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Sample records for brachial cutaneous nerve

  1. Cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome

    DongFuhui

    2004-01-01

    The cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome is named that, the cutaneous nerve's functional disorder caused by some chronic entrapment, moreover appears a series of nerve's feeling obstacle,vegetative nerve function obstacle, nutrition obstacle, even motor function obstacle in various degree.

  2. Nerve Transfers for Adult Traumatic Brachial Plexus Palsy (Brachial Plexus Nerve Transfer)

    Rohde, Rachel S.; Wolfe, Scott W.

    2006-01-01

    Adult traumatic brachial plexus injuries can have devastating effects on upper extremity function. Although neurolysis, nerve repair, and nerve grafting have been used to treat injuries to the plexus, nerve transfer makes use of an undamaged nerve to supply motor input over a relatively short distance to reinnervate a denervated muscle. A review of several recent innovations in nerve transfer surgery for brachial plexus injuries is illustrated with surgical cases performed at this institution.

  3. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  4. Modified Quad surgery significantly improves the median nerve conduction and functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus nerve injury

    Nath, Rahul K; Kumar, Nirupuma; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Background Nerve conduction studies or somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) have become an important tool in the investigation of peripheral nerve lesions, and is sensitive in detecting brachial plexus nerve injury, and other nerve injuries. To investigate whether the modified Quad surgical procedure improves nerve conductivity and functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus nerve injury (OBPI) patients. Methods All nerves were tested with direct functional electrical stimulation. A P...

  5. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  6. Correspondence in relation to the case report "Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note." published in May issue of Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Bhakta Pradipta

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Comment on 'Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note' Bhagat H, Agarwal A, Sharma MS Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury 2008, 3:14 (22 May 2008)

  7. Granular Cell Tumor of Brachial Plexus Mimicking Nerve Sheath Tumor: A Case Report

    Kim, Young-Im; Lee, Chul-kyu; Cho, Ki Hong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Primary tumors of the brachial plexus region are rare and granular cell tumors arising from the brachial plexus region is an extremely rare disease. We present a case of granular cell tumor arising from of the brachial plexus which appeared to be a usual presentation of nerve sheath tumor before the pathological confirmation. We report a granular cell tumor of the brachial plexus with literature review. Total resection is important for good clinical outcome and prognosis in the treatment of g...

  8. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. PMID:27094890

  9. Formation of median nerve without the medial root of medial cord and associated variations of the brachial plexus

    Bhanu SP

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The anatomical variations in the formation, course and termination of brachial plexus are well documented and have clinical significance to surgeons, neurologists and anatomists. The present case report describes the unusual origin of median nerve, arising directly from the lateral cord without the union of lateral and medial roots of brachial plexus. A communicating branch existed between the ulnar nerve and anterior division of middle trunk. The lateral pectoral nerve was arising from anterior divisions of upper and middle trunks as two separate branches instead from lateral cord. The branches then joined together to form the lateral pectoral nerve. The medial cord instead of its five terminal branches, had only three branches, the ulnar nerve, medial pectoral nerve and a single trunk for the medial cutaneous nerve of arm and forearm which got separated at the middle of the arm. The variations of the lateral cord and its branches make it a complicated clinical and surgical approach which is discussed with the developmental background.

  10. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Hua Jin; Qi Yang; Feng Ji; Ya-jie Zhang; Yan Zhao; Min Luo

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avul...

  11. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  12. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve:evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Hua Jin; Qi Yang; Feng Ji; Ya-jie Zhang; Yan Zhao; Min Luo

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as em-bryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 106 cells/mL, 3μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also signiifcantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effec-tively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  13. Intercostal Nerve Neurotization for the Treatment of Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy Patients

    Terzis, Julia K.; Kostas, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    In severe obstetrical brachial plexus palsy with proximal nerve root involvement, there is an insufficient number of motor axons to reconstruct the entire plexus, and neurotization procedures are the only possibility to achieve useful upper extremity function. One of the most useful neurotization procedures is intercostal nerve transfer. In our practice, intercostal nerve transfer was used for direct neurotization of primary nerve targets or for neurotization of transferred muscles. The best ...

  14. Comparision of nerve stimulator and ultrasonography as the techniques applied for brachial plexus anesthesia

    2011-01-01

    Background Brachial plexus block is useful for upper extremity surgery, and many techniques are available. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy of axillary brachial plexus block using an ultrasound technique to the peripheral nerve stimulation technique. Methods 60 patients scheduled for surgery of the forearm or hand were randomly allocated into two groups (n = 30 per group). For Group 1; US, and for Group 2 PNS was applied. The quality and the onset of the sensorial and motor bl...

  15. Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note

    Agarwal Anil; Bhagat Hemant; Sharma Manish S

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background To determine whether monitoring end- tidal Carbon Dioxide (capnography) can be used to reliably identify the phrenic nerve during the supraclavicular exploration for brachial plexus injury. Methods Three consecutive patients with traction pan-brachial plexus injuries scheduled for neurotization were evaluated under an anesthetic protocol to allow intraoperative electrophysiology. Muscle relaxants were avoided, anaesthesia was induced with propofol and fentanyl and the airw...

  16. Correspondence in relation to the case report "Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note." published in May issue of Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Bhakta Pradipta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comment on 'Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note' Bhagat H, Agarwal A, Sharma MS Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury 2008, 3:14 (22 May 2008

  17. Response to comments on "Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note"

    Agarwa Anil

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Response to comments on 'Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note' Bhagat H, Agarwal A, Sharma MS Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury 2008, 3:14 (22 May 2008

  18. Response to comments on "Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note"

    Agarwa Anil; Bhagat Hemant; Sharma Manish S

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Response to comments on 'Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note' Bhagat H, Agarwal A, Sharma MS Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury 2008, 3:14 (22 May 2008)

  19. Aberrant Dual Origin of the Dorsal Scapular Nerve and Its Communication with Long Thoracic Nerve: An Unusual Variation of the Brachial Plexus

    Shilal, Poonam; Sarda, Rohit Kumar; Chhetri, Kalpana; Lama, Polly; Tamang, Binod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Pre and post-fixed variations at roots of the brachial plexus have been well documented, however little is known about the variations that exist in the branches which arise from the brachial plexus. In this paper, we describe about one such rare variation related to the dorsal scapular and the long thoracic nerve, which are the branches arising from the roots of the brachial plexus. The variation was found during routine dissection. The dorsal scapular nerve, which routinely arises from the f...

  20. Dual Nerve Transfers for Restoration of Shoulder Function After Brachial Plexus Avulsion Injury.

    Chu, Bin; Wang, Huan; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yudong; Hu, Shaonan

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of shoulder function restoration by dual nerve transfers, spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve and 2 intercostal nerves to the anterior branch of the axillary nerve, in patients with shoulder paralysis that resulted from brachial plexus avulsion injury. It was a retrospective analysis to assess the impact of a variety of factors on reanimation of shoulder functions with dual nerve transfers. A total of 19 patients were included in this study. Most of these patients sustained avulsions of C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots (16 patients). Three of them had avulsions of C5 and C6 roots only. Through a posterior approach, direct coaptation of the intercostal nerves and the anterior branch of the axillary nerve was performed, along with accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve. Satisfactory shoulder function recovery (93.83° of shoulder abduction and 54.00° of external rotation on average) was achieved after a 62-month follow-up. This dual nerve transfer procedure provided us with a reliable and effective method for shoulder function reconstruction after brachial plexus root avulsion, especially C5/C6/C7 avulsion. The level of evidence is therapeutic IV. PMID:26835823

  1. The Diagnostic Value of Nerve Ultrasound in an Atypical Palmar Cutaneous Nerve Lesion.

    Zanette, Giampietro; Tamburin, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Detailed knowledge of the fascicular anatomy of peripheral nerves is important for microsurgical repair and functional electrostimulation.We report a patient with a lesion on the left palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve (PCBMN) and sensory signs expanding outside the PCBMN cutaneous innervation territory. Nerve conduction study showed the absence of left PCBMN sensory nerve action potential, but apparently, no median nerve (MN) involvement. Nerve ultrasound documented a neuroma of the left PCBMN and a coexistent lateral neuroma of the left MN in the carpal tunnel after the PCBMN left the main nerve trunk.Nerve ultrasound may offer important information in patients with peripheral nerve lesions and atypical clinical and/or nerve conduction study findings. The present case may shed some light on the somatotopy of MN fascicles at the wrist. PMID:26945219

  2. The usefulness of MR myelography for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    Myelography has been the most popular and reliable method for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury. However, it is invasive because it requires the use of contrast medium, dural puncture and exposure to radiation. In addition, it has a fault. When a nerve rootlet is not filled with contrast medium, it is impossible to evaluate it. It has sometimes been a problem in the injury to upper roots. Recently, MRI also has been used for diagnosis of brachial plexus injury. But it was not until recently that it has had a high resolution to detect affected nerve rootlets. We have used MR myelography with high resolution for diagnosis of brachial plexus injury. The purpose of this study is to investigate the usefulness of it. MR myelography was preoperatively performed in 14 cases, consisting of 13 traumatic brachial plexus injuries and an obstetrical palsy. In them, 12 cases had root avulsion injuries and 2 cases had infraclavicular injuries. A 1.5 Tesla MR system (Philips) and a cervical coil were used. Coronal sections with 2 mm-overcontiguous thickness were obtained by heavily T2-weighted sequence fast spin echo (TR/TE=3000/450). The fat signal was suppressed by a presaturation inversion-pulse. The scanning time was about five minutes. The three-dimensional image was reconstructed by using maximum intensity projection (MIP) method. MIP images and individual coronal images were used for evaluation for root avulsion. In evaluation the shape of a nerve sleeve and nerve rootlets was compared on both sides. The abnormal shape of a nerve sleeve or the defect of nerve rootlets was diagnosed as root avulsion. The brachial plexus lesions were exposed operatively and examined with electrophysiologic methods (SEP and/or ESCP) in all cases. Operative findings were compared with MR myelography. Twenty-four roots had been diagnosed as normal and 46 roots had been diagnosed as root avulsion with MR myelography preoperatively. In the former only one root was

  3. The usefulness of MR myelography for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    Nishiura, Yasumasa; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Miyauchi, Yukio; Niitsu, Mamoru [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2002-10-01

    Myelography has been the most popular and reliable method for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury. However, it is invasive because it requires the use of contrast medium, dural puncture and exposure to radiation. In addition, it has a fault. When a nerve rootlet is not filled with contrast medium, it is impossible to evaluate it. It has sometimes been a problem in the injury to upper roots. Recently, MRI also has been used for diagnosis of brachial plexus injury. But it was not until recently that it has had a high resolution to detect affected nerve rootlets. We have used MR myelography with high resolution for diagnosis of brachial plexus injury. The purpose of this study is to investigate the usefulness of it. MR myelography was preoperatively performed in 14 cases, consisting of 13 traumatic brachial plexus injuries and an obstetrical palsy. In them, 12 cases had root avulsion injuries and 2 cases had infraclavicular injuries. A 1.5 Tesla MR system (Philips) and a cervical coil were used. Coronal sections with 2 mm-overcontiguous thickness were obtained by heavily T2-weighted sequence fast spin echo (TR/TE=3000/450). The fat signal was suppressed by a presaturation inversion-pulse. The scanning time was about five minutes. The three-dimensional image was reconstructed by using maximum intensity projection (MIP) method. MIP images and individual coronal images were used for evaluation for root avulsion. In evaluation the shape of a nerve sleeve and nerve rootlets was compared on both sides. The abnormal shape of a nerve sleeve or the defect of nerve rootlets was diagnosed as root avulsion. The brachial plexus lesions were exposed operatively and examined with electrophysiologic methods (SEP and/or ESCP) in all cases. Operative findings were compared with MR myelography. Twenty-four roots had been diagnosed as normal and 46 roots had been diagnosed as root avulsion with MR myelography preoperatively. In the former only one root was

  4. Natural history of sensory nerve recovery after cutaneous nerve injury following foot and ankle surgery

    Bai, Lu; Han, Yan-ni; Zhang, Wen-tao; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Hong-lei

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous nerve injury is the most common complication following foot and ankle surgery. However, clinical studies including long-term follow-up data after cutaneous nerve injury of the foot and ankle are lacking. In the current retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical data of 279 patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery. Subjects who suffered from apparent paresthesia in the cutaneous sensory nerve area after surgery were included in the study. Patients received oral vitamin B12 and methylcobalamin. We examined final follow-up data of 17 patients, including seven with sural nerve injury, five with superficial peroneal nerve injury, and five with plantar medial cutaneous nerve injury. We assessed nerve sensory function using the Medical Research Council Scale. Follow-up immediately, at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months, and 1 year after surgery demonstrated that sensory function was gradually restored in most patients within 6 months. However, recovery was slow at 9 months. There was no significant difference in sensory function between 9 months and 1 year after surgery. Painful neuromas occurred in four patients at 9 months to 1 year. The results demonstrated that the recovery of sensory function in patients with various cutaneous nerve injuries after foot and ankle surgery required at least 6 months. PMID:25788928

  5. Natural history of sensory nerve recovery after cutaneous nerve injury following foot and ankle surgery

    Lu Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous nerve injury is the most common complication following foot and ankle surgery. However, clinical studies including long-term follow-up data after cutaneous nerve injury of the foot and ankle are lacking. In the current retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical data of 279 patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery. Subjects who suffered from apparent paresthesia in the cutaneous sensory nerve area after surgery were included in the study. Patients received oral vitamin B 12 and methylcobalamin. We examined final follow-up data of 17 patients, including seven with sural nerve injury, five with superficial peroneal nerve injury, and five with plantar medial cutaneous nerve injury. We assessed nerve sensory function using the Medical Research Council Scale. Follow-up immediately, at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months, and 1 year after surgery demonstrated that sensory function was gradually restored in most patients within 6 months. However, recovery was slow at 9 months. There was no significant difference in sensory function between 9 months and 1 year after surgery. Painful neuromas occurred in four patients at 9 months to 1 year. The results demonstrated that the recovery of sensory function in patients with various cutaneous nerve injuries after foot and ankle surgery required at least 6 months

  6. Natural history of sensory nerve recovery after cutaneous nerve injury following foot and ankle surgery

    Lu Bai; Yan-ni Han; Wen-tao Zhang; Wei Huang; Hong-lei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous nerve injury is the most common complication following foot and ankle surgery. However, clinical studies including long-term follow-up data after cutaneous nerve injury of the foot and ankle are lacking. In the current retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical data of 279 patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery. Subjects who suffered from apparent paresthesia in the cutaneous sensory nerve area after surgery were included in the study. Pa-tients received oral vitamin B12 and methylcobalamin. We examined ifnal follow-up data of 17 patients, including seven with sural nerve injury, ifve with superifcial peroneal nerve injury, and ifve with plantar medial cutaneous nerve injury. We assessed nerve sensory function using the Medical Research Council Scale. Follow-up immediately, at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months, and 1 year after surgery demonstrated that sensory function was gradually restored in most patients within 6 months. However, recovery was slow at 9 months. There was no signiifcant difference in sensory function between 9 months and 1 year after surgery. Painful neuromas occurred in four patients at 9 months to 1 year. The results demonstrated that the recovery of sensory func-tion in patients with various cutaneous nerve injuries after foot and ankle surgery required at least 6 months.

  7. Remote therapeutic effect of early nerve transposition in treatment of obstetric al brachial plexus palsy

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To report a method and remote therape utic effect of early nerve transposition in treatment of obstetrical brachial pl exus palsy.   Methods: From May 1995 to August 1996, 12 patients who had no r ecovery of biceps 3 months after birth were treated with nerve transposition. Ei ght had neuroma at the upper trunk and 4 had rupture or avulsion of the upper tr unk. Mallet test was used to evaluate the results.   Results: The follow-up of 40-52 months showed that excellent and good recovery in functions was found in 75% of the patients and the excellen t rate of phrenic nerve and accessory nerve transposition was 83.3% and 6 6.7% respectively. A complete recovery in shoulder and elbow joint function wa s in 3 patients and Mallet Ⅳ was in 6 patients.   Conclusions: Satisfactory outcome can be obtained by using earl y nerve transposition in treating obstetrical brachial plexus.Paralysis, obstetric; Peripheral nerves; Nerve trans position

  8. Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note

    Agarwal Anil

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether monitoring end- tidal Carbon Dioxide (capnography can be used to reliably identify the phrenic nerve during the supraclavicular exploration for brachial plexus injury. Methods Three consecutive patients with traction pan-brachial plexus injuries scheduled for neurotization were evaluated under an anesthetic protocol to allow intraoperative electrophysiology. Muscle relaxants were avoided, anaesthesia was induced with propofol and fentanyl and the airway was secured with an appropriate sized laryngeal mask airway. Routine monitoring included heart rate, noninvasive blood pressure, pulse oximetry and time capnography. The phrenic nerve was identified after blind bipolar electrical stimulation using a handheld bipolar nerve stimulator set at 2–4 mA. The capnographic wave form was observed by the neuroanesthetist and simultaneous diaphragmatic contraction was assessed by the surgical assistant. Both observers were blinded as to when the bipolar stimulating electrode was actually in use. Results In all patients, the capnographic wave form revealed a notch at a stimulating amplitude of about 2–4 mA. This became progressively jagged with increasing current till diaphragmatic contraction could be palpated by the blinded surgical assistant at about 6–7 mA. Conclusion Capnography is a sensitive intraoperative test for localizing the phrenic nerve during the supraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus.

  9. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  10. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emerge...

  11. Nerve transfer for treatment of brachial plexus injury: comparison study between the transfer of partial median and ulnar nerves and that of phrenic and spinal accessary nerves

    侯之启; 徐中和

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of using partial median and ulnar nerves for treatment of C5-6 or C5-7 avulsion of the brachial plexus with that of using phrenic and spinal accessary nerves.Methods: The patients were divided into 2 groups randomly according to different surgical procedures. Twelve cases were involved in the first group. The phrenic nerve was transferred to the musculocutaneous nerve or through a sural nerve graft, and the spinal accessary nerve was to the suprascapular nerve. Eleven cases were classified into the second group. A part of the fascicles of median nerve was transferred to be coapted with the motor fascicle of musculocutaneous nerve and a part of fascicles of ulnar nerve was transferred to the axillary nerve. The cases were followed up from 1 to 3 years and the clinical outcome was compared between the two groups. Results: There were 2 cases (16.6%) who got the recovery of M4 strength of biceps muscle in the first group but 7 cases (63.6%) in the second group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.025). However, it was not statistically different in the recovery of shoulder function between the two groups. Conclusions: Partial median and ulnar nerve transfer, phrenic and spinal accessary nerve transfer were all effective for the reconstruction of elbow or shoulder function in brachial plexus injury, but the neurotization using a part of median nerve could obtain more powerful biceps muscle strength than that of phrenic nerve transfer procedure.

  12. Brachial plexus

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that run from the lower neck through the upper shoulder area. These ... Damage to the brachial plexus nerves can cause muscle and sensation problems that are often associated with pain in the same area. Symptoms may ...

  13. Origin of Medial and Lateral Pectoral Nerves from the Supraclavicular Part of Brachial Plexus and its Clinical Importance – A Case Report

    Shetty, Prakashchandra; Nayak, Satheesha B.; KUMAR, NAVEEN; Thangarajan, Rajesh; D’Souza, Melanie Rose

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of normal and anomalous formation of brachial plexus and its branches is of utmost importance to anatomists, clinicians, anesthesiologists and surgeons. Possibility of variations in the origin, course and distribution of branches of brachial plexus must be kept in mind during anesthetizing the brachial plexus, mastectomy and plastic surgery procedures. In the current case, the medial pectoral nerve arose directly from the middle trunk of the brachial plexus and the lateral pectoral ...

  14. Isolated Unilateral Brachial Neuritis of the Phrenic Nerve (Parsonage-Turner Syndrome) in a Marathon Runner With Exertional Dyspnea

    Weng, Modern; Fidel, Constance

    2010-01-01

    Parsonage-Turner syndrome, or acute brachial neuritis/plexitis, is a rare condition that should be included in the differential diagnosis of any athlete who presents with antecedent flulike symptoms, with progression to significant neuropathic pain, followed by profound weakness in the affected upper extremity. In rare cases, the main presenting symptom of this condition may be dyspnea on exertion secondary to an isolated unilateral brachial neuritis of the phrenic nerve.

  15. Median nerve's loop in the arm penetrated by a superficial brachial artery: case report and neurosurgical considerations

    George K. Paraskevas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Median nerve is commonly formed by the union of the lateral and medial cord of the brachial plexus, which embrace the third part of the axillary artery. Formation of a median nerve's loop is a very rare condition. We present a cadaveric case, in which the right median nerve was found at the upper arm forming a fusiform neural loop penetrated by a superficial brachial artery, which continued over the forearm as the radial artery. The literature concerning nerve loops and traversing arteries is discussed, as well as the relevant embryology. We consider that such nerve loops constitute vulnerable sites of the nerve trunk since it is compressed by the pulsation of the abnormal traversing artery. Moreover, neurosurgeons should keep in mind that in case of existing arterial variation, variation of the associated neural structures may co-exist. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 2123-2125

  16. Unusual Communications between the Cutaneous Branches of Ulnar Nerve in the Palm

    Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Padavinangady, Abhinitha; Nayak, Satheesha B.; Jetti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Variations of dorsal and volar digital cutaneous branches of ulnar nerve are of tremendous clinical importance for successful regional nerve blocks, skin flaps, carpal tunnel release and placement of electrodes for electrophysiological studies. With the aforementioned clinical implications it is worth to report the variations of cutaneous branches of ulnar nerve. In the current case, we have encountered a rare variation (Kaplan`s anastomosis) of ulnar nerve, in the right upper limb. We have n...

  17. A Need for Logical and Consistent Anatomical Nomenclature for Cutaneous Nerves of the Limbs

    Gest, Thomas R.; Burkel, William E.; Cortright, Gerald W.

    2009-01-01

    The system of anatomical nomenclature needs to be logical and consistent. However, variations in translation to English of the Latin and Greek terminology used in Nomina Anatomica and Terminologia Anatomica have led to some inconsistency in the nomenclature of cutaneous nerves in the limbs. An historical review of cutaneous nerve nomenclature…

  18. Diagnosis of nerve root avulsion injuries in adults with traumatic brachial plexopathies: MRI compared with CT myelography

    Ewoudt van der Linde

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Computed tomography myelography (CTM has been broadly adopted as the ‘gold standard’ imaging technique in the diagnosis of nerve root avulsion injuries in traumatic brachial plexopathies. CTM has the distinct advantage of better spatial resolution than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; however, this technique is invasive and can result in significant patient discomfort. MRI, therefore, seems relatively more advantageous as it is less invasive (requires no lumbar puncture, lacks radiation exposure, has no adverse reactions related to intrathecal contrast agents and confers excellent soft-tissue contrast. Objectives: To compare the sensitivity and specificity of MRI with CTM in the diagnosis of preganglionic nerve root avulsion injuries in adults with traumatic brachial plexopathies at the Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital.Method: A retrospective comparative analysis was performed on 16 adult patients with traumatic preganglionic brachial plexopathies who underwent both MRI and CTM at Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital. Radiologists experienced in both CTM and MRI interpreted the data and a comparison was made using CTM as the gold standard. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for MRI detecting preganglionic nerve root avulsion injuries and pseudomeningoceles was 82% and 100% respectively. The interobserver agreement between CTM and MRI for the detection of preganglionic nerve root avulsion injuries was 81.25% (Kappa = 0.77 and 87.5% (Kappa = 0.84 for the detection of pseudomeningoceles. Conclusion: MRI was as sensitive as CTM at detecting preganglionic nerve root avulsion injuries and pseudomeningoceles of spinal nerve roots C7–T1 of the brachial plexus. Some mild discrepancies existed at the C5 and C6 nerve root levels. Owing to the invasiveness of the procedure and resultant patient discomfort, CTM should be reserved for complicated cases or for patients with contraindications to MRI.

  19. Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration in Hansen's disease: A retrospective analysis of our experience

    Prasoon, Dev; Mandal, Swapan Kumar; Agrawal, Parimal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leprosy affects peripheral nerves. As Mycobacterium leprae has unique tropism for Schwann cells, thickened sensory cutaneous nerves provide an easy target for the detection of lepra bacilli and other changes associated with the disease. Materials and Methods: The data of patients with sensory cutaneous nerve involvement were retrieved from our record for the period January 2006 to December 2014. The hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)- and May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG)-stained slides were...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injuries. New imaging technique and classification

    The Author describes a new magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique of the cervical nerve roots in traumatic brachial plexus injury. The overlapping coronal-oblique slice MR imaging procedure of the cervical nerve root was performed in 35 patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury. The results were retrospectively evaluated and classified into four major categories (normal rootlet, rootlet partial injuries, avulsion, and meningocele), after diagnosis by surgical exploration. In this study, the sensitivity of detection of the cervical nerve root avulsion in MR imaging was the same (92.9%) as that of myelography and CT myelography. The reliability and reproducibility of the MR imaging classification was prospectively in 10 patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury, assessed by eight independent observers, and its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of myelography and CT myelography. In this study, interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility showed that there were no statistically significant difference between both modalities. This new MR imaging technique is a reliable and reproducible method for detecting nerve root avulsion, and the MR imaging information provided valiable data for helping to decide whether to proceed with exploration, nerve repair, primary reconstruction, or other imaging modalities. (author)

  1. Unusual Communications between the Cutaneous Branches of Ulnar Nerve in the Palm

    Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Nayak, Satheesha B.; Jetti, Raghu

    2015-01-01

    Variations of dorsal and volar digital cutaneous branches of ulnar nerve are of tremendous clinical importance for successful regional nerve blocks, skin flaps, carpal tunnel release and placement of electrodes for electrophysiological studies. With the aforementioned clinical implications it is worth to report the variations of cutaneous branches of ulnar nerve. In the current case, we have encountered a rare variation (Kaplan`s anastomosis) of ulnar nerve, in the right upper limb. We have noticed that the dorsal cutaneous branch of ulnar nerve divided into three branches, the lateral two branches supplied the skin of the medial one and half fingers of the dorsum of hand. The medial branch established communications with the superficial branches of ulnar nerve and distributed to the skin of the one and half fingers of the volar aspect of hand. The possible outcome of this communications is discussed. Course and distribution of ulnar nerve on the contralateral side was found to be normal. PMID:25954612

  2. Comparison of the Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular and Axillary Approaches for Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus Block for Surgical Anesthesia

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Stav, Michael-Yohay; Portnoy, Isaak; Kantarovsky, Alexander; Galili, Offer; Luboshitz, Shmuel; Sevi, Roger; Sternberg, Ahud

    2016-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that ultrasound (US)-guided technique of the supra- and infraclavicular and axillary approaches of brachial plexus block (BPB) will produce a high quality of surgical anesthesia for operations below the shoulder independently of the approach and body mass index (BMI). Intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerves will be blocked separately because they are not a part of the brachial plexus. Methods This is a prospective randomized observer-blinded study. Th...

  3. Comparison of the Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular and Axillary Approaches for Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus Block for Surgical Anesthesia

    Anatoli Stav; Leonid Reytman; Michael-Yohay Stav; Isaak Portnoy; Alexander Kantarovsky; Offer Galili; Shmuel Luboshitz; Roger Sevi; Ahud Sternberg

    2016-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that ultrasound (US)-guided technique of the supra- and infraclavicular and axillary approaches of brachial plexus block (BPB) will produce a high quality of surgical anesthesia for operations below the shoulder independently of the approach and body mass index (BMI). Intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerves will be blocked separately because they are not a part of the brachial plexus. Methods This is a prospective randomized observer-blinded ...

  4. Brachial plexus (image)

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that originate from the neck region and branch off to give rise ... movement in the upper limb. Injuries to the brachial plexus are common and can be debilitating. If the ...

  5. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease.

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. "Sniff" test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609

  6. Origin, distribution, and insertion of the brachial plexus nerves in Blue-and-yellow Macaws (Ara ararauna, Linnaeus, 1758

    Kamal Achôa Filho

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has about 80 species of parrots cataloged, and five of them are identified as Macaws. As the vast majority of birds, Macaws use flight as their primary means of locomotion. However, the strength and power generated during the cycle of beating wings require a mechanism of active neuromuscular control and specialized adaptations of muscles responsible for flight, which are innervated by the brachial plexus. This study aims to describe the origin and distribution of peripheral nerves that make up the brachial plexus in Blue-and-yellow Macaw (Ara ararauna, Linnaeus, 1758, in order to aid the veterinarian to recognize and locate neuromuscular lesions in this species. We used five dead bodies, obtained from the Screening Center for Wild Animals in Paraíba, Brazil, in which the nerves were identified by direct dissection. Four nerve roots were viewed, originating three nerve trunks, which stem from the intervertebral spaces between the tenth cervical vertebra and the second thoracic vertebra. Nerves from the dorsal cord innervated extensor muscles, while ventral cord nerves innervated flexor muscles of the wing, in addition to the pectoral branches, responsible to innervate the superficial thoracic and shoulder muscles.

  7. Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature

    Radi Shahien

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Radi Shahien, Abdalla BowirratDepartment of Neurology, Ziv Medical Center, Zfat, IsraelAbstract: We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24-year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy.Keywords: facial nerve paralysis, partial brachial plexopathy, epidural blood patch

  8. Origin, distribution, and insertion of the brachial plexus nerves in Blue-and-yellow Macaws (Ara ararauna, Linnaeus, 1758)

    Kamal Achôa Filho; Marcio Nogueira Rodrigues; Erika Toledo da Fonseca; Rafael Magdanelo Leandro; Vanessa Bertagia Pasqualetti; Maria Angélica Miglino

    2014-01-01

    Brazil has about 80 species of parrots cataloged, and five of them are identified as Macaws. As the vast majority of birds, Macaws use flight as their primary means of locomotion. However, the strength and power generated during the cycle of beating wings require a mechanism of active neuromuscular control and specialized adaptations of muscles responsible for flight, which are innervated by the brachial plexus. This study aims to describe the origin and distribution of peripheral nerves that...

  9. Results of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer in 110 patients with complete palsy of the brachial plexus.

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Transfer of the spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve is a common procedure, performed to reestablish shoulder motion in patients with total brachial plexus palsy. However, the results of this procedure remain largely unknown. METHODS Over an 11-year period (2002-2012), 257 patients with total brachial plexus palsy were operated upon in the authors' department by a single surgeon and had the spinal accessory nerve transferred to the suprascapular nerve. Among these, 110 had adequate follow-up and were included in this study. Their average age was 26 years (SD 8.4 years), and the mean interval between their injury and surgery was 5.2 months (SD 2.4 months). Prior to 2005, the suprascapular and spinal accessory nerves were dissected through a classic supraclavicular L-shape incision (n = 29). Afterward (n = 81), the spinal accessory and suprascapular nerves were dissected via an oblique incision, extending from the point at which the plexus crossed the clavicle to the anterior border of the trapezius muscle. In 17 of these patients, because of clavicle fractures or dislocation, scapular fractures or retroclavicular scarring, the incision was extended by detaching the trapezius from the clavicle to expose the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular fossa. In all patients, the brachial plexus was explored and elbow flexion reconstructed by root grafting (n = 95), root grafting and phrenic nerve transfer (n = 6), phrenic nerve transfer (n = 1), or third, fourth, and fifth intercostal nerve transfer. Postoperatively, patients were followed for an average of 40 months (SD 13.7 months). RESULTS Failed recovery, meaning less than 30° abduction, was observed in 10 (9%) of the 110 patients. The failure rate was 25% between 2002 and 2004, but dropped to 5% after the staged/extended approach was introduced. The mean overall range of abduction recovery was 58.5° (SD 26°). Comparing before and after distal suprascapular nerve exploration (2005-2012), the

  10. The investigation of traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus by electromyography and short latency somatosensory potentials evoked by stimulation of multiple peripheral nerves.

    Yiannikas, C; Shahani, B T; Young, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    A study of 10 patients with brachial plexus trauma was performed to determine whether the diagnostic accuracy of sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) may be improved by using stimulation of multiple peripheral nerves (median, radial, musculocutaneous and ulnar). In addition, the relative advantages of SEPs and peripheral electrophysiological studies were considered. SEP patterns following most common brachial plexus lesions were predictable. Injuries to the upper trunk affected the musculocutaneo...

  11. Anatomical Variations in the Emergence of the Cutaneous Nerves from the Nerve Point in the Neck and Identification of the Landmarks to Locate the Nerve Point with Its Clinical Implications: A Cadaveric Study on South Indian Human Foetuses

    Gupta, Chandni; D’Souza, Antony Sylvan; Raythe, Biswabswabina

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The cutaneous nerves from the cervical plexuses are anaesthetized by using local anaesthetics for pain relief or when minor surgical operations are performed. Knowing the variations in these nerves is important for anaestheticists to administer an effective anaesthesia to a particular nerve. So, the aim of this study was to look for the variations in the emerging patterns of the cervical cutaneous nerves in the neck and to locate the nerve point in the neck by using the superficial...

  12. Computed tomography myelography with coronal and oblique coronal views for diagnosis of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    We describe a new computed tomography (CT) myelography technique with coronal and oblique coronal views to demonstrate the status of the cervical nerve rootlets that are involved in brachial plexus injury. We discuss the usefulness of this technique for the diagnosis of nerve root avulsion compared with that of CT myelography with axial view. CT myelography was performed with enhancement of the cervical subarachnoid space by using a contrast medium. Subsequently, coronal and oblique coronal reconstructions were created. The results of CT myelography were evaluated and classified in the presence of pseudomeningocele, intradural ventral nerve rootlets, and intradural dorsal nerve rootlets. The diagnosis was based on the findings of extraspinal surgical exploration with or without spinal evoked potential measurements and choline acetyltransferase activity measurement in 25 patients and recovery by a natural course in 3 patients. The diagnostic accuracies of CT myelography with coronal and oblique coronal views and that with axial view were compared and correlated with the surgical findings or natural course in 57 cervical roots in 28 patients. Coronal and oblique coronal views were superior to axial views in the visualization of the rootlets and orientation of the exact level of the root. They showed 100% sensitivity, 96% specificity, and 98% diagnostic accuracy (26 true-positive findings, 27 true-negative findings, none false-positive findings, and one false-negative findings) for diagnosing root avulsion. No statistically significant difference was observed between the coronal and oblique coronal views and the axial views. The information obtained using coronal and oblique coronal slice CT myelography enabled the assessment of the rootlets of the brachial plexus and provided valuable data for deciding the appropriate treatment strategy, namely, exploration, nerve repair, or primary reconstruction. (author)

  13. Cutaneous lesions sensory impairment recovery and nerve regeneration in leprosy patients

    Ximena Illarramendi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the mechanisms that enable peripheral neurons to regenerate after nerve injury in order to identify methods of improving this regeneration. Therefore, we studied nerve regeneration and sensory impairment recovery in the cutaneous lesions of leprosy patients (LPs before and after treatment with multidrug therapy (MDT. The skin lesion sensory test results were compared to the histopathological and immunohistochemical protein gene product (PGP 9.5 and the p75 nerve growth factor receptors (NGFr findings. The cutaneous neural occupation ratio (CNOR was evaluated for both neural markers. Thermal and pain sensations were the most frequently affected functions at the first visit and the most frequently recovered functions after MDT. The presence of a high cutaneous nerve damage index did not prevent the recovery of any type of sensory function. The CNOR was calculated for each biopsy, according to the presence of PGP and NGFr-immunostained fibres and it was not significantly different before or after the MDT. We observed a variable influence of MDT in the recovery from sensory impairment in the cutaneous lesions of LPs. Nociception and cold thermosensation were the most recovered sensations. The recovery of sensation in the skin lesions appeared to be associated with subsiding inflammation rather than with the regenerative activity of nerve fibres.

  14. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus block decreases the incidence of complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis or vascular punctures and improves success rate of brachial plexus nerve block compared with peripheral nerve stimulator in adults

    YUAN Jia-min; YANG Xiao-hu; FU Shu-kun; YUAN Chao-qun; CHEN Kai; LI Jia-yi; LI Quan

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of traditional techniques (such as landmark techniques,paresthesia and peripheral nerve stimulator) for upper-limb anesthesia has often been restricted to the expert or enthusiast,which was blind.Recently,ultrasound (US) has been applied to differ blood vessel,pleura and nerve,thus may reduce the risk of complications while have a high rate of success.The aim of this study was to determine if the use of ultrasound guidance (vs.peripheral nerve stimulator,(PNS)) decreases risk of vascular puncture,risk of hemi-diaphragmatic paresis and risk of Horner syndrome and improves the success rate of nerve block.Methods A search strategy was developed to identify randomized control trials (RCTs) reporting on complications of US and PNS guidance for upper-extremity peripheral nerve blocks (brachial plexus) in adults available through PubMed databases,the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials,Embase databases,SinoMed databases and Wanfang data (date up to 2011-12-20).Two independent reviewers appraised eligible studies and extracted data.Risk ratios (OR)were calculated for each outcome and presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI) with the software of ReviewManager 5.1.0 System (Cochrane Library).Results Sixteen trials involving 1321 adults met our criteria were included for analysis.Blocks performed using US guidance were more likely to be successful (risk ratio (RR) for block success 0.36,95% CI 0.23-0.56,P <0.00001),decreased incidence of vascular puncture during block performance (RR 0.13,95% CI 0.06-0.27,P <0.00001),decreased the risk of complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis (RR 0.09,95% CI 0.03-0.52,,P=0.0001).Conclusions US decreases risks of complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis or vascular puncture and improves success rate of brachial plexus nerve block compared with techniques that utilize PNS for nerve localization.Larger studies are needed to determine whether or not the use of US can decrease risk of neurologic complications.

  15. Surgical trainees neuropraxia? An unusual case of compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm.

    Seoighe, D M

    2010-09-01

    Compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm is an uncommon diagnosis but has been associated with strenuous upper limb activity. We report the unique case of a 32-year-old male orthopaedic trainee who suffered this nerve palsy as a result of prolonged elbow extension and forearm pronation while the single assistant during a hip resurfacing procedure. Conservative measures were sufficient for sensory recovery to be clinically detectable after 12 weeks.

  16. Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration in Hansen′s disease: A retrospective analysis of our experience

    Dev Prasoon; Swapan Kumar Mandal; Parimal Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leprosy affects peripheral nerves. As Mycobacterium leprae has unique tropism for Schwann cells, thickened sensory cutaneous nerves provide an easy target for the detection of lepra bacilli and other changes associated with the disease. Materials and Methods: The data of patients with sensory cutaneous nerve involvement were retrieved from our record for the period January 2006 to December 2014. The hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)- and May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG)-stained slides ...

  17. High-resolution sonography of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve

    A. Tagliafico (Alberto); F. Pugliese (Francesca); S. Bianchi (Stefano); G. Bodner (Gerd); L. Padua (Luca); M. Rubino (Maurizio); C. Martinoli (Carlo)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to describe the potential value of high-resolution sonography for evaluation of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve (MN). SUBJECTS AND METHODS. The volar wrists of 12 healthy volunteers and 22 consecutive patients with sensory deficit in t

  18. Schwannoma of Brachial Plexus

    Kumar, Ameet; Akhtar, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    Brachial plexus tumours are a rare entity. Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumours and only about 5% arise from the brachial plexus. Due to its rarity and complex anatomical location they can pose a formidable challenge to surgeons. We present a case of a young patient who presented with an axillary swelling three months after a lymph node biopsy from the same axilla, which turned out to be a Schwannoma arising for the medial cord of the brachial plexus.

  19. Electrical nerve stimulation as an aid to the placement of a brachial plexus block : clinical communication

    K.E. Joubert

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Most local anaesthetic blocks are placed blindly, based on a sound knowledge of anatomy. Very often the relationship between the site of deposition of local anaesthetic and the nerve to be blocked is unknown. Large motor neurons may be stimulated with the aid of an electrical current. By observing for muscle twitches, through electrical stimulation of the nerve, a needle can be positioned extremely close to the nerve. The accuracy of local anaesthetic blocks can be improved by this technique. By using the lowest possible current a needle could be positioned within 2-5mm of a nerve. The correct duration of stimulation ensures that stimulation of sensory nerves does not occur. The use of electrical nerve stimulation in veterinary medicine is a novel technique that requires further evaluation.

  20. Mechanical sensitization of cutaneous sensory fibers in the spared nerve injury mouse model

    Smith, Amanda K.; O’Hara, Crystal L; Cheryl L Stucky

    2013-01-01

    Background The spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain produces robust and reproducible behavioral mechanical hypersensitivity. Although this rodent model of neuropathic pain has been well established and widely used, peripheral mechanisms underlying this phenotype remain incompletely understood. Here we investigated the role of cutaneous sensory fibers in the maintenance of mechanical hyperalgesia in mice post-SNI. Findings SNI produced robust, long-lasting behavioral mechanical ...

  1. Cutaneous sensory nerve as a substitute for auditory nerve in solving deaf-mutes’ hearing problem: an innovation in multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology

    Li, Jianwen; Li, Yan; Zhang, Ming; Ma, Weifang; Ma, Xuezong

    2014-01-01

    The current use of hearing aids and artificial cochleas for deaf-mute individuals depends on their auditory nerve. Skin-hearing technology, a patented system developed by our group, uses a cutaneous sensory nerve to substitute for the auditory nerve to help deaf-mutes to hear sound. This paper introduces a new solution, multi-channel-array skin-hearing technology, to solve the problem of speech discrimination. Based on the filtering principle of hair cells, external voice signals at different...

  2. The brain plasticity in patients with brachial plexus root avulsion after contralateral C7 nerve-root transfer: a FDG-PET study

    Objectives: To study FDG-PET for imaging the brain plasticity in patients with brachial plexus root avulsion after contralateral C7 nerve-root transfer. Methods: One male patient with left brachial plexus root avulsion underwent a two-stage procedure (first phase: C7 root → ulnar nerve; second phase: ulnar nerve → recipient nerve) 4 years ago; Another with right brachial plexus root avulsion also underwent a two-stage procedure 3 years ago. First two patients underwent basic FDG-PET imaging, the next day FDG-PET scans were performed after initiative or passive limb movement. Using ROI and MPI tools to evaluate the images. The ratios of sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami to white matter were used as the semiquantitive index. Results: Whether brain plasticity had occurred was determined by whether the affected limb can perform initiative movement. The increases in glucose metabolism of left sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami in patient with left brachial plexus root avulsion were 40.1%, 37.9%, 48.3%, 31.9% after initiative movement, the right corresponding brain regions were 39.4%, 34.3%, 48.5%,35.4% respectively. However, the increases in glucose metabolism of left sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami in patient with right brachial plexus root avulsion were increased by 12.6%, 9.6%, 10.7%, 5.3% after passive movement, the right corresponding brain regions were respectively 17.9%, 12.9%, 15.4%, 10.1%. It was founded that the metabolism of bilateral sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami increased after initiative movement, while the metabolism of right sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami increased more obviously than that of the left brain regions when using MPI tool to substract the images before and after the affected limb movement. Conclusions: Sensorimotor frontal cingulated Thalami were necessary to the initiative movement. After being activated by movement, the metabolisms of plasticised brain regions increased obviously. However, the

  3. Dorsal cutaneous branch of ulnar nerve: an appraisal on the anatomy, injuries and application of conduction velocity studies in diagnosis

    GARIBALDI SOLANGE G

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical textbooks and recent publications about the anatomy of the dorsal cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve are revisited and correlated with methods of measurement of its conduction velocity, in order to evaluate the indications and limitations of the procedure. Etiology and pathogenesis of isolated lesions of this nerve branch are discussed.

  4. A Tool for Teaching Three-Dimensional Dermatomes Combined with Distribution of Cutaneous Nerves on the Limbs

    Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.

    2013-01-01

    A teaching tool that facilitates student understanding of a three-dimensional (3D) integration of dermatomes with peripheral cutaneous nerve field distributions is described. This model is inspired by the confusion in novice learners between dermatome maps and nerve field distribution maps. This confusion leads to the misconception that these two…

  5. Transfer of the radial branch of the superficial radial nerve to the sensory branch of the ulnar nerve for sensory restoration after C7-T1 brachial plexus injury.

    Xu, Bin; Dong, Zhen; Zhang, Cheng-Gang; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-03-01

    Previously, we have reconstructed the motor function of patients with C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies through combined nerve and tendon transfers. However, these patients lose not only the motor function of the hand but also the sensation on the ulnar side of the hand. Without sensory recovery, the injured hand may be further damaged, particularly by burns in this contact zone. Therefore, we described a technique to restore the sensation at the ulnar aspect of the hand by performing a transfer of the radial branch of the superficial radial nerve to the sensory branch of the ulnar nerve. PMID:26626199

  6. Dorsal cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve: a light and electron microscopy histometric study.

    Oliveira, Adriana L C R D; Fazan, Valéria P S; Marques, Wilson; Barreira, Amilton A

    2011-06-01

    This study describes the normal morphology and morphometry of the dorsal cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve (DCBU) in humans. Fourteen nerves of eight donors were prepared by conventional techniques for paraffin and epoxy resin embedding. Semiautomatic morphometric analysis was performed by means of specific computer software. Histograms of the myelinated and unmyelinated fiber population and the G-ratio distribution of fibers were plotted. Myelinated fiber density per nerve varied from 5,910 to 10,166 fibers/mm(2) , with an average of 8,170 ± 393 fibers/mm(2) . The distribution was bimodal with peaks at 4.0 and 9.5 µm. Unmyelinated fiber density per nerve varied from 50,985 to 127,108, with an average of 78,474 ± 6,610 fibers/mm(2) , with a unimodal distribution displaying a peak at 0.8 µm. This study thus adds information about the fascicles and myelinated and unmyelinated fibers of DCBU nerves in normal people, which may be useful in further studies concerning ulnar nerve neuropathies, mainly leprosy neuropathy. PMID:21692907

  7. Somatosensory evoked potential monitoring of the brachial plexus to predict nerve injury during internal mammary artery harvest: intraoperative comparisons of the Rultract and Pittman sternal retractors.

    Jellish, W S; Martucci, J; Blakeman, B; Hudson, E

    1994-08-01

    Brachial plexus injury after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) continues to be a common problem postoperatively. With the use of somatosensory evoked potential monitoring (SSEP), neurologic integrity of the brachial plexus during internal mammary artery (IMA) harvest was assessed and the Rultract and Pittman sternal retractors were compared to determine what effect they had on SSEP characteristics. Results showed that the Rultract and Pittman retractors caused large decreases in SSEP amplitudes after insertion, (1.25 +/- 0.14 versus 0.72 +/- 0.09, P < 0.05; and 1.64 +/- 0.27 versus 0.91 +/- 0.14, P < 0.05) respectively. This decrease was noted in 85% of Rultract and 68.75% of Pittman patients, respectively. Amplitudes increased after retractor removal but never returned to baseline values. Cooley retractor placement in the patients not undergoing IMA harvest (control) produced only mild decreases in amplitude. Waveform latency increased in all groups after retractor placement, but these increases were thought to be clinically insignificant. Postoperatively, three patients in each of the IMA retractor groups had brachial plexus symptoms (18%), whereas only one patient in the control group had symptoms. Somatosensory evoked potential monitoring seems to be a sensitive intraoperative monitor for assessing brachial plexus injury during CABG. The nerve plexus seems to be most at risk for pathologic injury during retraction of the sternum for IMA harvest. Though the Rultract retractor caused greater changes in SSEP characteristics than the Pittman, no clinical outcome differences between the two could be ascertained. Using SSEP monitoring may reduce brachial plexus injury during IMA harvest by allowing early detection of nerve compromise and therapeutic interventions to alleviate the insult while under general anesthesia. PMID:7948794

  8. Neuroma of medial dorsal cutaneous nerve of superficial peroneal nerve after ankle arthroscopy.

    Shim, Jae Sun; Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Soo Hong; Kim, MinYoung; Lee, Hang Jae; Min, Kyunghoon

    2014-09-01

    Superficial peroneal neuropathy is a known complication of foot and ankle arthroscopy. A 27-year-old man developed pain and paresthesia on the medial side of the dorsum of his left foot after ankle arthroscopy. An electrodiagnostic study revealed conduction abnormality in the medial branch of superficial peroneal nerve, in which neuroma-in-continuity was subsequently detected by ultrasonography. After neuroma excision and nerve graft, the subject's neuropathic pain was substantially improved. PMID:24486918

  9. BILATERAL MULTIPLE VARIATIONS IN THE FORMATION OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS AND ITS TERMINAL NERVES: A CASE REPORT

    Flora M Fabian; Hortensia G Nondoli; Gabriel J. Mchonde

    2013-01-01

    Variations in formation of brachial plexus roots, trunks, divisions and cords are not uncommon and maybe of important in regional anaesthesia involving the upper limb. However, in the present case we are reporting a rare bilateral multiple variations observed during routine dissection on a 77-years-old embalmed male cadaver on left and right brachial plexus. Understanding the anatomical variations involving brachial plexus is important and might benefit the physicians, surgeons, anaesthesiolo...

  10. Brachial plexus variation involving the formation and branches of the cords

    Fabian-Taylor FM

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This case report is aimed at reporting a rare variation of brachial plexus involving the cords and its branches in the right upper limb. The musculocutaneous nerve was missing. The whole medial cord continued as a medial root of median nerve. The lateral cord gave off the lateral root of median nerve and an additional root joined with posterior cord to form a short common trunk. The short common trunk divided into two roots: one joined the median nerve; and the second one continued down as ulnar nerve. Median nerve supplied biceps brachii and brachialis muscles. The coracobrachialis muscle was supplied by radial nerve. The cutaneous innervation to the upper limb was derived from radial and ulnar nerves.

  11. Brachial plexus myoclonus.

    Banks, G.; Nielsen, V K; Short, M P; Kowal, C D

    1985-01-01

    Rhythmic myoclonus in an arm began abruptly following an injury and persisted continuously for six years. Topographical EMG showed abnormal activity confined to muscles innervated by the axillary and radial nerves from the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. Abduction of the arm above horizontal level stopped myoclonus and EMG discharges. EEG was normal. It is suggested that the myoclonus was caused by mechanical irritation of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus.

  12. MRI of brachial plexopathies

    Sureka, J. [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India)], E-mail: drjyoticmch@rediffmail.com; Cherian, R.A.; Alexander, M.; Thomas, B.P. [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India)

    2009-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the primary imaging technique in the evaluation of brachial plexus pathology, and plays an important role in the identification, localization, and characterization of the cause. Improvements in MRI technique have helped in detecting changes in the signal intensity of nerves, subtle enhancement, and in detecting perineural pathology, thereby refining the differential diagnosis. The present review of the visualization of brachial plexus abnormalities using MRI is based on a review of 26 cases. The causes include trauma and a spectrum of non-traumatic causes, such as acute idiopathic/viral plexitis, metastases, immune-mediated plexitis, and mass lesions compressing the brachial plexus.

  13. BILATERAL MULTIPLE VARIATIONS IN THE FORMATION OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS AND ITS TERMINAL NERVES: A CASE REPORT

    Flora M Fabian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Variations in formation of brachial plexus roots, trunks, divisions and cords are not uncommon and maybe of important in regional anaesthesia involving the upper limb. However, in the present case we are reporting a rare bilateral multiple variations observed during routine dissection on a 77-years-old embalmed male cadaver on left and right brachial plexus. Understanding the anatomical variations involving brachial plexus is important and might benefit the physicians, surgeons, anaesthesiologists and neuroanatomists during their routine procedures involving the cervical, axillary and the upper limb regions.

  14. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: Can excision of upper trunk neuroma and nerve grafting improve function in babies with adequate elbow flexion at nine months of age?

    Argenta, Anne E; Brooker, Jack; MacIssac, Zoe; Natali, Megan; Greene, Stephanie; Stanger, Meg; Grunwaldt, Lorelei

    2016-05-01

    Accepted indications for exploration in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) vary by center. Most agree that full elbow flexion against gravity at nine months of age implies high chance of spontaneous recovery and thus excludes a baby from surgical intervention. However, there are certain movements of the shoulder and forearm that may not be used frequently by the infant, but are extremely important functionally as they grow. These movements are difficult to assess in a baby and may lead to some clinicians to recommend conservative treatment, when this cohort of infants may in fact benefit substantially from surgery. A retrospective review was conducted on all infants managed surgically at the Brachial Plexus Center of a major children's hospital from 2009 to 2014. Further analysis identified five patients who had near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion but who had weakness of shoulder abduction, flexion, external rotation, and/or forearm supination. In contrast to standard conservative management, this cohort underwent exploration, C5-6 neuroma excision, and sural nerve grafting. Data analysis was performed on this group to look for overall improvement in function. During an average follow-up period of 29 months, all patients made substantial gains in motor function of the shoulder and forearm, without loss of elbow flexion or extension, or worsening of overall outcome. In select infants with brachial plexus injuries but near-normal AMS scores for elbow flexion, surgical intervention may be indicated to achieve the best functional outcome. PMID:26806089

  15. The role of sensory nerve conduction study of the palmar cutaneous nerve in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with polyneuropathy

    Ayse Tokcaer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional methods in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS in patients with polyneuropathy (PNP are insufficient. Aims: We suggest that the comparison of the conduction of the median nerve with that of the neighboring peripheral nerves may be more beneficial in the diagnosis of entrapment neuropathy. Setting and Design: The median nerve sensory conduction in healthy volunteers, in cases of CTS, PNP cases without CTS and in cases of PNP in whom clinical findings point to CTS, were compared by palmar cutaneous nerve (PCN sensory conduction. Materials and Methods: Comparative parameters were difference of PCN-1st digits′ nerve conduction velocities (NCV, PCN/1st digit NCVs ratio, difference of 5th-2nd digits′ NCVs and 5th/2nd digits′ NCVs ratio. Statistical Analysis: The statistical analysis was performed by the SPSS package for statistics. Student t test and receiver operating characteristic were used. Results: Although the ratio of PCN-1st digit did not differ significantly between the control group and the polyneuropathy group, there was a significant difference between CTS and PNP+CTS groups and the control group ( P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively. The ratio of PCN-1st digit nerve conduction velocity was also significantly different between polyneuropathy and PNP+CTS groups ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: To diagnose CTS on a background of polyneuropathy in mild cases in which sensory conduction is preserved, the ratio of sensory nerve conduction velocities of the palmar cutaneous nerve and the median nerve 1st digit-wrist segment may be a criterion.

  16. MR neurography of the brachial plexus

    Magnetic resonance neurography was used to directly image the brachial plexus in patients with clinically suspected brachial plexus neuritis. The authors obtained spectral presaturation with inversion recovery and short T1 inversion recovery images parallel to the long axis of nerves using neurovascular array coils in 17 patients. In seven patients, the images revealed nerve swelling and hyperintensity in the the brachial plexus. In three patients with zoster paresis of the shoulder or upper extremity the images revealed marked hyperintensity in the roots. Direct nerve imaging may prove to be helpful in evaluating patients with brachial plexus neuritis. (author)

  17. Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve measurements to diagnose neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Machanic, Bennett I; Sanders, Richard J

    2008-03-01

    A reliable objective test is still needed to confirm the diagnosis of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS). Over the past 20 years, it has been suggested that responses to medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MAC) and C8 nerve root stimulation could be used for this purpose. Herein, we explore this thesis. A clinical diagnosis of NTOS was established in 41 patients, all of whom underwent surgical decompression. Preoperatively, all patients were studied with MAC sensory neural action potential (SNAP) determinations and C8 nerve root stimulation. Controls were 19 asymptomatic, healthy volunteers. MAC sensory latency on 79 control sides was 1.5-2.4 msec, while latency in 41 symptomatic patients ranged 2.2-2.8 msec. Latency of 2.5 or greater was noted in 30 patients (specificity 99%, sensitivity 73%), confirming a diagnosis of NTOS, while the remaining 11 (27%) fell into the borderline zone of 2.2-2.4 msec. The latency difference between right and left sides in controls was 0-0.2 msec in 17 (89%), while in NTOS patients 31 had a difference of 0.3 msec or more (sensitivity 89%, specificity 63%). Amplitudes of 10 muV or more occurred in 77 of 79 control sides, whereas the amplitude was under 10 muV in 28 patients (specificity 97%, sensitivity 68%). Amplitude ratios between right and left sides in controls were 1.7 or less. Ratios of 2.0 or more were measured in 25 patients (specificity 100%, sensitivity 61%). Using the four diagnostic criteria (latency over 2.4 msec, latency difference between sides of 0.3 or more, amplitude under 10 muV, and amplitude ratios of 2.0 or more), 40 of the 41 patients had at least one of the four diagnostic criteria, 23 patients (56%) had three or four positive criteria, and 12 (29%) had two. C8 nerve root stimulation responses were below normal (56 M/sec) in 54%. MAC measurement is a fairly reliable technique for confirming the diagnosis of NTOS. Latency determination appeared to be a slightly more consistent measurement in this study

  18. Operative treatment with nerve repair can restore function in patients with traction injuries in the brachial plexus

    Stiasny, Jerzy; Birkeland, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Brachial plexus injuries are usually a result of road traffic accidents and a cause of severe disability that typically affects young adult males. In 2010, a national centre was established for referral of these cases from Danish trauma centres. In this paper, we report on our...

  19. Avulsão do plexo braquial em cães - 2: biópsia fascicular e histologia dos nervos radial, mediano, ulnar e musculocutâneo Brachial plexus avulsion in dogs - 2: fascicular biopsy and histology of the radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves

    Mônica Vicky Bahr Arias

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi demonstrar os aspectos clínicos e neurológicos relevantes para o diagnóstico da avulsão do plexo braquial em cães, relacionando estes achados com os resultados da histologia dos nervos radiais, medianos, ulnar e músculo cutânea. A biópsia fascicular destes nervos foi realizada após abordagem cirúrgica às faces lateral e medial do braço afetado. Todos os fascículos submetidos ao exame histológico apresentaram alterações como tumefação axonal, degeneração walleriana e infiltrado inflamatório em graus variados, havendo principalmente nos nervos radial, mediano e ulnar a proliferação de colagem endoneural. A associação destes resultados com as alterações neurológicas e da eletroneuroestimulação (relatados na parte 1 e 3 deste trabalho respectivamente sugeriu envolvimento quase que total das raízes do plexo braquial em todos os casos.The main purposes of this work were the neurological evaluation of dogs with brachial plexus avulsion and correlation of these findings with the results of histology of the radial, median, and ulnar and muscle cutaneous nerves. Fascicular nerve biopsy was performed after surgical approach of medial and lateral aspect of the arm. Ali the submitted fascicles presented histologic alterations compatible with wallerian degeneration, axonal swelling, and inflammatory infiltrate ranging from mild to pronounced, with endoneural collagen proliferation mainly in radial, median and ulnar nerves. The association of these results with neurological and electroneurostimulation exams (respectively described in part 1 and 3 of this work suggested in all cases an almost total involvement of brachial plexus roots.

  20. Oberlin partial ulnar nerve transfer for restoration in obstetric brachial plexus palsy of a newborn: case report

    Kawamura Kenji; Kobata Yasunori; Yajima Hiroshi; Shigematsu Koji; Maegawa Naoki; Takakura Yoshinori

    2006-01-01

    Abstract An 8 month old male infant with Erb's birth palsy was treated with two peripheral nerve transfers. Except for rapid motor reinnervations, elbow flexion was obtained by an Oberlin's partial ulnar nerve transfer, while shoulder abduction was restored by an accessory-to-suprascapular nerve transfer. The initial contraction of the biceps muscle occurred two months after surgery. Forty months after surgery, elbow flexion reached M5 without functional loss of the ulnar nerve. This case dem...

  1. Transcriptional Profiling of Cutaneous MRGPRD Free Nerve Endings and C-LTMRs

    Ana Reynders

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous C-unmyelinated MRGPRD+ free nerve endings and C-LTMRs innervating hair follicles convey two opposite aspects of touch sensation: a sensation of pain and a sensation of pleasant touch. The molecular mechanisms underlying these diametrically opposite functions are unknown. Here, we used a mouse model that genetically marks C-LTMRs and MRGPRD+ neurons in combination with fluorescent cell surface labeling, flow cytometry, and RNA deep-sequencing technology (RNA-seq. Cluster analysis of RNA-seq profiles of the purified neuronal subsets revealed 486 and 549 genes differentially expressed in MRGPRD-expressing neurons and C-LTMRs, respectively. We validated 48 MRGPD- and 68 C-LTMRs-enriched genes using a triple-staining approach, and the Cav3.3 channel, found to be exclusively expressed in C-LTMRs, was validated using electrophysiology. Our study greatly expands the molecular characterization of C-LTMRs and suggests that this particular population of neurons shares some molecular features with Aβ and Aδ low-threshold mechanoreceptors.

  2. Cutaneous and Mixed Nerve Silent Period Recordings in Symptomatic Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia

    Cogez, Julien; Etard, Olivier; Derache, Nathalie; Defer, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The underlying neurophysiologic mechanism responsible for secondary paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is still unclear. Here, we study the pathogenesis of PKD in two patients with a demyelinating lesion in the spinal cord. Methods: Electromyogram recordings from affected arms of two patients with spinal cord lesions presenting PKD were compared with our laboratory standards. The cutaneous silent period (CuSP), mixed nerve silent period (MnSP) and coincidence period (CiP), defined as the common period between the CuSP and MnSP, were recorded. Results: A large decrease in the MnSP and disappearance of the CiP were observed in our patients, which was secondary to simultaneous extinction of the third portion of the MnSP, while the CuSP was normal. The MnSP and CiP were normal after recovery. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that the third portion of the MnSP and the CuSP do not correspond to the same physiologic process. These findings suggest that PKD patients have abnormal spinal interneuron integration. PMID:27330574

  3. Comparison of the Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular and Axillary Approaches for Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus Block for Surgical Anesthesia

    Anatoli Stav

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective We hypothesized that ultrasound (US-guided technique of the supra- and infraclavicular and axillary approaches of brachial plexus block (BPB will produce a high quality of surgical anesthesia for operations below the shoulder independently of the approach and body mass index (BMI. Intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerves will be blocked separately because they are not a part of the brachial plexus. Methods This is a prospective randomized observer-blinded study. The three approaches of the US-guided BPB without neurostimulation were compared for quality, performance time, and correlation between performance time and BMI. Intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerve blocks were used in all patients. Results A total of 101 patients were randomized into three groups: SCL (supraclavicular, ICL (infraclavicular, and AX (axillary. Seven patients were excluded due to various factors. All three groups were similar in demographic data, M:F proportion, preoperative diagnosis and type of surgery, anesthesiologists who performed the block, and surgical staff that performed the surgical intervention. The time between the end of the block performance and the start of the operation was also similar. The quality of the surgical anesthesia and discomfort during the operation were identical following comparison between groups. No direct positive correlation was observed between BMI and the block performance time. The time for the axillary block was slightly longer than the time for the supra- and infraclavicular approaches, but it had no practical clinical significance. Transient Horner syndrome was observed in three patients in the SCL group. No other adverse effects or complications were observed. Conclusions All three approaches can be used for US-guided BPB with similar quality of surgical anesthesia for operations of below the shoulder. A block of the intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerves is recommended

  4. Comparison of the Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular and Axillary Approaches for Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus Block for Surgical Anesthesia

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Stav, Michael-Yohay; Portnoy, Isaak; Kantarovsky, Alexander; Galili, Offer; Luboshitz, Shmuel; Sevi, Roger; Sternberg, Ahud

    2016-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that ultrasound (US)-guided technique of the supra- and infraclavicular and axillary approaches of brachial plexus block (BPB) will produce a high quality of surgical anesthesia for operations below the shoulder independently of the approach and body mass index (BMI). Intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerves will be blocked separately because they are not a part of the brachial plexus. Methods This is a prospective randomized observer-blinded study. The three approaches of the US-guided BPB without neurostimulation were compared for quality, performance time, and correlation between performance time and BMI. Intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerve blocks were used in all patients. Results A total of 101 patients were randomized into three groups: SCL (supraclavicular), ICL (infraclavicular), and AX (axillary). Seven patients were excluded due to various factors. All three groups were similar in demographic data, M:F proportion, preoperative diagnosis and type of surgery, anesthesiologists who performed the block, and surgical staff that performed the surgical intervention. The time between the end of the block performance and the start of the operation was also similar. The quality of the surgical anesthesia and discomfort during the operation were identical following comparison between groups. No direct positive correlation was observed between BMI and the block performance time. The time for the axillary block was slightly longer than the time for the supra- and infraclavicular approaches, but it had no practical clinical significance. Transient Horner syndrome was observed in three patients in the SCL group. No other adverse effects or complications were observed. Conclusions All three approaches can be used for US-guided BPB with similar quality of surgical anesthesia for operations of below the shoulder. A block of the intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerves is recommended. Obesity is not

  5. Oberlin partial ulnar nerve transfer for restoration in obstetric brachial plexus palsy of a newborn: case report

    Kawamura Kenji

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 8 month old male infant with Erb's birth palsy was treated with two peripheral nerve transfers. Except for rapid motor reinnervations, elbow flexion was obtained by an Oberlin's partial ulnar nerve transfer, while shoulder abduction was restored by an accessory-to-suprascapular nerve transfer. The initial contraction of the biceps muscle occurred two months after surgery. Forty months after surgery, elbow flexion reached M5 without functional loss of the ulnar nerve. This case demonstrates an excellent result of an Oberlin's nerve transfer for restoration of flexion of the elbow joint in Erb's birth palsy. However, at this time partial ulnar nerve transfer for Erb's birth palsy is an optional procedure; a larger number of cases will need to be studied for it to be widely accepted as a standard procedure for Erb's palsy at birth.

  6. Functional reconstruction following brachial plexus root avulsion

    Guixin Sun; Cunyi Fan; Yudong Gu

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To sum up the treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion and the progress in functional reconstruction and rehabilitation following brachial plexus root avulsion.DATA SOURCES: A search of Medline was performed to select functional reconstruction and rehabilitation following brachial plexus injury-related English articles published between January 1990 and July 2006, with key words of "brachial plexus injury, reconstruction and rehabilitation". Meanwhile, a computer-based search of CBM was carried out to select the similar Chinese articles published between January 1998 and July 2006,with key words of "brachial plexus injury, reconstruction and rehabilitation".STUDY SELECTION: The materials were checked primarily, and the literatures of functional reconstruction and rehabilitation of brachial plexus injury were selected and the full texts were retrieved.Inclusive criteria: ① Functional reconstruction following brachial plexus injury. ② Rehabilitation method of brachial plexus injury. Exclusive criteria: Reviews, repetitive study, and Meta analytical papers.DATA EXTRACTION: Forty-six literatures about functional reconstruction following brachial plexus injury were collected, and 36 of them met the inclusive criteria.DATA SYNTHESIS: Brachial plexus injury causes the complete or incomplete palsy of muscle of upper extremity. The treatment of brachial plexus is to displace not very important nerves to the distal end of very important nerve, called nerve transfer, which is an important method to treat brachial plexus injury.Postoperative rehabilitations consist of sensory training and motor functional training. It is very important to keep the initiativeness of exercise. Besides recovering peripheral nerve continuity by operation, combined treatment and accelerating neural regeneration, active motors of cerebral cortex is also the important factor to reconstruct peripheral nerve function.CONCLUSION: Consciously and actively strengthening functional

  7. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  8. Brachial plexopathy

    Khadilkar, Satish V; Snehaldatta S Khade

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN), often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles....

  9. Musculocutaneous nerve substituting for the distal part of radial nerve: A case report and its embryological basis

    A S Yogesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present case, we have reported a unilateral variation of the radial and musculocutaneous nerves on the left side in a 64-year-old male cadaver. The radial nerve supplied all the heads of the triceps brachii muscle and gave cutaneous branches such as lower lateral cutaneous nerve of the arm and posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm. The radial nerve ended without continuing further. The musculocutaneous nerve supplied the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles. The musculocutaneous nerve divided terminally into two branches, superficial and deep. The deep branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual deep branch of the radial nerve while the superficial branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual superficial branch of the radial nerve. The dissection was continued to expose the entire brachial plexus from its origin and it was found to be normal. The structures on the right upper limb were found to be normal. Surgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of the upper limb.

  10. From the brachial plexus to the hand, multiple connections between the median and ulnar nerves may serve as bypass routes for nerve fibres.

    Yang, H; Gil, Y; Kim, S; Bang, J; Choi, H; Lee, H Y

    2016-07-01

    Axons from the median and ulnar nerves can pass to each other through aberrant connections between them. Multiple interconnections between the nerves may provide a detour route for nerve fibres going to the hand. We investigated the incidence of variations and the associations between them in 90 cadaveric upper limbs. In 91% of upper limbs, one to five variations were found, with several statistically significant associations. The contribution of the C8 nerve to the lateral cord was positively associated with an accessory contribution of the lateral cord to the ulnar nerve. The latter variation showed positive association with the occurrence of any of the variations in the hand itself. Ulnar innervation of the superficial head of the flexor pollicis brevis was positively associated with the Riche-Cannieu communication. The co-existence of the variations and their associations may be the explanation for unusual clinical findings related to median and ulnar conduction, which appear contrary to anatomical knowledge. PMID:26763269

  11. Twenty-eight Cases of Neuritis of Lateral Cutaneous Nerve of Thigh Treated by Acupuncture and Point-Injection

    廖明扬

    2001-01-01

    @@Neuritis of lateral cutaneous nerve of thigh, also called meralgia paresthetica, is a commonly encountered disease in clinical practice. The author has treated 28 cases of meralgia paresthetica since 1996 by acupuncture plus point-injection with satisfactory results. A report follows. Clinical Data Among the 28 cases, 13 were male and 15 female. Their age ranged from 24 to 72 years, most of the patients being 35 to 50 years; the duration of illness varied from one month to ten years and 6 cases were affected on left side, 8 cases on right side and 14 cases on both sides.

  12. Selective bilateral activation of leg muscles after cutaneous nerve stimulation during backward walking

    Hoogkamer, W.; Massaad, F.; Jansen, K.; Bruijn, S.M.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2012-01-01

    During human locomotion, cutaneous reflexes have been suggested to function to preserve balance. Specifically, cutaneous reflexes in the contralateral leg's muscles (with respect to the stimulus) were suggested to play an important role in maintaining stability during locomotor tasks where stability

  13. Augmentation of partially regenerated nerves by end-to-side side-to-side grafting neurotization: experience based on eight late obstetric brachial plexus cases

    Moharram Ashraf N

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The effect of end-to-side neurotization of partially regenerated recipient nerves on improving motor power in late obstetric brachial plexus lesions, so-called nerve augmentation, was investigated. Methods Eight cases aged 3 – 7 years were operated upon and followed up for 4 years (C5,6 rupture C7,8T1 avulsion: 5; C5,6,7,8 rupture T1 avulsion:1; C5,6,8T1 rupture C7 avulsion:1; C5,6,7 ruptureC8 T1 compression: one 3 year presentation after former neurotization at 3 months. Grade 1–3 muscles were neurotized. Grade0 muscles were neurotized, if the electromyogram showed scattered motor unit action potentials on voluntary contraction without interference pattern. Donor nerves included: the phrenic, accessory, descending and ascending loops of the ansa cervicalis, 3rd and 4th intercostals and contralateral C7. Results Superior proximal to distal regeneration was observed firstly. Differential regeneration of muscles supplied by the same nerve was observed secondly (superior supraspinatus to infraspinatus regeneration. Differential regeneration of antagonistic muscles was observed thirdly (superior biceps to triceps and pronator teres to supinator recovery. Differential regeneration of fibres within the same muscle was observed fourthly (superior anterior and middle to posterior deltoid regeneration. Differential regeneration of muscles having different preoperative motor powers was noted fifthly; improvement to Grade 3 or more occurred more in Grade2 than in Grade0 or Grade1 muscles. Improvements of cocontractions and of shoulder, forearm and wrist deformities were noted sixthly. The shoulder, elbow and hand scores improved in 4 cases. Limitations The sample size is small. Controls are necessary to rule out any natural improvement of the lesion. There is intra- and interobserver variability in testing muscle power and cocontractions. Conclusion Nerve augmentation improves cocontractions and muscle power in the biceps, pectoral

  14. The expression of NGFr and PGP 9.5 in leprosy reactional cutaneous lesions: an assessment of the nerve fiber status using immunostaining

    Antunes Sérgio Luiz Gomes; Liang Yong; Neri José Augusto da Costa; Haak-Frendscho Mary; Johansson Olle

    2003-01-01

    The effects of reactional episodes on the cutaneous nerve fibers of leprosy patients was assessed in six patients (three with reversal reactions and three with erythema nodosum leprosum). Cryosections of cutaneous biopsy of reactional lesions taken during the episode and of another sample during the remission period were immunostained with anti-NGFr and anti-PGP 9.5 (indirect immunofluorescence). We found no significant statistical difference in the number of NGFr- and PGP 9.5-positive fibers...

  15. Brachial plexopathy.

    Khadilkar, Satish V; Khade, Snehaldatta S

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN), often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles. Idiopathic hypertrophic brachial neuritis, a rare condition, is usually painless to begin with, unlike IBN. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of paralysis and sensory disturbances in an affected limb, which is preceded by severe pain. While the frequency of the episodes tends to decrease with age, affected individuals suffer from residual deficits. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome affects the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. It is diagnosed on the basis of electrophysiology and is amenable to surgical intervention. Cancer-related brachial plexopathy may occur secondary to metastatic infiltration or radiation therapy. Traumatic brachial plexus injury is commonly encountered in neurology, orthopedic, and plastic surgery set-ups. Trauma may be a direct blow or traction or stretch injury. The prognosis depends on the extent and site of injury as well as the surgical expertise. PMID:23661957

  16. Brachial plexopathy

    Satish V Khadilkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN, often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles. Idiopathic hypertrophic brachial neuritis, a rare condition, is usually painless to begin with, unlike IBN. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of paralysis and sensory disturbances in an affected limb, which is preceded by severe pain. While the frequency of the episodes tends to decrease with age, affected individuals suffer from residual deficits. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome affects the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. It is diagnosed on the basis of electrophysiology and is amenable to surgical intervention. Cancer-related brachial plexopathy may occur secondary to metastatic infiltration or radiation therapy. Traumatic brachial plexus injury is commonly encountered in neurology, orthopedic, and plastic surgery set-ups. Trauma may be a direct blow or traction or stretch injury. The prognosis depends on the extent and site of injury as well as the surgical expertise.

  17. Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.

    Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

    1999-01-01

    Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment. PMID:10710825

  18. Brachial plexopathy

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2015-01-01

    Background Work-related upper limb disorders constitute a diagnostic challenge. However, patterns of neurological abnormalities that reflect brachial plexus dysfunction are frequent in limbs with pain, weakness and/or numbness/tingling. There is limited evidence about the association between...... occupational physical exposures and brachial plexopathy. Methods 80 patients with brachial plexopathy according to defined criteria and 65 controls of similar age and sex without upper limb complaints were recruited by general practitioners. Patients and controls completed a questionnaire on physical and....... The identified psychosocial relations were limited to measures reflecting physical exposures. Conclusions While the identified risk indicators have previously been associated to upper limb symptoms as well as to diagnosed disorders other than brachial plexopathy, this study indicates an association...

  19. Obstetric brachial plexus injury

    Mukund R Thatte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI, also known as birth brachial plexus injury (BBPI, is unfortunately a rather common injury in newborn children. Incidence varies between 0.15 and 3 per 1000 live births in various series and countries. Although spontaneous recovery is known, there is a large subset which does not recover and needs primary or secondary surgical intervention. An extensive review of peer-reviewed publications has been done in this study, including clinical papers, review articles and systematic review of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Causes of OBPI, indications of primary nerve surgery and secondary reconstruction of shoulder, etc. are discussed in detail. Although all affected children do not require surgery in infancy, a substantial proportion of them, however, require it and are better off for it. Secondary surgery is needed for shoulder elbow and hand problems. Results of nerve surgery are very encouraging. Children with OBPI should be seen early by a hand surgeon dealing with brachial plexus injuries. Good results are possible with early and appropriate intervention even in severe cases.

  20. Brachial neuritis following a corticosteroid injection.

    Robinson, Matthew; Fulcher, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a case of brachial neuritis following a subacromial corticosteroid injection. The patient developed an anterior interosseous neuropathy shortly after the injection, with no other trigger being identified. This neuropathy has unfortunately not shown any sign of recovery at 2 years. The authors propose that corticosteroid injection be added to the list of possible triggering events of brachial neuritis and highlight the frequent use of oral corticosteroids in its treatment. (1) The injection of local anaesthetic and corticosteroid should be considered as a potential trigger for brachial neuritis. (2) Brachial neuritis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with severe arm pain and weakness. (3) The nerves originating from the upper trunk of the brachial plexus are most commonly affected. (4) The anterior interosseous nerve is involved in one-third of cases. PMID:24596414

  1. Magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus

    Vaishali Upadhyaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is being increasingly recognised all over the world as the imaging modality of choice for brachial plexus and peripheral nerve lesions. Recent refinements in MRI protocols have helped in imaging nerve tissue with greater clarity thereby helping in the identification, localisation and classification of nerve lesions with greater confidence than was possible till now. This article on Magnetic Resonance Neurography (MRN is based on the authors′ experience of imaging the brachial plexus and peripheral nerves using these protocols over the last several years.

  2. Functional outcome of nerve transfer for restoration of shoulder and elbow function in upper brachial plexus injury

    Faruquee Sajedur

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcome of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer (XI-SSN done for restoration of shoulder function and partial transfer of ulnar nerve to the motor branch to the biceps muscle for the recovery of elbow flexion (Oberlin transfer. Methods This is a prospective study involving 15 consecutive cases of upper plexus injury seen between January 2004 and December 2005. The average age of patients was 35.6 yrs (15–52 yrs. The injury-surgery interval was between 2–6 months. All underwent XI-SSN and Oberlin nerve transfer. The coaptation was done close to the biceps muscle to ensure early recovery. The average follow up was 15 months (range 12–36 months. The functional outcome was assessed by measuring range of movements and also on the grading scale proposed by Narakas for shoulder function and Waikakul for elbow function. Results Good/Excellent results were seen in 13/15 patients with respect to elbow function and 8/15 for shoulder function. The time required for the first sign of clinical reinnervation of biceps was 3 months 9 days (range 1 month 25 days to 4 months and for the recovery of antigravity elbow flexion was 5 months (range 3 1/2 months to 8 months. 13 had M4 and two M3 power. On evaluating shoulder function 8/15 regained active abduction, five had M3 and three M4 shoulder abduction. The average range of abduction in these eight patients was 66 degrees (range 45–90. Eight had recovered active external rotation, average 44 degrees (range 15–95. The motor recovery of external rotation was M3 in 5 and M4 in 3. 7/15 had no active abduction/external rotation, but they felt that their shoulder was more stable. Comparable results were observed in both below and above 40 age groups and those with injury to surgery interval less than 3 or 3–6 months. Conclusion Transfer of ulnar nerve fascicle to the motor branch of biceps close to the muscle consistently

  3. Morphological description of the brachial plexus in ocelot (Leopardus pardalis)

    Kylma Lorena Saldanha Chagas; Lara Cochete Moura Fé; Luiza Correa Pereira; Érika Branco; Ana Rita de Lima

    2014-01-01

    The brachial plexus is formed by the ventral roots of the spinal nerves, which unite to form the nerve trunks. It is usually formed by contributions of the last three cervical nerves and the first two thoracic nerves. Due to the scarcity of information on neuroanatomy, this study aimed to determine the macroscopic morphology of the brachial plexus of the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis). In this work, we used two ocelot specimens from the area of the Paragominas Bauxite Mine, P...

  4. Resultado da neurotização do nervo ulnar para o músculo bíceps braquial na lesão do plexo braquial Results of ulnar nerve neurotization to brachial biceps muscle in brachial plexus injury

    Marcelo Rosa de Rezende

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar de forma crítica os fatores que influenciam os resultados da neurotização do nervo ulnar no ramo motor do músculo bíceps braquial, visando a restauração da flexão do cotovelo em pacientes com lesão do plexo braquial. MÉTODOS: 19 pacientes, 18 homens e uma mulher, com idade média de 28,7 anos foram avaliados entre fevereiro de 2003 e maio de 2007. Oito pacientes apresentavam lesão das raízes C5-C6 e 11, das raízes C5-C6-C7. O intervalo de tempo médio entre a injúria e o tratamento cirúrgico foi 7,5 meses. Quatro pacientes apresentavam fraturas cervicais associadas à lesão do plexo braquial. O seguimento pós-operatório foi de 15,7 meses. RESULTADO: Oito pacientes recuperaram força de flexão do cotovelo MRC grau 4; dois, MRC grau 3 e nove, MRC OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the factors influencing the results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of the brachial biceps muscle, aiming at the restoration of elbow flexion in patients with brachial plexus injury. METHODS: 19 patients, with 18 men and 1 woman, mean age 28.7 years. Eight patients had injury to roots C5-C6 and 11, to roots C5-C6-C7. The average time interval between injury and surgery was 7.5 months. Four patients had cervical fractures associated with brachial plexus injury. The postoperative follow-up was 15.7 months. RESULTS: Eight patients recovered elbow flexion strength MRC grade 4; two, MRC grade 3 and nine, MRC <3. There was no impairment of the previous ulnar nerve function. CONCLUSION: The surgical results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of brachial biceps muscle are dependent on the interval between brachial plexus injury and surgical treatment, the presence of associated fractures of the cervical spine and occipital condyle, residual function of the C8-T1 roots after the injury and the involvement of the C7 root. Signs of reinnervation manifested up to 3 months after surgery showed better results in the long term

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in brachial plexus injury.

    Caranci, F; Briganti, F; La Porta, M; Antinolfi, G; Cesarano, E; Fonio, P; Brunese, L; Coppolino, F

    2013-08-01

    Brachial plexus injury represents the most severe nerve injury of the extremities. While obstetric brachial plexus injury has showed a reduction in the number of cases due to the improvements in obstetric care, brachial plexus injury in the adult is an increasingly common clinical problem. The therapeutic measures depend on the pathologic condition and the location of the injury: Preganglionic avulsions are usually not amenable to surgical repair; function of some denervated muscles can be restored with nerve transfers from intercostals or accessory nerves and contralateral C7 transfer. Postganglionic avulsions are repaired with excision of the damaged segment and nerve autograft between nerve ends or followed up conservatively. Magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice for depicting the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus: It demonstrates the location of the nerve damage (crucial for optimal treatment planning), depicts the nerve continuity (with or without neuroma formation), or may show a completely disrupted/avulsed nerve, thereby aiding in nerve-injury grading for preoperative planning. Computed tomography myelography has the advantage of a higher spatial resolution in demonstration of nerve roots compared with MR myelography; however, it is invasive and shows some difficulties in the depiction of some pseudomeningoceles with little or no communication with the dural sac. PMID:23949940

  6. Regeneration of putative sensory and sympathetic cutaneous nerve endings in the rat foot after sciatic nerve injury.

    Stankovic, N; Johansson, O; Hildebrand, C

    1996-01-01

    The present study examines the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles in glabrous and hairy foot skin from normal and nerve-injured rats. After neurotomy/suture, glabrous skin samples contain few calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profies. The number of calcitonin gene-related peptide- and substance P-like immunoreacive profiles in the epidermis is significantly subnormal. Hairy skin from these rats does also contain few calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles. In addition, the presence of epidermal calcitonin gene-related peptide-like imunoreactive profiles in glabrous skin is subnormal on the contralateral side. After nerve crush injury, the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like, but not substance P-like, immunoreactive profiles in th epidermis of the glabrous skin is significantly subnormal. The occurrence of tyrosine hylase-like immnunoreactive fibres in relation to the digital artery is also subnormal. The occurrence in hairy skin of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive, substance P-like immunoreactive and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles is subnormal. In both skin types, the contralateral occurrence of such profiles is subjectively normal. These results show that the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P-, and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles in glabrous and hairy foot skin is clearly subnormal after neurotomy and suture and less abnormal after nerve crush. After neurotomy and suture the contralateral side is also affected. PMID:10970110

  7. MR imaging of brachial plexus

    The brachial plexus is a difficult region to evaluate with radiological techniques. MR imaging has great potentials for the depiction of the various anatomical structures of the branchial plexus - i.e., spinal ganglion, ventral nerve rami root exit of the neural foramina, trunks an cordes. Moreover, MR imaging, thanks to its direct multiplanarity, to its excellent soft-tissue contrast, and to its lack of motion artifacts, allows good evaluation of pathologic conditions in the branchial plexus, especially traumas and cancers. On the contrary CT, in spite of its high spatial resolution and good contrast, cannot demonstrate the anatomical structures of the brachial plexus. US detects superficials structures, and conventional radiographs depict only indirect changes in the adjacent lung apex and skeletal structures. From November 1989 to May 1990, 20 normal volunteers (15 males and 5 females; average age: 35 years) were studied with MR imaging. Multisection technique was employed with a dedicated coil and a primary coil. The anatomical structures of the brachial plexus were clearly demonstrated by T1-weighted sequences on the sagittal and axial planes. T2-weighted pulse sequences on the coronal plane were useful for the anatomical definition of the brachial plexus and for eventual tissue characterization. The correct representation of the anatomical structures of the brachial plexus allowed by MR imaging with author's standard technique makes MR imaging the most appropriate exam for the diagnosis of pathologic conditions in the brachial plexus, although its use must be suggested by specific clinical questions

  8. Idiopathic brachial neuritis in a child: A case report and review of the literature

    Shikha Jain; Girish Chandra Bhatt; Nirendra Rai; Bhavna Dhingra Bhan

    2014-01-01

    Brachial neuritis is a rare disease in children, affecting mainly the lower motor neurons of the brachial plexus and/or individual nerves or nerve branches. We report a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis in a 2³-year-old female child admitted with acute respiratory distress and given antibiotic therapy following which she developed weakness of the left hand. She was diagnosed as a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis and was given supportive care. Although, the association wit...

  9. GABAA-Receptor-Mediated Conductance and Action Potential Waveform in Cutaneous and Muscle Afferent Neurons of the Adult Rat: Differential Expression and Response to Nerve Injury

    OYELESE, ADETOKUNBO A.; Kocsis, Jeffery D.

    1996-01-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were obtained from identified cutaneous and muscle afferent neurons (33-60 μm diam) in dissociated L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) from normal rats and from rats 2-3 wk after sciatic nerve ligation or crush injury. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced conductance was compared in normal and injured neurons from both functional classes of sensory neurons.Control cutaneous afferent neurons had a peak GABA-mediated conductance of 287 ± 27 (SE) nS compared with...

  10. Anatomical study of the dorsal cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve (DCBUN) and its clinical relevance in TFCC repair.

    Poublon, A R; Kraan, G; Lau, S P; Kerver, A L A; Kleinrensink, G-J

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to define a detailed description of the dorsal cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve (DCBUN) in particular in relevance to triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) repairs. In 20 formalin-embalmed arms, the DCBUN was dissected, and the course in each arm was mapped and categorized. Furthermore, the point of origin of the DCBUN, that is, from the ulnar nerve in association with the ulnar styloid process, was defined. Finally, the distance between the ulnar styloid process and the branching of the radial-ulnar communicating branch (RUCB) and the first branch of DCBUN was measured. The distance between the origin of the DCBUN in relation to the ulnar styloid process ranges from 55 to 111 mm (mean 87 mm; STD 14 mm). The distance between the ulnar styloid process and the RUCB ranges from 1 to 54 mm (mean 19 mm; STD 12 mm). Finally, the distance between the ulnar styloid process and the lateral distal branch shows a range of -6 to 28 mm (mean 10 mm; STD 9 mm). In general, three dorsal digital nerves (medial, intermediate, and lateral branch), run at the dorsal ulnar aspect of the hand. The RUCB is often less abundant and shows a large amount of variation. No complete safe zone could be identified; the course of the DCBUN suggests a longitudinal incision for the 6R portal. In fact, a more dorsal incision also prevents damage to the main branches of the DCBUN. PMID:26997325

  11. Ultrasound guided lateral femoral cutaneous nerve block in meralgia paresthesia; review of 25 cases

    Sameh Khodair; Rasha Elshafey

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of ultrasound guidance technique for the treatment of meralgia paresthetica (lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy). Methods: 25 patients (10 males and 15 females); age 17–68 years; with meralgia paresthetica are diagnosed clinically by electromyography. A needle was inserted targeting the LFCN with ultrasound guidance, treatment with perineural injection of 2 mL of methylprednisolone acetate (40 mg/mL) and 8 mL of mepivacaine, 2%, under ultraso...

  12. Regionally distinct cutaneous afferent populations contribute to reflex modulation evoked by stimulation of the tibial nerve during walking.

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shinya; Futatsubashi, Genki; Ohtsuska, Hiroyuki; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Barss, Trevor S; Klarner, Taryn; Zehr, E Paul; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-07-01

    During walking, cutaneous reflexes in ankle flexor muscle [tibialis anterior (TA)] evoked by tibial nerve (TIB) stimulation are predominantly facilitatory at early swing phase but reverse to suppression at late swing phase. Although the TIB innervates a large portion of the skin of the foot sole, the extent to which specific foot-sole regions contribute to the reflex reversals during walking remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated regional cutaneous contributions from discrete portions of the foot sole on reflex reversal in TA following TIB stimulation during walking. Summation effects on reflex amplitudes, when applying combined stimulation from foot-sole regions with TIB, were examined. Middle latency responses (MLRs; 70-120 ms) after TIB stimulation were strongly facilitated during the late stance to mid-swing phases and reversed to suppression just before heel (HL) strike. Both forefoot-medial (f-M) and forefoot-lateral stimulation in the foot sole induced facilitation during stance-to-swing transition phases, but HL stimulation evoked suppression during the late stance to the end of swing phases. At the stance-to-swing transition, a summation of MLR amplitude occurred only for combined f-M&TIB stimulation. However, the same was not true for the combined HL&TIB stimulation. At the swing-to-stance transition, there was a suppressive reflex summation only for HL&TIB stimulation. In contrast, this summation was not observed for the f-M&TIB stimulation. Our results suggest that reflex reversals evoked by TIB stimulation arise from distinct reflex pathways to TA produced by separate afferent populations innervating specific regions of the foot sole. PMID:27075541

  13. High origin of dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve and variations in its branching pattern and distribution: a case report

    Lama, Polly; Potu, Bhagath K.; Bhat, Kumar MR

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Ulnar nerve is a branch of the brachial plexus. In the front of the forearm, normally near the wrist joint, it gives a dorsal cutaneous branch which supplies the skin of the dorsum of the hand. Case presentation The present case reports a very rare finding, the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve along with the main nerve trunk originated between the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, after descending along the medial border of the forearm extensor surface, on the dorsal ...

  14. Brachial Plexus Anatomy: Normal and Variant

    Orebaugh, Steven L.; Williams, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    Effective brachial plexus blockade requires a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the plexus, as well as an appreciation of anatomic variations that may occur. This review summarizes relevant anatomy of the plexus, along with variations and anomalies that may affect nerve blocks conducted at these levels. The Medline, Cochrane Library, and PubMed electronic databases were searched in order to compile reports related to the anatomy of the brachial plexus using the following free terms: "b...

  15. The expression of NGFr and PGP 9.5 in leprosy reactional cutaneous lesions: an assessment of the nerve fiber status using immunostaining

    Antunes Sérgio Luiz Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reactional episodes on the cutaneous nerve fibers of leprosy patients was assessed in six patients (three with reversal reactions and three with erythema nodosum leprosum. Cryosections of cutaneous biopsy of reactional lesions taken during the episode and of another sample during the remission period were immunostained with anti-NGFr and anti-PGP 9.5 (indirect immunofluorescence. We found no significant statistical difference in the number of NGFr- and PGP 9.5-positive fibers between the reactional and post-reactional groups. A significant difference was detected between the number of NGFr and PGP 9.5-stained fibers inside of the reactional group of biopsy cryosections but this difference was ascribed to the distinct aspects of the nerve fibers displayed whether stained with anti-NGFr or with anti-PGP 9.5; NGFr-positive branches looked larger and so interpreted as containing more fibers. In addition, a substantial number NGFr-positive fibers were PGP 9.5-negative. No differences in the number of stained fibers among the distinct cutaneous regions examined (epidermis + upper dermis, mid and deep dermis was detected. In conclusion, the number of PGP- and NGFr-positive fibers were not significantly different in the reactional and post-reactional biopsies in the present study. NGFr-staining of the nerve fibers is different from their PGP-imunoreactivity and the evaluation of the nerve fiber status on an innervated target organ should be carried out choosing markers for both components of nerve fibers (Schwann cells and axons.

  16. Brachial Plexus Injuries in Adults: Evaluation and Diagnostic Approach

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Badilas, Nikolaos K.; Mazis, George A.; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A; Kotoulas, Helias K.; Stamatios Kyriakopoulos; Ioannis Tagkalegkas; Sofianos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    The increased incidence of motor vehicle accidents during the past century has been associated with a significant increase in brachial plexus injuries. New imaging studies are currently available for the evaluation of brachial plexus injuries. Myelography, CT myelography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are indicated in the evaluation of brachial plexus. Moreover, a series of specialized electrodiagnostic and nerve conduction studies in association with the clinical findings during the n...

  17. Malignant brachial plexopathy: A pictorial essay of MRI findings

    For imaging, the brachial plexus is a technically and anatomically challenging region of the peripheral nervous system. MRI has a central role in the identification and accurate characterization of malignant lesions arising here, as also in defining their extent and the status of the adjacent structures. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe the MRI features of primary and secondary malignant brachial plexopathies and radiation-induced brachial nerve damage

  18. A comparison of two approaches to brachial plexus anaesthesia

    Rajib Hazarika; Tejwant Rajkhowa; Mridu Paban Nath; Samit Parua

    2016-01-01

    Background: A prospective, double blind study was performed to compare the clinical effect of vertical infraclavicular and supraclavicular brachial plexus block using a nerve stimulation technique for upper limb surgery. Methods: Eighty patients undergoing upper limb surgery under infraclavicular or supraclavicular brachial plexus block were enrolled into this study. The infraclavicular brachial plexus block was performed using the vertical technique (group I; N=40). The supraclavicular b...

  19. Peripheral communications of intercostobrachial nerve Peripheral communications of the intercostobrachial nerve in relation to the alar thoracic artery

    Shaifaly Madan Rustagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN is often encountered during axillary dissection for axillary lymph node dissection (ALND for diagnostic and therapeutic surgery for mastectomy. The present report is a case observed in the Department of Anatomy at Vardhman Mahavir Medical College, Delhi during routine dissection of the upper extremity of a male cadaver for first year undergraduate medical students. On the right side , the medial cord of brachial plexus gave two medial cutaneous nerves of arm. Both the nerves were seen communicating with the branches of the ICBN. The ICBN and one of its branches were surrounding the termination of an alar thoracic artery. These peripheral neural connections of the ICBN with the branches of the medial cord can be a cause of sensory impairment during axillary procedures done for mastectomy or exploration of long thoracic nerves. The alar thoracic artery found in relation to the ICBN could further be a cause of vascular complications during such procedures.

  20. Potential genotoxic effects of GSM-1800 exposure on human cutaneous and nerve cells

    Introduction The GSM-1800 signal has been in use for several years in Europe and questions raised about its potential biological effects, in view of the fact that, with respect to GSM-900, the increase in the carrier frequency corresponds to a more superficial absorption in the tissues. Consequently, the skin becomes an even more important target for the absorption of the radiofrequency radiation (R.F.R.) emitted by mobile phones. Nevertheless, brain tissues remain a critical target. Cells In order to determine whether R.F.R. at 1800 MHz could behave as a genotoxic agent, skin and brain cells were exposed to a 217-Hz-modulated GSM-1800 signal and assayed using the comet assay: (1) normal human epidermal keratinocytes (N.H.E.K.) and dermal fibroblasts (N.H.D.F.) which are cutaneous cells from epidermis and dermis respectively, and (2) the S.H. -S.Y.5.Y. and C.H.M.E.-5 human cell lines, which are neuroblastoma and micro-glial cells, respectively. Exposure The R.F.R. exposure system that was used in these experiments was manufactured by I.T. I.S. (Zurich, Switzerland). It consists in two shorted waveguides allowing to run exposed and sham conditions at the same time in the same culture incubator, at 37 Celsius degrees, 5% CO2. It is controlled by a software, which provides blind conditions until completion of data analysis. The specific absorption rate (S.A.R.) used was 2 W/kg, corresponding to the public exposure limit recommended by I.C.N.I.R.P. and the exposure duration was 48 hours. Comet assay At the end of the exposure, cells were removed from their Petri dish by trypsin/EDTA treatment, counted and 5 x 104 cells were used to detect DNA damage including single DNA breaks. Positive controls were performed using hydrogen peroxidase (1%, 1 hour). The genotoxic effects were detected using the alkaline comet assay kit (Trevigen slides) following the supplier procedure. Under these conditions, 6 independent experiments were performed for each cell type (2 Petri dishes

  1. Effect of superficial radial nerve stimulation on the activity of nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons in the cat: role of cutaneous sensory input

    The release of 3H-dopamine (DA) continuously synthesized from 3H-thyrosine was measured in the caudate nucleus (CN) and in the substantia nigra (SN) in both sides of the brain during electrical stimulation of the superficial radial nerve in cats lightly anaesthetized with halothane. Use of appropriate electrophysiologically controlled stimulation led to selective activation of low threshold afferent fibers whereas high stimulation activated all cutaneous afferents. Results showed that low threshold fiber activation induced a decreased dopaminergic activity in CN contralateral to nerve stimulation and a concomitant increase in dopaminergic activity on the ipsilateral side. Stimulation of group I and threshold stimulation of group II afferent fibers induced changes in the release of 3H-DA mainly on the contralateral CN and SN and in the ipsilateral CN. High stimulation was followed by a general increase of the neurotransmitter release in the four structures. This shows that the nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons are mainly-if not exclusively-controlled by cutaneous sensory inputs. This control, non-specific when high threshold cutaneous fibers are also activated. Such activations could contribute to restablish sufficient release of DA when the dopaminergic function is impaired as in Parkinson's disease. (Author)

  2. Herpetic Brachial Plexopathy: Application of Brachial Plexus Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound-Guided Corticosteroid Injection.

    Kim, Jeong-Gil; Chung, Sun G

    2016-05-01

    Herpes zoster, commonly known as shingles, is an infectious viral disease characterized by painful, unilateral skin blisters occurring in specific sensory dermatomes. Motor paresis is reported in 0.5% to 5% of patients. Although the mechanism of zoster paresis is still unclear, the virus can spread from the dorsal root ganglia to the anterior horn cell or anterior spinal nerve roots. It rarely involves the brachial plexus. We report a case of brachial plexitis following herpes zoster infection in which pathological lesions were diagnosed using brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging and treated with ultrasound-guided perineural corticosteroid injection. PMID:26829085

  3. MRI of the brachial plexus: A pictorial review

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brachial plexus is the imaging modality of first choice for depicting anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. The anatomy of the roots, trunks, divisions and cords is very well depicted due to the inherent contrast differences between the nerves and the surrounding fat. In this pictorial review the technique and the anatomy will be discussed. The following pathology will be addressed: neurogenic tumors of the brachial plexus and sympathetic chain, superior sulcus tumors, other tumors in the vicinity of the brachial plexus, the differentiation between radiation and metastatic plexopathy, trauma, neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome and immune-mediated neuropathies.

  4. MRI of the brachial plexus: A pictorial review

    Es, Hendrik W. van [Department of Radiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Koekoekslaan 1, 3435 CM Nieuwegein (Netherlands)], E-mail: h.es@antoniusziekenhuis.nl; Bollen, Thomas L.; Heesewijk, Hans P.M. van [Department of Radiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Koekoekslaan 1, 3435 CM Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brachial plexus is the imaging modality of first choice for depicting anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. The anatomy of the roots, trunks, divisions and cords is very well depicted due to the inherent contrast differences between the nerves and the surrounding fat. In this pictorial review the technique and the anatomy will be discussed. The following pathology will be addressed: neurogenic tumors of the brachial plexus and sympathetic chain, superior sulcus tumors, other tumors in the vicinity of the brachial plexus, the differentiation between radiation and metastatic plexopathy, trauma, neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome and immune-mediated neuropathies.

  5. Role of dexamethasone in brachial plexus block

    To evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to (lignocaine) on the onset and duration of axillary brachial plexus block. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from September 2009 to March 2010. Patients and Methods: A total of 100 patients, who were scheduled for elective hand and forearm surgery under axillary brachial plexus block, were randomly allocated to group A in which patients received 40 ml 1.5% lidocaine with 2 ml of isotonic saline (0.9%) and group B in which patients received 40 ml 1.5% lidocaine with 2 ml of dexamethasone (8 mg). Nerve stimulator with insulated needle for multiple stimulations technique was used to locate the brachial plexus nerves. After the injection onset of action and duration of sensory blockade of brachial plexus were recorded at 5 minutes and 15 minutes interval. Results: Group A showed the onset of action of 21.64 ± 2.30 min and in group B it was 15.42 ± 1.44 min (p< 0.001). Duration of nerve block was 115.08 ± 10.92 min in group A and 265.42 ± 16.56 min in group B (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The addition of dexamethasone to 1.5% lignocaine solution in axillary brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of sensory blockade significantly. (author)

  6. Can Local Anesthesia Prevent the Injury of Brachial Plexus?

    Alaattin Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurilemmomas) are benign tumors arising from peripheral nerve sheaths. They can be seen all over the body, but approximately half of the cases occur in the head and neck region. The schwannoma arising from brachial plexus is a rare cause of neck masses. They are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. The risk of nerve damage after excision is high under general anesthesia. In this article, a case of brachial plexus schwannoma was presented and the excision with local anesthesia was sh...

  7. Avulsion of the brachial plexus in a great horned owl (Bubo virginaus)

    Moore, M.P.; Stauber, E.; Thomas, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating peripheral nerve involvement. A brachial plexus avulsion was suspected on the basis of clinical signs, presence of electromyographic abnormalities in all muscles supplied by the nerves of the brachial plexus and absence of median-ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities.

  8. Variations of the ventral rami of the brachial plexus.

    Lee, H. Y.; Chung, I. H.; Sir, W. S.; Kang, H S; Lee, H.S.; Ko, J S; Lee, M. S.; Park, S. S.

    1992-01-01

    We studied the variations in the ventral rami of 152 brachial plexuses in 77 Korean adults. Brachial plexus were composed mostly of the fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth cervical nerves and the first thoracic nerve (77.0%). In 21.7% of the cases examined, the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth cervical and the first thoracic nerves contributed to the plexus. A plexus composed of the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth cervical and the first and second thoracic nerves, and a plexus c...

  9. Brachial plexus variations during the fetal period.

    Woźniak, Jowita; Kędzia, Alicja; Dudek, Krzysztof

    2012-12-01

    The brachial plexus is an important nervous system structure. It can be injured during the perinatal period and by postnatal damage. The goal of this study was to assess human fetal brachial plexus variability. A total of 220 brachial plexuses were surgically prepared from 110 human fetuses aged 14-32 weeks of fetal life (50 females and 60 males) ranging in CRL from 80 to 233 mm. The study incorporated the following methods: dissectional and anthropological, digital image acquisition, digital image processing using Image J and GIMP software, and statistical methods (Statistica 9.0). Symmetry and sexual dimorphism were examined. Anomalies of the brachial plexuses were observed in 117 (53.18 %) cases. No sexual dimorphism was found. It was observed that cord variations occurred more often on the left side. Division variants (33.64 %) occurred most often, but also cords (18.18 %) as well as root nerves and terminal ramifications (15.90 %) were found. Trunk anomalies were rare and occurred in only 5.45 % of plexuses. Three height types of median nerve roots in combination with the nerve were distinguished. In one-third of cases, median nerve root connections were found below the axillary fossa and even half in the proximal part of the humerus. In conclusion, the brachial plexus was characterized for anatomical structural variability. Most often division and cord variations were observed. Anomalies occurred regardless of sex or body side except for cord variants. Brachial plexus variation recognition is significant from the neurosurgical and traumatological point of view. PMID:22945314

  10. MRI diagnosis of brachial plexus preganglionic injury

    Objective: To evaluate MRI in diagnosing brachial plexus preganglionic injury. Methods: Twenty cases with brachial plexus preganglionic injury underwent MR scanning before operation. MR imaging was obtained by GE Signa EXCITE 1.5 T scanner. The scanning sequences included SE T1WI, FSE T2WI, T2WI STIR and 3 D Fast imaging employing steady state with phase cycled (3D-FIESTA-c). All the patients had exploration of the supraclavicular plexus and electrophysiology examination. And the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of MRI in diagnosing preganglionic brachial plexus injury were calculated with the standards of surgical and EMG results. Results: Among the 73 pairs of injured roots, MR imaging detected the abnormalities in 63 pairs. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of MRI in diagnosing preganglionic brachial plexus injury were 86.5% (83/96), 86.3% (63/73), 87.0% (20/23), respectively. The direct signs of brachial plexus preganglionic injury included (1) lack or mutilation of nerve root in 54 pairs (85.7%), (2) coarsening, bending, stiff course and unable to be traced to the intervertebral foramen continuously in 9 pairs (14.3%). The indirect signs included (1) cystic cerebrospinal fluid gathering in the vertebral canal, posttraumatic spinal meningocele in 46 pairs (73.0%), (2) abnormal shape of nerve sleeve in 13 pairs (20.6%), (3) displacement and deformity of spinal cord in 50 pairs (79.4%), (4) abnormal signal of paravertebral muscles in 19 patients. Conclusion: MRI can distinctly show the nerve rootlets within the vertebral canal, so it is helpful in making a correct diagnosis of brachial plexus preganglionic injuries. (authors)

  11. Idiopathic brachial neuritis in a child: A case report and review of the literature

    Shikha Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial neuritis is a rare disease in children, affecting mainly the lower motor neurons of the brachial plexus and/or individual nerves or nerve branches. We report a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis in a 2³-year-old female child admitted with acute respiratory distress and given antibiotic therapy following which she developed weakness of the left hand. She was diagnosed as a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis and was given supportive care. Although, the association with antibiotic therapy in this case could be incidental, indeed it is intriguing and requires further studies.

  12. Idiopathic brachial neuritis in a child: A case report and review of the literature.

    Jain, Shikha; Bhatt, Girish Chandra; Rai, Nirendra; Bhan, Bhavna Dhingra

    2014-01-01

    Brachial neuritis is a rare disease in children, affecting mainly the lower motor neurons of the brachial plexus and/or individual nerves or nerve branches. We report a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis in a 2½-year-old female child admitted with acute respiratory distress and given antibiotic therapy following which she developed weakness of the left hand. She was diagnosed as a case of idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis and was given supportive care. Although, the association with antibiotic therapy in this case could be incidental, indeed it is intriguing and requires further studies. PMID:25624937

  13. Morphological description of the brachial plexus in ocelot (Leopardus pardalis

    Kylma Lorena Saldanha Chagas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus is formed by the ventral roots of the spinal nerves, which unite to form the nerve trunks. It is usually formed by contributions of the last three cervical nerves and the first two thoracic nerves. Due to the scarcity of information on neuroanatomy, this study aimed to determine the macroscopic morphology of the brachial plexus of the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis. In this work, we used two ocelot specimens from the area of the Paragominas Bauxite Mine, PA, Brazil/Empresa Terra LTDA, with permission from SEMA – BP Nos. 455/2009 and 522/2009. The animals were donated to the Research Laboratory of Animal Morphology (LaPMA, Federal Rural University of Amazonia (UFRA, after they were accidentally run over. They were fixed by intramuscular injection of 10% formaldehyde. After fixation, the animals were dissected, allowing visualization of the thoracic nerves, as well as the identification of the ventral rami of the cervical and thoracic spinal nerves forming the brachial plexus. The brachial plexus was found to be formed by four trunks, which originated the ventral branches of cervical spinal nerves C6, C7 and C8 and the first thoracic (T1. These trunks gave rise to the suprascapular, subscapular, musculocutaneous, axillary, radial, median, ulnar, thoracodorsal and lateral thoracic nerves.

  14. Schwannoma of the brachial plexus presenting as a cystic swelling

    Somayaji, K. S. G.; Rajeshwari, A.; Gangadhara, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumours. A small percentage of these tumours arise from the brachial plexus. Cystic degeneration and hemorrhagic necrosis can occur in these tumours in up to 40% of the cases. Detailed preoperative evaluation and careful dissection during surgery will avoid post operative neurological complications. We report a case of schwannoma of the brachial plexus presenting as a cystic neck swelling which was successfully managed by us.

  15. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    Frizelle, H. P.

    1998-01-01

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patien...

  16. Sonographic evaluation of brachial plexus pathology

    Graif, Moshe; Blank, Anat; Weiss, Judith; Kessler, Ada [Department of Radiology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, 6 Weizmann Street, 64239, Tel Aviv (Israel); Martinoli, Carlo; Derchi, Lorenzo E. [Department of Radiology, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Rochkind, Shimon [Department of Neurosurgery, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center and the Sackler faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, 6 Weizmann Street, 64239, Tel Aviv (Israel); Trejo, Leonor [Department of Pathology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, 6 Weizmann Street, 64239, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2004-02-01

    Pre-operative US examinations of the brachial plexus were performed with the purpose of exploring the potential of this technique in recognizing lesions in the region and defining their sonographic morphology, site, extent, and relations to adjacent anatomic structures, and comparing them to the surgical findings to obtain maximal confirmation. Twenty-eight patients with clinical, electro-conductive, and imaging findings suggestive of brachial plexus pathology were included in this study. There were four main etiology groups: post-traumatic brachial plexopathies; primary tumors (benign and malignant); secondary tumors; and post irradiation injuries. Twenty-one of the 28 patients underwent surgery. Advanced imaging (mostly MRI) served as an alternative gold standard for confirmation of the findings in the non-surgically treated group of patients. The US examinations were performed with conventional US units operating at 5- to 10-MHz frequencies. The nerves were initially localized at the level of the vertebral foramina and then were followed longitudinally and axially down to the axillary region. Abnormal US findings were detected in 20 of 28 patients. Disruption of nerve continuity and focal scar tissue masses were the principal findings in the post-traumatic cases. Focal masses within a nerve or adjacent to it and diffuse thickening of the nerve were the findings in primary and secondary tumors. Post-irradiation changes presented as nerve thickening. Color Doppler was useful in detecting internal vascularization within masses and relation of a mass to adjacent vessels. The eight sonographically negative cases consisted either of traumatic neuromas smaller than 12 mm in size and located in relatively small branches of posterior location or due to fibrotic changes of diffuse nature. Sonography succeeded in depicting a spectrum of lesions of traumatic, neoplastic, and inflammatory nature in the brachial plexus. It provided useful information regarding the lesion site

  17. Sonographic evaluation of brachial plexus pathology

    Pre-operative US examinations of the brachial plexus were performed with the purpose of exploring the potential of this technique in recognizing lesions in the region and defining their sonographic morphology, site, extent, and relations to adjacent anatomic structures, and comparing them to the surgical findings to obtain maximal confirmation. Twenty-eight patients with clinical, electro-conductive, and imaging findings suggestive of brachial plexus pathology were included in this study. There were four main etiology groups: post-traumatic brachial plexopathies; primary tumors (benign and malignant); secondary tumors; and post irradiation injuries. Twenty-one of the 28 patients underwent surgery. Advanced imaging (mostly MRI) served as an alternative gold standard for confirmation of the findings in the non-surgically treated group of patients. The US examinations were performed with conventional US units operating at 5- to 10-MHz frequencies. The nerves were initially localized at the level of the vertebral foramina and then were followed longitudinally and axially down to the axillary region. Abnormal US findings were detected in 20 of 28 patients. Disruption of nerve continuity and focal scar tissue masses were the principal findings in the post-traumatic cases. Focal masses within a nerve or adjacent to it and diffuse thickening of the nerve were the findings in primary and secondary tumors. Post-irradiation changes presented as nerve thickening. Color Doppler was useful in detecting internal vascularization within masses and relation of a mass to adjacent vessels. The eight sonographically negative cases consisted either of traumatic neuromas smaller than 12 mm in size and located in relatively small branches of posterior location or due to fibrotic changes of diffuse nature. Sonography succeeded in depicting a spectrum of lesions of traumatic, neoplastic, and inflammatory nature in the brachial plexus. It provided useful information regarding the lesion site

  18. Imaging tumours of the brachial plexus

    Tumours of the brachial plexus are rare lesions and may be classified as benign or malignant. Within each of these groups, they are further subdivided into those that are neurogenic in origin (schwannoma, neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour) and those that are non-neurogenic. Careful pre-operative diagnosis and staging is essential to the successful management of these lesions. Benign neurogenic tumours are well characterized with pre-operative MRI, appearing as well-defined, oval soft-tissue masses, which are typically isointense on T1-weighted images and show the ''target sign'' on T2-weighted images. Differentiation between schwannoma and neurofibroma can often be made by assessing the relationship of the lesion to the nerve of origin. Many benign non-neurogenic tumours, such as lipoma and fibromatosis, are also well characterized by MRI. This article reviews the imaging features of brachial plexus tumours, with particular emphasis on the value of MRI in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasin...

  20. A comparison of infraclavicular and supraclavicular approaches to the brachial plexus using neurostimulation

    Yang, Chun Woo; Kwon, Hee Uk; Cho, Choon-Kyu; Jung, Sung Mee; Kang, Po-Soon; Park, Eun-Su; Heo, Youn Moo; Shinn, Helen Ki

    2010-01-01

    Background A prospective, double blind study was performed to compare the clinical effect of vertical infraclavicular and supraclavicular brachial plexus block using a nerve stimulator for upper limb surgery. Methods One hundred patients receiving upper limb surgery under infraclavicular or supraclavicular brachial plexus block were enrolled in this study. The infraclavicular brachial plexus block was performed using the vertical technique with 30 ml of 0.5% ropivacaine. The supraclavicular b...

  1. Evaluation of brachial plexus injury by MRI

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI in brachial plexus injury. Methods: Total 98 patients with brachial plexus injury were examined by MRI before operation. Fifty-four of 98 patients MR imaging were obtained by 0.5 Tesla scanner and other 44 patients were obtained by 1.5 Tesla scanner. The scanning sequences include: SE T1WI, T2WI, FFE T2WI and T2WI SPIR. Exploration of the supraclavicular plexus was carried out and the MR imaging were compared with the operative finding in 63 patients. Thirty-five patients who had not surgery, were followed-up. Results: MR imaging found pre-ganglionic injuries in 45 patients and post- ganglionic injuries in 56 patients. Pre- and post- ganglionic injuries simultaneously in 16 patients among them. MR imaging can not find injury, sings in 13 patients. The positive rate was 86.73%. MR imaging finding of pre-ganglionic injuries include: (1) Spinal cord edema and hemorrhage, 2 patients (4.44%). (2) Displacement of spinal cord, 17 patients (37.78%). (3) Traumatic meningoceles, 37 patients( 82.22% ). (4) Absence of roots in spinal canal, 25 patients (55.56%). (5) Scarring in the spinal cnanl,24 patients (53.33%). (6) Denervation of erector spine, 13 patients (28.89%). MR imaging finding of post-ganglionic injuries include: (1) Trunk thickening with hypointensities in T2WI, 23 patients (41.07%). (2) Nerve trunk complete loss of continuity with disappeared of nerve structure, 16 patients (28.57%). (3) Continuity of nerve trunk was well with disappearance of nerve structure, 14 patients (25.00%). (4) Traumatic neurofibroma, 3 patients (5.36%). Conclusion: MR imaging can reveal Pre- and post- ganglionic injuries of brachial plexus simultaneously. MR imaging is able to determine the location (pre- or post- ganglionic) and extent of brachial plexus injury, provided important information for treatment method selection. (authors)

  2. Pleural effusion and atelectasis during continuous interscalene brachial plexus block -A case report-

    Yang, Chun Woo; Jung, Sung Mee; Cho, Choon Kyu; Kwon, Hee Uk; Kang, Po Soon; Lim, Young Su; Oh, Jin Young; Yi, Jin Woong

    2010-01-01

    An interscalene brachial plexus block is an effective means of providing anesthesia-analgesia for shoulder surgery. However, it has a multitude of potential side effects such as phrenic nerve block. We report a case of a patient who developed atelectasis of the lung, and pleural effusion manifested as chest discomfort during a continuous interscalene brachial plexus block for postoperative analgesia.

  3. Schwannoma of the brachial plexus; report of two cases involving the C7 root

    Rashid, Mamoon; Salahuddin, Omer; Yousaf, Shumaila; Qazi, Uzair A; Yousaf, Kanwal

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus schwannomas are rare tumors. They are benign nerve sheath tumors and only about 5% of Schwannoma arise from the brachial plexus. They pose a great challenge to surgeons due to their rare occurrence and complex anatomical location. We present two cases who presented with a supraclavicular swelling, that were proven to be schwannoma on histopathology.

  4. Unusual nerve supply of biceps from ulnar nerve and median nerve and a third head of biceps

    Arora L; Dhingra R

    2006-01-01

    Variations in branching pattern of the brachial plexus are common and have been reported by several investigators. Of the four main nerves traversing the arm, namely median, ulnar, radial and musculocutaneous, the ulnar and median nerve do not give any branches to muscles of the arm. Ulnar nerve after taking origin from medial cord of brachial plexus runs distally through axilla on medial side of axillary artery till middle of arm, where it pierces the medial intermuscular septum and enters t...

  5. Evaluation of brachial plexus injury by CT myelography

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of CT myelography (CTM) in brachial plexus injury. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with brachial plexus injury were examined by using cervical CTM with spiral scan and bone reconstruction algorithm. CT images were reviewed by the senior radiologists, who determined if the nerve root avulsion was presented. The criteria of diagnosing nerve root avulsion were loss of normal nerve root appearance in the Isovist filled thecal sac in consecutive CTM slices plus companion signs. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CTM in diagnosing nerve root injuries were calculated with operation findings and follow-up results as gold standard. Results: Direct sign of nerve root avulsion was the loss of normal nerve root defect seen in the Isovist filled thecal sac in consecutive CTM slices. Indirect signs included: (1) Pseudomeningocele bulge: The leak of Isovist into nerve root sheath, and extended into foramina; (2) Arachnoid cyst: displacement of spinal cord; (3) Dissymmetry of subarachnoid cavity: deformity of thecal sac, partially lack of Isovist into arachnoid space; (4) Non-integrity of dural cap sule wall: one side of cap sule cavity was obstructed. Part of the surface of spinal cord was exposed. Brachial plexus injury could be diagnosed by direct sign with one of the indirect signs. Of the 27 patients (128 nerve roots), 91 nerve root avulsions were found on CTM, and 37 was found normal. Compared with operation findings, 84 were true positive, 7 false positive, 34 true negative, and 3 false negative. Based on these results, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 96.6%, 82.9%, and 92.2%, respectively. Conclusion: CTM is accurate in detecting nerve root avulsion of brachial plexus. (authors)

  6. The excimer lamp induces cutaneous nerve degeneration and reduces scratching in a dry-skin mouse model.

    Kamo, Atsuko; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Kamata, Yayoi; Kaneda, Kazuyuki; Ko, Kyi C; Matsuda, Hironori; Kimura, Utako; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Epidermal hyperinnervation, which is thought to underlie intractable pruritus, has been observed in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). The epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules has been reported to regulate epidermal hyperinnervation. Previously, we showed that the excimer lamp has antihyperinnervative effects in nonpruritic dry-skin model mice, although epidermal expression of axonal guidance molecules was unchanged. Therefore, we investigated the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation and its mechanism of action. A single irradiation of AD model mice significantly inhibited itch-related behavior 1 day later, following improvement in the dermatitis score. In addition, irradiation of nerve fibers formed by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons increased bleb formation and decreased nerve fiber expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2, suggesting degenerative changes in these fibers. We also analyzed whether attaching a cutoff excimer filter (COF) to the lamp, thus decreasing cytotoxic wavelengths, altered hyperinnervation and the production of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD), a DNA damage marker, in dry-skin model mice. Irradiation with COF decreased CPD production in keratinocytes, as well as having an antihyperinnervative effect, indicating that the antipruritic effects of excimer lamp irradiation with COF are due to induction of epidermal nerve degeneration and reduced DNA damage. PMID:24940652

  7. The histomorphological study of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve, the medial calcaneal nerve and the lateral calcaneal nerve:observation of sectional morphous and measurement of nerve fibre number%股外侧皮神经和跟内、外侧神经的截面形态观察与神经纤维计数

    唐举玉; 李康华; 吴梅英; 罗令; 宋达疆

    2009-01-01

    Objective To provide guidance for reconstructing the sensation of the anterolateral thigh flap (ALTF) used to repair extensive soft tissue defects in heel. Methods Choose 7 adult male corpses, take the nerval samples respectively from the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) 5cm below the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and the initial segment of the medial caleaneal nerve (MCN) and the lateral calcaneal nerve (LCN), fixed, dewatered gradiendy, embedded, located, and made them into semithin sections, dyed with toluidine blue. The pictures were taken by a medicine figure imaging analysis system named MOTICMED 6.0, observe the nerves's sectional morphous, the quantity and distribution of their nerve fiber bundles, count the quantity of nerve fibers and determine the density of them. Use Photoshop 7.0 version precinct software for measuring and calculating the area of the nerve fiber bundles and the Photoshop grid function was used to measure the density of the nerve fibers. Results In our cross-section study, the median number of nerve bunches in LFCN, MCN and LCN1, was 4, 3 and 4, respectively. The median number of nerve fibers' area was 114.8 um2, 126.92 um2 and 102.76um2, respectively. The median number of nerve fibers' density was 11.43/um2, 6.47/um2 and 10.08/um2, respectively. The median number of nerve fibers was 987, 862 and 570, respectively. Conclusion The MCN and the LCN1 are ideal cutaneous nerves to suture with LFCN in the ALTF used to repair widespread soft tissue defects in heel because they have similar histomorphological characteristics with the LFCN.%目的 为临床开展股前外侧皮瓣移植修复足跟软组织缺损感觉重建提供指导. 方法 选择7具成年男性标本,分别于股外侧皮神经髂前上棘下5 cm、跟内侧神经和跟外侧神经第一支主干起始段切取神经样本.经固定、梯度脱水、包埋、修块定位和半薄切片后,以甲苯胺蓝染色.以MOTICMED6.0数码医学图像分析系统摄

  8. Permanent upper trunk plexopathy after interscalene brachial plexus block.

    Avellanet, Merce; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Rodrigo, Lidia; Gonzalez-Viejo, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) has been widely used in shoulder surgical procedures. The incidence of postoperative neural injury has been estimated to be as high as 3 %. We report a long-term neurologic deficit after a nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. A 55 year-old male, with right shoulder impingement syndrome was scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was given an oral dose of 10 mg of diazepam prior to the nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. The patient immediately complained, as soon as the needle was placed in the interscalene area, of a sharp pain in his right arm and he was sedated further. Twenty-four hours later, the patient complained of severe shoulder and arm pain that required an increased dose of analgesics. Severe peri-scapular atrophy developed over the following days. Electromyography studies revealed an upper trunk plexus injury with severe denervation of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles together with a moderate denervation of the biceps brachii muscle. Chest X-rays showed a diaphragmatic palsy which was not present post operatively. Pulmonary function tests were also affected. Phrenic nerve paralysis was still present 18 months after the block as was dysfunction of the brachial plexus resulting in an inability to perform flexion, abduction and external rotation of the right shoulder. Severe brachial plexopathy was probably due to a local anesthetic having been administrated through the perineurium and into the nerve fascicles. Severe brachial plexopathy is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of IBPB. We propose a clinical algorithm using ultrasound guidance during nerve blocks as a safer technique of regional anesthesia. PMID:25744163

  9. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  10. MR evaluation of brachial plexus injuries

    Ten cases of brachial plexus injury were subjected to magnetic resonance (MR) to demonstrate the roots, trunks, divisions or cord abnormalities. Both normal and abnormal brachial plexuses were imaged in sagittal, axial, coronal and axial oblique planes. Myelography, using water soluble contrast agents, was performed in seven cases. MR demonstrated one traumatic meningocele, one extradural cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection, trunk and/or root neuromas in four, focal root fibrosis in two and diffuse fibrosis in the remaining two cases. Results of MR were confirmed at surgery in four cases with neuromas, while myelography was normal in two and was not carried out in the remaining two. In two cases, where MR demonstrated diffuse fibrosis of the brachial plexus, myelography showed C7 and T1 traumatic meningocele in one and was normal in the other. Both these patients showed excellent clinical and electrophysiological correlation with MR findings and in one of them surgical confirmation was also obtained. In the other two cases with focal nerve root fibrosis, myelography was normal in one and showed a traumatic meningocele in another. Operative findings in these cases confirmed focal root fibrosis but no root avulsion was observed although seen on one myelogram. Focal fibrosis, however, was noted at operation in more roots than was observed with MR. Initial experience suggests that MR may be the diagnostic procedure of choice for complete evaluation of brachial plexus injuries. (orig.)

  11. New approaches in imaging of the brachial plexus

    Imaging plays an essential role for the detection and analysis of pathologic conditions of the brachial plexus. Currently, several new techniques are used in addition to conventional 2D MR sequences to study the brachial plexus: the 3D STIR SPACE sequence, 3D heavily T2w MR myelography sequences (balanced SSFP = CISS 3D, True FISP 3D, bFFE and FIESTA), and the diffusion-weighted (DW) neurography sequence with fiber tracking reconstruction (tractography). The 3D STIR sequence offers complete anatomical coverage of the brachial plexus and the ability to slice through the volume helps to analyze fiber course modification and structure alteration. It allows precise assessment of distortion, compression and interruption of postganglionic nerve fibers thanks to the capability of performing maximum intensity projections (MIP) and multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs). The CISS 3D, b-SSFP sequences allow good visualization of nerve roots within the spinal canal and may be used for MR myelography in traumatic plexus injuries. The DW neurography sequence with tractography is still a work in progress, able to demonstrate nerves tracts, their structure alteration or deformation due to pathologic processes surrounding or located along the postganglionic brachial plexus. It may become a precious tool for the understanding of the underlying molecular pathophysiologic mechanisms in diseases affecting the brachial plexus and may play a role for surgical planning procedures in the near future.

  12. New approaches in imaging of the brachial plexus

    Vargas, M.I. [Department of Neuroradiology, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland)], E-mail: maria.i.vargas@hcuge.ch; Viallon, M. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Nguyen, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Beaulieu, J.Y. [Unit of Hand Surgery, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Delavelle, J. [Department of Neuroradiology, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Becker, M. [Unit of Head and Neck Radiology, Geneva University Hospital and University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    Imaging plays an essential role for the detection and analysis of pathologic conditions of the brachial plexus. Currently, several new techniques are used in addition to conventional 2D MR sequences to study the brachial plexus: the 3D STIR SPACE sequence, 3D heavily T2w MR myelography sequences (balanced SSFP = CISS 3D, True FISP 3D, bFFE and FIESTA), and the diffusion-weighted (DW) neurography sequence with fiber tracking reconstruction (tractography). The 3D STIR sequence offers complete anatomical coverage of the brachial plexus and the ability to slice through the volume helps to analyze fiber course modification and structure alteration. It allows precise assessment of distortion, compression and interruption of postganglionic nerve fibers thanks to the capability of performing maximum intensity projections (MIP) and multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs). The CISS 3D, b-SSFP sequences allow good visualization of nerve roots within the spinal canal and may be used for MR myelography in traumatic plexus injuries. The DW neurography sequence with tractography is still a work in progress, able to demonstrate nerves tracts, their structure alteration or deformation due to pathologic processes surrounding or located along the postganglionic brachial plexus. It may become a precious tool for the understanding of the underlying molecular pathophysiologic mechanisms in diseases affecting the brachial plexus and may play a role for surgical planning procedures in the near future.

  13. Brachial plexus neuropathy

    Hubka, Michael J; King, Laurie; Cassidy, J. David; Donat, JR

    1992-01-01

    Branchial plexus neuropathy is characterized by acute onset of intense pain in the shoulder or arm followed shortly by focal muscle weakness. This presentation may mislead the clinician into diagnosing shoulder or cervical spine pathology. Although brachial plexus neuropathy is not common, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pain and weakness of the arm. We present a patient with brachial plexus neuropathy who was originally misdiagnosed as having a cervical disc herniation.

  14. Evaluation of brachial plexus with MR echo planar imaging: initial experience

    Objective: To determine the optimal sequences and scan parameters of Brachial Plexus MRI. Methods: Eighteen volunteers were underwent conventional MRI and echo planar imaging scanning. The images acquired were compared with the standard anatomical pictures. Results: Ventral rami, ganglion, trunks, cords and some peripheral nerves of brachial plexus were demonstrated very well by echo planar imaging with the post-processing techniques such as MIP, thin slice MIP and MPR. In 18/18 cases the postganglions on both sides and 17/18 cases the preganglions of brachial plexus on both sides could be visualized in EPI pre-processed and post-processed images. Conclusion: Echo planar imaging is an effective technique of accurately displaying brachial plexus and adjacent structures. It has potential value in the diagnosis and treatment of brachial plexus diseases. It is also a potential technique to demonstrate other peripheral nerves accurately. (authors)

  15. Standard versus a novel technique for restoring neurological function following brachial plexus injuries

    Damien Kuffler

    2011-01-01

    The brachial plexus, a complex network of peripheral nerves, involves the motor, sensory, and sympathetic nerve supply to the upper extremity, and is formed by the union of the ventral primary rami of the spinal nerves. Brachial plexus trauma, damage to the complex of nerves, has a high incidence from delivery throughout life, leading to loss of all innervation of the arm and hand, their paralysis, and frequently results in excruciating neuropathic pain. The most frequent brachial plexus repair techniques use autologous sensory nerve grafts to bridge the nerve gaps. However, these do not induce reliable neurological recovery or reduce neuropathic pain, thus permanent neurological loss and neuropathic pain frequently occur. The present study evaluated the current best brachial plexus repair techniques and another involving a collagen tube filled with autologous platelet-rich fibrin that clinically induces extensive neurological recovery and a reduction/elimination of neuropathic pain, which are not possible by sural nerve grafts, even across long nerve gaps that are repaired years post trauma, and in older patients. This novel technique is proposed for use in restoring brachial plexus neurological function and in reducing/eliminating neuropathic pain.

  16. Myelography in obstetric palsies of brachial plexus

    The use of myelography in obstetric palsies of brachial plexus is aimed at diagnosing root avulsion.This kind of lesion appears as the disappearance of the slightly-transparent nerve roots which might be combined either with pseudo-meningocele or with deformation of radicular pouch. This study 69 operated patients who had previously undergone myelography have been considered. In 74.2% of cases mylographic findings were confirmed at surgery.False positives and false negatives were 9.7% and 3.2%, respectively. Uncorrect diagnoses were made in 12.9% of cases, because of misread lesions and uncorrect evaluation of their location, usually at the cervicol-dorsal junction.No side-effects were observed. Myelography appears thus to be extremely useful for both the preoperative evaluation and the choice of surgery in newborn children with obstetric palsy of the brachial plexus

  17. Brachial plexopathy after prone positioning

    Goettler, Claudia E; Pryor, John P; Reilly, Patrick M

    2002-01-01

    Two cases of brachial plexus injury after prone position in the intensive care unit are described. Mechanisms of brachial plexus injury are described, as are methods for prevention of this unusual complication.

  18. A comparative ultrastructural study of primary afferents from the brachial and cervical plexuses to the external cuneate nucleus of gerbils.

    Lan, C T; Wen, C. Y.; Tan, C K; Ling, E. A.; Shieh, J Y

    1995-01-01

    The synaptic organisation of the primary afferents from the brachial and cervical plexuses to the external cuneate nucleus of gerbils was compared following an intraneural injection of horseradish peroxidase into the musculocutaneous, median, ulnar and radial nerves of the brachial plexus or the main branches of the cervical plexus; 407 labelled primary afferent terminals from the brachial and 459 from the cervical plexus were studied. These boutons made synaptic contacts with 586 and 633 den...

  19. Functioning transferred free muscle innervated by part of the vascularized ulnar nerve connecting the contralateral cervical seventh root to themedian nerve: Case report

    Nakayama Ken; Ikeguchi Ryosuke; Kakinoki Ryosuke; Nakamura Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The limited nerve sources available for the reconstruction and restoration of upper extremity function is the biggest obstacle in the treatment of brachial plexus injury (BPI). We used part of a transplanted vascularized ulnar nerve as a motor source of a free muscle graft. Case presentation A 21-year-old man with a left total brachial plexus injury had received surgical intercostal nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve and a spinal accessory nerve transfer to the s...

  20. Comparative efficacy of ropivacaine and levobupivacaine in combined femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerve block with adjuvant magnesium for post-operative analgesia

    Prakash Khairnar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Patients with burns may require multiple surgeries, but poor general condition and underlying protein energy malnutrition make them unsuitable candidates for general or spinal anaesthesia. This study evaluated the role of magnesium sulphate as an adjuvant with levobupivacaine and ropivacaine used in combined femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN blocks in burn patients with relative sparing of thigh portion. Methods: This prospective, randomised, double-blind study included 54 adult patients of 18-65 years age, undergoing split-thickness skin graft harvest from the thigh, allotted to three equal groups of 18 each. Group L patients received femoral nerve (FN block with 15 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine and 8 mL for LFCN block; Group LM patients received 14 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine along with 1.0 mL of 15% magnesium sulphate for FN block, 7.5 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine with 0.5 mL of 15% of magnesium sulphate to LFCN block and Group R patients received 15 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine for FN block and 8 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine for LFCN block. Time to block onset and complete surgical block, duration of analgesia, total analgesic dose and the overall analgesia satisfaction score were measured in the first 24 h post-operatively. Quantitative data were analysed with ANOVA and qualitative data subjected to Chi-square tests. Intergroup comparison was performed with independent t-test. Results: The duration of post-operative analgesia did not differ with the addition of magnesium (P = 0.610. Time to onset of the block was significantly decreased with the addition of magnesium (P = 0.0341, but time to complete surgical block onset was similar across the groups. Conclusion: Both ropivacaine and levobupivacaine have good perioperative analgesic efficacy. Magnesium as an analgesia adjuvant with levobupivacaine does not prolong the duration of post-operative analgesia.

  1. 3 T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: Structural and microstructural evaluation

    Mallouhi, Ammar, E-mail: Ammar.Mallouhi@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Marik, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Marik@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela, E-mail: Daniela.Prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz, E-mail: Franz.Kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodner, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.Bodner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Kasprian@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus.

  2. 3 T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: Structural and microstructural evaluation

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus

  3. 3T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: structural and microstructural evaluation.

    Mallouhi, Ammar; Marik, Wolfgang; Prayer, Daniela; Kainberger, Franz; Bodner, Gerd; Kasprian, Gregor

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus. PMID:21763092

  4. Structure of the brachial plexus root and adjacent regions displayed by ultrasound imaging

    Zhengyi Li; Xun Xia; Xiaoming Rong; Yamei Tang; Dachuan Xu

    2012-01-01

    Brachial plexuses of 110 healthy volunteers were examined using high resolution color Doppler ultrasound. Ultrasonic characteristics and anatomic variation in the intervertebral foramen, interscalene, supraclavicular and infraclavicular, as well as the axillary brachial plexus were investigated. Results confirmed that the normal brachial plexus on cross section exhibited round or elliptic hypoechoic texture. Longitudinal section imaging showed many parallel linear hypo-moderate echoes, with hypo-echo. The transverse processes of the seventh cervical vertebra, the scalene space, the subclavian artery and the deep cervical artery are important markers in an examination. The display rates for the interscalene, and supraclavicular and axillary brachial plexuses were 100% each, while that for the infraclavicular brachial plexus was 97%. The region where the normal brachial plexus root traversed the intervertebral foramen exhibited a regular hypo-echo. The display rate for the C5-7 nerve roots was 100%, while those for C8 and T1 were 83% and 68%, respectively. A total of 20 of the 110 subjects underwent cervical CT scan. High-frequency ultrasound can clearly display the outline of the transverse processes of the vertebrae, which were consistent with CT results. These results indicate that high-frequency ultrasound provides a new method for observing the morphology of the brachial plexus. The C7 vertebra is a marker for identifying the position of brachial plexus nerve roots.

  5. CT appearance of intercostal nerve neurotisation

    Gadahadh, R; Rachapalli, V; Roberts, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    A nerve transfer or neurotisation procedure is performed to repair damaged nerves, in particular those of the brachial plexus following an avulsion injury. An intercostal to phrenic nerve transfer to re-innervate the diaphragm in patients with high cervical spine injury has also been reported in the literature. We present the imaging finding in a 65-year-old female who had an intercostal nerve transfer for a damaged phrenic nerve following a resection for a non-small cell lung carcinoma.

  6. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  7. Pediatric Stinger Syndrome: Acute Brachial Plexopathy After Minor Trauma.

    Quong, Whitney L; Hynes, Sally L; Arneja, Jugpal S

    2015-11-01

    The "stinger" or "burner" is a form of transient brachial plexopathy termed for its characteristic knife-like pain extending from the neck to the fingertips. Muscle weakness and paresthesia are oftentimes associated symptoms and are similarly temporary. Commonly observed in athletes of contact sports, the stinger results from high force trauma causing either traction/direct compression to the brachial plexus or extension/compression of the cervical nerve roots. We describe a pediatric case of a stinger in a 14-year-old boy, which was caused by a relatively low force trauma accident. Our management strategy and recommendations are discussed. PMID:26893985

  8. Penile erectile dysfunction after brachial plexus root avulsion injury in rats

    Guo Fu; Xuejia Li; Liqiang Gu; Bengang Qin; Li Jiang; Xijun Huang; Qinsen Lu; Dechun Zhang; Xiaolin Liu; Jiakai Zhu; Jianwen Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that some male patients suffering from brachial plexus injury, particularly brachial plexus root avulsion, show erectile dysfunction to varying degrees. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the erectile function after establishing brachial plexus root avulsion models with or without spinal cord injury in rats. After these models were established, we administered apomorphine (via a sub-cutaneous injection in the neck) to observe changes in erectile function. Rats subjected to simple brachial plexus root avulsion or those subjected to brachial plexus root avulsion combined with spinal cord injury had signiifcantly fewer erections than those subjected to the sham operation. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase did not change in brachial plexus root avulsion rats. However, neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression was signiifcantly decreased in brachial plexus root avulsion + spinal cord injury rats. These ifndings suggest that a decrease in neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in the penis may play a role in erectile dysfunction caused by the combi-nation of brachial plexus root avulsion and spinal cord injury.

  9. MR neurography in traumatic brachial plexopathy

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali, E-mail: vshali77@yahoo.co.in [Department of Radiology, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India); Upadhyaya, Divya N. [Department of Plastic Surgery, King George Medical University, Shah Meena Road, Chowk, Lucknow 226 003 (India); Kumar, Adarsh [Department of Plastic Surgery, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India); Gujral, Ratni B. [Department of Radiology, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • MR neurography is the imaging modality of choice in patients who have sustained brachial plexus injury. It is helpful in determining the level and extent of injury. • The authors have used a Visual Per-operative Scoring system to assess the usefulness of MR neurography in delineating the level and type of the lesion. • The imaging findings were classified based on the level of injury—root, trunk or cord. These findings were correlated with those seen on surgical exploration. A good correlation was found in the majority (65%) of patients and average correlation (30%) in others. - Abstract: Objectives: Imaging of the brachial plexus has come a long way and has progressed from plain radiography to CT and CT myelography to MRI. Evolution of MR imaging sequences has enabled good visualization of the small components of the plexus. The purpose of our study was to correlate the results of MR neurography (MRN) in patients with traumatic brachial plexopathy with their operative findings. We wanted to determine the usefulness of MRN and how it influenced surgical planning and outcome. Methods: Twenty patients with features of traumatic brachial plexopathy who were referred to the MRI section of the Department of Radiology between September 2012 and January 2014 and subsequently underwent exploration were included in the study. MR neurography and operative findings were recorded at three levels of the brachial plexus—roots, trunks and cords. Results: Findings at the level of roots and trunks were noted in 14 patients each and at the level of the cords in 16 patients. 10 patients had involvement at all levels. Axillary nerve involvement as a solitary finding was noted in two patients. These patients were subsequently operated and their studies were assigned a score based on the feedback from the operating surgeons. The MRN study was scored as three (good), two (average) or one (poor) depending on whether the MR findings correlated with operative

  10. MR neurography in traumatic brachial plexopathy

    Highlights: • MR neurography is the imaging modality of choice in patients who have sustained brachial plexus injury. It is helpful in determining the level and extent of injury. • The authors have used a Visual Per-operative Scoring system to assess the usefulness of MR neurography in delineating the level and type of the lesion. • The imaging findings were classified based on the level of injury—root, trunk or cord. These findings were correlated with those seen on surgical exploration. A good correlation was found in the majority (65%) of patients and average correlation (30%) in others. - Abstract: Objectives: Imaging of the brachial plexus has come a long way and has progressed from plain radiography to CT and CT myelography to MRI. Evolution of MR imaging sequences has enabled good visualization of the small components of the plexus. The purpose of our study was to correlate the results of MR neurography (MRN) in patients with traumatic brachial plexopathy with their operative findings. We wanted to determine the usefulness of MRN and how it influenced surgical planning and outcome. Methods: Twenty patients with features of traumatic brachial plexopathy who were referred to the MRI section of the Department of Radiology between September 2012 and January 2014 and subsequently underwent exploration were included in the study. MR neurography and operative findings were recorded at three levels of the brachial plexus—roots, trunks and cords. Results: Findings at the level of roots and trunks were noted in 14 patients each and at the level of the cords in 16 patients. 10 patients had involvement at all levels. Axillary nerve involvement as a solitary finding was noted in two patients. These patients were subsequently operated and their studies were assigned a score based on the feedback from the operating surgeons. The MRN study was scored as three (good), two (average) or one (poor) depending on whether the MR findings correlated with operative

  11. Changes in Spinal Cord Architecture after Brachial Plexus Injury in the Newborn

    Korak, Klaus J.; Tam, Siu Lin; Gordon, Tessa; Frey, Manfred; Aszmann, Oskar C.

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is a devastating birth injury. While many children recover spontaneously, 20-25% are left with a permanent impairment of the affected limb. So far, concepts of pathology and recovery have focused on the injury of the peripheral nerve. Proximal nerve injury at birth, however, leads to massive injury-induced…

  12. Five Roots Pattern of Median Nerve Formation

    Konstantinos Natsis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An unusual combination of median nerve’s variations has been encountered in a male cadaver during routine educational dissection. In particular, the median nerve was formed by five roots; three roots originated from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus joined individually the median nerve’s medial root. The latter (fourth root was united with the lateral (fifth root of the median nerve forming the median nerve distally in the upper arm and not the axilla as usually. In addition, the median nerve was situated medial to the brachial artery. We review comprehensively the relevant variants, their embryologic development and their potential clinical applications.

  13. Lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia: an anatomical insight.

    Dias Filho, L C; Valença, M M; Guimarães Filho, F A V; Medeiros, R C; Silva, R A M; Morais, M G V; Valente, F P; França, S M L

    2003-07-01

    A detailed anatomic study was carried out on the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve to better understand the etiology and treatment of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. As it passed from the pelvis into the thigh, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve ran through an "aponeuroticofascial tunnel," beginning at the iliopubic tract and ending at the inguinal ligament; as it passed through the tunnel, an enlargement in its side-to-side diameter was observed, suggesting that the fascial structures proximal to the inguinal ligament may be implicated in the genesis of lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia. The finding of pseudoneuromas at this location, distant from the inguinal ligament, supports this hypothesis. The anterior superior iliac spine is located approximately 0.7 cm from the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve and serves as the bony landmark for nerve localization. Within the first 3 cm of leaving the pelvis, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was observed deep to the fascia lata; therefore, surgical dissection within the subcutaneous fascia may be conducted with relative impunity near the anterior superior iliac spine just inferior to the inguinal ligament. In 36% of cases there was no posterior branch of the nerve, which is correlated to lateral femoral cutaneous neuralgia symptoms often being limited to the anterior branch region. An accessory nerve was found in 30% of cases. PMID:12794914

  14. Imaging tumours of the brachial plexus

    Saifuddin, Asif [Department of Radiology, The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Brockley Hill, HA7 4LP, Stanmore (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    Tumours of the brachial plexus are rare lesions and may be classified as benign or malignant. Within each of these groups, they are further subdivided into those that are neurogenic in origin (schwannoma, neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour) and those that are non-neurogenic. Careful pre-operative diagnosis and staging is essential to the successful management of these lesions. Benign neurogenic tumours are well characterized with pre-operative MRI, appearing as well-defined, oval soft-tissue masses, which are typically isointense on T1-weighted images and show the ''target sign'' on T2-weighted images. Differentiation between schwannoma and neurofibroma can often be made by assessing the relationship of the lesion to the nerve of origin. Many benign non-neurogenic tumours, such as lipoma and fibromatosis, are also well characterized by MRI. This article reviews the imaging features of brachial plexus tumours, with particular emphasis on the value of MRI in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Color Doppler Ultrasound-guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block to Prevent Vascular Injection

    Nagdev, Arun; Hahn, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks are quickly becoming integrated into emergency medicine practice for pain control and as an alternative to procedural sedation. Common, but potentially catastophic errors have not been reported outside of the anesthesiology literature. Evaluation of the brachial plexus with color Doppler should be standard for clinicians performing a supraclavicular brachial plexus block to determine ideal block location and prevention of inadvertant intravascular injection. [We...

  16. Free functional gracilis muscle transfer in children with severe sequelae from obstetric brachial plexus palsy

    Ocampo-Pavez Claudia; Bahm Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We present 4 children between 6 and 13 years suffering from severe sequelae after a total obstetric brachial plexus lesion resulting in a hand without functional active long finger flexion. They had successfully reanimated long finger flexion using a free functional gracilis muscle transfer. These children initially presented a total obstetric brachial plexus palsy without neurotisation of the lower trunk in an early microsurgical nerve reconstruction procedure. We describe our indic...

  17. Origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla: Cervidae)

    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira; Priscilla Rosa Queiroz Ribeiro; Mariana Oliveira Lima; Rogério Rodrigues de Souza; Sady Alexis Chavauty Valdes; André Luiz Quagliatto Santos

    2013-01-01

    The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region which innervates the thoracic limb and its surroundings. Its study in different species is important not only as a source of morphological knowledge, but also because it facilitates the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders resulting from various pathologies. This study aimed to describe the origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of Mazama gouazoubira. Three specimens were used, belonging to the scie...

  18. Idiopathic Brachial Neuritis

    Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Recober, Ana; Kelkar, Praful

    2002-01-01

    Idiopathic brachial neuritis is a well defined clinical condition that most commonly affects young adults, seen usually by primary care physicians, neurologists or orthopaedic surgeons. Its onset is characterized by acute, aching shoulder pain lasting a few days to weeks, followed by progressive shoulder girdle and upper extremity weakness and atrophy, with a slow but progressive recovery of motor function over 6 to 18 months. Its early recognition can help avoid unnecessary and potentially h...

  19. Schwannoma of the brachial plexus: cross-sectional imaging diagnosis using CT, sonography, and MR imaging

    Rettenbacher, Thomas; Soegner, Peter; Springer, Peter; Nedden, Dieter zur [Department of Radiology II, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fiegl, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Hussl, Heribert [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University Hospital Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2003-08-01

    Primary brachial plexus tumors are rare, usually benign, and in general have a good prognosis after surgical excision. We present a case of a schwannoma in which sonography enabled the correct diagnosis of a probably benign brachial plexus tumor. Key to the diagnosis was the demonstration of a smooth-bordered, longish, and well-defined nodule along a brachial plexus nerve root. Cross-sectional imaging modalities that provide a high degree of soft tissue contrast and spatial resolution, such as sonography and MR imaging, were suitable methods to establish the correct preoperative diagnosis. Findings at CT, sonography, MR imaging, and surgery are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Schwannoma of the brachial plexus: cross-sectional imaging diagnosis using CT, sonography, and MR imaging

    Primary brachial plexus tumors are rare, usually benign, and in general have a good prognosis after surgical excision. We present a case of a schwannoma in which sonography enabled the correct diagnosis of a probably benign brachial plexus tumor. Key to the diagnosis was the demonstration of a smooth-bordered, longish, and well-defined nodule along a brachial plexus nerve root. Cross-sectional imaging modalities that provide a high degree of soft tissue contrast and spatial resolution, such as sonography and MR imaging, were suitable methods to establish the correct preoperative diagnosis. Findings at CT, sonography, MR imaging, and surgery are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Distinction between neoplastic and radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, with emphasis on the role of EMG

    The results of clinical, radiologic, and electrophysiologic studies are retrospectively reviewed for 55 patients with neoplastic and 35 patients with radiation-induced brachial plexopathy. The presence or absence of pain as the presenting symptom, temporal profile of the illness, presence of a discrete mass on CT of the plexus, and presence of myokymic discharges on EMG contributed significantly to the prediction of the underlying cause of the brachial plexopathy. The distribution of weakness and the results of nerve conduction studies were of no help in distinguishing neoplastic from radiation-induced brachial plexopathy

  2. Neurolymphomatosis of Brachial Plexus in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Yong Jun Choi; Shin, Jung A; Yong Hoon Kim; Soon Joo Cha; Joong-Yang Cho; Seung Hee Kang; Seong Yoon Yi; Hye Ran Lee

    2013-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare clinical disease where neoplastic cells invade the cranial nerves and peripheral nerve roots, plexus, or other nerves in patients with hematologic malignancy. Most NL cases are caused by B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Diagnosis can be made by imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We experienced two cases of NL involving the brachial plexus in patients with NHL. One patient, who had NHL with central nervous...

  3. Management of Brachial Plexus Injuries

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    The results of early neurosurgical treatment of 58 infants with various types of brachial plexus birth injury have been compared with non-surgical intervention in 91 patients followed by a multidisciplinary team at the Brachial Plexus Program, Miami Children’s Hospital, FL.

  4. Neurolymphomatosis of Brachial Plexus in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Yong Jun Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurolymphomatosis (NL is a rare clinical disease where neoplastic cells invade the cranial nerves and peripheral nerve roots, plexus, or other nerves in patients with hematologic malignancy. Most NL cases are caused by B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Diagnosis can be made by imaging with positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We experienced two cases of NL involving the brachial plexus in patients with NHL. One patient, who had NHL with central nervous system (CNS involvement, experienced complete remission after 8 cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy but relapsed into NL of the brachial plexus 5 months later. The other patient, who suffered from primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, had been undergoing chemoradiotherapy but progressed to NL of the brachial plexus.

  5. Brachial plexus surgery: the role of the surgical technique for improvement of the functional outcome

    Leandro Pretto Flores

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study aims to demonstrate the techniques employed in surgery of the brachial plexus that are associated to evidence-based improvement of the functional outcome of these patients. METHOD: A retrospective study of one hundred cases of traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Comparison between the postoperative outcomes associated to some different surgical techniques was demonstrated. RESULTS: The technique of proximal nerve roots grafting was associated to good results in about 70% of the cases. Significantly better outcomes were associated to the Oberlin's procedure and the Sansak's procedure, while the improvement of outcomes associated to phrenic to musculocutaneous nerve and the accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer did not reach statistical significance. Reinnervation of the hand was observed in less than 30% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Brachial plexus surgery renders satisfactory results for reinnervation of the proximal musculature of the upper limb, however the same good outcomes are not usually associated to the reinnervation of the hand.

  6. Origem e distribuição do plexo braquial de Saimiri sciureus Origin and distribution of the brachial plexus of Saimiri sciureus

    Elenara B. Araújo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores descreveram a origem e composição do plexo braquial de quatro Saimiri sciureus, pertencentes ao Centro Nacional de Primatas (Cenp, Ananindeua/PA, os quais foram fixados com formaldeído e dissecados. Os achados revelaram que o plexo braquial desta espécie é constituído por fibras neurais provenientes da união das raízes dorsais e ventrais das vértebras cervicais C4 a C8 e torácica T1, e organizado em quatro troncos. Cada tronco formou um nervo ou um grupo de nervos, cuja origem variou entre os animais; na maioria, foi encontrado o tronco cranial originando o nervo subclávio, o tronco médio-cranial dando origem aos nervos supraescapular, subescapular, parte do radial, e em alguns casos ao nervo axilar, nervo musculocutâneo e ao nervo mediano; o tronco médio-caudal formou parte do nervo radial, e em alguns casos os nervos axilar, nervo musculocutâneo, nervo mediano, nervo toracodorsal, nervo ulnar e nervo cutâneo medial do antebraço, sendo os dois últimos também originados no tronco caudal.The authors described the origin and composition of the brachial plexus of four Saimiri sciureus, from the National Primate Center (Cenp, Ananindeua/PA, which were fixed with formaldehyde and dissected. Findings revealed that the brachial plexus of this species is composed by nervous fibers from the roots of cervical vertebrae C4 to C8 and thoracic vertebrae T1, and organized into four branchs. Each branch has formed a nerve or a group of nerves, the origin was varied between animals, mostly were found the cranial trunk originate the subclavian nerve; the medium-cranial originate the suprascapular, subscapular, part of radial and in some cases the axillary, musculocutaneous and median nerves; the medium-caudal trunk originate part of radial nerve and in some cases the axillary, musculocutaneous, median, thoracodorsal, ulnar and medial cutaneous of forearm nerves, the last two nerves also originate from the caudal trunk.

  7. Cutaneous Sarcoidosis

    Rupali Bargotra , Jyotsna Suri, Yudhvir Gupta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of exclusive cutaneous sarcoidosis with no clinical or radiological evidence of diseaseanywhere else in the body.Exclusive cutaneous involvement is rare and is reported in about 4.5%patientsof sarcoidosis.

  8. Adult traumatic brachial plexus injury

    Rankine, J.J. E-mail: james.rankine@leedsth.nhs.uk

    2004-09-01

    Injury to the brachial plexus in the adult is usually a closed injury and the result of considerable traction to the shoulder. Brachial plexus injury in the adult is an increasingly common clinical problem. Recent advances in neurosurgical techniques have improved the outlook for patients with brachial plexus injuries. The choice of surgical procedure depends on the level of the injury and the radiologist has an important role in guiding the surgeon to the site of injury. This article will describe the anatomy and pathophysiology of traction brachial plexus injury in the adult. The neurosurgical options available will be described with emphasis on the information that the surgeon wants from imaging studies of the brachial plexus. The relative merits of MRI and CT myelography are discussed.

  9. Adult traumatic brachial plexus injury

    Injury to the brachial plexus in the adult is usually a closed injury and the result of considerable traction to the shoulder. Brachial plexus injury in the adult is an increasingly common clinical problem. Recent advances in neurosurgical techniques have improved the outlook for patients with brachial plexus injuries. The choice of surgical procedure depends on the level of the injury and the radiologist has an important role in guiding the surgeon to the site of injury. This article will describe the anatomy and pathophysiology of traction brachial plexus injury in the adult. The neurosurgical options available will be described with emphasis on the information that the surgeon wants from imaging studies of the brachial plexus. The relative merits of MRI and CT myelography are discussed

  10. Origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region which innervates the thoracic limb and its surroundings. Its study in different species is important not only as a source of morphological knowledge, but also because it facilitates the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders resulting from various pathologies. This study aimed to describe the origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of Mazama gouazoubira. Three specimens were used, belonging to the scientific collection of the Laboratory for Teaching and Research on Wild Animals of Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU; they were fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde and dissected. In M. gouazoubira, the brachial plexus resulted from connections between the branches of the three last cervical spinal nerves, C6, C7, C8, and the first thoracic one, T1, and it had as derivations the nerves suprascapular, cranial and caudal subscapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, median, ulnar, radial, pectoral, thoracodorsal, long thoracic and lateral thoracic. The muscles innervated by the brachial plexus nerves were the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres major, teres minor, deltoid, cleidobrachial, coracobrachialis, biceps brachialis, brachial, triceps brachialis, anconeus, flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, lateral ulnar, extensor carpi obliquus, extensor digitorum, superficial pectoral, deep pectoral, ventral serratus, and external oblique abdominal.

  11. Cervical myelographic findings of brachial plexus injury by trauma

    Authors reviewed 50 cases of cervical myelography during 4 years and 5 months, from February, 1985 to July, 1989 at Department of Radiography, Wonkwang University Hospital to analyse myelographic findings of traumatic brachial plexus injury with symptoms and signs and to discuss literature. The results were as follows: 1. Brachial plexus injury was predominant in male and the incidence was 50% in 3rd decade of the males. 2. Among the 50 patients, 11 were the peripheral type, which had symptoms but normal findings in cervical myelography and 39 were the central type, which were definitely abnormal findings in cervical myelography. 3. Cervical myelographic findings in the central type were divided into 5 groups. (all 39 cases) a. Obliteration of nerve root filling defect 39(cases) b. Pseudomeningocele. 32(cases) c. Narrowing of ipsilateral subarachnoid space 31(cases) d. Diverticulum. 4 (cases) e. Tracking of dye down the axillary sheath 1 (cases) 4. The most large numbers of pseudomeningoceles in cervical myelography were shown for two and in each case, the most multiple developing numbers of pseudomeningoceles were identified for four, that happened in one case. 5. In brachial plexus injury, there were two the most large involving numbers among the nerve roots, and in each involving nerve root, C7 was most common

  12. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Leukel, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    cutaneous sensory function as evidenced by increased touch threshold. Absolute dorsiflexion force error increased without visual feedback during peroneal nerve stimulation. This was not a general effect of stimulation because force error did not increase during plantar nerve stimulation. The effects...... joint. Understanding how the nervous system normally uses cutaneous feedback in motor control will help us identify which functional aspects are impaired in aging and neurological diseases....

  13. Diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury

    Medina, L.S. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Yaylali, Ilker [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ruiz, Jennifer; Altman, Nolan R. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Grossman, John A.I. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); New York University, Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Detailed evaluation of a brachial plexus birth injury is important for treatment planning. To determine the diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury. Included in the study were 31 children with perinatal brachial plexus injury who underwent surgical intervention. All patients had cervical and brachial plexus MRI. The standard of reference was the combination of intraoperative (1) surgical evaluation and (2) electrophysiological studies (motor evoked potentials, MEP, and somatosensory evoked potentials, SSEP), and (3) the evaluation of histopathological neuronal loss. MRI findings of cord lesion, pseudomeningocele, and post-traumatic neuroma were correlated with the standard of reference. Diagnostic performance characteristics including sensitivity and specificity were determined. From June 2001 to March 2004, 31 children (mean age 7.3 months, standard deviation 1.6 months, range 4.8-12.1 months; 19 male, 12 female) with a brachial plexus birth injury who underwent surgical intervention were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of an MRI finding of post-traumatic neuroma were 97% (30/31) and 100% (31/31), respectively, using the contralateral normal brachial plexus as the control. However, MRI could not determine the exact anatomic area (i.e. trunk or division) of the post-traumatic brachial plexus neuroma injury. Sensitivity and specificity for an MRI finding of pseudomeningocele in determining exiting nerve injury were 50% and 100%, respectively, using MEP, and 44% and 80%, respectively, using SSEP as the standard of reference. MRI in infants could not image well the exiting nerve roots to determine consistently the presence or absence of definite avulsion. In children younger than 18 months with brachial plexus injury, the MRI finding of pseudomeningocele has a low sensitivity and a high specificity for nerve root avulsion. MRI and MR myelography cannot image well the exiting nerve roots to determine

  14. Diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury

    Detailed evaluation of a brachial plexus birth injury is important for treatment planning. To determine the diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury. Included in the study were 31 children with perinatal brachial plexus injury who underwent surgical intervention. All patients had cervical and brachial plexus MRI. The standard of reference was the combination of intraoperative (1) surgical evaluation and (2) electrophysiological studies (motor evoked potentials, MEP, and somatosensory evoked potentials, SSEP), and (3) the evaluation of histopathological neuronal loss. MRI findings of cord lesion, pseudomeningocele, and post-traumatic neuroma were correlated with the standard of reference. Diagnostic performance characteristics including sensitivity and specificity were determined. From June 2001 to March 2004, 31 children (mean age 7.3 months, standard deviation 1.6 months, range 4.8-12.1 months; 19 male, 12 female) with a brachial plexus birth injury who underwent surgical intervention were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of an MRI finding of post-traumatic neuroma were 97% (30/31) and 100% (31/31), respectively, using the contralateral normal brachial plexus as the control. However, MRI could not determine the exact anatomic area (i.e. trunk or division) of the post-traumatic brachial plexus neuroma injury. Sensitivity and specificity for an MRI finding of pseudomeningocele in determining exiting nerve injury were 50% and 100%, respectively, using MEP, and 44% and 80%, respectively, using SSEP as the standard of reference. MRI in infants could not image well the exiting nerve roots to determine consistently the presence or absence of definite avulsion. In children younger than 18 months with brachial plexus injury, the MRI finding of pseudomeningocele has a low sensitivity and a high specificity for nerve root avulsion. MRI and MR myelography cannot image well the exiting nerve roots to determine

  15. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus: 3.0 T versus 1.5 T imaging

    Highlights: •DW MRN of brachial and lumbosacral plexus at 1.5 T and at 3.0 T was compared. •For lumbosacral plexus, nerve conspicuity on MIP images was superior at 3.0 T, also visible length and mean sharpness of the nerves. •For brachial plexus, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T was rather inferior, nerve length was not significantly different, mean sharpness was superior at 3.0 T. -- Abstract: Purpose: To compare intraindividually the nerve conspicuity of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR neurography (MRN) at two different field strengths. Materials and methods: 16 healthy volunteers were investigated at 3.0 T and 1.5 T applying optimized variants of a DW spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with short TI inversion recovery fat suppression. Full-volume (FV) and curved sub-volume (CSV) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed and nerve conspicuity was visually assessed. Moreover, visible length and sharpness of the nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Results: On FV MIP images, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T was worse for brachial plexus (P = 0.00228), but better for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00666). On CSV MIP images, nerve conspicuity did not differ significantly for brachial plexus, but was better at 3.0 T for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00091). The visible length of the analyzed nerves did not differ significantly with the exception of some lumbosacral nerves, which were significantly longer at 3.0 T. The sharpness of all investigated nerves was significantly higher at 3.0 T by about 40–60% for cervical and 97–169% for lumbosacral nerves. Conclusion: DW MRN imaging at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T is superior for lumbosacral plexus, but not for brachial plexus

  16. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus: 3.0 T versus 1.5 T imaging

    Mürtz, P., E-mail: petra.muertz@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Kaschner, M., E-mail: Marius.Kaschner@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lakghomi, A., E-mail: Asadeh.Lakghomi@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, J., E-mail: juergen.gieseke@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Philips Healthcare, Lübeckertordamm 5, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Willinek, W.A., E-mail: winfried.willinek@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Schild, H.H., E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Thomas, D., E-mail: daniel.thomas@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •DW MRN of brachial and lumbosacral plexus at 1.5 T and at 3.0 T was compared. •For lumbosacral plexus, nerve conspicuity on MIP images was superior at 3.0 T, also visible length and mean sharpness of the nerves. •For brachial plexus, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T was rather inferior, nerve length was not significantly different, mean sharpness was superior at 3.0 T. -- Abstract: Purpose: To compare intraindividually the nerve conspicuity of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR neurography (MRN) at two different field strengths. Materials and methods: 16 healthy volunteers were investigated at 3.0 T and 1.5 T applying optimized variants of a DW spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with short TI inversion recovery fat suppression. Full-volume (FV) and curved sub-volume (CSV) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed and nerve conspicuity was visually assessed. Moreover, visible length and sharpness of the nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Results: On FV MIP images, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T was worse for brachial plexus (P = 0.00228), but better for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00666). On CSV MIP images, nerve conspicuity did not differ significantly for brachial plexus, but was better at 3.0 T for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00091). The visible length of the analyzed nerves did not differ significantly with the exception of some lumbosacral nerves, which were significantly longer at 3.0 T. The sharpness of all investigated nerves was significantly higher at 3.0 T by about 40–60% for cervical and 97–169% for lumbosacral nerves. Conclusion: DW MRN imaging at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T is superior for lumbosacral plexus, but not for brachial plexus.

  17. MRI of the brachial plexus and its region: anatomy and pathology

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brachial plexus and its region has become the imaging modality of choice, due to its multiplanar capabilities and inherent contrast differences between the brachial plexus, related vessels, and surrounding fat. A total of 41 patients with clinically suspected brachial plexus pathology or tumors in its region were studied. A normal anatomy was found in 12 patients. Pathologic entities included: traumatic nerve-root avulsion (n = 2), hematoma (n = 1), postoperative changes after scalenotomy (n = 2), primary tumor of the brachial plexus (n = 2), primary (n = 8) and metastatic (n = 1) tumors in the superior sulcus, primary (n = 5) and metastatic (n = 4) tumors in the axillary, supra- or infraclavicular region, and changes after nodal dissection and radiation therapy for breast carcinoma (n = 5; 1 patient also had had a prior scalenotomy). There was a positive correlation with surgery in 11 patients, and a negative correlation in 1 patient. (orig.)

  18. MRI of the brachial plexus and its region: anatomy and pathology

    Wouter van Es, H. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Witkamp, T.D. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Feldberg, M.A.M. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1995-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brachial plexus and its region has become the imaging modality of choice, due to its multiplanar capabilities and inherent contrast differences between the brachial plexus, related vessels, and surrounding fat. A total of 41 patients with clinically suspected brachial plexus pathology or tumors in its region were studied. A normal anatomy was found in 12 patients. Pathologic entities included: traumatic nerve-root avulsion (n = 2), hematoma (n = 1), postoperative changes after scalenotomy (n = 2), primary tumor of the brachial plexus (n = 2), primary (n = 8) and metastatic (n = 1) tumors in the superior sulcus, primary (n = 5) and metastatic (n = 4) tumors in the axillary, supra- or infraclavicular region, and changes after nodal dissection and radiation therapy for breast carcinoma (n = 5; 1 patient also had had a prior scalenotomy). There was a positive correlation with surgery in 11 patients, and a negative correlation in 1 patient. (orig.)

  19. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injur y:hot topics in the last decade

    Kaizhi Zhang; Zheng Lv; Jun Liu; He Zhu; Rui Li

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the de-velopment of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for pro-tection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimula-tion, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this ifeld change according to the hot topic of research.

  20. Brachial plexus injury in newborns

    ... and vascular disorders. In: Fenichel GM, ed. Neonatal Neurology . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2006: ... CB, Kratz JR, Jelin AC, Gelfand AA. Child neurology: brachial plexus birth injury: what every neurologist needs ...

  1. MRI of the brachial plexus

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of first choice for evaluating the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. This review discusses the used imaging techniques, the normal anatomy, and a variety of pathologies that can involve the brachial plexus. The pathology includes primary and secondary tumors (the most frequent secondary tumors being superior sulcus tumor and metastatic breast carcinoma), radiation plexopathy, trauma, thoracic outlet syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). (orig.)

  2. MRI of the brachial plexus

    Es, H.W. van [Dept. of Radiology, St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2001-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of first choice for evaluating the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. This review discusses the used imaging techniques, the normal anatomy, and a variety of pathologies that can involve the brachial plexus. The pathology includes primary and secondary tumors (the most frequent secondary tumors being superior sulcus tumor and metastatic breast carcinoma), radiation plexopathy, trauma, thoracic outlet syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). (orig.)

  3. A novel technique of ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block in calves.

    Iwamoto, Jiro; Yamagishi, Norio; Sasaki, Kouya; Kim, Danil; Devkota, Bhuminand; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2012-12-01

    An interventional ultrasound technique to increase the safety of surgical treatment of the calf forelimb was tested. First, the brachial plexus was evaluated using ultrasonography and then 2% lidocaine was injected under ultrasound guidance. Ultrasonically, the brachial plexus appeared as multiple hypoechoic areas surrounded by a hyperechoic rim or a hyperechoic structure characterised by multiple discontinuous lines. It was located between the omotransverse muscle and axillary artery and vein. The sensitive effect in the forelimb was seen mainly in the area supplied by the musculocutaneous nerve, indicating successful blockage in the nerve plexus. Out of the eight forelimbs, the motor effect was observed in seven forelimbs. These results suggest the clinical feasibility of ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block in bovine medicine, although further studies are needed to examine various approaches, including the sites of needle insertion and the appropriate volume and dosage of anaesthetic. PMID:22682007

  4. Prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following continuous interscalene brachial plexus block: A case report.

    Shinn, Helen Ki; Kim, Byung-Gun; Jung, Jong Kwon; Kwon, Hee Uk; Yang, Chunwoo; Won, Jonghun

    2016-06-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block provides effective anesthesia and analgesia for shoulder surgery. One of the disadvantages of this technique is the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis, which can occur as a result of phrenic nerve block and can cause a decrease in the pulmonary function, limiting the use of the block in patients with reduced functional residual capacity or a preexisting pulmonary disease. However, it is generally transient and is resolved over the duration of the local anesthetic's action.We present a case of a patient who experienced prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following a continuous interscalene brachial plexus block for the postoperative pain management of shoulder surgery, and suggest a mechanism that may have led to this adverse effect.Nerve injuries associated with peripheral nerve blocks may be caused by several mechanisms. Our findings suggest that perioperative nerve injuries can occur as a result of combined mechanical and chemical injuries. PMID:27310984

  5. COMMUNICATION BETWEEN RADIAL AND ULNAR NERVE AT A HIGH HUMERAL LEVEL

    Monika Lalit; Jagdev Singh Kullar; Sanjay Piplani

    2014-01-01

    Various communications between the different branches of brachial plexus have been reported by many authors but the communication between the radial and ulnar nerve; the branches of posterior and medial cords of brachial plexus in the arm is very rare. It features the communicating ramus travelling from proximal radial nerve and distal ulnar nerve at a high humeral level in the right arm of a 56 year old male cadaver. Knowledge of such variations may be of importance in the evalua...

  6. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    Frizelle, H P

    2012-02-03

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral\\/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patients were assessed for completeness of motor and sensory block. The overall success rate was 90 percent. Motor block was present in 80 percent of patients. Completion of the block was necessary in 5 patients. Two patients required general anaesthesia. The preponderance of ulnar deficiencies agrees with previously published data on this technique. No complications were described. Initial experience confirms the high success rate described using the Dupre technique. This technically straightforward approach with minimal complications can be recommended for regional anaesthesia of the upper limb.

  7. Magnetic resonance neurography in children with birth-related brachial plexus injury

    Smith, Alice B. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neuroradiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology, Box 0628, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gupta, Nalin [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurosurgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Strober, Jonathan [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Pediatric Neurology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chin, Cynthia [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neuroradiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) enables visualization of peripheral nerves. Clinical examination and electrodiagnostic studies have been used in the evaluation of birth-related brachial plexus injury. These are limited in their demonstration of anatomic detail and severity of injury. We investigated the utility of MRN in evaluating birth-related brachial plexus injury in pediatric patients, and assessed the degree of correlation between MRN findings and physical examination and electromyographic (EMG) findings. The MRN findings in 11 infants (age 2 months to 20 months) with birth-related brachial plexus injury were evaluated. A neuroradiologist blinded to the EMG and clinical examination findings reviewed the images. Clinical history, examination, EMG and operative findings were obtained. All infants had abnormal imaging findings on the affected side: seven pseudomeningoceles, six neuromas, seven abnormal nerve T2 signal, four nerve root enlargement, and two denervation changes. There was greater degree of correlation between MRN and physical examination findings (kappa 0.6715, coefficient of correlation 0.7110, P < 0.001) than between EMG and physical examination findings (kappa 0.5748, coefficient of correlation 0.5883, P = 0.0012). MRN in brachial plexus trauma enables localization of injured nerves and characterization of associated pathology. MRN findings demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with physical examination and EMG findings, and might be a useful adjunct in treatment planning. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance neurography in children with birth-related brachial plexus injury

    Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) enables visualization of peripheral nerves. Clinical examination and electrodiagnostic studies have been used in the evaluation of birth-related brachial plexus injury. These are limited in their demonstration of anatomic detail and severity of injury. We investigated the utility of MRN in evaluating birth-related brachial plexus injury in pediatric patients, and assessed the degree of correlation between MRN findings and physical examination and electromyographic (EMG) findings. The MRN findings in 11 infants (age 2 months to 20 months) with birth-related brachial plexus injury were evaluated. A neuroradiologist blinded to the EMG and clinical examination findings reviewed the images. Clinical history, examination, EMG and operative findings were obtained. All infants had abnormal imaging findings on the affected side: seven pseudomeningoceles, six neuromas, seven abnormal nerve T2 signal, four nerve root enlargement, and two denervation changes. There was greater degree of correlation between MRN and physical examination findings (kappa 0.6715, coefficient of correlation 0.7110, P < 0.001) than between EMG and physical examination findings (kappa 0.5748, coefficient of correlation 0.5883, P = 0.0012). MRN in brachial plexus trauma enables localization of injured nerves and characterization of associated pathology. MRN findings demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with physical examination and EMG findings, and might be a useful adjunct in treatment planning. (orig.)

  9. An unusual ulnar nerve-median nerve communicating branch.

    Hoogbergen, M M; Kauer, J M

    1992-01-01

    Branching of the ulnar nerve distal to the origin of the dorsal cutaneous branch was investigated in 25 hands in one of which an anatomical variation was observed. This finding may be of importance in the evaluation of certain entrapment phenomena of the ulnar nerve or unexplained sensory loss after trauma or surgical intervention in that particular area.

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Nerve Procedures.

    Strakowski, Jeffrey A

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound guidance allows real-time visualization of the needle in peripheral nerve procedures, improving accuracy and safety. Sonographic visualization of the peripheral nerve and surrounding anatomy can provide valuable information for diagnostic purposes and procedure enhancement. Common procedures discussed are the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular notch, deep branch of the radial nerve at the supinator, median nerve at the pronator teres and carpal tunnel, lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, superficial fibular nerve at the leg, tibial nerve at the ankle, and interdigital neuroma. For each procedure, the indications, relevant anatomy, preprocedural scanning technique, and injection procedure itself are detailed. PMID:27468673

  11. Ankle Brachial Index

    Wikstroem, J.; Hansen, T.; Johansson, L.; Lind, L.; Ahlstroem, H. (Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Medical Sciences, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (SE))

    2008-03-15

    Background: Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA) permits noninvasive vascular assessment, which can be utilized in epidemiological studies. Purpose: To assess the relation between a low ankle brachial index (ABI) and high-grade stenoses in the pelvic and leg arteries in the elderly. Material and Methods: WBMRA was performed in a population sample of 306 subjects aged 70 years. The arteries below the aortic bifurcation were graded after the most severe stenosis according to one of three grades: 0-49% stenosis, 50-99% stenosis, or occlusion. ABI was calculated for each side. Results: There were assessable WBMRA and ABI examinations in 268 (right side), 265 (left side), and 258 cases (both sides). At least one >=50% stenosis was found in 19% (right side), 23% (left side), and 28% (on at least one side) of the cases. The corresponding prevalences for ABI <0.9 were 4.5%, 4.2%, and 6.6%. An ABI cut-off value of 0.9 resulted in a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 20%, 99%, 83%, and 84% on the right side, and 15%, 99%, 82%, and 80% on the left side, respectively, for the presence of a >= 50% stenosis in the pelvic or leg arteries. Conclusion: An ABI <0.9 underestimates the prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in the general elderly population

  12. Enhancement of Median Nerve Regeneration by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Engraftment in an Absorbable Conduit: Improvement of Peripheral Nerve Morphology with Enlargement of Somatosensory Cortical Representation.

    Julia Teixeira Oliveira

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN, 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1, electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in 3 groups: MN Intact (n=4, PCL-Only (n=3 and PCL+MSC (n=3. Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group or without (PCL-Only group injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to 5 animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383±390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively than the PCL-Only group (2,226±575 fibers; 1.6 mm2. In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN.

  13. Clinical application of first dorsal metacarpal artery radial cutaneous branch and superficial radial nerve flap%第一掌骨背动脉桡侧皮支蒂桡神经浅支皮瓣的临床应用

    沈小芳; 芮永军; 许亚军; 糜菁熠; 赵刚

    2012-01-01

    目的 介绍应用第一掌骨背动脉桡侧皮支蒂桡神经浅支皮瓣修复拇指软组织缺损的体会.方法 2006年6月至2009年8月,对9例拇指桡侧软组织缺损患者,应用以第一掌骨背动脉桡侧皮支为轴心血管并携带桡神经浅支皮瓣进行修复,切取面积4.0 cm×2.0cm~7.0 cm× 3.5 cm.结果 术后9例皮瓣全部存活,6例获得随访,3例失访,随访时间为11~34个月.皮瓣质地良好,感觉恢复至S2~S3+,供区植皮愈合良好,轻度色素沉着,无痛性神经瘤发生.结论 第一掌骨背动脉桡侧皮支蒂桡神经浅支皮瓣血供可靠,成活率高,方法简单,可修复拇指全指腹缺损,是修复拇指软组织缺损的方法之一.%Objective To explore the clinical outcomes of applying first dorsal metacarpal artery radial cutaneous branch and superficial radial nerve flap to repair soft tissue defects of the thumb. Methods Nine cases of soft tissue defects in the thumb were treated from June 2006 to August 2009 with a flap using the first dorsal metacarpal artery radial cutaneous branch as the axial vessel and including the superficial radial nerve.The size of the raised flaps ranged from 4.0 cm× 2.0 cm to 7.0 cm× 3.5 cm. Results All the flaps survived after the surgery.Follow-up time ranged from 11 to 34 months in 6 cases.Three cases were lost to follow-up.The flaps had good texture.Protective sensation was restored from S2 to S3 +.The donor site skin graft healed well with slight pigmentation.There were on painful neuroma in these 6 cases. Conclusion First dorsal metacarpal artery radial cutaneous branch and superficial radial nerve flap has a high survival rate and reliable blood supply.It is easy to operate and can cover large defects.This flap is an ideal flap for repair of soft tissue defects in the thumb.

  14. Significance of magnetic resonance imaging in differential diagnosis of nontraumatic brachial plexopathy

    Perić Stojan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nontraumatic brachial plexopathies may be caused by primary or secondary tumors, radiation or inflammation. The aim of this study was to present the significance of MRI in revealing the cause of nontraumatic brachial plexopathy. Methods. A two-year retrospective study included 22 patients with nontraumatic brachial plexopathy. In all the patients typical clinical findings were confirmed by upper limb neurophysiological studies. In all of them MRI of brachial plexus was performed by 1.5 T scanner in T1 and T1 FS sequence with and without contrast, as well as in T2 and T2 FS sequences. Results. Seven (32% patients had brachial plexopathy with signs of inflammatory process, 5 (23% patients had secondary tumors, in 4 (18% patients multifocal motor neuropathy was established and in the same number (18% of the patients postradiation fibrosis was found. Two patients (9% had primary neurogenic tumors. Conclusion. According to the results of this study MRI is a method which may determine localization and cause of brachial plexopathy. MRI can detect focal nerve lesions when other methods fail to find them. Thus, MRI has a direct impact on further diagnostic and therapeutical procedures.

  15. True aneurysm of brachial artery.

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovričević, Ivo; Franjić, Dario Bjorn; Brkić, Petar; Tomas, Davor

    2010-10-01

    True upper extremity peripheral artery aneurysms are a rarely encountered arterial disorder. Following computer-tomography angiographic (CT-a) imaging examination, true saccular aneurysm, originating from the left brachial artery was diagnosed in the 77-year-old female without history of trauma. The aneurysm was resected by surgical intervention, and primary repair of the brachial artery was performed by interposition of a part of great saphenous vein harvested from the left groin and creation of two end-to-end anastomoses between interposition graft and previously resected part of brachial artery. No complication was observed during the follow-up. Surgical intervention for upper extremity aneurysms should be initiated without delay. Factors combined with minimal morbidity associated with repair suggest that surgical repair should be performed routinely for true upper extremity arterial aneurysms. PMID:20865459

  16. Avulsão do plexo braquial em cães - 3: eletroneuroestimulação dos nervos radial, mediano, ulnar e musculocutâneo Brachial plexus avulsion in dogs - 3: electroneurostimulation of radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves

    Mônica Vicky Bahr Arias

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi relacionar os aspectos clínicos, neurológicos e histopatológicos (descritos nas partes l e 2 deste trabalho com os resultados obtidos após estimulação elétrica dos nervos radiai, mediano, ulnar e musculocutâneo. Realizou-se a estimulação elétrica destes nervos durante o ato cirúrgico no qual foram coletados os fascículos para histopatolo gia. Os nervos radial, mediano e ulnar de todos os cães submetidos à eletroneuroestimulação apresentaram evidências de degenera- ção. enquanto que o nervo musculocutâneo apresentava função próxima do normal em 25% dos casos. A associação dos resultados do exame neurológico, da histologia e da eletroneuroestimulação sugeriu envolvimento quase que total das raízes do plexo braquial, enfatizando a necessidade de continuidade de pesquisas na área, visando principalmente a recuperação das raízes nervosas envolvidas.The purpose ofthis work was to relate lhe clinicai, neurological and histopathotogical aspects (as described in the sections I and 2 ofthis work with the obtained results after the electric stimulation of radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerrves. The electric stimulation of these nerves was realized during the cirurgic act, when the fascicle were obtained for the histopathologic examination. The radial, median and ulnar nerves of ali dogs submitted to electroneurostimulation presented evidences of degeneration, while the musculocutaneous nerve present almost normal functions in 25% of the cases. The interpretation ofthe results obtained from neurologic, histologic and electroneurostimulation examination suggested the almost total involvement of brachial plexus in ali cases. This work emphasized the need for further research in this área with lhe main purpose of recuperating the involved roots.

  17. Our experience on brachial plexus blockade in upper extremity surgery

    Ömer Uslukaya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peripheral nerve blocks are usually used either alone or along with general anesthesia for postoperative analgesia. We also aimed to present the results and experiences.Materials and methods: This retrospective study was conducted to scan the files of patients who underwent orthopedic upper extremity surgery with peripheral nerve block between September 2009 and October 2010. After ethics committee approval was obtained, 114 patients who were ASA physical status I-III, aged 18-70, performed upper extremity surgery in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic were included to study. Patients’ demographic data, clinical diagnoses, premedication status, peripheral block type, local anesthetic dose, stimuplex needle types, hemodynamic parameters at the during surgery, the first postoperative analgesic requirements, complications and patient satisfaction were recorded.Results: Demographic data were similar to each other. Brachial plexus block was commonly performed for the forearm surgery. Infraclavicular block was performed the most frequently to patients. As the classical methods in the supine position were preferred in 98.2% of patients, Stimuplex A needle (B. Braun, Melsungen AG, Germany have been used for blockage in 80.7% of patients. Also, in 54.4% of patients, 30 ml of local anesthetic solution composed of bupivacaine + prilocaine was used for blockade. Blocks applied to patients had provided adequate anesthesia.Conclusion: Since the brachial plexus blockade guided peripheral nerve stimulator for upper extremity surgery provide adequate depth of anesthesia and analgesia, it may be a good alternative to general anesthesia because of unwanted side effects

  18. Boston Children's Hospital approach to brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Vuillermin, Carley; Bauer, Andrea S

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of infants with brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) continues to be a focus at Boston Children's Hospital. Over the last 15 years, there have been many developments in the treatment of infants with BPBP. Some of the greatest changes have emerged through technical advances such as the advent of distal nerve transfers to allow targeted reinnervation as well as through research to understand the pathoanatomical changes that lead to glenohumeral dysplasia and how this dysplasia can be remodeled. This review will discuss our current practice of evaluation of the infant with BPBP, techniques for microsurgical reconstruction, and prevention and treatment of secondary glenohumeral dysplasia. PMID:27137763

  19. Robot-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus.

    Facca, Sybille; Hendriks, Sarah; Mantovani, Gustavo; Selber, Jesse C; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    New developments in the surgery of the brachial plexus include the use of less invasive surgical approaches and more precise techniques. The theoretical advantages of the use of robotics versus endoscopy are the disappearance of physiological tremor, three-dimensional vision, high definition, magnification, and superior ergonomics. On a fresh cadaver, a dissection space was created and maintained by insufflation of CO2. The supraclavicular brachial plexus was dissected using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). A segment of the C5 nerve root was grafted robotically. A series of eight clinical cases of nerve damage around the shoulder girdle were operated on using the da Vinci robot. The ability to perform successful microneural repair was confirmed in both the authors' clinical and experimental studies, but the entire potential of robotically assisted microneural surgery was not realized during these initial cases because an open incision was still required. Robotic-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus is still in its early stages. It would be ideal to have even finer and more suitable instruments to apply fibrin glue or electrostimulation in nerve surgery. Nevertheless, the prospects of minimally invasive techniques would allow acute and subacute surgical approach of traumatic brachial plexus palsy safely, without significant and cicatricial morbidity. PMID:24872778

  20. Bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via posterior com uso de neuroestimulador e ropivacaína a 0,5% Bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso de neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5% Posterior brachial plexus block with nerve stimulator and 0.5% ropivacaine

    Lúcia Beato

    2005-08-01

    ícula y húmero proximal. El objetivo de este estudio fue mostrar los resultados observados en pacientes sometidos a bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso del neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5%. MÉTODO: Veintidós pacientes con edad entre 17 y 76 años, estado físico ASA I y II, sometidos a cirugías ortopédicas envolviendo el hombro, clavícula y húmero proximal fueron anestesiados con bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior utilizando neuroestimulador desde 1 mA. Lograda la contracción deseada, la corriente fue disminuida para 0,5 MA y, permaneciendo la respuesta contráctil, fueron inyectados 40 mL de ropivacaína a 0,5%. Fueron evaluados los siguientes parámetros: latencia, analgesia, duración de la cirugía, duración de la analgesia y del bloqueo motor, complicaciones y efectos colaterales. RESULTADOS: El bloqueo fue efectivo en 20 de los 22 pacientes; la latencia media fue de 15,52 min; la duración media de la cirugía fue de 1,61 hora. La media de duración de la analgesia fue de 15,85 horas y del bloqueo motor 11,16 horas. No fueron observados señales y síntomas clínicos de toxicidad del anestésico local y ningún paciente presentó efectos adversos del bloqueo. CONCLUSIONES: En las condiciones de este estudio el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso del neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5% demostró que es una técnica efectiva, confortable para el paciente y de fácil realización.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There are several approaches to the brachial plexus depending on the experience of the anesthesiologist and the site of the surgery. Posterior brachial plexus block may be an alternative for shoulder, clavicle and proximal humerus surgery. This study aims at presenting the results of patients submitted to posterior brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine and the aid of nerve stimulator. METHODS: Participated in this study 22 patients aged 17 to 76 years, physical status ASA I and II

  1. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  2. Improved C3-4 transfer for treatment of root avulsion of the brachial plexus upper trunk Animal experiments and clinical application

    Lin Zou; Xuecheng Cao; Jing Li; Lifeng Liu; Pingshan Wang; Jinfang Cai

    2012-01-01

    Experimental rats with root avulsion of the brachial plexus upper trunk were treated with the improved C3-4 transfer for neurotization of C5-6. Results showed that Terzis grooming test scores were significantly increased at 6 months after treatment, the latency of C5-6 motor evoked potential was gradually shortened, and the amplitude was gradually increased. The rate of C3 instead of C5 and the C4 + phrenic nerve instead of C6 myelinated nerve fibers crossing through the anastomotic stoma was approximately 80%. Myelinated nerve fibers were arranged loosely but the thickness of the myelin sheath was similar to that of the healthy side. In clinical applications,39 patients with root avulsion of the brachial plexus upper trunk were followed for 6 months to 4.5 years after treatment using the improved C3 instead of C5 nerve root transfer and C4 nerve root and phrenic nerve instead of C6 nerve root transfer. Results showed that the strength of the brachial biceps and deltoid muscles recovered to level III-IV, scapular muscle to level III-IV, latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major muscles to above level III, and the brachial triceps muscle to level 0-III. Results showed that the improved C3-4 transfer for root avulsion of the brachial plexus upper trunk in animal models is similar to clinical findings and that C3-4 and the phrenic nerve transfer for neurotization of C5-6 can innervate the avulsed brachial plexus upper trunk and promote the recovery of nerve function in the upper extremity.

  3. Anatomical characteristics of the brachial plexus of the maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus Illiger, 1811)

    Gessica Ariane de Melo Cruz; Marta Adami; Vera Lúcia de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Eight male and female maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus) cadavers, previously fixed in formalin, were used to identify the origin of the brachial plexus, nerves and innervation territory in order to determine an anatomical pattern for this species. The plexus of B. torquatus was derived from the C7 to C10 and T1 to T2 spinal nerves, but the participation of T2 was variable. The spinal nerves gave origin to the cranial and caudal trunks, which joined to form a common trunk, from which two fascic...

  4. Perioperative nursing of 4 children receiving contralateral healthy cervical seventh nerve root transfer for brachial plexus injury%4例儿童臂丛神经损伤健侧C(7)椎体前移位直接修复术的护理

    黄天雯; 何翠环; 戚剑; 顾立强; 陈晓玲; 刘巧梨; 桂自珍; 刘回芬

    2011-01-01

    总结了4例儿童臂丛神经损伤健侧C(7)椎体前移位直接修复术围手术期的护理体会.术前通过心理护理、预防再损伤及功能锻炼、疼痛护理及术前体位训练等,患者情绪稳定,患者及家属对患者的伤残接受程度提高,患肢未出现再损伤.术后做好体位护理、病情观察、功能锻炼及出院指导,患儿术后康复过程顺利,切口Ⅰ级愈合,能够配合进行功能锻炼.%This paper summarizes the experience of perioperative nursing for 4 children receiving contralateral healthy cervical seventh nerve root transfer for brachial plexus injury. Before the operation,nursing care focused on psychological nursing,prevention from re-injury,functional training,pain management and posture training. The children and parents could face up the state of injury and keep calm in mood,and no re-injury occurred. The postoperative care included posture care,disease observation,functional training and discharge instruction. As a result,the children had a smooth recovery period after the operation. They could cooperate with physical therapy and the wounds healed well.

  5. Description of the brachial plexus of the short-eared dog (Atelocynus microtis Sclater, 1882: case report

    Luane Lopes Pinheiro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The short-eared dog (Atelocynus microtis is one of the rarest species of South American canids. Aiming to describe the morphology of this animal and enhance the study of comparative neuroanatomy, we studied the anatomical makeup of the brachial plexus of a female specimen from Paragominas (PA. The specimen was donated, after natural death, to the Institute of Animal Health and Production (ISPA at the Universidade Federal Rural da Amazônia (UFRA. The animal was fixed in 10% formalin and later dissected bilaterally to reveal the origin of the brachial plexus. In A. microtis, the brachial plexus is derived from the ventral rami of the last three cervical spinal nerves and the first thoracic spinal nerve (C6-T1. The brachial plexus derivatives with their respective origins were: suprascapular n. (C6 and C7, subscapular n. (C6, musculocutaneous n. (C6 and C7, axillary n. (C6 and C7, radial n. (C7 and C8, median n. (C7, C8 and T1, ulnar n. (C8 and T1, thoracodorsal n. (C8 and T1, cranial pectoral nn. (C7, C8 and T1 and caudal pectoral nn. (C8 and T1. The brachial plexus of A. microtis resembled what has been described for the domestic dog, in relation to the origin of the initial and final segment, but showed differences in the composition of some nerves.

  6. Cutaneous Porphyrias

    Christiansen, Anne L; Aagaard, Lise; Krag, Aleksander; Rasmussen, Lars M; Bygum, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Porphyrias are rare diseases caused by altered haem synthesis leading to the accumulation of different haem intermediates. Neurovisceral attacks may occur in acute porphyrias, while photosensitivity is the presenting symptom in cutaneous porphyrias. We present here an overview of symptoms and a...... flowchart for the diagnosis of cutaneous porphyrias, with recommendations for monitoring and an update of treatment options. From the Danish Porphyria Register, we present the incidences and approximate prevalences of cutaneous porphyrias within the last 25 years. A total of 650 patients with porphyria...... cutanea tarda were identified, 73 with erythropoietic protoporphyria, 9 with variegate porphyria, 4 with hereditary coproporphyria and one with congenital erythropoietic porphyria. The total incidence of all porphyrias was ~0.52/100,000 per year....

  7. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation

  8. Interscalenic approach to the cervico-brachial plexus.

    Evenepoel, M C; Blomme, A

    1981-12-01

    The concept of a closed peri-neurovascular space surrounding the cervicobrachial plexus, introduced by A. Winnie, allows the blockade of the cervical and brachial plexuses by means of a single puncture technique. The single puncture has positive advantages: 1. The rapidity of the blockade; 2. The simplicity of the blockade; 3. Comfort for the patient. The landmarks are easy to make. As with epidural blockade, the injection level and the volume of local anesthetic determine the quality and extent of the block. The traditional indication is surgery of the shoulder and of the supraclavicular area. A new indication seems to be the implantation of a cardiac pacemaker. Complications often quoted in literature are Horner syndrome-a minor complication-and blockade of the ascending branches of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and of the phrenic nerve. The risk of a pneumothorax is almost nil. PMID:7324853

  9. Unusual and Unique Variant Branches of Lateral Cord of Brachial Plexus and its Clinical Implications- A Cadaveric Study

    Padur, Ashwini Aithal; Shanthakumar, Swamy Ravindra; Shetty, Surekha Devadas; Prabhu, Gayathri Sharath; Patil, Jyothsna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adequate knowledge on variant morphology of brachial plexus and its branches are important in clinical applications pertaining to trauma and surgical procedures of the upper extremity. Aim Current study was aimed to report variations of the branches of the lateral cord of brachial plexus in the axilla and their possible clinical complications. Materials and Methods Total number of 82 upper limbs from 41 formalin embalmed cadavers was dissected. Careful observation was made to note the formation and branching pattern of lateral cord. Meticulous inspection for absence of branches, presence of additional or variant branches and presence of abnormal communications between its branches or with branches of other cords was carried out. Results In the present study, we noted varied branching pattern of lateral cord in 6 out of 82 limbs (7%). In one of the limb, the median nerve was formed by three roots; two from lateral cord and one from medial cord. Two limbs had absence of lateral pectoral nerve supplemented by medial pectoral nerves. One of which had an atypical ansa pectoralis. In 2 upper limbs, musculocutaneous nerve was absent and in both cases it was supplemented by median nerve. In one of the limb, coracobrachialis had dual nerve supply by musculocutaneous nerve and by an additional branch from the lateral cord. Conclusion Variations of brachial plexus and its branches could pose both intraoperative and postoperative complications which eventually affect the normal sensory and motor functions of the upper limb. PMID:27190783

  10. MR imaging of the brachial plexus

    Determining the cause of brachial plexopathy is often difficult. MR imaging allows for direct visualization of this region in multiple planes with high soft-tissue contrast. This paper defines the normal anatomy of the brachial plexus and demonstrates the ability of MR imaging to evaluate varied pathology in this region. Fifty-five patients with brachial plexopathy were evaluated with either a 1.5-T (General Electric, Milwaukee) or a 0.35-T (Diasonics, South San Francisco) superconducting MR system. Multiplanar, multiecho spin-echo images were obtained with either dual-coil imaging or a body coil. Individual fascicles to the brachial plexus were clearly separated from the subclavian artery and vein, clavicle, and surrounding musculature. Abnormalities well seen with MR imaging included primary tumors in the region of the brachial plexus, tumors metastatic to the brachial plexus, direct extension of pancoast tumors, postradiation fibrosis, and posttraumatic lesions, including fracture and edema

  11. Diagnostic value of combined magnetic resonance imaging examination of brachial plexus and electrophysiological studies in multifocal motor neuropathy

    Basta Ivana; Nikolić Ana; Apostolski Slobodan; Lavrnić Slobodan; Stošić-Opinćal Tatjana; Banjalić Sandra; Knežević-Apostolski Slađana; Ilić Tihomir V.; Marjanović Ivan; Milićev Milena; Lavrnić Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by slowly progressive asymetrical weakness of limbs without sensory loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the involvement of brachial plexus using combined cervical magnetic stimulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of plexus brachialis in patients with MMN. We payed special attention to the nerve roots forming nerves inervating weak muscles,...

  12. COMMUNICATION BETWEEN RADIAL AND ULNAR NERVE AT A HIGH HUMERAL LEVEL

    Monika Lalit

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Various communications between the different branches of brachial plexus have been reported by many authors but the communication between the radial and ulnar nerve; the branches of posterior and medial cords of brachial plexus in the arm is very rare. It features the communicating ramus travelling from proximal radial nerve and distal ulnar nerve at a high humeral level in the right arm of a 56 year old male cadaver. Knowledge of such variations may be of importance in the evaluation of certain entrapment phenomenon of ulnar nerve or unexplained sensory loss after trauma or surgical interventions in that particular area is also of clinical significance in anaesthetic blocks.

  13. Cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Mehmet Harman

    1990-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is used to describe a spectrum of diseases caused by the parasitic protozoa leishmania spp. and transmitted by infected female sandflies. There are three main forms of the disease; cutaneous, mucocutaneous, and visceral. According to the World Health Organization, almost 12 million people from 98 countries worldwide are currently infected with leishmaniasis, while 350 million people are at risk. It was reported that 2 million new cases are diagnosed every year, with three-fourth...

  14. Neuromuscular hamartoma arising in the brachial plexus

    We report a case brachial plexus neuromuscular hamartoma (choristoma) in a 28-year-old man who complained of numbness of the left hand and forearm for several years. MRI revealed a circumscribed, rounded mass in the left brachial plexus. The patient is well 2 years after surgery, with no neurological deficit. (orig.)

  15. Neuromuscular hamartoma arising in the brachial plexus

    Lai, P.H.; Chen, C.; Yeh, L.R.; Pan, H.B. [Department of Radiology, Veterans General Hospital-Kaohsiung, 386 Ta-Chung First Rd, 813, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); Ho, J.T.; Hsu, S.S. [Department of Neurosurgery, Veterans General Hospital-Kaohsiung, 386 Ta-Chung First Rd, 813, Kaosiung (Taiwan); Lin, S.L. [Department of Pathology, Veterans General Hospital-Kaohsiung, 386 Ta-Chung First Rd, 813, Kaohsiung (Taiwan)

    2004-03-01

    We report a case brachial plexus neuromuscular hamartoma (choristoma) in a 28-year-old man who complained of numbness of the left hand and forearm for several years. MRI revealed a circumscribed, rounded mass in the left brachial plexus. The patient is well 2 years after surgery, with no neurological deficit. (orig.)

  16. MR imaging of the brachial plexus

    Es, Hendrik Wouter van

    2001-01-01

    In this retrospective study we describe the MR imaging findings in 230 consecutive patients with suspected pathology in or near the brachial plexus. These patients were studied from 1991 through to 1996. Chapter 2 describes the anatomy and the MR imaging techniques. As the anatomy of the brachial pl

  17. Cutaneous melanoma

    The study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant melanoma was initiated by Y. Mishima and his associates. Following basic research of 13 years, this team started the first clinical trial of cutaneous melanoma BNCT using 10B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA) in 1985. Since then, 32 patients have been treated. We developed the following regimen for BNCT of malignant melanoma: 1) 170 - 250 mg/kg of BPA-fructose complex is administered by drip infusion over 3-hours. 2) The minimum dose for melanoma control by single irradiation is assumed to be 25 Gy-eq. 3) The maximum tolerable dose to the skin by single irradiation is assumed to be 18 Gy-eq. 4) As the therapeutic dose, the maximum tolerable dose to the skin itself is chosen. We report the clinical results of two patients with cutaneous melanoma treated by BNCT. We believe that cutaneous melanoma are suitable for BNCT and that the excellent results will have a great impact on patients in QOL. (author)

  18. Uso de concentrados autólogos de plaquetas como tratamiento de una fractura escapular y una lesión del plexo braquial producidas por un disparo en un caballo Use of autologous platelet concentrates as treatment for a scapular fracture and brachial plexus nerve injury produced by a gunshot in a horse

    C López

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Las heridas de bala han sido escasamente descritas en caballos. Los disparos a corta distancia suelen producir daños en tejidos blandos y fracturas conminutas. Un caso de una fractura conminuta del cuello de la escápula con lesión aguda del plexo braquial producida por una bala de 9 mm en un semental de seis años de edad es descrito. El paciente fue tratado con éxito mediante la combinación de desbridamiento quirúrgico de la región afectada e inyección local de varias dosis de concentrados autólogos de plaquetas (APC y fisioterapia. A pesar de la fractura de la escápula y del daño en los nervios periféricos que toman al menos 18-24 meses para una recuperación completa, este paciente se recuperó satisfactoriamente en nueve meses. Estos resultados sugieren que las inyecciones de APC en combinación con fisioterapia pueden proporcionar un beneficio terapéutico en el tratamiento de lesiones agudas de tejidos blandos y fracturas óseas en caballos.Gunshot injuries have been scarcely reported in horses. Close-range gunshots usually produce extensive soft tissue damage and comminute fractures. A case of a comminute fracture of the neck of the scapula with acute injury of the brachial plexus produced by a 9 mm gunshot in a six year-old stallion is described. The patient was successfully treated by combining surgical debridement of the affected region and local injection of several doses of autologous platelet concentrates (APCs and physiotherapy. Although scapular fractures and peripheral nerve damage take at least 18-24 months for full recovery, this patient reached full recuperation of the affected limb in 9 months. These results suggest that injections of APCs in combination with physiotherapy could provide a therapeutic benefit in the treatment of soft tissue acute injuries and bone fractures in horses.

  19. MR Imaging of Brachial Plexus and Limb-Girdle Muscles in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Agosta, Federica; Riva, Nilo; Spinelli, Edoardo G; Pagani, Elisabetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Chaabane, Linda; Copetti, Massimiliano; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Falini, Andrea; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Purpose To assess brachial plexus magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities as signs of muscle denervation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the local ethical committees on human studies, and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects before enrollment. By using an optimized protocol of brachial plexus MR imaging, brachial plexus and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities were evaluated in 23 patients with ALS and clinical and neurophysiologically active involvement of the upper limbs and were compared with MR images in 12 age-matched healthy individuals. Nerve root and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities were visually evaluated by two experienced observers. A region of interest-based analysis was performed to measure nerve root volume and T2 signal intensity. Measures obtained at visual inspection were analyzed by using the Wald χ(2) test. Mean T2 signal intensity and volume values of the regions of interest were compared between groups by using a hierarchical linear model, accounting for the repeated measurement design. Results The level of interrater agreement was very strong (κ = 0.77-1). T2 hyperintensity and volume alterations of C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots were observed in patients with ALS (P brachial nerve roots do not exclude a diagnosis of ALS and suggest involvement of the peripheral nervous system in the ALS pathogenetic cascade. MR imaging of the peripheral nervous system and the limb-girdle muscle may be useful for monitoring the evolution of ALS and distinguishing patients with ALS from those with inflammatory neuropathy, respectively. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26583760

  20. Proactive error analysis of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block performance.

    O'Sullivan, Owen

    2012-07-13

    Detailed description of the tasks anesthetists undertake during the performance of a complex procedure, such as ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade, allows elements that are vulnerable to human error to be identified. We have applied 3 task analysis tools to one such procedure, namely, ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade, with the intention that the results may form a basis to enhance training and performance of the procedure.

  1. Multichannel somato sensory evoked potential study demonstrated abnormalities in cervical cord function in brachial monomelic amyotrophy

    Nalini A; Praveen-Kumar S; Ebenezer Beulah; Ravishankar S; Subbakrishna D

    2008-01-01

    Background: Brachial monomelic amyotrophy (BMMA) is known to affect the central cervical cord gray matter resulting in single upper limb atrophy and weakness. Settings and Design: Case series of BMMA patients who underwent somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) studies at a tertiary referral center. Aims: We proposed to record Multichannel Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (MCSSEP) from median and ulnar nerves with neck in neutral and neck fully flexed position in 17 patients with classical...

  2. Surgical outcomes of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot wounds in adults

    Duz Bulent

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of brachial plexus injuries due to gunshot wounds is a surgical challenge. Better surgical strategies based on clinical and electrophysiological patterns are needed. The aim of this study is to clarify the factors which may influence the surgical technique and outcome of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries. Methods Two hundred and sixty five patients who had brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries were included in this study. All of them were male with a mean age of 22 years. Twenty-three patients were improved with conservative treatment while the others underwent surgical treatment. The patients were classified and managed according to the locations, clinical and electrophysiological findings, and coexisting lesions. Results The wounding agent was shrapnel in 106 patients and bullet in 159 patients. Surgical procedures were performed from 6 weeks to 10 months after the injury. The majority of the lesions were repaired within 4 months were improved successfully. Good results were obtained in upper trunk and lateral cord lesions. The outcome was satisfactory if the nerve was intact and only compressed by fibrosis or the nerve was in-contunuity with neuroma or fibrosis. Conclusion Appropriate surgical techniques help the recovery from the lesions, especially in patients with complete functional loss. Intraoperative nerve status and the type of surgery significantly affect the final clinical outcome of the patients.

  3. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing. PMID:26676806

  4. Absence of musculocutaneous nerve in the left axilla

    Virupaxi RD

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Variations of the arrangement and distribution of the lateral cord and its branches in the infraclavicular part of the brachial plexus are common in one or both axillae. These variations are important to the surgeons, neurologists, anesthetists and anatomists during surgery and dissection in the region of axilla. The present case report describes the absence of musculocutaneous nerve in the infraclavicular part of left brachial plexus, observed during routine dissection of a 40-year-old male Indian cadaver. On the right side usual origin and course of musculocutaneous nerve was seen. The clinical importances of these variations are discussed.

  5. Traumatic injuries of brachial plexus

    The authors report their experience in 144 patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury who underwent Direct Cervical Myelography (DCM). Sometimes the diagnostic investigation was completed by CT. Various myelographic patterns are described: pseudomeningocele, missing sheet of the root, scarring lesions. In 9 cases only, myelography was not sufficient to provide a complete diagnosis. The examination showed all plexus roots lacerated in 14 patients, a monoradicular lesion in 75 cases, and no lesion in 26 cases. Twenty-one out of the 26 negative cases were confirmed during surgery, while in 2 patients an intracanalar injury was found, which had not been detected due to the presence of scars. Scars often compress healty roots, and may mask intracanalar injuries. In such cases, and when the spinal cord stretches towards the side of the lesion, Myelo-CT can be useful. DCM proved to be an extremely sensitive and specific method, which can be used as a first-choice radiological procedure in the study of traumatic injuries of the brachial plexus

  6. Absence of upper trunk of the brachial plexus

    Adam, Ali H; Mohammed, Ammar M A; Grebballa, Abbas; Rizig, Sahar

    2011-01-01

    The brachial plexus is a complicated plexus supplying the upper limb. The brachial plexus is of great practical importance to the surgeon. It is encountered during operations upon the root of the neck, and hence it is in danger. Variations in the formation of the brachial plexus are common; and knowledge of the variation of the brachial plexus may be useful for surgeons, for improved guidance during supraclavicular block procedures, and for surgical approaches for brachial plexus. Here we rep...

  7. Brachial plexus palsy caused by halo traction before posterior correction in patients with severe scoliosis

    QIAN Bang-ping; QIU Yong; WANG Bin; YU Yang; ZHU Ze-zhang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical features and treatment results of brachial plexus palsy caused by halo traction before posterior correction in patients with severe scoliosis.Methods: A total of 300 cases of severe scoliosis received halo traction before posterior correction in our department from July 1997 to November 2004. Among them, 7 cases were complicated with brachial plexus palsy.The average Cobb angle was 110° (range, 90°-135°).Diagnoses were made as idiopathic scoliosis in 1 case,congenital scoliosis in 3 cases, and neuromuscular scoliosis in 3 cases. Additionally, diastematomyelia and tethered cord syndrome were found in 3 cases and thoracolumbar kyphosis in 2 cases. Weight of traction was immediately reduced when the patient developed any abnormal neurological symptoms in the upper extremity, and rehabilitation training was undertaken. Simultaneously,neurotrophic pharmacotherapy was applied, and the neurological function restoration of the upper limbs and the recovery time were documented.Results: Traction was used for an average of 3.5 weeks (range, 2-6 weeks) before spinal fusion for these 7 patients. The average traction weight was 8 kg, which was 19% on average (range, 13%-26%) of the average body weight (40.2 kg). These 7 patients had long and thin body configuration with a mean height of 175 cm. The duration between symptoms of brachial plexus paralysis and the diagnosis was 1-3 hours. All of these 7 patients presented various degrees of numbness in the ulnar side of the hand and forearm. Median nerve paresis was found in 3 cases and ulnar nerve paresis in 4 cases. Complete recovery of the neurological function had been achieved by the end of three months.Conclusions: The clinical features of brachial plexus palsy caused by halo traction include median nerve paresis,ulnar nerve paralysis, and numbness in the ulnar side of the hand and forearm, which may be due to the injury of the inferior part of the brachial plexus, i.e. , damage of Cs and

  8. Schwannomatosis of the sciatic nerve

    A 52-year-old woman with schwannomatosis in the left sciatic nerve is presented. The patient had no stigmata of neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 or 2. Cutaneous or spinal schwannomas were not detected. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the sciatic nerve revealed more than 15 tumors along the course of the nerve. Histological examination revealed schwannomas consisting of Antoni A and B areas. Immunohistochemical study showed most cells reacting intensely for S-100 protein. The patient underwent conservative follow-up treatment due to the minimal symptoms. The relationship of the disease with NF-2 and plexiform schwannoma is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Schwannomatosis of the sciatic nerve

    Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Shigeki; Mizuno, Kosaku [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kobe University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    A 52-year-old woman with schwannomatosis in the left sciatic nerve is presented. The patient had no stigmata of neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 or 2. Cutaneous or spinal schwannomas were not detected. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the sciatic nerve revealed more than 15 tumors along the course of the nerve. Histological examination revealed schwannomas consisting of Antoni A and B areas. Immunohistochemical study showed most cells reacting intensely for S-100 protein. The patient underwent conservative follow-up treatment due to the minimal symptoms. The relationship of the disease with NF-2 and plexiform schwannoma is discussed. (orig.)

  10. 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging in children with brachial plexus birth injury

    Shinong Pan; Qiyong Guo; Lijie Tian; Wei Liao; Feng Tian; Jian Mao; Fei Wang; Rongjie Bai; Qi Li; Zhian Chen

    2011-01-01

    Brachial plexus birth injuries in children are usually diagnosed using 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging, while the application of high-field magnetic resonance imaging is rarely reported. Therefore, a retrospective comparison of 18 cases of children with brachial plexus injury was performed to investigate the characteristics of 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative observations. Magnetic resonance examinations in 18 cases of children showed that pseudo-meningocele sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positivity rates were 83.3%, 79.6%, 81.1%, and 40.0%, respectively. As for the neuroma and fibrous scar encapsulation, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positivity rates were 92.9%, 50.0%, 83.3%, and 77.8%, respectively. These results confirm that 3.0-T high-field magnetic resonance imaging can clearly reveal abnormal changes in brachial plexus injury, in which pseudo-meningocele, fibrous scar encapsulation, and neuroma are the characteristic changes of obstetric brachial plexus preganglionic and postganglionic nerve injury.