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Sample records for blue oak quercus

  1. Patterns of stomatal conductance among blue oak (Quercus douglasii) size classes and populations: implications for seedling establishment.

    Matzner, Steven L; Rice, Kevin J; Richards, James H

    2003-08-01

    Quercus douglasii Hook. & Arn. (blue oak) is a deciduous white oak that is currently failing to regenerate throughout much of its range in California, USA. Patterns of water use were observed in adult trees, saplings and seedlings to determine if ontogenetic changes in water use occur, which might be important in the establishment of this long-lived perennial species in a Mediterranean-type system. Seasonal and diurnal stomatal conductance (g(s)), late-season predawn xylem water potentials (Psi(pre)), carbon isotopic ratio (delta(13)C) and soil water status were compared among the three size classes at three sites differing in mean precipitation and soil water characteristics. Comparisons were also made between microsites with and without regeneration (defined by the presence or absence of saplings). Overall patterns of water use were consistent among the three sites, except that, at the site with the highest rainfall, Q. douglasii plants had higher g(s) and more positive Psi(pre) values. Although no differences in water use patterns were found between regeneration and non-regeneration microsites, the observed ontogenetic differences in water use may have important implications for Q. douglasii establishment. Compared with adult trees and saplings, seedlings had higher gas exchange rates during periods of high soil water content (early in the season and in the morning). Seedling g(s) was correlated with percent extractable soil water (ESW) throughout the season; adult tree and sapling g(s) was correlated with ESW between June and September. Despite experiencing greater water stress (indicated by more negative Psi(pre) values) than older trees, seedlings had more negative delta(13)C values, implying lower water-use efficiencies. PMID:12839731

  2. Water use Efficiency in a Blue oak ( Quercus douglasii) Savanna - a Combined Analysis of Stable Isotopes and Eddy Covariance Measurements

    Mambelli, S.; Tu, K. P.; Knohl, A.; Ma, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Dawson, T. E.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between carbon assimilation and water consumption by natural vegetation is needed to assess how changes in climate will affect plant carbon and water exchange as well as the energy fluxes of ecosystems. While climate change is expected to cause significant warming, most models also suggest changes in the timing and amount of precipitation received; thus implications of this type of change are particularly acute in Mediterranean regions of the world. Blue oak savannas are already exposed to broad variation in water availability and to severe droughts during the summer months. Our objective was to evaluate the trade-off between carbon gain and water loss (Water Use Efficiency) in this ecosystem at both the leaf and at the ecosystem scales. We monitored the ratio of the partial pressures of CO2 inside the leaf (Ci) and in the outside air (Ca) or Ci/Ca, during the summer months of three subsequent years. This ratio is determined by the balance between photosynthetic capacity and stomatal conductance to water loss. Leaf-level estimates for individual trees were based on the carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of bulk leaf tissue and of recently fixed carbohydrates (leaf soluble sugars). These leaf and individual tree based estimates were then compared with canopy-level estimates derived from continuous eddy covariance measurements of fluxes of CO2, water vapor and meteorological variables from two eddy covariance systems, one above (23m) and one below (2m) the tree canopy. We found that savanna Blue oak trees cope with severe drought through coordinated down-regulation of carbon and water fluxes, i.e. the ratio Ci/Ca remained stable over four summer months, despite decreasing soil water content and leaf water potentials. Stable C isotope composition of leaf soluble sugars is the most robust measure of Ci/Ca because it reflects the initial discrimination of photosynthetic products, without the confounding effects ascribed to storage, tissue

  3. Regeneration Patterns of European Oak Species (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Quercus robur L.) in Dependence of Environment and Neighborhood

    Peter Annighöfer; Philip Beckschäfer; Torsten Vor; Christian Ammer

    2015-01-01

    Quercus robur L. (pedunculate oak) and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. (sessile oak) are two European oak species of great economic and ecological importance. Even though both oaks have wide ecological amplitudes of suitable growing conditions, forests dominated by oaks often fail to regenerate naturally. The regeneration performance of both oak species is assumed to be subject to a variety of variables that interact with one another in complex ways. The novel approach of this research was to ...

  4. Sap-flow velocities and distribution of wet-wood in trunks of healthy and unhealthy Quercus robur, Quercus petraea and Quercus cerris oak trees in Hungary

    Sap-flow of Quercus robur, Quercus petraea and Quercus cerris oak trees were studied. 43K radioisotope tracing, the heat pulse velocity technique and the Granier-method were employed. Numerous intense pulses were observed in healthy Quercus petraea superposing onto the usual diurnal change. Only a few pulses were observed in unhealthy Quercus petraea, in healthy Quercus cerris and healthy and unhealthy Quercus robur trees. Proportion of wet-wood assessed by γ- and X-ray computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging was significantly less in healthy Quercus petraea trees than in healthy Quercus cerris trees. Proportion of wet-wood was higher in healthy trees than unhealthy trees of both species. (author)

  5. Seedling bank dynamics in managed holm oak (Quercus ilex) forests

    Gracia, Marc; Retana, Javier; Picó, Francesc

    2001-01-01

    International audience The present study reports spatiotemporal variations in seedling bank dynamics during a 5-year period in thinned and unthinned holm oak (Quercus ilex) plots in the Montseny Massif (NE Spain). Large spatial and temporal variations in seedling density have been found in the three plots studied, while the spatial pattern has shown low temporal fluctuations. However, differences in recruitment and survival among thinned and unthinned plots were small, but both variables h...

  6. Microsatellite Primer Development for Post Oak, Quercus stellata (Fagaceae

    Warren B. Chatwin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: The American Cross Timbers forest ecosystem runs from southeastern Kansas to Central Texas and is primarily composed of post oak (Quercus stellata. This old-growth forest currently occupies only about 2% of its ancestral range. To facilitate genetic research on this species, we developed microsatellite primers specific to post oak from reduced genomic libraries. Methods and Results: Two Q. stellata individuals, sampled from the northern and southern range of the post oak forest, were subject to genomic reduction and 454 pyrosequencing. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative microsatellites from which 12 polymorphic primer sets were screened on three populations. The number of alleles observed ranged from five to 20 across all populations, while observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.05 to 0.833 and 0.236 to 0.893, respectively, within individual populations. Conclusions: We report the development of microsatellite markers, specific to post oak, to aid the study of genetic diversity and population structure of extant forest remnants.

  7. Regeneration patterns of European oak species (Quercus petraea (Matt. Liebl., Quercus robur L. in dependence of environment and neighborhood.

    Peter Annighöfer

    Full Text Available Quercus robur L. (pedunculate oak and Quercus petraea (Matt. Liebl. (sessile oak are two European oak species of great economic and ecological importance. Even though both oaks have wide ecological amplitudes of suitable growing conditions, forests dominated by oaks often fail to regenerate naturally. The regeneration performance of both oak species is assumed to be subject to a variety of variables that interact with one another in complex ways. The novel approach of this research was to study the effect of many ecological variables on the regeneration performance of both oak species together and identify key variables and interactions for different development stages of the oak regeneration on a large scale in the field. For this purpose, overstory and regeneration inventories were conducted in oak dominated forests throughout southern Germany and paired with data on browsing, soil, and light availability. The study was able to verify the assumption that the occurrence of oak regeneration depends on a set of variables and their interactions. Specifically, combinations of site and stand specific variables such as light availability, soil pH and iron content on the one hand, and basal area and species composition of the overstory on the other hand. Also browsing pressure was related to oak abundance. The results also show that the importance of variables and their combinations differs among the development stages of the regeneration. Light availability becomes more important during later development stages, whereas the number of oaks in the overstory is important during early development stages. We conclude that successful natural oak regeneration is more likely to be achieved on sites with lower fertility and requires constantly controlling overstory density. Initially sufficient mature oaks in the overstory should be ensured. In later stages, overstory density should be reduced continuously to meet the increasing light demand of oak seedlings

  8. Regeneration patterns of European oak species (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., Quercus robur L.) in dependence of environment and neighborhood.

    Annighöfer, Peter; Beckschäfer, Philip; Vor, Torsten; Ammer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Quercus robur L. (pedunculate oak) and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. (sessile oak) are two European oak species of great economic and ecological importance. Even though both oaks have wide ecological amplitudes of suitable growing conditions, forests dominated by oaks often fail to regenerate naturally. The regeneration performance of both oak species is assumed to be subject to a variety of variables that interact with one another in complex ways. The novel approach of this research was to study the effect of many ecological variables on the regeneration performance of both oak species together and identify key variables and interactions for different development stages of the oak regeneration on a large scale in the field. For this purpose, overstory and regeneration inventories were conducted in oak dominated forests throughout southern Germany and paired with data on browsing, soil, and light availability. The study was able to verify the assumption that the occurrence of oak regeneration depends on a set of variables and their interactions. Specifically, combinations of site and stand specific variables such as light availability, soil pH and iron content on the one hand, and basal area and species composition of the overstory on the other hand. Also browsing pressure was related to oak abundance. The results also show that the importance of variables and their combinations differs among the development stages of the regeneration. Light availability becomes more important during later development stages, whereas the number of oaks in the overstory is important during early development stages. We conclude that successful natural oak regeneration is more likely to be achieved on sites with lower fertility and requires constantly controlling overstory density. Initially sufficient mature oaks in the overstory should be ensured. In later stages, overstory density should be reduced continuously to meet the increasing light demand of oak seedlings and saplings

  9. Dalechampii oak (Quercus dalechampii Ten.), an important host plant for folivorous lepidoptera larvae

    Kulfan, M.; Holecová, M.; Beracko, P.

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a structured analysis of lepidoptera larvae taxocenoses living in leaf bearing crowns of Dalechampii oak (Quercus dalechampii Ten.) in nine study plots in the Malé Karpaty Mountains (Central Europe). The differences between lepidoptera taxocenoses in individual oak stands were analyzed. A total of 96 species and 2,140 individuals were found. Species abundance peaked in May, while number of species and species diversity reached the highest values from April to May and from April t...

  10. BVOC emissions from English oak (Quercus robur) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica) along a latitudinal gradient

    Persson, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; RINNAN, RIIKKA; Holst, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    English oak (Quercus robur) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica) are amongst the most common tree species growing in Europe, influencing the annual Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) budget in this region. Studies have shown great variability in the emissions from these tree species, originating from both genetic variability and differences in climatic conditions between study sites. In this study, we examine the emission patterns for English oak and European beech in genetically ident...

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Tree Species Diversity in Different Oak (Quercus spp.) Dominated Forests in Garhwal Himalaya, India

    Gajendra SINGH; Gopal S. RAWAT

    2012-01-01

    Himalayan broad-leaved forests are mainly dominated by oak (Quercus spp.) species. Oak species with other tree species provide numerous ecosystem services and serve as lifeline for local inhabitants. Overall tree diversity and their status in different oak dominated forests viz., Quercus leucotrichophora (1500-2200 m), Q. floribunda (2201-2700 m) and Q. semecarpifolia (2701-3300 m) were studied in Garhwal, Himalaya. A total of 54 tree species (40 genera) in Q. leucotrichophora, 43 tree specie...

  12. Carbon storage in degraded cork oak (Quercus suber) forests on flat lowlands in Morocco

    Oubrahim H; Boulmane M; Bakker MR; Augusto L; Halim M

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to quantify the carbon stored in a degraded cork oak (Quercus suber L.) ecosystem in the north west of Morocco, in view of potential management implications. To this end, carbon stocks were evaluated in the first 100 cm of the soil, the cork oak trees, and the understorey species (both above- and belowground). Results show that the total carbon stocks in the cork oak ecosystem ranges from 65 to 237 Mg ha-1 with a mean value of 121 Mg ha-1. The first 100 cm of the soil (...

  13. Cork oak (Quercus suber L.) seedlings acclimate to elevated

    Vaz, M; Cochard, Hervé; L. Gazarini; Graca, J; CHAVES, M. M.; Pereira, J.S.

    2012-01-01

    Leaf gas-exchange, leaf and shoot anatomy, wood density and hydraulic conductivity were investigated in seedlings of Quercus suber L. grown for 15 months either at elevated (700 mu mol mol(-1)) or normal (350 mu mol mol(-1)) ambient atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Plants were grown in greenhouses in a controlled environment: relative humidity 50% (+/- 5), temperature similar to external temperature and natural light conditions. Plants were supplied with nutrients and two water regimes (WW, we...

  14. Effectiveness of Quercus Branti Activated Carbon in Removal of Methylene Blue from Aqueous Solutions

    Abdolmotaleb Seidmohammadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Dyes are one of the most contaminants in textile industrial wastewater that they are often carcinogenic, mutagenic and non-degradable. Therefore, with regard to environmental aspects, their removal from effluents is very essential. The purpose of this study was the perception of adsorption process and promotion of an economic technology for colored wastewater treatment. Therefore, activated carbon from Oak fruit bark was used as an effective and economic adsorbent. Materials & Methods: This study was performed at laboratory scale and batch system. At present study, the adsorbent surface properties was evaluated by use of the (FT-IR test and scanning electronic microscope (SEM. Also, effect of various operating parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, initial dye concentration and temperature on dye removal from synthetic wastewater were studied. Results: In this study, maximum removal efficiency of methylene blue were achieved at optimal pH=6, reaction time 180 minutes, and adsorbent dose 2 gl-1. Methylene blue removal efficiency with initial concentration of 100 mg.l-1 was 91.08%. Conclusions: According to results, it was cleared that : Quercus branti activated carbon can be used as an effective and economic adsorbent in waste water treatment processes.

  15. Influence of Pericarp, Cotyledon and Inhibitory Substances on Sharp Tooth Oak (Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata) Germination

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Guangquan; Li, Qingmei; Liu, Yong; Hou, Longyu; Li, Guolei

    2012-01-01

    In order to explore the mechanism of delayed and uneven germination in sharp tooth oak (Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata) (STO), mechanical scarification techniques were used to study STO root and shoot germination and growth. The techniques used were: removing cup scar (RS), removing the pericarp (RP), and cutting off 1/2 (HC) and 2/3 (TC) cotyledons. Germination percentage and root and shoot length for Chinese cabbage (Beassica pekinensis) seeds (CCS) were also investigated for CCS cultivat...

  16. Analysis of the amount of ash during sessile oak (Quercus petraea, Mattuschka) wood combustion

    Nestorovski Ljupcho; Nacevski Mitko; Trajanov Zdravko; Trajkov Pande

    2015-01-01

    The subject of investigation in this paper is the amount of ash residue during combustion of Sessile oak (Quercus petraea, Mattuschka) wood that is one of the most usable ones as fire wood in households in the Republic of Macedonia. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the amount of ash, as one of the biggest problems during energy production with forest biomass. The material for this investigation is collected from two different regions of th...

  17. Properties of Hungarian oak(quercus conferta Kit.) wood from the Hilandar Monastery forest

    Popović Zdravko; Todorović Nebojša

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the study results of the basic physical and strength properties of Hungarian oak (Quercus conferta Kit.) wood from the Kakovo Monastery forests of Hilandar Monastery in Greece. Wood properties were analyzed in detail, as an indispensable proof of wood quality and its use for joinery, interiors and wooden floors. The basic physical properties of wood (moisture content at the time of tree felling, density and volume porosity) and the basic strength properties (compressive st...

  18. Conservation Strategies for the Threatened Quercus Semecarpifolia Sm. A Himalayan Timberline Oak

    Hemlata BISHT; Vinay PRAKASH; Anant Ram NAUTIYAL

    2011-01-01

    Quercus semecarpifolia Sm. is a temperate, timberline, multipurpose oak species. It plays an important role in the Himalayan ecosystem. Human pressure, predation, short-lived acorns, failure of good seed crop every year, poor regeneration, desiccation, frost sensitivity and climate change may lead to complete extinction of the species in a near future. Immediate attention to conservation and restoration measures of the Himalayan ecosystem, in which this species grows, is required. Thus, an ex...

  19. Fine-scale spatial genetic structure in a multi-oak-species (Quercus spp.) forest

    Curtu AL; Craciunesc I; Enescu CM; Vidalis A; Sofletea N

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of fine-scale spatial distribution of multilocus genotypes can provide valuable insights into the biology of forest tree species. Here we tested for the existence of spatial genetic structure (SGS) in a four-oak-species forest with contrasting species abundances and hybridization rates. A total of 483 adult trees were mapped over 8.6 ha and genotyped using 10 highly polymorphic genomic regions. A weak but significant SGS was observed in each of the four oak species, with Quercus frai...

  20. ADHESIVE-FREE WOOD JOINTS – PART I: SESSILE OAK WOOD (Quercus petraea L.

    Ramona-Elena DUMITRAȘCU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available act: Wood as a raw material is indispensable in various human activities. Its investigation is inexhaustible and its responsible valorization, in accordance with current requirements for re-use and subsequent re-integration, is a priority at national level. Rotational friction as an alternative method of joining wood elements or wooden structures has not been addressed in Romania until now, even if it has been under investigation during the past 15 years in the wood field. The paper presents an experimental investigation carried out in order to analyze the process parameters in case of sessile oak wood (Quercus petraea L. at the activation of lignin through rotational friction, with a view to using this method in furniture design as an alternative for classical (glued joints. The results showed that at 1600rpm, sessile oak wood (Quercus petraea L. registered a more compact and uniform area of contact than at 1120rpm, on both wood sections. There is a significant difference between dowels with oblique and linear ribbed joints: the dowels with linear ribs lead to a more uniform density. The quality of the connection mainly depends on the rotation speed and the insertion speed. The overall conclusion of this experimental research is that sessile oak wood (Quercus petraea L. can be used for adhesive-free joints for furniture.

  1. Polycyclism and phenological variability in the common oak (Quercus robur L.

    Bobinac M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclism is the ability for a plant to produce several flushes in the same growing season. The rare phenomenon of common oak (Quercus robur L. summer flowering is proof of complex polycyclism. Common oak summer flowering and the unusual transformation of inflorescences were the starting point for this study of the phenological variability of common oak trees in identical site conditions. This paper presents comparative research of leaf flushing, flowering, and leaf fall phenophases in a common oak with summer flowering and a control tree in which this phenomenon was not observed. Both trees displayed frequent polycyclism (polyphase formation of annual shoots during the growing season, but with different intensities depending on the trees and the years. Compared to the control tree, the tree with summer flowering was characterized by a later onset of leaf-flush phenophase and leaf fall phenophase and a longer retention of the leaves in the crown.

  2. Behavior of pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) wood to different thermal treatments

    Todaro L; Rita A; Negro F; Moretti N; Saracino A; Zanuttini R

    2015-01-01

    Quercus pubescens Willd. is a common oak species in the Mediterranean area, where it is currently exploited mainly for purposes such as firewood. To improve the technological properties of its wood, various steaming and/or heat treatments were applied to 160 wood samples from a southern Italian stand, cut from either sapwood or heartwood, while 20 samples served as controls. Steaming was carried out in an autoclave at 120 °C, whereas heat treatments were performed in an oven at 150 or 200 °C ...

  3. Oak (Quercus Floribunda): A Prominent Indigenous Multipurpose Tree for Carbon Storage and Sequestration Potential

    Pandey, K. K.; T. A. Bhosale; Awasthi, A. K.; Garima Gupta; Deepak Maurya

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic growth model (CO2FIX) has been used for estimating the carbon sequestration potential of Oak (Quercus floribunda), an indigenous multipurpose tree used for timber, fuel wood, fiber and specially fodder in addition to its ability of soil binder. The present study has been carried out in the campus of V.C.S.G. College of Horticulture, U.U.H.F., Bharsar, Pauri Garhwal, Uttarakhand. It is capable of thriving on snow and heavy rainfall condition. CO2FIX was parameterized for a simulation...

  4. Dalechampii oak (Quercus dalechampii Ten., an important host plant for folivorous lepidoptera larvae

    Kulfan, M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a structured analysis of lepidoptera larvae taxocenoses living in leaf bearing crowns of Dalechampii oak (Quercus dalechampii Ten. in nine study plots in the Malé Karpaty Mountains (Central Europe. The differences between lepidoptera taxocenoses in individual oak stands were analyzed. A total of 96 species and 2,140 individuals were found. Species abundance peaked in May, while number of species and species diversity reached the highest values from April to May and from April to June, respectively. Abundance showed two notable peaks in flush feeders and in late summer feeders. Lepidoptera taxocenosis in the study plot Horný háj (isolated forest, high density of ants differed significantly from all other taxocenoses according to Sörensen’s index of species similarity, species diversity, analysis of similarity on the basis of permutation and pairwise tests (ANOSIM, seasonal variability of species composition, and NMDS ordination.

  5. Carbon storage in degraded cork oak (Quercus suber forests on flat lowlands in Morocco

    Oubrahim H

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to quantify the carbon stored in a degraded cork oak (Quercus suber L. ecosystem in the north west of Morocco, in view of potential management implications. To this end, carbon stocks were evaluated in the first 100 cm of the soil, the cork oak trees, and the understorey species (both above- and belowground. Results show that the total carbon stocks in the cork oak ecosystem ranges from 65 to 237 Mg ha-1 with a mean value of 121 Mg ha-1. The first 100 cm of the soil (including the forest floor represents the largest carbon pool (~51% of the total organic carbon of the ecosystem. Tree biomass (above- and belowground tissues of cork oak represents the second largest pool (47%, whereas the contribution of the understorey is less than 2%. Within the first 100 cm of the soil, over 87% of all the soil organic carbon is situated in the first 40 cm of the soil depth. The amount of carbon stored here ranges from 30 to 110 Mg ha-1and these organic carbon stocks vary considerably with the stand basal area of the cork oak (R2 = 0.82. In practice, the carbon stocks of the different pools considered are strongly correlated with the stand density of the cork oak stands. In the semi-arid forest ecosystems of our study, management prescriptions aiming at increasing the standing biomass of the cork oak should thus considerably contribute, both directly through tree biomass and indirectly through increased soil organic matter, to efficient carbon sequestration.

  6. Foraging patterns of acorn woodpeckers (Melanerpes formicivorus) on valley oak (Quercus lobata Née) in two California oak savanna-woodlands

    Scofield, Douglas G.; Alfaro, Victor Ryan; Victoria L. Sork; Grivet, Delphine; Martinez, Edith; Papp, Jeannette; Andrea R Pluess; Koenig, Walter D.; Smouse, Peter E.

    2010-01-01

    Landscape characteristics and social behavior can affect the foraging patterns of seed-dependent animals. We examine the movement of acorns from valley oak (Quercus lobata) trees to granaries maintained by acorn woodpeckers (Melanerpes formicivorus) in two California oak savanna-woodlands differing in the distribution of Q. lobata within each site. In 2004, we sampled Q. lobata acorns from 16 granaries at Sedgwick Reserve in Santa Barbara County and 18 granaries at Hastings Reserve in Montere...

  7. Pedunculate oak forests (Quercus robur L. survey in the Ticino Regional Park (Italy by remote sensing

    Rossini M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedunculate oak forests (Quercus robur L. in the Ticino Regional Park (Italy show sensible damage conditions due to different environmental stresses: insect attacks, summer drought and air pollution. Knowing whether oaks are healthy or stressed can provide useful information in order to conserve the forest ecosystems and avoid the lost of valuable natural resources. Environmental stresses can affect tree biochemical and structural variables, such as the concentration, composition and efficiency in light harvesting of foliar pigments, and the Leaf Area Index (LAI. Interest in the use of these variables for forest condition assessment has recently increased because they can be indirectly estimated from remote observations at leaf and canopy level. In particular, in this research we found that total chlorophyll (Chl concentration, a biochemical variable related to crown discoloration rate, was the most suitable variable for the detection of pedunculate oak decline in the Ticino Park. A regression analysis between Chl concentration and optical indices computed from hyperspectral MIVIS data was performed in order to estimate Chl concentration from remote observations. The good correlation between field measurements of Chl concentration and MIVIS optical indices allowed the development of a model to map Chl concentration across the Ticino Park forested area. Promising results demonstrated that remotely sensed data can provide an accurate estimation of Chl concentration and indicated the potential of this technique for forest condition monitoring.

  8. Leaf morphological and physiological adaptations of a deciduous oak (Quercus faginea Lam.) to the Mediterranean climate: a comparison with a closely related temperate species (Quercus robur L.).

    Peguero-Pina, José Javier; Sisó, Sergio; Sancho-Knapik, Domingo; Díaz-Espejo, Antonio; Flexas, Jaume; Galmés, Jeroni; Gil-Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2016-03-01

    'White oaks'-one of the main groups of the genus Quercus L.-are represented in western Eurasia by the 'roburoid oaks', a deciduous and closely related genetic group that should have an Arcto-Tertiary origin under temperate-nemoral climates. Nowadays, roburoid oak species such as Quercus robur L. are still present in these temperate climates in Europe, but others are also present in southern Europe under Mediterranean-type climates, such as Quercus faginea Lam. We hypothesize the existence of a coordinated functional response at the whole-shoot scale in Q. faginea under Mediterranean conditions to adapt to more xeric habitats. The results reveal a clear morphological and physiological segregation between Q. robur and Q. faginea, which constitute two very contrasting functional types in response to climate dryness. The most outstanding divergence between the two species is the reduction in transpiring area in Q. faginea, which is the main trait imposed by the water deficit in Mediterranean-type climates. The reduction in leaf area ratio in Q. faginea should have a negative effect on carbon gain that is partially counteracted by a higher inherent photosynthetic ability of Q. faginea when compared with Q. robur, as a consequence of higher mesophyll conductance, higher maximum velocity of carboxylation and much higher stomatal conductance (gs). The extremely high gs of Q. faginea counteracts the expected reduction in gs imposed by the stomatal sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit, allowing this species to diminish water losses maintaining high net CO2 assimilation values along the vegetative period under nonlimiting soil water potential values. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that Q. faginea can be regarded as an example of adaptation of a deciduous oak to Mediterranean-type climates. PMID:26496958

  9. Properties of Hungarian oak(quercus conferta Kit. wood from the Hilandar Monastery forest

    Popović Zdravko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study results of the basic physical and strength properties of Hungarian oak (Quercus conferta Kit. wood from the Kakovo Monastery forests of Hilandar Monastery in Greece. Wood properties were analyzed in detail, as an indispensable proof of wood quality and its use for joinery, interiors and wooden floors. The basic physical properties of wood (moisture content at the time of tree felling, density and volume porosity and the basic strength properties (compressive strength, bending strength and module of elasticity were researched. The results are presented in Tables and in Diagrams with statistical parameters and compared to the literature data. The correlation of the study properties of wood was also analyzed.

  10. The macrofungal diversity and community of Atlantic oak (Quercus petraea and Q. robur forests in Ireland

    Harrington, Thomas J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The oak species Quercus petraea and Q. Robur are dominant canopy tree species of native deciduous forests in Ireland and coastal regions of Western Europe. These forests are typically plant species-rich, and can also have a rich fungal flora. This survey examined macrofungi found in five native oak sites across Ireland over three years. Overall, 94 macrofungal species belonging to 39 genera were discovered with Mycena, Lactarius, Russula and Cortinarius the most species-rich genera. The species accumulation curve did not show signs of levelling off, indicating that more sampling would reveal more new species. Species richness estimation using the Chao2 estimator indicated that up to 135 species may be present across all of our plots, with individual plots receiving estimates from 19 to 61 species per plot. Sampled-based rarefaction analysis showed no significant differences in macrofungal species richness between our plots. The five most common species were Laccaria amethystina, L. laccata, Stereum hirsutum, Armillaria mellea and Cortinarius flexipes. Comparisons of the results with results from oak forests in similar regions found that the communities in Great Britain were most similar to those found in Ireland. There were some key oak forest distinguishing fungal species from the family Boletaceae lacking from Irish oak forests. It is hypothesised that the historic deforestation of Ireland, caused a reduction of suitable habitats for Irish oak associated macrofungi, leading to the unspecific mycota found in the oak forests of this study. The threats to Atlantic oak forests in Ireland are briefly discussed.Las especies de Quercus petraea y Q. Robur se encuentran en bosques de Irlanda y regiones de influencia atlántica de Europa Occidental. Estos bosques, típicamente ricos en especies de plantas, presentan una abundante micobiota. Este estudio examina la diversidad de macromicetes en cinco bosques naturales de roble en Irlanda durante un

  11. Species-specific climate response of oaks (Quercus spp. under identical environmental conditions

    Sanders TGM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oak forests play a major role in Britain due to their economic, social and historic value. Sudden oak death and general decline symptoms have therefore caused major concerns in the forestry sector over the past decade. Several strategies have been proposed to preserve the economic and social value of oak forests, including the planting of native species with more southerly origins, or non-native species of oak that may be better suited to the projected climate of the future. The Ovington research plots, established 50 years ago at the Bedgebury Pinetum in southeast England, provided the opportunity to compare annual growth rates and climate-growth relationships of five oak species growing adjacent to each other on the same soil type and under the same climatic conditions. Clear differences were evident in annual increment and climate-growth responses for the five Quercus species. Growth rates were significantly lower (p<0.05 for the two species native to the UK (Q. petraea and Q. robur compared to the southern European and American species. A partitioning analysis using key climatic variables separates Q. coccinea from the other species due to its negative response to low temperatures. These results were confirmed by pointer year analysis. The analysis suggests that Q. robur is likely to be the more resilient of the two native species of oak to the future climate of southern Britain. Of the non-native species of oak evaluated, Q. coccinea represents an alternative species to Q. robur and Q. petraea on very dry, nutrient-poor sites. Q. palustris may also have some potential under current conditions for species diversification, but its requirement for higher summer precipitation than the other four species suggests that this potential may not be sustained as climate change progresses. However, if alternative species are selected as more resilient to climate change in terms of growth, it will be essential to consider a range of other issues

  12. Hrasti - Quercus spp.: bolezni listja: diseases of leaves: Microsphaera alphitoides, Discula quercina, Tubakia dryin: Oaks - Quercus spp.:

    Jurc, Dušan

    2006-01-01

    The most frequent diseases of oaks leaves in Slovenia are presented. Most important is oak mildew (Microsphaera alphitoides), which affects above all pedunculate oak and sessile oak. Accurately are presented anamorph and teleomorph, symtoms of the disease and ecological factors which influence the disease development. Possibilities of chemical control of the disease are described and the most recent findings in connection with biological control, which is based upon use of the fungus Ampelomy...

  13. Comparative Pollen Morphological Analysis and Its Systematic Implications on Three European Oak (Quercus L., Fagaceae) Species and Their Spontaneous Hybrids.

    Wrońska-Pilarek, Dorota; Danielewicz, Władysław; Bocianowski, Jan; Maliński, Tomasz; Janyszek, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Pollen morphology of three parental Quercus species (Q. robur L., Q. petraea (Matt) Liebl, Q. pubescens Willd.) and two spontaneous hybrids of these species (Q. ×calvescens Vuk. = Q. petraea × Q. pubescens and Q. ×rosacea Bechst. = Q. robur × Q. petraea) was investigated in this study. The pollen originated from 18 natural oak sites and 67 individuals (oak trees). Each individual was represented by 30 pollen grains. In total, 2010 pollen grains were measured. They were analysed for nine quantitative and four qualitative features. Pollen size and shape were important features to diagnosing Quercus parental species and hybrids. On the basis of exine ornamentation, it was possible to identify only Q. pubescens, while the remaining species and hybrids did not differ significantly with respect to this feature. The determination of the diagnostic value of endoaperture features requires further palynological studies. On the basis of pollen size and shape Q. robur × Q. petraea was clearly separated. Grouping of 67 oak trees on the basis of pollen grain features has shown that individuals from different as well as same taxa occurred in the same groups. Likewise, with respect to natural sites, oak trees originating from the same places as well as from geographically distant ones, grouped together. Pollen morphological features allow to distinguish a part of the studied Quercus taxa. Therefore, it can be used as an auxiliary feature in the taxonomy. PMID:27564015

  14. Behavior of pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd. wood to different thermal treatments

    Todaro L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Quercus pubescens Willd. is a common oak species in the Mediterranean area, where it is currently exploited mainly for purposes such as firewood. To improve the technological properties of its wood, various steaming and/or heat treatments were applied to 160 wood samples from a southern Italian stand, cut from either sapwood or heartwood, while 20 samples served as controls. Steaming was carried out in an autoclave at 120 °C, whereas heat treatments were performed in an oven at 150 or 200 °C for 3 or 6 h. The equilibrium moisture content, swelling, mass loss, wood density, compression strength, color variation, and lignin content of the samples were measured and compared among treatments. The swelling and water adsorption of wood samples decreased due to the hydrothermal treatments. The mass loss was strictly related to the temperature and duration of the heat treatments, whereas it was not influenced by the steaming treatment. The average axial compression strength value was positively influenced by the combination of steaming and heat treatments. A significant and general darkening of color was also observed for the harshest treatments, while an increase of lignin content was detected mainly in the sapwood. Thus, pubescent oak wood subjected to steaming and heat treatments may acquire useful characteristics suitable for its industrial use.

  15. Oak (Quercus Floribunda: A Prominent Indigenous Multipurpose Tree for Carbon Storage and Sequestration Potential

    K. K. Pandey

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic growth model (CO2FIX has been used for estimating the carbon sequestration potential of Oak (Quercus floribunda, an indigenous multipurpose tree used for timber, fuel wood, fiber and specially fodder in addition to its ability of soil binder. The present study has been carried out in the campus of V.C.S.G. College of Horticulture, U.U.H.F., Bharsar, Pauri Garhwal, Uttarakhand. It is capable of thriving on snow and heavy rainfall condition. CO2FIX was parameterized for a simulation of 100 years respectively. The results indicate that the long term tree biomass accumulated was 120.11 t/ha in above ground and 79.89 t/ha in below ground (Soil Carbon component respectively at the end of simulation period assuming a tree density of 825t/ha (approximately. The net annual carbon sequestration for Oak over the entire simulation period was 1.9 Mg C ha-1 yr -1 (t/ha/yr. Useful for scientific planning and effective implementation of Forestry and Agroforestry developmental programmes at district level as well as at State level for the development of country. For future research work following are few suggestions for better planning and development of State. This type of study can be taken including other parameters/resources such as different trees, different area, and different state and different country as well.

  16. Fine-scale spatial genetic structure in a multi-oak-species (Quercus spp. forest

    Curtu AL

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of fine-scale spatial distribution of multilocus genotypes can provide valuable insights into the biology of forest tree species. Here we tested for the existence of spatial genetic structure (SGS in a four-oak-species forest with contrasting species abundances and hybridization rates. A total of 483 adult trees were mapped over 8.6 ha and genotyped using 10 highly polymorphic genomic regions. A weak but significant SGS was observed in each of the four oak species, with Quercus frainetto, the species with the lowest density in the sampling plot, exhibiting the strongest SGS. The values of the Sp statistic were 0.0033, 0.0035, 0.0042, and 0.0098 for Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. pubescens, and Q. frainetto, respectively. The spatial correlogram of the total population was significantly different when hybrids were removed from the analysis, which suggests that hybridization influenced the SGS. Interspecific SGSs were significantly correlated with the rates of hybridization. Implications of the obtained results for the conservation and management of forest genetic resources are discussed.

  17. Physiological Responses to Prolonged Drought Differ Among Three Oak (Quercus) Species

    Cooper, C. E.; Moore, G. W.; Vogel, J. G.; Muir, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The physiological response of plants to water stress provides insights into which species may survive in exceptional drought conditions. This study conducted on a remnant post oak savanna site in College Station, Texas, examined how drought affected the physiology of three native oak species. In June 2014, after a period of equal watering, we subjected three year old Quercus shumardii (Shumard oak; SO), Q. virginiana (live oak; LO), and Q. macrocarpa (bur oak; BO) saplings to one of two watering treatments: 1) watered, receiving the equivalent of theaverage precipitation rate and 2) droughted, receiving a 100% reduction in precipitation. We measured predawn (ΨPD) and midday (ΨMD) leaf water potential; midday gas exchange (MGE) parameters including photosynthesis (Al), transpiration (T), stomatal conductance (gsw); and leaf soluble (SS) and non-soluble sugar (NSS) concentrations monthly between June and October 2014. Drought stress responses were evident after only one month of induced drought. Droughted saplings showed reduced ΨPD, ΨMD, and MGE (P ≤ 0.05) in comparison to watered saplings of the same species. LO saplings exhibited greater MGE (P ≤ 0.05) while maintaining similar LWP to their respective watered and droughted BO and SO counterparts. Droughted LO exhibited MGE rates similar to those of watered BO and SO (P ≤ 0.05), while watered LO adjusted its MGE rates to changes in water availability better than BO and LO during short-term drought. Compared to water saplings, droughted saplings had greater leaf SS (P = 0.08) and lower NSS concentrations (P = 0.10), possibly due to the conversion of NSS to SS and other simple compounds and reduced consumption of SS for growth by the droughted saplings. Although SO and BO exhibited similar photosynthesis rates, leaf total sugar (SS+NSS) concentration was greater in SO (P ≤ 0.05). By displaying the greatest average photosynthesis rate (P ≤ 0.05), LO should have accumulated the greatest amount of carbon

  18. Regional-scale stand density management diagrams for Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica Willd.) stands in north-west Spain

    Castaño-Santamaría J; Barrio-Anta M; Álvarez-Álvarez P

    2013-01-01

    Stand Density Management Diagrams are useful tools for designing and evaluating alternative density management regimes without the need of implementing any silvicultural action, and allowing the future stand conditions to be predicted prior to implementing management schedules. In this study, stand density management diagrams were developed for Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica Willd.) stands in north-west Spain by including data on stand volume, stand aboveground biomass, stand stem biomass an...

  19. Effects of cadmium on cork oak (Quercus suber L.) plants grown in hydroponics.

    Gogorcena, Yolanda; Larbi, Ajmi; Andaluz, Sofia; Carpena, Ramón O; Abadía, Anunciación; Abadía, Javier

    2011-12-01

    Cork oak (Quercus suber L.) is an autochthonous tree species that is being used for reforestation in heavy-metal-contaminated areas in Spain. A hydroponics experiment was carried out to characterize the effects of Cd on several morphological and physiological parameters in this species, including shoot length, nutrient concentrations and allocation in different organs, leaf pigment concentrations, photosynthetic efficiency, root ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity and organic acid concentrations in xylem sap. Four different Cd treatments were applied, adding Cd chelated with EDTA or as chloride salt at two different concentrations (10 and 50 µM Cd). After 1 month of Cd treatment, plant growth was significantly inhibited in all treatments. Results indicate that Cd accumulates in all organs 7- to 500-fold when compared with control plants. The highest Cd concentration was found in the 50 µM CdCl(2) treatment, which led to concentrations of ~30, 123 and 1153 µg Cd g(-1) dry weight in leaves, stems and roots, respectively. In the strongest Cd treatments the concentrations of P and Ca decreased in some plant parts, whereas the Mn leaf concentrations decreased with three of the four Cd treatments applied. The concentrations of chlorophyll and carotenoids on an area basis decreased, whereas the (zeaxanthin plus antheraxanthin)/(total violaxanthin cycle carotenoids) ratio and the non-photochemical quenching increased significantly in all Cd treatments. Cadmium treatments caused significant increases in the activity of the enzyme FCR in roots and in the concentrations of organic acids in xylem sap. Some of the physiological changes found support the fact that Cd induces a deficiency of Fe in cork oak, although the plant Fe concentrations were not reduced significantly. At higher concentrations the effects of Cd were more pronounced, and were more marked when Cd was in the free ion form than when present in the form of Cd-EDTA. PMID:22121153

  20. Conservation Strategies for the Threatened Quercus Semecarpifolia Sm. A Himalayan Timberline Oak

    Hemlata BISHT

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Quercus semecarpifolia Sm. is a temperate, timberline, multipurpose oak species. It plays an important role in the Himalayan ecosystem. Human pressure, predation, short-lived acorns, failure of good seed crop every year, poor regeneration, desiccation, frost sensitivity and climate change may lead to complete extinction of the species in a near future. Immediate attention to conservation and restoration measures of the Himalayan ecosystem, in which this species grows, is required. Thus, an experiment was designed to analyze the role of planting stock and micro-sites for the regeneration of Q. semecarpifolia in-situ. For that purpose, 16 microsites with presence/absence of litter, canopy and sunlight were identified, where seeds/propagules were planted. The presence of litter, canopy and sunlight influenced the seedling production, mainly impairing the processes, leading to the expansion in diameter of the radicle, causing shoot/root emergence. Radicle emergence took place in all the seeds immediately after shedding but only 20% of seedlings recovered; however, when the stored seeds were sown as soon as the emerging radicle attained 10-15cm in length and 2-3cm in diameter, 80% of seedlings were recovered. Surprisingly, after being detached from the seed the swollen radicle acted as a propagule and produced 80% seedlings irrespective of the microsites; however, radicles detached prior to diameter expansion failed to produce seedlings which is a crucial insight for promoting seedling production.

  1. Comparison of palaeobotanical observations with experimental data on the leaf anatomy of durmast oak [Quercus petraea (Fagaceae)] in response to environmental change

    Kurschner, W.M; Stulen, G; Wagner, F.; Kuiper, P.J C

    1998-01-01

    To test whether stomatal density measurements on oak leaf remains are reliable tools for assessing palaeoatmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO2], under changing Late Miocene palaeoenvironmental conditions, young seedings of oak (Quercus petraea, Liebl.) were grown at elevated vs. ambient atmo

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Tree Species Diversity in Different Oak (Quercus spp. Dominated Forests in Garhwal Himalaya, India

    Gajendra SINGH

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Himalayan broad-leaved forests are mainly dominated by oak (Quercus spp. species. Oak species with other tree species provide numerous ecosystem services and serve as lifeline for local inhabitants. Overall tree diversity and their status in different oak dominated forests viz., Quercus leucotrichophora (1500-2200 m, Q. floribunda (2201-2700 m and Q. semecarpifolia (2701-3300 m were studied in Garhwal, Himalaya. A total of 54 tree species (40 genera in Q. leucotrichophora, 43 tree species (30 genera in Q. floribunda and 23 tree species (16 genera in Q. semecarpifolia dominated forests were recorded. Lauraceae was the dominant family in Q. leucotrichophora and Q. floribunda forests (6 and 8 species respectively, while Ericaceae (3 species was the dominant family in Q. semecarpifolia dominated forests. Pinaceae and Taxaceae were only two gymnospermic family represented by Pinus roxburghii at low, Abies pinrow at mid, Abies spectabilis and Taxus wallichiana at higher elevational oak forests. There was no significant variation (p=0.8 between overall tree density in different oak forests which ranges from 337�51 individual/ha in Q. semecarpifolia to 433�92 individual/ha in Q. leucotrichophora forests. The seedling density has significant variation (p=0.01 in different oak forests where highest density was recorded in Q. leucotrichophora forests (1981 individual/ha and lowest in Q. semecarpifolia forests (348 individual/ha. The Total Basal Area (TBA reported from Q. leucotrichophora (88.06 m2/ha and Q. floribunda (110.5 m2/ha forests was higher than those of earlier reported from the region, while basal area of Q. semecarpifolia (90.16 m2/ha was comparable with the forests of western Himalaya.

  3. Interactive effects of O3 exposure on California black oak (Quercus kelloggii Newb.) seedlings with and without N amendment

    We examined the short-term separate and combined effects of simulated nitrogen (N) deposition (fertilization) and ozone (O3) exposure on California black oak seedlings (Quercus kelloggii Newb.), an ecologically important tree of the San Bernardino Mountains downwind of Los Angeles. Realistic concentrations of O3 were found to cause statistically and biologically significant negative effects on plant health, including lowered photosynthetic ability, lowered water use efficiency, and increased leaf chlorosis and necrosis. When subjected to abrupt changes in light levels, O3-exposed plants showed both a slower and smaller response than O3-free plants. Fertilized plants exhibited a significantly greater pre- to post-treatment decline in A at saturated [CO2] and a significantly lower level of post-treatment chlorosis than unfertilized plants. Fertilization tended to reduce plant sensitivity to O3. - Short term O3 exposure reduced carbon acquisition and water use efficiency in Quercus kelloggii seedlings; nitrogen amendment reduced sensitivity to ozone

  4. Influence of pericarp, cotyledon and inhibitory substances on sharp tooth oak (Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata) germination.

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Guangquan; Li, Qingmei; Liu, Yong; Hou, Longyu; Li, Guolei

    2012-01-01

    In order to explore the mechanism of delayed and uneven germination in sharp tooth oak (Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata) (STO), mechanical scarification techniques were used to study STO root and shoot germination and growth. The techniques used were: removing cup scar (RS), removing the pericarp (RP), and cutting off 1/2 (HC) and 2/3 (TC) cotyledons. Germination percentage and root and shoot length for Chinese cabbage (Beassica pekinensis) seeds (CCS) were also investigated for CCS cultivated in a Sanyo growth cabinet watered by distilled water and 80% methanol extracts from the acorn embryo, cotyledon and pericarp with concentrations of 1.0 g, 0.8 g, 0.6 g and 0.4 g dry acorn weight per ml methanol. The results showed that the majority of roots and shoots from acorns with RP and HC treatment emerged two weeks earlier, more simultaneously, and their total emergencies were more than 46% and 28% higher, respectively. TC accelerated root and shoot emergence time and root length, but root and shoot germination rate and shoot height had no significant difference from the control. Positive consequences were not observed on all indices of RS treatment. The germination rates of CCS watered by 1.0 g · ml(-1) methanol extracts from the embryo and cotyledon were significantly lower than those from the pericarp, and all concentrations resulted in decreased growth of root and shoot. Methanol extracts from pericarp significantly reduced root length of CCS, but presented little response in germination percentage and shoot length. The inhibitory effect was gradually increased with the increasing concentration of the methanol extract. We conclude that both the mechanical restriction of the pericarp and the presence of germination inhibitors in the embryo, cotyledon and pericarp are the causes for delayed and asynchronous germination of STO acorns. PMID:23133517

  5. Soil transfers from valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) stands increase ectomycorrhizal diversity and alter root and shoot growth on valley oak seedlings.

    Berman, J T; Bledsoe, C S

    1998-02-01

    Soils from valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) riparian areas of the Cosumnes River Nature Conservancy Preserve near Sacramento, California were added to growth medium of valley oak seedlings grown in a greenhouse or in agricultural fields at Cosumnes which probably once supported valley oak trees and are now replanted with native riparian vegetation or allowed to revegetate naturally. Agricultural field soil from the Cosumnes River Preserve was presumed to be low or lacking in ectomycorrhizal inoculum. The study was designed to (1) determine whether valley oak stand soil transfer could cause mycorrhizal infection on valley oak seedlings in an agricultural field and in a greenhouse, (2) describe ectomycorrhizal morphological types formed on valley oak seedlings, and (3) determine whether seedling growth is enhanced more by transfer of natural valley oak stand soil than agricultural field soil. In the field study, transfer of forest soil increased average ectomycorrhizal diversity (2.4 types) more than transfer of agricultural field soil (1.2 types). Valley oak seedlings were responsive to ectomycorrhizal infection in the field study. With increase in mycorrhizal infection there was an increase in shoot growth at the expense of root growth. In the greenhouse study, both percent mycorrhizal infection and mycorrhizal diversity were increased more by transfer of oak forest and woodland soils than agricultural field soil. Eight morphotypes occurred on seedlings in forest and woodland soils but only three morphotypes in agricultural soil. This result strongly suggests that the agricultural field also harbors ectomycorrhizal propagules but forest and woodland soils support a more abundant and diverse ectomycorrhizal flora. PMID:24578047

  6. Development of Molecular Markers for Determining Continental Origin of Wood from White Oaks (Quercus L. sect. Quercus)

    Schroeder, Hilke; Cronn, Richard; Yanbaev, Yulai; Jennings, Tara; Mader, Malte; Degen, Bernd; Kersten, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    To detect and avoid illegal logging of valuable tree species, identification methods for the origin of timber are necessary. We used next-generation sequencing to identify chloroplast genome regions that differentiate the origin of white oaks from the three continents; Asia, Europe, and North America. By using the chloroplast genome of Asian Q. mongolica as a reference, we identified 861 variant sites (672 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); 189 insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism) from representative species of three continents (Q. mongolica from Asia; Q. petraea and Q. robur from Europe; Q. alba from North America), and we identified additional chloroplast polymorphisms in pools of 20 individuals each from Q. mongolica (789 variant sites) and Q. robur (346 variant sites). Genome sequences were screened for indels to develop markers that identify continental origin of oak species, and that can be easily evaluated using a variety of detection methods. We identified five indels and one SNP that reliably identify continent-of-origin, based on evaluations of up to 1078 individuals representing 13 white oak species and three continents. Due to the size of length polymorphisms revealed, this marker set can be visualized using capillary electrophoresis or high resolution gel (acrylamide or agarose) electrophoresis. With these markers, we provide the wood trading market with an instrument to comply with the U.S. and European laws that require timber companies to avoid the trade of illegally harvested timber. PMID:27352242

  7. Influence of host species on ectomycorrhizal communities associated with two co-occurring oaks (Quercus spp.) in a tropical cloud forest.

    Morris, Melissa H; Pérez-Pérez, Miguel A; Smith, Matthew E; Bledsoe, Caroline S

    2009-08-01

    Interactions between host tree species and ectomycorrhizal fungi are important in structuring ectomycorrhizal communities, but there are only a few studies on host influence of congeneric trees. We investigated ectomycorrhizal community assemblages on roots of deciduous Quercus crassifolia and evergreen Quercus laurina in a tropical montane cloud forest, one of the most endangered tropical forest ecosystems. Ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified by sequencing internal transcribed spacer and partial 28S rRNA gene. We sampled 80 soil cores and documented high ectomycorrhizal diversity with a total of 154 taxa. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that oak host was significant in explaining some of the variation in ectomycorrhizal communities, despite the fact that the two Quercus species belong to the same red oak lineage (section Lobatae). A Tuber species, found in 23% of the soil cores, was the most frequent taxon. Similar to oak-dominated ectomycorrhizal communities in temperate forests, Thelephoraceae, Russulaceae and Sebacinales were diverse and dominant. PMID:19508503

  8. Tree species richness, diversity, and regeneration status in different oak (Quercus spp. dominated forests of Garhwal Himalaya, India

    Sushma Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Himalayan forests are dominated by different species of oaks (Quercus spp. at different altitudes. These oaks are intimately linked with hill agriculture as they protect soil fertility, watershed, and local biodiversity. They also play an important role in maintaining ecosystem stability. This work was carried out to study the diversity and regeneration status of some oak forests in Garhwal Himalaya, India. A total of 18 tree species belonging to 16 genera and 12 families were reported from the study area. Species richness varied for trees (4–7, saplings (3–10, and seedlings (2–6. Seedling and sapling densities (Ind/ha varied between 1,376 Ind/ha and 9,600 Ind/ha and 167 Ind/ha and 1,296 Ind/ha, respectively. Species diversity varied from 1.27 to 1.86 (trees, from 0.93 to 3.18 (saplings, and from 0.68 to 2.26 (seedlings. Total basal area (m2/ha of trees and saplings was 2.2–87.07 m2/ha and 0.20–2.24 m2/ha, respectively, whereas that of seedlings varied from 299 cm2/ha to 8,177 cm2/ha. Maximum tree species (20–80% had “good” regeneration. Quercus floribunda, the dominant tree species in the study area, showed “poor” regeneration, which is a matter of concern, and therefore, proper management and conservation strategies need to be developed for maintenance and sustainability of this oak species along with other tree species that show poor or no regeneration.

  9. Is cork oak (Quercus suber L. woodland loss driven by eucalyptus plantation? A case-study in southwestern Portugal

    Costa A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean landscapes with open cork oak (Quercus suber L. woodlands have recently experienced drastic changes in southwestern Portugal. Changes in agricultural activities, the traditional driver of the economy in this region, led to new land uses, such as long-term set aside (shrublands and eucalyptus plantations. A study was conducted on the oak woodland landscape dynamics over a 50-year period (from 1958 to 2007 in order to assess the effect of different biophysical conditions on landscape spatial changes, and to identify the resilience of lanscape composition to different disturbances (e.g., socio-economic changes and wildfires. Land use changes over two consecutive periods (1958-1995 and 1995-2007 were inferred by spatial analysis of land cover data (aerial photographs and related to landscape physical attributes (slope and soil type. A transition matrix of four vegetation land-cover classes was obtained, allowing the assessment of the landscape composition changes bewteen the two above periods. Results showed that lansdcape in 1958 was largely occupied by open farmland, with large patches of open oak woodlands on steep slopes surrounding watercourses. Open farmland and shrubland drastically declined from 1958 to 1995, while eucalyptus plantation exhibited a dramatic expansion. Although large areas of cork oak forest turned into eucalyptus plantation, the net loss of oak forest was low and counterbalanced by its increment on former open farmland. The occurrence of a wildfire in 2003 promoted a dramatic decrease in cork oak woodlands, which mostly turned into shrubland. However, shrubland may be considered “safe sites” for ecological succession, ensuring natural cork oak regeneration and the colonisation of neighboring areas.

  10. The ancient blue oak woodlands of California: longevity and hydroclimatic history

    Stahle, D.W.; Griffin, R.D.; Meko, D.M.; Therrell, M.D.; Edmondson, J.R.; Cleaveland, M.K.; Burnette, D.J.; Abatzoglou, J.T.; Redmond, K.T.; Dettinger, M.D.; Cayan, D.R.

    2013-01-01

    Ancient blue oak trees are still widespread across the foothills of the Coast Ranges, Cascades, and Sierra Nevada in California. The most extensive tracts of intact old-growth blue oak woodland appear to survive on rugged and remote terrain in the south Coast Ranges and on the foothills west and southwest of Mt. Lassen. In our sampling of old-growth stands, most blue oak appear to have recruited to the canopy in the mid- to late-19th century. The oldest living blue oak tree sampled was over 459-years old and several dead blue oak logs had over 500 annual rings. Precipitation sensitive tree-ring chronologies up to 700-years long have been developed from old blue oak trees and logs. Annual ring-width chronologies of blue oak are strongly correlated with cool season precipitation totals, streamflow in the major rivers of California, and the estuarine water quality of San Francisco Bay. A new network of 36 blue oak chronologies records spatial anomalies in growth that arise from latitudinal changes in the mean storm track and location of landfalling atmospheric rivers. These long, climate-sensitive blue oak chronologies have been used to reconstruct hydroclimatic history in California and will help to better understand and manage water resources. The environmental history embedded in blue oak growth chronologies may help justify efforts to conserve these authentic old-growth native woodlands.

  11. Digestion and body weight change in Tuj lambs receiving oak (Quercus hartwissiana) leaves with and without PEG

    Quercus hartwissiana (oak) leaves are a potential alternative feed resource in the north-east of Turkey. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effects of two levels (185 and 370 g/day) of dry oak leaves, in the presence (50 or 100 g/kg of dry oak leaves) or absence of polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000), on ruminal fermentation parameters (pH, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N)), microbial nitrogen (N) supply, apparent diet digestibility, N retention, and body weight (BW) change in fat-tailed Tuj lambs (n = 42, initial BW 33.0 ± 0.7 kg). The lambs received at random one of the following diets for 60 days (on a dry matter basis, n = 6 per group): (1) control, no oak leaves and no PEG; (2) 185 g oak leaves; (3) 185 g oak leaves + 10 g PEG; (4) 185 g oak leaves + 20 g PEG; (5) 370 g oak leaves; (6) 370 g oak leaves + 20 g PEG; (7) 370 g oak leaves + 40 g PEG. All groups were given 272 g concentrate and varying amounts of hay (a mixture of chopped grass and alfalfa in the ratio 55:45), such that the amount of hay plus oak leaves was equal to 645 g. Ruminal fermentation parameters did not change with treatment (pH 6.50 ± 0.02, total SCFA 86.3 ± 2.1 mmol/L, NH3-N = 207 ± 5 mg/L). Total CP digestibility (0.775, 0.714, 0.736, 0.748, 0.663, 0.690, 0.672; S.E.M. = 0.008, P 0.05). These data suggest that: (1) PEG addition seems unnecessary as it did not improve CP digestibility, N retention and BW; and (2) Q. hartwissiana leaves may be used to replace at least half of hay in the ration of Tuj lambs without a negative effect on BW. (author)

  12. Holm Oak (Quercus ilex L.) canopy as interceptor of airborne trace elements and their accumulation in the litter and topsoil

    We investigated the role of urban Holm Oak (Quercus ilex L.) trees as an airborne metal accumulators and metals' environmental fate. Analyses confirmed Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn as a main contaminants in Siena's urban environment; only Pb concentrations decreased significantly compared to earlier surveys. Additionally, we determined chemical composition of tree leaves, litter and topsoil (underneath/outside tree crown) in urban and extra-urban oak stands. Most notably, litter in urban samples collected outside the canopy had significantly lower concentrations of organic matter and higher concentrations of Pb, Cu, Cd and Zn than litter collected underneath the canopy. There was a greater metals' accumulation in topsoil, in samples collected under the tree canopy and especially near the trunk (‘stemflow area’). Thus, in urban ecosystems the Holm Oak stands likely increase the soil capability to bind metals. -- Highlights: ► Of the main metal contaminants only leaf Pb concentrations decreased in the period 1994–2011. ► Leaf Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations were higher in urban than in extra urban park. ► In urban park litter, Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations were higher outside than underneath the tree crown. ► Conversely, in urban park soil, Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations were lower outside the crown. ► Soil therefore behaves as a sink for metal contaminants such as Cu, Pb and Cd. -- Quercus ilex leaves are efficient interceptors of airborne trace elements in urban environments and we found an increased accumulation of metals in topsoil under the tree canopy

  13. Development of cork oak (Quercus suber L.) seedlings in response to tree shelters and mulching in northwestern Tunisia

    Taher Mechergui; Marta Pardos; Naceur Boussaidi; Brahim Hasnaoui; Douglass F.Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    The need for reforestation in cork oak (Quercus suber L.)areas is challenged by difficulties.Principal among these is herbivory of young plants,vegetative competition,and slow growth rates of cork oak seedlings.We evaluated the early development of cork oak seedlings treated using tree shelters and mulching in northwestern Tunisia.We tested three tree shelter treatments (non-vented,vented,and control) to shield seedlings from animal damage and five mulch types to control competing vegetation (Italian Stone Pine,Lentisk,combination of Italian Stone Pine and Lentisk (organic mulches),gravel (inorganic mulch) and no mulch).At the end of the two-year experiment,sheltered seedlings were 89-99% taller than unsheltered seedlings and had higher numbers and lengths of shoot growth flushes.In contrast,both stem diameter growth and dry weight biomass (from samples extracted after two years)were significantly reduced inside tree shelters.Root-to-shoot ratio was not significantly different in sheltered vs.unsheltered seedlings,suggesting that tree shelters do not adversely affect this parameter.Mulching alone did not favour growth,but could be beneficial when combined with tree shelters.The combination of vented tree shelters and gravel mulch was the most effective treatment for promoting diameter,height and stem volume growth.

  14. Seed production differences of the Andean oak Quercus Humboldtii Bonpl. in two Andean forests of the Colombian Eastern Cordillera

    Knowledge of mechanisms of tree species reproduction under natural situations including fruit and seed production patterns is very important for forest management strategies. Considering the influence of abiotic factors such as soil characteristics, humidity and rainfall on fruiting phenology, we studied fruit production patterns of the Andean oak (Quercus humboldtii: Fagaceae) in two forest sites of the Colombian Eastern Cordillera (Cachalu and Patios Altos), under contrasting environmental conditions. At both sites, we monitored monthly fruit production of 15 trees in Cachalu and 11 in Patios Altos using fruit/seed traps placed under the tree crowns. In each site soil cores were extracted below the litter layer 20 cm depth, and soil characteristics and nutrients were analyzed. In general, trees in Cachalu produced more fruits than in Patios Altos, as well as mean fruit mass (wet and dry weight) was significantly higher in Cachalu. At both sites, oak fruiting peaked from April to May, when the highest rainfall occurs. We found positive correlations between fruit production and rainfall one month prior. High phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) were the main variables for explaining the high production. In contrast, high aluminum (Al) contents explained the low production found in Patios Altos. We discuss the importance of including fruit production for oak management strategies, such as restoration and reforestation programs.

  15. Genetic structure of a natural oak community in central Italy: Evidence of gene flow between three sympatric white oak species (Quercus, Fagaceae

    Gaby Antonecchia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Incomplete reproductive barriers between species, especially in sympatric areas where several species coexist, may result in hybridization and an increase in genetic diversity. Here we assessed the amount of genetic diversity in a community of three interfertile and sympatric European oaks (Quercus frainetto Ten., Q. petraea Liebl. Matt. and Q. pubescens Willd. situated in central Italy. We used 11 microsatellite markers derived from Expressed Sequence Tag (EST-SSRs and we implemented a Bayesian clustering analysis to assign individuals to species or hybrids. All genotyped loci were polymorphic for all the species and three genetic clusters corresponding to each species were detected. Significant differences and a higher level of gene flow were observed between the three oak species. Occurrence of hybrids varied markedly within the studied area: hybrids between Q. petraea and Q, pubescens were the most frequent, while hybrids between Q. petraea and Q. frainetto were particularly rare. Q. pubescens and Q. petraea showed the highest number of alleles compared to Q. frainetto,which was characterized by a low number of private, but highly frequent, alleles. However, Q. frainetto showed a lower genetic diversity and a stronger reproductive isolation from the other two oak species.

  16. Regional-scale stand density management diagrams for Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica Willd. stands in north-west Spain

    Castaño-Santamaría J

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Stand Density Management Diagrams are useful tools for designing and evaluating alternative density management regimes without the need of implementing any silvicultural action, and allowing the future stand conditions to be predicted prior to implementing management schedules. In this study, stand density management diagrams were developed for Pyrenean oak (Quercus pyrenaica Willd. stands in north-west Spain by including data on stand volume, stand aboveground biomass, stand stem biomass and carbon pools. Data were obtained from Third National Forest Inventory plots (n=1860. The large geographical area analyzed in this study was classified by provenance regions, which were compared in terms of biomass production in order to define areas with similar characteristics for use as management units. The comparisons identified 6 independent groups. Different stand-level models and the associated diagrams for the aforementioned stand variables were therefore developed for each group.

  17. Water relations of cork oak (Quercus suber L.) seedlings in response to shading and moderate drought

    Pardos, Marta; Dolores Jiménez, M.; Aranda, Ismael; Puértolas, Jaime; A. Pardos, José

    2005-01-01

    Relations hydriques des semis de chêne-liège (Quercus suber L.) en réponse à l'ombre et à une sécheresse modérée. Les effets interactifs de la lumière et de la sécheresse sur les relations hydriques et les sucres solubles ont été étudiés sur des plantules de Quercus suber L. qui ont poussé sous la combinaison de quatre éclairements différents et de deux contenus en eau du sol. Les potentiels hydriques foliaires mesurés l'un avant l'aube et l'autre à midi étaient plus bas pour les plantules su...

  18. Digestion and body weight change in Tuj lambs receiving oak (Quercus hartwissiana) leaves with and without PEG

    Yildiz, S. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Kafkas University, Kars (Turkey)]. E-mail: yildizsedat@hotmail.com; Kaya, I.; Unal, Y.; Aksu Elmali, D.; Kaya, S.; Oncuer, A. [Department of Animal Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Kafkas University, Kars (Turkey); Cenesiz, M.; Kaya, M. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Kafkas University, Kars (Turkey)

    2005-08-19

    Quercus hartwissiana (oak) leaves are a potential alternative feed resource in the north-east of Turkey. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effects of two levels (185 and 370 g/day) of dry oak leaves, in the presence (50 or 100 g/kg of dry oak leaves) or absence of polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000), on ruminal fermentation parameters (pH, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 3}-N)), microbial nitrogen (N) supply, apparent diet digestibility, N retention, and body weight (BW) change in fat-tailed Tuj lambs (n = 42, initial BW 33.0 {+-} 0.7 kg). The lambs received at random one of the following diets for 60 days (on a dry matter basis, n = 6 per group): (1) control, no oak leaves and no PEG; (2) 185 g oak leaves; (3) 185 g oak leaves + 10 g PEG; (4) 185 g oak leaves + 20 g PEG; (5) 370 g oak leaves; (6) 370 g oak leaves + 20 g PEG; (7) 370 g oak leaves + 40 g PEG. All groups were given 272 g concentrate and varying amounts of hay (a mixture of chopped grass and alfalfa in the ratio 55:45), such that the amount of hay plus oak leaves was equal to 645 g. Ruminal fermentation parameters did not change with treatment (pH 6.50 {+-} 0.02, total SCFA 86.3 {+-} 2.1 mmol/L, NH{sub 3}-N = 207 {+-} 5 mg/L). Total CP digestibility (0.775, 0.714, 0.736, 0.748, 0.663, 0.690, 0.672; S.E.M. = 0.008, P < 0.001, for groups 1-7, respectively) and N retention (7.7, 6.8, 6.7, 7.5, 6.1, 5.8, 5.7 g/day; S.E.M. = 0.19, P < 0.05, for groups 1-7, respectively) were lowest but microbial N supply was highest in 370 g oak leaf group supplemented with PEG (6.51, 7.14, 11.45, 12.23, 9.03, 14.49, 14.39 g/day, S.E.M. = 0.76, P < 0.05, for groups 1-7, respectively). Final BW (32.5 {+-} 0.3 kg) did not differ among treatments (P > 0.05). These data suggest that: (1) PEG addition seems unnecessary as it did not improve CP digestibility, N retention and BW; and (2) Q. hartwissiana leaves may be used to replace at least half of hay in the ration of Tuj lambs without a

  19. First Report of Northern Root-Knot Nematode, Meloidogyne hapla, Parasitic on Oaks, Quercus brantii and Q. infectoria in Iran.

    Sohrabi, Effat; Maafi, Zahra Tanha; Panahi, Parisa; Barooti, Shapour

    2015-03-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) are the most serious plant parasitic nematodes having a broad host range exceeding 2,000 plant species. Quercus brantii Lindl. and Q. infectoria Oliv are the most important woody species of Zagros forests in west of Iran where favors sub-Mediterranean climate. National Botanical Garden of Iran (NBGI) is scheduled to be the basic center for research and education of botany in Iran. This garden, located in west of Tehran, was established in 1968 with an area of about 150 ha at altitude of 1,320 m. The Zagros collection has about 3-ha area and it has been designed for showing a small pattern of natural Zagros forests in west of Iran. Brant's oak (Q. brantii) and oak manna tree (Q. infectoria) are the main woody species in Zagros collection, which have been planted in 1989. A nematological survey on Zagros forest collection in NBGI revealed heavily infection of 24-yr-old Q. brantii and Q. infectoria to RKN, Meloidogyne hapla. The roots contained prominent galls along with egg sac on the surface of each gall. The galls were relatively small and in some parts of root several galls were conjugated, and all galls contained large transparent egg masses. The identification of M. hapla was confirmed by morphological and morphometric characters and amplification of D2-D3 expansion segments of 28S rRNA gene. The obtained sequences of large-subunit rRNA gene from M. hapla was submitted to the GenBank database under the accession number KP319025. The sequence was compared with those of M. hapla deposited in GenBank using the BLAST homology search program and showed 99% similarity with those KJ755183, GQ130139, DQ328685, and KJ645428. The second stage juveniles of M. hapla isolated from Brant's oak (Q. Brantii) showed the following morphometric characters: (n = 12), L = 394 ± 39.3 (348 to 450) µm; a = 30.9 ± 4 (24.4 to 37.6); b = 4.6 ± 0.44 (4 to 5.1); b΄ = 3.3 ± 0.3 (2.7 to 3.7), c = 8.0 ± 1 (6.2 to 10.3), ć = 5.3 ± 0.8 (3.5 to 6.3); Stylet = 12

  20. Evaluation of antioxidant interactions in combined extracts of green tea (Camellia sinensis), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and oak fruit (Quercus branti).

    Ranjbar Nedamani, Elham; Sadeghi Mahoonak, Alireza; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Kashaninejad, Mehdi

    2015-07-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) and oak fruit (Quercus branti) are of known medicinal plants used in traditional medicine. They provide substantial antioxidant activities but the possible antioxidant interaction between them has not been studied. In the present study first the bioactive compounds from these three plants were first extracted and thereafter assayed for total phenols, 2, 2-diphenyl-1- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, total antioxidant capacity (TAOC) and reducing power. In addition, the antioxidant properties of the extracts individually and in combinations were evaluated in soy bean oil as food system. There was a direct relation between total phenolics and antioxidant activities of extracts. Green tea and oak fruit extracts had the highest and least activity, respectively. All three kinds of interactions (synergistic, antagonistic and additive) were observed. In soy bean oil, the only effect was antagonism but even with this effect, combined extract was significantly (P extracts and their combination can be effectively used as a substituent of synthetic antioxidant BHT. PMID:26139926

  1. Spatial heterogeneity in the relative impacts of foliar quality and predation pressure on red oak, Quercus rubra, arthropod communities.

    Zehnder, Caralyn B; Stodola, Kirk W; Cooper, Robert J; Hunter, Mark D

    2010-12-01

    Predation pressure and resource availability often interact in structuring herbivore communities, with their relative influence varying in space and time. The operation of multiple ecological pressures and guild-specific herbivore responses may combine to override simple predictions of how the roles of plant quality and predation pressure vary in space. For 2 years at the Coweeta LTER in the Southern Appalachian Mountains, we conducted a bird exclosure experiment on red oak (Quercus rubra) saplings to investigate the effects of bird predation on red oak arthropod communities. We established bird exclosures at six sites along an elevational gradient and estimated variation in foliar nitrogen and bird predation pressure along this gradient. Foliar nitrogen concentrations increased with elevation while our index of bird predation pressure was variable across sites. Greater arthropod densities were detected inside exclosures; however, this result was mainly driven by the response of phloem feeders which were much more prevalent inside exclosures than on control trees. There was little evidence for an effect of bird predation on the other arthropod guilds. Consequently, there was no evidence of a trophic cascade either in terms of leaf damage or tree growth. Finally, we found more variation in arthropod density among trees within sites than variation in arthropod density among sites, indicating the importance of micro-site variation in structuring arthropod communities. PMID:20711610

  2. Spatial distribution of Cydia fagiglandana (Zeller) in an exploited holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) forest

    Jiménez Pino, Agustina; Maistrello, Lara; Soria Iglesias, Francisco Javier; Ocete Rubio, María Elvira; López Martínez, María Ángeles

    2011-01-01

    Cydia fagiglandana (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is a carpophagous insect which affects the quality and viability of the fruits of beech, oak and chestnut trees. The majority of the works on this species in holm oak woods dealt with assessing its damages. No investigations have yet been performed on the spatial distribution of this pest, although this element is one of the key features to take in account in order to develop proper integrated management programs. The present ...

  3. Aquaporin gene expression and apoplastic water flow in bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) leaves in relation to the light response of leaf hydraulic conductance

    Voicu, Mihaela C.; Cooke, Janice E.K.; Zwiazek, Janusz J.

    2009-01-01

    It has previously been shown that hydraulic conductance in bur oak leaves (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.), measured with the high pressure flow meter technique (HPFM), can significantly increase within 30 min following exposure to high irradiance. The present study investigated whether this increase could be explained by an increase in the cell-to-cell pathway and whether the response is linked to changes in the transcript level corresponding to aquaporin genes. Four cDNA sequences showing high s...

  4. Larvicidal activity of oak Quercus infectoria Oliv. (Fagaceae) gall extracts against Anopheles stephensi Liston.

    Aivazi, Ali-Ashraf; Vijayan, V A

    2009-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of botanical insecticides to reduce the use of synthetic pesticides in order to avoid environmental side effects. Anopheles stephensi is the primary vector of urban malaria, an endemic disease in India. So, an effort to assay An. stephensi larvae with gall extracts of Quercus infectoria was made under laboratory conditions at Mysore. Ethyl-acetate extract was found to be the most effective of all the five extracts tested for larvicidal activity against the fourth instar larvae, with LC(50) of 116.92 ppm followed by gallotannin, n-butanol, acetone, and methanol with LC(50) values of 124.62, 174.76, 299.26, and 364.61 ppm, respectively. The efficacy in killing mosquito larvae may make this plant promising for the development of new botanical larvicide. PMID:19148681

  5. Early Summer Drought Stress During the First Growing Year Stimulates Extra Shoot Growth in Oak Seedlings (Quercus petraea)

    Turcsán, Arion; Steppe, Kathy; Sárközi, Edit; Erdélyi, Éva; Missoorten, Marc; Mees, Ghislain; Mijnsbrugge, Kristine V.

    2016-01-01

    More severe summer droughts are predicted for mid-latitudes in Europe. To evaluate the impact on forest ecosystems and more specifically on forest regeneration, we studied the response to summer drought in oak seedlings (Quercus petraea). Acorns were collected from different mother trees in three stands in Belgium, sown in pots and grown in non-heated greenhouse conditions. We imposed drought on the seedlings in early summer by first watering the pots to saturation and then stopping any watering. Weight of the pots and stomatal conductance were regularly measured. Re-watering followed this drought period of 5 weeks. Height of the seedlings and apical bud development were observed. Stomatal resistance increased toward the end of the experiment in the drought-treated group and was restored after re-watering. The seedlings from the drought treatment displayed a higher probability to produce additional shoot growth after re-watering (p ≤ 0.05). A higher competition for water (two plants per pot) increased this chance. Although this chance was also higher for smaller seedlings, the actual length of the extra growth after re-watering was higher for larger seedlings (p ≤ 0.01). Both in the drought-treated and in the control group the autochthonous provenance growing on a xeric site produced less extra shoots compared to the two other provenances. Finally, stressed plants showed less developed apical buds compared to the control group after re-watering, suggesting a phenological effect on the growth cycle of oaks (p ≤ 0.0001). The higher chance for an extra shoot growth after the drought period can be considered as a compensation for the induced growth arrest during the drought period. PMID:26941760

  6. Multilevel Nonlinear Mixed-Effect Crown Ratio Models for Individual Trees of Mongolian Oak (Quercus mongolica in Northeast China.

    Liyong Fu

    Full Text Available In this study, an individual tree crown ratio (CR model was developed with a data set from a total of 3134 Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica trees within 112 sample plots allocated in Wangqing Forest Bureau of northeast China. Because of high correlation among the observations taken from the same sampling plots, the random effects at levels of both blocks defined as stands that have different site conditions and plots were taken into account to develop a nested two-level nonlinear mixed-effect model. Various stand and tree characteristics were assessed to explore their contributions to improvement of model prediction. Diameter at breast height, plot dominant tree height and plot dominant tree diameter were found to be significant predictors. Exponential model with plot dominant tree height as a predictor had a stronger ability to account for the heteroskedasticity. When random effects were modeled at block level alone, the correlations among the residuals remained significant. These correlations were successfully reduced when random effects were modeled at both block and plot levels. The random effects from the interaction of blocks and sample plots on tree CR were substantially large. The model that took into account both the block effect and the interaction of blocks and sample plots had higher prediction accuracy than the one with the block effect and population average considered alone. Introducing stand density into the model through dummy variables could further improve its prediction. This implied that the developed method for developing tree CR models of Mongolian oak is promising and can be applied to similar studies for other tree species.

  7. Assessment and Management of Oak Coppice Stands (Quercus variabilis) in Shangnan County,Southern Shaanxi Province

    Xiao-lan Wang; Hany El Kateb; Bernhard Felbermeier; Ping-cang Zhang; Reinhard Mosandl

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted within the frame of the Sino-German project " Rehabilitation of degraded land ecosystems in the mountainous area of the Southern Shaanxi Province,China".The study deals with the assessment of the potential of oak coppices as well as the evaluation of the socioeconomic conditions in the Shangnan County.The ulimate objective of the study is to provide recommendations on the sustainable management of forest resources,which does not only aim to improve the environmental situation but also to satisfy the demands of the local rural residents.The study was based on 30 samples of oak coppices stands,which were randomly selected within an area of a size of 20 km × 20 km.In each selected stand,the mature stand and understory regeneration were investigated in depth.For the socio-economic survey,175 households from 11 villages were randomly selected.Results revealed that the stocking capacity of the cork oak coppices reaches 120 m3/ha in average at the older age classes (≥25 years) even after frequent timber harvest.High potential for productivity was indicated by the availability of sufficient vigorous individuals at different age classes.In addition,the understory regeneration was sufficient in density (19,000 ± 133 individual/ha) and consisted of diverse valuable nativespecies (17 species within a survey area of 400 m2).The results of the assessment of the oak coppices provided possibilities for some practices that can be recommended towards sustainable management of such stands.On the other hand,results of the socioeconomic study showed a high degree of acceptance among the local inhabitants (79% of the total households)to change traditional land use,providing an enhancement of their economic situation.

  8. Sewage sludge effects on mesofauna and cork oak (Quercus suber L.) leaves decomposition in a Mediterranean forest firebreak.

    Pernin, Céline; Cortet, Jérôme; Joffre, Richard; Le Petit, Jean; Torre, Franck

    2006-01-01

    Effects of sewage sludge on litter mesofauna communities (Collembola and Acari) and cork oak (Quercus suber L.) leaf litter decomposition have been studied during 18 mo using litterbags in an in situ experimental forest firebreak in southeastern France. The sludge (2.74 t DM ha(-1) yr(-1)) was applied to fertilize and maintain a pasture created on the firebreak. Litterbag colonization had similar dynamics on both the control and fertilized plots and followed a typical Mediterranean pattern showing a greater abundance in spring and autumn and a lower abundance in summer. After 9 mo of litter colonization, Collembola and Acari, but mainly Oribatida, were more abundant on the sludge-fertilized plot. Leaf litter decomposition showed a similar pattern on both plots, but it was faster on the control plot. Furthermore, leaves from the fertilized plot were characterized by greater nitrogen content. Both chemical composition of leaves and sludges and the decomposition state of leaves have significantly affected the mesofauna community composition from each plot. PMID:17071899

  9. Exploring Growth Variability and Crown Vitality of Sessile Oak (Quercus petraea) in the Czech Republic

    Rybníček, Michal; Čermák, P.; Žid, T.; Kolář, Tomáš; Trnka, Miroslav; Büntgen, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 1 (2015), s. 17-27. ISSN 1733-8387 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.4.31.0056; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0265; GA ČR GA13-04291S Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Central Europe * crown condition * precipitation * sessile oak * temperature * tree rings Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2014

  10. The role of phytic acid in storage of acorns of sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.)

    Žitnik, Sašo; Kraigher, Hojka

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the research is to develop new cheap and practical methods for long-term storage of acorns of sessile oak, because today it is possible to store them only for few months (recalcitrant seeds). The research is based on the hypothesis, that the vitality of acorns after long-term storage is in positive correlation with the content of phytic acid in them, which is in positive correlation with the content of available phosphorus in soil. The experiment is established as a case study on t...

  11. Tree shelters and weed control enhance growth and survival of natural blue oak seedlings

    McCreary, Douglas D.; Tietje, William; Davy, Josh; Larsen, Royce E.; Doran, Morgan; Flavell, Dustin; Garcia, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Blue oak is regenerating poorly in portions of its range. Techniques to artificially regenerate trees by collecting acorns, growing seedlings in a nursery and then planting them are effective but costly. Improving the growth and survival rate of existing volunteer seedlings in woodlands could be more cost efficient and therefore more widely used. We tested tree shelters and weed control treatments over 3 years at six woodland sites to evaluate whether they helped blue oak seedlings grow into ...

  12. Ecophysiological characteristics and cadmium accumulation in Downy Oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.

    Cocozza C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metals provoke environmental pollution with potentially toxic effects on human and plants systems. Recently, investigations are conducted on plants that may play a relevant role on pollutants absorption or stabilization, focusing on fast growing tree species in agronomic conditions; little is known on the effects of contaminants on tree species colonizing abandoned fields to be used in restoration ecology. The effects of Cd on photosynthetic performance and metal accumulation were investigated in Quercus pubescens Willd. seedlings grown in pots containing a mixture of sand, clay, turf and Cd-treatments (0, 25 and 75 mg kg-1 dry soil. The studied photosynthetic parameters (Asat= net phytosynthesis; Rday= day respiration; Γcomp= CO2 compensation point; Vcmax= maximum carboxylation rate; Jmax = electron transport rate; TPU = triose phosphate use; Ci/Ca = ratio of intercellular (Ci to ambient (Ca [CO2] (Ci/Ca; Jmax/Vcmax = ratio; (gsmax = maximum stomatal conductance; (lg = stomatal conductance estimated relative to the photosynthetic rate; (Fv/Fm = maximum quantum yield of PSII photochemistry; (ΔF/F’m = effective photochemical efficiency varied progressively with increasing Cd concentration in the soil, highlighting a negative impact on photosynthetic potential and PSII functioning. Approximately 10% of added Cd was found to be extractable from the substrate, at the maximum concentration applied, with about 12 and 0.75 as bioaccumulation and translocation factors, respectively. Analogously, Cd accumulated up to 34, 30 and 46 mg kg−1 in leaves, stem and roots, respectively. While it is not possible to extrapolate from the present study with seedlings to effects on mature pine trees, there are clear implications for regeneration in soils contaminated with heavy metals, which may lead to ecosystem deterioration.

  13. Provenance-specific growth responses to drought and air warming in three European oak species (Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens).

    Arend, Matthias; Kuster, Thomas; Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S; Dobbertin, Matthias

    2011-03-01

    Provenance-specific growth responses to experimentally applied drought and air warming were studied in saplings of three European oak species: Quercus robur, Quercus petraea and Quercus pubescens. Four provenances of each species were grown in large open-top chambers and subjected to four climates: control, periodic drought, air warming or their combination in 3 subsequent years. Overall growth responses were found among species and provenances, with drought reducing shoot height growth and stem diameter growth and air warming stimulating shoot height growth but reducing stem diameter growth and root length growth. Differential growth responses in shoots, stems and roots resulted in altered allometric growth relations. Root length growth to shoot height growth increased in response to drought but decreased in response to air warming. Stem diameter growth to shoot height growth decreased in response to air warming. The growth responses in shoots and stems were highly variable among provenances indicating provenance-specific sensitivity to drought and air warming, but this response variability did not reflect local adaptation to climate conditions of provenance origin. Shoot height growth was found to be more sensitive to drought in provenances from northern latitudes than in provenances from southern latitudes, suggesting that genetic factors related to the postglacial immigration history of European oaks might have interfered with selective pressure at provenance origins. PMID:21422189

  14. Growth-Climate Response of Young Turkey Oak (Quercus cerris L. Coppice Forest Stands along Longitudinal Gradient in Albania

    Merita Stafasani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Turkey oak (Quercus cerris L. is the most widespread species in Albania and less investigated from dendroclimatological point of view. Previous studies have reported that Q. cerris is sensitive to the environment when growing at different latitudes and ecological conditions. Based on this fact we have explored the response of different Q. cerris populations located along the longitudinal gradient. Materials and Methods: The stem discs were sampled from six sites (Kukes, Diber, Rreshen, Ulez, Elbasan, Belsh along longitudinal gradient ranging from north-east to central Albania. All oak forests stands grow under the influence of specific local Mediterranean climate. Tree-ring widths were measured to the nearest 0.001 mm using a linear table, LINTAB and the TSAP-Win program. Following the standard dendrochronological procedures residual tree-ring width chronologies were built for each site. Statistical parameters commonly used in dendrochronology were calculated for each site chronology. Relations between the tree-ring chronologies were explored using Hierarchical Factor Classification (HFC and Principal Component Analysis (PCA, while the radial growth-climate relationship was analyzed through correlation analysis using a 19-month window from April in the year prior to tree-ring formation (year t - 1 until October in the year of growth (year t. Results and Conclusions: The length of the site chronologies ranged from 16 to 36 years, with the Elbasan site chronology being the longest and the Belsh site chronology the shortest one. Trees at lower elevation were younger than trees at higher elevation. Statistical parameters (mean sensitivity (MS and auto correlation (AC of site chronologies were different among them and lower values of AC1 showed a weaker dependence of radial growth from climatic conditions of the previous growing year. Principal component analysis showed that Belsh, Rreshen and Elbasan site chronologies were

  15. Precipitation, throughfall, soil solution and streamwater chemistry in a holm-oak ( Quercus ilex) forest

    Rodà, Ferran; Avila, Anna; Bonilla, David

    1990-08-01

    Bulk precipitation, throughfall, soil solution at 20 and 40 cm depths, and stream water were monitored for 2-4 years in a holm-oak forest on schists in the Montseny Mountains (NE Spain). Bulk precipitation was mildly acidic, with Ca 2+ and SO 2-4 as dominant ions. Canopy interactions produced a throughfall less acidic than bulk precipitation and enriched in all other ions. Large amounts of K + were leached from the canopy. Magnesium in net throughfall behaved similarly to K +, and it is concluded that leaching makes a major contribution to Mg 2+ enrichment beneath the canopy. Judging from the moderate increase of Na + and Ca 2+ in throughfall, dry deposition rates for both marine and continental aerosols were low in the studied stand, probably because of its sheltered topographic position within a well-vegetated massif, coupled with moderate tree height and low canopy roughness. Soil solution in the mineral soil was less acidic than throughfall. In common with most temperate forests, SO 2-4 was the dominant mobile anion in the soil water, being largely accompanied by Ca 2+. Potassium and NO -3 were depleted within the soil water with respect to throughfall, probably owing to biological uptake and cation exchange, and incorporation of K + into clay lattices. Subsurface flow dominated the hydrology of the small forested catchment studied. Stream water was basic and rich in bicarbonate. Its chemistry revealed fast rates of weathering of sodium- and magnesium-bearing silicates (mainly albite and chlorite, respectively). Soil respiration and silicate hydrolysis resulted in HCO -3 being the dominant mobile anion in stream water. Calcium to chloride ratios were similar in bulk precipitation and in stream water, indicating that Ca 2+ release from weathering has been counteracted by plant uptake. Nutrient uptake by this aggrading forest strongly influences the solution dynamics of K +, NO 3 and Ca 2+. It is concluded that: (1) this forest does not currently receive acidic

  16. Volatile compounds and sensorial characterization of wines from four Spanish denominations of origin, aged in Spanish Rebollo (Quercus pyrenaica Willd.) oak wood barrels.

    Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Cadahía, Estrella; Sanz, Miriam; Poveda, Pilar; Perez-Magariño, Silvia; Ortega-Heras, Miriam; González-Huerta, Carlos

    2008-10-01

    The evolution of almost 40 oak-related volatile compounds and the sensorial characteristics of red wines from four Spanish denominations of origin (DOs) (Bierzo, Toro, Ribera de Duero, and Rioja) during aging in barrels made of Rebollo oak wood, Quercus pyrenaica, were studied and compared to the same wines aged in American and French oak barrels. Each oak wood added unique and special characteristics to the wine, and in addition, each wine showed a different ability to extract the compounds, which result in these characteristics from the oak wood. In general, wines aged in Q. pyrenaica wood were characterized by high levels of eugenol, guaiacol, and other volatile phenols. In regards to compounds like cis-whiskylactone or maltol, the behavior of this wood is very similar to that of American oaks. When considering phenolic aldehydes and ketones, the levels of these compounds are intermediate between those of French and American woods and depend greatly on the type of wine. The type of oak, on the other hand, does not affect the chromatic characteristics of the wines. In sensory analysis, the biggest differences are found in the olfactory phase. Among the four DOs studied, wine aged in Q. pyrenaica presented the highest notes of wood, with more aromas of roasting, toasting, milky coffee, spices, or wine-wood interactions. The wines aged in barrels made of Q. pyrenaica wood were highly regarded, and preference was shown for them over those same wines when they had been aged in barrels of American or French oak. PMID:18778067

  17. Variation of Oriental Oak (Quercus variabilis Leaf δ13C across Temperate and Subtropical China: Spatial Patterns and Sensitivity to Precipitation

    Baoming Du

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of the carbon-13 isotope (leaf δ13C in leaves is negatively correlated with the mean annual precipitation (MAP atlarge geographical scales. In this paper, we explain the spatial pattern of leaf δ13C variation for deciduous oriental oak (Quercus variabilis Bl. across temperate and subtropical biomes and its sensitivity to climate factors such as MAP. There was a 6‰ variation in the leaf δ13C values of oak with a significant positive correlation with latitude and negative correlations with the mean annual temperature (MAT and MAP. There was no correlation between leaf δ13C and altitude or longitude. Stepwise multiple regression analyses showed that leaf δ13C decreased 0.3‰ per 100 mm increase in MAP. MAP alone could account for 68% of the observed variation in leaf δ13C. These results can be used to improve predictions for plant responses to climate change and particularly lower rainfall.

  18. Ultraviolet-B radiation influences the abundance and distribution of phylloplane fungi on pedunculate oak (Quercus robur)

    The effects of u.v.-B radiation (280-315 nm) on the fungi occurring on the lammas leaves of pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) were examined using saplings that were exposed at an outdoor facility to supplemental levels of u.v.-B radiation under treatment arrays of cellulose diacetate-filtered fluorescent lamps, which also produce u.v.-A radiation (315-400 nm). Saplings were also exposed to u.v.-A radiation alone under control arrays of polyester-filtered lamps, and to ambient levels of solar radiation under arrays of unenergized lamps. The u.v.-B treatment corresponded to a 30% elevation above the ambient level of erythemally-weighted u.v.-B radiation. The fungi were examined weekly over a 4-month-period in summer and autumn 1995 using two techniques, the spore fall and leaf impression methods, which differentiated between those fungi occurring on the upper (adaxial) and lower (abaxial) surfaces of the leaves. The abundances of Aureobasidium pullulans (De Bary) Arnaud and Sporobolomyces roseus Kluy. et van Niel, two leaf yeasts which had adaxial:abaxial ratios of < 1 under ambient levels of u.v.-B radiation, were negatively correlated with increasing ambient levels of u.v.-B radiation and were significantly reduced on adaxial leaf surfaces by supplemental levels of u.v.-B. There were few effects of supplemental u.v.-B radiation on the abundances of these yeasts on abaxial leaf surfaces. The abundances of the dematiaceous hyphomycetes, Cladosporium spp. and Epicoccum nigrum Link., species with adaxial:abaxial ratios of ⩾ 1 under ambient levels of u.v.-B radiation, were not correlated with ambient levels of u.v.-B radiation, nor were they usually affected on either leaf surface by supplemental u.v.-B radiation. Alternaria spp. and Microdochium nivale (Fr.) Samuels & Hallet showed consistent responses on adaxial leaf surfaces to u.v.-A radiation applied under control and treatment arrays. Our results suggest that current levels of shortwave radiation already

  19. Effectiveness of Quercus Branti Activated Carbon in Removal of Methylene Blue from Aqueous Solutions

    Abdolmotaleb Seidmohammadi; Ghorban Asgari; Mostafa Leili; Abdollah Dargahi; Azam Mobarakian

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims of the Study: Dyes are one of the most contaminants in textile industrial wastewater that they are often carcinogenic, mutagenic and non-degradable. Therefore, with regard to environmental aspects, their removal from effluents is very essential. The purpose of this study was the perception of adsorption process and promotion of an economic technology for colored wastewater treatment. Therefore, activated carbon from Oak fruit bark was used as an effective and economic adsorb...

  20. Use of forest species associated to oak forests (Quercus humboldtii Bonpl.) for energetic purposes, in three villages of the Encino municipality in Santander

    We surveyed the firewood consumption for energetic purposes from the oak forest of the Patios Altos and Canada villages in Encino-Santander. Tools used to collect data were: structured surveys, open interviews and participant observation to those families dependent upon forest resources. Twenty-one species for domestic use were recorded, from which seven were related to the oak for est. The most preferred and used tree species was the Oak (Quercus humboldtii Bonpl) followed by the Laurel (Morella pubescens (Humb. and Bonpl. ex Willd.) Wilbur). Results show that 98% of the population uses only firewood and firewood alternated with gas, which suggests the importance of firewood to the community. Firewood consumption per person is 3.6 + - 1.35 kg per day, while annual consumption of the whole group (54 families) is the 354.78 kg per year. This usage corresponds to native tree species (78.2%), native shrubs 12.4%) and exotics (9.3%). Firewood usage represents savings to local inhabitants, corresponding to 33% of their monthly earnings, approximate Oak forest, Colombia, wood demand, native forest species, firewood, domestic use of wood.

  1. The conservation of pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) stands in the territory of Parco Lombardo Valle del Ticino (province of Milano and Pavia): main results and management proposals after three years of testing

    Bianchi L; Caronni F; Giovannini G.; Paci M

    2013-01-01

    The conservation of pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) stands in the territory of Parco Lombardo Valle del Ticino (province of Milano and Pavia): main results and management proposals after three years of testing.. In the territory of “Parco Lombardo della Valle del Ticino” an experiment, aimed to assess the silviculture pattern suitable for the conservation of stands dominated by peduncolate oak, was set up in 2008. Four experimental areas were located, both in “meso-hygrophilous” and “mesophil...

  2. Genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation in long-lived tree species: the case of the mediterranean Holm Oak (Quercus ilex, L.).

    Ortego, Joaquín; Bonal, Raúl; Muñoz, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale forest fragmentation can increase interpopulation genetic differentiation and erode the genetic variability of remnant plant populations. In this study, we analyze the extent of clonality and the genetic variability and structure within a holm oak (Quercus ilex) population from Central Spain at 3 patches showing different degrees of fragmentation. For this purpose, we have typed 191 individuals (105 adults and 86 saplings) at 9 microsatellite loci. Microsatellite markers revealed an extensive clonal structure in this species, with most analyzed clumps constituting a single "genet", which in some cases extended over a considerable area (up to 318 m(2)). The maximum distance between "ramets" tended to be higher in the extremely fragmented patch, suggesting that intensive management and environmental perturbation has favored clonal propagation. We have also found evidence that fragmentation has contributed to reduce genetic variability and increase genetic differentiation in holm oak saplings, indicating that the younger cohorts are suffering some negative genetic consequences of long-term population fragmentation. Finally, analyses of fine spatial genetic structure have revealed significant kinship structures up to 20-50 m that were particularly patent in the 2 less fragmented patches. Overall, our findings point to long-term genetic shifts in population structure of holm oaks in fragmented landscapes; however, further research is required on pollen dispersal and gene flow in this species. PMID:20624756

  3. Top-down control of herbivory by birds and bats in the canopy of temperate broad-leaved oaks (Quercus robur.

    Stefan M Böhm

    Full Text Available The intensive foraging of insectivorous birds and bats is well known to reduce the density of arboreal herbivorous arthropods but quantification of collateral leaf damage remains limited for temperate forest canopies. We conducted exclusion experiments with nets in the crowns of young and mature oaks, Quercus robur, in south and central Germany to investigate the extent to which aerial vertebrates reduce herbivory through predation. We repeatedly estimated leaf damage throughout the vegetation period. Exclusion of birds and bats led to a distinct increase in arthropod herbivory, emphasizing the prominent role of vertebrate predators in controlling arthropods. Leaf damage (e.g., number of holes differed strongly between sites and was 59% higher in south Germany, where species richness of vertebrate predators and relative oak density were lower compared with our other study site in central Germany. The effects of bird and bat exclusion on herbivory were 19% greater on young than on mature trees in south Germany. Our results support previous studies that have demonstrated clear effects of insectivorous vertebrates on leaf damage through the control of herbivorous arthropods. Moreover, our comparative approach on quantification of leaf damage highlights the importance of local attributes such as tree age, forest composition and species richness of vertebrate predators for control of arthropod herbivory.

  4. First Report of Northern Root-Knot Nematode, Meloidogyne hapla, Parasitic on Oaks, Quercus brantii and Q. infectoria in Iran

    Sohrabi, Effat; Maafi, Zahra Tanha; Panahi, Parisa; Barooti, Shapour

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN) are the most serious plant parasitic nematodes having a broad host range exceeding 2,000 plant species. Quercus brantii Lindl. and Q. infectoria Oliv are the most important woody species of Zagros forests in west of Iran where favors sub-Mediterranean climate. National Botanical Garden of Iran (NBGI) is scheduled to be the basic center for research and education of botany in Iran. This garden, located in west of Tehran, was established in 1968 with an area of about 1...

  5. TECHNOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF LAMINATED WOOD MATERIALS MADE UP WITH THE COMBINATION OF OAK (Quercus petraea Liebl.) WOOD AND SCOTS PINE (Pinus sylvestris Lipsky) WOOD AND POSSIBILITIES OF USING THEM

    KESKİN, Hakan

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was conducted to determine  the best of using places by some of the technological properties of laminated wood materials made up with the combination of oak wood (Quercus petraea Liebl.) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris Lipsky) wood. For this aim, the laminated wood materials were prepared in the form of five layers from Scots pine and oak wood glued by Desmodur-VTKA adhesive. The air dry density TS 2472, bending strength TS 2474, modulus of elasticity in bending TS 2...

  6. Establishment limitation of holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp. Ballota (Desf.) Samp.) in a Mediterranean savanna - forest ecosystem

    Smit, C.; Díaz, M.; Jansen, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    ¿Tree recruitment in Mediterranean savannas is generally hampered, in contrast with the original oak forests where these savannas are derived from. We asked whether this difference in recruitment success can be explained by differential post-dispersal survival. For one year we monitored experimental

  7. Establishment limitation of holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp ballota (Desf.) Samp.) in a Mediterranean savanna - forest ecosystem

    Smit, Christian; Diaz, Mario; Jansen, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Tree recruitment in Mediterranean savannas is generally hampered, in contrast with the original oak forests where these savannas are derived from. We asked whether this difference in recruitment success can be explained by differential post-dispersal survival. For one year we monitored experimentall

  8. Oak (Quercus spp.) response to climate differs more among sites than among species in central Czech Republic

    Rybníček, Michal; Čermák, P.; Prokop, O.; Žid, T.; Trnka, Miroslav; Kolář, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 75, - (2016), s. 55-65. ISSN 1641-1307 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13030; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0265; GA ČR GA13-04291S Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Central Europe * oak * precipitation * temperature * tree rings Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.556, year: 2014

  9. A sample view of the pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) genome from the sequencing of hypomethylated and random genomic libraries

    Lesur, I.; Durand, J.; Sebastiani, F.; Gyllenstrand, N; Bodénès, C; Lascoux, Martin; Kremer, A; Vendramin, GG; Plomion, C

    2011-01-01

    Genomic resources have recently been developed for a number of species of Fagaceae, with the purpose of identifying the genetic factors underlying the adaptation of these long-lived, biologically predominant, commercially and ecologically important species to their environment. The sequencing of genomes of the size of the oak genome (740 Mb/C) is now becoming both possible and affordable due to breakthroughs in sequencing technology. However, an understanding of the composition and structure ...

  10. - A case study for sessile oak (Quercus petraea) distribution - Preliminarly results of a Decision Support System for climate impact analysis

    Gulyás, Krisztina; Gálos, Borbála; Berki, Imre; Czimber, Kornél

    2014-05-01

    Rainfed sectors of forestry are threatened by projected climate change especially in low-elevation regions in Southeast Europe, where precipitation is the limiting factor of production and ecosystem stability. To initiate preparation for frequency increase of extreme events, disasters and economic losses, a Decision Support System is under development, which provides GIS-supported information about the most important regional and local risks and mitigation options regarding climate change impacts. The case study will focus on the following aspects: • For the time period 1961-2010, precipitation and temperature means and extreme events have been analyzed in the Carpathian basin, using gridded station data from the EU-project CARPATCLIM (http://www.carpatclim-eu.org). • The climate indicators have been identified that characterize and determine the distribution, healty status and vitality of sessile oak. • As a product of the Decision Support System a distribution model is under development, which describes the connection between climate conditions and the distribution of sessile oak. The case study shows, how climate data can be used for impact analyses in the forestry sector. Applying different climate change scenarios, the expected distribution of tree species can be simulated. Acknowledgements: The development of the Decision Support System "Agrárklíma" is supported by TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV and 4.2.2.B-10/1-2010-0018 "Talentum" joint EU-national research projects. Keywords: climate change, decision support system, distribution model, sessile oak

  11. Analysis of landscape patterns and their relationship with oak (Quercus Humboldtii Bonpl.) regeneration in the municipality of Popayan, Cauca

    Landscape patterns were determined for three different areas having oak populations in the Popayan municipality (Clarete, Rejoya and Pisoje). Two Landsat images from different years and polygons with areas equal or greater than 1.5 hectares were used for land use classification. Patch Analysis software was used in order to determine quantitative variables. Structure description included: number of patches, mean patch size, mean patch index, mean patch fractal dimension and mean perimeter-area ratio. Dispersion and fragmentation were evaluated with the three indexes: Mean Nearest Neighbor Distance, Mean Proximity Index and Interspersion Juxtaposition Index. Community variables included: basal area, terrain slope, light percentage and regeneration density, and were measured in an area of 3600 m2 for each landscape. Landscape and community information were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The first two components explained 91.4% of data variability; they were determined mostly by landscape variables than community factors. Correlation analysis and the Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the variable of major importance regarding oak tree regeneration were the Neighbor Distance in secondary forest patches, the Mean Proximity Index in oak tree forest patches and the Juxtaposition Index in patches of planted forests.

  12. Tree-Ring Chronology of Pedunculate Oak (Quercus robur and its Potential for Development of Dendrochronological Research in Croatia

    Katarina Čufar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the local tree-ring chronology of pedunculate oak (Qercus robur from Kobiljak near Zagreb, Croatia (16º09’ E, 45º49’ N, 140 m a.s.l.. The chronology is based on 17 trees and is 127 years long and covers the period of 1883-2009. The well replicated part of the residual version of the ARSTAN chronology with SSS>0.80 (interval of 88 years, period 1922-2009 was used for dendroclimatological analysis, which showed that June precipitation has positive and temperature has negative effect on tree-ring variation. Comparison with 40 available oak chronologies from the surrounding countries confi rmed its good teleconnection with 2 local oak chronologies from Austria, 2 from Hungary, and 3 from Slovenia. It also exhibits good heteroconnection, i.e. similarity with chronologies of beech (Fagus sylvatica, from various sites in Slovenia. The similarities can be ascribed to response to common climatic factors. The results indicate that the chronology could be a good reference point for constructing a longer regional chronology in Croatia and surrounding countries, which could be used for different purposes including dating of objects of cultural heritage.

  13. Seed-hoarding of Edward's long-tailed rats Leopoldamys edwardsi in response to weevil infestation in cork oak Quercus variabilis

    Jinrui CHENG; Hongmao ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    Seed hoarders show different hoarding and eating responses towards insect-infested seeds that can affect the fitness of both the seeds and insects. It remains unclear how seed hoarders adopt different strategies in eating and hoarding infested seeds with and without larvae concealed inside. Here we investigated hoarding and eating responses of Edward's long-tailed rats Leopoldamys edwardsi (scatter hoarders) to weevil infestation of cork oak Quercus variabilis seeds within outdoor enclosures. We provided sound seeds, larvae-emerged seeds, (infested seeds where larvae have emerged) and larvae-concealed seeds (infested seeds with larvae concealed inside) to subjects independently (each seed type presented separately) and in pai-wise combinations (sound and larvae-emerged seeds; sound and larvae-concealed seeds). We found that L. Edwardsi removed, scatter hoarded and ate fewer larvae-emerged seeds than sound seeds. No difference was found between sound seeds and larvae-concealed seeds. These results suggest that sound and larvae-concealed seeds are more favored by L. Edwardsi than larvae-emerged seeds. We posit that not only plants but also insects may benefit from the behavioral responses of hoarders to seed infestation under natural conditions.

  14. Effects of partial defoliation on carbon and nitrogen partitioning and photosynthetic carbon uptake by two-year-old cork oak (Quercus suber) saplings.

    Cerasoli, S; Scartazza, A; Brugnoli, E; Chaves, M M; Pereira, J S

    2004-01-01

    At the end of the growing season in late July, 20-month-old cork oak (Quercus suber L.) saplings were partially defoliated (63% of leaf area) to evaluate their ability to recover leaf area after defoliation. At 18 and 127 days after defoliation, changes in starch and nitrogen pools were determined in leaves and perennial organs, and variations in photosynthetic carbon uptake were investigated. To determine the role of stored nitrogen in regrowth after defoliation, plant nitrogen was labeled in the previous winter by enriching the nutrient solution with 15N. Plants recovered the lost leaf area in 127 days. Although there was remobilization of starch and nitrogen from leaves and perennial organs, the availability of resources for growth in the following spring was not decreased by defoliation. On the contrary, starch concentration in coarse roots was higher in defoliated saplings than in control saplings, presumably as a result of the higher net CO2 exchange rate in newly developed leaves compared with pre-existing leaves. PMID:14652217

  15. Increased Drying Rate Lowers the Critical Water Content for Survival in Embryonic Axes of English Oak (Quercus robur L.) Seeds

    Tobias M. Ntuli; William E. Finch-Savage; Patricia Berjak; Norman W. Pammenter

    2011-01-01

    The potential to cryopreserve embryonic axes of desiccation-sensitive (recalcitrant) seeds is limited by damage during the desiccation necessary for low temperature survival, but the basis of this injury and how to reduce it is not well understood. The effects of drying rate on the viability, respiratory metabolism and free radical-mediated processes were therefore investigated during dehydration of Quercus robur L. embryonic axes. Viability, assessed by evidence of germination and tetrazolium staining, showed a sharp decline at 0.27 and 0.8 g/g during rapid (<12 h) or slow (3 d) dehydration, respectively. Rapid dehydration therefore lowered the critical water content for survival. At any given water content rapid dehydration was associated with higher activities of the free radical processing enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase and lower levels of hydroperoxide and membrane damage. Rapid dehydration was also associated with lower malate dehydrogenase activity, and a reduced decline in phosphofructokinase activity and in levels of the oxidized form of nicotinamide dinucleotide. Ageing may have contributed to increased damage during slow dehydration, since viability declined even in hydrated storage after 3 d. The results presented are consistent with rapid dehydration reducing the accumulation of damage resulting from desiccation induced aqueous-based deleterious reactions.

  16. Mercury Distribution and Seasonal and Inter annual Variation of Mercury in Oak (Quercus ilex L.) in Almadenejos (Ciudad Real, Spain)

    Plants that are exposed to environmental pollutants are able to accumulate them in their organs depending on plant species, type of organ or age among others. Evergreen plants can hold stems and leaves of the different age over the same branch. Thus, the amount of contaminants of these former organs could vary with its age because the contamination exposure time is different. The aim of this study is to know in a tree species, the mercury (Hg) distribution in it and the variation of Hg concentration in leaves and stems between consecutive years and along the same year. In order to carry this objective out, three different trees of Quercus ilex L. were selected and two branches were taken from each of them. Such trees are located in Almadenejos, a village from the Almaden mining district (Ciudad Real, Spain), an area well known due to the developed Hg mining activities for centuries. Considering each branch and each year, on average the results show that leaves had higher Hg concentration than stems. Furthermore, the lowest Hg concentration was measured in fruit (acorn). With regard to ageing effect on Hg concentration and taking into account each branch separately, the results show that the older leaves had higher Hg concentration than younger ones. Nevertheless, the oldest stems had not always higher Hg concentration than youngest ones. A seasonal variation in Hg content appeared both in leaves and in stems in 2010, increasing in 6.2 times on average, in about six months. This result suggests that this kind of organs should be analyzed in winter months. Finally, the results show a very high positive correlation between the Hg of the bark and the Hg of the wood in the sampled branches. Such result suggests that if bark is sampled and its Hg content is analyzed, we could know the Hg content in the big branches or in the trunk, avoiding the cutting of the branches or the whole tree. (Author)

  17. Identification and sensory evaluation of dehydro- and deoxy-ellagitannins formed upon toasting of oak wood (Quercus alba L.).

    Glabasnia, Arne; Hofmann, Thomas

    2007-05-16

    Traditionally, spirits such as whiskey are matured in toasted wood barrels to improve the sensory quality of the final beverage. In order to gain first insight into the puzzling road map of thermal ellagitannin transformation chemistry and provide evidence for the changes in sensory active nonvolatiles in oak wood during toasting, the purified oak ellagitannins castalagin and vescalagin, their corresponding dimers roburin A and roburin D, and 33-carboxy-33-deoxyvescalagin were thermally treated in model experiments. Besides mouth-coating and golden-brown colored melanoidin-type polymers, individual major reaction products were produced as transient intermediates which were identified for the first time by means of LC-MS/MS and 1D/2D-NMR spectroscopy. Depending strongly on the stereochemistry, castalagin is oxidized to the previously unreported dehydrocastalagin, whereas its diastereomer vescalagin, differing only in the stereochemistry at carbon C-1, is most surprisingly converted into deoxyvescalagin. Comparative model experiments with 33-carboxy-33-deoxyvescalagin revealed castalagin, vescalagin, dehydrocastalagin, and deoxyvescalagin as typical reaction products, thus indicating decarboxylation as a key step in the thermal degradation of that ellagitannin. Similar to the ellagitannin monomers, LC-MS/MS analyses gave strong evidence that the corresponding dimer roburin A, containing the vescalagin configuration at C-1, was converted into the deoxyroburin A, whereas roburin D, exhibiting the castalagin configuration at C-1, was oxidized to give the dehydroroburin D. Human sensory experiments revealed that the ellagitannin derivatives imparted an astringent mouth-coating sensation with threshold concentrations ranging from 1.1 to 126.0 micromol/L, depending strongly on their chemical structure. PMID:17444655

  18. Hrasti - Quercus spp.: Archips xylosteana, Tischeria ekebladella, Phylloxera spp., Caliroa annulipes,Apethymus abdominalis, Apethymus braccatus: insects on branches and leaves: Oaks - Quercus spp.: žuželke na poganjkih in listih:

    Jurc, Maja

    2006-01-01

    In the present contribution two species of butterflies are presented, the brown oak tortrix (Archips xylosteana) and oak miner (Tischeria ekebladella), a number of species of the genus Phylloxera of oaks which cause shrivelling ofthe leaves and three species of Hymenoptera - oak slug sawfly (Caliroa annulipes), Apethymus abdominalis and Apethymus braccatus - which eat oak leaves. We state that in the last years the species A. xylosteana, T. ekebladella, Phylloxerra spp. and Caliroa annulipes ...

  19. Effect of human disturbance on seed and seedling distribution of the Andean Oak (Quercus humboldtii Bonpl., Fagaceae) in the Colombian Eastern Cordillera

    Animals affect the spatial occupation patterns of tropical forest plants throughout the seed dispersal they perform. Therefore, changes in vertebrate populations by human disturbance might affect re generation dynamics of plant species. We studied differences in the spatial distribution of seeds and seedlings of the Andean oak (Quercus humboldtii) between two nearby forests with contrasting levels of anthropogenic influence in the Colombian Andes. Density and spatial distribution of seedlings were evaluated in 490 and 484 1 m2 plots located in a 28 ha area, in the high and low disturbed site, respectively. In each plot, all seedlings found were sampled and classified into three age categories. Density and spatial distribution of seeds were evaluated in 0.25 m2subplots placed in the same plots described above. Results showed a higher number and density of seedlings in the high disturbed site, as well as a marked decrease in seedling density as age increases. Distances to the nearest neighbour were shorter in the high disturbed site for all seedlings and each age category, in contrast to the low disturbed site. Indexes of spatial distribution indicate an aggregated pattern in the most disturbed site, while a uniform pattern in the low disturbed one. Seeds also exhibited an aggregated pattern in the high disturbed site and a higher seed predation by invertebrates. Results seemed to be a consequence of forest fragmentation and a decrease of vertebrate seed dispersers, seed predators and herbivores associated to the regeneration processes of the species. These results provide important information for the forest management and restoration activities, since in order to maintain plant populations in the long term, presence and viable populations of seed dispersers should be also maintained.

  20. Human contribution to trace elements in urban areas as measured in holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) bark.

    Minganti, Vincenzo; Drava, Giuliana; Giordani, Paolo; Malaspina, Paola; Modenesi, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The effect of human activities on the presence of trace elements in the atmosphere was evaluated by analyzing samples of holm oak bark, collected in Italy in a large city, in a small town, and in a reference area, scarcely inhabited. In all cases, point sources of pollution were excluded (e.g., industries and incinerators). The concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn were measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The element concentrations in the small town are not different from the reference area, except for Pb and Cu, while the samples collected in the large city show higher concentrations of Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn with respect to the rural area. In particular, the Pb levels in the large city are approximately 16 times higher than in the reference site, and five times higher than in the small town. Most element concentrations are correlated in the large city, while in the reference site, only a few significant correlations between elements were found. Even in the absence of specific sources of pollution, populations living in big cities are exposed to higher concentrations of trace elements than those living in rural environments or in small urban centers. PMID:27000118

  1. Silvicultural options in ageing holm oak (Quercus ilex L. coppices in Gargano: results after 14 growing seasons

    Scopigno D

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of a long-term research program concerning management of ageing holm oak coppices, results available after 14 growing seasons are reported in present paper. Experimental treatments include: A 50 standards per hectare, all of the same age; B 250 standards per hectare, all of the same age; C 140 standards per hectare, with two different ages; D conversion to high forest; E natural evolution (control. A total of 15 permanent plots were established (5 treatments x 3 replicates per treatment and the experimental design used is that of randomised blocks. Based on observations concerning seedlings and shoots development and standards growth and competitive effects, the following preliminary results may be highlighted: i recovering the traditional coppicing system with few standards per hectare represents a valid option from both ecological and shoots growth point of view; the stools, with few standards per hectare, showed a larger number of sprouts, provided with a higher average height and larger diameters; ii uneven-aged standards represent a good alternative form the points of view of both landscape impact immediately after felling operations and stand resistance to climatic damages; iii a good alternative is to apply conversion treatments to high forest, whenever their site quality allows these operations.

  2. Effects of fire temperature on the physical and chemical characteristics of the ash from two plots of Cork oak (Quercus Suber)

    Ubeda, X.; Pereira, P.; Outeiro, L.; Martin, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Cork oak, (Quercus suber) is widely distributed in the Mediterranean region, an area subject to frequent fires. The ash produced by burning can have impacts on the soil status and water resources that can differ according to the temperature reached during fire and the characteristics of the litter, defined as the dead organic matter accumulated on the soil surface prior to the fire. The aim of this work is to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of ash produced in laboratory experiments to approximate conditions typical of fires in this region. The litter of Quercus suber collected from two different plots on the Iberian Peninsula, Mas Bassets (Catalonia) and Albufeira (Portugal), was combusted at different temperatures for 2h. We measured Mass Loss (ML per cent), ash colour and CaCO3 content, pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC) and the major cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+) released from ash slurries created by mixing ash with deionized water. The results showed that ML per cent is higher at all temperatures in Albufeira samples compared to Mas Bassets samples, except at 550??C, and the rate of loss increases faster with temperature than the Mas Bassets samples. At 150??C the ash colour is yellowish, becoming reddish at 200- 250??C and black at 300??C. Above 400??C the ash is grey/white. This thermal degradation is mostly observed in Albufeira litter. The formation of CaCO3 was identified at a lower temperature in Albufeira litter. At temperatures <300??C, pH and EC values are lower, rising at higher temperatures, especially in Albufeira slurries. The concentration of cations at lower temperatures does not differ substantially from the unburned sample except for Mg2+. The cation concentration increases at medium temperatures and decrease at higher temperatures, especially the concentration of divalent cations. The monovalent cations showed a larger concentration at moderate temperatures, mainly in Albufeira ash slurries. The analysis of the Ca:Mg ratio

  3. Repeated summer drought and re-watering during the first growing year of oak (Quercus petraea delay autumn senescence and bud burst in the following spring

    Kristine Vander Mijnsbrugge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change predicts harsher summer droughts for mid-latitudes in Europe. To enhance our understanding of the putative impacts on forest regeneration, we studied the response of oak seedlings (Quercus petraea to water deficit. Potted seedlings originating from three locally sourced provenances were subjected to two successive drought periods during the first growing season each followed by a plentiful re-watering. Here we describe survival and phenological responses after the second drought treatment, applying general linear mixed modelling. From the 441 drought treated seedlings 189 subsisted with higher chances of survival among smaller plants and among single plants per pot compared to doubles. Remarkably, survival was independent of the provenance, although relatively more plants had died off in two provenances compared to the third one with mean plant height being higher in one provenance and standard deviation of plant height being higher in the other. Timing of leaf senescence was clearly delayed after the severe drought treatment followed by re-watering, with two seedlings per pot showing a lesser retardation compared to single plants. This delay can be interpreted as a compensation time in which plants recover before entering the subsequent developmental process of leaf senescence, although it renders seedlings more vulnerable to early autumn frosts because of the delayed hardening of the shoots. Onset of bud flush in the subsequent spring still showed a significant but small delay in the drought treated group, independent of the number of seedlings per pot, and can be considered as an after effect of the delayed senescence. In both phenological models significant differences among the three provenances were detected independent from the treatment. The only provenance that is believed to be local of origin, displayed the earliest leaf senescence and the latest flushing, suggesting an adaptation to the local maritime climate. This

  4. Repeated Summer Drought and Re-watering during the First Growing Year of Oak (Quercus petraea) Delay Autumn Senescence and Bud Burst in the Following Spring

    Vander Mijnsbrugge, Kristine; Turcsán, Arion; Maes, Jorne; Duchêne, Nils; Meeus, Steven; Steppe, Kathy; Steenackers, Marijke

    2016-01-01

    Climate change predicts harsher summer droughts for mid-latitudes in Europe. To enhance our understanding of the putative impacts on forest regeneration, we studied the response of oak seedlings (Quercus petraea) to water deficit. Potted seedlings originating from three locally sourced provenances were subjected to two successive drought periods during the first growing season each followed by a plentiful re-watering. Here, we describe survival and phenological responses after the second drought treatment, applying general linear mixed modeling. From the 441 drought treated seedlings 189 subsisted with higher chances of survival among smaller plants and among single plants per pot compared to doubles. Remarkably, survival was independent of the provenance, although relatively more plants had died off in two provenances compared to the third one with mean plant height being higher in one provenance and standard deviation of plant height being higher in the other. Timing of leaf senescence was clearly delayed after the severe drought treatment followed by re-watering, with two seedlings per pot showing a lesser retardation compared to single plants. This delay can be interpreted as a compensation time in which plants recover before entering the subsequent developmental process of leaf senescence, although it renders seedlings more vulnerable to early autumn frosts because of the delayed hardening of the shoots. Onset of bud flush in the subsequent spring still showed a significant but small delay in the drought treated group, independent of the number of seedlings per pot, and can be considered as an after effect of the delayed senescence. In both phenological models significant differences among the three provenances were detected independent from the treatment. The only provenance that is believed to be local of origin, displayed the earliest leaf senescence and the latest flushing, suggesting an adaptation to the local maritime climate. This provenance also

  5. Leaf-level responses to light in two co-occurring Quercus (Quercus ilex and Quercus suber): leaf structure, chemical composition and photosynthesis

    Vaz, Margarida; Maroco, J.; Ribeiro, Nuno; Gazarini, Luiz Carlos; Pereira, João Santos; Chaves, Maria Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We studied morphological, biochemical and physiological leaf acclimation to incident Photon- Photosynthetic-Flux-Density (PPFD) in Quercus ilex (holm oak) and Quercus suber (cork oak) at Mediterranean evergreen oak woodlands of southern Portugal. Specific leaf area (SLA) decreased exponentially with increasing PPFD in both species. Q. ilex had lower SLA values than Q. suber. Leaf nitrogen, cellulose and lignin concentration (leaf area-based) scaled positively ...

  6. Fragmentation patterns of evergreen oak woodlands in Southwestern Iberia

    Costa, A.; Madeira, M.; Lima Santos, J.;

    2014-01-01

    Mediterranean evergreen oak woodlands (composed of Quercus suber L. and Quercus rotundifolia Lam.) are becoming increasingly fragmented in the human-modified landscapes of Southwestern Portugal and Spain. Previous studies have largely neglected to assess the spatial changes of oak woodlands in...... patterns of oak recruitment and therefore, its study may be helpful in highlighting future baselines for the sustainable management of oak woodlands....

  7. Plant-plant interference in mediterranean forest dynamic: consequences of resource competition and allelopathy on Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.) and a deciduous oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) Growth

    Monnier, Y.; Vila, B.; FERNANDEZ C.

    2008-01-01

    Vegetation successionnal dynamic greatly depends of species installation processes. Particularly, plant-plant interferences (resources competition and allelopathy) could play a central role during installation stage. In Mediterranean region, Aleppo pine constitutes dense tree stands with low regeneration rate contrary to Quercus pubescens, a late successional species. Aleppo pine is known to produce secondary compounds may influence early recruitment. The purpose of this study is to distingui...

  8. Identification of fungal plant pathogens associated with oak (Quercus humboldtii Bonpl.), In the municipalities of Encino (Santander), Arcabuco, and Tipacoque (Boyaca)

    The objectives of this study were to isolate and determine the presence of the pathogen Phytophthora ramorum and other potential pathogens of Quercus humboldtii, and evaluate the possibility of using the antagonistic capacity of bacteria isolated from rhizosphere and phyllosphere against them. The study was conducted in the conservation corridor Guantiva - La Rusia - Iguaque, in the municipalities of Encino (Santander), Arcabuco and Tipacoque (Boyaca). The phytopathogenic fungi were isolated using direct seeding of leaves with symptoms of fungal infection in OGY, Sabouraud, and PDA + Lactic acid at 0.2%. We used the plate counting technique for the isolation of bacteria from rhizospheric and bulk soil. Phytophthora ramorum was not isolated, but phytopathogenic fungi of the genus Fusarium spp., and Pestalotia spp., were obtained in the isolates. Microbial populations of rhizospheric and bulk soil were scarce, exhibited low diversity, and were dominated by few morphotypes. We identified four species of bacteria: Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus macerans, Pinus sylvestris and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The phyllosphere community was dominated by Pseudomonas fluorescens. The species Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pinus sylvestris did not exhibited antagonistic properties against Pestalotia spp. Further studies are required to confirm Fusarium spp., and Pestalotia spp., pathogenic activity against Quercus humboldtii.

  9. Effects of a low severity prescribed fire on water-soluble elements in ash from a cork oak (Quercus suber) forest located in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula

    Pereira, P.; beda, X.; Martin, D.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Guerrero, C.

    2011-01-01

    Wildfire is the major disturbance in Mediterranean forests. Prescribed fire can be an alternative to reduce the amount of fuel and hence decrease the wildfire risk. However the effects of prescribed fire must be studied, especially on ash properties, because ash is an important nutrient source for ecosystem recovery. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of a low severity prescribed fire on water-soluble elements in ash including pH, electrical conductivity (EC), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), potassium (K), aluminum (Al), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), silica (SiO2) and total sulphur (TS). A prescribed fire was conducted in a cork oak (Quercus suber) (Q.S) forest located in the northeast part of the Iberian Peninsula. Samples were collected from a flat plot of 40??70m mainly composed of Q.S and Quercus robur (Q.R) trees. In order to understand the effects of the prescribed fire on the soluble elements in ash, we conducted our data analysis on three data groups: all samples, only Q.S samples and only Q.R samples. All three sample groups exhibited a significant increase in pH, EC (pfire induced a higher variability in the ash soluble elements, especially in Q.S samples, that at some points burned with higher severity. The increase of pH, EC, Ca, Mg, Na and K will improve soil fertility, mainly in the study area where soils are acidic. The application of this low severity prescribed fire will improve soil nutrient status without causing soil degradation and thus is considered to be a good management strategy. ?? 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of galls of Quercus infectoria

    Fırat Zafer Mengeloğlu; Umre Metin; Nesibe Özdemir; M. Kadir Oduncu

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Gall oak (Quercus infectoria) is a species of tree belonging to fagaceae family and its galls has been used in the treatment of burn wounds traditionally. In this study, it is aimed to investigate the antimicrobial activity of the extract of oak galls on some microorganisms.Materials and methods: With using microdilution method, a solution which was obtained by boiling the galls was studied on 20 staphylococci, 20 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 20 Candida albicans isolates which were ...

  11. HEAVY METAL ANALYSIS IN RED OAK (QUERCUS RUBRA POPULATIONS FROM A MINING REGION IN NORTHERN ONTARIO (CANADA: EFFECT OF SOIL LIMING AND ANALYSIS OF GENETIC VARIATION

    Anh Tran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the dynamic of metals in soil and plants and population diversity in Northern Ontario is essential in determining progress toward ecosystem sustainability in reclaimed sites. The objectives of the present study were to assess the levels of metal content in soils and their accumulation in red oak plants from limed and unlimed sites. Genetic variation in red oak populations from the Northern Ontario region was also analyzed. The levels of soil acidity was lower in limed areas compared to un limed sites, an indication of the prolonged beneficial effect of liming 20 to 30 years ago on soil toxicity. The levels of total metals were very high for most elements, but the proportion of metals that were bio available and readily available to plants was very small. The enrichment factors were16.78, 4.98 and 2.94 for total arsenic, copper and nickel, respectively. The Translocation Factor (TF values for available metals from soil to branches were high. There was more metal accumulation in leaves compared to branches. The degrees of genetic variability in red oak populations from limed and unlimed areas were compared using ISSR markers. The levels of polymorphic loci were moderate to high ranging from 44 to 65%. There were no significant differences in polymorphisms between areas that were limed and unlimed. Overall the red oak populations in stressed areas in Northern Ontario are sustainable.

  12. Production and Nutritional Quality of low elevation zone Grasslands and Kermes Oak Shrublands (Quercus coccifera L. in the South-East Mediterranean Basin

    C. Roukos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The objective of this study was to evaluate the production and nutrition quality of grasslands and kermes oak shrublands in Preveza Prefecture, northwest Greece. Approach: The study involved the collection of herbage and browse samples along a grazing period, from March to October for two consecutive years. In consequence, browse samples were manually separated to leaves and twigs. The three forage components (herbage, kermes oak leaves and twigs were analyzed for crude protein, Neutral-Detergent Fiber (NDF, Acid-Detergent Fiber (ADF, lignin and In Vitro Dry Matter Digestibility (IVDMD. After the 2 years of observation, we concluded that kermes oak browse, especially the leaves, had CP content adequate to fulfill the nutrient requirements of grazing goats throughout the grazing period. Results: However, this browse is characterized by a very low IVDMD during summer, which may be the result of high lignin content and the presence of anti-nutritional factors such as phenols and tannins. The month of harvest strongly affected the production and nutritive value of forage components, firstly by giving a significant positive correlation among average monthly temperature, production, cell wall contents and secondly, a negative correlation among average monthly rainfall, IVDMD and lignin content. Conclusion: In closure, kermes oak shrublands of the lower zone constitute an important alimentary source providing adequate amounts of browse in order to maintain the nutrient requirements for grazing goats during the summer, when the herbage is not desirable for consumption from sheep and cattle.

  13. THE EFFECT OF THE HEAT TREATMENT OF SESSILE OAK WOOD (Quercus petrea L.) FROM YOUNG TREES ON THE PROPERTIES OF PANELS WITH TRANSVERSAL GRAIN

    Noemi MARTON; Mihaela POROJAN; Alin OLĂRESCU; Mihaela CÂMPEAN; Lidia GURĂU

    2012-01-01

    Sessile oak from young trees represents asecondary resource with potential for superiorapplications in furniture panels providing theirdimensional stability to variations of relative airhumidity is reduced. A possibility to improve thisproperty was examined in this paper, by thermaltreatment of the raw material before manufacturingdecorative furniture panels with transversal grain.Panels with crosscut grain were manufactured fromboth heat treated and untreated wood and theirproperties were co...

  14. Tree Species Richness and Stand Productivity in Low-Density Cluster Plantings with Oaks (Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl.)

    Christian Kuehne; Somidh Saha; Jürgen Bauhus

    2013-01-01

    Low density plantings complemented by natural regeneration is an increasingly common reforestation technique to ensure growth of a sufficient number of trees from desired species while maintaining natural processes such as succession. One such form of low density planting that aims at lowering establishment costs—oak clusters—has been developed as an alternative to row planting since the 1980s in central Europe. However, whether cluster planting provides higher species richness and productivi...

  15. Identification of Quercus agrifolia (coast live oak resistant to the invasive pathogen Phytophthora ramorum in native stands using Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy

    Anna Olivia Conrad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades coast live oak (CLO dominance in many California coastal ecosystems has been threatened by the alien invasive pathogen Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death. In spite of high infection and mortality rates in some areas, the presence of apparently resistant trees has been observed, including trees that become infected but recover over time. However, identifying resistant trees based on recovery alone can take many years. The objective of this study was to determine if Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, a chemical fingerprinting technique, can be used to identify CLO resistant to P. ramorum prior to infection. Soft independent modeling of class analogy identified spectral regions that differed between resistant and susceptible trees. Regions most useful for discrimination were associated with carbonyl group vibrations. Additionally, concentrations of two putative phenolic biomarkers of resistance were predicted using partial least squares regression; > 99% of the variation was explained by this analysis. This study demonstrates that chemical fingerprinting can be used to identify resistance in a natural population of forest trees prior to infection with a pathogen. FT-IR spectroscopy may be a useful approach for managing forests impacted by sudden oak death, as well as in other situations where emerging or existing forest pests and diseases are of concern.

  16. Tree Species Richness and Stand Productivity in Low-Density Cluster Plantings with Oaks (Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Mattuschka Liebl.

    Christian Kuehne

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Low density plantings complemented by natural regeneration is an increasingly common reforestation technique to ensure growth of a sufficient number of trees from desired species while maintaining natural processes such as succession. One such form of low density planting that aims at lowering establishment costs—oak clusters—has been developed as an alternative to row planting since the 1980s in central Europe. However, whether cluster planting provides higher species richness and productivity than high density row planting has not previously been analyzed. Here, we compare tree species richness and productivity (measured as stand basal area between oak cluster plantings and conventional row planting in young (10–26 years old forest stands at seven study sites in Germany. Tree species richness was significantly higher in cluster plantings than in row plantings, whereas total basal areas were comparable. Naturally regenerated trees contributed on average to 43% of total stand basal area in cluster plantings, which was significantly higher than in row plantings. Total stand basal area in cluster planting was significantly related to the density of naturally regenerated trees. In turn, tree species diversity, density and basal area of naturally regenerated trees were increased with the size of unplanted area between clusters. Our results demonstrate that the admixture of naturally regenerated, early and mid-successional tree species compensates for a possible loss in productivity from planting fewer oaks. Low density cluster plantings can offer significant environmental benefits, at least for the first few decades of stand development, without compromising productivity.

  17. Oak (Quercus frainetto Ten.) Honeydew Honey—Approach to Screening of Volatile Organic Composition and Antioxidant Capacity (DPPH and FRAP Assay)

    Igor Jerković; Zvonimir Marijanović

    2010-01-01

    Two samples of oak honeydew honey were investigated. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with GC and GC/MS enabled identification of the most volatile organic headspace compounds being dominated by terpenes(mainly cis- and trans-linalool oxides). The volatile and less-volatile organic composition of the samples was obtained by ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE) with two solvents (1:2 (v/v) pentane -diethyl ether mixture and dichloromethane) followed by GC and GC/MS anal...

  18. Mapping the Distribution of Sand Live Oak (Quercus geminata) and Determining Growth Responses to Hurricane Katrina (2005) on Cat Island, Mississippi

    Funderburk, W.; Carter, G. A.; Harley, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    William R. Funderburk, Gregory A. Carter, Grant Harley Gulf Coast Geospatial Center, University of Southern Mississippi Department of Geography and Geology Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 U.S.A. william.funderburk@usm.edu The Mississippi-Alabama barrier islands serve to buffer mainland coastal areas from the impacts of hurricanes and other extreme weather events. On August 29, 2005, they were impacted heavily by the wind, waves, and storm surges of Hurricane Katrina. The purpose of this study is to determine the growth responses of Quercus geminata, a dominant tree species on Cat Island, MS, in relation to the impact of Hurricane Katrina. Remotely sensed data was utilized in conjunction with ground data to assess growth response post Hurricane Katrina. The main objectives of this study were: 1) determine growth response of Q. geminata through tree ring analysis; 2) understand how Q. geminata adapted to intense weather and climatic phenomena on Cat Island. The hypotheses tested were: 1) growth rates of Q. geminata on Cat Island were decreased by the impact of Hurricane Katrina 2) trees at higher elevations survived or recovered while trees at lower elevations did not recover or died. Decadal scale stability is required for forest stand development on siliciclastic barrier islands. Thus, monitoring the distribution of forest climax community species is key to understanding siliciclastic, subsiding, barrier island geomorphic processes and their relationships to successional patterns and growth rates. Preliminary results indicate that Q. geminata produces a faint growth ring, survive for at least two to three hundred years and is well-adapted to frequent salt water flooding. Cat Island: False color Image

  19. Spatio-temporal analysis of oak forests (Quercus humboldtii Bonpl.) change and its relationship with pottery at Aguabuena (Raquira-Boyaca)

    This research was conducted at Aguabuena, Raquira-Boyaca, and the main objective was to identify the changes in the settlement patterns and oak - forest cover, due to the development of new technologies and destinies for ceramics production. The study was carried out using aerial photographs from 1985 and 1993 processed in ArcGIS v. 9.0, as well as the application of participatory methods and spatial statistics. The spatio-temporal analysis of the forests allowed the measurement of perimeter and area changes and the number of fragments, where the loss of forest cover was 43.43% for the evaluated years. For analytical purposes related to the ceramics production organization, two different types of workshops can be pointed out: Domestic and Family - Industry. In the Domestic workshops spatial aggregation is due to the forest presence, its relative and different antiquity. The family - indus try- workshops are located along roads, for their relatives and population increment. Each ceramic production system represents different forms of relations with nature; the domestic ones are located in the oaks forests, using high quality fuel in the heating ceramics, while the Industrial-Family looks for the roads with the purpose of centralizing the production and favoring the intermediate relations. These two modes of production reflect the human role in the change and creation of new land scapes from the pottery.

  20. Did the late spring frost in 2007 and 2011 affect tree-ring width and earlywood vessel size in Pedunculate oak ( Quercus robur) in northern Poland?

    Puchałka, Radosław; Koprowski, Marcin; Przybylak, Julia; Przybylak, Rajmund; Dąbrowski, Henryk P.

    2016-08-01

    Trees are sensitive to extreme weather and environmental conditions. This sensitivity is visible in tree-ring widths and cell structure. In our study, we hypothesized that the sudden frost noted at the beginning of May in both 2007 and 2011 affected cambial activity and, consequently, the number and size of vessels in the tree rings. It was decided to test this hypothesis after damage to leaves was observed. The applied response function model did not show any significant relationships between spring temperature and growth. However, this method uses average values for long periods and sometimes misses the short-term effects. This is why we decided to study each ring separately, comparing them with rings unaffected by the late frost. Our study showed that the short-term effect of sudden frost in late spring did not affect tree rings and selected cell parameters. The most likely reasons for this are (i) cambial activity producing the earlywood vessels before the occurrence of the observed leaf damage, (ii) the forest micro-climate protecting the trees from the harsh frost and (iii) the temperature decline being too short-lived an event to affect the oaks. On the other hand, the visible damage may be occasional and not affect cambium activity and tree vitality at all. We conclude that oak is well-adapted to this phenomenon.

  1. Purification of a new isoform of laccase from a Marasmius quercophilus strain isolated from a cork oak litter (Quercus suber L).

    Farnet, A M; Criquet, S; Pocachard, E; Gil, G; Ferre, E

    2002-01-01

    A new isoform of laccase from Marasmius quercophilus is described in this study. The strain of this white-rot fungus was isolated for the first time on a cork oak litter. This isoform exhibited certain common properties of laccases (a molecular weight of 65 Kda, an optimum pH of 6.2 with syringaldazine). But this laccase has also particularly novel features: the best activity measured was observed at high temperatures (80 C) and this isoform was not inhibited with EDTA. Furthermore, this induced laccase was able to transform most of the aromatic compounds tested without the addition of mediators to the reaction mixture, and the transformation of certain chlorophenols (2-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol) by a laccase isoform from M. quercophilus is reported here for the first time. We also demonstrate the importance of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as a mediator since it allowed veratryl alcohol and p-hydroxybenzoic acid transformation. Moreover, new products of transformation were observed using the combination of ABTS with this isoform of laccase. PMID:21156546

  2. Oak (Quercus frainetto Ten. Honeydew Honey—Approach to Screening of Volatile Organic Composition and Antioxidant Capacity (DPPH and FRAP Assay

    Igor Jerković

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Two samples of oak honeydew honey were investigated. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME combined with GC and GC/MS enabled identification of the most volatile organic headspace compounds being dominated by terpenes(mainly cis- and trans-linalool oxides. The volatile and less-volatile organic composition of the samples was obtained by ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE with two solvents (1:2 (v/v pentane -diethyl ether mixture and dichloromethane followed by GC and GC/MS analysis. Shikimic pathway derivatives are of particular interest with respect to the botanical origin of honey and the most abundant was phenylacetic acid (up to 16.4%. Antiradical activity (DPPH assay of the honeydew samples was 4.5 and 5.1 mmol TEAC/kg. Ultrasonic solvent extracts showed several dozen times higher antiradical capacity in comparison to the honeydew. Antioxidant capacity (FRAP assay of honeydew samples was 4.8 and 16.1 mmol Fe2+/kg, while the solvent mixture extracts showed antioxidant activity of 374.5 and 955.9 Fe2+/kg, respectively, and the dichloromethane extracts 127.3 and 101.5 mmol Fe2+/kg.

  3. Shrub facilitation of Quercus ilex and Quercus pubescens regeneration in a wooded pasture in central Sardinia (Italy)

    Alias S; Bianchi L; Calamini G; Gregori E; Sioni S

    2010-01-01

    In the woodlands of Sardinia, as in many other areas of the Mediterranean region, grazing of domestic animals is still very common, though often in the absence of any sustainable management logic or technique. The present work analyzes the effects of excessive grazing pressure on a wooded pasture in the municipality of Orgosolo (Nuoro province), emphasizing the effects on the natural regeneration of the oak species (Quercus ilex and Quercus pubescens). This study has revealed the positive eff...

  4. INVESTIGATION ON THE PROPERTIES OF PEDUNCULATE OAK WOOD AFFECTED BY OAK DECLINE

    Dumitru LICA; Camelia COŞEREANU

    2014-01-01

    The combination of damaging agents, as biotic and abiotic factors, has as effect the deterioration in the appearance of the foliage of affected trees and then, progressive death of branches. Large numbers of pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea) trees are declining in the Central Romania. Depending on the deterioration of the foliage and of the branches, five grades of infestation levels of oak trees were determined. The objective of this study was to i...

  5. Characterization of Acorn Fruit Oils Extracted from Selected Mediterranean Quercus Species

    Al-Rousan, W. M.; Ajo, R. Y.; Al-Ismail, K. M.; Attlee, A.; Shaker, R. R.; Osaili, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed to identifying the acorn fruit oil composition of three Mediterranean white oak group species, Quercus aegilops (QA), Quercus infectoria (QI), and Quercus calliprinus (QC). Samples were estimated for the oil contents of acorn fruits, oil chemical and physical constants, fatty acid profile, tocopherols, phenolic compounds, and sterols.The oil content, expressed as dry weight, was found to be 3.40-7.51%. The physical and chemical constants included specific gravity 0....

  6. Land-use legacies in the forest structure of silvopastoral oak woodlands in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Plieninger, Tobias; Schaich, Harald; Kizos, Thanasis

    2013-01-01

    Eastern Mediterranean silvopastoral oak woodlands have been greatly damaged through forest conversion, illegal lumbering, overgrazing, and forest fires. The aim of this study was to assess land-use changes and the legacies that they have imprinted on the forest structure of Quercus macrolepis and accompanying Quercus pubescens and Quercus cerris woodlands on Lesvos Island, Greece. The size-structures of adult oak populations were analyzed as indicators of long-term oak regeneration, while sho...

  7. Adaptive strategies of weevil larvae in the superparasitized acorns of the Oriental white oak, Quercus aliena (Fagaceae)%槲栎超寄生橡子内象甲幼虫的适应对策

    董钟; 曹令立; 易现峰

    2012-01-01

    Acorns of oaks are usually attacked by weevils.Although the interaction between acorns and weevils has been well studied,how acorns affect the fitness of weevil larvae remains unclear. In this study,we attempted to investigate the evolutionary adaptation of weevils to the development of acorns through carefully investigating the seed fall processes and the characteristics of larval emergence from the trapped acorns of the Oriental white oak,Quercus aliena.Our results indicated that seed crop of Q.aliena was 51.92 ± 29.26 nuts/m2 with an infestation rate estimated of 42.4% in 2009.The infested acorns were much larger than the sound ones.About 65% of the infested acorns were superparasitized by weevil larvae.Weevil larvae emerged earlier were much larger than those exited later from infested acorns after seed fall.Early emerged weevil larvae were much larger than those coming out later from the same individual superparasitized acorn.Weevil larvae parasitized in the early abscised acorns were smaller than those in later abscised ones.Our results demonstrated that dry weight per weevil larva was decreased significantly with the increase in the number of weevil larvae in single acorn.The number of weevil larvae was closely and positively correlated with length and maximum width of acorns,respectively.Although the fitness of weevil larvae was reduced in the superparasitized acorns,a preference of female weevil for larger acorns to oviposition may counter this disadvantage.Our results may suggest that smaller acorns may benefit from superparasitization because large acorns attract female weevils to oviposit more eggs.%栎属植物的橡子常常受到象甲的侵害,对橡子存活产生影响,但有关橡子对象甲幼虫适合度影响的研究尚未见报道.本研究旨在通过对槲栎Quercus aliena种子雨进程以及象甲幼虫逃逸过程的调查,研究二者之间的进化适应关系.结果表明:当年槲栎的种子产量为51.92±29.26粒/m2,

  8. Density and mechanical properties of oak sapwood versus heartwood in three different oak species

    Merela, Maks; Čufar, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the main mechanical properties of sapwood and heartwood in white and red oaks. Samples of wood were taken from 26 oak beams prepared to be used for railway sleepers, of which 62% were from white oak (either Quercus petraea or Q. robur) and 38% from red oak group, represented by Q. cerris. For both oak groups, the following parameters were determined: the density, bending strength, modulus of elasticity (MOE), compression strength and Brinell hardness o...

  9. Pollen morphology of Quercus (subgenus Quercus, section Quercus in Iran and its systematic implication

    Parisa Panahi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, pollen morphology of 9 (4 spp. and 5 subspp. taxa representing lobed leaved oaks of Iran in the family of Fagaceae has been examined and illustrated using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of acetolysed material. Detailed pollen morphological characteristics are given for Quercus section. The pollen grains are single, isopolar, radially symmetrical, tricolpate, tricolporoidate or tricolporate. Pollens were studied to show all possible characteristics like shape, size, apertures, wall thickness, etc., with special reference to the specific features of each pollen type such as structural, sculptural and suprasculptural patterns. There is considerable variation in pollen morphology between taxa so that, three types of pollen shape, five types of structural pattern, two types of sculptural pattern, five types of suprasculptural pattern and three types of perfora distribution are defined. Furthermore, the relationship between pollen morphology and taxonomy is discussed. Overall, pollen characters are shown to be a useful and informative tool for assessing taxonomic position within Quercus section in Iran.

  10. Plastome data reveal multiple geographic origins of Quercus Group Ilex

    Grimm, Guido W.; Papini, Alessio; Vessella, Federico; Cardoni, Simone; Tordoni, Enrico; Piredda, Roberta; Franc, Alain; Denk, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences from the plastome are currently the main source for assessing taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships in flowering plants and their historical biogeography at all hierarchical levels. One major exception is the large and economically important genus Quercus (oaks). Whereas differentiation patterns of the nuclear genome are in agreement with morphology and the fossil record, diversity patterns in the plastome are at odds with established taxonomic and phylogenetic relationships. However, the extent and evolutionary implications of this incongruence has yet to be fully uncovered. The DNA sequence divergence of four Euro-Mediterranean Group Ilex oak species (Quercus ilex L., Q. coccifera L., Q. aucheri Jaub. & Spach., Q. alnifolia Poech.) was explored at three chloroplast markers (rbcL, trnK/matK, trnH-psbA). Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed including worldwide members of additional 55 species representing all Quercus subgeneric groups. Family and order sequence data were harvested from gene banks to better frame the observed divergence in larger taxonomic contexts. We found a strong geographic sorting in the focal group and the genus in general that is entirely decoupled from species boundaries. High plastid divergence in members of Quercus Group Ilex, including haplotypes shared with related, but long isolated oak lineages, point towards multiple geographic origins of this group of oaks. The results suggest that incomplete lineage sorting and repeated phases of asymmetrical introgression among ancestral lineages of Group Ilex and two other main Groups of Eurasian oaks (Cyclobalanopsis and Cerris) caused this complex pattern. Comparison with the current phylogenetic synthesis also suggests an initial high- versus mid-latitude biogeographic split within Quercus. High plastome plasticity of Group Ilex reflects geographic area disruptions, possibly linked with high tectonic activity of past and modern distribution ranges, that did not

  11. Penetration of UV-A, UV-B and blue light through the leaf trichome layers of two xeromorphic plants, olive and oak, measured by optical fibre microprobes

    Quartz fibre-optic microprobes were used to monitor the light microenvironment beneath trichome layers of the xeromorphic leaves of two Mediterranean evergreen sclerophylls, Olea europaea and Quercus ilex. Young developing leaves of both plants were densely pubescent on both surfaces of the lamina, whereas the mature leaves were pubescent only on the abaxial side. Trichome layers of young as well as of mature leaves of both plants attenuated almost all incident ultraviolet (UV)-B (310 nm) and UV-A (360 nm) radiation and a considerable portion of blue light (430 nm). Abaxial trichome layers of young leaves were more effective in screening out the incident radiation compared to the adaxial ones of the same leaves and also compared to the abaxial layer of the mature leaves. The abaxial epidermis of dehaired mature leaves of O. europaea was ineffective in absorbing most of the incident UV-B and UV-A radiation. UV and visible spectra beneath trichome layers of O. europaea in mature leaves confirmed that the light microenvironment on the epidermis was deprived in the UV-B, UV-A and partly in the blue spectral regions. It is proposed that the occurrence of a dense trichome layer, especially in young leaves, may play a protective role against not only UV-B radiation damage, but also against high visible irradiance. This function is performed irrespective of the differing anatomy of individual hairs of both plants. The protection provided by the trichomes could afford advantages under stress conditions, especially during leaf development. (author)

  12. Effects of Cattle Management on Oak Regeneration in Northern Californian Mediterranean Oak Woodlands

    Aida López-Sánchez; John Schroeder; Sonia Roig; Mar Sobral; Rodolfo Dirzo

    2014-01-01

    Oak woodlands of Mediterranean ecosystems, a major component of biodiversity hotspots in Europe and North America, have undergone significant land-use change in recent centuries, including an increase in grazing intensity due to the widespread presence of cattle. Simultaneously, a decrease in oak regeneration has been observed, suggesting a link between cattle grazing intensity and limited oak regeneration. In this study we examined the effect of cattle grazing on coast live oak (Quercus agri...

  13. Notes on three braconid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Doryctinae) parasitizing oak long-horned beetle, Massicus raddei (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), a severe pest of Quercus spp. in China, together with the description of a new species.

    Cao, Liangming; Yang, Zhongqi; Tang, Yanlong; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Three species of Doryctinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) parasitize larvae of oak longhorn beetle Massicus raddei Blessig (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), a serious wood borer pest in North China. Rhoptrocentrus quercusi sp. nov., is described as a new species and Doryctes petiolatus Shestakov, as well as Zombrus bicolor (Enderlein). The three species are idiobiont ectoparasitoids, and may have potential for biological control of oak longhorn beetle. PMID:26624143

  14. Density and Mechanical Properties of Oak Sapwood Versus Heartwood

    Maks Merela; Katarina Čufar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the main mechanical properties of sapwood and heartwood in white and red oaks. Samples of wood were taken from 26 oak beams prepared to be used for railway sleepers, of which 62 % were from white oak (either Quercus petraea or. Q. robur) and 38 % from red oak group, represented by Q. cerris. For both oak groups, the following parameters were determined: the density, bending strength, modulus of elasticity (MOE), compression strength and Brinell hardnes...

  15. Cork oak woodlands patchiness

    Costa, Augusta; Madeira, Manuel; Plieninger, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    The cork oak (Quercus suber L.) woodlands of the agroforestry landscapes of Southwestern Iberia are undergoing drastic change due to severe natural and anthropogenic disturbances. These may eventually result in woodland loss or deforestation, the final step of an ongoing process of woodland...... woodlands exhibited similar trends of decreasing fractional canopy cover and decreasing number of larger patches. Patchiness rather than fractional canopy cover seems, however, to be potentially more useful as a signature of imminent oak woodlands deforestation, given that its contrast before and after...

  16. Betydelsen av taggbuskar, ljus och hävd vid föryngring av ek (Quercus robur)

    Bornefall, Karin

    2005-01-01

    Many species and hence biodiversity depend on old, large oaks (Quercus robur) with hollow trunks. The populations of oak-living organisms have to migrate to a nearby old oak in order to survive the death of the host. The oak district south of Linköping, Sweden, is unique in area and the number of old oaks. It is anyway doubtful whether regeneration of oak will secure future continuity. Oaks are light-demanding and thrive in open pastures. Grazers also pose a problem, eating acorns and seedlin...

  17. CLIMATIC FACTORS AND ESTABLISHMENT OF QUERCUS ILEX - COMMUNITIES IN TRIESTE PROVINCE (NE ITALY)

    A. FURLANETTO; M. CODOGNO

    2004-01-01

    In the coastal area called "Cernizza" (near Duino. ca 15 km NW from Trieste), at an altitude between 0 and 40 m. is located a wood vegetation complex characterized by Quercus ilex and Carpinus orientalis. The bedrocks of this site is carbonatic. This wood vegetation does not occur in other sites or the Trieste province, where deciduous oak woods (Q. pubescells, Q. petraea s.1.) are dominant both on arenaceus and on carbonatic rocks. Other Quercus ilex communities are occurring only as scrubs ...

  18. Analysis of oak tannins by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    Mämmelä, P; Savolainen, H; Lindroos, L; Kangas, J; Vartiainen, T

    2000-09-01

    Extractable tannins were analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry in two oak species, North American white oak (Quercus alba) and European red oak (Quercus robur). They mainly included various glucose gallic and ellagic acid esters. The structures were partially determined, and they included grandinin/roburin E, castalagin/vescalagin, gallic acid, valoneic acid bilactone, monogalloyl glucose, digalloyl glucose, trigalloyl glucose, ellagic acid rhamnose, quercitrin and ellagic acid. PMID:10999626

  19. Biología reproductiva y conservación: el caso de la regeneración de bosques templados y subtropicales de robles (Quercus spp. Plant reproductive biology and conservation: the case of temperate and subtropical oak forest regeneration

    Fernando J. Pulido

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se revisan los resultados de 21 estudios experimentales sobre la regeneración de bosques de roble (Quercus spp. en los que se analizan al menos tres de las fases del ciclo reproductivo: fertilización, desarrollo de frutos viables, dispersión, consumo postdispersivo, germinación-emergencia de plántulas, establecimiento de juveniles y reclutamiento de adultos. La mayoría de las poblaciones estudiadas se encontraban en bosques templados de Norteamérica y Europa, repartidos de forma equitativa entre bosques de ambientes xéricos (incluidos los mediterráneos con especies perennes y habitualmente bajo explotación, y bosques de ambientes mésicos o montanos con especies generalmente caducifolias y escasamente alterados. Los estudios se clasificaron de acuerdo con los tipos de limitación de la regeneración encontrados por los autores, esto es, producción de semillas viables, presión de herbívoros y disponibilidad de sitios seguros. La revisión muestra que en la mayoría de los casos la regeneración se encontraba limitada por una combinación de factores, típicamente el consumo de bellotas y un ambiente abiótico desfavorable durante el establecimiento. La fecundidad de los árboles ha sido rara vez estudiada a pesar de que puede llegar ser en una limitación frecuente, al igual que ocurre con las limitaciones de la dispersión por animales. Finalmente, se analiza el grado de aplicación de la información ecológica acumulada a la solución de problemas de regeneración natural, y se discute su utilidad en comparación con las prácticas más comunes de regeneración artificial via plantacionesThis study presents a review of 21 experimental studies on oak (Quercus regeneration analysing at least three phases of the reproductive cycle, namely fertilization, viable fruit production, acorn dispersal, postdispersal predation, seedling emergence, sapling establishment, and adult recruitment. Most study cases came from North

  20. Relationship between Insect Infestation and Seed Rain Dynamics of Oriental Cork Oak (Quercus variabilis)%栓皮栎橡子虫蛀特征与种子雨进程的关系

    曹令立; 董钟; 刘文静; 雷晶洁; 申圳; 杨月琴

    2013-01-01

    为了解栓皮栎(Quercus variabilis)种子雨过程及昆虫捕食特征,于2008年和2009年秋季在洛阳天池山次生林中,对栓皮栎种群的种子雨过程和象甲虫的寄生特征进行了调查研究.结果表明,2008年和2009年栓皮栎的种子雨分别发生在8月24日-9月24日、8月22日-9月28日,密度分别为(18.33±10.05)粒/m2、(26.42±14.27)粒/m2,2009年种子雨产量显著大于2008年.2 a的种子雨构成比例有较大差异.2008年,完好种子、败育种子和虫蛀种子的比例分别为24.09%、55.90%和20.01%;2009年,完好种子比例为50.16%,显著高于2008年,败育种子比例为30.28%,显著低于2008年,而虫蛀种子比例为19.56%,2 a间无显著性差异.象甲幼虫寄生率与橡子大小呈显著正相关,说明象甲虫喜欢寄生较大的橡子.%The seed rain dynamics of Quercus variabilis and the characteristics of weevil infestation were investigated in 2008 and 2009 in Luoyang Tianchi mountain forests. Our results showed that the seed rain of Quercus variabilis began from 24 August and ceased on 24 September,with seed density of (18. 33 ± 10. 05) acorn/m2 in 2008. In 2009, the seed rain began from 22 August and ceased on 28 September, with seed density of (26. 42 ± 14. 27) acorn/m2,significantly larger than that in 2008. In addition,large difference was also found in the composition of seed rain in the two years. In 2008, the proportions of sound acorns, aborted acorns and insect-infested acorns were 24. 09%, 55. 90% and 20. 01% , respectively. In 2009, however, the corresponding proportions were 50. 16%,30. 28% and 19. 56% respectively. The proportion of sound acorns in 2009 was significantly higher than that in 2008,while the proportion of aborted acorns in 2009 was significantly lower than that in 2009, but no significant difference was found in the proportion of insect-infested acorns between the two years. A significant positive relationship was found between infestation rate and

  1. HIDROFOBICIDAD EN ANDISOLES BAJO ROBLEDAL (Quercus humboldtii Y PLANTACIONES FORESTALES (Pinus patula y Cupressus lusitanica EN LA CUENCA DE LA QUEBRADA PIEDRAS BLANCAS (MEDELLÍN, COLOMBIA HYDROPHOBICITY OF ANDISOLS OF OAK GROVES (Quercus humboldtii AND TREE PLANTATIONS (Pinus patula and Cupressus lusitanica IN THE PIEDRAS BLANCAS WATERSHED ( MEDELLÍN, COLOMBIA

    Juan Raúl Duque Zapata

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available En la cuenca de la quebrada Piedras Blancas se evaluó la persistencia de la repelencia al agua en el horizonte A de Andisoles bajo tres coberturas vegetales: Pinus patula, Cupressus lusitanica y Quercus humboldtii y en tres posiciones topográficas diferentes a lo largo de la vertiente de colinas bajas, mediante el método de WDPT, en muestras con la humedad de campo y secas al aire. En todas las coberturas se encontró repelencia al agua en los suelos. Además, cuando las muestras fueron secadas al aire, la persistencia de la repelencia al agua se incrementó. Se encontró diferencia significativa en la distribución de la persistencia de la repelencia al agua entre las coberturas y entre las posiciones en la vertiente de las colinas, sin que se presentara un comportamiento similar para las tres coberturas. Los suelos bajo cobertura de ciprés fueron los que presentaron los mayores valores de WDPT en todas las condiciones de medida, siendo este el primer reporte que se hace en la literatura, con un amplio respaldo muestral, de repelencia al agua en suelos bajo dicha cobertura vegetal. En ninguno de los casos, la humedad de las muestras fue el parámetro que explicara el comportamiento observado en la repelencia al agua de los suelos estudiados.The persistence of water repellency in the A horizon of Andisols was evaluated in the Piedras Blancas watershed under three vegetative covers: Pinus patula, Cupressus lusitanica, and Quercus humboldtii, and in three different topographic conditions across the slope of a low hill, using the WDPT method with samples containing field humidities and airdried samples. In all vegetative covers, water repellency of the soils was documented. Also, when the samples were air-dried, the persistency of the water repellency increased. A significant difference in the distribution of water repellency was documented among the different vegetative covers and topographic conditions, without a consistent pattern for the

  2. Evaluation and comparison of size-density relationships for pure even-aged stands of ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.), beech (Fagus silvatica L.), oak (Quercus petraea Liebl.), and sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L.)

    Le Goff, Noël; Ottorini, Jean Marc; Ningre, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Size-density relationships define the maximum number of stems that even-aged stands of a given species can hold in relation to the mean size of trees. They are used to derive stand density measures and are useful tools used to control tree mortality. Size-density relationships were already available in France for beech and oak. The objective of this study was to extend these relations to younger development stages and test if specific relations are needed to be established for a set of specie...

  3. Gene expression profiles of different breast cancer cells compared with their responsiveness to fermented mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts Iscador from oak (Quercus), pine (Pinus), white fir (Abies) and apple tree (Malus) in vitro.

    Eggenschwiler, Jenny; Patrignani, Andrea; Wagner, Ulrich; Rehrauer, Hubert; Schlapbach, Ralph; Rist, Lukas; Ramos, Mac H; Viviani, Angelika

    2006-06-01

    Cytotoxicity assays in vitro (MTT test) showed that the different breast cancer cell lines Kpl-1, MCF-7 and Mfm-223 respond differently to the mistletoe (Viscum album L.) preparations Iscador. Quercus (Qu), Abies (A), Malus (M) and Pinus (P). In order to determine the differences in the responsiveness of the cells more exactly, the gene expression profiles were determined by cells, which were treated with Mistletoe extracts, compared with untreated control cells. Such differences can be analysed in more detail by looking at the gene expression using Human Whole Genome microarray chips (41,000 genes). The results of the transcriptome analyses suggested that Iscador preparations influenced the overregulation of genes regarding immune defense, stress response, apoptosis and cell-cell adhesion pathways. Within the Mfm-223-Zellen was the Genexpression in MCF-7 and Kpl-1. The MCF-7 cells were affected on the genes which are involved in cell-cell contacts whereas Kpl-1 responded to the mistletoe extracts by changing the mRNA levels of the immune and stress response pathways. Concerning the effects of the mistletoe extract, we conclude that Iscador Qu and M have a greater influence on the immune defense and stress response genes whereas Iscador A tends to affect the cell-cell adhesion and cytoskeleton pathways. In summary, cDNA microarray analyses give us information on whether a cancer cell is sensitive to mistletoe extracts in relation to how many genes are significantly overrepresented after mistletoe treatment, and whether a particular mistletoe extract is more effective on a specific cancer cell than the other preparation. PMID:16927530

  4. Mercury Distribution and Seasonal and Inter annual Variation of Mercury in Oak (Quercus ilex L.) in Almadenejos (Ciudad Real, Spain); Distribucion y Variacion Estacional e Interanual de Mercurio en La Encina (Quercus ilex L.) en el Municipio de Almadenejos (Ciudad Real)

    Rodriguez-Alonso, J.; Sierra, M. J.; Millan, R.

    2014-10-01

    Plants that are exposed to environmental pollutants are able to accumulate them in their organs depending on plant species, type of organ or age among others. Evergreen plants can hold stems and leaves of the different age over the same branch. Thus, the amount of contaminants of these former organs could vary with its age because the contamination exposure time is different. The aim of this study is to know in a tree species, the mercury (Hg) distribution in it and the variation of Hg concentration in leaves and stems between consecutive years and along the same year. In order to carry this objective out, three different trees of Quercus ilex L. were selected and two branches were taken from each of them. Such trees are located in Almadenejos, a village from the Almaden mining district (Ciudad Real, Spain), an area well known due to the developed Hg mining activities for centuries. Considering each branch and each year, on average the results show that leaves had higher Hg concentration than stems. Furthermore, the lowest Hg concentration was measured in fruit (acorn). With regard to ageing effect on Hg concentration and taking into account each branch separately, the results show that the older leaves had higher Hg concentration than younger ones. Nevertheless, the oldest stems had not always higher Hg concentration than youngest ones. A seasonal variation in Hg content appeared both in leaves and in stems in 2010, increasing in 6.2 times on average, in about six months. This result suggests that this kind of organs should be analyzed in winter months. Finally, the results show a very high positive correlation between the Hg of the bark and the Hg of the wood in the sampled branches. Such result suggests that if bark is sampled and its Hg content is analyzed, we could know the Hg content in the big branches or in the trunk, avoiding the cutting of the branches or the whole tree. (Author)

  5. Patogenicidad de "Phytophthora spp." causantes de podredumbre radical de "Quercus ilex ssp." "ballota" en viveros forestales

    Andicoberry de los Reyes, Sergio; M. E. Sánchez; Trapero Casas, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Within a research project on quality of plants for forestation of agricultural lands, we studied the etiology of a root rot affecting holm oak (Quercus ilex ssp. ballota) seedlings in two forest nurseries in southern Spain. Major disease symptoms were foliar wilting and necrosis of feeder roots. Three fungal species, Phytophthora cinnamomi, P. cryptogea and P. drechsleri, were isolated from necrotic roots of holm oak. Isolates of the three species showed similar growth patterns at different t...

  6. Pharmacology of Quercus infectoria.

    Dar, M S; Ikram, M; Fakouhi, T

    1976-12-01

    The galls of Quercus infectoria (Fagaceae), a commonly available plant in Iran, were studied pharmacologically. Two fractions were employed, a dried acetone-treated methanol extract dissolved in water (Fraction A) and a subfraction prepared by chloroform-methanol extraction (Fraction B). Fraction A was active as an analgesic in rats and significantly reduced blood sugar levels in rabbits. Fraction B had CNS depressant activity. Data obtained with a treadmill indicated a decreased activity ratio by Fraction B, suggesting a possible interference in motor coordination. It potentiated the barbiturate sleeping time significantly without changing the onset time or the loss of the righting reflex. In addition, Fraction B exhibited a moderate antitremorine activity by causing a delay in the onset and a decrease in the severity of tremorine-induced tremors. The local anesthetic action of Fraction B was evident due to the complete blockade of the isolated frog sciatic nerve conduction. PMID:1032663

  7. OAK GALLS: THE MEDICINAL BALLS

    Shaikh Imtiyaz; S Javed Ali; Mohd. Tariq,; Shahid S Chaudhary; Mohd Aslam

    2013-01-01

    From centuries ago man has been using herbs for medicinal purposes, in traditional system of medicine like Unani, Ayurveda, Chinese medicine number of herbs and drugs of plant origin are found to be useful in curing of various ailments. Oak galls (Mazu) is an out growths formed on the young twigs of the dyer's oak, Quercus infectoria (Fagaceae), as a result of the deposition of the eggs of the gall-wasp Adleria gallae-tinctoriae Olivier, this is used for medicinal purposes before escape of in...

  8. Antimicrobial activity of galls of Quercus infectoria

    Fırat Zafer Mengeloğlu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Gall oak (Quercus infectoria is a species of tree belonging to fagaceae family and its galls has been used in the treatment of burn wounds traditionally. In this study, it is aimed to investigate the antimicrobial activity of the extract of oak galls on some microorganisms.Materials and methods: With using microdilution method, a solution which was obtained by boiling the galls was studied on 20 staphylococci, 20 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 20 Candida albicans isolates which were obtained from various clinical samples and the values of minimum inhibitor concentration (MIC were detected.Results: At the end of incubation MIC50 and MIC90 values were determined as 0,5 and 1 μg/ml for staphylococci, 1 and 2 μg/ml for Pseudomonas, 2 and 2 μg/ml for Candida, respectively.Conclusion: As a result, we concluded that galls of Q.infectoria has antimicrobial effect on common factors of burn wound infections. Larger studies about the antimicrobial and antiinflamatorial activity and in vivo effect of topical treatment of Q.infectoria will obtain more accurate data about using this plant in the treatment of burn wounds.

  9. Avaliação e caracterização dos principais compostos químicos da aguardente de cana-de-açúcar envelhecida em tonéis de carvalho (Quercus sp. Determination of the main chemical components in Brazilian sugar cane spirit aged in oak (Quercus sp. barrels

    Clóvis Parazzi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A aguardente de cana-de-açúcar ou cachaça é muito apreciada por seu aroma e sabor característico, que podem melhorar pelo envelhecimento em barris de madeira. Durante o envelhecimento muitas transformações ocorrem e alguns compostos novos podem ser incorporados ou formados, enquanto outros desaparecem. Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar os efeitos da madeira sobre a qualidade e composição química da aguardente quando envelhecida em barris de carvalho. Doze amostras de aguardentes foram armazenadas em barris de carvalho e em recipientes de vidro, sob as mesmas condições. As amostragens para análises foram realizadas a cada três meses por um período de três anos. Foram determinados os seguintes compostos: teor alcoólico, polifenóis, acetaldeído, acetato de etila, metanol, n-butílico, n-propílico, isobutílico, isoamílico, acidez e cobre. Houve diferença significativa entre as aguardentes armazenadas em barris de madeira e nos recipientes de vidro. As aguardentes armazenadas em barris apresentaram diferenças significativas para todos os elementos analisados, com exceção do n-butílico. Enquanto que as dos recipientes de vidro não apresentaram diferenças significativas, com exceção do acetato de etila, em relação às épocas de amostragem. Os recipientes utilizados e o tempo de armazenamento interferem nas características químicas e na qualidade da aguardente de cana-de-açúcar.Brazilian sugar cane spirit or "cachaça" is very appreciated for its typical aroma and flavour, which can even be improved by ageing the sugar cane spirit in wood barrels. During the ageing period, many transformations may occur and some new compounds can be incorporated or formed while others disappear. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the wood on the quality and chemical composition of sugar cane spirits when aged in oak barrels. Twelve samples of sugar cane spirit were stored in oak barrels and in glass containers

  10. Silviculture of oak for high-quality wood production

    Attocchi, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    Oak is one of the most valuable noble hardwood species in Europe. The production of high-quality wood is associated with long rotations and high labour costs. The aim of this thesis was to quantify and model the effects of some silvicultural practices, mainly thinning, on crown size, volume growth and stem quality on pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.), to provide a scientific basis to modify contemporary oak silviculture. The response pattern of specific silvicultural practices was tested in ...

  11. Isolation and characterization of repeat elements of the oak genome and their application in population analysis

    Four minisatellite sequence elements have been identified and isolated from the genome of the oak species Quercus petraea and Quercus robur. Minisatellites 1 and 2 are putative members of repeat families, while minisatellites 3 and 4 show repeat length variation among individuals of test populations. A 590 base pair (bp) long element has also been identified which reveals individual-specific autoradiographic patterns when used as probe in Southern hybridisations of genomic oak DNA. (author)

  12. Epiphytic lichen diversity on Quercus cerris and Q. frainetto in the Marmara region (Turkey)

    ORAN, Seyhan; Öztürk, Şule

    2012-01-01

    The epiphytic diversity of lichens associated with Quercus cerris L. and Quercus frainetto Ten. were investigated in 21 localities of the Marmara region. A total of 106 taxa belonging to 49 genera were reported on Q. cerris and Q. frainetto, and 16 of those taxa were recorded for the first time in the Marmara region. The number of lichen species found on Q. cerris was 83, while 85 taxa were found on Q. frainetto. Several differences regarding the lichen taxa were found in these 2 oaks species...

  13. Embryogenesis in Oak species. A review

    Aranzazu Gomez-Garay

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: A review on the propagation methods of four Quercus species, namely Q. suber, Q. robur, Q. ilex and Q. canariensis, through somatic embryogenesis and anther embryogenesis are presented.Area of study: The study comprises both Mediterranean and Atlantic oak species located in Spain.Material and Methods: Somatic embryogenesis was induced on immature zygotic embryos of diverse oak species, permitting the multiplication of half-sib families. Induction of haploid embryos and doubled haploids was assayed in both Q. suber and Q. ilex by temperature stress treatments of anthers containing late vacuolated microspores. The haploid origin of the anther embryos has been evaluated by quantitative nuclear DNA analysis through flow cytometry and by DNA microsatellite markers. Genetic transformation of cork oak has also been performed by means of Agrobacterium tumefaciens vectors. Proteomic analysis has been conducted to screen the diverse protein profiles followed by in vitro derived embryos during their development.Research highlights: Successful plant regeneration from both somatic and haploid embryos has been achieved. In the particular case of cork oak, doubled-haploid plants were obtained. Plantlets regenerated from selected parent trees through somatic embryogenesis were acclimated in the greenhouse and in the nursery, and were planted in an experimental plot in the field. Preliminary evaluation of the cork quality of the plants showed a good heritability correlation with the parent trees. This article revises the work of and is dedicated to Dr. M.A. Bueno, who devoted much of her professional life to the research on Biotechnology and Genetics of forest species, leading the Laboratory of Forest Biotechnology at the Spanish Institute of Agronomic Research (INIA.Key words: anther embryogenesis; microspore; pollen; Quercus canariensis; Quercus ilex; Quercus robur; Quercus suber; somatic embryogenesis. 

  14. Sprouting productivity and allometric relationships of two oak species managed for traditional charcoal making in central Mexico.

    Aguilar, R.; Ghilardi, A.; Vega, E.; Skutsch, M.; Oyama, K.

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable production systems for woodfuels in developing countries require basic information on tree productivity, and particularly on their coppicing productivity under current forms of management. We report biomass equations and sprouting productivity of two oak species (Quercus castanea and Que

  15. Rapid nitrogen transfer from ectomycorrhizal pines to adjacent ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants in a California oak woodland.

    He, Xinhua; Bledsoe, Caroline S; Zasoski, Robert J; Southworth, Darlene; Horwath, William R

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen transfer among plants in a California oak woodland was examined in a pulse-labeling study using 15N. The study was designed to examine N movement among plants that were mycorrhizal with ectomycorrhizas (EM), arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM), or both. Isotopically enriched N (K15NO3-) was applied to gray pine (Pinus sabiniana) foliage (donor) and traced to neighboring gray pine, blue oak (Quercus douglasii), buckbrush (Ceanothus cuneatus) and herbaceous annuals (Cynosurus echinatus, Torilis arvensis and Trifolium hirtum). After 2 wk, needles of 15N-treated pines and foliage from nearby annuals were similarly enriched, but little 15N had appeared in nontreated (receiver) pine needles, oak leaves or buckbrush foliage. After 4 wk foliar and root samples from pine, oak, buckbrush and annuals were significantly 15N-enriched, regardless of the type of mycorrhizal association. The rate of transfer during the first and second 2-wk periods was similar, and suggests that 15N could continue to be mobilized over longer times. PMID:16539611

  16. Penicillium cecidicola, a new species on cynipid insect galls on Quercus pacifica in the western United States

    Seifert, K.A.; Hoekstra, E.H.; Frisvad, Jens Christian;

    2004-01-01

    A synnematous species of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium was found inside emergence tunnels from insect galls (Cynipidae, Hymenoptera, the so-called gall wasps) on scrub oaks (Quercus pacifica Nixon & C.H. Muller) collected in the western United States. The fungus produces synnemata with white...

  17. Responses of evergreen and deciduous Quercus species to enhanced ozone levels

    Plants of one evergreen oak (Quercus ilex) and three deciduous oaks (Q. faginea, with small leaves; Q. pyrenaica and Q. robur, with large leaves) were exposed both to filtered air and to enhanced ozone levels in Open-Top Chambers. Q. faginea and Q. pyrenaica were studied for the first time. Based on visible injury, gas exchange, chlorophyll content and biomass responses, Q. pyrenaica was the most sensitive species, and Q. ilex was the most tolerant, followed by Q. faginea. Functional leaf traits of the species were related to differences in sensitivity, while accumulated ozone flux via stomata (POD1.6) partly contributed to the observed differences. For risk assessment of Mediterranean vegetation, the diversity of responses detected in this study should be taken into account, applying appropriate critical levels. - Ozone tolerance overlapped with leaf traits in four Quercus species.

  18. Responses of evergreen and deciduous Quercus species to enhanced ozone levels

    Calatayud, Vicent, E-mail: calatayud_viclor@gva.e [Instituto Universitario CEAM-UMH, Charles R. Darwin 14, Parc Tecnologic, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Cervero, Julia; Calvo, Esperanza [Instituto Universitario CEAM-UMH, Charles R. Darwin 14, Parc Tecnologic, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Garcia-Breijo, Francisco-Jose [Laboratorio de Anatomia e Histologia Vegetal ' Julio Iranzo' , Jardin Botanico, Universitat de Valencia, c/Quart 80, 46008 Valencia (Spain); Departamento de Ecosistemas Agroforestales, Escuela Tecnica Superior del Medio Rural y Enologia, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Avda. Blasco Ibanez 21, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Reig-Arminana, Jose [Departamento de Ecosistemas Agroforestales, Escuela Tecnica Superior del Medio Rural y Enologia, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Avda. Blasco Ibanez 21, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Sanz, Maria Jose [Instituto Universitario CEAM-UMH, Charles R. Darwin 14, Parc Tecnologic, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    Plants of one evergreen oak (Quercus ilex) and three deciduous oaks (Q. faginea, with small leaves; Q. pyrenaica and Q. robur, with large leaves) were exposed both to filtered air and to enhanced ozone levels in Open-Top Chambers. Q. faginea and Q. pyrenaica were studied for the first time. Based on visible injury, gas exchange, chlorophyll content and biomass responses, Q. pyrenaica was the most sensitive species, and Q. ilex was the most tolerant, followed by Q. faginea. Functional leaf traits of the species were related to differences in sensitivity, while accumulated ozone flux via stomata (POD{sub 1.6}) partly contributed to the observed differences. For risk assessment of Mediterranean vegetation, the diversity of responses detected in this study should be taken into account, applying appropriate critical levels. - Ozone tolerance overlapped with leaf traits in four Quercus species.

  19. Gambel Oak for Spanish Goats: A Digestion-Balance Evaluation of Nutrient Availability

    Dick, Brian L.

    1988-01-01

    Fresh-harvested Gambel oak (Quercus gambelii) browse was mixed with chopped alfalfa hay to formulate six diets , varying in oak content at two phenological stages. Diets included juvenile oak (65 ,80,95%), mature oak (40,80\\), and an alfalfa control . Diets we re evaluated for goats using a series of total-collection dige st ion balance trials . Dry matter intake was highest for animal s on mature oak diets, and lowest on diets containing a high percentage of juvenile oak, possibly due to dif...

  20. Addressing post-transplant summer water stress in Pinus pinea and Quercus ilex seedlings

    Pardos M; Calama R; Mayoral C; Madrigal G; Sánchez-González M

    2015-01-01

    In central Spain, post-transplant water stress produces high seedling mortality after the first summer following outplanting. Our study was designed to determine whether survival and performance of outplanted stone pine (Pinus pinea) and holm oak (Quercus ilex) seedlings in a burned area could be improved by summer irrigation and mulching and to identify whether there is a species-specific adaptive capacity to respond to treatment and environment. Seedlings were outplanted in March 2011 in 20...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex Strain Griffin-1 from Quercus rubra in Georgia.

    Chen, Jianchi; Huang, Hong; Chang, Chung-Jan; Stenger, Drake C

    2013-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex strain Griffin-1, isolated from a red oak tree (Quercus rubra) in Georgia, is reported here. The bacterium has a genome size of 2,387,314 bp, with a G+C content of 51.7%. The Griffin-1 strain genome contains 2,903 predicted open reading frames and 50 RNA genes. PMID:24115539

  2. Evaluation of biofilm removal activity of Quercus infectoria galls against Streptococcus mutans

    Maryam Mohammadi-Sichani; Vajihe Karbasizadeh; Samaneh Chaharmiri Dokhaharani

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dental caries is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases affecting humans of all ages. Streptococcus mutans has an important role in the development of dental caries by acid production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial and biofilm disinfective effects of the oak tree Quercus infectoria galls against S. mutans. Materials and Methods: The bacterial strain used in this study was S. mutans (ATCC: 35668). Two kinds of galls, Mazouj and Ghalghaf were...

  3. Foliar epidermis morphology in Quercus (subgenus Quercus, section Quercus) in Iran

    Panahi, Parisa; JAMZAD, Ziba; Pourmajidian, Mohammad R.; Fallah, Ashgar; Pourhashemi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    The foliar morphology of trichomes, epicuticular waxes and stomata in Quercus cedrorum, Q. infectoria subsp. boissieri, Q. komarovii, Q. longipes, Q. macranthera, Q. petraea subsp. iberica and Q. robur subsp. pedunculiflora were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The trichomes are mainly present on abaxial leaf surface in most species, but rarely they appear on adaxial surface. Five trichome types are identified as simple uniseriate, bulbous, solitary, fasciculate and stellate. The stom...

  4. Measurement of oak tree density with Landsat TM data for estimating biogenic isoprene emissions in Tennessee, USA

    Baugh, W; Klinger, L.; A. Guenther; Geron, C.

    2001-01-01

    Isoprene emissions from oak trees in the eastern USA play an important role in tropospheric ozone pollution. Oak trees (Quercus) emit an order of magnitude more isoprene than most other emitting tree species, and are by far the largest source of biogenic isoprene in the eastern US. We used Landsat TM data to measure oak tree abundance near Oak Ridge. Tennessee, to estimate fluxes of isoprene. The Landsat classification was performed using multi-date data: supervised classification techniques,...

  5. Susceptibility of sprouted oak acorns to Phytophthora ramorum zoospores

    Phytophthora ramorum is a recently emerged pathogen, having established in Europe and several western U.S. states, including California and Oregon. It has a wide host range and is a threat to forest ecology and the nursery industry. In California, coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) is a major host...

  6. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ON ISOPRENE EMISSION FROM LIVE OAK

    Live-oak plants (Quercus virginia) were subjected to various levels of CO2, water stress or photosynthetic photon flux density to test the hypothesis that isoprene biosynthesis occurred only under conditions of restricted CO2 availability. Isoprene emission increases as the ambie...

  7. Effects of Artificial Regeneration Methods on Mortality, Growth and Shape of Oak Seedlings in a Central European Oak-Hornbeam Stand

    TOBISCH, Tamás

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the results of an artificial regeneration experiment carried out in anoak-hornbeam stand. The effects of initial seedling density (10200, 14300, 35700 stems per hectare),spacing geometry (140 cm x 70 cm, 240 cm x 40 cm), chemical (with Erunit and Nabu) andmechanical weeding of pedunculate (Quercus robur) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea) wereexamined at the age of eight years. The mortality of Q. robur seedlings was independent of the initialdensity but that of Q. petraea ...

  8. OAK GALLS: THE MEDICINAL BALLS

    *Shaikh Imtiyaz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available From centuries ago man has been using herbs for medicinal purposes, in traditional system of medicine like Unani, Ayurveda, Chinese medicine number of herbs and drugs of plant origin are found to be useful in curing of various ailments. Oak galls (Mazu is an out growths formed on the young twigs of the dyer's oak, Quercus infectoria (Fagaceae, as a result of the deposition of the eggs of the gall-wasp Adleria gallae-tinctoriae Olivier, this is used for medicinal purposes before escape of insects in dried form as described by classical Unani literature. Keeping in view of it this literature is reviewed about medicinal properties of Mazu described by ancient Unani scholars along with latest research on it this review paper is formulated and an attempt is made to correlate properties of Mazu with latest scientific research.

  9. Application of High Resolution Satellite Imagery to Characterize Individual-Based Environmental Heterogeneity in a Wild Blue Tit Population

    Marta Szulkin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental heterogeneity in space and time plays a key role in influencing trait variability in animals, and can be particularly relevant to animal phenology. Until recently, the use of remotely sensed imagery in understanding animal variation was limited to analyses at the population level, largely because of a lack of high-resolution data that would allow inference at the individual level. We evaluated the potential of SPOT 4 (Take 5 satellite imagery data (with observations every fifth day at 20 m resolution and equivalent to acquisition parameters of Sentinel-2 in animal ecology research. We focused on blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus reproduction in a study site containing 227 nestboxes scattered in a Mediterranean forest dominated by deciduous downy oaks Quercus pubescens with a secondary cover of evergreen holm oaks Quercus ilex. We observed high congruence between ground data collected in a 50 m radius around each nestbox and NDVI values averaged across a 5 by 5 pixel grid centered around each nestbox of the study site. The number of deciduous and evergreen oaks around nestboxes explained up to 66% of variance in nestbox-centered, SPOT-derived NDVI values. We also found highly equivalent patterns of spatial autocorrelation for both ground- and satellite-derived indexes of environmental heterogeneity. For deciduous and evergreen oaks, the derived NDVI signal was highly distinctive in winter and early spring. June NDVI values for deciduous and evergreen oaks were higher by 58% and 8% relative to February values, respectively. The number of evergreen oaks was positively associated with later timing of breeding in blue tits. SPOT-derived, Sentinel-2 like imagery thus provided highly reliable, ground-validated information on habitat heterogeneity of direct relevance to a long-term field study of a free-living passerine bird. Given that the logistical demands of gathering ground data often limit our understanding of variation in animal

  10. A cortiça como sonda ambiental de metais pesados: um serviço sócio-ambiental prestado por montados de sobro e sobreirais The cork as environmental probe of heavy metals: a socio- environmental service done by “montados” with cork oaks and cork oak stands (Quercus suber L.

    J. Ponte-e-Sousa

    2007-01-01

    causa em cada camada da cortiça de sobreiros dispersos na área onde vegetam, poder obter-se uma estimativa dos teores médios desses metais nos locais frequentemente caracterizados pela presença daquela árvore, poderá vir a ser muito interessante para um conhecimento mais profundo desta realidade.The long term life of cork oak and the capacity that “amadia” cork has to build annual layers (highly separable allowed to create the hypothesis of correlation between the chemical marks made in each growing layer and the environmental characteristics of the place where the cork oak grows. This would allow to build space and time distribution series every nine years, about the characteristic in study. This is somewhat alike some dendrometric procedures, but these ones are much more aggressive. The objective of this work was to study lead (II in cork by voltammetry, because this method is well recognized as having competitive vantages over other known methods already used. The methodology adopted was: bark extraction, acid-hot digestion in closed recipient and voltammetric analytical signal search. The main conclusion is the possible association of this technique as another socioenvironmental service that “montado” can provide, in order to evaluate the quality of mediterranean basin continental areas with cork oak tree, regarding lead contamination.

  11. Canopy arthropods community within and among oak species in central Mexico

    Efraín TOVAR-SANCHEZ

    2009-01-01

    Quercus rugosa and Q.laurina are species that presents a wide geographical distribution range in temperate forests of Mexico. Oak canopies contain a considerable portion of arthropod diversity and the arthropods fauna fulfill a wide variety of ecological roles. We examined the effect of oak species and seasonal changes on some community structure parameters (diversity, composition, similarity, biomass, rare species, and density of arthropod fauna) of canopy arthropods. In total, 40 oak ca...

  12. A neighborhood analysis of the consequences of Quercus suber decline for regeneration dynamics in Mediterranean forests.

    Beatriz Ibáñez

    Full Text Available In forests, the vulnerable seedling stage is largely influenced by the canopy, which modifies the surrounding environment. Consequently, any alteration in the characteristics of the canopy, such as those promoted by forest dieback, might impact regeneration dynamics. Our work analyzes the interaction between canopy neighbors and seedlings in Mediterranean forests affected by the decline of their dominant species (Quercus suber. Our objective was to understand how the impacts of neighbor trees and shrubs on recruitment could affect future dynamics of these declining forests. Seeds of the three dominant tree species (Quercus suber, Olea europaea and Quercus canariensis were sown in six sites during two consecutive years. Using a spatially-explicit, neighborhood approach we developed models that explained the observed spatial variation in seedling emergence, survival, growth and photochemical efficiency as a function of the size, identity, health, abundance and distribution of adult trees and shrubs in the neighborhood. We found strong neighborhood effects for all the performance estimators, particularly seedling emergence and survival. Tree neighbors positively affected emergence, independently of species identity or health. Alternatively, seedling survival was much lower in neighborhoods dominated by defoliated and dead Q. suber trees than in neighborhoods dominated by healthy trees. For the two oak species, these negative effects were consistent over the three years of the experimental seedlings. These results indicate that ongoing changes in species' relative abundance and canopy trees' health might alter the successional trajectories of Mediterranean oak-forests through neighbor-specific impacts on seedlings. The recruitment failure of dominant late-successional oaks in the gaps opened after Q. suber death would indirectly favor the establishment of other coexisting woody species, such as drought-tolerant shrubs. This could lead current

  13. Can we use shelterwoods in Mediterranean pine forests to promote oak seedling development?

    Prévosto, Bernard; Monnier, Yogan; Ripert, Christian; Fernandez, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The use of shelterwoods to favour the development of natural or underplanted seedlings is common in temperate forests but rare in the pine forests of the Mediterranean area. Our aim was to assess the use of shelterwoods in Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis) woodlands in southern France to promote the survival and growth of two co-occurring oak species: the deciduous Quercus pubescens and the evergreen Quercus ilex. Twelve Aleppo pine stands were selected and differentially thinned to create a lig...

  14. Seasonal trends in photosynthesis and electron transport during the Mediterranean summer drought in leaves of deciduous oaks.

    Osuna, Jessica L; Baldocchi, Dennis D; Kobayashi, Hideki; Dawson, Todd E

    2015-05-01

    The California Mediterranean savanna has harsh summer conditions with minimal soil moisture, high temperature, high incoming solar radiation and little or no precipitation. Deciduous blue oaks, Quercus douglasii Hook. and Arn., are winter-deciduous obligate phreatophytes, transpiring mostly groundwater throughout the summer drought. The objective of this work is to fully characterize the seasonal trends of photosynthesis in blue oaks as well as the mechanistic relationships between leaf structure and function. We estimate radiative load of the leaves via the FLiES model and perform in situ measurements of leaf water potential, leaf nitrogen content, an index of chlorophyll content (SPAD readings), photosynthetic and electron transport capacity, and instantaneous rates of CO2 assimilation and electron transport. We measured multiple trees over 3 years providing data from a range of conditions. Our study included one individual that demonstrated strong drought stress as indicated by changes in SPAD readings, leaf nitrogen and all measures of leaf functioning. In the year following severe environmental stress, one individual altered foliation patterns on the crown but did not die. In all other individuals, we found that net carbon assimilation and photosynthetic capacity decreased during the summer drought. SPAD values, electron transport rate (ETR) and quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) did not show a strong decrease during the summer drought. In most individuals, PSII activity and SPAD readings did not indicate leaf structural or functional damage throughout the season. While net carbon assimilation was tightly coupled to stomatal conductance, the coupling was not as tight with ETR possibly due to contributions from photorespiration or other protective processes. Our work demonstrates that the blue oaks avoid structural damage by maintaining the capacity to convert and dissipate incoming solar radiation during the hot summer drought and are effective at fixing

  15. Shrub facilitation of Quercus ilex and Quercus pubescens regeneration in a wooded pasture in central Sardinia (Italy

    Alias S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the woodlands of Sardinia, as in many other areas of the Mediterranean region, grazing of domestic animals is still very common, though often in the absence of any sustainable management logic or technique. The present work analyzes the effects of excessive grazing pressure on a wooded pasture in the municipality of Orgosolo (Nuoro province, emphasizing the effects on the natural regeneration of the oak species (Quercus ilex and Quercus pubescens. This study has revealed the positive effects of the interaction between shrubs and seedlings of tree species. Crataegus monogyna proved to be the most efficient shrub species in favouring the establishment and growth of saplings; Rubus ulmifolius is efficient in the establishing phase but somewhat less so in the following stages. The other shrub species (Prunus spinosa, Genista pichi-sermolliana, Stachys glutinosa play a lesser facilitating role. Despite the fact that seedlings are found in more than half (56% of the shrub patches, the average age of the seedlings (14±0.6 yrs and their small average size (height 24±1.4cm lead to think that the present grazing pressure is incompatible with any concrete chance of success for their natural regeneration.

  16. Comparison of growth, nutrition and soil properties of pure stands of Quercus castaneifolia C. A. Mey. and mixed with Carpinus betulus L. in the Hyrcanian forests of Iran

    Seyed Mohsen Hosseini

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, Quercus castaneifolia (Oak, as target species and Carpinus betulus (Horn beam, as native component species were planted in five proportions (100Q, 70Q:30C, 60Q:40C, 50Q:50C, 40Q:60C in the Noor region (North Iran. After 12 years, the effects of the species on the growth of the trees, nutrient concentrations in the live and senescent leave and on soil properties were assessed. The results showed the survival and diameter at breast height (dbh of the individual Oak trees were positively affected by the presence of Horn beam. Percent retranslocation of the nutrients in Quercus trees was: K>N>P. Leaflitter fall production ranged from 4.70 to 6.80 Mg ha1 year 1. N concentration in fully expanded leaves, N and Ca concentrations in the senescent leaves of Quercus trees and N concentration in topsoil were higher in some of the mixed plantations than in the monocultures of the Quercus trees. N fluxes, N and P etranslocation, and soil P concentrations in the monocultures were intermediate relative to mixed plantations. The obtained results somewhat indicated that the mixing with hornbeam increased the productivity and sustainability of the oak sites. Within the framework of this experiment, it appeared that production was maximized when these two species were grown together in the proportion of 50% Quercus castaneifolia and 50% Carpinus betulus.

  17. Research advances in allelopathy of Quercus L.

    Li Guang-de; Jia Li-ming; Li Xiao-wen

    2007-01-01

    The term allelopathy refers to biochemical interaction between all types of plants including microorganisms through production of chemical compounds that escape into the environment and exist widely in Quercus L. The development of investigations into types of allelochemicals,their compounding and spreading pathways,as well as expression of allelopathy in Quercus L. are reviewed in this paper:We have closely and systematically emphasized the functional mechanisms of allelopathy in forest plants for our next research project on allelopathy in Quercus L.

  18. MEASUREMENT OF OAK TREE DENSITY WITH LANDSAT TM DATA FOR ESTIMATING BIOGENIC ISOPRENE EMISSIONS IN TENNESSEE, USA

    Isoprene emissions from oak trees in the eastern USA play an important role in tropospheric ozone pollution. Oak trees (Quercus) emit an order of magnitude more isoprene than most other emitting tree species and are by far the largest source of biogenic isoprene in the eastern US...

  19. Postpartum Blues

    Full Text Available ... baby blues). What are the baby blues? The word "blues" is not really correct since women with ... baby blues). What are the baby blues? The word "blues" is not really correct since women with ...

  20. CLIMATIC FACTORS AND ESTABLISHMENT OF QUERCUS ILEX - COMMUNITIES IN TRIESTE PROVINCE (NE ITALY

    A. FURLANETTO

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the coastal area called "Cernizza" (near Duino. ca 15 km NW from Trieste, at an altitude between 0 and 40 m. is located a wood vegetation complex characterized by Quercus ilex and Carpinus orientalis. The bedrocks of this site is carbonatic. This wood vegetation does not occur in other sites or the Trieste province, where deciduous oak woods (Q. pubescells, Q. petraea s.1. are dominant both on arenaceus and on carbonatic rocks. Other Quercus ilex communities are occurring only as scrubs on the calcareous coastal cliffs characterized by primitive lithosoils. In order to detect if this wood community might be an expression of the c1imate dominating this particular zone, some Duino's c1imatic data, relative lo a record period of 9 years. have been compared with the Trieste's ones. The analysed parameters were the following: air temperature. rainfall, evaporation. wind speed and relative humidity. From the comparison of these paramenters it emerged that the Duino's climate is more humid than the Trieste's one. Only in springtime Duino is less rainy than Trieste according lo the analysis of the monthly mean values of precipitation. From the ecophysiological point of view, a study of the seasonal changes of the root hydraulic conductance in some forest trees (Nardini el al .. 1998 has pointed out the superiority of Quercus ilex compared to Quercus pubescens, as regards the competitive ability of the seedlings during the spring. For this reason, the smaller spring rainfall could explain the occurrence of Quercus ilex stands not only in the neighbourhood of Duino but also at the beginning of the large valleys characterized by S•N direction in the South Eastern Alps.

  1. RNA-Seq Analysis of Quercus pubescens Leaves: De Novo Transcriptome Assembly, Annotation and Functional Markers Development

    Sara Torre; Massimiliano Tattini; Cecilia Brunetti; Silvia Fineschi; Alessio Fini; Francesco Ferrini; Federico Sebastiani

    2014-01-01

    Quercus pubescens Willd., a species distributed from Spain to southwest Asia, ranks high for drought tolerance among European oaks. Q. pubescens performs a role of outstanding significance in most Mediterranean forest ecosystems, but few mechanistic studies have been conducted to explore its response to environmental constrains, due to the lack of genomic resources. In our study, we performed a deep transcriptomic sequencing in Q. pubescens leaves, including de novo assembly, functional annot...

  2. Tabla de volumen para quercus copeyensis Muller en los robledales de San Gerardo de Dota, Costa Rica.

    Wilberth Jiménez.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a volume table for an oak Quercus copeyensis Müller forest located in San Gerardo de Dota, Talamanca Range. For the elaboration of the volume table, several models were tested: the Logarithmic function showed the best approximation. Bases on the Logarithmic model, a one-variable volume table were constructed. The volume per hectare for Q. copeyensis was calculated based on a complete inventory carried out in the same location.

  3. Conservation of nuclear SSR loci reveals high affinity of Quercus infectoria ssp. veneris A. Kern (Fagaceae) to section Robur

    Neophytou, Charalambos; Dounavi, Aikaterini; Aravanopoulos, Filippos A.

    2013-01-01

    Conservation of 16 nuclear microsatellite loci, originally developed for Quercus macrocarpa (section Albae), Q. petraea, Q. robur (section Robur) and Q. myrsinifolia, (subgenus Cyclobalanopsis) was tested in a Q. infectoria ssp. veneris population from Cyprus. All loci could be amplified successfully and displayed allele size and diversity patterns that match those of oak species belonging to the section Robur. At least in one case, limited amplification and high levels of homozygosity suppor...

  4. Transpiration of montane Pinus sylvestris L. and Quercus pubescens Willd. forest stands measured with sap flow sensors in NE Spain

    R. Poyatos; P. Llorens; Gallart, F.

    2005-01-01

    Stand transpiration was measured during the 2003 and 2004 growing seasons using heat dissipation sap flow sensors in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and a pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) forests located in a montane area of the Eastern Pyrenees (NE Spain). The first aim of the study was to assess the differences in quantitative estimates of transpiration (Ec) and the response to evaporative demand of the two stands. Over the studied period of 2003, characterised by a severe drough...

  5. A fast and cost-effective approach to develop and map EST-SSR markers: oak as a case study

    Durand, J; Bodénès, C.; Chancerel, E; Frigerio, J.M.; Vendramin, G.; Sebastiani, F.; Buonamici, A.; Gailing, O.; Koelewijn, H. P.; Villani, F.; Mattioni, C.; Cherubini, M.; Goicoechea, P.G.; Herrán, A.; Ikaran, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are a source of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) that can be used to develop molecular markers for genetic studies. The availability of ESTs for Quercus robur and Quercus petraea provided a unique opportunity to develop microsatellite markers to accelerate research aimed at studying adaptation of these long-lived species to their environment. As a first step toward the construction of a SSR-based linkage map of oak for quantitative trait locus (QTL) ma...

  6. A fast and cost-effective approach to develop and map EST-SSR markers: oak as a case study

    Cherubini Marcello; Mattioni Claudia; Villani Fiorella; Koelewijn Hans-Peter; Gailing Oliver; Buonamici Anna; Sebastiani Federico; Vendramin Giovanni; Frigerio Jean-Marc; Chancerel Emilie; Bodénès Catherine; Durand Jérôme; Goicoechea Pablo G; Herrán Ana; Ikaran Ziortza

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) are a source of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) that can be used to develop molecular markers for genetic studies. The availability of ESTs for Quercus robur and Quercus petraea provided a unique opportunity to develop microsatellite markers to accelerate research aimed at studying adaptation of these long-lived species to their environment. As a first step toward the construction of a SSR-based linkage map of oak for quantitative trait locus ...

  7. Measuring and modelling transpiration of pine and oak forest stands in a Mediterranean mountain area (Vallcebre, NE Spain)

    Poyatos López, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    [eng] This doctoral dissertation contains five applied reseaches about these subjectes: 1. "Transpiration of montane Pinus sylvestris L. and Quercus pubescens Willd. forest stands measured with sap flow sensors in NE Spain." Stand transpiration was measured during the 2003 and 2004 growing seasons using heat dissipation sap flow sensors in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and a pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) forest located in a montane area of the Eastern Pyrenees (NE Spain). Over...

  8. Pathogenicity of Swedish isolates of Phytophthora quercina to Quercus robur in two different soils

    Jönsson Belyazid, Ulrika; Jung, T.; Rosengren, Ulrika; Nihlgård, Bengt; Sonesson, Kerstin

    2003-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of soil-borne Phytophthora species, especially Phytophthora quercina , in European oak decline. However, knowledge about the pathogenicity of P. quercina in natural forest soils is limited. The short-term effects of two south-Swedish isolates of P. quercina on root vitality of Quercus robur seedlings grown in two different soils, one high pH, nutrient-rich peat-sand mixture and one acid, nitrogen-rich but otherwise nutrient-poor forest soil ar...

  9. Quercus faginea in the Mounts of Tlemcen (North-west Algeria): State of Knowledge

    Mohamed Berrichi; Ayyoub Bouazzaoui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present a summary of the dendrometric characteristics, the microscopic image and the physic-mechanical properties of wood and principally leaves morphology for to show the existence of zeen oak (Quercus faginea) population in the far North West of Algeria with specific characters. The morphology of 400 mature leaves taken from 10 trees at the 4 exposures shows that the length of the leaf blade is about 8.568 cm, the width is 4.955 cm, its perimeter about 14.280 cm and its su...

  10. Environmental stress on establishment and growth in Fagus sylvatica L. and Quercus robur L. seedlings

    Loef, Magnus [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp (Sweden). Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre

    1999-04-01

    In this thesis, the growth response to different environmental stresses in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and oak (Quercus robur L.) seedlings was studied in relation to site preparation and use of shelterwood. Growth and survival were compared between beech, oak and Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) seedlings under similar conditions. In a field experiment, with herbicide, herbicide plus fertilization and mowing as treatments, interference from herbaceous vegetation was mainly below ground. Furthermore, soil water is probably the growth factor of greatest importance for establishing beech and oak on fertile sites in southern Sweden. In pot experiments carried out in a climatic chamber both previous and current-year drought influenced growth in beech in the current year, and it was concluded that previous environmental conditions must be taken into consideration to understand growth of seedlings in the current year. Episodic drought resulted in long recovery periods in beech transpiration after rewatering, but also after-effects on transpiration. Thus, short periods of drought may still influence growth afterwards when the soil is rewetted. In field experiments, soil disturbance by patch scarification, mixing of humus with mineral soil and deep cultivation of soil did not increase growth in seedlings compared to untreated soil or where chemical vegetation control was carried out. When, vegetation was efficiently controlled by using a shelterwood of Norway spruce, survival of beech, oak and Norway spruce seedlings planted under the shelterwood trees was high. There was no difference in growth between beech and oak seedlings under the shelterwood. On an open site, oak had a shorter period of transplanting shock, higher growth during interference from vegetation and deeper roots than beech. Thus, beech need more intense site preparation for successful establishment. Herbivory by pine weevil was lower on beech and oak than on Norway spruce. Less efforts are therefore

  11. Applying Hotspot Detection Methods in Forestry: A Case Study of Chestnut Oak Regeneration

    Songlin Fei

    2010-01-01

    Hotspot detection has been widely adopted in health sciences for disease surveillance, but rarely in natural resource disciplines. In this paper, two spatial scan statistics (SaTScan and ClusterSeer) and a nonspatial classification and regression trees method were evaluated as techniques for identifying chestnut oak (Quercus Montana) regeneration hotspots among 50 mixed-oak stands in the central Appalachian region of the eastern United States. Hotspots defined by the three methods had a moder...

  12. Shifting Baselines in a California Oak Savanna: Nineteenth Century Data to Inform Restoration Scenarios

    Whipple, AA; Grossinger, RM; Davis, FW

    2011-01-01

    For centuries humans have reduced and transformed Mediterranean-climate oak woodland and savanna ecosystems, making it difficult to establish credible baselines for ecosystem structure and composition that can guide ecological restoration efforts. We combined historical data sources, with particular attention to mid-1800s General Land Office witness tree records and maps and twentieth century air photos, to reconstruct 150 years of decline in extent and stand density of Valley oak (Quercus lo...

  13. Topographic position modulates the mycorrhizal response of oak trees to interannual rainfall variability

    Querejeta Mercader, José Ignacio; Egerton-Warburton, L. M.; Allen, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    California coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia) forms tripartite symbiotic associations with arbuscular (AMF) and ectomycorrhizal (EMF) fungi. We selected oak individuals differing in topographic position and depth to groundwater (mesic valley vs. xeric hill sites) to investigate changes of tree mycorrhizal status in response to interannual rainfall variability. EMF root colonization, as well as hyphal abundance and viability in upper rhizosphere soil (0–30 cm), were negatively affected by seve...

  14. soil carbon pools within oak forest is endangered by global climate change in central mexico

    García-Oliva, Felipe; Merino, Agustín; González-Rodriguez, Antonio; Chávez-Vergara, Bruno; Tapia-Torres, Yunuen; Oyama, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Forest soil represents the main C pool in terrestrial ecosystems. In particular, temperate forest ecosystems play an important role in the C budget among tropical countries, such as Mexico. For example, the temperate forest ecosystem contains higher C contents on average (295 Mg C ha-1) than the soil C associated with other ecosystems in Mexico (between 56 to 287 Mg C ha-1). At a regional scale, oak forest has the highest C content (460 Mg C ha-1) among the forest ecosystem in Michoacán State at Central Mexico. At the local scale, the soil C content is strongly affected by the composition of organic matter produced by the plant species. The oak species are very diverse in Mexico, distributed within two sections: Quercus sensu stricto and Lobatae. The oak species from Quercus s.s. section produced litterfall with lower concentrations of recalcitrant and thermostable compounds than oak species from Lobatae section, therefore the soil under the former species had higher microbial activity and nutrient availability than the soil under the later species. However, the forest fragment with higher amount of oak species from Quercus s.s. section increases the amount of soil C contents. Unfortunately, Quercus species distribution models for the central western region of Mexico predict a decrease of distribution area of the majority of oak species by the year 2080, as a consequence of higher temperatures and lower precipitation expected under climate change scenarios. Additionally to these scenarios, the remnant oak forest fragments suffer strong degradation due to uncontrolled wood extraction and deforestation. For this reason, the conservation of oak forest fragments is a priority to mitigate the greenhouse gases emission to the atmosphere. In order to enhance the protection of these forest fragments it is required that the society identify the ecosystem services that are provided by these forest fragments.

  15. Distribution and spatial configuration of holm oak woodlands in the Montesinho/Nogueira site, Portugal

    Dias, Rui; Azevedo, João

    2008-01-01

    Holm oak (Quercus rotundifolia) is wide spread within the West Mediterranean region. In Portugal, it is distributed across the interior of the country but woodlands of this species are currently rare. Historical factors explain most of the regression of holm oak to areas not suitable for agriculture where woodlands of this species persist in spite of very frequent wild fires. With the purpose of identifying physical factors related to the maintenance...

  16. Wettability and water uptake of holm oak leaf surfaces

    Fernández, Victoria; Sancho Knapik, Domingo; Guzmán, Paula; Peguero Pina, José Javier; KARABOURNIOTIS, GEORGE; Khayet, Mohamed; Fasseas, Costas; Heredia Guerrero, José Alejandro; Heredia Bayona, Antonio; Gil Pelegrín, Eustaquio

    2014-01-01

    Plant trichomes play important protective functions and may have a major influence on leaf surface wettability. With the aim of gaining insight into trichome structure, composition and function in relation to water-plant surface interactions, we analyzed the adaxial and abaxial leaf surface of Quercus ilex L. (holm oak) as model. By measuring the leaf water potential 24 h after the deposition of water drops on to abaxial and adaxial surfaces, evidence for water penetration through the upper l...

  17. Large-scale patterns of Quercus ilex, Quercus suber, and Quercus pyrenaica regeneration in central-western Spain

    Plieninger, Tobias; Rolo, Víctor; Moreno, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    In Central-Western Spain, forests and woodlands composed of Quercus sp. support outstanding levels of biodiversity, but there is increasing concern about their long-term persistence due to a lack of regeneration. We hypothesize that this regenerative lack is operating on a large geographic scale...

  18. Stimulation of Armillaria rhizomorph growth by oak root fungi

    Hanna Kwaśna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thirty one different genera of fungi were isolated from the wood of roots of 5O·year·old oak (Quercus robur. The most frequently isolated fungi were: Mycelium radicis atrovirens alpha (MRAA, Clonostachys sp. and Penicillium daleae, Beauveria bassiana, Clonostachys sp., Cryplosporiopsis rodicicolo, Geotrichum candidum, Mortierella vinacea, MRAA, P. daleae, P. janczewskii P. spinulosum, Sporothrix schenckii and Tolypocladium niveum significantly enhanced Armillaria mellea rhizomorph initiation and growth from oak branch segments in vitro. The biggest stimulation effect was noticed when the dematiaceous hyphomycetes, e.g. MRAA, P. dimorphospora and S. schenckii were studied.

  19. Large Drought-Induced Variations in Oak Leaf Volatile Organic Compound Emissions during PINOT NOIR 2012

    Leaf-level isoprene and monoterpene emissions were collected and analyzed from five of the most abundant oak (Quercus) species in Central Missouri’s Ozarks Region in 2012 during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower ‐ NOx, Oxidants, Isoprene Research). Ju...

  20. Chloroplast DNA variation of oaks in western Central Europe and genetic consequences of human influences

    König, A.O.; Ziegenhagen, B.; Dam, van B.C.; Csaikl, U.M.; Coart, E.; Degen, B.; Burg, K.; Vries, de S.M.G.; Petit, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Oak chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variation was studied in a grid-based inventory in western Central Europe, including Belgium, The Netherlands, Luxembourg, Germany, the Czech Republic, and the northern parts of Upper and Lower Austria. A total of 2155 trees representing 426 populations of Quercus robur L

  1. The dynamics of cork oak systems in Portugal: the role of ecological and land use factors

    Acácio, V.C.

    2009-01-01

    Vegetation degradation and desertification occur in many semiarid ecosystems worldwide, particularly in the Western Mediterranean Basin. A peculiar semiarid Mediterranean land use system dominates the landscape of southern Portugal where cork oak (Quercus suber) is the main tree species. This system

  2. Analysis of the fluidized bed combustion behavior of Quercus ilex char

    Because of the high content of alkaline metals, biomass has very reactive ashes and these have a strong impact upon pyrolysis and combustion phenomena. From the study of the evolution with the combustion temperature, of the kinetic and diffusive data of several wood chars, it was found that the Quercus ilex (holm oak) char had an unexpected evolution of the heterogeneous phase reaction rate constant. Scanning electronic microscopy analysis of the ashes and thermogravimetric analysis of the char where performed, and the results shown that close to 750 °C there is a loss of mass associated with the release of inorganic matter, especially potassium and phosphorus, which have a known influence on the combustion process and the subsequent kinetic data collection. - Highlights: • Fluidized bed combustion of biomass. • Combustion behavior of holm oak char. • Influence of alkaline components on char combustion kinetic data

  3. Density and Mechanical Properties of Oak Sapwood Versus Heartwood

    Maks Merela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the main mechanical properties of sapwood and heartwood in white and red oaks. Samples of wood were taken from 26 oak beams prepared to be used for railway sleepers, of which 62 % were from white oak (either Quercus petraea or. Q. robur and 38 % from red oak group, represented by Q. cerris. For both oak groups, the following parameters were determined: the density, bending strength, modulus of elasticity (MOE, compression strength and Brinell hardness of sapwood and heartwood. Multiple analyses were done to compare the properties of sapwood and heartwood, as well as the properties of white vs. red oaks. The results revealed no significant differences between sapwood and heartwood properties but statistically significant differences were found between the properties of white and red oaks. The research results contradict the common opinion of users that the mechanical properties of sapwood are inferior to those of heartwood. Investigations revealed that Q. cerris had even better mechanical properties than Q. robur or Q. petraea, which also contradicts the common opinion that its mechanical properties are inferior to those of white oaks. The results help to understand better wood variability for optimal selection of timber for construction.

  4. Estimating the relative nutrient uptake from different soil depths in Quercus robur, Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies

    Göransson, Hans; Wallander, Håkan; Ingerslev, Morten;

    2006-01-01

    uptake capacity of Rb+ and NH4+ by these fine roots under standardized conditions in the laboratory. The study was performed in monocultures of oak (Quercus robur L.), European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] on sandy soil in a tree species trial in Denmark. The...

  5. Mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease and surrounding forest compositions.

    Oguro, Michio; Imahiro, Sawako; Saito, Shoichi; Nakashizuka, Tohru

    2015-12-01

    Japanese oak wilt (Raffaelea quercivora) is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the flying ambrosia beetle, Platypus quercivorus, and causes mass mortality in the fagaceous species of Japan. The data described in this article are available in Mendeley Data, DOI: 10.17632/xwj98nb39r.1 [1] and include the mortality status of 1089 Quercus crispula and 846 Quercus serrata trees and surrounding forest conditions. The findings using this dataset were published in M. Oguro, S. Imahiro, S. Saito, T. Nakashizuka, Relative importance of multiple scale factors to oak tree mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease, For. Ecol. Manag. (2015) doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2015.07.016 [2]. PMID:26543883

  6. Mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease and surrounding forest compositions

    Michio Oguro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Japanese oak wilt (Raffaelea quercivora is a vector-borne disease transmitted by the flying ambrosia beetle, Platypus quercivorus, and causes mass mortality in the fagaceous species of Japan. The data described in this article are available in Mendeley Data, DOI: 10.17632/xwj98nb39r.1 [1] and include the mortality status of 1089 Quercus crispula and 846 Quercus serrata trees and surrounding forest conditions. The findings using this dataset were published in M. Oguro, S. Imahiro, S. Saito, T. Nakashizuka, Relative importance of multiple scale factors to oak tree mortality due to Japanese oak wilt disease, For. Ecol. Manag. (2015 doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2015.07.016 [2].

  7. Postpartum Blues

    Full Text Available ... blues The postpartum blues E-mail to a friend Please fill in all fields. Please enter a ... blues: Talk to your partner or a good friend about how you feel Get plenty of rest ...

  8. Carbon Stock Potential of Oak and Pine Forests in Garhwal Region in Indian Central Himalayas

    Nanda Nautiyal; Vir Singh

    2013-01-01

    Oak (Quercus leucotichophora) and pine (Pinus roxburghii) are the two most dominant forest types occurring in Indian Central Himalayas. CO2 mitigation potential of these two forest types was observed in the present study. Carbon stock densities for AGTB, BB, LHG, DWS, AGSB and SOC were estimated and higher values were recorded in oak forest stands. Total carbon density estimated was 2420.54 Mg/ha for oak forest of Gopeshwar and 986.93 Mg/ha for pine forest of Nandprayag. CO2 mitigation potent...

  9. Antimicrobial Effects of Quercus Brantii Fruits on Bacterial Pathogens

    Issa Sadeghian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, a number of antibiotics have lost their effectiveness due to the development of resistant strains, mostly through the expression of resistance genes.Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial property of Quercus brantii fruits and compare its effects with some current antibiotics.Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activities of an ethanol extract of Q. brantii (Oak fruits (brown cortex: B.C and white core: W.C were tested in vitro against eight reference strains of enteric pathogenic bacteria. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts were examined based on the disc diffusion method. The results were evaluated as inhibition zones around the discs impregnated with B.C and W.C extracts at different concentrations (2 to 10 %.Results: The antibacterial effect of the B.C ethanolic extract on Escherichia coli was significant and had a concentration-related effect, although there was no significant effect found on Helicobacter pylori. The W.C ethanolic extract has a high antimicrobial effect on Streptococcus pyogenes; at the same time significant antibacterial activity occurred against H pylori. Comparisons between the antimicrobial activities of these extracts (B.C and W.C and standard antibiotics; gentamicin, colistin, and methicillin, showed that in the most commonly tested bacteria the antibacterial activity of these extracts was even greater than with the antibiotics. Analysis of the extracts components by gas chromatography, showed that tannins and phenolic compounds could be responsible for these antimicrobial activities.Conclusions: The results of this study showed that different parts of Q. brantii have antimicrobial activity against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. These antimicrobial activities, in almost all cases, were greater than with standard antibiotics..--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Implication for health

  10. Contrasting root associated fungi of three common oak-woodland plant species based on molecular identification: host specificity or non-specific amplification?

    Douhan, Greg W; Petersen, Carolyn; Bledsoe, Caroline S; Rizzo, David M

    2005-07-01

    An increasingly popular approach used to identify arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in planta is to amplify a portion of AM fungal small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU-rDNA) from whole root DNA extractions using the primer pair AM1-NS31, followed by cloning and sequencing. We used this approach to study the AM fungal community composition of three common oak-woodland plant species: a grass (Cynosurus echinatus), blue oak (Quercus douglasii), and a forb (Torilis arvensis). Significant diversity of AM fungi were found in the roots of C. echinatus, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating a high degree of AM fungal diversity from the roots of various hosts. In contrast, clones from Q. douglasii and T. arvensis were primarily from non-AM fungi of diverse origins within the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. This work demonstrates that caution must be taken when using this molecular approach to determine in planta AM fungal diversity if non-sequence based methods such as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, or temperature gradient gel electrophoresis are used. PMID:15772816

  11. Groundwater dependent ecohydrology in a semi-arid oak savanna (Invited)

    Miller, G. R.; Rubin, Y.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Chen, X.; Ma, S.

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater can serve as an important resource for woody vegetation in semi-arid landscapes, particularly when soil water is functionally depleted and unavailable to plants. This study examines the uptake of groundwater by deciduous blue oak trees (Quercus douglasii) in a California oak savanna. Here, we present a suite of direct and indirect measurement techniques, combined with modeling, that demonstrate its occurrence and quantify its rates. The study site is similar to others with shallow-soil ecohydrology: it is underlain by a thin, rocky soil layer followed fractured metavolcanic bedrock. Typical depth to groundwater is approximately 8 m and varies from 7- 10 m, both spatially and temporally. A variety of water storage and flux measurements were collected from 2005 to 2008, including groundwater levels, soil moisture contents, sap flows, and latent heat fluxes. During the dry season, groundwater uptake rates ranged from 4 to 25 mm per month, and approximately 80% of total ET during June, July, and August came from groundwater. Leaf and soil water potentials supported these results, indicating that groundwater uptake was thermodynamically favorable over soil water uptake for key portions of the growing season. Sap flow rates suggest differential access to groundwater by trees of varying size classes. Dynamic groundwater-soil-plant-atmosphere modeling has shown that in order to achieve these uptake rates, approximately 20% of roots must be exposed to groundwater. Modeled evapotranspiration rates drop dramatically during the late summer when this connection is severed (Figure 1). These findings strongly suggest that blue oaks should be considered obligate phreatophytes, and that groundwater reserves provide a buffer to rapid changes in their hydro-climate, if these assets are not otherwise depleted by prolonged drought or human consumption. While groundwater uptake may provide for short-term protection, it should be viewed not as a mechanism for continued plant

  12. Transpiration of montane Pinus sylvestris L. and Quercus pubescens Willd. forest stands measured with sap flow sensors in NE Spain

    R. Poyatos; P. Llorens; Gallart, F.

    2005-01-01

    Stand transpiration was measured during the 2003 and 2004 growing seasons using heat dissipation sap flow sensors in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and a pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) forest located in a montane area of the Eastern Pyrenees (NE Spain). The first aim of the study was to assess the differences in quantitative estimates of transpiration (Ec) and the response to evaporative demand of the two stands. Over the studied period of 2003, characterised by a severe drought...

  13. Study of the sap-flow and related quantities of oak trees in field experiments

    Complete text of publication follows. Climatology model calculations for the next decades in the Carpathian Basin predict more frequent occurrence of meteorological extremes and, especially, longer droughts with elevated average temperatures during the growing season. A drift of the transition zone between the wooden steppe and the forest regions is predicted, too, resulting in significant reduction and alteration of the climazonal forest communities in the mountainous regions. The aim of our project is obtaining information on the climatic sensitivity of the tree species in the sessile oak - Austrian oak forest stand of the Sikfoekut Project Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) area (Buekk Mountains, NE Hungary). 'Campaign-like' complex field measurements have been performed in contrasting vegetation seasons of 2007 and 2008. As a function of time, stomatal conductance and intensity of sap-flow and stem diameter of Quercus petraea and Quercus cerris trees were measured simultaneously with photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity and vapour pressure deficit (VPD) of air, precipitation and soil moisture. It was found that the two oak species of forest stand exhibit similar daily course of stomatal conductance in rainy periods. However, during drought stomatal conductance of Quercus cerris was higher, and after a transitional decrease around midday it exhibited a second maximum in late afternoon. In dry days after a maximum of stomatal conductance at early morning the stomatal closure of Quercus petraea was permanent which might result in 'carbon starvation' of trees if drought is too long. During rainy periods, sap-flow of both species changed in correlation with VPD. In dry period this correlation weakened especially in case of Quercus petraea but a stronger correlation of sap-flow maximum appeared with the decreasing soil moisture content. Quercus cerris showed smaller stem radial variation, than Quercus

  14. Effects of prescribed fires on young valley oak trees at a research restoration site in the Central Valley of California

    Holmes, K A; Veblen, Kari E.; T. P. YOUNG; Berry, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Woodland restoration sites planted with Quercus lobata (valley oak) often have serious invasions of nonnative annual grasses and thistles. Although prescribed fire can effectively control these exotics, restoration managers may be reluctant to use fire if it causes substantial mortality of recently planted saplings. We studied the effects of prescribed fires on the survival and subsequent growth of 5- and 6-year-old valley oak saplings at a research field near Davis, California. One set of bl...

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Raffaelea quercivora JCM 11526, a Japanese Oak Wilt Pathogen Associated with the Platypodid Beetle, Platypus quercivorus

    Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Ohkuma, Moriya; Endoh, Rikiya

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese oak wilt pathogen Raffaelea quercivora and the platypodid beetle, Platypus quercivorus, cause serious mass mortality of Quercus spp. in Japan. Here, we present the first draft genome sequence of R. quercivora JCM 11526 to increase our understanding of the mechanism of pathogenicity and symbiosis with the ambrosia beetle. PMID:27469944

  16. Root vitality of Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea Liebl. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in mature mixed forest stand

    Grygoruk, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    The main task of the present study was to investigate the root vitality of common beech Fagus sylvatica L., sessile oak Quercus petraea Liebl. and sycamore maple Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the optimal growth conditions in south-western Poland. The study was carried out in 130-year-old mixed stand located within natural range of studied tree species. The density of roots (g/100 cm3 of soil) and biomass of fine roots (g/m2) in topsoil layers (0–5 cm, 5–15 cm) were determined in the tree biogroup...

  17. Chromatographic analysis of natural pigments L. and quercus infectoria oliv: produced from datisca cannabina plants and their antimicrobial activity

    In this study, natural pigments from the hemp (Datisca cannabina L.) and dyer's oak ). 12H/sub 2/O (alum) mordant. A (Quercus infectoria Oliv.) dye plants were prepared by using KAl(SO/sub 4)/sub 2/ reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD) method was used in the identification of dyes in the natural pigments. The dye extractions from the natural pigments were carried out with 37% HCl/MeOH/H/sub 2/O (2:1:1 v/v/v) mixture. Also, antimicrobial activity of crude extracts of plants and pigments were investigated. (author)

  18. CHANGES IN VOLATILE COMPOSITION AND SENSORY PROPERTIES OF VUGAVA WINES AGED IN CROATIA OAK BARRELS

    Stanka HERJAVEC

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Vugava musts were fermented in medium-toasted Croatian barrique barrels (225 L made from Quercus petrea and Q. robur oak wood. The oak species used in this research infl uenced the specifi c change of the aroma structure of Vugava wines. During the age period the increase in the concentration of cis and trans oaklactons, guaiacol, eugenol, furfural and 5-methylfurfural was noted. Wines fermented and aged in Q. petrea barrels have higher concentrations of most volatile phenols compared to wines from Q. robur oak wood. From the organoleptic point of view this study suggested that fermentation and on the lees ageing production method in Croatian oak barrels positively infl uenced the quality of Vugava wines where best results were achieved by use of Q. petrea oak wood.

  19. Applying Hotspot Detection Methods in Forestry: A Case Study of Chestnut Oak Regeneration

    Songlin Fei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hotspot detection has been widely adopted in health sciences for disease surveillance, but rarely in natural resource disciplines. In this paper, two spatial scan statistics (SaTScan and ClusterSeer and a nonspatial classification and regression trees method were evaluated as techniques for identifying chestnut oak (Quercus Montana regeneration hotspots among 50 mixed-oak stands in the central Appalachian region of the eastern United States. Hotspots defined by the three methods had a moderate level of conformity and revealed similar chestnut oak regeneration site affinity. Chestnut oak regeneration hotspots were positively associated with the abundance of chestnut oak trees in the overstory and a moderate cover of heather species (Vaccinium and Gaylussacia spp. but were negatively associated with the abundance of hayscented fern (Dennstaedtia punctilobula and mountain laurel (Kalmia latiforia. In general, hotspot detection is a viable tool for assisting natural resource managers with identifying areas possessing significantly high or low tree regeneration.

  20. High-density linkage mapping and distribution of segregation distortion regions in the oak genome.

    Bodénès, Catherine; Chancerel, Emilie; Ehrenmann, François; Kremer, Antoine; Plomion, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    We developed the densest single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based linkage genetic map to date for the genus Quercus An 8k gene-based SNP array was used to genotype more than 1,000 full-sibs from two intraspecific and two interspecific full-sib families of Quercus petraea and Quercus robur A high degree of collinearity was observed between the eight parental maps of the two species. A composite map was then established with 4,261 SNP markers spanning 742 cM over the 12 linkage groups (LGs) of the oak genome. Nine genomic regions from six LGs displayed highly significant distortions of segregation. Two main hypotheses concerning the mechanisms underlying segregation distortion are discussed: genetic load vs. reproductive barriers. Our findings suggest a predominance of pre-zygotic to post-zygotic barriers. PMID:27013549

  1. Influence of fine-scale habitat structure on nest-site occupancy, laying date and clutch size in Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus

    Amininasab, Seyed Mehdi; Vedder, Oscar; Schut, Elske; de Jong, Berber; Magrath, Michael J. L.; Korsten, Peter; Komdeur, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Most birds have specific habitat requirements for breeding. The vegetation structure surrounding nest-sites is an important component of habitat quality, and can have large effects on avian breeding performance. We studied 13 years of Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus population data to determine whether characteristics of vegetation structure predict site occupancy, laying date and number of eggs laid. Measurements of vegetation structure included the density of English Oak Quercus robur, European Beech Fagus sylvatica, and other deciduous, coniferous and non-coniferous evergreen trees, within a 20-m radius of nest-boxes used for breeding. Trees were further sub-divided into specific classes of trunk circumferences to determine the densities for different maturity levels. Based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we reduced the total number of 17 measured vegetation variables to 7 main categories, which we used for further analyses. We found that the occupancy rate of sites and the number of eggs laid correlated positively with the proportion of deciduous trees and negatively with the density of coniferous trees. Laying of the first egg was advanced with a greater proportion of deciduous trees. Among deciduous trees, the English Oak appeared to be most important, as a higher density of more mature English Oak trees was associated with more frequent nest-box occupancy, a larger number of eggs laid, and an earlier laying start. Furthermore, laying started earlier and more eggs were laid in nest-boxes with higher occupancy rates. Together, these findings highlight the role of deciduous trees, particularly more mature English Oak, as important predictors of high-quality preferred habitat. These results aid in defining habitat quality and will facilitate future studies on the importance of environmental quality for breeding performance.

  2. Damage, biology and natural enemies of the green oak moth, [Tortrix viridana L. 1758 (Lep.; Tortricidae)] in Dinar district oak forests

    Tuncer, İsmail; Avcı, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of Tortrix viridana in Dinar region, its damage to the host plant stands as well as its biology and natural enemies were explored. Samples were examined and collected in the research area periodically from 2012 to 2014. The harmful insects were found on three oak species in the research area. They were Quercus coccifera, Q. infectoria and Q. pubescens. It was observed that adult insect emergence started in late May and continued decreasingly in June. It was als...

  3. Densities of Agrilus auroguttatus and Other Borers in California and Arizona Oaks

    Laurel J. Haavik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated within-tree population density of a new invasive species in southern California, the goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae, with respect to host species and the community of other borers present. We measured emergence hole densities of A. auroguttatus and other borers on the lower stem (bole of naïve oaks at 18 sites in southern California and on co-evolved oaks at seven sites in southeastern Arizona. We sampled recently dead oaks in an effort to quantify the community of primary and secondary borers associated with mortality—species that were likely to interact with A. auroguttatus. Red oaks (Section Lobatae produced greater densities of A. auroguttatus than white oaks (Section Quercus. On red oaks, A. auroguttatus significantly outnumbered native borers in California (mean ± SE of 9.6 ± 0.7 versus 4.5 ± 0.6 emergence holes per 0.09 m2 of bark surface, yet this was not the case in Arizona (0.9 ± 0.2 versus 1.1 ± 0.2 emergence holes per 0.09 m2. In California, a species that is taxonomically intermediate between red and white oaks, Quercus chrysolepis (Section Protobalanus, exhibited similar A. auroguttatus emergence densities compared with a co-occurring red oak, Q. kelloggii. As an invasive species in California, A. auroguttatus may affect the community of native borers (mainly Buprestidae and Cerambycidae that feed on the lower boles of oaks, although it remains unclear whether its impact will be positive or negative.

  4. Assessment of physicochemical and antioxidant characteristics of Quercus pyrenaica honeydew honeys.

    Shantal Rodríguez Flores, M; Escuredo, Olga; Carmen Seijo, M

    2015-01-01

    Consumers are exhibiting increasing interest in honeydew honey, principally due to its functional properties. Some plants can be sources of honeydew honey, but in north-western Spain, this honey type only comes from Quercus pyrenaica. In the present study, the melissopalynological and physicochemical characteristics and the antioxidant properties of 32 honeydew honey samples are described. Q. pyrenaica honeydew honey was defined by its colour, high pH, phenols and flavonoids. Multivariate statistical techniques were used to analyse the influence of the production year on the honey's physicochemical parameters and polyphenol content. Differences among the honey samples were found, showing that weather affected the physicochemical composition of the honey samples. Optimal conditions for oak growth favoured the production of honeydew honey. PMID:25053034

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  17. A comparative study of the chemical and integrated treatments impact against the defoliating insects on the structure and dynamics of the edaphic mesofauna in two oak forests from North-Eastern Romania

    Adina Cãlugãr

    2009-01-01

    The author presents in this paper some aspects about the edaphic microarthropods from the organic horizon of two forest soils belonging to the Ciurea Forest District, Iasi County: Santa (mixed stands mainly with oak, chemically treated against defoliating insects) and Poieni - Tomesti (Quercus robur and Quercus petraea stands with integrated treatments). The study of edaphic microarthropods was performed both from qualitative and quantitative point of view. It considered the average of the to...

  18. Seasonal Variations in Carbon, Water and Energy Fluxes in an Oak/Grass Savanna and in Photosynthetic Capacity of Oak Leaf in California

    Xu, L.; Baldocchi, D.

    2002-12-01

    We present the results of measurements on flux and ecophysiology from two co-existing Ameriflux sites, a grazed annual grassland site and an oak/grass savanna site, located at the foothill of Sierra Nevada in California. The two sites are about 2 km apart, and have a Mediterranean climate with wet, cold winter and dry, hot summer. The predominant tree species is blue oak (Quercus douglasii) and grasses are C3 species. The main objective of the study is to investigate the roles of high temperature, soil moisture and plant functional type on the carbon, water vapor and energy exchanges between ecosystems and atmosphere. Continuous measurements of carbon and water vapor fluxes over and under the oak/grass savanna ecosystem started in April 2001 and over the annual grassland ecosystem in October 2000. Meteorological and soil parameters (air temperature, radiation, VPD, precipitation, soil moisture etc.) were also measured. Grass leaf area index (LAI), predawn water potential and gas exchange (A/Ci curve) of oak leaf were measured at 1-2 weeks intervals. The annual grass germinates in late Oct after receiving a substantial rainfall and senesces in early May due to the soil drought development. Flux results show that daytime carbon uptake and latent heat flux (LE) at the grassland and understory of the savanna followed closely grass LAI, which in turn was controlled by soil moisture content. Nighttime ecosystem respiration was found to track closely to the daytime photosynthetic rate, indicating the importance of photosynthetic assimilates allocation for respiration. During the dry summer, when the grass was dead, virtually all the available energy was partitioned into sensible heat (H). Small positive values of FCO2 were observed. We also observed large pulse ecosystem respiration after rain events during non-growing season. In our ecosystems with very low NEP, such rain events might be one of major environment forcings that cause larger inter-annual variability in NEE

  19. Medium Density Fiberboard from Quercus robur

    Akgul, Mehmet; Copur, Yalcin; Guler, Cengiz; Tozluoglu, Ayhan; Buyuksari, Umit

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of oak (Ouercus robur L.) wood fibers from Turkey as a raw material for medium density fiberboard. In this study, some of the oak wood parts that are especially not suitable for other forest industries was utilized to produce fiberboards in laboratory environment. Test panels of varying densities (0.6, 0.7 and 0.8 g cm-3) were produced at 18 mm thickness using urea-formaldehyde adhesive. Mechanical, water resistance and dimensional stability properties of the test panels were determined according to Turkish standards. The results indicated that laboratory MDF panels produced using oak fibers resulted in mechanical properties that exceed (except panel type A) levels specified in the appropriate existing standards for the general propose fiberboards.

  20. Differences in fine-scale genetic structure and dispersal in Quercus ilex L. and Q. suber L.: consequences for regeneration of mediterranean open woods.

    Soto, A; Lorenzo, Z; Gil, L

    2007-12-01

    Cork oak (Quercus suber L.) and holm oak (Q. ilex L.) are among the most important tree species (economically and ecologically) in the Western Mediterranean region, where they define unique open woods (created and maintained by man) known as 'dehesas' in Spain. However, these formations are under increasing threat due to the lack of regeneration. We have analysed spatial genetic structure in a mixed parkland; inferences about gene dispersal have also been performed, according to the isolation by distance model. Noticeable differences have been detected between the species, despite their similar ecological roles. Restricted effective dispersal leads to kin structures in cork oak, up to 70 m, while no genetic structure is observed in holm oak. Our results suggest a very effective dispersal for the latter, with a local historical gene flow estimated between 55 and 95 m. This is the first time regeneration of Mediterranean oak parklands has been assessed from a genetic perspective. Effective gene flow detected for holm oaks allows us to discount the risk of inbreeding over successive generations. Thus, regeneration of Q. ilex dehesas will just require action directed to help the settlement of the saplings (such as limiting grazing). However, in those cases where densities are too low, more intense forestation (such as plantation and/or establishment of appropriate shelter) will be needed. The 'density threshold' for initiating regeneration will probably be higher for cork oak, due to its more limited dispersal and minor full-light tolerance. PMID:17971829

  1. Proposed causes and mechanisms for variation in photosynthesis of Quercus rubra along an urban to rural gradient

    Stephanie Searle

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Forests in the northeastern United States are currently sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide released by fossil fuels. The effects of accelerating urbanization and global warming on plant carbon uptake will thus have important consequences for future atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate change. The urban environment of New York City(NYC has been shown to produce increased plant growth and carbon sequestration in Populus deltoides. Here we investigate the effects of NYC’s urban environment on native red oaks (Quercus rubra L.. We grew four-year-old oak seedlings at four sites along an urban to rural gradient from NYC to the Catskills for 1.5 years. We measured the short-term response of photosynthesis to [CO2] in three seedlings at each site, as well as environmental parameters. Photosynthesis was highest in NYC, second highest in the Catskills, and lowest at the two intermediate sites. Comparison of photosynthesis data with environmental variables suggests that the combined effect of diurnal temperature range, [CO2], and ozone account for most of the variation in photosynthesis and growth along the gradient. These results and interpretations differ from those of Gregg et al. (2003; we suggest that these differences are due to the species tested, and that Quercus rubra may provide a more accurate indicator of how urbanization and climate change will affect carbon cycling in forests in the eastern United States.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of galls of Quercus infectoria

    Mengeloğlu, Fırat Zafer; Metin, Umre; Özdemir, Nesibe; Oduncu, M. Kadir

    2011-01-01

    Amaç: Mazı meşesi (Quercus infectoria), fagaceae famil­yasından geniş tepeli bir ağaç türü olup gal denilen to­humları halk arasında yanıklı hastaların tedavisinde kul­lanılagelmektedir. Bu çalışmada mazı meşesi gal tohumu ekstraktının bazı mikrorganizmalar üzerindeki antimikro­biyal etkisinin araştırılması amaçlandı. Gereç ve yöntem: Gal tohumlarının kaynatılmasıyla elde edilen solüsyon mikrodilüsyon yöntemi kullanılarak çeşitli klinik örneklerden izole ed...

  3. The negative impact of intentionally introduced Quercus rubra L. on a forest community

    Beata Woziwoda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some alien woody species used in commercial forestry become invasive and, as invaders, cause major problems in natural and semi-natural ecosystems. However, the deliberate introduction of aliens can bring unintended negative changes also within areas of their cultivation. This paper presents the effects of the intentional introduction of the North-American Quercus rubra in European mixed Scots pine-Pedunculate oak forests (POFs: Querco roboris-Pinetum (W. Mat. 1981 J. Mat. 1988. Phytosociological data from field research combined with GIS data analysis of the current distribution of Northern Red oak in the studied habitat were used to determine the composition and structure of forest communities in plots with and without Q. rubra participation.  The results show that Q. rubra significantly reduces native species richness and abundance, both in old-growth and in secondary (post-agricultural forests. Not one resident vascular plant benefits from the introduction of Northern Red oak and only a few are able to tolerate its co-occurrence. The natural restocking of all native woody species is also strongly limited by this alien tree.  The introduction of Northern Red oak significantly limits the environmental functions of the POF ecosystem and weakens its economic and social aspects. However, its further cultivation is justified from an economic point of view, as the essential function of the studied forests is commercial timber production, and the introduction of this fast growing alien tree supports the provisioning ecosystem services. A clear description of the level of trade-off between the accepted negative and positive effects of the introduction of Q. rubra on forest ecosystem services requires further interdisciplinary studies.

  4. Quercus suber range dynamics by ecological niche modelling: from the Last Interglacial to present time

    Vessella, Federico; Simeone, Marco Cosimo; Schirone, Bartolomeo

    2015-07-01

    Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) is widely used to depict species potential occurrence according to environmental variables under different climatic scenarios. We tested the ENM approach to infer past range dynamics of cork oak, a keystone species of the Mediterranean Biome, from 130 ka to the present time. Hindcasting implications would deal with a better species risk assessment and conservation management for the future. We modelled present and past occurrence of cork oak using seven ENM algorithms, starting from 63,733 spatially unique presence points at 30 arc-second resolution. Fourteen environmental variables were used and four time slices were considered (Last Interglacial, Last Glacial Maximum, mid-Holocene and present time). A threshold-independent evaluation of the goodness-of-fit of the models was evaluated by means of ROC curve and fossil or historical evidences were used to validate the results. Four weighted average maps depicted the dynamics of area suitability for cork oak in the last 130 ka. The derived species autoecology allowed its long-term occurrence in the Mediterranean without striking range reduction or shifting. Fossil and historical post-processing validation support the modelled past spatial extension and a neglected species presence at Levantine until the recent time. Despite the severe climatic oscillation since the Last Glacial Maximum, cork oak potential distribution area experienced limited range changes, confirming its strong link with the Mediterranean Basin. The ecological amplitude of Quercus suber could be therefore adopted as a reference to trace the Mediterranean bioclimate area. A better knowledge of the past events of Mediterranean vegetation, a wider range of study species and environmental determinants are essential to inform us about its current state, its sensitivity to human impact and the potential responses to future changes.

  5. Time to rethink the management intensity in a Mediterranean oak woodland: the response of insectivorous birds and leaf-chewing defoliators as key groups in the forest ecosystem

    Pereira, Pedro; Godinho, Carlos; Roque, Inês; Marques, Ana; Branco, Manuela; Rabaça, João E.

    2012-01-01

    International audience & Context The Iberian cork oak Quercus suber montados are dynamic agro-silvo-pastoral systems, contrasting with the abandonment trend of other Mediterranean forested areas. & Aims We aimed to identify the effect of management type and vegetation features on breeding insectivorous birds and leaf-chewing defoliator insects. & Methods In central Portugal, we selected two groups of 20 sites: dense montados (DM, high cover of cork oaks and low cattle impact) and sparse mo...

  6. Effects of various host plants on nutritional indices and some biochemical compounds in green oak leaf roller, Tortrix viridana L. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

    H. Yazdanfar; M. Ghodskhah Daryaei; J. Jalali Sendi; H. Ghobari; B. Valizadeh

    2015-01-01

    The green oak leaf roller, Tortrix viridana L., is one of the most destructive pests, causing damages to various species of oak, feeding on different host plants including Quercus infectoria Oliv, Q. branti Lindl, and Q. libani Oliv. Nutritional indices, activity of enzymatic and non-enzymatic compounds of T. viridana were studied under laboratory conditions. In addition, chemical components were analysed in the leaves of the three host plants. Fourth instar larvae reared on Q. branti showed ...

  7. Oak ecosystem succession of the Northern Caucasus

    Chalaya, Elena; Slepykh, Victor; Efimenko, Natalia; Povolotskaya, Nina

    2014-05-01

    English oak (Quercus robur L.) along with its well-known good properties has a high sanitary-hygienic and curative potential. Its volatile metabolites (VM) influence bacteriostatically Staphylococcus aureus 209r, oppressing it in vitro by 85% compared with the control, and Escherichia coli by 45%. There is the least amount of epiphytic microorganisms on the leaves of Q. robur L. compared with some tree species [1]. In addition, VM of Q. robur L. have direct milieu (hypotensive) effects on the organism under its canopy, lowering blood pressure by 20-25 mm Hg [2]. A.P. Kazankin (1993) [4] calculated the prehistoric formula of forest species composition of Caucasian Mineral Waters region (Northern Caucasus): 6Qr3Crp1Fr which was based on the theory of calcium-magnesium absorption complex. According to the theory, underground mineral water, soil, forest litter and the leaves of ground vegetation of the area have the same ratio of the cations Ca and Mg - calcium-magnesium index [3]. Hence oldgrowth in the region consisted of oak (Qr) by 60%, hornbeam (Carpinus-Crp) by 30% and ash (Fraxinus-Fr) only by 10%. Currently, the formula of the forests of the region has been changed by man: 5Fr3Crp2Qr. The proportion of oak forests has decreased to 20%, the proportion of ash has increased by 50%, but the proportion of hornbeam hasn't changed. So it is relevant to restore oak forests of the region in the former ratio to other forest-forming species - ash and hornbeam. Taking into consideration the change of economic formation of society in Russia, it is extremely important to restore natural seed oak forests. Therein the luminance of surface areal is a limiting factor. We have calculated that the natural recovery of oak forests is possible providing observation of optimal moisture standards and soil fertility in combination with solar light within 10-24% from the light of open space. Measures for promotion of oak natural regeneration in mountain resorts of the Northern Caucasus

  8. Yeast Associated with the Ambrosia Beetle, Platypus koryoensis, the Pest of Oak Trees in Korea

    Yun, Yeo Hong; Suh, Dong Yeon; Yoo, Hun Dal; Oh, Man Hwan; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Oak tree death caused by symbiosis of an ambrosia beetle, Platypus koryoensis, and an ophiostomatoid filamentous fungus, Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae, has been a nationwide problem in Korea since 2004. In this study, we surveyed the yeast species associated with P. koryoensis to better understand the diversity of fungal associates of the beetle pest. In 2009, a total of 195 yeast isolates were sampled from larvae and adult beetles (female and male) of P. koryoensis in Cheonan, Goyang, and Paj...

  9. Observations on natural regeneration in grazed Holm oak stands in the Ogliastra province (Sardinia, Italy)

    Sioni S; Bianchi L.; Calamini G

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the effects of grazing pressure in two Holm oak (Quercus ilex) stands in Ogliastra (central-eastern Sardinia, Italy), with particular reference to the interactions with the natural regeneration processes. There is a positive interaction (facilitation) between shrubs and seedlings of tree species, as observed in other similar studies carried out by the same authors in other areas of Sardinia. Rubus ulmifolius proved to be the most efficient shrub for the protection and gr...

  10. The dynamics of cork oak systems in Portugal: the role of ecological and land use factors

    Acácio, V.C.

    2009-01-01

    Vegetation degradation and desertification occur in many semiarid ecosystems worldwide, particularly in the Western Mediterranean Basin. A peculiar semiarid Mediterranean land use system dominates the landscape of southern Portugal where cork oak (Quercus suber) is the main tree species. This system is the result of both ecological and land use dynamics that shaped the landscape for centuries and created a fine-grained mosaic landscape, which includes four main types of vegetation patches: co...

  11. Characterization of Acorn Fruit Oils Extracted from Selected Mediterranean Quercus Species

    Al-Rousan, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed to identifying the acorn fruit oil composition of three Mediterranean white oak group species, Quercus aegilops (QA, Quercus infectoria (QI, and Quercus calliprinus (QC. Samples were estimated for the oil contents of acorn fruits, oil chemical and physical constants, fatty acid profile, tocopherols, phenolic compounds, and sterols.The oil content, expressed as dry weight, was found to be 3.40-7.51%. The physical and chemical constants included specific gravity 0.912-0.922, refractive index 1.4529-1.4645, specific extinction at 232 nm 2.497-2.536 and at 270 nm 1.495-2.037, iodine value 75.2-87.6, and saponification value 192.6-219.4. The fatty acid compositions were determined by GC as methyl esters. The most abundant fatty acids were oleic (53.3-56.1%, linoleic 21.3-23.4%, palmitic 17.8-18.7%, linolenic 1.5-1.6% and stearic acid 1.02-1.60%. The Tocopherol content was high in the range of 1440-1783 mg kg-1, γ-tocopherol constituted 84-91% of total tocopherols. Phenolic compounds were in remarkable amounts in all the three species 84-109 mg gallic acid kg-1 oil. Total sterol contents were between 2040-2480 mg kg-1 oil, with β-sitosterol being the main component comprising of 77.20-84.61%, followed by ∆5-avenasterol (5.8-11.4%, campesterol (3.6-4.5%, and stigmasterol (2.6-3.8. The cholesterol content was relatively high (0.42-0.55%.El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo identificar la composición de aceites de bellota de tres especies del grupo del roble blanco del Mediterráneo, Quercus Aegilops (QA, Quercus infectoria (QI y Quercus calliprinus (QC. Las muestras fueron evaluadas por el contenido de aceite, parámetros físico-químicos del aceite, perfil de ácidos grasos, tocoferoles, compuestos fenólicos y esteroles. El contenido de aceite, expresado en peso seco encontrado fue de 3,40 a 7,51%. Las constantes físico-químicas fueron: densidad 0,912-0,922, índice de refracción 1,4529 a 1,4645, extinción espec

  12. Identificação do carbamato de etila durante o armazenamento da cachaça em tonel de carvalho (quercus sp e recipiente de vidro

    Jeancarlo Pereira dos Anjos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was the identification and quantification of ethyl carbamate (EC, by HPLC-FLD, after different periods of storage in an oak (Quercus sp barrel and a glass vessel. The concentration of EC in the cachaça samples varied from oak barrel, and oak barrel and the glass vessel resulted in a significant increase in the concentration of this contaminant.

  13. Genetic diversity increases insect herbivory on oak saplings.

    Castagneyrol, Bastien; Lagache, Lélia; Giffard, Brice; Kremer, Antoine; Jactel, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence from community genetics studies suggests that ecosystem functions supported by plant species richness can also be provided by genetic diversity within plant species. This is not yet true for the diversity-resistance relationship as it is still unclear whether damage by insect herbivores responds to genetic diversity in host plant populations. We developed a manipulative field experiment based on a synthetic community approach, with 15 mixtures of one to four oak (Quercus robur) half-sib families. We quantified genetic diversity at the plot level by genotyping all oak saplings and assessed overall damage caused by ectophagous and endophagous herbivores along a gradient of increasing genetic diversity. Damage due to ectophagous herbivores increased with the genetic diversity in oak sapling populations as a result of higher levels of damage in mixtures than in monocultures for all families (complementarity effect) rather than because of the presence of more susceptible oak genotypes in mixtures (selection effect). Assemblages of different oak genotypes would benefit polyphagous herbivores via improved host patch location, spill over among neighbouring saplings and diet mixing. By contrast, genetic diversity was a poor predictor of the abundance of endophagous herbivores, which increased with individual sapling apparency. Plant genetic diversity may not provide sufficient functional contrast to prevent tree sapling colonization by specialist herbivores while enhancing the foraging of generalist herbivores. Long term studies are nevertheless required to test whether the effect of genetic diversity on herbivory change with the ontogeny of trees and local adaptation of specialist herbivores. PMID:22937168

  14. STANDARDIZATION AND CONTAMINATION STUDIES ON NUTGALLS OF QUERCUS INFECTORIA OLIVIER

    Asif M; Ansari SH; Haque; Kalam N

    2012-01-01

    Drug consists of nutgalls of Quercus infectoria (Family-Fagaceae), commonly known as “Mazuphal”. Standardization parameters like, physical constants, ash content, solvent residues, phytochemical screening, fluorescence and microscopical analysis were carried out for the quality, strength and purity of the drug. The present work is an also attempt to evaluate contamination parameters for safety of an herbal drug Quercus infectoria such as microbial contamination, aflatoxins, pesticide residues...

  15. Metabarcoding of Bacteria Associated with the Acute Oak Decline Syndrome in England

    Melanie Sapp

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of acute oak decline (AOD have been documented in England from 2006. Both species of native oaks (Quercus robur and Quercus petraea are affected. To complement isolation efforts for identification of putative causative biotic agents and increase our understanding of bacteria associated with oak tissue, five sites in England were chosen for this study. Samples of outer bark, inner bark, sapwood and heartwood were taken from healthy oak and trees with symptoms at varying stages of the syndrome. Furthermore, larval galleries attributed to infestation with Agrilus biguttatus were included. After DNA extraction and amplification of the V3–V5 fragment of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes by pyrosequencing, the dataset was analyzed to identify patterns in bacterial communities in oak tissue samples with and without AOD symptoms at each site. The composition of bacterial communities differed greatly according to the site from which the samples were obtained. Within each site, the composition of the bacteria associated with symptomatic tissue varied between advanced stages of the syndrome and healthy tissue. Key players in healthy and symptomatic tissue were identified and included members of the Gammaproteobacteria related to Pseudomonas sp. or Brenneria goodwinii and members of the Firmicutes.

  16. Carbon Stock Potential of Oak and Pine Forests in Garhwal Region in Indian Central Himalayas

    Nanda Nautiyal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Oak (Quercus leucotichophora and pine (Pinus roxburghii are the two most dominant forest types occurring in Indian Central Himalayas. CO2 mitigation potential of these two forest types was observed in the present study. Carbon stock densities for AGTB, BB, LHG, DWS, AGSB and SOC were estimated and higher values were recorded in oak forest stands. Total carbon density estimated was 2420.54 Mg/ha for oak forest of Gopeshwar and 986.93 Mg/ha for pine forest of Nandprayag. CO2 mitigation potential of oak forest of Gopeshwar was recorded to be 8,713.94 CO2e and of pine forests 3552.95 CO2e.

  17. The fauna of cynipid oak gall wasps and their parasitoids in Lorestan province, Iran.

    Azizkhani, E; Rasoulian, G R; Kharazi-Pakdel, A; Omid, R; Moniri, V R; Melika, G

    2006-01-01

    This study was carried out in the period 2003-2005 to collect and identify gall wasps and their parasitoids on oak species in Lorestan province. There are two oak species, Quercus brantii and Q. infectoria, with different dispersion patterns in the province. Thus, 3 study sampling sites were selected to cover distributional pattern of oak forests. Collected galls maintained in the laboratory condition. Based on results obtained, overall, 26 different galls-formed on various plant parts (catkins, buds, fruits, leaves) were collected on two oak species; of which, 11 gall wasps are active on Q. brantii and 13 gall wasps on Q. infectoria. 19 parasitoid wasps of 12 genera and 6 families belong to Chalcidoidea superfamily with various frequency and dispersal were collected from mentioned galls. PMID:17385504

  18. Comparison of the autoecology of Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Mattuschka Liebl. stands in the Northwest of the Iberian Peninsula

    A. Rodriguez-Campos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work is to characterize the functioning of the ecosystems of semideciduous and deciduous Atlantic oaks in the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula. The studied species were: Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea (Mattuschka Liebl. To advance in the knowledge of the autecology of these species it is necessary to descend at the regional level and describe in detail the variability of the environment to determine their potential, and to decide the silvicultural treatments to be applied to preserve them and to analyze future actuations in order to a possible expansion. The analysis of the results allows knowing differences in continentalityand site conditions, with more precipitation, soil variability and humidification in Q. petraea forests respect to Q. robur. These information represent appropriate measures for the sustainable and multifunctional management of these forests, useful as indicators environmental and forestry parameters as well as the conservationstatus of these formations.

  19. Studies on the ectomycorrhizal community in a declining Quercus suber L. stand.

    Lancellotti, Enrico; Franceschini, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    This survey was carried out in a Quercus suber L. stand with many trees affected by the disease "oak decline". Its aim was to obtain information about both the belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal community in a declining Q. suber stand as a whole, and the ectomycorrhizal fungal community of individual tree (EFT) detected in healthy and diseased plants. To this end, we first categorized the trees into four different decline classes (one for healthy plants and three for diseased plants) and then, by using morphological and molecular tools, we identified the ectomycorrhizas isolated from samples collected near the trees with different declining classes. The ectomycorrhizal community as a whole was seen to be composed of numerous ectomycorrhizal fungal species, only some of which appeared to be dominant (Cenococcum geophilum, Lactarius chrysorrheus, and some species of Tomentella genus), while most occurred sporadically. Results show that all root tips observed are mycorrhized and that decline class does not influence the number of ectomycorrhizal root tips found in the EFTs, thus oak decline does not impact the investment in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. However, some statistical differences can be observed in the values of evenness and taxonomic distinctness in the EFT associated with trees with different states of health. Finally, both the analysis of similarity test and the ordination technique highlight a compositional difference between the EFT associated with trees in different health conditions, but also suggest that other factors may play a role in causing these differences. PMID:23503869

  20. COENOTICAL CHAINS OF ACER PLATANOIDES AND QUERCUS ROBUR IN THE FORESTS OF NOVGOROD-SEVERSKOYE POLESYE

    Skliar V. G.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We summarized information on association of small undergrowth of Norway maple (Acer platanoides L. and English oak (Quercus robur L. under the canopy of the forest with plants that form the grass-shrub layer within Novgorod-Severskoye Polesye. We founded that the association at certain extent depends on the type of population behavior of undergrowth and grasses. Small undergrowth of A. platanoides being the tolerant species according to the type of population behavior demonstrates negative association with the herbs that have high competitive ability. The pattern of association of A. platanoides with tolerant species depends on their vegetative mobility: the maple has positive association with species with no vegetative mobility and positive and negative association with species characterized by high extent of vegetative mobility. The undergrowth of Q. robur which is the competitive species due to population behavior shows positive association with the herbs that have high competitive ability. We estimated the coenotic parameters that are required for successful resumption of maple and oak in the region of research. We also shown that coenotic optimum for A. platanoides corresponds to the environment with weak intensity of competition in the living soil cover with thin grass layer and density of coverage does not exceed 50%. Q. robur has coenotic optimum among habitats in the herbaceous layer with domination of green moss and (or Convallaria majalis L., Fragaria vesca L. with no grains and density of coverage in living ground cover not more than 60%.

  1. A comparative analysis of stomata and leaf trichome characteristics in Quercus robur L. genotypes

    Nikolić Nataša P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine genotype variability of leaf trichome and stoma characteristics. Leaves were sampled from seventeen pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L genotypes originating from clonal seed orchard Banov Brod (Srem, the Vojvodina Province. The pedunculate oak has hypostomatal leaves. Statistically significant differences were found for the dimensions and density of stomata. Genotype variability of stomatal dimensions was less pronounced in comparison with their density (CV = 8.88%. Stomata number ranged from 530 to 791 per mm2 of leaf area; genotypes 18 and 25 could be distinguished from the others for the highest stomata number per leaf unit area, genotype 35 for the lowest number. In all genotypes, only solitary eglandular trichomes were observed on the adaxial leaf surface while both solitary eglandular and uniseriate glandular hairs were present on the abaxial surface. Single glandular trichomes were observed in all genotypes, while some of them were characterized by the presence of two (genotypes 4, 5, 6, 16, 22, 25, 28, 29, 30, 35, 38, 40, and 85 or three (genotypes 16, 25, 35 hairs joined by their basal cells.

  2. Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks.

    Pilskog, Hanne Eik; Birkemoe, Tone; Framstad, Erik; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation. PMID:26945089

  3. Oaks were the historical foundation genus of the east-central United States

    Hanberry, Brice B.; Nowacki, Gregory J.

    2016-08-01

    Foundation tree species are dominant and define ecosystems. Because of the historical importance of oaks (Quercus) in east-central United States, it was unlikely that oak associates, such as pines (Pinus), hickories (Carya) and chestnut (Castanea), rose to this status. We used 46 historical tree studies or databases (ca. 1620-1900) covering 28 states, 1.7 million trees, and 50% of the area of the eastern United States to examine importance of oaks compared to pines, hickories, and chestnuts. Oak was the most abundant genus, ranging from 40% to 70% of total tree composition at the ecological province scale and generally increasing in dominance from east to west across this area. Pines, hickories, and chestnuts were co-dominant (ratio of oak composition to other genera of United States, and thus by definition, were not foundational. Although other genera may be called foundational because of localized abundance or perceptions resulting from inherited viewpoints, they decline from consideration when compared to overwhelming oak abundance across this spatial extent. The open structure and high-light conditions of oak ecosystems uniquely supported species-rich understories. Loss of oak as a foundation genus has occurred with loss of open forest ecosystems at landscape scales.

  4. Oaks were the historical foundation genus of the east-central United States

    Hanberry, Brice B.; Nowacki, Gregory J.

    2016-08-01

    Foundation tree species are dominant and define ecosystems. Because of the historical importance of oaks (Quercus) in east-central United States, it was unlikely that oak associates, such as pines (Pinus), hickories (Carya) and chestnut (Castanea), rose to this status. We used 46 historical tree studies or databases (ca. 1620-1900) covering 28 states, 1.7 million trees, and 50% of the area of the eastern United States to examine importance of oaks compared to pines, hickories, and chestnuts. Oak was the most abundant genus, ranging from 40% to 70% of total tree composition at the ecological province scale and generally increasing in dominance from east to west across this area. Pines, hickories, and chestnuts were co-dominant (ratio of oak composition to other genera of abundance or perceptions resulting from inherited viewpoints, they decline from consideration when compared to overwhelming oak abundance across this spatial extent. The open structure and high-light conditions of oak ecosystems uniquely supported species-rich understories. Loss of oak as a foundation genus has occurred with loss of open forest ecosystems at landscape scales.

  5. [Quantitative analysis on sharp-tooth oak stands in Qinling Mountains].

    Zhao, Yonghua; Lei, Ruide; Jia, Xia; He, Xingyuan; Chen, Wei

    2003-12-01

    The arbor stratum of Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata stands included two substratums. Phanerophyta synusium was in first position, and hemicryptophyta was inferior to it. The DBH structures of Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata and Pinus armandii were sinister normal school, which could finish self-regeneration under the natural conditions. The small DBH class individuals of Pinus tabulaeformis were dominant, their DBH classes being distributed irregularly and absent very much. The large DBH classes of Toxicodendron vernicifluum took biggish proportion, belonging to declining population. Young trees were the principal individuals of Castanea mollissima, and in transitional age stage from the young to the middle. Populus davidiana was in the transitional stage from progressive to stable and young-middle age stands. The stands DBH structure was mainly influenced by the DBH variety of Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata population. Quantitative classification (ward's method ward) and ordination (PCA) were used to study the community types of sharp-tooth oak. The results showed that the community could be divided into 6 types: 1. Ass. Smilax stans + Rosa multiflora-Quercus variabilis + Ulmus glaucescens-Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata; 2. Ass. Smilax stans + Lespedeza bicolor-Castanea mollissima-Q. aliena var. acuteserrata; 3. Ass. Corylus mandshurica-Populus davidiana + Dendrobenthamia angustata-Q. aliena var. acuteserrata; 4. Ass. Prunus pseudoccrasus + Corylus mandshurica-Toxicodendron vernicifluum-Q. aliena var. acuteserrata; 5. Ass. Corylus mandshurica + Rosa multiflora-Pinus armandii-Q. aliena var. acuteserrata; and 6. Ass. Sinarundinaria nitida-Pinus armandii + Pinus tabulaeformis-Q. aliena var. acuteserrata. Ward's method ward was better for classifying community types than the other clustering analyses in Qinling Mountains. The PCA results were consistent with the clustering, and demonstrated that the sharp-tooth oak stands were influenced by the altitude, site

  6. Leaf Litter Decomposition of two Central Himalayan Oaks

    Kirtika Padalia

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in two natural oak forest of Nainital (Uttarakhand India, during 2012-2013 to determine the weight loss pattern in leaf litter of two Central Himalayan Oaks (i.e., Quercus leucotrichophora A. Camus. and Quercus floribunda Lindl. with the help of litter bag technique. The present study concluded that weight loss proceeded throughout the study period and relatively higher within 60 days after the placement of litter bags into the soil. Among these two species, higher weight loss observed in Q. floribunda as compared to Q. leucotrichophora across both the sites. Within 365 days, average weight loss observed about 60% in Q. leucotrichophora and 62% in Q. floribunda. Decay rate coefficient rate ranged from 0.0596- 0.0014 for Q. leucotrichophora while it varies from 0.0558 to 0.0013 for Q. floribunda. The monthly relative decomposition rate (RDR ranged between 0.0598-0.0014 g/g/day and 0.0208-0.0050 g/g/day for Q. leucotrichophora and Q. floribunda, respectively. Climatic factors (rainfall, temperature and relative humidity also influenced the rate of decomposition.

  7. Addressing post-transplant summer water stress in Pinus pinea and Quercus ilex seedlings

    Pardos M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In central Spain, post-transplant water stress produces high seedling mortality after the first summer following outplanting. Our study was designed to determine whether survival and performance of outplanted stone pine (Pinus pinea and holm oak (Quercus ilex seedlings in a burned area could be improved by summer irrigation and mulching and to identify whether there is a species-specific adaptive capacity to respond to treatment and environment. Seedlings were outplanted in March 2011 in 200 planting holes in an area of 1.1 ha. Mulch was added in June; irrigation started in July and was repeated every week until mid-September. The severity of the 2011 summer drought constrained growth rates and photosynthetic characteristics, mainly in the non-irrigated seedlings, whose survival at the end of the year after planting was approximately 2.5%. Stone pine and holm oak seedlings responded more to irrigation than to mulching in terms of shoot growth, biomass and survival. Furthermore, stone pine seedlings were found to be more responsive to the partial alleviation of summer drought than holm oak seedlings. Irrigation alone produced similar results to those obtained when both irrigation and mulching were employed. In conclusion, first year summer irrigation should be considered as a planned adaptation measure in the management of outplanted Mediterranean ecosystems, because once a gravimetrically measured soil moisture level as low as 2% is achieved seedling survival and physiological performance can be guaranteed. However, the repercussions for the potential persistence of both species in the area will not only be related to the recurrence and intensity of summer droughts but also to drought duration.

  8. Model of the PCB and mercury exposure of mink and great blue heron inhabiting the off-site environment downstream from the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation

    This report presents a pair of wildlife exposure models developed for use in investigating the risks to wildlife of releases of mercury and PCBS. The species modeled are the great blue heron and mink The models may be used to estimate the exposure experienced by mink and herons, to help establish remedial action goals and to identify research needs. Because mercury and PCBs bioaccumulate through dietary uptake, the models simulate the food webs supporting the two species. Sources of contaminants include surface water, sediment, sediment pore water, and soil. The model are stochastic equilibrium models. Two types of variance in the input parameters are distinguished: stochastic variance among individual mink and herons and ignorance concerning true parameter values. The variance in the output due to stochastic parameters indicates the expected variance among the receptors. The variance due to ignorance indicates the extent to which the model outputs could be unpaved by additional sampling and measurement. The results of the models were compared to concentrations measured in great blue heron eggs and nestlings from colonies on the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers. The predicted concentrations agreed well with the measured concentrations. In addition, the variances in measured values among individuals was approximately equal to the total stochastic variance predicted by the models

  9. Model of the PCB and mercury exposure of mink and great blue heron inhabiting the off-site environment downstream from the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation. Environmental Restoration Program

    MacIntosh, D.L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). School of Public and Environmental Affairs; Suter, G.W. II; Hoffman, F.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-09-01

    This report presents a pair of wildlife exposure models developed for use in investigating the risks to wildlife of releases of mercury and PCBS. The species modeled are the great blue heron and mink The models may be used to estimate the exposure experienced by mink and herons, to help establish remedial action goals and to identify research needs. Because mercury and PCBs bioaccumulate through dietary uptake, the models simulate the food webs supporting the two species. Sources of contaminants include surface water, sediment, sediment pore water, and soil. The model are stochastic equilibrium models. Two types of variance in the input parameters are distinguished: stochastic variance among individual mink and herons and ignorance concerning true parameter values. The variance in the output due to stochastic parameters indicates the expected variance among the receptors. The variance due to ignorance indicates the extent to which the model outputs could be unpaved by additional sampling and measurement. The results of the models were compared to concentrations measured in great blue heron eggs and nestlings from colonies on the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers. The predicted concentrations agreed well with the measured concentrations. In addition, the variances in measured values among individuals was approximately equal to the total stochastic variance predicted by the models.

  10. Model of the PCB and mercury exposure of mink and great blue heron inhabiting the off-site environment downstream from the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation

    MacIntosh, D.L. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). School of Public and Environmental Affairs); Suter, G.W. II; Hoffman, F.O. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-09-01

    This report presents a pair of wildlife exposure models developed for use in investigating the risks to wildlife of releases of mercury and PCBS. The species modeled are the great blue heron and mink The models may be used to estimate the exposure experienced by mink and herons, to help establish remedial action goals and to identify research needs. Because mercury and PCBs bioaccumulate through dietary uptake, the models simulate the food webs supporting the two species. Sources of contaminants include surface water, sediment, sediment pore water, and soil. The model are stochastic equilibrium models. Two types of variance in the input parameters are distinguished: stochastic variance among individual mink and herons and ignorance concerning true parameter values. The variance in the output due to stochastic parameters indicates the expected variance among the receptors. The variance due to ignorance indicates the extent to which the model outputs could be unpaved by additional sampling and measurement. The results of the models were compared to concentrations measured in great blue heron eggs and nestlings from colonies on the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers. The predicted concentrations agreed well with the measured concentrations. In addition, the variances in measured values among individuals was approximately equal to the total stochastic variance predicted by the models.

  11. Postpartum Blues

    Full Text Available ... leader Partner Spotlight Become a partner World Prematurity Day Your support helps babies We are determined to ... confused The postpartum blues peak three to five days after delivery. They usually end by the tenth ...

  12. Postpartum Blues

    Full Text Available ... Saving Just a moment, please. You've saved this page It's been added to your dashboard . After ... blues" is not really correct since women with this condition are happy most of the time. But ...

  13. Postpartum Blues

    Full Text Available ... dashboard . After the baby is born, many new mothers have the postpartum blues (also called the baby ... compared to how she usually feels, the new mother: Is more irritable Cries more easily Feels sad ...

  14. Postpartum Blues

    Full Text Available ... articles March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card Grades Cities, Counties; Focuses on Racial and Ethnic Disparities ... baby blues: Talk to your partner or a good friend about how you feel Get plenty of ...

  15. Postpartum Blues

    Full Text Available ... leader Partner Spotlight Become a partner World Prematurity Day World Prematurity Your support helps babies We are ... confused The postpartum blues peak three to five days after delivery. They usually end by the tenth ...

  16. Postpartum Blues

    Full Text Available ... for your baby Feeding your baby Common illnesses New parents Family health & safety Complications & Loss Pregnancy complications ... your dashboard . After the baby is born, many new mothers have the postpartum blues (also called the ...

  17. The impact of seed predation and browsing on natural sessile oak regeneration under different light conditions in an over-aged coppice stand

    Kamler J; Dobrovolný L; Drimaj J; Kadavý J; Kneifl M; Adamec Z; Knott R; Martiník A; Plhal R; Zeman J; Hrbek J

    2016-01-01

    Sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) is one of the most important commercial species cultivated at low altitudes in the Czech Republic, and over-aged coppices are a significant part of oak stands in the region. In order to secure a high-valuable timber production (e.g., through conversion of such stands into coppices-with-standards), knowledge of the potential and limits of generative regeneration is essential. This study was conducted in three oak-dominated over-aged coppice stands i...

  18. Hyperdiversity of ectomycorrhizal fungus assemblages on oak seedlings in mixed forests in the southern Appalachian Mountains.

    Walker, John F; Miller, Orson K; Horton, Jonathan L

    2005-03-01

    Diversity of ectotrophic mycobionts on outplanted seedlings of two oak species (Quercus rubra and Quercus prinus) was estimated at two sites in mature mixed forests in the southern Appalachian Mountains by sequencing nuclear 5.8S rRNA genes and the flanking internal transcribed spacer regions I and II (ITS). The seedlings captured a high diversity of mycorrhizal ITS-types and late-stage fungi were well represented. Total richness was 75 types, with 42 types having a frequency of only one. The first and second order jackknife estimates were 116 and 143 types, respectively. Among Basidiomycetes, tomentelloid/thelephoroid, russuloid, and cortinarioid groups were the richest. The ascomycete Cenococcum geophilum was ubiquitously present. Dominant fungi included a putative Tuber sp. (Ascomycetes), and Basidiomycetes including a putative Craterellus sp., and Laccaria cf. laccata. Diversity was lower at a drier high elevation oak forest site compared to a low elevation mesic cove--hardwood forest site. Fungal specificity for red oak vs. white oak seedlings was unresolved. The high degree of rarity in this system imposes limitations on the power of community analyses at finer scales. The high mycobiont diversity highlights the potential for seedlings to acquire carbon from mycelial networks and confirms the utility of using outplanted seedlings to estimate ectomycorrhizal diversity. PMID:15723674

  19. Impact of stereoide fungi on decomposition of oak wood and possibility of its protection

    Mirić Milenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Four stereoide fungi, causers of decay of oak wood, have been investigated as follows: Stereum hirsutum, Chondrostereum purpureum, Stereum rugosum and Xylobolus frustulatus. The field tests have been undertaken in order to determine the influence of the stereoide fungi on the wood of Sessile oak (Quercus petraea and Austrian oak (Quercus robur. Artificial inoculations with mycelia have been provoked in vital standing trees, as well as in laying trunks. The appearance of dying back symptoms, the rate of mycelia spread through the stem, speed of wound callusing and appearance of fruit bodies or decay symptoms, have been observed. The protection possibility of trunks has been tested as well by using preservatives based on chromo-cupric boron salts, dichlorfluanide and chlorinepyriphos, cupric naphtenates, as well as with antiseptic paste. Microscopically analysis of attacked oak wood has been performed by utilizing of scanning electron (SEM and standard optical microscope providing normal, fluorescence, polarized and UV light, so that anatomical changes of the wood structure elements influenced by fungal activity have been noted.

  20. Transpiration of montane Pinus sylvestris L. and Quercus pubescens Willd. forest stands measured with sap flow sensors in NE Spain

    R. Poyatos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Stand transpiration was measured during the 2003 and 2004 growing seasons using heat dissipation sap flow sensors in a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and a pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd. forests located in a montane area of the Eastern Pyrenees (NE Spain. The first aim of the study was to assess the differences in quantitative estimates of transpiration (Ec and the response to evaporative demand of the two stands. Over the studied period of 2003, characterised by a severe drought episode during the summer, the oak stand (Ec was only 110 mm compared to the 239 mm transpired by the Scots pine stand, although the ratio of transpiration to reference evapotranspiration (Ec/ET0 in the oak stand compares well with the expected values predicted for low leaf area index (LAI oak forests in southern Europe. Scots pine showed a strong reduction in (Ec/ET0 as the drought developed, whereas pubescent oak was less affected by soil moisture deficits in the upper soil. As a second objective, and given the contrasting meteorological conditions between 2003 and 2004 summer periods, the interannual variability of transpiration was studied in the Scots pine plot. Rainfall during the summer months (June-September in 2003 was almost 40% less than in the same interval in 2004. Accordingly, transpiration was also reduced about 25% in 2003. Finally, Scots pine data from 2003 and 2004 was used to calibrate a simple transpiration model using ET0 and soil moisture deficit (SMD as input variables, and implicitly including stomatal responses to high vapour pressure deficits (Dd and soil water status.

  1. Saprotrophic basidiomycetes from temperate oak (Quercus petraea) forest soil: degradation of soil organic matter

    Valášková, Vendula; Šnajdr, Jaroslav; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Merhautová, Věra; Baldrian, Petr

    Vienna: Verlag, 2006, A141-A141. [International Symposium on Microbial Ecology – ISME-11 /11./. Vienna (AT), 20.08.2006-25.08.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/05/0168; GA MŠk LC06066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : basidiomycetes * forest soil * saprotrophic fungi Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  2. Oak (Quercus petraea) leaf litter degradation by litter-decomposing fungi

    Steffen, K.; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Šnajdr, Jaroslav; Baldrian, Petr

    Cairns: Verlag, 2006, s. 368-368. [International Mycological Congress /8/. Cairns (AU), 20.08.2006-25.08.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/05/0168; GA MŠk LC06066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : basidiomycetes * forest soil * saprotrophic fungi Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  3. ADHESIVE-FREE WOOD JOINTS – PART I: SESSILE OAK WOOD (Quercus petraea L.)

    Ramona-Elena DUMITRAȘCU

    2015-01-01

    act: Wood as a raw material is indispensable in various human activities. Its investigation is inexhaustible and its responsible valorization, in accordance with current requirements for re-use and subsequent re-integration, is a priority at national level. Rotational friction as an alternative method of joining wood elements or wooden structures has not been addressed in Romania until now, even if it has been under investigation during the past 15 years in the wood field. T...

  4. Groundwater and Light Conditions as Factors in the Survival of Pedunculate Oak (Quercus Robur L.) Seedlings

    Donnelly, DE; Čater, Matjaž; Roig, Ana Isabel; Batič, Franc; Llinares, Salvador

    2006-01-01

    A review of the academic and practitioner literature on customer relationship management indicates a general consensus that quality, value, and satisfaction are critical variables in explaining customer loyalty in services, yet, although much is known about the relationship between the aforementioned variables and customer loyalty, they don’t fully explain how customer loyalty is built? This paper argues that one critical variable has been excluded from consideration that impacts on customer ...

  5. Differetial degradation of oak (Quercus petraea) leaf litter by litter-decomposing basidiomycetes

    Steffen, K. T.; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Šnajdr, Jaroslav; Baldrian, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 5 (2007), s. 447-455. ISSN 0923-2508 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/05/0168; GA MŠk LC06066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : biopolymers * carbohydrate * laccase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.219, year: 2007

  6. EFFECTS OF STEAMING AND MICROWAVE PRETREATMENTS ON MASS TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS OF ALEPPE OAK (QUERCUS INFECTORIA)

    Hadi Dashti,; Mahdi Shahverdi; Hamid Reza Taghiyari; Shoboo Salehpur,; Sina Heshmati

    2012-01-01

    In this research, effects of steaming and microwave pretreatments on the mass transfer properties of never-dried Q. infectoria were investigated. Specimens at green moisture content were exposed to microwaves of frequency 2450 MHz for 10 minutes. The pre-steaming was performed at a temperature of 160°C for 1 hour under a pressure of 2 to 3 bars. Air permeability values were measured to be 4.8 and 4.9 (× 10-16 m3 m-1) in the sapwood and heartwood, respectively. Results showed a significant gen...

  7. EFFECTS OF STEAMING AND MICROWAVE PRETREATMENTS ON MASS TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS OF ALEPPE OAK (QUERCUS INFECTORIA

    Hadi Dashti,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, effects of steaming and microwave pretreatments on the mass transfer properties of never-dried Q. infectoria were investigated. Specimens at green moisture content were exposed to microwaves of frequency 2450 MHz for 10 minutes. The pre-steaming was performed at a temperature of 160°C for 1 hour under a pressure of 2 to 3 bars. Air permeability values were measured to be 4.8 and 4.9 (× 10-16 m3 m-1 in the sapwood and heartwood, respectively. Results showed a significant general increase in the air permeability and diffusion coefficients in the pretreated sapwood specimens. The presence of tyloses in the heartwood prevented the penetration of steam to the inner parts of the specimens, resulting in the diffusion coefficient remaining constant. The pressure gradient caused by the microwave heating resulted in the distortion of the tyloses structure in the heartwood, thus resulting in a significant increase in the air permeability. It may be concluded that the presence of tyloses has a significant effect on the final impact of either of the pretreatments.

  8. Production rate of quercus glauca pollen grains in a quercus glauca secondary forest

    Kiyonaga, Jota

    2002-01-01

    The production rate of pollen grains of Quercus glauca, in a secondary Q. glauca forest was determined over a three-year period, based on the number of pollen grains per male catkin and the fall rate of the male catkins. The latter parameter was measured using six litter traps. The annual production rate of pollen grains from 1996-1998 was 2.0×10^<11> 7.8×10^<11> no. ha^<-1>yr^1. The mean value for the three years is 4.4×10^lt;11> no.ha^<-1>yr^1. This value. which is lower than the results fr...

  9. Soil water content and emergence time control seedling establishment in three co-occurring Mediterranean oak species

    Rodríguez Urbieta, Itzíar; Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio Manuel; Zavala, Miguel A.; Marañón, Teodoro; Kobe, Richard K.

    2008-01-01

    Tree species can differ in their responses to resource availability during the critical phase of establishment, which could influence forest dynamics. In Mediterranean forests, most of the attention has focused on the effects of shade and summer drought on seedling survival, but little is known about the effect of autumn to spring rains on earlier stages of recruitment. A sowing experiment was set up along natural light and water gradients with three co-occurring oak species (Quercus suber L....

  10. Restoration of oak forest: Effects of former arable land use on soil chemistry and herb layer vegetation

    Valtinat, Karin; Bruun, Hans Henrik; Brunet, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Stands of pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) planted 50-80 years ago on two types of land (previously forested land and former arable fields) were compared regarding vegetation and soil. Former arable soils were characterized by a higher pH, higher nitrate concentration and higher soil density, but had lower organic matter content and lower ammonium concentration in the topsoil (0-5 cm). These differences, however, decreased with soil depth. Phosphorus concentration was consistently higher in fo...

  11. The influence of mature oak stands and spruce plantations on soil-dwelling click beetles in lowland plantation forests

    Loskotová, Tereza; Horák, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Most European forests have been converted into forest plantations that are managed for timber production. The main goal of this paper was to determine the difference between mature native sessile oak (Quercus petraea) stands and non-indigenous Norway spruce (Picea abies) plantations, with respect to communities of Athous click beetles in approximately 6,500 ha of lowland plantation forest area in the Czech Republic. Athous subfuscus was the most abundant and widespread species, followed by A....

  12. Emission of short chained organic acids, aldehydes and monoterpenes from Quercus ilex L. and Pinus pinea L. in relation to physiological activities, carbon budget and emission algorithms

    Kesselmeier, J.; Bode, K.; Hofmann, U.; Müller, H.; Schäfer, L.; Wolf, A.; Ciccioli, P.; Brancaleoni, E.; Cecinato, A.; Frattoni, M.; Foster, P.; Ferrari, C.; Jacob, V.; Fugit, J. L.; Dutaur, L.; Simon, V.; Torres, L.

    We report on the emission of monoterpenes, short-chained organic acids and aldehydes from Mediterranean oak ( Quercus ilex L.) and pine (Pinus pinea L.). All studies were done with dynamic cuvettes enclosing intact branches at the top of the canopy flushed with ambient air. Daily trends are compared with the photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), leaf temperature and the physiological activities of the enclosed branches, i.e. assimilation and transpiration, with special attention on the carbon budget. Oak emits monoterpenes in high amounts, up to 2% of the assimilated carbon. As compared with monoterpenes, short-chained organic acids and aldehydes are of minor importance for oak. However, on a leaf dry-weight basis equal amounts of acids and aldehydes are released from oak and pine. As pine emitted only low amounts of terpenes (below 0.2% of the assimilated carbon) the release of terpenes and oxygenated compounds is of equal importance for this species. A comparison of a modelled light and temperature driven emission with the observed volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions showed good agreement for monoterpenes as well as for organic acids emitted in the case of oak. For pine only the release of acids showed an adequate relation to the algorithm data, whereas the terpene emissions seemed to be dominated by temperature effects.

  13. Variation of equilibrium moisture content of heat-treated Couratari oblongifolia, Fraxinus excelsior, and Quercus rubra wood

    Qiaofang Zhou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatment may result in variation of wood equilibrium moisture content (EMC. During this study, tauari (Couratari oblongifolia, ash (Fraxinus excelsior, and oak (Quercus rubra woods were heat-treated at 190, 200, and 210ºC for 3 hours and then put into a conditioning chamber with a temperature from 30 to 75ºC and a relative humidity from 50 to 90%. The isothermal moisture adsorption curve was subsequently analyzed. Results indicated that the EMC of heat-treated wood was reduced by 23.4 to 37.4% compared to non-treated wood, but the EMC difference at different heat-treated temperatures for three hardwoods was quite small and the EMC of heat-treated wood was inversely proportional to their dry density.

  14. EFFECTS OF SOME IMPREGNATION CHEMICALS ON COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF LAMINATED VENEER LUMBER (LVL) PRODUCED WITH OAK AND POPLAR VENEERS

    Seref Kurt; Lütfü Köse; Günay Ozbay; Hamiyet Sahin Kol

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of impregnation chemicals on the combustion properties of 3-ply laminated veneer lumber (LVL) made of Oak (Quercus petraea subsp. İberica) and Poplar (Populus tremula L.). For this purpose, oak wood was used as the outer ply and poplar used for the core ply in LVL. Borax (BX), boric acid (BA), borax+boric acid (BX+BA), and di-ammonium phosphate (DAP) were used as impregnation chemicals, and urea formaldehyde (UF), phenol formaldehy...

  15. Blue gods, blue oil, and blue people.

    Fairbanks, V F

    1994-09-01

    Studies of the composition of coal tar, which began in Prussia in 1834, profoundly affected the economies of Germany, Great Britain, India, and the rest of the world, as well as medicine and surgery. Such effects include the collapse of the profits of the British indigo monopoly, the growth in economic power of Germany based on coal tar chemistry, and an economic crisis in India that led to more humane tax laws and, ultimately, the independence of India and the end of the British Empire. Additional consequences were the development of antiseptic surgery and the synthesis of a wide variety of useful drugs that have eradicated infections and alleviated pain. Many of these drugs, particularly the commonly used analgesics, sulfonamides, sulfones, and local anesthetics, are derivatives of aniline, originally called "blue oil" or "kyanol." Some of these aniline derivatives, however, have also caused aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, and methemoglobinemia (that is, "blue people"). Exposure to aniline drugs, particularly when two or three aniline drugs are taken concurrently, seems to be the commonest cause of methemoglobinemia today. PMID:8065194

  16. The State of the System and Steps Toward Resilience of Disturbance-dependent Oak Forests

    John C. Tyndall

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Current ecological, economic, and social conditions present unique challenges to natural resource managers seeking to maintain the resilience of disturbance-dependent ecosystems, such as oak (Quercus spp. forests. Oak-dominated ecosystems throughout the U.S. have historically been perpetuated through periodic disturbance, such as fire, but more recently show decline given shifting disturbance regimes associated with human land management decisions. We characterized the state of the social-ecological oak forest ecosystem in the midwestern U.S. through the perspectives of 32 natural resource professionals. Data from interviews with these change agents provided an integrative understanding of key system components, cross-scale interactions, dependencies, and feedbacks. Foremost, private landowner management decisions figured prominently in influencing oak regeneration success and were directly and indirectly shaped by a suite of interdependent ecological, e.g., deer herbivory, invasive shrub occurrence; economic, e.g., the cost of oak regeneration practices, the stumpage value of maple as compared to oak; and social forces, e.g., forestland parcelization, and personal relationships. Interviewees envisioned, and often preferred, a decline in oak dominance throughout the region, pointing to issues related to general landowner unwillingness to restore oak, the current trajectory of forest change, the threat of forest loss due to parcelization and housing development, and a combination of ecological and social factors that decrease the economic feasibility of restoration efforts. However, a decline in oak dominance may result in ecological communities that have no compositional equivalent on record and may not offer a desirable endpoint. Increasing social support offers the potential to enhance system capacity to manage for oak.

  17. Drought changes the dynamics of trace element accumulation in a Mediterranean Quercus ilex forest

    We conducted a field drought manipulation experiment in an evergreen oak Mediterranean forest from 1999 to 2005 to investigate the effects of the increased drought predicted for the next decades on the accumulation of trace elements that can be toxic for animals, in stand biomass, litter and soil. Drought increased concentrations of As, Cd, Ni, Pb and Cr in roots of the dominant tree species, Quercus ilex, and leaf Cd concentrations in Arbutus unedo and of Phillyrea latifolia codominant shrubs. The increased concentration of As and Cd can aggravate the toxic capacity of those two elements, which are already next or within the levels that have been shown to be toxic for herbivores. The study also showed a great reduction in Pb biomass content (100-135 g ha-1) during the studied period (1999-2005) showing the effectiveness of the law that prohibited leaded fuel after 2001. The results also indicate that drought increases the exportation of some trace elements to continental waters. - Drought increased biomass concentrations of As and Cd and favors exportation of some trace elements to continental waters in a Mediterranean forest

  18. Genetic stability evaluation of quercus suber l. somatic embryogenesis by rapd analysis

    A reliable protocol for adult Quercus suber L. somatic embryogenesis (SE) was developed recently. To evaluate the potential use of this protocol in cork oak forest breeding programs, it is essential to guarantee somatic embryos/emblings genetic stability. Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) is currently used to assess somaclonal variation providing information on genetic variability of the micropropagation process. In this work, SE was induced from adult trees by growing leaf explants on MS medium supplemented with 2,4-D and zeatin. Embling conversion took place on MS medium without growth regulators. DNA from donor tree, somatic embryos and emblings was used to assess genetic variability by RAPD fingerprinting. Fourteen primers produced 165 genetic loci with high quality and reproducibility. Despite somatic embryos originated some poor quality PCR-profiles, replicable and excellent fingerprints were obtained for both donor plant and embling. Results presented no differences among regenerated emblings and donor plant. Hence, the SE protocol used did not induce, up to moment, any genetic variability, confirming data previously obtained with other molecular/genetic techniques, supporting that this protocol may be used to provide true-to-type plants from important forestry species. (author)

  19. variability in foliar phenolic composition of several quercus species in northern mexico

    Quantitative and qualitative composition of the foliar phenolic compounds were investigated in 81 individual specimens of several white oak species (Quercus spp.). The trees were growing in twelve locations in Durango, Mexico. The phenol profiles were determined by HPLC-DAD and a Folin-Ciocateuprocedure. The results revealed that: (i) the foliar phenol profiles of all species analysed were complex and formed by 6 to 30 compounds, (ii) the flavonols mostly quercetin glycoside, isorhamnetin glycoside, kaempferol glycoside and phenolic acids were the main identified compounds, (iii) there was a high intra and inter-specific variability in the foliar phenol profiles both at the quantitative and qualitative levels, and (iv) the foliar phenol profiles indicated a slight species-specific tendency for phenols to be accumulated, although this was not clearly distinguished. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in the content and composition of the foliar flavonoids between species were observed due to the large environmental and soil conditions variability between localities. (author)

  20. Quercus faginea in the Mounts of Tlemcen (North-west Algeria: State of Knowledge

    Mohamed Berrichi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a summary of the dendrometric characteristics, the microscopic image and the physic-mechanical properties of wood and principally leaves morphology for to show the existence of zeen oak (Quercus faginea population in the far North West of Algeria with specific characters. The morphology of 400 mature leaves taken from 10 trees at the 4 exposures shows that the length of the leaf blade is about 8.568 cm, the width is 4.955 cm, its perimeter about 14.280 cm and its surface area 15.14 cm2. The mature leaf is composed of 20 lobes; the length of the six largest lobes is about 3.098 cm and the angles of their ribs 51.352°. The morphological characters studied have relatively high variability between the four aspects. Leaves at southern aspect have the lowest vegetative values. In contrast, at eastern aspect trees have large leaves with vegetative characters developed.

  1. Genetic diversity increases insect herbivory on oak saplings.

    Bastien Castagneyrol

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence from community genetics studies suggests that ecosystem functions supported by plant species richness can also be provided by genetic diversity within plant species. This is not yet true for the diversity-resistance relationship as it is still unclear whether damage by insect herbivores responds to genetic diversity in host plant populations. We developed a manipulative field experiment based on a synthetic community approach, with 15 mixtures of one to four oak (Quercus robur half-sib families. We quantified genetic diversity at the plot level by genotyping all oak saplings and assessed overall damage caused by ectophagous and endophagous herbivores along a gradient of increasing genetic diversity. Damage due to ectophagous herbivores increased with the genetic diversity in oak sapling populations as a result of higher levels of damage in mixtures than in monocultures for all families (complementarity effect rather than because of the presence of more susceptible oak genotypes in mixtures (selection effect. Assemblages of different oak genotypes would benefit polyphagous herbivores via improved host patch location, spill over among neighbouring saplings and diet mixing. By contrast, genetic diversity was a poor predictor of the abundance of endophagous herbivores, which increased with individual sapling apparency. Plant genetic diversity may not provide sufficient functional contrast to prevent tree sapling colonization by specialist herbivores while enhancing the foraging of generalist herbivores. Long term studies are nevertheless required to test whether the effect of genetic diversity on herbivory change with the ontogeny of trees and local adaptation of specialist herbivores.

  2. Variations in physiological and biochemical traits of oak seedlings grown under drought and ozone stress.

    Cotrozzi, Lorenzo; Remorini, Damiano; Pellegrini, Elisa; Landi, Marco; Massai, Rossano; Nali, Cristina; Guidi, Lucia; Lorenzini, Giacomo

    2016-05-01

    Despite the huge biodiversity characterizing the Mediterranean environment, environmental constraints, such as high sunlight and high temperatures alongside with dry periods, make plant survival hard. In addition, high irradiance leads to increasing ozone (O3 ) concentrations in ambient air. In this era of global warming, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms that allow native species to tolerate these environmental constraints and how such mechanisms interact. Three Mediterranean oak species (Quercus ilex, Quercus pubescens and Quercus cerris) with different features (drought tolerant, evergreen or deciduous species) were selected to assess their biometrical, physiological and biochemical responses under drought and/or O3 stress (80-100 nl l(-1) of O3 for 5 h day(-1) for 77 consecutive days). Leaf visible injury appeared only under drought stress (alone or combined with O3 ) in all three species. Drought × O3 induced strong reductions in leaf dry weight in Q. pubescens and Q. cerris (-70 and -75%, respectively). Alterations in physiological (i.e. decrease in maximum carboxylation rate) and biochemical parameters (i.e. increase in proline content and build-up of malondialdehyde by-products) occurred in all the three species, although drought represented the major determinant. Quercus ilex and Q. pubescens, which co-occur in dry environments, were more tolerant to drought and drought × O3 . Quercus ilex was the species in which oxidative stress occurred only when drought was applied with O3 . High plasticity at a biochemical level (i.e. proline content) and evergreen habitus are likely on the basis of the higher tolerance of Q. ilex. PMID:26541269

  3. Blue Nile

    Ramos, Manuel João

    2000-01-01

    The Blue Nile, whose source lies in highland Ethiopia, is known as “Al-Bahr al- Azraq” in Arabic, and as “Abbay” in Amharic. Along with the Atbara, it contributes more than 80 per cent of the Nile’s total water supply, the remainder coming mainly from the White Nile that stretches down to the Great Lakes plateau in Central Africa.

  4. Heavy metal adsorption by modified oak sawdust: Thermodynamics and kinetics

    This paper describes the adsorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions by oak (Quercus coccifera) sawdust modified by means of HCl treatment. Our study tested the removal of three heavy metals: Cu, Ni, and Cr. The optimum shaking speed, adsorbent mass, contact time, and pH were determined, and adsorption isotherms were obtained using concentrations of the metal ions ranging from 0.1 to 100 mg L-1. The adsorption process follows pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics, as well as Langmuir and D-R adsorption isotherms. The paper discusses the thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption (the Gibbs free energy, entropy, and enthalpy). Our results demonstrate that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic under natural conditions. The maximum removal efficiencies were 93% for Cu(II) at pH 4, 82% for Ni(II) at pH 8, and 84% for Cr(VI) at pH 3

  5. Production of anticandidal cotton textiles treated with oak gall extract.

    Tayel, Ahmed A; El-Tras, Wael F; Abdel-Monem, Omnia A; El-Sabbagh, Sabha M; Alsohim, Abdullah S; El-Refai, Elham M

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans, one of the most dreadful fungal pathogens threatening humans, could not be easily prevented. The anticandidal activity of oak gall extract, Quercus infectoria (QIE), was investigated as a potential natural alternative to synthetic and chemical fungicides. QIE anticandidal potentiality was confirmed using both qualitative and quantitative assays. Cotton textiles were treated with QIE and then evaluated as anticandidal fabrics. QIE-treated textiles had a potent anticandidal activity, which could completely inhibit the inoculated C. albicans cells. The durability of anticandidal activity in QIE-treated textiles almost completely disappeared after the fourth laundering cycle. QIE could be recommended, however, as a potent anticandidal agent for preparing antiseptic solutions and emulsions and as a finishing agent for manufacturing anticandidal disposable diapers and hygienic clothes. PMID:24401783

  6. Pharmacognostic studies of insect gall of Quercus infectoria Olivier (Fagaceae)

    Savitri Shrestha; Vasuki Srinivas Kaushik; Ravi Shankara Birur Eshwarappa; Sundara Rajan Subaramaihha; Latha Muuaiah Ramanna; Dhananjaya Bhadrapura Lakkappa

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the detailed pharmacognostic profile of galls of Quercus infectoria Olivier (Q. infectoria olivier) (Fagaceae), an important medicinal plant used in the Indian system of medicine. Methods: Samples of galls of Q. infectoria were studied by macroscopical, microscopical, physiochemical, phytochemical, fluorescence analysis and othjer methods for standardization as recommended by WHO. Results: Macroscopically, the crude drug is globose with horny appearances on external ...

  7. Variability of acorn anatomical characteristics in Quercus robur L. genotypes

    Nikolić Nataša P.; Merkulov Ljiljana S.; Krstić Borivoj Đ.; Pajević Slobodanka P.; Borišev Milan K.; Orlović Saša S.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine variability of acorn anatomical characteristics in seventeen Quercus robur L. genotypes. Acorns were collected in clonal seed orchard Banov Brod (Srem, Vojvodina, Serbia). Microscopic measurements were done for pericarp (total thickness, thickness of exocarp and mesocarp), seed coat (total thickness, thickness of outer epidermis, parenchyma, and inner epidermis), and embryo axis (diameter, thickness of cortical region, and diameter of stellar zone). Obtain...

  8. Posthuman blues

    Tonnies, Mac

    2013-01-01

    Posthuman Blues, Vol. I is first volume of the edited version of the popular weblog maintained by author Mac Tonnies from 2003 until his tragic death in 2009. Tonnies' blog was a pastiche of his original fiction, reflections on his day-to-day life, trenchant observations of current events, and thoughts on an eclectic range of material he culled from the Internet. What resulted was a remarkably broad portrait of a thoughtful man and the complex times in which he lived, rendered with intellige...

  9. Earlywood vessel features in Quercus faginea: relationship between ring width and wood density at two sites in Portugal

    Sousa VB

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wood anatomy holds relevant information for tree development and timber quality (e.g., wood density, which is important for the sustainability of the species. Quercus faginea Lam. (Portuguese or Lusitanian oak is an autoch­thonous Mediterranean oak species characterized by a shrinking natural distribution area and use abandonment. We studied the variation of several wood properties and their relationships with the aim of determining and possibly increasing the wood economic value of this species. The anatomical features of earlywood vessels (area, number, frequency and proportion were investigated in twenty Q. faginea trees sampled at two locations within the natural distribution of the species in Portugal. Moreover, we analyzed the variation of vessel features from pith to bark, the radial growth and the wood density to search for patterns and relationships among the analyzed parameters. Mean earlywood vessel area increased with cambial age up to 60-70 years and then leveled off. An inverse pattern was found for the number of vessels per ring beyond that age. Similar radial patterns of all vessel features were found at both sites, and no significant differences in earlywood vessel area were found between sites. The within-tree development of earlywood vessels was age-related, though not influenced by growth. Earlywood vessel features explained the variation of wood density, i.e., wood density of Q. faginea was strongly negatively correlated with both mean vessel area and proportion.

  10. Large drought-induced variations in oak leaf volatile organic compound emissions during PINOT NOIR 2012.

    Geron, Chris; Daly, Ryan; Harley, Peter; Rasmussen, Rei; Seco, Roger; Guenther, Alex; Karl, Thomas; Gu, Lianhong

    2016-03-01

    Leaf-level isoprene and monoterpene emissions were collected and analyzed from five of the most abundant oak (Quercus) species in Central Missouri's Ozarks Region in 2012 during PINOT NOIR (Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower - NOx, Oxidants, Isoprene Research). June measurements, prior to the onset of severe drought, showed isoprene emission rates and leaf temperature responses similar to those previously reported in the literature and used in Biogenic Volatile Organic Compound (BVOC) emission models. During the peak of the drought in August, isoprene emission rates were substantially reduced, and response to temperature was dramatically altered, especially for the species in the red oak subgenus (Erythrobalanus). Quercus stellata (in the white oak subgenus Leucobalanus), on the other hand, increased its isoprene emission rate during August, and showed no decline at high temperatures during June or August, consistent with its high tolerance to drought and adaptation to xeric sites at the prairie-deciduous forest interface. Mid-late October measurements were conducted after soil moisture recharge, but were affected by senescence and cooler temperatures. Isoprene emission rates were considerably lower from all species compared to June and August data. The large differences between the oaks in response to drought emphasizes the need to consider BVOC emissions at the species level instead of just the whole canopy. Monoterpene emissions from Quercus rubra in limited data were highest among the oaks studied, while monoterpene emissions from the other oak species were 80-95% lower and less than assumed in current BVOC emission models. Major monoterpenes from Q. rubra (and in ambient air) were p-cymene, α-pinene, β-pinene, d-limonene, γ-terpinene, β-ocimene (predominantly1,3,7-trans-β-ocimene, but also 1,3,6-trans-β-ocimene), tricyclene, α-terpinene, sabinene, terpinolene, and myrcene. Results are discussed in the context of canopy flux studies

  11. Fluorescent indices of oak and wheat leaves in dependence on chlorophyll content

    Kalmatskaya, Olesya Ð. ń.; Karavaev, Vladimir A.; Gunar, Lyudmila E.

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence induction curves of the leaves of two plant species in dependence on chlorophyll content were studied. Red oak (Quercus rubra L.) leaves upon the autumn chlorophyll degradation, as well as wheat leaves (Triticum aestivum L.) at various stages of ontogenesis showed linear dependence between the ratio ω = F740 / F685 (the ratio of the maximum values of fluorescence at respective wavelengths) and chlorophyll content. In both cases, parameter Fv / Fm (the relative value of the variable fluorescence) remained almost unchanged up to significant reduction of chlorophyll content, indicating on maintaining the high photochemical activity of photosystem 2.

  12. 11C-PET imaging reveals transport dynamics and sectorial plasticity of oak phloem after girdling

    De Schepper, Veerle; Bühler, Jonas; Thorpe, Michael; Roeb, Gerhard; Huber, Gregor; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Jahnke, Siegfried; Steppe, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Carbon transport processes in plants can be followed non-invasively by repeated application of the short-lived positron-emitting radioisotope 11C, a technique which has rarely been used with trees. Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) allowing 3D visualisation has been adapted for use with plants. To investigate the effects of stem girdling on the flow of assimilates, leaves on first order branches of two-year-old oak (Quercus robur L.) trees were labelled with 11C by supplying 11CO2-...

  13. Dynamics of Long-lived Foundation Species: The History of Quercus in Southern Scandinavia

    Foster, David Russell; Lindbladh, Matts

    2010-01-01

    (1) The long-term history of Quercus in southern Scandinavia has received little attention despite its important role in modern conservation. In this study the 4000-year dynamics of Quercus, its habitat and other important taxa were analysed with pollen data from 25 small hollows and 6 regional sites across southern Scandinavia. The aim was to provide a context for understanding the species’ current status and managing its future dynamics. (2) The results indicate that Quercus is much less ab...

  14. Management of oak forests

    Löf, Magnus; Brunet, Jörg; Filyushkina, Anna;

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the ecosystem services provided by oak-dominated forests in southern Sweden is a prerequisite for ensuring their conservation and sustainable management. These forests seem well-suited for multiple-use forestry, but knowledge is limited regarding how to manage them for multiple...... uses. Management for the production of high-value timber species like oaks and management to conserve biodiversity, or for cultural services can be in conflict with each other. This study evaluates the capacity of three contrasting management regimes to provide societies with economic revenue from...... timber production, habitats for biodiversity and cultural services, and the study analyses associated trade-offs and synergies. The three regimes were: intensive oak timber production (A), combined management for both timber production and biodiversity (B) and biodiversity conservation without management...

  15. Photosynthetic traits of Siebold's beech and oak saplings grown under free air ozone exposure in northern Japan

    We set up a free-air ozone (O3) exposure system for determining the photosynthetic responses of Siebold's beech (Fagus crenata) and oak (Quercus mongolica var. crispula) to O3 under field conditions. Ten-year-old saplings of beech and oak were exposed to an elevated O3 concentration (60 nmol mol−1) during daytime from 6 August to 11 November 2011. Ozone significantly reduced the net photosynthetic rate in leaves of both species in October, by 46% for beech and 15% for oak. In beech there were significant decreases in maximum rate of carboxylation, maximum rate of electron transport in photosynthesis, nitrogen content and photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, but not in oak. Stomatal limitation of photosynthesis was unaffected by O3. We therefore concluded photosynthesis in beech is more sensitive to O3 than that in oak, and the O3-induced reduction of photosynthetic activity in beech was due not to stomatal closure, but to biochemical limitation. -- Highlights: ► A free air ozone exposure system was set up in northern Japan. ► Beech is more sensitive to ozone than oak. ► Decrease of photosynthesis in beech was mainly due to biochemical limitation. -- Photosynthesis of beech is more sensitive to free air ozone exposure than that of oak

  16. Seasonal Pattern of Decomposition and N, P, and C Dynamics in Leaf litter in a Mongolian Oak Forest and a Korean Pine Plantation

    Jaeeun Sohng; Ah Reum Han; Mi-Ae Jeong; Yunmi Park; Byung Bae Park; Pil Sun Park

    2014-01-01

    Distinct seasons and diverse tree species characterize temperate deciduous forests in NE Asia, but large areas of deciduous forests have been converted to conifer plantations. This study was conducted to understand the effects of seasons and tree species on leaf litter decomposition in a temperate forest. Using the litterbag method, the decomposition rate and nitrogen, phosphorous, and carbon dynamics of Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica), Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis), and their mixed leaf l...

  17. Mycorrhization of Quercus robur L., Quercus cerris L. and Corylus avellana L. seedlings with Tuber macrosporum Vittad.

    Benucci, Gian Maria Niccolò; Gógán Csorbai, Andrea; Baciarelli Falini, Leonardo; Bencivenga, Mattia; Di Massimo, Gabriella; Donnini, Domizia

    2012-11-01

    Tuber macrosporum Vittad. is not a common truffle species, but with remarkable organoleptic qualities and much economic interest. After the addition of truffle spore slurry, 30 seedlings of Quercus robur L., Quercus cerris L. and Corylus avellana L. were grown inside a greenhouse for 11 months before evaluation of the mycorrhizal level. Two different potting mixes were used: a natural soil-based potting mix for Q. robur, Q. cerris and C. avellana and a peat-based potting mix for Q. robur. Quercus robur planted in soil potting mix was the most receptive towards the truffle spore inoculum, with a level of formation of T. macrosporum ectomycorrhizas (ECMs) of approximately 14 %, ranging from a minimum of ∼4 % to a maximum of ∼44 % in different seedlings. No T. macrosporum ECMs developed on Q. cerris (soil potting mix) or on Q. robur (peat potting mix), whereas a low percentage of ECMs was detected on only three C. avellana (soil potting mix) seedlings. The fungus Sphaerosporella brunnea (Alb. & Schwein.) Svrček & Kubička was also detected as a contaminant on almost half the truffle-inoculated seedlings. A new detailed description of the morphological and anatomical characteristics of T. macrosporum ECMs and their DNA-based verification with species-specific markers were also reported. PMID:22565651

  18. Oak Ridge national reservation

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation is located on 37 000 acres in east Tennessee. The Oak Ridge facilities include the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Y-12 National Security Complex and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP - originally built as a uranium enrichment facility for defence programmes and originally named 'The Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant'. After World War II this plant was renamed Oak Ridge K-25 Site and produced enriched uranium for the commercial nuclear power industry from 1945 to 1985. It was renamed ETTP in 1987. The situation at this site is characterized by hundreds of contaminated buildings in deteriorating conditions. The water table is shallow at the site implying a short travel time of the contaminants. The overall strategy for cleanup of the Reservation is based on surface water considerations as the Reservation encompasses five distinct watersheds. The cleanup strategy is a risk-based approach that focuses first on those contaminant sources that are the greatest contributors of risk. The watershed approach is used to determine which sources are the worst contributors and therefore should be cleaned up as early as possible. At the end of site cleanup, planned by 2015, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will continue to operate as a world-class research facility. Y-12 will continue to operate, fulfilling its national security mission. As cleanup of the East Tennessee Technology Park is completed DOE will transfer ownership of the uncontaminated buildings to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) which in turn will lease this property for immediate private industrial use. To further refine the overall cleanup strategy, a prioritization system has been developed to help guide decisions where investments should be made. The general priorities are as follows: (a) Mitigate immediate onsite and offsite risks; (b) Reduce offsite migration of contaminants; (c) Remediate sources of surface

  19. The history of widespread decrease in oak dominance exemplified in a grassland-forest landscape.

    Hanberry, Brice B; Dey, Daniel C; He, Hong S

    2014-04-01

    Regionally-distinctive open oak forest ecosystems have been replaced either by intensive agriculture and grazing fields or by denser forests throughout eastern North America and Europe. To quantify changes in tree communities and density in the Missouri Plains, a grassland-forest landscape, we used historical surveys from 1815 to 1864 and current surveys from 2004 to 2008. To estimate density for historical communities, we used the Morisita plotless density estimator and applied corrections for surveyor bias. To estimate density for current forests, we used Random Forests, an ensemble regression tree method, to predict densities from known values at plots using terrain and soil predictors. Oak species decreased from 62% of historical composition to 30% of current composition and black and white oaks historically were dominant species across 93% of the landscape and currently were dominant species across 42% of the landscape. Current forest density was approximately two times greater than historical densities, demonstrating loss of savanna and woodlands and transition to dense forest structure. Average tree diameters were smaller than in the past, but mean basal area and stocking remained similar over time because of the increase in density in current forests. Nevertheless, there were spatial differences; basal area and stocking decreased along rivers and increased away from rivers. Oak species are being replaced by other species in the Missouri Plains, similar to replacement throughout the range of Quercus. Long-term commitment to combinations of prescribed burning and silvicultural prescriptions in more xeric sites may be necessary for oak recruitment. Restoration of open oak ecosystems is a time-sensitive issue because restoration will become increasingly costly as oaks are lost from the overstory and the surrounding matrix becomes dominated by non-oak species. PMID:24496032

  20. Countervailing effects on pine and oak leaf litter decomposition in human-altered Mediterranean ecosystems.

    Sheffer, Efrat; Canham, Charles D; Kigel, Jaime; Perevolotsky, Avi

    2015-04-01

    Species affect the dynamics of litter decay through the intrinsic properties of their litter, but also by influencing the environmental conditions imposed by their canopy, roots, and litter layers. We examined how human-induced changes in the relative abundances of two dominant Mediterranean trees-Pinus halepensis and Quercus calliprinos-impact leaf litter decomposition. A reciprocal transplant experiment tested decomposition of pine, oak, and mixed leaf litter in oak woodland and pine forest ecosystems with different relative abundances of pine and oak. Using likelihood methods, we tested the importance and magnitude of the environmental effects of local species abundance, litter layer composition, and soil properties on litter mass loss. Oak litter decomposition was slower than pine, and had an antagonistic effect on mixed litter decay. These results differ from other reported pine-oak associations, and are probably associated with a higher content of tannins and phenols in oak compared to pine litter in our study sites. The environmental effects of the two species were opposite to their litter decomposition dynamics. An increased proportion of pine in the oak woodlands and a higher content of pine needles in the litter layer of pine forests reduced decay rates. The presence of more oak and broadleaf litter in the litter layer accelerated decomposition in pine forests. Our results highlight the importance of considering multidimensional species effects mediated by both chemical and physical properties, and imply that man-made changes in the composition and configuration of plant communities may result in complex unpredicted consequences to ecosystem biogeochemistry. PMID:25680333

  1. Poison ivy - oak - sumac rash

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000027.htm Poison ivy - oak - sumac rash To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Poison ivy, oak, and sumac are plants that commonly ...

  2. Aromatic Plants in Eurasian Blue Tit Nests: The ‘Nest

    Pires, Bárbara A.; Belo, Anabela F.; Rabaça, João E.

    2012-01-01

    The ‘Nest Protection Hypothesis’ suggests that some birds add aromatic plants to their nests to repel or kill ectoparasites. This behavior has been described for several species, including the Eurasian Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus). We studied the reproductive performance, based on 26 nests (in nest boxes), of this species in mixed forested areas of Quercus spp. and Pinus pinea in the Parque Florestal de Monsanto, the largest park of Lisbon, Portugal. The frequency of aromatic plant...

  3. Species response curves of oak species along climatic gradients in Turkey

    Uğurlu, Emin; Oldeland, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The genus Quercus is one of the most important tree species in Turkey. However, little is known on the ecological preferences of Turkish oak species regarding climate. We analyzed species response curves using a HOF-model approach to describe the general pattern of oak distributions along climatic gradients and to identify the driving climatic factors for eight oak species in Turkey. While climate data were extracted from the free available worldclim dataset, occurrence data on oak species were assembled from the literature into a vegetation database ( n = 1,104). From the analyzed species response curves, only fa ew (16%) showed unimodal responses, while most were linear (31%) or exhibited a threshold response (31%). The driving factors were seasonality of temperature and seasonality of precipitation, indicating that Turkish oak species can be characterized best by the preference of climatic stability. These findings have important implications for conservation and climate change research, which usually focuses on trends of the mean values of temperature or precipitation but less often on the seasonality. In this study, we further tested whether niche optima derived from raw mean values of occurrences could replace missing model optima due to non-responsiveness of HOF models of type I. However, we did not find this to be a satisfactory solution. Finally, we discuss the need for the construction of a national database based on phytosociological relevés for Turkey.

  4. Growth and form of Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior respond distinctly different to initial growing space: results from 24-year-old Nelder experiments

    Christian Kuehne; Edgar Kublin; Patrick Pyttel; Jürgen Bauhus

    2013-01-01

    Initial growing space is of critical importance to growth and quality development of individual trees.We investigated how mortality,growth (diameter at breast height,total height),natural pruning (height to first dead and first live branch and branchiness) and stem and crown form of 24-year-old pedunculate oak (Quercus robur [L.]) and European ash (Fraxinus excelsior [L.]) were affected by initial spacing.Data were recorded from two replicate single-species Nelder wheels located in southern Germany with eight initial stocking regimes varying from 1,020to 30,780 seedlings·ha-1.Mortality substantially decreased with increasing initial growing space but significantly differed among the two species,averaging 59% and 15% for oak and ash plots,respectively.In contrast to oak,the low self-thinning rate found in the ash plots over the investigated study period resulted in a high number of smaller intermediate or suppressed trees,eventually retarding individual tree as well as overall stand development.As a result,oak gained greater stem dimensions throughout all initial spacing regimes and the average height of ash significantly increased with initial growing space.The survival of lower crown class ashes also appeared to accelerate self-pruning dynamics.In comparison to oak,we observed less dead and live primary branches as well as a smaller number of epicormic shoots along the first 6 m of the lower stem of dominant and co-dominant ashes in all spacing regimes.Whereas stem form of both species was hardly affected by initial growing space,the percentage of brushy crowns significantly increased with initial spacing in oak and ash.Our findings suggest that initial stockings of ca.12,000seedlings per hectare in oak and 2,500 seedlings per hectare in ash will guarantee a sufficient number of at least 300 potential crop trees per hectare in pure oak and ash plantations at the end of the self-thinning phase,respectively.If the problem of epicormic shoots and inadequate self

  5. Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac

    ... Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth First Aid: Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac Print A A A Text Size The oil in poison ivy /oak/sumac plants (called urushiol ) can cause ...

  6. Land Change in Eastern Mediterranean Wood-Pasture Landscapes: The Case of Deciduous Oak Woodlands in Lesvos (Greece)

    Schaich, Harald; Kizos, Thanasis; Schneider, Stefan; Plieninger, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    In Mediterranean Europe, wood-pasture landscapes with oak woodlands as emblematic ecosystems are undergoing rapid land-use change, which may threaten their legacy as hotspots of biodiversity, ecosystem services, and cultural heritage. The objective of this study was to quantify land cover changes and transitions as well as the dynamics of oak woodland patterns and densities over 50 years in two municipalities at the center and edges of Quercus macrolepis distribution in Northern Lesvos (Greece). We used aerial photographs from 1960 and WorldView-2 satellite images from 2010 to process land cover maps and metrics, and to calculate oak canopy cover with a point-grid sampling approach. Spatiotemporal dynamics of land cover change were generally high—especially between oak woodlands and grass- and shrub-lands, resulting in a more heterogeneous and fragmented landscape in 2010. Surprisingly, oak woodland area remained stable with marginal losses in one study site and gains in the other one. Oak canopy cover increased by 8 and 9 %. Spatial hotspots of change were mountainous and peripheral phrygana areas with expanding oak stands, as well as river valleys and near urban areas with expanding olive groves and grass- and shrublands in former complex cultivation and oak stands. We conclude that the parallel processes of abandonment of crop cultivation and intensification of livestock grazing have been less detrimental to oak woodlands than supposed. To ensure long-term persistence of oak woodlands in the face of ongoing rural depopulation and land-use intensification, environmental and agricultural policies should better address their specificities as anthropogenic habitats.

  7. RNA-seq analysis of Quercus pubescens Leaves: de novo transcriptome assembly, annotation and functional markers development.

    Sara Torre

    Full Text Available Quercus pubescens Willd., a species distributed from Spain to southwest Asia, ranks high for drought tolerance among European oaks. Q. pubescens performs a role of outstanding significance in most Mediterranean forest ecosystems, but few mechanistic studies have been conducted to explore its response to environmental constrains, due to the lack of genomic resources. In our study, we performed a deep transcriptomic sequencing in Q. pubescens leaves, including de novo assembly, functional annotation and the identification of new molecular markers. Our results are a pre-requisite for undertaking molecular functional studies, and may give support in population and association genetic studies. 254,265,700 clean reads were generated by the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, with an average length of 98 bp. De novo assembly, using CLC Genomics, produced 96,006 contigs, having a mean length of 618 bp. Sequence similarity analyses against seven public databases (Uniprot, NR, RefSeq and KOGs at NCBI, Pfam, InterPro and KEGG resulted in 83,065 transcripts annotated with gene descriptions, conserved protein domains, or gene ontology terms. These annotations and local BLAST allowed identify genes specifically associated with mechanisms of drought avoidance. Finally, 14,202 microsatellite markers and 18,425 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were, in silico, discovered in assembled and annotated sequences. We completed a successful global analysis of the Q. pubescens leaf transcriptome using RNA-seq. The assembled and annotated sequences together with newly discovered molecular markers provide genomic information for functional genomic studies in Q. pubescens, with special emphasis to response mechanisms to severe constrain of the Mediterranean climate. Our tools enable comparative genomics studies on other Quercus species taking advantage of large intra-specific ecophysiological differences.

  8. RNA-Seq Analysis of Quercus pubescens Leaves: De Novo Transcriptome Assembly, Annotation and Functional Markers Development

    Torre, Sara; Tattini, Massimiliano; Brunetti, Cecilia; Fineschi, Silvia; Fini, Alessio; Ferrini, Francesco; Sebastiani, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Quercus pubescens Willd., a species distributed from Spain to southwest Asia, ranks high for drought tolerance among European oaks. Q. pubescens performs a role of outstanding significance in most Mediterranean forest ecosystems, but few mechanistic studies have been conducted to explore its response to environmental constrains, due to the lack of genomic resources. In our study, we performed a deep transcriptomic sequencing in Q. pubescens leaves, including de novo assembly, functional annotation and the identification of new molecular markers. Our results are a pre-requisite for undertaking molecular functional studies, and may give support in population and association genetic studies. 254,265,700 clean reads were generated by the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, with an average length of 98 bp. De novo assembly, using CLC Genomics, produced 96,006 contigs, having a mean length of 618 bp. Sequence similarity analyses against seven public databases (Uniprot, NR, RefSeq and KOGs at NCBI, Pfam, InterPro and KEGG) resulted in 83,065 transcripts annotated with gene descriptions, conserved protein domains, or gene ontology terms. These annotations and local BLAST allowed identify genes specifically associated with mechanisms of drought avoidance. Finally, 14,202 microsatellite markers and 18,425 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were, in silico, discovered in assembled and annotated sequences. We completed a successful global analysis of the Q. pubescens leaf transcriptome using RNA-seq. The assembled and annotated sequences together with newly discovered molecular markers provide genomic information for functional genomic studies in Q. pubescens, with special emphasis to response mechanisms to severe constrain of the Mediterranean climate. Our tools enable comparative genomics studies on other Quercus species taking advantage of large intra-specific ecophysiological differences. PMID:25393112

  9. Molecular organization of the 25S-18S rDNA IGS of Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber: a comparative analysis.

    Inácio, Vera; Rocheta, Margarida; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    The 35S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) units, repeated in tandem at one or more chromosomal loci, are separated by an intergenic spacer (IGS) containing functional elements involved in the regulation of transcription of downstream rRNA genes. In the present work, we have compared the IGS molecular organizations in two divergent species of Fagaceae, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus suber, aiming to comprehend the evolution of the IGS sequences within the family. Self- and cross-hybridization FISH was done on representative species of the Fagaceae. The IGS length variability and the methylation level of 18 and 25S rRNA genes were assessed in representatives of three genera of this family: Fagus, Quercus and Castanea. The intergenic spacers in Beech and Cork Oak showed similar overall organizations comprising putative functional elements needed for rRNA gene activity and containing a non-transcribed spacer (NTS), a promoter region, and a 5'-external transcribed spacer. In the NTS: the sub-repeats structure in Beech is more organized than in Cork Oak, sharing some short motifs which results in the lowest sequence similarity of the entire IGS; the AT-rich region differed in both spacers by a GC-rich block inserted in Cork Oak. The 5'-ETS is the region with the higher similarity, having nonetheless different lengths. FISH with the NTS-5'-ETS revealed fainter signals in cross-hybridization in agreement with the divergence between genera. The diversity of IGS lengths revealed variants from ∼ 2 kb in Fagus, and Quercus up to 5.3 kb in Castanea, and a lack of correlation between the number of variants and the number of rDNA loci in several species. Methylation of 25S Bam HI site was confirmed in all species and detected for the first time in the 18S of Q. suber and Q. faginea. These results provide important clues for the evolutionary trends of the rDNA 25S-18S IGS in the Fagaceae family. PMID:24893289

  10. Canopy structural alterations to nitrogen functions of the soil microbial community in a Quercus virginiana forest

    Moore, L. D.; Van Stan, J. T., II; Rosier, C. L.; Gay, T. E.; Wu, T.

    2014-12-01

    Forest canopy structure controls the timing, amount and chemical character of precipitation supply to soils through interception and drainage along crown surfaces. Yet, few studies have examined forest canopy structural connections to soil microbial communities (SMCs), and none have measured how this affects SMC N functions. The maritime Quercus virginiana Mill. (southern live oak) forests of St Catherine's Island, GA, USA provide an ideal opportunity to examine canopy structural alterations to SMCs and their functioning, as their throughfall varies substantially across space due to dense Tillandsia usneoides L. (spanish moss) mats bestrewn throughout. To examine the impact of throughfall variability on SMC N functions, we examined points along the canopy coverage continuum: large canopy gaps (0%), bare canopy (50-60%), and canopy of heavy T. usneoides coverage (>=85%). Five sites beneath each of the canopy cover types were monitored for throughfall water/ions and soil leachates chemistry for one storm each month over the growing period (7 months, Mar-2014 to Sep-2014) to compare with soil chemistry and SMC communities sampled every two months throughout that same period (Mar, May, Jul, Sep). DGGE and QPCR analysis of the N functioning genes (NFGs) to characterize the ammonia oxidizing bacterial (AOB-amoA), archaea (AOA-amoA), and ammonification (chiA) communities were used to determine the nitrification and decomposition potential of these microbial communities. PRS™-probes (Western Ag Innovations Inc., Saskatoon, Canada) were then used to determine the availability of NO3-N and NH4+N in the soils over a 6-week period to evaluate whether the differing NFG abundance and community structures resulted in altered N cycling.

  11. Dendrochronological Investigations of Valonia Oak Trees in Western Greece

    Andreas Papadopoulos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Valonia oak (Quercus ithaburensis subsp. macrolepis (Kotschy Hedge & Yalt. is an east Mediterranean endemic, xerothermic and deciduous tree of particular interest in forestry. There has been a growing demand lately to include the species in reforestations in Greece which also increased the interest to investigate its response to climate change. The main purpose of this research is to study valonia oak from a dendrochronological – dendroclimatological point of view within its Mediterranean distribution range. Materials and Methods: Sampling took place in characteristic valonia oak stands where cross sections or tree-cores were taken from 40 trees. The cross sections and the tree-cores were prepared and cross-dated using standard dendrochronological methods and tree-ring widths were measured to the nearest 0.001 mm using the Windendro software program. The ARSTAN program was used to standardize the tree-ring data and to calculate dendrochronological statistical parameters. The inter-annual variability of tree-ring width and the radial growth trend were examined. Finally, tree-ring widths to climate relationships were calculated by orthogonal regression in combination with the bootstrap procedure using master residual chronology and monthly precipitation, temperature data and scPDSI drought index, from October of the n-1 year up to November of the n year. Results: The master chronology of valonia oak trees in Western Greece reaches 365 years, with an average ring width of 0.89 mm and with mean sensitivity being 0.21. The variation of the tree-ring widths indicates the influence of climate and human intervention in the past. Tree-ring to climate relationships show that valonia oak growth is positively affected by precipitations in January and March and by drought reduction during June and July. Conclusions: Valonia oak in Western Greece is a species of great interest for dendrochronological and dendroclimatological studies

  12. Ectomycorrhizal fungal communities of pedunculate and sessile oak seedlings from bare-root forest nurseries.

    Leski, Tomasz; Pietras, Marcin; Rudawska, Maria

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we present the detailed molecular investigation of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) community of Quercus petraea and Quercus robur seedlings grown in bare-root forest nurseries. In all tested oak samples, mycorrhizal colonization was nearly 100%. Morphological observation and molecular investigations (sequencing of fungal ITS rDNA) revealed a total of 23 mycorrhizal taxa. The most frequent and abundant fungal taxa were Hebeloma sacchariolens, Tuber sp., and Peziza sp.; from the detected fungal taxa, 20 were noted for Q. petraea and 23 for Q. robur. Depending on the nursery, the species richness of identified ECM fungal taxa for both oak species ranged from six to 11 taxa. The mean species richness for all nurseries was 5.36 and 5.82 taxa per Q. petraea and Q. robur sample, respectively. According to the analysis of similarity, ECM fungal communities were similar for Q. petraea and Q. robur (R = 0.019; p = 0.151). On the other hand, detected fungal communities were significantly different between nurseries (R = 0.927; p ectomycorrhizal diversity (in terms of richness, the Shannon diversity, evenness, and Simpson dominance indices) is significantly related to the soil parameters of each nursery. We conclude that individual nursery may be considered as separate ecological niches that strongly discriminate diversity of ECM fungi. PMID:19756776

  13. A COMPARISON OF THE COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE OF TWO OAK FORESTS IN MARSHALL AND POTTAWATOMIE COUNTIES

    Bruce A. Smith

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In October 2011, high school students from McLoud High School sampled an oak forest in Earlsboro, Pottawatomie County. In July, 2012, students in the Pre-collegiate Field Studies Camp at the University of Oklahoma Biological Station sampled the Marshall County forest at the Buncombe Creek camp ground, located approximately 100 miles south of the Earlsboro forest and 1 mile north of the University of Oklahoma Biological Station. One component of each botany course was to study the composition and structure of an oak forest. These 2 forests were chosen to compare because of their similarity in composition and physical distance apart. They found 10 hardwood species in the Marshall County forest and 9 in the PottawatomieCounty forest, with 6 species common to both. Quercus stellata was most important in both forests and most frequent in the Pottawatomie forest where the total density was 0.141/m2. Quercus stellata and Ulmus alata were most frequent in the Marshall County forest where the total density was 0.107/m2.

  14. Soil CO2 Efflux in a Mixed Pine-Oak Forest in Valsaín (Central Spain

    Rosa Inclán

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil-surface CO2 efflux and its spatial and temporal variation were investigated in a southern Mediterranean, mixed pine-oak forest ecosystem on the northern slopes of the Sierra de Guadarrama in Spain from February 2006 to July 2006. Measurements of soil CO2 efflux, soil temperatures, and moisture were conducted in nine 1963-m2 sampling plots distributed in a gradient around the ecotone between Pinus sylvestris L. and Quercus pyrenaica Lam. forest stands. Total soil organic matter, Walkey-Black C, particulate organic matter, organic matter fraction below 53 μm, total soil nitrogen content, total soil organic carbon content, and pH were also measured under three representative mature oak, pine, and mixed pine-oak forest stands. Soil respiration showed a typical seasonal pattern with minimums in winter and summer, and maximums in spring, more pronounced in oak and oak-pine stands. Soil respiration values were highest in pine stands during winter and in oak stands during spring and summer.

  15. Allozymes Genetic Diversity of Quercus mongolica Fisch in China

    LI Wenying; GU Wanchun

    2006-01-01

    A gel electrophoresis method was used to study the genetic diversity of 8 Quercus mongolica populations throughout its range in China.Eleven of 21 loci from 13 enzymes assayed were polymorphic.Q.mongolica maintained low level of genetic variation compared with the average Quercus species.At the species level,: the mean number of alleles per locus (A) was 1.905, the percentage of polymorphic loci (P) was 52.38%, the observed heterozygosity (He) was 0.092 and the expected heterozygosity (He) was 0.099.At the population level, the estimates were A =1.421, P =28.976%, Ho= 0.088, He =0.085.Genetic differentiation (Gst was high among populations, it was 0.107.According to the UPGMA cluster analysis based on the genetic distance, 4 populations located in northeast and 2 populations in southwest of the geographical distribution are classified into 2 subgroups, but there was no clear relationship between genetic distance and geographic distance among populations.The low level of genetic diversity of Q.mongolica might be related to the long-term exploitation as economic tree species in history are comparatively seriously disturbed and damaged by human beings, and most of the existing stands are secondary forests.

  16. STANDARDIZATION AND CONTAMINATION STUDIES ON NUTGALLS OF QUERCUS INFECTORIA OLIVIER

    Asif M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Drug consists of nutgalls of Quercus infectoria (Family-Fagaceae, commonly known as “Mazuphal”. Standardization parameters like, physical constants, ash content, solvent residues, phytochemical screening, fluorescence and microscopical analysis were carried out for the quality, strength and purity of the drug. The present work is an also attempt to evaluate contamination parameters for safety of an herbal drug Quercus infectoria such as microbial contamination, aflatoxins, pesticide residues and heavy metals. Result revealed that the total ash content and acid insoluble siliceous matter were found 2.11% and 0.22% respectively in the drug. The extractive values were varies at different solvent at different condition. Loss on drying and pH at 25(ºC were 9.97 and 6.1 respectively. Study revealed that total bacterial count and total fungal count were found to be within the permissible limit. Heavy metal like cadmium and mercury were not detected in the drug but arsenic (0.31 mg/kg and lead (0.70 mg/kg were found under permissible limit. Pesticide residue such as o, p- DDD, p, p- DDD, o p- DDE, p, p- DDE, o, p- DDT, p, p- DDT, α- Endosulfan, β – Endosulfan, Parathion, α- HCH, β- HCH, γ- HCH, δ- HCH was absent in the nutgalls.

  17. Canopy arthropods community within and among oak species in central Mexico

    Efraín TOVAR-SANCHEZ

    2009-01-01

    Quercus rugosa and Q.laurina are species that presents a wide geographical distribution range in temperate forests of Mexico. Oak canopies contain a considerable portion of arthropod diversity and the arthropods fauna fulfill a wide variety of ecological roles. We examined the effect of oak species and seasonal changes on some community structure parameters (diversity, composition, similarity, biomass, rare species, and density of arthropod fauna) of canopy arthropods. In total, 40 oak canopies were fogged during rainy and dry season. A total of 614 identified arthropod morphospecies were recognized belonging to 22 orders associated with tree canopies. A separation of host tree species during both seasons, suggesting a different community structure on host plants species was demonstrated by the principal component analyses (PCA), therefore, differences between oak species results in phenotypes that structure the composition of the arthropod community. Q.laurina registered the highest densities, diversity index and number of rare species in comparison with Q.rugosa. While arthropod biomass showed an inverse pattern. Trees more close to one another (spatial distance) register a more similar canopy arthropod fauna. This study suggests that the trees of Q.laurina could act as a center of biodiversity by the accumulation of arthropod fauna with a considerable number of rare species, which presents wide ecological roles or is involved in critical processes that maintain forest ecosystems[Current Zoology 55(2):132-144,2009].

  18. Evergreen sclerophyllous Quercus forests in northwestern Yunnan, China as compared to the Mediterranean evergreen Quercus forests in California, USA and northeastern Spain

    C. Q. Tang

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Evergreen sclerophyllous Quercus forests in NW Yunnan (China were studied and compared with the Mediterranean evergreen sclerophyllous Quercus forests in central coastal California (USA and Catalonia (NE Spain. Forests of Q. aquifolioides, Q. pannosa, Q. longispica of NW Yunnan, Q. agrifolia of California and Q. ilex of NE Spain were analyzed as representative communities. The similarities and differences at the community level in the contemporary vegetation of the sclerophyllous Quercus forest found in the three regions are clarified. The general patterns of the evergreen Quercus forest in the three regions were similar, though different assemblages of species were involved. The species diversity in all three regions was rather low. The species richness did not significantly differ among the forests, although in the Q. longispica forest it is somewhat higher than the others. The three representative species of evergreen Quercus in NW Yunnan reached the greatest maximum height, while Q. agrifolia of California had the largest basal area per ha. The Q. ilex forest of Spain had the lowest values for maximum tree height and dbh and the highest density per ha. Frequency of dbh size classes indicated that Q. aquifolioides, Q. pannosa, and Q. agrifolia had potentially good regeneration of the sporadic type with highest values for the intermediate size classes, and the regeneration of Q. longispica and Q. ilex was strong as indicated by a reverse-J pattern. Still, in each area, most regeneration was from sprouting. In all three regions the evergreen Quercus species have adapted to environmental changes, for instance by development of sprouting and rooting abilities to resist drought, cold conditions and various disturbances. The evergreen Quercus forests in NW Yunnan were structurally more similar to the Q. agrifolia forest of central coastal California than to the Q. ilex forest of NE Spain.

  19. Soil CO2 Efflux in a Mixed Pine-Oak Forest in Valsaín (Central Spain)

    Rosa Inclán; Daniel De la Torre; Marta Benito; Agustín Rubio

    2007-01-01

    Soil-surface CO2 efflux and its spatial and temporal variation were investigated in a southern Mediterranean, mixed pine-oak forest ecosystem on the northern slopes of the Sierra de Guadarrama in Spain from February 2006 to July 2006. Measurements of soil CO2 efflux, soil temperatures, and moisture were conducted in nine 1963-m2 sampling plots distributed in a gradient around the ecotone between Pinus sylvestris L. and Quercus pyrenaica Lam. forest stands. Total soil organic matter, Walkey-Bl...

  20. Relative importance of various regeneration mechanisms in different restoration stages of Quercus variabilis forest after selective logging

    Yaoqin Xue

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Quercus variabilis (Chinese cork oak reproduces asexually and sexually. This study aimed to determine the status and growth of asexual and sexual recruits of Q. variabilis in different forest recovery stages.Area of study: Three selective logged stands and one unlogged stand in Q. variabilis forest, Shaanxi Province, China.Material and Methods: Origin, number, basal diameter, height and size structure of Q. variabilis shoots (height ≤200 cm were investigated in the plots of 5, 10, and 20-years post-logging stands and unlogged stand. Effects of recovery stage on the density and growth of the three original recruits (stump sprouts, stem base sprouts and true seedlings were analysis by One-way ANOVA.Main results: Sprouts dominated logged stands, whereas true seedlings dominated unlogged stand, stem base sprouts only existed in 20-years post-logging and unlogged stands. Stump sprout density and sprout number per stump both declined with extended post-logging time. True seedlings density increased from 7 to 20 shoots/100 m2 as the postlogging time extended, and peaked in unlogged stand (94 shoots/100 m2. An ongoing size structure was observed in true seedlings in all stands. Stump sprouts were taller and greater than true seedlings.Research highlights: Stump sprouts contributed more to Q. variabilis forest recovery in the early stage after disturbance. The contribution of true seedlings was limited in the same stage, but they were beneficial for population long-term development. Stem base sprouts were most likely to be a survival strategy rather than a reproductive strategy.Key words: asexual reproduction; true seedling; post-logging time; Chinese cork oak.

  1. Drivers of Productivity Trends in Cork Oak Woodlands over the Last 15 Years

    Maria João Santos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher biodiversity leads to more productive ecosystems which, in turn, supports more biodiversity. Ongoing global changes affect ecosystem productivity and, therefore, are expected to affect productivity-biodiversity relationships. However, the magnitude of these relationships may be affected by baseline biodiversity and its lifeforms. Cork oak (Quercus suber woodlands are a highly biodiverse Mediterranean ecosystem managed for cork extraction; as a result of this management cork oak woodlands may have both tree and shrub canopies, just tree and just shrub canopies, and just grasslands. Trees, shrubs, and grasses may respond differently to climatic variables and their combination may, therefore, affect measurements of productivity and the resulting productivity-biodiversity relationships. Here, we asked whether the relationship between productivity and climate is affected by the responses of trees, shrubs, and grasses in cork oak woodlands in Southern Portugal. To answer this question, we linked a 15-year time series of Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI derived from Landsat satellites to micrometeorological data to assess the relationship between trends in EVI and climate. Between 2000 and 2013 we observed an overall decrease in EVI. However, EVI increased over cork oaks and decreased over shrublands. EVI trends were strongly positively related to changes in relative humidity and negatively related to temperature. The intra-annual EVI cycle of grasslands and sparse cork oak woodland without understorey (savannah-like ecosystem had higher variation than the other land-cover types. These results suggest that oaks and shrubs have different responses to changes in water availability, which can be either related to oak physiology, to oaks being either more resilient or having lagged responses to changes in climate, or to the fact that shrublands start senesce earlier than oaks. Our results also suggest that in the future EVI could improve because the

  2. Canopy structure, vertical radiation profile and photosynthetic function in a Quercus ilex evergreen forest

    The studied evergreen forest dominated by Quercus ilex showed a leaf area index (LAI) of 4.5, of which 61 % was accumulated within the tree layer, 30 % within the shrub layer, and 9 % within the herb layer. The leaves of all the species were ± horizontally oriented (41°), absorbing a relevant percentage of incident irradiance. The high LAI drastically modified the quality and quantity of solar radiation on the forest underground. The spectral distribution of the radiation under the forest was markedly deficient in blue and red wavelengths. The maximum absorption in these spectral bands was found in spring, when net photosynthetic rate (P N ) was at its maximum, and in summer, when new leaves reached 90 % of their definitive structure. The vertical radiation profile showed an evident reduction of the red-far red ratio (R/FR). Radiation quality and quantity influenced leaf physiology and morphology. Clear differences in leaf size, leaf water content per area (LWC) and specific leaf area (SLA) on the vertical profile of the forest were observed. All the shrub species showed similar SLA (12.02 m2 kg-1, mean value). The ability to increase SLA whilst simultaneously reducing leaf thickness maximized the carbon economy. The high chlorophyll (Chl) content of shrub layer leaves (1.41 g kg-1, mean value) was an expression of shade adaptation. Both leaf morphology and leaf physiology expressed the phenotypic plasticity. Q. ilex, Phillyrea latifolia and Pistacia lentiscus of the forest shrub layer showed wide differences in leaf structure and function with respect to the same species developing under strong irradiance (low maquis): a 57 % mean increase of SLA and a 86 % mean decrease of PN. They showed high leaf plasticity. Leaf plasticity implies that the considered sclerophyllous species has an optimum developmental pattern achieving adaptation to environments. (author)

  3. Comparison of the carbon stock in forest soil of sessile oak and beech forests

    Horváth, Adrienn; Bene, Zsolt; Bidló, András

    2016-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are the most important carbon sinks. The forest soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle, because the global climate change or the increase of atmospheric CO2 level. We do not have enough data about the carbon stock of soils and its change due to human activities, which have similar value to carbon content of biomass. In our investigation we measured the carbon stock of soil in 10 stands of Quercus petraea and Fagus sylvatica. We took a 1.1 m soil column with soil borer and divided to 11 samples each column. The course organic and root residues were moved. After evaluation, we compared our results with other studies and the carbon stock of forests to each other. Naturally, the amount of SOC was the highest in the topsoil layers. However, we found significant difference between forest stands which stayed on the same homogenous bedrock, but very close to each other (e.g. distance was 1 or 2 km). We detected that different forest utilizations and tree species have an effect on the forest carbon as the litter as well (amount, composition). In summary, we found larger amount (99.1 C t/ha on average) of SOC in soil of stands, where sessile oak were the main stand-forming tree species. The amount of carbon was the least in turkey oak-sessile oak stands (85.4 C t/ha on average). We found the highest SOC (118.3 C t/ha) in the most mixed stand (silver lime-beech-red oak). In the future, it will be very important: How does climate change affect the spread of tree species or on carbon storage? Beech is more sensitive, but even sessile oak. These species are expected to replace with turkey oak, which is less sensitive to drought. Thus, it is possible in the future that we can expect to decrease of forest soil carbon stock capacity, which was confirmed by our experiment. Keywords: carbon sequestration, mitigation, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, litter Acknowledgements: Research is supported by the "Agroclimate.2" (VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034) EU

  4. Arthropod diversity in pure oak forests of coppice origin in northern Thrace (Turkey

    Keten A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oak (Quercus spp. forests are among the most important forest types in Turkey. In the past, oak forests were managed through coppice clear-cutting, but in recent decades they have mostly been converted to high forest. This study was aimed at explaining how arthropod diversity is affected during conversion from coppice to high oak forest and during the early stages of coppice succession. We tested the hypothesis that arthropod richness, abundance and diversity in coppice oak sites varied according to stand age and a number of other forest characteristics. Arthropod communities were sampled in 50 plots using four different methods: pitfall traps, sweep nets, sticky cards and cloth shaking. A total of 13 084 individuals were collected and classified into 193 Recognizable Taxonomic Units (RTUs, with the most RTUs and the greatest number of specimens captured by sweep netting. We identified 17 taxa within RTU’s with more than 1% of the captured arthropods, which constituted 75% of the total specimens. The number of RTUs varied significantly according to trap type. Arthropod richness and Shannon-Wiener biodiversity index (H′ increased with elevation and precipitation. In young (1-40 yrs-old and middle-aged (41-80 yrs stands, arthropod biodiversity was not significantly affected by stand type, but slightly increased with diameter at breast height and tree height. Forest characteristics, such as the litter layer, understory and crown diameter, weakly influenced arthropod richness and abundance. Cluster analysis revealed that stand types and trap types differed taxonomically. Principal component analysis showed that stand types were clearly separated by the stand parameters measured. Insect families (Formicidae, Thripidae, Lygaeidae, Dolichopodidae, Luaxanidae, Cicadellidae and Ichneumonidae could potentially be used as indicators of coppice oak conditions. As the coppice oak changes to mature forest, further studies are needed to better assess the

  5. Catalytic Rapid Pyrolysis of Quercus variabilis over Nanoporous Catalysts

    Hyeon Koo Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic rapid pyrolysis of Quercus variabilis, a Korean native tree species, was carried out using Py-GC/MS. Mesoporous MFI, which has both nanopores and micropores, and three nanoporous materials, Al-MCM-41, Al-SBA-15, and γ-Al2O3, were used as the catalyst. The acid sites of mesoporous MFI were strong Brønsted acid sites, whereas those of nanoporous materials were mostly weak acid sites. The composition of the product bio-oil varied greatly depending on the acid characteristics of the catalyst used. Phenolics were the most abundant species in the bio-oil, followed by acids and furanics, obtained over Al-MCM-41 or Al-SBA-15 with weak acid sites, whereas aromatics were the most abundant species produced over mesoporous MFI with strong acid sites, followed by phenolics. Aromatics, phenolics, and furanics are all important chemicals contributing to the improvement of bio-oil quality.

  6. Paisang (Quercus griffithii): a keystone tree species in sustainable agroecosystem management and livelihoods in Arunachal Pradesh, India.

    Singh, Ranjay K; Singh, Anshuman; Garnett, Stephen T; Zander, Kerstin K; Lobsang; Tsering, Darge

    2015-01-01

    In a study of the traditional livelihoods of 12 Monpa and Brokpa villages in Arunachal Pradesh, India using social-ecological and participatory rural appraisal techniques, we found that the forest tree species paisang (Quercus griffithii, a species of oak) is vital to agroecosystem sustainability. Paisang trees are conserved both by individuals and through community governance, because their leaves play a crucial role in sustaining 11 traditional cropping systems of the Monpa peoples. An Indigenous institution, Chhopa, regulates access to paisang leaves, ensuring that the relationship between paisang and traditional field crop species within Monpa agroecosystems is sustainable. The Monpa farmers also exchange leaves and agricultural products for yak-based foods produced by the transhumant Brokpa, who are primarily yak herders. Yak herds also graze in paisang groves during winter. These practices have enabled the conservation of about 33 landraces, yak breeds, and a number of wild plants. Paisang thus emerged as a culturally important keystone species in the cultures and livelihoods of both Monpa and Brokpa. Ecological and conservation knowledge and ethics about paisang vary with gender, social systems, and altitudes. Labor shortages, however, have already caused some changes to the ways in which paisang leaves are used and yak grazing patterns are also changing in the face of changes in attitude among local landowners. Given new competing interests, incentives schemes are now needed to conserve the ecologically sustainable traditional livelihoods. PMID:25343981

  7. Paisang ( Quercus griffithii): A Keystone Tree Species in Sustainable Agroecosystem Management and Livelihoods in Arunachal Pradesh, India

    Singh, Ranjay K.; Singh, Anshuman; Garnett, Stephen T.; Zander, Kerstin K.; Lobsang; Tsering, Darge

    2015-01-01

    In a study of the traditional livelihoods of 12 Monpa and Brokpa villages in Arunachal Pradesh, India using social-ecological and participatory rural appraisal techniques, we found that the forest tree species paisang ( Quercus griffithii, a species of oak) is vital to agroecosystem sustainability. Paisang trees are conserved both by individuals and through community governance, because their leaves play a crucial role in sustaining 11 traditional cropping systems of the Monpa peoples. An Indigenous institution, Chhopa, regulates access to paisang leaves, ensuring that the relationship between paisang and traditional field crop species within Monpa agroecosystems is sustainable. The Monpa farmers also exchange leaves and agricultural products for yak-based foods produced by the transhumant Brokpa, who are primarily yak herders. Yak herds also graze in paisang groves during winter. These practices have enabled the conservation of about 33 landraces, yak breeds, and a number of wild plants. Paisang thus emerged as a culturally important keystone species in the cultures and livelihoods of both Monpa and Brokpa. Ecological and conservation knowledge and ethics about paisang vary with gender, social systems, and altitudes. Labor shortages, however, have already caused some changes to the ways in which paisang leaves are used and yak grazing patterns are also changing in the face of changes in attitude among local landowners. Given new competing interests, incentives schemes are now needed to conserve the ecologically sustainable traditional livelihoods.

  8. Photosynthetic responses to elevated CO2 and O3 in Quercus ilex leaves at a natural CO2 spring

    Photosynthetic stimulation and stomatal conductance (Gs) depression in Quercus ilex leaves at a CO2 spring suggested no down-regulation. The insensitivity of Gs to a CO2 increase (from ambient 1500 to 2000 μmol mol-1) suggested stomatal acclimation. Both responses are likely adaptations to the special environment of CO2 springs. At the CO2-enriched site, not at the control site, photosynthesis decreased 9% in leaves exposed to 2x ambient O3 concentrations in branch enclosures, compared to controls in charcoal-filtered air. The stomatal density reduction at high CO2 was one-third lower than the concomitant Gs reduction, so that the O3 uptake per single stoma was lower than at ambient CO2. No significant variation in monoterpene emission was measured. Higher trichome and mesophyll density were recorded at the CO2-enriched site, accounting for lower O3 sensitivity. A long-term exposure to H2S, reflected by higher foliar S-content, and CO2 might depress the antioxidant capacity of leaves close to the vent and increase their O3 sensitivity. - Very high CO2 concentrations did not compensate for the effects of O3 on holm oak photosynthesis

  9. A comparative study of the chemical and integrated treatments impact against the defoliating insects on the structure and dynamics of the edaphic mesofauna in two oak forests from North-Eastern Romania

    Adina Cãlugãr

    2009-01-01

    The author presents in this paper some aspects about the edaphicmicroarthropods from the organic horizon of two forest soils belonging to the Ciurea Forest District, Iasi County: ªanta (mixed stands mainly with oak, chemically treated against defoliating insects) and Poieni - Tomesti (Quercus robur and Quercuspetraea stands with integrated treatments). The study of edaphic microarthropods was performed both from qualitative and quantitative point of view. It considered the average of the tota...

  10. Blue cures blue but be cautious

    Pranav Sikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Methemoglobinemia is a disorder characterized by the presence of >1% methemoglobin (metHb in the blood. Spontaneous formation of methemoglobin is normally counteracted by protective enzyme systems, for example, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH methemoglobin reductase. Methemoglobinemia is treated with supplemental oxygen and methylene blue (1-2 mg/kg administered slow intravenously, which acts by providing an artificial electron acceptor for NADPH methemoglobin reductase. But known or suspected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is a relative contraindication to the use of methylene blue because G6PD is the key enzyme in the formation of NADPH through pentose phosphate pathway and G6PD-deficient individuals generate insufficient NADPH to efficiently reduce methylene blue to leukomethylene blue, which is necessary for the activation of the NADPH-dependent methemoglobin reductase system. So, we should be careful using methylene blue in methemoglobinemia patient before G6PD levels.

  11. Seasonal dynamics of secondary growth and xylem anatomy in two coexisting Mediterranean Quercus; Dinamica estacional del crecimiento secundario y anatomia del xilema en dos Quercus mediterraneos que coexisten

    Albuixech, J.; Camarero, J. J.; Montserrat-Marti, G.

    2012-11-01

    The contribution of secondary growth's patterns and wood anatomy on the coexistence of two species of Quercus (Quercus ilex subsp ballota diffused porous wood and Quercus faginea ring porous wood) were studied in a location with continental Mediterranean climate, which has been studied during two years with contrasted climatology. According to our results secondary growth pattern of Q. faginea is concentrated in the spring, starting before, and responding more than Q. ilex to a rainfall increase during this period. Q. ilex extends wood formation into the fall and late summer growth. Q. ilex growth during the fall and late summer has a greater importance in terms of theoretical hydraulic conductivity than in Q. faginea, which concentrates hydraulic conductivity in spring vessels. Therefore, different response of wood phenology formation and xylem anatomy in both species to the seasonal pattern of precipitation could contribute to explain the coexistence of Q. ilex and Q. faginea. (Author) 48 refs.

  12. Tvorba marketingovej stratégie internetového obchodu Quercus

    Krahulcová, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    Diploma thesis is focused on creation of new marketing strategy for company QUERCUS' electronic store. Theoretical part deals with basic concepts of marketing and strategic marketing planning. It further introduces marketing mix specifics on the internet, basic aspects of electronic commerce and consumer behavior on internet. Practical part includes introduction of company QUERCUS, e-shop SWOT analysis, brief characteristic of current marketing strategy and finally proposal of new marketing s...

  13. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Galls of Quercus infectoria Olivier against Oral Pathogens

    Dayang Fredalina Basri; Liy Si Tan; Zaleha Shafiei; Noraziah Mohamad Zin

    2012-01-01

    The galls of Quercus infectoria are commonly used in Malay traditional medicine to treat wound infections after childbirth. In India, they are employed traditionally as dental applications such as that in treatment of toothache and gingivitis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of galls of Quercus infectoria Olivier against oral bacteria which are known to cause dental caries and periodontitis. Methanol and acetone extracts were screened against two Gram-p...

  14. ESTIMACIÓN DE LA BIOMASA FORESTAL PARA LAS ESPECIES QUERCUS ROTUNDIFOLIA Y QUERCUS SUBER BASADA EN IMÁGENES DEL SATÉLITE QUICKBIRD

    Sousa, Adélia; Marques da Silva, José; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Mesquita, Paulo; Silva, Luis; Baptista, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    para una buena gestión. Actualmente las técnicas de inventario y monitoreo de biomasa forestal son usualmente lentas, muy trabajosas y de elevado coste, verificándose así la necesidad de desarrollar otras técnicas, que sean fiables y con costes relativamente reducidos. El objetivo de este estudio es desarrollar una metodología para estimar la biomasa forestal de las especies Quercus rotundifolia y Quercus suber basada en imágenes del satélite QuickBird. La estimación de la biomasa...

  15. Direct effects of elevated UV-B radiation on the decomposition of Quercus robur leaf litter

    Decomposing Quercus robur L. leaf litter was exposed for 64 weeks at an outdoor facility to supplemental levels of UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) under treatment arrays of cellulose diacetate-filtered fluorescent lamps which also produce UV-A radiation (315-400 nm). Litter was also exposed to UV-A radiation alone under control arrays of polyester-filtered lamps and to ambient levels of solar radiation under arrays of unenergised lamps. The treatment corresponded to a 30% elevation above the ambient erythemally-weighted level of UV-B radiation. Litter was sampled after 11, 39 and 64 weeks and was examined for differences in mass loss, decomposition constants (k), chemical composition and the abundances of saprotrophic fungi. No effects of UV radiation on k values were recorded, but after 11 weeks, percentage mass loss of litter exposed to UV-B radiation under treatment arrays was 3% lower than under control arrays and 2% lower than under ambient arrays. After 39 weeks, litters exposed to UV-A radiation under control arrays had 10% lower total nitrogen contents and 13% higher C:N ratios than those litters exposed beneath ambient arrays. At the last sampling, litters exposed to supplemental UV-B radiation had 5% higher carbon contents than those under ambient arrays. A 2.4-fold increase in the frequency of lamina particles of litter that were uncolonised by fungi was recorded in litter exposed to UV-B radiation under treatment arrays, compared to ambient arrays. The abundances of the saprotrophic fungi Cladosporium spp. and Acremonium persicinum (Nicot) W. Gams were decreased by 50% and 91%, respectively, under UV-B treatment arrays compared to ambient arrays, and the abundance of coelomycete conidiomata recorded on leaves was increased by 12% under treatment arrays, compared to ambient. Dactylella spp. were not recorded on litter exposed to UV-A radiation under control arrays and UV-A radiation applied under control and treatment arrays apparently increased the

  16. Changes in carbon uptake and allocation patterns in Quercus robur seedlings in response to elevated CO2 and water stress: an evaluation with 13C labelling

    A semi-closed (CO2)-C-13 labelling system (1.5% C-13) was used to assess both carbon uptake and allocation within pedunculate oak seedlings (Quercus robur L) grown under ambient (350 vpm) and elevated (700 vpm) atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and in either well-watered or droughted conditions. Pulse-chase C-13 labelling data highlighted the direct positive effect of elevated CO2 on photosynthetic carbon acquisition. Consequently, in well-watered conditions, CO2-enriched plants produced 1.52 times more biomass (dry mass at harvest) and 1.33 times more dry root matter (coarse plus fine roots) over the 22-week growing period than plants grown under ambient [CO2]. The root/shoot biomass ratio was decreased both by drought and [CO2], despite lower N concentrations in CO2-enriched plants. However, both long-term and short-term C allocation to fine roots were not altered by CO2, and relative specific allocation (RSA), a parameter expressing sink strength, was hip her in all plant organs under 700 vpm compared to 350 vpm. Results showed that C availability for growth and metabolic processes was greater in fine roots of oaks grown under an elevated CO2 atmosphere irrespective of soil water availability

  17. Stomatal limitation to CO2 assimilation and down-regulation of photosynthesis in Quercus ilex resprouts in response to slowly imposed drought.

    Peña-Rojas, Karen; Aranda, Xavier; Fleck, Isabel

    2004-07-01

    Holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) is native to hot, dry Mediterranean forests where limited water availability often reduces photosynthesis in many species, and forest fires are frequent. Holm oaks resprout after a disturbance, with improved photosynthetic activity and water relations compared with unburned plants. To better understand the role of water availability in this improvement, watering was withheld from container-grown plants, either intact (controls) or resprouts after excision of the shoot, to gradually obtain a wide range of soil water availabilities. At high water availability, gas exchange rates did not differ between controls and resprouts. At moderate soil dryness, net photosynthesis of control plants decreased as a result of increased stomatal limitation, whereas gas exchange rates of resprouts, which had higher midday and predawn leaf water potentials, were unchanged. Under severe drought, resprouts showed a less marked decline in gas exchange than controls and maintained photosystem II integrity, as indicated by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. Photosynthesis was down-regulated in both plant types in response to reduced CO2 availability caused by high stomatal limitation. Lower non-stomatal limitations in resprouts than in control plants, as evidenced by higher carboxylation velocity and the capacity for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration, conferred greater drought resistance under external constraints similar to summer conditions at midday. PMID:15123453

  18. 柞树单宁的提取及柞树品种间单宁含量的比较%Tannin Extraction of Oak Tree and Comparison of Tannin Content of Oak Trees

    张娜; 王斌赫; 张超; 姜义仁; 秦利

    2014-01-01

    Taking green leaves of oaks in Northern Liaoning province as the material ,the experiment adopted or-ganic solvent extraction method and spectrophotometry to extract tannins of oak trees ,and compared the tannin contents in green leaves ,defoliations and branches from five different oak trees .The results show that on the premise of the extracting agent of 80% ethanol (containing 1% hydrochloric acid) ,solid-liquid ratio of 1 :15 and extracting time of 2 .5h and temperature of 75℃ ,the tannin extraction can reach 206 .74 mg/g ;the Quercus acuti-ssima Carruth contains the highest tannin which is 222 .02mg/g in green leaf period and 177 .30mg/g in defolia-tion period ,the tannin content in branches amounts to 67 .92mg/g .The tannin contents for Quercus liaotungen-sis Koidz .,Xylosma and Quercus aliena var .acuteserrataMaxim .as well as Quercus dentata Thunb .vary .%本试验以辽东栎绿叶样品为材料,采用有机溶剂萃取法及分光光度法探讨了柞树单宁提取工艺,并对5种不同柞树品种的绿叶、落叶及枝条中单宁含量进行了比较。结果表明,选用80%乙醇(含1%盐酸)作提取剂,在料液比1∶15、提取时间2.5 h、提取温度75℃条件下,单宁的提取量可达206.74 m g/g ;麻栎的单宁含量较高,绿叶期可达222.02 m g/g ,落叶期可达177.30 m g/g ,枝条单宁含量可达67.92 m g/g ,辽东栎、蒙古栎、锐齿槲栎及槲各有不同。

  19. 柞树单宁的提取及柞树品种间单宁含量的比较%Tannin Extraction of Oak Tree and Comparison of Tannin Content of Oak Trees

    张娜; 王斌赫; 张超; 姜义仁; 秦利

    2014-01-01

    本试验以辽东栎绿叶样品为材料,采用有机溶剂萃取法及分光光度法探讨了柞树单宁提取工艺,并对5种不同柞树品种的绿叶、落叶及枝条中单宁含量进行了比较。结果表明,选用80%乙醇(含1%盐酸)作提取剂,在料液比1∶15、提取时间2.5 h、提取温度75℃条件下,单宁的提取量可达206.74 m g/g ;麻栎的单宁含量较高,绿叶期可达222.02 m g/g ,落叶期可达177.30 m g/g ,枝条单宁含量可达67.92 m g/g ,辽东栎、蒙古栎、锐齿槲栎及槲各有不同。%Taking green leaves of oaks in Northern Liaoning province as the material ,the experiment adopted or-ganic solvent extraction method and spectrophotometry to extract tannins of oak trees ,and compared the tannin contents in green leaves ,defoliations and branches from five different oak trees .The results show that on the premise of the extracting agent of 80% ethanol (containing 1% hydrochloric acid) ,solid-liquid ratio of 1 :15 and extracting time of 2 .5h and temperature of 75℃ ,the tannin extraction can reach 206 .74 mg/g ;the Quercus acuti-ssima Carruth contains the highest tannin which is 222 .02mg/g in green leaf period and 177 .30mg/g in defolia-tion period ,the tannin content in branches amounts to 67 .92mg/g .The tannin contents for Quercus liaotungen-sis Koidz .,Xylosma and Quercus aliena var .acuteserrataMaxim .as well as Quercus dentata Thunb .vary .

  20. Persisting soil drought reduces leaf specific conductivity in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens)

    Sterck, F.J.; Zweifel, R.; Sass-Klaassen, U.; Qumruzzaman, C.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Leaf specific conductivity (LSC; the ratio of stem conductivity (KP) to leaf area (AL)), a measure of the hydraulic capacity of the stem to supply leaves with water, varies with soil water content. Empirical evidence for LSC responses to drought is ambiguous, because previously published res

  1. Xylic substrates at the fossilisation barrier: oak trunks (Quercus sp.) in the Holocene sediments of the Labe River, Czech Republic

    Mikuláš, Radek

    Berlin ; Heidelberg : Springer, 2008 - (Wisshak, M.; Tapanila, L.), s. 415-429 ISBN 978-3-540-77597-3. [International Bioerosion Workshop /5./. Erlangen (DE), 29.10.2006-03.11.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : xylic substrate * Holocene * trace fossils * insects * fungi * fluvial settings Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  2. Effects of soil compaction on seedling morphology, growth, and architecture of chestnut-leaved oak (Quercus castaneifolia)

    Jourgholami M; Khoramizadeh A; Zenner EK

    2016-01-01

    Soil compaction following traffic by heavy-timber harvesting machinery usually causes an increase in soil strength, that is a stress factor negatively affecting the growth of newly germinated seedlings. This study used a soil strength experiment carried out in a greenhouse to test the hypotheses that increasing soil strength would adversely affect seedling morphology and alter seedling architecture by changing biomass allocation patterns. We explored the effects of soil compaction in a loam t...

  3. Regeneration patterns of Quercus suber according to montado management systems

    Simões, M. Paula; Belo, Anabela F.; Fernandes, Mariana; Madeira, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Traditional management of montado (dehesa) is an example of integration of sustainable land-use and biodiversity conservation. The whole system sustainability is currently threatened by the intensification of soil tilling to control shrub invasion and promote pastureland, the absence of tree natural regeneration being one of the most outstanding threats. A study to assess effects of management on tree regeneration at early stages was developed in a cork oak montado grazed by cattle, in southe...

  4. Soil moisture in sessile oak forest gaps

    Zagyvainé Kiss, Katalin Anita; Vastag, Viktor; Gribovszki, Zoltán; Kalicz, Péter

    2015-04-01

    By social demands are being promoted the aspects of the natural forest management. In forestry the concept of continuous forest has been an accepted principle also in Hungary since the last decades. The first step from even-aged stand to continuous forest can be the forest regeneration based on gap cutting, so small openings are formed in a forest due to forestry interventions. This new stand structure modifies the hydrological conditions for the regrowth. Without canopy and due to the decreasing amounts of forest litter the interception is less significant so higher amount of precipitation reaching the soil. This research focuses on soil moisture patterns caused by gaps. The spatio-temporal variability of soil water content is measured in gaps and in surrounding sessile oak (Quercus petraea) forest stand. Soil moisture was determined with manual soil moisture meter which use Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR) technology. The three different sizes gaps (G1: 10m, G2: 20m, G3: 30m) was opened next to Sopron on the Dalos Hill in Hungary. First, it was determined that there is difference in soil moisture between forest stand and gaps. Second, it was defined that how the gap size influences the soil moisture content. To explore the short term variability of soil moisture, two 24-hour (in growing season) and a 48-hour (in dormant season) field campaign were also performed in case of the medium-sized G2 gap along two/four transects. Subdaily changes of soil moisture were performed. The measured soil moisture pattern was compared with the radiation pattern. It was found that the non-illuminated areas were wetter and in the dormant season the subdaily changes cease. According to our measurements, in the gap there is more available water than under the forest stand due to the less evaporation and interception loss. Acknowledgements: The research was supported by TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0004 and AGRARKLIMA.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034.

  5. Effect of habitat type and nest-site characteristics on the breeding performance of Great and Blue Tits (Parus major and P. caeruleus) in a Mediterranean landscape

    Sanz, Juan José; García-Navas, Vicente; Ruiz-Peinado, Juan V.

    2010-01-01

    Compared to coniferous forests, deciduous woodlands have often been considered a more suitable habitat for Blue and Great Tits. We compared reproductive parameters of both species in oak woodland and pine plantation patches within a Mediterranean landscape. We found no inter-habitat differences in breeding traits of Blue Tits, but clutches of Great Tits were larger and were laid earlier in the oak woodland than in the pine plantations. However, the breeding success of Great Tit...

  6. Poison ivy - oak - sumac rash

    Poison ivy, oak, and sumac are plants that commonly cause an allergic skin reaction. The result is most often ... oils most often enter the skin rapidly. POISON IVY This is one of the most frequent causes ...

  7. Herbaceous species diversity in relation to fire severity in Zagros oak forests, Iran

    Morteza Pourreza; Seyed Mohsen Hosseini; Ali Akbar Safari Sinegani; Mohammad Matinizadeh; Seyed Jalil Alavai

    2014-01-01

    Zagros forests are mainly covered byQuercus brantii L. coppices and oak sprout clumps occupy the forest area like patches. We investigated post-fire herbaceous diversity in the first growing season after fire. For this purpose neighboring burned and unburned areas were selected with the same plant species and ecological conditions. The data were collected from areas subjected to different fire severities. Overall 6 treatments were considered with respect to fire severity and the mi-crosites of inside and outside of oak sprout clumps including: unburned inside and outside of sprout clumps (Ni and No), inside of sprout clumps that burned with high fire severity (H), inside of sprout clumps that burned with moderate fire severity (M), outside of sprout clumps that burned with low fire severity (OH and OM). Different herbaceous com-position was observed in the unburned inside and outside of oak sprout clumps. The species diversity and richness were increased in treatments burned with low and moderate fire severity. However, in treatment burned with high fire severity (H), herbaceous cover was reduced, even-ness was increased, and richness and diversity were not significantly changed. We concluded that besides the microsites conditions in forest, fire severity is an inseparable part of the ecological effect of fire on her-baceous composition.

  8. Nitrogen partitioning in oak leaves depends on species, provenance, climate conditions and soil type.

    Hu, B; Simon, J; Kuster, T M; Arend, M; Siegwolf, R; Rennenberg, H

    2013-01-01

    Climate-tolerant tree species and/or provenances have to be selected to ensure the high productivity of managed forests in Central Europe under the prognosticated climate changes. For this purpose, we studied the responses of saplings from three oak species (i.e. Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens) and provenances of different climatic origin (i.e. low or high rainfall, low or high temperature habitats) with regard to leaf nitrogen (N) composition as a measure of N nutrition. Saplings were grown in model ecosystems on either calcareous or acidic soil and subjected to one of four treatments (control, drought, air warming or a combination of drought and air warming). Across species, oak N metabolism responded to the influence of drought and/or air warming with an increase in leaf amino acid N concentration at the expense of structural N. Moreover, provenances or species from drier habitats were more tolerant to the climate conditions applied, as indicated by an increase in amino acid N (comparing species) or soluble protein N (comparing provenances within a species). Furthermore, amino acid N concentrations of oak leaves were significantly higher on calcareous compared to acidic soil. From these results, it can be concluded that seeds from provenances or species originating from drier habitats and - if available - from calcareous soil types may provide a superior seed source for future forest establishment. PMID:22934888

  9. Evaluating small mammal response to natural disturbance and restoration in oak ecosystems in the Mississippi alluvial valley

    Oak species form a conspicuous and often dominant component of bottom land forests of the Mississippi Alluvial Valley. The extent of these forests has been drastically reduced as a result of clearing for agriculture in the past two centuries. Patterns of clearing have reduced the distribution of remaining forest patches to a much more flood-prone subset of the landscape than was historically the case, reducing the diversity of oak species currently present on the landscape. Intensive harvesting has further changed the composition of the remaining stands. Small remnant patches of primary forest continue to exist as Research Natural Areas on the Delta National Forest in Sharkey County, Mississippi. In particular, the Over cup Oak (Quercus lyrata) and Redgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) Research Natural Areas pres ent substantial components of the trees for which the areas were named, as well as Quercus nuttallii and smaller components of other species. Recent interest in afforestation has produced a resurgence of interest in restoration of oak forest to abandoned farmland in the region. We have studied small mammal response to restoration on an extensive experiment near the Delta National Forest since 1995. We have also examined small mammal response to a tornado that disturbed approximately half of the Over cup Oak Research Natural Area in 2008. We use these studies to demonstrate how population estimates of small mammals can be obtained from capture-recapture studies, employing different designs, and utilizing Program Capture for population estimation. Small mammal communities in these stands are more species-rich in early succession than in primary forest. The study of response to tornado damage to the Over cup Oak Research Natural Area is complicated by the fact that this particular forest type is very flood-prone, creating obstacles to colonization by small mammals. Analysis of capture-recapture data with robust methods illustrated in this study permits extraction

  10. Contact sensitivity to oak moss

    Gonçalo, S; Cabral, F.; Gonçalo, Margarida

    1988-01-01

    Oak moss allergy was the principle allergen in contact sensitivity to perfumes (45%); 31 patients reacting to oak moss were studied. The sensitivity was attributed to contact with perfumes in 20, lichens in 7 and unknown in 4. Atranorin was the most frequent allergen, followed by usnic, evernic and fumarprotocetraric acids. Concomitant allergy occurred to several lichen acids and also to balsam of Peru, colophony and other fragrance components.

  11. Antiinflammatory evaluation of alcoholic extract of galls of Quercus infectoria.

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Hamid, Hinna; Ali, Asif; Alam, M Sarwar; Athar, Mohammad

    2004-02-01

    Galls of Quercus infectoria Olivier (Fagaceae) possess pleiotropic therapeutic activities, with particular efficacy against inflammatory diseases. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of alcoholic extract of Q. infectoria galls on various in vivo and in vitro experimental models of inflammation. Oral administration of gall extract significantly inhibited carrageenan, histamine, serotonin and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induced paw oedemas, while topical application of gall extract inhibited phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) induced ear inflammation. The extract also inhibited various functions of macrophages and neutrophils relevant to the inflammatory response. In vitro exposure of rat peritoneal macrophages to gall extract ameliorated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated PGE2 and nitric oxide (NO) production and PMA stimulated superoxide (O2*-) production in a dose dependent manner. Gall extract also scavenged NO and O2*-. Probing into mechanism of NO inhibition in macrophages revealed gall extract to ameliorate the induction of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), respectively without any inhibitory effect on its catalytic activities even at higher concentrations. Gall extract also significantly inhibited formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) stimulated degranulation in neutrophils. These results suggest that alcoholic extract of galls of Q. infectoria exerts in vivo antiinflammatory activity after oral or topical administration and also has the ability to prevent the production of some inflammatory mediators. PMID:15013194

  12. Pharmacognostic studies of insect gall of Quercus infectoria Olivier (Fagaceae)

    Savitri Shrestha; Vasuki Srinivas Kaushik; Ravi Shankara Birur Eshwarappa; Sundara Rajan Subaramaihha; Latha Muuaiah Ramanna; Dhananjaya Bhadrapura Lakkappa

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the detailed pharmacognostic profile of galls of Quercus infectoria Olivier (Q. infectoria olivier) (Fagaceae), an important medicinal plant used in the Indian system of medicine. Methods: Samples of galls of Q. infectoria were studied by macroscopical, microscopical, physiochemical, phytochemical, fluorescence analysis and othjer methods for standardization as recommended by WHO. Results:Macroscopically, the crude drug is globose with horny appearances on external surface (1.4-2.3 cm in length and 1-1.5 cm in diameter), with greyish-brown to brownish-black in colour externally and dark brown buff colored. Surface is smooth with numerous horny protuberances giving rough touch, and with unpleasant odour. Microscopically, a wide zone of radially elongated parenchyma cells between upper and lower epidermis were found. The vascular strands were present at all places and radially elongated sclerides touched the lower epidermis. In physico-chemical studies, the moisture, total ash, acid insoluble ash, alcohol soluble, water soluble, petroleum ether, chloroform extractive value and tannin content were found to be 2.790, 5.020, 0.110, 38.780, 41.210, 0.402, 1.590 and 49.200 percentage respectively. Preliminary phytochemical screening showed the presence of phenols, flavonoids, steroids, triterpenes, tannins, saponins and alkaloids. Conclusions:The results of the present study serve as a valuable source of information and provide suitable standards for identification of this medicinally important plant drug material for future investigations and applications.

  13. Variability of acorn anatomical characteristics in Quercus robur L. genotypes

    Nikolić Nataša P.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine variability of acorn anatomical characteristics in seventeen Quercus robur L. genotypes. Acorns were collected in clonal seed orchard Banov Brod (Srem, Vojvodina, Serbia. Microscopic measurements were done for pericarp (total thickness, thickness of exocarp and mesocarp, seed coat (total thickness, thickness of outer epidermis, parenchyma, and inner epidermis, and embryo axis (diameter, thickness of cortical region, and diameter of stellar zone. Obtained results revealed certain divergence between genotypes. The thickness of pericarp varied from 418 to 559 mm (genotypes 20 and 22, respectively. On average, the participation of exocarp in the total thickness of pericarp was 36.3%, of mesocarp 61.0%, while of endocarp 2.6%. The thickness of seed coat for individual genotypes ranged from 71 mm (genotype 28 to 157 mm (genotype 38. In addition, anatomic parameters of embryo axis varied among studied genotypes. The lowest cortical zone thickness and stellar zone diameter were measured in genotype 40, while the highest values in genotype 33.

  14. Interrelationships among life-history traits in three California oaks.

    Barringer, Brian C; Koenig, Walter D; Knops, Johannes M H

    2013-01-01

    Life-history traits interact in important ways. Relatively few studies, however, have explored the relationships between life-history traits in long-lived taxa such as trees. We examined patterns of energy allocation to components of reproduction and growth in three species of California oaks (Quercus spp.) using a combination of annual acorn censuses, dendrometer bands to measure radial increment, and litterfall traps. Our results are generally consistent with the hypothesis that energy invested in reproduction detracts from the amount of energy available for growth in these long-lived taxa; i.e., there are trade-offs between these traits. The relationships between reproduction and growth varied substantially among specific trait combinations and tree species, however, and in some cases were in the direction opposite that expected based on the assumption of trade-offs between them. This latter finding appears to be a consequence of the pattern of resource use across years in these long-lived trees contrasting with the expected partitioning of resource use within years in short-lived taxa. Thus, the existence and magnitude of putative trade-offs varied depending on whether the time scale considered was within or across years. Collectively, our results indicate that negative relationships between fundamental life-history traits can be important at multiple levels of modular organization and that energy invested in reproduction can have measurable consequences in terms of the amount of energy available for future reproduction and both current and future growth. PMID:22707038

  15. Photosynthetic efficiency of Pedunculate oak seedlings under simulated water stress

    Popović Zorica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic performance of seedlings of Quercus robur exposed to short-term water stress in the laboratory conditions was assessed through the method of induced fluorometry. The substrate for seedlings was clayey loam, with the dominant texture fraction made of silt, followed by clay and fine sand, with total porosity 68.2%. Seedlings were separated in two groups: control (C (soil water regime in pots was maintained at the level of field water capacity and treated (water-stressed, WS (soil water regime was maintained in the range of wilting point and lentocapillary capacity. The photosynthetic efficiency was 0.642±0.25 and 0.522±0.024 (WS and C, respectively, which was mostly due to transplantation disturbances and sporadic leaf chlorosis. During the experiment Fv/Fm decreased in both groups (0.551±0.0100 and 0.427±0.018 in C and WS, respectively. Our results showed significant differences between stressed and control group, in regard to both observed parameters (Fv/Fm and T½. Photosynthetic efficiency of pedunculate oak seedlings was significantly affected by short-term water stress, but to a lesser extent than by sufficient watering.

  16. Yeast Associated with the Ambrosia Beetle, Platypus koryoensis, the Pest of Oak Trees in Korea.

    Yun, Yeo Hong; Suh, Dong Yeon; Yoo, Hun Dal; Oh, Man Hwan; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-12-01

    Oak tree death caused by symbiosis of an ambrosia beetle, Platypus koryoensis, and an ophiostomatoid filamentous fungus, Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae, has been a nationwide problem in Korea since 2004. In this study, we surveyed the yeast species associated with P. koryoensis to better understand the diversity of fungal associates of the beetle pest. In 2009, a total of 195 yeast isolates were sampled from larvae and adult beetles (female and male) of P. koryoensis in Cheonan, Goyang, and Paju; 8 species were identified by based on their morphological, biochemical and molecular analyses. Meyerozyma guilliermondii and Candida kashinagacola were found to be the two dominant species. Among the 8 species, Candida homilentoma was a newly recorded yeast species in Korea, and thus, its mycological characteristics were described. The P. koryoensis symbiont R. quercusmongolicae did not show extracelluar CM-cellulase, xylanase and avicelase activity that are responsible for degradation of wood structure; however, C. kashinagacola and M. guilliermondii did show the three extracellular enzymatic activities. Extracelluar CM-cellulase activity was also found in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, C. kashinagacola, and Candida sp. Extracelluar pectinase activity was detected in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, Candida sp., and M. guilliermondii. All the 8 yeast species displayed compatible relationships with R. quercus-mongolicae when they were co-cultivated on yeast extract-malt extract plates. Overall, our results demonstrated that P. koryoensis carries the yeast species as a symbiotic fungal associate. This is first report of yeast diversity associated with P. koryoensis. PMID:26839506

  17. Chemopreventive effect of Quercus infectoria against chemically induced renal toxicity and carcinogenesis

    Muneeb U Rehman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have shown that Quercus infectoria attenuates Fe- NTA induced renal oxidative stress, hyperproliferative response and renal carcinogenesis in rats. Fe-NTA promoted DEN (N-diethyl nitrosamine initiated renal carcinogenesis by increasing the percentage incidence of tumors and induces early tumor markers viz. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC level and PCNA expression. Fe- NTA (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally enhances renal Malondialdehyde, xanthine oxidase and hydrogen peroxide generation with reduction in renal glutathione content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, catalase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and phase-II metabolizing enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase and quinone reductase. It also enhances blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine. Fe-NTA also lead to increase in levels of some inflammatory markers viz NO and MPO and some proinflammatory cytokines viz PGE-2 and TNF-1. The chemopreventive efficacy of Quercus infectoria was studied in terms of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities, LPO, redox status, serum toxicity markers, inflammatory and proinflammatory markers and cell proliferation in the kidney tissue. Oral administration of Quercus infectoria at doses of 75 and 150 mg/kg b wt effectively suppressed renal oxidative stress, inflammation and tumor incidence. Chemopreventive effects of Quercus infectoria were associated with up-regulation of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities and down regulation of serum toxicity markers. Present study supports Quercus infectoria as a potent chemopreventive agent and suppresses Fe-NTA-induced renal carcinogenesis and oxidative and inflammatory response in Wistar rat.

  18. Floristic study in an oak grove of the flora and fauna sanctuary of Iguaque (Boyaca, Colombia)

    The floristic diversity of an oak Andean forest was studied at the national reserve Santuario de flora y fauna de Iguaque (Boyaca, Colombia). All individuals with DAP >2.5 were measured and registered in ten 50 x 2 m transects for a total of 0.1 ha. There were found 384 individuals, 53 species, 27 families and 34 genera; the most species-rich were Ericaceae (7), Lauraceae (5) and Myrsinaceae (5). The results show a forest with low diversity in which a few species predominate; the species with higher important value index (ivi) were quercus humboldtii (34 %), Weinmannia tomentosa (21.2 %), Clusia inesiana (4.8 %), Viburnum tinoides (4.7 %) and Ternstroemia meridionalis (4.6 %)

  19. Analysis of the expression of putative heat-stress related genes in relation to thermotolerance of cork oak.

    Correia, Barbara; Rodriguez, José Luis; Valledor, Luis; Almeida, Tânia; Santos, Conceição; Cañal, Maria Jesús; Pinto, Glória

    2014-03-15

    Cork oak (Quercus suber L.) is a research priority in the Mediterranean area and because of cork oaks' distribution these stands are experiencing daily stress. Based on projections of intensifying climate change and considering the key role of exploring the recovery abilities, cork oak seedlings were subjected to a cumulative temperature increase from 25°C to 55°C and subsequent recovery. CO2 assimilation rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, anthocyanins, proline and lipid peroxidation were used to evaluate plant performance, while the relative abundance of seven genes encoding for proteins of cork oak with a putative role in thermal/stress regulation (POX1, POX2, HSP10.4, HSP17a.22, CHS, MTL and RBC) was analyzed by qPCR (quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction). A temperature change to 35°C showed abundance alterations in the tested genes; at 45°C, the molecular changes were associated with an antioxidant response, possibly modulated by anthocyanins. At 55°C, HSP17a.22, MTL and proline accumulation were evident. After recovery, physiological balance was restored, whereas POX1, HSP10.4 and MTL abundances were suggested to be involved in increased thermotolerance. The data presented here are expected to pinpoint some pathways changes occurring during such stress and further recovery in this particular Mediterranean species. PMID:24594391

  20. 黑龙江省不同地点蒙古栎林生态特点研究%The ecological characteristics of Quercus mongolica forest in Heilongjiang Province

    于顺利; 马克平; 等

    2001-01-01

    通过对黑龙江省6个地点的天然蒙古栎林的结构和更新特点的分析,蒙古栎林可划分为不同特点的蒙古栎群落,即纯蒙古栎群落、蒙古栎桦树群落、蒙古栎槭树群落、蒙古栎红松群落和蒙古栎红松混交林群落,其演替趋势如下:红蒙古栎群落、蒙古栎桦树群落至蒙古栎槭树群落、蒙古栎红松群落,再至蒙古栎红松混交林群落。蒙古栎群落类型的多样性主要反应群落不同的演替阶段,造成蒙古栎群落多样性的原因是人类活动和自然因素作用的结果。随着群落的演替,蒙古栎的优势地位逐渐被削弱,乔木种类丰富度增多,草本种类丰富度增多;蒙栎的相对密度下降,林内环境由干燥逐渐变中性至较湿润;蒙古栎幼苗和幼树在总幼苗和幼树中所占的比例下降,耐荫物种如色木槭等的幼苗和幼树所占比例上升;在演替过程中,蒙古栎分布格局聚集分布的聚集程度逐渐降低,并向随机分布的方向发展。%According to regeneration characteristics,Quercus mongolica forests in Heilongjiang Province could be divided into 5 types:pure oak forest,oak-birch forest,oak-maple forest,oak-pine forest and oak-pine mixed forest.Their successional trend is from pure oak forest to oak-birch forest,oak-maple forest,oak-pine forest and oak-pine mixed forest.The diversity of oak forests reflects different successional stages.Human activity and other disturbances are responsible for different regeneration characteristics.Fire and human activities have increased the dominance of oak forest.With community succession,the richness of tree species and relative density of the seedling and sapling of maple and red pine increase and the dominance of mature oak tree and relative density of the seedling and sapling of oak tree decrease.The distribution pattern of oak is from clumped to random distribution.

  1. Monitoring drought impact on Mediterranean oak savanna vegetation using remote sensing

    González-Dugo, Maria P.; Carpintero, Elisabet; Andreu, Ana

    2015-04-01

    A holm oak savanna, known as dehesa in Spain and montado in Portugal, is the largest agroforest ecosystem in Europe, covering about 3 million hectares in the Iberian Peninsula and Greece (Papanastasis et al., 2004). It is considered an example of sustainable land use, supporting a large number of species and diversity of habitats and for its importance in rural development and economy (Plieninger et al., 2001). It is a combination between an agricultural and a naturally vegetated ecosystem, consisting of widely-spaced oak trees (mostly Quercus Ilex and Quercus suber) combined with a sub-canopy composed by crops, annual grassland and/or shrubs. It has a Mediterranean climate with severe periodic droughts. In the last decades, this system is being exposed to multiple threats derived from socio-economic changes and intensive agricultural use, which have caused environmental degradation, including tree decline, changes in soil properties and hydrological processes, and an increase of soil erosion (Coelho et al., 2004). Soil water dynamics plays a central role in the current decline and reduction of forested areas that jeopardizes the preservation of the system. In this work, a series of remotely sensed images since 1990 to present was used to evaluate the effect of several drought events occurred in the study area (1995, 2009, 2010/2011) on the tree density and water status. Data from satellites Landsat and field measurements have been combined in a spectral mixture model to assess separately the evolution of tree, dry grass and bare soil ground coverage. Only summer images have been used to avoid the influence of the green herbaceous layer on the analysis. Thermal data from the same sensors and meteorological information are integrated in a two source surface energy balance model to compute the Evaporative Stress Index (ESI) and evaluate the vegetation water status. The results have provided insights about the severity of each event and the spatial distribution of

  2. Feeling blue? Blue phosphors for OLEDs

    Hungshin Fu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs has been revitalized, partly due to the debut of the OLED TV by SONY in 2008. While there is still plenty of room for improvement in efficiency, cost-effectiveness and longevity, it is timely to report on the advances of light emitting materials, the core of OLEDs, and their future perspectives. The focus of this account is primarily to chronicle the blue phosphors developed in our laboratory. Special attention is paid to the design strategy, synthetic novelty, and their OLED performance. The report also underscores the importance of the interplay between chemistry and photophysics en route to true-blue phosphors.

  3. Blue-green algae

    ... Lac Klamath, Anabaena, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Arthrospira maxima, Arthrospira platensis, BGA, Blue Green Algae, Blue-Green Micro-Algae, Cyanobacteria, Cyanobactérie, Cyanophycée, Dihe, Espirulina, Hawaiian Spirulina, Klamath, Klamath Lake Algae, Lyngbya wollei, Microcystis aeruginosa, ...

  4. Blue-green algae

    ... unresponsive to other treatments, taking 500 mg of spirulina blue-green algae by mouth 3 times daily for 6 months ... was seen in undernourished children who were given spirulina blue-green algae with a combination of millet, soy and peanut ...

  5. Templated blue phases.

    Ravnik, Miha; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2015-11-21

    Cholesteric blue phases of a chiral liquid crystal are interesting examples of self-organised three-dimensional nanostructures formed by soft matter. Recently it was demonstrated that a polymer matrix introduced by photopolymerization inside a bulk blue phase not only stabilises the host blue phase significantly, but also serves as a template for blue phase ordering. We show with numerical modelling that the transfer of the orientational order of the blue phase to the surfaces of the polymer matrix, together with the resulting surface anchoring, can account for the templating behaviour of the polymer matrix inducing the blue phase ordering of an achiral nematic liquid crystal. Furthermore, tailoring the anchoring conditions of the polymer matrix surfaces can bring about orientational ordering different from those of bulk blue phases, including an intertwined complex of the polymer matrix and topological line defects of orientational order. Optical Kerr response of templated blue phases is explored, finding large Kerr constants in the range of K = 2-10 × 10(-9) m V(-2) and notable dependence on the surface anchoring strength. More generally, the presented numerical approach is aimed to clarify the role and actions of templating polymer matrices in complex chiral nematic fluids, and further to help design novel template-based materials from chiral liquid crystals. PMID:26412643

  6. Soil CO2 efflux in a mixed pine-oak forest in Valsaín (central Spain).

    Inclán, Rosa; De la Torre, Daniel; Benito, Marta; Rubio, Agustín

    2007-01-01

    Soil-surface CO2 efflux and its spatial and temporal variation were investigated in a southern Mediterranean, mixed pine-oak forest ecosystem on the northern slopes of the Sierra de Guadarrama in Spain from February 2006 to July 2006. Measurements of soil CO2 efflux, soil temperatures, and moisture were conducted in nine 1963-m2 sampling plots distributed in a gradient around the ecotone between Pinus sylvestris L. and Quercus pyrenaica Lam. forest stands. Total soil organic matter, Walkey-Black C, particulate organic matter, organic matter fraction below 53 microm, total soil nitrogen content, total soil organic carbon content, and pH were also measured under three representative mature oak, pine, and mixed pine-oak forest stands. Soil respiration showed a typical seasonal pattern with minimums in winter and summer, and maximums in spring, more pronounced in oak and oak-pine stands. Soil respiration values were highest in pine stands during winter and in oak stands during spring and summer. Soil respiration was highly correlated with soil temperatures in oak and pine-oak stands when soil moisture was above a drought threshold of 15%. Below this threshold value, soil moisture was a good predictor of soil respiration in pine stands. Greater soil organic matter, particulate organic matter, Walkey-Black C, total organic C, and total N content in pine compared to oak sites potentially contributed to the greater total soil CO2 efflux in these stands during the winter. Furthermore, opposing trends in the organic matter fraction below 53 microm and soil respiration between plots suggest that in oak stands, the C forms are less affected by possible changes in use. The effects of soil properties on soil respiration were masked by differences in soil temperature and moisture during the rest of the year. Understanding the spatial and temporal variation even within small geographic areas is essential to assess C budgets at ecosystem level accurately. Thus, this study bears

  7. Limited Pollen Dispersal Contributes to Population Genetic Structure but Not Local Adaptation in Quercus oleoides Forests of Costa Rica.

    Nicholas John Deacon

    Full Text Available Quercus oleoides Cham. and Schlect., tropical live oak, is a species of conservation importance in its southern range limit of northwestern Costa Rica. It occurs in high-density stands across a fragmented landscape spanning a contrasting elevation and precipitation gradient. We examined genetic diversity and spatial genetic structure in this geographically isolated and genetically distinct population. We characterized population genetic diversity at 11 nuclear microsatellite loci in 260 individuals from 13 sites. We monitored flowering time at 10 sites, and characterized the local environment in order to compare observed spatial genetic structure to hypotheses of isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment. Finally, we quantified pollen dispersal distances and tested for local adaptation through a reciprocal transplant experiment in order to experimentally address these hypotheses.High genetic diversity is maintained in the population and the genetic variation is significantly structured among sampled sites. We identified 5 distinct genetic clusters and average pollen dispersal predominately occurred over short distances. Differences among sites in flowering phenology and environmental factors, however, were not strictly associated with genetic differentiation. Growth and survival of upland and lowland progeny in their native and foreign environments was expected to exhibit evidence of local adaptation due to the more extreme dry season in the lowlands. Seedlings planted in the lowland garden experienced much higher mortality than seedlings in the upland garden, but we did not identify evidence for local adaptation.Overall, this study indicates that the Costa Rican Q. oleoides population has a rich population genetic history. Despite environmental heterogeneity and habitat fragmentation, isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-environment alone do not explain spatial genetic structure. These results add to studies of genetic structure by

  8. Contact allergy to oak moss

    Bernard, Guillaume; Giménez-Arnau, Elena; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Heydorn, Siri; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Menné, Torkil; Goossens, An; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    In addition to pure synthetic fragrance materials several natural extracts are still in use in the perfume industry. Among them oak moss absolute, prepared from the lichen Evernia prunastri (L.) Arch., is considered a major contact sensitizer and is therefore included in the fragrance mix used for...... diagnosing perfume allergy. The process of preparing oak moss absolute has changed during recent years and, even though several potential sensitizers have been identified from former benzene extracts, its present constituents and their allergenic status are not clear. In the study reported here, we applied a...... method developed for the identification of contact allergens present in natural complex mixtures to oak moss absolute. The method is based on the combination of bioassay-guided chemical fractionation, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis and structure-activity relationship studies. Our first...

  9. Resource use and efficiency, and stomatal responses to environmental drivers of oak and pine species in an Atlantic Coastal Plain forest

    Heidi J Renninger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pine-oak ecosystems are globally distributed even though differences in anatomy and leaf habit between many co-occurring oaks and pines suggest different strategies for resource use, efficiency and stomatal behavior. The New Jersey Pinelands contain sandy soils with low water- and nutrient-holding capacity providing an opportunity to examine trade-offs in resource uptake and efficiency. Therefore, we compared resource use in terms of transpiration rates and leaf nitrogen content and resource-use efficiency including water-use efficiency (WUE via gas exchange and leaf carbon isotopes and photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (PNUE between oaks (Quercus alba, Q. prinus, Q. velutina and pines (Pinus rigida, P. echinata. We also determined environmental drivers (vapor pressure deficit (VPD, soil moisture, solar radiation of canopy stomatal conductance (GS estimated via sap flow and stomatal sensitivity to light and soil moisture. Net assimilation rates were similar between genera, but oak leaves used about 10% more water and pine foliage contained about 20% more N per unit leaf area. Therefore, oaks exhibited greater PNUE while pines had higher WUE based on gas exchange, although WUE from carbon isotopes was not significantly different. For the environmental drivers of GS, oaks had about 10% lower stomatal sensitivity to VPD normalized by reference stomatal conductance compared with pines. Pines exhibited a significant positive relationship between shallow soil moisture and GS, but only GS in Q. velutina was positively related to soil moisture. In contrast, stomatal sensitivity to VPD was significantly related to solar radiation in all oak species but only pines at one site. Therefore, oaks rely more heavily on groundwater resources but have lower WUE, while pines have larger leaf areas and nitrogen acquisition but lower PNUE demonstrating a trade-off between using water and nitrogen efficiently in a resource-limited ecosystem.

  10. Resource use and efficiency, and stomatal responses to environmental drivers of oak and pine species in an Atlantic Coastal Plain forest.

    Renninger, Heidi J; Carlo, Nicholas J; Clark, Kenneth L; Schäfer, Karina V R

    2015-01-01

    Pine-oak ecosystems are globally distributed even though differences in anatomy and leaf habit between many co-occurring oaks and pines suggest different strategies for resource use, efficiency and stomatal behavior. The New Jersey Pinelands contain sandy soils with low water- and nutrient-holding capacity providing an opportunity to examine trade-offs in resource uptake and efficiency. Therefore, we compared resource use in terms of transpiration rates and leaf nitrogen content and resource-use efficiency including water-use efficiency (WUE) via gas exchange and leaf carbon isotopes and photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency (PNUE) between oaks (Quercus alba, Q. prinus, Q. velutina) and pines (Pinus rigida, P. echinata). We also determined environmental drivers [vapor pressure deficit (VPD), soil moisture, solar radiation] of canopy stomatal conductance (GS) estimated via sap flow and stomatal sensitivity to light and soil moisture. Net assimilation rates were similar between genera, but oak leaves used about 10% more water and pine foliage contained about 20% more N per unit leaf area. Therefore, oaks exhibited greater PNUE while pines had higher WUE based on gas exchange, although WUE from carbon isotopes was not significantly different. For the environmental drivers of GS, oaks had about 10% lower stomatal sensitivity to VPD normalized by reference stomatal conductance compared with pines. Pines exhibited a significant positive relationship between shallow soil moisture and GS, but only GS in Q. velutina was positively related to soil moisture. In contrast, stomatal sensitivity to VPD was significantly related to solar radiation in all oak species but only pines at one site. Therefore, oaks rely more heavily on groundwater resources but have lower WUE, while pines have larger leaf areas and nitrogen acquisition but lower PNUE demonstrating a trade-off between using water and nitrogen efficiently in a resource-limited ecosystem. PMID:25999966

  11. Fuel wood properties of some oak tree species of Manipur, India.

    Meetei, Shougrakpam Bijen; Singh, E J; Das, Ashesh Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Five indigenous oak tree species, i.e., Castanopsis indica (Roxb. ex Lindl.) A.DC., Lithocarpus fenestratus (Roxb.) Rehder, Lithocarpus pachyphyllus (Kurz) Rehder, Lithocarpus polystachyus (Wall. ex A.DC.) Rehder and Quercus serrata Murray were estimated for their wood properties such as calorific value, density, moisture content and ash content from a sub-tropical forest of Haraothel hill, Senapati District, Manipur. Wood biomass components were found to have higher calorific value (kJ g(-)) than bark components. The calorific values for tree species were found highest in L. pachyphyllus (17.99 kJ g(-1)) followed by C. indica (17.98 kJ g1), L. fenestratus (17.96 kJ g"), L. polystachyus (17.80 kJ g(-1)) and Q. serrata (17.49 kJ g(-1)). Calorific values for bole bark, bole wood and branch bark were found significantly different (F > 3.48 at p = 0.05) in five oak tree species. Percentage of ash on dry weight basis was found to be highest in Q. serrata (4.73%) and lowest in C. indica (2.19%). Ash content of tree components gives a singnificant factor in determining fuelwood value index (FVI). Of all the five oak tree species, Q. serrata exhibited highest value of wood density (0.78 g cm-) and lowest was observed in C. indica (0.63 g cm(-3)). There was significant correlation between wood density (p L. pachyphyllus (898.41)> L. polystachyus (879.02)> L. fenestratus (824.61)> Q. serrata (792.50). Thus, the present study suggests that C. indica may be considered as a fuelwood oak tree species in Manipur. PMID:26364482

  12. Population variation and natural selection on leaf traits in cork oak throughout its distribution range

    Ramírez-Valiente, José Alberto; Valladares, Fernando; Sánchez-Gómez, David; Delgado, Antonio; Aranda, Ismael

    2014-07-01

    A central issue in evolutionary biology is the exploration of functional trait variation among populations and the extent to which this variation has adaptive value. It was recently proposed that specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen concentration per mass (Nmass) and water use efficiency in cork oak play an important role in adaptation to water availability in the environment. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we explored, first, whether there was population-level variation in cork oak (Quercus suber) for these functional traits throughout its distribution range; if this were the case, it would be consistent with the hypothesis that different rainfall patterns have led to ecotypic differentiation in this species. Second, we studied whether the population-level variation matched short-term selection on these traits under different water availability conditions using two fitness components: survival and growth. We found high population-level differentiation in SLA and Nmass, with populations from dry places exhibiting the lowest values for SLA and Nmass. Likewise, reduced SLA had fitness benefits in terms of growth for plants under dry conditions. However, contrary to our expectations, we did not find any pattern of association between functional traits and survival in nine-year-old saplings despite considerable drought during one year of the study period. These results together with findings from the literature suggest that early stages of development are the most critical period for this species. Most importantly, these findings suggest that cork oak saplings have a considerable potential to cope with dry conditions. This capacity to withstand aridity has important implications for conservation of cork oak woodlands under the ongoing climate change.

  13. 77 FR 23506 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The Region of Three Oaks Museum, Three Oaks, MI

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: The Region of Three Oaks Museum, Three Oaks, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Region of Three Oaks Museum has... contact The Region of Three Oaks Museum. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribe...

  14. Blue ocean strategy.

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2004-10-01

    Despite a long-term decline in the circus industry, Cirque du Soleil profitably increased revenue 22-fold over the last ten years by reinventing the circus. Rather than competing within the confines of the existing industry or trying to steal customers from rivals, Cirque developed uncontested market space that made the competition irrelevant. Cirque created what the authors call a blue ocean, a previously unknown market space. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In red oceans--that is, in all the industries already existing--companies compete by grabbing for a greater share of limited demand. As the market space gets more crowded, prospects for profits and growth decline. Products turn into commodities, and increasing competition turns the water bloody. There are two ways to create blue oceans. One is to launch completely new industries, as eBay did with online auctions. But it's much more common for a blue ocean to be created from within a red ocean when a company expands the boundaries of an existing industry. In studying more than 150 blue ocean creations in over 30 industries, the authors observed that the traditional units of strategic analysis--company and industry--are of limited use in explaining how and why blue oceans are created. The most appropriate unit of analysis is the strategic move, the set of managerial actions and decisions involved in making a major market-creating business offering. Creating blue oceans builds brands. So powerful is blue ocean strategy, in fact, that a blue ocean strategic move can create brand equity that lasts for decades. PMID:15559577

  15. Allele discovery of ten candidate drought-response genes in Austrian oak using a systematically informatics approach based on 454 amplicon sequencing

    Homolka Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rise of temperatures and shortening of available water as result of predicted climate change will impose significant pressure on long-lived forest tree species. Discovering allelic variation present in drought related genes of two Austrian oak species can be the key to understand mechanisms of natural selection and provide forestry with key tools to cope with future challenges. Results In the present study we have used Roche 454 sequencing and developed a bioinformatic pipeline to process multiplexed tagged amplicons in order to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms and allelic sequences of ten candidate genes related to drought/osmotic stress from sessile oak (Quercus robur and sessile oak (Q. petraea individuals. Out of these, eight genes of 336 oak individuals growing in Austria have been detected with a total number of 158 polymorphic sites. Allele numbers ranged from ten to 52 with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.115 to 0.640. All loci deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and linkage disequilibrium was found among six combinations of loci. Conclusions We have characterized 183 alleles of drought related genes from oak species and detected first evidences of natural selection. Beside the potential for marker development, we have created an expandable bioinformatic pipeline for the analysis of next generation sequencing data.

  16. New York Blue

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — New York Blue is used cooperatively by the Laboratory and Stony Brook University as part of the New York Center for Computation Sciences. Ranked as the 28th fastest...

  17. Code blue: seizures.

    Hoerth, Matthew T; Drazkowski, Joseph F; Noe, Katherine H; Sirven, Joseph I

    2011-06-01

    Eyewitnesses frequently perceive seizures as life threatening. If an event occurs on the hospital premises, a "code blue" can be called which consumes considerable resources. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and characteristics of code blue calls for seizures and seizure mimickers. A retrospective review of a code blue log from 2001 through 2008 identified 50 seizure-like events, representing 5.3% of all codes. Twenty-eight (54%) occurred in inpatients; the other 22 (44%) events involved visitors or employees on the hospital premises. Eighty-six percent of the events were epileptic seizures. Seizure mimickers, particularly psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, were more common in the nonhospitalized group. Only five (17.9%) inpatients had a known diagnosis of epilepsy, compared with 17 (77.3%) of the nonhospitalized patients. This retrospective survey provides insights into how code blues are called on hospitalized versus nonhospitalized patients for seizure-like events. PMID:21546315

  18. Epiphytic bryophytes of Quercus forests in Central and North inland Iberian Peninsula

    Nagore García Medina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Diversity patterns are governed by a complex network of interacting factors. Studies directed to disentangle the most important factors affecting diversity have frequently shown divergent results, which has encouraged a rewarding debate about the relative importance of each factor. Scale dependency has been identified as a direct cause of at least part of such divergences. However, studies with spatially-explicit measurements at different scales are costly and therefore they are relatively scarce despite their importance. Here, we present a database to disentangle the cross-scale variation in the importance of factors affecting the diversity of epiphytic bryophyte communities in Quercus dominated forests (Quercus ilex L., Quercus pyrenaica Willd. and Quercus faginea Lam. in the North-western region of the Iberian Peninsula. We provide species-per-site abundance information with more than 9000 entries and an environmental table containing 20 in situ measured variables at three different scales (forest, stand, and sample. The database will help to advance the research of cross-scale effects of diversity patterns while at the same time providing valuable information on the distribution of a poorly known group of organisms. 

  19. [Effect of drought stress on apparent resource utilization efficiency of Quercus mongolica].

    Wang, Miao; Dai, Limin; Ji, Lanzhu

    2002-03-01

    To study the effect of drought stress on the physiological characteristics and resource utilization efficiency of Quercus mongolica, a dominant species in the Korean pine broad-leaved forest in Changbai Mountain, a comparative experiment was carried out under three soil moisture gradients as 85%-100% (high water, CK), 65%-85% (Medium water, MW), and 45%-65% (low water, LW) of field water-bolding capacity. The results showed that net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conduction, transpiration rate, water utilization efficiency, apparent CO2 utilization efficiency and apparent light utilization efficiency of the seedlings of Quercus mongolica were all significantly influenced by simulated drought stress. Stomatal conduction, water utilization efficiency and net photosynthetic rate of large tress of Quercus mongolica were affected by the soil drought stress, while transpiration rate, apparent CO2 utilization efficiency, and apparent light utilization efficiency were not influenced. Moderate soil water condition could greatly increase gas exchange and water utilization efficiency. These results indicated that the responses of gas exchange and resource utilization efficiency to various water stresses were different. Quercus mongolica was a species with variable resistance to drought stress, and the resistance would be improved by drought stress, especially moderate water stress. PMID:12132152

  20. Particulate Matter deposition on Quercus ilex leaves in an industrial city of central Italy

    Sgrigna, G.; Saebo, A.; Gawronski, S.; Popek, R.; Calfapietra, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 197, FEB 2015 (2015), s. 187-194. ISSN 0269-7491 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : PM10 * PM2.5 * Leaf deposition * Quercus ilex * urban environment * atmospheric pollution Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.143, year: 2014

  1. Intrapopulation and Interpopulation Genetic Variation ofQuercus in Denmark in Denmark

    Siegismund, Hans Redlef; Jensen, Jan Svejgaard

    2001-01-01

    '' sample from The Netherlands), seven Quercus petraea [Matt.] Liebl. and two putative hybrid stands were included in the study. The average genetic diversity was similar for the two species as well as for the putative hybrid stands: 0.25 for Q. robur, 0.27 for Q. petraea and 0.26 for the hybrid stands. The...

  2. Antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Ruta chalapensis (L), Quercus infectoria (Oliver) and Canthium parviflorum (Lam)

    Priya, P. Sathiya; Sasikumar, J. M.; Gowsigan, G.

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Ruta chalapensis, L., (Rutaceae), Quercus infectoria Oliver., (Fagaceae) and Canthium parviflorum Lam., (Rubiaceae) against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella oxytocoa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis. The experiment was carried out using disc diffusion method. The results revealed that the methanol extract of aerial parts of Ruta chalepensis (L) pr...

  3. A fast and cost-effective approach to develop and map EST-SSR markers: oak as a case study

    Cherubini Marcello

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs are a source of simple sequence repeats (SSRs that can be used to develop molecular markers for genetic studies. The availability of ESTs for Quercus robur and Quercus petraea provided a unique opportunity to develop microsatellite markers to accelerate research aimed at studying adaptation of these long-lived species to their environment. As a first step toward the construction of a SSR-based linkage map of oak for quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping, we describe the mining and survey of EST-SSRs as well as a fast and cost-effective approach (bin mapping to assign these markers to an approximate map position. We also compared the level of polymorphism between genomic and EST-derived SSRs and address the transferability of EST-SSRs in Castanea sativa (chestnut. Results A catalogue of 103,000 Sanger ESTs was assembled into 28,024 unigenes from which 18.6% presented one or more SSR motifs. More than 42% of these SSRs corresponded to trinucleotides. Primer pairs were designed for 748 putative unigenes. Overall 37.7% (283 were found to amplify a single polymorphic locus in a reference full-sib pedigree of Quercus robur. The usefulness of these loci for establishing a genetic map was assessed using a bin mapping approach. Bin maps were constructed for the male and female parental tree for which framework linkage maps based on AFLP markers were available. The bin set consisting of 14 highly informative offspring selected based on the number and position of crossover sites. The female and male maps comprised 44 and 37 bins, with an average bin length of 16.5 cM and 20.99 cM, respectively. A total of 256 EST-SSRs were assigned to bins and their map position was further validated by linkage mapping. EST-SSRs were found to be less polymorphic than genomic SSRs, but their transferability rate to chestnut, a phylogenetically related species to oak, was higher. Conclusion We have generated a bin map for oak

  4. Nuevas especies de Pythium que causan podredumbre radical de Quercus en España y Portugal

    Vicente, M.; Serrano, M.S.; Sánchez Hernández, Esperanza; Trapero Casas, Antonio; Jiménez, J.J.; Fernández, P.

    2008-01-01

    Pythium spiculum, una nueva especie recientemente descrita, se viene aislando desde 2003 de raíces y rizosfera de Quercus rotundifolia y Q. suber que sufren decaimiento en el sur de España y Portugal. En los suelos donde crecen formaciones de Quercus, esta especie ha sido aislada con frecuencias similares a las encontradas para Phytophthora cinnamomi, especie que, hasta el momento, ha sido el único oomiceto descrito como patógeno radical de Quercus en esta región. Las inoculaciones artificial...

  5. Monitoring endophyte populations in pine plantations and native oak forests in Northern Spain

    Martinez-Alvarez, P.; Martin-Garcia, J.; Rodriguez-Ceinos, S.; Diez, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    The replacement of native forest with plantations of other species may have important impacts on ecosystems. Some of these impacts have been widely studied, but very little is known about the effects on fungal communities and specifically endo phytic fungi. In this study, endophyte assemblages in pine plantations (Pinus sylvestris, P. nigra and P. pinaster) and native oak forests (Quercus pyrenaica) in the north of the province of Palencia (Spain) were analyzed. For this purpose, samples of needles/leaves and twigs were collected from three trees in each of three plots sampled per host species. The samples were later processed in the laboratory to identify all of the endo phytic species present. In addition, an exhaustive survey was carried out of the twelve sites to collect data on the environmental, crown condition, dendrometric and soil variables that may affect the distribution of the fungi. The endophyte assemblages isolated from P. sylvestris and P. nigra were closely related to each other, but were different from those isolated from P. pinaster. The endophytes isolated from Q. pyrenaica were less closely related to those from the other hosts, and therefore preservation of oak stands is important to prevent the loss of fungal diversity. Finally, the distribution of the endophyte communities was related to some of the environmental variables considered. (Author) 42 refs.

  6. California black oak response to nitrogen amendment at a high O3, nitrogen-saturated site

    In a nitrogen (N) saturated forest downwind from Los Angeles, California, the cumulative response to long-term background-N and N-amendment on black oak (Quercus kelloggii) was described in a below-average and average precipitation year. Monthly measurements of leaf and branch growth, gas exchange, and canopy health attributes were conducted. The effects of both pollutant exposure and drought stress were complex due to whole tree and leaf level responses, and shade versus full sun leaf responses. N-amended trees had lower late summer carbon (C) gain and greater foliar chlorosis in the drought year. Leaf water use efficiency was lower in N-amended trees in midsummer of the average precipitation year, and there was evidence of poor stomatal control in full sun. In shade, N-amendment enhanced stomatal control. Small differences in instantaneous C uptake in full sun, lower foliar respiration, and greater C gain in low light contributed to the greater aboveground growth observed. - Despite ecosystem-level N saturation, lower foliar respiration and significant photosynthetic gains under low light conditions resulted in greater wood production in black oak

  7. A phenological timetable of oak growth under experimental drought and air warming.

    Thomas M Kuster

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to increase temperature and decrease summer precipitation in Central Europe. Little is known about how warming and drought will affect phenological patterns of oaks, which are considered to possess excellent adaptability to these climatic changes. Here, we investigated bud burst and intra-annual shoot growth of Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens grown on two different forest soils and exposed to air warming and drought. Phenological development was assessed over the course of three growing seasons. Warming advanced bud burst by 1-3 days °C⁻¹ and led to an earlier start of intra-annual shoot growth. Despite this phenological shift, total time span of annual growth and shoot biomass were not affected. Drought changed the frequency and intensity of intra-annual shoot growth and advanced bud burst in the subsequent spring of a severe summer drought by 1-2 days. After re-wetting, shoot growth recovered within a few days, demonstrating the superior drought tolerance of this tree genus. Our findings show that phenological patterns of oaks are modified by warming and drought but also suggest that ontogenetic factors and/or limitations of water and nutrients counteract warming effects on the biomass and the entire span of annual shoot growth.

  8. Different responses to shade of evergreen and deciduous oak seedlings and the effect of acorn size

    Ke, Guo; Werger, Marinus J. A.

    1999-11-01

    An evergreen oak species, Cyclobalanopsis multinervis, and a deciduous oak species, Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata were grown from acorns under two light levels (full sunlight and shade at about 18 % of full sunlight, simulating the light intensities in forest clearings and gaps, respectively) for one growing season. Three hypotheses were tested: (i) the deciduous species grows faster than the evergreen species in forest gaps and clearings; (ii) the deciduous species responds more strongly in terms of growth and morphology to variation in light climate than the evergreen species; and (iii) seedling size is positively correlated to acorn size. The results showed: (i) at both light levels, the deciduous seedlings gained significantly more growth in biomass and height than the evergreen seedlings; (ii) both species produced significantly more biomass in full sunlight than in shade, without showing any significant difference in height between treatments. Increase in light intensity improved the growth of the deciduous seedlings more strongly; (iii) at a similar age, the deciduous seedlings showed a greater response in leaf morphology and biomass allocation to variation in light levels, but when compared at a similar size, biomass allocation patterns did not differ significantly between species; (iv) bigger acorns tended to produce larger seedlings, larger leaf sizes and more leaf area, between and within species. These differences demonstrate that the deciduous species is gap-dependent and has the advantage over the evergreen species in forest gaps and clearings.

  9. The Blues of David Lynch

    Roche, David

    2009-01-01

    This article is an attempt to elaborate a typology of the color blue in the color films of David Lynch up to and including Mulholland Drive (2001). The color blue is considered alternately as light, matter or verbal language. The author studies the use, function, value and meaning of blue lighting, divided into static and flashing light, and of the blue objects in Blue Velvet (1986) and Mulholland Drive. The author shows how Lynch appropriates connotations Western culture, under the influence...

  10. Seasonal variations in species diversity, dry matter and net primary productivity of herb layer of Quercus leucotrichophora-Pinus roxburghii mixed forest in Kumaun Himalaya, India

    Mukesh Joshi; Y.S.Rawat; J.Ram

    2012-01-01

    Plant biomass,species diversity and net primary productivity are presented for herb layer of banj oak (Quercus leucotrichophora A.Camus)-chir pine (Pinus roxburghii Sarg.) mixed forest in Kumaun,central Himalaya,India.The species diversity declined from a maximum (3.56) in September to a minimum (2.11) in December.The monthly live shoots biomass exhibited a single peak growth pattern with highest live shoot biomass of 185 g·m-2 in August.The seasonal pattern showed that the maximum above-ground production (131 g·m-2) occurred during the rainy season and the minimum (1 g·m-2) during winter season.The below-ground production was maximum during winter season (84 g·m-2) and minimum during summer season (34 g·m-2).The annual net shoot production was 171 g·m-2 and total below-ground production was 165 g·m-2.Of the total input 61% was channeled to above-ground parts and 39% to below-ground parts.Transfer of live shoots to dead shoots compartments and that of dead shoots to litter compartments was 61% and 66%,respectively.The total dry matter disappearance was 61% of the total input within annual cycle.The herb layer showed a net accumulation of organic matter,indicating the seral nature of the community.

  11. Time and dose of irrigation impact Tuber melanosporum ectomycorrhiza proliferation and growth of Quercus ilex seedling hosts in young black truffle orchards.

    Olivera, Antoni; Bonet, José Antonio; Oliach, Daniel; Colinas, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    In Mediterranean climate, young truffle-oak orchards are subjected to drought episodes that can compromise the development of Tuber melanosporum. We investigated the responses of T. melanosporum to water supply in three periods: May to July, August to October, and May to October. In each period, five water doses were established: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% of the reference evapotranspiration (ETo). Five orchards were planted with Quercus ilex inoculated with T. melanosporum, and in each orchard, we arranged a two-factorial design with irrigation period and irrigation dose as main factors to test their combined effects on the development of both T. melanosporum and Q. ilex after 3 years in the field. Irrigation period significantly interacted with irrigation doses for the absolute presence per seedling of T. melanosporum mycorrhizae. Irrigation in May-July increased significantly T. melanosporum colonization in seedlings irrigated with 50% ETo dose compared to the 0% ETo dose. A similar pattern with smaller differences in means was observed in August-October period, but the irrigation doses did not change T. melanosporum colonization when we watered from May to October. We found ectomycorrhizae different from T. melanosporum in 51% of the seedlings studied, but their presence was marginal. Our results suggest that a moderate irrigation dose promotes seedling growth and number of fine root tips per unit of fine root length, which may be potentially colonized by T. melanosporum. PMID:24310929

  12. Photosynthetic responses to elevated CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} in Quercus ilex leaves at a natural CO{sub 2} spring

    Paoletti, E. [Istituto Protezione Piante, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy)]. E-mail: e.paoletti@ipp.cnr.it; Seufert, G. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, I-21020 Ispra (Italy); Della Rocca, G. [Istituto Protezione Piante, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Thomsen, H. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, I-21020 Ispra (Italy)

    2007-06-15

    Photosynthetic stimulation and stomatal conductance (Gs) depression in Quercus ilex leaves at a CO{sub 2} spring suggested no down-regulation. The insensitivity of Gs to a CO{sub 2} increase (from ambient 1500 to 2000 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) suggested stomatal acclimation. Both responses are likely adaptations to the special environment of CO{sub 2} springs. At the CO{sub 2}-enriched site, not at the control site, photosynthesis decreased 9% in leaves exposed to 2x ambient O{sub 3} concentrations in branch enclosures, compared to controls in charcoal-filtered air. The stomatal density reduction at high CO{sub 2} was one-third lower than the concomitant Gs reduction, so that the O{sub 3} uptake per single stoma was lower than at ambient CO{sub 2}. No significant variation in monoterpene emission was measured. Higher trichome and mesophyll density were recorded at the CO{sub 2}-enriched site, accounting for lower O{sub 3} sensitivity. A long-term exposure to H{sub 2}S, reflected by higher foliar S-content, and CO{sub 2} might depress the antioxidant capacity of leaves close to the vent and increase their O{sub 3} sensitivity. - Very high CO{sub 2} concentrations did not compensate for the effects of O{sub 3} on holm oak photosynthesis.

  13. Absorption, metabolism, and effects at transcriptome level of a standardized French oak wood extract, Robuvit, in healthy volunteers: pilot study.

    Natella, Fausta; Leoni, Guido; Maldini, Mariateresa; Natarelli, Lucia; Comitato, Raffaella; Schonlau, Frank; Virgili, Fabio; Canali, Raffaella

    2014-01-15

    The consumption of wine and spirits, traditionally aged in oak barrels, exposes humans to roburin ingestion. These molecules belong to a class of ellagitannins (ETs), and their only known source is oak wood. Very little is currently known about roburin bioavailability and biological activity. We reported for the first time human absorption of roburins from a French oak wood (Quercus robur) water extract (Robuvit) by measuring the increase of total phenols (from 0.63 ± 0.06 to 1.26 ± 0.18 μg GAE equiv/mL plasma) and the appearance of roburin metabolites (three different glucoronidate urolithins and ellagic acid), in plasma, after 5 days of supplementation. Robuvit supplementation induced also the increase of plasma antioxidant capacity from 1.8 ± 0.05 to 1.9 ± 0.01 nmol Trolox equiv/mL plasma. Moreover, utilizing a combined ex vivo cell culture approach, we assessed the effect of Q. robur metabolites (present in human serum after supplementation) on gene expression modulation, utilizing an Affymetrix array matrix, in endothelial, neuronal, and keratinocyte cell lines. The functional analysis reveals that Robuvit metabolites affect ribosome, cell cycle, and spliceosome pathways. PMID:24354337

  14. EFFECTS OF SOME IMPREGNATION CHEMICALS ON COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF LAMINATED VENEER LUMBER (LVL PRODUCED WITH OAK AND POPLAR VENEERS

    Seref Kurt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of impregnation chemicals on the combustion properties of 3-ply laminated veneer lumber (LVL made of Oak (Quercus petraea subsp. İberica and Poplar (Populus tremula L.. For this purpose, oak wood was used as the outer ply and poplar used for the core ply in LVL. Borax (BX, boric acid (BA, borax+boric acid (BX+BA, and di-ammonium phosphate (DAP were used as impregnation chemicals, and urea formaldehyde (UF, phenol formaldehyde (PF, and melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF adhesives as bonding agent were used to produce LVLs. The vacuum – pressure method was used for the impregnation process. The combustion test was performed according to the procedure defined in the ASTM–E 69 standards, and during the test the mass reduction, temperature, and released gas (CO, O2 were determined for each 30 seconds. As a result, di-ammonium phosphate was found to be the most successful fire retardant chemical in LVL with MUF adhesive. LVL produced from a combination of oak and poplar veneers with MUF adhesive and impregnated with DAP can be recommended to be used as a fire resistant building material where required.

  15. Soil Properties and Plant Community Changes along a Goat Grazing Intensity Gradient in an Open Canopy Oak Forest

    Aimilia LEMPESI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how the management practices of silvopastoral systems affect the long-term sustainability of oak ecosystems and what their influence is on nutrient cycling and plant community, is of great interest. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of relative grazing intensity on soil properties and on vegetation characteristics in an open canopy oak forest dominated by Quercus frainetto. The research was conducted in the area of Pentalofos, which is located in Evros region, north-eastern Greece and is grazed by goats. The distance from a goat corral was used to represent relative grazing intensity. In June 2011, soil and vegetation samples were collected along transects placed at 50, 150, 300, 600 and 1200 m from the goat corral, running perpendicular to three replicates. Soil measurements included pH, phosphorous (P and nitrogen (N concentrations while vegetation measurements included plant cover, species composition and diversity. Plant cover was not significantly different among grazing intensities. Species diversity, especially of the woody vegetation layer, was significantly higher in the light grazing intensity in comparison to both the heavy and the very light grazing. Heavy grazing reduced soil organic matter while it increased total nitrogen. Grazing intensity did not affect available P and soil pH. Light to moderate goat grazing could ameliorate floristic diversity and increase sustainability of oak forests in the Mediterranean region.

  16. Seasonal and spatial variability of rainfall redistribution under Scots pine and Downy oak forests in Mediterranean conditions

    Garcia-Estringana, Pablo; Latron, Jérôme; Molina, Antonio J.; Llorens, Pilar

    2013-04-01

    The large degree of temporal and spatial variability of throughfall input patterns may lead to significant changes in the volume of water that reach the soil in each location, and beyond in the hydrological response of forested hillslopes. To explore the role of vegetation in the temporal and spatial redistribution of rainfall in Mediterranean climatic conditions two contrasted stands were monitored. One is a Downy oak forest (Quercus pubescens) and the other is a Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris), both are located in the Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain, 42° 12'N, 1° 49'E). These plots are representative of Mediterranean mountain areas with spontaneous afforestation by Scots pine as a consequence of the abandonment of agricultural terraces, formerly covered by Downy oaks. The monitoring design of each plot consists of a set of 20 automatic rain recorders and 40 automatic soil moisture probes located below the canopy. 100 hemispheric photographs of the canopy were used to place the instruments at representative locations (in terms of canopy cover) within the plot. Bulk rainfall, stemflow and meteorological conditions above the forest cover are also automatically recorded. Canopy cover as well as biometric characteristics of the plots are also regularly measured. This work presents the first results describing the variability of throughfall beneath each forest stand and compares the persistence of temporal patterns among stands, and for the oaks stand among the leafed and the leafless period. Furthermore, canopy structure, rainfall characteristics and meteorological conditions of rainfall events are evaluated as main drivers of throughfall redistribution.

  17. The influence of mature oak stands and spruce plantations on soil-dwelling click beetles in lowland plantation forests.

    Loskotová, Tereza; Horák, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Most European forests have been converted into forest plantations that are managed for timber production. The main goal of this paper was to determine the difference between mature native sessile oak (Quercus petraea) stands and non-indigenous Norway spruce (Picea abies) plantations, with respect to communities of Athous click beetles in approximately 6,500 ha of lowland plantation forest area in the Czech Republic. Athous subfuscus was the most abundant and widespread species, followed by A. zebei and A. haemorrhoidalis, while A. vittatus was considered rare. Spatial analysis of environmental variables inside studied patches showed that the species composition of Athous beetles best responded to a 20 m radius surrounding traps. The species' responses to the environment showed that A. vittatus and A. haemorrhoidalis preferred oak stands, while A. zebei and A. subfuscus were associated with spruce plantations. In addition, oak stands showed higher diversity of beetle communities. The studied species are important for their ecosystem services (e.g. predation on pests or bioturbation) and seem to tolerate certain degrees of human disturbances, which is especially beneficial for forest plantations managed for timber production. PMID:26793425

  18. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  19. Beyond Deep Blue

    Newborn, Monty

    2011-01-01

    More than a decade has passed since IBM's Deep Blue computer stunned the world by defeating Garry Kasparov, the world chess champion at that time. Beyond Deep Blue tells the continuing story of the chess engine and its steady improvement. The book provides analysis of the games alongside a detailed examination of the remarkable technological progress made by the engines - asking which one is best, how good is it, and how much better can it get. Features: presents a total of 118 games, played by 17 different chess engines, collected together for the first time in a single reference; details the

  20. The Blue Collar Brain

    Guy eVan Orden

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue collar role compared to the white collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

  1. Laboratory evaluation of molluscicidal activity of extracts from Cotula cinerea (L) and Quercus lusitania var. infectoria galls (Oliv.).

    Redwane, A; Markouk, M; Lazrek, H B; Amarouch, H; Jana, M

    1998-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the molluscicidal activity of different extracts obtained from Cotula cinerea and Quercus lusitania var. infectoria galls. The hydroalcoholic extract of Cotula cinerea, acetonic extract and gallotanin of Quercus infectoria galls have presented high activity against Bulinus truncatus. The hydroalcoholic extract of Cotula cinerea was fractionated by chromatography on silica gel column. We have isolated two very active fractions at concentrations respectively of 52.5 and 27.5 ppm. PMID:9872015

  2. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of the Methanol Extract from the Galls of Quercus infectoria (Olivier) in Rats.

    Fan, Sook-Ha; Ali, Noraisah Akbar; Basri, Dayang Fredalina

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the analgesic activity of the methanol extract of the galls of Quercus infectoria in rats using hot plate and tail-flick methods. The extract was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 20 mg/kg while morphine sulfate and sodium salicylate (10 mg/kg) served as standards. The methanol extract exhibited significant analgesic activity in the tail-flick model (P Quercus infectoria displayed analgesic activity. PMID:25254062

  3. Uso estructural del hábitat por una comunidad de aves en bosques de rebollo (Quercus pyrenaica, Willd

    Calvo, Jesús M.

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence on the bird community of 9 structural zones in two plots of Iberian oak-woodland (Quercus pyrenaica with differences in vegetation structure was studied. Bird utilization of vegetation was measured by taking samples of each observed individual every 30 seconds, specifying the zone used as a food resource. Existence of a preferential selection in tree top and shrub was verified in the "Monte" plot, whereas tree top and ground in "Dehesa" plot were the preferential zones. The incidence of the seasons in the utilization of some zones (tree top, shrub and air was proven, while others zones (ground and trunks maintained an uniform level of utilization all year round. Shrub is used more in Iberian-oak forest than in other evergreen Quercus woods, while the opposite happens for the ground. The hardest period for birds in the study forest in the winter, while in other evergreen Mediterranean woods It is the summer.

    Depto. de Biología Animal, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Salamanca, 37071- Salamanca, España [es] Se estudia la influencia que ejercen sobre la comunidad de aves, las 9 zonas estructurales definidas dentro de dos parcelas de rebollar que presentan diferente estructura de su vegetación. La utilización del medio se midió observando cada individuo a intervalos de 30 segundos, anotando la zona sobre la que se encontraba buscando alimento. Se comprueba la selección preferencial de la copa de los árboles y del matorral en la parcela "Monte" y de la copa y el suelo en la parcela "Dehesa". Se pone de manifiesto la incidencia de la estacionalidad sobre la selección de algunos sustratos (copa de árboles, matorral y aire, mientras que otros mantienen una utilización más uniforme durante todo el año (suelo y troncos. El matorral es más ampliamente empleado en el rebollar que en bosques de Quercus perennes ibéricos, mientras que sucede lo contrario respecto al empleo del suelo. El invierno

  4. Changes in the dynamics of foliar N metabolites in oak saplings by drought and air warming depend on species and soil type.

    Bin Hu

    Full Text Available Climate change poses direct or indirect influences on physiological mechanisms in plants. In particular, long living plants like trees have to cope with the predicted climate changes (i.e. drought and air warming during their life span. The present study aimed to quantify the consequences of simulated climate change for foliar N metabolites over a drought-rewetting-drought course. Saplings of three Central European oak species (i.e. Quercus robur, Q. petraea, Q. pubescens were tested on two different soil types (i.e. acidic and calcareous. Consecutive drought periods increased foliar amino acid-N and soluble protein-N concentrations at the expense of structural N in all three oak species. In addition, transient effects on foliar metabolite dynamics were observed over the drought-rewetting-drought course. The lowest levels of foliar soluble protein-N, amino acid-N and potassium cation with a minor response to drought and air warming were found in the oak species originating from the driest/warmest habitat (Q. pubescens compared to Q. robur and Q. petraea. Higher foliar osmolyte-N and potassium under drought and air warming were observed in all oak species when grown on calcareous versus acidic soil. These results indicate that species-specific differences in physiological mechanisms to compensate drought and elevated temperature are modified by soil acidity.

  5. Phytolith analysis as a tool for palaeo-environmental studies: a case study of the reconstruction of the historical extent of oak savanna in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    Kirchholtes, Renske; van Mourik, Jan; Johnson, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Landscape-level restorations can be costly, so the effectiveness of the approach and the objectives of the restoration should be supported by a comprehensive investigation. The goal of the research presented here is to provide the basis for such a restoration effort using phytolith analyses. Fire suppression and loss of indigenous burning in the Willamette Valley, Oregon (USA) has led to near disappearance of the Oregon white oak savanna. Under suppressed fire regimes the shade-intolerant Garry oaks (Quercus garryana) are outcompeted by Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). As a consequence, the Oregon white oak savanna has been reduced to historical study. Phytoliths are small yet robust silica particles produced by most plants. Many phytoliths take on cell shapes diagnostic of specific plant lineages, acting as indicators of their past presence. Unlike pollen grains, phytoliths readily preserve in well-drained soils during intermittent dry periods characteristic of sites such as the Jim's Creek research area. By reconstructing locality-scale pre-settlement vegetation patterns at the Jim's Creek Research Area using phytoliths, we confirm the broader-scale pattern of tree encroachment. However, phytolith assemblages from over 150 years ago document the presence of pines and firs, suggesting savannas in the Willamette Valley were not necessarily always dominated by oaks.

  6. The "Blue Banana" Revisited

    Faludi, A.K.F.

    2015-01-01

    This essay is about the “Blue Banana”. Banana is the name given subsequently by others to a Dorsale européenne (European backbone) identified empirically by Roger Brunet. In a background study to the Communication of the European Commission ‘Europe 2000’, Klaus Kunzmann and Michael Wegener put forwa

  7. Blue spectral inflation

    Schunck, Franz E

    2008-01-01

    We reconsider the nonlinear second order Abel equation of Stewart and Lyth, which follows from a nonlinear second order slow-roll approximation. We find a new eigenvalue spectrum in the blue regime. Some of the discrete values of the spectral index n_s have consistent fits to the cumulative COBE data as well as to recent ground-base CMB experiments.

  8. ANTI-DIABETIC ACTIVITY OF ROOTS OF QUERCUS INFECTORIA OLIVIER IN ALLOXAN INDUCED DIABETIC RATS

    R. Saini * and S.M. Patil

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The methanolic extract of roots of Quercus infectoria Olivier at a dose of 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg body weight respectively was tested for anti-diabetic activity in Alloxan-induced hyperglycaemic rats. The blood glucose levels were measured at 0, 2h, 4h and 6h after the treatment. The methanolic extract reduced the blood glucose Alloxan- induced diabetic rats from 285.52 to 206.57mg/dl, 6h after oral administration of extract (P<0.01. The antidiabetic activity of methanolic extract of Quercus infectoria Olivier was compared with glibenclamide, an oral hypoglycaemic agent (3mg/kg.

  9. PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WOOD IN Quercus laeta Liemb. OF EL SALTO, DURANGO

    Juan Abel Nájera Luna; Zacarías Vargas Antonio; Jorge Méndez González; José de Jesús Graciano Luna

    2005-01-01

    In this work the results obtained on the mechanical and physical trials in Quercus laeta Liemb. wood of El Salto, Durango are showed. The mechanical and physical trials were developed under COPANT rules (Comisión Panamericana de Normas Técnicas), being these: density, volumetric shrinkage, fiber saturation point (FSP) and anisotropic relation (ANR). The mechanical trials were: perpendicular compression and parallel to grain, static bending, perpendicular and parallel tension to grain, hardne...

  10. Apoplastic and symplastic phloem loading in Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior

    Öner-Sieben, Soner; Lohaus, Gertrud

    2014-01-01

    Whereas most of the research on phloem loading is performed on herbaceous plants, less is known about phloem loading strategies in trees. In this study, the phloem loading mechanisms of Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior were analysed. The following features were examined: the minor vein structure, the sugar concentrations in phloem sap by the laser–aphid–stylet technique, the distribution of photoassimilates in the mesophyll cells by non-aqueous fractionation, gradients of sugar concentrat...

  11. Rapid Detection of Ophiostoma piceae and O. quercus in Stained Wood by PCR

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Uzunovic, Adnan; Breuil, Colette

    1999-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and simple method was developed to detect the sapstain fungi Ophiostoma piceae and O. quercus in stained wood. By using microwave heating for DNA extraction and PCR with internal transcribed spacer-derived-specific primers, detection was feasible within 4 h, even with DNA obtained from a single synnema. This method can easily be extended for the detection of other wood-inhabiting fungi.

  12. Rapid detection of Ophiostoma piceae and O. quercus in stained wood by PCR.

    Kim, S H; Uzunovic, A; Breuil, C

    1999-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and simple method was developed to detect the sapstain fungi Ophiostoma piceae and O. quercus in stained wood. By using microwave heating for DNA extraction and PCR with internal transcribed spacer-derived-specific primers, detection was feasible within 4 h, even with DNA obtained from a single synnema. This method can easily be extended for the detection of other wood-inhabiting fungi. PMID:9872792

  13. Imprints of Natural Selection Along Environmental Gradients in Phenology-Related Genes of Quercus petraea

    Florian J Alberto; Derory, Jérémy; Boury, Christophe; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Kremer, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    We explored single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation in candidate genes for bud burst from Quercus petraea populations sampled along gradients of latitude and altitude in Western Europe. SNP diversity was monitored for 106 candidate genes, in 758 individuals from 32 natural populations. We investigated whether SNP variation reflected the clinal pattern of bud burst observed in common garden experiments. We used different methods to detect imprints of natural selection (FST outlier, clin...

  14. Succession dynamics of ectomycorrhizal fungi in inoculated Quercus rubra seedlings – a field study

    Franco, Albina R.; Ramos, Miguel A.; Sousa, Nadine R.; Oliveira, Rui S.; Castro, Paula M. L.

    2011-01-01

    Selected ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi may have a beneficial effect on the establishment of nursery grown seedlings and may influence their survival on the first years. By increasing seedling capacity to capture nutrients, ECM fungi often contribute to a successful plant establishment. We investigated the performance of pre-inoculated Quercus rubra seedlings on a reforestation site and monitored ECM fungal persistence and succession dynamics between selected ECM fungi and native fungal communi...

  15. Isolation of antibacterial compounds from Quercus dilatata L. through bioassay guided fractionation

    Jamil Maryam; ul Haq Ihsan; Mirza Bushra; Qayyum Mazhar

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Four medicinal plants (Chrozophora hierosolymitana Spreng, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum L., Ephedra gerardiana Wall. ex Stapf, and Quercus dilatata L.) used by indigenous healers to treat various infectious diseases were selected for the present study. The major objective of the present study was isolation and characterization of antimicrobial components from the crude plant extracts using bioassay guided fractionation. Methods Seven methanolic extracts of the four plants we...

  16. Antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Ruta chalapensis (L), Quercus infectoria (Oliver) and Canthium parviflorum (Lam).

    Priya, P Sathiya; Sasikumar, J M; Gowsigan, G

    2009-10-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Ruta chalapensis, L., (Rutaceae), Quercus infectoria Oliver., (Fagaceae) and Canthium parviflorum Lam., (Rubiaceae) against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella oxytocoa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis. The experiment was carried out using disc diffusion method. The results revealed that the methanol extract of aerial parts of Ruta chalepensis (L) presented the highest zone of inhibition against tested pathogens. Other plants showed significant zone of inhibition. PMID:22557348

  17. Hepatoprotective effects of Quercus infectoria gall extract against carbon tetrachloride treated liver injury in rats

    Gaurav Lodhi; Singh, Hemant K.; PANT, KAMLESH K.; Rao, Ch V; Zeashan Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Summary. In the present study, galls of Quercus infectoria possessing potent antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties were evaluated for their hepatoprotective effect against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Subcutaneous injection of CCl4, administered twice a week, produced a marked elevation in the serum levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Histological analysis of the liver of these rats re...

  18. Chemopreventive effect of Quercus infectoria against chemically induced renal toxicity and carcinogenesis

    Rehman, Muneeb U.; Mir Tahir, Farrah Ali; Wajhul Qamar; Rehan Khan; Abdul Quaiyoom Khan; Abdul Lateef; Oday-O-Hamiza; Sarwat Sultana

    2012-01-01

    In this study we have shown that Quercus infectoria attenuates Fe- NTA induced renal oxidative stress, hyperproliferative response and renal carcinogenesis in rats. Fe-NTA promoted DEN (N-diethyl nitrosamine) initiated renal carcinogenesis by increasing the percentage incidence of tumors and induces early tumor markers viz. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) level and PCNA expression. Fe- NTA (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) enhances renal Malondialdehyde, xanthine oxidase and hydrogen ...

  19. Hepatoprotective Potential of Extracts from Seeds of Areca catechu and Nutgalls of Quercus infectoria

    Rapepol Bavovada; Pimolpan Pithayanukul; Saruth Nithitanakool

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous extracts from seeds of Areca catechu L. (Arecaceae) (AC) and nutgalls of Quercus infectoria Oliv. (Fagaceae) (QI) were investigated for their hepatoprotective potential by studying their antioxidant capacity using four different methods, by determining their in vitro anti−inflammatory activity against 5-lipoxygenase, and by evaluating their hepatoprotective potential against liver injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rats. AC and QI extracts exhibited potent antioxidant an...

  20. Uji Aktivitas Antiinflamasi Ekstrak Etanol Majakani (Quercus Infectoria G. Olivier) Terhadap Tikus Putih Yang Diinduksi Karagenan

    Rambe, Khairunnisa

    2015-01-01

    Obat-obat antiinflamasi non-steroid (OAINS) termasuk obat analgesik, antipiretik dan antiinflamasi yang mempunyai efek samping terhadap gastrointestinal, sehingga perlu dicari obat alami yang lebih aman. Majakani (Quercus infectoria G. Olivier) telah lama digunakan untuk pengobatan inflamasi secara tradisional yang diharapkan mempunyai efek yang sama dengan OAINS. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui efek antiinflamasi ekstrak etanol majakani terhadap udem kaki tikus yang diinduksi ...

  1. Anti-Candida activity of Quercus infectoria gall extracts against Candida species

    Nur Saeida Baharuddin; Hasmah Abdullah; Wan Nor Amilah Wan Abdul Wahab

    2015-01-01

    Background: Galls of Quercus infectoria have been traditionally used to treat common ailments, including yeast infections caused by Candida species. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the in vitro anti-Candida activity of Q. infectoria gall extracts against selected Candida species. Materials and Methods: Methanol and aqueous extracts of Q. infectoria galls were tested for anti-Candida activity against Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida t...

  2. Does the structure of wood contribute to understanding the oaks decline phenomenon?

    Mirela Tulik

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Vascular cambium is a meristematic tissue which produces wood centriphugaly and phloem centripetaly. In the structure of wood and phloem, data concerning developmental processes taking place in the cambium is recorded. The history of the cambium is encoded in the dimensions, numbers and arrangements of the wood and phloem cells. For investigations, the wood is usually preferred because it is durable and such data could remain unchanged for centuries, whereas in the phloem due to distorted processes, it deranges after a few years. In broadleaves, the wood is composed of vessels, tracheids, fibers and parenchyma cells. The process of the wood formation consists of the cambial cell derivatives expansion, lignification of its walls and programmed cell death. Since the seventies of the nineteenth century, the process of declining oaks taking place in Europe on a regular basis has been observed. Oak decline is a complex process that involves interactions of both biotic and abiotic factors leading to increased trees mortality. The main goal of the studies is the examination of the structure of wood in declining oaks (Quercus robur L. in respect to physiological (conductive role of this tissue. It is known that on the level of the wood structure, water transport efficiency depends on the diameter of vessels - the main elements of the hydraulic conductivity system. Any reduction of the vessels lumen causes the reduction of the water transport to the organs of the trees body and, therefore, influences organisms survival rate. Anatomical analyses were carried out on wood samples (comprising all annual rings formed during the 30-40 years life of the analyzed trees collected at breast height from the main stem of healthy, weakened and dead oaks. The anatomical traits of the wood like as the width of the annual increments, the diameter and density of early wood vessels were measured. The results which are described in the paper by Tulik (2014 revealed that

  3. Fungal species isolated from Quercus castaneifolia in Hyrcanian Forests, North of Iran

    GOODARZ HAJIZADEH

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kavosi MR, Feridon F, Hajizadeh G. 2013. Fungal species isolated from Quercus castaneifolia in Hyrcanian Forests, North of Iran. Biodiversitas 13: 61-66. In order to isolate and identify of fungi associated with Quercus castaneifolia seed, sampling carried out in Shast-Kalate, Ghorogh, Loveh and Golestan forest. Collected seeds sterilized and then separated sections including: outer section of seed (crust and inner seed section (endosperm. Each section of seed tissue is cultured on potato dextrose agar media. After sub-culture and providing of the fungi pure cultures, various species isolated and identified by spores characteristics, their size and color, including: Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, Curvularia affinis, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichothecium roseum, Eurotium rubrum, E. amstelodami, Penicillium implicatum, P. fellutanum, Diplodia sp. Nigrospora gossypi, Alternaria alternata , Fusarium oxysporum and Beltrania santapaui. The most frequency of fungus in Shast-Kalate forest was P. implicatum by 74% of frequency within seed section, the most frequency in Ghorogh and Loveh Forest was P. fellutanum with 63 and 66% of frequency within seed section respectively and the most frequency in Golestan forest was B. santapaui by 51% of frequency outer seed section. The result showed diversity of the fungi on the outer seed section is higher than within seed section. The results also showed during several isolation a saprophyte fungus always could be finding on the acorn seeds. This is the comprehensive report on fungi associated with Quercus castaneifolia seed in Hyrcanian forest, North of Iran.

  4. Particulate Matter deposition on Quercus ilex leaves in an industrial city of central Italy

    A number of studies have focused on urban trees to understand their mitigation capacity of air pollution. In this study particulate matter (PM) deposition on Quercus ilex leaves was quantitatively analyzed in four districts of the City of Terni (Italy) for three periods of the year. Fine (between 0.2 and 2.5 μm) and Large (between 2.5 and 10 μm) PM fractions were analyzed. Mean PM deposition value on Quercus ilex leaves was 20.6 μg cm−2. Variations in PM deposition correlated with distance to main roads and downwind position relatively to industrial area. Epicuticular waxes were measured and related to accumulated PM. For Fine PM deposited in waxes we observed a higher value (40% of total Fine PM) than Large PM (4% of total Large PM). Results from this study allow to increase our understanding about air pollution interactions with urban vegetation and could be hopefully taken into account when guidelines for local urban green management are realized. - Highlights: • A quantitative analysis of Particulate Matter deposition on urban Quercus ilex leaves was implemented. • Deposition data were correlated with pollutants sources such as roads and local steel factory, and with epicuticular waxes. • Results provide new insight about the capacity of trees in removing pollutants in urban environment. - This paper is providing useful information on PM deposition on urban vegetation

  5. Water use and carbon exchange of red oak- and eastern hemlock-dominated forests in the northeastern USA: implications for ecosystem-level effects of hemlock woolly adelgid.

    Hadley, Julian L; Kuzeja, Paul S; Daley, Michael J; Phillips, Nathan G; Mulcahy, Thomas; Singh, Safina

    2008-04-01

    Water use and carbon exchange of a red oak-dominated (Quercus rubra L.) forest and an eastern hemlock-dominated (Tsuga canadensis L.) forest, each located within the Harvard Forest in north-central Massachusetts, were measured for 2 years by the eddy flux method. Water use by the red oak forest reached 4 mm day(-1), compared to a maximum of 2 mm day(-1) by the eastern hemlock forest. Maximal carbon (C) uptake rate was also higher in the red oak forest than in the eastern hemlock forest (about 25 versus 15 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Sap flux measurements indicated that transpiration of red oak, and also of black birch (Betula lenta L.), which frequently replaces eastern hemlock killed by hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Annand.), were almost twice that of eastern hemlock. Despite the difference between species in maximum summertime C assimilation rate, annual C storage of the eastern hemlock forest almost equaled that of the red oak forest because of net C uptake by eastern hemlock during unusually warm fall and spring weather, and a near-zero C balance during the winter. Thus, the effect on C storage of replacing eastern hemlock forest with a forest dominated by deciduous species is unclear. Carbon storage by eastern hemlock forests during fall, winter and spring is likely to increase in the event of climate warming, although this may be offset by C loss during hotter summers. Our results indicate that, although forest water use will decrease immediately following eastern hemlock mortality due to the hemlock woolly adelgid, the replacement of eastern hemlock by deciduous species such as red oak will likely increase summertime water use over current rates in areas where hemlock is a major forest species. PMID:18244947

  6. The impact of seed predation and browsing on natural sessile oak regeneration under different light conditions in an over-aged coppice stand

    Kamler J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt. Liebl. is one of the most important commercial species cultivated at low altitudes in the Czech Republic, and over-aged coppices are a significant part of oak stands in the region. In order to secure a high-valuable timber production (e.g., through conversion of such stands into coppices-with-standards, knowledge of the potential and limits of generative regeneration is essential. This study was conducted in three oak-dominated over-aged coppice stands in different stages of conversion into coppices-with-standards and characterized by different basal area (BA, from 9.3 to 14.1 m2 ha-1 and relative diffuse radiation (ISF, from 12.1 to 35.5%. The study stands were compared with respect to seed predation following acorn fall and oak regeneration parameters. At the time of their fall the acorns represented a sought-after source of food for large mammals (particularly wild boar. At the end of acorn fall, 13-67% acorns were lost due to animal predation. A control evaluation conducted the following spring revealed a decrease of 92-97% in fallen acorns. Despite the major animal impact, a high reserve of acorns and saplings remained in the stands (4 600-29 000 acorns and 66 000-310 000 saplings per ha. With increasing light intensity the oak regeneration density decreased, while the height and age variability of oak regeneration increased. Although saplings were capable of surviving several years under unfavorable light conditions (even below 12% ISF, they require a minimum of 20% ISF (i.e., BA < 16 m2 ha-1 to achieve sustainable height increment. Based on our results, for conversion of such stands into coppices-with-standards we recommend a maximum of 200 reserved trees (BA = 16 m2 ha-1 to achieve successful height growth of the understorey.

  7. Effects of losing keystone oak species on soil microbial community composition in temperate forests in the USA

    Djukic, Ika; McGuire, Krista; Schuster, Wiliam; Griffin, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    Plant communities are closely associated with distinct soil microbial communities by controlling available soil carbon, temperature and water content. In the Eastern North America forests, genus Quercus (Oak) represents one of the foundation tree taxa. However, the future of oak forests is uncertain as forests are impacted by events such as insect herbivory, pathogen introduction and human disturbance; hence, the feedback to nutrients cycling will in part be dependent on changes in the associated microbial communities which in turn may have dramatically impact on the ecosystem services. The main objective of this study was to mimic pathogen-induced cascade mortality of the key taxa and subsequently to evaluate its specific impact on the soil microbial community composition. To this end, a tree-girdling experiment was performed (summer 2008) by excluding oak trees (50% (O50) and all (O)) and non-oak trees (N), respectively. Already one year after the tree-girdling, all soil chemical properties have been affected by the treatment. Soil pH increased from 0.2 to 0.7 units and was coupled with the increase of base cations probably as a result of disturbed absorption. However, a reversed trend was noted for the C:N ratios indicating a limited carbon supply for the soil microorganisms. Principal component analysis (PCA) of phospholipids fatty acids (PLFA) patterns revealed that the microbial communities were compositionally distinct among different treatments and their position along the slope, which in turn indicates an important indirect effect of soil chemistry on the microbial composition. The simulated decrease in carbon supply resulted in a considerable reduction of the relative fungal abundance in particular at the all oak girdled plots (by 6% at O50 and 27% at all oak girdled plots). The relative bacterial abundance remains unchanged; however, an increase in cyclopropy fatty acids, an indicator of the stress conditions, could be noted for all treated plots. The

  8. Mammals of the Oak forest

    The high rate of deforestation over the Andean forests has generated a large proportion of fragmented landscapes in the country. The distribution of oak groves in the country was determined based on ecosystem maps. Charala and Encino oak groves patches are the largest ones found at the east Andes and like others, due to the unfair use of these resources, have suffered a fragmentation process. Fifty-five species of mammals included in 10 orders and 14 families were found in these forests. Chiroptera and Rodentia were the most representative groups. Anthropic processes had produced a 68.1% loss of the habitat and constitute the main threat for these forests. The sizes of the patches were evaluated for three mammal species categories. The patches' area are not favorable for large-size species, intermediately to favorable to medium-size species and are favorable for small-size species. It is suggested that patches' area effect over mammal species could relate to the decrease of species richness and of each fragment area. There are good connections between patches (only five isolated), allowing the presence of a greater species diversity. There is also a bleak plateau zone between connected patches increasing their connectivity and offering different habitats and resources for some mammal species

  9. Tree age-related effects on seasonal dynamics of carbon reserves in Quercus petraea: an in situ experimental approach

    Gilson, Angélique; Bazot, Stéphane; Barthes, Laure; Delpierre, Nicolas; Fresneau, Chantal; Audebert, Louise; Dufrêne, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Forest productivity plays an important role in wood production and forest carbon storage capacity. It is well known that forest productivity declines with tree age (Genet et al., 2009). This decline could result from a carbon assimilation decrease and/or a modification of carbon allocation (Ryan et al., 2006 ; Genet, 2009). Relationships between tree age and leaf surface (Bond-Lamberty et al., 2002 ; Louis et al., 2012), light interception (Niinemets et al., 2005) or hydraulic constraint (Bond, 2000 ; Zaehle, 2006) have been widely studied. Yet, studies of relationships between tree age and carbon storage/remobilization processes are scarce in deciduous trees. Therefore in situ experiments appear necessary to have a better understanding of the carbon functioning of deciduous forest ecosystems. Our objective was to compare the seasonal carbon dynamics of different age oak trees classes. We studied three age categories (8, 20, 100 years) of Quercus petraea in the Barbeau national forest (France) over one leafy season. Leaves, 2010 and 2011 twigs, stem, fine and coarse roots were sampled at different key phenological stages (before budburst, at budburst, maximum leaf area index, maximum leaf mass area, summer, yellowing and winter) for determination of starch concentrations. We observed only differences between classes for 2010 twigs and fine roots. After carbon reserves remobilization during budburst, starch concentrations of 2010 twigs for 8 and 20 years old trees don't increase before the end of wood growth (i.e. end of july). Starch concentrations increase occurs just after budburst for the oldest tree category. Starch concentrations in fine roots in the two oldest trees categories are stable throughout the year. On the contrary, juvenile trees present an enhanced starch concentration in autumn. Nevertheless, for oldest tree coarse roots starch concentration increase from summer to yellowing. These first results highlight that starch storage is different between

  10. The Blue Emu

    Descalzi, Doug; Gillett, John; Gordon, Carlton; Keener, ED; Novak, Ken; Puente, Laura

    1993-01-01

    The primary goal in designing the Blue Emu was to provide an airline with a cost efficient and profitable means of transporting passengers between the major cities in Aeroworld. The design attacks the market where a demand for inexpensive transportation exists and for this reason the Blue Emu is an attractive investment for any airline. In order to provide a profitable aircraft, special attention was paid to cost and economics. For example, in manufacturing, simplicity was stressed in structural design to reduce construction time and cost. Aerodynamic design employed a tapered wing which reduced the induced drag coefficient while also reducing the weight of the wing. Even the propulsion system was selected with cost effectiveness in mind, yet also to maintain the marketability of the aircraft. Thus, in every aspect of the design, consideration was given to economics and marketability of the final product.

  11. Point processes statistics of stable isotopes: analysing water uptake patterns in a mixed stand of Aleppo pine and Holm oak

    Carles Comas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Understanding inter- and intra-specific competition for water is crucial in drought-prone environments. However, little is known about the spatial interdependencies for water uptake among individuals in mixed stands. The aim of this work was to compare water uptake patterns during a drought episode in two common Mediterranean tree species, Quercus ilex L. and Pinus halepensis Mill., using the isotope composition of xylem water (δ18O, δ2H as hydrological marker. Area of study: The study was performed in a mixed stand, sampling a total of 33 oaks and 78 pines (plot area= 888 m2. We tested the hypothesis that both species uptake water differentially along the soil profile, thus showing different levels of tree-to-tree interdependency, depending on whether neighbouring trees belong to one species or the other. Material and Methods: We used pair-correlation functions to study intra-specific point-tree configurations and the bivariate pair correlation function to analyse the inter-specific spatial configuration. Moreover, the isotopic composition of xylem water was analysed as a mark point pattern. Main results: Values for Q. ilex (δ18O = –5.3 ± 0.2‰, δ2H = –54.3 ± 0.7‰ were significantly lower than for P. halepensis (δ18O = –1.2 ± 0.2‰, δ2H = –25.1 ± 0.8‰, pointing to a greater contribution of deeper soil layers for water uptake by Q. ilex. Research highlights: Point-process analyses revealed spatial intra-specific dependencies among neighbouring pines, showing neither oak-oak nor oak-pine interactions. This supports niche segregation for water uptake between the two species.

  12. Synthesizing a Blue Ocean

    Vester, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this Master thesis was to determine how electronic musical instrument companies could utilize innovation strategies to add value to their products and create new business markets beyond their core. The theoretical framework was established by outlining competitive strategies suitable for adoption by electronic musical instrument companies. The Blue Ocean Strategy was compared to traditional competitive strategies such as Porter’s Five Forces, and subsequently chosen because of ...

  13. Emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Emergency preparedness for industry was commonly believed to be an essential responsibility on the part of management. Therefore, this study was conducted to research and accumulate information and data on emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to conduct a thorough evaluation of emergency preparedness knowledge among employees to determine if they were properly informed or if they needed more training. Also, this study was conducted to provide insight to management as to what their responsibility was concerning this training. To assess employee emergency preparedness knowledge, a questionnaire was developed and administered to 100 employees at ORNL. The data was analyzed using frequencies and percentages of response and was displayed through the use of graphs within the report. 22 refs., 22 figs

  14. NEW AND PERSPECTIVE SAMPLE OF QUERCUS ROBUR L. FOR GREEN BUILDING AND FORESTATION IN THE ROSTOV REGION

    Kozlovsky B. L.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Green building, forestry, agriculture of the Rostov region is in desperate need of resistant and long-lived samples of deciduous trees of the first grade. The main object of the search of promising forms of deciduous trees were artificial plantations of Quercus robur in the Botanical Garden of SFU. The research identified several of samples of Quercus robur, which are of economic interest. Based on ecological and biological properties and economic qualities, the most promising on was a sample of Quercus robur var. tardiflora, planted in 1888. This sample is less receptive to pests and diseases. It also has a high winter hardiness and drought resistance and significantly superior to similar samples of Quercus robur along longevity and has a high decorative effect. Dedicated sample of Quercus robur var. tardiflora, and his generation from seed is very different from other samples of the population by time of phenological phases. The all main henological phases of this sample occured later by on 10-15 days. The sample belongs to the group of plants of late phenological dates start and end of the growing season. The phenology of dedicated samples contributes to their high steadiness into regional climate. It propagates by sowing freshly harvested seeds. Phenological features of the selected sample might be inherited in the seminal generations

  15. Litter Species Composition and Topographic Effects on Fuels and Modeled Fire Behavior in an Oak-Hickory Forest in the Eastern USA.

    Dickinson, Matthew B; Hutchinson, Todd F; Dietenberger, Mark; Matt, Frederick; Peters, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Mesophytic species (esp. Acer rubrum) are increasingly replacing oaks (Quercus spp.) in fire-suppressed, deciduous oak-hickory forests of the eastern US. A pivotal hypothesis is that fuel beds derived from mesophytic litter are less likely than beds derived from oak litter to carry a fire and, if they do, are more likely to burn at lower intensities. Species effects, however, are confounded by topographic gradients that affect overstory composition and fuel bed decomposition. To examine the separate and combined effects of litter species composition and topography on surface fuel beds, we conducted a common garden experiment in oak-hickory forests of the Ohio Hills. Each common garden included beds composed of mostly oak and mostly maple litter, representative of oak- and maple-dominated stands, respectively, and a mixture of the two. Beds were replenished each fall for four years. Common gardens (N = 16) were established at four topographic positions (ridges, benches on south- and northeast-facing slopes, and stream terraces) at each of four sites. Litter source and topographic position had largely independent effects on fuel beds and modeled fire dynamics after four years of development. Loading (kg m-2) of the upper litter layer (L), the layer that primarily supports flaming spread, was least in more mesic landscape positions and for maple beds, implying greater decomposition rates for those situations. Bulk density in the L layer (kg m-3) was least for oak beds which, along with higher loading, would promote fire spread and fireline intensity. Loading and bulk density of the combined fermentation and humic (FH) layers were least on stream terrace positions but were not related to species. Litter- and FH-layer moistures during a 5-day dry-down period after a rain event were affected by time and topographic effects while litter source effects were not evident. Characteristics of flaming combustion determined with a cone calorimeter pointed to greater fireline

  16. 都江堰地区灌丛内袍栎橡子的捕食和搬运%Acorn predation and removal of Quercus serrata in a shrubland in Dujiangyan Region,China

    肖治术; 张知彬; 王玉山; 程瑾瑞

    2004-01-01

    From Sep. 2000 to Dec. 2002, we used Quercus serrata, a dominant tree species, to measure acorn predation and removal by seed-eating insects, rodents and fungi over three years in a shrujland in a subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest in the Dujiangyan Region of Sichuan Province, China. Our results showed that: (1) rodent species abundance changed little among these three years, which may be related to small variation of acorn crops; (2) the proportion of insect-infested acorns ranged from 14.17 % -32.49 %, with a significant difference among these three years;(3) the main factors influencing acorn fates on the ground were being eaten in situ or removed by small rodents; (4)variation of insect-infestation of Quercus serrata acorns can affect rodent foraging activity. Differential consumption and removal of sound and insect-infested acorns by small rodents may play an important role in natural regeneration of some nut-bearing tree species, e. g. oak species [Acta Zoologica Sinica 50 (4): 535- 540, 2004].%从2000年9月至2002年12月,以四川都江堰常绿阔叶林灌丛内的优势种--枹栎(Quercus serrata)为研究对象,研究了昆虫、鼠类和真菌对枹栎橡子的捕食和搬运.结果表明:(1)取食橡子的鼠类的群落结构和数量在年间差异较小,这可能与三年间袍栎橡子的产量相对稳定有关;(2)袍栎橡子的虫蛀率在三年间存在显著性差异,范围在14.17%-32.49%之间;(3)鼠类的就地取食和搬运是影响种子库内橡子命运的主要因素;(4)橡子虫蛀率的变化影响鼠类的觅食活动.鼠类对饱满橡子和虫蛀橡子的选择性取食和搬运可能影响许多坚果植物(栎树)的自然更新过程[动物学报50(4):535-540,2004].

  17. Our Blue Gene Experience

    Jakl, Ondřej; Starý, Jiří

    Ostrava : Ústav geoniky AV ČR, 2009 - (Blaheta, R.; Starý, J.), s. 50-54 ISBN 978-80-86407-60-9. [SNA '09 - Seminar on numerical analysis: modelling and simulation of challenging engineering problems. Ostrava (CZ), 02.02.2009-06.02.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA105/09/1830 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : IBM Blue Gene/P * finite element solver * parallel scalability Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  18. Estruturas fundamentais no blues

    Silva, Rafael Palmeira da

    2012-01-01

    Resumo: Esta pesquisa tem como objeto de estudo a aplicação e adaptação da teoria de Schenker como ferramenta analítica aplicada ao jazz, tendo em vista a possibilidade de encontrar estruturas fundamentais distintas na música popular. Tendo como base as análises feitas por Larson (1998; 2009), Forte (2011) e Stock (1993) a pesquisa abordará, em um primeiro momento, as origens do jazz (blues e ragtime) como parte essencial para sua abordagem analítica, através da ótica etno-schenkeriana propos...

  19. Comparison between ethanol and hexane for oil extraction from Quercus suber L. fruits

    Abreu, José M.F.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to (i evaluate the feasibility of replacing n-hexane with ethanol for the extraction of oil from Quercus suber fruits and (ii optimize, at lab scale, sample preparation and extraction time for both solvents used (n-hexane vs. anhydrous ethanol. For both solvents, the effect of the conditioning process on extraction yield was evaluated. Therefore, a full factorial design was used as a function of four variables: dehulling (with vs. without husks, and thermal treatment of the crushed material (40ºC vs. 75ºC, at different times (5 min vs. 120 min and pressures (10 kPa vs. 100 kPa. Higher oil yields were obtained with n-hexane when dehulled fruits were conditioned under atmospheric pressure. Better yields were obtained with n-hexane, when dehulled material was treated at 75ºC for 90 min. Ethanol was not adequate for oil extraction from Quercus fruits, since other materials rather than oil were also extracted.El objetivo de este estudio fue (i evaluar la posibilidad de reemplazar el n-hexano por el etanol para la extracción del aceite de los frutos de Quercus suber y (ii optimizar, a escala de laboratorio, la preparación de la muestra y el tiempo de extracción para ambos solventes (n-hexano vs. etanol anhidro. Para ambos solventes, se ha evaluado el efecto del proceso de acondicionamiento en el rendimiento de la extracción. Para ello, se ha empleado un diseño factorial completo como función de cuatro variables: descascarillado (con vs sin cascarilla, y tratamiento térmico del material triturado (40ºC vs. 75ºC, a diferentes tiempos (5 min vs. 120 min y presiones (10 kPa vs. 100 kPa. Los rendimientos más elevados de extracción de aceite se obtuvieron con n-hexano cuando los frutos descascarillados se acondicionaron a presión atmosférica. Cuando el material descascarillado fue tratado a 75ºC por 90 min, se obtuvieron mejores rendimientos con n-hexano. El etanol demostró no ser adecuado para la

  20. Larvicidal activity of extracts from Quercus lusitania var. infectoria galls (Oliv.).

    Redwane, A; Lazrek, H B; Bouallam, S; Markouk, M; Amarouch, H; Jana, M

    2002-02-01

    The present study indicates the efficacy of extracts and fractions of Quercus lusitania var. infectoria galls (Oliv.) as larvicidal agents and their possible use in biological control of Culex pipiens, the urban nuisance mosquito. Extracts and fractions were tested against second and fourth instar larvae. The LC(50) values of gallotannins were 335 and 373 ppm, respectively for the 2nd and 4th instar period. The most interesting value of LC(50) (24 h) is obtained with the fraction F(2) (60 ppm). PMID:11801390

  1. alpha-Glycosidase inhibitory activity of hexagalloylglucose from the galls of Quercus infectoria.

    Hwang, J K; Kong, T W; Baek, N I; Pyun, Y R

    2000-04-01

    Hexagalloylglucose (3-O-digalloyl-1,2,4,6-tetra-O-galloyl-beta-D- glucose), which was isolated from the methanol extract of the galls of Quercus infectoria, significantly inhibited alpha-glycosidases such as sucrase, maltase and isomaltase. Its inhibitory activity was comparable to acarbose being used as a hypoglycemic agent, while the inhibitory activity on alpha-amylase was approximately 10 times lower than that of acarbose. The results indicate that, when compared to acarbose, hexagalloylglucose might reduce the side effects by reducing inhibition of alpha-amylase. PMID:10821056

  2. ANTI-DIABETIC ACTIVITY OF ROOTS OF QUERCUS INFECTORIA OLIVIER IN ALLOXAN INDUCED DIABETIC RATS

    R. Saini * and S.M. Patil

    2012-01-01

    The methanolic extract of roots of Quercus infectoria Olivier at a dose of 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg body weight respectively was tested for anti-diabetic activity in Alloxan-induced hyperglycaemic rats. The blood glucose levels were measured at 0, 2h, 4h and 6h after the treatment. The methanolic extract reduced the blood glucose Alloxan- induced diabetic rats from 285.52 to 206.57mg/dl, 6h after oral administration of extract (P

  3. Crecimiento de plántulas y árboles de seis especies de Quercus

    Villar, R.; B. Lopez Iglesias; Ruiz Benito, P.; E. G. de la Riva; Zavala, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Los objetivos principales de este trabajo son: a) describir algunas características importantes relativas a los rasgos funcionales en plántulas de las especies del género Quercus, b) determinar cómo varía la proporción de hoja, tallo y raíz en adultos, y c) estimar las tasas de crecimiento relativo(RGR) de estas especies para plántulas e individuos adultos. Para ello, usamos los datos de experimentos realizados en plántulas bajo condiciones controladas, del Inventario Forestal Nacional (IFN2 ...

  4. Drying of the aqueous extract of acorn Quercus robur in a spout-fluid bed

    Rakić S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the chemical investigations of variously treated acorn samples are presented in this paper with the aim of obtaining data on the amount of nutritious components and biologically active substances. The Quercus robur acorn, which belongs to the Fagaceae family, was investigated in a raw, thermally treated form and as an extract that was subsequently dried in a dryer with a fluidized bed. The obtained results regarding the content of tannin, nitrogen containing compounds, macro- and microelements indicate that acorn maintains its functional characteristics after the investigated treatments.

  5. The effect of nitrogen additions on oak foliage and herbivore communities at sites with high and low atmospheric pollution

    To evaluate plant and herbivore responses to nitrogen we conducted a fertilization study at a low and high pollution site in the mixed conifer forests surrounding Los Angeles, California. Contrary to expectations, discriminant function analysis of oak herbivore communities showed significant response to N fertilization when atmospheric deposition was high, but not when atmospheric deposition was low. We hypothesize that longer-term fertilization treatments are needed at the low pollution site before foliar N nutrition increases sufficiently to affect herbivore communities. At the high pollution site, fertilization was also associated with increased catkin production and higher densities of a byturid beetle that feeds on the catkins of oak. Leaf nitrogen and nitrate were significantly higher at the high pollution site compared to the low pollution site. Foliar nitrate concentrations were positively correlated with abundance of sucking insects, leafrollers and plutellids in all three years of the study. - Nitrogen additions at sites impacted by air pollution were associated with altered foliar herbivore communities and increased densities of a catkin-feeding beetle on Quercus kellogii

  6. Defense pattern of Chinese cork oak across latitudinal gradients: influences of ontogeny, herbivory, climate and soil nutrients.

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gao, Wen-Qiang; Deng, Yun-Peng; Ni, Yan-Yan; Xiao, Yi-Hua; Kang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Qi; Lei, Jing-Pin; Jiang, Ze-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of latitudinal patterns in plant defense and herbivory is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that govern ecosystem functioning and for predicting their responses to climate change. Using a widely distributed species in East Asia, Quercus variabilis, we aim to reveal defense patterns of trees with respect to ontogeny along latitudinal gradients. Six leaf chemical (total phenolics and total condensed tannin concentrations) and physical (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and dry mass concentration) defensive traits as well as leaf herbivory (% leaf area loss) were investigated in natural Chinese cork oak (Q. variabilis) forests across two ontogenetic stages (juvenile and mature trees) along a ~14°-latitudinal gradient. Our results showed that juveniles had higher herbivory values and a higher concentration of leaf chemical defense substances compared with mature trees across the latitudinal gradient. In addition, chemical defense and herbivory in both ontogenetic stages decreased with increasing latitude, which supports the latitudinal herbivory-defense hypothesis and optimal defense theory. The identified trade-offs between chemical and physical defense were primarily determined by environmental variation associated with the latitudinal gradient, with the climatic factors (annual precipitation, minimum temperature of the coldest month) largely contributing to the latitudinal defense pattern in both juvenile and mature oak trees. PMID:27252112

  7. Defense pattern of Chinese cork oak across latitudinal gradients: influences of ontogeny, herbivory, climate and soil nutrients

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gao, Wen-Qiang; Deng, Yun-Peng; Ni, Yan-Yan; Xiao, Yi-Hua; Kang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Qi; Lei, Jing-Pin; Jiang, Ze-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of latitudinal patterns in plant defense and herbivory is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that govern ecosystem functioning and for predicting their responses to climate change. Using a widely distributed species in East Asia, Quercus variabilis, we aim to reveal defense patterns of trees with respect to ontogeny along latitudinal gradients. Six leaf chemical (total phenolics and total condensed tannin concentrations) and physical (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and dry mass concentration) defensive traits as well as leaf herbivory (% leaf area loss) were investigated in natural Chinese cork oak (Q. variabilis) forests across two ontogenetic stages (juvenile and mature trees) along a ~14°-latitudinal gradient. Our results showed that juveniles had higher herbivory values and a higher concentration of leaf chemical defense substances compared with mature trees across the latitudinal gradient. In addition, chemical defense and herbivory in both ontogenetic stages decreased with increasing latitude, which supports the latitudinal herbivory-defense hypothesis and optimal defense theory. The identified trade-offs between chemical and physical defense were primarily determined by environmental variation associated with the latitudinal gradient, with the climatic factors (annual precipitation, minimum temperature of the coldest month) largely contributing to the latitudinal defense pattern in both juvenile and mature oak trees. PMID:27252112

  8. California black oak response to nitrogen amendment at a high O{sub 3}, nitrogen-saturated site

    Grulke, N.E. [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)]. E-mail: ngrulke@fs.fed.us; Dobrowolski, W. [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States); Mingus, P. [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States); Fenn, M.E. [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 4955 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)

    2005-10-15

    In a nitrogen (N) saturated forest downwind from Los Angeles, California, the cumulative response to long-term background-N and N-amendment on black oak (Quercus kelloggii) was described in a below-average and average precipitation year. Monthly measurements of leaf and branch growth, gas exchange, and canopy health attributes were conducted. The effects of both pollutant exposure and drought stress were complex due to whole tree and leaf level responses, and shade versus full sun leaf responses. N-amended trees had lower late summer carbon (C) gain and greater foliar chlorosis in the drought year. Leaf water use efficiency was lower in N-amended trees in midsummer of the average precipitation year, and there was evidence of poor stomatal control in full sun. In shade, N-amendment enhanced stomatal control. Small differences in instantaneous C uptake in full sun, lower foliar respiration, and greater C gain in low light contributed to the greater aboveground growth observed. - Despite ecosystem-level N saturation, lower foliar respiration and significant photosynthetic gains under low light conditions resulted in greater wood production in black oak.

  9. Morphological and ultrastructural changes in the cell structure of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 following treatment with Quercus infectoria nut galls.

    Suwalak, Sakol; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P

    2009-10-01

    Some information is available on the oak (Quercus infectoria) nut gall as an effective medicinal plant against Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7. However, its antibacterial mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. In this study, some antibacterial actions against STEC O157:H7 were investigated by observing cell viability as well as morphological and ultrastructural changes. An ethanolic extract of Q. infectoria demonstrated inhibitory and bactericidal effects on all of the strains tested with minimal inhibition concentrations (MICs) at 0.78-1.56 mg ml(-1) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) at 1.56-3.12 mg ml(-1). Cell numbers treated with 4MIC of the extract decreased at least two log-fold within 4 h and were completely killed within 12 h. Scanning electron microscopy illustrated a complete loss of surface appendages and pronounced morphological changes at MIC and 2MIC. The whole cell collapsed at 4MIC. Ultrastructural changes from corresponding transmission electron micrographs further verified that damages in the treated cells increased with the increase in the extract concentrations. At MIC (0.78 mg ml(-1)), there was some evidence that the cytoplasmic membranes of the treated E. coli were bulging and/or ruptured, and the cells appeared to be discharging intracellular materials. At 2MIC, the outer membrane of the treated E. coli which was attached to the cell wall became separated from the wall. Disruption in the outer wall and cytoplasmic membranes, especially at the polar regions of the cells occurred and some vacuolization appeared. At 4MIC, the damage to E. coli cells was extensive, and there was loss of their cellular integrity. PMID:19451663

  10. Blue emitting undecaplatinum clusters

    Chakraborty, Indranath; Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Bhat, Shridevi; Pradeep, T.

    2014-07-01

    A blue luminescent 11-atom platinum cluster showing step-like optical features and the absence of plasmon absorption was synthesized. The cluster was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) suggest a composition, Pt11(BBS)8, which was confirmed by a range of other experimental tools. The cluster is highly stable and compatible with many organic solvents.A blue luminescent 11-atom platinum cluster showing step-like optical features and the absence of plasmon absorption was synthesized. The cluster was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) suggest a composition, Pt11(BBS)8, which was confirmed by a range of other experimental tools. The cluster is highly stable and compatible with many organic solvents. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experimental procedures, instrumentation, chromatogram of the crude cluster; SEM/EDAX, DLS, PXRD, TEM, FT-IR, and XPS of the isolated Pt11 cluster; UV/Vis, MALDI MS and SEM/EDAX of isolated 2 and 3; and 195Pt NMR of the K2PtCl6 standard. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02778g

  11. Blue ocean leadership.

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2014-05-01

    Ten years ago, two INSEAD professors broke ground by introducing "blue ocean strategy," a new model for discovering uncontested markets that are ripe for growth. In this article, they apply their concepts and tools to what is perhaps the greatest challenge of leadership: closing the gulf between the potential and the realized talent and energy of employees. Research indicates that this gulf is vast: According to Gallup, 70% of workers are disengaged from their jobs. If companies could find a way to convert them into engaged employees, the results could be transformative. The trouble is, managers lack a clear understanding of what changes they could make to bring out the best in everyone. Here, Kim and Mauborgne offer a solution to that problem: a systematic approach to uncovering, at each level of the organization, which leadership acts and activities will inspire employees to give their all, and a process for getting managers throughout the company to start doing them. Blue ocean leadership works because the managers' "customers"-that is, the people managers oversee and report to-are involved in identifying what's effective and what isn't. Moreover, the approach doesn't require leaders to alter who they are, just to undertake a different set of tasks. And that kind of change is much easier to implement and track than changes to values and mind-sets. PMID:24956870

  12. Blue tits are ultraviolet tits

    Hunt, S; Bennett, A.T.D.; Cuthill, I. C.; Griffiths, R.

    1998-01-01

    The blue tit (Parus caeruleus) has been classified as sexually monochromatic. This classification is based on human colour perception yet, unlike humans, most birds have four spectrally distinct classes of cone and are visually sensitive to wavelengths in the near-ultraviolet (300 to 400 nm). Reflectance spectrophotometry reveals that blue tit plumage shows considerable reflection of UV light. For example, the blue crest shows peak reflectance at wavelengths around 352 nm. Furthermore, the bl...

  13. Postpartum Blues and Postpartum Depression

    Erdem Ö et al.

    2009-01-01

    Postpartum blues which is seen during the postpartum period is a transient psychological state. Most of the mothers experience maternity blues in postpartum period. It remains usually unrecognized by the others. Some sensitive families can misattribute these feelings as depression. In this article, we tried to review the characteristics of maternity blues and its differences from depression. We defined depression and presented the incidence and diagnostic criteria, of major depression as well...

  14. Spatial Distribution of Oak Mistletoe as It Relates to Habits of Oak Woodland Frugivores

    Wilson, Ethan A.; Sullivan, Patrick J.; Dickinson, Janis L

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the underlying spatial distribution of oak mistletoe, Phoradendron villosum, a hemi-parasitic plant that provides a continuous supply of berries for frugivorous birds overwintering the oak savanna habitat of California's outer coast range. As the winter community of birds consuming oak mistletoe varies from group-living territorial species to birds that roam in flocks, we asked if mistletoe volume was spatially autocorrelated at the scale of persistent territories or whet...

  15. The enigma of the establishment of Quercus ithaburensis park forest in northern Israel: co-evolution of wild boar and men?

    Kaplan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Yahudia Forest Nature Reserve covers an area of 6620 ha, and is situated northeast of the Sea of Galilee. The vegetation is a park forest of Quercus ithaburensis, over rich herbaceous vegetation. This woodland is a remnant of a vast park forest that covered the Golan up to the middle of the 19th Century. Most of the oaks are girded by cairns, which are tumuli from the Calcolithic Era (4000-3150 B.C., or dolmens from the Middle Bronze (2200-2000 B.C.. The following factors, affecting the germination and establishment of Q. ithaburensis, were assessed: Acorns: Productivity and consumption (by wild boar, Sus scrofa, and rodents. Habitat: Competition with herbaceous vegetation, lack of water and microclimate. Management: Fire and grazing by cattle. A high yield of acorns per tree was found. Even though 70% of acorns were eaten by wild boar, cows and rodents, many were left to germinate. Acorns buried by wild boar, and others, which have fallen behind the cairn stones, are unreachable. Rodents eat acorns and store many more in the cairns. Some of these germinate, even though partly eaten. Wild boar consumes acorns, but also buries them, providing a better chance of germination. Competition with herbaceous vegetation for water is dominant. Thus, water added in May led to a significantly higher establishment of seedlings. Irrigation, during the late spring period, increased survival from 35.5% to 61.5%. Grazing by cattle and wild boar contributes positively to the establishment of seedlings, mainly through fire prevention. The effect of fire on seedling survival was important. Only 23.7% of the seedlings not affected by fire desiccated in their first summer, whereas the proportion of those affected by fire was three times higher (69.3%. Ecological niche: seedlings growing in cairns had a better chance of survival than those growing in open places. The cairns play a decisive role in the establishment of the oaks by protecting them from fire, from

  16. Ectomycorrhizal association of three Lactarius species with Carpinus and Quercus trees in a Mexican montane cloud forest.

    Lamus, Valentina; Montoya, Leticia; Aguilar, Carlos J; Bandala, Victor M; Ramos, David

    2012-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi are being monitored in the Santuario del Bosque de Niebla in the central region of Veracruz (eastern Mexico). Based on the comparison of DNA sequences (ITS rDNA) of spatiotemporally co-occurring basidiomes and EM root tips, we discovered the EM symbiosis of Lactarius indigo, L. areolatus and L. strigosipes with Carpinus caroliniana, Quercus xalapensis and Quercus spp. The host of the EM tips was identified by comparison of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL). Descriptions coupled with photographs of ectomycorrhizas and basidiomes are presented. PMID:22675052

  17. Beyond CO2: Changes in Limiting Resources in California Oak Woodland

    Hasselquist, N.; Allen, M.

    2007-12-01

    As atmospheric CO2 continues to increase, other resources become even more limiting to plants and the wildland ecosystems they support. Traditionally, California Mediterranean-type ecosystems are limited by water, then N. In these ecosystems, CO2 enrichment causes a minor increase in production associated with enhanced water-use efficiency, but N rapidly becomes the limiting factor to both production and to soil organism dynamics. In urbanizing areas, such as southern California, strong gradients in NOx deposition are also created by vehicular pollution. We have studied the regulation of N uptake by mycorrhizae in Coast Live Oak (Quercus agrifolia) using information with natural abundance from the early 1900s, current plants and fungi, and modeling change. Contrasts were made from a high NOx deposition site, a low deposition site, and a site where NOx deposition is rapidly increasing. We examined natural abundance δ15 N of current and past plant material (leaves, wood), mycorrhizal and saprobic fungal fruiting bodies, and soil. We modeled relative N uptake, fractionation, and transport between soil, fungus and plant. Our data show complex interactions between increasing NOx deposition and increasing atmospheric CO2 on mycorrhizal-plant interactions. There is a significant shift in N sources and reduction upon mycorrhizae with NOx deposition. However, the elevated CO2 appears to also have created a greater N demand on the trees, increasing dependence on mycorrhizae and the ability of the fungi to acquire organic N and NH4. The individual fungal species differ among sites, but complex trends between fungal genera and trees can be seen. Projections of increasing atmospheric CO2 and regional NOx deposition suggest strong but complex gradients in fungal-oak interactions with decreasing dependence on mycorrhizae near urbanizing areas, mediated by the rate of increasing CO2 and inorganic NOx deposition, and paradoxically, increasing dependency on mycorrhizae and organic

  18. Powdery Mildew Decreases the Radial Growth of Oak Trees with Cumulative and Delayed Effects over Years

    Bert, Didier; Lasnier, Jean-Baptiste; Capdevielle, Xavier; Dugravot, Aline; Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Quercus robur and Q. petraea are major European forest tree species. They have been affected by powdery mildew caused by Erysiphe alphitoides for more than a century. This fungus is a biotrophic foliar pathogen that diverts photosynthetate from the plant for its own nutrition. We used a dendrochronological approach to investigate the effects of different levels of infection severity on the radial growth of young oak trees. Oak infection was monitored at individual tree level, at two sites in southwestern France, over a five-year period (2001–2005). Mean infection severity was almost 75% (infected leaf area) at the end of the 2001 growing season, at both sites, but only about 40% in 2002, and 8%, 5% and 2% in 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively. Infection levels varied considerably between trees and were positively related between 2001 and 2002. Increment cores were taken from each tree to assess annual ring widths and increases in basal area. Annual radial growth was standardised to take the effect of tree size into account. Annual standardised radial growth was significantly and negatively correlated with infection severity in the same year, for both 2001 and 2002, and at both sites. The decrease in growth reached 70–90% for highly infected trees. The earlywood width was poorly correlated with infection severity, but the proportion of latewood in tree rings was lower in highly infected trees (60%) than in less heavily infected trees (85%). Infection in 2001 and 2002 was found to have a cumulative effect on radial growth in these years, together with a delayed effect detectable in 2003. Thus, even non-lethal pathogens like powdery mildew can have a significant impact on tree functioning. This impact should be taken into account in growth and yield models, to improve predictions of forest net primary production. PMID:27177029

  19. Powdery Mildew Decreases the Radial Growth of Oak Trees with Cumulative and Delayed Effects over Years.

    Didier Bert

    Full Text Available Quercus robur and Q. petraea are major European forest tree species. They have been affected by powdery mildew caused by Erysiphe alphitoides for more than a century. This fungus is a biotrophic foliar pathogen that diverts photosynthetate from the plant for its own nutrition. We used a dendrochronological approach to investigate the effects of different levels of infection severity on the radial growth of young oak trees. Oak infection was monitored at individual tree level, at two sites in southwestern France, over a five-year period (2001-2005. Mean infection severity was almost 75% (infected leaf area at the end of the 2001 growing season, at both sites, but only about 40% in 2002, and 8%, 5% and 2% in 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively. Infection levels varied considerably between trees and were positively related between 2001 and 2002. Increment cores were taken from each tree to assess annual ring widths and increases in basal area. Annual radial growth was standardised to take the effect of tree size into account. Annual standardised radial growth was significantly and negatively correlated with infection severity in the same year, for both 2001 and 2002, and at both sites. The decrease in growth reached 70-90% for highly infected trees. The earlywood width was poorly correlated with infection severity, but the proportion of latewood in tree rings was lower in highly infected trees (60% than in less heavily infected trees (85%. Infection in 2001 and 2002 was found to have a cumulative effect on radial growth in these years, together with a delayed effect detectable in 2003. Thus, even non-lethal pathogens like powdery mildew can have a significant impact on tree functioning. This impact should be taken into account in growth and yield models, to improve predictions of forest net primary production.

  20. Characterization of Rosaceae tree species in a young Turkey oak-dominated coppice forest

    Giulietti V

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available First results of a trial carried out in an experimental area (“Comunità Montana Colline Metallifere”, Tuscany. After coppicing (winter 1998-1999, 77 Sorbus torminalis, Sorbus domestica and others valuable tree species were released on the whole of 220 standard trees per hectare. Aim of the present study was to estimate the opportunity to produce valuable timber from standards of sporadic tree species living into coppice forests. A research trial aimed at evaluating stem and crown quality as well as radial growth of standards after coppicing was carried out in an area 3 hectares wide. Wild service tree, Service tree and Turkey oak trees were analysed. Seven years after coppicing, the growth pattern of the different species, was also analysed by means of two structural transects. In the early phase after coppicing, root and stump suckers of both Sorbus species (especially Service tree are able to compete with Turkey oak sprouts as for height growth. In the following stage, the social regression of Sorbus trees is easily foreseeible because of the high competitive ability of Quercus. The good stem and crown shaping showed to be characters owned by a few Sorbus standards only. These were characterized as the largest-sized and early well-crown shaped trees. The same trees showed the highest dbh growth and developed few epicormic branches. A better targeted selection rule of valuable timber tree species to build up the standards’ stock is the recommended practice to improve forest biodiversity, as well as to create an economically important additional option to firewood, usually produced in these coppice forests.

  1. High temporal resolution tracing of xylem CO2 transport in oak trees

    Bloemen, Jasper; Ingrisch, Johannes; Bahn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Carbon (C) allocation defines the flows of C between plant organs and their storage pools and metabolic processes and is therefore considered as an important determinant of forest C budgets and their responses to climate change. In trees, assimilates derived from leaf photosynthesis are transported via the phloem to above- and belowground sink tissues, where partitioning between growth, storage, and respiration occurs. At the same time, root- and aboveground respired CO2 can be dissolved in water and transported in the xylem tissue, thereby representing a C flux of large magnitude whose role in C allocation yet is unresolved. In this study, we infused 13C labeled water into the stem base of five year old potted oak (Quercus rubra) trees as a surrogate for respired CO2 to investigate the role of respired CO2 transport in trees in C allocation. We used high-resolution laser-based measurements of the isotopic composition of stem and soil CO2 efflux combined with stem gas probes to monitor the transport of 13C label. The high enrichment of the gas probes in the stem at the bottom of the canopy showed that the label was transported upwards from the base of the tree toward the top. During its ascent, the 13C label was removed from the transpiration stream and lost to the atmosphere at stem level, as was observed using the stem CO2 efflux laser-based measurements. This study is the first to show results from tracing xylem CO2 transport in trees at high temporal resolution using a 13C labeling approach. Moreover, they extend results from previous studies on internal CO2 transport in species with high transpiration rates like poplar to species with lower transpiration rates like oak. Internal transport of CO2 indicates that the current concepts of the tree C allocation need to be revisited, as they show that current gas exchange approach to estimating above- and belowground autotrophic respiration is inadequate.

  2. Between-site differences in the scale of dispersal and gene flow in red oak.

    Emily V Moran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nut-bearing trees, including oaks (Quercus spp., are considered to be highly dispersal limited, leading to concerns about their ability to colonize new sites or migrate in response to climate change. However, estimating seed dispersal is challenging in species that are secondarily dispersed by animals, and differences in disperser abundance or behavior could lead to large spatio-temporal variation in dispersal ability. Parentage and dispersal analyses combining genetic and ecological data provide accurate estimates of current dispersal, while spatial genetic structure (SGS can shed light on past patterns of dispersal and establishment. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we estimate seed and pollen dispersal and parentage for two mixed-species red oak populations using a hierarchical bayesian approach. We compare these results to those of a genetic ML parentage model. We also test whether observed patterns of SGS in three size cohorts are consistent with known site history and current dispersal patterns. We find that, while pollen dispersal is extensive at both sites, the scale of seed dispersal differs substantially. Parentage results differ between models due to additional data included in bayesian model and differing genotyping error assumptions, but both indicate between-site dispersal differences. Patterns of SGS in large adults, small adults, and seedlings are consistent with known site history (farmed vs. selectively harvested, and with long-term differences in seed dispersal. This difference is consistent with predator/disperser satiation due to higher acorn production at the low-dispersal site. While this site-to-site variation results in substantial differences in asymptotic spread rates, dispersal for both sites is substantially lower than required to track latitudinal temperature shifts. CONCLUSIONS: Animal-dispersed trees can exhibit considerable spatial variation in seed dispersal, although patterns may

  3. Physiological responses of seedlings of two oak species to flooding stress

    2008-01-01

    The physiological responses of 2-year-old seedlings of Nuttall's oak (Quercus nuttalli) and Southern red oak (Q. falcata) with two treatments i.e., deep-drowning and shallow-drowning, were studied. Taxodium distichum was selected as a control. The survival rates of seedlings were calculated, the photosynthetic indices were detected by Licor-6400 photosynthetic system instrument,and the root activities of seedlings were tested by the method of triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). Results showed that: 1) By experiencing flooding for 76 d and recovering for 60 d after water was drained off, all seedlings survived under the shallow-drowning treatment. None of Q. falcata seedlings died in the deep-drowning treatment until the 49th day. The survival rate of Q. falcata in the deep-drowning treatment was 30%. 2) Within 61 d of waterlogging treatments, the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration rate (Tr) showed a tendency of declining, but intercellular concentration of CO2 (Ci) increased. With the pro-longation of flooding stress, the extents of variation for all indices under deep-drowning treatment were larger than those under the shallow-drowning treatment. The variation of Q. falcata in flooding stress was larger than that of Q. nuttallii. 3) The root vigor and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities were detected at the 61st day in flooding stress. Waterlogging obviously inhibited root ac-tivities. Shallow-drowning made root vigor of Q. nuttallii decreased by 11.7%, and for Q. falcata, by 51.88%. Shallow-drowning treatment had no remarkable effects on ADH activities of seedlings, but deep-&owning increased those of Q. nuttallii seedlings by 227.24%, and decreased those of Q. falcata seedlings by 59.22% in the meantime. We conclude that Q. nuttallii had a stronger wa-terlogging resistance than Q. falcata, but weaker than T. distichum.

  4. Comparison of Compression Strength of Red Oak and Pedunculate Oak Wood from Mine Dumps

    Brich, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the strength of wood in compression on samples of oak and red oak coming from the reclaimed landscape, the Most brown coal basins. There was also examined the dependence of the strength of density, which eventually significantly affected. These results were achieved by laboratory tests and calculations according to. The average value of red oak strength is 55,29 MPa and tensile oak 56,18 MPa. These values correspond to those in the literature. ...

  5. Oak Ridge TNS Program: system description manual

    This document provides a systems description of the Reference Design for The Next Step (TNS) evolved at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during FY 1978. The description is presented on the basis of 24 individual device and facility systems. Additional information on these systems, the Reference Design, and the FY 1978 Oak Ridge TNS activities can be found in the associated technical memoranda, ORNL/TM-6720 and ORNL/TM-6722--ORNL/TM-6733

  6. Native birds and alien insects: spatial density dependence in songbird predation of invading oak gallwasps.

    Karsten Schönrogge

    Full Text Available Revealing the interactions between alien species and native communities is central to understanding the ecological consequences of range expansion. Much has been learned through study of the communities developing around invading herbivorous insects. Much less, however, is known about the significance of such aliens for native vertebrate predators for which invaders may represent a novel food source. We quantified spatial patterns in native bird predation of invading gall-inducing Andricus wasps associated with introduced Turkey oak (Quercus cerris at eight sites across the UK. These gallwasps are available at high density before the emergence of caterpillars that are the principle spring food of native insectivorous birds. Native birds showed positive spatial density dependence in gall attack rates at two sites in southern England, foraging most extensively on trees with highest gall densities. In a subsequent study at one of these sites, positive spatial density dependence persisted through four of five sequential week-long periods of data collection. Both patterns imply that invading galls are a significant resource for at least some native bird populations. Density dependence was strongest in southern UK bird populations that have had longest exposure to the invading gallwasps. We hypothesise that this pattern results from the time taken for native bird populations to learn how to exploit this novel resource.

  7. Frost-acclimation of photosynthesis in overwintering Mediterranean holm oak, grown in Central Europe

    Ellen Pflug

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of global change, forestry in Central Europe has to expect and be prepared for an increase of hot and dry summers in the near future. In two model plantations of the Mediterranean holm oak (Quercus ilex L. in Central Europe (Rhine-Main basin we tested its potential as a future forestry tree for drought-threatened stands by studying its overwintering strategy under harsh winter conditions. During prolonged frost periods, chronic photoinhibition was developed, which lasted until the end of the frost period. Nearly all plants survived minimum temperatures of - 16 to -18°C and their photosynthetic apparatus recovered completely during late winter. A detailed study of the temperature dependence of chlorophyll (chl fluorescence parameters of the OJIP test revealed statistically significant correlations between minimum temperature and maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry (Fv/Fm, absorption rate/reaction centre (ABS/RC, dissipation rate/reaction centre (DI0/RC and electron transport rate/reaction centre (ET0/RC as well as with the deepoxidation state (DES of the xanthophyll pigments. The DES correlated with Fv/Fm, ABS/RC, DI0/RC and ET0/RC. It is concluded, that from the point of view of the winter hardiness of the photosynthetic apparatus, Q. ilex should be further investigated as a potential future forestry tree also for very dry and warm stands in Central Europe under the scenarios of climate change.

  8. Evolutionary and demographic history of the Californian scrub white oak species complex: an integrative approach.

    Ortego, Joaquín; Noguerales, Víctor; Gugger, Paul F; Sork, Victoria L

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the factors promoting species formation is a major task in evolutionary research. Here, we employ an integrative approach to study the evolutionary history of the Californian scrub white oak species complex (genus Quercus). To infer the relative importance of geographical isolation and ecological divergence in driving the speciation process, we (i) analysed inter- and intraspecific patterns of genetic differentiation and employed an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) framework to evaluate different plausible scenarios of species divergence. In a second step, we (ii) linked the inferred divergence pathways with current and past species distribution models (SDMs) and (iii) tested for niche differentiation and phylogenetic niche conservatism across taxa. ABC analyses showed that the most plausible scenario is the one considering the divergence of two main lineages followed by a more recent pulse of speciation. Genotypic data in conjunction with SDMs and niche differentiation analyses support that different factors (geography vs. environment) and modes of speciation (parapatry, allopatry and maybe sympatry) have played a role in the divergence process within this complex. We found no significant relationship between genetic differentiation and niche overlap, which probably reflects niche lability and/or that multiple factors, have contributed to speciation. Our study shows that different mechanisms can drive divergence even among closely related taxa representing early stages of species formation and exemplifies the importance of adopting integrative approaches to get a better understanding of the speciation process. PMID:26547661

  9. Revegetation of a uranium mine dump by using fertilizer treated sessile oaks.

    Lange, Christian A; Böcker, Lutz; Katzur, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The rehabilitation of contaminated sites and the establishment of suitable trees for revegetation purposes is often problematic due to the mostly suboptimal nutrient supply and the poor humus reservoir. For these reasons hydrogels (Stockosorb) and novel humus substitutes (NOVIHUM), serving as long lasting fertilizer (LLF), were recently tested successfully. At the beginning of this multiyear study, those LLFs were administered to the root zone of young sessile oaks (Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl.), growing in test trials on a uranium mine dump in Schlema (Germany). To quantify the effect of LLFs on plant vitality, chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements and JIP test analyses were used. The results revealed up to 49% higher average photosynthetic vitality (PI(ABS)) of the LLF treated plants compared to controls. Particularly in the first test year, the efficiency of photosynthetic electron transport was strongly increased. This stimulation of photosynthetic activity was supported by direct measurements showing up to 129% increased diameter growth of the treated plants after a four year experimental period. Furthermore an increase of the maximum water holding capacity of the dump soil was attained by using LLFs. Overall, the findings reported here represent a feasible, ecologically justifiable reforestation method with a low environmental hazard potential. PMID:21598765

  10. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    This two-volume report, the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1989, is the nineteenth in an annual series that began in 1971. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at the three major US Department of Energy (DOE) production and research installations in Oak Ridge on the immediate areas' and surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation and wildlife, and through these multiple and varied pathways, the resident human population. Information is presented for the environmental monitoring Quality Assurance (QA) Program, audits and reviews, waste management activities, land special environmental studies. Data are included for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Volume 1 presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions based on environmental monitoring at the three DOE installations and in the surrounding environs during calendar year (CY) 1989. Volume 1 is intended to be a ''stand-alone'' report about the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the reader who does not want an in-depth review of 1989 data. Volume 2 presents the detailed data from which these conclusions have been drawn and should be used in conjunction with Volume 1

  11. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R. (eds.)

    1990-10-01

    This two-volume report, the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1989, is the nineteenth in an annual series that began in 1971. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at the three major US Department of Energy (DOE) production and research installations in Oak Ridge on the immediate areas' and surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation and wildlife, and through these multiple and varied pathways, the resident human population. Information is presented for the environmental monitoring Quality Assurance (QA) Program, audits and reviews, waste management activities, land special environmental studies. Data are included for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Volume 1 presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions based on environmental monitoring at the three DOE installations and in the surrounding environs during calendar year (CY) 1989. Volume 1 is intended to be a stand-alone'' report about the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the reader who does not want an in-depth review of 1989 data. Volume 2 presents the detailed data from which these conclusions have been drawn and should be used in conjunction with Volume 1.

  12. Instant BlueStacks

    Judge, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. A fast-paced, example-based approach guide for learning BlueStacks.This book is for anyone with a Mac or PC who wants to run Android apps on their computer. Whether you want to play games that are freely available for Android but not your computer, or you want to try apps before you install them on a physical device or use it as a development tool, this book will show you how. No previous experience is needed as this is written in plain English

  13. Isolation of antibacterial compounds from Quercus dilatata L. through bioassay guided fractionation

    Jamil Maryam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Four medicinal plants (Chrozophora hierosolymitana Spreng, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum L., Ephedra gerardiana Wall. ex Stapf, and Quercus dilatata L. used by indigenous healers to treat various infectious diseases were selected for the present study. The major objective of the present study was isolation and characterization of antimicrobial components from the crude plant extracts using bioassay guided fractionation. Methods Seven methanolic extracts of the four plants were screened to identify any antimicrobial agents present in them. The active crude plant extract was fractionated first by solvent partitioning and then by HPLC. Characterization of the active fractions was done by using spectrophotometer. Results All the seven methanolic extracts showed low antifungal activity, however, when these extracts were tested for antibacterial activity, significant activity was exhibited by two extracts. The extract of aerial parts of Q. dilatata was most active and therefore, was selected for further analysis. Initially fractionation was done by solvent-solvent partitioning and out of six partitioned fractions, ethanol fraction was selected on the basis of results of antibacterial activity and phytochemical analysis. Further, fractionation was carried out by RP- HPLC and purified active subfractions were characterized by comparing their absorption spectra with that of the known natural products isolated from the plants of Quercus genus. Discussion and conclusion The results suggest that this is the first report of the isolated antibacterial compounds from this genus.

  14. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Galls of Quercus infectoria Olivier against Oral Pathogens.

    Basri, Dayang Fredalina; Tan, Liy Si; Shafiei, Zaleha; Zin, Noraziah Mohamad

    2012-01-01

    The galls of Quercus infectoria are commonly used in Malay traditional medicine to treat wound infections after childbirth. In India, they are employed traditionally as dental applications such as that in treatment of toothache and gingivitis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of galls of Quercus infectoria Olivier against oral bacteria which are known to cause dental caries and periodontitis. Methanol and acetone extracts were screened against two Gram-positive bacteria (Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419) and two Gram-negative bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586). The screening test of antibacterial activity was performed using agar-well diffusion method. Subsequently, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by using twofold serial microdilution method at a concentration ranging between 0.01 mg/mL and 5 mg/mL. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was obtained by subculturing microtiter wells which showed no changes in colour of the indicator after incubation. Both extracts showed inhibition zones which did not differ significantly (P infectoria galls exhibited similar antibacterial activity against oral pathogens. Thus, the galls may be considered as effective phytotherapeutic agents for the prevention of oral pathogens. PMID:22203875

  15. Sensitivity of leaf size and shape to climate within Acer rubrum and Quercus kelloggii.

    Royer, Dana L; McElwain, Jennifer C; Adams, Jonathan M; Wilf, Peter

    2008-01-01

    * Variation in the size and shape (physiognomy) of leaves has long been correlated to climate, and paleobotanists have used these correlations to reconstruct paleo-climate. Most studies focus on site-level means of largely nonoverlapping species sets. The sensitivity of leaf shape to climate within species is poorly known, which limits our general understanding of leaf-climate relationships and the value of intraspecific patterns for paleoclimate reconstructions. * The leaf physiognomy of two species whose native North American ranges span large climatic gradients (Acer rubrum and Quercus kelloggii) was quantified and correlated to mean annual temperature (MAT). Quercus kelloggii was sampled across a wide elevation range, but A. rubrum was sampled in strictly lowland areas. * Within A. rubrum, leaf shape correlates with MAT in a manner that is largely consistent with previous site-level studies; leaves from cold climates are toothier and more highly dissected. By contrast, Q. kelloggii is largely insensitive to MAT; instead, windy conditions with ample plant-available water may explain the preponderance of small teeth at high elevation sites, independent of MAT. * This study highlights the strong correspondence between leaf form and climate within some species, and demonstrates that intraspecific patterns may contribute useful information towards reconstructing paleoclimate. PMID:18507771

  16. Multiple glacial refugia for cool-temperate deciduous trees in northern East Asia: the Mongolian oak as a case study.

    Zeng, Yan-Fei; Wang, Wen-Ting; Liao, Wan-Jin; Wang, Hong-Fang; Zhang, Da-Yong

    2015-11-01

    In East Asia, temperate forests are predicted to have retracted southward to c. 30° N during the last glacial maximum (LGM) based on fossil pollen data, whereas phylogeographic studies have often suggested glacial in situ survival of cool-temperate deciduous trees in their modern northern ranges. Here we report a study of the genetic diversity and structure of 29 natural Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica) populations using 19 nuclear simple sequence repeat (nSSR) loci and four chloroplast DNA fragments. Bayesian clustering analysis with nSSRs revealed five groups, which were inferred by approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to have diverged in multiple refugia through multiple glacial-interglacial cycles. Analysis of chloroplast DNA variation revealed four lineages that were largely but incompletely geographically disjunct. Ecological niche modelling (ENMs) indicated a southward range shift of the oak's distribution at the LGM, although high suitability scores were also evident in the Changbai Mts. (Northeast China), the Korean Peninsula, areas surrounding the Bohai Sea, and along the coast of the Russian Far East. In addition, endemic chloroplast DNA haplotypes and nuclear lineages occurred in high-latitude northern areas where the ENM predicted no suitable habitat. The combined evidence from nuclear and chloroplast DNA, and the results of the ENM clearly demonstrate that multiple northern refugia, including cryptic ones, were maintained across the current distributional range of the Mongolian oak during the LGM or earlier glacial periods. Though spatially limited, postglacial expansions from these refugia have led to a pattern of decreased genetic diversity with increasing latitude. PMID:26439083

  17. Influence of canopy traits on spatio-temporal variability of throughfall in Mediterranean Downy oak and Scots pine stands

    Llorens, Pilar; Garcia-Estringana, Pablo; Latron, Jérôme; Molina, Antonio J.; Gallart, Francesc

    2014-05-01

    The spatio-temporal variability of throughfall is the result of the interaction of biotic factors, related to the canopy traits, and abiotic factors, linked to the meteorological conditions. This variability may lead to significant differences in the volume of water and solutes that reach the ground in each location, and beyond in the hydrological and biogeochemical dynamics of forest soils. Two forest stands in Mediterranean climatic conditions were studied to analyse the role of biotic and abiotic factors in the temporal and spatial redistribution of throughfall. The monitored stands are a Downy oak forest (Quercus pubescens) and a Scots pine forest (Pinus sylvestris), both located in the Vallcebre research catchments (NE Spain, 42º 12'N, 1º 49'E). The study plots are representative of Mediterranean mountain areas with spontaneous afforestation by Scots pine as a consequence of the abandonment of agricultural terraces, formerly covered by Downy oaks. The monitoring design of each plot consisted of a set of 20 automatic rain recorders and 40 automatic soil moisture probes located below the canopy. 100 hemispheric photographs of the canopy were used to place the instruments at representative locations (in terms of canopy cover) within the plot. Bulk rainfall, stemflow and meteorological conditions above the forest cover were also automatically recorded. Canopy cover as well as biometric characteristics of the plots were also regularly measured. The results indicate a temporal persistence of throughfall in both stands, as observed elsewhere. However, for the oak plot the seasonal evolution of canopy traits added additional variability, with higher variability in summer and different locations of wet and dry spots depending on the season. Furthermore, this work investigates the influence of canopy structure on the spatial variability of throughfall by analysing a large set of forest parameters, from main canopy traits to detailed leaves and wood characteristics

  18. An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    An aerial radiological survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding area in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was conducted during the period March 30 to April 14,1992. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment of the Oak Ridge Reservation for use in environmental management programs and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) along a series of parallel lines 250 feet (76 meters) apart and included X-10 (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), K-25 (former Gaseous Diffusion Plant), Y-12 (Weapons Production Plant), the Freels Bend Area and Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, the East Fork Poplar Creek (100-year floodplain extending from K-25 to Y-12), Elza Gate (former uranium ore storage site located in the city of Oak Ridge), Parcel A, the Clinch River (river banks extending from Melton Hill Dam to the city of Kingston), and the CSX Railroad Tracks (extending from Y-12 to the city of Oak Ridge). The survey encompassed approximately 55 square miles (1 41 square kilometers) of the Oak Ridge Reservation and surrounding area

  19. The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Johnson, R.O.

    1996-05-01

    This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.

  20. 40 CFR 180.1179 - Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria...

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plant extract derived from Opuntia... Tolerances § 180.1179 Plant extract derived from Opuntia lindheimeri, Quercus falcata, Rhus aromatica, and Rhizophoria mangle; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. The biochemical pesticide plant...