species-level responses to weather variables raises important complications for the prediction of biotic responses to shifting climatic conditions. In addition, we found that clear associations with weather can be detected when considering ecologically delimited subsets of the community. For example, resident species and non-ruderal species had a much more unified response to weather variables compared to non-resident species and ruderal species, which suggests local adaptation to climate. These results highlight the complexity of biotic-abiotic interactions and confront that complexity with methodological advances that allow ecologists to understand communities and shifting climates while simultaneously revealing species-specific variation in response to climate. PMID:25230467

  19. Community structure of skipper butterflies (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae) along elevational gradients in Brazilian Atlantic forest reflects vegetation type rather than altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Eduardo; Mielke, Olaf Hermann Hendrik; Casagrande, Mirna Martins; Fiedler, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Species turnover across elevational gradients has matured into an important paradigm of community ecology. Here, we tested whether ecological and phylogenetic structure of skipper butterfly assemblages is more strongly structured according to altitude or vegetation type along three elevation gradients of moderate extent in Serra do Mar, Southern Brazil. Skippers were surveyed along three different mountain transects, and data on altitude and vegetation type of every collection site were recorded. NMDS ordination plots were used to assess community turnover and the influence of phylogenetic distance between species on apparent community patterns. Ordinations based on ecological similarity (Bray-Curtis index) were compared to those based on phylogenetic distance measures (MPD and MNTD) derived from a supertree. In the absence of a well-resolved phylogeny, various branch length transformation methods were applied together with four different null models, aiming to assess if results were confounded by low-resolution trees. Species composition as well as phylogenetic community structure of skipper butterflies were more prominently related to vegetation type instead of altitude per se. Phylogenetic distances reflected spatial community patterns less clearly than species composition, but revealed a more distinct fauna of monocot feeders associated with grassland habitats, implying that historical factors have played a fundamental role in shaping species composition across elevation gradients. Phylogenetic structure of community turned out to be a relevant additional tool which was even superior to identify faunal contrasts between forest and grassland habitats related to deep evolutionary splits. Since endemic skippers tend to occur in grassland habitats in the Serra do Mar, inclusion of phylogenetic diversity may also be important for conservation decisions. PMID:25272004

  20. Stable Heliconius butterfly hybrid zones are correlated with a local rainfall peak at the edge of the Amazon basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Neil; Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K; Mallet, James

    2014-12-01

    Multilocus clines between Müllerian mimetic races of Heliconius butterflies provide a classic example of the maintenance of hybrid zones and their importance in speciation. Concordant hybrid zones in the mimics Heliconius erato and H. melpomene in northern Peru were carefully documented in the 1980s, and this prior work now permits a historical analysis of the movement or stasis of the zones. Previous work predicted that these zones might be moving toward the Andes due to selective asymmetry. Extensive deforestation and climate change might also be expected to affect the positions and widths of the hybrid zones. We show that the positions and shapes of these hybrid zones have instead remained remarkably stable between 1985 and 2012. The stability of this interaction strongly implicates continued selection, rather than neutral mixing following secondary contact. The stability of cline widths and strong linkage disequilibria (gametic correlation coefficients Rmax = 0.35-0.56 among unlinked loci) over 25 years suggest that mimetic selection pressures on each color pattern locus have remained approximately constant (s ? 0.13-0.40 per locus in both species). Exceptionally high levels of precipitation at the edge of the easternmost Andes may act as a population density trough for butterflies, trapping the hybrid zones at the foot of the mountains, and preventing movement. As such, our results falsify one prediction of the Pleistocene Refugium theory: That the ranges of divergent species or subspecies should be centered on regions characterized by maxima of rainfall, with hybrid zones falling in more arid regions between them. PMID:25311415