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Sample records for barometric pressure conditions

  1. New insights from well responses to fluctuations in barometric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J.J.; Jin, W.; Mohammed, G.A.; Reboulet, E.C.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrologists have long recognized that changes in barometric pressure can produce changes in water levels in wells. The barometric response function (BRF) has proven to be an effective means to characterize this relationship; we show here how it can also be utilized to glean valuable insights into semi-confined aquifer systems. The form of the BRF indicates the degree of aquifer confinement, while a comparison of BRFs between wells sheds light on hydrostratigraphic continuity. A new approach for estimating hydraulic properties of aquitards from BRFs has been developed and verified. The BRF is not an invariant characteristic of a well; in unconfined or semi-confined aquifers, it can change with conditions in the vadose zone. Field data from a long-term research site demonstrate the hydrostratigraphic insights that can be gained from monitoring water levels and barometric pressure. Such insights should be of value for a wide range of practical applications. ?? 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  2. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Barometric Pressure, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Barometric Pressure data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have...

  3. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site. Nuclear chimney analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations of barometric pressure testing of NTS nuclear chimneys were reviewed. This review includes the models used in the interpretation, methods of analysis, and results. Analytic and semi-analytic models were presented and applied to both historical data and new data taken for this current project. An interpretation technique based on non-linear least squares methods was used to analyze this data in terms of historic and more recent chimney models. Finally, a detailed discussion of radioactive gas transport due to surface barometric pressure fluctuations was presented. This mechanism of transport, referred to as ''barometric pumping,'' is presented in terms of conditions likely to be encountered at the NTS. The report concludes with a discussion of the current understanding of gas flow properties in the alluvial and volcanic areas of the NTS, and suggestions for future efforts directed toward increasing this understanding are presented

  4. Time series analysis of barometric pressure data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time series of atmospheric pressure data, collected over a period of several years, were analysed to provide undergraduate students with educational examples of application of simple statistical methods of analysis. In addition to basic methods for the analysis of periodicities, a comparison of two forecast models, one based on autoregression algorithms, and the other making use of an artificial neural network, was made. Results show that the application of artificial neural networks may give slightly better results compared to traditional methods.

  5. Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs

  6. The Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Barometric Pressure on Short Sprint Race Times

    CERN Document Server

    Mureika, J R

    2006-01-01

    A numerical model of 100 m and 200 m world class sprinting performances is modified using standard hydrodynamic principles to include effects of air temperature, pressure, and humidity levels on aerodynamic drag. The magnitude of the effects are found to be dependent on wind speed. This implies that differing atmospheric conditions can yield slightly different corrections for the same wind gauge reading. In the absence of wind, temperature is found to induce the largest variation in times (0.01 s per $10\\dc$ increment in the 100 m), while relative humidity contributes the least (under 0.01 s for all realistic conditions for 100 m). Barometric pressure variations at a particular venue can also introduce fluctuations in performance times on the order of a 0.01 s for this race. The combination of all three variables is essentially additive, and is more important for head-wind conditions that for tail-winds. As expected, calculated corrections in the 200 m are magnified due to the longer duration of the race. The...

  7. Investigation of relationship between barometric pressure and coal and gas outburst events in underground coal mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yönet, Sinem; Esen, Olgun; Fi?ne, Abdullah

    2015-04-01

    Coal and gas outburst is a serious risk which occurs during the mine production. This accident results both ejection of high volumes of gas and high amount of coal into the mine production area, and death of mining workers for many years in Turkey. Outburst of gas, coal and rock can be defined as sudden release of coal and rock accompanied by large quantities of gas into the working face or other mine workings. It is a phenomena that influenced by geological structure such as folds, joints of rocks or coal seams, is also still investigated for many years. Zonguldak Coal Basin is the main part of the Upper Carboniferous bituminous coal basin of Turkey. Much of the bituminous coal mining has thus been concentrated in the Zonguldak Basin which is located on the Black Sea coast. The coal field has been disturbed by tectonic activity, first by Hercynian and later by Alpine orogenesis resulting in folding and faulting of strata. This formation has a complex structural geology which consists mostly fault zones, anticlinal and syncline strata and because of this a large amount of methane gases are adsorbed or accumulated in strata or in coal fractures, pores and micropores. There are 5 Collieries exists in Zonguldak Coalfield and coal and gas outbursts were occurred only in two collieries such as Karadon and Kozlu Mines. In addition at a number of 90 coal and gas outburst events were experienced in these collieries. Based on the analysis of data, oscillation at barometric pressure and temperature values at the location of Kozlu and Karadon Mines were seen when coal and gas outburst events were occurred. In this study, barometric pressure and temperature changes are investigated at Kozlu and Karadon Mines. Also the relationship between the variation at temperature with barometric pressure and coal and gas outbursts are evaluated. It can be understand that this investigation depends to field observations and macroscopic considerations and on the purpose of predicting the coal and gas outburst event earlier.

  8. Investigation of temperature and barometric pressure variation effects on radon concentration in the Sopronbánfalva Geodynamic Observatory, Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentes, Gyula; Eper-Pápai, Ildikó

    2015-11-01

    Radon concentration variation has been monitored since 2009 in the artificial gallery of the Sopronbánfalva Geodynamic Observatory, Hungary. In the observatory, the radon concentration is extremely high, 100-600 kBq m(-3) in summer and some kBq m(-3) in winter. The relationships between radon concentration, temperature and barometric pressure were separately investigated in the summer and winter months by Fast Fourier Transform, Principal Component Analysis, Multivariable Regression and Partial Least Square analyses in different frequency bands. It was revealed that the long-period radon concentration variation is mainly governed by the temperature (20 kBq m(-1) °C(-1)) both in summer and winter. The regression coefficients between long-period radon concentration and barometric pressure are -1.5 kBq m(-3) hPa(-1) in the summer and 5 kBq m(-3) hPa(-1) in the winter months. In the 0.072-0.48 cpd (cycles per day) frequency band the effect of the temperature is about -1 kBq m(-3) °C(-1) and that of the barometric pressure is -5 kBq m(-3) hPa(-1) in summer and -0.5 kBq m(-3) hPa(-1) in winter. In the high frequency range (>0.48 cpd) all regression coefficients are one order of magnitude smaller than in the range of 0.072-0.48 cpd. Fast Fourier Transform of the radon concentration, temperature and barometric pressure time series revealed S1, K1, P1, S2, K2, M2 tidal constituents in the data and weak O1 components in the radon concentration and barometric pressure series. A detailed tidal analysis, however, showed that the radon tidal components are not directly driven by the gravitational force but rather by solar radiation and barometric tide. Principal Component Analysis of the raw data was performed to investigate the yearly, summer and winter variability of the radon concentration, temperature and barometric pressure. In the summer and winter periods the variability does not change. The higher variability of the radon concentration compared to the variability of the temperature and the barometric pressure shows that besides the temperature and barometric pressure variations other agents, e.g. natural ventilation of the observatory, wind, etc. also play an important role in the radon concentration variation. PMID:26207821

  9. Detection of postural transitions using trunk-worn inertial and barometric pressure sensor: application to stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Massé, Fabien; Gonzenbach, Roman; Ionescu, Anisoara; Luft, Andreas; Aminian, Kamiar

    2014-01-01

    To better understand how rehabilitation therapy of stroke survivors is transferred in patient’s daily life, activity monitors exist but require multiple wearable devices and may hinder patient’s movements. In this study, the use of a single wearable barometric pressure sensor, placed on the trunk, is investigated as a complementary sensor to inertial sensors for reliably identifying Sit-to-Stand and Stand-to-Sit transitions in daily-life, key components of balance control. The pressure was fi...

  10. Hazards of high altitude decompression sickness during falls in barometric pressure from 1 atm to a fraction thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    Various tests related to studies concerning the effects of decompression sicknesses at varying pressure levels and physical activity are described. The tests indicate that there are no guarantees of freedom from decompression sicknesses when man transitions from a normally oxygenated normobaric nitrogen-oxygen atmosphere into an environment having a 0.4 atm or lower pressure and he is performing physical work.

  11. Mapping of multi-floor buildings: A barometric approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan; Fan, Zhun

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for mapping multi5floor buildings. The method combines laser range sensor for metric mapping and barometric pressure sensor for detecting floor transitions and map segmentation. We exploit the fact that the barometric pressure is a function of the elevation, and it varies between different floors. The method is tested with a real robot in a typical indoor environment, and the results show that physically consistent multi5floor representations are achievable.

  12. Variations in cosmic radiation intensity associated with the barometric effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fco. Valdés-Galicia

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The barometric effect for the Mexico City neutron monitor is obtained from cosmic ray intensity data obtained during the years 1990-1997, more than half a solar cycle, by correlation between the neutron intensity and the atmospheric pressure. In order to eliminate other factors of solar or geomagnetic origin we use only geomagnetically quiet days (kp<20°. The evolution of the barometric coefficient from maximum (1990 to minimum (1997 solar activity is discussed.

  13. Variations in cosmic radiation intensity associated with the barometric effect

    OpenAIRE

    José Fco. Valdés-Galicia; Rogelio Caballero López

    2000-01-01

    The barometric effect for the Mexico City neutron monitor is obtained from cosmic ray intensity data obtained during the years 1990-1997, more than half a solar cycle, by correlation between the neutron intensity and the atmospheric pressure. In order to eliminate other factors of solar or geomagnetic origin we use only geomagnetically quiet days (kp

  14. Barometric pumping with a twist: VOC containment and remediation without boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large national cost is incurred in remediating near-surface contamination such as surface spills, leaking buried pipelines, and underground storage tank sites. Many of these sites can be contained and remediated using enhanced natural venting, capitalizing on barometric pumping. Barometric pumping is the cyclic movement experienced by soil gas due to oscillations in atmospheric pressure. Daily variations of 5 millibars are typical, while changes of 25 to 50 millibars can occur due to major weather front passage. The fluctuations can cause bulk vertical movement in soil gas ranging from centimeters to meters, depending on the amplitude of the pressure oscillation, soil gas permeability, and depth to an impermeable boundary such as the water table. Since the bulk gas movement is cyclic, under natural conditions no net advective vertical movement occurs over time. Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., is developing an engineered system to capitalize on the oscillatory flow for soil contaminant remediation and containment. By design, the system allows normal upward movement of soil gas but restricts the downward movement during barometric highs. The earth's surface is modified with a sealant and vent valve such that the soil gas flow is literally open-quotes ratchetedclose quotes to cause a net upward flow over time. A key feature of the design is that it does not require boreholes, resulting in a very low cost remediation effort and reduced personnel exposure risk. In the current phase (Phase I) the system's performance is being evaluated. Static and transient analysis results are presented which illustrate the relative magnitude of this advective movement compared to downward contaminant diffusion rates. Calculations also indicate the depth of influence for various surface and soil configurations. The system design will be presented, as well as a cost assessment compared to conventional techniques

  15. Barometric pumping with a twist: VOC containment and remediation without boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, W.; Dunn, S.D.; Walsh, R. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    A large national cost is incurred in remediating near-surface contamination such as surface spills, leaking buried pipelines, and underground storage tank sites. Many of these sites can be contained and remediated using enhanced natural venting, capitalizing on barometric pumping. Barometric pumping is the cyclic movement experienced by soil gas due to oscillations in atmospheric pressure. Daily variations of 5 millibars are typical, while changes of 25 to 50 millibars can occur due to major weather front passage. The fluctuations can cause bulk vertical movement in soil gas ranging from centimeters to meters, depending on the amplitude of the pressure oscillation, soil gas permeability, and depth to an impermeable boundary such as the water table. Since the bulk gas movement is cyclic, under natural conditions no net advective vertical movement occurs over time. Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., is developing an engineered system to capitalize on the oscillatory flow for soil contaminant remediation and containment. By design, the system allows normal upward movement of soil gas but restricts the downward movement during barometric highs. The earth`s surface is modified with a sealant and vent valve such that the soil gas flow is literally {open_quotes}ratcheted{close_quotes} to cause a net upward flow over time. A key feature of the design is that it does not require boreholes, resulting in a very low cost remediation effort and reduced personnel exposure risk. In the current phase (Phase I) the system`s performance is being evaluated. Static and transient analysis results are presented which illustrate the relative magnitude of this advective movement compared to downward contaminant diffusion rates. Calculations also indicate the depth of influence for various surface and soil configurations. The system design will be presented, as well as a cost assessment compared to conventional techniques.

  16. Passive remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds using barometric pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Program, sponsored by the Department of Energy, is to demonstrate new subsurface characterization, monitoring, and remediation technologies. The interbedded clay and sand layers at the Integrated Demonstration Site (IDS) are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs). Characterization studies show that the bulk of the contamination is located in the approximately 40 m thick vadose zone. The most successful strategy for removing contaminants of this type from this environment is vapor extraction alone or in combination with other methods such as air sparging or enhanced bioremediation. Preliminary work at the IDS has indicated that natural pressure differences between surface and subsurface air caused by surface barometric fluctuations can produce enough gas flow to make barometric pumping a viable method for subsurface remediation. Air flow and pressure were measured in wells that are across three stratigraphic intervals in the vadose zone' The subsurface pressures were correlated to surface pressure fluctuations but were damped and lagging in phase corresponding to depth and stratum permeability. Piezometer wells screened at lower elevations exhibited a greater phase lag and damping than wells screened at higher elevations where the pressure wave from barometric fluctuations passes through a smaller number of low permeable layers. The phase lag between surface and subsurface pressures results in significant fluxes through these wells. The resultant air flows through the subsurface impacts CVOC fate and transport. With the appropriate controls (e.g. solenoid valves) a naturally driven vapor extraction system can be implemented requiring negligible operating costs yet capable of a large CVOC removal rate (as much as 1--2 kg/day in each well at the IDS)

  17. Barometric Pumping of a Fractured Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, P. M.; Mourzenko, V.; Thovert, J. F.; Pili, E.; Guillon, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fluctuations in the ambient atmospheric pressure result in motion of air in porous fractured media. This mechanism, known as barometric pumping, efficiently transports gaseous species through the vadose zone to the atmosphere. This is of interest in fields, such as transport of trace gases from soil to atmosphere, remediation of contaminated sites, radon in buildings, leakage from carbon sequestration sites and detection of nuclear explosions. The fractures are modeled as polygonal plane surfaces with a given transmissivity embedded in a permeable matrix. The slightly compressible fluid obeys Darcy's law in these two media with exchanges between them. The solute obeys convection-diffusion equations in both media again with exchanges. The fractures and the porous medium are meshed by triangles and tetrahedra, respectively. The equations are discretized by the finite volume method. A Flux Limiting Scheme diminishes numerical dispersion ; the solute transfer between the fractures and the porous medium is precisely evaluated. The resulting equations are solved by conjugate gradient algorithms. This model is applied to the Roselend Natural Laboratory. At a 55 m depth, a sealed cavity allows for gas release experiments across fractured porous rocks in the unsaturated zone. The fractures are hexagons with a radius of 5m; their density is larger than 2.4 10-3 m-3; the aperture is about 0.5 mm. The pressure fluctuations are sinusoidal, of amplitude 0.01 bar and period 1 week. The solute concentration is equal to 1 at the bottom. Systematic results will be presented. First, the precision of the calculations is assessed. Second, the pressure and solute concentration fields are displayed and discussed. Third, the influence of the major parameters (fracture density, aperture, porosity, diffusion coefficient,…) is illustrated and discussed. These results are discussed in terms of the amplification of solute transfer to the ground surface by the pressure fluctuations.

  18. Observando as marés atmosféricas: uma aplicação da placa Arduino com sensores de pressão barométrica e temperatura / Observing the atmospheric tides: an application of the Arduino board with sensors for barometric pressure and temperature

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luiz Raimundo Moreira de, Carvalho; Helio Salim de, Amorim.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos uma montagem experimental simples para o estudo da maré atmosférica, baseada no uso da placa Arduino Uno. Com essa montagem, o professor de física no Ensino Médio poderá apresentar para seus alunos as oscilações barométricas, um efeito fundamentalmente de origem térmica devido ao aqueci [...] mento da atmosfera produzido pela radiação solar. Apresentamos também uma comparação entre a maré atmosférica e o efeito gravitacional da maré oceânica, destacando as diferenças entre os dois fenômenos. Abstract in english We present a simple experimental apparatus for studying the atmospheric tide based on the use of Arduino Uno board. With this apparatus, the physics teacher in high school can present to your students barometric oscillations, an effect mainly of thermal origin, due to the warming of the atmosphere p [...] roduced by solar radiation. We also present a comparison between atmospheric tide and the gravitational effect of ocean tide, with emphasis on the differences between the two phenomena.

  19. Detecting the vulnerability of groundwater in semi-confined aquifers using barometric response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odling, N. E.; Perulero Serrano, R.; Hussein, M. E. A.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of barometric response functions (BRFs) for detecting the presence of fully penetrating, highly conductive bodies within aquifer confining layers that present potential pathways for contaminants is explored. BRFs are determined from borehole water level (WL) and barometric pressure (Bp) records. Past studies have shown that confining layer properties can be estimated from BRFs, providing a potential link between BRFs and the concept of groundwater vulnerability. Existing analytical models that predict the BRF from system properties assume homogeneity within the aquifer and its confining layer, conditions which are seldom satisfied in nature. The impact of partially and fully penetrating, high diffusivity heterogeneities within a confining layer (representing potential high flow pathways for contaminants) on the BRF is investigated through a suite of three-dimensional, transient numerical simulations of the confining layer-aquifer system. The results are interpreted through comparison with a modified pre-existing analytical model for the BRF. Comparison of numerically and analytically calculated BRFs reveals that the key effect of a localised, fully penetrating, high diffusivity heterogeneity within a low diffusivity confining layer is to reduce the BRF gain with only minor changes to the phase. This impact on the BRF decreases with increasing distance from the heterogeneity. The importance of heterogeneity size is secondary to distance from the borehole and partially penetrating heterogeneities affect the BRF to only a minor extent. Data from a study of the Chalk Aquifer (E. Yorkshire, England) which is semi-confined by heterogeneous glacial sediments display variations in BRFs which are qualitatively similar to those shown by the numerical results. It is suggested that the variation in BRFs estimated from borehole records across a semi-confined aquifer could be used to assess the degree of spatial continuity of low diffusivity lithologies within the confining layer which protect the aquifer against surface sourced contamination, and thus provide a tool to improve groundwater vulnerability assessment.

  20. Parametric study of barometric pumping of a fractured porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Pierre; Mourzenko, Valeri; Thovert, Jean Francois; Pili, Eric; Guillon, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Fluctuations in the ambient atmospheric pressure result in motion of air in porous fractured media. This mechanism, known as barometric pumping, efficiently transports gaseous species through the vadose zone to the atmosphere. This is of interest in fields, such as transport of trace gases from soil to atmosphere, remediation of contaminated sites, radon in buildings, leakage from carbon sequestration sites and detection of nuclear explosions. The fractures are modeled as polygonal plane surfaces with a given transmissivity embedded in a permeable matrix. The slightly compressible fluid obeys Darcy's law in these two media with exchanges between them. The solute obeys convection-diffusion equations in both media again with exchanges. The numerical methodology is briefly described. The fractures and the porous medium are meshed by triangles and tetrahedra, respectively. The equations are discretized by the finite volume method and a Flux Limiting Scheme diminishes numerical dispersion. This model is applied to the Roselend Natural Laboratory. At a 55 m depth, a sealed cavity allows for gas release experiments across fractured porous rocks in the unsaturated zone. The standard case consist of hexagonal fractures with a radius of 5m, of aperture 0.5 mm and of density larger than 2.4 10-3 m-3; the pressure fluctuations are sinusoidal, of amplitude 0.01 bar and period 1 week; the solute concentration is equal to 1 at the bottom. Systematic results will be presented. First, the precision of the calculations is assessed. Second, the pressure and solute concentration fields are displayed and discussed. Within the time limit, the influence of the major parameters (fracture density, aperture, porosity, diffusion coefficient, pressure fluctuations including real recordings, …) is illustrated and discussed relatively to the standard case. Emphasis is put on some paradoxical results which are obtained. These results are discussed in terms of the amplification of solute transfer to the ground surface by the pressure fluctuations.

  1. A Sensor Fusion Method for Tracking Vertical Velocity and Height Based on Inertial and Barometric Altimeter Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Maria Sabatini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A sensor fusion method was developed for vertical channel stabilization by fusing inertial measurements from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU and pressure altitude measurements from a barometric altimeter integrated in the same device (baro-IMU. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF estimated the quaternion from the sensor frame to the navigation frame; the sensed specific force was rotated into the navigation frame and compensated for gravity, yielding the vertical linear acceleration; finally, a complementary filter driven by the vertical linear acceleration and the measured pressure altitude produced estimates of height and vertical velocity. A method was also developed to condition the measured pressure altitude using a whitening filter, which helped to remove the short-term correlation due to environment-dependent pressure changes from raw pressure altitude. The sensor fusion method was implemented to work on-line using data from a wireless baro-IMU and tested for the capability of tracking low-frequency small-amplitude vertical human-like motions that can be critical for stand-alone inertial sensor measurements. Validation tests were performed in different experimental conditions, namely no motion, free-fall motion, forced circular motion and squatting. Accurate on-line tracking of height and vertical velocity was achieved, giving confidence to the use of the sensor fusion method for tracking typical vertical human motions: velocity Root Mean Square Error (RMSE was in the range 0.04–0.24 m/s; height RMSE was in the range 5–68 cm, with statistically significant performance gains when the whitening filter was used by the sensor fusion method to track relatively high-frequency vertical motions.

  2. Pyrolysis and gasification behavior of black liquor under pressurized conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitty, K.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study has been to enhance the understanding of the processes involved in pressurized black liquor gasification. Gasification is known to occur in three stages: drying, pyrolysis and char gasification. The work presented here focuses on the pyrolysis and gasification stages. Experiments were carried out primarily in two laboratory-scale reactors. A pressurized grid heater was used to study black liquor pyrolysis under pressurized conditions. Char yields and the fate of elements in the liquor, as well as the degree of liquor swelling, were measured in this device. A pressurized thermogravimetric reactor was used to measure the rate of the char gasification process under different temperatures and pressures and in various gas atmospheres. Pyrolysis experiments were also carried out in this device, and data on swelling behavior, char yields and component release were obtained 317 refs.

  3. Pohorje eclogites revisited: Evidence for ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirijam Vrabec

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Kyanite eclogites from the Pohorje Mountains, Slovenia, are providing the first evidence of ultrahigh-pressureEo-Alpine metamorphism in the Eastern Alps. Polycrystalline quartz inclusions in garnet, omphacite and kyaniteare surrounded by radial fractures and exhibit microtextures diagnostic for the recovery after coesite breakdown.The non-stoichiometric supersilicic omphacites found in Pohorje eclogites contain up to 5 mol % of Ca-Eskola molecule.Such clinopyroxenes are known to be stable exclusively at high-pressure conditions exceeding 3 GPa. Theirbreakdown during decompression resulted in exolution of quartz rods and needles that are oriented parallel toomphacite c-axis. The absence of coesite is a consequence of near-isothermal decompression during the first stagesof exhumation.Pressure and temperature conditions for the formation of the peak metamorphic mineral assemblages have beenassessed through a consideration of a Fe2+-Mg partitioning between garnet and omphacite pairs, based on differentcalibrations; b the equilibrium between garnet + clinopyroxene + phengite ± kyanite ± quartz/coesite assemblage.Estimated peak pressure and temperature conditions of 3.0-3.1 GPa and 750-783 °C are well within the coesite, i.e.the ultrahigh-pressure stability field.

  4. Investigations on pressure suppression system loads at accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For simulation of the integral behavior of pressure suppresion systems at accident conditions a mathematical model was developed which simulates a wide range of the loads occurring during a loss-of coolant accident. The multi-zone point model DRASYS serves for mathematical simulation of quasistatic (pressure and temperature build-up in the dry well and the suppression chamber) as well as dynamic loads (free-blowing process, water throw-up and condensing oscillations) in the course of a loss-of-coolant accident. For determination of the state variations with time in the individual pressure sections thermodynamic equilibrium is assumed between steam and water phases. Thermal non-equilibrium states are taken into account if phase separation interfaces between water and steam/air mixture exist. The flows between the individual pressure sections are treated as homogeneous, nonsteady, incompressible flows. For verification of the mathematical model recalculations were made of experiments performed at various test stands. Teh recalculations showed that the mathematical model has got a wide range of application and is suited for design and assessment of pressure suppression systems at accident conditions. (orig.)

  5. Drying kinetics of RDX under atmospheric pressure and vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In this study, RDX is dried in the ranges of 60–90 °C under atmospheric pressure and vacuum conditions. • Ten models are used to describe the drying of RDX. • The Midilli–Kucuk model is determined as the most suitable model. • Effective moisture diffusivity and activation energy for drying process are determined. - Abstract: The drying characteristics of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) are investigated in the ranges of 60–90 °C of drying temperature under atmospheric pressure and vacuum conditions in a laboratory scale dryer. The effect of drying temperature and absolute pressure on the drying characteristics is determined. In order to estimate and select the suitable form of RDX drying curves, the curves are fitted to ten different semi-theoretical and/or empirical thin-layer drying models and coefficients are evaluated by non-linear regression analysis. The models are compared based on their coefficient of determination, such as mean bias error, root mean square error, reduced chi-square and modeling efficiency between experimental and predicted moisture ratios. It is deduced that Midilli–Kucuk model has shown a better fit to the experimental drying data as compared to other models. A diffusion model is used to describe the moisture transfer and the effective diffusivity for RDX drying is also determined at each temperature. Beside, the activation energy is also expressed using Arrhenius-type relationship under atmospheric pressure and vacuum conditions

  6. Touch mode micromachined capacitive pressure sensor with signal conditioning electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fragiacomo, Giulio; Eriksen, Gert F.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades, pressure sensors have been one of the greatest successes of the MEMS industry. Many companies are using them in a variety of applications from the automotive to the environmental field. Currently piezoresistive pressure sensors are the most developed, and a well established technology to design and fabricate these sensors has been implemented. Capacitive pressure sensing, on the other hand, is still an open and really promising field. Results Capacitive microsensors were designed and fabricated (Fig. 1) and an analytical model for touch mode regime, which fitted accurately the measurements done on the devices, was investigated. Fabrication was carried on at Danchip cleanrooms where fusion bonding was used in order to obtain a thin silicon plate on top of a sealed vacuum cavity (Fig. 2). A viable signal conditioning scheme for capacitive pressure sensing was simulated and implemented. A measurement setup was arranged and tested for accuracy and reliability with respect to hysteresis. Finally, designs with different radii of the top plate were characterized by a capacitance versus pressure curve at different frequencies and temperatures (Fig. 3). Industrial possibilities Energy saving systems is one of the key challenges nowadays. In this context, house heating is a priority for environmental issues. For this reason, the possibilities of using a low power consumption technique, such as capacitive pressure sensing, in harsh environments is a concrete market opportunity. Our aim is therefore to develop new technologies based on capacitive sensing to be able to fulfil future requirements in this field.

  7. Barometric tides from ECMWF operational analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Ray

    Full Text Available The solar diurnal and semidiurnal tidal oscillations in surface pressure are extracted from the operational analysis product of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF. For the semidiurnal tide this involves a special temporal interpolation, following Van den Dool et al. (1997. The resulting tides are compared with a "ground truth" tide data set, a compilation of well-determined tide estimates deduced from many long time series of station barometer measurements. These comparisons show that the ECMWF (analysis tides are significantly more accurate than the tides deduced from two other widely available reanalysis products. Spectral analysis of ECMWF pressure series shows that the tides consist of sharp central peaks with modulating sidelines at integer multiples of 1 cycle/year, superimposed on a broad cusp of stochastic energy. The integrated energy in the cusp dominates that of the side-lines. This complicates the development of a simple empirical model that can characterize the full temporal variability of the tides.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (waves and tides

  8. Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-27

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  9. Continuous positive airway pressure setups evaluated at simulated exercise conditions

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Marcelo Vieira Leão, Nunes; Antonio, Giannella-Neto; Frederico Caetano Jandre de Assis, Tavares.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Studies have shown increases in airway opening pressure (Pao) swings and work of breathing (WOB) by different continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices at rest, but few address this issue during exercise. The aim of the present work was to analyze the imposed WOB (WOBi), the a [...] pparent resistance (Rapp) and swings of Pao (deltaP) of 3 CPAP assemblies at simulated exercise conditions. METHODS: The CPAP measures were obtained from: a commercial CPAP (Assembly 1), a high flow CPAP (Assembly 2) and the parallel association of these devices (Assembly 3). In each assembly the spring-loaded positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) valve was set to fully opened (mode A) or at the same CPAP pressure (mode B). The exercise protocol simulation, performed manually by a calibrated syringe and a metronome, employed a respiratory frequency of 30 bpm, tidal volume of 2.7 L and inspiratory-to-expiratory ratio of 1. The setups were evaluated at CPAP settings of 5, 10 and 15 cmH2O. RESULTS: The lowest deltaP as well as Rapp and WOBi were obtained with Assembly 3 in mode A with an adjusted CPAP of 10 cmH2O (deltaP=8.1 (0.5) cmH2O, WOBi=1.4 (0.14) cmH2O/L/s, Rapp= 1.3 (0.07) J/s) showed as median (interquartile range). CONCLUSION: For the conditions studied, the best CPAP setup was obtained with mode A.

  10. Modelling of radionuclide migration after underground nuclear explosions by barometric pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During and shortly after a nuclear explosion several noble gas isotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) besides many other fission products are produced. If the explosion is emplaced underground for clandestine test purposes these isotopes, all other fission and activation products are injected into the surrounding rocks. Only the noble gases are able to migrate upwards to the surface through suitable pathways in a fractured permeable medium due to cyclical changes in barometric surface pressure. Possible pathways are cracks, faults or high-permability layers. Times of arrival are much shorter than is expected by diffusion-process alone and may be of orders of magnitude more significant to allow verifying the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). This work calculates time of arrival and shifts in abundance of the radioxenons due to its different molecular diffusion lengths

  11. Pressurized thermal shock. Thermo-hydraulic conditions in the CNA-I reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we analyze several reports issued by the Utility (Nucleo Electrica S.A.) and related to Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) phenomena in the CNA-I Nuclear Power Plant. These analyses are aimed at obtaining conclusions and establishing criteria ensuring the RPV integrity. Special attention was given to the effects ECCS cold-water injection at the RPV down-comer leading to pressurized thermal shock scenarios. The results deal with hypothetical primary system pipe breaks of different sizes, the inadvertent opening of the pressurizer safety valve, the double guillotine break of a live steam line in the containment and the inadvertent actuation pressurizer heaters. Modeling conditions were setup to represent experiments performed at the UPTF, under the hypothesis that they are representative of those that, hypothetically, may occur at the CNA-I. No system scaling analysis was performed, so this assertion and the inferred conclusions are no fully justified, at least in principle. The above mentioned studies, indicate that the RPV internal wall surface temperature will be nearly 40 degree. It was concluded that they allowed a better approximation of PTS phenomena in the RPV of the CNA-I. Special emphasis was made on the influence of the ECCS systems on the attained RPV wall temperature, particularly the low-pressure TJ water injection system. Some conservative hypothesis made, are discussed in this report. (author)

  12. Evaluation of pressurized thermal shock in transitional condition for boiling water reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural integrity for Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) was evaluated for the RPVs of Japanese Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). It has been clarified that the BWR RPVs have the sufficient margin of fracture toughness by calculating the stress intensity factor in transitional condition and the acceptance criteria for RPV shell plate which is assumed to be neutron-irradiated in core region for 60 years. (author)

  13. Micromachined capacitive pressure sensor with signal conditioning electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fragiacomo, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Micromachined capacitive pressure sensors for harsh environment together with interfacing electronic circuits have been studied in this project. Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have been proposed as substitutes for macro scale sensor’s systems in many different fields and are the only possible solution in many cases where, for example, the dimensions of the sensing element is the limiting factor. Furthermore, MEMS can significantly reduce costs and power consumption being the best candidate for consumer electronics such as mobile phones and cameras, or for the automotive industry where a great deal of sensors are used. Pressure sensors are among the most successful MEMS and are used in a huge variety of applications. In this project an absolute capacitive pressure sensor has been developed with the aim to integrate it in pump control systems to improve the efficiency of the pump. The developed MEMS consist of hermetically sealed vacuum cavities surrounded by two heavily doped silicon layers which constitute the plates of a capacitor. The top plate is also the sensing element being a thin diaphragm that deflects when pressure is applied, thus increasing the capacitance (i.e. the output signal) of the device. Fusion bonding of two wafers has been used in order to obtain the cavities, this is also the only non-standard cleanroom process involved in the fabrication of the transducers. The device developed can measure absolute pressures from 0 to 10 bar with sensitivity up to 80 pF/bar. As a part of the project a suitable interfacing circuit has been developed. Different solutions have been studied in order to optimize size, costs, sensitivity and stability. A comparative analysis between them has been carried out and suggestion for the final product has been proposed. Both the electronic conditioning circuits and the MEMS have been fully described with mathematical models and simulated with electrical networks software for the circuit part and finite element for the sensor part. A good matching between analytical models and simulations results has been achieved. Furthermore, the experimental results are in good agreement with the models proposed. Finally a demonstrator has been fabricated under the constraints of a previously designed case in order to contain costs; modification or re-design of the packaging is in fact one of the major costs for the MEMS industry. This demonstrator has been characterized and presented at Grundfos Direct Sensors A/S and constitute the preliminary work for a new product which is intended target the low power or wireless pressure sensor for harsh environment market.

  14. Evaluating road surface conditions using dynamic tire pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yubo; Wu, H. Felix; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Wang, Ming L.

    2014-03-01

    In order to best prioritize road maintenance, the level of deterioration must be known for all roads in a city's network. Pavement Condition Index (PCI) and International Roughness Index (IRI) are two standard methods for obtaining this information. However, IRI is substantially easier to measure. Significant time and money could be saved if a method were developed to estimate PCI from IRI. This research introduces a new method to estimate IRI and correlate IRI with PCI. A vehicle-mounted dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS) system is used. The DTPS measures the signals generated from the tire/road interaction while driving. The tire/road interaction excites surface waves that travel through the road. DTPS, which is mounted on the tire's valve stem, measures tire/road interaction by analyzing the pressure change inside the tire due to the road vibration, road geometry and tire wall vibration. The road conditions are sensible to sensors in a similar way to human beings in a car. When driving on a smooth road, tire pressure stays almost constant and there are minimal changes in the DTPS data. When driving on a rough road, DTPS data changes drastically. IRI is estimated from the reconstructed road profile using DTPS data. In order to correlate IRI with PCI, field tests were conducted on roads with known PCI values in the city of Brockton, MA. Results show a high correlation between the estimated IRI values and the known PCI values, which suggests that DTPS-based IRI can provide accurate predictions of PCI.

  15. Phase stability limit of c-BN under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianwei; Du, Jinglian; Wen, Bin; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Xiangyi

    2014-04-28

    Phase stability limit of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) has been investigated by the crystal structure search technique. It indicated that this limit is ?1000 GPa at hydrostatic pressure condition. Above this pressure, c-BN turns into a metastable phase with respect to rocksalt type boron nitride (rs-BN). However, rs-BN cannot be retained at 0 GPa owing to its instability at pressure below 250 GPa. For non-hydrostatic pressure conditions, the phase stability limit of c-BN is substantially lower than that under hydrostatic pressure conditions and it is also dramatically different for other pressure mode. PMID:24784296

  16. Phase stability limit of c-BN under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase stability limit of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) has been investigated by the crystal structure search technique. It indicated that this limit is ?1000 GPa at hydrostatic pressure condition. Above this pressure, c-BN turns into a metastable phase with respect to rocksalt type boron nitride (rs-BN). However, rs-BN cannot be retained at 0 GPa owing to its instability at pressure below 250 GPa. For non-hydrostatic pressure conditions, the phase stability limit of c-BN is substantially lower than that under hydrostatic pressure conditions and it is also dramatically different for other pressure mode

  17. Phase stability limit of c-BN under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jianwei; Du, Jinglian; Wen, Bin, E-mail: wenbin@ysu.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiangyi [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Melnik, Roderick [M2NeT Lab, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo25, 75 University Ave. West, Ontario, Canada N2L 3C5 (Canada); Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, 6-6-4 Aramaki-aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579, Japan and Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 1, Lavyrentyev Avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-28

    Phase stability limit of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) has been investigated by the crystal structure search technique. It indicated that this limit is ?1000 GPa at hydrostatic pressure condition. Above this pressure, c-BN turns into a metastable phase with respect to rocksalt type boron nitride (rs-BN). However, rs-BN cannot be retained at 0 GPa owing to its instability at pressure below 250 GPa. For non-hydrostatic pressure conditions, the phase stability limit of c-BN is substantially lower than that under hydrostatic pressure conditions and it is also dramatically different for other pressure mode.

  18. Phase stability limit of c-BN under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianwei; Du, Jinglian; Wen, Bin; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Xiangyi

    2014-04-01

    Phase stability limit of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) has been investigated by the crystal structure search technique. It indicated that this limit is ˜1000 GPa at hydrostatic pressure condition. Above this pressure, c-BN turns into a metastable phase with respect to rocksalt type boron nitride (rs-BN). However, rs-BN cannot be retained at 0 GPa owing to its instability at pressure below 250 GPa. For non-hydrostatic pressure conditions, the phase stability limit of c-BN is substantially lower than that under hydrostatic pressure conditions and it is also dramatically different for other pressure mode.

  19. Pressurized heavy water reactor fuel behaviour in power ramp conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, S.; U??, O.; Pârvan, M.; Ohâi, D.

    2009-03-01

    In order to check and improve the quality of the Romanian CANDU fuel, an assembly of six CANDU fuel rods has been subjected to a power ramping test in the 14 MW TRIGA reactor at INR. After testing, the fuel rods have been examined in the hot cells using post-irradiation examination (PIE) techniques such as: visual inspection and photography, eddy current testing, profilometry, gamma scanning, fission gas release and analysis, metallography, ceramography, burn-up determination by mass spectrometry, mechanical testing. This paper describes the PIE results from one out of the six fuel rods. The PIE results concerning the integrity, dimensional changes, oxidation, hydriding and mechanical properties of the sheath, the fission-products activity distribution in the fuel column, the pressure, volume and composition of the fission gas, the burn-up, the isotopic composition and structural changes of the fuel enabled the characterization of the behaviour of the Romanian CANDU fuel in power ramping conditions performed in the TRIGA materials testing reactor.

  20. Touch mode micromachined capacitive pressure sensor with signal conditioning electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fragiacomo, Giulio; Eriksen, Gert F.; Christensen, Carsten; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades, pressure sensors have been one of the greatest successes of the MEMS industry. Many companies are using them in a variety of applications from the automotive to the environmental field. Currently piezoresistive pressure sensors are the most developed, and a well established technology to design and fabricate these sensors has been implemented. Capacitive pressure sensing, on the other hand, is still an open and really promising field. Results Capacitive microsensors were des...

  1. Comparing temporal and spatial change of pore water pressure and slope stability between wet soil condition and unsaturated soil condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongyeob; Im, Sangjun; Lee, Eun Jai; Ahn, Byungkyu

    2013-04-01

    Intense rainfall event during short duration is the most significant reason of landslide in South Korea. Typically, it increases pore water pressure in soil and reduces soil effective stress, which cause landslide. In rainfall-induced landslide, saturation rate of soil at initial condition can affect whether landslide occurs. The objective of this study is to compare temporal and spatial pore water pressure and slope stability between in wet soil and in unsaturated soil under same rainfall condition. Two different infiltration models of TRIGRS 2 (Fortran Program for Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability Analysis) were employed to analyze difference of pore water pressure and soil stability under different soil initial conditions. The study site was two small watersheds of Mt. Umyeon in South Korea, where several landslides occurred under an extreme rainfall event on July 27, 2011. Topographical data were generated based on 1 m x 1 m-LiDAR data, and parameters of soil and water characteristics were measured in-situ for TRIGRS 2 simulation. In addition, soil water characteristic curve of the site for the unsaturated soil condition was estimated by the pressure plate method and the filter paper method. The simulation results showed that pore water pressure differently responded between the different water conditions of soil. Ground water table rise appeared relatively faster and higher in the wet soil condition than in the unsaturated soil condition. Moreover, in the wet soil condition, pore water pressure increased with depth while in the unsaturated soil condition, vertical distribution of pore water pressure varied in time. In terms of slope stability, lower factor of safety (FS) were estimated in the wet soil condition than in the unsaturated soil condition. Comparing with landslide initiation positions in reality, FS were calculated more reasonably in the wet soil condition while FS were under-estimated in the unsaturated soil condition. These results indicate that estimating accurate initial water condition of landslide site is important for assessing landslide susceptibility.

  2. An alternative method to Mariotte reservoir system for maintaining constant hydraulic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some studies being done to evaluate the suitability of the Yucca Mountain area as a potential radioactive waste repository require the application of a constant water pressure as a boundary condition to study water flow through porous media. The Mariotte reservoir system is commonly used to supply such a boundary condition. Several problems with the Mariotte reservoir system were discovered when it was used to apply a constant water pressure as a boundary condition for a prolonged period. The constant-pressure boundary condition is required for some lab. experiments to study water flow through porous media. The observed problems were caused by temperature and barometric-pressure fluctuations while the flow rates were very small and caused erroneous water flow-rate measurements. An alternative method was developed and used where the water pressure is controlled by regulating its level by using water-level sensing electrodes. The new method eliminated the effects of temperature and barometric-pressure fluctuations and maintained an acceptable accuracy of the estimated water flow rate without compromising the advantage of the Mariotte reservoir

  3. How Ambient Pressure Influences Water Droplet Nucleation at Tropospheric Conditions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Brus, David; Wedekind, J.; Lihavainen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Ro?. 37, - (2010), L21802. ISSN 0094-8276 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nucleations theories * ambient pressure * condensation of droplets Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.505, year: 2010

  4. Single particle studies of black liquor gasification under pressurized conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitty, K.; Backman, R.; Hupa, M.; Backman, P.; Ek, P.; Hulden, S.T.; Kullberg, M.; Sorvari, V.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide experimental data relevant to pressurized black liquor gasification concepts. Specifically, the following two goals will be achieved: Data on swelling, char yields and component release during pressurized pyrolysis of small samples of black liquor will be obtained. The reactivity and physical behavior of single black liquor droplets during simultaneous pyrolysis and gasification will be investigated. The structure and composition of black liquor char during formation and conversion will be studied. (orig.)

  5. Intelligent fiber optic pressure sensor for measurements in extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buimistriuc, G. Y. [Instruments Plant Vibrator, 194294, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Rogov, A. M. [Saint-Petersburg State Technological University, 190013 (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    Application of a fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) for measurements of pressure and speed of pressure variation in water reactors of nuclear power plants contributes to improving their safety and long-term metrological stability, which demands for intelligent sensors. It is shown that the manufacturing of a FFPI sensitive element based on a molecular layering nano-technology provides for substantial enhancement of the quality of the gauge. The algorithm of self-calibration of the pressure sensor based on the fact that the length of the FFPI cavity depends on the pressure at a constant spectrum of an optical source is considered. By means of fast tuning of the spectrum of an optical source it is possible to make self-calibration in the course of continuous work of the pressure gauge. It is also shown that the intelligent FFPI pressure sensor maintains metrological characteristics when the total dose of high-neutron/ gamma radiation is over 2 MGy. (authors)

  6. Beat Pressure and Comparing it with Ascending Aorta Pressure in Normal and Abnormal Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Ghasemalizadeh, Omid; Firoozabadi, Bahar; Sajadi, Behrang; Zolfonoon, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Lumped method (Electrical analogy) is a quick and easy way to model human cardiovascular system. In this paper Lumped method is used for simulating a complete model. It describes a 36-vessel model and cardiac system of human body with details that could show hydrodynamic parameters of cardiovascular system. Also this paper includes modeling of pulmonary, atrium, left and right ventricles with their equivalent circuits. Exact modeling of right and left ventricles pressure with division of ascending aorta into 27 segments increases the accuracy of our simulation. In this paper we show that a calculated pressure for aorta from our complex circuit is near to measured pressure by using advanced medical instruments. Also it is shown that pressure graph from brachial is so near to aortic pressure because of this its pressure signal is usable instead of aortic pressure. Furthermore, obstruction in ascending aorta, brachial and its effects has been showed in different figures.

  7. Borderline pulmonary pressures in scleroderma - a ‘pre-pulmonary arterial hypertension’ condition?

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacs, Gabor; Olschewski, Horst

    2015-01-01

    Patients with systemic sclerosis may develop borderline pulmonary arterial pressure. The clinical relevance of this condition is not always clear. Reported data support the evidence that this subgroup may represent an intermediate stage between normal pulmonary arterial pressure and manifest pulmonary arterial hypertension, a serious complication in scleroderma. Recognizing the clinical relevance of borderline pulmonary arterial pressure increase in scleroderma patients, future studies should...

  8. Barometric pumping with a twist: VOC containment and remediation without boreholes. Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The majority of the planned remediation sites within the DOE complex are contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In many instances the contamination has not reached the water table, does not pose an immediate threat, and is not considered a high priority problem. These sites will ultimately require remediation of some type, either by active vapor extraction, bioremediation, or excavation and ex-situ soil treatment. The cost of remediating these sites can range from $50 K to more than $150 K, depending on site characteristics, contaminants, and remediation method. Additionally, for many remediated sites, residual contamination exists which could not practically be removed by the applied remediation technology. These circumstances result in modest sites with contamination of limited risk, but by regulation they must still be controlled. A remediation solution being developed by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA) for the Department of Energy serves as an in-situ containment and extraction methodology for sites where most or all of the contamination resides in the vadose zone soil. The approach capitalizes on the advective soil gas movement resulting from barometric pressure oscillations.

  9. Systems and methods of monitoring acoustic pressure to detect a flame condition in a gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve (Simpsonville, SC); Krull, Anthony Wayne (Anderson, SC); Healy, Timothy Andrew (Simpsonville, SC), Yilmaz, Ertan (Glenville, NY)

    2011-05-17

    A method may detect a flashback condition in a fuel nozzle of a combustor. The method may include obtaining a current acoustic pressure signal from the combustor, analyzing the current acoustic pressure signal to determine current operating frequency information for the combustor, and indicating that the flashback condition exists based at least in part on the current operating frequency information.

  10. Surgical Space Conditions During Low-Pressure Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy with Deep Versus Moderate Neuromuscular Blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr-Rye, Anne K; Rasmussen, Lars S.; Rosenberg, Jacob; Juul, Poul; Lindekaer, Astrid L; Riber, Claus; Gätke, Mona R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed during low intraabdominal pressure (<12 mm Hg) is associated with significantly less postoperative pain than standard pressure (?12 mm Hg). The impact on surgical space conditions and safety of operating at lower pressures has not been adequately described, but deep neuromuscular blockade may be beneficial. We investigated if deep muscle relaxation would be associated with a higher proportion of procedures with "optimal" surgical space condition...

  11. Solid Nitrogen at Extreme Conditions of High Pressure and Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, A; Gregoryanz, E

    2004-04-05

    We review the phase diagram of nitrogen in a wide pressure and temperature range. Recent optical and x-ray diffraction studies at pressures up to 300 GPa and temperatures in excess of 1000 K have provided a wealth of information on the transformation of molecular nitrogen to a nonmolecular (polymeric) semiconducting and two new molecular phases. These newly found phases have very large stability (metastability) range. Moreover, two new molecular phases have considerably different orientational order from the previously known phases. In the iota phase (unlike most of other known molecular phases), N{sub 2} molecules are orientationally equivalent. The nitrogen molecules in the theta phase might be associated into larger aggregates, which is in line with theoretical predictions on polyatomic nitrogen.

  12. Micromachined capacitive pressure sensor with signal conditioning electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fragiacomo, Giulio

    2012-01-01

    Micromachined capacitive pressure sensors for harsh environment together with interfacing electronic circuits have been studied in this project. Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) have been proposed as substitutes for macro scale sensor’s systems in many different fields and are the only possible solution in many cases where, for example, the dimensions of the sensing element is the limiting factor. Furthermore, MEMS can significantly reduce costs and power consumption being the best candida...

  13. A cylinder pressure based proportional controller for fuel injected engines at idle conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, D.A.C.

    1990-06-01

    An investigation into the use of cylinder pressure as a control system feedback variable was conducted using computer simulation techniques. A control algorithm was developed to apply closed-loop control to the warmup phase of engine operation. The control algorithm used a correlation between effective equivalence ratio and cylinder pressure. The cylinder pressure was characterized by the difference in cylinder pressure between the pressure at top dead center on the compression stroke and the maximum cylinder pressure. This differential pressure provided the minimum number of points to describe the cylinder pressure curve. Testing of the control strategy was done with the use of a spark ignition engine cycle model. The control system was able to respond to changes in engine conditions during warmup to re-establish the desired effective equivalence ratio within three engine cycles. These favorable results demonstrated the potential of this method for further development. 69 refs., 48 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Jump conditions for pressure anisotropy and comparison with the Earth's bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. Vogl

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the pressure anisotropy in the solar wind, we study the magnetic field and plasma parameters downstream of a fast shock, as functions of upstream parameters and downstream pressure anisotropy. In our theoretical approach, we model two cases: a the perpendicular shock and b the oblique shock. We use two threshold conditions of plasma instabilities as additional equations to bound the range of pressure anisotropy. The criterion of the mirror instability is used for pressure anisotropy p perp /pparrallel > 1. Analogously, the criterion of the fire-hose instability is taken into account for pressure anisotropy p perp /pparrallel < 1. We found that the variations of the parallel pressure, the parallel temperature, and the tangential component of the velocity are most sensitive to the pressure anisotropy downstream of the shock. Finally, we compare our theory with plasma and magnetic field parameters measured by the WIND spacecraft.

  15. A study on the manufacturing conditions of metal matrix composites by low pressure infiltration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal fiber preform reinforced aluminum alloy composite as made by the infiltration of molten metal under low pressure casting process. The infiltration behavior of filling pattern and the velocity profile with low-pressure casting process was investigated. The thermocouple was inserted into the preform in order to observe the infiltration behavior. The infiltration of applied pressure time, 1, 2 and 5 s under constant pressure of 0.4 MPa was completely filled during 0.4 s. In these conditions, molten aluminum alloy has successfully infiltrated to FeCrSi metal fiber preform by low-pressure casting process. It was observed the porosity of composites for reliability of composites. The automobile piston was developed with FeCrSi reinforced aluminum alloy that is 0% porosity by the optimal applied pressure and applied pressure time

  16. Individual Pressure Vessel (PV) and Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) Nickel-Hydrogen Battery Performance Under LEO Cycling Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas B.; Lewis, Harlan L.

    2004-01-01

    LEO life cycle testing of Individual Pressure Vessel (PV) and Common Pressure Vessel (CPV) nickel-hydrogen cell packs have been sponsored by the NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Program. The cell packs have cycled under both 35% and 60% depth-of- discharge and temperature conditions of -5 C and +lO C. The packs have been on test since as early as 1992 and have generated a substantial database. This report will provide insight into performance trends as a function of the specific cell configuration and manufacturer for eight separate nickel-hydrogen battery cell packs.

  17. Design and Application of a High Sensitivity Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor for Low Pressure Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huiyang; Huang, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a pressure sensor for low pressure detection (0.5 kPa-40 kPa) is proposed. In one structure (No. 1), the silicon membrane is partly etched to form a crossed beam on its top for stress concentration. An aluminum layer is also deposited as part of the beam. Four piezoresistors are fabricated. Two are located at the two ends of the beam. The other two are located at the membrane periphery. Four piezoresistors connect into a Wheatstone bridge. To demonstrate the stress concentrate effect of this structure, two other structures were designed and fabricated. One is a flat membrane structure (No. 2), the other is a structure with the aluminum beam, but without etched silicon (No. 3). The measurement results of these three structures show that the No.1 structure has the highest sensitivity, which is about 3.8 times that of the No. 2 structure and 2.7 times that of the No. 3 structure. They also show that the residual stress in the beam has some backside effect on the sensor performance. PMID:26371001

  18. Design and Application of a High Sensitivity Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor for Low Pressure Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyang Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a pressure sensor for low pressure detection (0.5 kPa–40 kPa is proposed. In one structure (No. 1, the silicon membrane is partly etched to form a crossed beam on its top for stress concentration. An aluminum layer is also deposited as part of the beam. Four piezoresistors are fabricated. Two are located at the two ends of the beam. The other two are located at the membrane periphery. Four piezoresistors connect into a Wheatstone bridge. To demonstrate the stress concentrate effect of this structure, two other structures were designed and fabricated. One is a flat membrane structure (No. 2, the other is a structure with the aluminum beam, but without etched silicon (No. 3. The measurement results of these three structures show that the No.1 structure has the highest sensitivity, which is about 3.8 times that of the No. 2 structure and 2.7 times that of the No. 3 structure. They also show that the residual stress in the beam has some backside effect on the sensor performance.

  19. Blind source separation for groundwater pressure analysis based on nonnegative matrix factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Vesselinov, Velimir V.

    2014-09-01

    The identification of the physical sources causing spatial and temporal fluctuations of aquifer water levels is a challenging, yet a very important hydrogeological task. The fluctuations can be caused by variations in natural and anthropogenic sources such as pumping, recharge, barometric pressures, etc. The source identification can be crucial for conceptualization of the hydrogeological conditions and characterization of aquifer properties. We propose a new computational framework for model-free inverse analysis of pressure transients based on Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) method for Blind Source Separation (BSS) coupled with k-means clustering algorithm, which we call NMFk. NMFk is capable of identifying a set of unique sources from a set of experimentally measured mixed signals, without any information about the sources, their transients, and the physical mechanisms and properties controlling the signal propagation through the subsurface flow medium. Our analysis only requires information about pressure transients at a number of observation points, m, where m?r, and r is the number of unknown unique sources causing the observed fluctuations. We apply this new analysis on a data set from the Los Alamos National Laboratory site. We demonstrate that the sources identified by NMFk have real physical origins: barometric pressure and water-supply pumping effects. We also estimate the barometric pressure efficiency of the monitoring wells. The possible applications of the NMFk algorithm are not limited to hydrogeology problems; NMFk can be applied to any problem where temporal system behavior is observed at multiple locations and an unknown number of physical sources are causing these fluctuations.

  20. Accessing High Pressure States Relevant to Core Conditions in the Giant Planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remington, B A; Cavallo, R M; Edwards, M J; Ho, D D; Lorenz, K T; Lorenzana, H E; Lasinski, B F; McNaney, J M; Pollaine, S M; Smith, R F

    2004-04-15

    We have designed an experimental technique to use on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to achieve very high pressure (P{sub max} > 10 Mbar = 1000 GPa), dense states of matter at moderate temperatures (kT < 0.5 eV = 6000 K), relevant to the core conditions of the giant planets. A discussion of the conditions in the interiors of the giant planets is given, and an experimental design that can approach those conditions is described.

  1. Two universal equations of state for solids satisfying the limiting condition at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiuxun, Sun; Qiang, Wu; Lingcang, Cai; Fuqian, Jing

    2005-05-01

    In this paper it is shown that the relationship of bulk modulus with pressure, B=f(P), should be linear both at low and high-pressure limiting conditions. Because most of present equations of state (EOS) for solids cannot satisfy such linear relationship at high pressure, a new function f(P) is proposed to satisfy the linearity. By integrating the bulk modulus, an EOS with three parameters and satisfying the quantum-statistics limitation is derived. It is shown that the EOS can be reduced to two-parameter EOS approximately satisfying the limiting condition. By applying the two EOSs and other three typical EOSs to 50 materials, it is concluded that for materials at low and middle-pressure regimes, the limiting condition does not operate, the Baonza EOS gives the best results, but it cannot provide analytic expression for cohesive energy. The Vinet and our second EOSs are slightly inferior, both EOSs can provide analytic expression for cohesive energy, and for materials at high-pressure regimes our second EOS gives the best results. The Holzapfel and our first EOSs give the worst results, although they strictly satisfy the limiting condition. For practical applications, the limiting condition is not important because it only operates as V?0.

  2. Prediction of pressure fluctuation of a hydraulic turbine at no-load condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T. J.; Wu, X. J.; Liu, J. T.; Wu, Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    In order to study characteristics of pressure fluctuation of a turbine during the starting period, a turbine with guide vanes device at no-load condition was investigated using RNG k-epsilon turbulence model. The inner flow distribution and pressure fluctuation characteristics were analyzed. Results show that the pressure fluctuations in the region between the runner and guide vanes are different around the runner inlet. The dominant frequency of pressure fluctuation in the vaneless space close to the casing outlet is the blade passing frequency, while the dominant frequency at the rest region is the twice of the blade passing frequency. The increase of amplitude of pressure fluctuation close to the casing outlet can be attribute to the large scale stall at suction side of the runner inlet.

  3. Lumped-parameter modeling of PWR downcomer and pressurizer for LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two lumped-parameter models, one for a PWR downcomer and the other for a pressurizer, are presented. The models are based on the transient, nonhomogeneous, drift-flux description of two-phase flow, and are suitable for simulating a hypothetical LOCA condition. Effects of thermal nonequilibrium are incorporated in the downcomer model, whereas the pressurizer model can track the interfaces among various flow regimes. Semiimplicit numerical schemes are used for solution. Encouraging results have been obtained for both the models. (author)

  4. Determination of optimal conditions for pressure oxidative leaching of Sarcheshmeh Molybdenite concentrate using Taguchi method

    OpenAIRE

    Khoshnevisana A.; Yoozbashizadeha H.

    2012-01-01

    The present research work is based on finding the optimum conditions for pressure oxidative leaching of the molybdenite concentrate to produce technical-grade molybdic oxide (MoO3) with high recovery through further treatment of the filtrate solution. The Taguchi method was used to design and minimize the number of experiments. By using Taguchi orthogonal (L25) array, five parameters (time, temperature, oxygen pressure, pulp density and acid concentration) at five levels were selected f...

  5. Analysis of Pressure Fluctuations in a Natural Gas Engine Under Lean Burn Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, A.K.; Litak, G.; Yao, B.-F.; Li, G. -X.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We have investigated the cycle-to-cycle pressure fluctuations in a natural gas engine under lean burn conditions. In particular, we have examined the dynamics of the indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) variations for four different values of the equivalence ratio. For each equivalence ratio, we used a continuous wavelet transform to identify the dominant spectral modes and the number of cycles over which these modes may persist. Our results reveal that when the mixtur...

  6. On dependence of the rate of gas-free combustion conditions upon the pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considered is the reason of dependence of combustion rate on the pressure, detected in the system, which must burn under gas-free conditions with permanent rate, according to thermodynamic calculations. The experimental results on combustion rates, lengthening of the burnt samples, the content and quantity of liberated gases in the inert gas pressure range of 120 at>=p>=1 mm Hg are presented for various mixtures of titanium with boron, differing in component particle sizes and impurities

  7. Cutting and conditioning of the reactor pressure vessel in the NPP Wuergassen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NPP Wuergassen was shutdown in 1995 after 23 years of operation. Since 1997 the nuclear power plant is being dismantled. The cutting of the reactor pressure vessel internals was performed between 2003 and 2008. After decontamination the cylindrical parts of the reactor pressure vessel were dissected, the process was finalized in 2010. AREVA has now a 30 years-experience concerning repair, replacement and dismantling of reactor components. In the contribution the authors describe the process planning, manufacture and testing of appropriate remote handled tools, decontamination, dissection of the pressure vessel (320 t), conditioning, packaging and transport of the radioactive waste including radiation protection monitoring.

  8. LHe Flow Regime/Pressure Drop for D0 Solenoid at Steady State Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-03-03

    This paper describes in a note taking format what was learned from several sources on two phase liquid helium flow regimes and pressure drops as applied to the D-Zero solenoid upgrade project. Calculations to estimate the steady state conditions for the D-Zero solenoid at 5, 10 and 15 g/s are also presented. For the lower flow rates a stratified type regime can be expected with a pressure drop less than 0.5 psi. For the higher flow rate a more homogeneous flow regime can be expected with a pressure drop between 0.4 to 1.5 psi.

  9. Abiotic Formation of Valine Peptides Under Conditions of High Temperature and High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Ishiguro, Takato; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the oligomerization of solid valine and the stabilities of valine and valine peptides under conditions of high temperature (150-200 °C) and high pressure (50-150 MPa). Experiments were performed under non-aqueous condition in order to promote dehydration reaction. After prolonged exposure of monomeric valine to elevated temperatures and pressures, the products were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry comparing their retention times and masses. We identified linear peptides that ranged in size from dimer to hexamer, as well as a cyclic dimer. Previous studies that attempted abiotic oligomerization of valine in the absence of a catalyst have never reported valine peptides larger than a dimer. Increased reaction temperature increased the dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides to products such as glycine, ?-alanine, ammonia, and amines by processes such as deamination, decarboxylation, and cracking. The amount of residual valine and peptide yields was greater at higher pressures at a given temperature, pressure, and reaction time. This suggests that dissociative decomposition of valine and valine peptides is reduced by pressure. Our findings are relevant to the investigation of diagenetic processes in prebiotic marine sediments where similar pressures occur under water-poor conditions. These findings also suggest that amino acids, such as valine, could have been polymerized to peptides in deep prebiotic marine sediments within a few hundred million years.

  10. Separating expansion from contraction and generalizing TOV condition in spherically symmetric models with pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Delliou, Morgan Le

    2009-01-01

    We investigate spherically symmetric solutions with pressure and discuss the existence of a dividing shell separating expanding and collapsing regions. We perform a 3+1 splitting and obtain gauge invariant conditions relating not only the intrinsic spatial curvature of the shells to the ADM mass, but also a function of the pressure which we introduce that generalises the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equilibrium condition. We consider the particular case of a Lema\\^itre-Tolman dust models with a cosmological constant (a $\\Lambda$-CDM model) as an example of our results.

  11. Phase Transformation of BN Nanoparticles Under High Pressure Low Temperature Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z.; Lai, Z. F.; Li, K.; Cui, D. L.; Lun, N.; Wang, Q. L.; Jiang, M. H.

    Phase transformation of BN nanoparticles under high pressure (580~860MPa) and low temperature (270~325°C) hot press conditions was investigated. It was found that the contents of orthorhombic boron nitride (oBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) increased with the increase of temperature and the prolonging of hot pressing time under high pressure conditions. At the same time, because of the intergrowth of hBN, oBN and cBN. there are strong interactions among these three phases.

  12. Embedded optical probes for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement of materials in extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, R. L.; Rodriguez, G.; Gibson, L. L.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Grover, M.; Lalone, B. M.; Udd, E.

    2014-05-01

    We present recent efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop sensors for simultaneous, in situ pressure and temperature measurements under dynamic conditions by using an all-optical fiber-based approach. While similar tests have been done previously in deflagration-to-detonation tests (DDT), where pressure and temperature were measured to 82 kbar and 400°C simultaneously, here we demonstrate the use of embedded fiber grating sensors to obtain high temporal resolution, in situ pressure measurements in inert materials. We present two experimental demonstrations of pressure measurements: (1) under precise shock loading from a gas-gun driven plate impact and (2) under high explosive driven shock in a water filled vessel. The system capitalizes on existing telecom components and fast transient digitizing recording technology. It operates as a relatively inexpensive embedded probe (single-mode 1550 nm fiber-based Bragg grating) that provides a continuous fast pressure record during shock and/or detonation. By applying well-controlled shock wave pressure profiles to these inert materials, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave and compare our results with particle velocity wave profiles measured simultaneously.

  13. Embedded optical probes for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement of materials in extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present recent efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop sensors for simultaneous, in situ pressure and temperature measurements under dynamic conditions by using an all-optical fiber-based approach. While similar tests have been done previously in deflagration-to-detonation tests (DDT), where pressure and temperature were measured to 82 kbar and 400°C simultaneously, here we demonstrate the use of embedded fiber grating sensors to obtain high temporal resolution, in situ pressure measurements in inert materials. We present two experimental demonstrations of pressure measurements: (1) under precise shock loading from a gas-gun driven plate impact and (2) under high explosive driven shock in a water filled vessel. The system capitalizes on existing telecom components and fast transient digitizing recording technology. It operates as a relatively inexpensive embedded probe (single-mode 1550 nm fiber-based Bragg grating) that provides a continuous fast pressure record during shock and/or detonation. By applying well-controlled shock wave pressure profiles to these inert materials, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave and compare our results with particle velocity wave profiles measured simultaneously.

  14. Boiling heat transfer and dryout in helically coiled tubes under different pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Heat transfer characteristics and dryout for helically coiled tube are performed. • A boiling heat transfer tends to increase with a pressure increase. • Dryout occurs at high quality test conditions investigated. • Steiner–Taborek’s correlation is predicted well based on the experimental results. - Abstract: A helically coiled once-through steam generator has been used widely during the past several decades for small nuclear power reactors. The heat transfer characteristics and dryout conditions are important to optimal design a helically coiled steam generator. Various experiments with the helically coiled tubes are performed to investigate the heat transfer characteristics and occurrence condition of a dryout. For the investigated experimental conditions, Steiner–Taborek’s correlation is predicted reasonably based on the experimental results. The pressure effect is important for the boiling heat transfer correlation. A boiling heat transfer tends to increase with a pressure increase. However, it is not affected by the pressure change at a low power and low mass flow rate. Dryout occurs at high quality test conditions investigated because a liquid film on the wall exists owing to a centrifugal force of the helical coil

  15. Determination of optimal conditions for pressure oxidative leaching of Sarcheshmeh Molybdenite concentrate using Taguchi method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshnevisana A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research work is based on finding the optimum conditions for pressure oxidative leaching of the molybdenite concentrate to produce technical-grade molybdic oxide (MoO3 with high recovery through further treatment of the filtrate solution. The Taguchi method was used to design and minimize the number of experiments. By using Taguchi orthogonal (L25 array, five parameters (time, temperature, oxygen pressure, pulp density and acid concentration at five levels were selected for 25 experiments. The experiments were designed and carried out in a high-pressure reactor in the presence of nitric acid as solvent and oxidizing agent for the molybdenite concentrate and its ReS2 content. The optimum conditions for pressure leaching of molybdenite were obtained through using Signal to Noise analysis and modified by using Minitab software prediction tool. Furthermore, the optimum condition for an economical pressure leaching of rhenium sulfide (ReS2 was achieved with the same process. Analysis of variance (ANOVA showed that the pulp density is of paramount importance in this process.

  16. Relationship between the Effectiveness of Arthrocentesis under Sufficient Pressure and Conditions of the Temporomandibular Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Yuri Izumiyama; Kazuhiro Ooi; Shinya Yura

    2011-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study is to investigate the conditions of the temporomandibular joint relative to the effectiveness of an arthrocentesis-like enforced manipulation technique followed by irrigation under high pressure in patients with closed lock. Methods. We performed arthroscopic examination and manipulation followed by irrigation as the initial treatment in 50 joints with closed lock. Relationship between the effectiveness of the procedure and conditions of the temporomandib...

  17. Modeling and Investigation of Electromechanical Valve Train Actuator at simulated Pressure conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Tufail

    2012-01-01

    In an electromechanical valve actuated engine, the valves are driven by solenoid-type actuators and cam-shaft is eliminated. Control of each valve provides flexibility in valve timings over all engine conditions and achieves the benefits of variable valve timing(VVT). This paper is about investigation of Electro-mechanical actuator at simulated pressure conditions for a single cylinder engine. For this purpose, a scaled down actuator with reduced armature lift and high stiffness springs are bein...

  18. Effect of Low Pressure End Conditions on Steam Power Plant Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Syed Haider; Baheta Aklilu Tesfamichael; Hassan Suhaimi

    2014-01-01

    Most of the electricity produced throughout the world today is from steam power plants and improving the performance of power plants is crucial to minimize the greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. Energy efficiency of a thermal power plant strongly depends on its boiler-condenser operating conditions. The low pressure end conditions of a condenser have influence on the power output, steam consumption and efficiency of a plant. Hence, the objective this paper is to study the effect o...

  19. Numerical investigation of pressure transient responses of a well penetrating a deep geothermal reservoir at super-critical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Yusaku; Ishido, Tsuneo

    1996-01-24

    Numerical simulations were carried out to predict pressure transients in a hypothetical deep geothermal well which penetrates a reservoir at super-critical conditions. Production at about 4000 m depth was assumed. In many cases, two-phase conditions develop due to high temperature and production-induced pressure decrease. Several cases in which single-phase conditions are maintained were studied in detail. Pressure transients are influenced by the reservoir temperature distribution - in particular, a temperature distribution with subcritical conditions at the well but supercritical conditions farther away causes a characteristic nonlinear pressure response whlch is influenced by the large compressibility and small kinematic viscosity near the critical point.

  20. Experimental investigations of bundle boiloff and reflood under high-pressure low heat flux conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported from high-pressure bundle boiloff and reflood tests run during the second series of pressurized-water reactor small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) heat transfer experiments. Tests were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF), a 64-rod, full-length rod bundle heat transfer loop. Tests discussed include five bundle boiloff tests and five reflood tests. Tests were performed under conditions similar to those expected in an SBLOCA. The objective of reflood testing was to study bundle quenching behavior under conditions of varying system pressure, linear power, and flooding rate. Results indicate that average bundle quench rates are roughly 40% of flooding rates for THTF heater rods. The purpose of the boiloff testing was to characterize the response of a full-length heated core undergoing a low-power boiloff transient. Primary test parameters included the linear heat rate and the depressurization rate

  1. Effect of processing conditions on oil point pressure of moringa oleifera seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviara, N A; Musa, W B; Owolarafe, O K; Ogunsina, B S; Oluwole, F A

    2015-07-01

    Seed oil expression is an important economic venture in rural Nigeria. The traditional techniques of carrying out the operation is not only energy sapping and time consuming but also wasteful. In order to reduce the tedium involved in the expression of oil from moringa oleifera seed and develop efficient equipment for carrying out the operation, the oil point pressure of the seed was determined under different processing conditions using a laboratory press. The processing conditions employed were moisture content (4.78, 6.00, 8.00 and 10.00 % wet basis), heating temperature (50, 70, 85 and 100 °C) and heating time (15, 20, 25 and 30 min). Results showed that the oil point pressure increased with increase in seed moisture content, but decreased with increase in heating temperature and heating time within the above ranges. Highest oil point pressure value of 1.1239 MPa was obtained at the processing conditions of 10.00 % moisture content, 50 °C heating temperature and 15 min heating time. The lowest oil point pressure obtained was 0.3164 MPa and it occurred at the moisture content of 4.78 %, heating temperature of 100 °C and heating time of 30 min. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) showed that all the processing variables and their interactions had significant effect on the oil point pressure of moringa oleifera seed at 1 % level of significance. This was further demonstrated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Tukey's test and Duncan's Multiple Range Analysis successfully separated the means and a multiple regression equation was used to express the relationship existing between the oil point pressure of moringa oleifera seed and its moisture content, processing temperature, heating time and their interactions. The model yielded coefficients that enabled the oil point pressure of the seed to be predicted with very high coefficient of determination. PMID:26139917

  2. Effects of variations in loading conditions on maximum pressure and muzzle velocity when using composite charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Tawakley

    1960-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effects on maximum pressure and muzzle velocity due to small changes in various quantities defining the loading conditions have been obtained mathematically when using composite charge in guns. Calculations have been done for a particular gun to illustrate these results.

  3. Effect of Low Pressure End Conditions on Steam Power Plant Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Syed Haider

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of the electricity produced throughout the world today is from steam power plants and improving the performance of power plants is crucial to minimize the greenhouse gas emissions and fuel consumption. Energy efficiency of a thermal power plant strongly depends on its boiler-condenser operating conditions. The low pressure end conditions of a condenser have influence on the power output, steam consumption and efficiency of a plant. Hence, the objective this paper is to study the effect of the low pressure end conditions on a steam power plant performance. For the study each component was modelled thermodynamically. Simulation was done and the results showed that performance of the condenser is highly a function of its pressure which in turn depends on the flow rate and temperature of the cooling water. Furthermore, when the condenser pressure increases both net power output and plant efficiency decrease whereas the steam consumption increases. The results can be used to run a steam power cycle at optimum conditions.

  4. Fusion of Barometric Sensors, WLAN Signals and Building Information for 3--D Indoor/Campus Localization

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hui; Lenz, Henning; Szabo, Andrei; Hanebeck, Uwe D.

    2006-01-01

    Location estimation in indoor/campus environments has attracted much interest for its broad applications. Many applications (e.g. personnel security) require not only the 2-D coordinate but also the floor index where the mobile users are situated. However, most of the current location systems cannot provide the floor information accurately and robustly. In this paper, we propose a 3-D localization scheme which fuses the barometric sensor with Wireless LAN (WLAN) signals and building informa...

  5. Characterisation of Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome in French Bulldogs Using Whole-Body Barometric Plethysmography

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Nai-Chieh; Sargan, David R; Adams, Vicki J; Ladlow, Jane F.

    2015-01-01

    Brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome (BOAS) is an important health and welfare problem in several popular dog breeds. Whole-body barometric plethysmography (WBBP) is a non-invasive method that allows safe and repeated quantitative measurements of respiratory cycles on unsedated dogs. Here respiratory flow traces in French bulldogs from the pet population were characterised using WBBP, and a computational application was developed to recognise affected animals. Eighty-nine French bulldog...

  6. Gender and age differences in psychomotor vigilance performance under differential sleep pressure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatter, Katharina; Graw, Peter; Münch, Mirjam; Knoblauch, Vera; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Cajochen, Christian

    2006-04-01

    The effects of sleep pressure and circadian phase on neurobehavioral function can be sensitively measured with the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). We compared PVT performance in 16 young (8 men and 8 women, 20-31 years) and 16 elderly healthy subjects (8 men and 8 women, 57-74 years) during a 40-h sleep deprivation (SD, high sleep pressure) and a 40-h multiple nap protocol (NAP, low sleep pressure) under dim light and constant posture conditions in a balanced crossover design. Independent of age and sleep pressure conditions, women exhibited significantly slower reaction times (RTs) than men. This effect became more apparent with increasing time elapsed into both the 40-h NAP and SD protocol. However, women tended to have fewer premature key presses than men. Independent of gender, the elderly showed slower RTs than the young in the NAP protocol during the biological day (8-24 h) but not during the biological night (24-8 h). In the SD protocol, they had also significantly slower RTs but only during the first 16 h under low to moderate levels of sleep pressure conditions. The relative PVT performance decline after SD was significantly less pronounced in the elderly than in the young, so that both age groups exhibited similar performance decrements after 16 h into the SD protocol. Thus, nighttime- and sleep pressure-related RT slowing in the young "makes them old", or the elderly are less susceptible to circadian and wake-dependent PVT performance decrements. We interpret the gender effect as a different strategy in women when performing the PVT, although the instructions to be 'as fast as possible' were identical. Not only sleepiness and circadian phase, but also age and gender are major factors that may contribute to attentional failures in extended work shifts and during nighttime work shifts. PMID:16386807

  7. Safety conditions of using structural steels under high temperature and pressures in hydrogen containing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for establishing full-strength conditions was suggested on the base of results of creep-rupture test of tube samples under hydrogen pressure and according to permissible stresses in neutral medium. Applicability of the method was considered taking St3 and 12KhM steels as examples. It was shown that the use of suggested dependences and special efficiency factors enables to forecast endurance limit for the given steel grade and assigned partial hydrogen pressure without labour-intensive test conducting

  8. Improvement of the RELAP5 subcooled boiling model for low pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RELAP5/MOD3.2.2 Gamma code was assessed against low pressure subcooled boiling experiments performed by Zeitoun and Shoukri [1] in a vertical annulus. The predictions of subcooled boiling bubbly flow showed that the present version of the RELAP5 code underestimates the void fraction growth along the tube. To improve the void fraction prediction at low pressure conditions a set of model changes is proposed, which includes modifications of bubbly-slug transition criterion, drift-flux model, interphase heat transfer coefficient and wall evaporation modeling. The improved experiment predictions with the modified RELAP5 code are presented and analysed. (author)

  9. The transpired turbulent boundary layer in various pressure gradients and the blow-off condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, D. P.; Louis, J. F.

    1984-12-01

    Experimental data are reported from studies of the cooling effectiveness and conditions leading to blow-off in transpiration cooling (TC). The TC configuration used featured a sintered bronze plate in a hot blowdown wind tunnel. Cooled air was pumped through the plate and data were gathered with calorimeters downstream of a piece of sandpaper which tripped the boundary layer. Pressure taps were also used. Local pressure gradient effects were small, but local accelerations reduced the cooling effectiveness. The downstream Stanton numbers were sensitive to the upstream coolant-injection ratio. Increasing the injection rate had, at best, only a small effect on the local heat flux.

  10. Pressure-volume-temperature gauging method experiment using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition of parabolic flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Man Su; Park, Hana; Yoo, Don Gyu; Jeong, Sang Kwon [Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young Suk [Launcher Systems Development Team, Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Measuring an exact amount of remaining cryogenic liquid propellant under microgravity condition is one of the important issues of rocket vehicle. A Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) gauging method is attractive due to its minimal additional hardware and simple gauging process. In this paper, PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen is investigated under microgravity condition with parabolic flight. A 9.2 litre metal cryogenic liquid storage tank containing approximately 30% of liquid nitrogen is pressurized by ambient temperature helium gas. During microgravity condition, the inside of the liquid tank becomes near-isothermal condition within 1 K difference indicated by 6 silicon diode sensors vertically distributed in the middle of the liquid tank. Helium injection with higher mass flow rate after 10 seconds of the waiting time results in successful measurements of helium partial pressure in the tank. Average liquid volume measurement error is within 11% of the whole liquid tank volume and standard deviation of errors is 11.9. As a result, the applicability of PVT gauging method to liquid.

  11. Barometric gas transport along faults and its application to nuclear test-ban monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underground nuclear explosions produce a unique but evanescent set of radionuclide gases that potentially can be used in the context of an on-site, test-ban monitoring program to differentiate them from other detected events such as earthquakes or mining activity. In Part I of this report we describe an experiment to evaluate the upward transport of gases from an underground explosion using two gas tracers with very different diffusivities that were released in a 400-m-deep, chemical explosive detonation. The less diffusive (more massive) tracer was detected on a nearby geologic fault 50 days following the detonation while the more diffusive tracer was detected 375 days after release. Computer simulations indicate that the arrival time and the chromatographic behavior of transport are characteristic of barometrically induced flow in a fractured, porous matrix regime. For a hypothetical 1-kiloton fission explosion subject to the same weather and gas transport conditions of the chemical explosion, simulations predict the detectability of argon-37 after 80 days in spite of depletion by radioactive decay. Largely because of the earlier arrival of xenon-133, owing to its lower binary gas diffusivity, the exceedingly short lived isotope should also be detectable - arriving about 30 days earlier than argon. In Part II we consider that our prediction of the detectability of argon and xenon is based upon the small volume (0.00001 m3) sampling technique of the NPE tracer-gas sampling study while actual sampling for radionuclides would involve drawing much larger volume (possibly 0.1-1 m3) gas samples from the near-surface. Extraction of such a large volume of gas from 1-5 meter depths in the soil raises the possibility of significant atmospheric infiltration, leading to substantial dilution of the extracted gas sample. However, an infiltration experiment suggests that significant dilution would not, in fact, occur at the most prolific sampling stations of the earlier gas-tracer study. Of the soil gas being extracted at the shallowest sample site, less than 10% of the gas in the sample volume can be attributed to the infiltration of atmospheric gas. (author)

  12. Optimal heat rejection pressure in transcritical carbon dioxide air conditioning and heat pump systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shengming; Jakobsen, Arne

    1998-01-01

    Due to the urgent need for environmentally benign refrigerants, the use of the natural substance carbon dioxide in refrigeration systems has gained more and more attention. In systems such as automobile air-conditioners and heat pumps, owing to the relatively high heat rejection temperatures, the cycles using carbon dioxide as refrigerant will have to operate in the transcritical area. In a transcritical carbon dioxide system, there is an optimal heat rejection pressure that gives a maximum COP. In this paper, it is shown that the value of this optimal heat rejection pressure mainly depends on the outlet temperature of the gas cooler, the evaporation temperature and the efficiency of the compressor. General correlations for this optimal heat rejection pressure were derived based on cycle simulations. The correlations presented in this paper provide a basisfor designing transcritical carbon dioxide air conditioning or heat pump systems and for intelligent controlling such systems.

  13. Analysis of brittle fracture conditions in WWER reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal steps are shown of computer assessment of the resistance of the WWER pressure vessels to brittle fracture during transients due to thermal shocks in emergency cooling. A pipe with inner diameter of 20 mm was used to show that a typical WWER-440 pressure vessel is always free from brittle fracture. Calculations were made of temperature and stress fields during emergency cooling. An analysis of brittle fracture conditions was performed in accordance with the INTERATOMEHNERGO, an international corporation for cooperation in the nuclear field, standard. Graphs are presented of the typical temperature distribution along the pressure vessel perimeter, of temperature and stress field distribution through vessel thickness, of stress intensity factor dependence on crack depth for different time intervals during pipe failure, and the time and temperature dependence of the stress intensity factor for different crack depths. (J.B.). 7 figs

  14. Fine particulate contaminant control by the UV/photoelectron method under a low pressure condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Takafumi; Okuyama, Kikuo; Inoue, Yuuki; Yokoyama, Shin; Kurose, Shin-ichi; Hirose, Masataka; Fujii, Toshiaki

    1995-11-01

    A new method for removing fine airborne particles using an UV/photoelectron method is investigated for low pressure conditions. In the UV/photoelectron method, particles are unipolarly charged by collision with ions, which are produced by photoelectrons emitted from an UV-irradiated Au film. The particles are collected on electrodes under a strong electric field. To investigate the particle collection efficiency, a test chamber of 53l in volume is used in the experiment. More than 95% of the particles are removed by the method where the chamber pressure is above 10 Torr and the particle diameter ranges from 200 to 400 nm. The results can be explained by the current charging theory of fine particles. This method can be used to design superclean spaces for the storage and handling of wafers, such as wafer stockers, wafer delivering systems, and vacuum load-lock chambers under conventional operating conditions.

  15. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments at extreme conditions: high temperatures and high pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Hosokawa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we review the present status of experimental techniques under extreme conditions of high temperature and high pressure used for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS experiments of liquid metals, semiconductors, molten salts, molecular liquids, and supercritical water and methanol. For high temperature experiments, some types of single-crystal sapphire cells were designed depending on the temperature of interest and the sample thickness for the X-ray transmission. Single-crystal diamond X-ray windows attached to the externally heated high-pressure vessel were used for the IXS experiment of supercritical water and methanol. Some typical experimental results are also given, and the perspective of IXS technique under extreme conditions is discussed.

  16. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments at extreme conditions: high temperatures and high pressures

    OpenAIRE

    Hosokawa, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we review the present status of experimental techniques under extreme conditions of high temperature and high pressure used for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) experiments of liquid metals, semiconductors, molten salts, molecular liquids, and supercritical water and methanol. For high temperature experiments, some types of single-crystal sapphire cells were designed depending on the temperature of interest and the sample thickness for the X-ray transmission. Single-crystal d...

  17. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  18. Finite Element Simulation of Photoacoustic Pressure in a Resonant Photoacoustic Cell Using Lossy Boundary Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Lopes, Natasha; Willatzen, Morten; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2011-01-01

    The finite-element method (FEM) is used to simulate the photoacoustic signal in a cylindrical resonant photoacoustic cell. Simulations include loss effects near the cell walls that appear in the boundary conditions for the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation governing the acoustic pressure. Reasonably good agreement is obtained between theoretical results and experimental data. However, it was anticipated that loss mechanisms other than viscous and thermal boundary losses occur and should be includ...

  19. Conditions of mist formation in pressure gas plants. Bedingungen der Nebelbildung in Druckgasanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobanski, R. (Lehrstuhl Waermetechnik, Technische Hochschule Szczecin (Poland))

    1993-01-01

    The achievement of bearable working conditions for divers under high pressure are the main point of the work at the Thermal Technology Department of TH Szczecin. As damp air to be supplied to the diver tends to form a mist on expansion, criteria to avoid this in its preparation are essential. In the article, a theoretical concept is shown, which makes the determination of the relative humidity and the derivation of criteria for forming condensation nuclei possible. (orig.)

  20. Novel Techniques for High Pressure Falling Sphere Viscosimetry under Simulated Earth's Mantle Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H. J.; Beckmann, F.; Dobson, D. P.; Hunt, S. A.; Secco, R.; Lauterjung, J.; Lathe, C.

    2014-12-01

    Viscosity data of melts measured under in situ high pressure conditions are crucial for the understanding of Earth's lower mantle and the interior of terrestrial and extrasolar Super-Earth planets. We report recent technical advances and techniques enabling falling sphere viscosity measurements in single- and double-stage DIA-type multi-anvil apparatus. For the experiments we used presses with a maximum load of 250 tons and 1750 tons. We anticipate that our system will enable viscosity measurements up to the maximum pressure for non-diamond anvils, i.e. pressures up to some 30 GPa. For the development of the new set ups the deformation of the cell assemblies were analyzed by X-ray absorption tomography at beamline W II at DESY/HASYLAB after the high pressure runs. These analysis gave considerable insights into strategies for improving the cell assembly with the result that the optimized assemblies could be used at much higher pressures without blow-outs. We think this approach is much faster and more beneficial than the classical way of trial and error. Additionally to prevent high pressure blow outs the task was to make the whole melting chamber accessible for the high pressure X-radiography system up to the maximum pressures. This way the accuracy and reliability of the measurements can be improved. For this goal we used X-ray transparent cBN-anvils at the single-stage DIA large volume press. Because this material is recently not available for the cube size of 32 mm this aproach did not work for the double-stage DIA. As a very useful and economical alternative we used slotted carbide anvils filled with fired pyrophyllite bars. To improve the frame quality of the platinum spheres taken by the CCD-camera the energy of the monochromatic X-rays had to be increased to 100 keV. The resulting ascent of scattered radiation required a new design of the X-radiography unit. Our results are demonstrated with viscosity measurements following Stokes law by evaluation of X-radiography sequences taken by a CCD-camera at pressures of 5 GPa as well as 10 GPa and temperatures of 1890 K. As the first result we could increase the maximum pressure range of published viscosity measurements with dacite melts by almost factor 1.5 (see Tinker et al., 2004).

  1. Modeling and Investigation of Electromechanical Valve Train Actuator at simulated Pressure conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Tufail

    2012-01-01

    In an electromechanical valve actuated engine, the valves are driven by solenoid-type actuators and cam-shaft is eliminated. Control of each valve provides flexibility in valve timings over all engine conditions and achieves the benefits of variable valve timing(VVT). This paper is about investigation of Electro-mechanical actuator at simulated pressure conditions for a single cylinder engine. For this purpose, a scaled down actuator with reduced armature lift and high stiffness springs are being used. Experiments are conducted to measure valve release timings, transition times and contact velocities. Furthermore, discussion about the spring, magnetic, exhausts gas forces and their ability to actuate the system as desired.

  2. Earth tidal and barometric responses observed in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation at ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Fluid pressure or hydraulic head measured in wells in geological formations can respond to Earth tidal forces and atmospheric pressure variations. At Andra Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory located in Bure (France), water level and fluid pressure are measured in several boreholes in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation (COX) and in overlying geological formations. One of these boreholes (EST207) is equipped with a multi-packer system monitoring 11 intervals, including 8 in the COX. The recorded fluid pressures in EST207 were analyzed to determine possible Earth tidal responses. In this borehole, the fluid pressure and atmospheric pressure variations data are recorded every fifteen minutes and 6.5 years of such data from 2004/06/02 to 2010/12/31 were analyzed. Various perturbed data, gaps, drift and abnormal data were corrected through a data preprocessing process. Data interpolation and filtering processes were performed to have data available every 15 minutes at 0, 15, 30 and 45 minutes on the hour. A spectral analysis (Fast Fourier Transform) of each pressure data series shows amplitude peaks at frequencies corresponding to various Earth tidal frequencies: diurnal and semi diurnal waves can be identified. Spectral analyses were also performed on the atmospheric pressure data. The solar semi diurnal wave (S2) was identified. The 'Earth Tides ETERNA package' was used to separate the waves according to the frequencies bands. The analyses performed using ETERNA are indicated as 'Earth Tidal Analyses' (ETAN). Tidal parameters are estimated from ETAN: amplitudes A and its standard deviation ?(A)[hPa], phase ? for the main waves in diurnal and semi diurnal frequencies bands before and after atmospheric pressure variations correction. The barometric efficiency (BE) and its standard deviation ? (BE) as regression coefficient is calculated. The atmospheric pressure data are also analyzed with ETERNA; the wave S2 amplitude and phase values usually taken into account as references are in good agreement with values calculated at others sites. This result validates the atmospheric pressure data sets. Having high quality data and multi-year data sets, it was possible to separate several main tidal waves in the diurnal band and in the semi diurnal band. K1, O1, P1, S1 and M2, N2, S2, K2 bands were first taken into account in each series to determine whether they were significant or not. The ETAN results are in good agreement with the spectral analyses results and with these results it can be concluded that the 11 monitoring intervals in borehole EST207 respond to Earth Tidal forces and to atmospheric pressure variations. The ETERNA software allows identifying more tidal waves with more accuracy. In all the intervals, the best identified significant waves are O1, K1, M2 and S2. While the M2 amplitude is not or only slightly perturbed by atmospheric pressure variations and the M2 phase is not, the S2 wave amplitude and phase are very sensitive to atmospheric pressure. After barometric correction, the amplitudes through the borehole are generally decreasing from the bottom to the top. In a preliminary hydrogeological interpretation, the detailed intercomparison of tidal analyses results according to the barometric correction effect, the BE values and the waves identification quality provide a classification of the barometric and tidal responses as a function of the various intervals. These responses were classified into four groups depending on the monitoring intervals in the Dogger, the lower COX, the upper COX and the base of Oxfordian. The BE values show that the greater the clay content of the formation is, the greater the BE values are. The BE values in the Dogger are similar to the values estimated in the Oxfordian. In 2003, Andra investigated earth tides and barometric responses in the Oxfordian of two boreholes, EST203 and EST104. The hydrogeological interpretation in these two boreholes provided estimates of transmissivity and storage coefficient consistent wi

  3. Equation of state for solids with high accuracy and satisfying the limitation condition at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiuxun, Sun; Qiang, Wu; Lingcang, Cai; Fuqian, Jing

    2006-01-01

    An equation of state (EOS) with high accuracy is proposed to strictly satisfy the Fermi gas limitation condition at high pressure. The EOS (SJX EOS) is a modification of the effective Rydberg (ER2) EOS. Instead of Holzapfel's method to directly modify the ER2 EOS, one modifying term is added to the ER2 EOS to make it not only satisfy the high pressure limitation condition, but also to avoid the disadvantages occurring in the Holzapfel and ‘adapted polynomial expansion of the order 3’ (AP3) EOSs. The two-parameter ER2, Holzapfel, and three-parameter SJX, AP3, Kumari and Dass (KD) EOSs are applied to 50 materials to fit all experimental compression data available. The five EOSs also are applied to 37 of the 50 materials to fit experimental compression data at low-pressure ranges. The results show that for all pressure ranges the AP3 EOS gives the best fitting results; the SJX, ER2, Holzapfel and KD EOSs sequentially give inferior results. Otherwise, it is shown that the values of B0, B0? and B0? are different for different EOSs and also, within one EOS, for high and low-pressure ranges. The SJX EOS gives the best consistency between the values obtained by fitting all experimental data available, and the experimental data at low-pressure ranges, respectively. The AP3 EOS gives the worst results. The differences of the values of B0, B0? and B0? obtained for the ER2, Holzapfel and KD EOSs with those obtained for the SJX EOS are large at high-pressure ranges, but decrease at low-pressure ranges. At present, the newest experimental compression data, within the widest compression range, are available for solid n-H 2. The values of B0, B0? and B0? fitted by using the SJX EOS are almost in agreement with these experimental data. The ER2 EOS gives inferior values, and other EOSs give fairly bad results. For the predicted compression curves and the cohesive energy, the SJX EOS gives the best results; the AP3 EOS gives the worst results, even for many solids the AP3 EOS cannot give physically correct results for the cohesive energy. The analysis shows that for such solids, the variation of pressure and energy versus compression ratio calculated by using the AP3 EOS would oscillate, physically incorrectly. Although the AP3 EOS has the best fitting ability to the pressures, it has the worst predicting ability, and fails to be a universal EOS. The SJX EOS is recommended and can be taken as a candidate of universal EOSs to predict compression curves of solids in a wide pressure range only using the values of B0, B0? and B0? obtained from low-pressure data.

  4. High performance PEMFC stack with open-cathode at ambient pressure and temperature conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Rosa, D.T.; Pinto, D.G.; Silva, V.S. [SRE - Solucoes Racionais de Energia, S.A., Poligono Industrial do Alto do Ameal, Ramalhal (Portugal); Silva, R.A.; Rangel, C.M. [INETI, Unidade de Electroquimica de Materiais, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2007-12-15

    An open-air cathode proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was developed. This paper presents a study of the effect of several critical operating conditions on the performance of an 8-cell stack. The studied operating conditions such as cell temperature, air flow rate and hydrogen pressure and flow rate were varied in order to identify situations that could arise when the PEMFC stack is used in low-power portable PEMFC applications. The stack uses an air fan in the edge of the cathode manifolds, combining high stoichiometric oxidant supply and stack cooling purposes. In comparison with natural convection air-breathing stacks, the air dual-function approach brings higher stack performances, at the expense of having a lower use of the total stack power output. Although improving the electrochemical reactions kinetics and decreasing the polarization effects, the increase of the stack temperature lead to membrane excessive dehydration (loss of sorbed water), increasing the ohmic resistance of the stack (lower performance). The results show that the stack outputs a maximum power density of 310mW/cm{sup 2} at 790mA/cm{sup 2} when operating at ambient temperature, atmospheric air pressure, self-humidifying, air fan voltage at 5.0 V and 250 mbar hydrogen relative pressure. For the studied range of hydrogen relative pressure (150-750 mbar), it is found that the stack performance is practically not affected by this operation condition, although a slightly higher power output for 150 mbar was observed. On the other hand, it is found that the stack performance increases appreciably when operated with forced air convection instead of natural convection. Finally, the continuous fuel flow operation mode does not improve the stack performance in comparison with the hydrogen dead-end mode, in spite of being preferable to operate the stack with hydrogen flow rates above 0.20 l/min. (author)

  5. Detectability and significance of 12 hr barometric tide in radon-222 signal, drip water flow rate, air temperature and carbon dioxide concentration in an underground tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searching for small periodic signals, such as the 12 hr (S2) barometric tide, and monitoring their amplitude as a function of time, can provide important clues on the complex processes affecting fluid transport in unsaturated fractured media under multiple influences. Here, first, we show that a modified spectrogram analysis (MSA) is more efficient than simple Fourier transform to reveal weak periodic signals. Secondly, we show how transient periodic signals can be monitored as a function of time using spectrograms. These methods are applied to time-series of radon and carbon dioxide concentration, drip water flow rates and air temperature measured during several years in the Roselend dead-end tunnel, located in the French Alps near an artificial lake. A weak S2 line is evidenced in radon concentration, with enhanced amplitude during transient radon bursts. Similarly, the S2 line is observed using MSA in drip water flow rates which sample mainly fracture flow, as suggested by a hydrochemical analysis, while it is not seen in drip water flow rates sampling matrix flow. In the absence of a strong 24 hr line, the presence of a S2 line suggests sensitivity to barometric pressure, and thus a significant advective contribution in radon and some drip water transport. No S2 line is observed in the carbon dioxide time-series. The temporal structure of the S2 component, however, is not similar in the radon concentration and the drip water flow rates, suggesting, in particular, that drip water does not play a significant role in the generation of radon bursts. Temperature time-series exhibit a significant S2 contribution, induced by atmospheric pressure, spatially organised in the tunnel, decreasing vertically upwards. A remarkable transient temperature inversion during radon bursts suggests that the additional advective air contributions responsible for the radon bursts occur from the non-saturated rocks below the tunnel. (authors)

  6. Measurements of mixtures with carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions using commercial high pressure equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Luciana L.P.R. de; Rutledge, Luis Augusto Medeiros; Moreno, Eesteban L.; Hovell, Ian; Rajagopal, Krishnaswamy [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (LATCA-EQ-UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica. Lab. de Termodinamica e Cinetica Aplicada

    2012-07-01

    There is a growing interest in studying physical properties of binary and multicomponent fluid mixtures with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) over an extended range of temperature and pressure. The estimation of properties such as density, viscosity, saturation pressure, compressibility, solubility and surface tension of mixtures is important in design, operation and control as well as optimization of chemical processes especially in extractions, separations, catalytic and enzymatic reactions. The phase behaviour of binary and multicomponent mixtures with supercritical CO{sub 2} is also important in the production and refining of petroleum where mixtures of paraffin, naphthene and aromatics with supercritical fluids are often encountered. Petroleum fluids can present a complex phase behaviour in the presence of CO{sub 2}, where two-phase (VLE and LLE) and three phase regions (VLLE) might occur within ranges of supercritical conditions of temperature and pressure. The objective of this study is to develop an experimental methodology for measuring the phase behaviour of mixtures containing CO{sub 2} in supercritical regions, using commercial high-pressure equipment. (author)

  7. Fluid-structure Interaction Modeling of Aneurysmal Conditions with High and Normal Blood Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Ryo; Oshima, Marie; Kobayashi, Toshio; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2006-09-01

    Hemodynamic factors like the wall shear stress play an important role in cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the influence of hemodynamic factors in blood vessels, the authors have developed a numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis technique. The objective is to use numerical simulation as an effective tool to predict phenomena in a living human body. We applied the technique to a patient-specific arterial model, and with that we showed the effect of wall deformation on the WSS distribution. In this paper, we compute the interaction between the blood flow and the arterial wall for a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm with various hemodynamic conditions, such as hypertension. We particularly focus on the effects of hypertensive blood pressure on the interaction and the WSS, because hypertension is reported to be a risk factor in rupture of aneurysms. We also aim to show the possibility of FSI computations with hemodynamic conditions representing those risk factors in cardiovascular disease. The simulations show that the transient behavior of the interaction under hypertensive blood pressure is significantly different from the interaction under normal blood pressure. The transient behavior of the blood-flow velocity, and the resulting WSS and the mechanical stress in the aneurysmal wall, are significantly affected by hypertension. The results imply that hypertension affects the growth of an aneurysm and the damage in arterial tissues.

  8. Core void fraction distribution under high-temperature high-pressure boil-off conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prediction of void fraction distributions in a core under boil-off conditions is important for analyzing the core cooling performance during reactor accidents. In this work, boil-off experiments were conducted under high-temperature high-pressure conditions using PWR-type and tight-lattice type (p/d = 1.11) simulated fuel assembly test sections of the Two-Phase flow Test Facility (TPTF). Several existing void fraction correlations and models were assessed against the experimental data. As a result, it has become clear that: 1) while the Chexal-Lellouche model predicts best the present experimental data, the model has a tendency to underestimate void fraction at higher pressures; 2) no significant problems are found in the applicability of the tested correlations and models to the tight-lattice geometry; and 3) void fractions measured by single-beam gamma densitometers tend to be larger than those measured by differential pressure transducers due to the radial void fraction distribution. (author)

  9. Behavior of surface flaws in reactor pressure vessels under thermal-shock loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the conditions necessary for crack propagation during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), the detailed behavior of the cracks under these specific conditions, and an experimental program designed to determine the validity of the method of analysis (linear-elastic fracture mechanics) used to predict the behavior of flaws under severe thermal-shock loading conditions. A detailed fracture-mechanics analysis of the LOCA thermal shock was performed to help establish the scope of the experimental program. The results of this analysis indicate that present-generation and future pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels will not experience excessive crack propagation. This is also true of earlier PWR vessels, which contain rather high concentrations of copper. The agreement between experimental results and the LEFM analysis was very good. 14 refs

  10. Dynamic response of berea sandstone shock-loaded under dry, wet and water-pressurized conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single-stage light-gas gun was used to perform shock-recovery experiments on Berea sandstone under dry, wet and hydrostatically water-pressurized conditions. The samples were impacted by flyer-plates to achieve stress levels in the range 1.3 to 9.8 GPa. The microstructure of the shocked samples was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser particle analysis and X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT). The dry samples show strongly fragmented and irregularly fractured quartz grains with a considerably reduced porosity, whereas the wet and water-pressurized specimens show less grain damage and less porosity reduction. During shock compression the water in the pores distributes the stresses and therefore the contact force between the grains is reduced. The interaction between the grains during the shock process was modeled by explicitly treating the grain-pore structure using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and the Discrete Element Method (DEM)

  11. Analysis of Reactor Pressurized Thermal Shock Conditions Considering Upgrading of Systems Important to Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper analyzes conditions of pressurized thermal shock on the reactor pressure vessel taking into account upgrading of the emergency core cooling system and primary overpressure protection system. For representative accident scenarios, calculation and comparative analysis was carried out. These scenarios include a small leak from the hot leg and PRZ SV stuck opening with re closure after 3600 sec and 3 SG heat transfer tube rupture. The efficiency of mass flow control by valves on the pump head (emergency core cooling systems) and cold overpressure protection (primary overpressure protection system) was analyzed. The thermal hydraulic model for RELAP5/Mod3.2 code with detailed downcomer (DC) model and changes in accordance with upgrades was used for calculations. Detailed (realistic) modeling of piping and equipment was performed. The upgrades prevent excessive primary cooling and, consequently, help to preserve the RPV integrity and to avoid the formation of a through crack, which can lead to a severe accident

  12. Sulphation of oil shale ash under atmospheric and pressurized combustion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main problems in conventional combustion boilers firing pulverized oil shale is the corrosion and fouling of heating surfaces, which is caused by sulphur compounds. Another major problem, from the environmental point of view, are the high SO2 emissions. Consequently, the amount of sulphur in flue gases must be reduced. One alternative to lower the SO2, concentration is the use of new technologies, such as pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC). In FBC processes, the sulphur components are usually removed by the addition of limestone (CaCO3) or dolomite (CaCO3 x MgCO3) into the bed. The calcium in these absorbents react with SO2, producing solid CaSO4. However, when burning oil shale, there would be no need to add limestone or dolomite into the bed, due to the initially high limestone content in the fuel (molar ratio Ca/S =10). The capture of sulphur by oil shale ashes has been studied using a pressurized thermogravimetric apparatus (PTGA). The chosen experimental conditions were typical for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Four different materials were tested - one cyclone ash from an Estonian oil shale boiler, two size fractions of Estonian oil shale and, one fraction of Israeli oil shale. The cyclone ash was found to be the poorest sulphur absorbent. In general, the results from the sulphur capture experiments under both atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed conditions showed that the oil shale can capture not only its own sulphur but also significant amounts of additional sulphur from another fuel if the fuels are mixed together. (author)

  13. Rheological contrast between olivine and garnet at high pressures under anhydrous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, S.; Suzuki, A. M.; Kohlstedt, D. L.; Durham, W. B.; Dixon, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we carried out experiments investigating the rheological contrast between olivine and garnet, two major components of the mantle, at mantle temperatures and pressures. Experiments were carried out using a deformation-DIA at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples were fabricated from powdered minerals; olivine was from San Carlos and garnet from the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt in China. In the experiments, a cold-pressed cylinder of fine-grained olivine and one of garnet, each with a diameter of ~1.1 mm and a length of ~0.8 mm, were stacked together, separated by a nickel foil disk. This duplex sample was assembled with alumina pistons, a boron nitride sleeve, and graphite resistance heater into a 6.2-mm edge length cubic mullite-pyrophyllite pressure cell. Experiments were carried out at 1373 - 1573 K and pressures of 3 - 5 GPa. With the synchrotron x-ray beam, a time series of in-situ radiographs enables monitoring of the instantaneous lengths of both deforming samples at the same temperature, pressure, and load. At our experimental conditions, both samples deform with stress exponents of n ? 3 and with activation energies of Q ? 300 kJ/mol. Samples of olivine deform only a factor of ~1.5 faster than samples of garnet of similar grain size, indicating that there is no significant rheological contrast between samples of olivine and garnet under anhydrous conditions. This result, which is the first direct comparison of the rheological behavior of olivine and garnet, provides a solid basis for modeling the rheological structures of subducted lithosphere.

  14. Microstructural Changes in SA508 Gr.4N Pressure Vessel Steel with Heat Treatment Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low carbon low alloy steels, are used for nuclear reactor pressure vessels, which determine the safety and the life span of nuclear power plant. In addition, they are utilized for long period under very severe conditions such as high pressure, high temperature, and neutron irradiation and corrosion, so that they are requested high strength and toughness, weldability, neutron irradiation resistance. These mechanical properties can be affected by grain size and carbide precipitation behavior that depend on chemical composition and heat treatment condition. It is well known that SA508 Gr.4N steel with higher Ni and Cr contents has excellent mechanical properties due to its enhanced hardenability. However more verification is needed, in order to use for the nuclear plant. This study was initiated to evaluate the effects of metallurgical variables on mechanical properties of SA508 Gr.4N steel as a candidate for the advanced RPV materials. In order to control grain size and carbide morphology, austenitizing and tempering condition were changed. Also SA508 Gr.3 steel was used to compare microstructure and mechanical properties to those of SA508 Gr.4N steel

  15. Microstructural Changes in SA508 Gr.4N Pressure Vessel Steel with Heat Treatment Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Joung Lim; Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gil Moo [Chungnam National University, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Low carbon low alloy steels, are used for nuclear reactor pressure vessels, which determine the safety and the life span of nuclear power plant. In addition, they are utilized for long period under very severe conditions such as high pressure, high temperature, and neutron irradiation and corrosion, so that they are requested high strength and toughness, weldability, neutron irradiation resistance. These mechanical properties can be affected by grain size and carbide precipitation behavior that depend on chemical composition and heat treatment condition. It is well known that SA508 Gr.4N steel with higher Ni and Cr contents has excellent mechanical properties due to its enhanced hardenability. However more verification is needed, in order to use for the nuclear plant. This study was initiated to evaluate the effects of metallurgical variables on mechanical properties of SA508 Gr.4N steel as a candidate for the advanced RPV materials. In order to control grain size and carbide morphology, austenitizing and tempering condition were changed. Also SA508 Gr.3 steel was used to compare microstructure and mechanical properties to those of SA508 Gr.4N steel.

  16. Windsock memory conditioned RAM (Co-Ram) pressure effect: forced reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail

    CERN Document Server

    Vörös, Z; Khodachenko, M; Honkonen, I; Janhunen, P; Palmroth, M

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection (MR) is a key physical concept explaining the addition of magnetic flux to the magnetotail and closed flux lines back-motion to the dayside magnetosphere. This scenario elaborated by \\citet{dung63}, can explain many aspects of solar wind-magnetosphere interaction processes, including substorms. However, neither the Dungey model nor its numerous modifications were able to explain fully the onset conditions for MR in the tail. In this paper, we introduce new onset conditions for forced MR in the tail. We call our scenario the "windsock memory conditioned ram pressure effect". Our non-flux-transfer associated forcing is introduced by a combination of large-scale windsock motions exhibiting memory effects and solar wind dynamic pressure actions on the nightside magnetopause during northward oriented IMF. Using global MHD GUMICS-4 simulation results, upstream data from WIND, magnetosheath data from Cluster-1 and distant-tail data from the two-probe ARTEMIS mission, we show that the simultaneo...

  17. Optimizing ammonia pressurization/depressurization processing conditions to enhance enzymatic susceptibility of dwarf elephant grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, A; Byers, F M; Sulbarán-de-Ferrer, B; Dale, B E; Aiello, C

    2000-01-01

    An ammonia pressurization/depressurization process was investigated to evaluate the potential of producing reducing sugars from dwarf elephant grass, a warm-season forage. Moisture, temperature, and ammonia loading affected sugar yield (p < 0.0001). At optimal conditions, ammonia processing solubilized 50.9% of the hemicellulose and raised the sugar yield (percentage of theoretical) from 18 to 83%. Glucose and xylose production were increased 3.2- and 8.2-fold, respectively. The mild processing conditions of the ammonia treatment (90-100 degrees C, 5 min), the low enzyme loading (2 international filter paper units/g), and the short hydrolysis time (24 h), greatly enhance the potential of using forages to produce sugars valuable for several applications. PMID:10849787

  18. Finite Element Simulation of Photoacoustic Pressure in a Resonant Photoacoustic Cell Using Lossy Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggen, L.; Lopes, N.; Willatzen, M.; Rubahn, H.-G.

    2011-04-01

    The finite-element method (FEM) is used to simulate the photoacoustic signal in a cylindrical resonant photoacoustic cell. Simulations include loss effects near the cell walls that appear in the boundary conditions for the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation governing the acoustic pressure. Reasonably good agreement is obtained between theoretical results and experimental data. However, it was anticipated that loss mechanisms other than viscous and thermal boundary losses occur and should be included. Nevertheless, the feasibility to use FEM together with the derived boundary conditions to simulate the photoacoustic signal was demonstrated and good agreement with experiments for the actual resonance frequency and the quality factor of the cell was obtained despite its complicated geometry.

  19. Finite Element Simulation of Photoacoustic Pressure in a Resonant Photoacoustic Cell Using Lossy Boundary Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Lopes, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    The finite-element method (FEM) is used to simulate the photoacoustic signal in a cylindrical resonant photoacoustic cell. Simulations include loss effects near the cell walls that appear in the boundary conditions for the inhomogeneous Helmholtz equation governing the acoustic pressure. Reasonably good agreement is obtained between theoretical results and experimental data. However, it was anticipated that loss mechanisms other than viscous and thermal boundary losses occur and should be included. Nevertheless, the feasibility to use FEM together with the derived boundary conditions to simulate the photoacoustic signal was demonstrated and good agreement with experiments for the actual resonance frequency and the quality factor of the cell was obtained despite its complicated geometry.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels under boiling water reactor conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, H. P.; Ritter, S.

    2008-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of different reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and weld filler/heat-affected zone materials was characterized under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) normal water (NWC) and hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions by periodical partial unloading, constant and ripple load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. The experiments were performed in oxygenated or hydrogenated high-purity or sulphate/chloride containing water at temperatures from 150 to 288 °C. In good agreement with field experience, these investigations revealed a very low susceptibility to SCC crack growth and small crack growth rates (power operation practice or modern RPVs. Application of HWC always resulted in a significant reduction of SCC crack growth rates by more than one order of magnitude under these critical system conditions and growth rates dropped well below the 'BWRVIP-60 SCC disposition lines'.

  1. Study on intermittent flow behavior in a vertical channel under low-pressure condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intermittent flow behavior in a vertical annulus under a low-pressure condition was experimentally studied using a scaling experiment facility. The temperature and pressure variations in the channel had been obtained under the heat load ranging from 0 to 2.0 kW, initial subcooled water temperature ranging from 50 to 90°C and length–diameter ratio ranging from 1.6 to 50. The effects of the heat load and length–diameter ratio of channel on the flow characteristics were investigated in detail. The experimental results showed that the steam bubbles erupted more frequently and regularly at a high heat load. The intermittent flow period decreased with increase of the heat load and aspect ratio. Based on the mechanism analysis, an empirical model considering the steam oscillation and the vapor–liquid interface rupture based on the experimental data was proposed. It was found that the accumulated steam basically increased linearly. The oscillation of the pressure and velocity decreased gradually with continuous steam accumulation. The Reynolds number of the liquid within the rising section was very small at the stagnation state since there was no forced circulation flow. Finally, a blockage was engendered in the pipeline with the steam accumulated. (author)

  2. Liquid Fuel Emulsion Jet-in-Crossflow Penetration and Dispersion Under High Pressure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Guillermo Andres

    The current work focuses on the jet-in-crossflow penetration and dispersion behavior of water-in-oil emulsions in a high pressure environment. Both fuel injection strategies of using a water-in-oil emulsion and a jet-in-crossflow have demonstrated unique benefits in improving gas turbine performance from an emissions and efficiency standpoint. A jet-in-crossflow is very practical for use in gas turbine engines, rocket propulsion, and aircraft engines since it utilizes already available crossflow air to atomize fuel. Injecting water into a combustion chamber in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion allows for pollutant emissions reduction while reducing efficiency loses that may result from using a separate water or steam injection circuit. Dispersion effects on oil droplets are expected, therefore investigating the distribution of both oil and water droplets in the crossflow is an objective in this work. Understanding the synchronization and injection behavior of the two strategies is of key interest due to their combined benefits. A water-to-oil ratio and an ambient pressure parameter are developed for emulsion jet-in-crossflow trajectories. To this end, a total of 24 emulsion jet-in-crossflow tests were performed with varying ambient pressures of 2-8 atm and momentum flux ratios of 50, 85, and 120. Sobel edge filtering was applied to each averaged image obtained from a high speed video of each test case. Averaged and filtered images were used to resolve top and bottom edges of the trajectory in addition to the overall peak intensity up to 40 mm downstream of the injection point. An optimized correlation was established and found to differ from literature based correlations obtained under atmospheric pressure conditions. Overall it was found that additional parameters were not necessary for the top edge and peak intensity correlations, but a need for a unique emulsion bottom edge and width trajectory correlation was recognized. In addition to investigating emulsion jet-in-crossflow trajectory correlations, a unique Dual Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (Dual-PLIF) method was applied for the first time on emulsions at elevated pressure conditions. From the Dual-PLIF results, qualitative observations provided insight into the unique dispersion of oil and water concentrations within a cross-sectional plane down stream of the jet-in-crossflow injection.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of pressure-driven flows in microchannels using Navier-Maxwell slip boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, T; Dellar, PJ

    2012-01-01

    We present lattice Boltzmann simulations of rarefied flows driven by pressure drops along two-dimensional microchannels. Rarefied effects lead to non-zero cross-channel velocities, nonlinear variations in the pressure along the channel. Both effects are absent in flows driven by uniform body forces. We obtain second-order accuracy for the two components of velocity the pressure relative to asymptotic solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with slip boundary conditions. Since th...

  4. CFD simulation of pressure and discharge surge in Francis turbine at off-design conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid 1D-3D CFD model is developed for the numerical simulation of pressure and discharge surge in hydraulic power plants. The most essential part – the turbine itself – is simulated directly using 3D unsteady equations of turbulent motion of fluid-vapor mixture, while the rest of the hydraulic system is simulated in frames of 1D hydro-acoustic model. Thus the model accounts for the main factors responsible for excitation and propagation of pressure and discharge waves in hydraulic power plant. Boundary conditions at penstock inlet and draft tube outlet are discussed in detail. Then simulations of dynamic behavior at part load and full load operating points are performed. It is shown that the numerical model is able to capture self-excited oscillations in full load conditions. The influence of penstock length and flow structure behind the runner are investigated. The presented approach seems to be a promising tool for prediction and investigation the dynamic behavior in hydraulic power plants.

  5. CFD simulation of pressure and discharge surge in Francis turbine at off-design conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirkov, D.; Avdyushenko, A.; Panov, L.; Bannikov, D.; Cherny, S.; Skorospelov, V.; Pylev, I.

    2012-11-01

    A hybrid 1D-3D CFD model is developed for the numerical simulation of pressure and discharge surge in hydraulic power plants. The most essential part - the turbine itself - is simulated directly using 3D unsteady equations of turbulent motion of fluid-vapor mixture, while the rest of the hydraulic system is simulated in frames of 1D hydro-acoustic model. Thus the model accounts for the main factors responsible for excitation and propagation of pressure and discharge waves in hydraulic power plant. Boundary conditions at penstock inlet and draft tube outlet are discussed in detail. Then simulations of dynamic behavior at part load and full load operating points are performed. It is shown that the numerical model is able to capture self-excited oscillations in full load conditions. The influence of penstock length and flow structure behind the runner are investigated. The presented approach seems to be a promising tool for prediction and investigation the dynamic behavior in hydraulic power plants.

  6. Safety criterion for burnout of the plate-type fuel in pressurized conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduced enrichment program for JMTR is now underway and the core conversion to LEU (Low Enrichment Uranium) is scheduled to be made in 1993. Consistent with the safety guide which have been recently developed for research and test reactors in Japan, the safety analysis for the JMTR LEU conversion was conducted. In the safety analysis, DNB (Departure from Nucleate Boiling) heat flux correlation for the JMTR downflow condition was reconsidered because recent studies on burnout show that DNB heat fluxes with thin rectangular channels under low flow rate and low pressure conditions are much lower than predicted values by conventional DNB correlations. Available DNB data, however, are very limited for the JMTR operation pressure range, so that DNB experiments were conducted simulating the JMTR fuel subchannel. Based mainly on the present experimental data, the DNB correlations scheme composed of three correlations was selected for the JMTR safety analysis. Errors of the correlations scheme with experimental data were evaluated in order to determine the allowable limit of the minimum DNB ratio for preventing fuel failure. (author)

  7. Sudden pore pressure rise and rapid landslide initiation induced under extreme rainfall conditions - a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Wang, Fawu; Wang, Gonghui

    2010-05-01

    Since July 19 to 26, 2009, western Japan had a severe rainstorms and caused floods and landslides. Most of the landslides are debris slide - debris flows. Most devastated case took place in Hofu city, Japan. On July 21, extremely intense rainstorm caused numerous debris flows and mud flows in the hillslopes Some of the debris flows destroyed residential houses and home for elderly people, and finally killed 14 residents. Debris flow distribution map was prepared soon based on airphoto interpretation. Japanese Meteorological Agency runs nation-wide ground-based rain gauge network as well as radar rain gauges, which provide hourly to 10 minutes precipitation distribution real-time with spatial resolution of about 5 km. Distribution of daily (cumulative) precipitation of July 21 shows (1) The cumulative precipitation from 6 am -- 12 am of the day was evaluated that their return period could be 200 - 600 years statistically. In 2009, another extraordinary rainfall, of which intensity was evaluated as less than 100 years more more, caused floods in another city claiming many residents lives on the way to evacuation area. Those frequent extraordinary extreme rainfall is not concluded as the consequence of global warming nor climate change, however, those frequency of extreme rainfall events affecting societies are obviously increasing in Japan, too. As for the Hofu city case, it was proved that debris flows took place in the high precipitation area and covered by covered by weathered granite sands and silts which is called "masa". This sands has been proved susceptible against landslides under extreme rainfall conditions. However, the transition from slide - debris flow process is not well revealed, except authors past experiment on the similar masa samples in June 1999 Hiroshima debris flow case. Authors have embedded pore pressure control system for the undrained ring shear apparatus. Strongly weathered sandy soils were sampled just on the smooth and flat granitic sliding surface of one of the upstream small-scale landslides. Those contained finer grains and lower permeability rather than the one sampled in the Hiroshima case. Sample was consolidated by smaller stress corresponding to the site condition, and saturated by overnight circulating de-aired water. Normal stress and shear stress corresponding the slope condition was given, then, pore pressure (back pressure) was raised artificially at constant rate. When the effective stress reached the failure line, suddenly measured pore pressure monitored at about 2 mm above the shear plane, quickly increased. This sudden change abruptly accelerate the shear displacement. Stress condition soon reached the steady state and remained there thereafter. The reason of the excess pore pressure generation was the negative dilatancy, following a slight positive dilatancy. Most of the negative dilatancy could be explained by collapse of loose soil skelton as well as grain crushing during deformation and shearing.

  8. High-pressure phase transitions in BiFeO3: hydrostatic vs. non-hydrostatic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Guennou, Mael; Bouvier, Pierre; Haumont, Raphaël; Garbarino, Gaston; Kreisel, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We report high-pressure x-ray diffraction experiments on BiFeO3 (BFO) single crystals in diamond-anvil cells up to 14 GPa. Two data sets are compared, one in hydrostatic conditions, with helium used as pressure-transmitting medium, and the other in non-hydrostatic conditions, with silicon oil as pressure-transmitting medium. It is shown that the crystal undergoes different phase transitions in the two cases, highlighting the high sensitivity of BFO to non-hydrostatic stress....

  9. Bench-Scale Trace Contaminant Testing of SA9T at Ambient and Reduced Pressure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broerman, Craig; Sweterlitsch, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    A principal concern for air revitalization technology in a closed loop system is the capability to control carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity (H2O). An amine based sorbent technology, SA9T, has been evaluated for use in this application and several programs are evaluating it for use in both cabin and space suit applications. While the CO2 and H2O performance of the sorbent has been tested extensively, the question of how trace contaminants impact performance requires further evaluation. This paper presents experimental results of bench-scale SA9T testing that was performed under a variety of test conditions and with several different trace contaminants. Tests were conducted to determine if the capacity of the SA9T media to sufficiently remove CO2 and H2O is compromised after exposure to a fully saturated trace contaminant at ambient conditions. Tests also were conducted to evaluate the performance of SA9T at ambient conditions in a continuous 30-day test with a mixed trace contaminant stream. In addition, testing also evaluated the impact of CO2 and H2O removal performance at suit loop pressures (29.6 KPa/4.3 psia) during cyclic operation with a constant inlet contaminant load.

  10. Small Scale Trace Contaminant Testing of SA9T at Ambient and Reduced Pressure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broerman, Craig; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    A principle concern for air revitalization technology in a closed loop system is the capability to control carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity (H2O). An amine based sorbent technology, SA9T, has long been evaluated for use in this application and several programs are evaluating it for use in both a cabin as well as space suit applications. While the CO2 and H2O performance of the sorbent has been tested extensively, the question of how trace contaminants impact performance requires further evaluation. This paper presents experimental results of small scale SA9T testing that was performed over a variety of test conditions and with a variety of trace contaminants. Testing evaluated the ability of SA9T media to sufficiently remove CO2 and H2O after exposure to a fully saturated trace contaminant at ambient conditions. Testing also evaluated the impact of CO2 and H2O removal performance at suit loop pressures during cyclic operation with a constant inlet contaminant load. In addition, testing evaluated the performance of SA9T at ambient conditions in a continuous 30-day test with a mixed trace contaminant stream.

  11. QUAVER - A programme to evaluate monopole and dipole boundary conditions in pressure tube reactor lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to apply source-sink theory to pressure tube reactor lattices it is necessary to calculate boundary conditions at the fuel channel/moderator interfaces to be satisfied by the neutron flux. A method is described for evaluating the necessary coefficients using multi-group diffusion theory in a cylindricalised lattice cell for both monopole and dipole components of flux. Provision is made for in or out leakage of neutrons in each group at the cell boundary so that allowance can be made for effects of cell environment on the channel boundary conditions. The programme QUAVER (written in EGTRAN) is described for use on the English Electric KDF9 Computer. QUAVER outputs the boundary condition matrices on cards for use in source-sink core calculations, and includes a facility for the condensation of the primary group output to a secondary group structure. The numerical method and the data input specification are described together with full details of a sample calculation. (author)

  12. Micromechanical cohesion force between gas hydrate particles measured under high pressure and low temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Sum, Amadeu K

    2015-04-01

    To prevent hydrate plugging conditions in the transportation of oil/gas in multiphase flowlines, one of the key processes to control is the agglomeration/deposition of hydrate particles, which are determined by the cohesive/adhesive forces. Previous studies reporting measurements of the cohesive/adhesive force between hydrate particles used cyclopentane hydrate particles in a low-pressure micromechanical force apparatus. In this study, we report the cohesive forces of particles measured in a new high-pressure micromechanical force (MMF) apparatus for ice particles, mixed (methane/ethane, 74.7:25.3) hydrate particles (Structure II), and carbon dioxide hydrate particles (Structure I). The cohesive forces are measured as a function of the contact time, contact force, temperature, and pressure, and determined from pull-off measurements. For the measurements performed of the gas hydrate particles in the gas phase, the determined cohesive force is about 30-35 mN/m, about 8 times higher than the cohesive force of CyC5 hydrates in the liquid CyC5, which is about 4.3 mN/m. We show from our results that the hydrate structure (sI with CO2 hydrates and sII with CH4/C2H6 hydrates) has no influence on the cohesive force. These results are important in the deposition of a gas-dominated system, where the hydrate particles formed in the liquid phase can then stick to the hydrate deposited in the wall exposed to the gas phase. PMID:25785915

  13. Advanced development and operating experience with a canned motor pump under pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the research reactor FRG-2, Geesthacht, an irradiation device is in operation for testing defective light-water-reactor (LWR) test fuel rods under pressurized water reactor conditions (3200C, 160 bar). The requirements to the canned motor pump for cooling water circulation: medium: Demineralized water, operating temperature 3200C, operating pressure 155 bar, radiation field of the reactor, integration in the irradiation capsule, helium leak rate -6mbar.dm3.s-1, minimum working life 3000 hours, were high and caused difficulties in the acquisition of this component. First test runs with supplied pumps showed that the desired working life could not be achieved. The results of the development steps, the test runs, and the performance in service show that for our range of applications, the best combination of materials for the radial bearings is silicon-infiltrated SiC (8% free Si) against the same material. These bearings allowed a good working life for the pump to be achieved. (orig./GL)

  14. Investigation of LPP combustors under elevated pressure conditions; Untersuchungen zu LPP-Flugtriebwerksbrennkammern unter erhoehtem Druck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, R.

    2001-05-01

    The development of new combustor concepts for aero engines to meet future emissions regulations in based on a detailed knowledge of the combustion process and the velocity field. In the presented thesis, non intrusive measurements were performed in a model combustion chamber under almost realistic pressure and temperature conditions. The species OH, NO, unburned hydrocarbons and fuel droplets were detected in 2 dimensions with the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). The velocity field was measured with the Particle Image Velocimetry technique (PIV). [German] Die Weiterentwicklung neuer Brennkammerkonzepte zur Erfuellung zukuenftiger Schadstoffemissionsrichtlinien erfordert genaue Kenntnisse der ablaufenden Verbrennungs- und Stroemungsvorgaenge in der Brennkammer. Bei den in der Arbeit vorgestellten Untersuchungen wurden in einer LPP-Modellbrennkammer unter annaehernd realistischen Eintrittsbedingungen die Spezies OH, NO, unverbrannte Kohlenwasserstoffe sowie noch fluessiger Brennstoff zweidimensional anhand der Laserinduzierten Fluoreszenz (LIF) nachgewiesen. Das Stroemungsfeld wurde mit Hilfe der Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) gemessen.

  15. Characterization of transient discharges under atmospheric pressure conditions applying nitrogen photoemission and current measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Sandra; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Plasma parameters of three transient discharges (filamentary and homogeneous dielectric barrier discharges in air, and the spark discharge of an argon plasma coagulator) operated at atmospheric pressure conditions are determined applying a combination of diagnostics methods, namely numerical simulation, current measurement, and optical emission spectroscopy. These diagnostic methods supplement each other and resolve problems, which arise when these methods are used separately. Nitrogen is used as sensor gas and is admixed to argon for studying the argon plasma coagulator. The Boltzmann equation is solved in 'local' approximation to determine electron velocity distribution function. Drift velocity, electron-impact excitation rate constants for nitrogen molecular emission, electric current density, and emission spectrum of nitrogen molecule are calculated. Plasma parameters (electron velocity distribution function and electron density) are determined applying calculated as far as measured electric current, and ...

  16. Multipole Electrodynamic Ion Trap Geometries for Microparticle Confinement under Standard Ambient Temperature and Pressure Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalcea, Bogdan M; Stan, Cristina; Visan, Gina T; Ganciu, Mihai; Filinov, Vladimir E; Lapitsky, Dmitry S; Deputatova, Lidiya V; Syrovatka, Roman A

    2015-01-01

    Trapping of microparticles and aerosols is of great interest for physics and chemistry. We report microparticle trapping in multipole linear Paul trap geometries, operating under Standard Ambient Temperature and Pressure (SATP) conditions. An 8-electrode and a 12-electrode linear trap geometries have been designed and tested with an aim to achieve trapping for larger number of particles and to study microparticle dynamical stability in electrodynamic fields. We report emergence of planar and volume ordered structures of the microparticles, depending on the a.c. trapping frequency and particle specific charge ratio. The electric potential within the trap was mapped using the electrolytic tank method. Particle dynamics was simulated using a stochastic Langevin equation. We emphasize extended regions of stable trapping with respect to quadrupole traps, as well as good agreement between experiment and numerical simulations.

  17. An experimental study on sub-cooled flow boiling CHF of R134a at low pressure condition with atmospheric pressure (AP) plasma assisted surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Jun [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zou, Ling [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jones, Barclay G. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering

    2015-02-01

    In this study, sub-cooled flow boiling critical heat flux tests at low pressure were conducted in a rectangular flow channel with one uniformly heated surface, using simulant fluid R-134a as coolant. The experiments were conducted under the following conditions: (1) inlet pressure (P) of 400-800 kPa, (2) mass flux (G) of 124-248 kg/m2s, (3) inlet sub-cooling enthalpy (?Hi) of 12~ 26 kJ/kg. Parametric trends of macroscopic system parameters (G, P, Hi) were examined by changing inlet conditions. Those trends were found to be generally consistent with previous understandings of CHF behavior at low pressure condition (i.e. reduced pressure less than 0.2). A fluid-to-fluid scaling model was utilized to convert the test data obtained with the simulant fluid (R-134a) into the prototypical fluid (water). The comparison between the converted CHF of equivalent water and CHF look-up table with same operation conditions were conducted, which showed good agreement. Furthermore, the effect of surface wettability on CHF was also investigated by applying atmospheric pressure plasma (AP-Plasma) treatment to modify the surface characteristic. With AP-Plasma treatment, the change of microscopic surface characteristic was measured in terms of static contact angle. The static contact angle was reduced from 80° on original non-treated surface to 15° on treated surface. An enhancement of 18% on CHF values under flow boiling conditions were observed on AP-Plasma treated surfaces compared to those on non-treated heating surfaces.

  18. Characteristics of Syngas Auto-ignition at High Pressure and Low Temperature Conditions with Thermal Inhomogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Pal, Pinaki

    2015-05-31

    Effects of thermal inhomogeneities on syngas auto-ignition at high-pressure low-temperature conditions, relevant to gas turbine operation, are investigated using detailed one-dimensional numerical simulations. Parametric tests are carried out for a range of thermodynamic conditions (T = 890-1100 K, P = 3-20 atm) and composition (? = 0.1, 0.5). Effects of global thermal gradients and localized thermal hot spots are studied. In the presence of a thermal gradient, the propagating reaction front transitions from spontaneous ignition to deflagration mode as the initial mean temperature decreases. The critical mean temperature separating the two distinct auto-ignition modes is computed using a predictive criterion and found to be consistent with front speed and Damkohler number analyses. The hot spot study reveals that compression heating of end-gas mixture by the propagating front is more pronounced at lower mean temperatures, significantly advancing the ignition delay. Moreover, the compression heating effect is dependent on the domain size.

  19. Appropriate welding conditions of temper bead weld repair for SQV2A pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, R.; Matsuda, F. [NDE Center, Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp. (Japan); Brziak, P. [Welding Research Inst. - Industrial Inst. of Slovak Republic (Slovakia); Lomozik, M. [Inst. of Welding (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    Temper bead welding technique is one of the most important repair welding methods for large structures for which it is difficult to perform the specified post weld heat treatment. In this study, appropriate temper bead welding conditions to improve the characteristics of heat affected zone (HAZ) are studied using pressure vessel steel SQV2A corresponding to ASTM A533 Type B Class 1. Thermal/mechanical simulator is employed to give specimens welding thermal cycles from single to quadruple cycle. Charpy absorbed energy and hardness of simulated CGHAZ by first cycle were degraded as compared with base metal. Improvability of these degradations by subsequent cycles is discussed and appropriate temper bead thermal cycles are clarified. When the peak temperature lower than Ac1 and near Ac1 in the second thermal cycle is applied to CGAHZ by first thermal cycle, the characteristics of CGHAZ improve enough. When the other peak temperatures (that is, higher than Ac1) in the second thermal cycle are applied to the CGHAZ, third or more thermal cycle temper bead process should be applied to improve the properties. Appropriate weld condition ranges are selected based on the above results. The validity of the selected ranges is verified by the temper bead welding test. (orig.)

  20. Optimization of processing conditions for the fractionation of triticale straw using pressurized low polarity water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronyk, C; Mazza, G

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized low polarity water (PLPW) fractionation of triticale straw was optimized to maximize hemicellulose and lignin yield, and to produce a cellulose rich fraction for biofuels production. The optimum PLPW conditions for hemicellulose yield was determined to be 165 °C, with a flow rate of 115 mL/min, and a solvent-to-solid ratio of 60 mL/g. Hemicellulose and lignin yield generally increased with increasing temperature and solvent-to-solid ratio. There was a small decrease in hemicellulose yield with an increase in flow rate. Minimum lignin content of the triticale straw residue after extraction was predicted to occur at a processing condition of 206 °C, 160 mL/min, and 67 mL/g. PLPW was successful in removing 73-78% of the hemicellulose, leaving a cellulose rich fraction (65% glucose concentration). Lignin was equally distributed between the solid residues and the extracts and most of the hemicellulose was extracted in oligomer form. Remaining solid residues after fractionation were highly digestible by cellulase enzymes. PMID:20933393

  1. The kinetics of dolomite reaction rim growth under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. G.; Abart, R.; Dresen, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    During burial and exhumation, rocks are simultaneously exposed to metamorphic reactions and tectonic stresses. Therefore, the reaction rate of newly formed minerals may depend on chemical and mechanical driving forces. Here, we investigate the reaction kinetics of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) rim growth by solid-state reactions experiments on oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions. Cylindrical samples of 3-5 mm length and 7 mm diameter were drilled and polished perpendicular to the rhombohedral cleavage planes of natural clear crystals. The tests were performed using a Paterson-type deformation apparatus at P = 400 MPa confining pressure, temperatures, T, between 750 and 850°C, and reaction durations, t, of 2 - 146 h to calculate the kinetic parameters of dolomite rim growth under isostatic stress conditions. For non-isostatic reaction experiments we applied in addition differential stresses, ?, up to 40 MPa perpendicular to the contact interface at T = 750°C for 4 - 171 h duration, initiating minor inelastic deformation of calcite. The thickness of the resulting dolomite reaction rims increases linearly with the square root of time, indicating a diffusion-controlled reaction. The rims consist of two different textural domains. Granular dolomite grains (? 2 -5 ?m grain size) form next to calcite and elongated palisade-shaped grains (1-6 ?m diameter) grow perpendicular to the magnesite interface. Texture measurements with the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicate that the orientations of dolomite grains are mainly influenced by the orientation of the calcite educt crystal, in particular in the granular rim. To some extent, the texture of dolomite palisades is also influenced by the orientation of magnesite. The thickness of the two individual layers increases with temperature. At 400 MPa isostatic pressure, T = 750°C and t = 29 hours, a 5 ?m thick granular dolomite layer and a 7 ?m thick palisade-shaped layer evolve. At similar conditions and a differential stress of 30 MPa, the rim thickness remains similar; consequently the effect of non-isostatic stress on dolomite rim growth is negligible. Platinum markers show that the initial calcite-magnesite interface is located between granular and palisade-forming dolomite, indicating that rim growth occurs by counter diffusion of MgO and CaO. Diffusion of MgO across the dolomite reaction rim into calcite forms additionally magnesio-calcite grains with diameters of ? 13 - 46 ?m, depending on the experimental conditions and increasing with increasing distance to the dolomite boundary. At T = 750°C, t = 29 hours, the thickness of the magnesio-calcite layer is 32 ?m (isostatic) - 35 ?m (? = 30 MPa). The experiments indicate that solid-state reaction rim growth of dolomite between calcite and magnesite is primarily controlled by diffusion of MgO and CaO, forming layers with different microstructures during growth into the educt phases. The kinetics of the reaction in the carbonate system are not significantly changed by differential stresses up to 40 MPa. We suggest that volume diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism, which is presumably less affected by non-isostatic stresses than grain boundary diffusion.

  2. Magnetite reactivity in representative conditions of the secondary circuit of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the secondary circuit of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), magnetite deposits lead to steam generators (SG) fouling, which decreases thermal performances and enhances stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of magnetite particles behaviour and their reactivity in the secondary circuit conditions. Experimental tests investigated the fast thermal decomposition of hydrazine, injected in the secondary circuit to eliminate oxygen. Temperature, pH, and catalytic properties of materials surfaces have an influence on the kinetics of hydrazine decomposition. A predictive model was proposed. Growing, transport and deposits of iron oxides, essentially formed with magnetite, responsible of the steam generator fouling, were studied in the experimental loop FORTRAND, Formation and Transport of Deposits. Surface characterizations show that magnetite is the corrosion product formed on carbon steel and stainless steel at 220 C, and goethite is formed at room temperature on stainless steel. Results indicate also that the effect of different amines, used in the secondary circuit, on the soluble iron is principally due to their effect on the pH. Performed tests highlight transport and deposition of magnetite particles in the loop. Deposits formed in the SG could promote SCC of tubes by sorption and reduction of sulfates. To reproduce secondary circuit conditions, studies of sorption were made in reducing medium imposed by hydrazine. At 275 C, the presence of hydrazine has an effect on the speciation of sulfates in solution but does not seem to influence the sorption nor to lead to H2S(g) emission predicted by thermodynamic calculations. These experimental results are used to predict sulfur and iron species behaviour in the secondary circuit. Low pH conditioning enhances soluble iron concentration, consequently iron transport in the SG. Sulfides are the most probable sulfur species in flow-restricted areas of SG, harmful for stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  3. Socket Interface Pressure and Amputee Reported Outcomes for Comfortable and Uncomfortable Conditions of Patellar Tendon Bearing Socket: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad Reza; Tafti, Nahid; Aminian, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the current study were to compare intra-socket pressure differences between comfortable and uncomfortable socket conditions, and the usefulness of subject perception of satisfaction, activity limitations, and socket comfort in distinguishing between these two socket conditions. Five unilateral trans-tibial amputees took part in the study. They answered the Socket Comfort Score (SCS) and Trinity Amputation and Prosthetic Experience Scale (TAPES) questionnaires before the interface pressure (in standing and walking) was measured for the uncomfortable socket condition at five regions of the residual limb. Participants were then provided with a comfortable socket and wore it for two weeks. Participants who were satisfied with the socket fit after two weeks repeated the SCS and TAPES questionnaires and interface pressure measurements. The differences between the test results of the two conditions were not statistically significant, except for the interface pressure at the popliteal region during the early stance phase, TAPES socket fit subscale, and the SCS. Due to large variability of the data and the lack of statistical significance, no firm conclusion can be made on the possible relationship between the interface pressure values and the patient-reported outcomes of the two socket conditions. A larger sample size and longer acclimation period are required to locate significant differences. PMID:26132222

  4. Bottom nozzle failure mechanism of water reactor pressure vessel under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of past studies devoted to the creep rupture of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head under severe accident conditions, have focused on global deformation and rupture modes. Limited efforts were made on local failure modes associated with penetration nozzles as a part of TMI-2 vessel investigation project (TMI-2 VIP) in 1990s. However, it was based on an excessively simplified shear deformation model. In the present study, the mode of nozzle failure has been investigated using data and nozzle materials from Sandia National Laboratory's lower head failure experiment (SNL-LHF). Crack-like separations were revealed at the nozzle weld metal to RPV interfaces indicating the importance of normal stress component rather than the shear stress in the creep rupture. Creep rupture tests were conducted for nozzle and weld metal materials, respectively, at various temperature and stress levels. Stress distribution in the nozzle region is calculated using elastic-viscoplastic finite element analysis (FEA) using the measured properties. Calculation results are compared with earlier results based on the pure shear model of TMI-2 VIP. It is concluded from both LHF-4 nozzle examination and FEA that normal stress at the nozzle/lower head interface is the dominant driving force for the local failure. From the FEA for the nozzle weld attached in RPV, it is shown that nozzle welds failure occur by displacement controlled fracture of nozzle hole not by load controlled fracture of internal pressure. Considering these characteristics of nozzle weld failure, new concept of nozzle failure time prediction is proposed

  5. Bottom nozzle failure mechanism of water reactor pressure vessel under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Young J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinlim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: yjoh2@peacer.org; Lim, Joon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinlim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kwang J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinlim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Il S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinlim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Most of past studies devoted to the creep rupture of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head under severe accident conditions, have focused on global deformation and rupture modes. Limited efforts were made on local failure modes associated with penetration nozzles as a part of TMI-2 vessel investigation project (TMI-2 VIP) in 1990s. However, it was based on an excessively simplified shear deformation model. In the present study, the mode of nozzle failure has been investigated using data and nozzle materials from Sandia National Laboratory's lower head failure experiment (SNL-LHF). Crack-like separations were revealed at the nozzle weld metal to RPV interfaces indicating the importance of normal stress component rather than the shear stress in the creep rupture. Creep rupture tests were conducted for nozzle and weld metal materials, respectively, at various temperature and stress levels. Stress distribution in the nozzle region is calculated using elastic-viscoplastic finite element analysis (FEA) using the measured properties. Calculation results are compared with earlier results based on the pure shear model of TMI-2 VIP. It is concluded from both LHF-4 nozzle examination and FEA that normal stress at the nozzle/lower head interface is the dominant driving force for the local failure. From the FEA for the nozzle weld attached in RPV, it is shown that nozzle welds failure occur by displacement controlled fracture of nozzle hole not by load controlled fracture of internal pressure. Considering these characteristics of nozzle weld failure, new concept of nozzle failure time prediction is proposed.

  6. Test equipment for the determination of the corrosion fatigue of reactor materials under pressurized water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental set-up was developed for the determination of corrosion fatigue properties under pressure water conditions. The design of the autoclave and its arrangement in a servo-hydraulic pulsator are described. Tests can be performed with this apparatus in pressure water up to 3500C and 165 bar with top loads of 20 000 N at frequencies up to 30 cycles per second. (orig.)

  7. Influence of the external conditions on salt retention and pressure-induced electrical potential measured across a composite membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, Juana; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Transport on single electrolyte solutions (NaCl and MgCl2) due to pressure gradients across a commercial reverse osmosis membrane was studied by measuring volume flux (J(v)), salt rejection (S) and pressure induced electrical potential (Delta E) in a crossflow cell. The influence on these parameters of different external conditions due to hydrodynamic or chemical changes in the feed solutions was also studied. Changes were carried out by variation of the feed solution velocity (Reynolds numbers ...

  8. HEADCO: a program for converting observed water levels and pressure measurements to formation pressure and standard hydraulic head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Static water-level and fluid pressure measurements are commonly converted in hydrologic studies to formation pressure and hydraulic head, which are used to determine groundwater flow characteristics of aquifer systems. While the direct use of field measurements is usually adequate for determining formation pressure and hydraulic head for shallow flow systems (i.e., <1000 ft), corrections and conversion parameters must be used to properly account for fluid-column density effects, which commonly occur with deep systems. This report presents a program, HEADCO, for converting static water-level and pressure measurements to formation pressure and standard hydraulic head. The HEADCO program corrects field measurements for the effects of fluid-density variation and selected external stresses. Factors that affect density of the fluid column, in which field measurements are made, include temperature, pressure, salinity, suspended solids, and multiphase conditions. External stresses examined in HEADCO include barometric and earth tide fluctuations, and gravitational acceleration variation. A program description and procedures for converting field measurements obtained using field test arrangements commonly employed in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project field program are provided in this report. The report includes user instructions and an illustrative test example. Results of a field example comparison are also provided. This comparison examines observed and HEADCO-calculated pressures for 30 pressure probes recently calibrated in a laboratory and tested under field conditions at borehole DC-8. The test case and field example comparisons indicate that HEADCO provides accurate estimates of formation pressure and standard hydraulic head that are well within the accuracy range of downhole pressure-measuring instrumentation. 44 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Numerical simulation of pressure fluctuation of a pump-turbine with MGV at no-load condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. T.; Liu, S. H.; Sun, Y. K.; Wu, Y. L.; Wang, L. Q.

    2012-11-01

    In order to analyse the pressure fluctuation caused by misaligned guide vanes (MGV) during starting period at no-load condition, 3-D (three dimensional), unsteady flows in a pump-turbine were numerically studied. Pressure fluctuations of different points at no-load condition are obtained. Fast Fourier Transform(FFT) was used to analyse the frequency spectrum of pressure fluctuations. The amplitude and dominant frequency of pressure fluctuation at vaneless space between the runner and guide vane, as well as the inlet of draft tube, was investigated. The amplitude of pressure fluctuation of the pump-turbine with MGV device is twice that of synchronous vanes. This might be caused by the non-uniform flow in the pump-turbine due to the pre-opened guide vanes. The pump-turbine with synchronous vanes has a low frequency which is 0.33fn, while the low frequency changes into 0.63fn when the MGV device is used. The vortex rope in the draft tube is large than that of synchronize vanes. Resultsof pressure fluctuations with synchronous vanes agree with each other between computational and testing results. The numerical study of pressure fluctuations with MGV can provide a basic understanding for the improvement of the instability of a pump-turbine.

  10. Numerical simulation of pressure fluctuation of a pump-turbine with MGV at no-load condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to analyse the pressure fluctuation caused by misaligned guide vanes (MGV) during starting period at no-load condition, 3-D (three dimensional), unsteady flows in a pump-turbine were numerically studied. Pressure fluctuations of different points at no-load condition are obtained. Fast Fourier Transform(FFT) was used to analyse the frequency spectrum of pressure fluctuations. The amplitude and dominant frequency of pressure fluctuation at vaneless space between the runner and guide vane, as well as the inlet of draft tube, was investigated. The amplitude of pressure fluctuation of the pump-turbine with MGV device is twice that of synchronous vanes. This might be caused by the non-uniform flow in the pump-turbine due to the pre-opened guide vanes. The pump-turbine with synchronous vanes has a low frequency which is 0.33fn, while the low frequency changes into 0.63fn when the MGV device is used. The vortex rope in the draft tube is large than that of synchronize vanes. Resultsof pressure fluctuations with synchronous vanes agree with each other between computational and testing results. The numerical study of pressure fluctuations with MGV can provide a basic understanding for the improvement of the instability of a pump-turbine.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of pressure-driven flows in microchannels using Navier-Maxwell slip boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Tim; Dellar, Paul J.

    2012-11-01

    We present lattice Boltzmann simulations of rarefied flows driven by pressure drops along two-dimensional microchannels. Rarefied effects lead to non-zero cross-channel velocities, and nonlinear variations in the pressure along the channel. Both effects are absent in flows driven by uniform body forces. We obtain second-order accuracy for the two components of velocity and the pressure relative to asymptotic solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with slip boundary conditions. Since the common lattice Boltzmann formulations cannot capture Knudsen boundary layers, we replace the usual discrete analogs of the specular and diffuse reflection conditions from continuous kinetic theory with a moment-based implementation of the first-order Navier-Maxwell slip boundary conditions that relate the tangential velocity to the strain rate at the boundary. We use these conditions to solve for the unknown distribution functions that propagate into the domain across the boundary. We achieve second-order accuracy by reformulating these conditions for the second set of distribution functions that arise in the derivation of the lattice Boltzmann method by an integration along characteristics. Our moment formalism is also valuable for analysing the existing boundary conditions. It reveals the origin of numerical slip in the bounce-back and other common boundary conditions that impose conditions on the higher moments, not on the local tangential velocity itself.

  12. Cyclic thermal shock crack propagation tests on the HDR-reactor pressure vessel nozzle under operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the HDR-Safety Research Program Cyclic Thermal Shock Tests were performed on a cladded reactor pressure vessel nozzle under operating conditions (temperature 3100C, pressure about 11 MPa). The whole round inner edge of the nozzle (diameter 200 mm) was sprayed with cold water by a special device. The main goal of these investigation is to contribute to the understanding of crack propagation of flaws under cyclic loading for adverse environmental water conditions. Furthermore, it is the object of the tests to monitor such cracks and the crack growth by non destructive technics as well as to assess and qualify the applied fracture analysis methods. (orig.)

  13. Study on an Efficient Dehumidifying Air-conditioning System utilizing Phase Change of Intermediate Pressure Refrigerant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kensaku; Inaba, Hideo

    The present study has proven a new dehumidifying system that aimed to reduce the sensible heat factor(SHF) of cooling process without using additional heat to relieve the internationally indicated conflict between energy saving and dehumidification necessary for keeping adequate indoor air quality (IAQ). In this system, we used intermediate pressure refrigerant in a vapor compression refrigerating cycle as heat transfer medium of a characteristic heat exchanger to precool the process air entering into an evaporator as well as to reheat the process air leaving from the evaporator. By this system, the present results achieved higher moisture removal and consequently higher efficiency of dehumidifying process. In addition to this fact, since this system has capability of integration into air-conditioning apparatus(HVAC system), it will be able to work for wide range of cooling load by variable SHF function. In the present paper, technical information, experimental results, and simulation results which assumed to apply this system into HVAC system are reported.

  14. Nozzle failure mechanism of a water reactor pressure vessel under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of past studies for the creep rupture of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head under severe accident conditions, have focused on global deformation and rupture modes. Limited efforts were made on local failure modes associated with penetration nozzles as a part of TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project (TMI-2 VIP) in 1990's. However, it was based on an excessively simplified shear deformation model. In the present study, the mode of nozzle failures has been investigated using data and nozzle materials from Sandia National Laboratory's Lower Head Failure Experiment (SNL-LHF). Crack-like separations were revealed at the nozzle weld metal to RPV interfaces indicating the importance of normal stress component rather than the shear stress in the creep rupture. Creep rupture tests were conducted for nozzle and weld metal materials, respectively, at various temperature and stress levels. Stress distribution in the nozzle region is calculated using elastic-viscoplastic finite element analysis (FEA) using the measured properties. Calculation results are compared with earlier results based on the pure shear model of TMI-2 VIP. It has been concluded from both LHF-4 nozzle examination and FEA that normal stress at the nozzle/lower head interface is the dominant driving force for the local failure with its likelihood significantly greater than previously assumed. (authors)

  15. Local failure characteristics of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel nozzle under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most past studies for the creep rupture of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head under severe accident conditions, have focused on global deformation and rupture modes. Limited efforts were made on local failure modes associated with penetration nozzles as a part of TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project (TMI-2 VIP) in 1990's. However, it was based on an excessively simplified shear deformation model. In the present study, the mode of nozzle failures is investigated using data and nozzle materials from Sandia National Laboratory's Lower Head Failure Experiment (SNL-LHF). Crack-like separations were revealed at the nozzle weld metal to RPV interfaces indicating the importance of normal stress component rather than the shear stress in the creep rupture. Creep rupture tests were conducted for nozzle and weld metal materials, respectively, at various temperature and stress levels. Stress distribution in the nozzle region is calculated using elastic-viscoplastic finite element analysis (FEA) using the measured properties. Calculation results are compared with earlier results based on the pure shear model of TMI-2 VIP. It has been concluded from both LHF-4 nozzle examination and FEA that normal stress at the nozzle/lower head interface is the dominant driving force for the local failure with its likelihood significantly greater than previously assumed

  16. Microstructure and spectroscopy studies on cubic boron nitride synthesized under high-pressure conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Nistor, L C; Dinca, G; Georgeoni, P; Landuyt, J V; Manfredotti, C; Vittone, E

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) studies of the microstructure and specific defects in hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) precursors and cubic boron nitride (c-BN) crystals made under high-pressure high-temperature conditions revealed the presence of half-nanotubes at the edges of the h-BN particles. Their sp sup 3 bonding tendency could strongly influence the nucleation rates of c-BN. The atomic resolution at extended dislocations was insufficient to allow us to determine the stacking fault energy in the c-BN crystals. Its mean value of 191 pm, 15 mJ m sup - sup 2 is of the same order of magnitude as that of diamond. High-frequency (94 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance studies on c-BN single crystals have produced new data on the D1 centres associated with the boron species. Ion-beam-induced luminescence measurements have indicated that c-BN is a very interesting luminescent material, which is characterized by four luminescence bands and exhibits a better resistance to ionizing radiation than CVD di...

  17. Sulphate chemistry under pressurized oxidizing, reducing and fluctuating conditions; Sulfatkemi under trycksatta oxiderande, reducerande och fluktuerande foerhaallanden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Yrjas, P.; Backman, P. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-10-01

    In the literature it has been reported that sulfur capture with limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) under atmospheric fluidized bed combustion conditions reaches a maximum at about 850 deg C. Previously, the maximum has been attributed to the sintering of sorbent particles which decreases the reactive surface area. Lately, also another explanation has been reported. In this case the sulfur capture decrease at higher temperatures was concluded to be due to fluctuating oxidizing/reducing conditions in the atmospheric combustor. In this work the influence of alternating oxidizing/reducing conditions on SO{sub 2} capture at atmospheric and elevated pressure (15 bar) has been studied. In the pressurized case, the CO{sub 2} partial pressure was kept high enough to prevent CaCO{sub 3} from calcining and therefore the CaSO{sub 4} would not form CaO but CaCO{sub 3} under reducing conditions. The experiments were done with a pressurized TGA by periodically changing the gas environment between oxidizing (O{sub 2}. SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) and slightly reducing (CO, SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}) gas mixtures at different temperatures. The results from the experiments showed that under normal pressure and slightly reducing conditions CaO formation from CaSO{sub 4} increased with temperature as expected. However, no significant amounts of CaCO{sub 3} were formed from CaSO{sub 4} at elevated pressure. It was also concluded that since the formation of CaO from CaSO{sub 4} was relatively slow it could not explain the sharp sulfur capture maximum at about 850 deg C. Therefore, it was assumed that the strongly reducing zones, where CaS thermodynamically is the stable compound, play a more important role concerning the sulfur capture in fluidized bed combustors. (orig.)

  18. An Inexpensive Arterial Pressure Wave Sensor and its application in different physiological condition

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Sur, Shantanu

    2005-01-01

    Arterial Blood Pressure wave monitoring is considered to be important in assessment of cardiovascular system. We developed a novel pulse wave detection system using low frequency specific piezoelectric material as pressure wave sensor. The transducer detects the periodic change in the arterial wall diameter produced by pressure wave and the amplified signal after integration represents the pressure wave. The signal before integration is proportional to the rate of change of pressure wave and it not only reproduces the pressure waveform faithfully, but also its sharper nature helps to reliably detect the heart period variability (HPV). We have studied the position-specific (e.g. over carotid or radial artery) nature of change of this pulse wave signal (shape and amplitude) and also the changes at different physiological states.

  19. Numerical prediction of the pressure fluctuations on small discharge condition of a pump-turbine at pump mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y. Y.; Xiao, Y. X.; Zhu, W.; An, S. H.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    The operational stability of the pump turbine at the pump mode will be greatly influenced by large pressure fluctuations when operated in the small-discharge conditions. Therefore, it is significant to analyse the flow characteristic under the small discharge operating conditions deeply. Study of the internal flow in the small discharge condition has been investigate in great detail combined with model experiments in this paper. The SST k-? turbulence model is adopted to perform three-dimensional numerical simulation of the entire pump-turbine flow passage at optimal guide vanes opening. The numerical simulation results match well with experimental data. Then internal flow under the small discharge condition is analysed. The results show that the dominant frequency inside the flow passage is a relative low frequency. In addition, there are obvious complex flow phenomena inside the draft tube, runner and diffuser domains, such as secondary flow, backflow and even vortex, leading to strong unsteady flow and significant pressure fluctuation.

  20. Outflow boundary conditions for 3D simulations of non-periodic blood flow and pressure fields in deformable arteries

    CERN Document Server

    Vignon-Clementel, Irene; Jansen, K E; Taylor, C A; 10.1080/10255840903413565

    2010-01-01

    The simulation of blood flow and pressure in arteries requires outflow boundary conditions that incorporate models of downstream domains. We previously described a coupled multidomain method to couple analytical models of the downstream domains with 3D numerical models of the upstream vasculature. This prior work either included pure resistance boundary conditions or impedance boundary conditions based on assumed periodicity of the solution. However, flow and pressure in arteries are not necessarily periodic in time due to heart rate variability, respiration, complex transitional flow or acute physiological changes. We present herein an approach for prescribing lumped parameter outflow boundary conditions that accommodate transient phenomena. We have applied this method to compute haemodynamic quantities in different physiologically relevant cardiovascular models, including patient-specific examples, to study non-periodic flow phenomena often observed in normal subjects and in patients with acquired or congen...

  1. Determination of safe operating conditions for gasketed flange joint under combined internal pressure and temperature: A finite element approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abid, Muhammad [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi-23460, NWFP (Pakistan)]. E-mail: abid@giki.edu.pk

    2006-06-15

    Performance of a flange joint is characterised mainly by its 'strength' and 'sealing capability'. A number of analytical and experimental studies have been conducted to study these characteristics under internal pressure loading. However, with the advent of new technological trends for high temperature and pressure applications, an increased demand for analysis is recognized. The effect of steady-state thermal loading makes the problem more complex as it leads to combined application of internal pressure and temperature. The present design codes do not address the effects of temperature on the structural integrity and sealing ability. In addition, the available design solutions do not solve problems of failure of a gasketed flange joint even under bolt up and internal pressure loading conditions. To investigate joint strength and sealing capability under combined internal pressure and different steady-state thermal loading, a 3D nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) of a gasketed flange joint is carried out and its behaviour is discussed. To determine the safe operating conditions or the actual joint load capacity, the joint is further analyzed for different internal pressures keeping the temperature constant.

  2. Determination of safe operating conditions for gasketed flange joint under combined internal pressure and temperature: A finite element approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance of a flange joint is characterised mainly by its 'strength' and 'sealing capability'. A number of analytical and experimental studies have been conducted to study these characteristics under internal pressure loading. However, with the advent of new technological trends for high temperature and pressure applications, an increased demand for analysis is recognized. The effect of steady-state thermal loading makes the problem more complex as it leads to combined application of internal pressure and temperature. The present design codes do not address the effects of temperature on the structural integrity and sealing ability. In addition, the available design solutions do not solve problems of failure of a gasketed flange joint even under bolt up and internal pressure loading conditions. To investigate joint strength and sealing capability under combined internal pressure and different steady-state thermal loading, a 3D nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) of a gasketed flange joint is carried out and its behaviour is discussed. To determine the safe operating conditions or the actual joint load capacity, the joint is further analyzed for different internal pressures keeping the temperature constant

  3. Leakage rate through a non-cracked concrete wall, comparison between two situations: Air pressure test and accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experimental research investigated the behaviour of a concrete wall, with a local zone very permeable to air, subjected to accident conditions. The high level of permeability in the concrete was obtained for one specimen with a porous concrete having connected pores (intrinsic permeability of 10-16 m2). The aim of this work was to study comparatively, in the laboratory, the permeability of a non-cracked concrete wall under two conditions. A cylindrical specimen 1.3 m thick was used. No appreciable stresses were applied on the concrete. The first condition was at ambient temperature, under an increasing pressure (up to 0.42 MPa) of the air applied on one face of the specimen, the other one being at atmospheric pressure. The second condition was an accident scenario with simultaneous effects of temperature and gas (a mix of air and steam) pressure applied on one face, the other one remaining at atmospheric pressure and temperature. During the test, the lateral face of the cylindrical specimen was thermally isolated and made leak tight. So, a uni-dimensional experimental analysis was performed. The accident conditions consisted of a rise from ambient conditions to a temperature of 141 deg C and a relative pressure of 0.42 MPa (steam pressure of 0.377 MPa and air pressure of 0.043 MPa) for 3 h, the maximum values remaining constant for several days. Thermocouples, pressure taps and moisture gauges were implanted in the specimens at the moment of casting, to provide local information about the inner wall under the simultaneous effects of temperature and steam pressure. Outside the specimen, the chamber enclosed a condenser with a humidity meter and thermocouple, so it was possible to quantify separately the saturated airflow with a flow-metre and the condensed water. During the permeability test at ambient temperature, the field of pressure was affected by the variation of local permeability of the concrete. Furthermore, some movement of interstitial water inside the specimen induced an increase of the predicted outflow, no liquid phase appeared. For the natural porous concrete, during accident testing, the field of pressure advanced slowly, the outflow progressively increased to obtain a maximum at 70 h, after this time on the one hand the airflow rate decreased and became equal to zero; on the other hand, the liquid flow rate was constant, at the end of the test, about 30 cm of the specimen was water saturated. A uni-dimensional numerical analysis was performed. The Tham model (non-saturated porous media thermo-hydro-mechanic) included in CodeAster[reg] was used. Two fluid phases can be considered in the material: a liquid phase (water) and a gas phase (dry air plus vapour) with the liquid/vapour phase changes. The thermodynamic aspects dealt with open systems framework, with temperature, capillary pressure and gas total pressure as variables. Observing the considered conditions (progressive saturation of the wall), the shape of sorption isotherm and permeabilities had an important influence on the results. The numerical results were in good agreement with experimental results, on the phenomenology and on flow rate through the wall. This study gave some indicators about the relations between airflow during a permeability test and gas (air + steam) flows during accident testing

  4. Flow Control Under Low-Pressure Turbine Conditions Using Pulsed Jets: Experimental Data Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is the final report of research performed under an NRA/Cooperative Interagency Agreement, and includes a supplemental CD-ROM with detailed data. It is complemented by NASA/CR-2012-217416 and NASA/CR-2012-217417 which include a Ph.D. Dissertation and an M.S. thesis respectively, performed under this contract. In this study the effects of unsteady wakes and flow control using vortex generator jets (VGJs) were studied experimentally and computationally on the flow over the L1A low pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. The experimental facility was a six passage linear cascade in a low speed wind tunnel at the U.S. Naval Academy. In parallel, computational work using the commercial code FLUENT (ANSYS, Inc.) was performed at Cleveland State University, using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) methods. In the first phase of the work, the baseline flow was documented under steady inflow conditions without flow control. URANS calculations were done using a variety of turbulence models. In the second phase of the work, flow control was added using steady and pulsed vortex generator jets. The VGJs successfully suppressed separation and reduced aerodynamic losses. Pulsed operation was more effective and mass flow requirements are very low. Numerical simulations of the VGJs cases showed that URANS failed to capture the effect of the jets. LES results were generally better. In the third phase, effects of unsteady wakes were studied. Computations with URANS and LES captured the wake effect and generally predicted separation and reattachment to match the experiments. Quantitatively the results were mixed. In the final phase of the study, wakes and VGJs were combined and synchronized using various timing schemes. The timing of the jets with respect to the wakes had some effect, but in general once the disturbance frequency was high enough to control separation, the timing was not very important. This is the supplemental CD-ROM

  5. Photochemical modelling of the Barcelona area under weak pressure synoptic summer conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This city of Barcelona and its surrounding area, located in the western Mediterranean basin, can reach high levels of O3 in summertime under weak pressure synoptic conditions. To study the origin of this photochemical pollution, the episode that took place between the 3 and 5 August 1990 was chosen. The main meteorological mesoscale flows that take place in the region, such as sea and land breeze, convection cells and topographic injections, were reproduced with the meteorological non-hydrostatic mesoscale model MEMO for 5 August 1990. Industrial and commercial activity on 5 August 1990 was very low because it was a Sunday in the summer holiday period. Therefore, the emissions inventory calculated for this day in an area of 80x80 km2 around Barcelona showed that the main sources of VOC were traffic (51%) and vegetation (34%), while NOx were mostly emitted by traffic (88%). Photochemical simulation with the MARS model has shown that the combination of mesoscale circulations and local emissions is crucial in the production of O3. For instance, NOx inland transport towards regions where biogenic VOC are emitted causes the formation of O3, while topographic injections cause the formation of elevated O3 air layers. The synoptic wind, coming from the northeast in this case, also played an important role in advecting the air masses with local generated O3 away from their precursor emission sources. Evaluation of the model simulations is also performed and discussed by means of comparison of meteorological measurements in 9 surface stations and concentration measurements in 5 surface stations. (Author)

  6. Local charge transport properties of hydrazine reduced monolayer graphene oxide sheets prepared under pressure condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuzaki, Sou, E-mail: ryuzaki.soh.341@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Meyer, Jakob A. S.; Petersen, Søren; Nørgaard, Kasper; Hassenkam, Tue; Laursen, Bo W. [Nano-Science Center and Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetparken 5, 2100 Københaven Ø (Denmark)

    2014-09-01

    Charge transport properties of chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets prepared by treatment with hydrazine were examined using conductive atomic force microscopy. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of monolayer RGO sheets prepared under atmospheric pressure followed an exponentially increase due to 2D variable-range hopping conduction through small graphene domains in an RGO sheet containing defect regions of residual sp{sup 3} carbon clusters bonded to oxygen groups, whereas RGO sheets prepared in a closed container under moderate pressure showed linear I-V characteristics with a conductivity of 267.2?537.5?S/m. It was found that the chemical reduction under pressure results in larger graphene domains (sp{sup 2} networks) in the RGO sheets when compared to that prepared under atmospheric pressure, indicating that the present reduction of GO sheets under the pressure is one of the effective methods to make well-reduced GO sheets.

  7. Controlling and assessing pressure conditions during treatment of tar sands formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Etuan; Beer, Gary Lee

    2015-11-10

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the tar sands formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. Heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. A pressure in the portion of the formation is controlled such that the pressure remains below a fracture pressure of the formation overburden while allowing the portion of the formation to heat to a selected average temperature of at least about 280.degree. C. and at most about 300.degree. C. The pressure in the portion of the formation is reduced to a selected pressure after the portion of the formation reaches the selected average temperature.

  8. Comparison Of Vented And Absolute Pressure Transducers For Water-Level Monitoring In Hanford Site Central Plateau Wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The disequilibrium is likely limited to wells screened across the water table (i.e., open to the deep vadose zone) where the depth to water is large or a low-permeability layer occurs in the vadose zone. Such wells are a pathway for air movement between the deep vadose zone and land surface and this sustains the pressure disequilibrium between the well bore and the atmosphere for longer time periods. Barometric over-response was not observed with the absolute pressure transducers because barometric compensation was achieved by directly measuring the air pressure within the well. Users of vented pressure transducers should be aware of the over-response issue in certain Hanford Site wells and ascertain if it will affect the use of the data. Pressure disequilibrium between the well and the atmosphere can be identified by substantial air movement through the wellbore. In wells exhibiting pressure disequilibrium, it is recommended that absolute pressure transducers be used rather than vented transducers for applications that require precise automated determinations of well water-level changes in response to barometric pressure fluctuations.

  9. COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCDONALD JP

    2011-09-08

    Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The disequilibrium is likely limited to wells screened across the water table (i.e., open to the deep vadose zone) where the depth to water is large or a low-permeability layer occurs in the vadose zone. Such wells are a pathway for air movement between the deep vadose zone and land surface and this sustains the pressure disequilibrium between the well bore and the atmosphere for longer time periods. Barometric over-response was not observed with the absolute pressure transducers because barometric compensation was achieved by directly measuring the air pressure within the well. Users of vented pressure transducers should be aware of the over-response issue in certain Hanford Site wells and ascertain if it will affect the use of the data. Pressure disequilibrium between the well and the atmosphere can be identified by substantial air movement through the wellbore. In wells exhibiting pressure disequilibrium, it is recommended that absolute pressure transducers be used rather than vented transducers for applications that require precise automated determinations of well water-level changes in response to barometric pressure fluctuations.

  10. Surgical Space Conditions During Low-Pressure Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy with Deep Versus Moderate Neuromuscular Blockade : A Randomized Clinical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr Rye, Anne Kathrine; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed during low intraabdominal pressure (<12 mm Hg) is associated with significantly less postoperative pain than standard pressure (?12 mm Hg). The impact on surgical space conditions and safety of operating at lower pressures has not been adequately described, but deep neuromuscular blockade may be beneficial. We investigated if deep muscle relaxation would be associated with a higher proportion of procedures with "optimal" surgical space conditions compared with moderate relaxation during low-pressure (8 mm Hg) laparoscopic cholecystectomy. METHODS:: In this assessor-blinded study, 48 patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were administered rocuronium for neuromuscular blockade and randomized to either deep neuromuscular blockade (rocuronium bolus plus infusion maintaining a posttetanic count 0-1) or moderate neuromuscular blockade (rocuronium repeat bolus only for inadequate surgical conditions with spontaneous recovery of neuromuscular function). Patients received anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil, and rocuronium. The primary outcome was the proportion of procedures with optimal surgical space conditions (assessed by the surgeon as 1 on a 4-point scale). Secondary outcomes included the proportion of procedures completed at pneumoperitoneum 8 mm Hg and surgical space conditions on dissection of the gallbladder (numeric rating scale 0-100; 0 = optimal surgical space conditions; 100 = unacceptable surgical space conditions). RESULTS:: Optimal surgical space conditions during the entire procedure were observed in 7 of 25 patients allocated to deep neuromuscular blockade and in 1 of 23 patients allocated to moderate blockade (P = 0.05) with an absolute difference of 24% between the groups (95% confidence interval, 4%-43%). Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was completed at pneumoperitoneum 8 mm Hg in 15 of 25 and 8 of 23 patients in the deep and moderate group, respectively (95% confidence interval, -2% to 53%; P = 0.08). Surgical space conditions during dissection of the gallbladder assessed by use of the numeric rating scale were 20 (10-50) (median [25%-75% range]) in the deep neuromuscular blockade group and 30 (10-50) in the moderate group (P = 0.58; Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney odds, 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-2.5). No operations were converted to laparotomy. CONCLUSIONS:: Deep neuromuscular blockade was associated with surgical space conditions that were marginally better than with moderate muscle relaxation during low-pressure laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  11. Transient behavior of pressure and wall temperature in water flow in a tube under flow reduction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow reduction transient boiling phenomena have been studied in vertical up-flow of water in a tube under an atmospheric pressure to provide information on the transient thermal-hydraulic behavior of a LWR core during Power Cooling Mismatch (PCM) conditions. The electrically heated test section was stainless steel tube 8 mm in diameter and 800 mm long. Experiment was conducted under the conditions; inlet water temperature = 30 -- 800C heat flux = 0.54 -- 1.1 x 106 kcal/hm2, initial mass velocity=3.6 -- 8.4 x 106 kg/hm2, and flow reduction time = 0.05 -- 62 sec. According to the observed behavior of the pressure and wall temperature, the flow reduction transient boiling phenomena are similar to those in the steady-state boiling at flow reduction rates below about 10cm/sec/sec under the ranges of experimental conditions. (auth.)

  12. Development and calibration of differential mobility analyzer for 20 to 80 nm particles under low pressure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Ji Hun; Cho, Dae Guen; Kim, Young Jin; Choi, Jae Boong; Kang, Sang Woo; Yun, Ju Young; Shin, Yong Hyeon; Kim, Tae Sung

    2011-07-01

    The vienna-type differential mobility analyzer (DMA) was developed for the measurement of wide-range nm-sized particles under low-pressure conditions (2.9-8 kPa) with the faraday cup electrometer (FCE). The length, inner and outer diameter of DMA are calculated as a function of flow rate, applied voltage, pressure, and particle diameter to avoide breakdown in DMA. The algorithm for the diffusion transfer function of the DMA was successfully developed and verified by comparing the numerical and experimental results. The DMA was calibrated via the tandem DMA (TDMA) method which using two DMA in parallel. The inversion algorithm was applied to the size distribution obtained from the current of the FCE. The calibration experiment was performed with 1% NaCl particles under atmospheric and low-pressure conditions. The calibration result showed that the development of the DMA was successful as it was able to measure 20- to 80-nm paricles under low-pressure conditions with various flow rates (0.1-0.5 l/min). PMID:22121701

  13. EXAFS measurements under high pressure conditions using a combination of a diamond anvil cell and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EXAFS spectra for Fe, Co, Ni K-edges were successfully measured under high pressure conditions using a combination of a set of normal 1/8 carat diamond anvils, synchrotron radiation and a scintillation counter. A newly developed motor controlled goniometer stage was used for adjusting the position of a miniature diamond anvil cell. On the measurement of Cr and Mn spectra, specially designed thinner diamond anvil was necessary. EXAFS analysis of bis(dimethylglyoximato)nickel(II) at pressures from 1 atm to 5.6 GPa was made. (author)

  14. Formation of the –N(NO)N(NO)– polymer at high pressure and stabilization at ambient conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Hai; An, Qi; Goddard, William A., III; Liu, Wei-Guang; Zybin, Sergey V.

    2013-01-01

    A number of exotic structures have been formed through high-pressure chemistry, but applications have been hindered by difficulties in recovering the high-pressure phase to ambient conditions (i.e., one atmosphere and 300 K). Here we use dispersion-corrected density functional theory [PBE-ulg (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor of DFT with the universal low gradient correction for long range London dispersion)] to predict that above 60 gigapascal (GPa) the most stable form of N2O (the laughing gas...

  15. SOLUTE CLUSTERING AND PRECIPITATION IN PRESSURE VESSEL STEELS UNDER LOW FLUENCE IRRADIATION CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, M.; Miller, M.

    1988-01-01

    The microstructural features present in reactor pressure vessel steels after low fluence neutron irradiation have been characterized by atom probe field-ion microscopy. Unlike the clusters and precipitates which have been reported in pressure vessel steels irradiated to intermediate and higher fluences, very diffuse solute-enriched atmospheres have been observed. Although copper is associated with a high proportion of these atmospheres, phosphorus appears to play a more dominant role in the f...

  16. Experiments on rocks under high pressure conditions in GTA 20-32 triaxial press

    OpenAIRE

    Polá?ek, Josef; Kožušníková, Alena

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the methodology of measurements in the GTA 20-32 triaxial press. The deformation behaviour of two different types of rocks was compared: ? gypsum with plastic deformation even at lower confining pressure, ? Carboniferous sandstone with brittle failure even at the highest confining pressure. The influence of gypsum layering was studied as well. The experimental results show that the deformation and strength properties of the gypsum in the triaxial state of stress d...

  17. Osmosis-induced water uptake by Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste and pressure development in constant volume conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marieen, A., E-mail: amarien@sckcen.be [Waste and Disposal Expert Group, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Mokni, N., E-mail: Nadia.mokni@upc.edu [Department of Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences, Universidad Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Calle Gran Capitan, s/n, Edificio C-1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Valcke, E. [Waste and Disposal Expert Group, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Olivella, S. [Department of Geotechnical Engineering and Geosciences, Universidad Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Calle Gran Capitan, s/n, Edificio C-1, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Smets, S. [Waste and Disposal Expert Group, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Li, X., E-mail: xli@sckcen.be [EIG EURIDICE, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The water uptake by Eurobitum is studied to judge the safety of geological disposal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High pressures of up to 20 MPa are measured in constant volume water uptake tests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology of leached Eurobitum samples is studied with {mu}CT and ESEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observations are reproduced by an existing CHM formulation for Eurobitum. - Abstract: The chemo-hydro-mechanical (CHM) interaction between swelling Eurobitum radioactive bituminized waste (BW) and Boom Clay is investigated to assess the feasibility of geological disposal for the long-term management of this waste. These so-called compatibility studies include laboratory water uptake tests at Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK-CEN, and the development of a coupled CHM formulation for Eurobitum by the International Center for Numerical Methods and Engineering (CIMNE, Polytechnical University of Cataluna, Spain). In the water uptake tests, the osmosis-induced swelling, pressure increase and NaNO{sub 3} leaching of small cylindrical BW samples (diameter 38 mm, height 10 mm) is studied under constant total stress conditions and nearly constant volume conditions; the actual geological disposal conditions should be intermediate between these extremes. Two nearly constant volume tests were stopped after 1036 and 1555 days to characterize the morphology of the hydrated BW samples and to visualize the hydrated part with microfocus X-ray Computer Tomography ({mu}CT) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). In parallel, a coupled CHM formulation is developed that describes chemically and hydraulically coupled flow processes in porous materials with salt crystals, and that incorporates a porosity dependent membrane efficiency, permeability and diffusivity. When Eurobitum BW is hydrated in (nearly) constant volume conditions, the osmosis-induced water uptake results in an increasing pressure to values that can be (in theory) as high as 42.8 MPa, being the osmotic pressure of a saturated NaNO{sub 3} solution. After about four years of hydration in nearly constant volume water uptake tests, pressures up to 20 MPa are measured. During this hydration period only the outer layers with a thickness of 1-2 mm were hydrated (as derived from {mu}CT and ESEM analyses), and only about 10-20% of the initial NaNO{sub 3} content was released by the samples. In the studied test conditions, the rates of water uptake and NaNO{sub 3} leaching are low because of the low porosity, and thus low permeability, of the hydrated BW samples in combination with a highly efficient semi-permeable bitumen membrane. In contrast to the hydration in free swelling conditions, the increase in porosity is limited by the high pressures in the nearly constant volume tests. Furthermore, at the interface with the stainless steel filters, a low permeable re-compressed bitumen layer is formed, as observed on the ESEM images. The experimental results of pressure increase and NaNO{sub 3} leaching, as well as observations on {mu}CT and ESEM images (e.g. compression of leached layers, high dissolved NaNO{sub 3} concentration in hydrated BW after about four years), were reproduced rather successfully by the coupled CHM formulation for Eurobitum BW. A long-term model prediction of the evolution of the osmosis-induced pressure in the nearly constant volume tests shows that the pressure would reach a maximal value of about 20 MPa after about 5.5 years, after which the pressure would start to decrease. After 10,000 days ({approx}27 years) the pressure would have decreased to a value of {approx}2 MPa.

  18. Osmosis-induced water uptake by Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste and pressure development in constant volume conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? The water uptake by Eurobitum is studied to judge the safety of geological disposal. ? High pressures of up to 20 MPa are measured in constant volume water uptake tests. ? The morphology of leached Eurobitum samples is studied with ?CT and ESEM. ? The observations are reproduced by an existing CHM formulation for Eurobitum. - Abstract: The chemo-hydro-mechanical (CHM) interaction between swelling Eurobitum radioactive bituminized waste (BW) and Boom Clay is investigated to assess the feasibility of geological disposal for the long-term management of this waste. These so-called compatibility studies include laboratory water uptake tests at Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK-CEN, and the development of a coupled CHM formulation for Eurobitum by the International Center for Numerical Methods and Engineering (CIMNE, Polytechnical University of Cataluña, Spain). In the water uptake tests, the osmosis-induced swelling, pressure increase and NaNO3 leaching of small cylindrical BW samples (diameter 38 mm, height 10 mm) is studied under constant total stress conditions and nearly constant volume conditions; the actual geological disposal conditions should be intermediate between these extremes. Two nearly constant volume tests were stopped after 1036 and 1555 days to characterize the morphology of the hydrated BW samples and to visualize the hydrated part with microfocus X-ray Computer Tomography (?CT) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). In parallel, a coupled CHM formulation is developed that describes chemically and hydraulically coupled flow processes in porous materials with salt crystals, and that incorporates a porosity dependent membrane efficiency, permeability and diffusivity. When Eurobitum BW is hydrated in (nearly) constant volume conditions, the osmosis-induced water uptake results in an increasing pressure to values that can be (in theory) as high as 42.8 MPa, being the osmotic pressure of a saturated NaNO3 solution. After about four years of hydration in nearly constant volume water uptake tests, pressures up to 20 MPa are measured. During this hydration period only the outer layers with a thickness of 1–2 mm were hydrated (as derived from ?CT and ESEM analyses), and only about 10–20% of the initial NaNO3 content was released by the samples. In the studied test conditions, the rates of water uptake and NaNO3 leaching are low because of the low porosity, and thus low permeability, of the hydrated BW samples in combination with a highly efficient semi-permeable bitumen membrane. In contrast to the hydration in free swelling conditions, the increase in porosity is limited by the high pressures in the nearly constant volume tests. Furthermore, at the interface with the stainless steel filters, a low permeable re-compressed bitumen layer is formed, as observed on the ESEM images. The experimental results of pressure increase and NaNO3 leaching, as well as observations on ?CT and ESEM images (e.g. compression of leached layers, high dissolved NaNO3 concentration in hydrated BW after about four years), were reproduced rather successfully by the coupled CHM formulation for Eurobitum BW. A long-term model prediction of the evolution of the osmosis-induced pressure in the nearly constant volume tests shows that the pressure would reach a maximal value of about 20 MPa after about 5.5 years, after which the pressure would start to decrease. After 10,000 days (?27 years) the pressure would have decreased to a value of ?2 MPa.

  19. Osmosis-induced water uptake by Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste and pressure development in constant volume conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariën, A.; Mokni, N.; Valcke, E.; Olivella, S.; Smets, S.; Li, X.

    2013-01-01

    The chemo-hydro-mechanical (CHM) interaction between swelling Eurobitum radioactive bituminized waste (BW) and Boom Clay is investigated to assess the feasibility of geological disposal for the long-term management of this waste. These so-called compatibility studies include laboratory water uptake tests at the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK•CEN, and the development of a coupled CHM formulation for Eurobitum by the International Center for Numerical Methods and Engineering (CIMNE, Polytechnical University of Cataluña, Spain). In the water uptake tests, the osmosis-induced swelling, pressure increase and NaNO3 leaching of small cylindrical BW samples (diameter 38 mm, height 10 mm) is studied under constant total stress conditions and nearly constant volume conditions; the actual geological disposal conditions should be intermediate between these extremes. Two nearly constant volume tests were stopped after 1036 and 1555 days to characterize the morphology of the hydrated BW samples and to visualize the hydrated part with microfocus X-ray Computer Tomography (?CT) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). In parallel, a coupled CHM formulation is developed that describes chemically and hydraulically coupled flow processes in porous materials with salt crystals, and that incorporates a porosity dependent membrane efficiency, permeability and diffusivity. When Eurobitum BW is hydrated in (nearly) constant volume conditions, the osmosis-induced water uptake results in an increasing pressure to values that can be (in theory) as high as 42.8 MPa, being the osmotic pressure of a saturated NaNO3 solution. After about four years of hydration in nearly constant volume water uptake tests, pressures up to 20 MPa are measured. During this hydration period only the outer layers with a thickness of 1-2 mm were hydrated (as derived from ?CT and ESEM analyses), and only about 10-20% of the initial NaNO3 content was released by the samples. In the studied test conditions, the rates of water uptake and NaNO3 leaching are low because of the low porosity, and thus low permeability, of the hydrated BW samples in combination with a highly efficient semi-permeable bitumen membrane. In contrast to the hydration in free swelling conditions, the increase in porosity is limited by the high pressures in the nearly constant volume tests. Furthermore, at the interface with the stainless steel filters, a low permeable re-compressed bitumen layer is formed, as observed on the ESEM images. The experimental results of pressure increase and NaNO3 leaching, as well as observations on ?CT and ESEM images (e.g. compression of leached layers, high dissolved NaNO3 concentration in hydrated BW after about four years), were reproduced rather successfully by the coupled CHM formulation for Eurobitum BW. A long-term model prediction of the evolution of the osmosis-induced pressure in the nearly constant volume tests shows that the pressure would reach a maximal value of about 20 MPa after about 5.5 years, after which the pressure would start to decrease. After 10,000 days (˜27 years) the pressure would have decreased to a value of ˜2 MPa.

  20. Advanced setup for high-pressure and low-temperature neutron diffraction at hydrostatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a design of the experimental setup for neutron diffraction studies at low temperatures and hydrostatic pressure. The significant benefit of the setup, compared to the previous methods, is that it makes possible the simultaneous collection of neutrons diffracted at the 30 deg. -150 deg. range with no contamination by the primary scattering from the sample surroundings and without cutting out the incident and diffracted beams. The suggested design is most useful for third-generation time-of-flight diffractometers and constant wavelength instruments. Application of the setup expands the capabilities of high-pressure neutron diffraction, allowing time-resolved kinetics and structural studies, multihistogram Rietveld, and pair distribution function and texture analyses. The high efficiency of the setup was proven for the HIPPO diffractometer at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center under pressures up to 10 kbar and temperatures from 4 to 300 K

  1. Void fraction under high pressure, low flow conditions in rod bundle geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Void-fraction data are reported from a series of high pressure, low heat and mass flux experiments. Testing was performed in a heated vertical rod bundle with internal dimensions similar to a PWR fuel bundle. The results are of interest in analyses of small break loss of coolant accidents. The experiments showed that, at a given pressure, void-fraction data could be fitted to a drift-flux equation with a constant drift-velocity. The drift-velocity was observed to decrease with increasing pressure and was independent of void fraction: a characteristic normally associated with churn-turbulent flow. However, relevant drift-flux correlations found in the literature gave relatively poor predictions of void fractions. The best predictions were obtained from an empirical correlation based on dimensional analyses. (orig.)

  2. The effect of high pressure-high temperature processing conditions on acrylamide formation and other Maillard reaction compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleeschouwer, Kristel; Van der Plancken, Iesel; Van Loey, Ann; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2010-11-24

    The effect of high pressure-high temperature (HPHT) processing on the formation of acrylamide and other Maillard-type reaction compounds was investigated in order to elucidate the impact of HPHT conditions on the different stages of the Maillard reaction. This study was performed in equimolar asparagine-glucose model systems that were treated at various HP/HT conditions (100-115 °C, 400-700 MPa, 0-60 min), and, for comparison, the model system was also heat-treated at ambient pressure. On the treated samples, the concentration of acrylamide, reactants, hydroxymethylfurfural, organic acids, and melanoidins was determined and the pH prior to and after treatment was measured. Based on the measured responses, the retarding effect of high pressure on the overall Maillard reaction was demonstrated; no or little differences were observed between 400 and 700 MPa. The study was conducted in two types of buffer, i.e. phosphate and MES buffer. In case of acrylamide, aspartic acid and browning, a higher concentration was generated in the MES buffer system, but these differences with the phosphate buffer system could be ascribed to pH changes resulting from the application of combined high pressure and high temperature. Based on the results, acrylamide formation is not expected to pose a major hazard to HPHT-treated products. PMID:20973553

  3. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Transitional Flows in Low-Pressure Turbines under a Wide Range of Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Ashpis, D. E.; Volino, R. J.; Corke, T. C.; Thomas, F. O.; Huang, J.; Lake, J. P.; King, P. I.

    2007-01-01

    A transport equation for the intermittency factor is employed to predict the transitional flows in low-pressure turbines. The intermittent behavior of the transitional flows is taken into account and incorporated into computations by modifying the eddy viscosity, mu(sub p) with the intermittency factor, gamma. Turbulent quantities are predicted using Menter's two-equation turbulence model (SST). The intermittency factor is obtained from a transport equation model which can produce both the experimentally observed streamwise variation of intermittency and a realistic profile in the cross stream direction. The model had been previously validated against low-pressure turbine experiments with success. In this paper, the model is applied to predictions of three sets of recent low-pressure turbine experiments on the Pack B blade to further validate its predicting capabilities under various flow conditions. Comparisons of computational results with experimental data are provided. Overall, good agreement between the experimental data and computational results is obtained. The new model has been shown to have the capability of accurately predicting transitional flows under a wide range of low-pressure turbine conditions.

  4. Feasibility Study of PM Elimination by Silent Discharge Type of DPF under Room Temperature and Atmospheric Pressure Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuubachi, Minoru; Nagasawa, Takeshi

    This Silent Discharge type of DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) has been studied for eliminating PM (Particulate Mater) we call it “SDeDPF”. Usually, exhaust gas temperature of diesel engines is under 200 or 250°C at normal city driving condition. Under that condition, generally PM is not bourn out in the normal ceramic DPF. This SDeDPF aims to remove PM electrically and chemically even at room temperature and atmospheric pressure continuously. Finally, in the basic lab test result, 95.6% reduction of PM has been verified by SDeDPF with a special MFS (Metal Fiber Sheet) for discharge electrode to reduce a back pressure, a special Turbulent Block for turbulent and slower velocity of exhaust gas, the 1mm gap between electrodes and an optimum total area of piled electrodes. Also, 98.1% reduction of PM could be designed by most suitable gap between electrodes.

  5. Gas bubble dimensions in Archean lava flows indicate low air pressure at 2.7 Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, S. M.; Buick, R.; Hagadorn, J.; Blake, T.; Perreault, J.; Harnmeijer, J.; Catling, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Air pressure constrains atmospheric composition, which, in turn, is linked to the Earth system through biogeochemical cycles and fluxes of volatiles from and to the Earth's interior. Previous studies have only placed maximum levels on surface air pressure for the early Earth [1]. Here, we calculate an absolute value for Archean barometric pressure using gas bubble size (vesicle) distributions in uninflated basaltic lava flows that solidified at sea level 2.7 billion years ago in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia. These vesicles have been filled in by secondary minerals deposited during metasomatism and so are now amydules, but thin sections show that infilling did not change vesicle dimensions. Amygdule dimensions are measured using high-resolution X-ray tomography from core samples obtained from the top and bottom of the lava flows. The modal size expressed at the top and at the bottom of an uninflated flow can be linked to atmospheric pressure using the ideal gas law. Such a technique has been verified as a paleoaltimeter using Hawaiian Quaternary lava flows [2]. We use statistical methods to estimate the mean and standard deviation of the volumetric size of the amygdules by applying 'bootstrap'resampling and the Central Limit Theorem. Our data indicate a surprisingly low atmospheric pressure. Greater nitrogen burial under anaerobic conditions likely explains lower pressure. Refs: [1] Som et al. (2012) Nature 484, 359-262. D. L. Sahagian et al. (2002) J. Geol., 110, 671-685.

  6. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part I: BWR/NWC conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Devrient, B.; Roth, A. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Ehrnsten, U. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M. [Nuclear Research Institute, NRI, Rez (Czech Republic); Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T. [Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt, MPA, Stuttgart (Germany); Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWR) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It was focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of EAC crack growth behaviour/mechanism of LAS in high-temperature water under steady-state power operation (constant load) and transient operating conditions (e.g., start-up/shut-down, transients in water chemistry and load). Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurised water reactor (VVER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (VVER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarises the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated BWR/NWC conditions. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  7. Aluminum oxide films deposited in low pressure conditions by reactive pulsed dc magnetron sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Seino, T

    2002-01-01

    The reactive pulsed dc sputtering technique is widely used for the deposition of oxide films. The operating pressure for sputtering is commonly above 0.13 Pa. In this study, however, aluminum oxide (alumina) films were deposited at operating pressures from 0.06 to 0.4 Pa using a sputtering system equipped with a scanning magnetron cathode and a pulsed dc power supply. The pulsed dc power was found to be useful not only to reduce arcing, but also to sustain the discharge at low pressure. The electrical breakdown field, intrinsic stress, O/Al ratio, refractive index, and surface roughness were investigated. Both a low intrinsic stress and an O/Al ratio around the stoichiometry were required to get the film having a high breakdown field. A low operating pressure of 0.1 Pa was found to provide the necessary stress and O/Al ratio targets. A 50-nm-thick alumina film having a maximum breakdown field of 7.4 MV/cm was obtained.

  8. Theoretical study of possible benzene dimerizations under high-pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We offer a theoretical explanation of the rate processes observed macroscopically in materials composed of aromatic ring structures subjected to high pressure. Earlier workers have made qualitative suggestions that the origin of these processes may be due to interring pi bonding. By making quantum-mechanical calculations on a simple special case of such systems (i.e., two interacting benzene rings), we attempt to produce a quantitative microscopic foundation for the suggestions. We briefly review earlier experimental and theoretical work on the subject and thereby motivate the working hypotheses used in the calculations. The principal hypothesis is that by studying restricted parts of the two benzene-ring energy hypersurface, we can learn something about the pressure-induced rate process for all the arene structures. By use of the modified-neglect-of-diatomic-differential-overlap (MNDO) method and the generalized valence bond ''perfect-pairing'' (GVP--PP) method supplemented by configuration interaction, we found two metastable ground electronic state dimers of benzene; we suggest that one of these is the source of the observed rate process seen in benzene at high pressure. Further, we suggest that analogous dimerizations are responsible for the rate processes seen in larger arene materials subjected to very high pressures. The detailed geometries and energies of both benzene dimers are given. Suggestions for experimentally testing whether the proposed explanation is correct are given

  9. TURBULENCE SETS THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-PRESSURE ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Contreras, Y. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW, 1710 (Australia); Longmore, S. N.; Bastian, N. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Jackson, J. M. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Kruijssen, J. M. D. [Max-Planck Institut fur Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Alves, J. F. [University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Bally, J. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 8030 (United States); Foster, J. B. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101 New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Garay, G. [Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Testi, L. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Walsh, A. J., E-mail: Jill.Rathborne@csiro.au [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth (Australia)

    2014-11-10

    Despite the simplicity of theoretical models of supersonically turbulent, isothermal media, their predictions successfully match the observed gas structure and star formation activity within low-pressure (P/k < 10{sup 5} K cm{sup –3}) molecular clouds in the solar neighborhood. However, it is unknown whether or not these theories extend to clouds in high-pressure (P/k > 10{sup 7} K cm{sup –3}) environments, like those in the Galaxy's inner 200 pc central molecular zone (CMZ) and in the early universe. Here, we present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array 3 mm dust continuum emission within a cloud, G0.253+0.016, which is immersed in the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. While the log-normal shape and dispersion of its column density probability distribution function (PDF) are strikingly similar to those of solar neighborhood clouds, there is one important quantitative difference: its mean column density is one to two orders of magnitude higher. Both the similarity and difference in the PDF compared to those derived from solar neighborhood clouds match predictions of turbulent cloud models given the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. The PDF shows a small deviation from log-normal at high column densities confirming the youth of G0.253+0.016. Its lack of star formation is consistent with the theoretically predicted, environmentally dependent volume density threshold for star formation which is orders of magnitude higher than that derived for solar neighborhood clouds. Our results provide the first empirical evidence that the current theoretical understanding of molecular cloud structure derived from the solar neighborhood also holds in high-pressure environments. We therefore suggest that these theories may be applicable to understand star formation in the early universe.

  10. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part II: WWER conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWRs) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of crack growth behavior of LAS in high-temperature water due to EAC under constant load (steady-state power operation), to study the effect of transient conditions (during operation or start-up/shut-down of a plant) using their impact on time-based and cycle-based crack growth rates and to a more detailed understanding of the acting mechanisms. Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurized water reactor (WWER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (WWER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarizes the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated WWER conditions. The influence of oxygen content and the effect of specimen size (C(T)25 versus C(T)50 specimens) on the crack growth rates are shown. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  11. Stresses in heated pressurized multi-layer cylinders in generalized plane strain conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical solution for the displacement field and corresponding stress state in multi-layer cylinders subjected to pressure and thermal loading is developed. Solutions are developed for axially loaded and spring-mounted cylinders, assuming that the combined multi-layer cross-section remains plane after deformation (generalized plane strain). The analytical solutions are verified by means of detailed three-dimensional finite element analyses. The solutions are easily implemented in, and suitable for, engineering applications. - Highlights: • An analytical solution for heated pressurized multi-layer cylinders is developed. • The solution is easily implemented and computationally efficient. • The solution highlights application to coated pipelines. • The analytical solution is verified numerically by finite element analyses

  12. In Vitro Effects of External Pressure Changes on the Sealing Ability under Simulated Diving Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus Stoetzer; Martin Ruecker; Andreas Koch; Dirk Ziebolz; Horst Kokemüller; Christina Kaempf; Nils-Claudius Gellrich; Constantin von See

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To measure and validate the permeability of pressure changes in correlation to different root filling techniques. Methods. Eighty extracted single-rooted teeth were randomly assigned to one of eight groups of ten teeth. Following standardized instrumentation and irrigation, root canal fillings were performed using either cold lateral condensation, a warm carrier-based gutta-percha obturation technique, a warm carrier-based Resilon, or warm gutta-percha compaction with the downpack/backfi...

  13. Reduced herbivore pressure under rainy ENSO conditions could facilitate dryland reforestation

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez, J. R.; Holmgren, M.; Manrique, R; Squeo, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Most semi-arid and arid regions around the world have lost a major part of their original vegetation. Restoration of once shrublands and woodlands is often challenged by low seedling establishment success due to water stress and herbivory. In some regions, increased rainfall during El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events can significantly stimulate plant recruitment. However, recruitment seems to be strongly modulated by herbivore pressure. Also, seedling establishment in arid ecosystems c...

  14. Local charge transport properties of hydrazine reduced monolayer graphene oxide sheets prepared under pressure condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Meyer, Jakob Abild Stengaard; Petersen, Søren Vermehren; Nørgaard, Kasper; Hassenkam, Tue; Laursen, Bo Wegge

    2014-01-01

    Charge transport properties of chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets prepared by treatment with hydrazine were examined using conductive atomic force microscopy. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of monolayer RGO sheets prepared under atmospheric pressure followed an exponentially increase due to 2D variable-range hopping conduction through small graphene domains in an RGO sheet containing defect regions of residual sp3carbon clusters bonded to oxygen groups, whereas RGO sheets ...

  15. Turbulence Sets the Initial Conditions for Star Formation in High-pressure Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathborne, J. M.; Longmore, S. N.; Jackson, J. M.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Alves, J. F.; Bally, J.; Bastian, N.; Contreras, Y.; Foster, J. B.; Garay, G.; Testi, L.; Walsh, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Despite the simplicity of theoretical models of supersonically turbulent, isothermal media, their predictions successfully match the observed gas structure and star formation activity within low-pressure (P/k 107 K cm-3) environments, like those in the Galaxy's inner 200 pc central molecular zone (CMZ) and in the early universe. Here, we present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array 3 mm dust continuum emission within a cloud, G0.253+0.016, which is immersed in the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. While the log-normal shape and dispersion of its column density probability distribution function (PDF) are strikingly similar to those of solar neighborhood clouds, there is one important quantitative difference: its mean column density is one to two orders of magnitude higher. Both the similarity and difference in the PDF compared to those derived from solar neighborhood clouds match predictions of turbulent cloud models given the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. The PDF shows a small deviation from log-normal at high column densities confirming the youth of G0.253+0.016. Its lack of star formation is consistent with the theoretically predicted, environmentally dependent volume density threshold for star formation which is orders of magnitude higher than that derived for solar neighborhood clouds. Our results provide the first empirical evidence that the current theoretical understanding of molecular cloud structure derived from the solar neighborhood also holds in high-pressure environments. We therefore suggest that these theories may be applicable to understand star formation in the early universe.

  16. Land use change under conditions of high population pressure : the case of Java

    OpenAIRE

    Verburg, P.H.; Veldkamp, A.; Bouma, J

    1999-01-01

    A long history of increases in population pressure in Java has caused agricultural land use to expand and intensify. More recent land use changes caused the conversion of prime agricultural land into residential and industrial area. Results of a dynamic, regional-scale, land use change model are presented, defining the spatial distribution of these land use changes. The model is based on multi-scale modelling of the relations between land use and socio-economic and biophysical determinants. H...

  17. Iron under Earth's core conditions: Liquid-state thermodynamics and high-pressure melting curve

    OpenAIRE

    Alfe, D.; Price, G D; Gillan, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    {\\em Ab initio} techniques based on density functional theory in the projector-augmented-wave implementation are used to calculate the free energy and a range of other thermodynamic properties of liquid iron at high pressures and temperatures relevant to the Earth's core. The {\\em ab initio} free energy is obtained by using thermodynamic integration to calculate the change of free energy on going from a simple reference system to the {\\em ab initio} system, with thermal aver...

  18. Optimal heat rejection pressure in transcritical carbon dioxide air conditioning and heat pump systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shengming; Jakobsen, Arne

    1998-01-01

    Due to the urgent need for environmentally benign refrigerants, the use of the natural substance carbon dioxide in refrigeration systems has gained more and more attention. In systems such as automobile air-conditioners and heat pumps, owing to the relatively high heat rejection temperatures, the cycles using carbon dioxide as refrigerant will have to operate in the transcritical area. In a transcritical carbon dioxide system, there is an optimal heat rejection pressure that gives a maximum COP....

  19. Acrylic resin water sorption under different pressure, temperature and time conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Marisa Rizzatti-Barbosa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to analyze water sorption by polymerized acrylic resins under different pressure, temperature and time treatments. A thermo-cured acrylic resin was used as the denture base (Classico Ltda. and ethylene glycol di-methacrylate as a cross-linking agent, with processing carried out in a water bath at 73 °C for nine hours. Forty-five samples were prepared following the criteria and dimensions of specification # 12 of the American Dental Association (ADA, using a matrix in the shape of a stainless steel disc with 50 ± 1 mm diameter and 0.5 ± 0.05 mm thickness. The control group samples were stored in distilled water for 30 days, while groups GII to GIX were placed in a polymerization device with adjustable pressure, time and temperature. An analysis of the variance of the results revealed the influence of different factors on water sorption only, with significant factors being temperature, time, pressure and the interaction between time and temperature. Other interactions exerted no significant influence on water sorption. Neither additional treatments nor the control group (GI showed any significant difference in comparison to the averages of other treatments.

  20. Acrylic resin water sorption under different pressure, temperature and time conditions

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Célia Marisa, Rizzatti-Barbosa; Marco Aurélio, Fraga; Tarcísio de Moraes, Gonçalves.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to analyze water sorption by polymerized acrylic resins under different pressure, temperature and time treatments. A thermo-cured acrylic resin was used as the denture base (Classico Ltda.) and ethylene glycol di-methacrylate as a cross-linking agent, with processing car [...] ried out in a water bath at 73 °C for nine hours. Forty-five samples were prepared following the criteria and dimensions of specification # 12 of the American Dental Association (ADA), using a matrix in the shape of a stainless steel disc with 50 ± 1 mm diameter and 0.5 ± 0.05 mm thickness. The control group samples were stored in distilled water for 30 days, while groups GII to GIX were placed in a polymerization device with adjustable pressure, time and temperature. An analysis of the variance of the results revealed the influence of different factors on water sorption only, with significant factors being temperature, time, pressure and the interaction between time and temperature. Other interactions exerted no significant influence on water sorption. Neither additional treatments nor the control group (GI) showed any significant difference in comparison to the averages of other treatments.

  1. Microstructural studies on steam oxidised Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube under simulated LOCA condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of the microstructural evolution of Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube material of Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) due to steam oxidation at high temperature (in the range 500-1050°C) was carried out on pressure tube coupons. Hydrogen pick up was less than 55 ppm in the samples oxidized at temperatures up to 850°C but high (250-400 ppm) in the samples oxidized in the ? phase region (900°C and above). The microstructure of the samples oxidized above the ?-Zr/?-Zr transition temperature showed from the surface inwards sequentially the presence of an oxide layer, an underlying oxygen stabilized ?-Zr layer and a prior ?-Zr phase containing hydride precipitates. An increase in the hardness was observed near the oxide-metal interface in the coupons oxidized above 900°C, due to formation of oxygen stabilized ?-Zr layer. Higher hardness was also observed in the base metal in the samples oxidized at 1000 and 1050°C (author)

  2. Turbulence sets the initial conditions for star formation in high-pressure environments

    CERN Document Server

    Rathborne, J M; Jackson, J M; Kruijssen, J M D; Alves, J F; Bally, J; Bastian, N; Contreras, Y; Foster, J B; Garay, G; Testi, L; Walsh, A J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the simplicity of theoretical models of supersonically turbulent, isothermal media, their predictions successfully match the observed gas structure and star formation activity within low-pressure (P/k 10^7 K cm^-3) environments, like those in the Galaxy's inner 200 pc Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) and in the early Universe. Here we present ALMA 3mm dust continuum emission within a cloud, G0.253+0.016, which is immersed in the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. While the log-normal shape and dispersion of its column density PDF is strikingly similar to those of solar neighbourhood clouds, there is one important quantitative difference: its mean column density is 1--2 orders of magnitude higher. Both the similarity and difference in the PDF compared to those derived from solar neighbourhood clouds match predictions of turbulent cloud models given the high-pressure environment of the CMZ. The PDF shows a small deviation from log-normal at high column densities confirming the youth of G0.253+0.016. Its...

  3. Pressure measurements and high speed visualizations of the cavitation phenomena at deep part load condition in a Francis turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Müller, A.; Favrel, A.; Landry, C.; Avellan, F.

    2014-03-01

    In a hydraulic power plant, it is essential to provide a reliable, sustainable and flexible energy supply. In recent years, in order to cover the variations of the renewable electricity production, hydraulic power plants are demanded to operate with more extended operating range. Under these off-design conditions, a hydraulic turbine is subject to cavitating swirl flow at the runner outlet. It is well-known that the helically/symmetrically shaped cavitation develops at the runner outlet in part load/full load condition, and it gives severe damage to the hydraulic systems under certain conditions. Although there have been many studies about partial and full load conditions, contributions reporting the deep part load condition are limited, and the cavitation behaviour at this condition is not yet understood. This study aims to unveil the cavitation phenomena at deep part load condition by high speed visualizations focusing on the draft tube cone as well as the runner blade channel, and pressure fluctuations associated with the phenomena were also investigated.

  4. A new transducer for roll gap measurements of the roll pressure distribution and the friction condition in cold flat rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagergren, Jonas; Wanheim, Tarras

    2005-01-01

    Background/purpose The only way to establish the true rolling pressure and the true friction condition in cold rolling is to conduct measurements in the roll bite. A new transducer design is therefore proposed, this to overcome problems in previous measurements in the past 70 years. Method The new idea is to increase the contact surface of the transducer, to be larger than the arc of contact. This is in the opposite way, compared to the smaller and smaller contact pin design that has been prevailing. Results The measurements where conducted during cold dry rolling of both copper strips and stainless steel strips in a pilot mill. The recordings were selected from a steady state with no disturbance from the material flow. The transducer was able to simultaneously measure both the normal pressure and the friction stress. An estimation of the coefficient of friction was accordingly performed. Conclusions The new transducer works very well, it was seen to be robust and able to avoid signal disturbance. The pressure and friction stress distribution results was as expected by the authors and a good reproducibility, together with a proven agreement between recorded signals and signals simulated. Keywords Friction stress, normal pressure distribution, roll bite measurements, cold flat rolling of metals

  5. An experimental study on the two-phase critical flow with non-condensable gas at high pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study was performed on a two-phase critical flow with non-condensable gas at high pressure conditions. Experimental data for the critical flow rates was generated using sharp-edged stainless steel pipes with an inner diameter of 10.9 mm, a thickness of 3.2 mm, and a length of 1000 mm. The test conditions were changed via the stagnation pressures of 4.0, 7.0, and 10.0 MPa, the water subcoolings of 0.0, 20.0, and 50.0degC, and the nitrogen gas flow rates of 0.0 ? 0.22 kg/s. The experimental results show that the critical mass flux decreases rapidly with an increase of the volumetric non-condensable gas fraction. Also the critical mass flux increases with an increase of the stagnation pressure and a decrease of the stagnation temperature. An empirical correlation of the non-dimensional critical mass flux, which is expressed as an exponential function of the non-condensable gas fraction of the volumetric flow, is obtained from the experimental data. (author)

  6. Problems of investigation of HTGR fuel elements under loss-of-pressure accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conditions of operation of fuel elements in emergency situations with the depressurization of the primary circuit and air ingress the latter are discussed for the pebble bed module reactor. The analytical models of light and heavy corrosion of the fuel elements as well as the criterion conditions that determine the nature of corrosion are given. The local differentialities of surface corrosion of the fuel elements in the pebble bed with a natural convection of gas are evaluated. (author). 7 refs, 8 figs

  7. Application on electrochemistry measurement of high temperature high pressure condition in PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature high pressure electrochemistry testing system was comprehensively analyzed in this paper, according to actual status for supervision in primary and secondary circuits of PWR nuclear power plants. Three research methods were reviewed and discussed for in-situ monitor system. By combination with ECP realtime measurement it was executed for evaluation and water chemistry optimization in nuclear power plants. It is pointed out that in-situ electrochemistry measurement has great potential application for water chemistry evaluation in PWR nuclear power plants. (authors)

  8. Reactivity of solid silicon with hydrogen under conditions of a low pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactivity of solid silicon with a hydrogen plasma has been studied in a temperature range between about 100C and approximately 5400C at discharge currents up to approximately 420 mA and a pressure of approximately 0.13 mbar (0.1 torr). At a given current the reaction rate displays a pronounced maximum at a temperature T1 0C and it approaches zero at T2 0C; both T1 and T2 depending on the discharge current. Consequently, chemical transport of silicon is possible in temperature as well as plasma gradients. (Auth.)

  9. The application of the Buckingham theorem to modeling high-pressure regenerative heat exchangers in changed conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Marcin Laskowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study presents the possibility of applying the Buckingham theorem to modeling high-pressure regenerative heat exchangers in changed conditions. A list of independent parameters on which the water temperature at the outlet of the heat exchanger depends was selected; and by means of the Buckingham theorem a functional relation between two dimensionless quantities, where there is no overall heat transfer coefficient, was obtained. The exact form of the function was determined on the basis of actual measurement data and a linear relation between two dimensionless quantities was obtained. The correctness of the proposed relation was examined for two high-pressure regenerative exchangers for a 200 MW power plant.

  10. Numerical study of the pressure drop in a plain fin-and-circular tube heat exchanger under frost condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are carried out to study the pressure drop behavior in a plain fin-and-four staggered layout and circular tube rows for different fin pitches under frost conditions using FLUENT 6.3 CFD code. Models geometry is created and meshed using GAMBIT 2.3. Fluid flow and heat transfer are simulated and results calculated using (Transitional SST k-omega) turbulence model, with steady-state solver. Model validation is carried out by comparing the pressure drop of a simulated case with experimental results from the literature. It was found that Fluent 6.3 software has been sufficient for simulating the flow characteristics in tube-fin heat exchangers. (author)

  11. Evaluation of hydraulic and mechanical properties of Berea sandstone under different conditions of temperature and confining pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotropic compression experiments using Berea sandstone were conducted under the different temperature and confining pressure conditions, and the evolutions of hydraulic and mechanical properties were observed. The temperatures and confining pressures prescribed for the experiments are 20 and 90degC, and 7.5 or 8.0 MPa, respectively. The observed permeability at 20degC did not significantly evolve during the experiment period, while that at 90degC decreased by roughly 20% relative to the original value. This reduction may be attributed to the change of pore-structure induced by mineral dissolution and/or precipitation. Unlikely, the uniaxial compression tests showed no obvious change observed between pre- and post-experimental results. The XRD observation also showed no significant difference of mineralogy between them. (author)

  12. A pressure correction scheme for generalized form of energy-stable open boundary conditions for incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, S.; Shen, J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a generalized form of open boundary conditions, and an associated numerical algorithm, for simulating incompressible flows involving open or outflow boundaries. The generalized form represents a family of open boundary conditions, which all ensure the energy stability of the system, even in situations where strong vortices or backflows occur at the open/outflow boundaries. Our numerical algorithm for treating these open boundary conditions is based on a rotational pressure correction-type strategy, with a formulation suitable for C0 spectral-element spatial discretizations. We have introduced a discrete equation and associated boundary conditions for an auxiliary variable. The algorithm contains constructions that prevent a numerical locking at the open/outflow boundary. In addition, we have developed a scheme with a provable unconditional stability for a sub-class of the open boundary conditions. Extensive numerical experiments have been presented to demonstrate the performance of our method for several flow problems involving open/outflow boundaries. We compare simulation results with the experimental data to demonstrate the accuracy of our algorithm. Long-time simulations have been performed for a range of Reynolds numbers at which strong vortices or backflows occur at the open/outflow boundaries. We show that the open boundary conditions and the numerical algorithm developed herein produce stable simulations in such situations.

  13. Time variations of the barometric coefficient of cosmic ray neutron component at Morioka, Tokyo and Mt. Norikura during the period 1970 - 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, trial calculations of the barometric coefficient by various methods are given using the neutron component observed at Morioka, Tokyo, Mt. Norikura, and Deep River during the period, January 1970 - December 1973. The results of the calculations obtained are discussed in comparison with each other. It was found that the method by multiple correlation is the best one among three methods used here, that is, method by deviation, method by single correlation, and the above one. The variable tendency of the barometric coefficients with solar activity as pointed out by Bachelet et al. and others was not found clearly because of the short period of analysis. It will be possible to derive a significant conclusion about the long-term variation of the barometric coefficients by developing this study over a longer period. (auth.)

  14. Post-dryout heat transfer and entrained droplet sizes at low pressure and low flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The entrainment mechanisms and the entrained droplet sizes with relation to the flow regimes are investigated. Through the analysis of many experimental post-dryout data, it is shown that the most probable flow regime near dryout or quench front is not annular flow but churn-turbulent flow when the mass flux is low. A correlation describing the initial droplet size just after the CHF position at low mass flux is suggested through regression analysis. The history-dependent post-dryout model of Varone and Rohsenow replaced by the Webb-Chen model for wall-vapor heat transfer is used as a reference model in the analysis. In the post-dryout region at low pressure and low flow, it is found that the suggested one-dimensional mechanistic model is not applicable when the vapor superficial velocity is very low. This is explained by the change of main entrainment mechanism with the change of flow regime. In bubbly or slug flow a number of tiny droplets generated from bubble burst become important in the heat transfer after dryout. Therefore, the suggested correlation is valid only in the churn-turbulent flow regime (jg* = 0.5?4.5). It is also suggested that the droplet size generated from the churn-turbulent surface is dependent not only on the pressure but also on the vapor velocity. It turns out that the present model can predict the measured cladding and vapor temperatures within 20% and 25%, respectively

  15. Creep failure of a reactor pressure vessel lower head under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A severe accident in a nuclear power plant could result in the relocation of large quantities of molten core material onto the lower head of he reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of inherent cooling mechanisms, failure of the RPV ultimately becomes possible under the combined effects of system pressure and the thermal heat-up of the lower head. Sandia National Laboratories has performed seven experiments at 1:5th scale simulating creep failure of a RPV lower head. This paper describes a modeling program that complements the experimental program. Analyses have been performed using the general-purpose finite-element code ABAQUS-5.6. In order to make ABAQUS solve the specific problem at hand, a material constitutive model that utilizes temperature dependent properties has been developed and attached to ABAQUS-executable through its UMAT utility. Analyses of the LHF-1 experiment predict instability-type failure. Predicted strains are delayed relative to the observed strain histories. Parametric variations on either the yield stress, creep rate, or both (within the range of material property data) can bring predictions into agreement with experiment. The analysis indicates that it is necessary to conduct material property tests on the actual material used in the experimental program. The constitutive model employed in the present analyses is the subject of a separate publication

  16. Experimental Detection of Neutron Gas Pressure on the Control Rods of a Nuclear Reactor under the Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrodnikov, Anatoly V.; Poupko, Victor Ya.; Gryaznov, George M.

    1994-07-01

    In typical reactor conditions, where the neutron density is not very great, the neutron gas behaves as a statistical ensemble of neutral particles. As a result of impulse exchanges between moving neutrons and the nuclei of substance of the reactor construction, the latter will experience the pressure effects similar to that created by usual gases. However, these efforts are so negligible that it always remains unnoticed in the terrestrial conditions of reactor operation. Another matter is the reactor operation in the state of non-gravity at Earth orbit, when the unique conditions exist for the showing of effects even for very low-power mechanical forces, in particular, because of the moving neutrons braking in solid bodies. Use of the thermoelectric NPS in space in the USSR since October 1970 (Poupko et al. 1992) gave the possibility, for the first time in the world, to identify and to measure by indirect method the mentioned effects of neutron gas pressure. These results are discussed below.

  17. Experimental study on DNB heat flux of plate-type fuel in pressurized condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental study was carried out in order to determine the DNB correlation for the safety analysis of the JMTR low enrichment fuel core. Since it is essential to examine applicability and safety margin of the correlation for the safety analysis, DNB heat fluxes were measured with the test section of rectangular flow channel simulating JMTR fuel element subchannel in the pressure range of 1 ? 13 kg/cm2 abs and the velocity range of 0 ? 4.4 m/s. Reviewing existed DNB correlations based on the experimental data, Sudo correlations scheme was selected for the JMTR safety analysis with minor modification for the high flow rate region. Comparing the correlations scheme with experimental data, allowable limit of the minimum DNBR was determined to be 1.5. (author)

  18. Combining Hard with Soft Materials in Nanoscale Under High-Pressure High-Temperature Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Gierlotka, S.; Swiderska-Sroda, A.; Fietkiewicz, K.; Kalisz, G.; Grzanka, E.; Stel'makh, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Nano-composites with a primary nanocrystalline ceramic matrix and a secondary nanocrystalline material (metal or semiconductor) were synthesized by infiltration of an appropriate liquid into ceramic compacts under pressures of up to 8 GPa and temperatures of up to 2000 K. The purpose of our work is to obtain nanocomposites which constitute homoger?ous mixtures of two phases, both forming nano- grains of about 10 nm in size. The high pressure is used to bring the porosity of the compacted powders down to the nano-scale and force a given liquid into the nano-sized pores. The advantage of the infiltration technique is that, in a single, continuous process, we start with a nanocrystalline powder, compress it to form the matrix of the composite, and crystallize and/or synthesize a second nanomaterial in the matrix pores. The key limitation of this technology is, that the pores in the matrix need to stay open during the entire process of infiltration. Thus the initial powder should form a rigid skeleton, otherwise the so-called self-stop process can limit cr block a further flow of the liquid phase and hinder the process of the composite formation. Therefore powders of only very hard ceramic materials like diamond, Sic, or Alz03, which can withstand a substantial external load without undesired deformation, can be used as the primary phase. With this technique, using diamond and S i c ceramic powders infiltrated by liquid metals (AI, Zn, Sn, Ag, Au) and semiconductors (Si, Ge, GaAs, CdTe), we obtained nano-composites with the grain size in the range of 10 - 30 nm. Our work addresses the key problem in manufacturing bulk nanocrystalline materials, i.e. preservation of nano-scale during the fabrication process. In this paper we discuss basic technical and methodological problems associated with nano-infiltration based on the results obtained for Zn-Sic composites.

  19. Spatiotemporal variation of radon and carbon dioxide concentrations in an underground quarry: coupled processes of natural ventilation, barometric pumping and internal mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon-222 and carbon dioxide concentrations have been measured during several years at several points in the atmosphere of an underground limestone quarry located at a depth of 18 m in Vincennes, near Paris, France. Both concentrations showed a seasonal cycle. Radon concentration varied from 1200 to 2000 Bq m-3 in summer to about 800-1400 Bq m-3 in winter, indicating winter ventilation rates varying from 0.6 to 2.5 x 10-6 s-1. Carbon dioxide concentration varied from 0.9 to 1.0% in summer, to about 0.1-0.3% in winter. Radon concentration can be corrected for natural ventilation using temperature measurements. The obtained model also accounts for the measured seasonal variation of carbon dioxide. After correction, radon concentrations still exhibit significant temporal variation, mostly associated with the variation of atmospheric pressure, with coupling coefficients varying from -7 to -26 Bq m-3 hPa-1. This variation can be accounted for using a barometric pumping model, coupled with natural ventilation in winter, and including internal mixing as well. After correction, radon concentrations exhibit residual temporal variation, poorly correlated between different points, with standard deviations varying from 3 to 6%. This study shows that temporal variation of radon concentrations in underground cavities can be understood to a satisfactory level of detail using non-linear and time-dependent modelling. It is important to understand the temporal variation of radon concentrations and the limitations in their modelling to monitor the properties of natural or artificial underground settings, and to be able to assess the existence of new processes, for example associated with the preparatory phases of volcanic eruptions or earthquakes.

  20. Influence of dc Pulsed Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Processing Conditions on Polymer Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Dowling, Denis P; O'Neill, Feidhlim T.; Langlais, Simon J.; Law, Victor J.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma treatments are widely used to activate polymer surfaces prior to adhesive bonding. This study investigates the influence of plasma treatment conditions on the surface activation of a range of polymers using the PlasmaTreat (Open Air) system. In this study the effect of dc pulse plasma cycle time, compressed air flow rate and the plasma jet nozzle to substrate distance on the plasma discharge was examined. The influence that the dc pulse plasma cycle time parameter has on the activation...

  1. Windsock memory conditioned RAM (Co-Ram) pressure effect: forced reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail

    OpenAIRE

    Vörös, Z.; Facskó, G.; Khodachenko, M.; Honkonen, I.; Janhunen, P.; Palmroth, M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection (MR) is a key physical concept explaining the addition of magnetic flux to the magnetotail and closed flux lines back-motion to the dayside magnetosphere. This scenario elaborated by \\citet{dung63}, can explain many aspects of solar wind-magnetosphere interaction processes, including substorms. However, neither the Dungey model nor its numerous modifications were able to explain fully the onset conditions for MR in the tail. In this paper, we introduce ...

  2. Fabrication of High-Pressure Cold-Sprayed Coating on Ni-Based Superalloy for High-Temperature Corrosive Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harminder

    2015-11-01

    The surface behavior of the Ni-based superalloy (composition similar to UNS N06075) is altered in this study by depositing a 298- µm-thick coating for various erosive-corrosive and wear applications at a high temperature. The 50%Ni-50%Cr coating was developed by a high-pressure cold-spraying method. The coating microstructure was studied by various characterization techniques. The unmelted solid particles formed the coating structure, which is homogeneous, dense, hard, and free from cracks, oxides, and other defects. The coating composition and microstructure is suitable for providing protection to the substrate under high-temperature corrosive conditions. The developed coating performed well, with degradation rate of 0.47 mm/year, in the chlorine-based highly corrosive conditions of actual waste incinerator at 900°C.

  3. Influence of the external conditions on salt retention and pressure-induced electrical potential measured across a composite membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, Juana; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Transport on single electrolyte solutions (NaCl and MgCl2) due to pressure gradients across a commercial reverse osmosis membrane was studied by measuring volume flux (J(v)), salt rejection (S) and pressure induced electrical potential (Delta E) in a crossflow cell. The influence on these parameters of different external conditions due to hydrodynamic or chemical changes in the feed solutions was also studied. Changes were carried out by variation of the feed solution velocity (Reynolds numbers between 1500 and 3300) or the concentration ratio of mixed electrolytes (r = HCl/NaCl and HCl/MgCl2, r = 1, 0.5 and 0.1), respectively. Results show that J(v), S and Delta E values slightly increase when the velocity of the feed solution increases, but the mixed electrolytes strongly affect both salt rejection and pressure-induced electrical potential. A change in the sign of both parameters with respect to the value determined with single electrolytes at the same concentration was obtained, which is attributed to a strong coupling among the fluxes of individual ions and their distribution in the membrane when transport of mixed salt is studied. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of in-sewer transformation on 43 pharmaceuticals in a pressurized sewer under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelic, Aleksandra; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damia; Gutierrez, Oriol

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of 43 pharmaceuticals and 2 metabolites of ibuprofen was evaluated at the inlet and the outlet of a pressure sewer pipe in order to asses if in-sewer processes affect the pharmaceutical concentrations during their pass through the pipe. The target compounds were detected at concentrations ranging from low ng/L to a few ?g/L, which are in the range commonly found in municipal wastewater of the studied area. The changes in concentrations between two sampling points were negligible for most compounds, i.e. from -10 to 10%. A higher decrease in concentrations (25-60 %) during the pass through the pipe was observed for diltiazem, citalopram, clarithromycin, bezafibrate and amlodipine. Negative removal was calculated for sulfamethoxazole (-66 ± 15%) and irbesartan (-58 ± 25%), which may be due to the conversion of conjugates back to their parent compounds in the sewer. The results show that microbial transformation of pharmaceuticals begins in sewer, albeit to different extents for different compounds. Therefore, the in-sewer transformation of pharmaceuticals should be assessed especially when their concentrations are used to estimate and refine the estimation of their per capita consumption in a catchment of interest in the sewage epidemiology approach. PMID:25462720

  5. Separated Flow Transition Mechanism with Passive Flow Control under Low Pressure Turbine Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Bohl, Douglas G.

    2003-11-01

    Boundary layer separation and transition have been studied experimentally on the suction side of a simulated low pressure turbine passage. Rectangular ribs were used as passive flow control devices to induce transition and promote reattachment. Thin ribs promote reattachment after a small separation bubble, resulting in lower aerodynamic losses. The ribs appear to have no immediate effect on the mean or rms streamwise velocity profiles, but do impart a very small disturbance in the boundary layer. The boundary layer separates, as in the unmodified flow, but undergoes transition and reattachment upstream of the location in the unmodified flow. Measurements of the wall normal velocity show the regular growth of small disturbances in the pre-transitional flow in cases with and without ribs. The transition mechanism appears similar in all cases. Ribs and elevated freestream turbulence increase the magnitude of the initial disturbance, leading to an earlier attainment of a disturbance large enough to initiate transition. These observations lead to a new correlation for transition onset location which accounts for rib height, freestream turbulence level, and Reynolds number.

  6. Current Pressure Transducer Application of Model-based Prognostics Using Steady State Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teubert, Christopher; Daigle, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Prognostics is the process of predicting a system's future states, health degradation/wear, and remaining useful life (RUL). This information plays an important role in preventing failure, reducing downtime, scheduling maintenance, and improving system utility. Prognostics relies heavily on wear estimation. In some components, the sensors used to estimate wear may not be fast enough to capture brief transient states that are indicative of wear. For this reason it is beneficial to be capable of detecting and estimating the extent of component wear using steady-state measurements. This paper details a method for estimating component wear using steady-state measurements, describes how this is used to predict future states, and presents a case study of a current/pressure (I/P) Transducer. I/P Transducer nominal and off-nominal behaviors are characterized using a physics-based model, and validated against expected and observed component behavior. This model is used to map observed steady-state responses to corresponding fault parameter values in the form of a lookup table. This method was chosen because of its fast, efficient nature, and its ability to be applied to both linear and non-linear systems. Using measurements of the steady state output, and the lookup table, wear is estimated. A regression is used to estimate the wear propagation parameter and characterize the damage progression function, which are used to predict future states and the remaining useful life of the system.

  7. Farmers Under Pressure : Analysis of the Social Conditions of Cases of Animal Neglect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade, Stefan Bastholm; Anneberg, Inger

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyse how risk factors in highly industrialised agriculture are connected to animal neglect. With Danish agriculture as a case study, we use two types of data. First, we use register data from Statistics Denmark to map how risk factors such as farmers’ financial and social troubles are connected to convictions of neglect. Second, we analyse narratives where interviewed farmers, involved in cases of neglect, describe how they themselves experienced the incidents. We find that while livestock farmers in general have a low risk of animal neglect problems, a small percentage of them face severe financial difficulties, divorce and psychiatric problems, which are connected to an increased risk of being convicted for the neglect of farm animals. The narratives bring forward themes of pressure related to financial trouble, technological break down, family problems, stress and a growing concern among the farmers towards the governmental control in farm animal production. We discuss how these factorscan be used to identify and help farmers with a high risk of being convicted of livestock neglect.

  8. The ReactorSTM: Atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy under high-pressure, high-temperature catalytic reaction conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbschleb, C. T.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Roobol, S. B.; Navarro, V.; Bakker, J. W.; Liu, Q.; Stoltz, D.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Verdoes, G.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Bergman, M.; Crama, L.; Taminiau, I.; Frenken, J. W. M., E-mail: frenken@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van [Leiden Probe Microscopy B.V., J.H. Oortweg 21, 2333 CH Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    To enable atomic-scale observations of model catalysts under conditions approaching those used by the chemical industry, we have developed a second generation, high-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM): the ReactorSTM. It consists of a compact STM scanner, of which the tip extends into a 0.5 ml reactor flow-cell, that is housed in a ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The STM can be operated from UHV to 6 bars and from room temperature up to 600 K. A gas mixing and analysis system optimized for fast response times allows us to directly correlate the surface structure observed by STM with reactivity measurements from a mass spectrometer. The in situ STM experiments can be combined with ex situ UHV sample preparation and analysis techniques, including ion bombardment, thin film deposition, low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of Au(111) and atom-row resolution on Pt(110), both under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions.

  9. The Formation of Oxide Films Under Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Coolant Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study investigated the effects of steam generator (SG) alloy composition and post-processing (e.g. heat treatment), and coolant boron concentration and zinc addition, on oxide film formation under PWR primary coolant conditions. Specimens of Alloy 600, Alloy 690, Alloy 800, type 304 stainless steel (SS304) and zircaloy-4 - the major materials of construction of primary circuits - were exposed to high-temperature coolant of different chemistries in autoclaves. In experiments with heat flux, surface-area ratios of specimens involved just the heated or cooled portions of zircaloy or SG alloy while the SS was isothermal; ratios were typical of actual reactor systems. In isothermal experiments, the ratios involved all wetted surfaces. After exposures of several days, specimens were removed and the oxides characterized with surface analysis techniques. As expected, the results revealed that Ni-based alloys and SS304 were both covered with iron rich crystallites overlaying an amorphous chromium rich layer, while zircaloy-4 was covered with a single oxide layer. For the SG tubing of the same post-processing, the higher chromium alloys apparently produced a more compact oxide than the lower chromium alloys. This effect of post-processing was observed on all alloys, but was not as obvious as the effect of alloy composition. The most compact oxides were formed in coolant containing boron, which tended to concentrate in the inner oxide layers. Thicker and looser outer layer oxides were found on Alloy 600 exposed for 30 days to coolant with pH300oC of 7.4 than on the same alloy for five or ten days to coolant with pH300oC of 7.1. Zinc in the coolant was incorporated in the inner oxide layer on SG material but had different effects on the outer layers on different materials. Observed differences in oxide morphologies may account for differences in crud behaviour in operating plants. (author)

  10. Water under Hydrothermal, Supercritical, and High Pressure Conditions as Key to Developing Green Processes and New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.

    2010-11-01

    In this work, an overview of research and activity in the hydrothermal and supercritical fields is given. Properties and characteristics of water are reviewed in relation to separations, materials, and chemical conversion processes. Examples that are discussed include biomass fractionation, natural product extraction, material formation, biomass oxidation, biomass conversions, waste treatment, flames, and hydrocarbon upgrading. In the field of chromatography, water under hydrothermal conditions can be used to replace many organic solvents. As a solvent for separation processes, hot water can be used to achieve rapid and efficient fractionation of biomass or isolation of chemical compounds. In the field of materials, water in its supercritical state can be used to synthesize practical materials and to develop processes with low environmental burden. In the field of chemical processing, water can be used under oxidizing conditions to generate clean and renewable energy and to reduce the number of chemical steps for producing chemical products. A few other technological applications such as flames and hydrocarbon upgrading will be discussed. Water under hydrothermal, supercritical and high pressure conditions has many favorable properties that allow the development of green chemical processes and new technologies.

  11. Investigations of Response Time Parameters of a Pneumatic 3/2 Direct Acting Solenoid Valve Under Various Working Pressure Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Venkataraman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In pneumatic circuits, a solenoid valve is a key component for controlling and directing pneumatic energy. The solenoid valve functional performances are defined as response time parameters with respect to its actuations in terms of direction changing time. This paper aims to present response time parameters of solenoid valves under various working pressures. An experimental setup is employed in order to measure response time with reference to the input signals. The response time plays significant role for evaluating the valve performance in sensitive applications. The response time parameters includes the on delay, the off delay, the on time, the off time, the cycle time and the switching frequency. In this experimental investigation the influence of various input pressure conditions is recorded and tabulated. Valves with varying orifice diameter are employed and the investigation reveals the influence of orifice diameter in response time variations. The newly-proposed six response time parameters can be used to rate and select the appropriate valve for various industrial applications.

  12. Numerical simulation on the "S" characteristics and pressure fluctuation of reduced pump-turbine at start-up condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. M.; Zheng, J. S.; Wen, G. Z.; Zhao, Y. Z.; Shi, Q. H.

    2012-11-01

    The performance of a reversible pump turbine with S-shaped characteristics is of great importance to the transition processes such as start-up and load rejection. In order to improve the "S" characteristics of reduced pump-turbine, several MGV (misaligned guide vane) schemes are calculated. The SST (shear stress turbulence) model is added to the N-S (Navier-strokes) governing equation. In order to predict the S-shaped curve accurately and develop a reliable tool for design improvement, the "S" characteristic is investigated in a whole pump-turbine including spiral casing, stay vanes, guide vanes, runner and draft tube. To validate the scheme reasonable, the mesh independent is tested. Comparison of unit discharge and unit speed performance showed that good correspondence is obtained between experimental data and calculated results. The "S shape" of reduced pump-turbine is eliminated with MGV schemes. Based on this, internal flow analysis is carried out adopting six typical MGV schemes at the same working condition. Through the calculation, we find that, first the pressure fluctuation is different between the guide vane and runner among the five MGV schemes, second the pressure fluctuation amplitude of MGV schemes D (4*35° and 16*6° average installed) is smallest, third the main frequency is the blade passing frequency and guide vane passing frequency at vane-less space and head cover, respectively. The conclusion is the "S shape" of pump-turbine can be improved with the average installed scheme.

  13. Numerical simulation on the 'S' characteristics and pressure fluctuation of reduced pump-turbine at start-up condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a reversible pump turbine with S-shaped characteristics is of great importance to the transition processes such as start-up and load rejection. In order to improve the 'S' characteristics of reduced pump-turbine, several MGV (misaligned guide vane) schemes are calculated. The SST (shear stress turbulence) model is added to the N-S (Navier-strokes) governing equation. In order to predict the S-shaped curve accurately and develop a reliable tool for design improvement, the 'S' characteristic is investigated in a whole pump-turbine including spiral casing, stay vanes, guide vanes, runner and draft tube. To validate the scheme reasonable, the mesh independent is tested. Comparison of unit discharge and unit speed performance showed that good correspondence is obtained between experimental data and calculated results. The 'S shape' of reduced pump-turbine is eliminated with MGV schemes. Based on this, internal flow analysis is carried out adopting six typical MGV schemes at the same working condition. Through the calculation, we find that, first the pressure fluctuation is different between the guide vane and runner among the five MGV schemes, second the pressure fluctuation amplitude of MGV schemes D (4*35° and 16*6° average installed) is smallest, third the main frequency is the blade passing frequency and guide vane passing frequency at vane-less space and head cover, respectively. The conclusion is the 'S shape' of pump-turbine can be improved with the average installed scheme.

  14. Development of Evaluation Technique for Hydrogen Embrittlement Behavior of Metallic Materials Using in-situ SP Testing under Pressurized Hydrogen Gas Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, alternative and novel energy resources have been developed for use in the future because of the current environmental problems and exhaustion of fossil energy resources. Hydrogen energy has many merits, such as its environmental friendliness, easy storage, and easy production, but it also has disadvantages, in that it is highly combustible and explosive. In this study, a test procedure using a simple SP test under highly pressurized hydrogen gas conditions was established. In order to evaluate its applicability, SP tests were carried out using a stainless steel (SUS316L) sample under atmospheric, pressurized helium, and pressurized hydrogen gas conditions. The results under the pressurized hydrogen gas condition showed fissuring and produced a reduction of the elongation in the plastic instability region due to hydrogen embrittlement, showing the effectiveness of the current in-situ SP test

  15. Environmentally-Assisted Cracking of Low-Alloy Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels under Boiling Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S

    2002-02-01

    The present report summarizes the experimental work performed by PSI on the environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels (LAS) in the frame of the RIKORR-project during the period from January 2000 to August 2001. Within this project, the EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, weld filler and weld heat-affected zone materials is investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR/NWC power operation conditions. The EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels was characterized by slow rising load (SRL) / low-frequency corrosion fatigue (LFCF) and constant load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 C. These tests revealed the following important interim results: Under low-flow and highly oxidizing (ECP >= 100 mV SHE) conditions, the ASME XI 'wet' reference fatigue crack growth curve could be significantly exceeded by cyclic fatigue loading at low frequencies (<0.001 Hz), at high and low load-ratios R, and by ripple loading near to DKth fatigue thresholds. The BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines may be significantly or slightly exceeded (even in steels with a low sulphur content) in the case of small load fluctuations at high load ratios (ripple loading) or at intermediate temperatures (200 -250 C) in RPV materials, which show a distinct susceptibility to dynamic strain ageing (DSA). (author)

  16. Environmentally-Assisted Cracking of Low-Alloy Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels under Boiling Water Reactor Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report summarizes the experimental work performed by PSI on the environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels (LAS) in the frame of the RIKORR-project during the period from January 2000 to August 2001. Within this project, the EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, weld filler and weld heat-affected zone materials is investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR/NWC power operation conditions. The EAC crack growth behaviour of different low-alloy RPV steels was characterized by slow rising load (SRL) / low-frequency corrosion fatigue (LFCF) and constant load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 C. These tests revealed the following important interim results: Under low-flow and highly oxidizing (ECP >= 100 mV SHE) conditions, the ASME XI 'wet' reference fatigue crack growth curve could be significantly exceeded by cyclic fatigue loading at low frequencies (<0.001 Hz), at high and low load-ratios R, and by ripple loading near to DKth fatigue thresholds. The BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines may be significantly or slightly exceeded (even in steels with a low sulphur content) in the case of small load fluctuations at high load ratios (ripple loading) or at intermediate temperatures (200 -250 C) in RPV materials, which show a distinct susceptibility to dynamic strain ageing (DSA). (author)

  17. Correlation Approach to Evaluate Critical Brittleness Temperature for WWER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials in Unirradiated Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A statistical data analysis for ten WWER-1000 units of Ukrainian nuclear power plants has been performed to derive the relationship between the critical brittleness temperatures Tk0 (technical data on reactor pressure vessel) and Tkt (surveillance test data) for base and weld metal in unirradiated condition. According to standard PNAE G-7-002-86, there are two methods to evaluate the critical brittleness temperature of RPV materials in unirradiated (initial) condition. One method is deterministic, in which specified criteria are to be fulfilled to determine the critical brittleness temperature (Tk0). This temperature is evaluated within RPV material qualification tests. The other method employs a regression analysis of the temperature dependence of impact toughness applying a hyperbolic tangent function. In the latter case, the brittleness temperature (Tkt) is determined using the surveillance test data. The analysis has shown that Tkt increases with higher Tk0, and this correlation is linear for the examined materials. The set temperature Tk0 is 15deg C higher than Tkt on average. The standard deviation for the linear correlation is 6deg C. An equation to evaluate Tk0 has been proposed within this correlation analysis and can be applied to determine the critical brittleness temperature with a required safety margin for justification of WWER-1000 RPV safe operation.

  18. Interrelations and circadian changes of electroencephalogram frequencies under baseline conditions and constant sleep pressure in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasenkov, R; Deboer, T

    2011-04-28

    Similar to the nap-protocols applied in humans, the repeated short-sleep deprivation protocol in rats stabilizes slow-wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4 Hz) in the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), thus reflecting a constant sleep pressure or sleep homeostatic level, whereas higher frequencies (7-25 Hz) in these conditions preserve their daily rhythm, therefore demonstrating a strong input from an endogenous circadian clock. How different EEG frequencies in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and waking respond to these constant conditions, how they interrelate to each other within the different vigilance states, and which component of sleep regulation (homeostatic or circadian) is involved, remain unknown. To answer these questions, we applied power spectral analysis and correlation analysis to 1 Hz bin EEG frequency data for different vigilance states in freely moving rats in constant darkness, under baseline conditions and during the repeated short-sleep deprivation protocol. Our analysis suggests that (1) 0.5-5 Hz frequencies in NREM sleep and higher frequencies in REM sleep (above 19 Hz) and waking (above 10 Hz) are sleep-dependent, and thus seem to be under control of the sleep homeostat, while (2) faster frequencies in the NREM sleep EEG (7-25 Hz) and 3-7 Hz activity in the REM sleep EEG are under strong influence of the endogenous circadian clock. Theta activity in waking (5-7 Hz) seems to reflect both circadian and behavior dependent influences. NREM sleep EEG frequencies between 9 and 14 Hz showed both homeostatic and circadian components in their behavior. Thus, frequencies in the EEG of the different vigilance states seem to represent circadian and homeostatic components of sleep regulatory mechanisms, where REM sleep and waking frequency ranges behave similarly to each other and differently from NREM sleep frequencies. PMID:21303684

  19. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roobol, S. B.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Bergman, M.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Onderwaater, W. G.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Koehler, R.; Frenken, J. W. M., E-mail: frenken@arcnl.nl [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, RA Leiden 2300 (Netherlands); Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van [Leiden Probe Microscopy B.V., J.H. Oortweg 21, 2333 CH Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

  20. The ReactorAFM: Non-contact atomic force microscope operating under high-pressure and high-temperature catalytic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) has been integrated in a miniature high-pressure flow reactor for in-situ observations of heterogeneous catalytic reactions under conditions similar to those of industrial processes. The AFM can image model catalysts such as those consisting of metal nanoparticles on flat oxide supports in a gas atmosphere up to 6 bar and at a temperature up to 600 K, while the catalytic activity can be measured using mass spectrometry. The high-pressure reactor is placed inside an Ultrahigh Vacuum (UHV) system to supplement it with standard UHV sample preparation and characterization techniques. To demonstrate that this instrument successfully bridges both the pressure gap and the materials gap, images have been recorded of supported palladium nanoparticles catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions

  1. A Barometric Survey of Dust-Devil Vortices on a Desert Playa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Lanagan, Peter D.

    2014-12-01

    Dust devils, and other columnar vortices, are associated with local surface pressure drops that can be observed in time-series data on both Earth and Mars. High cadence measurements are needed to resolve these small structures, and we report a month-long survey (June/July 2012) on a Nevada desert playa using microbarographs sampled multiple times per second. Candidate dust-devil signatures are classified, with detections being robust at about one per day for pressure drops exceeding 0.3 hPa (roughly a 5:1 signal-to-noise threshold, where the observed noise level corresponds reasonably well with the dynamic pressure associated with the estimate convective velocity scale). The vortex population is evaluated and compared with those observed on Mars: a broken power law or a more convex distribution describes the terrestrial data. A single station observes about three events per week (for normalized pressure drops of 0.06 %), about three times fewer than Mars observations for the same normalized drop. We find evidence for clustering of vortex events in a pseudo-periodic manner with a 20-min period, consistent with the size of boundary-layer convection cells.

  2. Crack growth behaviour of low alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions (CASTOC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T. [Materialpruefungsanstalt, Univ. Stuttgart (Germany); Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT) (Spain); Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M. [Nuclear Research Inst. (NRI) (Czech Republic); Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI) (Switzerland); Roth, A.; Devrient, B. [Framatome ANP GmbH (F ANP) (Germany); Ehrnsten, U. [Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    The CASTOC project addresses environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) phenomena in low alloy steels used for pressure boundary components in both Western type boiling water reactors (BWR) and Russian type pressurised water reactors (VVER). It comprises the four work packages (WP): inter-laboratory comparison test (WP1); EAC behaviour under static load (WP2), EAC behaviour under cyclic load and load transients (WP3); evaluation of the results with regard to their relevance for components in practice (WP4). The use of sophisticated test facilities and measurement techniques for the on-line detection of crack advances have provided a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms of environmentally assisted cracking and provided quantitative data of crack growth rates as a function of loading events and time, respectively. The effect of several major parameters controlling EAC was investigated with particular emphasis on the transferability of the results to components in service. The obtained crack growth rate data were reflected on literature data and on commonly applied prediction curves as presented in the appropriate Code. At relevant stress intensity factors it could be shown that immediate cessation of growing cracks occurs after changing from cyclic to static load in high purity oxygenated BWR water and oxygen-free VVER water corresponding to steady state operation conditions. Susceptibility to environmentally assisted cracking under static load was observed for a heat affected zone material in oxygenated high purity water and also in base materials during a chloride transient representing BWR water condition below Action Level 1 of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines according to the lectrical conductivity of the water but in the range of Action Level 2 according to the content of chlorides. Time based crack growth was also observed in one Russian type base material in oxygenated VVER water and in one Western type base material in oxygenated high purity BWR water at stress intensity factors above the limit for linear elastic fracture mechanics. There is evidence that the prediction curves of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI, Appendix A are not conservative for some relevant cases with regard to crack growth rates under cyclic load even in oxygenated high purity BWR water. The CASTOC results have provided an important contribution to the understanding of crack growth behavior on the one hand as a function of time and on the other hand as a consequence of the number and height of loading events. This is an important key for the evaluation of transient events, which may occur in a plant during service. (orig.)

  3. Readiness of teenagers to will pressures and pedagogical conditions of their training in the course of physical training at comprehensive school.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudnik I.O.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The main components in the structure of general school students' readiness to the will pressures, such as cognitive, motivational-emotional, active are considered. 318 students f the middle school age took part in the experiment. As a result of certifying experiment all the students were nominally divided into tree groups: with high, middle and law levels of readiness to the will pressures. The effectiveness of the proposed pedagogical conditions was proved as well as readiness to the will pressures training models for teenagers in the process of physical education at comprehensive school were developed.

  4. Mechanical and thermal properties of ?-Mg2SiO4 under high temperature and high pressure conditions such as in mantle: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xing; Xiao, Jianwei; Melnik, Roderick; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Wen, Bin

    2015-09-01

    ?-Mg2SiO4 is an important mineral in mantle, and our knowledge on its mechanical and thermal properties is critical for many areas of geological sciences. In this work, the crystal structure of ?-Mg2SiO4 under high temperature and high pressure conditions is optimized by using the GOMASC method, and the total energy, thermal expansion coefficients, and elastic constants at different temperature and pressure conditions are obtained. On the basis of phonon spectrum, group velocity, phase velocity, Grüneisen parameter, and thermal conductivity are calculated for ?-Mg2SiO4 under high temperature and high pressure conditions. These calculated results can provide an important reference for geological research.

  5. Evaluation of Low Pressure Fogging System for Improving Crop Yield of Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.: Grown under Heat Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobi Shilo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In Mediterranean regions, many tomato plants are grown throughout the hot summer period (May–September in sheltered cultivation, mainly for plant protection reasons. Most of the shelters that are used are low cost net houses covered with 50 mesh insect proof net. In most cases these net houses have a flat roof and no ventilation or climate control measures. This insufficient ventilation during the hot summer leads to above optimal air temperatures and causes moderate heat stress inside the shelters, which leads to yield reduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of a simple and inexpensive low pressure fogging system installed in a naturally ventilated net house to lower temperatures and improve the yield during the summer. The study showed that in areas where relative air humidity (RH during the daytime is less than 60%, tomato plants improved their performance when grown through the summer in net houses under moderate heat stress. Under fogging conditions pollen grain viability and fruit set were significantly improved. This improvement influenced the yield picked during September (104–136 DAP. However, total seasonal yield was not affected by the fogging treatment.

  6. Black tea lowers blood pressure and wave reflections in fasted and postprandial conditions in hypertensive patients: a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Davide; Draijer, Richard; Desideri, Giovambattista; Mulder, Theo; Ferri, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and arterial stiffening are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Flavonoids may exert some vascular protection. We investigated the effects of black tea on blood pressure (BP) and wave reflections before and after fat load in hypertensives. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 19 patients were assigned to consume black tea (129 mg flavonoids) or placebo twice a day for eight days (13 day wash-out period). Digital volume pulse and BP were measured before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after tea consumption. Measurements were performed in a fasted state and after a fat load. Compared to placebo, reflection index and stiffness index decreased after tea consumption (ptea consumption (ptea decreased systolic and diastolic BP (-3.2 mmHg, ptea consumption lowers wave reflections and BP in the fasting state, and during the challenging haemodynamic conditions after a fat load in hypertensives. Considering lipemia-induced impairment of arterial function may occur frequently during the day, our findings suggest regular consumption of black tea may be relevant for cardiovascular protection. PMID:25658240

  7. Black Tea Lowers Blood Pressure and Wave Reflections in Fasted and Postprandial Conditions in Hypertensive Patients: A Randomised Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Grassi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension and arterial stiffening are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Flavonoids may exert some vascular protection. We investigated the effects of black tea on blood pressure (BP and wave reflections before and after fat load in hypertensives. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 19 patients were assigned to consume black tea (129 mg flavonoids or placebo twice a day for eight days (13 day wash-out period. Digital volume pulse and BP were measured before and 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after tea consumption. Measurements were performed in a fasted state and after a fat load. Compared to placebo, reflection index and stiffness index decreased after tea consumption (p < 0.0001. Fat challenge increased wave reflection, which was counteracted by tea consumption (p < 0.0001. Black tea decreased systolic and diastolic BP (?3.2 mmHg, p < 0.005 and ?2.6 mmHg, p < 0.0001; respectively and prevented BP increase after a fat load (p < 0.0001. Black tea consumption lowers wave reflections and BP in the fasting state, and during the challenging haemodynamic conditions after a fat load in hypertensives. Considering lipemia-induced impairment of arterial function may occur frequently during the day, our findings suggest regular consumption of black tea may be relevant for cardiovascular protection.

  8. Experimental Study of Abiotic Organic Synthesis at High Temperature and Pressure Conditions: Carbon Isotope and Mineral Surface Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, R. A.; Niles, P. B.

    2010-01-01

    Abiotic organic synthesis processes have been proposed as potential mechanisms for methane generation in subseafloor hydrothermal systems on Earth, and on other planets. To better understand the detailed reaction pathways and carbon isotope fractionations in this process under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, hydrothermal experiments at high temperature (750 C) and pressure (0.55 GPa) were performed using piston cylinder apparatus. Formic acid was used as the source of CO2 and H2, and magnetite was the mineral catalyst. The chemical and carbon isotopic compositions of dissolved organic products were determined by GC-C-MS-IRMS, while organic intermediaries on the mineral catalyst were characterized by Pyrolysis-GC-MS. Among experimental products, dissolved CO2 was the dominant carbon species with a relative abundance of 88 mol%. Dissolved CH4 and C2H6 were also identified with a mole ratio of CH4 over C2H6 of 15:1. No dissolved CO was detected in the experiment, which might be attributable to the loss of H2 through the Au capsule used in the experiments at high temperature and pressure conditions and corresponding conversion of CO to CO2 by the water-gas shift reaction. Carbon isotope results showed that the 13C values of CH4 and C2H6 were -50.3% and -39.3% (V-PDB), respectively. CO2 derived from decarboxylation of formic acid had a (sigma)C-13 value of -19.2%, which was 3.2% heavier than its source, formic acid. The (sigma)C-13 difference between CO2 and CH4 was 31.1%, which was higher than the value of 9.4% calculated from theoretical isotopic equilibrium predictions at experimental conditions, suggesting the presence of a kinetic isotope effect. This number was also higher than the values (4.6 to 27.1%) observed in similar experiments previously performed at 400 C and 50 MPa with longer reaction times. CH4 is 11.0% less enriched in C-13 than C2H6. Alcohols were observed as carbon compounds on magnetite surfaces by Pyrolysis-GC-MS, which confirms the hypothesis regarding the reaction pathways of hydrothermal abiotic organic synthesis proposed by Fu et al. (2007, 2008). In this proposed pathway, hydroxymethylene (-CHOH) groups serve as organic intermediaries on mineral surfaces while dissolved H2 serves as a chain terminator/breaker to generate short chain hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds. This pathway is different from the carbide polymerization theory of Fischer- Tropsch-type (FTT) synthesis in a gas phase. The observed increase of (sigma)C-13 values of C1 and C2 alkanes with carbon number in our hydrothermal experiments can be readily interpreted by hydroxymethylene pathway, and might be used to differentiate between hydroxymethylene and carbide polymerization pathways. Carbon isotope analysis of alcohols on mineral catalyst surfaces is under way to provide further constraints on formation of organic compounds by FTT in hydrothermal systems.

  9. Speciation of High-Pressure Carbon-Saturated COH Fluids at Buffered fO2 Conditions: An Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumiati, S.; Tiraboschi, C.; Recchia, S.; Poli, S.

    2014-12-01

    The quantitative assessment of species in COH fluids is crucial in modelling mantle processes. For instance, H2O/CO2 ratio in the fluid phase influences the location of the solidus and of carbonation/decarbonation reactions in peridotitic systems . In the scientific literature, the speciation of COH fluids has been generally assumed on the basis of thermodynamic calculations using equations of state of simple H2O-non-polar gas systems (e.g., H2O-CO2-CH4). Only few authors dealt with the experimental determination of high-pressure COH fluid species at different conditions, using diverse experimental and analytical approaches (e.g., piston cylinder+capsule-piercing+gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry; cold-seal+silica glass capsules+Raman). We performed experiments on COH fluids using a capsule-piercing device coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometry. This type of analyzer ensures superior performances in terms of selectivity of molecules to be detected, high acquisition rates and extended linear response range. Experiments were carried out in a rocking piston cylinder apparatus at pressure of 1 GPa and temperatures from 800 to 900°C. Carbon-saturated fluids were generated through the addition of oxalic acid dihydrate and graphite. Single/double capsules and different packing materials (BN and MgO) were used to evaluate the divergence from the thermodynamic speciation model. Moreover, to assess the effect of solutes on COH fluid speciation we also performed a set of experiments adding synthetic forsterite to the charge. To determine the speciation we assembled a capsule-piercing device that allows to puncture the capsule in a gas-tight vessel at 80°C. The extraction Teflon vessel is composed of a base part, where the capsule is allocated on a steel support, and a top part where a steel drill is mounted. To release the quenched fluids from the capsule, the base part of vessel is hand-tighten to the top part, allowing the steel pointer to pierce the capsule. The evolved gases are then convoyed to a quadrupole mass spectrometer through a heated line to avoid the condensation of water. Our results suggest that fluid speciation can diverge considerably compared to the thermodynamic model depending on the experimental strategies adopted and on the presence of solutes in complex COH systems.

  10. Theoretical evaluation of radon emanation under a variety of conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cylindrical coordinate mathematical model to calculate 222Rn flux and movement was developed considering 222Rn production, decay, and diffusion in a multilayered, porous, permeable matrix. Air movement, transporting radon through the media, satisfies Darcy's law and is influenced by the air (barometric) pressure applied at the surface. Two zones of porous material have been defined, one with a 222Rn production term (the uranium ore zone) and the other without this term to simulate shotcrete or concrete ground support. A provision is made to evaluate the effect of a pinhole in an otherwise impermeable sealant. Comparisons are made between field measurements and predicted values. Specific examples are given of 222Rn flux from a finite ore-body model versus steady and periodic changes in barometric pressure. Also examined are 222Rn losses through pinholes for cases of linearly varying and static barometric pressures. The results suggest factors to consider in uranium mine radon control. For example, pinholes are not a serious problem since it appears that several thousand, 2 mm diameter pinholes per square meter are required to cause a significant loss of a barrier coating's effectiveness. (author)

  11. Fuel pellets from biomass: The importance of the pelletizing pressure and its dependency on the processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Holm, Jens K.; Sanadi, Anand R.; Barsberg, Søren; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the key factors affecting the pelletizing pressure in biomass pelletization processes. The impact of raw material type, pellet length, temperature, moisture content and particle size on the pressure build up in the press channel of a pellet mill was studied using a single pellet press unit. It was shown that the pelletizing pressure increased exponentially with the pellet length. The rate of increase was dependent on biomass species, te...

  12. Fuel pellets from biomass: The importance of the pelletizing pressure and its dependency on the processing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Holm, Jens K.; Sanadi, Anand R.; Barsberg, Søren; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the key factors affecting the pelletizing pressure in biomass pelletization processes. The impact of raw material type, pellet length, temperature, moisture content and particle size on the pressure build up in the press channel of a pellet mill was studied using a single pellet press unit. It was shown that the pelletizing pressure increased exponentially with the pellet length. The rate of increase was dependent on biomass species, temperature, mois...

  13. Development of strapdown inertial navigation system with MEMS sensors, barometric altimeter and ultrasonic range meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholopov, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    The results of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) tests with 9 degrees of freedom MEMS sensor MPU-9150 (triaxial accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer), pressure sensor LPS331 and ultrasonic range meter HC-SR04, implemented on the FPGA Altera Cyclone-II evaluation board DE1 is considered. SINS measures the spatial coordinates and altitude relative to the starting point, the orientation angles and distances to obstacles along the way. It is shown that the relative error of the spatial coordinates estimation does not exceed 1.1% in interval of some minutes.

  14. Fuel pellets from biomass: The importance of the pelletizing pressure and its dependency on the processing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Holm, Jens K.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the key factors affecting the pelletizing pressure in biomass pelletization processes. The impact of raw material type, pellet length, temperature, moisture content and particle size on the pressure build up in the press channel of a pellet mill was studied using a single pellet press unit. It was shown that the pelletizing pressure increased exponentially with the pellet length. The rate of increase was dependent on biomass species, temperature, moisture content and particle size. A mathematical model, predicting the pelletizing pressure, was in good accordance with experimental data. It was shown that increasing the temperature resulted in a decrease of the pelletizing pressure. Infrared spectra taken from the pellets surface, indicated hydrophobic extractives on the pellet surface, for pellets produced at higher temperatures. The extractives act as lubricants, lowering the friction between the biomass and the press channel walls. The effect of moisture content on the pelletizing pressure was dependent on the raw material species. Different particle size fractions, from below 0.5 mm up to 2.8 mm diameter, were tested, and it was shown that the pelletizing pressure increased with decreasing particle size. The impact of pelletizing pressure on pellet density was determined, and it was shown that a pelletizing pressure above 200 MPa resulted only in minor increase in pellet density. 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Measuring unsteady pressure on rotating compressor blades. [with semiconductor strain gages under gas turbine engine operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, D. R.; Grant, H. P.; Lanati, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    The capability for accurate measurement of unsteady pressure on the surface of compressor and fan blades during engine operation was established. Tests were run on miniature semiconductor strain gage pressure transducers mounted in several arrangements. Both surface mountings and recessed flush mountings were tested. Test parameters included mounting arrangement, blade material, temperature, local strain in the blade, acceleration normal to the transducer diaphragm, centripetal acceleration, and pressure. Test results showed no failures of transducers or mountings and indicated an uncertainty of unsteady pressure measurement of approximately + or - 6%, plus 0.1 kPa for a typical application.

  16. Definition of routine conditions of transport: a perspective on pressure and temperature for excepted and industrial packages as required by ST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of ST-1 will bring a change to the requirements for packages to withstand ambient temperatures and pressures that are likely to be encountered in routine transport. This paper, making use of published data, postulates an environment and then considers the physical effect of that environment on excepted and industrial packages. The effect of atmospheric pressure changes is considered together with pressures arising from ambient temperature changes. Assuming a constant volume the pressure that could be developed within a package is estimated to be 21.4 kPa for transport in the UK at the highest road elevation. This equates to a volume change of 23% assuming constant pressure and variable volume. The constant pressure case is applicable to a wrapped or bagged package and the constant volume to a drum. Information from a major drum manufacturer indicates that a standard 200 litre drum may experience deformation of the lid beyond its elastic limit (particularly if the route is over mountain passes), although it is still likely to retain its contents (up to a pressure differential of 100 kPa). The paper poses the following questions: (1) Are the conditions considered for the UK realistic and acceptable to the Competent Authority? If not what should be used? (2) Is a drum capable of withstanding a 1.2 m drop test in its pressurised configuration, or does it have to? (3) Is there operational experience which refutes or supports the above?. (author)

  17. Desaturation of a clay-stone around a ventilated gallery: numerical modelling of pressures and water contents under various conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. We present simulation tests focusing on the drying process around a gallery in an initially saturated (water-filled) porous clay rock, in the framework of a research on the isolation properties and hydro-mechanical behaviour of a clayey geologic repository for radioactive waste. The saturated/unsaturated hydrodynamic parameters used in these tests correspond to a hypothetical clay-stone, similar to the 130 m thick Callovo-Oxfordian formation located between depths 400 m and 600 m at the Meuse / Haute-Marne (MHM) Underground Research Laboratory (URL), operated by ANDRA (Bure, France). The simulations tests were designed according to 3 'types' of computational geometries. The drying period was extended to very long time scales in some cases. The clay rock was taken homogeneous in many tests, but the damaged zone was represented in some (Type III) tests. Type (I) tests are conducted in a simplified non circular geometry. Assuming a square cross-section for the drift, the drying process is obtained by imposing a fixed suction on a flat piece of wall at the roof. The bottom of the porous domain coincides with the roof of the drift. The imposed suction at the roof affects the near field pressure both horizontally and vertically. Type (II) tests reproduce the circular cylindrical geometry of a partially or perfectly filled gallery, with drying conditions imposed at both ends of the drift. Finally, Type (III) tests consider the case of an empty ventilated cylindrical drift with circular cross-section. In this case the drying is imposed on the curved walls of the drift via a transmission mechanism thanks the 'macro-porous immersion' method. In all cases, the drying of the porous clay rock is modeled by imposing a suction condition (?), obtained from relative air humidity (HR) via Kelvin's law (?). Briefly, the macro-porous immersion method consists in the following interrelated procedures. First, the volumetric excavation (cylindrical drift) is discretized and internalized as a 3D 'macro-porous' body within the computational porous domain. Secondly, the properties of this internal macro-porous body are adjusted in such a way that it will transmit properly the imposed suction (or pressure, or flux, as the case may be) from external to internal boundaries. Here, the suction is imposed on the entry face of the gallery (external boundary), and it is transmitted to the clay/gallery interface (internal boundary). The macro-porous body has a porosity of 100%, a large Darcy permeability compared to the clay-stone, and other special nonlinear and non-isotropic unsaturated properties. Briefly, numerical modelling was conducted with BIGFLOW 3D, an implicit finite volume solver of the saturated/unsaturated Richards equation in mixed form (moisture content '?', pressure head 'h'). We used the nonlinear Van Genuchten / Mualem conductivity and water retention curves (K(h); ?(h)) in the unsaturated zone. A specific elastic storativity (SS) was added in the saturated zone to take into account slight deformation mechanisms in a simplified way (the storativity model does not deal with total stress; it assumes ??EFF ? ?p, where p is pore pressure, and ?EFF is Terzaghi's effective stress taken positive when extensional). Finally, the BIGFLOW code can also handle 3D heterogeneity and nonlinear diagonal anisotropy, that is: [Kii(h,x,y,z); ?(h,x,y,z)]. We used these additional capabilities of the code in some of the tests. Figs.1 and 2 show the evolution of desaturation for a 'Type I' test, i.e., with suction imposed on a flat horizontal piece of wall located at the roof of the drift. The drift 'radius' (half-side) is R=2 m. The case shown here is only 'moderately dry': the prescribed suction is ?=3000 m (?30 MPa), corresponding to HR=80.74% at TAIR=25 C and PATM=1 bar (according to Kelvin's law). The imposed desaturation of the porous medium at the drift wall is significant (more than 50% drop of the degree of saturation). The steady state is attained after ?10-30 years, due to the infl

  18. Modelling of crud growth mechanisms under local boiling conditions in pressurized water reactors fuel clads leading to important volumes activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) primary circuit materials are subject to general corrosion leading to soluble metallic element (mainly Fe, Ni, Cr, Mn, Co) transfer and subsequent ion precipitation processes on the primary circuit surfaces. When deposited on fuel rods, these species are activated by neutron flux. Thus, crud erosion and dissolution processes induce to primary coolant activity. During a normal operating cycle in a EDF PWR, the volume activity in the coolant is relatively stable (usually about 10-20 MBq.m-3 in 58Co). In some cycles (depending on fuel management), significant increases in 58Co and 51Cr volume activities are observed (10 to 100 times the ordinary volume activities). These increases of volume activities are due to local sub-cooled nucleate boiling on the 'hot' parts of fuel assemblies. As presented in this thesis, boiling at the top of some fuel assemblies may lead to much higher amount of metallic elements than usual (some micrometers). Indeed, boiling that can locally occurs under PWR conditions concentrates species and to increase significantly the quantity of deposited and precipitated material. Erosion flux is higher in these regions due to thicker crud thickness, involving a greater mass transfer of activated isotopes to the primary coolant. The OSCAR calculation code, developed by the 'Laboratoire de Modelisation des interactions et Transferts en Reacteur' in CEA, with these new mass transfer models can now well estimate the amount of deposit and the volume activities in the primary coolant in case of boiling in accordance with french PWR measurements. (author)

  19. Optimization of hydrostatic pressure at varied sonication conditions--power density, intensity, very low frequency--for isothermal ultrasonic sludge treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Henri; Le, Ngoc Tuan; Barthe, Laurie; Julcour-Lebigue, Carine

    2015-07-01

    This work aims at investigating for the first time the key sonication (US) parameters: power density (DUS), intensity (IUS), and frequency (FS) - down to audible range, under varied hydrostatic pressure (Ph) and low temperature isothermal conditions (to avoid any thermal effect). The selected application was activated sludge disintegration, a major industrial US process. For a rational approach all comparisons were made at same specific energy input (ES, US energy per solid weight) which is also the relevant economic criterion. The decoupling of power density and intensity was obtained by either changing the sludge volume or most often by changing probe diameter, all other characteristics being unchanged. Comprehensive results were obtained by varying the hydrostatic pressure at given power density and intensity. In all cases marked maxima of sludge disintegration appeared at optimum pressures, which values increased at increasing power intensity and density. Such optimum was expected due to opposite effects of increasing hydrostatic pressure: higher cavitation threshold then smaller and fewer bubbles, but higher temperature and pressure at the end of collapse. In addition the first attempt to lower US frequency down to audible range was very successful: at any operation condition (DUS, IUS, Ph, sludge concentration and type) higher sludge disintegration was obtained at 12 kHz than at 20 kHz. The same values of optimum pressure were observed at 12 and 20 kHz. At same energy consumption the best conditions - obtained at 12 kHz, maximum power density 720 W/L and 3.25 bar - provided about 100% improvement with respect to usual conditions (1 bar, 20 kHz). Important energy savings and equipment size reduction may then be expected. PMID:25199444

  20. Dynamic observations of the effect of pressure and temperature conditions on the selective synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ transmission electron microscopy studies have been carried out to determine the effect of temperature and pressure on the growth of carbon nanotubes by the Ni-catalyzed chemical vapour deposition of acetylene. The temperature range explored was 450-650 deg. C and the acetylene pressure range was 0.8-20 mTorr. Our observations show that straight, single-wall, carbon nanotubes tend to form at higher temperatures and lower pressures while bent, zigzag, multi-wall carbon nanotubes form at lower temperatures and higher pressures. These results can be understood as the result of competition between the arrival rate of carbon and the nucleation rate of carbon hexagons (which increases at high pressure and low temperature), and the annealing rate of the 5-ring and 7-ring defects that are responsible for the nanotube curvature

  1. Experimental investigation of the influence of boundary conditions on the stability of cylindrical shells made of fiberglass-reinforced plastic subjected to external pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of attachment conditions on the stability of cylindrical shells subjected to external pressure has been studied in detail in a number of works. These works mainly focused on single-layer, isotropic shells. In the present article results are presented from an experimental investigation of the stability of cylindrical shells made of fiberglass-reinforced plastic subjected to the load of a uniform (confining) external pressure. Experiments are performed for different types of boundary conditions. The influence of boundary conditions on the stability of cylindrical shells has been studied using shells manufactured by pouring and wounding mutually orthogonal, longitudinally transverse strips of fiberglass-reinforced plastic in a 1:2 ratio. In these experiments all the shells had a length of 260±1 mm, radius of 94 mm, and total thickness of the walls 0.66±0.01 mm

  2. Oxygen K-edge fine structures of water by x-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy under pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine structure of the oxygen K edge was investigated for water at ambient pressure, 0.16, 0.21, 0.27, 0.47, and 0.60 GPa using x-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy (XRS). Similarity in near-edge structures at 0.16 and 0.60 GPa suggests little difference in the electronic state of oxygen in the low-pressure and high-pressure forms of water. Yet, we observed significant variation of preedge structure of the XRS spectra with compression. The intensity of the preedge peak at 535.7 eV has a minimal value at around 0.3 GPa, indicating that the number of hydrogen bonding increases first and then decreases as a function of pressure

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the dynamic behaviour of a reactor pressure vessel and a primary steam pipe line under operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new remotely operated snapback excitation system was used for vibration tests at the pressure vessel and a primary steam pipe of a nuclear power plant under different operating conditions (temperature 20-2850C in steps, internal pressure 0-70 bar). The measured acceleration-, displacement- and strain time histories were compared with results of pre-calculations of the test load cases using a FE-model. Additionally, a modal analysis of the measured signals permitted a comparison of resonance frequencies, mode shapes and damping values of the system investigated with the modal parameters of the computation model. (orig.)

  4. Structural Phase Transition in CdSb + 3 % MnSb Composite at a High Hydrostatic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.G. Dzhamamedov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In CdSb + 3 % MnSb composite, structural properties have been studied, specific resistance ? and Hall coefficient RH are measured at a high hydrostatic pressure of up to P ? 9 GPa. An irreversible structural phase transition is found at barometric dependencies p(P and RH(P. From our experimental data, barometric dependencies of carrier concentration and their mobility are calculated. On the basis of the heterophase structure – effective medium model, characteristic points and parameters of the phase transition, and also dynamics of variation of the initial phase volume C1 as a function of pressure are computed. The latter dependence is in agreement with the investigation results of Raman scattering before and after application of pressure.

  5. Grid spacer effect on reflood behavior observed at reflood experiment with 5 x 5 bundle test section under wide pressure condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a lot of works on quenching behavior and minimum film boiling temperature. However, these phenomena are not clear enough for high-pressure condition. Therefore, reflood experiments were performed with 5 x 5-bundle test section under pressure of 2 MPa to 15.5 MPa. Geometry of a bundle test section used at the present experiments was principally the same as that of conventional PWRs. Grid spacers used at the present experiments were designed to simulate conventional ones. Data on clad temperature transient, quench time, and heat transfer coefficient were obtained. Quenching took place at several elevations where grid spacers located, and then each quenching front propagated downstream, or toward upper elevations under high mass flux condition. Thus, grid spacers showed influence of significant promotion of quenching occurrence above grid spacers. This promotion is more significant at higher mass flux and slightly significant at higher pressure. Under such condition, grid spacer effect is not negligible to analyze thermal-hydraulics accurately for PWRs and BWRs accidents. On the other hand, grid spacer effect on quenching occurrence is small at lower mass flux and lower pressure. The boundary of above two cases was determined experimentally. In order to study above characteristics, heat transfer coefficient distribution along the distance of the grid spacer was investigated. Heat transfer coefficient was enhanced above grid spacers and the enhancement was decayed along the distance of the grid spacer. The enhancement at the grid spacer was significant at higher mass flux. Relaxation length of grid spacer effect was about 0.1 m. Thus, effects of mass flux and pressure on promotion of quenching occurrence is explained by heat transfer enhancement above the grid spacers. (author)

  6. A new experimental setup for the liquid-solid phase transition determination in crude oils under high pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Rizzo; H. Carrier; J. Castillo; S. Acevedo; J. Pauly [UNEXPO - Vicerectorado Barquisimeto (Venezuela). Departamento de Ingeniera Quimica

    2007-08-15

    A high pressure apparatus based on two sapphire windows high pressure cell coupled with a detection system of the reflected and refracted light intensities coming from a laser beam was designed to determine the phase transitions by the measurement of the light intensity change. The setup was used to measure the wax disappearance temperature under pressure up to 100 MPa in pure component, synthetic complex mixtures made up of distributions of n-paraffins ranging from n-C{sub 20} to n-C{sub 42}. Finally a real stabilized condensate was successfully investigated and the sensitivity of the detection system was demonstrated on a dark crude oil. 30 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Development of a CATHENA Fuel Channel Analysis Model for a Fuel Channel with Axial Variation of Radial Pressure Tube Creep in a Stratified Two-Phase Flow Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-phase heat transfer phenomena in the fuel bundle strings located in a horizontal pressure tube with an axial variation of the radial creep, especially under a low stratified two-phase flow condition such as encountered in the CANDU reactor under the later stage of the blowdown phase of a LBLOCA, involves a complex heat transfer nature. This includes the conduction in the fuel rods, pressure tube, convection in the vapor and liquid regions, and radiation between the fuel rods exposed in the steam and the pressure tube, pressure tube and calandria tube. As these three modes of heat transfer has to be treated in a combined way, modeling the heat transfer phenomena inside the fuel bundle under the stratified flow during the later stage of LBLOCA blowdown has been one of the most challenging tasks in the CANDU safety analyses. The main reason for this hot attention is that it closely related to the integrity of the pressure tube. In this study a heat transfer model for handling this situation is developed, implemented and under preliminary testing of the analysis results. The analysis result up to now is encouraging and the validation of the model developed is ongoing. The major motivation of this study is to evaluate the conservatism of the current CANDU safety analysis methodology for a fuel channel with an axial variation of the radial creep of the pressure tube as easily experienced in the aged CANDU plant as it assumes the centerline of the fuel bundle string is the same as that of the pressure tube

  8. Research on the influence of the technical conditions of a homogenizer pump on the quality of the process of pressure homgenization

    OpenAIRE

    Popko H.; Komsta H.; Popko R.; Hys L.

    2002-01-01

    The research presented in this paper refers to the role of the technical condition of the plunger pump’s working units vis-a-vis the quality of homogenized emulsion. Technical condi- tion was determined ‘on line’ by analysing the measured value of the signal of homogenization pressure. This signal contains - among other things - some information about the condition of the plunger pump’s valve unit. The process quality was determined by the process affecting value changes ...

  9. High-pressure behavior and crystal–fluid interaction under extreme conditions in paulingite [PAU-topology].

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gatta, G. D.; Scheidl, K. S.; Pippinger, T.; Skála, Roman; Lee, J.; Miletich, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ro?. 206, April (2015), s. 34-41. ISSN 1387-1811 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : paulingite * high pressure * X-ray diffraction * compressibility * crystal–fluid interaction Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.453, year: 2014

  10. Peculiar magnetic properties of Er conditioned Ni43Co7Mn31Ga19 at ambientand hydrostatic pressures.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaštil, J.; Kamarád, Ji?í; Knížek, Karel; Arnold, Zden?k; Javorský, P.

    2013-01-01

    Ro?. 565, JUL (2013), s. 134-138. ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ?R GAP204/12/0692 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Heusler alloys * hydrostatic pressure * magnetism Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 2.726, year: 2013 www.elsevier.com/locate/jalcom

  11. Desulfurization under Conditions of Substoichiometric Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion of Coal - Comparison with TG-Tests and Equilibrium Limits.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Karel; Hartman, Miloslav; ?ermák, Ji?í; Poho?elý, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Ro?. 11, ?. 120 (2001), s. 39-53. ISSN 1211-1929 R&D Projects: GA AV ?R IAA4072801; GA MŠk OK 349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : desulfurization * sub-stoichiometric * pressurized fluidized bed combustion Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  12. High-pressure crystal structure of elastically isotropic CaTiO3 perovskite under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural evolution of orthorhombic CaTiO3 perovskite has been studied using high-pressure single-crystal x-ray diffraction under hydrostatic conditions up to 8.1 GPa and under a non-hydrostatic stress field formed in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to 4.7 GPa. Under hydrostatic conditions, the TiO6 octahedra become more tilted and distorted with increasing pressure, similar to other 2:4 perovskites. Under non-hydrostatic conditions, the experiments do not show any apparent difference in the internal structural variation from hydrostatic conditions and no additional tilts and distortions in the TiO6 octahedra are observed, even though the lattice itself becomes distorted due to the non-hydrostatic stress. The similarity between the hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic cases can be ascribed to the fact that CaTiO3 perovskite is nearly elastically isotropic and, as a consequence, its deviatoric unit-cell volume strain produced by the non-hydrostatic stress is very small; in other words, the additional octahedral tilts relevant to the extra unit-cell volume associated with the deviatoric unit-cell volume strain may be totally neglected. This study further addresses the role that three factors-the elastic properties, the crystal orientation and the pressure medium-have on the structural evolution of an orthorhombic perovskite loaded in a DAC under non-hydrostatic conditions. The influence of these factors can be clearly visualized by plotting the three-dimensional distribution of the deviatoric unit-cell volume strain in relation to the cylindrical axis of the DAC and indicates that, if the elasticity of a perovskite is nearly isotropic as it is for CaTiO3, the other two factors become relatively insignificant. (paper)

  13. High-pressure crystal structure of elastically isotropic CaTiO3 perovskite under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Ross, Nancy L; Wang, Di; Angel, Ross J

    2011-11-16

    The structural evolution of orthorhombic CaTiO3 perovskite has been studied using high-pressure single-crystal x-ray diffraction under hydrostatic conditions up to 8.1 GPa and under a non-hydrostatic stress field formed in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) up to 4.7 GPa. Under hydrostatic conditions, the TiO6 octahedra become more tilted and distorted with increasing pressure, similar to other 2:4 perovskites. Under non-hydrostatic conditions, the experiments do not show any apparent difference in the internal structural variation from hydrostatic conditions and no additional tilts and distortions in the TiO6 octahedra are observed, even though the lattice itself becomes distorted due to the non-hydrostatic stress. The similarity between the hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic cases can be ascribed to the fact that CaTiO3 perovskite is nearly elastically isotropic and, as a consequence, its deviatoric unit-cell volume strain produced by the non-hydrostatic stress is very small; in other words, the additional octahedral tilts relevant to the extra unit-cell volume associated with the deviatoric unit-cell volume strain may be totally neglected. This study further addresses the role that three factors--the elastic properties, the crystal orientation and the pressure medium--have on the structural evolution of an orthorhombic perovskite loaded in a DAC under non-hydrostatic conditions. The influence of these factors can be clearly visualized by plotting the three-dimensional distribution of the deviatoric unit-cell volume strain in relation to the cylindrical axis of the DAC and indicates that, if the elasticity of a perovskite is nearly isotropic as it is for CaTiO3, the other two factors become relatively insignificant. PMID:22037221

  14. Pressure measurements in G-Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport of water in an unsaturated medium such as the proposed study site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is very likely to be two-phase: vapor (or steam) and liquid water. Determination of partial vapor pressure in the medium is therefore desired for a model study of the transport mechanism. In this prototype test in G-Tunnel, the author commits to measure the relative humidity and moisture content of the rock around the heater. To determine the partial vapor pressure in the rock, he also needs to determine the total pressure in the medium. For that purpose, he decided to measure the pore-air (include steam or vapor) pressure in the boreholes where relative humidity will be determined (P1, P2, and P3). The total pore-air pressure will be measured by using a strain-gaged pressure transducer. Other purposes of this test are to try the pressure measuring technique and to investigate the long-term stability of sensitive pressure transducers. He also measures the barometric pressure in the alcove, outside the boreholes where total pressure is measured

  15. Studies of in Situ Pore Pressure Fluctuations At Various Scales Études des fluctuations in situ de la pression de pore à différentes échelles

    OpenAIRE

    Kümpel H. J.; Grecksch G.; Lehmann K.; Rebscher D.; Schulze K. C.

    2006-01-01

    Pore pressure fluctuations in fluid saturated geological formations, either of natural or anthropogenic origin, can be observed at different scales. Natural fluctuations, e. g. , due to tidal, barometric or seismogenic forcing, or man-made effects as through use of underground fluid reservoirs, or initial filling and cyclic loading of lake reservoirs may have wavelengths from meters to kilometers. In situ monitoring of processes, in which both rock deformation and pore pressure changes are si...

  16. Modelling for post-dryout heat transfer and droplet sizes at low pressure and low flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A correlation describing the initial droplet size just after the CHF position at low mass flux is suggested through regression analysis. The history-dependent post-dryout model of Varone and Rohsenow replaced by the Webb-Chen model for wall-vapor heat transfer is used as a reference model in the analysis. In the post-dryout region at low pressure and low flow, it is found that the suggested one-dimensional mechanistic model is valid only in the churn-turbulent flow regime (j*g = 0.5 ? 4.5). It is also suggested that the droplet size generated from the churn-turbulent surface is dependent not only on the pressure but also on the vapor velocity. It turns out that the present model can predict the measured cladding and vapor temperatures within 20% and 15%, respectively

  17. Black Tea Lowers Blood Pressure and Wave Reflections in Fasted and Postprandial Conditions in Hypertensive Patients: A Randomised Study

    OpenAIRE

    Grassi, Davide; Draijer, Richard; DESIDERI, GIOVAMBATTISTA; Mulder, Theo; Ferri, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and arterial stiffening are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Flavonoids may exert some vascular protection. We investigated the effects of black tea on blood pressure (BP) and wave reflections before and after fat load in hypertensives. According to a randomized, double-blind, controlled, cross-over design, 19 patients were assigned to consume black tea (129 mg flavonoids) or placebo twice a day for eight days (13 day wash-out period). Digital volume pulse and ...

  18. Investigations of Response Time Parameters of a Pneumatic 3/2 Direct Acting Solenoid Valve Under Various Working Pressure Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    K. A. Venkataraman; K. Kanthavel; B. Nirmal Kumar

    2013-01-01

    In pneumatic circuits, a solenoid valve is a key component for controlling and directing pneumatic energy. The solenoid valve functional performances are defined as response time parameters with respect to its actuations in terms of direction changing time. This paper aims to present response time parameters of solenoid valves under various working pressures. An experimental setup is employed in order to measure response time with reference to the input signals. The response time plays signif...

  19. Application of the statistical safety evaluation method to the small break LOCA with high pressure injection failure. Sensitivity analyses to determine the break conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By applying a statistical safety evaluation method, the uncertainties of best estimate results can be estimated quantitatively, and as a consequence, excessive conservatism can be reasonably removed to obtain evaluation results with enhanced reliability. Application of a statistical evaluation method is being made to analyses of the “low pressure injection by intentional depressurization of the steam generator secondary side” which is an accident management approach in a SBLOCA (small break loss-of-coolant accident) with HPI (high pressure injection) failure. At the time of a SBLOCA, the break conditions such as the break size are important parameters since they influence PCT (peak cladding temperature). In this research, sensitivity analyses about the break size, direction and position were carried out for a system plant under a condition which the start timing of the steam generator secondary side intentional depressurization is severer than an actual abnormal operating condition. From the result of the sensitivity analyses, differences in the phenomena progression which change depending on the break conditions were evaluated, and a 3 inch facing-down break of the cold-leg was determined as the base case of a statistical safety evaluation. (author)

  20. A versatile elevated-pressure reactor combined with an ultrahigh vacuum surface setup for efficient testing of model and powder catalysts under clean gas-phase conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfin, Franck; Piccolo, Laurent [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l' environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), UMR 5256 CNRS and Université Lyon 1, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, F-69626 Villeurbanne (France)

    2013-09-15

    A small-volume reaction cell for catalytic or photocatalytic testing of solid materials at pressures up to 1000 Torr has been coupled to a surface-science setup used for standard sample preparation and characterization under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The reactor and sample holder designs allow easy sample transfer from/to the UHV chamber, and investigation of both planar and small amounts of powder catalysts under the same conditions. The sample is heated with an infrared laser beam and its temperature is measured with a compact pyrometer. Combined in a regulation loop, this system ensures fast and accurate temperature control as well as clean heating. The reaction products are automatically sampled and analyzed by mass spectrometry and/or gas chromatography (GC). Unlike previous systems, our GC apparatus does not use a recirculation loop and allows working in clean conditions at pressures as low as 1 Torr while detecting partial pressures smaller than 10{sup ?4} Torr. The efficiency and versatility of the reactor are demonstrated in the study of two catalytic systems: butadiene hydrogenation on Pd(100) and CO oxidation over an AuRh/TiO{sub 2} powder catalyst.

  1. Biogas barometer; barometre biogaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-11-15

    The biogas sector has never before aroused so much attention as it does today. Elected officers and investors' interest has been fired by the gradual introduction of regulatory restrictions on the treatment of organic waste and the renewable energy commitments recently made by the European Union Member States. The biogas sector is gradually deserting its core activities of waste cleanup and treatment and getting involved in energy production, with so much enthusiasm that in some countries its scope of action has extended to using energy crops. Across the European Union, the sector's progress is as clear as daylight, as in 2009, primary energy growth leapt by a further 4.3 per cent. (author)

  2. Biofuels barometer; Barometre biocarburants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2008-05-15

    Biofuels represent 2,6% of the energy content of all the fuels used in road transport in Europe today. Nearly half of the target of 5,75% for 2010 set by the directive on biofuels has thus been reached in four years time. To achieve 5,75%, the european union is going to have to increase its production and doubtless call even more on imports, at a moment when biofuels are found at the core of complex ecological and economic issues. This analysis provided data and reflexions on the biofuels situation in the european union: consumption, bio-diesel, bio-ethanol, producers, environmental problems, directives. (A.L.B.)

  3. Biofuels barometer; Barometre biocarburants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-07-15

    In 2010 bio-fuel continued to gnaw away at petrol and diesel consumption in the European Union (EU). However its pace backs the assertion that bio-fuel consumption growth in EU slackened off in 2010. In the transport sector, it increased by only 1.7 Mtoe compared to 2.7 Mtoe in 2009. The final total bio-fuel consumption figure for 2010 should hover at around 13.9 Mtoe that can be broken down into 10.7 Mtoe for bio-diesel, 2.9 Mtoe for bio-ethanol and 0.3 Mtoe for others. Germany leads the pack for the consumption of bio-fuels and for the production of bio-diesel followed by France and Spain

  4. Biofuels Barometer; Barometre Biocarburants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    In 2010 biofuel continued to gnaw away at petrol and diesel consumption in the European Union. However its pace backs the assertion that EU biofuel consumption growth slackened off. In the transport sector, it increased by only 1.7 Mtoe compared to 2.7 Mtoe in 2009. The final total biofuel consumption figure for 2010 should hover at around 13,9 Mtoe. [French] Dans les pays de l'union europeenne, les biocarburants ont continue en 2010 a se substituer a la consommation d'essence et de diesel. Ils l'ont cependant fait a un rythme plus lent, confirmant la perte de vitesse de la croissance de la consommation de biocarburants dans l'union europeenne. Dans le secteur des transports, l'augmentation n'a ete que de 1,7 Mtep en 2010 contre une augmentation de 2,7 Mtep en 2009. la consommation totale de biocarburants devrait finalement etre de l'ordre de 13,9 Mtep en 2010.

  5. Leaf injury characteristics of grassland species exposed to ozone in relation to soil moisture condition and vapour pressure deficit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A range of plant species typical of semi-natural grasslands were tested for their sensitivity to short-term ozone injury under normal and reduced irrigation, and in relationship to air vapour pressure deficit. Potted specimens of 24 herbs, legumes and grasses were exposed during two seasons to four O3 treatments in open-top chambers. The ozone treatments were: (a) charcoal-filtered air; (b) charcoal-filtered air plus ozone to match ambient levels; (c) charcoal-filtered air plus O3 to ambient levels 1.5 and (d) charcoal-filtered air with ozone added to twice ambient levels during selected episodes of 7–13 d. During these ozone episodes, half of the plants in each ozone treatment received reduced irrigation (dry treatment) while the rest was kept under full irrigation (wet treatment). Type and date of first occurrence of leaf injury were noted during individual growth periods. Plants were harvested three times per year, and the percentage of injured leaves was recorded. Depending on species, injury symptoms were expressed as flecking (O3-specific injury), leaf yellowing or anthocyanin formation. Carum carvi and most species of the Fabaceae family (Onobrychis sativa, Trifolium repens, Trifolium pratense) were found to be most responsive to O3, injury occurring after only a few days of exposure in treatment (b). An episodic reduction in irrigation tended to reduce the expression of O3-specific symptoms, but only in species for which a reduction in soil moisture potential and an associated reduction in stomatal conductance during the dry episodes were observed. In other species, the protection from O3 injury seemed to be of little importance. Using artificial neural networks the injury response of nine species was analysed in relation to Species, stomatal conductance, ozone as AOT40 (accumulated exposure above a threshold of 0.04 ppm for periods with global radiation ? 50 W m?2 (Fuhrer et al., 1997)), mean relative growth rate, air vapour pressure deficit and global radiation. In the model with all factors, Species was most important, and when Species was omitted, stomatal conductance was the most important determinant for leaf injury to occur, whereas mean relative growth rate was less important. With no plant-related factors included, air vapour pressure deficit and AOT40 were of highest importance. Only in eight species was a positive relationship found between these two factors during the five days before the onset of injury, indicating increasing protection from ozone with increasing air vapour pressure deficit in some but not all species. These data show that across a range of grassland species, leaf injury caused by elevated levels of ozone is most likely to occur in species with high stomatal conductance and that protection from ozone during dry periods is species-specific and depends on a reduction in stomatal conductance due to a decrease in soil moisture potential. Protection under increased vapour pressure deficit can occur in some but not all species, depending on the relationship between stomatal conductance and air vapour pressure deficit. (author)

  6. Film boiling heat transfer from a vertical cylinder in forced flow of liquids under saturated and subcooled conditions at pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forced convection film boiling heat transfer on a vertical 3-mm diameter and 180-mm length platinum test cylinder located in the center of the 40-mm inner diameter test channel was measured. Saturated water, and saturated and subcooled R113 were used as the test liquids that flowed upward along the cylinder in the test channel. Flow velocities ranged from 0 to 3 m s-1, pressures from 102 to 490 kPa, and liquid subcoolings for R113 from 0 to 60 K. The heat transfer coefficients for a certain pressure and liquid subcooling are almost independent of flow velocity and of a vertical position on the cylinder for the flow velocities lower than ?1 m s-1 (the first range), and they become higher for the velocities higher than ?1 m s-1 (the second range). Slight dependence on a vertical position being nearly proportional to z-1/4, where z is the height from the leading edge of the test cylinder, exists for the flow velocities in the second range. The heat transfer coefficients at each velocity in the first and second ranges are higher for higher pressure and liquid subcooling. Correlation for the forced convection film boiling heat transfer with radiation contribution on a vertical cylinder was derived by modifying an approximate analytical solution for a two-phase laminar boundary layer model to agree better with the experimental data. It was confirmed that the experimental data of film boiling heat transfer coefficients in water and R113 were described by the correlation within ±20% difference.

  7. High-pressure deformation of calcite marble and its transformation to aragonite under non-hydrostatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, B.R.; Kirby, S.H.

    1993-01-01

    We conducted deformation experiments on Carrara marble in the aragonite and calcite stability fields to observe the synkinematic transformation of calcite to aragonite, and to identify any relationships between transformation and deformation or sample strength. Deformation-induced microstructures in calcite crystals varied most significantly with temperature, ranging from limited slip and twinning at 400??C, limited recrystallization at 500??C, widespread recrystallization at 600 and 700??C, to grain growth at 800-900??C. Variations in confining pressure from 0.3 to 2.0 GPa have no apparent effect on calcite deformation microstructures. Aragonite grew in 10-6-10-7 s-1strain rate tests conducted for 18-524 h at confining pressures of 1.7-2.0 GPa and temperatures of 500-600??C. As in our previously reported hydrostatic experiments on this same transformation, the aragonite nucleated on calcite grain boundaries. The extent of transformation varied from a few percent conversion near pistons at 400??C, 2.0 GPa and 10-4 s-1 strain rate in a 0.8 h long experiment, to 98% transformation in a 21-day test at a strain rate of 10-7 s-7, a temperature of 600??C and a pressure of 2.0 GPa. At 500??C, porphyroblastic 100-200 ??m aragonite crystals grew at a rate faster than 8 ?? 10-1m s-1. At 600??C, the growth of aragonite neoblasts was slower, ???6 ?? 10-1 m s -1, and formed 'glove-and-finger' cellularprecipitation-like textures identical to those observed in hydrostatic experiments. The transformation to aragonite is not accompanied by a shear instability or anisotropic aragonite growth, consistent with its relatively small volume change and latent heat in comparison with compounds that do display those features. ?? 1993.

  8. High doses of aldosterone antagonist is a condition of sufficient blood pressure control in bilateral adrenal hyperplasia.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therwani, Safa; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2015-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism occurs in 1-10% of hypertensive patients and is classified in adenomas or bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to discriminate these subtypes and in guiding treatment selection. This case report describes a 65-year-old man with hypertension and hypokalaemia during 25 years. Bilateral adrenal hyperplasia was diagnosed based on a CT, and an oral sodium-loading test with measurement of renin and aldosterone confirmed the diagnosis. Blood pressure and potassium in plasma was normalized during treatment with the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist eplerenon.

  9. Prospects of application of structural steels with superequilibrium nitrogen content for high temperature and hydrogen pressure condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One performed the system analysis of the basic experimentally determined regularities in exhibition of hydrogen embrittlement and cracking of steels under increased temperatures and pressures of hydrogen. The reason of the mentioned phenomenon was the chemical interaction of hydrogen with solid solution carbon at the inner surface of closed micropores. In that connection one substantiated the prospects of nitrogen substitution for carbon in simple and low alloy steels. The problem of the most available technique to prepare those steels with nitrogen superequilibrium content using the most traditional melting techniques was studied

  10. An experimental and analytical investigation of uncovered core heat transfer under high pressure, low heat flux conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and analytical results are reported from two series of high pressure core uncovering experiments. It was determined that the uncovered core is cooled primarily by convection and radiation to dry steam and that droplets are confined to the immediate vicinity of the mixture level. Spacer grids substantially increased heat transfer at an downstream of the grid. A simple heat transfer model is presented which accurately predicts uncovered core heat transfer at modified wall Reynolds numbers greater than 2000. Results are expected to be of use in modelling small break loss of coolant accidents. (orig.)

  11. Muon capture probability of carbon and oxygen for CO, CO2, and COS under low-pressure gas conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a negatively charged muon is stopped in a substance, it is captured by an atom of the substance, and the muonic atom is formed. The muon capture process is significantly affected by the chemical environment of the atom and factors such as molecular structure (chemical effect). In this study, we performed muon irradiation for low-pressure CO, CO2, and COS molecules and measured the muonic X-rays emitted immediately after muon capture by an atom. In this paper, we quantitatively discuss the muon capture probability of each type of atom using the LMM model. (author)

  12. Unique rod lens/video system designed to observe flow conditions in emergency core coolant loops of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques and equipment are described which are used for video recordings of the single- and two-phase fluid flow tests conducted with the PKL Spool Piece Measurement System designed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and EG and G Inc. The instrumented spool piece provides valuable information on what would happen in pressurized water reactor emergency coolant loops should an accident or rupture result in loss of fluid. The complete closed-circuit television video system, including rod lens, light supply, and associated spool mounting fixtures, is discussed in detail. Photographic examples of test flows taken during actual spool piece system operation are shown

  13. Performance of a CCD detector using rotating anode generator for x-ray diffraction studies at ambient and high pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Details of a two dimensional x-ray area detector developed using a charge coupled device, image intensifier and a fibre optic taper are given. The detector system is optimized for angle dispersive x-ray diffraction set up using rotating anode x-ray generator. The performance of this detector was tested by carrying out powder x-ray diffraction measurements on various materials such as intermetallics AuIn2, AuGa2, high Z material Pd and low Z scatterer adamantane (C10H16) at ambient conditions. Its utility for quick detection of phase transitions at high pressures with diamond anvil cell is demonstrated by reproducing the known pressure induced structural transitions in RbI, KI and a new structural phase transition in AuGa2 above 10 GPa. Various software have also been developed to analyse data from this detector. (author)

  14. Experimental investigations of two-phase mixture level swell and axial void fraction distribution under high pressure, low heat flux conditions in rod bundle geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data is reported from a series of quasi-steady-state two-phase mixture level swell and void fraction distribution tests. Testing was performed at ORNL in the Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility - a large electrically heated test loop configured to produce conditions similar to those expected in a small break loss of coolant accident. Pressure was varied from 2.7 to 8.2 MPa and linear power ranged from 0.33 to 1.95 kW/m. Mixture swell was observed to vary linearly with the total volumetric vapor generation rate over the power range of primary interest in small break analysis. Void fraction data was fit by a drift-flux model and both the drift-velocity and concentration parameter were observed to decrease with increasing pressure

  15. High temperature steam oxidation study on Zr–2.5%Nb pressure tube under simulated LOCA condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Suparna, E-mail: sup@barc.gov.in [Post Irradiation Examination Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sawarn, Tapan K.; Alur, V.D.; Rath, B.N. [Post Irradiation Examination Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kaity, Santu [Radio Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Pandit, K.M.; Anantharaman, S.; Sah, D.N. [Post Irradiation Examination Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-08-15

    Study of high temperature steam oxidation kinetics and microstructural evolution during the oxidation was carried out on the coupons of Zr–2.5%Nb pressure tube material of Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) in the temperature range 500–1050 °C. The oxidation kinetics derived from the weight gain measurements showed a parabolic rate law with the parabolic rate constant K{sub P} expressed as an Arrhenius equation K{sub P} = 10.12 × 10{sup 8} × exp(?18664/T). Hydrogen pick up was less than 55 ppm in the samples oxidized at temperatures up to 850 °C but high (250–400 ppm) in the samples oxidized in the ? phase region (900 °C and above). The microstructure of the samples oxidized above the ?-Zr/?-Zr transition temperature showed from the surface inwards sequentially the presence of an oxide layer, an underlying oxygen stabilized ?-Zr layer and a prior ?-Zr phase containing hydride precipitates. An increase in the hardness was observed near the oxide-metal interface in the coupons oxidized above 900 °C, due to formation of oxygen stabilized ?-Zr layer. Higher hardness was also observed in the base metal in the samples oxidized at 1000 °C and 1050 °C.

  16. Investigation of the level difference between sound pressure and sound intensity in an aircraft cabin under different fuselage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, M. S.; Crocker, M. J.; Heitman, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Problems in using two-microphone sound-intensity (SI) measurements to measure structural transmission losses are investigated in experiments involving light-aircraft fuselage panels and windows. Both sound pressure (SP) and SI are measured near the passenger and door windows and panels of a single-engine aircraft and with these barriers removed, and the effect of increasing interior acoustic absorption and blocking flanking transmission paths is also tested. The results are presented graphically, and the SP measurements are used to indicate frequency ranges in which the two-microphone technique significantly underestimates SI. It is inferred that flanking paths and interior reverberation must be effectively suppressed in order to obtain accurate transmission-loss measurements.

  17. Volume reduction on all particle size of the contaminated soil. Continuous processing technology of attrition, chemical wash under an ambient temperature and pressure condition and magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An examination was conducted in order to establish a practical purification system that could largely reduce the storage volume of radioactive waste in the Intermediate Storage Facility. The examination consists of a 3-step washing treatment of contaminated soil, which includes “Milling Washing” of removed contaminated soil, chemical extraction of fine soil fraction resulted from the “Milling Washing” under an ambient temperature and pressure condition, and magnetic separation of cesium from the extracted solution. As a result of the examination, we succeeded in development of a safe system with low initial cost and running cost. (author)

  18. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today. PMID:26573709

  19. Analysis of blood pressure–heart rate feedback regulation under non-stationary conditions: beyond baroreflex sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feedback regulation of blood pressure and heart rate is an important indicator of human autonomic function usually assessed by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). We suggest a new method yielding a higher temporal resolution than standard BRS methods. Our approach is based on a regression analysis of the first differences of inter-heartbeat intervals and blood pressure values. Data are recorded from 23 patients with hypertension and sleep apnoea, 22 patients with diabetes mellitus and 23 healthy subjects. Using the proposed method for 3 min data segments, we obtain average regression coefficients of 9.1 and 3.5 ms mmHg?1 for healthy subjects in supine and orthostatic positions, respectively. In patients with hypertension, we find them to be 3.8 and 2.6 ms mmHg?1. The diabetes patients with and without autonomic neuropathy are characterized by 3.1 and 6.1 ms mmHg?1 in the supine position compared with 1.7 and 3.3 ms mmHg?1 in the orthostatic position. The results are highly correlated with conventional BRS measures; we find r > 0.9 for the dual sequence method. Therefore, we suggest that the new method can quantify BRS. It is superior in distinguishing healthy subjects from patients both in supine and orthostatic positions for short-term recordings. It is suitable for non-stationary data and has good reproducibility. Besides, we cannot exclude that other regulatory mechanisms than BRS may also contribute to the regression coefficients between the first differences

  20. Using Atmospheric Pressure Tendency to Optimise Battery Charging in Off-Grid Hybrid Wind-Diesel Systems for Telecoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Daniels

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Off grid telecom base stations in developing nations are powered by diesel generators. They are typically oversized and run at a fraction of their rated load for most of their operating lifetime. Running generators at partial load is inefficient and, over time, physically damages the engine. A hybrid configuration uses a battery bank, which powers the telecoms’ load for a portion of the time. The generator only operates when the battery bank needs to be charged. Adding a wind turbine further reduces the generator run hours and saves fuel. The generator is oblivious to the current wind conditions, which leads to simultaneous generator-wind power production. As the batteries become charged by the generator, the wind turbine controller is forced to dump surplus power as heat through a resistive load. This paper details how the relationship between barometric pressure and wind speed can be used to add intelligence to the battery charger. A Simulink model of the system is developed to test the different battery charging configurations. This paper demonstrates that if the battery charger is aware of upcoming wind conditions, it will provide modest fuel savings and reduce generator run hours in small-scale hybrid energy systems.

  1. Heat pump control method based on direct measurement of evaporation pressure to improve energy efficiency and indoor air temperature stability at a low cooling load condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • New heat pump control method was developed. • Experimental investigation on performance of heat pump with various control method. • New control method appeared to improve the stability of indoor air temperature. • New control method appeared to have a potential to reduce power consumption. - Abstract: The control systems of conventional heat pumps have an input of refrigerant temperature at the evaporator outlet to maintain superheat at proper level. In order to develop a control method that can be used to achieve better indoor thermal comfort and energy efficiency at a low cooling load condition than the current control method, a new method of the evaporation pressure control based on the evaporator outlet pressure reading (EPCP) was developed. The changes in the stability of indoor air temperature and power consumption were measured while changing the compressor frequency in accordance with the new control method. Compared with the evaporation pressure control based on the evaporator outlet temperature reading, the EPCP control method appeared to improve the stability of room air temperature or occupant thermal comfort significantly

  2. Fatigue crack growth rates in a pressure vessel steel under various conditions of loading and the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, P. D.; Robinson, F. P. A.

    1986-10-01

    Corrosion fatigue (CF) tests have been carried out on SA508 Cl 3 pressure vessel steel, in simulated P.W.R. environments. The test variables investigated included air and P.W.R. water environments, frequency variation over the range 1 Hz to 10 Hz, transverse and longitudinal crack growth directions, temperatures of 20 °C and 50 °C, and R-ratios of 0.2 and 0.7. It was found that decreasing the test frequency increased fatigue crack growth rates (FCGR) in P.W.R. environments, P.W.R. environment testing gave enhanced crack growth (vs air tests), FCGRs were greater for cracks growing in the longitudinal direction, slight increases in temperature gave noticeable accelerations in FCGR, and several air tests gave FCGR greater than those predicted by the existing ASME codes. Fractographic evidence indicates that FCGRs were accelerated by a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. The presence of elongated MnS inclusions aided both mechanical fatigue and hydrogen embrittlement processes, thus producing synergistically fast FCGRs. Both anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms have been proposed for the environmental enhancement of crack growth rates. Electrochemical potential measurements and potentiostatic tests have shown that sample isolation of the test specimens from the clevises in the apparatus is not essential during low temperature corrosion fatigue testing.

  3. A hybrid Markov chain Monte Carlo method for generating permeability fields conditioned to multiwell pressure data and prior information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonet-Cunha, L.; Oliver, D.S.; Redner, R.A. [and others

    1996-12-31

    In order to properly evaluate the uncertainty in reservoir performance predictions, it is necessary to construct and sample the a posteriori probability density functions for the rock property fields. In this work, the a posteriori probability density function is constructed based on prior means and variograms (covariance function) for log-permeability and multiwell pressure data. Within the context of sampling the probability density function, we argue that the notion of equally probable realizations is the wrong paradigm for reservoir characterization. If the simulation of Gaussian random fields with a known variogram is the objective, it is shown that the variogram should not be incorporated directly into the objective function if simulated annealing is applied either to sample the a posteriori probability density function or to estimate a global minimum of the associated objective function. It is shown that the hybrid Markov chain Monte Carlo method provides a way to explore more fully the set of plausible log-permeability fields and does not suffer from the high rejection rates of more standard Markov chain Monte Carlo methods.

  4. High temperature steam oxidation study on Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube under simulated LOCA condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetic rate equation for steam oxidation reaction of Zr-2 .5%Nb pressure tube can be used in the assessment of hydrogen generation during postulated loss of coolant accident or LOCA in a nuclear reactor. Experiments were carried out in the temperature range from 500 to 1050 deg C for different time periods. Heating was carried out at a rate of 30 to 40 deg C/sec. Isothermal heating was followed by air cooling. The oxidation kinetics derived from the mass gain showed a parabolic rate law having 'n' of the equation, ?W = ktn, in the range from 0.53 to 0.6. The experimentally measured parabolic rate constants have been expressed as Arrhenius type of function. The micro structural observation showed the presence of an oxide layer, an underlying coarse oxygen stabilized ?-Zr(O) platelets interspersed with prior ?-Zr, a transformed ?-Zr phase and hydride precipitates for the specimens heated above the a? -Zr + ?-Zr/?-Zr transition temperature. Specimens heated below the transition temperature but above the monotectoid temperature revealed a microstructure containing ?-Zr and ?-Zr and hydride precipitates. As fabricated microstructure with no significant modification was observed in case of coupons heated below the monotectoid temperature. (author)

  5. Reaction mechanism for the aqueous-phase mineral carbonation of heat-activated serpentine at low temperatures and pressures in flue gas conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Louis-César; Mercier, Guy; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    Mineral carbonation is known as one of the safest ways to sequester CO2. Nevertheless, the slow kinetics and low carbonation rates constitute a major barrier for any possible industrial application. To date, no studies have focused on reacting serpentinite with a relatively low partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) close to flue gas conditions. In this work, finely ground and heat-treated serpentinite [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4] extracted from mining residues was reacted with a 18.2 vol % CO2 gas stream at moderate global pressures to investigate the effect on CO2 solubility and Mg leaching. Serpentinite dissolution rates were also measured to define the rate-limiting step. Successive batches of gas were contacted with the same serpentinite to identify surface-limiting factors using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Investigation of the serpentinite carbonation reaction mechanisms under conditions close to a direct flue gas treatment showed that increased dissolution rates could be achieved relative to prior work, with an average Mg dissolution rate of 3.55 × 10(-11) mol cm(-2) s(-1). This study provides another perspective of the feasibility of applying a mineral carbonation process to reduce industrial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from large emission sources. PMID:24669999

  6. Reaction kinetics and solubilities of corrosion products in the physicochemical conditions of the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A better understanding of the behavior of the corrosion products at operating conditions of PWR is required. This study aims to collect new thermodynamic data on the species composing the corrosion products. The experimental work, described in this paper, focuses on the study of two solid phases: nickel oxide NiO and nickel ferrite NiFe2O4. Dissolution rate of nickel oxide has been measured to 130 C in acidic conditions (pH 3 to 5). A kinetic model has been used to describe the measured dissolution rates. This calculation allowed us to determine the real activation energy of the dissolution reaction of nickel oxide which is equal to 56,5 ± 3,7 kJ.mol-1. The dissolution rates of nickel oxide are slow and as a consequence, only a limited amount of nickel oxide can be dissolved during reactor shutdown. Solubility of a stoichiometric nickel ferrite, experimentally synthesized, has been measured from 100 to 200 C in acidic conditions with a hydrogen electrode concentration cell. The results show a non-congruent dissolution of nickel ferrite with an iron excess. The speciation of soluble iron and nickel was studied based on the available thermodynamic data at high temperature and the measured concentrations were compared with the equilibrium constants with the MULTEQ code. The solubility of nickel ferrite in a reducing acidic solution is reasonably well described by the available thermodynamic data. A new high temperature solubility measurement cell was designed and built. This paper describes in detail the design of the cell and the first tests that have been conducted. (author)

  7. On-line surveillance instrumentation for full scale thermal shock trials under real pressurized water conditions (German HDR-program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal shock tests on a saturated steam outlet nozzle edge have been conducted under simulated realistic operation conditions (T = 3000C, p = 11 MPa) for the past three years. The tests are to improve our understanding of crack formation and crack growth under thermal shock conditions and to evaluate and improve the suitability of non-destructive test methods for the on-line surveillance, the detection and quantitative description of natural cracks and crack fields. For on-line monitoring of the thermal shock tests conducted on the A2 nozzle, thermocouples and strain gauges (both on the inside and the outside), clip gauges (CMOD measurement), stationary US-probes, the potential drop technique (potential measurement on the inside), and acoustic emission tests have been used. In the final two test phases (approx. 800 load cycles) by a new six-channel R and D acoustic emission analysis system (signal parameter processor) developed and built at IzfP has been applied. (orig./HP)

  8. Interaction between phosphorus removal and hybrid granular sludge formation under low hydraulic selection pressure at alternating anaerobic/aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Longqi; Wan, Junfeng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Jie; Wang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    The hybrid granular sludge (HGS) formation and its performances on phosphorus removal were investigated in a sequencing batch airlift reactor. Under conditions of low superficial air velocity (SAV?=?0.68?cm?s(-1)) and relatively long settling time (15-30?min), aerobic granules appeared and coexisted with bio-flocs after 120 days operation. At the stable phase, 54% of total suspended solid (m/m) was granular sludge with the two typical sizes (Dmean?=?1.77?±?0.33 and 0.89?±?0.11?mm) in the reactor, where the settling velocity was 98.7?±?12.4 and 37.8?±?0.9?m?h(-1) for the big and small granules. With progressive extension of anaerobic time from 15 to 60 min before aerobic condition per cycle during the whole experiment, the HGS system can be maintained at a high total phosphorus removal efficiency (ca. 99%) since Day-270. The phosphorus content (wt %) in biomass was respectively 9.54?±?0.29, 7.60?±?0.48 and 6.15?±?0.59 for the big granules, small granules and flocs. PMID:25921951

  9. Monitoring of prestressed concrete pressure vessels. II. performance of selected concrete embedment strain meters under normal and extreme environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unique types of instrumentation are used in prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) to measure strains, stresses, deflections, prestressing forces, moisture content, temperatures, and possibly cracking. Their primary purpose is to monitor these complex structures throughout their 20- to 30-year operating lifetime in order to provide continuing assurance of their reliability and safety. Numerous concrete embedment instrumentation systems are available commercially. Since this instrumentation is important in providing continuing assurance of satisfactory performance of PCPVs, the information provided must be reliable. Therefore, laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate the reliability of these commercially available instrumentation systems. This report, the second in a series related to instrumentation embedded in concrete, presents performance-reliability data for 13 types of selected concrete embedment strain meters which were subjected to a variety of loading environments, including unloaded, thermally loaded, simulated PCPV, and extreme environments. Although only a limited number of meters of each type were tested in any one test series, the composite results of the investigation indicate that the majority of these meters would not be able to provide reliable data throughout the 20- to 30-year anticipated operating life of a PCPV. Specific conclusions drawn from the study are: (1) Improved corrosion-resistant materials and sealing techniques should be developed for meters that are to be used in PCPV environments. (2) There is a need for the development of meters that are capable of surviving in concretes where temperatures in excess of 660C are present for extended periods of time. (3) Research should be conducted on other measurement techniques, such as inductance, capacitance, and fluidics

  10. Continuous monitoring of natural ventilation pressure at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a US Department of Energy research and development facility designed to demonstrate the permanent, safe disposal of US defense-generated transuranic waste. The waste storage horizon is 655 m (2150 ft) below surface in bedded salt. To date the WIPP project has not emplaced any waste. There are three intake shafts used to supply air to the underground. All air is exhausted through a single return shaft. The total design airflow during normal operations is 200 m3/s (424,000 cfm). The ventilation system is designed to provide separate air splits to construction, experimental, and storage activities. Separation is achieved by isolating the storage circuit from the construction or experimental circuits with bulkheads. Any air leakage must be towards the storage area of the facility. Field studies have shown that the pressure differential necessary to maintain the correct leakage direction is susceptible to the effects of natural ventilation; therefore, extensive studies and analyses have been conducted to quantify the natural ventilation effects on the WIPP underground airflow system. A component of this work is a monitoring system designed to measure the air properties necessary for calculation of the natural ventilation pressure (NVP). This monitoring system consists of measuring dry bulb temperature, relative humidity, and barometric pressure at strategic location on surface and underground. The psychometric parameters of the air are measured every fifteen minutes. From these data, trends can be determined showing the impact of NVP on the ventilation system during diurnal variations in surface climate. Both summer and winter conditions have been studied. To the author's knowledge this is the first reported instance of automatic and continuous production of time and temperature variant NVPs. This paper describes the results of the initial monitoring study

  11. Crack initiation and crack growth during thermal shock tests in the reactor pressure vessel of the HDR under corrosive medium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is presented of the status of comprehensive thermal shock investigations performed at a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In a separate group of experiments it was first studied which impacts are exerted on the undamaged RPV wall by fluid transients resembling emergency cooling conditions. Furthermore, crack formation and crack growth were enforced in selected wall zones by providing appropriate boundary conditions. It is proposed to load in a final step the wall zones heavily damaged by quasi-reality crack fields under conditions similar to emergency cooling. The investigations are performed to verify the capability of non-destructive testing methods and of computations (of temperatures, stresses, crack behaviour) to provide relevant information. The computations have yielded clear overestimations as well as underestimations. For instance, the investigations performed at the plant proper have produced the result that the thermal shocks acting on the RPV wall surface are substantially reduced by thermal mixing processes in water. In the subsequent computations of the RPV wall structure, rotation symmetric computer codes are found to fail completely under conditions of intensive local cooling. Finally - although the crack growth computations for the special cyclic thermal shocks under corrosive medium conditions were extremely conservative - it has been demonstrated, by use of acoustic emission analysis and other techniques that the present crack growth computations do not adequately take into account crucial parameters influencing the material behaviour. This means that the results obtained with laboratory-scale specimens cannot be safely transferred to the components under the testing conditions prevailing for the time being. (author)

  12. Large eddy simulation of pressure fluctuations at off-design condition in a Francis turbine based on cavitation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W. T.; Li, X. B.; Li, F. C.; Han, W. F.; Wei, X. Z.; Guo, J.

    2013-12-01

    To study the instability of a Francis turbine at off-design operating condition, a hydraulic model was established and the flow characteristics at the off-design point were studied based on large eddy simulation (LES). The simulation was conducted for both single phase model and cavitation model. The results were compared with the experimental data. Results show that the simulation based on cavitation model can capture more channel vortex structures than single phase calculation. The result of vortex rope by cavitation model is similar to the experimental result. The dominant frequency can be obtained by these two methods, while the result based on cavitation model can capture the high frequency component at the inlet of draft tube. Great difference can be seen from the internal flow of the two simulation results. These conclusions can provide a basis for the study of instability of Francis turbine.

  13. Effect of surface conditions on transient critical heat fluxes for a horizontal cylinder in a pool of water at pressures due to exponentially increasing heat inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transient critical heat fluxes, CHFs, on 1.2-mm horizontal cylinders with mirror finished surface (MS) and Emery-3 finished rough one (RS) in a pool of water due to exponentially increasing heat inputs, Q0et/?, with the periods, ?, ranged from 20 s down to 2 ms at pressures ranging from atmospheric up to 2 MPa for the subcoolings ranging from 0 to 80 K were measured. A heat input with the period of 20 s corresponds to quasi-steadily increasing one. The obtained data compared with the corresponding data for a cylinder with commercial surface (CS) which were already published in other papers. The trend of CHFs for the periods was generally as follows: the CHF first increases with a decrease in period up to a certain maximum CHF, then it decreases down to a minimum CHF and finally again increases with a decrease in period; namely the CHFs for the periods are separated into the first, second and third groups for longer, shorter and intermediate periods, respectively. The three groups of the CHFs for the periods tested were clearly observed for the cylinders with MS and RS, though the CHFs values for the shorter periods belonging to the second group were not observed for the cylinder with CS except those for the saturation condition at around atmospheric pressure, and those for high subcoolings at higher pressures. At the CHFs belonging to the second group the direct or semi-direct transition clearly occurs from transient conduction regime to film boiling without or with the vapor bubbles for a while with instantaneous increasing of heat flux for both cylinders of MS and RS. It was assumed that the transitions at the CHFs occur due to the explosive-like heterogeneous spontaneous nucleation (HSN) in originally flooded cavities similar to the assumption for the cylinder with CS previously published. It should be noted that as a typical example the minimum CHFs for the periods of 10 ms on the MS and RS cylinders at the pressure of 1 MPa for the subcooling of 40 K were ?40% of the corresponding steady-state CHF. It was observed that the trends of CHFs for the periods belonging to the second and third groups are significantly affected by the cylinder surface conditions.

  14. Experiments of CHF and ONB in a finned rod bundle under low flow and low pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the experimental results for ONB and CHF measurements in a finned rod bundle at low flow conditions. Test was performed to supplement CHF data for HANARO fuel in a low flow region. A test bundle comprised of several finned rods was designed to have the same geometric characteristics of the HANARO fuel. For the experiments, 3 types of test sections, whose shapes are hexagonal with 7 rods, triangular with 3 rods and rectangular with 4 rods, were used. It is difficult to find out the accurate ONB and CHF point in a bundle because the growth of void and the occurrence of dryout inside can not be visual. So, thermocouples were attached to the end of each fuel rods for detecting the CHF and a transparent window was made in the upper region of the test section to know the ONB point together with the coolant behavior during both tests. To supplement the detection of ONB point, a microphone was also attached to the wall of test section together with the amplifier of sound signal. The physical phenomena and flow patterns were observed with the support of a high-speed camera system during the experiments. Roughly speaking, CHF seems to be occurred in the annular flow regime when the heat flux is high enough to evaporate the water film near the top of heater before the surface is continuously cooled by the periodic chugging water. The parametric trends on the inlet temperature and mass flux for the obtained data are same as those of CHF characteristics well known in the text. The measured heat flux of ONB and CHF were compared with those in a single pin of same geometry. For CHF data, bundle CHF data seems to be larger than that of a single rod CHF data by 4% ? 32%. It is considered that these results are induced by the enhancement of turbulence and thermal mixing generated by spacers that were not attached in the single pin test

  15. A priori and a posteriori investigations for developing large eddy simulations of multi-species turbulent mixing under high-pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) database was created representing mixing of species under high-pressure conditions. The configuration considered is that of a temporally evolving mixing layer. The database was examined and analyzed for the purpose of modeling some of the unclosed terms that appear in the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) equations. Several metrics are used to understand the LES modeling requirements. First, a statistical analysis of the DNS-database large-scale flow structures was performed to provide a metric for probing the accuracy of the proposed LES models as the flow fields obtained from accurate LESs should contain structures of morphology statistically similar to those observed in the filtered-and-coarsened DNS (FC-DNS) fields. To characterize the morphology of the large-scales structures, the Minkowski functionals of the iso-surfaces were evaluated for two different fields: the second-invariant of the rate of deformation tensor and the irreversible entropy production rate. To remove the presence of the small flow scales, both of these fields were computed using the FC-DNS solutions. It was found that the large-scale structures of the irreversible entropy production rate exhibit higher morphological complexity than those of the second invariant of the rate of deformation tensor, indicating that the burden of modeling will be on recovering the thermodynamic fields. Second, to evaluate the physical effects which must be modeled at the subfilter scale, an a priori analysis was conducted. This a priori analysis, conducted in the coarse-grid LES regime, revealed that standard closures for the filtered pressure, the filtered heat flux, and the filtered species mass fluxes, in which a filtered function of a variable is equal to the function of the filtered variable, may no longer be valid for the high-pressure flows considered in this study. The terms requiring modeling are the filtered pressure, the filtered heat flux, the filtered pressure work, and the filtered species mass fluxes. Improved models were developed based on a scale-similarity approach and were found to perform considerably better than the classical ones. These improved models were also assessed in an a posteriori study. Different combinations of the standard models and the improved ones were tested. At the relatively small Reynolds numbers achievable in DNS and at the relatively small filter widths used here, the standard models for the filtered pressure, the filtered heat flux, and the filtered species fluxes were found to yield accurate results for the morphology of the large-scale structures present in the flow. Analysis of the temporal evolution of several volume-averaged quantities representative of the mixing layer growth, and of the cross-stream variation of homogeneous-plane averages and second-order correlations, as well as of visualizations, indicated that the models performed equivalently for the conditions of the simulations. The expectation is that at the much larger Reynolds numbers and much larger filter widths used in practical applications, the improved models will have much more accurate performance than the standard one

  16. A priori and a posteriori investigations for developing large eddy simulations of multi-species turbulent mixing under high-pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghesi, Giulio [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bellan, Josette, E-mail: josette.bellan@jpl.nasa.gov [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109-8099 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) database was created representing mixing of species under high-pressure conditions. The configuration considered is that of a temporally evolving mixing layer. The database was examined and analyzed for the purpose of modeling some of the unclosed terms that appear in the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) equations. Several metrics are used to understand the LES modeling requirements. First, a statistical analysis of the DNS-database large-scale flow structures was performed to provide a metric for probing the accuracy of the proposed LES models as the flow fields obtained from accurate LESs should contain structures of morphology statistically similar to those observed in the filtered-and-coarsened DNS (FC-DNS) fields. To characterize the morphology of the large-scales structures, the Minkowski functionals of the iso-surfaces were evaluated for two different fields: the second-invariant of the rate of deformation tensor and the irreversible entropy production rate. To remove the presence of the small flow scales, both of these fields were computed using the FC-DNS solutions. It was found that the large-scale structures of the irreversible entropy production rate exhibit higher morphological complexity than those of the second invariant of the rate of deformation tensor, indicating that the burden of modeling will be on recovering the thermodynamic fields. Second, to evaluate the physical effects which must be modeled at the subfilter scale, an a priori analysis was conducted. This a priori analysis, conducted in the coarse-grid LES regime, revealed that standard closures for the filtered pressure, the filtered heat flux, and the filtered species mass fluxes, in which a filtered function of a variable is equal to the function of the filtered variable, may no longer be valid for the high-pressure flows considered in this study. The terms requiring modeling are the filtered pressure, the filtered heat flux, the filtered pressure work, and the filtered species mass fluxes. Improved models were developed based on a scale-similarity approach and were found to perform considerably better than the classical ones. These improved models were also assessed in an a posteriori study. Different combinations of the standard models and the improved ones were tested. At the relatively small Reynolds numbers achievable in DNS and at the relatively small filter widths used here, the standard models for the filtered pressure, the filtered heat flux, and the filtered species fluxes were found to yield accurate results for the morphology of the large-scale structures present in the flow. Analysis of the temporal evolution of several volume-averaged quantities representative of the mixing layer growth, and of the cross-stream variation of homogeneous-plane averages and second-order correlations, as well as of visualizations, indicated that the models performed equivalently for the conditions of the simulations. The expectation is that at the much larger Reynolds numbers and much larger filter widths used in practical applications, the improved models will have much more accurate performance than the standard one.

  17. Radionuclides release from re-irradiated fuel under high temperature and pressure conditions. Gamma-ray measurements of VEGA-5 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Akihide; Kudo, Tamotsu; Nakamura, Takehiko; Kanazawa, Toru; Kiuchi, Toshio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program is being performed at JAERI to clarify mechanisms of radionuclides release from irradiated fuel during severe accidents and to improve source term predictability. The fifth VEGA-5 test was conducted in January 2002 to confirm the reproducibility of decrease in cesium release under elevated pressure that was observed in the VEGA-2 test and to investigate the release behavior of short-life radionuclides. The PWR fuel of 47 GWd/tU after about 8.2 years of cooling was re-irradiated at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) for 8 hours before the heat-up test. After that, the two pellets of 10.9 g without cladding were heated up to about 2,900 K at 1.0 MPa under the inert He condition. The experiment reconfirmed the decrease in cesium release rate under the elevated pressure. The release data on short-life radionuclides such as Ru-103, Ba-140 and Xe-133 that have never been observed in the previous VEGA tests without re-irradiation was obtained using the {gamma} ray measurement. (author)

  18. Defect formation in aqueous environment: Theoretical assessment of boron incorporation in nickel ferrite under conditions of an operating pressurized-water nuclear reactor (PWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rák, Zs.; Bucholz, E. W.; Brenner, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    A serious concern in the safety and economy of a pressurized water nuclear reactor is related to the accumulation of boron inside the metal oxide (mostly NiFe2O4 spinel) deposits on the upper regions of the fuel rods. Boron, being a potent neutron absorber, can alter the neutron flux causing anomalous shifts and fluctuations in the power output of the reactor core. This phenomenon reduces the operational flexibility of the plant and may force the down-rating of the reactor. In this work an innovative approach is used to combine first-principles calculations with thermodynamic data to evaluate the possibility of B incorporation into the crystal structure of NiFe2O4, under conditions typical to operating nuclear pressurized water nuclear reactors. Analyses of temperature and pH dependence of the defect formation energies indicate that B can accumulate in NiFe2O4 as an interstitial impurity and may therefore be a major contributor to the anomalous axial power shift observed in nuclear reactors. This computational approach is quite general and applicable to a large variety of solids in equilibrium with aqueous solutions.

  19. Effect of SG Modeling on Primary Side Pressure and Temperature Trend During Long Term Station Black Out Conditions in VVER Using RELAP5 and CATHARE2 System Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although station black out conditions (i.e. loss of off-site power with simultaneous failure of all diesel generators) over a period of several hours are very unlikely, analysis of station black out transients and possible countermeasures are important. A well planned emergency operating procedure, utilizing just equipment powered by batteries, can extend the grace period considerably, and mitigate severe accident progression. Until the occurrence of core damage best estimate thermal hydraulic system codes like Relap5 or Cathare2 can give a good picture of the development of the transient. Heat transfer from the primary to the secondary side is one of the dominant phenomena during the first hours of a station black out transient. Primary side pressure stays high, and the decay heat is transferred by natural circulation to the secondary side. The steam generator inventory boils off, and the steam generator level decreases. Modelling of the steam generator therefore is of special importance. The current paper presents an analysis for VVER-1000 type steam generators (horizontal) with different nodalization detail and different codes (Cathare2 and Relap5). The nodalization approach has been verified by comparing calculated results to PSB-VVER steam generator experiments. The results show that codes like Relap5 and Cathare2, by assuming uniform bulk flow properties over the flow cross section and within volume units, introduce a distortion compared to the real physics in case station black out conditions. The reason lies in the specifics of the horizontal steam generator. While the heat transfer surface decreases continuously in the actual steam generator, the necessity of modelling the steam generator with nodes of finite volume creates a step-wise reduction of the heat transfer surface. The effects on the primary side temperature and pressure trends are not negligible, and decrease with increasing detail of modelling.(author)

  20. New antiferromagnetic perovskite CaCo3V4O12 prepared at high-pressure and high-temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikov, Sergey V; Zainulin, Yury G; Kadyrova, Nadezda I; Tyutyunnik, Alexander P; Semenova, Anna S; Kasinathan, Deepa; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Karkin, Alexander E

    2013-10-21

    A new perovskite, CaCo(2+)3V(4+)4O12, has been synthesized at high-pressure and high-temperature (HP-HT) conditions. The properties of this perovskite were examined by a range of techniques. CaCo3V4O12 was found to adopt a double-perovskite cubic lattice [a = 7.3428(6) Å] with Im3 symmetry. We have established that this new perovskite is stable at ambient conditions, and its oxidation and/or decomposition at ambient pressure begins above 500 °C. It undergoes an abrupt antiferromagnetic transition around 98 K. Electrical resistivity data suggest semimetallic conductivity in the temperature range of 1.6-370 K. We have established that the Co(2+) ions in CaCo3V4O12 are in the high-spin state with a sizable orbital moment, even though their square-planar oxygen coordination could be more suitable for the low-spin state, which is prone to Jahn-Teller distortion. Electrical resistivity curves also exhibit a distinct steplike feature around 100 K. CaCo3V4O12 is a first example of perovskite in which the sites A' are fully occupied by Co(2+) ions, and hence its synthesis opens the door to a new class of double perovskites, ACo3B4O12, that may be derived by chemical substitution of the A sublattice by lanthanides, sodium, strontium, and bismuth and by other elements and/or of the B sublattice by some other transition metals. PMID:24083336

  1. Evaporation kinetics of oxide fuels and their consequences on actinide redistributions in reactor fuel pins and on fuel vapor pressures under conditions of core disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the evaporation kinetics of UO2 and (U,Pu)O2. Mathematical models were developed for free evaporation and for evaporation in closed cavities, which allow to calculate location and time dependent redistribution in evaporating specimens. The following two evaporation processes were studied: 1) evaporation of (U,Pu) mixed oxide in fuel pores,which migrate towards the center of the fuel pin and contribute to radial (U,Pu) redistribution; and 2) evaporation of liquid oxide fuels under core disruptive accident conditions in hypothetical prompt critical excursions. The calculations made with respect to core accident conditions have shown that the fuel surface composition changes rapidly in open-evaporation, when the fuel evaporates freely or into major cavities. The changes of surface composition result in a change of the vapor pressure over the oxide. So, the calculated total vapor pressure during free evaporation of (U,Pu)O2 is lower by the factor 2-7 (depending on the evaporation temperature) than the equation-of-state pressure of (U,Pu)O2 with unchanged composition. The changes in surface composition also entail other significant consequences for theoretical and experimental investigations dealing with the high-temperature evaporation of oxide fuels. Calculations on pore migration have shown that a pore migrating as a result of evaporation and condensation of (U,Pu) mixed oxide will transport Pu (or U) to the center of the fuel pin. Starting from this single effect it was calculated the total redistribution effect caused in a fuel pin by migrating pores. It was shown in an out-of-pile experiment that the migration of pores in the temperature gradient is an effective mechanism for (U,Pu) redistribution. This was also confirmed by post-irradiation investigations of pins of an FR2 irradiation experiment. Superposition of the redistribution effect of pore migration on that of thermodiffusion yielded good agreement between measured and calculated radial (U,Pu) distributions for three fuel pins having initial stoichiometries of 1.90, 1.95 and 2.003, respectively. (orig./RW)

  2. Polystyrene as a model system to probe the impact of ambient gas chemistry on polymer surface modifications using remote atmospheric pressure plasma under well-controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartis, Elliot A J; Luan, Pingshan; Knoll, Andrew J; Hart, Connor; Seog, Joonil; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat polystyrene (PS) films under remote conditions where neither the plume nor visible afterglow interacts with the film surface. Carefully controlled conditions were achieved by mounting the APPJ inside a vacuum chamber interfaced to a UHV surface analysis system. PS was chosen as a model system as it contains neither oxygen nor nitrogen, has been extensively studied, and provides insight into how the aromatic structures widespread in biological systems are modified by atmospheric plasma. These remote treatments cause negligible etching and surface roughening, which is promising for treatment of sensitive materials. The surface chemistry was measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to evaluate how ambient chemistry, feed gas chemistry, and plasma-ambient interaction impact the formation of specific moieties. A variety of oxidized carbon species and low concentrations of NOx species were measured after APPJ treatment. In the remote conditions used in this work, modifications are not attributed to short-lived species, e.g., O atoms. It was found that O3 does not correlate with modifications, suggesting that other long-lived species such as singlet delta oxygen or NOx are important. Indeed, surface-bound NO3 was observed after treatment, which must originate from gas phase NOx as neither N nor O are found in the pristine film. By varying the ambient and feed gas chemistry to produce O-rich and O-poor conditions, a possible correlation between the oxygen and nitrogen composition was established. When oxygen is present in the feed gas or ambient, high levels of oxidation with low concentrations of NO3 on the surface were observed. For O-poor conditions, NO and NO2 were measured, suggesting that these species contribute to the oxidation process, but are easily oxidized when oxygen is present. That is, surface oxidation limits and competes with surface nitridation. Overall, surface oxidation takes place easily, but nitridation only occurs under specific conditions with the overall nitrogen content never exceeding 3%. Possible mechanisms for these processes are discussed. This work demonstrates the need to control plasma-ambient interactions and indicates a potential to take advantage of plasma-ambient interactions to fine-tune the reactive species output of APP sources, which is required for specialized applications, including polymer surface modifications and plasma medicine. PMID:25930012

  3. Evaluation of pH control agents influencing on corrosion of carbon steel in secondary water chemistry condition of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of various pH agents on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel was investigated under a simulated secondary water chemistry condition of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in a laboratory, and the steel's corrosion performance was compared with the field data obtained from Uljin NPP unit 2 reactor. All tests were carried out at temperatures of 50 degrees C-250 degrees C and pH of 8.5 - 10. The pH at a given temperature was controlled by adding different agents. Laboratory data indicate that the corrosion rate of carbon steel decreased as the pH increased under the test conditions and the highest corrosion rate was measured at 150 degrees C. This high corrosion rate may be related to high dissolution and instability of Fe oxide (Fe3O4) at 150 degrees C. It was also found that an addition of ethanolamine (ETA) to ammonia was more effectivefor anticorrosion than ammonia alone, and that mixed treatment reduced 50% of iron or more at pHs of 9.5 or higher, especially in the steam generator (SG) and the moisture separator and re-heater

  4. An application of liquid sublayer dryout mechanism to the prediction of critical heat flux under low pressure and low velocity conditions in round tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on several experimental evidences for nucleate boiling in annular film and the existence of residual liquid film flow rate at the critical heat flux (CHF) location, the liquid sublayer dryout (LSD) mechanism under annular film is firstly introduced to evaluate the CHF data at low pressure and low velocity (LPLV) conditions, which would not be predicted by a normal annular film dryout (AFD) model. In this study, the CHF occurrence due to annular film separation or breaking down is phenomenologically modelled by applying the LSD mechanism to this situation. In this LSD mechanism, the liquid sublayer thickness, the incoming liquid velocity to the liquid sublayer, and the axial distance from the onset of annular flow to the CHF location are used as the phenomena-controlling parameters. From the model validation on the 1406 CHF data points ranging over P = 0.1 - 2 MPa, G = 4 - 499 kg/m2s, L/D = 4 - 402, most of CHF data (more than 1000 points) are predicted within ±30% error bounds by the LSD mechanism. However, some calculation results that critical qualities are less than 0.4 are considerably overestimated by this mechanism. These overpredictions seem to be caused by inadequate CHF mechanism classification criteria and an insufficient consideration of the flow instability effect on CHF. Further studies for a new classification criterion screening the CHF data affected by flow instabilities and a new bubble detachment model for LPLV conditions are needed to improve the model accuracy. (author)

  5. An application of liquid sublayer dryout mechanism to the prediction of critical heat flux under low pressure and low velocity conditions in round tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang-Won; Yang, Jae-Young; Baik, Se-Jin [NSSS Engineering and Development, Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Based on several experimental evidences for nucleate boiling in annular film and the existence of residual liquid film flow rate at the critical heat flux (CHF) location, the liquid sublayer dryout (LSD) mechanism under annular film is firstly introduced to evaluate the CHF data at low pressure and low velocity (LPLV) conditions, which would not be predicted by a normal annular film dryout (AFD) model. In this study, the CHF occurrence due to annular film separation or breaking down is phenomenologically modelled by applying the LSD mechanism to this situation. In this LSD mechanism, the liquid sublayer thickness, the incoming liquid velocity to the liquid sublayer, and the axial distance from the onset of annular flow to the CHF location are used as the phenomena-controlling parameters. From the model validation on the 1406 CHF data points ranging over P = 0.1 - 2 MPa, G = 4 - 499 kg/m{sup 2}s, L/D = 4 - 402, most of CHF data (more than 1000 points) are predicted within {+-}30% error bounds by the LSD mechanism. However, some calculation results that critical qualities are less than 0.4 are considerably overestimated by this mechanism. These overpredictions seem to be caused by inadequate CHF mechanism classification criteria and an insufficient consideration of the flow instability effect on CHF. Further studies for a new classification criterion screening the CHF data affected by flow instabilities and a new bubble detachment model for LPLV conditions are needed to improve the model accuracy. (author)

  6. Tunnel construction work under high earth pressure and springwater flouing condition. Construction details of a pioneer drift for Hida tunnel, Tokai-Hokuriku expressway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnels such as those planned for the International Linear Collider (ILC) Project are long and narrow structures under the ground. In the construction of these tunnels, various circumstances sometimes restrict the initial surveys from obtaining detailed geological information. In Japan, complicated geological structure composed of discontinuous plate tectonics can be found. Therefore, in order to ensure effective construction planning and execution, it is important that precise geological information be acquired through initial survey and then verified with investigation results during the construction. Hida Tunnel of Tokai Hokuriku Expressway, which is 10.7 km long and took more than 11 years to finish, is the second longest highway tunnel in Japan. The tunnel was constructed using the TBM method in the beginning. Later the method was replaced with NATM because of hostile construction conditions, which include existences of springwater and massive earth pressure due to more than 1000 m of earth loading on top, as well as weak zones consisted of active faults. This paper reports on the geological structure and construction details of a pioneer drift for Hida Tunnel, which was completed by overcoming complicated and poor geological conditions. At the same time, we will mention the ideal method of the geological survey in future ILC plan. (author)

  7. Distinguishing HIV-1 drug resistance, accessory, and viral fitness mutations using conditional selection pressure analysis of treated versus untreated patient samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV can evolve drug resistance rapidly in response to new drug treatments, often through a combination of multiple mutations 123. It would be useful to develop automated analyses of HIV sequence polymorphism that are able to predict drug resistance mutations, and to distinguish different types of functional roles among such mutations, for example, those that directly cause drug resistance, versus those that play an accessory role. Detecting functional interactions between mutations is essential for this classification. We have adapted a well-known measure of evolutionary selection pressure (Ka/Ks and developed a conditional Ka/Ks approach to detect important interactions. Results We have applied this analysis to four independent HIV protease sequencing datasets: 50,000 clinical samples sequenced by Specialty Laboratories, Inc.; 1800 samples from patients treated with protease inhibitors; 2600 samples from untreated patients; 400 samples from untreated African patients. We have identified 428 mutation interactions in Specialty dataset with statistical significance and we were able to distinguish primary vs. accessory mutations for many well-studied examples. Amino acid interactions identified by conditional Ka/Ks matched 80 of 92 pair wise interactions found by a completely independent study of HIV protease (p-value for this match is significant: 10-70. Furthermore, Ka/Ks selection pressure results were highly reproducible among these independent datasets, both qualitatively and quantitatively, suggesting that they are detecting real drug-resistance and viral fitness mutations in the wild HIV-1 population. Conclusion Conditional Ka/Ks analysis can detect mutation interactions and distinguish primary vs. accessory mutations in HIV-1. Ka/Ks analysis of treated vs. untreated patient data can distinguish drug-resistance vs. viral fitness mutations. Verification of these results would require longitudinal studies. The result provides a valuable resource for AIDS research and will be available for open access upon publication at http://www.bioinformatics.ucla.edu/HIV Reviewers This article was reviewed by Wen-Hsiung Li (nominated by Eugene V. Koonin, Robert Shafer (nominated by Eugene V. Koonin, and Shamil Sunyaev.

  8. An utilization of liquid sublayer dryout mechanism in predicting critical heat flux under low pressure and low velocity conditions in round tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a theoretical assessment of extensive critical heat flux (CHF) data under low pressure and low velocity (LPLV) conditions, it was found out that lots of CHF data would not be well predicted by a normal annular film dryout (AFD) mechanism, although their flow patterns were identified as annular-mist flow. To predict these CHF data, a liquid sublayer dryout (LSD) mechanism has been newly utilized in developing the mechanistic CHF model based on each identified CHF mechanism. This mechanism postulates that the CHF occurrence is caused by dryout of the thin liquid sublayer resulting from the annular film separation or breaking down due to nucleate boiling in annular film or hydrodynamic fluctuation. In principle, this mechanism well supports the experimental evidence of residual film flow rate at the CHF location, which can not be explained by the AFD mechanism. For a comparative assessment of each mechanism, the CHF model based on the LSD mechanism is developed together with that based on the AFD mechanism. The validation of these models is performed on the 1406 CHF data points ranging over P=0.1-2 MPa, G=4-499 kg m-2 s-1, L/D=4-402. This model validation shows that 1055 and 231 CHF data are predicted within ±30 error bound by the LSD mechanism and the AFD mechanism, respectively. However, some CHF data whose critical qualities are <0.4 or whose tube length-to-diameter ratios are <70 are considerably overestimated by the CHF model based on the LSD mechanism. These overestimations seem to be caused by an inadequate CHF mechanism classification and an insufficient consideration of the flow instability effect on CHF. Further studies for a new classification criterion screening the CHF data affected by flow instabilities as well as a new bubble detachment model for LPLV conditions, are needed to improve the model accuracy.

  9. An utilization of liquid sublayer dryout mechanism in predicting critical heat flux under low pressure and low velocity conditions in round tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang-Won E-mail: jimlee@ns.kopec.co.kr; Baik, Se-Jin; Ro, Tae-Sun

    2000-08-01

    From a theoretical assessment of extensive critical heat flux (CHF) data under low pressure and low velocity (LPLV) conditions, it was found out that lots of CHF data would not be well predicted by a normal annular film dryout (AFD) mechanism, although their flow patterns were identified as annular-mist flow. To predict these CHF data, a liquid sublayer dryout (LSD) mechanism has been newly utilized in developing the mechanistic CHF model based on each identified CHF mechanism. This mechanism postulates that the CHF occurrence is caused by dryout of the thin liquid sublayer resulting from the annular film separation or breaking down due to nucleate boiling in annular film or hydrodynamic fluctuation. In principle, this mechanism well supports the experimental evidence of residual film flow rate at the CHF location, which can not be explained by the AFD mechanism. For a comparative assessment of each mechanism, the CHF model based on the LSD mechanism is developed together with that based on the AFD mechanism. The validation of these models is performed on the 1406 CHF data points ranging over P=0.1-2 MPa, G=4-499 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, L/D=4-402. This model validation shows that 1055 and 231 CHF data are predicted within {+-}30 error bound by the LSD mechanism and the AFD mechanism, respectively. However, some CHF data whose critical qualities are <0.4 or whose tube length-to-diameter ratios are <70 are considerably overestimated by the CHF model based on the LSD mechanism. These overestimations seem to be caused by an inadequate CHF mechanism classification and an insufficient consideration of the flow instability effect on CHF. Further studies for a new classification criterion screening the CHF data affected by flow instabilities as well as a new bubble detachment model for LPLV conditions, are needed to improve the model accuracy.

  10. Critical heat flux enhancement in flow boiling of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiC nanofluids under low pressure and low flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Won; Park, Seong Dae; Kang, Sarah; Kim, Seong Man; Seo, Han; Bang, In Cheol [Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is the thermal limit of a phenomenon in which a phase change occurs during heating (such as bubbles forming on a metal surface used to heat water), which suddenly decreases the heat transfer efficiency, thus causing localized overheating of the heating surface. The enhancement of CHF can increase the safety margins and allow operation at higher heat fluxes; thus, it can increase the economy. A very interesting characteristic of nanofluids is their ability to significantly enhance the CHF. Nanofluids are nanotechnology-based colloidal dispersions engineered through the stable suspension of nanoparticles. All experiments were performed in round tubes with an inner diameter of 0.01041 m and a length of 0.5 m under low pressure and low flow (LPLF) conditions at a fixed inlet temperature using water, 0.01 vol.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid, and SiC/water nanofluid. It was found that the CHF of the nanofluids was enhanced and the CHF of the SiC/water nanofluid was more enhanced than that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid.

  11. Optimum condition of thermal cycle for temper bead weld repair of SQV2A pressure vessel steel. Fundamental investigation in Gleeble simulation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temper bead welding technique is one of the most important repair welding methods for large structures for which post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is difficult to perform. In this study the optimum condition of weld thermal cycles to carry out temper bead weld repair for pressure vessel steel SQV2A are investigated taking interest in the improvement of the characteristics of coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ) re-heated to the temperature between 670degC (Acl temperature) and 837degC (Ac3 temperature). Thermal/mechanical simulator Gleeble 1500 is employed to give specimens repeated thermal cycles. Improvability of the Charpy absorbed energy and the hardness for the thermal cycles is discussed. The temper bead thermal cycles were suggested that the peak temperature in the second thermal cycle should be selected as lower than Acl but near Acl. In this case triple thermal cycles temper bead process are enough to improve the characteristics of CGHAZ. When the other peak temperatures (that is, higher than Acl) in the succeeding thermal cycle are applied to CGHAZ, quadruple or more thermal cycle temper bead process should be applied. (author)

  12. Determining the microwave coupling and operational efficiencies of a microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition reactor under high pressure diamond synthesis operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nad, Shreya; Gu, Yajun; Asmussen, Jes

    2015-07-01

    The microwave coupling efficiency of the 2.45 GHz, microwave plasma assisted diamond synthesis process is investigated by experimentally measuring the performance of a specific single mode excited, internally tuned microwave plasma reactor. Plasma reactor coupling efficiencies (?) > 90% are achieved over the entire 100-260 Torr pressure range and 1.5-2.4 kW input power diamond synthesis regime. When operating at a specific experimental operating condition, small additional internal tuning adjustments can be made to achieve ? > 98%. When the plasma reactor has low empty cavity losses, i.e., the empty cavity quality factor is >1500, then overall microwave discharge coupling efficiencies (?coup) of >94% can be achieved. A large, safe, and efficient experimental operating regime is identified. Both substrate hot spots and the formation of microwave plasmoids are eliminated when operating within this regime. This investigation suggests that both the reactor design and the reactor process operation must be considered when attempting to lower diamond synthesis electrical energy costs while still enabling a very versatile and flexible operation performance.

  13. Non-Complexing Anions for Quantitative Speciation Studies Using Raman Spectroscopy in Fused Silica High-Pressure Optical Cells Under Hydrothermal Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegarth, Lucas M S G A; Alcorn, Christopher; Bissonette, Katherine; Noël, John; Tremaine, Peter R

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports methods for obtaining time-dependent reduced isotropic Raman spectra of aqueous species in quartz capillary high-pressure optical cells under hydrothermal conditions, as a means of determining quantitative speciation in hydrothermal fluids. The methods have been used to determine relative Raman scattering coefficients and to examine the thermal decomposition kinetics of the non-complexing anions bisulfate (HSO4(-)), perchlorate (CIO4(-)), perrhenate (ReO4(-)), and trifluoromethanesulfonate, or "triflate" (CF3SO3(-)) in acidic and neutral solutions at temperatures up to 400°C and 30 MPa. Arrhenius expressions for calculating the thermal decomposition rate constants are also reported. Thermal stabilities in the acidic solutions followed the order HSO4(-) (stable) > ReO4(-) > CIO4(-) > CF3SO3(-), with half-lives (t1/2) > 7 h at 300°C. In neutral solutions, the order was HSO4(-) (stable) > CF3SO3(-) > ReO4(-) > CIO4(-), with t1/2 > 8 h at 350°C. CF3SO3(-) was extremely stable in neutral solutions, with t1/2 > 11 h at 400°C. PMID:26162934

  14. CFD-tool for assessment of the reactor pressure vessel integrity in pressure thermal shock conditions for lifetime evaluation. Qualification phasis and thermal-hydraulic study of a safety injection in a PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrity evaluation methods for nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs) under Pressurised Thermal Shock (PTS) loading are applied by French Utility. They are based on the analysis of the behaviour of relatively shallow cracks under PTS loading conditions due to the emergency cooling during SBLOCA transients. This paper presents the Research and Development program started at Electricity De France (EDF) on the CFD determination of the cooling phenomena of a PWR vessel during a Pressurised Thermal Shock. The numerical results are obtained with the thermal-hydraulic tools N3S and Code Saturne, in combination with the thermal-solid computer code SYRTHES to take into account the coupled effect of heat transfer between the fluid flow and the vessel. We first explain the recent improvement of the thermal-hydraulic analysis with the global definition of the SBLOCA transient and the local analysis in the down comer. Then, the qualification task of the EDF numerical tools is described. In order to reach this purpose, we have investigated several configurations related to an injection of cold water and focused our analysis particularly in the cold leg but also in a the down comer. Two experiment test cases have been studied. A comparison between experiment and numerical results in terms of temperature field is presented. On the whole, the main purpose of the numerical thermal-hydraulic studies is to accurately estimate the distribution of fluid temperature in the down comer and the heat transfer coefficients on the inner RPV surface for a fracture mechanics computation which will subsequently assess the associated RPV safety margins. (author)

  15. Transition pressures and enthalpy barriers for the cd->beta-tin transition in Si and Ge under non-hydrostatic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Gaal-Nagy, Katalin; Strauch, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    We present an ab-initio study of the phase transition cd->beta-tin in Si and Ge under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure. For this purpose we have developed a new method to calculate the influence of non-hydrostatic pressure components not only on the transition pressure but also on the enthalpy barriers between the phases. We find good agreement with available experimental and other theoretical data. The calculations have been performed using the plane-wave pseudopote...

  16. Laser ablation for membrane processing of AlGaN/GaN- and micro structured ferroelectric thin film MEMS and SiC pressure sensors for extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehetner, J.; Vanko, G.; Dzuba, J.; Ryger, I.; Lalinsky, T.; Benkler, Manuel; Lucki, Michal

    2015-05-01

    AlGaN/GaN based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), Schottky diodes and/or resistors have been presented as sensing devices for mechanical or chemical sensors operating in extreme conditions. In addition we investigate ferroelectric thin films for integration into micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS). Creation of appropriate diaphragms and/or cantilevers out of SiC is necessary for further improvement of sensing properties of such MEMS sensors. For example sensitivity of the AlGaN/GaN based MEMS pressure sensor can be modified by membrane thickness. We demonstrated that a 4H-SiC 80?m thick diaphragms can be fabricated much faster with laser ablation than by electrochemical, photochemical or reactive ion etching (RIE). We were able to verify the feasibility of this process by fabrication of micromechanical membrane structures also in bulk 3C-SiC, borosilicate glass, sapphire and Al2O3 ceramic substrates by femtosecond laser (520nm) ablation. On a 350?m thick 4H-SiC substrate we produced an array of 275?m deep and 1000?m to 3000?m of diameter blind holes without damaging the 2?m AlN layer at the back side. In addition we investigated ferroelectric thin films as they can be deposited and micro-patterned by a direct UV-lithography method after the ablation process for a specific membrane design. The risk to harm or damage the function of thin films was eliminated by that means. Some defects in the ablated membranes are also affected by the polarisation of the laser light. Ripple structures oriented perpendicular to the laser polarisation promote creation of pin holes which would perforate a thin membrane. We developed an ablation technique strongly inhibiting formation of ripples and pin poles.

  17. Effect of chloride transients on the corrosion behavior of low-alloy steels in cladding flaws of reactor pressure vessels under oxygenated high-temperature water conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojinov, Martin [University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Sofia (Bulgaria). Dept. of Physical Chemistry; Nowak, Erika; Stanislowski, Michael [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Saario, Timo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). VTT Materials and Building

    2014-04-15

    Strain-induced corrosion cracking in low alloy steels (LAS) has been extensively investigated during the last decades. One finding from recent investigations is the detrimental role of even small amounts of chlorides, which has been shown to increase the cracking susceptibility of LAS. In order to evaluate this finding a demanding research programme has been established. In light water reactor plants, the pressure vessel and in some cases also the piping is made of LAS, covered with welded stainless steel cladding for improved corrosion protection. In structural failure assessments of primary circuits, penetrating cladding flaws have to be assumed, which could locally expose the underlying LAS to the cooling water. Due to the narrow opening of such weld defects the aqueous solution in contact with the underlying LAS would have a different composition from that of the bulk cooling water. In this paper, first detailed calculations of the water chemistry prevailing in such conditions revealed that oxygen concentration decreases rapidly when going from the mouth of the cladding flaw towards the bottom, bringing the redox potential to values, much lower than those typical for oxygenated high temperature water (HTW). Also, chloride was found to enrich into the cladding flaw volume by a factor of x30. The material studied was 20MnMoNi55 used for the reactor coolant line of a German NPP. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that chloride transients up to 50 ppb in the bulk HTW, resulting in an enrichment of chloride in a penetrating cladding flaw up to 1,500 ppb, do not result in any serious consequences for the corrosion of LAS at the bottom of the cladding flaw. (orig.)

  18. Effect of ambient pressure variation on closed loop gas system for India based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilot unit of a closed loop gas mixing and distribution system for the INO project was designed and is being operated with 1.8meters × 1.9meters RPCs for about two years. A number of studies on controlling the flow and optimisation of the gas mixture through the RPC stack were carried out during this period. The gas system essentially measures and attempts to maintain absolute pressure inside the RPC gas volume. During typical Mumbai monsoon seasons, the barometric pressure changes rather rapidly, due to which the gas system fails to maintain the set differential pressure between the ambience and the RPC gas volume. As the safety bubblers on the RPC gas input lines are set to work on fixed pressure differentials, the ambient pressure changes lead to either venting out and thus wasting gas through safety bubblers or over pressuring the RPCs gas volume and thus degrading its performance. The above problem also leads to gas mixture contamination through minute leaks in gas gap. The problem stated above was solved by including the ambient barometric pressure as an input parameter in the closed loop. Using this, it is now possible to maintain any set differential pressure between the ambience and RPC gas volumes between 0 to 20mm of water column, thus always ensuring a positive pressure inside the RPC gas volume with respect to the ambience. This has resulted in improved performance of the gas system by maintaining the constant gas flow and reducing the gas toping up frequency. In this paper, we will highlight the design features and improvements of the closed loop gas system. We will present some of the performance studies and considerations for scaling up the system to be used with the engineering module and then followed by Iron Calorimeter detector (ICAL), which is designed to deploy about 30,000 RPCs of 1.8meters × 1.9 meters in area

  19. Elastic geobarometry for ultra high pressure metamorphic (UHPM) rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchelli, Mattia Luca; Angel, Ross John; Alvaro, Matteo; Nimis, Paolo; Domeneghetti, Chiara Maria; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    Conventional thermo-barometric methods can be challenged in UHPM terraines as the temperatures of deep subduction often exceed the closure temperature of geothermobarometers, and they are also afflicted by the effects of further reactions and re-equilibration on exhumation. Since minerals trapped as inclusions within other host minerals develop residual stresses on exhumation as a result of the differences between the thermo-elastic properties of the host and inclusion phases, their elastic behavior provides an alternative method independent of chemistry and chemical equilibria. The determination of possible entrapment pressures from this residual stress requires the knowledge of the equations of state (EoS) and the mutual elastic relaxation of the host and inclusion phases. So far, even the simplest elastic system of a single inclusion embedded in an isotropic host has not been properly addressed for geological systems. However, this is useful for determining the depths of formation of diamonds, and could also provide constraints on the prograde and retrograde stress-temperature paths of metamorphic assemblages. Previous analyses (i.e. Zhang, 1998) have relied on assumptions that are not physically correct (i.e. linear elasticity and invariant elastic properties of the minerals with P and T, or assume that the host material is completely rigid). We will present a solution to the single-inclusion problem that incorporates non-linear elasticity and can be applied to determine the stress distribution in the host and inclusion that arises from any change in P and T. Our solution shows that the previous calculations of residual inclusion pressures are incorrect in the relaxation term, which arises from the difference in stress at the host/inclusion interface. The general form of our solution relies on the concept of the isomeke, a line in P-T space along which the fractional volume changes of the host and inclusion are the same (Angel et al. 2014a). This allows our solution to be used in combination with any form of equation of state and/or thermal expansion, and is not restricted to linear elasticity or just invertible EoS. Calculations can be performed with Eosfit7c (Angel et al. 2014b). A key result is that non-uniform stress fields are developed within the constrained two-phase system. Such stress fields can give rise to either over- or under-pressure with respect to external lithostatic pressure. This is true for all combinations of host and inclusion minerals and examination of simplified systems can provide some constraints to this problem. Thus, for example, quartz inclusions trapped in the cores of garnet during the prograde path of the Kulet whiteschist (e.g. Parkinson, 2000) experience pressures lower than the external pressure. By peak conditions of ~3.5 GPa and ~780°C, the quartz inclusions are calculated as experiencing a peak pressure of only 1.9 GPa, sufficient to prevent them entering the stability field of coesite. This work was supported by ERC starting grant 307322 to Fabrizio Nestola. Angel R.J., et al. (2014a) Am Mineral, 99(10), 2146-2149. Angel RJ, Gonzalez-Platas J, Alvaro M (2014b) Z Kristallogr, 229, 405-419. Parkinson, CD (2000) Lithos, 52:215-233. Zhang, Y (1998) EPSL, 157:209-222

  20. An experimental study of relative permeability hysteresis, capillary trapping characteristics, and capillary pressure of CO2/brine systems at reservoir conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Suthanthiraraj, Pearlson Prashanth

    We present the results of an extensive experimental study on the effects of hysteresis on permanent capillary trapping and relative permeability of CO2/brine and supercritical (sc)CO2+SO2/brine systems. We performed numerous unsteady- and steady-state drainage and imbibition full-recirculation flow experiments in three different sandstone rock samples, i.e., low and high-permeability Berea, Nugget sandstones, and Madison limestone carbonate rock sample. A state-of-the-art reservoir conditions core-flooding system was used to perform the tests. The core-flooding apparatus included a medical CT scanner to measure in-situ saturations. The scanner was rotated to the horizontal orientation allowing flow tests through vertically-placed core samples with about 3.8 cm diameter and 15 cm length. Both scCO2 /brine and gaseous CO2 (gCO2)/brine fluid systems were studied. The gaseous and supercritical CO2/brine experiments were carried out at 3.46 and 11 MPa back pressures and 20 and 55°C temperatures, respectively. Under the above-mentioned conditions, the gCO2 and scCO2 have 0.081 and 0.393 gr/cm3 densities, respectively. During unsteady-state tests, the samples were first saturated with brine and then flooded with CO2 (drainage) at different maximum flow rates. The drainage process was then followed by a low flow rate (0.375 cm 3/min) imbibition until residual CO2 saturation was achieved. Wide flow rate ranges of 0.25 to 20 cm3/min for scCO2 and 0.125 to 120 cm3min for gCO2 were used to investigate the variation of initial brine saturation (Swi) with maximum CO2 flow rate and variation of trapped CO2 saturation (SCO2r) with Swi. For a given Swi, the trapped scCO2 saturation was less than that of gCO2 in the same sample. This was attributed to brine being less wetting in the presence of scCO2 than in the presence of gCO 2. During the steady-state experiments, after providing of fully-brine saturated core, scCO2 was injected along with brine to find the drainage curve and as a consequence the Swi, then it was followed by the imbibition process to measure SCO2r. We performed different cycles of relative permeability experiments to investigate the effect of hysteresis. The Swi and SCO2r varied from 0.525 to 0.90 and 0.34 to 0.081, respectively. Maximum CO2 and brine relative permeabilities at the end of drainage and imbibition and also variation of brine relative permeability due to post-imbibition CO2 dissolution during unsteady-state experiment were also studied. We co-injected SO2 with CO2 and brine into the Madison limestone core sample. The sample was acquired from the Rock Springs Uplift in southwest Wyoming. The temperature and pressure of the experiments were 60°C and 19.16 MPa, respectively. Each drainage-imbibition cycle was followed by a dissolution process to establish Sw=1. The results showed that about 76% of the initial CO2 was trapped by capillary trapping mechanism at the end of imbibition test. We also investigated the scCO2+SO2/brine capillary pressure versus saturation relationship through performing primary drainage, imbibition, and secondary drainage experiments. The results indicated that the wettability of the core sample might have been altered owing to being in contact with the scCO 2+SO2/brine system. During primary drainage CO2 displaced 52.5% of brine, i.e., Swi = 0.475. The subsequent imbibition led to 0.329 CO2 saturation. For all series of experiments, the ratio of SCO2r to initial CO2 saturation (1- S wi) was found to be much higher for low initial CO2 saturations. This means that greater fractions of injected CO2 can be permanently trapped at higher initial brine saturations. The results illustrated that very promising fractions (about 49 to 83 %) of the initial CO2 saturation can be trapped permanently. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  1. Correlation between the expansion pressure determined under laboratory conditions and selected indices describing the coking properties of coals from the Upper Silesian Coal Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karcz, Aleksander; Winnicka, Grazyna [AGH, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Fuels and Energy

    2004-07-01

    Intensification of coke production in Poland may lead to serious coke-oven operation threats resulting from side effects of expansion pressure. Laboratory-scale tests do not enable a precise prognosis of real expansion pressure. The authors studied 449 samples of ortho-coking (hard) and gaseous-coking (semi-soft) coals from the Upper Silesia Basin used in Polish coke plants. They studied potential relationships between the expansion pressure determined by the Nadziakiewicz-Sonntag test method (PN/G-04522)and the selected coal properties, i.e., volatile matter content Vdaf, reflectance of vitrinite Ro , Arnu-Audibert dilatometric indices, and Sapoznikov indices x and y. Data characterizing the coal rank (volatile matter content Vdaf and reflectance of vitrinite Ro) were related to the corresponding expansion pressure Pmax. Volatile matter content determines the amount of released volatiles which impedes a magnitude of the pressure and also determines a solid product's yield. These phenomena result in shrinkage of semi-coke and coke as well as in creation of a net of fissures that diminish negative effects of the expansion pressure on coke-oven walls. Several authors have found a correlation between volatile matter content Vdaf or reflectance of vitrinite Ro and expansion pressure. Studies here however show no evident/strong correlation. Nevertheless, the results suggest the highest chances for high expansion pressures in coals with the volatile matter contents ranging from 18 to 26%. The performance of coke batteries with wide coke-oven chambers has verified such opinions in practice and confirmed safe coking of coals with the relatively low volatile matter contents. An attempt was made to correlate the Arnu-Audibert dilatometric indices with the expansion pressure. 7 figs.

  2. Transition pressures and enthalpy barriers for the cd->beta-tin transition in Si and Ge under non-hydrostatic conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Gaál-Nagy, K; Gaal-Nagy, Katalin; Strauch, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    We present an ab-initio study of the phase transition cd->beta-tin in Si and Ge under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic pressure. For this purpose we have developed a new method to calculate the influence of non-hydrostatic pressure components not only on the transition pressure but also on the enthalpy barriers between the phases. We find good agreement with available experimental and other theoretical data. The calculations have been performed using the plane-wave pseudopotential approach to the density-functional theory within the local-density and the generalized-gradient approximation implemented in VASP.

  3. Breeding pond selection and movement patterns by eastern spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) in relation to weather and edaphic conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, Cathyrn, H.; Tanner, George, W.

    2004-08-31

    Cathryn H. Greenberg and George W. Tanner. 2004. Breeding pond selection and movement patterns by eastern spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) in relation to weather and edaphic conditions. J. Herp. 38(4):569-577. Abstract: Eastern Spadefoot Toads (Scaphiopus holbrookii) require fish-free, isolated, ephemeral ponds for breeding but otherwise inhabit the surrounding uplands, commonly xeric longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ?wiregrass (Aristida beyrichiana). Hence both pond and upland conditions can potentially affect their breeding biology, and population persistence. Hardwood invasion due to fire suppression in sandhills could alter upland and pond suitability by higher hardwood density and increased transpiration. In this paper we explore breeding and neonatal emigration movements in relation to weather, hydrological conditions of ponds, and surrounding upland matrices. We use 9 years of data from continuous monitoring with drift fences and pitfall traps at 8 ephemeral ponds in 2 upland matrices: regularly-burned, savanna-like sandhills (n = 4), and hardwood-invaded sandhills (n = 4). Neither adult nor neonate captures differed between ponds within the 2 upland matrices, suggesting that they are tolerant of upland heterogeneity created by fire frequency. Explosive breeding occurred during 9 periods and in all seasons; adults were captured rarely otherwise. At a landscape-level rainfall, maximum change in barometric pressure, and an interaction between those 2 variables were significant predictors of explosive breeding. At a pond-level, rainfall, change in pond depth during the month prior to breeding, and days since a pond was last dry were significant predictors of adult captures. Transformation date, rather than weather, was associated with neonatal emigrations, which usually were complete within a week. Movement by first-captured adults and neonates was directional, but adult emigrations were apparently not always toward their origin. Our results suggest that Spadefoot Toads are highly adapted to breeding conditions and upland habitat heterogeneity created by weather patterns and fire frequency in Florida sandhills.

  4. Territorial characterisation considering geo morphological properties of subsoil as well as climatic and meteorological conditions for the evaluation of the effects of radiological nature on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition and origin of the rocky substratum, the permeability of the ground, its degree of humidity and the particle size are the main factors that influence radon concentration in the subsoil and in the water stratums as well as its upward migration. The climatic and meteorological conditions, particularly the moisture, the barometric pressure and the temperature, can influence more or less directly the underground emanation and diffusion properties of radon and thoron giving rise to short-term modifications of radiological nature in the subsoil, closely related to the presence of these elements. The great concentration of some radioisotopes, in some particular areas, can also induce high dose rates caused by the radiation coming from emergent rocks, due for instance to activities related to building works, with consequent possible exposure of the personnel involved in underground excavations. In such situations it is possible to carry out systematical radiometric measurements, which provide instantaneous and time integrated data, using fixed or movable instrumentation. The stratigraphical structure of the subsoil and the related variations of lithological nature as well as the lack of homogeneity in the land, due also to the unevenness of the ground outline and to the presence of fault planes, increase considerably the complexity of analytical evaluations based upon the chemical and physical characteristics of the subsoil and upon the meteorological and climatic properties

  5. Electrical resistivity of YbRh2Si2 and EuT2Ge2 (T=Co,Cu) at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation addresses the effect that pressure, p, and temperature, T, have on 4f states of the rare-earth elements in the isostructural YbRh2Si2, EuCo2Ge2, and EuCu2Ge2 compounds. Upon applying pressure the volume of the unit cell reduces, enforcing either the enhancement of the hybridization of the 4f localized electrons with the ligand or a change in the valence state of the rare-earth ions. Here, we probe the effect of a pressure-induced lattice contraction on these system by means of electrical-resistivity measurements, ?(T), from room temperature down to 100 mK. (orig.)

  6. Thermal-hydraulic instability of the natural circulation BWR. 6. Occurrence condition and mechanism of the instability at the higher system pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate thermal-hydraulic instabilities at the higher system pressure ranging from 1.0 to 7.2 MPa in a boiling natural circulation loop with a chimney. A test facility used in this experiments was designed and constructed to have non-dimensional values which are nearly equal to those of natural circulation BWR flow dynamics. Stability maps in reference to the system pressure, the channel inlet subcooling, and heat flux are presented. This instability mechanism is classified into the density wave oscillations that oscillation period is one to two times the time required for a bubble generated in the channel to travel through the chimney, and different from the flashing induced instability at the lower system pressure. The difference from other phenomena such as flow pattern transient oscillations and natural circulation oscillations are discussed by investigating the transient flow pattern and the response of momentum energy to driving force of the circulation. (author)

  7. Changes in entrapped gas content and hydraulic conductivity with pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinas, Maricris; Roy, James W; Smith, James E

    2013-01-01

    Water table fluctuations continuously introduce entrapped air bubbles into the otherwise saturated capillary fringe and groundwater zone, which reduces the effective (quasi-saturated) hydraulic conductivity, K(quasi), thus impacting groundwater flow, aquifer recharge and solute and contaminant transport. These entrapped gases will be susceptible to compression or expansion with changes in water pressure, as would be expected with water table (and barometric pressure) fluctuations. Here we undertake laboratory experiments using sand-packed columns to quantify the effect of water table changes of up to 250 cm on the entrapped gas content and the quasi-saturated hydraulic conductivity, and discuss our ability to account for these mechanisms in ground water models. Initial entrapped air contents ranged between 0.080 and 0.158, with a corresponding K(quasi) ranging between 2 and 6 times lower compared to the K(s) value. The application of 250 cm of water pressure caused an 18% to 26% reduction in the entrapped air content, resulting in an increase in K(quasi) by 1.16 to 1.57 times compared to its initial (0 cm water pressure) value. The change in entrapped air content measured at pressure step intervals of 50 cm, was essentially linear, and could be modeled according to the ideal gas law. Meanwhile, the changes in K(quasi) with compression-expansion of the bubbles because of pressure changes could be adequately captured with several current hydraulic conductivity models. PMID:22320934

  8. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: A new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.J.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Yang, M.Z.

    2006-01-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition. ?? 2006 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  9. Assessment of gas production and pressure conditions of fibre reinforced concrete containers under disposal due to microbial degradation and radiolysis of cellulose. The mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to develop a mathematical model for evaluation of rate of formation of gaseous products of radiolytic and microbial decomposition of cellulose and pressure dependence in fibre reinforced concrete containers contained radioactive wastes at their long-time disposal. (authors)

  10. A model for the effective diffusion of gas or the vapor phase in a fractured media unsaturated zone driven by periodic atmospheric pressure fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vold, E.L.

    1997-03-01

    There is evidence for migration of tritiated water vapor through the tuff in the unsaturated zone from the buried disposal shafts located on a narrow mesa top at Area G, Los Alamos, NM. Field data are consistent with an effective in-situ vapor phase diffusion coefficient of 1.5x10{sup {minus}3} m{sup s}/s, or a factor of 60 greater than the binary diffusion coefficient for water vapor in air. A model is derived to explain this observation of anomolously large diffusion, which relates an effective vapor or gas phase diffusion coefficient in the fractured porous media to the subsurface propagation of atmospheric pressure fluctuations (barometric pumping). The near surface (unattenuated) diffusion coefficient is independent of mode period under the simplified assumptions of a complete {open_quote}mixing mechanism{close_quote} for the effective diffusion process. The unattenuated effective diffusion driven by this barometric pumping is proportional to an average media permeability times the sum of the square of pressure mode amplitudes, while the attenuation length is proportional to the squarer root of the product of permeability times mode period. There is evidence that the permeability needed to evaluate the pressure attenuation length is the in-situ value, approximately that of the matrix. The diffusion which results using Area G parameter values is negligible in the matrix but becomes large at the effective permeability of the fractured tuff matrix. The effective diffusion coefficient predicted by this model, due to pressure fluctuations and the observed fracture characteristics, is in good agreement with the observed in-situ diffusion coefficient for tritium field measurements. It is concluded that barometric pumping in combination with the enhanced permeability of the fractured media is a likely candidate to account for the observed in-field migration of vapor in the near surface unsaturated zone at Area G.

  11. Biogas barometer; Le barometre biogaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-12-15

    This annual evaluation is a synthesis of works published in 2006. Comparisons are presented between the wind power performances and European Commission White Paper and Biomass action plan objectives. The United Kingdom is the leading european country in terms of production, but is being challenged more and more by Germany, which markedly increased its production in 2005. France is only classed 5. in Europe in spite of a valorisable potential. (A.L.B.)

  12. Bio fuels barometer; Barometre biocarburants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2009-07-15

    With almost 10 million tons of oil equivalent, biofuels consumption in 2008 represented a 3,3% share of the total consumption of fuels devoted to transport in the European Union. The rate of progression of the sector marked time however with growth of 28,5% between 2007 and 2008 compared to 45,7% between 2006 and 2007. Certain EU countries will have to redouble efforts in the next two years to come into line with the European biofuels directive which aims for an incorporation rate of 5,75% by 2010.

  13. Effects of weather conditions on emergency ambulance calls for acute coronary syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vencloviene, Jone; Babarskiene, Ruta; Dobozinskas, Paulius; Siurkaite, Viktorija

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between weather conditions and daily emergency ambulance calls for acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The study included data on 3631 patients who called the ambulance for chest pain and were admitted to the department of cardiology as patients with ACS. We investigated the effect of daily air temperature ( T), barometric pressure (BP), relative humidity, and wind speed (WS) to detect the risk areas for low and high daily volume (DV) of emergency calls. We used the classification and regression tree method as well as cluster analysis. The clusters were created by applying the k-means cluster algorithm using the standardized daily weather variables. The analysis was performed separately during cold (October-April) and warm (May-September) seasons. During the cold period, the greatest DV was observed on days of low T during the 3-day sequence, on cold and windy days, and on days of low BP and high WS during the 3-day sequence; low DV was associated with high BP and decreased WS on the previous day. During June-September, a lower DV was associated with low BP, windless days, and high BP and low WS during the 3-day sequence. During the warm period, the greatest DV was associated with increased BP and changing WS during the 3-day sequence. These results suggest that daily T, BP, and WS on the day of the ambulance call and on the two previous days may be prognostic variables for the risk of ACS.

  14. Intraosseous phlebography, intraosseous pressure measurements and sup(99m)Tc-polyphosphate scintigraphy in patients with various painful conditions in the hip and knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-five patients with pain in the knee or hip were examined by means of bilateral intraosseous phlebography, intraosseous pressure measurements and sup(99m) technetium polyphosphate scintigraphy. All patients with typical rest pain - either due to osteoarthritis or to the intraosseous engorgement-pain syndrome - showed venous statis and increased pressure in the bone marrow near the painful joint and abnormally high uptake of the radiotracer. In patients with other types of pain this correlation was absent. The results indicate that sup(99m)technetium polyphosphate scintigraphy can be used as a screening method in the diagnosis of the intraosseous engorgement-pain syndrome in patients with a typical history. However, increased isotope uptake in a joint region may be due to a variety of other causes. The identical findings with all three methods of investigation in patients with the intraosseous engorgement-pain syndrome and osteoarthritis suggest a common pathomechanism. (author)

  15. Bridging the pressure gap: In situ atomic-level investigations of model platinum catalyst surfaces under reaction conditions by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, B.J.

    1994-05-01

    Results of this thesis show that STM measurements can provide information about the surfaces and their adsorbates. Stability of Pt(110) under high pressures of H2, O2, and CO was studied (Chap. 4). In situ UHV and high vacuum experiments were carried out for sulfur on Pt(111) (Chap.5). STM studies of CO/S/Pt(111) in high CO pressures showed that the Pt substrate undergoes a stacking-fault-domain reconstruction involving periodic transitions from fcc to hcp stacking of top-layer atoms (Chap.6). In Chap.7, the stability of propylene on Pt(111) and the decomposition products were studied in situ with the HPSTM. Finally, in Chap.8, results are presented which show how the Pt tip of the HPSTM was used to locally rehydrogenate and oxidize carbonaceous clusters deposited on the Pt(111) surface; the Pt tip acted as a catalyst after activation by short voltage pulses.

  16. Study of Behavior of Sesame (Sesamum Indicum L.) to Relative Turgidity, Diffusion Pressure Deficit and Transpiration Intensity under Arid Conditions of Western Rajasthan

    OpenAIRE

    Pankaj Swami; Shamindra Saxena; Suman Lata Tripathi

    2010-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted during kharif season of 2008 and 2009 (from august to october) to investigatethe behavior of crop plant Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) to RT (Relative turgidity), DPD (Diffusion pressuredeficit) and TI (Transpiration intensity). The plant species (Sesamum indicum L.) investigated has been found tobehave differentially with respect to relative turgidity, Diffusion pressure deficit and Transpiration intensityduring different hours of day and at different stages Viz...

  17. Effect of Ratio of Jet Area to Total Area and of Pressure Ratio on Lift Augmentation of Annular Jets in Ground Effect Under Static Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Kenneth W.; Otis, James H., Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to determine the effects of the ratio of jet area to total area and of the pressure ratio on the lift-augmentation characteristics of annular jets in ground effect. The investigation was made over an area-ratio range of 1.00 to 0.02 and a pressure-ratio range of about 1.04 to 1.95. Several configurations with center jets were tested through an angle-of-attack range to determine the pitching-moment characteristics. The tests were conducted in a static test room with the use of the compressed-air facilities. The results show that lift augmentation increases somewhat as the area ratio is reduced to about 0.10, below which it deteriorates due to thin jet mixing. The effect of pressure ratio on lift was negligible for the area-ratio range investigated. Calculations of the lift per air horsepower for a given base loading indicate that the greatest lift per air horsepower occurs at area ratios above 0.10, where the greatest lift augmentation occurs. The data show that annular-Jet vehicles are unstable at ratios of height above ground to nozzle diameter above about 0.10. The stability of the annular-jet vehicle can be improved by the use of large center jets. Base compartments also reduces the unstable moment.

  18. Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may form. Pressure sores are also called bedsores, pressure ulcers and decubitus ulcers. Symptoms What are the symptoms of a ... put in a vein) or orally (by mouth). Prevention How can pressure sores be prevented? The most ...

  19. Nar is the dominant dissimilatory nitrate reductase under high pressure conditions in the deep-sea denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. MT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Yuji; Sinmura, Yui; Ishizaka, Hikari; Midorikawa, Ryota; Kawamoto, Jun; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Kato, Chiaki; Horikoshi, Koki; Tamegai, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, relative nitrate reductase activities of the soluble and membrane fractions of MT-1 grown anaerobically under atmospheric pressure in the presence of 30 mM NaNO3 were measured. In the analyses, the diazocoupling method was employed to determine the concentration of nitrite formed. Follow-up recent experiments have revealed that formed coupling compound lose its color rapidly, but this instability is unusual. The authors recognized the possibility that they failed to quantify the accurate concentration of nitrite formed and agree the additional in-depth analyses should be performed. Thus, the JGAM editorial board agreed to retract the paper. PMID:26377135

  20. Effects of line pressure stress, magnetic properties and test conditions on magnetic flux leakage signals. Annual report, May 1995-April 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atherton, D.L.; Mandal, K.; Hauge, C.; Krause, T.W.; Dufour, D.

    1996-05-01

    Stress, such as produced by line pressure or bending, can cause changes of up to 80% in the amplitude of Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) signals. Corrections should therefore be made to high resolution MFL data to enable defect sizes to be deduced accurately. The effects are complex and depend on the magnetic properties of the particular line pipe. Tests of the effects of bulk stress on MFL signals using samples of GRI PSF flow loop pipe show that the effects depend on the direction of the magnetizing field with respect to the applied stress direction, whether near or far side defects are being examined and the flux density in the pipe wall.

  1. An investigation of the heat transfer and static pressure on the over-tip casing wall of an axial turbine operating at engine representative flow conditions. (I). Time-mean results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The over-tip casing of the high-pressure turbine in a modern gas turbine engine is subjected to strong convective heat transfer that can lead to thermally induced failure (burnout) of this component. However, the complicated flow physics in this region is dominated by the close proximity of the moving turbine blades, which gives rise to significant temporal variations at the blade-passing frequency. The understanding of the physical processes that control the casing metal temperature is still limited and this fact has significant implications for the turbine design strategy. A series of experiments has been performed that seeks to address some of these important issues. This article reports the measurements of time-mean heat transfer and time-mean static pressure that have been made on the over-tip casing of a transonic axial-flow turbine operating at flow conditions that are representative of those found in modern gas turbine engines. Time-resolved measurements of these flow variables (that reveal the details of the blade-tip/casing interaction physics) are presented in a companion paper. The nozzle guide vane exit flow conditions in these experiments were a Mach number of 0.93 and a Reynolds number of 2.7 x 106 based on nozzle guide vane mid-height axial chord. The axial and circumferential distributions of heat transfer rate, adiabatic wall temperature, Nusselt number and static pressure are presented. The data reveal large axial variations in the wall heat flux and adiabatic wall temperature that are shown to be primarily associated with the reduction in flow stagnation temperature through the blade row. The heat flux falls by a factor of 6 (from 120 to 20 kW/m2). In contrast, the Nusselt number falls by just 36% between the rotor inlet plane and 80% rotor axial chord; additionally, this drop is near to linear from 20% to 80% rotor axial chord. The circumferential variations in heat transfer rate are small, implying that the nozzle guide vanes do not produce a strong variation in casing boundary layer properties in the region measured. The casing static pressure measurements follow trends that can be expected from the blade loading distribution, with maximum values immediately upstream of the rotor inlet plane, and then a decreasing trend with axial position as the flow is turned and accelerated in the relative frame of reference. The time-mean static pressure measurements on the casing wall also reveal distinct circumferential variations that are small in comparison to the large pressure gradient in the axial direction

  2. Blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure of 115 millimeters of mercury a diastolic pressure of 70 millimeters of mercury (stated as "115 over 70"). If an individual were to have a consistent blood pressure reading of 140 over 90, he would ...

  3. Design of an R.F. Excited Helium Neon Visible Gas Laser and Study of the Optimal Conditions for Gas Mixtures and Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Juyal

    1972-10-01

    Full Text Available Design of a continuous were helium-neon visible gas laser has been described. Brewster angle window of fused quartz and external concave mirrors of B.S.C. glass have been used in the fabrication of resonant cavity. An RF oscillator having variable frequency in the range of 20-30 MHz and an out-put power of about 50 watts served as excitation source. Different mixture ratios of He and Ne have been tried and for each ratio power output was measured versus total pressure inside the discharge tube keeping cavity length constant. The optimum power output has been obtained for 5:1 mixture at 1.4 torr for a tube of length 55 cm and internal diameter 0.5 cm. Laser action at 1.53 meu has been achieved.`

  4. Pressure locking test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, open-quotes Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.close quotes Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions

  5. Pressure locking test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  6. Experimental investigations of uncovered-bundle heat transfer and two-phase mixture-level swell under high-pressure low heat-flux conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are reported from a series of uncovered-bundle heat transfer and mixture-level swell tests. Experimental testing was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the Thermal Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF). The THTF is an electrically heated bundle test loop configured to produce conditions similar to those in a small-break loss-of-coolant accident. The objective of heat transfer testing was to acquire heat transfer coefficients and fluid conditions in a partially uncovered bundle. Testing was performed in a quasi-steady-state mode with the heated core 30 to 40% uncovered. Linear heat rates varied from 0.32 to 2.22 kW/m.rod (0.1 to 0.68 kW/ft.rod). Under these conditions peak clad temperatures in excess of 1050 K (14300F) were observed, and total heat transfer coefficients ranged from 0.0045 to 0.037 W/cm2.K (8 to 65 Btu/h.ft2.0F). Spacer grids were observed to enhance heat transfer at, and downstream of, the grid. Radiation heat transfer was calculated to account for as much as 65% of total heat transfer in low-flow tests

  7. A multipurpose ultra-high vacuum-compatible chamber for in situ X-ray surface scattering studies over a wide range of temperature and pressure environment conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, P.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Heyman, C.; Esteban-Betegón, F.; Castro, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A low/high temperature (60-1000K) and pressure (10-10-3x103 mbar) "baby chamber", specially adapted to the grazing-incidence X-ray scattering station, has been designed, developed and installed at the Spanish CRG BM25 SpLine beamline at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The chamber has a cylindrical form with 100 mm of diameter, built on a 360° beryllium nipple of 150 mm height. The UHV equipment and a turbo pump are located on the upper part of the chamber to leave a wide solid angle for exploring reciprocal space. The chamber features 4 CF16 and 5 CF40 ports for electrical feed through and leak valves, ion gun, etc. The heat exchanger is a customized compact LN2 (or LHe) continuous flow cryostat. The sample is mounted on a Mo support on the heat exchanger, which has in the back side a BORALECTRIC® Heater Elements. Experiments of surfaces/interfaces/ multilayer materials, thin films or single crystals in a huge variety of environments can be performed, also in situ studies of growth or evolution of the samples. Data measurement can be collected with a punctual and a bi-dimensional detector, being possible to simultaneously use them.

  8. A multipurpose ultra-high vacuum-compatible chamber for in situ X-ray surface scattering studies over a wide range of temperature and pressure environment conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low/high temperature (60-1000K) and pressure (10?10?3x103 mbar) baby chamber, specially adapted to the grazing-incidence X-ray scattering station, has been designed, developed and installed at the Spanish CRG BM25 SpLine beamline at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The chamber has a cylindrical form with 100 mm of diameter, built on a 360° beryllium nipple of 150 mm height. The UHV equipment and a turbo pump are located on the upper part of the chamber to leave a wide solid angle for exploring reciprocal space. The chamber features 4 CF16 and 5 CF40 ports for electrical feed through and leak valves, ion gun, etc. The heat exchanger is a customized compact LN2 (or LHe) continuous flow cryostat. The sample is mounted on a Mo support on the heat exchanger, which has in the back side a BORALECTRIC® Heater Elements. Experiments of surfaces/interfaces/ multilayer materials, thin films or single crystals in a huge variety of environments can be performed, also in situ studies of growth or evolution of the samples. Data measurement can be collected with a punctual and a bi-dimensional detector, being possible to simultaneously use them.

  9. Dismantling reactor pressure vessel internals at the Stade nuclear power station. Another milestone reached on the way to green field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November 2003, the Stade nuclear power station (KKS) of E.ON Kernkraft GmbH was shut down for economic reasons. In its history of 31 years of operation up to that point in time KKS generated 152,460,660 MWh (gross) of electricity. From 1984 on, the reactor in addition supplied district heat to an adjacent saltworks. In early 2007 E.ON Kernkraftwerk GmbH, in the course of dismantling phase III, commissioned Areva NP to disassemble and package the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals. Within 17 months Areva did the entire engineering for this project, which was demanding in many respects. Over that period of time, detailed planning, drafting and licensing of the documents, design and manufacturing of the machines and facilities as well as their qualification, and personnel training were completed. Activities on site began in May 2008. Twelve months later, the RPV internals had been dismantled. This contractual milestone was reached even ahead of time. The shielding measures taken, ongoing optimization throughout the project phase, and the possibility to do without a containment allowed the estimated collective dose for these activities to be clearly underrun. The whole project was completed in late August 2009, and disassembly and packaging ready for repository storage of the RPV internals were carried out in a minimum of time. (orig.)

  10. Study on flow induced vibration evaluation for a large scale JSFR piping. (3) Pressure fluctuation characteristics in 1/3 scale hot-leg piping experiments under deflected inflow conditions due to UIS structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, flow-induced vibration experiments were performed using a test facility that simulates the hot-leg (HL) piping with a 1/3-scale model to investigate flow patterns and fluctuating pressures on the pipe wall. The complicated flow in the upper plenum of the reactor vessel goes into the HL piping. One of the flows entering the HL which could significantly influence a flow-induced vibration is deflected flow. This paper describes the 1/3-scale experimental results under the deflected-flow conditions at the inlet of the HL. To simulate the flow conditions, a part of an upper internal structure was modeled in the test facility to generate deflected flow. The parameters were an intensity of deflected flow controlled by the opening ratio of the no.1 baffle plate of the upper internal structure. Quantitative investigation was conducted in terms of the influence of the deflected flow on the size of the flow separation, the flow velocity distribution, and intensity of fluctuating pressure on the pipe wall. It could be observed that the region of the flow separation was deformed by the deflect flow. In the case of the 0% opening, the tendency of the velocity distribution near the flow separation and the shape of flow separation differ from those in the other cases of opening. (author)

  11. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lee, E-mail: leeli@mail.hust.edu.cn; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, HuaZhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  12. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  13. Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... She'd just had a big dose of peer pressure. Who Are Your Peers? When you were a ... adults — parents, teachers, guidance counselors, etc. — talk about peer pressure more than the benefits of belonging to a ...

  14. Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They commonly ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which are ...

  15. Pressure ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... area forms a blister, then an open sore Pressure sores most commonly occur on the Buttocks Elbow Hips Heels Ankles Shoulders Back Back of head Pressure sores categorized as deep tissue injury may be purple ...

  16. Examination of metal condition of the reactor pressure vessel and the core barrel at Rostov NPP unit 1 by nondestructive magnetic-hardness testing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surveillance programs of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials are necessary to assert the changes in the mechanical properties. The program can be achieved through 2 complementary ways: 1) mechanical tests on surveillance specimens irradiated inside the reactor vessel and 2) the use of specimen-free non-destructive methods that require in-site periodic routine inspection campaigns. This article is dedicated to the monitoring of mechanical properties of RPV steels through 2 specimen-free methods, one based on kinetic hardness and the other on magnetic structure analysis. The first method consists in refunding the complete diagram of penetration of a ball indentor into the investigated material, the adequate mathematical processing allows to draw standard diagram of mono-axial tension and to define strength characteristics. This method has been improved through the continuous registration of the indentation process, performed with the use of a 3-coordinates diagram: on-indentor loading, the material's surface indentation depth, and a current indentation velocity. Possessing an integral form, the diagram provides information about physical-mechanical properties of materials. Kinetic hardness method, however is unacceptable for monitoring clad RPV materials from PWR, as the presence of a stainless steel austenitic cladding whose thickness oscillates between 6-8 mm, closes access to investigated material. Magnetic structure analysis relies on a correlation between magnetic properties of RPV steels due to their ferromagnetic nature. Different comparisons between measured values of the coercive force and changes in yield stress are discussed. A correlation between ductile to brittle transition temperature and coercive force is shown for specimen of metal from welded joints. The measuring device (Magnetest) has been optimized for monitoring metal properties through a layer of austenitic cladding up to 10 mm thick

  17. Upgrading of existing NPPs with 440 and 1000 MW WWER type pressurized water reactors for severe external loading conditions. Proceedings. Working material. V. 1, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Seminar was intended to provide the opportunity for the exchange of updated information concerning the state-of-the-art related to structural safety of the WWER 440 and 1000 MW nuclear power plants operating or under construction in the Russian Federation and several Eastern European countries. Codes and standards, design assumptions, seismic upgrading and requalification activities, recent verification by experimental methods as well as the corresponding reanalysis and reevaluation procedures were included in the scope. Also presented and discussed were the results of recent studies of typical structures and components under seismic loading. The Seminar was divided into five working sessions. Each session consisted of several presentations by invited speakers and extensive discussions. The topic of discussions involved the following: standards used during design phase, input load definitions and criteria, evaluation of as-built conditions and walk down information, site-specific dynamic response of structures based on recent studies and evaluation of results, capacity evaluations of components and systems based on updated acceptance criteria and strengthening concepts, functional qualification of active mechanical and electrical components and systems

  18. Management of the coastal biophysical environment in tropical Queensland under conditions of heavy developmental pressure: the case of tourist resorts and acid sulphate soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Erfurt-Haupt

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available La côte tropicale du Queensland est confrontée à un accroissement rapide de la population. Les fortes pressions anthropiques pèsent sur le milieu biophysique, qui comprend notamment a plus grande île de sable du monde, un site classé Patrimoine de l’Humanité, Port Hinchinbrook et Fraser Island.  Malgré l’existence d’une législation nationale orientée vers la préservation de l’environnement, il est manifeste que peu d’attention est accordée aux effets à long terme des sites touristiques et du développement de l’urbanisation sur ces franges côtières sensibles. L’aspect massif des flux de visiteurs et leurs impacts sur le milieu naturel a été identifié comme un sujet d’inquiétude particulier dans certaines régions. La connaissance des impacts sur la géomorphologie côtière souterraine est très réduite et les choix de développement sont souvent faits dans l’ignorance ou au mépris de la présence répandue de terrains de sulfate d’acide dans ce milieu côtier. Des sols réactifs comme ceux-là peuvent affecter, et affectent, grandement les résultats géophysiques d’un développement lorsqu’ils sont connus. Des études de cas sur le problème des sols de sulfate d’acide suggèrent qu’une partie de la solution pour le gouvernement de l’Etat du Queensland est d’imposer des normes obligatoires pour le développement du tourisme dans la zone côtière.The tropical coast of Queensland, Australia is experiencing rapid population and tourism growth. Heavy development pressure is being placed on the biophysical environment, which includes the largest sand island in the world (World Heritage listed, Fraser Island. Despite the existence of State planning legislation oriented towards environmental sustainability, it is apparent that little, if any, regard is being paid to the long-term effects of resort and canal-estate development on the underlying biophysical environment of the coast and islands.  While the remarkable surface features of the tropical coastal environment such as the surf beaches, the unique dune lakes, and the coastal vegetation, as well as the prolific wildlife, are used as selling points for new settlement and above all tourism, little is known or apparently of major concern with respect to the long term environmental impact of coastal development. While the crowding effect of large numbers of visitors and their impact on the natural environment - through significant degradation, site hardening or lack of proper on-site management – has been identified as a particular problem in certain areas, there is little knowledge of impacts on the underlying coastal geomorphology. In particular, developmental choices are often made in ignorance of, or disregard of, the widespread existence of tropical acid sulfate soils in that coastal environment. Reactive soils such as these can, and do, greatly affect the biophysical outcomes of a development if they are exposed. This paper documents such impacts in the form of a case study of the acid sulfate soil problem in relation to the development of tourist resorts, and suggests that part of the solution is for the State Government to insist on enforceable standards relating to their development for tourism in the coastal zone. These would reduce the use by many resort owners of fancy golf course developments as an environmental cover up to make it look as if they put a lot of effort into protecting the environment ….

  19. Proceedings of the twenty-fourth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; Reactor vessel lower head integrity; Evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Fourth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 21--23, 1996. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, Norway, Russia and United Kingdom. This volume is divided into the following sections: reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; reactor vessel lower head integrity; and evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  20. Pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pressure sensor will be used for pressure measurement in high-temperature liquids, in particular for Na or K during fast breeder operation. It has a soft membrane which is unshielded at the pressure medium side and can actuate a rigid membrane an the other side by means of a botton element. The displacement of the rigid membrane is proportional to the difference between the liquid pressure and a reference gas pressure. The displacement can be measured by means of a capacity displacement measuring instrument, using a fixed plate as reference. Absolute calibration is performed by admitting pressurized gas into the zone between the membranes and into the zone between rigid membrane and fixed plate. The coupling between the soft and the rigid membrane is thus interrupted. (DG)

  1. Pressure transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An isolator or the like for nuclear power stations employed to separate two fluids or two pressures or other sensing instruments from the containment or elsewhere includes first and second fluid filled bellows having a fluid connection in between and which together provide a pressure transfer mechanism. Excessive travel of the bellows is prevented by overrange valves, one of which closes the pathway on application of high pressure. (author)

  2. Olmesartan vs ramipril in the treatment of hypertension and associated clinical conditions in the elderly: a reanalysis of two large double blind, randomized studies at the light of the most recent blood pressure targets recommended by guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omboni S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Omboni,1 Ettore Malacco,2 Jean-Michel Mallion,3 Massimo Volpe4,5 1Clinical Research Unit, Italian Institute of Telemedicine, Solbiate Arno, Varese, Italy; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Ospedale L Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; 3Cardiology and Arterial Hypertension, CHU de Grenoble, Grenoble, France; 4Division of Cardiology, II Faculty of Medicine, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy; 5IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Isernia, Italy Abstract: In this paper, we present the results of a reanalysis of the data of two large randomized, double-blind, parallel group studies with a similar design, comparing the efficacy of an angiotensin-receptor blocker (olmesartan medoxomil with that of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ramipril, by applying two different blood pressure targets recently recommended by hypertension guidelines for all patients, irrespective of the presence of diabetes (<140/90 mmHg, and for elderly hypertensive patients (<150/90 mmHg. The efficacy of olmesartan was not negatively affected by age, sex, hypertension type, diabetes status or other concomitant clinical conditions, or cardiovascular risk factors. In most cases, olmesartan provided better blood pressure control than ramipril. Olmesartan was significantly more effective than ramipril in male patients, in younger patients (aged 65–69 years, in those with metabolic syndrome, obesity, dyslipidemia, preserved renal function, diastolic ± systolic hypertension, and, in general, in patients with a high or very high cardiovascular risk. Interestingly, patients previously untreated or treated with two or more antihypertensive drugs showed a significantly larger response with olmesartan than with ramipril. Thus, our results confirm the good efficacy of olmesartan in elderly hypertensives even when new blood pressure targets for antihypertensive treatment are considered. Such results may be relevant for the clinical practice, providing some hint on the possible different response of elderly hypertensive patients to two different drugs acting on the renin–angiotensin system, when patients are targeted according to the blood pressure levels recommended by recent hypertension guidelines. Keywords: arterial hypertension, elderly, guidelines, olmesartan medoxomil, ramipril

  3. Pressure Core Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  4. Corrosion test of Fugen pressure tube (Zr-2.5wt%Nb alloy) under the sub-surface disposal environment. Examination of processable method for specimen and confirmation of optimal test conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is making preparations for the sub-surface disposal of own low level radioactive wastes. In order to carry out the disposal, it is necessary to confirm the safety of the disposal. For activated metal wastes which are the reactor structural materials classified as one of the subject wastes, the rate of nuclide elution under the disposal environment is an important parameter in evaluating the safety. According to the standard of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) on the sub-surface disposal system, nuclides in a metal matrix are shown to be released with corrosion congruently. However, the corrosion rate under the disposal environment is not reported about Zr-2.5wt%Nb alloy, which is used in the pressure tube of Fugen(ATR) and thus one of the activated metal wastes. We planned the gas-accumulating type corrosion test on Zr-2.5wt%Nb alloy in order to obtain long-term corrosion rate data under the low oxygen and alkaline conditions assuming the disposal environment. Before starting the test, we examined the specimen machining method and confirmed the corrosion test conditions. (author)

  5. Critical CRBR core pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conditions are detailed under which gas pressure will cause or initiate failure in the structural containment of the fuel core. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is the prototype structure. Two general classes of problems have been studied, representing two entirely distinct configurations of containment failure. The first model determines the minimum pressure to lift a portion or the entire core from its containment. The second model estimates the critical pressure above which the fuel rods interior to the hexagonal fuel can warp, leading to blockage of the gas passages. Such blockage might cause further buildup of the gas pressure to a level causing the failure of the fuel rod containment in the hexagonal fuel container

  6. Large diamonds grown at high pressure conditions

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    H., Kanda.

    Full Text Available A technique has been established to grow large diamonds up to 2 cm. The crystals are bulky polyhedron with yellow, blue, green or brown color as well as colorless, which depend on impurities. The impurities incorporated into the diamond are limited, i.e. nitrogen, boron, nickel, cobalt, silicon and [...] phosphorus.

  7. Cochlear and cerebrospinal fluid pressure: their inter-relationship and control mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchbanks, R J; Reid, A

    1990-06-01

    The patency of the cochlear aqueduct is a key factor in intra-cochlear hydromechanics. If patent, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) provides the reference pressure for the perilymph and also to a large extent the endolymph, since Reissner's membrane can only withstand a relatively small pressure differential. The aqueduct often becomes sealed as a natural process of ageing. In this instance the reference pressure is from a source, its position unknown, within the boundaries of the cochlea itself. Relatively large and rapid changes in the cerebrospinal fluid pressure may result from everyday events such as coughing (ca. 175 mm saline) and sneezing (ca. 250 mm saline). The resistive nature of the cochlear aqueduct and the mechanical compliance of the cochlear windows are probably important factors in limiting the amount of stress, and therefore possible damage, which may occur to the cochlea and cochlear windows for a given pressure change within the CSF system. A narrow aqueduct and compliant cochlear windows reduce the risk of structural damage. In practice, this should mean that the risk of structural damage will be increased by any process which reduces the compliance of one or both of the cochlear windows, for example, extremes of middle ear pressure perhaps brought about by Eustachian tube dysfunction or rapid barometric pressure changes. Techniques are now available which provide non-invasive indirect measures of perilymphatic pressure and CSF-perilymphatic pressure transfer. The tympanic membrane displacement measurement technique has been used to provide reliable measures of perilymphatic pressure and CSF-perilymphatic pressure transfer on an individual subject basis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2194603

  8. Pressure Points: Preventing and Controlling Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Pressure Points: Preventing and Controlling Hypertension Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... and the millions more facing hypertension can begin controlling their conditions. "Don't wait until your pressure ...

  9. Pressure sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  10. Carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity, and barometric pressure collected via surface underway survey onboard Cape Hatteras in the South Atlantic Bight from January 6, 2005 to May 27, 2006 (NODC Accession 0051983)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The survey was carried out on six cruises: 5-16 January 2005, 19-30 March 2005, 27 July - 5 August 2005, 7-17 October 2005, 16-21 December 2005, and 17-27 May 2006....

  11. Carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity, and barometric pressure collected via surface underway survey from R/V McArthur II in the eastern North and South Pacific from July 30, 2006 to July 26, 2007 (NODC Accession 0084052)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0084052 includes underway chemical, meteorological, and physical data collected from MCARTHUR II in Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Cordell Bank...

  12. Adaptation of the Bridgman anvil cell to liquid pressure mediums

    OpenAIRE

    Ruetschi, A. -S.; D. Jaccard

    2008-01-01

    The advantage of Bridgman anvil pressure cells is their wide pressure range and the large number of wires which can be introduced into the pressure chamber. In these pressure cells soft solid pressure mediums like steatite are used. We have succeeded in adapting the Bridgman cell to liquid pressure mediums. With this breakthrough it is now possible to measure in very good hydrostatic pressure conditions up to 7 GPa, which is about twice the pressure attainable in piston-cyli...

  13. Pressure Alopecia

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Kate E; Yesudian, PD

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative or pressure alopecia (PA) is an infrequently reported group of scarring and non-scarring alopecias. It has been reported after immobilization of the head during surgery and following prolonged stays on intensive care units, and may be analogous to a healed pressure ulcer. This review presents a summary of cases published in pediatrics and after cardiac, gynecological, abdominal and facial surgeries. PA may manifest as swelling, tenderness, and ulceration of the scalp in the firs...

  14. Studies of in Situ Pore Pressure Fluctuations At Various Scales Études des fluctuations in situ de la pression de pore à différentes échelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kümpel H. J.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Pore pressure fluctuations in fluid saturated geological formations, either of natural or anthropogenic origin, can be observed at different scales. Natural fluctuations, e. g. , due to tidal, barometric or seismogenic forcing, or man-made effects as through use of underground fluid reservoirs, or initial filling and cyclic loading of lake reservoirs may have wavelengths from meters to kilometers. In situ monitoring of processes, in which both rock deformation and pore pressure changes are significant, improves our knowledge on the mechanical behaviour and the role of pore pressure in porous rocks and sedimentary layers. Pressure transducers for continuous recording of fluid level variations in wells, reflecting pore pressure changes at depth, or borehole tiltmeters that are sensitive to ground deformation caused by gradients of pore pressure fluctuations are relatively simple means to trace the dynamics of such rock-fluid interactions. The obtained data series are usually interpreted in two ways: by application of analytical solutions-adopting homogeneous poroelastic conditions or single fracture models in a uniform, elastic medium-and by simulation through numerical calculations allowing for some heterogeneity in the model volume. Field cases presented in this article include tilt measurements in the vicinity of pumped wells (1 to 100 m scale, fluid level monitoring in wells (borehole scale, and studies of pore pressure effects induced by seismic events (1 to 100 km scale. Specific rock parameters that can be constrained are the Skempton ratio, the hydraulic diffusivity, and the type of the effective rheology. In cases of tiltmeter studies, anisotropy of pore fluid flow can also be detected. Keywords: fluids in rocks, pore pressure, poroelasticity, hydrology. Les fluctuations de la pression de pore dans les formations géologiques saturées en fluides, d'origine naturelle ou anthropogéniques, peuvent être observées à différentes échelles. Les fluctuations naturelles, par exemple celles d'origine sismique, barométrique ou marémotrice, ainsi que les effets provoqués par l'exploitation de réservoirs de fluides souterrains par l'homme, ou encore les chargements initiaux et cycliques de lacs servant de réservoirs, peuvent avoir des longueurs d'ondes allant du mètre au kilomètre. Le contrôle in situ des processus, pour lesquels la déformation de la roche ainsi que les variations de pression sont significatives, améliore notre connaissance sur la réaction mécanique et sur le rôle de la pression de pore dans les roches poreuses et les couches sédimentaires. Les capteurs de pression pour un enregistrement continu des variations du niveau de fluide dans les puits (reflétant les changements de pression en profondeur ou les inclinomètres de puits, sensibles à la déformation du sol causée par des gradients de variations de pression de pore, constituent des moyens relativement simples permettant de suivre les dynamiques de telles interactions roches-fluides. Les données obtenues sont généralement interprétées de deux manières différentes : par l'utilisation de solutions analytiques - avec des conditions poroélastiques homogènes ou des modèles de fracture unique en milieu élastique homogène - et par la simulation numérique qui permet de prendre en compte, dans le modèle, certaines hétérogénéités. Les cas de gisements présentés dans cet article incluent des mesures inclinométriques proches des puits de pompage (échelle allant de 1 à 100 m, des contrôles du niveau de fluide dans les puits profonds (échelle du puits et des études sur les variations de la pression de pore d'origine sismique (échelle allant de 1 à 100 km. Les paramètres caractéristiques des roches qui peuvent être soumis à des contraintes sont le coefficient de Skempton, la diffusivité hydraulique et le type de la rhéologie effective. Dans le cas des mesures d'inclinométrie, l'anisotropie d'écoulement du fluide peut également être détectée.

  15. Pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety device provides that at a crack or rupture in the reactor pressure vessel the internal pressure can spread, but that it is prevented that larger fragments loosen themselves from the vessel. Therefore, the pressure vessel is surrounded by a network of cables. The cylindrical mid-section of the vessel is encompassed by vertically running single cable-ropes, lying parallel to each other, which are spanned between two brackets. The hemispherical top and bottom sections are covered by a checkerboardlike network of cable-ropes. They are also mounted on ring-shaped brackets. All the cable-ropes have tension links. For laterally acting forces which develop for instance when coolant is lost, there is in addition another set of anchor cables between the vessel and the supporting framework. (DG)

  16. Reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a long-term operation of nuclear power plants, the component materials are degraded under severe reactor conditions such as neutron irradiation, high temperature, high pressure and corrosive environment. It is necessary to establish the reliable and practical technologies for improving and developing the component materials and for evaluating the mechanical properties. Especially, it is very important to investigate the technologies for reactor pressure boundary materials such as reactor vessel and pipings in accordance with their critical roles. Therefore, this study was focused on developing and advancing the microstructural/micro-mechanical evaluation technologies, and on evaluating the neutron irradiation characteristics and radiation effects analysis technology of the reactor pressure boundary materials, and also on establishing a basis of nuclear material property database

  17. An investigation of the heat transfer and static pressure on the over-tip casing wall of an axial turbine operating at engine representative flow conditions. (II). Time-resolved results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports the measurements of time-resolved heat transfer rate and time-resolved static pressure that have been made on the over-tip casing of a transonic axial-flow turbine operating at flow conditions that are representative of those found in modern gas turbine engines. This data is discussed and analysed in the context of explaining the physical mechanisms that influence the casing heat flux. The physical size of the measurement domain was one nozzle guide vane-pitch and from -20% to +80% rotor axial chord. Additionally, measurements of the time-resolved adiabatic wall temperature are presented. The time-mean data from the same set of experiments is presented and discussed in Part I of this article. The nozzle guide vane exit flow conditions in these experiments were a Mach number of 0.93 and a Reynolds number of 2.7 x 106 based on nozzle guide vane mid-height axial chord. The data reveal large temporal variations in heat transfer characteristics to the casing wall that are associated with blade-tip passing events and in particular the blade over-tip leakage flow. The highest instantaneous heat flux to the casing wall occurs within the blade-tip gap, and this has been found to be caused by a combination of increasing flow temperature and heat transfer coefficient. The time-resolved static pressure measurements have enabled a detailed understanding of the tip-leakage aerodynamics to be established, and the physical mechanisms influencing the casing heat load have been determined. In particular, this has focused on the role of the unsteady blade lift distribution that is produced by upstream vane effects. This has been seen to modulate the tip-leakage flow and cause subsequent variations in casing heat flux. The novel experimental techniques employed in these experiments have allowed the measurement of the time-resolved adiabatic wall temperature on the casing wall. These data clearly show the falling flow temperatures as work is extracted from the gas by the turbine. Additionally, these temperature measurements have revealed that the absolute stagnation temperature within the tip-gap flow can be above the turbine inlet total temperature, and indicates the presence of a work process that leads to high adiabatic wall temperatures as a blade-tip passes a point on the casing wall. It is shown that this phenomena can be explained by consideration of the flow vectors within the tip-gap, and that these in turn are related to the local blade loading distribution. The paper also assesses the relative importance of different time-varying phenomena to the casing heat load distribution. This analysis has indicated that up to half of the casing heat load is associated with the over-tip leakage flow. Finally, the implications of the experimental findings are discussed in relation to future shroudless turbine design, and in particular the importance of accounting for the high heat fluxes found within the tip-gap

  18. The January 2002 opinion barometer about French people and the energy; Le barometre d'opinion sur les francais et l'energie en janvier 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    As requested by the French energy observatory, the CREDOC (research centre for the study and observation of living conditions) has carried out an inquiry on a sample of 2000 representative people of 18 years old and more, selected according to the quotas method. The questionnaire comprises 9 questions about energy and concerns 4 main topics: the nuclear energy (advantages and drawbacks), the security of energy supplies (development of new and renewable energy sources and of nuclear energy), the electricity (burial of overhead lines, power generation from renewable energy sources and electricity prices), and the rise of energy prices in general (automotive fuels, electricity, gas, domestic fuel oil, public anxiety). This document summarizes the results of this inquiry. (J.S.)

  19. Influence of transmural pressure on retrograde pressure pulse transmission velocity in the canine superior vena cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minten, J; Van de Werf, F; Aubert, A E; Kesteloot, H; De Geest, H

    1984-11-01

    The influence of intrathoracic and intraluminal pressure on venous pressure pulse propagation velocity in the superior vena cava was investigated in acute canine experiments. The propagation velocity of distinct points of the venous pressure curve was measured under different conditions of preload, during expiratory and inspiratory apnea and during positive-negative pressure respiration. Under control conditions transmission velocities varied from 1.07 m/s to 3.29 m/s. After volume expansion propagation velocities rose significantly and varied from 1.09 m/s to 6.48 m/s. During expiratory apnea and at peak negative expiratory pressure, the propagation speed of distinct pressure points was higher than during inspiratory apnea and at peak positive inspiratory pressure. Significant linear correlation coefficients were found between the transmission velocities of different distinct pressure points and the transmural pressure, but not between the propagation speed and the intraluminal pressure. PMID:6085251

  20. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure Anyone can develop high ... this condition are why family history is a risk factor for this condition. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: ...

  1. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Heart & Blood Vessels > ... posture, and medications. Continue Long-Term Effects of High Blood Pressure When someone has high blood pressure, the heart ...

  2. Pressurized hopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Secure Automated Fuel Fabrication Line is being developed to reduce personnel exposure and to improve safeguards. Fertile and fissile fuel powders are blended in the line for making fuel pellets. A pressurized hopper was developed for use not only as a blender, but also as a storage and feeding device. It works with or without injection tubes to produce a well-blended powder with reduced agglomerate population. Results of blending experiments using dry Kaolin clay and Tempra pigment are given

  3. Blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The lower ...

  4. Pressure transients across HEPA filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle facilities require ventilation for health and safety reasons. High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are located within ventilation systems to trap radioactive dust released in reprocessing and fabrication operations. Pressure transients within the air cleaning systems may be such that the effectiveness of the filtration system is questioned under certain accident conditions. These pressure transients can result from both natural and man-caused phenomena: atmospheric pressure drop caused by a tornado or explosions and nuclear excursions initiate pressure pulses that could create undesirable conditions across HEPA filters. Tornado depressurization is a relatively slow transient as compared to pressure pulses that result from combustible hydrogen-air mixtures. Experimental investigation of these pressure transients across air cleaning equipment has been undertaken by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and New Mexico State University. An experimental apparatus has been constructed to impose pressure pulses across HEPA filters. The experimental equipment is described as well as preliminary results using variable pressurization rates. Two modes of filtration of an aerosol injected upstream of the filter is examined. A laser instrumentation for measuring the aerosol release, during the transient, is described

  5. Evaluation of high temperature pressure sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is becoming more important to measure the pressure in high temperature environments in many industrial fields. However, there is no appropriate evaluation system and compensation method for high temperature pressure sensors since most pressure standards have been established at room temperature. In order to evaluate the high temperature pressure sensors used in harsh environments, such as high temperatures above 250 deg. C, a specialized system has been constructed and evaluated in this study. The pressure standard established at room temperature is connected to a high temperature pressure sensor through a chiller. The sensor can be evaluated in conditions of changing standard pressures at constant temperatures and of changing temperatures at constant pressures. According to the evaluation conditions, two compensation methods are proposed to eliminate deviation due to sensitivity changes and nonlinear behaviors except thermal hysteresis.

  6. Integral analysis of cavity pressurization in a fuel rod during an ULOF driven TOP with inclusion of surface tension effects on froth gas bubbles and variable cavity conditions due to fuel melting and ejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transient cavity pressurization in an ULOF driven TOP excursion has been analyzed for the SPX-1 reactor with an equation of state that allows to simulate the contribution of small froth gas bubbles to the pressure build-up in a fuel pin with inclusion of restraints from surface tension. Calculations were performed for various bubble parameters. Estimates are made for effective gas availabilities at fuel melting which can be used in a cavity model with an ideal gas equation to arrive at similar pressure transients

  7. Analysis of atmospheric pressure and temperature effects on cosmic ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    de MendonçA, R. R. S.; Raulin, J.-P.; Echer, E.; Makhmutov, V. S.; Fernandez, G.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze atmospheric pressure and temperature effects on the records of the cosmic ray detector CARPET. This detector has monitored secondary cosmic ray intensity since 2006 at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (San Juan, Argentina, 31°S, 69°W, 2550 m over sea level) where the geomagnetic rigidity cutoff, Rc, is ~9.8 GV. From the correlation between atmospheric pressure deviations and relative cosmic ray variations, we obtain a barometric coefficient of -0.44 ± 0.01 %/hPa. Once the data are corrected for atmospheric pressure, they are used to analyze temperature effects using four methods. Three methods are based on the surface temperature and the temperature at the altitude of maximum production of secondary cosmic rays. The fourth method, the integral method, takes into account the temperature height profile between 14 and 111 km above Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito. The results obtained from these four methods are compared on different time scales from seasonal time variations to scales related to the solar activity cycle. Our conclusion is that the integral method leads to better results to remove the temperature effect of the cosmic ray intensity observed at ground level.

  8. High Pressure Inactivation of Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Kilimann, Klaus Valentin

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to study the effect of temperature-co-solvent or combined pressure-temperature-co-solvent induced inactivation behaviour of bacteria. Therefore, the focus was set on the fermentative organism Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris MG 1363, which should be characterised on its physiological behaviour under extreme conditions. In addition, previously measured data sets were used (Molina-Höppner, 2002) to the pressure-temperature-co-solvent dependent inactivation kinetics th...

  9. Optimization of compound pressure cylinders

    OpenAIRE

    G.H. Majzoobi; A. Ghomi

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is optimization of the weight of compound cylinder for a specific pressure. The variables are shrinkage radius and shrinkage tolerance.Design/methodology/approach: SEQ technique for optimization, the finite element code, ANSYS for numerical simulation are employed to predict the optimized conditions. The results are verified by testing a number of closed end cylinders with various geometries, materials and internal pressures.Findings: The weight of a compoun...

  10. Reproducibility of calibration results by 0-A-0 pressurization procedures for hydraulic pressure transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Hiroaki; Kobata, Tokihiko

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on 0-A-0 pressurization for the calibration of electromechanical pressure gauges in order to obtain reproducible results by various procedures. In 0-A-0 pressurization, pressure is released to atmospheric pressure after finishing each measurement at each calibration pressure, and the output reading at atmospheric pressure is used for offset correction. Pressure gauges are calibrated under various pressure sequence and time interval conditions in the pressure range of 10 MPa to 100 MPa using a fully automated calibration system that uses a pressure balance as the standard device. Results for a quartz Bourdon-type pressure transducer are mainly reported. The hysteresis obtained by 0-A-0 pressurization is found to be nearly one-tenth of that obtained by stepwise pressurization. The effect of the previously applied pressure is less than 10 parts per million even for a random pressure sequence. Key points for calibration procedures are proposed from the calibration results for different time intervals. When the appropriate procedure is used, 0-A-0 pressurization largely reduces the effect of pressurization history, thus yielding highly reproducible calibration results.

  11. A system for incubations at high gas partial pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Patrick; Glombitza, Clemens; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure is a key feature of deep subsurface environments. High partial pressure of dissolved gasses plays an important role in microbial metabolism, because thermodynamic feasibility of many reactions depends on the concentration of reactants. For gases, this is controlled by their partial pressure, which can exceed 1 MPa at in situ conditions. Therefore, high hydrostatic pressure alone is not sufficient to recreate true deep subsurface in situ conditions, but the partial pressure of disso...

  12. A system for incubations at high gas partial pressure

    OpenAIRE

    PatrickSauer

    2012-01-01

    High-pressure is a key feature of deep subsurface environments. High partial pressure of dissolved gasses plays an important role in microbial metabolism, because thermodynamic feasibility of many reactions depends on the concentration of reactants. For gases, this is controlled by their partial pressure, which can exceed 1?MPa at in situ conditions. Therefore, high hydrostatic pressure alone is not sufficient to recreate true deep subsurface in situ conditions, but the partial pressure of di...

  13. Dynamic Model of Pressure Regulating Valve

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Abed

    2014-01-01

    Pressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPre...

  14. Use of statistical design of experiments in the optimization of Ar-O2 low-pressure plasma treatment conditions of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) for increasing polarity and adhesion, and inhibiting hydrophobic recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrón-García, María Isabel; Jofre-Reche, José Antonio; Martín-Martínez, José Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film was treated with RF low-pressure plasmas (LPPs) made of mixtures of oxygen and argon for increasing surface polarity, minimizing hydrophobic recovery (i.e. retard ageing) and increasing adhesion to acrylic adhesive tape for medical use. Statistical design of experiments has been used for determining the most influencing experimental parameters of the LPP treatment of PDMS. Water contact angle values (measured 24 h after treatment) and the O/C ratio obtained from XPS experiments were used as response variables. Working pressure was the most influencing parameter in LPP treatment of PDMS, and the duration of the treatment, the power and the oxygen-argon mixture composition determined noticeably its effectiveness. The optimal surface properties in PDMS and inhibited hydrophobic recovery were achieved by treatment with 93 vol% oxygen + 7 vol% argon LLP at low working pressure (300 mTorr), low power (25 W) and long duration of treatment (120 s).

  15. Electrical resistivity of YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and EuT{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (T=Co,Cu) at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionicio, G.A.

    2006-07-01

    This investigation addresses the effect that pressure, p, and temperature, T, have on 4f states of the rare-earth elements in the isostructural YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, EuCo{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, and EuCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} compounds. Upon applying pressure the volume of the unit cell reduces, enforcing either the enhancement of the hybridization of the 4f localized electrons with the ligand or a change in the valence state of the rare-earth ions. Here, we probe the effect of a pressure-induced lattice contraction on these system by means of electrical-resistivity measurements, {rho}(T), from room temperature down to 100 mK. (orig.)

  16. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) Tweet Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a brain disorder in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in ... About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Normal pressure hydrocephalus occurs when excess cerebrospinal ...

  17. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is a pressure sore? What are the causes of pressure sores in people with spinal cord ... with a spinal cord injury to do to prevent pressure sores? Why is pressure relief so important ...

  18. Bedsores (Pressure Ulcers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ulcer. Overview Bedsores (pressure ulcers), also known as pressure sores or decubitus ulcers, result from prolonged pressure that ... down. The skin is especially likely to develop pressure sores if it is exposed to rubbing (friction) and ...

  19. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Oct 22,2015 Blood pressure is typically recorded as two numbers, written as a ratio ... blood). What is the AHA recommendation for healthy blood pressure? This chart reflects blood pressure categories defined by ...

  20. Olmesartan vs ramipril in the treatment of hypertension and associated clinical conditions in the elderly: a reanalysis of two large double-blind, randomized studies at the light of the most recent blood pressure targets recommended by guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omboni, Stefano; Malacco, Ettore; Mallion, Jean-Michel; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a reanalysis of the data of two large randomized, double-blind, parallel group studies with a similar design, comparing the efficacy of an angiotensin-receptor blocker (olmesartan medoxomil) with that of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ramipril), by applying two different blood pressure targets recently recommended by hypertension guidelines for all patients, irrespective of the presence of diabetes (angiotensin system, when patients are targeted according to the blood pressure levels recommended by recent hypertension guidelines. PMID:26491273

  1. Solar thermal barometer; Barometre solaire thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-06-15

    In 2008, the European solar thermal market put on a strong spurt only to mark time in 2009 with about 4.2 million m{sup 2} installed, which is 450000 m{sup 2} less year-on-year. The main reasons of the decrease is the financial crisis and the low oil price, other reasons more specific to the country exist, for instance the property crisis has dragged the Spanish market down. In 2009, the solar thermal collector surface area in service in the European Union is of the magnitude of 32.6 million m{sup 2}, equivalent to a capacity of 22.8 GWTh. The solar thermal sector is one of the renewable sectors that creates the highest number of jobs and wealth, partly because the vast majority of the system components sold in Europe are produced in Europe and partly because the sale, installation fitting and maintenance are labour-intensive. In 2009, there were 50000 direct or indirect jobs in the European solar thermal sector. The main European actors in this sector are GREENoneTEC, Bosch-Thermotechnik, Viessmann, Vaillant and Solvis. No clear recovery is expected before 2011. (A.C.)

  2. Bio-fuels barometer; Barometre biocarburants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-07-15

    European Union bio-fuel use for transport reached 12 million tonnes of oil equivalent (mtoe) threshold during 2009. The slowdown in the growth of European consumption deepened again. Bio-fuel used in transport only grew by 18.7% between 2008 and 2009, as against 30.3% between 2007 and 2008 and 41.8% between 2006 and 2007. The bio-fuel incorporation rate in all fuels used by transport in the E.U. is unlikely to pass 4% in 2009. We can note that: -) the proportion of bio-fuel in the German fuels market has plummeted since 2007: from 7.3% in 2007 to 5.5% in 2009; -) France stays on course with an incorporation rate of 6.25% in 2009; -) In Spain the incorporation rate reached 3.4% in 2009 while it was 1.9% in 2008. The European bio-diesel industry has had another tough year. European production only rose by 16.6% in 2009 or by about 9 million tonnes which is well below the previous year-on-year growth rate recorded (35.7%). France is leading the production of bio-ethanol fuels in Europe with an output of 1250 million liters in 2009 while the total European production reached 3700 million litters and the world production 74000 million liters. (A.C.)

  3. DETERMINATION OF LAMINAR FLAME SPEED OF METHANE-AIR FLAMES AT SUBATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS USING THE CONE METHOD AND CH* EMISSION / DETERMINACIÓN DE LA VELOCIDAD DE DEFLAGRACIÓN LAMINAR DE LLAMAS METANO -AIRE A CONDICIONES SUBATMOSFÉRICAS EMPLEANDO EL MÉTODO DEL CONO Y LA EMISIÓN DE CH*

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    LUIS FERNANDO, LONDOÑO; CARLOS ESTEBAN, LÓPEZ; FRANCISCO, CADAVID; HUGO, BURBANO.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mediciones experimentales de la velocidad de deflagración laminar para llamas de premezcla metano-aire fueron realizadas para distintos dosados a condiciones subatmosféricas, 0,852 bar y 298 K. Las llamas fueron obtenidas utilizando un quemador de puerto rectangular el cual cuenta con un sistema de [...] refrigeración por agua, necesario para mantener la temperatura de la premezcla constante. Se utilizó una cámara ICCD para captar la quimioluminiscencia emitida por los radicales presentes en la llama y así definir el frente de llama. La velocidad de deflagración fue calculada empleando el método del cono. Los resultados experimentales fueron comparados con los reportados por otros autores y simulaciones numéricas realizadas con software CHEMKIN empleando el mecanismo GRIMECH 3.0. En este trabajo se encontró que la disminución de la presión atmosférica de 1013 mbar a 852 mbar genera un incremento del 7% en la velocidad de deflagración laminar. Abstract in english Experimental measurements of laminar flame speed for premixed methane-air flames were carried out for different equivalence ratios at subatmospheric conditions, 852 mbar and 298 K. The flames were obtained using a rectangular port burner with a water cooler system necessary to maintain the temperatu [...] re of the mixture constant. An ICCD camera was used to capture chemiluminescence emitted by OH-CH radicals present in the flame and thus define the flame front. Laminar flame speed was calculated using the cone method and experimental results were compared with those reported by other authors and the numerical simulations made with the software CHEMKIN using the GRIMECH 3.0 mechanism. In this work it was found that decreasing the barometric pressure from 1013 mbar to 852 mbar generated an increase of 7% in the laminar flame speed.

  4. Pressurized thermal shock tests with model pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressurized thermal shock experiments are performed in the Prometey Institute for the purpose of investigating the behaviour of surface flaws under pressurized water reactor overcooling accident conditions. The model pressure vessels are made of a steel 15X2MFA. The specific aim of the tests is to determine whether a surface flaw would be critical during a very severe pressurized thermal shock loading, and how well this situation can be predicted. In the tests with the second vessel the effect of the cladding on the fracture behaviour is studied. The preliminary finite-element analyses for the tests with the first model vessel and the pre-test analyses for the test with the second model vessel were presented in this paper. (orig./DG)

  5. 2010 weather and aeolian sand-transport data from the Colorado River corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealy, Timothy P.; East, Amy E.; Fairley, Helen C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of weather parameters and aeolian sand transport were made in 2010 near selected archeological sites in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Arizona. Data collected in 2010 indicate event- and seasonal-scale variations in rainfall, wind, temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure. Differences in weather patterns between 2009 and 2010 included a slightly later spring windy season, greater spring precipitation and annual rainfall totals, and a later onset and length of the reduced diurnal barometric-pressure fluctuations commonly associated with summer monsoon conditions. The increase in spring precipitation was consistent with the 2010 spring El Niño conditions compared to the 2009 spring La Niña conditions, whereas the subsequent transition to an El Niño-Southern Oscillation neutral phase appeared to delay the reduction in diurnal barometric fluctuations.

  6. Pressure distribution in a large-anvil pressure cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minimising the pressure gradients in large-anvil pressure cells is one of conditions for getting the high-quality results in investigations of structural and physical properties of the solid state. Pressure or temperature distributions in such devices are usually studied by scanning the sample with finely collimated X-ray beam. The previously reported pressure and temperature distributions in diamond anvil cells as well as temperature distributions in large-anvil cells, exhibit a strong dependence on materials of the sample environment and on the construction of sample assembly (data for pressure distribution in large-anvil cells were not available in literature). Present experiments were performed in energy-dispersive mode at MAX80 X-ray diffraction press installed at F2.1 beamline (Hasylab). The pressure distribution along the z-axis of a cylindrical NaCl sample mounted within a graphite heater embedded in a boron-epoxy cube was derived from the energetical positions of the 002 reflection along the sample scanned with white collimated X-ray beam. The pressure is found to be constant along the z-axis

  7. STRESS ANALYSIS AND BURST PRESSURE DETERMINATION OF TWO LAYER COMPOUND PRESSURE VESSEL

    OpenAIRE

    HARERAM LOHAR; SUSENJIT SARKAR; SAMAR CHANDRA MONDAL

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer pressure vessel is designed to work under high-pressure condition. This paper introduces the stress analysis and the burst pressure calculation of a two-layer shrink fitted pressure vessel. In the shrink-fitting problems, considering long hollow cylinders, the plane strain hypothesis can be regarded as more natural. Generally hoops stress distribution is non-linear and sharply reduced toward the outer surface. By shrink fitting concentric shells towards the inner shells are placed ...

  8. Pressurized thermal shock (PTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, a description of Thermal Shock in Pressurized conditions (PTS), and its influence in the treatment of the integrity of the pressure vessel (RPV) of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and/or of a Heavy water Pressurized water Reactor (PHWR) is made. Generally, the analysis of PTS involves a process of three stages: a-) Modeling with a System Code of relevant thermohydraulics transients in reference with the thermal shock; b-) The local distribution of temperatures in the downcomer and the heat transference coefficients from the RPV wall to the fluid, are determined; c-) The fracture mechanical analysis. These three stages are included in this work: Results with the thermohydraulics code Relap5/mod.3, are obtained, for a LOCA scenario in the hot leg of the cooling System of the Primary System of the CAN-I reactor. The method used in obtaining results is described. A study on the basis of lumped parameters of the local evolutions of the temperature of the flow is made, in the downcomer of the reactor pressure vessel. The purpose of this study is to determine how the intensification of the stress coefficient, varies in function of the emergency injected water during the thermohydraulic transients that take place under the imposed conditions in the postulated scene. Specially, it is considered a 50 cm2 break, located in the neighborhoods of the pressurized with the corresponding hot leg connection. This size is considered like the most critical. The method used to obtain the results is described. The fracture mechanical analysis is made. From the obtained results we confirmed that we have a simple tool of easy application in order to analyze phenomena of the type PTS in the postulated scenes by break in the cold and hot legs of the primary system. This methodology of calculus is completely independent of the used ones by the Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (NASA) in the analysis of the PTS phenomena in the CAN-I. The results obtained with the adopted methodology, offer results, very similar to the obtained ones that are validated against experiences of experimental facilities such like the experimental facility UPTF (Upper Plenum Test Facility). An important observation arises from the analysis of the behavior of the temperature in the fluid contained in the RPV downcomer, below the cold leg level, versus the water injected temperature (THPI) by the CAN-I low pressure emergency system (Tj system). It is possible to be noticing that when the temperature THPI increases, the possibility that the conditions occur so that a phenomenon of PTS happens is decreasing. The temperature that is reached in the fuel elements, that is to say, that does not put in risk the structural integrity of the cladding of the fuel element, will fix the maximum limit for the temperature THPI. We insist on the solution of engineering that would allow modifying the Emergency Core Cooler System (ECCS) behavior, extending the safety margin, what it means, the distance between the Klc of the material and the Kl of the process. It is emphasized the excessive conservative hypotheses that have been used in all the previous studies and the necessity to replace them with other more realists that would allow to extend the safety margin. At the moment this safety margin based in these coefficients is about 22 C degrees. (author)

  9. [Pressure sores: management and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, D; Seron, A; Jacquerye, A; Bustillo, A; Strale, H; Haubrechts, J; Del Marmol, V

    1997-09-01

    The global management of pressure sores is best ensured with a multidisciplinary approach. We present the experience of the "Groupe de Travail Escarres" (Pressure Sore Workgroup) which gathers physicians and nurses interested with this pathology. The majority of the decubitus ulcers will heal spontaneously with a conservative treatment only. This treatment typically aims at relieving the causes that lead to pressure sores, at eliminating the necrotic tissues, at obtaining favourable local conditions to allow wound healing and at controlling the health status of the patient. Surgical treatment of pressure sores is indicated when wound healing does not occur and when the health status of the patient is sufficiently good. Defect coverage is best carried out using myocutaneous flaps since their excellent blood supply allows a good cleansing of the wound. PMID:9411658

  10. Maraging steels for pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to conduct evaluations of the efficiency of the materials using their strength and plasticity determined during short-time tensile tests as well as selection of the material for manifacturing one-layer vessels and vessel details for operation under pressures up to 10 kb and room temperature. During the tests of the vessels water was used as a medium transducing pressure, the use of which conditions selection of the material with the increased corrosion resistance. It is shown that maraging steels, possessing high complex of mechanical properties are perspective materials for manifacturing high pressure vessels and also ensure satisfactory plasticity in the transverse direction. Empiric dependence of the working pressure evaluation in the vessels P=?sub(0.2) 1g ?x10-1 is suggested

  11. Virtual Polar Motion and Universal Time Variations in Space Geodetic Techniques due to Atmospheric Pressure Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes Cerveira, P. J.; Englich, S.; Boehm, J.; Weber, R.; Schuh, H.

    2006-12-01

    Earth rotation variations, in polar motion and universal time (ERP), appear as a response due to the sum of solid Earth displacements, fluid and gaseous mass transports. In finite networks, e.g., the network of eleven operational VLBI stations during the CONT05 VLBI experiment, horizontal displacements due to atmospheric pressure loading (APL) may accidentally introduce a net rotation. Generally, a no-net-rotation is expected, hypothesizing a surface normal stress due to APL upon a radially symmetric Earth. However, the horizontal crustal deformations due to APL given on a 2.5x2.5 degrees grid provided by the Goddard VLBI Group show systematic temporal net rotations. We compared the change of the eleven station network of CONT05 with and without APL, every six hours, by a three Helmert parameter transformation (three rotations). The "virtual" predicted ERP variations were validated w.r.t. the estimated ones, obtained from CONT05 (using the OCCAM 61E VLBI software). These tiny ERP variations, representing about 2 mm on Earth's surface, could statistically be detected if more VLBI sessions were processed. Even the inverted and non-inverted barometric assumptions of the response of the oceans to atmospheric pressure variations could potentially be verified.

  12. Ultrahigh vacuum/high-pressure flow reactor for surface x-ray diffraction and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering studies close to conditions for industrial catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A versatile instrument for the in situ study of catalyst surfaces by surface x-ray diffraction and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering in a 13 ml flow reactor combined with reaction product analysis by mass spectrometry has been developed. The instrument bridges the so-called ''pressure gap'' and ''materials gap'' at the same time, within one experimental setup. It allows for the preparation and study of catalytically active single crystal surfaces and is also equipped with an evaporator for the deposition of thin, pure metal films, necessary for the formation of small metal particles on oxide supports. Reactions can be studied in flow mode and batch mode in a pressure range of 100-1200 mbar and temperatures up to 950 K. The setup provides a unique combination of sample preparation, characterization, and in situ experiments where the structure and reactivity of both single crystals and supported nanoparticles can be simultaneously determined.

  13. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition. Moreover, the knoweledge of seismic velocities can be considered an powerful tool to detect the overpressure in case that the pore pressure is equal to the hydrostatic pressure plus the 50% of the difference between the lithostatic and the hydrostatic pressure. In conclusions, an accurate analysis of the BSR nature and the pore pressure are required to improve the reliability of the gas-phase estimation for different target, such as gas hydrate and free gas exploitations and environmental studies.

  14. Effect of Preparation Conditions in the Pressure Range of Atmospheric Nitrogen (2 ... 50 ?10-4 Torr on the Structural and Phase State of the Vacuum-arc Coatings of Mo-N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobol` O.V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the impact of the reactive atmosphere (N2 pressure and bias potential values on the phase-structural state of the coatings being formed. It has been found that at a low bias potential Ub=(0 … -40 V, and with pressure increase from 2·10-4 up to 5·10-3 Torr, phase formation takes place in the following sequence: supersaturated solid solution of nitrogen in the bcc lattice of Mo (Mo(N ? ?-??2N ? ?-MoN phases with the NaCl-type lattice and with different degrees of octahedral interstitial site occupation with nitrogen. At Ub=(-40 … -100 V, the sequence of phase-structural states is as follows: ?? (??(N ? ?-??2N ? ?-MoN (hexagonal lattice ? ?-??N. At highest Ub (with a strong radiation factor effect values ranging between -150 V and -200 V and with pressure increase, the composition changes to ?? (??(N ? ?-??2N ? ?-??2N ? ?-MoN ? ?-??N.

  15. Sources of Pressure in Titan's Plasma Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Achilleos, N; Bertucci, C; Guio, P; Romanelli, N; Sergis, N

    2013-01-01

    In order to analyze varying plasma conditions upstream of Titan, we have combined a physical model of Saturn's plasmadisk with a geometrical model of the oscillating current sheet. During modeled oscillation phases where Titan is furthest from the current sheet, the main sources of plasma pressure in the near-Titan space are the magnetic pressure and, for disturbed conditions, the hot plasma pressure. When Titan is at the center of the sheet, the main source is the dynamic pressure associated with Saturn's cold, subcorotating plasma. Total pressure at Titan (dynamic plus thermal plus magnetic) typically increases by a factor of five as the current sheet center is approached. The predicted incident plasma flow direction deviates from the orbital plane of Titan by < 10 deg. These results suggest a correlation between the location of magnetic pressure maxima and the oscillation phase of the plasmasheet.

  16. Baseline estimate of the retained gas volume in Tank 241-C-106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a study of the retained gas volume in Hanford Tank 241-C-106 (C-106) using the barometric pressure effect method. This estimate is required to establish the baseline conditions for sluicing the waste from C-106 into AY-102, scheduled to begin in the fall of 1998. The barometric pressure effect model is described, and the data reduction and detrending techniques are detailed. Based on the response of the waste level to the larger barometric pressure swings that occurred between October 27, 1997, and March 4, 1998, the best estimate and conservative (99% confidence) retained gas volumes in C-106 are 24 scm (840 scf) and 50 scm (1,770 scf), respectively. This is equivalent to average void fractions of 0.025 and 0.053, respectively

  17. Studies on pressure suppression pool dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several newly identified pressure suppression pool hydrodynamic loads associated with a loss-of-coolant accident, or actuation of the safety/relief valves, are attracting attention because of their potential influence on integrity of the BWR pressure suppression containment. This report provides a survey of the research works and experiences on performance of the pressure suppression system during abnormal and normal reactor operating conditions. Specific areas for future studies are also indicated. (author)

  18. Hydrogeologic characterization and evolution of the 'excavation damaged zone' by statistical analyses of pressure signals: application to galleries excavated at the clay-stone sites of Mont Terri (Ga98) and Tournemire (Ga03)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. This paper presents methods of statistical analysis and interpretation of hydrogeological signals in clayey formations, e.g., pore water pressure and atmospheric pressure. The purpose of these analyses is to characterize the hydraulic behaviour of this type of formation in the case of a deep repository of Mid- Level/High-Level and Long-lived radioactive wastes, and to study the evolution of the geologic formation and its EDZ (Excavation Damaged Zone) during the excavation of galleries. We focus on galleries Ga98 and Ga03 in the sites of Mont Terri (Jura, Switzerland) and Tournemire (France, Aveyron), through data collected in the BPP- 1 and PH2 boreholes, respectively. The Mont Terri site, crossing the Aalenian Opalinus clay-stone, is an underground laboratory managed by an international consortium, namely the Mont Terri project (Switzerland). The Tournemire site, crossing the Toarcian clay-stone, is an Underground Research facility managed by IRSN (France). We have analysed pore water and atmospheric pressure signals at these sites, sometimes in correlation with other data. The methods of analysis are based on the theory of stationary random signals (correlation functions, Fourier spectra, transfer functions, envelopes), and on multi-resolution wavelet analysis (adapted to nonstationary and evolutionary signals). These methods are also combined with filtering techniques, and they can be used for single signals as well as pairs of signals (cross-analyses). The objective of this work is to exploit pressure measurements in selected boreholes from the two compacted clay sites, in order to: - evaluate phenomena affecting the measurements (earth tides, barometric pressures..); - estimate hydraulic properties (specific storage..) of the clay-stones prior to excavation works and compare them with those estimated by pulse or slug tests on shorter time scales; - analyze the effects of drift excavation on pore pressures before, during, and after excavation works. To achieve the above objectives, we analyse and interpret pressure signals using several statistical methods which we programmed as custom-made Matlab Tool Boxes - including the following: 1) Auto-correlation, cross-correlation and temporal transfer functions (deconvolution). 2) Fourier spectral analysis, cross-spectral analysis and frequency gain. 3) Cross analysis of pore water and atmospheric pressure; ACF analysis (Atmospheric Correction Factory); relation with the concept 'relative pressure'; consequences on the barometric effect. 4) Multi-resolution dyadic wavelet analysis (and cross-wavelet analysis). 5) Statistical envelope of evolutionary signals (Hilbert transform, Cramer-Leadbetter envelope). Before these analyses are performed, the raw signals are pre-processed using a number of techniques for homogenizing the time steps, detecting outliers, and/or reconstructing missing data. Furthermore, the various methods of signal analyses themselves involve parameters that need to be tested (such as spectral estimation filters). For these reasons, in each case, a validation test is developed for a better interpretation of the signal processing tools. In this paper, the statistical analyses of pressure signals are used to assess the hydraulic characteristics of the clay-stone. In particular, the statistical analyses allow us to detect and to characterize, at diurnal time scales, the relationship between piezo-metric and atmospheric pressure (whence the barometric efficiency), and at semi-diurnal time scales, the statistical influence of earth tides (whence an estimate of specific storage). We focus in particular on the time evolution of these phenomena in the zone damaged by excavation works. Excavation of the galleries: effects on the evolution of pore pressure, and specific storage The statistical analyses of pore pressure signals indicate the emergence of a damaged zone (EDZ) as the excavation front passes near the pressure sensors (hydro-mechanical disturbance). These effects are observed in gallery Ga98 at

  19. From chemical mapping to pressure temperature deformation micro-cartography: mineralogical evolution and mass transport in thermo-mechanic disequilibrium systems: application to meta-pelites and confinement nuclear waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineralogical composition of metamorphic rocks or industrial materials evolves when they are submitted to thermomechanical disequilibria, i.e. a spatial or temporal pressure and temperature evolution, or chemical disequilibria as variations in redox conditions, pH... For example, during low temperature metamorphic processes, rocks re-equilibrate only partially, and thus record locally thermodynamic equilibria increasing so the spatial chemical heterogeneities. Understanding the P-T evolution of such systems and deciphering modalities of their mineralogical transformation imply to recognize and characterize the size of these local 'paleo-equilibria', and so to have a spatial chemical information at least in 2 dimensions. In order to get this information, microprobe X-ray fluorescence maps have been used. Computer codes have been developed with Matlab to quantify these maps in view of thermo-barometric estimations. In this way, P-T maps of mineral crystallisation were produced using the multi-equilibria thermodynamic technique. Applications on two meta-pelites from the Sambagawa blue-schist belt (Japan) and from the Caledonian eclogitic zone in Spitsbergen, show that quantitative chemical maps are a powerful tool to retrieve the metamorphic history of rocks. From these chemical maps have been derived maps of P-T-time-redox-deformation that allow to characterize P-T conditions of minerals formation, and so, the P-T path of the sample, the oxidation state of iron in the chlorite phase. As a result, we underline the relation between deformation and crystallisation, and propose a relative chronology of minerals crystallisation and deformations. The Fe3+ content map in chlorite calculated by thermodynamic has also been validated by a ?-XANES mapping at the iron K-edge measured at the ESRF (ID24) using an innovative method. Another application relates to an experimental study of clay materials, main components of an analogical model of a nuclear waste storage site. Chemical maps allowed to characterize the 2D mineralogical evolution of clays toward iron rich end-members. They have also been used as input data in a 2D finite element numerical model aiming to estimate the iron diffusion coefficient in clays at low temperatures, important parameter to model the destabilization of nuclear waste storage sites in the course of time. (author)

  20. High-pressure phase transition in ?-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FTIR, EDXD, and PLM; data for a new high-pressure polymorph, ?-HNIW, which is formed from ?-HNIW at 0.7 +/- 0.05 GPa and room temperature. The ?-? transformation is rapid and reversible in single crystals in a hydrostatic pressure transmitting medium, but the ? form could not be retrieved to ambient conditions. 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are three ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  2. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  3. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  4. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  5. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experts \\ Preventing Pressure Sores Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from Hospital to Home ...

  6. Preventing pressure ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decubitus ulcer prevention; Bedsore prevention; Pressure sores prevention ... Burke S, et al., Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. Pressure ulcer prevention and treatment Protocol. Updated January 2012. Available at: ...

  7. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from ...

  8. Association between perioral muscle pressure and masticatory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M; Koide, K; Arakawa, I; Mizuhashi, F

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between strength of the perioral muscles and masticatory performance. Subjects were 56 healthy adults (30 men and 26 women; mean age of 24·9 years) with normal occlusion. Perioral muscle pressure was measured using JMS tongue pressure measurement device, and maximum tongue pressure and cheek pressure on the habitual chewing side (H) and non-habitual side (non-H) were measured. The masticatory performance was evaluated using gummy jelly, and the amount of glucose extracted was measured after chewing under condition H or non-H. The association between sex and maximum tongue pressure was analysed using Student's t-test. Cheek pressure and the amount of the glucose extracted between condition H and non-H or between men and women were analysed by two-way repeated-measures anova. In addition, the correlations between maximum tongue pressure and cheek pressure on condition H, maximum tongue pressure and the amount of glucose extracted under condition H, and cheek pressure and the amount of glucose extracted under condition H were analysed using Pearson's correlation coefficients for men and women. The maximum tongue pressure, cheek pressure and the amount of glucose extracted were higher in men than in women. The amount of glucose extracted was higher under condition H than under condition non-H, but no significant difference in chewing side was observed in cheek pressure between men and women. Additionally, positive correlations were shown between maximum tongue pressure, habitual-side cheek pressure and the amount of glucose extracted on men and women. In conclusion, the association between higher perioral muscle pressure and better masticatory performance was shown. PMID:24118057

  9. Choosing Medicines for High Blood Pressure: A Review of the Research on ACEs, ARBs, and DRIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Summary – Oct. 24, 2011 Choosing Medicines for High Blood Pressure: A Review of the Research on ACEIs, ARBs, ... Aliskiren (Tekturna®) No About Your Condition What is high blood pressure? “Blood pressure” is the force of blood in ...

  10. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  11. Principle conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Nanasiova, Olga

    2003-01-01

    The definition of the conditional probability is very important in the theory of the probability. This definition is based on the fact, that random events can be simultaneously measurable. This paper deal with the problem of conditioning for such random events, which are not simultaneously measurable. This paper defines conditional states as convex combination of special states.

  12. NDE and Stress Monitoring on Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Damage caused by composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) failure can be catastrophic. Thus, monitoring condition and stress in the composite overwrap,...

  13. IIH with normal CSF pressures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Youn Suh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP in the absence of space occupying lesions. ICP is usually measured by lumbar puncture and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure above 250 mm H 2 O is one of the diagnostic criteria of IIH. Recently, we have encountered two patients who complained of headaches and exhibited disc swelling without an increased ICP. We prescribed acetazolamide and followed both patients frequently; because of the definite disc swelling with IIH related symptoms. Symptoms and signs resolved in both patients after they started taking acetazolamide. It is generally known that an elevated ICP, as measured by lumbar puncture, is the most important diagnostic sign of IIH. However, these cases caution even when CSF pressure is within the normal range, that suspicion should be raised when a patient has papilledema with related symptoms, since untreated papilledema may cause progressive and irreversible visual loss.

  14. Control of superplastic cavitation by hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that the application of hydrostatic gas pressures during superplastic deformation of fine grained 7475 Al can prevent the intergranular cavitation normally encountered at atmospheric pressure. A critical ratio of hydrostatic pressure to flow stress may be defined for each superplastic forming condition above which virtually no cavitation occurs. In deformation conditions where intergranular cavitation plays a significant part in final tensile rupture, superplastic ductility may be improved by the application of hydrostatic pressures. Similarly, detrimental effects of large superplastic strains on service properties may be reduced or eliminated by the application of suitable hydrostatic pressures during superplastic forming. In this case, superplastically formed material may have the same design allowables as conventional 7475 Al sheet

  15. Pressure measurements at ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low average pressure (less than 10-11 torr N2-equivalent) specified for ISABELLE makes it necessary to use pressure gauges of a low pressure limit p less than 10-12 torr. This is, even with the present technology, hard to achieve. As an aid to an appropriate selection of the type of gauge to be used, a brief summary is given of the effects determining the low pressure limit of such an instrument, this limit being defined as the pressure indication if the true pressure was zero. Hot filament ionization gauges only are considered, since cold discharge gauges tend to be nonlinear at the pressure range in question

  16. Optimización de las condiciones de biobalística de baja presión para análisis de expresión transitoria de genes heterólogos en hojas de tabaco cultivadas in vitro / Optimization of low pressure biobalistics conditions for analysis of transient expression of heterologous gene in tobacco leaves tobacco cultivated in vitro

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juan Carlos, Vaca-Vaca; Andrea Jimena, Pulido-Rendón; Karina, López-López.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Los estudios de expresión transitoria de genes heterólogos de interés biotecnológico son un paso previo a su expresión estable en plantas transgénicas. El objetivo del trabajo fue optimizar las condiciones de biobalística para realizar ensayos de expresión transitoria de genes heterólogos en Nicotia [...] na tabacum variedad Xanthi (tabaco) utilizando la pistola de genes de baja presión Helios® Gene Gun (BioRad®). Como gen heterólogo se utilizó al promotor 35S de CaMV fusionado al gen uidA (GUS) clonado en el vector pBI121. Las condiciones evaluadas fueron: presión de disparo, número de disparos y distancia de disparo sobre discos de hojas u hojas completas de tabaco cultivadas in vitro. La expresión de GUS se evaluó como el promedio del número de puntos azules observados en los tejidos bombardeados. únicamente se consideraron puntos azules cuando se utilizaron hojas completas de tabaco. Se observó un mayor número de puntos azules cuando se empleó una presión de 160 psi, cuatro disparos y un bombardeo directo sobre hojas completas. Para confirmar las condiciones obtenidas se utilizó el vector pCAMBIA 1305.2, observándose un alto número de puntos azules en los tejidos bombardeados, indicativo de la eficiencia de las condiciones optimizadas en el presente trabajo. Abstract in english Transient expression studies of heterologous genes with biotechnological interest are a prerequisite to its stable expression in transgenic plants. The aim of this research was to optimized the biobalistic conditions for testing transient expression of heterologous genes in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacu [...] m - Xanthi) using the low pressure Helios® Gene Gun System (Biorad ®). As heterologous gene construction was used CaMV 35S promoter fused to the uidA (GUS) gene cloned into the vector pBI121. The optimized conditions were: shot pressure, number of shots and shooting distance of leaf fragments or full sheets of tobacco. GUS expression was evaluated by average number of the blue dots observed on plant tissues already bombarded. Only blue dots were observed when whole leaves tobacco were used. A great deal of blue spots was observed using the following conditions: a pressure of 160 psi, 4 shots and 0 cm on whole sheets. In order to confirm the conditions earlier obtained, the pCAMBIA 1305.2 vector was employed in this experiment. Higher numbers of blue points were observed in tissues previously bombarded; those were as an indicative of the efficiency experimental conditions earlier optimized.

  17. Descripción de las variaciones horarias medias de presión en la Argentina y su influencia en los sistemas báricos / Description of hourly mean variation of pressure in Argentina and its application to pressure systems

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Norma, Possia; Bibiana, Cerne; Claudia, Campetella.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available La presión atmosférica horaria media mensual presenta una variación semidiurna regular de unos pocos hectopascales (entre 4 y 2 hPa aproximadamente), efecto conocido como marea barométrica. Si bien la existencia de esta oscilación es ampliamente conocida, en este trabajo se la documenta en forma men [...] sual para algunas estaciones de Argentina. La variación semidiurna es más importante durante los meses cálidos que fríos. Los máximos y mínimos principales tienen lugar entre las 12 y 14 UTC y 20 y 21 UTC, y presenta tres tipos de comportamientos. La región Centro y Este donde la amplitud disminuye con el aumento de la latitud y muestran un ciclo estacional marcado. La región Patagónica con menor amplitud pero con mayor diferencia entre verano e invierno que la región anterior. Y la región Oeste, que presenta la amplitud de onda más importante y además la mayor diferencia entre verano e invierno. La longitud de onda es 5 horas mayor en verano que invierno en las estaciones estudiadas. La amplitud de estas oscilaciones estaría modulada no sólo por el efecto de térmico del sol sino también por otros efectos locales. La marea barométrica afecta de distinta forma a la profundidad de los sistemas báricos según la hora en que ellos tengan lugar, por lo que este resultado debería ser tenido en cuenta en el momento de definir y caracterizar la profundidad de los ciclones/anticiclones para realizar cualquier estudio y/o pronóstico del tiempo. Abstract in english The hourly monthly mean atmospheric pressure variation has a semidiurnal oscillation of few hectoPascals (between approximately 4 and 2 hPa), an effect known as barometric tide. The existence of this oscillation is well known but not well documented, so this work describes the monthly barometric tid [...] e for some synoptic stations from Argentina. The semidiurnal variation of pressure is more important during the warm months. The principal maximum and minimum take place between 12 and 14 UTC and 20 and 21 UTC and presents three types of behaviors. The Central and East regions, where the amplitude decreases as the latitude increase and show an important seasonal cycle. The Patagonia region, with smaller amplitude but showing a greater difference between summer and winter than the previous region. And the West region, which has the largest wave amplitude and also the largest difference between summer and winter. The wavelength is 5 hours greater in summer than in winter for the whole synoptic stations studied. The amplitude of these oscillations would modulated not only by the effect of heat from the sun but also for other local effects. Depending of the time of the day, the barometric tide affects in a different way the depth of pressure systems. So this result should be taken into account when defining and characterizing the depth of cyclones / anticyclones for the analyses and weather forecast.

  18. Commonwealth Edison Company pressure locking test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure Locking is a phenomena which can cause the unseating thrust for a gate valve to increase dramatically from its typical static unseating thrust. This can result in the valve actuator having insufficient capability to open the valve. In addition, this can result in valve damage in cases where the actuator capability exceeds the valve structural limits. For these reasons, a proper understanding of the conditions which may cause pressure locking and thermal binding, as well as a methodology for predicting the unseating thrust for a pressure locked or thermally bound valve, are necessary. This report discusses the primary mechanisms which cause pressure locking. These include sudden depressurization of piping adjacent to the valve and pressurization of fluid trapped in the valve bonnet due to heat transfer. This report provides a methodology for calculating the unseating thrust for a valve which is pressure locked. This report provides test data which demonstrates the accuracy of the calculation methodology

  19. Commonwealth Edison Company pressure locking test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunte, B.D.; Kelly, J.F.

    1996-12-01

    Pressure Locking is a phenomena which can cause the unseating thrust for a gate valve to increase dramatically from its typical static unseating thrust. This can result in the valve actuator having insufficient capability to open the valve. In addition, this can result in valve damage in cases where the actuator capability exceeds the valve structural limits. For these reasons, a proper understanding of the conditions which may cause pressure locking and thermal binding, as well as a methodology for predicting the unseating thrust for a pressure locked or thermally bound valve, are necessary. This report discusses the primary mechanisms which cause pressure locking. These include sudden depressurization of piping adjacent to the valve and pressurization of fluid trapped in the valve bonnet due to heat transfer. This report provides a methodology for calculating the unseating thrust for a valve which is pressure locked. This report provides test data which demonstrates the accuracy of the calculation methodology.

  20. Pressure pain endurance in women with fibromyalgia

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Rodrigo Pegado de Abreu, Freitas; Sandra Cristina de, Andrade; Ranulfo Fiel Pereira Pessoa de, Carvalho; Maria Bernardete Cordeiro de, Sousa.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic condition causing spontaneous widespread pain associated with hypersensitivity. This study aimed at investigating the pressure pain endurance in women with fibromyalgia syndrome to determine the range of painful stimulation that an indiv [...] idual with fibromyalgia syndrome can resist acceptably. METHODS: We conducted an observational, descriptive, crosssectional study with 60 subjects (51.23±8 years), who met the American College of Rheumatology/1990 (ACR) criteria for fibromyalgia syndrome, and 42 healthy volunteers (48.33±9 years) as the control group. Algometry was performed to record pressure pain detection threshold and pressure pain tolerance, and fibromyalgia impact questionnaire was used to determine the impact of fibromyalgia syndrome. Pressure pain endurance was calculated as the arithmetic difference between pressure pain tolerance and pressure pain detection threshold. RESULTS: A significant difference in fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (p

  1. Simultaneous high-temperature removal of alkali and particulates in a pressurized gasification system. Fifth quarterly project report, April 1982-June 1982. [Concentration of Na and K in gas at process conditions; also optimization of removal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulik, P.R.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-07-01

    This program is directed at performing experimental and analytical investigations, deriving system designs, and estimating costs to ascertain the feasibility of using aluminosilicate-based getters for controlling alkali in pressurized gasification systems. Its overall objective is to develop a comprehensive plan for evaluating a scaled-up version of the gettering process as a unit operation or as an integral part of a particulate removal device. This report briefly summarizes efforts previously completed on thermodynamic projections and system performance projections, together with current work on getter selection and qualification completed during the fifth quarter of the project. Work on the thermodynamic projections has been completed and includes an update of the data base, development of alkali phase diagrams, and projections for several gasification processes. Getter selection and qualification efforts involved four tests - two with activated bauxite and one each with diatomaceous earth and Novacite on the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) system. Finally, system performance projections entailed examination of available kinetic data to ascertain the rate-controlling step, along with modeling efforts to determine the size requirements of a commercial-sized unit.

  2. 46 CFR 197.462 - Pressure vessels and pressure piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... false Pressure vessels and pressure piping. 197.462 Section 197.462 Shipping...462 Pressure vessels and pressure piping. (a) The diving supervisor shall...cylinder and PVHO, and each pressure piping system is examined and tested as...

  3. Weather, Climate, and You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Information from the American Institute of Medical Climatologists on human responses to weather and climatic conditions, including clouds, winds, humidity, barometric pressure, heat, cold, and other variables that may exert a pervasive impact on health, behavior, disposition, and the level of efficiency with which individuals function is reviewed.…

  4. Pressure tube ballooning experiments analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrity of pressure tubes is one of the milestones in achieving safe operation of nuclear power plants with CANDU reactors. The aim of a safety analysis is to demonstrate pressure tube integrity by showing that the pressure tube does not rupture both: (1) when it balloons (because of local strain), and (2) after it contacts the calandria tube. Therefore, the ability to model pressure-tube ballooning is a key step in the licensing analysis of a CANDU reactor during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident. AECB sponsored an experimental research project at the Stern Laboratory [1] to address the repeatability of pressure tube ballooning data and to demonstrate the effect of bearing pad fretting on rupture. This research project is part of a broader study on the effect of in-service degradation on the ballooning behaviour of pressure tubes. Newly performed experiments, in the Phase 5 of the research project [2], comprised the testing of nine pressure tube specimens to study the effects of hydride blisters and uniformly distributed hydrogen. A phase to test irradiated tubes has been put on hold pending results of COG tests. As a part of continuing support of the research project on pressure tube ballooning, the present work concentrated on resimulation of the newly performed experiments by using three computer codes, e.g. PTDFORM, PTSTRAIN and AECBALL. Intercode comparisons show that code calculated results for strain rates and time of failure are close to each other, for nonuniform ballooning under specified conditions. However, it can be seen that both codes largely under predict the creep rate and experimental failure strains. The factor, among others, that may be contributing significantly to the poor agreement between the codes is clearly nonlinear character of the straining. One of the sources of nonlinearity may certainly be attributed to the localized irreversible heat generation due to the deformation work done on the pressure tube, particularly around the location of the failure. This effect is not considered in either one of the codes used for pressure tube integrity analysis. Obviously, ballooning and straining in the plastic deformation region cannot be easily addressed with simple mechanistic models used in these codes. (author)

  5. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom segment and is trapped by the flange on the top dome segment when these components are bolted together with high-strength bolts. The pressure dome has several unique features. It is made (to ASME Pressure Vessel guidelines) in a high-strength aluminum alloy with the strength of stainless steel and the weight benefits of aluminum. The flange of the upper dome portion contains specially machined flats for mounting the dome, and other flats dedicated to the special feedthroughs for electrical connections. A pressure dome can be increased in length to house larger stacks (more cells) of the same diameter with the simple addition of a cylindrical segment. To aid in dome assembly, two stainless steel rings are employed. One is used beneath the heads of the high-strength bolts in lieu of individual hardened washers, and another is used instead of individual nuts. Like electrolyzers could be operated at low or high pressures simply by operating the electrolyzer outside or inside a pressurized dome.

  6. STRESS ANALYSIS AND BURST PRESSURE DETERMINATION OF TWO LAYER COMPOUND PRESSURE VESSEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARERAM LOHAR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer pressure vessel is designed to work under high-pressure condition. This paper introduces the stress analysis and the burst pressure calculation of a two-layer shrink fitted pressure vessel. In the shrink-fitting problems, considering long hollow cylinders, the plane strain hypothesis can be regarded as more natural. Generally hoops stress distribution is non-linear and sharply reduced toward the outer surface. By shrink fitting concentric shells towards the inner shells are placed in residual compression so that the initial compressive hoop stress must be relieved by internal pressure before hoop tensile stress are developed. Therefore the maximum hoop stress will be reduced, resulting more burst pressure. The analytical results of stress distribution and burst pressure is calculated and validated by ANSYS Workbench results.

  7. Recurring inspection system of the A-1 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main technical specifications and operating conditions are shown for the A-1 nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel. The procedures and the principles of pressure vessel recurring inspections are summarized. The methodology of predicting the pressure vessel life is given on the basis of results obtained so far. (F.M.)

  8. Fuzzy control applied to nuclear power plant pressurizer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants (NPPs) the pressure control in the primary loop is very important for keeping the reactor in a safety condition and improve the generation process efficiency. The main component responsible for this task is the pressurizer. The pressurizer pressure control system (PPCS) utilizes heaters and spray valves to maintain the pressure within an operating band during steady state conditions, and limits the pressure changes, during transient conditions. Relief and safety valves provide overpressure protection for the reactor coolant system (RCS) to ensure system integrity. Various protective reactor trips are generated if the system parameters exceed safe bounds. Historically, a proportional-integral derivative (PID) controller is used in PWRs to keep the pressure in the set point, during those operation conditions. The purpose of this study has two main goals: first is to develop a pressurizer model based on artificial neural networks (ANNs); second is to develop a fuzzy controller for the PWR pressurizer pressure, and compare its performance with the P controller. Data from a simulator PWR plant was used to test the ANN and the controllers as well. The reference simulator is a Westinghouse 3-loop PWR plant with a total thermal output of 2785 MWth. The simulation results show that the pressurizer ANN model response are in reasonable agreement with the simulated power plant, and the fuzzy controller built in this study has better performance compared to the P controller. (author)

  9. Fuzzy control applied to nuclear power plant pressurizer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Mauro V.; Almeida, Jose C.S., E-mail: mvitor@ien.gov.b, E-mail: jcsa@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants (NPPs) the pressure control in the primary loop is very important for keeping the reactor in a safety condition and improve the generation process efficiency. The main component responsible for this task is the pressurizer. The pressurizer pressure control system (PPCS) utilizes heaters and spray valves to maintain the pressure within an operating band during steady state conditions, and limits the pressure changes, during transient conditions. Relief and safety valves provide overpressure protection for the reactor coolant system (RCS) to ensure system integrity. Various protective reactor trips are generated if the system parameters exceed safe bounds. Historically, a proportional-integral derivative (PID) controller is used in PWRs to keep the pressure in the set point, during those operation conditions. The purpose of this study has two main goals: first is to develop a pressurizer model based on artificial neural networks (ANNs); second is to develop a fuzzy controller for the PWR pressurizer pressure, and compare its performance with the P controller. Data from a simulator PWR plant was used to test the ANN and the controllers as well. The reference simulator is a Westinghouse 3-loop PWR plant with a total thermal output of 2785 MWth. The simulation results show that the pressurizer ANN model response are in reasonable agreement with the simulated power plant, and the fuzzy controller built in this study has better performance compared to the P controller. (author)

  10. High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... time. High blood pressure is also called hypertension. High Blood Pressure in the United States Having high blood pressure ...

  11. Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate Updated:Sep 4,2014 Blood ... was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  12. Pressurized Thermal Shock Analysis for OPR1000 Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study provides a brief understanding of the analysis procedure and techniques using ANSYS, such as the acceptance criteria, selection and categorization of events, thermal analysis, structural analysis including fracture mechanics assessment, crack propagation and evaluation of material properties. PTS may result from instrumentation and control malfunction, inadvertent steam dump, and postulated accidents such as smallbreak (SB) LOCA, large-break (LB) LOCA, main steam line break (MSLB), feedwater line breaks and steam generator overfill. In this study our main focus is to consider only the LB LOCA due to a cold leg break of the Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe (OPR1000). Consideration is given as well to the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) specific sequence with the operating parameters like pressure, temperature and time sequences. The static structural and thermal analysis to investigate the effects of PTS on RPV is the main motivation of this study. Specific surface crack effects and its propagation is also considered to measure the integrity of the RPV. This study describes the procedure for pressurized thermal shock analysis due to a loss of coolant accidental condition and emergency core cooling system operation for reactor pressure vessel.. Different accidental events that cause pressurized thermal shock to nuclear RPV that can also be analyzed in the same way. Considering the limitations of low speed computer only the static analysis is conducted. The modified LBLOCA phases and simplified geometry can is utilized to analyze the effect of PTS on RPV for general understanding not for specific specialized purpose. However, by integrating the disciplines of thermal and structural analysis, and fracture mechanics analysis a clearer understanding of the total aspect of the PTS problem has resulted. By adopting the CFD, thermal hydraulics, uncertainties and risk analysis for different type of accidental conditions, events and sequences with proper mathematical models and boundary conditions, the PTS analysis can be improved further

  13. Pressurized Thermal Shock Analysis for OPR1000 Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowmik, P. K.; Shamim, J. A.; Gairola, A.; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The study provides a brief understanding of the analysis procedure and techniques using ANSYS, such as the acceptance criteria, selection and categorization of events, thermal analysis, structural analysis including fracture mechanics assessment, crack propagation and evaluation of material properties. PTS may result from instrumentation and control malfunction, inadvertent steam dump, and postulated accidents such as smallbreak (SB) LOCA, large-break (LB) LOCA, main steam line break (MSLB), feedwater line breaks and steam generator overfill. In this study our main focus is to consider only the LB LOCA due to a cold leg break of the Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe (OPR1000). Consideration is given as well to the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) specific sequence with the operating parameters like pressure, temperature and time sequences. The static structural and thermal analysis to investigate the effects of PTS on RPV is the main motivation of this study. Specific surface crack effects and its propagation is also considered to measure the integrity of the RPV. This study describes the procedure for pressurized thermal shock analysis due to a loss of coolant accidental condition and emergency core cooling system operation for reactor pressure vessel.. Different accidental events that cause pressurized thermal shock to nuclear RPV that can also be analyzed in the same way. Considering the limitations of low speed computer only the static analysis is conducted. The modified LBLOCA phases and simplified geometry can is utilized to analyze the effect of PTS on RPV for general understanding not for specific specialized purpose. However, by integrating the disciplines of thermal and structural analysis, and fracture mechanics analysis a clearer understanding of the total aspect of the PTS problem has resulted. By adopting the CFD, thermal hydraulics, uncertainties and risk analysis for different type of accidental conditions, events and sequences with proper mathematical models and boundary conditions, the PTS analysis can be improved further.

  14. Preconditioning the pressure operator for the time dependent Stokes problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    In implicit time stepping procedures for the linearized Navier Stokes equations, a linear perturbed Stokes problem must be solved at each time step. Many methods for doing this require a good preconditioner for the resulting pressure operator (Schur complement). In contrast to the time independent Stokes equations where the pressure operator is well conditioned, the pressure operator for the perturbed system becomes more illconditioned as the time step is reduced (and/or the Reynolds number is increased). The authors describe the method for solving the coupled velocity/pressure systems and, in particular, show how to construct good preconditioners for the poorly conditioned pressure operator.

  15. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Errandonea, D.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Agouram, S.

    2015-08-01

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20-27 GPa to 7.5-12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B0 = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe2O4 (B0 = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B0 = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the RONALD H. BROWN in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Pacific Ocean and others from 2008-01-22 to 2009-01-11 (NODC Accession 0109930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109930 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from RONALD H. BROWN in the North Atlantic...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the Bell M. Shimada in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2012-02-20 to 2012-09-16 (NODC Accession 0115714)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115714 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from Bell M. Shimada in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska,...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the Bell M. Shimada in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2011-06-27 to 2011-08-31 (NODC Accession 0115710)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115710 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from Bell M. Shimada in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska,...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary from 2007-01-07 to 2007-06-04 (NODC Accession 0112887)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112887 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean and Stellwagen...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the RONALD H. BROWN in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2013-07-18 to 2013-10-02 (NODC Accession 0117699)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117699 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from RONALD H. BROWN in the North Atlantic Ocean and South...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the Atlantic Companion in the Irish Sea and St. George's Channel and North Atlantic Ocean from 2011-12-05 to 2011-12-13 (NCEI Accession 0115715)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115715 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Atlantic Companion in the Irish Sea and St. George's...

  2. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary from 2003-11-20 to 2003-12-21 (NODC Accession 0112929)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112929 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean and Stellwagen...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the RONALD H. BROWN in the South Pacific Ocean from 2014-02-25 to 2014-03-13 (NODC Accession 0117674)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117674 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from RONALD H. BROWN in the South Pacific Ocean from...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, Barometric pressure sensor and other instruments from the RONALD H. BROWN in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2005-01-11 to 2005-02-24 (NODC Accession 0108153)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108153 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical and profile data collected from RONALD H. BROWN in the South...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from THALASSA in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-08-19 to 2012-09-10 (NODC Accession 0117712)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117712 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from THALASSA in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-08-19 to...

  6. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary from 2006-03-15 to 2007-01-04 (NODC Accession 0112932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112932 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland Sea and Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary from 2004-02-17 to 2005-01-06 (NODC Accession 0112930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0112930 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from SKOGAFOSS in the North Atlantic Ocean, North Greenland...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2003-02-08 to 2004-01-03 (NODC Accession 0081032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0081032 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea,...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Bay of Fundy, Caribbean Sea and others from 2006-12-31 to 2007-12-01 (NODC Accession 0081035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0081035 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Bay of Fundy,...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2004-01-03 to 2005-01-02 (NODC Accession 0081033)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0081033 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea,...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using Alkalinity titrator, Barometric pressure sensor and other instruments from the ROGER REVELLE in the Indian Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Tasman Sea from 2007-02-04 to 2007-03-17 (NODC Accession 0108119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108119 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from ROGER REVELLE in...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and North Atlantic Ocean from 2005-01-02 to 2005-12-18 (NODC Accession 0109924)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0109924 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from EXPLORER OF THE SEAS in the Caribbean Sea,...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the KEIFU MARU in the East China Sea (Tung Hai), North Pacific Ocean and others from 2001-01-20 to 2011-03-22 (NODC Accession 0081044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0081044 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from KEIFU MARU in the East China Sea (Tung Hai), North...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using Alkalinity titrator, Barometric pressure sensor and other instruments from the ROGER REVELLE in the Indian Ocean from 2008-02-04 to 2008-03-17 (NODC Accession 0108118)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108118 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from ROGER REVELLE in...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the RONALD H. BROWN in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2013-07-18 to 2013-10-31 (NODC Accession 0117689)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117689 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from RONALD H. BROWN in the Caribbean Sea, North Atlantic...

  16. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the Drifting Buoy in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and others from 2001-11-20 to 2007-05-08 (NODC Accession 0117495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117495 includes Surface underway, biological, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from Drifting Buoy in the Indian Ocean, South...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the ROGER REVELLE in the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean from 2007-03-22 to 2007-04-28 (NODC Accession 0108120)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108120 includes biological, chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the Bay of Bengal and...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using Alkalinity titrator, Barometric pressure sensor and other instruments from the ROGER REVELLE in the Bay of Bengal and Indian Ocean from 2007-03-22 to 2007-05-01 (NODC Accession 0110791)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0110791 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from ROGER REVELLE in...

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the JAMES CLARK ROSS in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and others from 2012-11-15 to 2013-08-16 (NODC Accession 0115256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115256 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea,...

  20. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and underway - surface observations using Alkalinity titrator, Barometric pressure sensor and other instruments from the ROGER REVELLE in the South Pacific Ocean from 2005-01-06 to 2005-02-19 (NODC Accession 0108095)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108095 includes chemical, discrete sample, meteorological, physical, profile and underway - surface data collected from ROGER REVELLE in the South...