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Sample records for band structure density

  1. Electron momentum density, band structure, and structural properties of SrS

    Sharma, G., E-mail: gsphysics@gmail.com [University of Kota, Department of Pure and Applied Physics (India); Munjal, N.; Vyas, V. [Banasthali University, Department of Physics (India); Kumar, R.; Sharma, B. K. [University of Rajasthan, Department of Physics (India); Joshi, K. B. [MLS University, Department of Physics (India)

    2013-10-15

    The electron momentum density, the electronic band structure, and the structural properties of SrS are presented in this paper. The isotropic Compton profile, anisotropies in the directional Compton profiles, the electronic band structure and density of states are calculated using the ab initio periodic linear combination of atomic orbitals method with the CRYSTAL06 code. Structural parameters of SrS-lattice constants and bulk moduli in the B1 and B2 phases-are computed together with the transition pressure. The computed parameters are well in agreement with earlier investigations. To compare the calculated isotropic Compton profile, measurement on polycrystalline SrS is performed using 5Ci-{sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Additionally, charge transfer is studied by means of the Compton profiles computed from the ionic model. The nature of bonding in the isovalent SrS and SrO compounds is compared on the basis of equal-valenceelectron-density profiles and the bonding in SrS is found to be more covalent than in SrO.

  2. From Metal Cluster to Metal Nanowire: A Topological Analysis of Electron Density and Band Structure Calculation

    Yu Wang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:We investigate a theoretical model of molecular metalwire constructed from linear polynuclear metal complexes. In particular we study the linear Crn metal complex and Cr molecular metalwire. The electron density distributions of the model nanowire and the linear Crn metal complexes, with n = 3, 5, and 7, are calculated by employing CRYSTAL98 package with topological analysis. The preliminary results indicate that the bonding types between any two neighboring Cr are all the same, namely the polarized open-shell interaction. The pattern of electron density distribution in metal complexes resembles that of the model Cr nanowire as the number of metal ions increases. The conductivity of the model Cr nanowire is also tested by performing the band structure calculation.

  3. Electron momentum density and band structure calculations of {alpha}- and {beta}-GeTe

    Vadkhiya, Laxman [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Arora, Gunjan [Department of Physics, Techno India NJR Institute of Technology, Udaipur 313002, Rajasthan (India); Rathor, Ashish [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2011-12-15

    We have measured isotropic experimental Compton profile of {alpha}-GeTe by employing high energy (662 keV) {gamma}-radiation from a {sup 137}Cs isotope. To compare our experiment, we have also computed energy bands, density of states, electron momentum densities and Compton profiles of {alpha}- and {beta}-phases of GeTe using the linear combination of atomic orbitals method. The electron momentum density is found to play a major role in understanding the topology of bands in the vicinity of the Fermi level. It is seen that the density functional theory (DFT) with generalised gradient approximation is relatively in better agreement with the experiment than the local density approximation and hybrid Hartree-Fock/DFT. - Highlights: > Compton profile of {alpha}-GeTe using a 20 Ci {sup 137}Cs Compton spectrometer. > Compared experimental Compton data with density functional theory. > Reported energy bands and density of states of {alpha}- and {beta}-GeTe. > EVED profiles analysed to check the covalent character.

  4. Wigner random banded matrices with sparse structure local spectral density of states

    Fyodorov, Yu V; Izrailev, F M; Casati, G

    1995-01-01

    Random banded matrices with linearly increasing diagonal elements are recently considered as an attractive model for complex nuclei and atoms. Apart from early papers by Wigner \\cite{Wig} there were no analytical studies on the subject. In this letter we present analytical and numerical results for local spectral density of states (LDOS) for more general case of matrices with a sparsity inside the band. The crossover from the semicircle form of LDOS to that given by the Breit-Wigner formula is studied in detail.

  5. Density of resonant states and a manifestation of photonic band structure in small clusters of spherical particles

    Yamilov, Alexey; Cao, Hui

    2003-08-01

    We introduce a numerical recipe for calculating the density of the resonant states of the clusters of dielectric spheres. Using truncated multipole expansions (generalized multisphere Mie solution) we obtain the scattering matrix of the problem. By introducing an infinitesimal absorption in the spheres we express the dwell time of the electromagnetic wave in terms of the elements of the scattering matrix. Using the parameters in recent light localization experiments [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 153901 (2001)], we demonstrate that the density of the resonant states, related to the dwell time, shows the formation of the photonic band structure in small clusters of dielectric spheres as the small as five particles. Density of resonant states of a cluster of 32 spheres exhibits a well defined structure similar to the density of electromagnetic states of the infinite photonic crystal. Our results suggest that, due to the formation of small ordered clusters, a significant modification of the density of electromagnetic states can occur in a random collection of monodisperse spheres.

  6. Band structure of semiconductors

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  7. Electronic band structure and charge density wave transition in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Guyot, H.; Laubschat, C.; Molodtsov, S. L.; Asensio, M. C.

    2008-03-01

    High resolution angle-resolved photoemission of quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze has been performed in the range from room temperature to 130 K, slightly above the charge density wave (CDW) transition (Tc = 110 K), and down to 35 K (well below Tc). In this paper we report a detailed study of how electronic band structure is affected by this transition driven by the hidden nesting scenario. The expected spectroscopic fingerprints of the CDW phase transition have been found and discussed according to the hidden one dimension and the development of a quasi-commensurate CDW. The excellent agreement between theory and our experimental results makes of potassium purple bronze a reference system for studying this type of instabilities.

  8. Electronic band structure and charge density wave transition in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze

    High resolution angle-resolved photoemission of quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze has been performed in the range from room temperature to 130 K, slightly above the charge density wave (CDW) transition (Tc = 110 K), and down to 35 K (well below Tc). In this paper we report a detailed study of how electronic band structure is affected by this transition driven by the hidden nesting scenario. The expected spectroscopic fingerprints of the CDW phase transition have been found and discussed according to the hidden one dimension and the development of a quasi-commensurate CDW. The excellent agreement between theory and our experimental results makes of potassium purple bronze a reference system for studying this type of instabilities

  9. The band structure of WO3 and non-rigid-band behaviour in Na0.67WO3 derived from soft x-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory

    The electronic structure of single-crystal WO3 and Na0.67WO3 (a sodium–tungsten bronze) has been measured using soft x-ray absorption and resonant soft x-ray emission oxygen K-edge spectroscopies. The spectral features show clear differences in energy and intensity between WO3 and Na0.67WO3. The x-ray emission spectrum of metallic Na0.67WO3 terminates in a distinct Fermi edge. The rigid-band model fails to explain the electronic structure of Na0.67WO3 in terms of a simple addition of electrons to the conduction band of WO3. Instead, Na bonding and Na 3s–O 2p hybridization need to be considered for the sodium–tungsten bronze, along with occupation of the bottom of the conduction band. Furthermore, the anisotropy in the band structure of monoclinic γ-WO3 revealed by the experimental spectra with orbital-resolved geometry is explained via density functional theory calculations. For γ-WO3 itself, good agreement is found between the experimental O K-edge spectra and the theoretical partial density of states of O 2p orbitals. Indirect and direct bandgaps of insulating WO3 are determined from extrapolating separations between spectral leading edges and accounting for the core–hole energy shift in the absorption process. The O 2p non-bonding states show upward band dispersion as a function of incident photon energy for both compounds, which is explained using the calculated band structure and experimental geometry. (paper)

  10. Split Hubbard bands at low densities

    Hansen, Daniel; Perepelitsky, Edward; Shastry, B. Sriram

    2011-05-01

    We present a numerical scheme for the Hubbard model that throws light on the rather esoteric nature of the upper and lower Hubbard bands, which have been invoked often in literature. We present a self-consistent solution of the ladder-diagram equations for the Hubbard model, and show that these provide, at least in the limit of low densities of particles, a vivid picture of the Hubbard split bands. We also address the currently topical problem of decay of the doublon states that are measured in optical trap studies, using both the ladder scheme and also an exact two-particle calculation of a relevant Green’s function.

  11. Angle-resolved photoemission study of the evolution of band structure and charge density wave properties in RTe3 (R= Y, La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb and Dy)

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Hussain, Z.; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D.H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.

    2010-02-15

    We present a detailed ARPES investigation of the RTe{sub 3} family, which sets this system as an ideal 'textbook' example for the formation of a nesting driven Charge Density Wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDW instabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi Surface (FS) (up to 0.4eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k-space. An additional advantage of RTe{sub 3} is that the band structure can be very accurately described by a simple 2D tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure, by comparing our ARPES measurements with Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and, for the first time, of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k-space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDW interaction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n(Ef), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  12. Electronic band structure and charge density wave transition in quasi-2D KMo{sub 6}O{sub 17} purple bronze

    Valbuena, M A [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Avila, J; Asensio, M C [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Vyalikh, D V; Laubschat, C; Molodtsov, S L [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Guyot, H [LEPES, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: mvbuena@icmm.csic.es

    2008-03-15

    High resolution angle-resolved photoemission of quasi-2D KMo{sub 6}O{sub 17} purple bronze has been performed in the range from room temperature to 130 K, slightly above the charge density wave (CDW) transition (T{sub c} = 110 K), and down to 35 K (well below T{sub c}). In this paper we report a detailed study of how electronic band structure is affected by this transition driven by the hidden nesting scenario. The expected spectroscopic fingerprints of the CDW phase transition have been found and discussed according to the hidden one dimension and the development of a quasi-commensurate CDW. The excellent agreement between theory and our experimental results makes of potassium purple bronze a reference system for studying this type of instabilities.

  13. Microstrip microwave band gap structures

    V Subramanian

    2008-04-01

    Microwave band gap structures exhibit certain stop band characteristics based on the periodicity, impedance contrast and effective refractive index contrast. These structures though formed in one-, two- and three-dimensional periodicity, are huge in size. In this paper, microstrip-based microwave band gap structures are formed by removing the substrate material in a periodic manner. This paper also demonstrates that these structures can serve as a non-destructive characterization tool for materials, a duplexor and frequency selective coupler. The paper presents both experimental results and theoretical simulation based on a commercially available finite element methodology for comparison.

  14. ARPES study of the evolution of band structure and charge density wave properties in RTe3 ( R=Y , La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb, and Dy)

    Hussain, Zahid; Brouet, Veronique; Yang, Wanli; Zhou, Xingjiang; Hussain, Zahid; Moore, R.G.; He, R.; Lu, D. H.; Shen, Z.X.; Laverock, J.; Dugdale, S.B.; Ru, N.; Fisher, R.

    2008-01-16

    We present a detailed angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of the RTe3 family, which sets this system as an ideal"textbook" example for the formation of a nesting driven charge density wave (CDW). This family indeed exhibits the full range of phenomena that can be associated to CDWinstabilities, from the opening of large gaps on the best nested parts of Fermi surface (up to 0.4 eV), to the existence of residual metallic pockets. ARPES is the best suited technique to characterize these features, thanks to its unique ability to resolve the electronic structure in k space. An additional advantage of RTe3 is that theband structure can be very accurately described by a simple two dimensional tight-binding (TB) model, which allows one to understand and easily reproduce many characteristics of the CDW. In this paper, we first establish the main features of the electronic structure by comparing our ARPES measurements with the linear muffin-tinorbital band calculations. We use this to define the validity and limits of the TB model. We then present a complete description of the CDW properties and of their strong evolution as a function of R. Using simple models, we are able to reproduce perfectly the evolution of gaps in k space, the evolution of the CDW wave vector with R, and the shape of the residual metallic pockets. Finally, we give an estimation of the CDWinteraction parameters and find that the change in the electronic density of states n (EF), due to lattice expansion when different R ions are inserted, has the correct order of magnitude to explain the evolution of the CDW properties.

  15. Electronic band structure of beryllium oxide

    Sashin, V A; Kheifets, A S; Ford, M J

    2003-01-01

    The energy-momentum resolved valence band structure of beryllium oxide has been measured by electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS). Band dispersions, bandwidths and intervalence bandgap, electron momentum density (EMD) and density of occupied states have been extracted from the EMS data. The experimental results are compared with band structure calculations performed within the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital approximation. Our experimental bandwidths of 2.1 +- 0.2 and 4.8 +- 0.3 eV for the oxygen s and p bands, respectively, are in accord with theoretical predictions, as is the s-band EMD after background subtraction. Contrary to the calculations, however, the measured p-band EMD shows large intensity at the GAMMA point. The measured full valence bandwidth of 19.4 +- 0.3 eV is at least 1.4 eV larger than the theory. The experiment also finds a significantly higher value for the p-to-s-band EMD ratio in a broad momentum range compared to the theory.

  16. Band Anticrossing in Dilute Germanium Carbides Using Hybrid Density Functionals

    Stephenson, Chad A.; O'brien, William A.; Qi, Meng; Penninger, Michael; Schneider, William F.; Wistey, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    Dilute germanium carbides (Ge1- x C x ) offer a direct bandgap for compact silicon photonics, but widely varying properties have been reported. This work reports improved band structure calculations for Ge1- x C x using ab initio simulations that employ the HSE06 exchange-correlation density functional. Contrary to Vegard's law, the conduction band minimum at Γ is consistently found to decrease with increasing C content, while L and X valleys change much more slowly. The calculated Ge bandgap is within 11% of experimental values. A decrease in energy at the Γ conduction band valley of (170 meV ± 50)/%C is predicted, leading to a direct bandgap for x > 0.008. These results indicate a promising material for Group IV lasers.

  17. Band structure and nuclear dynamics

    The relation between the Variable Moment of Inertia model and the Interacting Boson Model are discussed from a phenomenological viewpoint. New results on ground state mean-square radii in nuclei far from stability are reported, and a discussion of band structure extending to high angular momentum states and methods of extracting information on the underlying dynamics is given

  18. Engineering chiral density waves and topological band structures by multiple-Q superpositions of collinear up-up-down-down orders

    Hayami, Satoru; Ozawa, Ryo; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic orders characterized by multiple ordering vectors harbor noncollinear and noncoplanar spin textures and can be a source of unusual electronic properties through the spin Berry phase mechanism. We theoretically show that such multiple-Q states are stabilized in itinerant magnets in the form of superpositions of collinear up-up-down-down (UUDD) spin states, which accompany the density waves of vector and scalar chirality. The result is drawn by examining the ground state of the Kondo lattice model with classical localized moments, especially when the Fermi surface is tuned to be partially nested by the symmetry-related commensurate vectors. We unveil the instability toward a double-Q UUDD state with vector chirality density waves on the square lattice and a triple-Q UUDD state with scalar chirality density waves on the triangular lattice, using the perturbative theory and variational calculations. The former double-Q state is also confirmed by large-scale Langevin dynamics simulations. We also show that, for a sufficiently large exchange coupling, the chirality density waves can induce rich nontrivial topology of electronic structures, such as the massless Dirac semimetal, Chern insulator with quantized topological Hall response, and peculiar edge states which depend on the phase of chirality density waves at the edges.

  19. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  20. High-energy band structure of gold

    Christensen, N. Egede

    1976-01-01

    The band structure of gold for energies far above the Fermi level has been calculated using the relativistic augmented-plane-wave method. The calculated f-band edge (Γ6-) lies 15.6 eV above the Fermi level is agreement with recent photoemission work. The band model is applied to interpret...

  1. Band structure of 79Br

    High-spin states of 79Br have been studied in the reaction 76Ge(7Li, 4nγ) at 32 MeV. A gamma-detector array with twelve Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors was used. The positive-parity yrast states, interpreted as a rotationally aligned g(9(2)) proton band, and the negative-parity ground state band have been extended to spins of (33(2+)) and (25(2-)), respectively. Lifetime measurements indicate that both bands have a similar quadrupole deformation of β2 ∼ 0.2. The positive-parity α = -(1(2)) band has been identified. Several new inter-band transitions are observed. A cranked-shell model analysis shows that the νg(9(2)) and πg(9(2)) alignments occur in the positive-parity and the negative-parity bands at rotational frequencies of ℎω ∼ 0.6 and 0.4 MeV, respectively. The level energies and the electromagnetic properties of the g(9(2)) band can be well reproduced by a particle-rotor model calculation with an axially symmetric core

  2. Density Measurements in Air by Optically Exciting the Cordes Bands of I2

    Balla, R. Jeffrey; Exton, Reginald J.

    2000-01-01

    We describe an optical method based on laser-induced fluorescence for obtaining instantaneous measurements of density along a line in low-density air seeded with I2. The Cordes bands of I2 (D(sup 1)sigma(sup +, sub u)) left arrow X(sup 1)sigma(sup +, sub g)) are excited with a tunable ArF excimer laser. air densities in the range (0.1-6.5) x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3) are measured over 295-583 K using the density-dependent emission ratio of two emission bands of I2; the 340 nm bands and the diffuse-structured McLennan bands near 320 nm.

  3. Maximizing band gaps in plate structures

    Halkjær, Søren; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    Band gaps, i.e., frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate, can be found in elastic structures for which there is a certain periodic modulation of the material properties or structure. In this paper, we maximize the band gap size for bending waves in a Mindlin plate. We analyze an infinite...

  4. Modeling charged defects inside density functional theory band gaps

    Density functional theory (DFT) has emerged as an important tool to probe microscopic behavior in materials. The fundamental band gap defines the energy scale for charge transition energy levels of point defects in ionic and covalent materials. The eigenvalue gap between occupied and unoccupied states in conventional DFT, the Kohn–Sham gap, is often half or less of the experimental band gap, seemingly precluding quantitative studies of charged defects. Applying explicit and rigorous control of charge boundary conditions in supercells, we find that calculations of defect energy levels derived from total energy differences give accurate predictions of charge transition energy levels in Si and GaAs, unhampered by a band gap problem. The GaAs system provides a good theoretical laboratory for investigating band gap effects in defect level calculations: depending on the functional and pseudopotential, the Kohn–Sham gap can be as large as 1.1 eV or as small as 0.1 eV. We find that the effective defect band gap, the computed range in defect levels, is mostly insensitive to the Kohn–Sham gap, demonstrating it is often possible to use conventional DFT for quantitative studies of defect chemistry governing interesting materials behavior in semiconductors and oxides despite a band gap problem

  5. Electron charge densities at conduction-band edges of semiconductors

    We demonstrate that both the empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) and the linear combination of atomiclike orbitals (LCAO) approach are capable of producing consistent electronic charge distributions in a compound semiconductor. Since the EPM approach is known to produce total valence electron charge densities which compare well with experimental x-ray data (e.g., Si), this work serves as a further test for the LCAO method. In particular, the EPM scheme, which uses an extended plane-wave basis, and the LCAO scheme, which employs a localized Gaussian basis, are used, with the same empirical potential as input, to analyze both the total valence electron charge density and the charge density of the first conduction band at the GAMMA, L, and X k points of the Brillouin zone. These charge densities are decomposed into their s-, p-, and d-orbital contributions, and this information is used to interpret the differences in the topologies of the conduction bands at GAMMA, L, and X. Such differences are crucial for a comprehensive understanding of interstitial impurities and the response of specific band states to perturbations in compound semiconductors

  6. Carrier density dependence of 1/f noise in graphene explained as a result of the interplay between band-structure and inhomogeneities

    Pellegrini, B.; Marconcini, P.; Macucci, M.; Fiori, G.; Basso, G.

    2016-05-01

    We present a model for 1/f noise in graphene based on an analysis of the effect of charge trapping and detrapping events on the fluctuations of the number of charge carriers. Inclusion of a Gaussian distribution of fluctuations of the electrostatic potential enables us to reproduce all the various experimentally observed behaviors of the flicker noise power spectral density as a function of carrier density, both for monolayer and bilayer graphene. The key feature of a flicker noise minimum at the Dirac point that appears in bilayer graphene and sometimes also in monolayer graphene is explained in terms of the disappearance, when the number of electrons equals that of holes, of the carrier number fluctuations induced by trapping events. Such a disappearance is analyzed with two different approaches, in order to gain a better understanding of the physical origin of the effect, and to make some considerations about possible analogous phenomena in other semiconductors.

  7. Density-matrix renormalization group study of pairing when electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions coexist: effect of the electronic band structure

    Tezuka, Masaki; Arita, Ryotaro; Aoki, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Density-matrix renormalization group is used to study the pairing when both of electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions are strong in the Holstein-Hubbard model at half-filling in a region intermediate between the adiabatic (Migdal's) and antiadiabatic limits. We have found: (i) the pairing correlation obtained for a one-dimensional system is nearly degenerate with the CDW correlation in a region where the phonon-induced attraction is comparable with the electron-electron repulsion,...

  8. Electronic band structures of binary skutterudites

    The electronic properties of complex binary skutterudites, MX3 (M = Co, Rh, Ir; X = P, As, Sb) are explored, using various density functional theory (DFT) based theoretical approaches including Green's Function (GW) as well as regular and non-regular Tran Blaha modified Becke Jhonson (TB-mBJ) methods. The wide range of calculated bandgap values for each compound of this skutterudites family confirm that they are theoretically as challenging as their experimental studies. The computationally expensive GW method, which is generally assume to be efficient in the reproduction of the experimental bandgaps, is also not very successful in the calculation of bandgaps. In this article, the issue of the theoretical bandgaps of these compounds is resolved by reproducing the accurate experimental bandgaps, using the recently developed non-regular TB-mBJ approach, based on DFT. The effectiveness of this technique is due to the fact that a large volume of the binary skutterudite crystal is empty and hence quite large proportion of electrons lie outside of the atomic spheres, where unlike LDA and GGA which are poor in the treatment of these electrons, this technique properly treats these electrons and hence reproduces the clear electronic picture of these compounds. - Highlights: • Theoretical and experimental electronic band structures of binary skutterudites are reviewed. • The literature reveals that none of the existing theoretical results are consistent with the experiments. • GW, regular and non-regular TB-mBJ methods are used to reproduce the correct results. • The GW and regular TB-mBJ results are better than the available results in literature. • However, non-regular TB-mBJ reproduces the correct experimental band structures

  9. Electronic band structures of binary skutterudites

    Khan, Banaras [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Aliabad, H.A. Rahnamaye [Department of Physics, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saifullah [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Jalali-Asadabadi, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan (UI), 81744 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khan, Imad [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Ahmad, Iftikhar, E-mail: ahma5532@gmail.com [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan)

    2015-10-25

    The electronic properties of complex binary skutterudites, MX{sub 3} (M = Co, Rh, Ir; X = P, As, Sb) are explored, using various density functional theory (DFT) based theoretical approaches including Green's Function (GW) as well as regular and non-regular Tran Blaha modified Becke Jhonson (TB-mBJ) methods. The wide range of calculated bandgap values for each compound of this skutterudites family confirm that they are theoretically as challenging as their experimental studies. The computationally expensive GW method, which is generally assume to be efficient in the reproduction of the experimental bandgaps, is also not very successful in the calculation of bandgaps. In this article, the issue of the theoretical bandgaps of these compounds is resolved by reproducing the accurate experimental bandgaps, using the recently developed non-regular TB-mBJ approach, based on DFT. The effectiveness of this technique is due to the fact that a large volume of the binary skutterudite crystal is empty and hence quite large proportion of electrons lie outside of the atomic spheres, where unlike LDA and GGA which are poor in the treatment of these electrons, this technique properly treats these electrons and hence reproduces the clear electronic picture of these compounds. - Highlights: • Theoretical and experimental electronic band structures of binary skutterudites are reviewed. • The literature reveals that none of the existing theoretical results are consistent with the experiments. • GW, regular and non-regular TB-mBJ methods are used to reproduce the correct results. • The GW and regular TB-mBJ results are better than the available results in literature. • However, non-regular TB-mBJ reproduces the correct experimental band structures.

  10. Bulk band structure of Bi2Te3

    Michiardi, Matteo; Aguilera, Irene; Bianchi, Marco;

    2014-01-01

    The bulk band structure of Bi2Te3 has been determined by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and compared to first-principles calculations. We have performed calculations using the local density approximation (LDA) of density functional theory and the one-shot GW approximation within the all......-electron full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave (FLAPW) formalism, fully taking into account spin-orbit coupling. Quasiparticle effects produce significant changes in the band structure of Bi2Te3 when compared to LDA. Experimental and calculated results are compared in the spectral regions where...... distinct differences between the LDA and GW results are present. Overall a superior agreement with GW is found, highlighting the importance of many-body effects in the band structure of this family of topological insulators....

  11. One-Dimensional Anisotropic Band Gap Structure

    2000-01-01

    The band gap structure of one-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal has been studied by means of the transfer matrix formalism. From the analytic expressions and numeric calculations we see some general characteristics of the band gap structure of anisotropic photonic crystals, each band separates into two branches and the two branches react to polarization sensitively. In the practical case of oblique incidence, gaps move towards high frequency when the angle of incidence increases. Under some special conditions, the two branches become degenerate again.

  12. Excitation spectra and ground-state properties from density functional theory for the inverted band-structure systems $\\beta$-HgS, HgSe, and HgTe

    Delin, A

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a systematic density-functional study of the mercury chalcogenide compounds $\\beta$-HgS, HgSe, and HgTe using an all-electron full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) method. We find that, in the zinc-blende structure, both HgSe and HgTe are semimetals whereas $\\beta$-HgS has a small spin-orbit induced band gap. Our calculated relativistic photoemission and inverse photoemission spectra (PES and IPES, respectively) reproduce very well the most recently measured spectra, as do also our theoretical optical spectra. In contrast to the normal situation, we find that the local density approximation (LDA) to the density functional gives calculated equilibrium volumes in much better agreement with experiment than does the generalized gradient corrected functional (GGA). We also address the problem of treating relativistic $p$ electrons with methods based on a scalar-relativistic basis set, and show that the effect is rather small for the present systems.

  13. Band Structure and Optical Properties of Ordered AuCu3

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Lengkeek, H. P.

    1979-01-01

    initio band structure obtained by the relativistic linear muffin-tin orbitals method. The band calculation reveals that ordered AuCu3 has distinct copper and gold d bands positioned in and hybridizing with an s band common to copper and gold. The calculated state density is found to be in good agreement...

  14. Phononic band gap structures as optimal designs

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use topology optimization to design phononic band gap structures. We consider 2D structures subjected to periodic loading and obtain the distribution of two materials with high contrast in material properties that gives the minimal vibrational response of the structure. Both in...

  15. Development of S-band accelerating structure

    In Pohang Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) in Korea construction of XFEL (X-ray Free electron Lazar) institution is under construction aiming at the completion in 2014. Energy 10 GeV of the linac part of this institution and main frequency are planned in S-band (2856 MHz), and about 178 S-band 3m accelerating structures are due to be used for this linac. The oscillation of an X-ray laser requires very low emittance electron beam. On the other hand, since the accelerating structure which accelerates an electron beam has a feed port of microwave (iris), the electromagnetic field asymmetry of the microwave feeding device called coupler worsens the emittance of an electron beam. MHI manufactured two kinds of S-band accelerating structures with which the electromagnetic field asymmetry of coupler cavity was compensated for PALXFEL linac. We report these accelerating structures. (author)

  16. Band alignment of semiconductors from density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory

    Hinuma, Yoyo; Grüneis, Andreas; Kresse, Georg; Oba, Fumiyasu

    2014-10-01

    The band lineup, or alignment, of semiconductors is investigated via first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and many-body perturbation theory (MBPT). Twenty-one semiconductors including C, Si, and Ge in the diamond structure, BN, AlP, AlAs, AlSb, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs, InSb, ZnS, ZnSe, ZnTe, CdS, CdSe, and CdTe in the zinc-blende structure, and GaN and ZnO in the wurtzite structure are considered in view of their fundamental and technological importance. Band alignments are determined using the valence and conduction band offsets from heterointerface calculations, the ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (EA) from surface calculations, and the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum relative to the branch point energy, or charge neutrality level, from bulk calculations. The performance of various approximations to DFT and MBPT, namely the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) semilocal functional, the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) hybrid functional, and the GW approximation with and without vertex corrections in the screened Coulomb interaction, is assessed using the GWΓ1 approximation as a reference, where first-order vertex corrections are included in the self-energy. The experimental IPs, EAs, and band offsets are well reproduced by GWΓ1 for most of the semiconductor surfaces and heterointerfaces considered in this study. The PBE and HSE functionals show sizable errors in the IPs and EAs, in particular for group II-VI semiconductors with wide band gaps, but are much better in the prediction of relative band positions or band offsets due to error cancellation. The performance of the GW approximation is almost on par with GWΓ1 as far as relative band positions are concerned. The band alignments based on average interfacial band offsets for all pairs of 17 semiconductors and branch point energies agree with explicitly calculated interfacial band offsets with small mean absolute errors of both ˜0.1eV, indicating a

  17. Band Structure Based Analysis of Certain Photonic Crystal Structures

    Wolff, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystals are periodic dielectric structures that may exhibit a complete photonic band gap. First, I discuss geometric properties of the band structure such as band edges. In a second part, I present work on photonic Wannier functions and their use for solving the wave equation. The third part is devoted to applications of the presented methods: A polarization resolved transmission experiment of opel films and an analogy experiment for spontaneous emission inside a photonic crystal.

  18. Band structures of 121,123I

    The band structures of 121,123I nuclei have been studied using a version of the particle-rotor-model in which the experimental excitation energies of the neighbouring (A-1) cores can be fed directly as input parameters. The calculations have been carried out with axially symmetric Nilsson potential with both prolate and oblate deformations. The parameters of the model have been chosen from earlier theoretical work and experimental odd-even mass differences. Only the Coriolis attenuation factor has been treated as adjustable parameter. The theoretical band structures are in very good agreement with the available experimental data. (orig.)

  19. Band structure of CdTe under high pressure

    The band structures and density of states of cadmium telluride (CdTe) under various pressures ranging from normal to 4.5 Mbar are obtained. The electronic band structure at normal pressure of CdTe (ZnS structure) is analyzed and the direct band gap value is found to be 1.654 eV. CdTe becomes metal and superconductor under high pressure but before that it undergoes structural phase transition from ZnS phase to NaCl phase. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and the phase transition pressure at which the compounds undergo structural phase transition from ZnS to NaCl are predicted from the total energy calculations. The density of states at the Fermi level (N(EF)) gets enhanced after metallization, which leads to the superconductivity in CdTe. In our calculation, the metallization pressure (PM = 1.935 Mbar) and the corresponding reduced volume ((V/V0)M = 0.458) are estimated. Metallization occurs via direct closing of band gap at Γ point. (author)

  20. Band structure engineering in organic semiconductors.

    Schwarze, Martin; Tress, Wolfgang; Beyer, Beatrice; Gao, Feng; Scholz, Reinhard; Poelking, Carl; Ortstein, Katrin; Günther, Alrun A; Kasemann, Daniel; Andrienko, Denis; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-17

    A key breakthrough in modern electronics was the introduction of band structure engineering, the design of almost arbitrary electronic potential structures by alloying different semiconductors to continuously tune the band gap and band-edge energies. Implementation of this approach in organic semiconductors has been hindered by strong localization of the electronic states in these materials. We show that the influence of so far largely ignored long-range Coulomb interactions provides a workaround. Photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the ionization energies of crystalline organic semiconductors can be continuously tuned over a wide range by blending them with their halogenated derivatives. Correspondingly, the photovoltaic gap and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells can be continuously tuned by the blending ratio of these donors. PMID:27313043

  1. Design of smooth orthogonal wavelets with beautiful structure from 2-band to 4-band

    2006-01-01

    A complete algorithm to design 4-band orthogonal wavelets with beautiful structure from 2-band orthogonal wavelets is presented. For more smoothness, the conception of transfer vanishing moment is introduced by transplanting the requirements of vanishing moment from the 4-band wavelets to the 2-band ones. Consequently, the design of 4-band orthogonal wavelets with P vanishing moments and beautiful structure from 2-band ones with P transfer vanishing moments is completed.

  2. High spin band structure in 139Nd

    XU Qiang; ZHU Sheng-Jiang; CHE Xing-Lai; DING Huai-Bo; GU Long; ZHU Li-Hua; WU Xiao-Guang; LIU Ying; HE Chuang-Ye; LI Li-Hua; PAN Bo; HAO Xin; LI Guang-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    High-spin states in 139Nd nucleus have been reinvestigated with the reaction 128Te (16O, 5n) at a beam energy of 90 MeV. The level scheme has been expanded with spin up to 47/2 h. At the low spin states,the yrast collective structure built on the vh(-1)(11/2) multiplet shows a transitional shape with γ≈32° according to calculations of the triaxial rotor-plus-particle model. Three collective oblate bands with γ~-60° at the high spin states were identified for the first time. A band crossing is observed around hw ~0.4 MeV in one oblate band based on the 25/2- level.

  3. Hubbard-U band-structure methods

    Albers, R.C.; Christensen, Niels Egede; Svane, Axel

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen a large increase in the number of electronic-structure calculations that involve adding a Hubbard term to the local-density approximation band-structure Hamiltonian. The Hubbard term is then determined either at the mean-field level or with sophisticated many...... inconsistent with what the calculations actually do. Although many of these calculations are often treated as essentially first-principles calculations, in fact, we argue that they should be viewed from an entirely different point of view, namely, as based on phenomenological many-body corrections to band-structure......-body techniques such as using dynamical mean-field theory. We review the physics underlying these approaches and discuss their strengths and weaknesses in terms of the larger issues of electronic structure that they involve. In particular, we argue that the common assumptions made to justify such calculations are...

  4. The band-gap enhanced photovoltaic structure

    Tessler, Nir

    2016-05-01

    We critically examine the recently suggested structure that was postulated to potentially add 50% to the photo-conversion efficiency of organic solar cells. We find that the structure could be realized using stepwise increase in the gap as long as the steps are not above 0.1 eV. We also show that the charge extraction is not compromised due to an interplay between the contact's space charge and the energy level modification, which result in a flat energy band at the extracting contact.

  5. Coral Skeleton Density Banding: Biotic Response to Changes in Sea Surface Temperature

    Hill, C. A.; Sivaguru, M.; Fried, G. A.; Fouke, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    Density bands in the CaCO3 (aragonite) skeleton of scleractinian corals are commonly used as chronometers, where crystalline couplets of high and low density bands represent the span of one year. Isotopic analysis of these density bands provides a sensitive reconstructive tool for paleoclimatology and paleoecology. However, the detailed biotic mechanisms controlling coral skeleton aragonite nucleation and crystallization events and resulting skeletal growth rate remain uncertain. The coral tissue organic matrix, composed of macromolecules secreted by the calicoblastic ectoderm, is closely associated with skeletal precipitation and is itself incorporated into the skeleton. We postulate that density banding is primarily controlled by changes in the rate of aragonite crystal precipitation mediated by the coral holobiont response to changes in sea surface temperature (SST). To test this hypothesis, data were collected from coral skeleton-tissue biopsies (2.5 cm in diameter) extracted from four species of Montastraea growing on the fringing reef tract of Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. Annual mean variation in SST on Curacao range from 29o in mid-September to 26o C in late February. Samples were collected at strategic time periods spanning the 3o C annual variations in SST. Our nanometer-scale optical analyses of skeletal morphology have revealed consistent changes between high- and low-skeletal density bands, resulting in an 11% increase in the volume of aragonite precipitated in high-density skeletal bands. The re-localization and/or change in abundance of mucus, carbonic anhydrase (a molecule that catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide), calmodulin (a calcium-binding protein) and the change in density of gastrodermal symbiotic dinoflagellates has permitted estimates of seasonally-fluctuating carbon allocation by the coral holobiont in response to changing environmental conditions. This digital reconstruction of over 2000 images of one-micron-thick histological

  6. Nonequilibrium band structure of nano-devices

    Hackenbuchner, S.; Sabathil, M.; Majewski, J. A.; Zandler, G.; Vogl, P.; Beham, E.; Zrenner, A.; Lugli, P.

    2002-03-01

    A method is developed for calculating, in a consistent manner, the realistic electronic structure of three-dimensional (3-D) heterostructure quantum devices under bias and its current density close to equilibrium. The nonequilibrium electronic structure is characterized by local Fermi levels that are calculated self-consistently. We have applied this scheme to predict asymmetric Stark shifts and tunneling of confined electrons and holes in single-dot GaAs/InGaAs photodiodes.

  7. Emission bands of phosphorus and calculation of band structure of rare earth phosphides

    The method of x-ray emission spectroscopy has been used to investigate the electronic structure of monophosphides of rare-earth metals (REM). The fluorescence K bands of phosphorus have been obtained in LaP, PrP, SmP, GdP, TbP, DyP, HoP, ErP, TmP, YbP, and LuP and also the Lsub(2,3) bands of phosphorus in ErP, TmP, YbP, and LuP. Using the Green function technique involving the muffin-tin potential, the energy spectrum for ErP has been calculated in the single-electron approximation. The hystogram of electronic state distribution N(E) is compared with the experimental K and Lsub(2,3) bands of phosphorus in ErP. The agreement between the main details of N(E) and that of x-ray spectra allows to state that the model used provides a good description of the electron density distribution in crystals of REM monophosphides. In accordance with the character of the N(E) distribution the compounds under study are classified as semimetals or semiconductors with a very narrow forbidden band

  8. Analysis of the electronic structure of crystals through band structure unfolding

    Gordienko, A. B.; Kosobutsky, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we consider an alternative implementation of the band structure unfolding method within the framework of the density functional theory, which combines the advantages of the basis of localized functions and plane waves. This approach has been used to analyze the electronic structure of the ordered CuCl x Br1- x copper halide alloys and F 0 center in MgO that enables us to reveal qualitatively the features remaining hidden when using the standard supercell method, because of the complex band structure of systems with defects.

  9. Phononic First Band Gap of Quaternary Layered Periodic Structure with the Lumped-Mass Method

    Chen Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing band gap analysis is mostly focused on the binary structure, while the researches on the quaternary layered periodic structure are still lacking. In this paper, the unidimensional lumped-mass method in the phonic crystal theory is firstly improved so that the material viscoelasticity can be taken into consideration. Then, the binary layered periodic structure is converted into a quaternary one and band gaps appear at low frequency range. Finally, the effects of density, elastic modulus, damping ratio, and the thickness of single material on the first band gap of the quaternary layered periodic structure are analyzed after the algorithm is promoted. The research findings show that effects of density, elastic modulus, and thickness of materials on the first band gap are considerable but those of damping ratio are not so distinct. This research provides theoretical bases for band gap design of the quaternary layered periodic structure.

  10. Electron density and carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands

    Gnacinski, P.; Sikorski, J. K.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    We have used the ionisation equilibrium equation to derive the electron density in interstellar clouds in the direction to 13 stars. A linear relation was found, that allows the determination of the electron density from the Mg I and Mg II column densities in diffuse clouds. The comparison of normalised equivalent width of 12 DIBs with the electron density shows that the DIBs equivalent width do not change with electron density varying in the range ne=0.01-2.5 cm^-3. Therefore the DIBs carrie...

  11. Electronic band structure of tetracene-TCNQ and perylene-TCNQ compounds

    Shokaryev, I.; Buurma, A. J. C.; Jurchescu, O. D.; Uijttewaal, M. A.; de Wijs, G.A.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Groot, R.A. de

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between the crystal structures, band structures, and electronic properties of acene-TCNQ complexes has been investigated. We focus on the newly synthesized crystals of the charge-transfer salt tetracene-TCNQ and similar to it. perylene-TCNQ, potentially interesting for realization of ambipolar transport. The band structures were calculated from first principles using density-functional theory (DFT). Despite the similarity in the crystal structures of the acene-TCNQ complexes ...

  12. First principle study of band structure of SrMO3 perovskites

    Daga, Avinash; Sharma, Smita

    2016-05-01

    First principle study of band structure calculations in the local density approximations (LDA) as well as in the generalized gradient approximations (GGA) have been used to determine the electronic structure of SrMO3 where M stands for Ti, Zr and Mo. Occurrence of band gap proves SrTiO3 and SrZrO3 to be insulating. A small band gap is observed in SrMoO3 perovskite signifies it to be metallic. Band structures are found to compare well with the available data in the literature showing the relevance of this approach. ABINIT computer code has been used to carry out all the calculations.

  13. A Theoretical Structure of High School Concert Band Performance

    Bergee, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to verify a theoretical structure for high school concert band performance and to test that structure for viability, generality, and invariance. A total of 101 university students enrolled in two different bands rated two high school band performances (a "first"…

  14. Electronic structure and electron momentum density in TiSi

    Ghaleb, A.M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Kirkuk (Iraq); Mohammad, F.M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Tikreet, Tikreet (Iraq); Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Sharma, Mukesh [Physics Division, Forensic Science Laboratory, Jaipur, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2013-03-01

    We report the electron momentum density in titanium monosilicide using {sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profile has been compared with the theoretical profiles computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). The energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface structures of TiSi are reported using the LCAO and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave methods. Theoretical anisotropies in directional Compton profiles are interpreted in terms of energy bands. To confirm the conducting behavior, we also report the real space analysis of experimental Compton profile of TiSi.

  15. Electronic structure and electron momentum density in TiSi

    Ghaleb, A. M.; Mohammad, F. M.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Sharma, Mukesh; Ahuja, B. L.

    2013-03-01

    We report the electron momentum density in titanium monosilicide using 241Am Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profile has been compared with the theoretical profiles computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). The energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface structures of TiSi are reported using the LCAO and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave methods. Theoretical anisotropies in directional Compton profiles are interpreted in terms of energy bands. To confirm the conducting behavior, we also report the real space analysis of experimental Compton profile of TiSi.

  16. Quasiparticle band structure of thirteen semiconductors and insulators

    By using a model dielectric matrix in electron self-energy evaluations the computational effort of a quasiparticle band-structure calculation for a semiconductor is greatly reduced. Applications to various systems with or without inversion symmetry, having narrow or wide band gaps, and semiconductor alloys demonstrate the reliability and accuracy of the method. Calculations have been performed for thirteen semiconducting or insulating materials: Si, LiCl, AlP, AlAs, AlSb, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs, InSb, and the Al0.5Ga0.5As and In0.53Ga0.47As alloys. Excellent agreement with experimental results is obtained for the quasiparticle energies for these materials. The only three exceptions, E(Γ1c) of AlP, E(L1c) of AlAs, and E(L1c) of AlSb are discussed and attributed to various experimental uncertainties. Several other quasiparticle-excitation-related properties are also examined in this work. The many-body corrections to the eigenvalues of the valence-band-maximum states obtained from the local-density approximation are calculated for the zinc-blende-structure semiconductors, which are widely used in semiconductor-interface studies. In the present approach, the static screening of the Coulomb interaction between two electrons in a crystal is determined using a model that depends only on the local charge densities at these two points. Since a direct quantitative modeling of the electron self-energy operator has proven difficult, the successful application of the present model-dielectric-function scheme in self-energy calculations makes possible detailed studies of the quasiparticle properties of rather complex systems, which would be otherwise computationally too demanding

  17. Density changes in shear bands of a metallic glass determined by correlative analytical transmission electron microscopy

    Density changes between sheared zones and their surrounding amorphous matrix as a result of plastic deformation in a cold-rolled metallic glass (melt-spun Al88Y7Fe5) were determined using high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) detector intensities supplemented by electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) and nano-beam diffraction analyses. Sheared zones or shear bands were observed as regions of bright or dark contrast arising from a higher or lower density relative to the matrix. Moreover, abrupt contrast changes from bright to dark and vice versa were found within individual shear bands. We associate the decrease in density mainly with an enhanced free volume in the shear bands and the increase in density with concomitant changes of the mass. This interpretation is further supported by changes in the zero loss and Plasmon signal originating from such sites. The limits of this new approach are discussed. - Highlights: • We describe a novel approach for measuring densities in shear bands of metallic glasses. • The linear relation of the dark-field intensity I/I0 and the mass thickness ρt was used. • Individual shear bands showed abrupt contrast changes from bright to dark and vice versa. • Density changes ranging from about −10% to +6% were found for such shear bands. • Mixtures of amorphous/medium range ordered domains were found within the shear bands

  18. Band-Structure of Thallium by the LMTO Method

    Holtham, P. M.; Jan, J. P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1977-01-01

    The relativistic band structure of thallium has been calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) method. The positions and extents of the bands were found to follow the Wigner-Seitz rule approximately, and the origin of the dispersion of the bands was established from the canonical s and...

  19. Kink Band Instability and Propagation in Layered Structures

    Wadee, M.A.; Hunt, G.W.; Peletier, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    A recent two-dimensional prototype model for the initiation of kink banding in compressed layered structures is extended to embrace the two propagation mechanisms of band broadening and band progression. As well as interlayer friction, overburden pressure and layer bending energy, the characteristic

  20. Dual-band electromagnetic band gap structure for noise isolation in mixed signal SiP

    Rotaru, M. D.; Sykulski, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    A compact dual-band electromagnetic band-gap (EBG) structure is proposed. It is shown through numerical simulation using 3D electromagnetic finite element modelling that by adding a slit to the classical mushroom shape an extra resonance is introduced and thus dual-band EBG structures can be built by cascading these new elements. It is also demonstrated that this novel approach can be used to isolate noise in a system such as a dual band transceiver integrated into a mixed signal system in a ...

  1. α-cluster structure and density waves in oblate nuclei

    Pentagon and triangle shapes in 28Si and 12C are discussed in relation to nuclear density waves. In the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics calculations, the Kπ=5- band in 28Si and the Kπ=3- band in 12C are described by the pentagon and triangle shapes, respectively. These negative-parity bands can be interpreted as the parity partners of the Kπ=0+ ground bands and they are constructed from the parity-asymmetric-intrinsic states. The pentagon and the triangle shapes originate in 7α- and 3α-cluster structures, respectively. In a mean-field picture, they are described also by the static one-dimensional density waves at the edge of the oblate states. In analyses with ideal α-cluster models using Brink-Bloch cluster wave functions and that with a simplified model, we show that the static edge density waves for the pentagon and triangle shapes can be understood by spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry, i.e., the instability of the oblate states with respect to the edge density waves. The density wave is enhanced in the Z=N nuclei due to the proton-neutron coherent density waves, while it is suppressed in Z≠N nuclei.

  2. Self energy corrections to the ''ab initio'' band structure: Chromium

    We describe the effect of many particle corrections to improve the electronic energy spectrum calculated in the framework of the Density Functional Formalism (DFF). We show that it is possible to consider an n particle diagram like a correction to the DFF results for electronic structure, if we take into account the electron-electron interaction with non-zero transmitted momentum q or energy ε. The model is proposed for calculating the leading term of the self-energy expansion as a power series in interactions, i.e. the second order term under the conditions q=O and ε≠O. This model is illustrated by calculating the electronic band structure and optical properties of anti ferromagnetic chromium. The self-energy correction leads to a better agreement between the theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of electronic properties. (author). 40 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Band structure and optical properties of LiKB4O7 single crystal

    Smok, P; Seinert, H; Kityk, [No Value; Berdowski, J

    2003-01-01

    The band structure (BS), electronic charge density distribution and linear optical properties of the LiKB4O7 (LKB4) single crystal are calculated using a self-consistent norm-conserving pseudo-potential method within the framework of the local density approximation theory. Dispersion of the imaginar

  4. Elucidating the stop bands of structurally colored systems through recursion

    Amir, Ariel

    2012-01-01

    Interference phenomena are the source of some of the spectacular colors of animals and plants in nature. In some of these systems, the physical structure consists of an ordered array of layers with alternating high and low refractive indices. This periodicity leads to an optical band structure that is analogous to the electronic band structure encountered in semiconductor physics; namely, specific bands of wavelengths (the stop bands) are perfectly reflected. Here, we present a minimal model for optical band structure in a periodic multilayer and solve it using recursion relations. We present experimental data for various beetles, whose optical structure resembles the proposed model. The stop bands emerge in the limit of an infinite number of layers by finding the fixed point of the recursive relations. In order for these to converge, an infinitesimal amount of absorption needs to be present, reminiscent of the regularization procedures commonly used in physics calculations. Thus, using only the phenomenon of...

  5. Density structures inside the plasmasphere: Cluster observations

    Darrouzet, F.; Decreau, P.M.E.; De Keyser, J.; Masson, A.; Gallagher, D.L.; Santolik, O.; Sandel, B.R.; Trotignon, J.G.; Rauch, J.L.; Le Guirriec, E.; Canu, P.; Sedgemore-Schulthess, F.; Andre, M.; Lemaire, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    The electron density profiles derived from the EFW and WHISPER instruments on board the four Cluster spacecraft reveal density structures inside the plasmasphere and at its outer boundary, the plasmapause. We have conducted a statistical study to characterize these density structures. We focus on...

  6. Band structures of TiO2 doped with N, C and B

    2006-01-01

    This study on the band structures and charge densities of nitrogen (N)-, carbon (C)- and boron (B)-doped titanium dioxide (TiO2) by first-principles simulation with the CASTEP code (Segall et al., 2002) showed that the three 2p bands of impurity atom are located above the valence-band maximum and below the Ti 3d bands, and that along with the decreasing of impurity atomic number, the fluctuations become more intensive. We cannot observe obvious band-gap narrowing in our result.Therefore, the cause of absorption in visible light might be the isolated impurity atom 2p states in band-gap rather than the band-gap narrowing.

  7. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  8. Band structure of 158Gd in DPPQ and IBM

    The band structure of 158Gd has been studied extensively in the decay of 158Eu and in reaction work. The Kumar-Baranger semimicroscopic DPPQ model yields the parameters of the collective Hamiltonian and predicts the band structure. The Interacting Boson Model (IBM-1) was also used for comparison

  9. The complex band structure for armchair graphene nanoribbons

    Zhang Liu-Jun; Xia Tong-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Using a tight binding transfer matrix method, we calculate the complex band structure of armchair graphene nanoribbons. The real part of the complex band structure calculated by the transfer matrix method fits well with the bulk band structure calculated by a Hermitian matrix. The complex band structure gives extra information on carrier's decay behaviour. The imaginary loop connects the conduction and valence band, and can profoundly affect the characteristics of nanoscale electronic device made with graphene nanoribbons. In this work, the complex band structure calculation includes not only the first nearest neighbour interaction, but also the effects of edge bond relaxation and the third nearest neighbour interaction. The band gap is classified into three classes. Due to the edge bond relaxation and the third nearest neighbour interaction term, it opens a band gap for N= 3M-1. The band gap is almost unchanged for N = 3M + 1, but decreased for N = 3M. The maximum imaginary wave vector length provides additional information about the electrical characteristics of graphene nmaoribbons, and is also classified into three classes.

  10. Topological band order, structural, electronic and optical properties of XPdBi (X = Lu, Sc) compounds

    Narimani, M.; Nourbakhsh, Z.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the structural, electronic and optical properties of LuPdBi and ScPdBi compounds are investigated using the density functional theory by WIEN2K package within the generalized gradient approximation, local density approximation, Engel-Vosco generalized gradient approximations and modified Becke-Johnson potential approaches. The topological phases and band orders of these compounds are studied. The effect of pressure on band inversion strength, electron density of states and the linear coefficient of the electronic specific heat of these compounds is investigated. Furthermore, the effect of pressure on real and imaginary parts of dielectric function, absorption and reflectivity coefficients of these compounds is studied.

  11. Pressure effects on band structures in dense lithium

    We studied the change of the band structures in some structures of Li predicted at high pressures, using GGA and GW calculations. The width of the 1s band coming from the 1s electron of Li shows broadening by the pressurization, which is the normal behavior of bands at high pressure. The width of the band just below the Fermi level decreases by the pressurization, which is an opposite behavior to the normal bands. The character of this narrowing band is mostly p-like with a little s-like portion. The band gaps in some structures are really observed even by the GGA calculations. The gaps by the GW calculations increase to about 1.5 times the GGA values. Generally the one-shot GW calculation (diagonal only calculations) gives more reliable values than the GGA, but it may fail to predict band gaps for the case where band dispersion shows complex crossing near the Fermi level. There remains some structures for which GW calculations with off-diagonal elements taken into account are needed to identify the phase to be metallic or semiconducting.

  12. Broadening of effective photonic band gaps in biological chiral structures: From intrinsic narrow band gaps to broad band reflection spectra

    Vargas, W. E.; Hernández-Jiménez, M.; Libby, E.; Azofeifa, D. E.; Solis, Á.; Barboza-Aguilar, C.

    2015-09-01

    Under normal illumination with non-polarized light, reflection spectra of the cuticle of golden-like and red Chrysina aurigans scarabs show a structured broad band of left-handed circularly polarized light. The polarization of the reflected light is attributed to a Bouligand-type left-handed chiral structure found through the scarab's cuticle. By considering these twisted structures as one-dimensional photonic crystals, a novel approach is developed from the dispersion relation of circularly polarized electromagnetic waves traveling through chiral media, to show how the broad band characterizing these spectra arises from an intrinsic narrow photonic band gap whose spectral position moves through visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  13. Density structures inside the plasmasphere: Cluster observations

    Darrouzet, F.; Decreau, P.M.E.; De Keyser, J.;

    2004-01-01

    The electron density profiles derived from the EFW and WHISPER instruments on board the four Cluster spacecraft reveal density structures inside the plasmasphere and at its outer boundary, the plasmapause. We have conducted a statistical study to characterize these density structures. We focus on...... the plasmasphere crossing on I I April 2002, during which Cluster observed several density irregularities inside the plasmasphere, as well as a plasmaspheric plume. We derive the density gradient vectors from simultaneous density measurements by the four spacecraft. We also determine the normal...... velocity of the boundaries of the plume and of the irregularities from the time delays between those boundaries in the four individual density profiles, assuming they are planar. These new observations yield novel insights about the occurrence of density irregularities, their geometry and their dynamics...

  14. Density structures inside the plasmasphere: Cluster observations

    F. Darrouzet

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The electron density profiles derived from the EFW and WHISPER instruments on board the four Cluster spacecraft reveal density structures inside the plasmasphere and at its outer boundary, the plasmapause. We have conducted a statistical study to characterize these density structures. We focus on the plasmasphere crossing on 11 April 2002, during which Cluster observed several density irregularities inside the plasmasphere, as well as a plasmaspheric plume. We derive the density gradient vectors from simultaneous density measurements by the four spacecraft. We also determine the normal velocity of the boundaries of the plume and of the irregularities from the time delays between those boundaries in the four individual density profiles, assuming they are planar. These new observations yield novel insights about the occurrence of density irregularities, their geometry and their dynamics. These in-situ measurements are compared with global images of the plasmasphere from the EUV imager on board the IMAGE satellite.

  15. Alpha-cluster structure and density wave in oblate nuclei

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2011-01-01

    Pentagon and triangle shapes in Si-28 and C-12 are discussed in relation with nuclear density wave. In the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics calculations, the $K^\\pi=5^-$ band in Si-28 and the $K^\\pi=3^-$ band in C-12 are described by the pentagon and triangle shapes, respectively. These negative-parity bands can be interpreted as the parity partners of the $K^\\pi=0^+$ ground bands and they are constructed from the parity-asymmetric-intrinsic states. The pentagon and the triangle shapes originate in 7alpha and 3alpha cluster structures, respectively. In a mean-field picture, they are described also by the static one-dimensional density wave at the edge of the oblate states. In analysis with ideal alpha cluster models using Brink-Bloch cluster wave functions and that with a simplified model, we show that the static edge density wave for the pentagon and triangle shapes can be understood by spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry, i.e., the instability of the oblate states with respect to the edge density wave....

  16. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses. PMID:24052052

  17. Momentum-dependent band spin splitting in semiconducting MnO2: a density functional calculation.

    Noda, Yusuke; Ohno, Kaoru; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2016-05-11

    Recently, manganese-oxide compounds have attracted considerable attention, in particular, as candidate materials for photochemical water-splitting reactions. Here, we investigate electronic states of pristine manganese dioxides (MnO2) in different crystal phases using spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) with Hubbard U correction. Geometrical structures and band dispersions of α-, β-, δ-, and λ-MnO2 crystals with collinear magnetic [ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM)] orders are discussed in detail. We reveal that penalty energies that arise by violating the Goodenough-Kanamori rule are important and the origin of the magnetic interactions of the MnO2 crystals is governed by the superexchange interactions of Mn-O-Mn groups. In addition, it is found that momentum-dependent band spin splitting occurs in the AFM α-, β-, and δ-MnO2 crystals while no spin splitting occurs in the AFM λ-MnO2 crystal. Our results show that spin-split band dispersions stem from the different orientations of Mn-centred oxygen octahedra. Such interesting electronic states of the MnO2 crystals are unraveled by our discussion on the relationship between the effective (spin-dependent) single-electron potentials and the space-group symmetry operations that map up-spin Mn atoms onto down-spin Mn atoms. This work provides a basis to understand the relationship between the spin-dependent electronic states and the crystallography of manganese oxides. Another relationship to the recent experimental observations of the photochemical oxygen evolution of MnO2 crystals is also discussed. PMID:27119122

  18. Shell model description of band structure in 48Cr

    The band structure for normal and abnormal parity bands in 48Cr are described using the m-scheme shell model. In addition to full fp-shell, two particles in the 1d3/2 orbital are allowed in order to describe intruder states. The interaction includes fp-, sd- and mixed matrix elements

  19. Fractional Band Filling in an Atomic Chain Structure

    Crain, J. N.; Kirakosian, A.; Altmann, K. N.; Bromberger, C.; Erwin, S. C.; McChesney, J. L.; Lin, J.-L.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2003-05-01

    A new chain structure of Au is found on stepped Si(111) which exhibits a 1/4-filled band and a pair of ≥1/2-filled bands with a combined filling of 4/3. Band dispersions and Fermi surfaces for Si(553)-Au are obtained by photoemission and compared to that of Si(557)-Au. The dimensionality of both systems is determined using a tight binding fit. The fractional band filling makes it possible to preserve metallicity in the presence of strong correlations.

  20. Structure of nearly degenerate dipole bands in {sup 108}Ag

    Sethi, J. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Palit, R., E-mail: palit@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Saha, S.; Trivedi, T. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Bhat, G.H.; Sheikh, J.A. [Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006 (India); Datta, P. [Ananda Mohan College, Kolkata 700009 (India); Carroll, J.J. [US Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Chattopadhyay, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Donthi, R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Garg, U. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Jadhav, S.; Jain, H.C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Karamian, S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Kumar, S. [University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Litz, M.S. [US Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Mehta, D. [Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Naidu, B.S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Naik, Z. [Sambalpur University, Sambalpur 143005 (India); Sihotra, S. [Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); and others

    2013-08-09

    The high spin negative parity states of {sup 108}Ag have been investigated with the {sup 11}B + {sup 100}Mo reaction at 39 MeV beam energy using the INGA facility at TIFR, Mumbai. From the γ–γ coincidence analysis, an excited negative parity band has been established and found to be nearly degenerate with the ground state band. The spin and parity of the levels are assigned using angular correlation and polarization measurements. This pair of degenerate bands in {sup 108}Ag is studied using the recently developed microscopic triaxial projected shell model approach. The observed energy levels and the ratio of the electromagnetic transition probabilities of these bands in this isotope are well reproduced by the present model. Further, it is shown that the partner band has a different quasiparticle structure as compared to the yrast band.

  1. Structure of nearly degenerate dipole bands in 108Ag

    The high spin negative parity states of 108Ag have been investigated with the 11B + 100Mo reaction at 39 MeV beam energy using the INGA facility at TIFR, Mumbai. From the γ–γ coincidence analysis, an excited negative parity band has been established and found to be nearly degenerate with the ground state band. The spin and parity of the levels are assigned using angular correlation and polarization measurements. This pair of degenerate bands in 108Ag is studied using the recently developed microscopic triaxial projected shell model approach. The observed energy levels and the ratio of the electromagnetic transition probabilities of these bands in this isotope are well reproduced by the present model. Further, it is shown that the partner band has a different quasiparticle structure as compared to the yrast band

  2. Study of periodic band gap structure of the magnetized plasma photonic crystals

    ZHANG Hai-feng; MA Li; LIU Shao-bin

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the periodic band gaps of the one dimension magnetized plasma photonic crystals are studied with the piecewise linear current density recursive convolution (PLCDRC) finite-differential time-domain (FDTD) method. In fre-quency-domain, the transmission coefficients of electromagnetic Gaussian pulses are computed, and the effects of the periodic structure constant, plasma layer thickness and parameters of plasma on the properties of periodic band gaps of magnetized photonic crystals are analyzed. The results show that the periodic band gaps depend strongly on the plasma parameters.

  3. Density functional theory and electronic structure

    The paper presents an overview of the density functional theory and provides a brief appraisal of the latest developments of the theory. Particular emphasis is placed on the understanding of the electronic structure of materials via the density functional theory. 37 refs, 1 tab

  4. Relationships between magnetic foot points and G-band bright structures

    Ishikawa, R; Kitakoshi, Y; Katsukawa, Y; Bonet, J A; Domínguez, S Vargas; van der Voort, L H M Rouppe; Sakamoto, Y; Ebisuzaki, T

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic elements are thought to be described by flux tube models, and are well reproduced by MHD simulations. However, these simulations are only partially constrained by observations. We observationally investigate the relationship between G-band bright points and magnetic structures to clarify conditions, which make magnetic structures bright in G-band. The G-band filtergrams together with magnetograms and dopplergrams were taken for a plage region covered by abnormal granules as well as ubiquitous G-band bright points, using the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) under very good seeing conditions. High magnetic flux density regions are not necessarily associated with G-band bright points. We refer to the observed extended areas with high magnetic flux density as magnetic islands to separate them from magnetic elements. We discover that G-band bright points tend to be located near the boundary of such magnetic islands. The concentration of G-band bright points decreases with inward distance from the boundar...

  5. Pair-Breaking Critical Current Density of Two-Band Superconductor MgB2

    I.N. Askerzade

    2005-01-01

    Temperature dependence of the pair-breaking critical current density of MgB2, jd(T), is studied using a two-band Ginzburg-Landau theory. The results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data for the superconducting magnesium diboride MgB2.

  6. Electronic Band Structures of TiO2 with Heavy Nitrogen Doping

    XUE Jinbo; LI Qi; LIANG Wei; SHANG Jianku

    2008-01-01

    The first-principles density-functional calculation was conducted to investigate the electronic band structures of titanium dioxide with heavy nitrogen doping (TiO2-xNx).The calculation results indicate that when x≤0.25,isolated N 2p states appear above the valence-band maximum of TiO2 without a band-gap narrowing between O 2p and Ti 3d states.When x≥0.50,an obvious band gap narrowing between O 2p and Ti 3d states was observed along with the existence of isolated N 2p states above the valence-band of TiO2,indicating that the mechanism proposed by Asahi et al operates under heavy nitrogen doping condition.

  7. Band structure of surface barrier states and resonances

    Full text: G. Binnig and H. Rohrer, Nobel Prize Winners for the invention of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope, write in the opening sentence of one of their papers, co-authored with others : 'One of the fundamental problems in surface physics is obtaining knowledge of the electron-metal-surface interaction potential.' Although it is known that the surface barrier has an 'image' asymptotic form and saturates or weakens closer to the crystal surface, the position of the image tail, momentum dependence of the barrier height and saturation closer to the surface have not been agreed upon by different workers and techniques to this day. Ab initio calculations using the density functional approximation produce locations for the position of the image tail which differ by ∼50% depending on whether the exiting or incoming electron is considered part of the crystal or a classical charge interacting with the electron gas. Very low energy electron diffraction (VLEED), k-resolved inverse photoemission spectroscopy (KRIPES) and 2-photon photoemission spectroscopy (2PPE) are sensitive to the barrier but analyses to date have not yielded consistent conclusions. In this work we have used our plane-wave scattering method to calculate the barrier energy band structure for Cu (001) over the whole SBZ to compare with experimental results from KRIPES and 2PPE data as well as the calculation of Smith et al. This calculation used a parameterized nearly-free-electron function to represent the substrate scattering and could only produce states not resonances which occur outside of bulk band gaps and above the barrier height. As well, no inelastic scattering could be included. We show that inelastic scattering, surface restructuring and an extended data-base must be included for definitive conclusions about details of the barrier. Also, our calculation shows above-barrier resonances are strong and should be measured by experimentalists to extract the momentum dependent saturation and

  8. Density functional calculation of equilibrium geometry and electronic structure of pyrite

    邱冠周; 肖奇; 胡岳华; 徐竞

    2001-01-01

    The equilibrium geometry and electronic structure of pyrite has been studied using self-consistent density-functional theory within the local density approximation (LDA). The optimum bulk geometry is in good agreement with crystallographic data. The calculated band structure and density of states in the region around the Fermi energy show that valence-band maximum (VBM) is at X (100), and the conduction-band minimum (CBM) is at G (000). The indirect and direct band gaps are 0.6eV and 0.74eV, respectively. The calculated contour map of difference of charge density shows excess charge in nonbonding d electron states on the Fe sites. The density increases between sulfur nuclei and between iron and sulfur nuclei qualitatively reveal that S-S bond and Fe-S bond are covalent binding.

  9. Analytical formulas for carrier density and Fermi energy in semiconductors with a tight-binding band

    Analytical formulas for evaluating the relation of carrier density and Fermi energy for semiconductors with a tight-binding band have been proposed. The series expansions for a carrier density with fast convergency have been obtained by means of a Bessel function. A simple and analytical formula for Fermi energy has been derived with the help of the Gauss integration method. The results of the proposed formulas are in good agreement with accurate numerical solutions. The formulas have been successfully used in the calculation of carrier density and Fermi energy in a miniband superlattice system. Their accuracy is in the order of 10−5. (paper)

  10. Photonic band gap of superconductor-medium structure: Two-dimensional triangular lattice

    Liu, Wan-guo; Pan, Feng-ming, E-mail: fmpan@nuaa.edu.cn; Cai, Li-wei

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • Plane wave expansion is generalized to superconductor-medium periodic structure. • A wider band gap appears than that in conventional photonic crystals. • Part of original energy levels are rearranged upon consideration of the superconductivity. • Band gap width decreases monotonically with penetration length, but not with the filling factor. • Band gaps can be partially shut down or opened by adjusting filling factor. - Abstract: Based on London theory a general form of wave equation is formulated for both dielectric medium and superconductor. Using the wave equation and applying plane wave expansion, we have numerically calculated the band structures and density of states of a photonic crystal, whose intersection is constructed by a two-dimensional triangular lattice of superconductor padding in dielectric medium. Results indicate a wider band gap in the superconductor-medium photonic crystal than that in conventional photonic crystals. And part of original energy levels are found to be rearranged upon consideration of the superconductivity. The dependence of band gap on penetration length and filling factor is also discussed. Band gap width decreases monotonically with the penetration length, but not with the filling factor. Band gaps can be partially shut down or opened by adjusting filling factor.

  11. Effect of density of state on isotope effect exponent of two-band superconductors

    The exact formula of T c's equation and the isotope effect exponent of two-band s-wave superconductors in weak-coupling limit are derived by considering the influence of two kinds of density of state: constant and van Hove singularity. The paring interaction in each band consisted of two parts: the electron-phonon interaction and non-electron-phonon interaction are included in our model. We find that the interband interaction of electron-phonon show more effect on isotope exponent than the intraband interaction and the isotope effect exponent with constant density of state can fit to experimental data, MgB2 and high-T c superconductor, better than van Hove singularity density of state

  12. Design for maximum band-gaps in beam structures

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to extend earlier optimum design results for transversely vibrating Bernoulli-Euler beams by determining new optimum band-gap beam structures for (i) different combinations of classical boundary conditions, (ii) much larger values of the orders n and n-1 of adjacent upper and lower...... eigenfrequencies of maximized band-gaps, and (iii) different values of a minimum cross-sectional area constraint. The periodicity of the optimum beams and the attenuation of their band-gaps are also discussed....

  13. Coupling between Fano and Bragg bands in photonic band structure of two-dimensional metallic photonic structures

    Markos, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Frequency and transmission spectrum of two-dimensional array of metallic rods is investigated numerically. Based on the recent analysis of the band structure of two-dimensional photonic crystal with dielectric rods [P. Marko\\v{s}, Phys. Rev. A 92 043814 (2015)] we identify two types of bands in the frequency spectrum: Bragg (P) bands resulting from a periodicity and Fano (F) bands which arise from Fano resonances associated with each of the cylinders within the periodic structure. It is shown that the existence of Fano band in a certain frequency range is manifested by a Fano resonance in the transmittance. In particular, we re-examine the symmetry properties of the H- polarized band structure in the frequency range where the spectrum consists of the localized modes associated with the single scatterer resonances and we explore process of formation of Fano bands by identifying individual terms in the expansion of the LCAO states. We demonstrate how the interplay between the two scattering mechanisms affects p...

  14. Band formation in coupled-resonator slow-wave structures.

    Möller, Björn M; Woggon, Ulrike; Artemyev, Mikhail V

    2007-12-10

    Sequences of coupled-resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) have been examined as slow-wave structures. The formation of photonic bands in finite systems is studied in the frame of a coupled oscillator model. Several types of resonator size tuning in the system are evaluated in a systematical manner. We show that aperiodicities in sequences of coupled microspheres provide an additional degree of freedom for the design of photonic bands. PMID:19551030

  15. Band structures and localization properties of aperiodic layered phononic crystals

    Yan Zhizhong, E-mail: zzyan@bit.edu.cn [Department of Applied Mathematics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang Chuanzeng [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Siegen, D-57078 Siegen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The band structures and localization properties of in-plane elastic waves with coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes oblique propagating in aperiodic phononic crystals based on Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences are studied. Using transfer matrix method, the concept of the localization factor is introduced and the correctness is testified through the Rytov dispersion relation. For comparison, the perfect periodic structure and the quasi-periodic Fibonacci system are also considered. In addition, the influences of the random disorder, local resonance, translational and/or mirror symmetries on the band structures of the aperiodic phononic crystals are analyzed in this paper.

  16. Crystal structure, energy band and optical properties of dysprosium monophosphate DyPO{sub 4}

    Khadraoui, Z.; Bouzidi, C., E-mail: bouzidtc@yahoo.fr; Horchani-Naifer, K.; Ferid, M.

    2014-12-25

    Graphical abstract: The monophosphate DyPO{sub 4} has been synthesized by high temperature solid-state reaction method and was structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. DyPO{sub 4} crystallizes in the tetragonal system (I4{sub 1}/Iamd). The energy-band structure, density of states and the chemical bonds have been investigated by density functional methods (DFT). - Highlights: • The DyPO{sub 4} has been synthesized by high temperature solid-state reaction method. • DFT was used to determine the electronic structure and optical properties of DyPO{sub 4}. • The monophosphate DyPO{sub 4} is an insulator with direct band gap (6.38 eV). - Abstract: A rare earth monophosphate crystal of DyPO{sub 4} has been synthesized by high temperature solid-state reaction method and was structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Atomic arrangement of DyPO{sub 4} structure is based on corner and edge sharing PO{sub 4} tetrahedra and DyO{sub 8} polyhedra. The FTIR, Raman, Scanning electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance and emission spectra of the compound have been investigated. Density functional calculation using a Generalized Gradient Approximation was used to determine the electronic structure and optical properties. The calculated total and partial densities of states indicate that the top of valance band is mainly built upon O-2p states with P-3p states via σ (P–O) interactions, and the low conduction bands mostly originates from Dy-5d. The results show that the monophosphate DyPO{sub 4} is an insulator with a calculated band gap (5.8 eV) closer to the experimental value (6.38 eV)

  17. Hybrid functional band gap calculation of SnO6 containing perovskites and their derived structures

    We have studied the properties of SnO6 octahedra-containing perovskites and their derived structures using ab initio calculations with different density functionals. In order to predict the correct band gap of the materials, we have used B3LYP hybrid density functional, and the results of B3LYP were compared with those obtained using the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation data. The calculations have been conducted for the orthorhombic ground state of the SnO6 containing perovskites. We also have expended the hybrid density functional calculation to the ASnO3/A'SnO3 system with different cation orderings. We propose an empirical relationship between the tolerance factor and the band gap of SnO6 containing oxide materials based on first principles calculation. - Graphical abstract: (a) Structure of ASnO3 for orthorhombic ground state. The green ball is A (Ba, Sr, Ca) cation and the small (red) ball on edge is oxygen. SnO6 octahedrons are plotted as polyhedron. (b) Band gap of ASnO3 as a function of the tolerance factor for different density functionals. The experimental values of the band gap are marked as green pentagons. (c) ASnO3/A'SnO3 superlattices with two types cation arrangement: [001] layered structure and [111] rocksalt structure, respectively. (d) B3LYP hybrid functional band gaps of ASnO3, [001] ordered superlattices, and [111] ordered superlattices of ASnO3/A'SnO3 as a function of the effective tolerance factor. Note the empirical linear relationship between the band gap and effective tolerance factor. - Highlights: • We report the hybrid functional band gap calculation of ASnO3 and ASnO3/A'SnO3. • The band gap of ASnO3 using B3LYP functional reproduces the experimental value. • We propose the linear relationship between the tolerance factor and the band gap

  18. Tuning the electronic band structure of PCBM by electron irradiation

    Yoo Seung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tuning the electronic band structures such as band-edge position and bandgap of organic semiconductors is crucial to maximize the performance of organic photovoltaic devices. We present a simple yet effective electron irradiation approach to tune the band structure of [6, 6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM that is the most widely used organic acceptor material. We have found that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO level of PCBM up-shifts toward the vacuum energy level, while the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO level down-shifts when PCBM is electron-irradiated. The shift of the HOMO and the LUMO levels increases as the irradiated electron fluence increases. Accordingly, the band-edge position and the bandgap of PCBM can be controlled by adjusting the electron fluence. Characterization of electron-irradiated PCBM reveals that the variation of the band structure is attributed to the molecular structural change of PCBM by electron irradiation.

  19. Determination of the valence band structure of an alkali phosphorus oxynitride glass: A synchrotron XPS study on LiPON

    Schwöbel, André; Precht, Ruben; Motzko, Markus; Carrillo Solano, Mercedes A.; Calvet, Wolfram; Hausbrand, René; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2014-12-01

    Lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) is a solid state electrolyte commonly used in thin film batteries (TFBs). Advanced TFBs face the issue of detrimental electrode-electrolyte interlayer formation, related to the electronic structure of the interface. In this contribution, we study the valence band structure of LiPON using resonant photoemission and synchrotron photoemission with variable excitation energies. The identification of different valence band features is done according to the known valence band features of meta- and orthophosphates. Additionally we compare our results with partial density of states simulations from literature. We find that the valence band structure is similar to the known metaphosphates with an additional contribution of nitrogen states at the top of the valence band. From the results we conclude that synchrotron X-ray photoemission (XPS) is a useful tool to study the valence band structure of nitridated alkali phosphate glasses.

  20. Simulation of the Band Structure of Graphene and Carbon Nanotube

    Simulation technique has been performed to simulate the band structure of both graphene and carbon nanotube. Accordingly, the dispersion relations for graphene and carbon nanotube are deduced analytically, using the tight binding model and LCAO scheme. The results from the simulation of the dispersion relation of both graphene and carbon nanotube were found to be consistent with those in the literature which indicates the correctness of the process of simulation technique. The present research is very important for tailoring graphene and carbon nanotube with specific band structure, in order to satisfy the required electronic properties of them.

  1. Simulation of the Band Structure of Graphene and Carbon Nanotube

    Mina, Aziz N.; Awadallah, Attia A.; Phillips, Adel H.; Ahmed, Riham R.

    2012-02-01

    Simulation technique has been performed to simulate the band structure of both graphene and carbon nanotube. Accordingly, the dispersion relations for graphene and carbon nanotube are deduced analytically, using the tight binding model & LCAO scheme. The results from the simulation of the dispersion relation of both graphene and carbon nanotube were found to be consistent with those in the literature which indicates the correctness of the process of simulation technique. The present research is very important for tailoring graphene and carbon nanotube with specific band structure, in order to satisfy the required electronic properties of them.

  2. High-Pressure Crystal Structure, Lattice Vibrations, and Band Structure of BiSbO4.

    Errandonea, Daniel; Muñoz, Alfonso; Rodríguez-Hernández, Placida; Gomis, Oscar; Achary, S Nagabhusan; Popescu, Catalin; Patwe, Sadeque J; Tyagi, Avesh K

    2016-05-16

    The high-pressure crystal structure, lattice-vibrations, and electronic band structure of BiSbO4 were studied by ab initio simulations. We also performed Raman spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, and diffuse-reflectance measurements, as well as synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. High-pressure X-ray diffraction measurements show that the crystal structure of BiSbO4 remains stable up to at least 70 GPa, unlike other known MTO4-type ternary oxides. These experiments also give information on the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameters. Calculations properly describe the crystal structure of BiSbO4 and the changes induced by pressure on it. They also predict a possible high-pressure phase. A room-temperature pressure-volume equation of state is determined, and the effect of pressure on the coordination polyhedron of Bi and Sb is discussed. Raman- and infrared-active phonons were measured and calculated. In particular, calculations provide assignments for all the vibrational modes as well as their pressure dependence. In addition, the band structure and electronic density of states under pressure were also calculated. The calculations combined with the optical measurements allow us to conclude that BiSbO4 is an indirect-gap semiconductor, with an electronic band gap of 2.9(1) eV. Finally, the isothermal compressibility tensor for BiSbO4 is given at 1.8 GPa. The experimental (theoretical) data revealed that the direction of maximum compressibility is in the (0 1 0) plane at ∼33° (38°) to the c-axis and 47° (42°) to the a-axis. The reliability of the reported results is supported by the consistency between experiments and calculations. PMID:27128858

  3. Strain effects on band structure of wurtzite ZnO: a GGA + U study

    Band structures in wurtzite bulk ZnO/Zn1−xMgxO are calculated using first-principles based on the framework of generalized gradient approximation to density functional theory with the introduction of the on-site Coulomb interaction. Strain effects on band gap, splitting energies of valence bands, electron and hole effective masses in strained bulk ZnO are discussed. According to the results, the band gap increases gradually with increasing stress in strained ZnO as an Mg content of Zn1−xMgxO substrate less than 0.3, which is consistent with the experimental results. It is further demonstrated that electron mass of conduction band (CB) under stress increases slightly. There are almost no changes in effective masses of light hole band (LHB) and heavy hole band (HHB) along [00k] and [k00] directions under stress, and stress leads to an obvious decrease in effective masses of crystal splitting band (CSB) along the same directions. (semiconductor materials)

  4. Tunable band structures of polycrystalline graphene by external and mismatch strains

    Jiang-Tao Wu; Xing-Hua Shi; Yu-Jie Wei

    2012-01-01

    Lacking a band gap largely limits the application of graphene in electronic devices.Previous study shows that grain boundaries (GBs) in polycrystalline graphene can dramatically alter the electrical properties of graphene.Here,we investigate the band structure of polycrystalline graphene tuned by externally imposed strains and intrinsic mismatch strains at the GB by density functional theory (DFT) calculations.We found that graphene with symmetrical GBs typically has zero band gap even with large uniaxial and biaxial strain.However,some particular asymmetrical GBs can open a band gap in graphene and their band structures can be substantially tuned by external strains.A maximum band gap about 0.19 eV was observed in matched-armchair GB (5,5) | (3,7) with a misorientation of θ =13° when the applied uniaxial strain increases to 9%.Although mismatch strain is inevitable in asymmetrical GBs,it has a small influence on the band gap of polycrystalline graphene.

  5. Band-gap corrected density functional theory calculations for InAs/GaSb type II superlattices

    We performed pseudopotential based density functional theory (DFT) calculations for GaSb/InAs type II superlattices (T2SLs), with bandgap errors from the local density approximation mitigated by applying an empirical method to correct the bulk bandgaps. Specifically, this work (1) compared the calculated bandgaps with experimental data and non-self-consistent atomistic methods; (2) calculated the T2SL band structures with varying structural parameters; (3) investigated the interfacial effects associated with the no-common-atom heterostructure; and (4) studied the strain effect due to lattice mismatch between the two components. This work demonstrates the feasibility of applying the DFT method to more exotic heterostructures and defect problems related to this material system

  6. G0W0 band structure of CdWO4

    The full quasiparticle band structure of CdWO4 is calculated within the single-shot GW (G0W0) approximation using maximally localized Wannier functions, which allows one to assess the validity of the commonly used scissor operator. Calculations are performed using the Godby–Needs plasmon pole model and the accurate contour deformation technique. It is shown that while the two methods yield identical band gap energies, the low-lying states are given inaccurately by the plasmon pole model. We report a band gap energy of 4.94 eV, including spin–orbit interaction at the DFT–LDA (density functional theory–local density approximation) level. Quasiparticle renormalization in CdWO4 is shown to be correlated with localization distance. Electron and hole effective masses are calculated at the DFT and G0W0 levels. (paper)

  7. Acoustic band gaps in 2D liquid phononic crystals of rectangular structure

    We present band structure results for a new two dimensional (2D) rectangular array geometry of water (mercury) cylinders of square cross section in a mercury (water) host. The results show that the water/mercury system, consisting of low-density cylinders in a high-density host, is the most favourable configuration for obtaining large acoustic gaps. Otherwise, only very small stop gaps can be found for the mercury/water systems. For a given cylinder width value, the lowest band gap may not always have the maximum width, but at some value in both systems the lowest band gap will always have the largest width. The differences in the case of circular cylinders are also discussed. (author)

  8. Optimum design of band-gap beam structures

    Olhoff, Niels; Niu, Bin; Cheng, Gengdong

    2012-01-01

    of a single, linearly elastic material without damping. Numerical results are presented for different combinations of classical boundary conditions, prescribed orders of the upper and lower natural frequencies of maximized natural frequency gaps, and a given minimum constraint value for the beam......The design of band-gap structures receives increasing attention for many applications in mitigation of undesirable vibration and noise emission levels. A band-gap structure usually consists of a periodic distribution of elastic materials or segments, where the propagation of waves is impeded or...... significantly suppressed for a range of external excitation frequencies. Maximization of the band-gap is therefore an obvious objective for optimum design. This problem is sometimes formulated by optimizing a parameterized design model which assumes multiple periodicity in the design. However, it is shown in...

  9. Reconfigurable wave band structure of an artificial square ice

    Iacocca, Ezio; Gliga, Sebastian; Stamps, Robert L.; Heinonen, Olle

    2016-04-01

    Artificial square ices are structures composed of magnetic nanoelements arranged on the sites of a two-dimensional square lattice, such that there are four interacting magnetic elements at each vertex, leading to geometrical frustration. Using a semianalytical approach, we show that square ices exhibit a rich spin-wave band structure that is tunable both by external magnetic fields and the magnetization configuration of individual elements. Internal degrees of freedom can give rise to equilibrium states with bent magnetization at the element edges leading to characteristic excitations; in the presence of magnetostatic interactions these form separate bands analogous to impurity bands in semiconductors. Full-scale micromagnetic simulations corroborate our semianalytical approach. Our results show that artificial square ices can be viewed as reconfigurable and tunable magnonic crystals that can be used as metamaterials for spin-wave-based applications at the nanoscale.

  10. Insights on Coral Adaptation from Polyp and Colony Morphology, Skeletal Density Banding and Carbonate Depositional Facies

    Oehlert, A. M.; Hill, C. A.; Piggot, A. M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2008-12-01

    As one of the core reservoirs of primary production in the world's oceans, tropical coral reefs support a complex ecosystem that directly impacts over ninety percent of marine organisms at some point in their life cycle. Corals themselves are highly complex organisms and exhibit a range of growth forms that range from branching to massive, foliaceous, columnar, encrusting, free living and laminar coralla. Fierce competition over scarce resources available to each individual coral species creates niche specialization. Throughout the Phanerozic geological record, this has driven speciation events and created distinct skeletal growth morphologies that have differential abilities in feeding strategy. In turn, this has presumably led to the development of niche specialization that can be quantitatively measured through hierarchical morphological differences from the micrometer to the meter scale. Porter (1976) observed significant differences in skeletal morphology between Caribbean coral species that reflects an adaptive geometry based on feeding strategy. Within the Montastraea species complex there are four major morphologies; columnar, bouldering, irregular mounding, and skirted. Each morphotype can be found forming high abundance along the bathymetric gradient of coral reefs that grow along the leeward coast of Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. We have undertaken a study to determine the relative relationships amongst coral morphology, skeletal density and feeding strategy by comparing the morphometric measurements of individual polyps as well as the entire colony along spatial and bathymetric gradients. Polyp diameter, mouth size, interpolyp area, and interpolyp distance were measured from high-resolution images taken on a stereoscope, and evaluated with AxioVision image analysis software. These high-resolution optical analyses have also revealed new observations regarding folded tissue structures of the outer margin of polyps in the Montastrea complex. Skeletal

  11. Band structure of the quasi two-dimensional purple molybdenum bronze

    Guyot, H.; Balaska, H.; Perrier, P.; Marcus, J.

    2006-09-01

    The molybdenum purple bronze KMo 6O 17 is quasi two-dimensional (2D) metallic oxide that shows a Peierls transition towards a metallic charge density wave state. Since this specific transition is directly related to the electron properties of the normal state, we have investigated the electronic structure of this bronze at room temperature. The shape of the Mo K1s absorption edge reveals the presence of distorted MoO 6 octahedra in the crystallographic structure. Photoemission experiments evidence a large conduction band, with a bandwidth of 800 meV and confirm the metallic character of this bronze. A wide depleted zone separates the conduction band from the valence band that exhibits a fourfold structure, directly connected to the octahedral symmetry of the Mo sites. The band structure is determined by ARUPS in two main directions of the (0 0 1) Brillouin zone. It exhibits some unpredicted features but corroborates the earlier theoretical band structure and Fermi surface. It confirms the hidden one-dimensionality of KMo 6O 17 that has been proposed to explain the origin of the Peierls transition in this 2D compound.

  12. Photonic Band Gap structures: A new approach to accelerator cavities

    Kroll, N. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Smith, D.R.; Schultz, S. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-12-31

    We introduce a new accelerator cavity design based on Photonic Band Gap (PGB) structures. The PGB cavity consists of a two-dimensional periodic array of high dielectric, low loss cylinders with a single removal defect, bounded on top and bottom by conducting sheets. We present the results of both numerical simulations and experimental measurements on the PGB cavity.

  13. Photonic Band Gap structures: A new approach to accelerator cavities

    We introduce a new accelerator cavity design based on Photonic Band Gap (PGB) structures. The PGB cavity consists of a two-dimensional periodic array of high dielectric, low loss cylinders with a single removal defect, bounded on top and bottom by conducting sheets. We present the results of both numerical simulations and experimental measurements on the PGB cavity

  14. Photonic band gap structures of obliquely incident electromagnetic wave propagation in a one-dimension absorptive plasma photonic crystal

    The photonic band gap structures of obliquely incident electromagnetic waves propagating in a one-dimension plasma photonic crystal with collision have been studied on the basis of electromagnetic theory and transfer matrix approach. The dispersion relations for both the transverse electric wave case and the transverse magnetic wave case are deduced. And the photonic band gap structures, with their function dependence on the microplasma layer density, microplasma width, collision frequency, background material dielectric constant, and incident angle, are computed. The results show that there exist two photonic band gap structures in an adsorptive plasma photonic crystal: one is a normal photonic band gap structure and the other is an absorption photonic band gap structure. Parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed.

  15. X-Band Photonic Band-Gap Accelerator Structure Breakdown Experiment

    Marsh, Roark A.; /MIT /MIT /NIFS, Gifu /JAERI, Kyoto /LLNL, Livermore; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.; /MIT; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Laurent, Lisa L.; Lewandowski, James R.; Yeremian, A.Dian; Tantawi, Sami G.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    In order to understand the performance of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures under realistic high gradient, high power, high repetition rate operation, a PBG accelerator structure was designed and tested at X band (11.424 GHz). The structure consisted of a single test cell with matching cells before and after the structure. The design followed principles previously established in testing a series of conventional pillbox structures. The PBG structure was tested at an accelerating gradient of 65 MV/m yielding a breakdown rate of two breakdowns per hour at 60 Hz. An accelerating gradient above 110 MV/m was demonstrated at a higher breakdown rate. Significant pulsed heating occurred on the surface of the inner rods of the PBG structure, with a temperature rise of 85 K estimated when operating in 100 ns pulses at a gradient of 100 MV/m and a surface magnetic field of 890 kA/m. A temperature rise of up to 250 K was estimated for some shots. The iris surfaces, the location of peak electric field, surprisingly had no damage, but the inner rods, the location of the peak magnetic fields and a large temperature rise, had significant damage. Breakdown in accelerator structures is generally understood in terms of electric field effects. These PBG structure results highlight the unexpected role of magnetic fields in breakdown. The hypothesis is presented that the moderate level electric field on the inner rods, about 14 MV/m, is enhanced at small tips and projections caused by pulsed heating, leading to breakdown. Future PBG structures should be built to minimize pulsed surface heating and temperature rise.

  16. Band Structure Modifications in Deformed InP Quantum Wires

    V.V. Kuryliuk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The work describes the features of the band structure of deformed InP nanowires with different diameters. It is shown that the bending of quantum wires is capable of creating local minima in the conduction and valence bands which are separated from the surface of the cylindrical wire. This result opens up new possibilities for controlling both the lifetime of photoexcited carriers by keeping them at these minima and the magnitude of the photovoltage in solar energy conversion devices based on quantum wires. The work lies within a common goal aiming to develop new methods of functionalization of nanostructured surfaces using mechanical deformations.

  17. Multi-band and broadband acoustic metamaterial with resonant structures

    We design an acoustic metamaterial (AM) with multi-band of negative modulus composed of different sized split hollow spheres (SHSs). From acoustic transmitted experiment, the AM exhibits simultaneously negative modulus at frequencies 914, 1298 and 1514 Hz. Based on the multi-band designed concept, broadband AM is fabricated by arraying gradually sized SHS. The transmission results indicate that this medium can achieve negative modulus at the frequency range from 900 to 1500 Hz. This kind of broadband AM is very convenient to couple with other structures to gain the double-negative AM.

  18. Inter-band optoelectronic properties in quantum dot structure of low band gap III-V semiconductors

    A generalized theory is developed to study inter-band optical absorption coefficient (IOAC) and material gain (MG) in quantum dot structures of narrow gap III-V compound semiconductor considering the wave-vector (k→) dependence of the optical transition matrix element. The band structures of these low band gap semiconducting materials with sufficiently separated split-off valance band are frequently described by the three energy band model of Kane. This has been adopted for analysis of the IOAC and MG taking InAs, InSb, Hg1−xCdxTe, and In1−xGaxAsyP1−y lattice matched to InP, as example of III–V compound semiconductors, having varied split-off energy band compared to their bulk band gap energy. It has been found that magnitude of the IOAC for quantum dots increases with increasing incident photon energy and the lines of absorption are more closely spaced in the three band model of Kane than those with parabolic energy band approximations reflecting the direct the influence of energy band parameters. The results show a significant deviation to the MG spectrum of narrow-gap materials having band nonparabolicity compared to the parabolic band model approximations. The results reflect the important role of valence band split-off energies in these narrow gap semiconductors

  19. Coupling effect of quantum wells on band structure

    Jie, Chen; Weiyou, Zeng

    2015-10-01

    The coupling effects of quantum wells on band structure are numerically investigated by using the Matlab programming language. In a one dimensional finite quantum well with the potential barrier V0, the calculation is performed by increasing the number of inserted barriers with the same height Vb, and by, respectively, varying the thickness ratio of separated wells to inserted barriers and the height ratio of Vb to V0. Our calculations show that coupling is strongly influenced by the above parameters of the inserted barriers and wells. When these variables change, the width of the energy bands and gaps can be tuned. Our investigation shows that it is possible for quantum wells to achieve the desired width of the bands and gaps.

  20. Coupling effect of quantum wells on band structure

    The coupling effects of quantum wells on band structure are numerically investigated by using the Matlab programming language. In a one dimensional finite quantum well with the potential barrier V0, the calculation is performed by increasing the number of inserted barriers with the same height Vb, and by, respectively, varying the thickness ratio of separated wells to inserted barriers and the height ratio of Vb to V0. Our calculations show that coupling is strongly influenced by the above parameters of the inserted barriers and wells. When these variables change, the width of the energy bands and gaps can be tuned. Our investigation shows that it is possible for quantum wells to achieve the desired width of the bands and gaps. (paper)

  1. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF BANDED STRUCTURES IN DUAL-PHASE STEELS

    Benoit Krebs

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dual-Phase (DP steels are composed of martensite islands dispersed in a ductile ferrite matrix, which provides a good balance between strength and ductility. Current processing conditions (continuous casting followed by hot and cold rolling generate 'banded structures' i.e., irregular, parallel and alternating bands of ferrite and martensite, which are detrimental to mechanical properties and especially for in-use properties. We present an original and simple method to quantify the intensity and wavelength of these bands. This method, based on the analysis of covariance function of binary images, is firstly tested on model images. It is compared with ASTM E-1268 standard and appears to be more robust. Then it is applied on real DP steel microstructures and proves to be sufficiently sensitive to discriminate samples resulting from different thermo-mechanical routes.

  2. Mid-frequency Band Dynamics of Large Space Structures

    Coppolino, Robert N.; Adams, Douglas S.

    2004-01-01

    High and low intensity dynamic environments experienced by a spacecraft during launch and on-orbit operations, respectively, induce structural loads and motions, which are difficult to reliably predict. Structural dynamics in low- and mid-frequency bands are sensitive to component interface uncertainty and non-linearity as evidenced in laboratory testing and flight operations. Analytical tools for prediction of linear system response are not necessarily adequate for reliable prediction of mid-frequency band dynamics and analysis of measured laboratory and flight data. A new MATLAB toolbox, designed to address the key challenges of mid-frequency band dynamics, is introduced in this paper. Finite-element models of major subassemblies are defined following rational frequency-wavelength guidelines. For computational efficiency, these subassemblies are described as linear, component mode models. The complete structural system model is composed of component mode subassemblies and linear or non-linear joint descriptions. Computation and display of structural dynamic responses are accomplished employing well-established, stable numerical methods, modern signal processing procedures and descriptive graphical tools. Parametric sensitivity and Monte-Carlo based system identification tools are used to reconcile models with experimental data and investigate the effects of uncertainties. Models and dynamic responses are exported for employment in applications, such as detailed structural integrity and mechanical-optical-control performance analyses.

  3. Band structure, cohesive properties, and Compton profile of γ- and α-cerium

    Podloucky, R.; Glötzel, D.

    1983-03-01

    Recent Compton scattering experiments on the high-volume (γ) and low-volume (α) phases of fcc cerium and their interpretation in terms of the renormalized-free-atom model cast severe doubts on the promotional model of Pauling and Zachariasen for the γ-α transition. Stimulated by these results, we have extended a previous self-consistent local-density band-structure investigation to study the Compton profiles of γ- and α-cerium. For the band structure, Bloch functions, and their Fourier transforms we use the linear muffin-tin orbital method in the atomic-sphere approximation. We analyze the calculated Compton profiles in terms of band structure and local angular momentum character of the wave functions. The change in band structure and wave functions under compression (with approximately one electron per atom in the 4f band of both phases) accounts well for the observed change in the Compton profile. This provides further evidence against the promotional model in agreement with the analysis of Kornstädt et al. In addition, we study the cohesive energy of fcc cerium as a function of volume in the local-density approximation. For α-cerium in the 4f1(5d 6s)3 configuration we find a cohesive energy of 5.4 eV/atom in good agreement with experiment, whereas the "promotional" 4f0(5d 6s)4 state yields a binding energy of 0.6 eV/atom only. Therefore the fourth valence electron has to be a 4f electron, and α-cerium has to be regarded as an f-band metal.

  4. Band Jahn-Teller effect on the density of states of the magnetic high-Tc superconductors: A model study

    We report here a mean-field study of competing antiferromagnetism, superconductivity and lattice strain phases and their effect on the local density of states of the cuprate system. Our model Hamiltonian incorporating these interactions is reported earlier [G.C. Rout et al., Physica C, 2007]. The analytic expression for superconducting, antiferromagnetism and lattice strain order parameters are calculated and solved self-consistently. The interplay of these order parameters is investigated considering the calculated density of states (DOSs) of the conduction electrons. The DOS displays multiple gap structures with multiple peaks. It is suggested that the tunneling conductance data obtained from the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements could be interpreted by using the quasi-particle bands calculated from our model Hamiltonian. We have discussed the mechanism to calculate the order parameters from the conductance data.

  5. Partial cross sections and density of states effects in the valence band photoemission from solid nitrogen

    Photoelectron energy distribution curves from solid nitrogen have been measured for excitation energies ranging from threshold (14.2 eV) to 40 eV using Synchrotron Radiation. The partial cross sections for the emission from the 3sigmasub(g), 1πsub(u) and 2sigmasub(u) derived valence bands show pronounced maxima 3.4 eV, 2.9 eV and 3.0 eV above the vacuum level respectively which we interpret as being due to a high density of conduction band final states. These states are closely related to the πsub(g)* negative-ion shape resonance for molecular nitrogen. (orig.)

  6. First-Principles Band Calculations on Electronic Structures of Ag-Doped Rutile and Anatase TiO2

    HOU Xing-Gang; LIU An-Dong; HUANG Mei-Dong; LIAO Bin; WU Xiao-Ling

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structures of Ag-doped rutile and anatase TiO2 are studied by first-principles band calculations based on density funetionai theory with the full-potentiai linearized-augraented-plane-wave method.New occupied bands ore found between the band gaps of both Ag-doped rutile and anatase TiO2.The formation of these new bands Capri be explained mainly by their orbitals of Ag 4d states mixed with Ti 3d states and are supposed to contribute to their visible light absorption.

  7. Self-consistent field variational cellular method as applied to the band structure calculation of sodium

    The band structure of metallic sodium is calculated, using for the first time the self-consistent field variational cellular method. In order to implement the self-consistency in the variational cellular theory, the crystal electronic charge density was calculated within the muffin-tin approximation. The comparison between our results and those derived from other calculations leads to the conclusion that the proposed self-consistent version of the variational cellular method is fast and accurate. (author)

  8. Effect of intraband variability on stable isotope and density time series obtained from banded corals

    S Chakraborty; R Ramesh; J M Lough

    2000-03-01

    Density, 18O and 13C were measured along two tracks, one close to the central growth axis and the other, ∼20° off the axis, in a coral (Porites lutea) collected from the Stanley Reef, Central Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The 18O variations in the coral are well correlated with sea surface temperature changes. The common variances between the two tracks were about 60% in the 18O, 13C and the skeletal density variations. Part of the noise (40%) could be due to the difficulty of sampling exactly time contemporaneous parts of each band along the two tracks and part of it could be due to genuine intraband variability. In spite of the intraband variability, the time series obtained from the two tracks are similar, indicating that the dominant causative factor for the isotopic variations is external, i.e., the environmental conditions that prevail during the growth of the coral; density band formation does not appear to be directly controlled by the sea surface temperature.

  9. Development of X-band accelerating structures for high gradients

    S. Bini; M. G. Grimaldi; L. Romano; F. Ruffino; R. Parodi; V. Chimenti; A. Marcelli; L. Palumbo; B. Spataro; V. A. Dolgashev; S. Tantawi; A.D. Yeremian; Y. Higashi

    2012-01-01

    Short copper standing wave (SW) structures operating at an X-band frequency have been recently designed and manufactured at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) using the vacuum brazing technique.High power tests of the structures have been performed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.In this manuscript we report the results of these tests and the activity in progress to enhance the high gradient performance of the next generation of structures,particularly the technological characterization of high performance coatings obtained via molybdenum sputtering.

  10. Engineering Design of a Multipurpose X-band Accelerating Structure

    Gudkov, Dmitry; Samoshkin, Alexander; Zennaro, Riccardo; Dehler, Micha; Raguin, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    Both FEL projects, SwissFEL and Fermi-Elettra each require an X-band RF accelerating structure for optimal bunch compression at the respective injectors. As the CLIC project is pursuing a program for producing and testing the X-band high-gradient RF structures, a collaboration between PSI, Elettra and CERN has been established to build a multipurpose X-band accelerating structure. This paper focuses on its engineering design, which is based on the disked cells jointed together by diffusion bonding. Vacuum brazing and laser beam welding is used for auxiliary components. The accelerating structure consists of two coupler subassemblies, 73 disks and includes a wakefield monitor and diagnostic waveguides. The engineering study includes the external cooling system, consisting of two parallel cooling circuits and an RF tuning system, which allows phase advance tuning of the cell by deforming the outer wall. The engineering solution for the installation and sealing of the wake field monitor feed-through devices that...

  11. Ultrafast Band Structure Control of a Two-Dimensional Heterostructure.

    Ulstrup, Søren; Čabo, Antonija Grubišić; Miwa, Jill A; Riley, Jonathon M; Grønborg, Signe S; Johannsen, Jens C; Cacho, Cephise; Alexander, Oliver; Chapman, Richard T; Springate, Emma; Bianchi, Marco; Dendzik, Maciej; Lauritsen, Jeppe V; King, Phil D C; Hofmann, Philip

    2016-06-28

    The electronic structure of two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors can be significantly altered by screening effects, either from free charge carriers in the material or by environmental screening from the surrounding medium. The physical properties of 2D semiconductors placed in a heterostructure with other 2D materials are therefore governed by a complex interplay of both intra- and interlayer interactions. Here, using time- and angle-resolved photoemission, we are able to isolate both the layer-resolved band structure and, more importantly, the transient band structure evolution of a model 2D heterostructure formed of a single layer of MoS2 on graphene. Our results reveal a pronounced renormalization of the quasiparticle gap of the MoS2 layer. Following optical excitation, the band gap is reduced by up to ∼400 meV on femtosecond time scales due to a persistence of strong electronic interactions despite the environmental screening by the n-doped graphene. This points to a large degree of tunability of both the electronic structure and the electron dynamics for 2D semiconductors embedded in a van der Waals-bonded heterostructure. PMID:27267820

  12. The calculation of the band structure in 3D phononic crystal with hexagonal lattice

    Aryadoust, Mahrokh; Salehi, H. [University of Shahid Chamran, Ahvaz (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the propagation of acoustic waves in the phononic crystals (PCs) of three dimensions with the hexagonal (HEX) lattice is studied theoretically. The PCs are constituted of nickel (Ni) spheres embedded in epoxy. The calculations of the band structure and the density of states are performed using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method in the irreducible part of the Brillouin zone (BZ). In this study, we analyse the dependence of the band structures inside (the complete band gap width) on c/a and filling fraction in the irreducible part of the first BZ. Also, we have analysed the band structure of the ALHA and MLHKM planes. The results show that the maximum width of absolute elastic band gap (AEBG) (0.045) in the irreducible part of the BZ of HEX lattice is formed for c/a=6 and filling fraction equal to 0.01. In addition, the maximum of the first and second AEBG widths are 0.0884 and 0.0474, respectively, in the MLHKM plane, and the maximum of the first and second AEBG widths are 0.0851 and 0.0431, respectively, in the ALHA plane.

  13. Study of the band structures in 104Pd

    Complete text of publication follows. During the past years, beside the A ∼ 130 mass region, chiral candidate twin bands have been found also in odd-odd and odd-mass rhodium isotopes with A ∼ 100. The role of triaxial deformation of the core in degeneracy of chiral band doubling has been pointed out in 102Ru and 103Rh. More recently, a study of 106Ag has revealed that gamma softness has marked implications for the phenomenon of nuclear chirality. In order to further examine this effect on the stability of chiral geometry we studied the band structures of 104Pd, the core nucleus of 106Ag. High-spin states in 104Pd have been studied through the 96Zr(13C,5n) reaction at beam energies of 51 and 58 MeV, using the Euroball IV γ-ray spectrometer. The γ rays were measured in coincidence with charged particles detected by the Diamant array in order to eliminate the contaminants from the stronger (13C,xn) reaction channels. A total of ∼ 2 x 109 triple- and higher-fold coincidence events were stored among which ∼ 4.5 x 108 belonged to the 104Pd reaction channel. On the basis of the analysis of γγγ-coincidence data, several new high-spin bands have been established. The ground state band has been extended up to Ex ∼12 MeV with Iπ=(26+), while the previously published negative-parity bands have been extended up to Ex ∼11 and ∼9 MeV with Iπ=(23-) and (20-), respectively. The theoretical interpretation of the experimental results obtained is in progress

  14. Air Density Measurements in a Mach 10 Wake Using Iodine Cordes Bands

    Balla, Robert J.; Everhart, Joel L.

    2012-01-01

    An exploratory study designed to examine the viability of making air density measurements in a Mach 10 flow using laser-induced fluorescence of the iodine Cordes bands is presented. Experiments are performed in the NASA Langley Research Center 31 in. Mach 10 air wind tunnel in the hypersonic near wake of a multipurpose crew vehicle model. To introduce iodine into the wake, a 0.5% iodine/nitrogen mixture is seeded using a pressure tap at the rear of the model. Air density was measured at 56 points along a 7 mm line and three stagnation pressures of 6.21, 8.62, and 10.0 MPa (900, 1250, and 1450 psi). Average results over time and space show rho(sub wake)/rho(sub freestream) of 0.145 plus or minus 0.010, independent of freestream air density. Average off-body results over time and space agree to better than 7.5% with computed densities from onbody pressure measurements. Densities measured during a single 60 s run at 10.0 MPa are time-dependent and steadily decrease by 15%. This decrease is attributed to model forebody heating by the flow.

  15. Calculation of complex band structure for low symmetry lattices

    Srivastava, Manoj; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2009-03-01

    Complex band structure calculation is an integral part of a first-principles plane-wave based quantum transport method. [1] The direction of decay for the complex wave vectors is also the transport direction. The existing algorithm [1] has the limitation that it only allows the transport direction along a lattice vector perpendicular to the basal plane formed by two other lattice vectors, e.g., the c-axis of a tetragonal lattice. We generalize this algorithm to nonorthogonal lattices with transport direction not aligned with any lattice vector. We show that this generalization leads to changes in the boundary conditions and the Schrodinger's equation projected to the transport direction. We present, as an example, the calculation of the complex band structure of fcc Cu along a direction perpendicular to the (111) basal plane. [1] Hyoung Joon Choi and Jisoon Ihm, Phys. Rev. B 59, 2267 (1999).

  16. Parameterization and algebraic structure of 3-band orthogonal wavelet systems

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a complete parameterization for the 3-band compact wavelet systems is presented. Using the parametric result, a program of the filterbank design is completed, which can give not only the filterbanks but also the graphs of all possible scaling functions and their corresponding wavelets. Especially some symmetric wavelets with small supports are given. Finally an algebraic structure for this kind of wavelet systems is characterized.

  17. The structure of rotational bands in alpha-cluster nuclei

    Bijker Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, I discuss an algebraic treatment of alpha-cluster nuclei based on the introduction of a spectrum generating algebra for the relative motion of the alpha-clusters. Particular attention is paid to the discrete symmetry of the geometric arrangement of the α-particles, and the consequences for the structure of the rotational bands in the 12C and 16O nuclei.

  18. Intermediate band solar cell structures grown by MOVPE

    Vyskočil, Jan; Zíková, Markéta; Hospodková, Alice; Oswald, Jiří; Petříček, Otto; Pangrác, Jiří

    Lund: Nanometer Structure Consortium, 2015 - (Ghalamestani, S.; Lundfald, L.), s. 191-194 [EWMOVPE XVI - 16th European Workshop on Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy. Lund (SE), 07.06.2015-10.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP14-21285P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : InAs * GaAsSb * quantum dot * intermediate band solar cell s Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  19. Band structural properties of MoS2 (molybdenite)

    Semiconductivity and superconductivity in MoS2 (molybdenite) can be understood in terms of the band structure of MoS2. The band structural properties of MoS2 are presented here. The energy dependence of nsub(eff) and epsilon(infinity)sub(eff) is investigated. Using calculated values of nsub(eff) and epsilon(infinity)sub(eff), the Penn gap has been determined. The value thus obtained is shown to be in good agreement with the reflectivity data and also with the value obtained from the band structure. The Ravindra and Srivastava formula has been shown to give values for the isobaric temperature gradient of Esub(G)[(deltaEsub(G)/deltaT)sub(P)], which are in agreement with the experimental data, and the contribution to (deltaEsub(G)/deltaT)sub(P) due to the electron lattice interaction has been evaluated. In addition, the electronic polarizability has been calculated using a modified Lorentz-Lorenz relation. (author)

  20. Trap density of states in n-channel organic transistors: variable temperature characteristics and band transport

    We have investigated trap density of states (trap DOS) in n-channel organic field-effect transistors based on N,N ’-bis(cyclohexyl)naphthalene diimide (Cy-NDI) and dimethyldicyanoquinonediimine (DMDCNQI). A new method is proposed to extract trap DOS from the Arrhenius plot of the temperature-dependent transconductance. Double exponential trap DOS are observed, in which Cy-NDI has considerable deep states, by contrast, DMDCNQI has substantial tail states. In addition, numerical simulation of the transistor characteristics has been conducted by assuming an exponential trap distribution and the interface approximation. Temperature dependence of transfer characteristics are well reproduced only using several parameters, and the trap DOS obtained from the simulated characteristics are in good agreement with the assumed trap DOS, indicating that our analysis is self-consistent. Although the experimentally obtained Meyer-Neldel temperature is related to the trap distribution width, the simulation satisfies the Meyer-Neldel rule only very phenomenologically. The simulation also reveals that the subthreshold swing is not always a good indicator of the total trap amount, because it also largely depends on the trap distribution width. Finally, band transport is explored from the simulation having a small number of traps. A crossing point of the transfer curves and negative activation energy above a certain gate voltage are observed in the simulated characteristics, where the critical VG above which band transport is realized is determined by the sum of the trapped and free charge states below the conduction band edge

  1. Band gap and electronic structure of MgSiN2

    Density functional theory calculations and electron energy loss spectroscopy indicate that the electronic structure of ordered orthorhombic MgSiN2 is similar to that of wurtzite AlN. A band gap of 5.7 eV was calculated for both MgSiN2 (indirect) and AlN (direct) using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof approximation. Correction with respect to the experimental room-temperature band gap of AlN indicates that the true band gap of MgSiN2 is 6.2 eV. MgSiN2 has an additional direct gap of 6.3 eV at the Γ point.

  2. Band gap and electronic structure of MgSiN{sub 2}

    Quirk, J. B., E-mail: james.quirk09@imperial.ac.uk; Råsander, M.; McGilvery, C. M.; Moram, M. A. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Palgrave, R. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, Gordon Street WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Density functional theory calculations and electron energy loss spectroscopy indicate that the electronic structure of ordered orthorhombic MgSiN{sub 2} is similar to that of wurtzite AlN. A band gap of 5.7 eV was calculated for both MgSiN{sub 2} (indirect) and AlN (direct) using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof approximation. Correction with respect to the experimental room-temperature band gap of AlN indicates that the true band gap of MgSiN{sub 2} is 6.2 eV. MgSiN{sub 2} has an additional direct gap of 6.3 eV at the Γ point.

  3. Electronic band structure and photoemission: A review and projection

    A brief review of electronic-structure calculations in solids, as a means of interpreting photoemission spectra, is presented. The calculations are, in general, of three types: ordinary one-electron-like band structures, which apply to bulk solids and are the basis of all other calculations; surface modified calculations, which take into account, self-consistently if at all possible, the presence of a vacuum-solid interface and of the electronic modifications caused thereby; and many-body calculations, which go beyond average-field approximations and consider dynamic rearrangement effects caused by electron-electron correlations during the photoemission process. 44 refs

  4. Structure of high-spin bands in 104Pd

    Complete text of publication follows. High-spin states of 104Pd were studied through the 96Zr(13C,5n) reaction at beam energies of 51 and 58 MeV, using the Euroball IV γ-ray spectrometer in conjunction with the Diamant charged particle array. On the basis of the analysis of γγγ-coincidence data, the previously known rotation-like structures (bands 1,2,3,4) have been extended up to Ex∼6, 13, 11 and 9 MeV with Iπ=(12+), (26+), (23-) and (20-), respectively. Besides the major sideband structures, two new negative parity cascades (bands 5,6) were found and built up to Ex∼8 MeV with Iπ=(17-) and (18-). The 104Pd nucleus with its 6 valence protons and 8 valence neutrons relative to 90Zr lies in the upper part of the g9/2 proton subshell and in the middle part of the d5/2, g7/2 neutron subshell where the low-Ωh11/2 orbitals intrude already at small deformations. To get a deeper insight into the structure of the observed bands, total routhian surface (trs) calculations based on the Woods-Saxon cranking formalism were performed. Comparing the experimental Routhians E' and aligned angular momenta Ix with the trs results (Fig. 1), we assign two-quasiparticle ν(h11/2)2 configuration to the positive-parity bands 1 and 2. According to this expectation, the alignment of a h11/2 neutron pair is clearly visible at ℎω∼0.4 MeV frequency with nearly the full possible alignment gain of ∼10ℎ. As in the negative-parity bands 3,4,5 and 6 the νh11/2 alignment seems to be blocked, their configuration contains one neutron in the h11/2 orbit. Furthermore, the second quasineutron is expected to have a g7/2, d5/2 origin due to their parity. This assumption is supported by the good agreement of the experimental data with the trs results and accordingly we suggest νh11/2(d5/2, g7/2) configurations for these bands.

  5. Study on Band Structure of YbB6 and Analysis of Its Optical Conductivity Spectrum

    2007-01-01

    The electronic structure of YbB6 crystal was studied by means of density functional (GGA+U) method.The calculations were performed by FLAPW method.The high accurate band structure was achieved.The correlation between the feature of the band structure and the Yb-B6 bonding in YbB6 was analyzed.On this basis, some optical constants of YbB6 such as reflectivity, dielectric function, optical conductivity, and energy-loss function were calculated.The results are in good agreement with the experiments.The real part of the optical conductivity spectrum and the energy-loss function spectrum were analyzed in detail.The assignments of the spectra were carried out to correlate the spectral peaks with the interband electronic transitions, which justify the reasonable part of previous empirical assignments and renew the missed or incorrect ones.

  6. Stable porous crystalline silicon with nanotubular structure: A predicted allotrope with direct band gap

    Tang, Chi-Pui, E-mail: duncantcp@yahoo.com.hk [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lunar and Planetary Science Laboratory, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macau (Macao); Cao, Jie [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xiong, Shi-Jie, E-mail: sjxiong@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-06-15

    On basis of the first principle calculation we show that a crystalline structure of silicon, as a novel allotrope with nanotubular holes along two perpendicular directions, is stable. The calculations on geometrical and electronic properties reveal that this allotrope possesses a direct band gap wider by 0.5 eV than the indirect one of silicon with diamond structure. The crystal belongs to I41/AMD space group, showing anisotropic optical properties and Young modulus. The bulk modulus is 64.4 GPa and the density is 1.9 g/cm{sup 3}, lower than that of the diamond silicon due to the presence of nanotubular holes. It is hopeful that the allotrope may widely expand applications of silicon in many fields due to its direct band gap and specific nanotubular structure.

  7. Band structure and itinerant magnetism in quantum critical NbFe2

    Subedi, A. P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Singh, David J [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    We report first-principles calculations of the band structure and magnetic ordering in the C14 Laves phase compound NbFe{sub 2}. The magnetism is itinerant in the sense that the moments are highly dependent on ordering. We find an overestimation of the magnetic tendency within the local spin-density approximation, similar to other metals near magnetic quantum critical points. We also find a competition between different magnetic states due to band-structure effects. These lead to competing magnetic tendencies due to competing interlayer interactions, one favoring a ferrimagnetic solution and the other an antiferromagnetic state. While the structure contains Kagome lattice sheets, which could, in principle, lead to strong magnetic frustration, the calculations do not show dominant nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic interactions within these sheets. These results are discussed in relation to experimental observations.

  8. Stable porous crystalline silicon with nanotubular structure: A predicted allotrope with direct band gap

    On basis of the first principle calculation we show that a crystalline structure of silicon, as a novel allotrope with nanotubular holes along two perpendicular directions, is stable. The calculations on geometrical and electronic properties reveal that this allotrope possesses a direct band gap wider by 0.5 eV than the indirect one of silicon with diamond structure. The crystal belongs to I41/AMD space group, showing anisotropic optical properties and Young modulus. The bulk modulus is 64.4 GPa and the density is 1.9 g/cm3, lower than that of the diamond silicon due to the presence of nanotubular holes. It is hopeful that the allotrope may widely expand applications of silicon in many fields due to its direct band gap and specific nanotubular structure

  9. Band structure and electron-phonon coupling in H3S : A tight-binding model

    Ortenzi, L.; Cappelluti, E.; Pietronero, L.

    2016-08-01

    We present a robust tight-binding description, based on the Slater-Koster formalism, of the band structure of H3S in the Im3 ¯m structure, stable in the range of pressure P =180 -220 GPa. We show that the interatomic hopping between the 3 s and 3 p orbitals (and partially between the 3 p orbitals themselves) of sulfur is fundamental to capturing the relevant physics associated with the Van Hove singularities close to the Fermi level. Comparing the model so defined with density functional theory calculations we obtain a very good agreement not only of the overall band structure but also of the low-energy states and the Fermi surface properties. The description in terms of Slater-Koster parameters permits us also to evaluate at a microscopic level a hopping-resolved linear electron-lattice coupling which can be employed for further tight-binding analyses also at a local scale.

  10. k.p Parameters with Accuracy Control from Preexistent First-Principles Band Structure Calculations

    Sipahi, Guilherme; Bastos, Carlos M. O.; Sabino, Fernando P.; Faria Junior, Paulo E.; de Campos, Tiago; da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    The k.p method is a successful approach to obtain band structure, optical and transport properties of semiconductors. It overtakes the ab initio methods in confined systems due to its low computational cost since it is a continuum method that does not require all the atoms' orbital information. From an effective one-electron Hamiltonian, the k.p matrix representation can be calculated using perturbation theory and the parameters identified by symmetry arguments. The parameters determination, however, needs a complementary approach. In this paper, we developed a general method to extract the k.p parameters from preexistent band structures of bulk materials that is not limited by the crystal symmetry or by the model. To demonstrate our approach, we applied it to zinc blende GaAs band structure calculated by hybrid density functional theory within the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof functional (DFT-HSE), for the usual 8 ×8 k.p Hamiltonian. Our parameters reproduced the DFT-HSE band structure with great accuracy up to 20% of the first Brillouin zone (FBZ). Furthermore, for fitting regions ranging from 7-20% of FBZ, the parameters lie inside the range of values reported by the most reliable studies in the literature. The authors acknowledge financial support from the Brazilian agencies CNPq (Grant #246549/2012-2) and FAPESP (Grants #2011/19333-4, #2012/05618-0 and #2013/23393-8).

  11. Electronic band structure of the layered compound Td-WTe2

    Augustin, J.; Eyert, V.; Böker, Th.; Frentrup, W.; Dwelk, H.; Janowitz, C.; Manzke, R.

    2000-10-01

    We have studied the electronic structure of the layered compound Td-WTe2 experimentally using high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, and theoretically using density-functional based augmented spherical wave calculations. Comparison of the measured and calculated data shows in general good agreement. The theoretical results reveal the semimetallic as well as metallic character of Td-WTe2; the semimetallic character is due to a 0.5 eV overlap of Te 5p- and W 5d-like bands along Γ-Y, while the metallic character is due to two classical metallic bands. The rather low conductivity of Td-WTe2 is interpreted as resulting from a low density of states at the Fermi level.

  12. Band-Gap Modulation of GeCH3 Nanoribbons Under Elastic Strain: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Ma, ShengQian; Li, Feng; Jiang, ChunLing

    2016-06-01

    Using the density functional theory method, we researched the band-gap modulation of GeCH3 nanoribbons under uniaxial elastic strain. The results indicated that the band gap of GeCH3 nanoribbons could be tuned along two directions, namely, stretching or compressing ribbons when ɛ was changed from -10% to 10% in 6-zigzag, 10-zigzag, 13-armchair, and 17-armchair nanoribbons, respectively. The band gap greatly changed with strain. In the case of tension, the amount of change in the band gap was bigger. But in the case of compression, the gradient was steeper. The band gap had a nearly linear relationship when ɛ ranges from 0% to 10%. We also investigated if the band gap is changed with widths. The results showed variation of the band gap did not rely on widths. Therefore, the GeCH3 nanoribbons had the greatest potential application in strain sensors and optical electronics at the nanoscale.

  13. Dual-band metamaterial with a windmill-like structure

    A broadband negative refractive index metamaterial based on a windmill-like structure is proposed, and investigated numerically and experimentally at the microwave frequency range. From the numerical and experimental results, effect media parameters are retrieved, which clearly show that two broad frequency bands exist in which the permittivity and permeability are negative. The two negative bands are from 9.1 GHz to 10.5 GHz and from 12.05 GHz to 14.65 GHz respectively, and the negative bandwidth is 4 GHz. Due to the good bandwidth performance, the metallic cell with double negative property obtained in this paper is suitable for use in the design of multiband or broadband microwave devices. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  14. Simple metamaterial structure enabling triple-band perfect absorber

    Two resonators in metamaterial usually correspond only to two absorption peaks. In this report, by breaking the symmetry, we could create multi-fundamental resonances at GHz frequencies in both simulation and experiment. First, a dual-band metamaterial absorber (MA) was achieved for 4.6 and 10.6 GHz. Next, by modifying the relative position of inner square, the triple-band MA was obtained with enhanced absorption properties. In addition, dependence on the polarization of the incident electromagnetic (EM) wave was clarified. The mechanism is elucidated to be an alteration of the coupling strength, which is made by changing the geometrical configuration of the inner square and the outer ring. It is shown that our structural configuration can be applied to the fields where the interaction with a wide range of EM waves exists or is needed. (paper)

  15. Gender-related differences in the apparent timing of skeletal density bands in the reef-building coral Siderastrea siderea

    Carricart-Ganivet, J. P.; Vásquez-Bedoya, L. F.; Cabanillas-Terán, N.; Blanchon, P.

    2013-09-01

    Density banding in skeletons of reef-building corals is a valuable source of proxy environmental data. However, skeletal growth strategy has a significant impact on the apparent timing of density-band formation. Some corals employ a strategy where the tissue occupies previously formed skeleton during as the new band forms, which leads to differences between the actual and apparent band timing. To investigate this effect, we collected cores from female and male colonies of Siderastrea siderea and report tissue thicknesses and density-related growth parameters over a 17-yr interval. Correlating these results with monthly sea surface temperature (SST) shows that maximum skeletal density in the female coincides with low winter SSTs, whereas in the male, it coincides with high summer SSTs. Furthermore, maximum skeletal densities in the female coincide with peak Sr/Ca values, whereas in the male, they coincide with low Sr/Ca values. Both results indicate a 6-month difference in the apparent timing of density-band formation between genders. Examination of skeletal extension rates also show that the male has thicker tissue and extends faster, whereas the female has thinner tissue and a denser skeleton—but both calcify at the same rate. The correlation between extension and calcification, combined with the fact that density banding arises from thickening of the skeleton throughout the depth reached by the tissue layer, implies that S. siderea has the same growth strategy as massive Porites, investing its calcification resources into linear extension. In addition, differences in tissue thicknesses suggest that females offset the greater energy requirements of gamete production by generating less tissue, resulting in differences in the apparent timing of density-band formation. Such gender-related offsets may be common in other corals and require that environmental reconstructions be made from sexed colonies and that, in fossil corals where sex cannot be determined

  16. Alpha-cluster structure and density wave in oblate nuclei

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko; Hidaka, Yoshimasa

    2011-01-01

    Pentagon and triangle shapes in Si-28 and C-12 are discussed in relation with nuclear density wave. In the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics calculations, the $K^\\pi=5^-$ band in Si-28 and the $K^\\pi=3^-$ band in C-12 are described by the pentagon and triangle shapes, respectively. These negative-parity bands can be interpreted as the parity partners of the $K^\\pi=0^+$ ground bands and they are constructed from the parity-asymmetric-intrinsic states. The pentagon and the triangle shapes orig...

  17. Wakefield Monitor Experiments with X-Band Accelerating Structures

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Malina, Lukas; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating structures for CLIC must be aligned with a precision of a few um with respect to the beam trajectory in order to mitigate emittance growth due to transverse wake fields. We report on first results from wake field monitor tests in an X-band structure, with a probe beam at the CLIC Test Facility. The monitors are currently installed in the CLIC Two-Beam Module. In order to fully demonstrate the feasibility of using wakefield monitors for CLIC, the precision of the monitors must be verified using a probe beam while simultaneously filling the structure with high power rf used to drive the accelerating mode. We outline plans to perform such a demonstration in the CLIC Test Facility.

  18. Collective Band Structures in Neutron-Rich 108Mo Nucleus

    DING Huai-Bo; WANG Jian-Guo; XU Qiang; ZHU Sheng-Jiang; J. H. Hamilton; A. V. Ramayya; J. K. Hwang; Y. X. Luo; J. O. Rasmussen; I. Y. Lee; CHE Xing-Lai

    2007-01-01

    High spin states in the neutron-rich 108Mo nucleus are studied by measuring prompt γ-rays following the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with a Gammasphere detector array. The ground-state band is confirmed, and the one-phonon γ-vibrational band is updated with spin up to 12 h. A new collective band with the band head level at 1422.4 keV is suggested as a two-phonon γ-vibrational band. Another new band is proposed as a two-quasi-proton excitation band. Systematic characteristics of the collective bands are discussed.

  19. Determination of the valence band structure of an alkali phosphorus oxynitride glass: A synchrotron XPS study on LiPON

    Schwöbel, André, E-mail: aschwoebel@surface.tu-darmstadt.de [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Materials Science Department, Surface Science Division, Jovanka-Bontschits-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Precht, Ruben; Motzko, Markus; Carrillo Solano, Mercedes A. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Materials Science Department, Surface Science Division, Jovanka-Bontschits-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Calvet, Wolfram [Helmholzzentrum Berlin GmbH, Solar Energy Research, Heterogeneous Materials Systems, Albert Einstein Straße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hausbrand, René; Jaegermann, Wolfram [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Materials Science Department, Surface Science Division, Jovanka-Bontschits-Str. 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • In situ photoemission of LiPON solid Li-ion electrolyte. • We find that the valence band is similar to the known phosphates. • We find evidence for a resonance at the O1s edge shown by a Fano profile. • We find that the top of the valence band is due to N2p states. - Abstract: Lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) is a solid state electrolyte commonly used in thin film batteries (TFBs). Advanced TFBs face the issue of detrimental electrode–electrolyte interlayer formation, related to the electronic structure of the interface. In this contribution, we study the valence band structure of LiPON using resonant photoemission and synchrotron photoemission with variable excitation energies. The identification of different valence band features is done according to the known valence band features of meta- and orthophosphates. Additionally we compare our results with partial density of states simulations from literature. We find that the valence band structure is similar to the known metaphosphates with an additional contribution of nitrogen states at the top of the valence band. From the results we conclude that synchrotron X-ray photoemission (XPS) is a useful tool to study the valence band structure of nitridated alkali phosphate glasses.

  20. Determination of the valence band structure of an alkali phosphorus oxynitride glass: A synchrotron XPS study on LiPON

    Highlights: • In situ photoemission of LiPON solid Li-ion electrolyte. • We find that the valence band is similar to the known phosphates. • We find evidence for a resonance at the O1s edge shown by a Fano profile. • We find that the top of the valence band is due to N2p states. - Abstract: Lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) is a solid state electrolyte commonly used in thin film batteries (TFBs). Advanced TFBs face the issue of detrimental electrode–electrolyte interlayer formation, related to the electronic structure of the interface. In this contribution, we study the valence band structure of LiPON using resonant photoemission and synchrotron photoemission with variable excitation energies. The identification of different valence band features is done according to the known valence band features of meta- and orthophosphates. Additionally we compare our results with partial density of states simulations from literature. We find that the valence band structure is similar to the known metaphosphates with an additional contribution of nitrogen states at the top of the valence band. From the results we conclude that synchrotron X-ray photoemission (XPS) is a useful tool to study the valence band structure of nitridated alkali phosphate glasses

  1. Analysis of photonic band-gap structures in stratified medium

    Tong, Ming-Sze; Yinchao, Chen; Lu, Yilong;

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - To demonstrate the flexibility and advantages of a non-uniform pseudo-spectral time domain (nu-PSTD) method through studies of the wave propagation characteristics on photonic band-gap (PBG) structures in stratified medium Design/methodology/approach - A nu-PSTD method is proposed in...... the occasions where the spatial distributions contain step of up to five times larger than the original size, while simultaneously the flexibility of non-uniform sampling offers further savings on computational storage. Research limitations/implications - Research has been mainly limited to the simple...

  2. Band structure in the polymer quantization of the harmonic oscillator

    We discuss the detailed structure of the spectrum of the Hamiltonian for the polymerized harmonic oscillator and compare it with the spectrum in the standard quantization. As we will see the non-separability of the Hilbert space implies that the point spectrum consists of bands similar to the ones appearing in the treatment of periodic potentials. This feature of the spectrum of the polymeric harmonic oscillator may be relevant for the discussion of the polymer quantization of the scalar field and may have interesting consequences for the statistical mechanics of these models. (paper)

  3. Band structures of a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in one-dimensional lattices

    Lin, Yuanyao; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Kao, Yee-Mou; Jiang, Tsin-Fu

    2008-08-01

    We derive the effective Gross-Pitaevskii equation for a cigar-shaped dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in one-dimensional lattices and investigate the band structures numerically. Due to the anisotropic and the long-ranged dipole-dipole interaction in addition to the known contact interaction, we elucidate the possibility of modifying the band structures by changing the alignment of the dipoles with the axial direction. With the considerations of the transverse parts and the practical physical parameters of a cigar-shaped trap, we show the possibility to stabilize an attractive condensate simply by adjusting the orientation angle of dipoles. Some interesting Bloch waves at several particle current densities are identified for possible experimental observations.

  4. Synchronous changes in coral chromatophore tissue density and skeletal banding as an adaptive response to environmental change

    Ardisana, R. N.; Miller, C. A.; Sivaguru, M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2013-12-01

    Corals are a key reservoir of biodiversity in coastal, shallow water tropical marine environments, and density banding in their aragonite skeletons is used as a sensitive record of paleoclimate. Therefore, the cellular response of corals to environmental change and its expression in skeletal structure is of significant importance. Chromatophores, pigment-bearing cells within the ectoderm of hermatypic corals, serve to both enhance the photosynthetic activity of zooxanthellae symbionts, as well as protect the coral animal from harmful UV radiation. Yet connections have not previously been drawn between chromatophore tissue density and the development of skeletal density bands. A histological analysis of the coral Montastrea faveolata has therefore been conducted across a bathymetric gradient of 1-20 m on the southern Caribbean island of Curaçao. A combination of field and laboratory photography, serial block face imaging (SBFI), two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM), and 3D image analysis has been applied to test whether M. faveolata adapts to increasing water depth and decreasing photosynthetically active radiation by shifting toward a more heterotrophic lifestyle (decreasing zooxanthellae tissue density, increasing mucocyte tissue density, and decreasing chromatophores density). This study is among the first to collect and evaluate histological data in the spatial context of an entire unprocessed coral polyp. TPLSM was used to optically thin section unprocessed tissue biopsies with quantitative image analysis to yield a nanometer-scale three-dimensional map of the quantity and distribution of the symbionts (zooxanthellae) and a host fluorescent pigments (chromatophores), which is thought to have photoprotective properties, within the context of an entire coral polyp. Preliminary results have offered new insight regarding the three-dimensional distribution and abundance of chromatophores and have identified: (1) M. faveolata tissue collected from 8M SWD do

  5. Engineered band structure for an enhanced performance on quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Jin, Bin Bin; Wang, Ye Feng; Wei, Dong; Cui, Bin; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Jing Hui

    2016-06-01

    A photon-to-current efficiency of 2.93% is received for the Mn-doped CdS (MCdS)-quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) using Mn:ZnO (MZnO) nanowire as photoanode. Hydrothermal synthesized MZnO are spin-coated on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass with P25 paste to serve as photoanode after calcinations. MCdS was deposited on the MZnO film by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method. The long lived excitation energy state of Mn2+ is located inside the conduction band in the wide bandgap ZnO and under the conduction band of CdS, which increases the energetic overlap of donor and acceptor states, reducing the "loss-in-potential," inhibiting charge recombination, and accelerating electron injection. The engineered band structure is well reflected by the electrochemical band detected using cyclic voltammetry. Cell performances are evidenced by current density-voltage (J-V) traces, diffuse reflectance spectra, transient PL spectroscopy, and incident photon to current conversion efficiency characterizations. Further coating of CdSe on MZnO/MCdS electrode expands the light absorption band of the sensitizer, an efficiency of 4.94% is received for QDSSCs.

  6. Comprehensive comparison and experimental validation of band-structure calculation methods in III-V semiconductor quantum wells

    Zerveas, George; Caruso, Enrico; Baccarani, Giorgio; Czornomaz, Lukas; Daix, Nicolas; Esseni, David; Gnani, Elena; Gnudi, Antonio; Grassi, Roberto; Luisier, Mathieu; Markussen, Troels; Osgnach, Patrik; Palestri, Pierpaolo; Schenk, Andreas; Selmi, Luca; Sousa, Marilyne; Stokbro, Kurt; Visciarelli, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We present and thoroughly compare band-structures computed with density functional theory, tight-binding, k · p and non-parabolic effective mass models. Parameter sets for the non-parabolic Γ, the L and X valleys and intervalley bandgaps are extracted for bulk InAs, GaAs and InGaAs. We then consider quantum-wells with thickness ranging from 3 nm to 10 nm and the bandgap dependence on film thickness is compared with experiments for In0.53Ga0.47 As quantum-wells. The impact of the band-structure on the drain current of nanoscale MOSFETs is simulated with ballistic transport models, the results provide a rigorous assessment of III-V semiconductor band structure calculation methods and calibrated band parameters for device simulations.

  7. Surface alloying in the Sn/Ni(111) system studied by synchrotron radiation photoelectron valence band spectroscopy and ab-initio density of states calculations

    Karakalos, S.; Ladas, S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras and FORTH/ICE-HT, POB 1414, 26504 Rion (Patras) (Greece); Janecek, P.; Sutara, F.; Nehasil, V. [Department of Electronic and Vacuum Physics, Charles University, V.Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Tsud, N. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza-Trieste (Italy); Prince, K. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza-Trieste (Italy); INFM, Laboratorio TASC, in Area Science Park, Strada Statale 14, km 163.5, 34012 Basovizza-Trieste (Italy); Matolin, V. [Department of Electronic and Vacuum Physics, Charles University, V.Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Chab, V. [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Cucrovarnicka 10, 16200 Prague (Czech Republic); Papanicolaou, N.I. [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, P.O. Box 1186, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)], E-mail: nikpap@uoi.gr; Dianat, A.; Gross, A. [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2008-03-31

    Photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation and ab-initio electronic structure calculations were used in order to describe the fine structure of the valence band in the Sn/Ni(111) system. The characteristic contributions of each metal in the valence band photoemission spectra obtained with a photon energy of 80 eV and their changes upon the formation of the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{sup o} Sn/Ni(111) surface alloy were also born out in the calculated density-of-states curves in fair agreement with the experiments. The Sn-Ni interaction leads to a considerable broadening of the valence band width at the bimetallic surfaces.

  8. Density functional calculation of band-parameters for boron nitride at normal and high pressures

    The present work employs the total-energy pseudopotential technique within the framework of the density-functional theory with both the local-density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange-correlation functional so as to calculate the structural, electronic, chemical bonding and elastic properties of BN in the zinc-blende structure at normal and high pressures. The results are generally in good agreement with the available experimental data. We found that in many cases (except may be for elastic constants) the GGA improves agreement with experiment. The calculations showed that the transition pressure for BN from the zinc-blende phase to the rocksalt phase is much smaller than previously reported theoretical values

  9. Analysis of band structure, transmission properties, and dispersion behavior of THz wave in one-dimensional parabolic plasma photonic crystal

    The photonic band gap of obliquely incident terahertz electromagnetic waves in a one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal is studied. The periodic structure consists of lossless dielectric and inhomogeneous plasma with a parabolic density profile. The dispersion relation and the THz wave transmittance are analyzed based on the electromagnetic equations and transfer matrix method. The dependence of effective plasma frequency and photonic band gap characteristics on dielectric and plasma thickness, plasma density, and incident angle are discussed in detail. A theoretical calculation for effective plasma frequency is presented and compared with numerical results. Results of these two methods are in good agreement

  10. Analysis of band structure, transmission properties, and dispersion behavior of THz wave in one-dimensional parabolic plasma photonic crystal

    Askari, Nasim; Eslami, Esmaeil, E-mail: eeslami@iust.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science & Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzaie, Reza [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 1983969411 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The photonic band gap of obliquely incident terahertz electromagnetic waves in a one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal is studied. The periodic structure consists of lossless dielectric and inhomogeneous plasma with a parabolic density profile. The dispersion relation and the THz wave transmittance are analyzed based on the electromagnetic equations and transfer matrix method. The dependence of effective plasma frequency and photonic band gap characteristics on dielectric and plasma thickness, plasma density, and incident angle are discussed in detail. A theoretical calculation for effective plasma frequency is presented and compared with numerical results. Results of these two methods are in good agreement.

  11. Structure of negative parity yrast bands in odd mass 125-131Ce nuclei

    Arun Bharti; Suram Singh; S K Khosa

    2010-04-01

    The negative parity yrast bands of neutron-deficient 125-131Ce nuclei are studied by using the projected shell model approach. Energy levels, transition energies and (1)/(2) ratios are calculated and compared with the available experimental data. The calculations reproduce the band-head spins of negative parity yrast bands and indicate the multi-quasiparticle structure for these bands.

  12. Photonic Band Gaps in 3D Network Structures with Short-range Order

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Noh, Heeso; Schreck, Carl F; Dufresne, Eric R; O'Hern, Corey S; Cao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic study of photonic band gaps (PBGs) in three-dimensional (3D) photonic amorphous structures (PAS) with short-range order. From calculations of the density of optical states (DOS) for PAS with different topologies, we find that tetrahedrally connected dielectric networks produce the largest isotropic PBGs. Local uniformity and tetrahedral order are essential to the formation of PBGs in PAS, in addition to short-range geometric order. This work demonstrates that it is possible to create broad, isotropic PBGs for vector light fields in 3D PAS without long-range order.

  13. Photonic band gaps in three-dimensional network structures with short-range order

    We present a systematic study of photonic band gaps (PBGs) in three-dimensional (3D) photonic amorphous structures (PASs) with short-range order. From calculations of the density of optical states (DOS) for PASs with different topologies, we find that tetrahedrally connected dielectric networks produce the largest isotropic PBGs. Local uniformity and tetrahedral order are essential to the formation of PBGs in PASs, in addition to short-range geometric order. This work demonstrates that it is possible to create broad, isotropic PBGs for vector light fields in 3D PASs without long-range order.

  14. Influence of Structural Parameters on a Novel Metamaterial Absorber Structure at K-band Frequency

    Cuong, Tran Manh; Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Tuan, Le Anh

    2016-05-01

    Metamaterials nowadays continue to gain attention thanks to their special electromagnetic characteristics. An increasing number of studies are being conducted on the absolute electromagnetic absorber configurations of high impedance surface materials at a certain frequency band. These configurations are usually fabricated with a layer of metal structure based on a dielectric sheet. In this study, we present an optimal design of a novel electromagnetic absorber metamaterial configuration working at a 23-GHz frequency range (K band).

  15. Measured intrinsic defect density throughout the entire band gap at the Si/SiO2 interface

    Sands, D.; Brunson, K. M.; Tayarani-Najaran, M. H.

    1992-08-01

    Conductance-frequency measurements down to temperatures of 100 K have been performed on both p-type and n-type silicon oxidized in dry oxygen at 900 degrees C. The metal electrode capacitors used were not given a post-metallization anneal in forming gas. This has allowed measurements of the intrinsic density of states, capture cross section, and surface potential fluctuations to within 0.06 eV of the band edges. Two peaks in the defect density at energies of 0.3 eV and 0.85 eV above the valence band are clearly visible above an asymmetric background, which rises rapidly towards the conduction band edge. The capture cross section is near constant at approximately 1016 cm2 across the gap and independent of temperature. The surface potential fluctuations reveal a peak value of approximately 70 meV centred at 0.4 eV above the valence band superimposed on a constant background of approximately 40 meV. The authors attribute the peaks in the density of states to the amphoteric trivalent silicon Pb centres. The probable causes of the asymmetric background are either the tail of a defect peak centred around the conduction band edge, or states descending from the conduction band induced by stress within the oxide.

  16. X-band coaxial standing-wave linear accelerator structure

    A new high efficiency X-Band, standing-wave linear accelerator cavity structure has been developed. It utilizes a shaped coaxial cavity as the coupling cavity between accelerating cavities for π/2 mode operation, hence the overall diameter is extremely small while maintaining a very high shunt impedance. The coupling cavity and accelerating cavity are easily machined on opposite sides of a single cell, eliminating any subassembly steps. Cavity geometries were developed using the computer codes LACC and LALA. Prototype 1.5 MeV and 4.0 MeV, 20 cm long accelerators are now under development. The accelerators employ a stepped field focusing technique to keep the beam focused at low field levels. The beam dynamics code PARMELA was used to optimize the longitudinal bunching and transverse beam characteristics. The accelerator design parameters, as well as experimental results, are presented

  17. Measuring large-scale structure with quasars in narrow-band filter surveys

    Abramo, L. Raul; Strauss, Michael A.; Lima, Marcos; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Lazkoz, Ruth; Moles, Mariano; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; Sendra, Irene; Sodré, Laerte; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    2012-07-01

    We show that a large-area imaging survey using narrow-band filters could detect quasars in sufficiently high number densities, and with more than sufficient accuracy in their photometric redshifts, to turn them into suitable tracers of large-scale structure. If a narrow-band optical survey can detect objects as faint as i= 23, it could reach volumetric number densities as high as 10-4 h3 Mpc-3 (comoving) at z˜ 1.5. Such a catalogue would lead to precision measurements of the power spectrum up to z˜ 3-4. We also show that it is possible to employ quasars to measure baryon acoustic oscillations at high redshifts, where the uncertainties from redshift distortions and non-linearities are much smaller than at z≲ 1. As a concrete example we study the future impact of the Javalambre Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS), which is a narrow-band imaging survey in the optical over 1/5 of the unobscured sky with 42 filters of ˜100-Å full width at half-maximum. We show that J-PAS will be able to take advantage of the broad emission lines of quasars to deliver excellent photometric redshifts, σz≃ 0.002 (1 +z), for millions of objects.

  18. Measuring large-scale structure with quasars in narrow-band filter surveys

    Abramo, L Raul; Lima, Marcos; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Lazkoz, Ruth; Moles, Mariano; de Oliveira, Cláudia M; Sendra, Irene; Sodré, Laerte

    2011-01-01

    We show that a large-area imaging survey using narrow-band filters could detect quasars in sufficiently high number densities, and with more than sufficient accuracy in their photometric redshifts, to turn them into suitable tracers of large-scale structure. If a narrow-band optical survey can detect objects as faint as i=23, it could reach volumetric number densities as high as 10^{-4} h^3 Mpc^{-3} (comoving) at z~1.5 . Such a catalog would lead to precision measurements of the power spectrum up to z~3-4. We also show that it is possible to employ quasars to measure baryon acoustic oscillations at high redshifts, where the uncertainties from redshift distortions and nonlinearities are much smaller than at z<1. As a concrete example we study the future impact of J-PAS, which is a narrow-band imaging survey in the optical over 1/5 of the unobscured sky with 42 filters of ~100 A full-width at half-maximum. We show that J-PAS will be able to take advantage of the broad emission lines of quasars to deliver exc...

  19. Band structure and optical functions of K2ZnCl4 crystals in ferroelectric phase

    Band electronic structure (BS), density of states (DOS), and optical functions of K2ZnCl4 crystal for the orthorhombic space group of symmetry Pna21 corresponding to the ferroelectric phase (12 formula units in the crystallographic unit cell) have been calculated for the first time using the density functional theory based code VASP (Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Program). The valence-to-conduction band gap Eg of the crystal is found to be direct in the Γ-point of Brillouin zone. The effective masses m* have been calculated for the top valence and bottom conduction bands for different points and directions of Brillouin zone of the crystal and the results obtained have been analyzed. Peculiarities of the photon energy dependences n(E) and k(E) of refractive (n) and absorption (k) indices obtained in the range 0-28 eV have been identified on the basis of BS and DOS of the crystal. Calculated optical functions agree satisfactorily with the experimental data n(E) in the range of crystal's transparency, E < 5 eV.

  20. Role of interface band structure on hot electron transport

    Garramone, John J.

    Knowledge of electron transport through materials and interfaces is fundamentally and technologically important. For example, metal interconnects within integrated circuits suffer increasingly from electromigration and signal delay due to an increase in resistance from grain boundary and sidewall scattering since their dimensions are becoming shorter than the electron mean free path. Additionally, all semiconductor based devices require the transport of electrons through materials and interfaces where scattering and parallel momentum conservation are important. In this thesis, the inelastic and elastic scattering of hot electrons are studied in nanometer thick copper, silver and gold films deposited on silicon substrates. Hot electrons are electron with energy greater than kBT above the Fermi level (EF). This work was performed utilizing ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) which is a three terminal scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique that measures the percentage of hot electrons transmitted across a Schottky barrier interface. Hot electron attenuation lengths of the metals were extracted by measuring the BEEM current as a function of metal overlayer thickness for both hot electron and hot hole injection at 80 K and under ultra high vacuum. The inelastic and elastic scattering lengths were extracted by fitting the energetic dependence of the measured attenuation lengths to a Fermi liquid based model. A sharp increase in the attenuation length is observed at low injection energies, just above the Schottky barrier height, only for metals on Si(001) substrates. In contrast, the attenuation length measured on Si(111) substrates shows a sharp decrease. These results indicate that interface band structure and parallel momentum conservation have significant impact upon the transport of hot electrons across non epitaxial metal-semiconductor interfaces. In addition, they help to separate effects upon hot electron transport that are inherent to the metal

  1. Photonic band gaps with layer-by-layer double-etched structures

    Periodic layer-by-layer dielectric structures with full three-dimensional photonic band gaps have been designed and fabricated. In contrast to previous layer-by-layer structures the rods in each successive layer are at an angle of 70.5 degree to each other, achieved by etching both sides of a silicon wafer. Photonic band-structure calculations are utilized to optimize the photonic band gap by varying the structural geometry. The structure has been fabricated by double etching Si wafers producing millimeter wave photonic band gaps between 300 and 500 GHz, in excellent agreement with band calculations. Overetching this structure produces a multiply connected geometry and increases both the size and frequency of the photonic band gap, in very good agreement with experimental measurements. This new robust double-etched structure doubles the frequency possible from a single Si wafer, and can be scaled to produced band gaps at higher frequencies. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  2. Electronic structure and Fermi surface of the two-dimensional three-band Hubbard model in doped cuprates

    The electronic structure of the high-Tc copper oxides is calculated by means of an extended two-dimensional three-band Hubbard model in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The influence of the coupling parameters on the obtained bands, as well as their doping dependence are investigated especially at the Fermi surface. Results are discussed in the light of recent experimental data for the cuprate Fermi surfaces. A comparative analysis of these conflicting data on the basis of our results sheds some light on the interpretation of the measured band structures. The direct oxygen-oxygen hopping interaction is found to be essential in fitting experimental results, suggesting that, in the doped regime, the oxygen band plays a key role at least in the near-EF region. Antiferromagnetic correlations among copper atoms turn out as well to be crucial. The results agree remarkably well with previous local-density calculations and with spectroscopic measurements

  3. Computing the band structure and energy gap of penta-graphene by using DFT and G0W0 approximations

    Einollahzadeh, H.; Dariani, R. S.; Fazeli, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the optimum coordinate of the penta-graphene. Penta-graphene is a new stable carbon allotrope which is stronger than graphene. Here, we compare the band gap of penta-graphene with various density functional theory (DFT) methods. We plot the band structure of penta-graphene which calculated with the generalized gradient approximation functional HTCH407, about Fermi energy. Then, one-shot GW (G0W0) correction for precise computations of band structure is applied. Quasi-direct band gap of penta-graphene is obtained around 4.1-4.3 eV by G0W0 correction. Penta-graphene is an insulator and can be expected to have broad applications in future, especially in nanoelectronics and nanomechanics.

  4. Nuclear energy density optimization: Shell structure

    Kortelainen, M; Nazarewicz, W; Olsen, E; Reinhard, P -G; Sarich, J; Schunck, N; Wild, S M; Davesne, D; Erler, J; Pastore, A

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear density functional theory is the only microscopical theory that can be applied throughout the entire nuclear landscape. Its key ingredient is the energy density functional. In this work, we propose a new parameterization UNEDF2 of the local Skyrme energy density functional. The functional optimization is carried out using the POUNDerS optimization algorithm within the framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Compared to the previous parameterization UNEDF1, restrictions on the tensor term of the energy density have been lifted, yielding the most general form of the Skyrme energy density functional up to second order in derivatives of the one-body local density. In order to impose constraints on all the parameters of the functional, selected data on single-particle splittings in spherical doubly-magic nuclei have been included into the experimental dataset. The agreement with both bulk and spectroscopic nuclear properties achieved by the resulting UNEDF2 parameterization is comparable wi...

  5. Nuclear energy density optimization: Shell structure

    Kortelainen, M.; McDonnell, J.; W. Nazarewicz; Olsen, E; Reinhard, P. -G.; Sarich, J.; Schunck, N.; Wild, S. M.; Davesne, D.; Erler, J.; Pastore, A.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear density functional theory is the only microscopical theory that can be applied throughout the entire nuclear landscape. Its key ingredient is the energy density functional. In this work, we propose a new parameterization UNEDF2 of the Skyrme energy density functional. The functional optimization is carried out using the POUNDerS optimization algorithm within the framework of the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Compared to the previous parameterization UNEDF1, restrictions on th...

  6. Three-dimensional structure of low-density nuclear matter

    Okamoto, Minoru, E-mail: okamoto@nucl.ph.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Maruyama, Toshiki, E-mail: maruyama.toshiki@jaea.go.jp [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Yabana, Kazuhiro, E-mail: yabana@nucl.ph.tsukuba.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Center of Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Tatsumi, Toshitaka, E-mail: tatsumi@ruby.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2012-07-09

    We numerically explore the pasta structures and properties of low-density nuclear matter without any assumption on the geometry. We observe conventional pasta structures, while a mixture of the pasta structures appears as a metastable state at some transient densities. We also discuss the lattice structure of droplets.

  7. QUANTUM-MECHANICAL MODELING OF SPATIAL AND BAND STRUCTURE OF Y3AL5O12 SCINTILLATION CRYSTAL

    I. I. Vrubel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and electronic structures of a unit cell of yttrium-aluminum garnet have been studied. Quantum-mechanical model have been presented. Semi-empirical methods PM6 and PM7 have been used for geometry optimization of the crystal unit cell. Band structure has been calculated within density functional theory with the use of PBE exchange-correlation functional. Histograms of metal-oxygen distances for equilibrium geometry have been constructed. Comparison of the used methods has been carried out and recommendation about their applicability for such problems was given. The single-particle wave functions and energies have been calculated. The bandgap was estimated. The band structure was plotted. It was shown that the method gives reliable results for spatial and band structure of Y3Al5O12 scintillation crystal. The results of this work can be used for improvement of characteristics of garnet scintillation crystals.

  8. Electronic structure of metals of the beginning and the end of the third transition period. 1. Energy-band structure (review)

    The papers connected with the calculation of the energetic band structure of elements of the beginning and the end of the third transition period, such as Lu, Hf, Ir, Pt and Au, are considered. It is noted that the best agreement between theoretical and experimental ata is observed in casds when the crystalline potential is plotted on relativistic wave functions with complete Slater exchange. The application of the relativistic method of attached flat waves to calculate band structure and partial densities of transition metal states is considered. The effect of relativistic effects on the energetic band structure and energy distribution of complete and partical densities of states of the elements of the third transition period is discussed

  9. Phononic Band Gaps in 2D Quadratic and 3D Cubic Cellular Structures

    Franziska Warmuth

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The static and dynamic mechanical behaviour of cellular materials can be designed by the architecture of the underlying unit cell. In this paper, the phononic band structure of 2D and 3D cellular structures is investigated. It is shown how the geometry of the unit cell influences the band structure and eventually leads to full band gaps. The mechanism leading to full band gaps is elucidated. Based on this knowledge, a 3D cellular structure with a broad full band gap is identified. Furthermore, the dependence of the width of the gap on the geometry parameters of the unit cell is presented.

  10. Enlargement of Photonic Band Gaps and Physical Picture of Photonic Band Structures

    ZHANG Yan; SHI Jun-Jie

    2006-01-01

    @@ Light propagation in a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC), consisting of alternative slabs with refractive indices (layer thicknesses) n1 (a) and n2 (b), is investigated. An important optimal parameter matching condition,n1a ≈ n2b, is obtained for the largest photonic band gap (PBG). Moreover, we find that the exact analytical solutions for the electric/magnetic field eigenmodes at the band edges are standing waves with odd or even symmetry about the centre of each layer. The electric/magnetic field eigenfunctions at the top and bottom of the nth band have n and n - 1 nodes in one period of PC, respectively. The PBG arises from the symmetric differences of the field eigenfunctions at the band edges.

  11. Hyperspectral bands prediction based on inter-band spectral correlation structure

    Ahmed, Ayman M.; Sharkawy, Mohamed El.; Elramly, Salwa H.

    2013-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has been widely studied in many applications; notably in climate changes, vegetation, and desert studies. However, such kind of imaging brings a huge amount of data, which requires transmission, processing, and storage resources for both airborne and spaceborne imaging. Compression of hyperspectral data cubes is an effective solution for these problems. Lossless compression of the hyperspectral data usually results in low compression ratio, which may not meet the available resources; on the other hand, lossy compression may give the desired ratio, but with a significant degradation effect on object identification performance of the hyperspectral data. Moreover, most hyperspectral data compression techniques exploits the similarities in spectral dimensions; which requires bands reordering or regrouping, to make use of the spectral redundancy. In this paper, we analyze the spectral cross correlation between bands for AVIRIS and Hyperion hyperspectral data; spectral cross correlation matrix is calculated, assessing the strength of the spectral matrix, we propose new technique to find highly correlated groups of bands in the hyperspectral data cube based on "inter band correlation square", and finally, we propose a new technique of band regrouping based on correlation values weights for different group of bands as network of correlation.

  12. DeHaas-vanAlphen Effect and LMTO Band-structure of LaSn3

    Boulet, R. M.; Jan, J. -P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    Results of de Haas-van Alphen experiments in the intermetallic compound LaSn3 can be explained by a linear muffin-tin orbital band structure calculation without involving the f bands of lanthanum.......Results of de Haas-van Alphen experiments in the intermetallic compound LaSn3 can be explained by a linear muffin-tin orbital band structure calculation without involving the f bands of lanthanum....

  13. The effects of band structure on recombination processes in narrow gap materials and laser diodes

    The work described in this thesis investigates the effects of band structure modifications, brought about by Landau confinement, hydrostatic pressure and uniaxial stress, on recombination processes in narrow-gap materials and laser diodes. The effects of Landau confinement on the characteristics of InSb-based emission devices operating at a wavelength of ∼5μm at 77K were studied. The change in performance due to the magnetic field applied along both the cavity and the growth direction and thereby simulating quasi-quantum wire and quasi-quantum dot structures clearly demonstrated the benefits, such as reduced threshold and temperature sensitivity, gained by the reduced dimensionality. On the other hand, suppression of LO-phonon emission due to the discrete nature of the density of states was observed, for the first time, in an interband laser device. Interband recombination dynamics were studied in In1-xGaxSb and PbSe over a range of excited carrier densities and temperatures down to 30K. Detailed analysis of the results found that the Auger-1 mechanism is reduced in In1-xGaxSb as a function of Ga-fraction due to the increased bandgap energy, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. In PbSe, the Auger-1 rate was observed to dominate at low excited carrier concentrations in spite of near-mirror bands, and was found to be approximately constant between 300K and 70K and was seen to be quenched in the low temperature regime. Stimulated emission was seen to be the most efficient recombination mechanism at high excited carrier densities at low temperatures. The Auger coefficient in PbSe was found to be one to two orders of magnitude lower than for materials with a Kane band structure (Hg1-xCdxTe) with comparable bandgap. An experimental technique was developed which enables measurements at high hydrostatic pressures and high magnetic fields at low temperatures. Hydrostatic pressures were applied to a 1.5μm laser diode at different temperatures revealing the

  14. True photonic band-gap mode-control in VCSEL structures

    Romstad, F.; Madsen, M.; Birkedal, Dan;

    2003-01-01

    Photonic band-gap mode confinement in novel nano-structured large area VCSEL structures is confirmed by the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Both guide and anti-guide VCSEL structures are experimentally characterised to verify the photonic band-gap effect.......Photonic band-gap mode confinement in novel nano-structured large area VCSEL structures is confirmed by the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum. Both guide and anti-guide VCSEL structures are experimentally characterised to verify the photonic band-gap effect....

  15. Photonic-band-gap effects in two-dimensional polycrystalline and amorphous structures

    We study numerically the density of optical states (DOS) in two-dimensional photonic structures with short-range positional order and observe a transition from polycrystalline to amorphous photonic systems. In polycrystals, photonic band gaps (PBGs) are formed within individual domains, which leads to a depletion of the DOS similar to that in periodic structures. In amorphous photonic media, the domain sizes are too small to form PBGs, thus the depletion of the DOS is weakened significantly. The critical domain size that separates the polycrystalline and amorphous regimes is determined by the attenuation length of Bragg scattering, which depends not only on the degree of positional order but also the refractive-index contrast of the photonic material. Even with relatively low-refractive-index contrast, we find that modest short-range positional order in photonic structures enhances light confinement via collective scattering and interference.

  16. Valence and Conduction Band Densities of States of Metal Halide Perovskites: A Combined Experimental–Theoretical Study

    2016-01-01

    We report valence and conduction band densities of states measured via ultraviolet and inverse photoemission spectroscopies on three metal halide perovskites, specifically methylammonium lead iodide and bromide and cesium lead bromide (MAPbI3, MAPbBr3, CsPbBr3), grown at two different institutions on different substrates. These are compared with theoretical densities of states (DOS) calculated via density functional theory. The qualitative agreement achieved between experiment and theory leads to the identification of valence and conduction band spectral features, and allows a precise determination of the position of the band edges, ionization energy and electron affinity of the materials. The comparison reveals an unusually low DOS at the valence band maximum (VBM) of these compounds, which confirms and generalizes previous predictions of strong band dispersion and low DOS at the MAPbI3 VBM. This low DOS calls for special attention when using electron spectroscopy to determine the frontier electronic states of lead halide perovskites. PMID:27364125

  17. Valence and Conduction Band Densities of States of Metal Halide Perovskites: A Combined Experimental-Theoretical Study.

    Endres, James; Egger, David A; Kulbak, Michael; Kerner, Ross A; Zhao, Lianfeng; Silver, Scott H; Hodes, Gary; Rand, Barry P; Cahen, David; Kronik, Leeor; Kahn, Antoine

    2016-07-21

    We report valence and conduction band densities of states measured via ultraviolet and inverse photoemission spectroscopies on three metal halide perovskites, specifically methylammonium lead iodide and bromide and cesium lead bromide (MAPbI3, MAPbBr3, CsPbBr3), grown at two different institutions on different substrates. These are compared with theoretical densities of states (DOS) calculated via density functional theory. The qualitative agreement achieved between experiment and theory leads to the identification of valence and conduction band spectral features, and allows a precise determination of the position of the band edges, ionization energy and electron affinity of the materials. The comparison reveals an unusually low DOS at the valence band maximum (VBM) of these compounds, which confirms and generalizes previous predictions of strong band dispersion and low DOS at the MAPbI3 VBM. This low DOS calls for special attention when using electron spectroscopy to determine the frontier electronic states of lead halide perovskites. PMID:27364125

  18. Handbook of the band structure of elemental solids from Z = 1 to Z = 112

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitris A

    2015-01-01

    This handbook presents electronic structure data and tabulations of Slater-Koster parameters for the whole periodic table. This second edition presents data sets for all elements up to Z = 112, Copernicium, whereas the first edition contained only 53 elements. In this new edition, results are given for the equation of state of the elements together with the parameters of a Birch fit, so that the reader can regenerate the results and derive additional information, such as Pressure-Volume relations and variation of Bulk Modulus with Pressure. For each element, in addition to the equation of state, the energy bands, densities of states, and a set of tight-binding parameters is provided. For a majority of elements, the tight-binding parameters are presented for both a two- and three-center approximation. For the hcp structure, new three-center tight-binding results are given. Other new material in this edition include: energy bands and densities of states of all rare-earth metals, a discussion of the McMillan-Gas...

  19. Meaningful structural descriptors from charge density.

    Stalke, Dietmar

    2011-08-16

    This paper provides a short introduction to the basics of electron density investigations. The two predominant approaches for the modelling and various interpretations of electron density distributions are presented. Their potential translations into chemical concepts are explained. The focus of the article lies on the deduction of chemical properties from charge density studies in some selected main group compounds. The relationship between the obtained numerical data and commonly accepted simple chemical concepts unfortunately is not always straightforward, and often the chemist relies on heuristic connections rather than rigorously defined ones. This article tries to demonstrate how charge density analyses can shed light on aspects of chemical bonding and reactivity resulting from the determined bonding situation. Sometimes this helps to identify misconceptions and sets the scene for new unconventional synthetic approaches. PMID:21717511

  20. One-band density of states for various fourfold-coordinated random networks with periodic boundary conditions

    Guttman, L.

    1975-01-15

    Three different types of random networks were generated by computer simulation, starting from crystalline arrangements. All are perfectly fourfold coordinated, and satisfy periodic boundary conditions. The valence-band densities of electronic states of the various types are far from featureless and can clearly be distinguished from each other. (auth)

  1. Band structures of ZnTe:O alloys with isolated oxygen and with clustered oxygen impurities

    Highlights: • Band structures of ZnTe:O alloy highly depends on the status of oxygen. • Clustered oxygen lowers the bandgap while isolated oxygen increases the bandgap. • The solar adsorption efficiency of ZnTe:O can be improved by oxygen clustering. -- Abstract: First-principles calculations reveal that band structures of ZnTe:O alloys highly depend on the configuration of oxygen in the alloy. For alloys with isolated oxygen, the calculated band structure shows the formation of intermediate states between valence and conduction band and the shift of conduction band to higher energy level. It expands the gap between valence and conduction band. For alloys with clustered oxygen, the formation of intermediate band is still observed, while the gap between valence and conduction band is decreased. For alloys with oxygen impurities adjacent to Zn vacancy, the band structure only shows the decrease of the gap between valence and conduction band without the formation of any intermediate band. These results suggest the critical role of Zn–O bonding in determining the energy level of the impurity states. On the basis of our results, a possible band engineering approach is suggested in order to improve the performance of ZnTe:O alloy as intermediate band solar adsorbent

  2. Photonic band structure of two-dimensional metal/dielectric photonic crystals

    An improved plane wave expansion method for the numerical calculation of photonic bands of metal/dielectric photonic crystal (PC) are presented. This method is applied to two-dimensional PCs with frequency-dependent dielectric constants. We obtained the photonic band structure of three kinds of structures: sawtooth, cylinder and hole PCs. The results show that the lowest band-1 is relatively flat, and does not approach zero. Also, there is no complete band-gap that extends throughout the first Brillouin zone for these three structures. However, there are partial band-gaps in different directions in the first Brillouin zone. For the complementary cylinder and hole PCs, their photonic bands are similar except for the lowest three bands; the hole PC’s lowest frequency of band-1 is larger than that of cylinder PC for the configuration R/d  =  0.2. (paper)

  3. Electron densities and chemical bonding in TiC, TiN and TiO derived from energy band calculations

    It was the aim of this paper to describe the chemical bonding of TiC, TiN and TiO by means of energy bands and electron densities. Using the respective potentials we have calculated the bandstructure of a finer k-grid with the linearized APW method to obtain accurate densities of states (DOS). These DOS wer partitioned into local partial contributions and the metal d DOS were further decomposed into tsub(2g) and esub(g) symmetry components in order to additionally characterize bonding. The electron densities corresponding to the occupied valence states are obtained from the LAPW calculations. They provide further insight into characteristic trends in the series from TiC to TiO: around the nonmetal site the density shows increasing localisation; around the metal site the deviation from spherical symmetry changes from esub(g) to tsub(2g). Electron density plots of characteristic band states allow to describe different types of bonding occurring in these systems. For TiC and TiN recent measurements of the electron densities exist for samples of TiCsub(0.94) and TiNsub(0.99), where defects cause static displacements of the Ti atoms. If this effect can be compensated by an atomic model one hopefully can extrapolate to stoichiometric composition. This procedure allows a comparison with structure factors derived from theoretical electron densities. The agreement for TiN is very good. For TiC the extrapolated data agree in terms of the deviations from spherical symmetry near the Ti site with the LAPW data, but the densities around both atoms are more localized than in theory. An explanation could be: a) the defects affect the electronic structure in TiCsub(0.94) with respect to TiCsub(1.0): b) the applied atomic model does not properly extrapolate to stoichiometry, because parameters of this model correlate or become unphysical. (Author)

  4. Rietveld analysis and electronic bands structure on Tc superconductors systems

    A procedure for simultaneous refinement of structural and micro-structural disorder parameters for polycrystalline YBa2Cu3O7-x system is proposed. It is based on Rietveld method combined with Fourier analysis for broadened peaks Another purpose of this paper consists in electronic structure determination studied by using the self-consistent Tight Binding Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital Atomic Spheres Approximation TB-LMTO-ASA methods. The Rietveld method uses an analytical function that describes the profiles, usually pseudo-Voigt (pV) or Pearson VII (PVII). The parameters of the analytical profiles describe its amplitude, position and peak shape. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) is supposed to vary with the diffraction angle in agreement with the Caglioti, Paoletti and Ricci's relationship. The best structural parameters are determined in the least squares sense by the minimisation a classical residual using the Marquardt method. In this case, the peak profiles were modelled by the pseudo-Voigt function corrected by the instrumental asymmetry. The physical information obtained are: scale factor, lattice parameters, atomic position and displacements, atomic occupation numbers, temperature factor (isotropy or anisotropy), preferred orientation parameter, crystalline size and micro-strain along different crystallographic directions, distributions of crystallite size and micro-strain functions. This procedure was implemented on computer code and it has a friendly graphical interface based on pull down menus technique. From the experimental point of view the X-ray diffraction data were collected using a horizontal powder diffractometer in the Bragg-Brentano (BB) geometry with a Ni filtered CuKα, λ = 1.54178 A, at room temperature using a DRON 2 set-up. The diffraction profiles were measured with a proportional gas detector, a single channel pulse-height discrimination and a standard associated counting circuit. The electronic band calculations are based on the TB

  5. Miniaturization of electromagnetic band gap structures for mobile applications

    Goussetis, G.; Feresidis, A. P.; Palikaras, G. K.; Kitra, M.; Vardaxoglou, J. C.

    2005-12-01

    It is well known that interference of the human body affects the performance of the antennas in mobile phone handsets. In this contribution, we investigate the use of miniaturized metallodielectric electromagnetic band gap (MEBG) structures embedded in the case of a mobile handset as a means of decoupling the antenna from the user's hand. The closely coupled MEBG concept is employed to achieve miniaturization of the order of 15:1. Full wave dispersion relations for planar closely coupled MEBG arrays are presented and are validated experimentally. The performance of a prototype handset with an embedded conformal MEBG is assessed experimentally and is compared to a similar prototype without the MEBG. Reduction in the detuning of the antenna because of the human hand by virtue of the MEBG is demonstrated. Moreover, the efficiency of the handset when loaded with a human hand model is shown to improve when the MEBG is in place. The improvements are attributed to the decoupling of the antenna from the user's hand, which is achieved by means of suppressing the fields in the locality of the hand.

  6. Refractory Coated/Lined Low Density Structures Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses the development of refractory coated or lined low density structures applicable for advanced future propulsion system technologies. The...

  7. Band Structure and Fermi-Surface Properties of Ordered beta-Brass

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Christensen, N. E.

    1973-01-01

    The band structure of ordered β-brass (β′-CuZn) has been calculated throughout the Brillouin zone by the augmented-plane-wave method. The present band model differs from previous calculations with respect to the position and width of the Cu 3d band. The derived dielectric function ε2(ω) and the...

  8. Strained band edge characteristics from hybrid density functional theory and empirical pseudopotentials: GaAs, GaSb, InAs and InSb

    The properties of a semiconductor are drastically modified when the crystal point group symmetry is broken under an arbitrary strain. We investigate the family of semiconductors consisting of GaAs, GaSb, InAs and InSb, considering their electronic band structure and deformation potentials subject to various strains based on hybrid density functional theory. Guided by these first-principles results, we develop strain-compliant local pseudopotentials for use in the empirical pseudopotential method (EPM). We demonstrate that the newly proposed empirical pseudopotentials perform well close to band edges and under anisotropic crystal deformations. Using the EPM, we explore the heavy hole–light hole mixing characteristics under different stress directions, which may be useful in manipulating their transport properties and optical selection rules. The very low 5 Ry cutoff targeted in the generated pseudopotentials paves the way for large-scale EPM-based electronic structure computations involving these lattice mismatched constituents. (paper)

  9. Strained band edge characteristics from hybrid density functional theory and empirical pseudopotentials: GaAs, GaSb, InAs and InSb

    Çakan, Aslı; Sevik, Cem; Bulutay, Ceyhun

    2016-03-01

    The properties of a semiconductor are drastically modified when the crystal point group symmetry is broken under an arbitrary strain. We investigate the family of semiconductors consisting of GaAs, GaSb, InAs and InSb, considering their electronic band structure and deformation potentials subject to various strains based on hybrid density functional theory. Guided by these first-principles results, we develop strain-compliant local pseudopotentials for use in the empirical pseudopotential method (EPM). We demonstrate that the newly proposed empirical pseudopotentials perform well close to band edges and under anisotropic crystal deformations. Using the EPM, we explore the heavy hole-light hole mixing characteristics under different stress directions, which may be useful in manipulating their transport properties and optical selection rules. The very low 5 Ry cutoff targeted in the generated pseudopotentials paves the way for large-scale EPM-based electronic structure computations involving these lattice mismatched constituents.

  10. Conduction-band edge and Shubnikov-de Haas effect in low-electron-density SrTiO3

    Allen, S. James; Jalan, Bharat; Lee, SungBin; Ouellette, Daniel G.; Khalsa, Guru; Jaroszynski, Jan; Stemmer, Susanne; MacDonald, Allan H.

    2013-07-01

    The Shubnikov-de Haas effect is used to explore the conduction-band edge of high mobility SrTiO3 films doped with La. The results largely confirm the earlier measurements by Uwe [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys.0021-492210.1143/JJAP.24.L335 24 (Suppl. 24-2), 335 (1985)]. The band edge dispersion differs significantly from the predictions of ab initio electronic structure theory.

  11. Novel semiconductor solar cell structures: The quantum dot intermediate band solar cell

    The Quantum Dot Intermediate Band Solar Cell (QD-IBSC) has been proposed for studying experimentally the operating principles of a generic class of photovoltaic devices, the intermediate band solar cells (IBSC). The performance of an IBSC is based on the properties of a semiconductor-like material which is characterised by the existence of an intermediate band (IB) located within what would otherwise be its conventional bandgap. The improvement in efficiency of the cell arises from its potential (i) to absorb below bandgap energy photons and thus produce additional photocurrent, and (ii) to inject this enhanced photocurrent without degrading its output photo-voltage. The implementation of the IBSC using quantum dots (QDs) takes advantage of the discrete nature of the carrier density of states in a 0-dimensional nano-structure, an essential property for realising the IB concept. In the QD-IBSC, the IB arises from the confined electron states in an array of quantum dots. This paper reviews the operation of the first prototype QD-IBSCs and discusses some of the lessons learnt from their characterisation

  12. Refractory Coated/Lined Low Density Structures Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation in this proposed effort is the development of refractory coated or lined low density structures. Lightweight structures are desirable for space...

  13. Measurements of band gap structure in diamond compressed to 370 GPa

    Gamboa, Eliseo; Fletcher, Luke; Lee, Hae-Ja; Zastrau, Ulf; Gauthier, Maxence; Gericke, Dirk; Vorberger, Jan; Granados, Eduardo; Heimann, Phillip; Hastings, Jerome; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-06-01

    We present the first measurements of the electronic structure of dynamically compressed diamond demonstrating a widening of the band gap to pressures of up to 370 +/- 25 GPa. The 8 keV free electron laser x-ray beam from the Linac Coherently Light Source (LCLS) has been focussed onto a diamond foil compressed by two counter-propagating laser pulses to densities of up to 5.3 g/cm3 and temperatures of up to 3000 +/- 400 K. The x-ray pulse excites a collective interband transition of the valence electrons, leading to a plasmon-like loss. We find good agreement with the observed plasmon shift by including the pressure dependence of the band gap as determined from density functional theory simulations. This work was performed at the Matter at Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument of LCLS, supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under Contract No. SF00515. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under F.

  14. Population and Employment Densities: Structure and Change

    Small, Kenneth A.; Song, Shunfeng

    1994-01-01

    We examine spatial patterns and their changes during the 1970s for the Los Angeles region, by estimating monocentric and polycentric density functions for employment and population. Downtown Los Angeles is clearly identified as the statistical monocentric center of the region, and it is the most consistently strong center in the polycentric patterns. Polycentric models fit statistically better than monocentric models, and there was some shift in employment distribution toward a more polycentr...

  15. Evolution of band structures in MoS2-based homo- and heterobilayers

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to elucidate the detailed evolution of band structures in MoS2-based homo- and heterobilayers. By constructing the energy-band alignments we observed that biaxial tensile and compressive strain in the constituent transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayer shifts the states at the K C, Q C, and K V points down and up, respectively, while the states at the ΓV point are almost unaltered. In contrast, interlayer coupling tends to modify the states at the ΓV and Q C points by splitting the band-edge states of two strained or unstrained constituent TMD monolayers, while it does not affect the states at the K C and K V points. Considering the combined actions of strain and interlayer coupling, the relevant electronic parameters, especially the detailed evolution processes, of the band structures of the investigated bilayer systems can be clearly described. When further applying the extra biaxial strain to the three bilayer systems, it is found that energy differences ΔE(K C  −  Q C) and ΔE(K V  −  ΓV) decrease linearly as the increasing of the biaxial strain. According to the varying trends of ΔE(K C  −  Q C) and ΔE(K V  −  ΓV), MoS2 bilayer will maintain the indirect-bandgap character under any compressive or tensile strain. Differently, WS2/MoS2 heterobilayer transforms interestingly to the direct-bandgap material under the strain from  −1.6% to  −1.2% with the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum located at the K C and K V point respectively. The direct-to-indirect bandgap transition can be obtained for the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer when applying much larger extra tensile or compressive strain. The results offer an effective route to verify and tailor the electronic properties of TMD homo- and heterostructures and can be helpful in evaluating the performance of TMD-based electronic devices. (paper)

  16. Evolution of band structures in MoS2-based homo- and heterobilayers

    Zhu, H. L.; Zhou, C. J.; Huang, X. J.; Wang, X. L.; Xu, H. Z.; Lin, Yong; Yang, W. H.; Wu, Y. P.; Lin, W.; Guo, F.

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to elucidate the detailed evolution of band structures in MoS2-based homo- and heterobilayers. By constructing the energy-band alignments we observed that biaxial tensile and compressive strain in the constituent transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayer shifts the states at the K C, Q C, and K V points down and up, respectively, while the states at the ΓV point are almost unaltered. In contrast, interlayer coupling tends to modify the states at the ΓV and Q C points by splitting the band-edge states of two strained or unstrained constituent TMD monolayers, while it does not affect the states at the K C and K V points. Considering the combined actions of strain and interlayer coupling, the relevant electronic parameters, especially the detailed evolution processes, of the band structures of the investigated bilayer systems can be clearly described. When further applying the extra biaxial strain to the three bilayer systems, it is found that energy differences ΔE(K C  -  Q C) and ΔE(K V  -  ΓV) decrease linearly as the increasing of the biaxial strain. According to the varying trends of ΔE(K C  -  Q C) and ΔE(K V  -  ΓV), MoS2 bilayer will maintain the indirect-bandgap character under any compressive or tensile strain. Differently, WS2/MoS2 heterobilayer transforms interestingly to the direct-bandgap material under the strain from  -1.6% to  -1.2% with the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum located at the K C and K V point respectively. The direct-to-indirect bandgap transition can be obtained for the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer when applying much larger extra tensile or compressive strain. The results offer an effective route to verify and tailor the electronic properties of TMD homo- and heterostructures and can be helpful in evaluating the performance of TMD-based electronic devices.

  17. Band-structure calculations and structure-factor estimates of Cu - their complementarity

    Rather than an uncritical comparison of experimental and theoretical values, the various sets of structure-factor values of copper metal derived from experimental diffraction procedures are mutally compared as also are the various sets of theoretical values derived from band-structure calculations. This approach reveals the presence of outlier sets in each group and allows recognition of their condition before any attempt is made to intercompare the groups. Within the experimental group, the γ-ray values do not appear to sustain the absolute status originally claimed from them. Within the theoretical group, an inadequacy in defining the core contribution is indicated. The latter conclusion suggests that it is an inappropriate operation to make direct comparison between diffraction-sourced experimental values of structure factors and theoretical values from band-structure calculations. Instead, the latter should be used on a complementary basis with the full (sin θ)/λ range of experimental values to establish the best core contribution. The minor valence-bond contribution to scattering, which is largely restricted to the low (sin θ)/λ region, is most sensitively defined by reference to band-structure prediction of photoemission spectral distribution. Attention is drawn to the possible significance of the form-factor curve versus (sin θ)/λ being dependent on the unit-cell dimension. (orig.)

  18. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the electronic band structure of metal-organic frameworks of HKUST-1 type

    The electronic properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are increasingly attracting the attention due to potential applications in sensor techniques and (micro-) electronic engineering, for instance, as low-k-dielectric in semiconductor technology. Here, the band gap and the band structure of MOFs of type HKUST-1 are studied in detail by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry applied to thin surface-mounted MOF films and by means of quantum chemical calculations. The analysis of the density of states, the band structure, and the excitation spectrum reveal the importance of the empty Cu-3d orbitals for the electronic properties of HKUST-1. This study shows that, in contrast to common belief, even in the case of this fairly “simple” MOF, the excitation spectra cannot be explained by a superposition of “intra-unit” excitations within the individual building blocks. Instead, “inter-unit” excitations also have to be considered

  19. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the electronic band structure of metal-organic frameworks of HKUST-1 type

    Gu, Zhi-Gang; Heinke, Lars; Wöll, Christof; Neumann, Tobias; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Li, Qiang; Fink, Karin; Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2015-11-01

    The electronic properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are increasingly attracting the attention due to potential applications in sensor techniques and (micro-) electronic engineering, for instance, as low-k-dielectric in semiconductor technology. Here, the band gap and the band structure of MOFs of type HKUST-1 are studied in detail by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry applied to thin surface-mounted MOF films and by means of quantum chemical calculations. The analysis of the density of states, the band structure, and the excitation spectrum reveal the importance of the empty Cu-3d orbitals for the electronic properties of HKUST-1. This study shows that, in contrast to common belief, even in the case of this fairly "simple" MOF, the excitation spectra cannot be explained by a superposition of "intra-unit" excitations within the individual building blocks. Instead, "inter-unit" excitations also have to be considered.

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the electronic band structure of metal-organic frameworks of HKUST-1 type

    Gu, Zhi-Gang [Institut für Funktionelle Grenzflächen (IFG), Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350002 Fuzhou (China); Heinke, Lars, E-mail: Lars.Heinke@KIT.edu; Wöll, Christof [Institut für Funktionelle Grenzflächen (IFG), Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Neumann, Tobias; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Li, Qiang; Fink, Karin [Institute of Nanotechnology (INT), Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Zahn, Dietrich R. T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2015-11-02

    The electronic properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are increasingly attracting the attention due to potential applications in sensor techniques and (micro-) electronic engineering, for instance, as low-k-dielectric in semiconductor technology. Here, the band gap and the band structure of MOFs of type HKUST-1 are studied in detail by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry applied to thin surface-mounted MOF films and by means of quantum chemical calculations. The analysis of the density of states, the band structure, and the excitation spectrum reveal the importance of the empty Cu-3d orbitals for the electronic properties of HKUST-1. This study shows that, in contrast to common belief, even in the case of this fairly “simple” MOF, the excitation spectra cannot be explained by a superposition of “intra-unit” excitations within the individual building blocks. Instead, “inter-unit” excitations also have to be considered.

  1. Band structure of sup 7 sup 9 Br

    Ray, I; Bhattacharya, S; Saha-Sarkar, M; Sethi, B; Chatterjee, J M; Chattopadhyay, S; Goswami, A; Muralithar, S; Singh, R P; Bhowmik, R K

    1999-01-01

    High-spin states of sup 7 sup 9 Br have been studied in the reaction sup 7 sup 6 Ge( sup 7 Li, 4n gamma) at 32 MeV. A gamma-detector array with twelve Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors was used. The positive-parity yrast states, interpreted as a rotationally aligned g sub ( sub 9 sub ( sub 2 sub ) sub ) proton band, and the negative-parity ground state band have been extended to spins of (33(2 sup +)) and (25(2 sup -)), respectively. Lifetime measurements indicate that both bands have a similar quadrupole deformation of beta sub 2 approx 0.2. The positive-parity alpha = -(1(2)) band has been identified. Several new inter-band transitions are observed. A cranked-shell model analysis shows that the nu g sub ( sub 9 sub ( sub 2 sub ) sub ) and pi g sub ( sub 9 sub ( sub 2 sub ) sub ) alignments occur in the positive-parity and the negative-parity bands at rotational frequencies of Planck constant omega approx 0.6 and 0.4 MeV, respectively. The level energies and the electromagnetic properties of the g sub ( sub ...

  2. Density-functional based tight-binding modelling of ZnO structures

    Fisker, Christian; Pedersen, Thomas G. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University (Denmark)

    2009-02-15

    A self-consistent charge density-functional based tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) parametrisation for structural optimization and electronic properties of zinc oxide is presented. Repulsive potentials are obtained from the ZnO wurtzite geometry and a thin nanowire and applied to the bulk rock salt phase, a (0001) oriented slab and nanowires of different sizes. The parametrisation is shown to reproduce geometries in agreement with DFT calculations. A different set of parameters is generated for electronic calculations giving band structures with a bulk band gap of 3.3 eV and a strong split-off of the d-bands in agreement with experiments. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Dispersion-Corrected Density Functional Theory Investigations of Structural and Electronic Properties of Bulk MoS2: Effect of Uniaxial Strain

    Nguyen, Chuong V.; Hieu, Nguyen N.; Nguyen, Duong T.

    2015-01-01

    Strain-dependent structural and electronic properties of MoS2 materials are investigated using first principles calculations. The structural and electronic band structures of the MoS2 with relaxed unit cells are optimized and calculated by the dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D2). Calculations within the local density approximation (LDA) and GGA using PAW potentials were also performed for specific cases for the purpose of comparison. The effect of strain on the band gap an...

  4. New linear accelerator (Linac) design based on C-band accelerating structures for SXFEL facility

    ZHANG Meng; GU Qiang

    2011-01-01

    A C-band accelerator structure is one promising technique for a compact XFEL facility.It is also attractive in beam dynamics in maintaining a high quality electron beam,which is an important factor in the performance of a free electron laser.In this paper,a comparison between traditional S-band and C-band accelerating structures is made based on the linac configuration of a Shanghai Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser (SXFEL) facility.Throughout the comprehensive simulation,we conclude that the C-band structure is much more competitive.

  5. Band structure and optical properties of highly anisotropic LiBa2[B10O16(OH)3] decaborate crystal

    The band structure (BS), charge density distribution and linear-optical properties of the anisotropic crystal LiBa2[B10O16(OH)3] (LBBOH) are calculated using a self-consistent norm-conserving pseudopotential method within the framework of the local-density approximation theory. A high anisotropy of the band energy gap (4.22 eV for the E parallel b, 4.46 eV for the E parallel c) and giant birefringence (up to 0.20) are found. Comparison of the theoretically calculated and the experimentally measured polarised spectra of the imaginary part of the dielectric susceptibility ε2 shows a good agreement. The anisotropy of the charge density distribution, BS dispersion and of the optical spectra originate from anisotropy between the 2pzB-2pzO and 2py,xB-2py,yO bonding orbitals. The observed anisotropy in the LBBOH is principally different from that of β-BaB2O4 (BBO) single crystals. In the LBBOH single crystals the anisotropy of optical and charge density distribution is caused by different projection of the orbitals originating from particular borate clusters on the particular crystallographic axes, contrary to the BBO, where the anisotropy is caused prevailingly by a different local site symmetry of oxygen within the borate planes. The observed anisotropy is analysed in terms of the band energy dispersion and space charge density distribution

  6. Relationships between magnetic foot points and G-band bright structures

    Ishikawa, R.; Tsuneta, S.; Kitakoshi, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Bonet, J. A.; Domínguez, S. Vargas; van der Voort, L. H. M. Rouppe; Sakamoto, Y; Ebisuzaki, T.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic elements are thought to be described by flux tube models, and are well reproduced by MHD simulations. However, these simulations are only partially constrained by observations. We observationally investigate the relationship between G-band bright points and magnetic structures to clarify conditions, which make magnetic structures bright in G-band. The G-band filtergrams together with magnetograms and dopplergrams were taken for a plage region covered by abnormal granules as well as u...

  7. Density-functional LCAO calculations for solids: Comparison between Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham structural properties

    The Density-Functional method, with Linear Combination of Atomic Orbitals, has been applied to eight crystals; the lattice equilibrium parameters, and the lattice formation energies have been calculated at the Hartree-Fock level (HF), at the hybrid Hartree-Fock Density-Functional level (DFT/HF), and at the Kohn-Sham Density-Functional level (DFT). The band structures and the electronic charge distributions calculated at the DFT and HF levels are compared

  8. Design and analysis of defected ground structure transformer for dual-band antenna

    Wai-Wa Choi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a novel dual-band antenna design methodology utilising a dual-frequency impedance transformer with defected ground structure (DGS. The proposed dual-frequency DGS impedance transformer generates a second resonant frequency from a conventional single-band antenna, resulting dual-band operation. Simulation studies illustrate that the adopted design achieves versatile configurations for arbitrary operating frequencies and diverse input impedance ranges in planar antenna structures. To experimentally verify the proposed design methodology, a dual-frequency DGS impedance transformer was implemented for a 2.4 GHz monopole antenna to obtain a 900/2400 MHz dual-band antenna. Measurement shows that the 10 dB return loss bandwidth in 900 MHz band is 34.4 MHz, whereas that in 2400 MHz band is wider than 530 MHz. Typical monopole radiation patterns are observed at both operating bands.

  9. Band structures in silicene on monolayer gallium phosphide substrate

    Ren, Miaojuan; Li, Mingming; Zhang, Changwen; Yuan, Min; Li, Ping; Li, Feng; Ji, Weixiao; Chen, Xinlian

    2016-07-01

    Opening a sizable band gap in the zero-gap silicene is a key issue for its application in nanoelectronics. We design new 2D silicene and GaP heterobilayer (Si/GaP HBL) composed of silicene and monolayer (ML) GaP. Based on first-principles calculations, we find that the interaction energies are in the range of -295.5 to -297.5 meV per unit cell, indicating a weak interaction between silicene and gallium phosphide (GaP) monolayer. The band gap changes ranging from 0.06 to 0.44 eV in hybrid HBLs. An unexpected indirect-direct band gap crossover is also observed in HBLs, dependent on the stacking pattern. These provide a possible way to design effective FETs out of silicene on GaP monolayer.

  10. New bismuth borophosphate Bi4BPO10: Synthesis, crystal structure, optical and band structure analysis

    New bismuth borophosphate Bi4BPO10 was obtained by spontaneous crystallization from the melt of correspondent composition at 804 °C. Crystal structure with orthorhombic lattice parameters: a = 22.5731(3) Å, b = 14.0523(2) Å, c = 5.5149(1) Å, V = 1749.34(4), Z = 8, SG Pcab was determined by X-ray powder diffraction technique. The [Bi2O2]2+ -layers, which are typical for bismuth oxide compounds, transform into cationic endless strips of 4 bismuth atoms width directed along the c-axis in Bi4BPO10. The strips combining stacks are separated by flat triangle [BO3]3− -anions within stacks. Neighboring stacks are separated by tetrahedral [PO4]3−-anions and shifted relatively to each other. Bismuth atoms are placed in 5–7 vertex oxygen irregular polyhedra. Bi4BPO10 is stable up to 812 °C, then melts according to the peritectic law. The absorption spectrum in the range 350–700 nm was obtained and the width of the forbidden band was estimated as 3.46 eV. The band electronic structure of Bi4BPO10 was modeled using DFT approach. The calculated band gap (3.56 eV) is in good agreement with the experimentally obtained data. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • New bismuth borophosphate with composition Bi4BPO10 was synthesized. • The crystal structure was determined by X-ray powder diffraction technique. • Bismuth-oxygen part [Bi4O3]6+ forms endless strips of 4 bismuth atoms width. • Electronic structure was modeled by DFT method. • The calculated band gap (3.56 eV) is very close to the experimental one (3.46 eV)

  11. The Density Functional Theory Study of Structural and Electronical Properties of ZnO Clusters

    O.V. Bovgyra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory studies of structural and electronic properties of small clusters were performed. For each cluster an optimization of structure and the basic properties of the band structure were conducted. It was determined that with increasing (n energetically more efficient in the small clusters is stabilization from the ring to fulleren-like structures containing tetragonal and hexagonal faces and all atoms have coordination number equal three. Among the clusters (ZnO12 with doped atoms most stable are clusters where Zn was replaced by Mn, Cu and Co atoms. Band gap in the electronic spectrum of doped clusters decreases due to p-d hybridization orbitals of the impurity atom with the orbitals of the oxygen atom.

  12. Photonic band structures in one-dimensional photonic crystals containing Dirac materials

    We have investigated the band structures of one-dimensional photonic crystals (1DPCs) composed of Dirac materials and ordinary dielectric media. It is found that there exist an omnidirectional passing band and a kind of special band, which result from the interaction of the evanescent and propagating waves. Due to the interface effect and strong dispersion, the electromagnetic fields inside the special bands are strongly enhanced. It is also shown that the properties of these bands are invariant upon the lattice constant but sensitive to the resonant conditions

  13. Nitrogen defects in wide band gap oxides: defect equilibria and electronic structure from first principles calculations.

    Polfus, Jonathan M; Bjørheim, Tor S; Norby, Truls; Haugsrud, Reidar

    2012-09-01

    The nitrogen related defect chemistry and electronic structure of wide band gap oxides are investigated by density functional theory defect calculations of N(O)(q), NH(O)(×), and (NH2)(O)(·) as well as V(O)(··) and OH(O)(·) in MgO, CaO, SrO, Al(2)O(3), In(2)O(3), Sc(2)O(3), Y(2)O(3), La(2)O(3), TiO(2), SnO(2), ZrO(2), BaZrO(3), and SrZrO(3). The N(O)(q) acceptor level is found to be deep and the binding energy of NH(O)(×) with respect to N(O)' and (OH(O)(·) is found to be significantly negative, i.e. binding, in all of the investigated oxides. The defect structure of the oxides was found to be remarkably similar under reducing and nitriding conditions (1 bar N(2), 1 bar H(2) and 1 × 10(-7) bar H(2)O): NH(O)(×) predominates at low temperatures and [N(O)'] = 2[V(O)(··) predominates at higher temperatures (>900 K for most of the oxides). Furthermore, we evaluate how the defect structure is affected by non-equilibrium conditions such as doping and quenching. In terms of electronic structure, N(O)' is found to introduce isolated N-2p states within the band gap, while the N-2p states of NH(O)(×) are shifted towards, or overlap with the VBM. Finally, we assess the effect of nitrogen incorporation on the proton conducting properties of oxides and comment on their corrosion resistance in nitriding atmospheres in light of the calculated defect structures. PMID:22828729

  14. Band structure engineering of graphene by a local gate defined periodic potential

    Forsythe, Carlos; Maher, Patrick; Scarabelli, Diego; Dean, Cory; Kim, Philip

    Recent improvements in 2-dimensional (2D) material layering have resulted in enhanced device quality and created pathways for new device architectures. We fabricate periodic arrays from a patterned local back gate and a uniform top gate on hBN encapsulated graphene channels. The symmetry and lattice size of the periodic potential can be determined by state-of-art electron beam lithography and etching, achieving a lattice constant of 35 nm. The strength of the electric potential modulation can be controlled through applied voltage on the patterned gate. We observe signatures of superlattice modulation near the main Dirac peak in the density dependent resistance measurement at zero magnetic field. Current studies focus on the exploration of Hofstadter fractal band structures under magnetic fields. Our nano-patterned engineered superlattices on graphene hold great promise for wider applications.

  15. Density functional study of electronic structure, elastic and optical properties of MNH2 (M=Li, Na, K, Rb)

    We report a systematic first principles density functional study on the electronic structure, elastic and optical properties of nitrogen based solid hydrogen storage materials LiNH2, NaNH2, KNH2, and RbNH2. The ground state structural properties are calculated by using standard density functional theory, and also dispersion corrected density functional theory. We find that van der Waals interactions are dominant in LiNH2 whereas they are relatively weak in other alkali metal amides. The calculated elastic constants show that all the compounds are mechanically stable and LiNH2 is found to be a stiffer material among the alkali metal amides. The melting temperatures are calculated and follow the order RbNH2 2 2 2. The electronic band structure is calculated by using the Tran–Blaha modified Becke–Johnson potential and found that all the compounds are insulators, with a considerable band gap. The [NH2]− derived states completely dominate in the entire valence band region while the metal atom states occupy the conduction band. The calculated band structure is used to analyze the different interband optical transitions occurring between valence and conduction bands. Our calculations show that these materials have considerable optical anisotropy. (paper)

  16. Vibrational dynamics and band structure of methyl-terminated Ge(111)

    Hund, Zachary M.; Nihill, Kevin J.; Sibener, S. J., E-mail: s-sibener@uchicago.edu [The James Franck Institute and Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago, 929 E. 57" t" h Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Campi, Davide; Bernasconi, M. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Wong, Keith T.; Lewis, Nathan S. [Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Beckman Institute and Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, 210 Noyes Laboratory, 127-72, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Benedek, G. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Universidad del País Vasco (EHU), 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain)

    2015-09-28

    A combined synthesis, experiment, and theory approach, using elastic and inelastic helium atom scattering along with ab initio density functional perturbation theory, has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics and band structure of a recently synthesized organic-functionalized semiconductor interface. Specifically, the thermal properties and lattice dynamics of the underlying Ge(111) semiconductor crystal in the presence of a commensurate (1 × 1) methyl adlayer were defined for atomically flat methylated Ge(111) surfaces. The mean-square atomic displacements were evaluated by analysis of the thermal attenuation of the elastic He diffraction intensities using the Debye-Waller model, revealing an interface with hybrid characteristics. The methyl adlayer vibrational modes are coupled with the Ge(111) substrate, resulting in significantly softer in-plane motion relative to rigid motion in the surface normal. Inelastic helium time-of-flight measurements revealed the excitations of the Rayleigh wave across the surface Brillouin zone, and such measurements were in agreement with the dispersion curves that were produced using density functional perturbation theory. The dispersion relations for H-Ge(111) indicated that a deviation in energy and lineshape for the Rayleigh wave was present along the nearest-neighbor direction. The effects of mass loading, as determined by calculations for CD{sub 3}-Ge(111), as well as by force constants, were less significant than the hybridization between the Rayleigh wave and methyl adlayer librations. The presence of mutually similar hybridization effects for CH{sub 3}-Ge(111) and CH{sub 3}-Si(111) surfaces extends the understanding of the relationship between the vibrational dynamics and the band structure of various semiconductor surfaces that have been functionalized with organic overlayers.

  17. Vibrational dynamics and band structure of methyl-terminated Ge(111)

    A combined synthesis, experiment, and theory approach, using elastic and inelastic helium atom scattering along with ab initio density functional perturbation theory, has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics and band structure of a recently synthesized organic-functionalized semiconductor interface. Specifically, the thermal properties and lattice dynamics of the underlying Ge(111) semiconductor crystal in the presence of a commensurate (1 × 1) methyl adlayer were defined for atomically flat methylated Ge(111) surfaces. The mean-square atomic displacements were evaluated by analysis of the thermal attenuation of the elastic He diffraction intensities using the Debye-Waller model, revealing an interface with hybrid characteristics. The methyl adlayer vibrational modes are coupled with the Ge(111) substrate, resulting in significantly softer in-plane motion relative to rigid motion in the surface normal. Inelastic helium time-of-flight measurements revealed the excitations of the Rayleigh wave across the surface Brillouin zone, and such measurements were in agreement with the dispersion curves that were produced using density functional perturbation theory. The dispersion relations for H-Ge(111) indicated that a deviation in energy and lineshape for the Rayleigh wave was present along the nearest-neighbor direction. The effects of mass loading, as determined by calculations for CD3-Ge(111), as well as by force constants, were less significant than the hybridization between the Rayleigh wave and methyl adlayer librations. The presence of mutually similar hybridization effects for CH3-Ge(111) and CH3-Si(111) surfaces extends the understanding of the relationship between the vibrational dynamics and the band structure of various semiconductor surfaces that have been functionalized with organic overlayers

  18. Phononic band gaps and vibrations in one- and two-dimensional mass-spring structures

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    The vibrational response of finite periodic lattice structures subjected to periodic loading is investigated. Special attention is devoted to the response in frequency ranges with gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice. The effects of boundaries, viscous damping......, and imperfections are studied by analyzing two examples; a 1-D filter and a 2-D wave guide. In 1-D the structural response in the band gap is shown to be insensitive to damping and small imperfections. In 2-D the similar effect of damping is noted for one type of periodic structure, whereas for...... another type the band gap effect is nearly eliminated by damping. In both 1-D and 2-D it is demonstrated how the free structural boundaries affect the response in the band gap due to local resonances. Finally, 2-D wave guides are considered by replacing the periodic structure with a homogeneous structure...

  19. Electronic Band Structures of the Highly Desirable III-V Semiconductors: TB-mBJ DFT Studies

    Rehman, Gul; Shafiq, M.; Saifullah; Ahmad, Rashid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Maqbool, M.; Khan, Imad; Rahnamaye-Aliabad, H.; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-05-01

    The correct band gaps of semiconductors are highly desirable for their effective use in optoelectronic and other photonic devices. However, the experimental and theoretical results of the exact band gaps are quite challenging and sometimes tricky. In this article, we explore the electronic band structures of the highly desirable optical materials, III-V semiconductors. The main reason of the ineffectiveness of the theoretical band gaps of these compounds is their mixed bonding character, where large proportions of electrons reside outside atomic spheres in the intestinal regions, which are challenging for proper theoretical treatment. In this article, the band gaps of the compounds are revisited and successfully reproduced by properly treating the density of electrons using the recently developed non-regular Tran and Blaha's modified Becke-Johnson (nTB-mBJ) approach. This study additionally suggests that this theoretical scheme could also be useful for the band gap engineering of the III-V semiconductors. Furthermore, the optical properties of these compounds are also calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  20. Band gap engineering and \\vec{k}\\cdot \\vec{\\pi } electronic structure of lead and tin tellurides

    Behera, S. S.; Tripathi, G. S.

    2016-06-01

    We study the effect of the variation of energy gap on the k\\cdot π electronic structure of PbTe and SnTe, using a six-level basis at the L point. The basis functions in both the systems have the same transformation properties. However, the basis functions of the band edge states in SnTe are reversed with respect to the same in PbTe. Band dispersions are obtained analytically for a two band model. As the band gap decreases, the bands become linear. Far bands are included in the electronic dispersion, using perturbation theory. Fermi energy and the Density of States at the Fermi energy, { D }({\\varepsilon }F), are calculated for different carrier concentrations and energy gaps through a self-consistent approach. Interesting results are seen when the energy gap is reduced from the respective equilibrium values. For both the systems, the Fermi energy increases as the gap is decreased. The behavior of { D }({\\varepsilon }F) is, however, different. It decreases with the gap. It is also on expected lines. Calculated values of the electronic effective mass, as a function of temperature, energy gap and carrier concentration, are compared with previously published data. As distinguished from a first principles calculation, the work has focused on the carrier dependent electronic parameters for use both by theorists and experimenters as well.

  1. Electronic Band Structures of the Highly Desirable III-V Semiconductors: TB-mBJ DFT Studies

    Rehman, Gul; Shafiq, M.; Saifullah; Ahmad, Rashid; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Maqbool, M.; Khan, Imad; Rahnamaye-Aliabad, H.; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2016-07-01

    The correct band gaps of semiconductors are highly desirable for their effective use in optoelectronic and other photonic devices. However, the experimental and theoretical results of the exact band gaps are quite challenging and sometimes tricky. In this article, we explore the electronic band structures of the highly desirable optical materials, III-V semiconductors. The main reason of the ineffectiveness of the theoretical band gaps of these compounds is their mixed bonding character, where large proportions of electrons reside outside atomic spheres in the intestinal regions, which are challenging for proper theoretical treatment. In this article, the band gaps of the compounds are revisited and successfully reproduced by properly treating the density of electrons using the recently developed non-regular Tran and Blaha's modified Becke-Johnson (nTB-mBJ) approach. This study additionally suggests that this theoretical scheme could also be useful for the band gap engineering of the III-V semiconductors. Furthermore, the optical properties of these compounds are also calculated and compared with the experimental results.

  2. Recent Results from Broad-Band Intensity Mapping Measurements of Cosmic Large Scale Structure

    Zemcov, Michael B.; CIBER, Herschel-SPIRE

    2016-01-01

    Intensity mapping integrates the total emission in a given spectral band over the universe's history. Tomographic measurements of cosmic structure can be performed using specific line tracers observed in narrow bands, but a wealth of information is also available from broad-band observations performed by instruments capable of capturing high-fidelity, wide-angle images of extragalactic emission. Sensitive to the continuum emission from faint and diffuse sources, these broad-band measurements provide a view on cosmic structure traced by components not readily detected in point source surveys. After accounting for measurement effects and astrophysical foregrounds, the angular power spectra of such data can be compared to predictions from models to yield powerful insights into the history of cosmic structure formation. This talk will highlight some recent measurements of large scale structure performed using broad-band intensity mapping methods that have given new insights on faint, distant, and diffuse components in the extragalactic background light.

  3. Density Functional Theory study on the electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of strained Mn4Si7

    Cuong, Do Duc; Park, Jinsik; Rhim, S. H.; Hong, Soon Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The strain effect on electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of Higher Manganese Silicides (HMSs) Mn4Si7 was studied using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and through solving Boltzman Transport Equation (BTE). We found that the tensile strain attempts to reduce the band gap while the compressive strain not much affect to band gap. The Seebeck coeficient was found to be increased with increasing temperature, which is very consistent to experiments. The electrical conductivity and po...

  4. Novel structure for magnetic rotation bands in 60Ni

    Zhao, P. W.; Zhang, S.Q.; Peng, J.; H.Z. Liang; Ring, P.; Meng, J

    2011-01-01

    The self-consistent tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field theory based on a point-coupling interaction has been established and applied to investigate systematically the newly observed shears bands in 60Ni. The tilted angles, deformation parameters, energy spectra, and reduced M1 and $E2$ transition probabilities have been studied in a fully microscopic and self-consistent way for various configurations and rotational frequencies. It is found the competition between the configurations ...

  5. Band structures in 98Ru and 99Ru

    The level schemes of 98sup(,)99Ru were studied with the reactions 8Mo(α,3nγ) and 98Mo(α,4nγ) at Esub(α) = 35 to 55 MeV, using a large variety of in-beam γ-ray detection techniques and conversion-electron measurements. A search for the 3- state was carried out with the reaction 98Ru(p,p'). The ground-state band of 98Ru was excited up to Jsup(π) = (12)+ and a negative-parity band up to (15)-. New levels in 98Ru were found at Esub(x) = 2285 (Jsup(π) = 4+), 2435 (Jsup(π) = (3-,4+), 2671, 3540, 4224, 4847, 4915 (Jsup(π) = (12)sup()), 4989 (Jsup(π) = (12sup())), 5521 (Jsup(π) = (13)-), 5889, 6591 (Jsup(π) = (15)-), and 7621 keV. New unambiguous spin and parity assignments were made for the levels at Esub(x) = 2014 and 3852 keV, as Jsup(π) = 3+ and 9-, respectivley. New levels in 99Ru were found at Esub(x) = 1976, 2021 (Jsup(π) = (15/2+)), 2393, 2401 (Jsup(π) = (17/2+)), 2875 (π = (+)), 3037, 3201 (Jsup(π) = (23/2)-), 3460 (J = (17/2)), 3484 (Jsup(π) = (21/2+)), 3985, 4224 (Jsup(π) = (27/2-)), and 5359 keV. The 1070 keV, Jsup(π) = 11/2- level in 99Ru has a half-life of 2.8 ns. A strongly excited negative-parity band is built on this level. A positive-parity band based on the ground state was excited up to Jsup(π) = (21/2+). The level schemes are well reproduced by the interacting boson model in the vibrational limit. (orig.)

  6. Direct band gap electroluminescence from bulk germanium at room temperature using an asymmetric fin type metal/germanium/metal structure

    Wang, Dong, E-mail: wang.dong.539@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Maekura, Takayuki; Kamezawa, Sho [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Yamamoto, Keisuke; Nakashima, Hiroshi [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-02-16

    We demonstrated direct band gap (DBG) electroluminescence (EL) at room temperature from n-type bulk germanium (Ge) using a fin type asymmetric lateral metal/Ge/metal structure with TiN/Ge and HfGe/Ge contacts, which was fabricated using a low temperature (<400 °C) process. Small electron and hole barrier heights were obtained for TiN/Ge and HfGe/Ge contacts, respectively. DBG EL spectrum peaked at 1.55 μm was clearly observed even at a small current density of 2.2 μA/μm. Superlinear increase in EL intensity was also observed with increasing current density, due to superlinear increase in population of elections in direct conduction band. The efficiency of hole injection was also clarified.

  7. Band Jahn-Teller effect on the density of states of the magnetic high-T{sub c} superconductors: A model study

    Pradhan, B. [Department of Physics, Govt. Science College, Malkangiri 764 048 (India); Mohanta, K.L. [Department of Physics, ITER, Siksha ' O' Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar 751 030 (India); Rout, G.C., E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in [Condensed Matter Physics Group, Dept. of Applied Physics and Ballistics, F.M. University, Balasore 756 019 (India)

    2012-05-15

    We report here a mean-field study of competing antiferromagnetism, superconductivity and lattice strain phases and their effect on the local density of states of the cuprate system. Our model Hamiltonian incorporating these interactions is reported earlier [G.C. Rout et al., Physica C, 2007]. The analytic expression for superconducting, antiferromagnetism and lattice strain order parameters are calculated and solved self-consistently. The interplay of these order parameters is investigated considering the calculated density of states (DOSs) of the conduction electrons. The DOS displays multiple gap structures with multiple peaks. It is suggested that the tunneling conductance data obtained from the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements could be interpreted by using the quasi-particle bands calculated from our model Hamiltonian. We have discussed the mechanism to calculate the order parameters from the conductance data.

  8. Physical properties and electronic band structure of noncentrosymmetric Th7Co3 superconductor.

    Sahakyan, M; Tran, V H

    2016-05-25

    The physical properties of the noncentrosymmetric superconductor Th7Co3 have been investigated by means of ac-magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, specific heat, electrical resistivity, magnetoresistance and Hall effect measurements. From these data it is established that Th7Co3 is a dirty type-II superconductor with [Formula: see text] K, [Formula: see text] and moderate electron-phonon coupling [Formula: see text]. Some evidences for anisotropic superconducting gap are found, including e.g. reduced specific heat jump ([Formula: see text]) at T c, diminished superconducting energy gap ([Formula: see text]) as compared to the BCS values, power law field dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient at 0.4 K ([Formula: see text]), and a concave curvature of the [Formula: see text] line. The magnitudes of the thermodynamic critical field and the energy gap are consistent with mean-squared anisotropy parameter [Formula: see text]. The electronic specific heat in the superconducting state is reasonably fitted to an oblate spheroidal gap model. Calculations of scalar relativistic and fully relativistic electronic band structures reveal considerable differences in the degenerate structure, resulting from asymmetric spin-orbit coupling (ASOC). A large splitting energy of spin-up spin-down bands at the Fermi level E F, [Formula: see text] meV is observed and a sizeable ratio [Formula: see text] could classify the studied compound into the class of noncentrosymmetric superconductors with strong ASOC. The noncentrosymmetry of the crystal structure and the atomic relativistic effects are both responsible for an importance of ASOC in Th7Co3. The calculated results for the density of states show a Van Hove singularity just below E F and dominant role of the 6d electrons of Th to the superconductivity. PMID:27120582

  9. Physical properties and electronic band structure of noncentrosymmetric Th7Co3 superconductor

    Sahakyan, M.; Tran, V. H.

    2016-05-01

    The physical properties of the noncentrosymmetric superconductor Th7Co3 have been investigated by means of ac-magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, specific heat, electrical resistivity, magnetoresistance and Hall effect measurements. From these data it is established that Th7Co3 is a dirty type-II superconductor with {{T}\\text{c}}=1.8+/- 0.02 K, Hc2\\text{orb}energy gap ({{Δ }0}/{{k}\\text{B}}{{T}\\text{c}}=2.17 ) as compared to the BCS values, power law field dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient at 0.4 K ({{C}p}/T\\propto {{H}0.6} ), and a concave curvature of the {{H}c2}≤ft({{T}\\text{c}}\\right) line. The magnitudes of the thermodynamic critical field and the energy gap are consistent with mean-squared anisotropy parameter ∼ 0.23 . The electronic specific heat in the superconducting state is reasonably fitted to an oblate spheroidal gap model. Calculations of scalar relativistic and fully relativistic electronic band structures reveal considerable differences in the degenerate structure, resulting from asymmetric spin–orbit coupling (ASOC). A large splitting energy of spin-up spin-down bands at the Fermi level E F, Δ {{E}\\text{ASOC}}∼ 100 meV is observed and a sizeable ratio Δ {{E}\\text{ASOC}}/{{k}\\text{B}}{{T}\\text{c}}∼ 640 could classify the studied compound into the class of noncentrosymmetric superconductors with strong ASOC. The noncentrosymmetry of the crystal structure and the atomic relativistic effects are both responsible for an importance of ASOC in Th7Co3. The calculated results for the density of states show a Van Hove singularity just below E F and dominant role of the 6d electrons of Th to the superconductivity.

  10. Obtaining the band structure of a complicated photonic crystal by linear operations

    吴良; 叶卓; 何赛灵

    2003-01-01

    Absolute band gaps can be created by lifting the degeneracy in the bands of a photonic crystal.To calculate the band structure of a complicated photonic crystal generated by e.g.symmetry breaking,general forms of all possible linear operations are presented in terms of matrices and a procedure to combine these operations is given.Other forms of linear operations(such as the addition,subtraction,and translation transforms) are also presented to obtain an explicit expression for the Fourier coefficient of the dielectric function in the plane-wave expansion method.With the present method,band structures for various complicated photonic crystals(related through these linear operations) can be obtained easily and quickly.As a numerical example,a large absolute band gap for a complicated photonic crystal structure of GaAs is found in the high region of normalized frequency.

  11. Valence band structure of binary chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors by high-resolution XPS

    Kozyukhin, S., E-mail: sergkoz@igic.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Science, Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Golovchak, R. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A. [Lehigh University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Scientific Research Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' (Ukraine); Jain, H. [Lehigh University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States)

    2011-04-15

    High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to study regularities in the formation of valence band electronic structure in binary As{sub x}Se{sub 100-x}, As{sub x}S{sub 100-x}, Ge{sub x}Se{sub 100-x} and Ge{sub x}S{sub 100-x} chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors. It is shown that the highest occupied energetic states in the valence band of these materials are formed by lone pair electrons of chalcogen atoms, which play dominant role in the formation of valence band electronic structure of chalcogen-rich glasses. A well-expressed contribution from chalcogen bonding p electrons and more deep s orbitals are also recorded in the experimental valence band XPS spectra. Compositional dependences of the observed bands are qualitatively analyzed from structural and compositional points of view.

  12. Detailed study of the TE band structure of two dimensional metallic photonic crystals with square symmetry

    By virtue of the efficiency of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann map method, we have calculated, for H-polarization (TE mode), the band structure of 2D photonic crystals with a square lattice composed of metallic rods embedded in an air background. The rod in the unit cell is chosen to be circular in shape. Here, from a practical point of view, in order to obtain maximum band gaps, we have studied the band structure as a function of the size of the rods. We have also studied the flat bands appearing in the band structures and have shown that for frequencies around the surface plasmon frequency, the modes are highly localized at the interface between the metallic rods and the air background.

  13. Model comparison for the density structure along solar prominence threads

    Arregui, I

    2015-01-01

    Quiescent solar prominence fine structures are typically modelled as density enhancements, called threads, which occupy a fraction of a longer magnetic flux tube. The profile of the mass density along the magnetic field is however unknown and several arbitrary alternatives are employed in prominence wave studies. We present a comparison of theoretical models for the field-aligned density along prominence fine structures. We consider Lorentzian, Gaussian, and parabolic profiles. We compare their theoretical predictions for the period ratio between the fundamental transverse kink mode and the first overtone to obtain estimates for the ratio of densities between the central part of the tube and its foot-points and to assess which one would better explain observed period ratio data. Bayesian parameter inference and model comparison techniques are developed and applied. Parameter inference requires the computation of the posterior distribution for the density gradient parameter conditional on the observable period...

  14. Structure of Dipole Bands in 112In: Through Lifetime Measurement

    High-spin states of the 112In nucleus have been populated via 100Mo(16O, p3n) reaction at 80 MeV beam energy. Lifetimes of excited states of dipole bands have been measured using Doppler-shift attenuation method. The B(M1) transition rates deduced from the measured lifetimes show a rapid decrease with increasing angular momentum. The decrease in B(M1) values are well accounted by the prediction of tilted axis cranking calculations. These measurements confirm the presence of shears mechanism in this nuclei.

  15. Quasiparticle electronic band structure of the alkali metal chalcogenides

    S.V. Syrotyuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The electronic energy band spectra of the alkali metal chalcogenides M2A (M: Li, Na, K, Rb; A: O, S, Se, Te have been evaluated within the projector augmented waves (PAW approach by means of the ABINIT code. The Kohn-Sham single-particle states have been found in the GGA framework. Further, on the basis of these results the quasiparticle energies of electrons as well as the dielectric constants were obtained in the approximation GW. The calculations based on the Green's function have been originally done for all the considered M2A crystals, except Li2O.

  16. Determination of conduction and valence band electronic structure of anatase and rutile TiO2

    Jakub Szlachetko; Katarzyna Michalow-Mauke; Maarten Nachtegaal; Jacinto Sá

    2014-03-01

    Electronic structures of rutile and anatase polymorph of TiO2 were determined by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering measurements and FEFF9.0 calculations. Difference between crystalline structures led to shifts in the rutile Ti -band to lower energy with respect to anatase, i.e., decrease in band gap. Anatase possesses localized states located in the band gap where electrons can be trapped, which are almost absent in the rutile structure. This could well explain the reported longer lifetimes in anatase. It was revealed that HR-XAS is insufficient to study in-depth unoccupied states of investigated materials because it overlooks the shallow traps.

  17. Compact electromagnetic bandgap structures for notch band in ultra-wideband applications.

    Rotaru, Mihai; Sykulski, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to create notch band filters in the front-end of ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems based on electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) structures. The concept presented here can be implemented in any structure that has a microstrip in its configuration. The EBG structure is first analyzed using a full wave electromagnetic solver and then optimized to work at WLAN band (5.15-5.825 GHz). Two UWB passband filters are used to demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the novel EBG notch band feature. Simulation results are provided for two cases studied. PMID:22163430

  18. Model comparison for the density structure across solar coronal waveguides

    Arregui, I; Ramos, A Asensio

    2015-01-01

    The spatial variation of physical quantities, such as the mass density, across solar atmospheric waveguides governs the timescales and spatial scales for wave damping and energy dissipation. The direct measurement of the spatial distribution of density, however, is difficult and indirect seismology inversion methods have been suggested as an alternative. We applied Bayesian inference, model comparison, and model-averaging techniques to the inference of the cross-field density structuring in solar magnetic waveguides using information on periods and damping times for resonantly damped magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) transverse kink oscillations. Three commonly employed alternative profiles were used to model the variation of the mass density across the waveguide boundary. Parameter inference enabled us to obtain information on physical quantities such as the Alfv\\'en travel time, the density contrast, and the transverse inhomogeneity length scale. The inference results from alternative density models were compared a...

  19. Band gap structure modification of amorphous anodic Al oxide film by Ti-alloying

    Canulescu, Stela; Rechendorff, K.; Borca, C. N.;

    2014-01-01

    The band structure of pure and Ti-alloyed anodic aluminum oxide has been examined as a function of Ti concentration varying from 2 to 20 at. %. The band gap energy of Ti-alloyed anodic Al oxide decreases with increasing Ti concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that Ti atoms are not...

  20. Band Structure and Quantum Confined Stark Effect in InN/GaN superlattices

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede;

    2012-01-01

    InN/GaN superlattices offer an important way of band gap engineering in the blue-green range of the spectrum. This approach represents a more controlled method than the band gap tuning in quantum well systems by application of InGaN alloys. The electronic structures of short-period wurtzite InN/G...

  1. First-principles band-structure calculations and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure of TlPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5}

    Khyzhun, O.Y., E-mail: khyzhun@ipms.kiev.ua [Institute for Problems of Materials Science, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky Street, Kyiv 03142 (Ukraine); Bekenev, V.L.; Denysyuk, N.M. [Institute for Problems of Materials Science, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky Street, Kyiv 03142 (Ukraine); Parasyuk, O.V. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Eastern European National University, 13 Voli Avenue, Lutsk 43025 (Ukraine); Fedorchuk, A.O. [Department of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, Lviv National University of Veterinary Medicine and Biotechnologies, Pekarska St., 50, 79010 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • Electronic structure of TlPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5} is calculated by the FP-LAPW method. • The valence band is dominated by contributions of Cl 3p states. • Contributions of Pb 6p{sup *} states dominate at the bottom of the conduction band. • The FP-LAPW data allow concluding that TlPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5} is an indirect-gap material. • XPS core-level and valence-band spectra of polycrystalline TlPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5} are measured. -- Abstract: We report on first-principles calculations of total and partial densities of states of atoms constituting TlPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5} using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The calculations reveal that the valence band of TlPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5} is dominated by contributions of the Cl 3p-like states, which contribute mainly at the top of the valence band with also significant contributions throughout the whole valence-band region. In addition, the bottom of the conduction band of TlPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5} is composed mainly of contributions of the unoccupied Pb 6p-like states. Our FP-LAPW data indicate that the TlPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5} compound is an indirect-gap material with band gap of 3.42 eV. The X-ray photoelectron core-level and valence-band spectra for pristine and Ar{sup +} ion-irradiated surfaces of a TlPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5} polycrystalline sample were measured. The measurements reveal high chemical stability and confirm experimentally the low hygroscopicity of TlPb{sub 2}Cl{sub 5} surface.

  2. Acoustic band pinning in the phononic crystal plates of anti-symmetric structure

    Cai Chen; Zhu Xue-Feng; Chen Qian; Yuan Ying; Liang Bin; Cheng Jian-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic bands are studied numerically for a Lamb wave propagating in an anti-symmetric structure of a onedimensional periodic plate by using the method of supercell plane-wave expansion.The results show that all the bands are pinned in pairs at the Brillouin zone boundary as long as the anti-symmetry remains and acoustic band gaps (ABGs) only appear between certain bands.In order to reveal the relationship between the band pinning and the anti-symmetry,the method of eigenmode analysis is introduced to calculate the displacement fields of different plate structures.Further,the method of harmony response analysis is employed to calculate the reference spectra to verify the accuracy of numerical calculations of acoustic band map,and both the locations and widths of ABGs in the acoustic band map are in good agreement with those of the reference spectra.The investigations show that the pinning effect is very sensitive to the anti-symmetry of periodic plates,and by introducing different types of breakages,more ABGs or narrow pass bands will appear,which is meaningful in band gap engineering.

  3. Liquid Water Structure from Anomalous Density under Ambient Condition

    SUN Qiang; ZHENG Hai-Fei

    2006-01-01

    @@ From discussion of the structure of liquid water, we deduce that water under ambient condition is mainly composed of ice Ih-like molecular clusters and clathrate-like molecular clusters. The water molecular clusters remain in a state of chemical equilibrium (reversible clustering reactions). This structural model can be demonstrated by quantitative study on anomalous density with increasing temperature at ambient pressure.

  4. Electronic band structures of AV2 (A = Ta, Ti, Hf and Nb) Laves phase compounds

    First-principles density functional calculations, using the all-electron full potential linearized augmented plane wave method, have been performed in order to investigate the structural and electronic properties for Laves phase AV2 (A = Ta, Ti, Hf and Nb) compounds. The generalized gradient approximation and the Engel-Vosko-generalized gradient approximation were used. Our calculations show that these compounds are metallic with more bands cutting the Fermi energy (EF) as we move from Nb to Ta, Hf and Ti, consistent with the increase in the values of the density of states at the Fermi level N(EF). N(EF) is controlled by the overlapping of V-p/d, A-d and A-p states around the Fermi energy. The ground state properties of these compounds, such as equilibrium lattice constant, are calculated and compared with the available literature. There is a strong/weak hybridization between the states, V-s states are strongly hybridized with A-s states below and above EF. Around the Fermi energy we notice that V-p shows strong hybridization with A-p states.

  5. Multi-large low-frequency band gaps in a periodic hybrid structure

    Wang, T.; Sheng, M. P.; Guo, H. B.

    2016-03-01

    A hybrid structure composed of a local resonance mass and an external oscillator is proposed in this paper for restraining the elastic longitudinal wave propagation. Theoretical model has been established to investigate the dispersion relation and band gaps of the structure. The results show that the hybrid structure can produce multi-band gaps wider than the multi-resonator acoustic metamaterials. It is much easier for the hybrid structure to yield wide and low band gaps by adjusting the mass and stiffness of the external oscillator. Small series spring constant ratio results in low-frequency band gaps, in which the external oscillator acts as a resonator and replaces the original local resonator to hold the band gaps in low frequency range. Compared with the one-dimensional phononic crystal (PC) lattice, a new band gap emerges in lower frequency range in the hybrid structure because of the added local resonance, which will be a significant assistance in low-frequency vibration and noise reduction. Further, harmonic response analysis using finite element method (FEM) has been performed, and results show that elastic longitudinal waves are efficiently forbidden within the band gaps.

  6. Spin orbit splitting in the valence bands of ZrSxSe2−x: Angle resolved photoemission and density functional theory

    Highlights: ► We performed high resolution ARPES on 1T–ZrSxSe2−x. ► A characteristic splitting of the chalcogen p-derived VB along high symmetry directions was observed. ► The splitting size at the A point of the BZ is found to increase from 0.06 to 0.31 eV from ZrS2 towards ZrSe2. ► Electronic structure calculations based on the DFT were performed using the model of TB–MBJ. ► The calculations show that the splitting is due to SO coupling of the valence bands. -- Abstract: Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation has been performed on 1T–ZrSxSe2−x, where x varies from 0 to 2, in order to study the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in the valence bands. The crystals were grown by chemical vapour transport technique using Iodine as transport agent. A characteristic splitting of the chalcogen p-derived valence bands along high symmetry directions has been observed experimentally. The size of the splitting increases with the increase of the atomic number of the chalcogenide, e.g. at the A point of the Brillouin zone from 0.06 eV to 0.31 eV with an almost linear dependence with x, as progressing from ZrS2 towards ZrSe2, respectively. Electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory have been performed using the model of Tran–Blaha [1] and the modified version of the exchange potential proposed by Becke and Johnson [2] (TB–MBJ) both with and without spin-orbit (SO) coupling. The calculations show that the splitting is mainly due to spin-orbit coupling and the degeneracy of the valance bands is lifted

  7. Band structure engineering through orbital interaction for enhanced thermoelectric power factor

    Band structure engineering for specific electronic or optical properties is essential for the further development of many important technologies including thermoelectrics, optoelectronics, and microelectronics. In this work, we report orbital interaction as a powerful tool to finetune the band structure and the transport properties of charge carriers in bulk crystalline semiconductors. The proposed mechanism of orbital interaction on band structure is demonstrated for IV-VI thermoelectric semiconductors. For IV-VI materials, we find that the convergence of multiple carrier pockets not only displays a strong correlation with the s-p and spin-orbit coupling but also coincides with the enhancement of power factor. Our results suggest a useful path to engineer the band structure and an enticing solid-solution design principle to enhance thermoelectric performance

  8. Banded structure and its distribution in friction stir processing of 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Highlights: ► Friction stir processing (FSP) as a repair method. ► Sigma phase formed in the FSP zone. ► Low heat input contributes to restrain sigma phase precipitation. - Abstract: Banded structures, which vary with welding parameters, were observed in friction stir processing of 316L austenite stainless steel. Sigma phase precipitation was detected in banded structures by transmission electron microscopy. The amount of banded structure had direct ratio relations with heat input. The higher the heat input, the larger the area of banded structures. This is attributable to slower cooling rate at high heat input, which results in longer exposure to the temperature range for precipitation. The formation of sigma phase produced Cr depletion, which resulted in largely degraded corrosion resistance. The present study suggests that low heat input (i.e. low rotation speeds, low working loads and high welding speed) contributes to restrain sigma phase precipitation.

  9. The impurity optical absorption and structure of conduction band in 6H-SiC

    The investigation of absorption spectra in n-type nitrogen doped 6H-SiC crystals from the near infrared up to fundamental band region at polarization of electric field (E) of the light wave relatively the optical axis (C) for E parallel to C and E perpendicular to C has been carried out. It is for the first time that at E parallel to C a slight absorption band with maximum at 2.85 eV has been investigated. All absorption bands observed were caused by photoionization of donors (nitrogen) with electron transition in to above-lying minima of the conduction band situated at different critical points of the Brillouin zone. The analysis of data obtained and experimental data available on the photoionization of nitrogen, alongside with theoretical data on the structure of the conduction band make it possible to propose the structure and symmetry of additional extrema in Brillouin zone for 6H-SiC

  10. Simple inverted band structure model for cadmium arsenide (Cd3As2)

    The development of a simple Hamiltonian yielding the inverted band structure of Cd3As2 in the 4 mm (C4v12) low-temperature phase is proposed. The presented theory takes into account the spin orbit interaction and tetragonal distortion of lattice in the low symmetry. The authors obtain k-linear terms in the band structure and therefore a splitting in k-space of spin degenerate energy bands. The reported band model contains only one new crystal field parameter d = cr|Z> in addition to well known Kildal's set. The first evaluation of this shows that (0.028 < d < 0.072) eV using optical absorption edge data. The finite width of the anisotropic heavy and light hole bands is pointed out. (authors)

  11. Band structure of Heusler compounds studied by photoemission and tunneling spectroscopy

    Arbelo Jorge, Elena

    2011-07-01

    Heusler compounds are key materials for spintronic applications. They have attracted a lot of interest due to their half-metallic properties predicted by band structure calculations. The aim of this work is to evaluate experimentally the validity of the predictions of half metallicity by band structure calculations for two specific Heusler compounds, Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa. Two different spectroscopy methods for the analysis of the electronic properties were used: Angular Resolved Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARUPS) and Tunneling Spectroscopy. Heusler compounds are prepared as thin films by RF-sputtering in an ultra high vacuum system. For the characterization of the samples, bulk and surface crystallographic and magnetic properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa are studied. X-ray and electron diffraction reveal a bulk and surface crossover between two different types of sublattice order (from B2 to L2{sub 1}) with increasing annealing temperature. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism results show that the magnetic properties in the surface and bulk are identical, although the magnetic moments obtained are 5 % below from the theoretically predicted. By ARUPS evidence for the validity of the predicted total bulk density of states (DOS) was demonstrated for both Heusler compounds. Additional ARUPS intensity contributions close to the Fermi energy indicates the presence of a specific surface DOS. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the crystallographic order, controlled by annealing, plays an important role on broadening effects of DOS features. Improving order resulted in better defined ARUPS features. Tunneling magnetoresistance measurements of Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa based MTJ's result in a Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} spin polarization of 44 %, which is the highest experimentally obtained value for this compound, although it is lower than the 100 % predicted. For Co

  12. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  13. Efficient VLSI Architecture For CSD Basedsub-Band Tree Structure Using 4-Tap Filter

    Radhe Kant Mishra,; Dr. Subbaratnam Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A sub-band tree structure hardware design based on canonic signed digit (CSD) architecture is presented in this paper. We have proposed based on canonic signed digit (CSD) arithmetic for low complexity and efficient implementation of sub-band tree structure. The canonic signed digit (CSD) technique has been applied to reduce the number of full adders required by 2’s complement based deigns. This architecture is suitable for high speed on-line applications. With this architectu...

  14. Theory of the electronic structure of dilute nitride alloys: beyond the band-anti-crossing model

    We use an sp3s* tight-binding Hamiltonian to investigate the band-anti-crossing (BAC) model for dilute GaNxAs1-x alloys. The BAC model describes the strong band-gap bowing at low N composition x in terms of an interaction between the conduction band edge (E-) and a higher-lying band of localized nitrogen resonant states (E+). We demonstrate that the E- level can be described very accurately by the BAC model, in which we treat the nitrogen levels explicitly using a linear combination of isolated nitrogen resonant states (LCINS). We also use the LCINS results to identify E+ in the full tight-binding calculations, showing that at low N composition E+ forms a sharp resonance in the conduction band Γ-related density of states, which broadens rapidly at higher N composition when the E+ level rises in energy to become degenerate with the larger L-related density of states. We then turn to the conduction band dispersion, showing that the two-level BAC model must be modified to give a quantitative understanding of the dispersion. We demonstrate that the unexpectedly large electron effective mass values observed in some GaNAs samples are due to hybridization between the conduction band edge and nitrogen states close to the band edge. Finally we show that there is a fundamental connection between the strong composition-dependence of the conduction-band-edge energy and the n-type carrier scattering cross-section in Ga(In)NxAs1-x alloys, imposing general limits on the carrier mobility, comparable to the highest measured mobility in such alloys

  15. Weibel instability driven by spatially anisotropic density structures

    Tomita, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Observations of afterglows of gamma-ray bursts suggest (GRBs) that post-shock magnetic fields are strongly amplified to about 100 times the shock-compressed value. The Weibel instability appears to play an important role in generating of the magnetic field. However, recent simulations of collisionless shocks in homogeneous plasmas show that the magnetic field generated by the Weibel instability rapidly decays. There must be some density fluctuations in interstellar and circumstellar media. The density fluctuations are anisotropically compressed in the downstream region of relativistic shocks. In this paper, we study the Weibel instability in electron--positron plasmas with the spatially anisotropic density distributions by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We find that large magnetic fields are maintained for a longer time by the Weibel instability driven by the spatially anisotropic density structure. Particles anisotropically escape from the high density region, so that the temperature ...

  16. Dual-Band Terahertz Left-Handed Metamaterial with Fishnet Structure

    We present the design of a dual-band left-handed metamaterial with fishnet structure in the terahertz regime. Its left-handed properties are described by the retrieved effective electromagnetic parameters. We introduce an equivalent circuit which offers a theoretical explanation for the left-handed behavior of the dual-band fishnet metamaterial, and investigate its losses receiving higher figure of merit. The design is beneficial to the development of frequency agile and broadband THz materials and devices. The dual-band fishnet metamaterial can be extended to infrared and optical frequency ranges by regulating the structural parameters. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  17. Design of UWB Monopole Antenna with Dual Notched Bands Using One Modified Electromagnetic-Bandgap Structure

    Hao Liu; Ziqiang Xu

    2013-01-01

    A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG) structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensio...

  18. Realization of Band-Notch UWB Monopole Antenna Using AMC Structure

    Pradeep Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the design, simulation and testing of an Ultra Wide Band (UWB planar monopole antenna with WLAN band-notch characteristic. The proposed antenna consists, the combination of planar monopole antenna with partial ground and a pair of AMC structures. The AMC structure used for the design is mushroom-like. Design equation of EBG parameters is also proposed for FR4 substrate using transmission line model. Using proposed equations, Mushroom-like EBG structure is integrated along the feed line of a monopole antenna for WLAN (5 GHz – 6 GHz band rejection. TheCurrent distribution and equivalent circuit model of antenna is used to explain band-notch characteristic of EBG resonator. The proposed antenna is fabricated on an FR4 substrate with a thickness of 1.6 mmand εr = 4.4. The measured VSWR characteristic is less than 2 for complete UWB band except for WLAN band i.e. 5 GHz – 6 GHz. The gain of the proposed structure is around 2 dBi – 6.7 dBi for complete UWBband except for WLAN band where it is reduced to -4 dBi. The measured radiation pattern of proposed antenna is omnidirectional along H plane and bidirectional in E plane. A nearly constant group delaywith variations < 2ns, except for the notched bandwidth makes proposed antenna suitable for UWB application.

  19. Band structure of hydrogenated silicene on Ag(111): Evidence for half-silicane

    Wang, W.; Olovsson, W.; Uhrberg, R. I. G.

    2016-02-01

    In the case of graphene, hydrogenation removes the conductivity due to the bands forming the Dirac cone by opening up a band gap. This type of chemical functionalization is of the utmost importance for electronic applications. As predicted by theoretical studies, a similar change in the band structure is expected for silicene, the closest analog to graphene. We here report a study of the atomic and electronic structures of hydrogenated silicene with hydrogen on one side, the so-called half-silicane. The ("2 √{3 }×2 √{3 } ") phase of silicene on Ag(111) was used in this Rapid Communication since it can be formed homogeneously across the entire surface of the Ag substrate. Low-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy data clearly show that hydrogenation changes the structure of silicene on Ag(111) resulting in a (1 × 1) periodicity with respect to the silicene lattice. The hydrogenated silicene also exhibits a quasiregular (2 √{3 }×2 √{3 } )-like arrangement of vacancies. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy revealed two dispersive bands which can be unambiguously assigned to half-silicane. The common top of these bands is located at ˜0.9 eV below the Fermi level. We find that the experimental bands are closely reproduced by the theoretical band structure of free-standing silicene with H adsorbed on the upper hexagonal sublattice.

  20. An atomic orbital based real-time time-dependent density functional theory for computing electronic circular dichroism band spectra

    Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-06-01

    One of the challenges of interpreting electronic circular dichroism (ECD) band spectra is that different states may have different rotatory strength signs, determined by their absolute configuration. If the states are closely spaced and opposite in sign, observed transitions may be washed out by nearby states, unlike absorption spectra where transitions are always positive additive. To accurately compute ECD bands, it is necessary to compute a large number of excited states, which may be prohibitively costly if one uses the linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. Here we implement a real-time, atomic-orbital based TDDFT method for computing the entire ECD spectrum simultaneously. The method is advantageous for large systems with a high density of states. In contrast to previous implementations based on real-space grids, the method is variational, independent of nuclear orientation, and does not rely on pseudopotential approximations, making it suitable for computation of chiroptical properties well into the X-ray regime.

  1. Phononic band structures and stability analysis using radial basis function method with consideration of different interface models

    Yan, Zhi-zhong; Wei, Chun-qiu; Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a meshless radial basis function (RBF) collocation method is developed to calculate the phononic band structures taking account of different interface models. The present method is validated by using the analytical results in the case of perfect interfaces. The stability is fully discussed based on the types of RBFs, the shape parameters and the node numbers. And the advantages of the proposed RBF method compared to the finite element method (FEM) are also illustrated. In addition, the influences of the spring-interface model and the three-phase model on the wave band gaps are investigated by comparing with the perfect interfaces. For different interface models, the effects of various interface conditions, length ratios and density ratios on the band gap width are analyzed. The comparison results of the two models show that the weakly bonded interface has a significant effect on the properties of phononic crystals. Besides, the band structures of the spring-interface model have certain similarities and differences with those of the three-phase model.

  2. On the structure of collective bands in 78Kr

    Using 16O, 19F, and 12C induced reactions high spin states in 78Kr were excited. The targets consisted of 65Cu, 69Ni, and 68Zn. On the base of gamma spectroscopic methods as γγ-coincidences, angular distributions and excitation functions a level scheme of 78Kr is proposed. Four bands could be identified, which decay mostly by stretched E2-transitions. From recoil distance Doppler shift as well as Doppler shift attenuation measurements lifetimes of about 20 states were measured. The β-decay of the 103 keV isomeric state and the ground state in 78Rb was observed and the half-lifes determined. Altogether a very good agreement of the level scheme and the E2- and E1-transition strength with predictions of the interacting boson model were found. Using a Monte Carlo code the γ-decay of the continuum of highly excited nuclei is described. Entry states, mean γ-energies, γ-spectra, mean multiplicities, multipolarities, and mean feeding times as well as e.g. their second moments were calculated for the reactions 58Ni(16O,2p)72Se and 68Zn(12C,2n)78Kr. The results are discussed and compared with experimental data. (HSI)

  3. Comparison and fit of the two and six band k.p models for the band edge structure of Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te

    The band edge structure of Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te is derived in detail using a two band ellipsoidal model and compared with a more rigorous calculation based on six bands. A quantitative comparison is made for two values of the energy gap, corresponding to the cases where x=0 and x=0.17. It was found that, for the occupied states in nondegenerate materials, both models are practically equivalent. Discrepancies may occur only in high degeneracies or deep inversion layers. The agreement between both models was significantly improved by introducing an effective energy gap in the two band model. It is suggested that the use of the effective energy gap may improve the agreement between the two band model and experiment whenever the details of the band edge structure enter the interpretation of the experimental results. (author)

  4. Precise fabrication of X-band accelerating structure

    An accelerating structure with a/λ=0.16 is being fabricated to study a precise fabrication method. A frequency control of each cell better than 10-4 level is required to realize a detuned structure. The present machining level is nearly 1 MHz/11.4 GHz in relative frequency error, which just satisfies the above requirement. To keep this machining precision, the diffusion bonding technique is found preferable to join the cells. Various diffusion conditions were tried. The frequency change can be less than 1 MHz/11.4 GHz and it can be controlled well better than that. (author)

  5. Evidence of ion intercalation mediated band structure modification and opto-ionic coupling in lithium niobite

    Shank, Joshua C.; Tellekamp, M. Brooks; Doolittle, W. Alan, E-mail: alan.doolittle@ece.gatech.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The theoretically suggested band structure of the novel p-type semiconductor lithium niobite (LiNbO{sub 2}), the direct coupling of photons to ion motion, and optically induced band structure modifications are investigated by temperature dependent photoluminescence. LiNbO{sub 2} has previously been used as a memristor material but is shown here to be useful as a sensor owing to the electrical, optical, and chemical ease of lithium removal and insertion. Despite the high concentration of vacancies present in lithium niobite due to the intentional removal of lithium atoms, strong photoluminescence spectra are observed even at room temperature that experimentally confirm the suggested band structure implying transitions from a flat conduction band to a degenerate valence band. Removal of small amounts of lithium significantly modifies the photoluminescence spectra including additional larger than stoichiometric-band gap features. Sufficient removal of lithium results in the elimination of the photoluminescence response supporting the predicted transition from a direct to indirect band gap semiconductor. In addition, non-thermal coupling between the incident laser and lithium ions is observed and results in modulation of the electrical impedance.

  6. Valence band structure of the Si(331)-(12 x 1) surface reconstruction

    Battaglia, Corsin [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Rue A-L Breguet 2, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Fabian Schwier, Eike; Monney, Claude; Didiot, Clement; Mariotti, Nicolas; Gunnar Garnier, Michael; Aebi, Philipp [Department of Physics and Fribourg Center for Nanomaterials, Universite de Fribourg, Chemin du Musee 3, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Gaal-Nagy, Katalin; Onida, Giovanni, E-mail: corsin.battaglia@epfl.ch [Dipartimento di Fisica and European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-04-06

    Using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy we investigate the electronic valence band structure of the Si(331)-(12 x 1) surface reconstruction for which we recently proposed a structural model containing silicon pentamers as elementary structural building blocks. We find that this surface, reported to be metallic in a previous study, shows a clear band gap at the Fermi energy, indicating semiconducting behavior. An occupied surface state, presumably containing several spectral components, is found centered at - 0.6 eV exhibiting a flat energy dispersion. These results are confirmed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and are consistent with recent first-principles calculations for our structural model.

  7. Valence band structure of the Si(331)-(12 x 1) surface reconstruction

    Using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy we investigate the electronic valence band structure of the Si(331)-(12 x 1) surface reconstruction for which we recently proposed a structural model containing silicon pentamers as elementary structural building blocks. We find that this surface, reported to be metallic in a previous study, shows a clear band gap at the Fermi energy, indicating semiconducting behavior. An occupied surface state, presumably containing several spectral components, is found centered at - 0.6 eV exhibiting a flat energy dispersion. These results are confirmed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and are consistent with recent first-principles calculations for our structural model.

  8. Calculated high-pressure structural properties, lattice dynamics and quasi particle band structures of perovskite fluorides KZnF3, CsCaF3 and BaLiF3

    Vaitheeswaran, G.; Kanchana, V.; Zhang, Xinxin; Ma, Yanming; Svane, A.; Christensen, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    A detailed study of the high-pressure structural properties, lattice dynamics and band structures of perovskite structured fluorides KZnF3, CsCaF3 and BaLiF3 has been carried out by means of density functional theory. The calculated structural properties including elastic constants and equation of state agree well with available experimental information. The phonon dispersion curves are in good agreement with available experimental inelastic neutron scattering data. The electronic structures of these fluorides have been calculated using the quasi particle self-consistent GW approximation. The GW calculations reveal that all the fluorides studied are wide band gap insulators, and the band gaps are significantly larger than those obtained by the standard local density approximation, thus emphasizing the importance of quasi particle corrections in perovskite fluorides.

  9. Raman scattering from layered superconductors: Effects of charge ordering, two-band superconductivity, and structural disorder

    Mialitsin, Aleksej

    Subject of this dissertation is the investigation with experimental means of how the Raman response of three structurally similar materials -- MgB2, NbSe2, and CaC6 -- is affected by superconductivity (all three), charge ordering (NbSe2), or crystalline order-to-disorder phase transitions (CaC6). Universal characteristics of spectral renormalization pertaining to the superconducting phase transition are observed in all three compounds. Yet, the crystalline and electronic structures are sufficiently distinct, such that specific for each compound characteristics are imposed on this superconductivity-induced renormalization. Consequently, the method of polarized Raman scattering has been used to establish a variety of physical concepts: (1) Multi-band superconductivity in the layered superconductor MgB2 and its primary mediation by the strongly coupled 640 cm--1 E2g phonon. Additionally, it is shown how a Josephson-like coupling of two SC condensates in the reciprocal space is responsible for an exotic collective mode, the Leggett's resonance. (2) Interplay between the superconducting and the incommensurate charge-density-wave order parameters in NbSe2, which has been found to be consistent with an isotropic multi-band superconductivity scenario. This scenario is proposed in the frame of a picture that involves a combined 'superconductivity plus charge-density-wave' order parameter. (3) The Fano-Breit-Wigner line-shape formalism to account for an anti-resonance interference in the low temperature Raman response from NbSe2, in the polarization geometry corresponding to the non-symmetric E 2g symmetry channel. (4) Validity of the double resonant Raman scattering picture in the presence of disorder in the graphite intercalation compound CaC6. Simultaneously, it is explored how disorder suppresses superconductivity. To that end, the CaC6 superconducting coherence peak, too, is presented. All these phenomena are manifestations of electron-phonon coupling in solids. It is

  10. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Robert Tenzer and Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the _ crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The _ gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  11. Superconductivity in a two-band system with a low carrier density

    The paper investigates thermodynamic properties of two-zone system with low density of carriers in the vicinity of superconducting transition temperature Tc, taking into account various pairings of carriers. Bell-shaped dependence of Tc on electron concentration is derived and a possibility of occurrence of high-temperature superconductivity is shown. Absolute, CS - CN, and relative, (CS - CN)/CN jumps of electron heat capacity is calculated in the point T=Tc and concentration dependence of these values is studied. The theory allows to derive small, (CS - CN)/CN S - CN)/CN > 1.43 value. Favorable conditions for experimental observation of the bent, depending on chemical potential μ(T) in the point T=Tc, are established. 35 refs., 4 figs

  12. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin [Industrial Technology Research Institute-South, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Chen, E-mail: fengchiahsu@itri.org.t, E-mail: hsujc@yuntech.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-21

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  13. Effect of structured packing density on performance of air dehumidifier

    An experimental study has been conducted to investigate the performance of a liquid desiccant air dehumidifier equipped with a structured packing made of wood for three different densities using triethylene glycol (TEG) as the liquid desiccant. The structured packing densities used were 77, 100 and 200 m2/m3. The performance of the dehumidifier was expressed in terms of the moisture removal rate and the dehumidifier effectiveness under different air and desiccant parameters, i.e. the air and TEG flow rates, air and TEG inlet temperatures, inlet air humidity and inlet TEG concentration. In general, the trend in the dehumidifier performance was similar to that reported by other investigators using random packing. The effect of packing density on moisture removal rate and dehumidifier effectiveness is assessed. The differences in the effectiveness of different packing densities are attributed to the wetting condition. Lower effectiveness of the column is shown with the packing density of 200 m2/m3 compared to the other two packing densities when the air flow rate, inlet concentration and desiccant flow rate are increased. However, higher effectiveness is shown when either the inlet temperature of the air or desiccant is increased

  14. Effect of structured packing density on performance of air dehumidifier

    Abdul-Wahab, S.A. E-mail: sabah1@squ.edu.om; Abu-Arabi, M.K.; Zurigat, Y.H

    2004-09-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to investigate the performance of a liquid desiccant air dehumidifier equipped with a structured packing made of wood for three different densities using triethylene glycol (TEG) as the liquid desiccant. The structured packing densities used were 77, 100 and 200 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}. The performance of the dehumidifier was expressed in terms of the moisture removal rate and the dehumidifier effectiveness under different air and desiccant parameters, i.e. the air and TEG flow rates, air and TEG inlet temperatures, inlet air humidity and inlet TEG concentration. In general, the trend in the dehumidifier performance was similar to that reported by other investigators using random packing. The effect of packing density on moisture removal rate and dehumidifier effectiveness is assessed. The differences in the effectiveness of different packing densities are attributed to the wetting condition. Lower effectiveness of the column is shown with the packing density of 200 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3} compared to the other two packing densities when the air flow rate, inlet concentration and desiccant flow rate are increased. However, higher effectiveness is shown when either the inlet temperature of the air or desiccant is increased.

  15. Strong Evidence for the Density-wave Theory of Spiral Structure in Disk Galaxies

    Pour-Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Davis, Benjamin L.; Shields, Douglas W.; Shameer Abdeen, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    The density-wave theory of galactic spiral-arm structure makes a striking prediction that the pitch angle of spiral arms should vary with the wavelength of the galaxy’s image. The reason is that stars are born in the density wave but move out of it as they age. They move ahead of the density wave inside the co-rotation radius, and fall behind outside of it, resulting in a tighter pitch angle at wavelengths that image stars (optical and near-infrared) than those that are associated with star formation (far-infrared and ultraviolet). In this study we combined large sample size with wide range of wavelengths, from the ultraviolet to the infrared to investigate this issue. For each galaxy we used an optical wavelength image (B-band: 445 nm) and images from the Spitzer Space Telescope at two infrared wavelengths (infrared: 3.6 and 8.0 μm) and we measured the pitch angle with the 2DFFT and Spirality codes. We find that the B-band and 3.6 μm images have smaller pitch angles than the infrared 8.0 μm image in all cases, in agreement with the prediction of density-wave theory. We also used images in the ultraviolet from Galaxy Evolution Explorer, whose pitch angles agreed with the measurements made at 8 μm.

  16. The valence band electronic structure of the Cu(111) (√3X√3)R30deg-Si interface

    Full text: The structure and bonding of the copper-silicon interface is of considerable interest from a number of aspects. Firstly as a catalyst in the commercial synthesis of silane polymers, secondly as an anti-corrosion treatment, and thirdly, the formation of a well ordered and reactive silicon layer, which can be oxidised is relevant in the creation of ultra-thin silicon oxide-metal interfaces for electronic devices. Silicon is capable of forming a number of compounds with copper, the most widely studied of which is Cu3Si. Calculations have shown that when silicon impurity atoms are incorporated into a copper solid, there is an interaction between copper 3d levels and the 3s and sp levels of silicon. The silicon 2p orbitals rehybridise with the copper 3d band to form bonding and antibonding states separated by -4 eV. The resulting compounds have metallic, rather than semiconducting nature, there is charge transfer from copper to silicon and there is an increase in electron density into the silicon valence bands, making silicon more reactive. The splitting of the density of states near the Fermi edge has been measured as 4-5 eV in amorphous copper-silicon alloys, using Si Kβ fluorescence spectroscopy and has also been inferred from the 4 eV splitting of the LV V auger lines in Cu-Si compounds and in copper deposited on Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces. In this study we have used high resolution valence band photoemission spectroscopy to investigate the nature of the silicon valence bands in a well ordered silicon-copper interface. By comparing the valence band spectra of the clean surface and those from the silicon interface, we are able to identify three silicon-derived features which are in agreement with other published data. We suggest that these levels are due to emission from the 3s and 3p levels of Si

  17. Superlattice band structure: New and simple energy quantification condition

    Assuming an approximated effective mass and using Bastard's boundary conditions, a simple method is used to calculate the subband structure for periodic semiconducting heterostructures. Our method consists to derive and solve the energy quantification condition (EQC), this is a simple real equation, composed of trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, and does not need any programming effort or sophistic machine to solve it. For less than ten wells heterostructures, we have derived and simplified the energy quantification conditions. The subband is build point by point; each point presents an energy level. Our simple energy quantification condition is used to calculate the subband structure of the GaAs/Ga0.5Al0.5As heterostructures, and build its subband point by point for 4 and 20 wells. Our finding shows a good agreement with previously published results

  18. Superlattice band structure: New and simple energy quantification condition

    Maiz, F.

    2014-10-01

    Assuming an approximated effective mass and using Bastard's boundary conditions, a simple method is used to calculate the subband structure for periodic semiconducting heterostructures. Our method consists to derive and solve the energy quantification condition (EQC), this is a simple real equation, composed of trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, and does not need any programming effort or sophistic machine to solve it. For less than ten wells heterostructures, we have derived and simplified the energy quantification conditions. The subband is build point by point; each point presents an energy level. Our simple energy quantification condition is used to calculate the subband structure of the GaAs/Ga0.5Al0.5As heterostructures, and build its subband point by point for 4 and 20 wells. Our finding shows a good agreement with previously published results.

  19. Superlattice band structure: New and simple energy quantification condition

    Maiz, F., E-mail: fethimaiz@gmail.com [University of Cartage, Nabeul Engineering Preparatory Institute, Merazka, 8000 Nabeul (Tunisia); King Khalid University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, P.O. Box 9004, Abha 61413 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-10-01

    Assuming an approximated effective mass and using Bastard's boundary conditions, a simple method is used to calculate the subband structure for periodic semiconducting heterostructures. Our method consists to derive and solve the energy quantification condition (EQC), this is a simple real equation, composed of trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, and does not need any programming effort or sophistic machine to solve it. For less than ten wells heterostructures, we have derived and simplified the energy quantification conditions. The subband is build point by point; each point presents an energy level. Our simple energy quantification condition is used to calculate the subband structure of the GaAs/Ga{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.5}As heterostructures, and build its subband point by point for 4 and 20 wells. Our finding shows a good agreement with previously published results.

  20. A theoretical investigation of ZnO{sub x}S{sub 1-x} alloy band structure

    Rozale, H.; Beldi, L.; Bouhafs, B. [Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Sidi Bel-Abbes, 22000 Sidi Bel-Abbes (Algeria); Ruterana, P. [SIFCOM UMR 6176, CNRS-ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France)

    2007-05-15

    We report the properties of ordered ZnO{sub x}S{sub 1-x} alloys calculated in various structures (CuAu-I, Cu {sub 3}Au, Luzonite and Famatinite) using a first-principles total-energy formalism based on the hybrid full-potential augmented plane-wave plus local orbitals (APW+lo) method, within the local-density approximation (LDA). The calculated band gaps of the alloys are direct and range from 0.49 for O-rich to 1.55 eV for S-rich ZnO{sub x}S{sub 1-x}. The non linear variation of the band gap energy is related to the large electronegativity difference between O and S. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Effect of extended line defects on thermal conduction of carbon nanotubes: analyzing phonon structures by band unfolding

    We theoretically investigate the effect of extended line defects (ELDs) on thermal transport properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using nonequilibrium Green’s function method. Our study shows that the thermal conductance of CNTs with ELDs can be 25% lower than that of pristine CNTs. By extending the application of the recently developed unfolding method for electronic structures to phonon spectra, we find that the unfolded phonon bands of defected CNTs are split with obvious gap opening, leading to lower phonon transmissions. Further phonon local density of states analysis reveals that the change of bonding configuration near the ELD in defected CNTs can tail the degree of phonon localization. Our results indicate that introducing ELDs might be an efficient way to control thermal conduction of CNTs. The extended unfolding method for phonon systems, found to be efficient in this work, is expected to be applicable to other systems with densely folded phonon bands. (paper)

  2. Structure sensitive bands in the vibrational spectra of metal complexes of tetraphenylporphine

    Oshio, Hiroki; Ama, Tomoharu; Watanabe, Takeshi; Kincaid, James; Nakamoto, Kazuo

    The i.r. and RR spectra of twenty Fe(TPP)LL' type complexes have been measured to locate structure-sensitive bands. In i.r. spectra, band I (1350-1330 cm -1) and band III (469-432 cm -1) are spin-state sensitive whereas band II (806-790 cm -1) is oxidation-state sensitive and slightly spin-state sensitive in the Fe(II) state. To examine the nature of these bands, the i.r. spectra of Co(TPP), (Fe(TPP)) 2O and their d8 and d20 analogs have been measured, and empirical assignments proposed. In RR spectra, band C (1545-1498 cm -1, ap) and band D (1565-1540 cm -1, p) are spin-state sensitive whereas band E (391-376 cm -1, p) is sensitive to both spin and oxidation states. These results on RR spectra are in good agreement with those of previous workers.

  3. Electronic structure and band alignment at an epitaxial spinel/perovskite heterojunction.

    Qiao, Liang; Li, Wei; Xiao, Haiyan; Meyer, Harry M; Liang, Xuelei; Nguyen, N V; Weber, William J; Biegalski, Michael D

    2014-08-27

    The electronic properties of solid-solid interfaces play critical roles in a variety of technological applications. Recent advances of film epitaxy and characterization techniques have demonstrated a wealth of exotic phenomena at interfaces of oxide materials, which are critically dependent on the alignment of their energy bands across the interface. Here we report a combined photoemission and electrical investigation of the electronic structures across a prototypical spinel/perovskite heterojunction. Energy-level band alignment at an epitaxial Co3O4/SrTiO3(001) heterointerface indicates a chemically abrupt, type I heterojunction without detectable band bending at both the film and substrate. The unexpected band alignment for this typical p-type semiconductor on SrTiO3 is attributed to its intrinsic d-d interband excitation, which significantly narrows the fundamental band gap between the top of the valence band and the bottom of the conduction band. The formation of the type I heterojunction with a flat-band state results in a simultaneous confinement of both electrons and holes inside the Co3O4 layer, thus rendering the epitaxial Co3O4/SrTiO3(001) heterostructure to be a very promising material for high-efficiency luminescence and optoelectronic device applications. PMID:25075939

  4. Design of UWB monopole antenna with dual notched bands using one modified electromagnetic-bandgap structure.

    Liu, Hao; Xu, Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG) structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB) antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR WiMAX) and the wireless local area network (WLAN) at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively. PMID:24170984

  5. Influence of indium clustering on the band structure of semiconducting ternary and quaternarynitride alloys

    Gorczyca,, I.; Łepkowski, S. P.; Suski, T.;

    2009-01-01

    atomic arrangements are examined. Particular attention is paid to the magnitude of and trends in bowing of the band gaps. Indium composition fluctuation (clustering) is simulated by different distributions of In atoms and it is shown that it strongly influences the band gaps. The gaps are considerably......The electronic band structures of InxGa1-xN, InxAl1-xN, and InxGayAl1-x-yN alloys are calculated by ab initio methods using a supercell geometry, and the effects of varying the composition and atomic arrangements methods using a supercell geometry, and the effects of varying the composition and...

  6. Band structure properties of (BGa)P semiconductors for lattice matched integration on (001) silicon

    Hossain, Nadir; Sweeney, Stephen [Advanced Technology Institute and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Hosea, Jeff [Advanced Technology Institute and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK and Ibnu Sina Institute for Fundamental Science Studies, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru 81310 (Malaysia); Liebich, Sven; Zimprich, Martin; Volz, Kerstin; Stolz, Wolfgang [Material Sciences Center and Faculty of Physics, Philipps-University, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Kunert, Bernerdette [NAsP III/V GmbH, Am Knechtacker 19, 35041 Marburg (Germany)

    2013-12-04

    We report the band structure properties of (BGa)P layers grown on silicon substrate using metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy. Using surface photo-voltage spectroscopy we find that both the direct and indirect band gaps of (BGa)P alloys (strained and unstrained) decrease with Boron content. Our experimental results suggest that the band gap of (BGa)P layers up to 6% Boron is large and suitable to be used as cladding and contact layers in GaP-based quantum well heterostructures on silicon substrates.

  7. Photonic band structures of two-dimensional photonic crystals with deformed lattices

    Cai Xiang-Hua; Zheng Wan-Hua; Ma Xiao-Tao; Ren Gang; Xia Jian-Bai

    2005-01-01

    Using the plane-wave expansion method, we have calculated and analysed the changes of photonic band structures arising from two kinds of deformed lattices, including the stretching and shrinking of lattices. The square lattice with square air holes and the triangular lattice with circular air holes are both studied. Calculated results show that the change of lattice size in some special ranges can enlarge the band gap, which depends strongly on the filling factor of air holes in photonic crystals; and besides, the asymmetric band edges will appear with the broken symmetry of lattices.

  8. Engineering the electronic structure and band gap of boron nitride nanoribbon via external electric field

    Chegel, Raad

    2016-06-01

    By using the third nearest neighbor modified tight binding (3NN-TB) method, the electronic structure and band gap of BNNRs under transverse electric fields are explored. The band gap of the BNNRs has a decreasing with increasing the intensity of the applied electric field, independent on the ribbon edge types. Furthermore, an analytic model for the dependence of the band gap in armchair and zigzag BNNRs on the electric field is proposed. The reduction of E g is similar for some N a armchair and N z zigzag BNNRs independent of their edges.

  9. Tight-binding modelling of the electronic band structure of layered superconducting perovskites

    Mishonov, T.; Penev, E.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed tight-binding analysis of the electron band structure of the CuO_2 plane of layered cuprates is performed within a sigma-band Hamiltonian including four orbitals - Cu3d_x^2-y^2, Cu4s, O2p_x, and O2p_y. Both the experimental and theoretical hints in favor of Fermi level located in a Cu or O band, respectively, are considered. For these two alternatives analytical expressions are obtained for the LCAO electron wave functions suitable for the treatment of electron superexchange. Simpl...

  10. Promoting Photochemical Water Oxidation with Metallic Band Structures.

    Liu, Hongfei; Moré, René; Grundmann, Henrik; Cui, Chunhua; Erni, Rolf; Patzke, Greta R

    2016-02-10

    The development of economic water oxidation catalysts is a key step toward large-scale water splitting. However, their current exploration remains empirical to a large extent. Elucidating the correlations between electronic properties and catalytic activity is crucial for deriving general and straightforward catalyst design principles. Herein, strongly correlated electronic systems with abundant and easily tunable electronic properties, namely La(1-x)Sr(x)BO3 perovskites and La(2-x)Sr(x)BO4 layered perovskites (B = Fe, Co, Ni, or Mn), were employed as model systems to identify favorable electronic structures for water oxidation. We established a direct correlation between the enhancement of catalytic activity and the insulator to metal transition through tuning the electronic properties of the target perovskite families via the La(3+)/Sr(2+) ratio. Their improved photochemical water oxidation performance was clearly linked to the increasingly metallic character. These electronic structure-activity relations provide a promising guideline for constructing efficient water oxidation catalysts. PMID:26771537

  11. Substrate Integrated Waveguides Structures using Frequency Selective Surfaces operating in Stop-Band (SBFSS-SIW)

    Esparza López, Nuria; Alcón García, Pablo; Herrán Ontañón, Luis Fernando; Las Heras Andrés, Fernando Luis

    2016-01-01

    A novel Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) is proposed using Frequency Selective Surfaces (FSS) operating in Stop- Band (SBFSS-SIW) as metal conductor plates. These structures preserve the propagation properties and the dimensions of the conventional SIW, and have periodic isolated pads that could allow the direct integration of biased active and passive devices on the SIW surface. A set of SBFSS-SIW for X-band have been designed, simulated and experimentally measured to demonstrat...

  12. Band structure analysis of (1 × 2)-H/Pd(110)-pr

    Shuttleworth, I. G.

    2013-09-01

    A novel method of band structure analysis based on the atomic orbital (AO) coefficients in LCAO-DFT has been applied to the (1 × 2)-H/Pd(110)-pr system. The analysis has revealed symmetry-dependent Pd 4d band splitting due to H ligand effects; ensemble effects due to the (1 × 2) Pd reconstruction are shown to be relatively minor.

  13. Estimating the vertical structure of intense Mediterranean precipitation using two X-band weather radar systems

    Berne, A.D.; Delrieu, G.; Andrieu, H.

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims at a preliminary approach of multiradar compositing applied to the estimation of the vertical structure of precipitation¿an important issue for radar rainfall measurement and prediction. During the HYDROMET Integrated Radar Experiment (HIRE¿98), the vertical profile of reflectivity was measured, on the one hand, with an X-band vertically pointing radar system, and, on the other hand, with an X-band RHI scanning protocol radar. The analysis of the raw data highlights the...

  14. Precision photonic band structure calculation of Abrikosov periodic lattice in type-II superconductors

    We have performed a numerical solution for band structure of an Abrikosov vortex lattice in type-II superconductors forming a periodic array in two dimensions for applications of incorporating the photonic crystals concept into superconducting materials with possibilities for optical electronics. The implemented numerical method is based on the extensive numerical solution of the Ginzburg-Landau equation for calculating the parameters of the two-fluid model and obtaining the band structure from the permittivity, which depends on the above parameters and the frequency. This is while the characteristics of such crystals highly vary with an externally applied static normal magnetic field, leading to nonlinear behavior of the band structure, which also has nonlinear dependence on the temperature. The similar analysis for every arbitrary lattice structure is also possible to be developed by this approach as presented in this work. We also present some examples and discuss the results

  15. A New Diagnostic of the Radial Density Structure of Be Disks

    Draper, Zachary H; Bjorkman, Karen S; Haubois, Xavier; Carciofi, Alex C; Bjorkman, Jon E; Meade, Marilyn R; Okazaki, Atsuo

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the intrinsic polarization of two classical Be stars in the process of losing their circumstellar disks via a Be to normal B star transition originally reported by Wisniewski et al. During each of five polarimetric outbursts which interrupt these disk-loss events, we find that the ratio of the polarization across the Balmer jump (BJ+/BJ-) versus the V-band polarization traces a distinct loop structure as a function of time. Since the polarization change across the Balmer jump is a tracer of the innermost disk density whereas the V-band polarization is a tracer of the total scattering mass of the disk, we suggest such correlated loop structures in Balmer jump-V band polarization diagrams (BJV diagrams) provide a unique diagnostic of the radial distribution of mass within Be disks. We use the 3-D Monte Carlo radiation transfer code HDUST to reproduce the observed clockwise loops simply by turning "on/off" the mass decretion from the disk. We speculate that counter-clockwise loop structures we observe...

  16. A NEW DIAGNOSTIC OF THE RADIAL DENSITY STRUCTURE OF Be DISKS

    We analyze the intrinsic polarization of two classical Be stars in the process of losing their circumstellar disks via a Be to normal B star transition originally reported by Wisniewski et al. During each of five polarimetric outbursts which interrupt these disk-loss events, we find that the ratio of the polarization across the Balmer jump (BJ+/BJ-) versus the V-band polarization traces a distinct loop structure as a function of time. Since the polarization change across the Balmer jump is a tracer of the innermost disk density whereas the V-band polarization is a tracer of the total scattering mass of the disk, we suggest that such correlated loop structures in Balmer jump-V-band polarization diagrams (BJV diagrams) provide a unique diagnostic of the radial distribution of mass within Be disks. We use the three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiation transfer code HDUST to reproduce the observed clockwise loops simply by turning 'on/off' the mass decretion from the disk. We speculate that counterclockwise loop structures we observe in BJV diagrams might be caused by the mass decretion rate changing between subsequent 'on/off' sequences. Applying this new diagnostic to a larger sample of Be disk systems will provide insight into the time-dependent nature of each system's stellar decretion rate.

  17. Modeling the band structure of the higher manganese silicides starting from Mn$_4$Si$_7$

    V., Vijay Shankar; Tseng, Yu-Chih; Kee, Hae-Young

    2016-01-01

    The higher manganese silicides (HMS), with the chemical formula MnSi$_x$($x \\approx 1.73 - 1.75$), have been attracted a lot of attention due to their potential application as thermoelectric materials. While the electronic band structures of HMS have been previously studied using first principle calculations, the relation between crystal structures of Mn and Si atoms and their band structures is not well understood. Here we study Mn$_4$Si$_7$ using first principle calculations and show that a...

  18. Research on the large band gaps in multilayer radial phononic crystal structure

    Gao, Nansha; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study the band gaps (BGs) of new proposed radial phononic crystal (RPC) structure composed of multilayer sections. The band structure, transmission spectra and eigenmode displacement fields of the multilayer RPC are calculated by using finite element method (FEM). Due to the vibration coupling effects between thin circular plate and intermediate mass, the RPC structure can exhibit large BGs, which can be effectively shifted by changing the different geometry values. This study shows that multilayer RPC can unfold larger and lower BGs than traditional phononic crystals (PCs) and RPC can be composed of single material.

  19. Polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric, twisted-band structures

    Kardaś, Tomasz M.; Jagodnicka, Anna; Wasylczyk, Piotr, E-mail: pwasylcz@fuw.edu.pl [Photonic Nanostructure Facility, Institute of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-11-23

    We propose a concept for light polarization management: polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric microstructures. Numerical simulations of light propagation show that with an appropriately configured array of twisted bands, such structures may exhibit zero birefringence and at the same time diffract two circular polarizations with different efficiencies. Non-birefringent structures as thin as 3 μm have a significant difference in diffraction efficiency for left- and right-hand circular polarizations. We identify the structural parameters of such twisted-band matrices for optimum performance as circular polarizers.

  20. Polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric, twisted-band structures

    Kardaś, Tomasz M.; Jagodnicka, Anna; Wasylczyk, Piotr

    2015-11-01

    We propose a concept for light polarization management: polarization-dependent diffraction in all-dielectric microstructures. Numerical simulations of light propagation show that with an appropriately configured array of twisted bands, such structures may exhibit zero birefringence and at the same time diffract two circular polarizations with different efficiencies. Non-birefringent structures as thin as 3 μm have a significant difference in diffraction efficiency for left- and right-hand circular polarizations. We identify the structural parameters of such twisted-band matrices for optimum performance as circular polarizers.

  1. Analysis of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures using the FDTD method

    Tong, M.S.; Cheng, M.; Lu, Y.L.;

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a number of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures, which are formed by periodic circuit elements printed oil transmission-line circuits, are studied by using a well-known numerical method, the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results validate the band-stop filter...... behavior of these structures, and the computed results generally match well with ones published in the literature. It is also found that the FDTD method is a robust, versatile, and powerful numerical technique to perform such numerical studies. The proposed PBG filter structures may be applied in microwave...

  2. Photonic stop bands in quasi-random nanoporous anodic alumina structures

    Maksymov, Ivan; Pallares, Josep; Marsal, Lluis F

    2011-01-01

    The existence of photonic stop bands in the self-assembled arrangement of pores in porous anodic alumina structures is investigated by means of rigorous 2D finite- difference time-domain calculations. Self-assembled porous anodic alumina shows a random distribution of domains, each of them with a very definite triangular pattern, constituting a quasi-random structure. The observed stop bands are similar to those of photonic quasicrystals or random structures. As the pores of nanoporous anodic alumina can be infiltrated with noble metals, nonlinear or active media, it makes this material very attractive and cost-effective for applications including inhibition of spontaneous emission, random lasing, LEDs and biosensors.

  3. 3D Coronal Density Reconstruction and Retrieving the Magnetic Field Structure during Solar Minimum

    Kramar, M; Mikić, Z; Davila, J

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal phenomena at all scales. We employed STEREO/COR1 data obtained during a deep minimum of solar activity in February 2008 (Carrington rotation CR 2066) to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D) coronal electron density in the range of heights from 1.5 to 4 Rsun using a tomography method. With this, we qualitatively deduced structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in the 195 A band obtained by tomography for the same CR. A global 3D MHD model of the solar corona was used to relate the reconstructed 3D density and emissivity to open/closed magnetic field structures. We show that the density maximum locations can serve as an indicator of current sheet position, while the locations of the density gradient maximum can be a reliable indicator of coronal hole boundaries. We find that the magnetic field configuration du...

  4. Tensor classification of structure in smoothed particle hydrodynamics density fields

    Forgan, Duncan; Bonnell, Ian; Lucas, William; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    As hydrodynamic simulations increase in scale and resolution, identifying structures with non-trivial geometries or regions of general interest becomes increasingly challenging. There is a growing need for algorithms that identify a variety of different features in a simulation without requiring a `by eye' search. We present tensor classification as such a technique for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). These methods have already been used to great effect in N-Body cosmological simulations, which require smoothing defined as an input free parameter. We show that tensor classification successfully identifies a wide range of structures in SPH density fields using its native smoothing, removing a free parameter from the analysis and preventing the need for tessellation of the density field, as required by some classification algorithms. As examples, we show that tensor classification using the tidal tensor and the velocity shear tensor successfully identifies filaments, shells and sheet structures in giant molecular cloud simulations, as well as spiral arms in discs. The relationship between structures identified using different tensors illustrates how different forces compete and co-operate to produce the observed density field. We therefore advocate the use of multiple tensors to classify structure in SPH simulations, to shed light on the interplay of multiple physical processes.

  5. Near-edge band structures and band gaps of Cu-based semiconductors predicted by the modified Becke-Johnson potential plus an on-site Coulomb U

    Diamond-like Cu-based multinary semiconductors are a rich family of materials that hold promise in a wide range of applications. Unfortunately, accurate theoretical understanding of the electronic properties of these materials is hindered by the involvement of Cu d electrons. Density functional theory (DFT) based calculations using the local density approximation or generalized gradient approximation often give qualitative wrong electronic properties of these materials, especially for narrow-gap systems. The modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) method has been shown to be a promising alternative to more elaborate theory such as the GW approximation for fast materials screening and predictions. However, straightforward applications of the mBJ method to these materials still encounter significant difficulties because of the insufficient treatment of the localized d electrons. We show that combining the promise of mBJ potential and the spirit of the well-established DFT + U method leads to a much improved description of the electronic structures, including the most challenging narrow-gap systems. A survey of the band gaps of about 20 Cu-based semiconductors calculated using the mBJ + U method shows that the results agree with reliable values to within ±0.2 eV

  6. Tensor classification of structure in smoothed particle hydrodynamics density fields

    Forgan, Duncan; Lucas, William; Rice, Ken

    2016-01-01

    As hydrodynamic simulations increase in scale and resolution, identifying structures with non-trivial geometries or regions of general interest becomes increasingly challenging. There is a growing need for algorithms that identify a variety of different features in a simulation without requiring a "by-eye" search. We present tensor classification as such a technique for smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). These methods have already been used to great effect in N-Body cosmological simulations, which require smoothing defined as an input free parameter. We show that tensor classification successfully identifies a wide range of structures in SPH density fields using its native smoothing, removing a free parameter from the analysis and preventing the need for tesselation of the density field, as required by some classification algorithms. As examples, we show that tensor classification using the tidal tensor and the velocity shear tensor successfully identifies filaments, shells and sheet structures in giant m...

  7. Kinetic-energy density functional: Atoms and shell structure

    We present a nonlocal kinetic-energy functional which includes an anisotropic average of the density through a symmetrization procedure. This functional allows a better description of the nonlocal effects of the electron system. The main consequence of the symmetrization is the appearance of a clear shell structure in the atomic density profiles, obtained after the minimization of the total energy. Although previous results with some of the nonlocal kinetic functionals have given incipient structures for heavy atoms, only our functional shows a clear shell structure for most of the atoms. The atomic total energies have a good agreement with the exact calculations. Discussion of the chemical potential and the first ionization potential in atoms is included. The functional is also extended to spin-polarized systems. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. A Universal Density Structure for Circum-Galactic Gas

    Stern, Jonathan; Prochaska, J Xavier; Werk, Jessica K

    2016-01-01

    We develop a new method to constrain the physical conditions in the cool (~10^4 K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) from measurements of ionic columns densities, under two main assumptions: that the cool CGM spans a large range of gas densities, and that small high-density clouds are hierarchically embedded in large low-density clouds. The new method combines (or `stacks') the information available from different sightlines during the photoionization modeling, thus yielding significantly tighter constraints on the CGM properties compared to traditional methods which model each sightline individually. Applying this new technique to the COS-Halos survey of low-redshift ~L* galaxies, we find that we can reproduce all observed ion columns in all 44 galaxies in the sample, from the low-ions to OVI, with a single universal density structure for the cool CGM. The gas densities span the range 50 < \\rho/\\rho_mean < 5x10^5 (\\rho_mean is the cosmic mean), while the physical size of individual clouds scales as ~\\rho^-1,...

  9. Electronic structure of topological insulators with MM′X half-Heusler compounds using density functional theory

    The band structures and partial density of states of MM′X half-Heusler compounds as topological insulators have been simulated by using local density approximate + U. Results show that both the covalent M′–X bonds and the ionic M–M′ bands contribute the band structures, and the covalent bonds between M′ and X atoms decide the number of (EΓ6 − EΓ8) (Γ6 and Γ8 denote the twofold s-type orbitals and fourfold p-type orbitals and M, M′, and X show atoms located at different positions in the lattice); big size of |χM′ − χX| and small value of V are propitious to form topological insulators. - Highlights: • Both of covalent M′–X bonds and ionic M–M′ bands contribute band structures. • The covalent M′–X bonds decide the number of (EΓ6 − EΓ8). • Big value of |χM′ − χX| and small value of V are propitious to form topological insulators

  10. Band gap engineering and electronic structure study of ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2-x}. Novel materials for solar cell applications

    Moustafa, Mohamed Orabi

    2012-11-01

    Single crystals of layered transition metal dichalcogenide compounds of ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2-x} were grown by the chemical vapour transport technique. The S-concentration parameter x was varied over the entire compositional range (0{<=}x{<=}2). As a result, we were able to obtain compositions that are S-rich (x>1) or Se-rich (x<1). The crystals were characterized with the help of different methods e.g. EDX, LEED, and Laue diffraction. The band gaps were determined by means of optical measurements. The values of the band gaps were determined from the analysis of the energy dependence of the measured optical absorption. The obtained band gaps, varying from 1.18 eV for ZrSe{sub 2} to 1.7 eV for ZrS{sub 2}, showed an almost linear dependence on the composition parameter x. This reveals an interesting band gap engineering character of this series of material. Additionally, the temperature dependence of the band gaps has been studied and discussed taking into consideration both the implicit and explicit contributions. The exponential increasing adsorption edge was observed which is known as the Urbach tail is discussed in detail. The electronic band structure of the whole series of ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2-x} was studied by means of high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) used in conjunction with synchrotron radiation facilities. The experimental valence band structure of the complete series is reported along the normal direction and along the major symmetry directions of the Brillouin zone parallel to the layers. The obtained experimental band structure compares well with recent band structure calculations based on the density functional theory (DET). The results show that the binding energies of the topmost valence band shift almost linearly with the composition parameter x. Further, a characteristic splitting of the chalcogen p-derived valence bands along high symmetry directions is observed. Our band structure calculations based on the DFT prove

  11. Effects of weak nonlinearity on dispersion relations and frequency band-gaps of periodic structures

    Sorokin, Vladislav; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the behaviour of linear periodic structures can be traced back over 300 years, to Sir Isaac Newton, and still attracts much attention. An essential feature of periodic struc-tures is the presence of frequency band-gaps, i.e. frequency ranges in which waves cannot propagate....... Determination of band-gaps and the corresponding attenuation levels is an im-portant practical problem. Most existing analytical methods in the field are based on Floquet theory; e.g. this holds for the classical Hill’s method of infinite determinants, and the method of space-harmonics. However, application of...... accounted for. The present work deals with analytically predicting dynamic responses for nonlinear continuous elastic periodic structures. Specifically, the effects of weak nonlinearity on the dispersion re-lation and frequency band-gaps of a periodic Bernoulli-Euler beam performing bending os...

  12. Electronic structure and momentum density distribution of titanium dioxide

    LCAO calculations have been performed for the electronic and structural properties of the rutile TiO2 under the periodic HF and DFT schemes. The methods have been applied to study Compton profiles and the structure factors. The experimental Compton profile based on Am241 Compton spectrometer for polycrystalline TiO2 has been compared with the calculations. The calculated Compton profile from HF-LCAO has been found to be in good agreement with the measurement compared to the ionic model and DFT-LCAO method. The published experimental X-ray structure factors support the FLAPW method more than the periodic HF-LCAO method. Signatures of charge transfer on compound formation are observed. Partial ionic as well as covalent character of bonding is observed on the basis of structure factor as well as momentum density analysis. The present work enables to examine the DFT and HF approaches in terms of structure factor and the Compton profile studies

  13. Structure and electronic structure of S-doped graphitic C3N4 investigated by density functional theory

    Chen Gang; Gao Shang-Peng

    2012-01-01

    The structures of the heptazine-based graphitic C3N4 and the S-doped graphitic C3N4 are investigated by using the density functional theory with a semi-empirical dispersion correction for the weak long-range interaction between layers.The corrugated structure is found to be energetically favorable for both the pure and the S-doped graphitic C3N4.The S doptant is prone to substitute the N atom bonded with only two nearest C atoms.The band structure calculation reveals that this kind of S doping causes a favorable red shift of the light absorption threshold and can improve the electroconductibility and the photocatalytic activity of the graphitic C3N4.

  14. 纤锌矿结构ZnO的准粒子能带结构%Quasiparticle band structures of wurtzite ZnO

    郑勇平; 陈志高; 卢宇; 黄志高

    2009-01-01

    理论上对ZnO能带的计算一般采用局域密度近似(LDA),而该方法得到的带隙结果却被严重的低估了.在本文中,我们在密度泛函理论的LDA近似的框架下,通过第一性原理GW近似(GWA)对ZnO的能带进行了修正.在LDA和GWA计算中,将Zn3d电子作为价电子,LDA结果表明ZnO是一种直接带隙半导体,同时讨论了LDA和GWA计算得到的能带之间的差异.%The theoretical calculation of the band structure of ZnO mostly involves the local - density ap-proximation (LDA) method,which usually seriously underestimates the band gap. So,it is desirable to calculate the band structures in a more reliable method. In this paper,we present the band - structure calculations of wurtzite ZnO within the framework of density - functional theory (DFT) in LDA,emplo-ying the correction for band structures of wurtzite ZnO with GW approximation (GWA) using the ab initio pseudopotential method. The Zn 3d electrons are considered as valence states both in LDA and quasipar-ticle calculations. The LDA spectrum shows that ZnO is a direct band -gap semiconductor. The differ-ences between the band structures obtained by the GWA and IDA are discussed.

  15. Band structure engineering and vacancy induced metallicity at the GaAs-AlAs interface

    Upadhyay Kahaly, M.

    2011-09-20

    We study the epitaxial GaAs-AlAs interface of wide gap materials by full-potential density functional theory. AlAsthin films on a GaAs substrate and GaAsthin films on an AlAs substrate show different trends for the electronic band gap with increasing film thickness. In both cases, we find an insulating state at the interface and a negligible charge transfer even after relaxation. Differences in the valence and conduction band edges suggest that the energy band discontinuities depend on the growth sequence. Introduction of As vacancies near the interface induces metallicity, which opens great potential for GaAs-AlAs heterostructures in modern electronics.

  16. Strong Evidence for the Density-wave Theory of Spiral Structure in Disk Galaxies

    Pour-Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Julia; Davis, Benjamin L; Shields, Douglas W; Abdeen, Mohamed Shameer

    2016-01-01

    The density-wave theory of galactic spiral-arm structure makes a striking prediction that the pitch angle of spiral arms should vary with the wavelength of the galaxy's image. The reason is that stars are born in the density wave but move out of it as they age. They move ahead of the density wave inside the co-rotation radius, and fall behind outside of it, resulting in a tighter pitch angle at wavelengths that image stars (optical and near-infrared) than those that are associated with star formation (far-infrared and ultraviolet). In this study we combined large sample size with wide range of wavelengths, from the ultraviolet to the infrared to investigate this issue. For each galaxy we used an optical wavelength image (B-band: 445 nm) and images from the Spitzer Space Telescope at two infrared wavelengths (infrared: 3.6 and 8.0 {\\mu}m) and we measured the pitch angle with the 2DFFT and Spirality codes. We find that the B-band and 3.6 {\\mu}m images have smaller pitch angles than the infrared 8.0 {\\mu}m image...

  17. Microscopic structure of deformed and superdeformed collective bands in rotating nuclei

    We investigate in self-consistent cranked Nilsson plus quasiparticle random-phase approximation the structure of 190,192,194Hg in their evolution from normal to superdeformation and from low to high rotational frequencies. The analysis of the energy levels suggests a splitting of few normally deformed bands into two or more branches. The investigation of the dynamical moments of inertia supports the octupole character of the low-lying negative parity superdeformed bands, in agreement with previous theoretical predictions and experimental findings. As a more direct confirm of their octupole nature, we obtain strong E1 transitions linking those bands to the yrast superdeformed band, in agreement with experiments. A similar result is shown to hold also for 152Dy. Like in 152Dy, the collectivity of the low-lying scissors mode gets enhanced with the onset of superdeformation

  18. Electronic structure of transition metal dichalcogenides monolayers 1H-MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te) from ab-initio theory: new direct band gap semiconductors

    Kumar, A.; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2012-06-01

    We report first principles calculations of the electronic structure of monolayer 1H-MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te), using the pseudopotential and numerical atomic orbital basis sets based methods within the local density approximation. Electronic band structure and density of states calculations found that the states around the Fermi energy are mainly due to metal d states. From partial density of states we find a strong hybridisation between metal d and chalcogen p states below the Fermi energy. All studied compounds in this work have emerged as new direct band gap semiconductors. The electronic band gap is found to decrease as one goes from sulphides to the tellurides of both Mo and W. Reducing the slab thickness systematically from bulk to monolayers causes a blue shift in the band gap energies, resulting in tunability of the electronic band gap. The magnitudes of the blue shift in the band gap energies are found to be 1.14 eV, 1.16 eV, 0.78 eV, 0.64, 0.57 eV and 0.37 eV for MoS2, WS2, MoSe2, WSe2, MoTe2 and WTe2, respectively, as we go from bulk phase (indirect band gap) to monolayer limit (direct band gap). This tunability in the electronic band gap and transitions from indirect to direct band make these materials potential candidates for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices.

  19. Band structure and optical response of 2H-Mo X2 compounds ( X=S , Se, and Te)

    Reshak, Ali Hussain; Auluck, Sushil

    2005-04-01

    We report calculations of the electronic and optical properties for the 2H-MoX2 (X=S,Se,Te) compounds using the full potential linear augmented plane wave method within the local density approximation. When S is replaced by Se and Te, the energy gap changes and the bandwidth of the Mo-d bands reduces. From the partial density of states we find a strong hybridization between Mo-d and X-p states below the Fermi energy EF . On going from S to Se to Te the structures in the frequency-dependent imaginary part of the dielectric function ɛ2(ω) shifts towards lower energies. The frequency-dependent reflectivity and absorption show that the plasma minimum also shifts towards lower energies. We compare our calculations with the experimental optical data and find a good agreement.

  20. Covariant density functional theory: Reexamining the structure of superheavy nuclei

    Agbemava, S E; Nakatsukasa, T; Ring, P

    2015-01-01

    A systematic investigation of even-even superheavy elements in the region of proton numbers $100 \\leq Z \\leq 130$ and in the region of neutron numbers from the proton-drip line up to neutron number $N=196$ is presented. For this study we use five most up-to-date covariant energy density functionals of different types, with a non-linear meson coupling, with density dependent meson couplings, and with density-dependent zero-range interactions. Pairing correlations are treated within relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) theory based on an effective separable particle-particle interaction of finite range and deformation effects are taken into account. This allows us to assess the spread of theoretical predictions within the present covariant models for the binding energies, deformation parameters, shell structures and $\\alpha$-decay half-lives. Contrary to the previous studies in covariant density functional theory, it was found that the impact of $N=172$ spherical shell gap on the structure of superheavy elemen...

  1. Energy band structure of Cr by the Slater-Koster interpolation scheme

    The matrix elements of the Hamiltonian between nine localized wave-functions in tight-binding formalism are derived. The symmetry adapted wave-functions and the secular equations are formed by the group theory method for high symmetry points in the Brillouin zone. A set of interaction integrals is chosen on physical ground and fitted via the Slater-Koster interpolation scheme to the abinito band structure of chromium calculated by the Green function method. Then the energy band structure of chromium is interpolated and extrapolated in the Brillouin zone. (author)

  2. Numerical study of the effect of permeability on square and triangular microwave band gap structures

    We report the theoretical work on the photonic band gap structures suitable for microwave frequency region formed by magnetic materials (ε=9.87 and μ=2.17) using plane wave expansion method. The structures under analysis are two-dimensional square and triangular lattices. The calculated band gap between 10 and 20GHz region is anlaysed for the effect due to lattice spacing and the property of the material. The results are also compared with that of pure dielectric case. Obtained results indicate that both impedance and effective refractive index are responsible for the gap width and mid-gap frequency

  3. Structural and electronic properties of solid naphthalene under pressure: density functional calculations

    Xiao, Ling-Ping; Zeng, Zhi; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2016-06-01

    The pressure effect on the geometrical and electronic structures of crystalline naphthalene is calculated up to 30 GPa by performing density functional calculations. The lattice parameters a, b, and c, decrease by 1.77 Å (-20.4%), 0.85 Å (-14.1%), and 0.91 Å (-8.2%), respectively, while the monoclinic angle β increases by 3.95° in this pressure region. At the highest pressure of 30 GPa the unit cell volume decreases by 62.7%. The detailed analysis of the molecular arrangement within crystal structure reveals that the molecular motion becomes more and more localized, and hints towards the evolution of intermolecular interaction with pressure. Moreover, the electronic structure of naphthalene under high pressure is also discussed. A pressure induced decrease of the band gap is observed.

  4. Electronic structure of C and N co-doped TiO2: A combined hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory study

    We have studied the electronic structure of C and N co-doped TiO2 using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and first-principles density functional theory calculations. Our results reveal overlap of the 2p states of O, N, and C in the system which shifts the valence band maximum towards the Fermi level. Combined with optical data we show that co-doping is an effective route for band gap reduction in TiO2. Comparison of the measured valence band with theoretical photoemission density of states reveals the possibility of C on Ti and N on O site

  5. Density Functional Study of the structural properties in Tamoxifen

    de Coss-Martinez, Romeo; Tapia, Jorge A.; Quijano-Quiñones, Ramiro F.; Canto, Gabriel I.

    2013-03-01

    Using the density functional theory, we have studied the structural properties of Tamoxifen. The calculations were performed with two methodological approaches, which were implemented in SIESTA and Spartan codes. For SIESTA, we considerate a linear combination of atomic orbitals method, using pseudopotentials and the van der Waals approximation for the exchange-correlation potential. Here we analyzed and compared the atomic structure between our results and other theoretical study. We found differences in the bond lengths between the results, that could be attributed to code approaches in each one. This work was supported under Grant FOMIX 2011-09 N: 170297 of Ph.D. A. Tapia.

  6. Parity Violating Measurements of Neutron Densities and Nuclear Structure

    Horowitz, C J

    2000-01-01

    Parity violating electron nucleus scattering is a clean and powerful tool for measuring the spatial distributions of neutrons in nuclei with unprecedented accuracy. Parity violation arises from the interference of electromagnetic and weak neutral amplitudes, and the $Z^0$ of the Standard Model couples primarily to neutrons at low $Q^2$. Experiments are now feasible at existing facilities. We show that theoretical corrections are either small or well understood, which makes the interpretation clean. A neutron density measurement may have many implications for nuclear structure, atomic parity nonconservation experiments, and the structure of neutron stars.

  7. Spin orbit splitting in the valence bands of ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2−x}: Angle resolved photoemission and density functional theory

    Moustafa, Mohamed, E-mail: moustafa@physik.hu-berlin.de [Institut für Physik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Faculty of Engineering, Pharos University in Alexandria, Canal El Mahmoudia Str., Alexandria (Egypt); Ghafari, Aliakbar; Paulheim, Alexander; Janowitz, Christoph; Manzke, Recardo [Institut für Physik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► We performed high resolution ARPES on 1T–ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2−x}. ► A characteristic splitting of the chalcogen p-derived VB along high symmetry directions was observed. ► The splitting size at the A point of the BZ is found to increase from 0.06 to 0.31 eV from ZrS{sub 2} towards ZrSe{sub 2}. ► Electronic structure calculations based on the DFT were performed using the model of TB–MBJ. ► The calculations show that the splitting is due to SO coupling of the valence bands. -- Abstract: Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation has been performed on 1T–ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2−x}, where x varies from 0 to 2, in order to study the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in the valence bands. The crystals were grown by chemical vapour transport technique using Iodine as transport agent. A characteristic splitting of the chalcogen p-derived valence bands along high symmetry directions has been observed experimentally. The size of the splitting increases with the increase of the atomic number of the chalcogenide, e.g. at the A point of the Brillouin zone from 0.06 eV to 0.31 eV with an almost linear dependence with x, as progressing from ZrS{sub 2} towards ZrSe{sub 2}, respectively. Electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory have been performed using the model of Tran–Blaha [1] and the modified version of the exchange potential proposed by Becke and Johnson [2] (TB–MBJ) both with and without spin-orbit (SO) coupling. The calculations show that the splitting is mainly due to spin-orbit coupling and the degeneracy of the valance bands is lifted.

  8. Complete multipactor suppression in an X-band dielectric-loaded accelerating structure

    Jing, C.; Gold, S. H.; Fischer, Richard; Gai, W.

    2016-05-01

    Multipactor is a major issue limiting the gradient of rf-driven Dielectric-Loaded Accelerating (DLA) structures. Theoretical models have predicted that an axial magnetic field applied to DLA structures may completely block the multipactor discharge. However, previous attempts to demonstrate this magnetic field effect in an X-band traveling-wave DLA structure were inconclusive, due to the axial variation of the applied magnetic field, and showed only partial suppression of the multipactor loading [Jing et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 213503 (2013)]. The present experiment has been performed under improved conditions with a uniform axial magnetic field extending along the length of an X-band standing-wave DLA structure. Multipactor loading began to be continuously reduced starting from 3.5 kG applied magnetic field and was completely suppressed at ˜8 kG. Dependence of multipactor suppression on the rf gradient inside the DLA structure was also measured.

  9. Low interface trapped charge density in MBE in situ grown Si3N4 cubic GaN MIS structures

    In this work we report on the electrical characterization of nonpolar cubic GaN metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS) structures. Si3N4 layers were deposited in situ on top of cubic GaN grown on 3C–SiC (0 0 1) substrates. The electric characteristics of the MIS structures are determined by current–voltage measurements and by capacitance and admittance spectroscopy techniques. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) was used to investigate the composition of our samples. From the flat band voltage in the MIS capacitors and a detailed band diagram analysis, the conduction band discontinuity of Si3N4 and cubic GaN was evaluated 1.17 eV, which is slightly lower than reported for hexagonal GaN. By admittance spectroscopy interface state densities are calculated. Current–voltage characteristics were used to evaluate the influence of the substrate temperature on the insulating properties of the MIS structures. The energetic position of the interface traps was found to be about 0.3 eV below the conduction band of cubic GaN. The density of these traps is 2.5 × 1011 cm−2 eV−1. We find a conductivity minimum in the MIS structure grown at 600 °C. (paper)

  10. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    Kevin Jerome Sutherland

    2001-05-01

    Photonic band gap (PBG) crystals are periodic dielectric structures that manipulate electromagnetic radiation in a manner similar to semiconductor devices manipulating electrons. Whereas a semiconductor material exhibits an electronic band gap in which electrons cannot exist, similarly, a photonic crystal containing a photonic band gap does not allow the propagation of specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This phenomenon results from the destructive Bragg diffraction interference that a wave propagating at a specific frequency will experience because of the periodic change in dielectric permitivity. This gives rise to a variety of optical applications for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of opto-electronic devices. These applications are reviewed later. Several methods are currently used to fabricate photonic crystals, which are also discussed in detail. This research involves a layer-by-layer micro-transfer molding ({mu}TM) and stacking method to create three-dimensional FCC structures of epoxy or titania. The structures, once reduced significantly in size can be infiltrated with an organic gain media and stacked on a semiconductor to improve the efficiency of an electronically pumped light-emitting diode. Photonic band gap structures have been proven to effectively create a band gap for certain frequencies of electro-magnetic radiation in the microwave and near-infrared ranges. The objective of this research project was originally two-fold: to fabricate a three dimensional (3-D) structure of a size scaled to prohibit electromagnetic propagation within the visible wavelength range, and then to characterize that structure using laser dye emission spectra. As a master mold has not yet been developed for the micro transfer molding technique in the visible range, the research was limited to scaling down the length scale as much as possible with the current available technology and characterizing these structures with other methods.

  11. Electron-Phonon Renormalization of Electronic Band Structures of C Allotropes and BN Polymorphs

    Tutchton, Roxanne M.; Marchbanks, Christopher; Wu, Zhigang

    The effect of lattice vibration on electronic band structures has been mostly neglected in first-principles calculations because the electron-phonon (e-ph) renormalization of quasi-particle energies is often small (zero-point renormalizations of band gaps in these materials, except for graphene, are larger than 100 meV, and (2) there are large variations in e-ph renormalization of band gaps due to differences in crystal structure. This work was supported by a U.S. DOE Early Career Award (Grant No. DE-SC0006433). Computations were carried out at the Golden Energy Computing Organization at CSM and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  12. Study on temperature property of band structures in onedimensional photonic crystals

    2007-01-01

    Using transfer matrix method, the optical transmission properties in one-dimensional (1-D) photonic crystal is analyzed.When the temperature varies, not only the refractive index of the optical medium is changed because of the thermo-optical effect, but also the thickness of the optical medium is changed due to the thermal-expansion effect. Thus, the structure of 1/4 wave-plate stack in original photonic crystal is destroyed and the band structure varies. In this work, the effects of the temperature variation on the first and second band gap in a 1-D photonic crystal are analyzed in detail. It is found that the changes of the starting wavelength, the cut-off wavelength and the forbidden band width depend linearly on the temperature.

  13. Global Evolutionary Algorithms in the Design of Electromagnetic Band Gap Structures with Suppressed Surface Waves Propagation

    P. Kovacs

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the automated design and optimization of electromagnetic band gap structures suppressing the propagation of surface waves. For the optimization, we use different global evolutionary algorithms like the genetic algorithm with the single-point crossover (GAs and the multi-point (GAm one, the differential evolution (DE and particle swarm optimization (PSO. The algorithms are mutually compared in terms of convergence velocity and accuracy. The developed technique is universal (applicable for any unit cell geometry. The method is based on the dispersion diagram calculation in CST Microwave Studio (CST MWS and optimization in Matlab. A design example of a mushroom structure with simultaneous electromagnetic band gap properties (EBG and the artificial magnetic conductor ones (AMC in the required frequency band is presented.

  14. Dielectric band structure of crystals: General properties, and calculations for silicon

    We shift the dielectric band structure method, orginially proposed by Baldereschi and Tosatti for the description of microscopic electronic screening in crystals. Some general properties are examined first, including the requirements of causality and stability. The specific test case of silicon is then considered. Dielectric bands are calculated, according to several different prescriptions for the construction of the dielectric matrix. It is shown that the results allow a very direct appraisal of the screening properties of the system, as well as of the quality of the dielectric model adopted. The electronic charge displacement induced by γsub(25') and X3 phonon-like displacements of the atoms is also calculated and compared with the results of existent full self-consistent calculations. Conclusions are drawn on the relative accuracies of the dielectric band structures. (author)

  15. Mini-Dirac cones in the band structure of a copper intercalated epitaxial graphene superlattice

    Forti, S.; Stöhr, A.; Zakharov, A. A.; Coletti, C.; Emtsev, K. V.; Starke, U.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic band structure of an epitaxial graphene superlattice, generated by intercalating a monolayer of Cu atoms, is directly imaged by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The 3.2 nm lateral period of the superlattice is induced by a varying registry between the graphene honeycomb and the Cu atoms as imposed by the heteroepitaxial interface Cu/SiC. The carbon atoms experience a lateral potential across the supercell of an estimated value of about 65 meV. The potential leads to strong energy renormalization in the band structure of the graphene layer and the emergence of mini-Dirac cones. The mini-cones’ band velocity is reduced to about half of graphene's Fermi velocity. Notably, the ordering of the interfacial Cu atoms can be reversibly blocked by mild annealing. The superlattice indeed disappears at ∼220 °C.

  16. Plant lighting system with five wavelength-band light-emitting diodes providing photon flux density and mixing ratio control

    Yano Akira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant growth and development depend on the availability of light. Lighting systems therefore play crucial roles in plant studies. Recent advancements of light-emitting diode (LED technologies provide abundant opportunities to study various plant light responses. The LED merits include solidity, longevity, small element volume, radiant flux controllability, and monochromaticity. To apply these merits in plant light response studies, a lighting system must provide precisely controlled light spectra that are useful for inducing various plant responses. Results We have developed a plant lighting system that irradiated a 0.18 m2 area with a highly uniform distribution of photon flux density (PFD. The average photosynthetic PFD (PPFD in the irradiated area was 438 micro-mol m–2 s–1 (coefficient of variation 9.6%, which is appropriate for growing leafy vegetables. The irradiated light includes violet, blue, orange-red, red, and far-red wavelength bands created by LEDs of five types. The PFD and mixing ratio of the five wavelength-band lights are controllable using a computer and drive circuits. The phototropic response of oat coleoptiles was investigated to evaluate plant sensitivity to the light control quality of the lighting system. Oat coleoptiles irradiated for 23 h with a uniformly distributed spectral PFD (SPFD of 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 at every peak wavelength (405, 460, 630, 660, and 735 nm grew almost straight upwards. When they were irradiated with an SPFD gradient of blue light (460 nm peak wavelength, the coleoptiles showed a phototropic curvature in the direction of the greater SPFD of blue light. The greater SPFD gradient induced the greater curvature of coleoptiles. The relation between the phototropic curvature (deg and the blue-light SPFD gradient (micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1 was 2 deg per 1 micro-mol m–2 s–1 nm–1 m–1. Conclusions The plant lighting system, with a computer with a

  17. Electronic structure of ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2-x} by density functional theory

    Ghafari, Ailakbar; Moustafa, Mohamed; Janowitz, Christoph; Dwelk, Helmut; Manzke, Recardo [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Bouchani, Arash [Physics Department, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah Branch (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    The electronic properties of the ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2-x} (x varies between zero and two) semiconductors have been calculated by density functional theory (using the Wien2K code) employing the full potential Hamiltonian within the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) method. The results obtained for the end members of the series, i.e. ZrS{sub 2} and ZrSe{sub 2} reveal that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum are located at {gamma} and between {gamma} and K respectively which is in agreement with our photoemission experimental data. Trends in the electronic structure for the whole substitution series are discussed.

  18. Investigation on cored-eutectic structure in Ni60/WC composite coatings fabricated by wide-band laser cladding

    Ma, Qunshuang, E-mail: maqunshuang@126.com; Li, Yajiang, E-mail: yajli@sdu.edu.cn; Wang, Juan, E-mail: jwang@sdu.edu.cn; Liu, Kun, E-mail: liu_kun@163.com

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Perfect composite coatings were fabricated using wide-band laser cladding. • Special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized in Ni60/WC composite coatings. • Cored-eutectic consists of hard carbide compounds and fine lamellar eutectic of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe). • Wear resistance of coating layer was significantly improved due to precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. - Abstract: Ni60 composite coatings reinforced with WC particles were fabricated on the surface of Q550 steel using LDF4000-100 fiber laser device. The wide-band laser and circular beam laser used in laser cladding were obtained by optical lens. Microstructure, elemental distribution, phase constitution and wear properties of different composite coatings were investigated. The results showed that WC particles were partly dissolved under the effect of wide-band fiber laser irradiation. A special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized due to dissolution of WC particles. According to EDS and XRD results, the inside cores were confirmed as carbides of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} enriched in Cr, W and Fe. These complex carbides were primarily separated out in the molten metal when solidification started. Eutectic structure composed of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides and γ-Ni(Fe) grew around carbides when cooling. Element content of Cr and W is lower at the bottom of cladding layer. In consequence, the eutectic structure formed in this region did not have inside carbides. The coatings made by circular laser beam were composed of dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic carbides, lacking of block carbides. Compared to coatings made by circular laser spot, the cored-eutectic structure formed in wide-band coatings had advantages of well-distribution and tight binding with matrix. The uniform power density and energy distribution and the weak liquid convection in molten pool lead to the unique microstructure evolution in composite coatings made by wide-band laser

  19. Investigation on cored-eutectic structure in Ni60/WC composite coatings fabricated by wide-band laser cladding

    Highlights: • Perfect composite coatings were fabricated using wide-band laser cladding. • Special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized in Ni60/WC composite coatings. • Cored-eutectic consists of hard carbide compounds and fine lamellar eutectic of M23C6 carbides and γ-Ni(Fe). • Wear resistance of coating layer was significantly improved due to precipitation of M23C6 carbides. - Abstract: Ni60 composite coatings reinforced with WC particles were fabricated on the surface of Q550 steel using LDF4000-100 fiber laser device. The wide-band laser and circular beam laser used in laser cladding were obtained by optical lens. Microstructure, elemental distribution, phase constitution and wear properties of different composite coatings were investigated. The results showed that WC particles were partly dissolved under the effect of wide-band fiber laser irradiation. A special cored-eutectic structure was synthesized due to dissolution of WC particles. According to EDS and XRD results, the inside cores were confirmed as carbides of M23C6 enriched in Cr, W and Fe. These complex carbides were primarily separated out in the molten metal when solidification started. Eutectic structure composed of M23C6 carbides and γ-Ni(Fe) grew around carbides when cooling. Element content of Cr and W is lower at the bottom of cladding layer. In consequence, the eutectic structure formed in this region did not have inside carbides. The coatings made by circular laser beam were composed of dendritic matrix and interdendritic eutectic carbides, lacking of block carbides. Compared to coatings made by circular laser spot, the cored-eutectic structure formed in wide-band coatings had advantages of well-distribution and tight binding with matrix. The uniform power density and energy distribution and the weak liquid convection in molten pool lead to the unique microstructure evolution in composite coatings made by wide-band laser. Experiment results indicated the wear resistance and

  20. Structure and Evolution of Convection Band Occurred over the Korean Peninsula

    Kim, W.; Lee, T.

    2011-12-01

    A significant portion of the annual precipitation on the Korean peninsula is produced by heavy precipitation systems (HPSs) during summer. HPSs over the Korean peninsula could be classified into four major types (convection bands, cloud clusters, isolated thunderstorms, and squall lines) by phenomenological analysis. Among four major types of HPSs, convection bands (CBs) tend to concentrate a large amount of rainfall over limited area due to their quasi-stationary behavior for several hours. Convective cells embedded in CB move along the band and new cells are continuously formed in the upstream of the band. In this study, the structure and evolution of CB have been investigated using NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Thirty CB cases occurred during 2000-2010 were selected to conduct composite analysis. We obtained several profiles which represent northern area (NA), southern area (SA), and upstream area (UA) of CB by composite analysis. Modest band-perpendicular wind component (5 m s-1) is found in the level of 925-1000 hPa in SA, while band-perpendicular wind component of NA is nearly zero. Additionally, equivalent potential temperature in the lower-troposphere of SA is about 10 K larger than that of NA. Low-level band-perpendicular wind component of SA seems to play an important role in the development of CB by providing the environment for large-scale convergence and transporting warm and moist air from southern area of CB. Band-parallel wind component is predominant in the middle- and lower-troposphere. On the basis of the results of composite analysis, ideal simulation for the evolution of CB was set up. The analysis for the evolution of CB is in progress.

  1. A Review of Electronic Band Structure of Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes Using Tight Binding

    Davood Fathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The electronic band structure variations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs using Huckle/tight binding approximation theory are studied. According to the chirality indices, the related expressions for energy dispersion variations of these elements are derived and plotted for zigzag and chiral nanotubes.

  2. NiO: correlated band structure of a charge-transfer insulator

    Kuneš, Jan; Anisimov, V.I.; Skornyakov, S.L.; Lukoyanov, A.V.; Vollhardt, D.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 15 (2007), 156404/1-156404/4. ISSN 0031-9007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : band structure * dynamical mean field * charge transfer insulators Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 6.944, year: 2007

  3. Photonic Band Structure of Dispersive Metamaterials Formulated as a Hermitian Eigenvalue Problem

    Raman, Aaswath

    2010-02-26

    We formulate the photonic band structure calculation of any lossless dispersive photonic crystal and optical metamaterial as a Hermitian eigenvalue problem. We further show that the eigenmodes of such lossless systems provide an orthonormal basis, which can be used to rigorously describe the behavior of lossy dispersive systems in general. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  4. Band structure of ZrS{sub x}Se{sub 2-x} by ARPES

    Moustafa, Mohamed; Paulheim, Alexander; Janowitz, Christoph; Manzke, Recardo [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The valence band structure of mixed samples of ZrS{sub x} Se{sub 2-x} single crystals, where x varies from 0 to 2, has been studied by means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) using synchrotron radiation. The crystals were found to be extrinsic n-type semiconductors with indirect bandgap. The composition dependence of the band structure is presented and discussed. A characteristic splitting of the chalcogen p-derived valence bands at the symmetric point A is observed. The size of the splitting shows to increases almost linearly as progressing from ZrS{sub 2} to ZrSe{sub 2} reaching 320 meV. Further, the energy gap values are estimated from the valence band maximum to the observed emission close to the conduction band minimum. The gaps are found to vary from 1.78 eV to 1.16 eV for ZrS{sub 2} to ZrSe{sub 2}, respectively, and are compared to our previously reported optical values.

  5. Design of UWB Monopole Antenna with Dual Notched Bands Using One Modified Electromagnetic-Bandgap Structure

    Hao Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified electromagnetic-bandgap (M-EBG structure and its application to planar monopole ultra-wideband (UWB antenna are presented. The proposed M-EBG which comprises two strip patch and an edge-located via can perform dual notched bands. By properly designing and placing strip patch near the feedline, the proposed M-EBG not only possesses a simple structure and compact size but also exhibits good band rejection. Moreover, it is easy to tune the dual notched bands by altering the dimensions of the M-EBG. A demonstration antenna with dual band-notched characteristics is designed and fabricated to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed antenna can satisfy the requirements of VSWR < 2 over UWB 3.1–10.6 GHz, except for the rejected bands of the world interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX and the wireless local area network (WLAN at 3.5 GHz and 5.5 GHz, respectively.

  6. Valley-dependent band structure and valley polarization in periodically modulated graphene

    Lu, Wei-Tao

    2016-08-01

    The valley-dependent energy band and transport property of graphene under a periodic magnetic-strained field are studied, where the time-reversal symmetry is broken and the valley degeneracy is lifted. The considered superlattice is composed of two different barriers, providing more degrees of freedom for engineering the electronic structure. The electrons near the K and K' valleys are dominated by different effective superlattices. It is found that the energy bands for both valleys are symmetric with respect to ky=-(AM+ξ AS) /4 under the symmetric superlattices. More finite-energy Dirac points, more prominent collimation behavior, and new crossing points are found for K' valley. The degenerate miniband near the K valley splits into two subminibands and produces a new band gap under the asymmetric superlattices. The velocity for the K' valley is greatly renormalized compared with the K valley, and so we can achieve a finite velocity for the K valley while the velocity for the K' valley is zero. Especially, the miniband and band gap could be manipulated independently, leading to an increase of the conductance. The characteristics of the band structure are reflected in the transmission spectra. The Dirac points and the crossing points appear as pronounced peaks in transmission. A remarkable valley polarization is obtained which is robust to the disorder and can be controlled by the strain, the period, and the voltage.

  7. Observation of dark-current signals from the S-band structures of the SLAC linac

    It is well known that the electro-magnetic fields in high-gradient RF structures can cause electron emission from the metallic structure walls. If the emitted electrons are captured and accelerated by the accelerating fields so-called dark-current is induced. Dark-currents have been measured and studied for various RF-structures. In this paper the authors present measurements of RF induced signals for the SLC S-band structures. For nominal gradients of 17 MV/m it is shown that the dark-current can be strong enough to significantly reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the SLC beam wire scanners. They also show results from RF measurements in the dipole band. The measurements are compared to more direct observations of dark-current and it is tried to connect the results to possible effects on the accelerated particle beam

  8. Ferromagnetism and the electronic band structure in (Ga,Mn)(Bi,As) epitaxial layers

    Impact of Bi incorporation into (Ga,Mn)As layers on their electronic- and band-structures as well as their magnetic and structural properties has been studied. Homogenous (Ga,Mn)(Bi,As) layers of high structural perfection have been grown by the low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy technique. Post-growth annealing treatment of the layers results in an improvement of their structural and magnetic properties and an increase in the hole concentration in the layers. The modulation photoreflectance spectroscopy results are consistent with the valence-band model of hole-mediated ferromagnetism in the layers. This material combines the properties of (Ga,Mn)As and Ga(Bi,As) ternary compounds and offers the possibility of tuning its electrical and magnetic properties by controlling the alloy composition.

  9. Dyadic Green's function study of band structures of dispersive photonic crystals

    We present here in terms of a dyadic Green's function (DGF) a general description of optical phenomena in photonic crystal (PC) structures, described particularly by frequency-dependent components, assuming that PC structures are decomposed into their relatively simple constituent parts via conductivity tensors. We demonstrate this approach by explicitly calculating the DGFs for electromagnetic waves propagating in the one- and two-dimensional dispersive PCs consisting of a periodic array of identical metallic quantum wells and a periodic square array of identical metallic quantum wires, each embedded in a three-dimensional dispersive medium. By means of the explicit analytic dispersion relations, which result from the frequency poles of the corresponding DGFs, we also calculate the band structures of these dispersive PCs by simple numerical means. Our analysis shows that the band structures calculated from our DGF approach conform well with those calculated from the traditional computational methods.

  10. Wide-band underwater acoustic absorption based on locally resonant unit and interpenetrating network structure

    The interpenetrating network structure provides an interesting avenue to novel materials. Locally resonant phononic crystal (LRPC) exhibits excellent sound attenuation performance based on the periodical arrangement of sound wave scatters. Combining the LRPC concept and interpenetrating network glassy structure, this paper has developed a new material which can achieve a wide band underwater strong acoustic absorption. Underwater absorption coefficients of different samples were measured by the pulse tube. Measurement results show that the new material possesses excellent underwater acoustic effects in a wide frequency range. Moreover, in order to investigate impacts of locally resonant units, some defects are introduced into the sample. The experimental result and the theoretical calculation both show that locally resonant units being connected to a network structure play an important role in achieving a wide band strong acoustic absorption. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  11. Band structure effects in nitrogen K-edge resonant inelastic X ray scattering from GaN

    Strocov, V. N.; Schmitt, T.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Blaha, P; Paskova, T.; Nilsson, P. O.

    2004-01-01

    Systematic experimental data on resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) in GaN near the N K-edge are presented for the first time. Excitation energy dependence of the spectral structures manifests the band structure effects originating from momentum selectivity of the RIXS process. This finding allows obtaining k-resolved band structure information for GaN crystals and nanostructures.

  12. Sharp magnetic structures from dynamos with density stratification

    Jabbari, Sarah; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) of large-scale turbulent dynamos in strongly stratified layers have resulted in surprisingly sharp bipolar structures at the surface. Here we present new DNS of helically and non-helically forced turbulence with and without rotation and compare with corresponding mean-field simulations (MFS) to show that these structures are a generic outcome of a broader class of dynamos in density-stratified layers. The MFS agree qualitatively with the DNS, but the period of oscillations tends to be longer in the DNS. In both DNS and MFS, the sharp structures are produced by converging flows at the surface and are driven by the Lorentz force associated with the large-scale dynamo-driven magnetic field if the dynamo number is at least 5 times supercritical.

  13. Band Structure and Terahertz Optical Conductivity of Transition Metal Oxides: Theory and Application to CaRuO(3).

    Dang, Hung T; Mravlje, Jernej; Georges, Antoine; Millis, Andrew J

    2015-09-01

    Density functional plus dynamical mean field calculations are used to show that in transition metal oxides, rotational and tilting (GdFeO(3)-type) distortions of the ideal cubic perovskite structure produce a multiplicity of low-energy optical transitions which affect the conductivity down to frequencies of the order of 1 or 2 mV (terahertz regime), mimicking non-Fermi-liquid effects even in systems with a strictly Fermi-liquid self-energy. For CaRuO(3), a material whose measured electromagnetic response in the terahertz frequency regime has been interpreted as evidence for non-Fermi-liquid physics, the combination of these band structure effects and a renormalized Fermi-liquid self-energy accounts for the low frequency optical response which had previously been regarded as a signature of exotic physics. Signatures of deviations from Fermi-liquid behavior at higher frequencies (∼100  meV) are discussed. PMID:26382698

  14. RF breakdown studies on an S-band disk-loaded structure

    RF breakdown test in an S-band traveling wave accelerating structure were studied by use of a resonant ring. The accelerating structure with a surface roughness of 300 nm was used without any special treatment after the fabrication. The maximum field gradient on the beam axis was 104.5 MV/m with a peak field-emission current of 24 mA. This current level, however, was decreasing by the RF processing. (author)

  15. Density functional study of optical properties of beryllium chalcogenides compounds in nickel arsenide B8 structure

    The structural, electronic and optical properties of beryllium chalcogenides BeS, BeSe and BeTe using the full-potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method are investigated. The exchange-correlation energy within the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) are described. The Engel-Vosko (EVGGA) formalism is applied for electronic and optical properties. The structural parameters of our model and the transition pressure from zinc-blende (B3) to the NiAs (B8) phase are confirmed. It is found that these compounds have indirect band gaps except for BeTe in NiAs (B8) phase. The results of reflectivity, refractive index and optical dielectric functions of Be compounds are investigated. An agreement is found between our results and those of other theoretical calculations and the experimental data.

  16. Electromagnetic wave band structure due to surface plasmon resonances in a complex plasma

    Vladimirov, S. V.; Ishihara, O.

    2016-07-01

    The dielectric properties of complex plasma containing either metal or dielectric spherical inclusions (macroparticles, dust) are investigated. We focus on surface plasmon resonances on the macroparticle surfaces and their effect on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is demonstrated that the presence of surface plasmon oscillations can significantly modify plasma electromagnetic properties by resonances and cutoffs in the effective permittivity. This leads to related branches of electromagnetic waves and to the wave band gaps. The conditions necessary to observe the band-gap structure in laboratory dusty plasma and/or space (cosmic) dusty plasmas are discussed.

  17. Investigation of band structure of {sup 103,105}Rh using microscopic computational technique

    Kumar, Amit, E-mail: akbcw2@gmail.com [Research Scholar, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu-180006 (India); Singh, Suram, E-mail: suramsingh@gmail.com [Assistant Professor, Department of Physics Govt. Degree College, Kathua-184142 (India); Bharti, Arun, E-mail: arunbharti-2003@yahoo.co.in [Professor, Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu-180006 (India)

    2015-08-28

    The high-spin structure in {sup 61}Cu nucleus is studied in terms of effective two body interaction. In order to take into account the deformed BCS basis, the basis states are expanded in terms of the core eigenfunctions. Yrast band with some other bands havew been obtained and back-bending in moment of inertia has also been calculated and compared with the available experimental data for {sup 61}Cu nucleus. On comparing the available experimental as well as other theoretical data, it is found that the treatment with PSM provides a satisfactory explanation of the available data.

  18. Dual Band and Beam-Steering Antennas Using Reconfigurable Feed on Sierpinski Structure

    Seonghun Kang; Chang Won Jung

    2015-01-01

    Fractal patch antennas based on the Sierpinski structure are studied in this paper. The antennas operate at dual bands (around 2 and 5 GHz) and are designed to steer the beam directions at around 5 GHz band (the first harmonic). The antennas use reconfigurable triple feeds on the same antenna plane to have three beam directions. The same scale factor defines the geometrical self-similarity of the Sierpinski fractal. The proposed antennas are fabricated through three iterations from 1st order ...

  19. Electromagnetic wave band structure due to surface plasmon resonances in a complex plasma.

    Vladimirov, S V; Ishihara, O

    2016-07-01

    The dielectric properties of complex plasma containing either metal or dielectric spherical inclusions (macroparticles, dust) are investigated. We focus on surface plasmon resonances on the macroparticle surfaces and their effect on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is demonstrated that the presence of surface plasmon oscillations can significantly modify plasma electromagnetic properties by resonances and cutoffs in the effective permittivity. This leads to related branches of electromagnetic waves and to the wave band gaps. The conditions necessary to observe the band-gap structure in laboratory dusty plasma and/or space (cosmic) dusty plasmas are discussed. PMID:27575225

  20. Investigation of band structure of 103,105Rh using microscopic computational technique

    The high-spin structure in 61Cu nucleus is studied in terms of effective two body interaction. In order to take into account the deformed BCS basis, the basis states are expanded in terms of the core eigenfunctions. Yrast band with some other bands havew been obtained and back-bending in moment of inertia has also been calculated and compared with the available experimental data for 61Cu nucleus. On comparing the available experimental as well as other theoretical data, it is found that the treatment with PSM provides a satisfactory explanation of the available data

  1. Relationship between thermoelectric power and electron density of states in valence band measured with XPS for Fe-Cr binary alloys and Fe-Cr-Ni ternary alloys

    In order to clarify the mechanism behind the change in thermoelectric power (TEP) of Fe-Cr binary alloys and Fe-Cr-Ni ternary alloys due to Cr concentration, using these alloys with various Cr concentrations, dependence of TEP on Cr concentration was investigated. According to the Mott-Jones theory, TEP is largely related to electron density of states at the Fermi level. The electron density of states for the alloys in valence band was measured with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and theoretically calculated TEP from the XPS spectrum was compared with experimentally measured TEP. Electron density of states in valence band of the both alloys changed due to Cr concentration, and the theoretically calculated TEP from XPS spectrum and the experimentally measured TEP similarly changed with Cr concentration. We think that the change in TEP with Cr concentration is due to the change in electron density of states with Cr concentration. (author)

  2. Metal-induced gap states in ferroelectric capacitors and its relationship with complex band structures

    Junquera, Javier; Aguado-Puente, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    At metal-isulator interfaces, the metallic wave functions with an energy eigenvalue within the band gap decay exponentially inside the dielectric (metal-induced gap states, MIGS). These MIGS can be actually regarded as Bloch functions with an associated complex wave vector. Usually only real values of the wave vectors are discussed in text books, since infinite periodicity is assumed and, in that situation, wave functions growing exponentially in any direction would not be physically valid. However, localized wave functions with an exponential decay are indeed perfectly valid solution of the Schrodinger equation in the presence of defects, surfaces or interfaces. For this reason, properties of MIGS have been typically discussed in terms of the complex band structure of bulk materials. The probable dependence on the interface particulars has been rarely taken into account explicitly due to the difficulties to include them into the model or simulations. We aim to characterize from first-principles simulations the MIGS in realistic ferroelectric capacitors and their connection with the complex band structure of the ferroelectric material. We emphasize the influence of the real interface beyond the complex band structure of bulk materials. Financial support provided by MICINN Grant FIS2009-12721-C04-02, and by the European Union Grant No. CP-FP 228989-2 ``OxIDes''. Computer resources provided by the RES.

  3. Structural characteristic correlated to the electronic band gap in Mo S2

    Chu, Shengqi; Park, Changyong; Shen, Guoyin

    2016-07-01

    The structural evolution with pressure in bulk Mo S2 has been investigated by high-pressure x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. We found that the out-of-plane S-Mo-S bond angle θ increases and that in in-plane angle ϕ decreases linearly with increasing pressure across the known semiconducting-to-metal phase transition, whereas the Mo-S bond length and the S-Mo-S trilayer thickness display only little change. Extrapolating the experimental result along the in-plane lattice parameter with pressure, both S-Mo-S bond angles trend to those found in monolayer Mo S2 , which manifests as a structural characteristic closely correlating the electronic band gap of Mo S2 to its physical forms and phases, e.g., monolayer as direct band gap semiconductor, multilayer or bulk as indirect band gap semiconductor, and high-pressure (>19 GPa ) bulk form as metal. Combined with the effects of bond strength and van der Waals interlayer interactions, the structural correlations between the characteristic bond angle and electronic band gaps are readily extendible to other transition metal dichalcogenide systems (M X2 , where M =Mo , W and X =S , Se, Te).

  4. High energy density capacitors using nano-structure multilayer technology

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1992-08-01

    Today, many pulse power and industrial applications are limited by capacitor performance. While incremental improvements are anticipated from existing capacitor technologies, significant advances are needed in energy density to enable these applications for both the military and for American economic competitiveness. We propose a program to research and develop a novel technology for making high voltage, high energy density capacitors. Nano-structure multilayer technologies developed at LLNL may well provide a breakthrough in capacitor performance. Our controlled sputtering techniques are capable of laying down extraordinarily smooth sub-micron layers of dielectric and conductor materials. With this technology, high voltage capacitors with an order of magnitude improvement in energy density may be achievable. Well-understood dielectrics and new materials will be investigated for use with this technology. Capacitors developed by nano-structure multilayer technology are inherently solid state, exhibiting extraordinary mechanical and thermal properties. The conceptual design of a Notepad capacitor is discussed to illustrate capacitor and capacitor bank design and performance with this technology. We propose a two phase R&D program to address DNA`s capacitor needs for electro-thermal propulsion and similar pulse power programs. Phase 1 will prove the concept and further our understanding of dielectric materials and design tradeoffs with multilayers. Nano-structure multilayer capacitors will be developed and characterized. As our materials research and modeling prove successful, technology insertion in our capacitor designs will improve the possibility for dramatic performance improvements. In Phase 2, we will make Notepad capacitors, construct a capacitor bank and demonstrate its performance in a meaningful pulse power application. We will work with industrial partners to design full scale manufacturing and move this technology to industry for volume production.

  5. Anisotropic mass density by radially periodic fluid structures.

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2010-10-22

    This Letter reports physical realization of acoustic metamaterials with anisotropic mass density. These metamaterials consist of a superlattice of two fluidlike components radially periodic. Several structures are spectroscopically characterized at large wavelengths (homogenization limit) by studying the acoustic resonances existing in the circular cavity where they are embedded. This characterization method allows us to extract the diagonal components of the sound speed tensor. Analytical expressions describing the anisotropic behavior as a function of the corrugation parameter are also developed and their predictions are in agreement with measurements. PMID:21231048

  6. Quasiparticle excitations in valence-fluctuation materials: effects of band structure and crystal fields

    Evidence is now quite strong that the elementary hybridization model is the correct way to understand the lattice-coherent Fermi liquid regime at very low temperatures. Many-body theory leads to significant renormalizations of the input parameters, and many of the band-theoretic channels for hybridization are suppressed by the combined effects of Hund's-rule coupling, crystal-field splitting, and the f-f Coulomb repulsion U. Some exploratory calculations based on this picture are described, and some inferences are drawn about the band structures of several heavy-fermion materials. These inferences can and should be tested by suitably modified band-theoretic calculations. We find evidence for a significant Baber-scattering contribution in the very-low-temperature resistivity. A new mechanism is proposed for crossover from the coherent Fermi-liquid regime to the incoherent dense-Kondo regime. 28 refs

  7. Band structures of carbon nanotube with spin-orbit coupling interaction

    Liu Hong, E-mail: liuhong3@njnu.edu.c [Physics Department, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2011-01-01

    We explore the band structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with two types of spin-orbit couplings. The obtained results indicate that weak Rashba spin-orbit coupling interaction can lead to the breaking of four-fold degeneracy in all tubes even though without the intrinsic SO coupling. The asymmetric splitting between conduction bands and valence bands is caused by both SO couplings at the same time. When the ratio of Rashba spin-orbit coupling to the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling is larger than 3, metallic zigzag nanotube is always metallic conductor, on the contrary it becomes semiconducting properties. However, only when this ratio is equal to about 3 or the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling is much weak, the metallic armchair nanotube still holds the metallic behavior in transport.

  8. Effect of Symmetry Breaking on Electronic Band Structure: Gap Opening at the High Symmetry Points

    Guillaume Vasseur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Some characteristic features of band structures, like the band degeneracy at high symmetry points or the existence of energy gaps, usually reflect the symmetry of the crystal or, more precisely, the symmetry of the wave vector group at the relevant points of the Brillouin zone. In this paper, we will illustrate this property by considering two-dimensional (2D-hexagonal lattices characterized by a possible two-fold degenerate band at the K points with a linear dispersion (Dirac points. By combining scanning tunneling spectroscopy and angle-resolved photoemission, we study the electronic properties of a similar system: the Ag/Cu(111 interface reconstruction characterized by a hexagonal superlattice, and we show that the gap opening at the K points of the Brillouin zone of the reconstructed cell is due to the symmetry breaking of the wave vector group.

  9. Transport and band structure studies of crystalline ZnRh2O4

    Mansourian-Hadavi, Negar; Wansom, Supaporn; Perry, Nicola H.; Nagaraja, Arpun R.; Mason, Thomas O.; Ye, Lin-hui; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2010-02-17

    We report the synthesis and characterization of non-d{sup 10} p-type transparent conducting oxides of the normal spinel ZnRh{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Undoped ZnRh{sub 2}O{sub 4} was successfully prepared by means of bulk solid-state synthesis. The conduction mechanism and bulk defect chemistry of polycrystalline sintered pellets of ZnRh{sub 2}O{sub 4} were studied through electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements, in defect equilibrium at elevated temperature under controlled atmospheres. Optical diffuse reflectance measurements were also carried out to evaluate band gap. The data were analyzed in terms of an activated mobility (small polaron conduction), with a hopping energy of 0.25 eV. Results from band structure calculations by LDA+U and optical band-gap measurement by UV-visible spectrometry are in good agreement with literature data.

  10. The structure of an active acoustic metamaterial with tunable effective density

    Baz, A [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)], E-mail: baz@umd.edu

    2009-12-15

    A new class of one-dimensional active acoustic metamaterials (AAMMs) with programmable effective densities is presented. The proposed AAMM is capable of producing densities that are orders of magnitudes lower or higher than the ambient fluid. Such characteristics are achieved by using an array of fluid cavities separated by piezoelectric diaphragms that are controlled to generate constant densities over wide frequency bands. The piezodiaphragms are augmented with passive electrical components to broaden the operating frequency bandwidth and enable densities higher than the fluid medium to be generated. The use of these components is shown to be essential to maintain the closed-loop compliance of the piezodiaphragm away from the zone of elastic instabilities. The values of the passive components are selected on a rational basis in order to ensure a balance between the frequency bandwidth and control voltage. With this unique structure of the AAMM, physically realizable acoustic cloaks can be implemented and objects treated with these active metamaterials can become acoustically invisible.

  11. The structure of an active acoustic metamaterial with tunable effective density

    A new class of one-dimensional active acoustic metamaterials (AAMMs) with programmable effective densities is presented. The proposed AAMM is capable of producing densities that are orders of magnitudes lower or higher than the ambient fluid. Such characteristics are achieved by using an array of fluid cavities separated by piezoelectric diaphragms that are controlled to generate constant densities over wide frequency bands. The piezodiaphragms are augmented with passive electrical components to broaden the operating frequency bandwidth and enable densities higher than the fluid medium to be generated. The use of these components is shown to be essential to maintain the closed-loop compliance of the piezodiaphragm away from the zone of elastic instabilities. The values of the passive components are selected on a rational basis in order to ensure a balance between the frequency bandwidth and control voltage. With this unique structure of the AAMM, physically realizable acoustic cloaks can be implemented and objects treated with these active metamaterials can become acoustically invisible.

  12. Robust topology optimization of three-dimensional photonic-crystal band-gap structures

    Men, Han; Freund, Robert M; Peraire, Jaime; Johnson, Steven G

    2014-01-01

    We perform full 3D topology optimization (in which "every voxel" of the unit cell is a degree of freedom) of photonic-crystal structures in order to find optimal omnidirectional band gaps for various symmetry groups, including fcc (including diamond), bcc, and simple-cubic lattices. Even without imposing the constraints of any fabrication process, the resulting optimal gaps are only slightly larger than previous hand designs, suggesting that current photonic crystals are nearly optimal in this respect. However, optimization can discover new structures, e.g. a new fcc structure with the same symmetry but slightly larger gap than the well known inverse opal, which may offer new degrees of freedom to future fabrication technologies. Furthermore, our band-gap optimization is an illustration of a computational approach to 3D dispersion engineering which is applicable to many other problems in optics, based on a novel semidefinite-program formulation for nonconvex eigenvalue optimization combined with other techniq...

  13. Giant magnetoresistance and band structure of topological semimetal RhSb3

    Wang, Kefeng; Wang, Limin; Nakajima, Y.; Wang, Renxiong; Yong, Jie; Paglione, J.

    2015-03-01

    Recently materials with skutterudite structure such as CoSb3 were predicted to provide a promising platform for the realization of new topological materials such as topological insulators and Dirac-Weyl semimetals. Here we report a detailed study of the electronic structure and magnetotransport properties of high quality RhSb3 single crystals. First-principles electronic structure calculations reveal a highly dispersive band with Sb-p and Rh-3d weight that shows apparent band inversion. Inclusion of spin-orbit coupling leaves the Fermi level pinned to a doublet, indicating a topological semimetal. Our synthesized high-quality single crystals show typical metallic behavior but with very small residual resistivity ratio, a sign of semimetal behavior, in zero field. We will present magnetotrasport data that exhibits a very large magnetoresistance that hints of a very sensitive evolution of electronic properties and Dirac-like spectrum.

  14. Bloch mode synthesis: Ultrafast methodology for elastic band-structure calculations

    Krattiger, Dimitri; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2014-12-01

    We present a methodology for fast band-structure calculations that is generally applicable to problems of elastic wave propagation in periodic media. The methodology, called Bloch mode synthesis, represents an extension of component mode synthesis, a set of substructuring techniques originally developed for structural dynamics analysis. In Bloch mode synthesis, the unit cell is divided into interior and boundary degrees-of-freedom, which are described, respectively, by a set of normal modes and a set of constraint modes. A combination of these mode sets then forms a reduced basis for the band structure eigenvalue problem. The reduction is demonstrated on a phononic-crystal model and a locally resonant elastic-metamaterial model and is shown to accurately predict the frequencies and Bloch mode shapes with a dramatic decrease in computation time in excess of two orders of magnitude.

  15. Experimental Studies Of W-band Accelerator Structures At High Field

    Hill, M E

    2001-01-01

    A high-gradient electron accelerator is desired for high- energy physics research, where frequency scalings of breakdown and trapping of itinerant beamline particles dictates operation of the accelerator at short wavelengths. The first results of design and test of a high-gradient mm-wave linac with an operating frequency at 91.392 GHz (W-band) are presented. A novel approach to particle acceleration is presented employing a planar, dielectric lined waveguide used for particle acceleration. The traveling wave fields in the planar dielectric accelerator (PDA) are analyzed for an idealized structure, along with a circuit equivalent model used for understanding the structure as a microwave circuit. Along with the W-band accelerator structures, other components designed and tested are high power rf windows, high power attenuators, and a high power squeeze-type phase shifter. The design of the accelerator and its components where eased with the aide of numerical simulations using a finite-difference electromagneti...

  16. Omnidirectional photonic band gap enlarged by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure

    In this paper, an omnidirectional photonic band gap realized by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure, which is composed of homogeneous unmagnetized plasma and two kinds of isotropic dielectric, is theoretically studied by the transfer matrix method. It has been shown that such an omnidirectional photonic band gap originates from Bragg gap in contrast to zero-n gap or single negative (negative permittivity or negative permeability) gap, and it is insensitive to the incidence angle and the polarization of electromagnetic wave. From the numerical results, the frequency range and central frequency of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be tuned by the thickness and density of the plasma but cease to change with increasing Fibonacci order. The bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be notably enlarged. Moreover, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap. It is shown that such new structure Fibonacci quasiperiodic one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals have a superior feature in the enhancement of frequency range of omnidirectional photonic band gap compared with the conventional ternary and conventional Fibonacci quasiperiodic ternary plasma photonic crystals.

  17. Omnidirectional photonic band gap enlarged by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure

    Zhang Haifeng [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China); Liu Shaobin [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves of Southeast University, Nanjing Jiangsu 210096 (China); Kong Xiangkun; Bian Borui; Dai Yi [College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2012-11-15

    In this paper, an omnidirectional photonic band gap realized by one-dimensional ternary unmagnetized plasma photonic crystals based on a new Fibonacci quasiperiodic structure, which is composed of homogeneous unmagnetized plasma and two kinds of isotropic dielectric, is theoretically studied by the transfer matrix method. It has been shown that such an omnidirectional photonic band gap originates from Bragg gap in contrast to zero-n gap or single negative (negative permittivity or negative permeability) gap, and it is insensitive to the incidence angle and the polarization of electromagnetic wave. From the numerical results, the frequency range and central frequency of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be tuned by the thickness and density of the plasma but cease to change with increasing Fibonacci order. The bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap can be notably enlarged. Moreover, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the bandwidth of omnidirectional photonic band gap. It is shown that such new structure Fibonacci quasiperiodic one-dimensional ternary plasma photonic crystals have a superior feature in the enhancement of frequency range of omnidirectional photonic band gap compared with the conventional ternary and conventional Fibonacci quasiperiodic ternary plasma photonic crystals.

  18. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    Kramar, Maxim; Lin, Haosheng

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131) to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D) coronal electron density in the range of heights from $1.5$ to $4\\ \\mathrm{R}_\\odot$ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 \\AA \\ band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below $\\sim 2.5 \\ \\mathrm{R}_\\odot$. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the a...

  19. Multi-instrument observations of the electric and magnetic field structure of omega bands

    J. A. Wild

    Full Text Available High time resolution data from the CUTLASS Finland radar during the interval 01:30-03:30 UT on 11 May, 1998, are employed to characterise the ionospheric electric field due to a series of omega bands extending ~5° in latitude at a resolution of 45 km in the meridional direction and 50 km in the azimuthal direction. E-region observations from the STARE Norway VHF radar operating at a resolution of 15 km over a comparable region are also incorporated. These data are combined with ground magnetometer observations from several stations. This allows the study of the ionospheric equivalent current signatures and height integrated ionospheric conductances associated with omega bands as they propagate through the field-of-view of the CUTLASS and STARE radars. The high-time resolution and multi-point nature of the observations leads to a refinement of the previous models of omega band structure. The omega bands observed during this interval have scale sizes ~500 km and an eastward propagation velocity ~0.75 km s-1. They occur in the morning sector (~05 MLT, simultaneously with the onset/intensification of a substorm to the west during the recovery phase of a previous substorm in the Scandinavian sector. A possible mechanism for omega band formation and their relationship to the substorm phase is discussed..

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; electric fields and currents · Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

  20. Density of mixed alkali borate glasses: A structural analysis

    Density of mixed alkali borate glasses has been correlated with the glass structure. It is assumed that in such glasses each alkali oxide associates with a proportional quantity of B2O3. The number of BO3 and BO4 units related to each type of alkali oxide depends on the total concentration of alkali oxide. It is concluded that in mixed alkali borate glasses the volumes of structural units related to an alkali ion are the same as in the corresponding binary alkali borate glass. This reveals that each type of alkali oxide forms its own borate matrix and behaves as if not affected with the presence of the other alkali oxide. Similar conclusions are valid for borate glasses with three types of alkali oxide

  1. Density of mixed alkali borate glasses: A structural analysis

    Doweidar, H. [Glass Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, P.O. Box 83, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt)]. E-mail: hdoweidar@mans.edu.eg; El-Damrawi, G.M. [Glass Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, P.O. Box 83, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt); Moustafa, Y.M. [Glass Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, P.O. Box 83, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt); Ramadan, R.M. [Glass Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, P.O. Box 83, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt)

    2005-05-15

    Density of mixed alkali borate glasses has been correlated with the glass structure. It is assumed that in such glasses each alkali oxide associates with a proportional quantity of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The number of BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} units related to each type of alkali oxide depends on the total concentration of alkali oxide. It is concluded that in mixed alkali borate glasses the volumes of structural units related to an alkali ion are the same as in the corresponding binary alkali borate glass. This reveals that each type of alkali oxide forms its own borate matrix and behaves as if not affected with the presence of the other alkali oxide. Similar conclusions are valid for borate glasses with three types of alkali oxide.

  2. A quantitative discussion on band-gap energy and carrier density of CdO in terms of temperature and oxygen partial pressure

    Calculations relative to the band-gap energy shift and carrier spatial density in cadmium oxide are performed in terms of the oxygen partial pressure and substrate temperature relative to the deposition process in the crystal growth of the above material, starting from the consideration of the Fermi energy of an exciton gas. In particular, the band-gap shift experienced by cadmium oxide in terms of the corresponding partial pressure of oxygen is considered as well as the electron spatial density as a function of the pressure in question. Influence of temperature is discussed by estimating the average rate of variation of the band-gap shift versus temperature. In addition, the sensitivity of the above-mentioned shift to temperature is studied by means of a suitable parameter

  3. Thermal Condensate Structure and Cosmological Energy Density of the Universe

    Antonio Capolupo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study thermal vacuum condensate for scalar and fermion fields. We analyze the thermal states at the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB and we show that the vacuum expectation value of the energy momentum tensor density of photon fields reproduces the energy density and pressure of the CMB. We perform the computations in the formal framework of the Thermo Field Dynamics. We also consider the case of neutrinos and thermal states at the temperature of the neutrino cosmic background. Consistency with the estimated lower bound of the sum of the active neutrino masses is verified. In the boson sector, nontrivial contribution to the energy of the universe is given by particles of masses of the order of 10−4 eV compatible with the ones of the axion-like particles. The fractal self-similar structure of the thermal radiation is also discussed and related to the coherent structure of the thermal vacuum.

  4. Thermal condensate structure and cosmological energy density of the Universe

    Capolupo, Antonio; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the study of thermal vacuum condensate for scalar and fermion fields. We analyze the thermal states at the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and we show that the vacuum expectation value of the energy momentum tensor density of photon fields reproduces the energy density and pressure of the CMB. We perform the computations in the formal framework of the thermo field dynamics. We also consider the case of neutrinos and thermal states at the temperature of the neutrino cosmic background. Consistency with the estimated lower bound of the sum of the active neutrino masses is verified. In the boson sector, non trivial contribution to the energy of the universe is given by particles of masses of the order of $10^{-4}eV$ compatible with the ones of the axion-like particles. The fractal self-similar structure of the thermal radiation is also discussed and related to the coherent structure of the thermal vacuum.

  5. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin–orbit coupling effects

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin–orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed.

  6. Band structures of phononic crystal composed of lattices with different periodic constants

    With a square lattice mercury and water system being as the model, the band structures of nesting and compound phononic crystals with two different lattice constants were investigated using the method of the supercell plane wave expansion. It was observed that large band gaps can be achieved in low frequency regions by adjusting one of the lattice constants. Meanwhile, effects similar to interstitial impurity defects can be achieved with the increase of lattice constant of the phononic crystal. The corresponding defect modes can be stimulated in band gaps. The larger the lattice constant, the stronger the localization effect of defect modes on the wave. In addition, the change of the filling fraction of impurity exerts great influence on the frequency and localization of defect modes. Furthermore, the change of the position of impurity has notable influence on the frequency of defect modes and their localization. However, the geometry structure and orientation of impurity have little effect on the frequency of defect modes and their localization in the band gap.

  7. Determination of the band structure of LuNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C

    Bergk, B. [Hochfeld-Magnetlabor, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Bartkowiak, M.; Ignatchik, O. [Hochfeld-Magnetlabor, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Jaeckel, M. [Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Wosnitza, J.; Rosner, H.; Petzold, V. [MPI fuer chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Canfield, P. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames (United States). Ames Lab., Condensed Matter Physics

    2007-07-01

    We present de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) investigations on the nonmagnetic borocarbide superconductor LuNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C which have been performed by use of the torque method in high magnetic fields up to 32 T and at low temperatures down to 50 mK. The complex band structure is extracted from the quantum oscillations in the normal state. In comparison with full-potential-local-orbital calculations of the band structure we are able to assign the observed dHvA frequencies to the different bands. Temperature dependent dHvA investigations allowed the extraction of the effective band masses for the several Fermi-surface sheets. We observe an enhancement of the effective masses compared to the theoretical calculations which is due to electron-phonon interaction. Finally, we are able to examine the angular dependence of the electron-phonon coupling for the different Fermi-surface sheets. (orig.)

  8. Complex band structures of transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers with spin-orbit coupling effects.

    Szczęśniak, Dominik; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Ahzi, Saïd

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted renewed attention due to the potential use of their low-dimensional forms in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides play a pivotal role. The present paper provides a new insight into these essential properties by studying the complex band structures of popular transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers (MX 2, where M  =  Mo, W; X  =  S, Se, Te) while including spin-orbit coupling effects. The conducted symmetry-based tight-binding calculations show that the analytical continuation from the real band structures to the complex momentum space leads to nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems. Herein an efficient method for solving such a class of nonlinear problems is presented and yields a complete set of physically relevant eigenvalues. Solutions obtained by this method are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states manifest not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gap of MX 2 monolayers, where electrons can directly tunnel between the band gap edges. To describe these tunneling currents, decay behavior of electronic states in the forbidden energy region is elucidated and their importance within the ballistic transport regime is briefly discussed. PMID:27367475

  9. Calculation of electronic structure of SrZrO3 crystal by density functional technique in LCAO approach

    One calculated four certain modifications of SrZrO3 crystal of various symmetry: a cubic one, a tetragonal one and two orthorhombic ones, by the density functional technique in the basis of linear combination of atomic orbitals. One carried out comparison analysis of electron properties of the investigated crystals based on the calculated band structures and distribution densities of electron states (the complete ones and atomic state designed ones). The calculation base relative stability of different modifications correlates adequately with the experimental data on phase transitions in SrZrO3 crystal: less symmetric low-temperature modifications are more stable ones

  10. Design of C-band 50 MW klystron with traveling wave output structure

    This paper presents the simulation study of a C-band 50 MW klystron with disc-loaded waveguide traveling wave output structure. The electron gun with a perveance of 1.53 μP is designed. The gun has a voltage gradient lower than 22.1 kV/mm and a cathode load current lower than 6.3 A/cm2. The beam focusing system is a space-charge balanced flow type with solenoid magnet structure and the focusing beam trajectories have a good laminar condition. A single gap cavity is adopted instead of the traveling wave output structure in the initial beam-wave interaction simulation to decide the parameters of the cavities except the output structure. A C-band disc-loaded waveguide output structure working at π/2 mode is designed and the dispersion and interaction impedance of the structure are determined by the CST code. The beam-wave interaction system with disc-loaded waveguide output structure is simulated by a three-dimensional PIC code. More than 50 MW output power is obtained. The efficiency is more than 45% and the saturate gain is more than 50 dB. The voltage gradient of the disc-loaded waveguide output structure is 30 percent less than that of the single gap cavity and there is an increase of 4% in efficiency above that of the single gap cavity. (authors)

  11. Triaxial projected shell model description of high-spin band-structures in 103,105Rh isotopes

    High-spin band structures in odd-proton 103,105Rh are investigated using the microscopic triaxial projected shell model approach. It is demonstrated that the observed band structures built on one- and three-quasiparticle states are reproduced reasonably well in the present work. Further, it is evident from the analysis of the projected wavefunctions that side-band in the low-spin regime is the normal γ-band built on the ground-state configuration. However, in the high-spin regime, the side band is shown to be highly mixed and ceases to be a γ-band. We provide a complete set of electromagnetic transition probabilities for the two bands and the experimental measurements are desirable to test the predictions of the present work.

  12. Two-dimensional microwave band-gap structures of different dielectric materials

    E D V Nagesh; G Santosh Babu; V Subramanian; V Sivasubramanian; V R K Murthy

    2005-12-01

    We report the use of low dielectric constant materials to form two-dimensional microwave band-gap structures for achieving high gap-to-midgap ratio. The variable parameters chosen are the lattice spacing and the geometric structure. The selected geometries are square and triangular and the materials chosen are PTFE ( = 2.1), PVC ( = 2.38) and glass ( = 5.5). Using the plane-wave expansion method, proper lattice spacing is selected for each structure and material. The observed experimental results are analyzed with the help of the theoretical prediction.

  13. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

  14. Simulation of structured 4T1→6A1 emission bands of Mn2+ impurity in Zn2SiO4: A first-principle methodology

    A sequential, fully first-principle theoretical study of the Mn2+ green emission bands in the Zn2SiO4:Mn2+ phosphor is presented for the first time. A combined approach is developed based on the modern periodic density-functional theory and cluster ab initio wave-function-based electronic structure methods, the linear response theory for lattice phonons, and generating function formalism of vibronic spectra within the displaced multi-mode harmonic oscillator model. We obtain fairly good agreement between the calculated low- and high-temperature emission band positions, widths, zero-phonon lines and phonon wings and the available experimental emission studies, with special emphasis on Mn2+ distribution over two non-equivalent Zn2+ sites in the Zn2SiO4 material. An interpretation for vibronic structure observed in the low-temperature emission spectrum of this phosphor is suggested based on the present first-principle study. - Highlights: ► First-principle methodology for simulation of vibronic bands of impurities. ► Calculation of zero phonon lines and phonon structures. ► Estimation of temperature broadening of emission bands. ► Theoretical analysis of green emission band of Zn2SiO4:Mn phosphor. ► Distribution of Mn ions over Zn sites in the host matrix.

  15. Electronic band structure of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As superlattice in an intense laser field

    Sakiroglu, S., E-mail: serpil.sakiroglu@deu.edu.tr [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Dokuz Eyluel University, 35160 Izmir (Turkey); Yesilgul, U.; Ungan, F. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Duque, C.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Sokmen, I. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Dokuz Eyluel University, 35160 Izmir (Turkey)

    2012-06-15

    We perform theoretical calculations for the band structure of semiconductor superlattice under intense high-frequency laser field. In the frame of the non-perturbative approach, the laser effects are included via laser-dressed potential. Results reveal that an intense laser field creates an additional geometric confinement on the electronic states. Numerical results show that when tuning the strength of the laser field significant changes come in the electronic energy levels and density of states. - Graphical abstract: We have theoretically investigated the influence of an intense, high-frequency, non-resonant laser field on the electronic band structure of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As semiconductor superlattice. By tuning the strength of the laser field significant changes come in the electronic energy levels and density of states. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Band structure of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As superlattice under an ILF is investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dramatic variation of the confinement potential in the well/barrier region is predicted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ILF creates an additional geometric confinement on the electronic states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes come in the electronic energy levels and density of states.

  16. A density functional theory investigation of the electronic structure and spin moments of magnetite

    We present the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations on magnetite, Fe3O4, which has been recently considered as electrode in the emerging field of organic spintronics. Given the nature of the potential applications, we evaluated the magnetite room-temperature cubic Fd 3-bar m phase in terms of structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. We considered GGA (PBE), GGA + U (PBE + U), and range-separated hybrid (HSE06 and HSE(15%)) functionals. Calculations using HSE06 and HSE(15%) functionals underline the impact that inclusion of exact exchange has on the electronic structure. While the modulation of the band gap with exact exchange has been seen in numerous situations, the dramatic change in the valence band nature and states near the Fermi level has major implications for even a qualitative interpretation of the DFT results. We find that HSE06 leads to highly localized states below the Fermi level while HSE(15%) and PBE + U result in delocalized states around the Fermi level. The significant differences in local magnetic moments and atomic charges indicate that describing room-temperature bulk materials, surfaces and interfaces may require different functionals than their low-temperature counterparts. (paper)

  17. A density functional theory investigation of the electronic structure and spin moments of magnetite

    Noh, Junghyun

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations on magnetite, Fe3O4, which has been recently considered as electrode in the emerging field of organic spintronics. Given the nature of the potential applications, we evaluated the magnetite room-temperature cubic phase in terms of structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. We considered GGA (PBE), GGA + U (PBE + U), and range-separated hybrid (HSE06 and HSE(15%)) functionals. Calculations using HSE06 and HSE(15%) functionals underline the impact that inclusion of exact exchange has on the electronic structure. While the modulation of the band gap with exact exchange has been seen in numerous situations, the dramatic change in the valence band nature and states near the Fermi level has major implications for even a qualitative interpretation of the DFT results. We find that HSE06 leads to highly localized states below the Fermi level while HSE(15%) and PBE + U result in delocalized states around the Fermi level. The significant differences in local magnetic moments and atomic charges indicate that describing room-temperature bulk materials, surfaces and interfaces may require different functionals than their low-temperature counterparts.

  18. Band offsets and electronic structures of interface between In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As and InP

    Cai, Genwang [School of Physical Science and Engineering and Key Laboratory of Materials Physics of Ministry of Education of China, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); College of Science, Henan University of Technology, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Changhong; Wang, Weichao [College of Electronic Information and Optical Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liang, Erjun, E-mail: ejliang@zzu.edu.cn [School of Physical Science and Engineering and Key Laboratory of Materials Physics of Ministry of Education of China, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China)

    2016-02-07

    III–V semiconductor interfacing with high-κ gate oxide is crucial for the high mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field transistor device. With density functional theory calculations, we explored the band offsets and electronic structures of the In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/InP interfaces with various interfacial bondings. Among six different bonding interfaces, we found that P-In(Ga) bonding interface showed the highest stability. Local density of states calculations was adopted to calculate the band offsets. Except for the metallic interface, we noticed that neither valence band offset nor conduction band offset depended on the interfacial bondings. For the most stable P-In(Ga) interface, we did not observe any gap states. Furthermore, we explored the P-In(Ga) interfaces with interfacial P-As exchange defects, which slightly modified the interface stability and the band offsets but did not produce any gap states. These findings provide solid evidence that InP could serve as a promising interfacial passivation layer between III–V material and high-κ oxide in the application of high mobility devices.

  19. Band offsets and electronic structures of interface between In0.5Ga0.5As and InP

    III–V semiconductor interfacing with high-κ gate oxide is crucial for the high mobility metal-oxide-semiconductor field transistor device. With density functional theory calculations, we explored the band offsets and electronic structures of the In0.5Ga0.5As/InP interfaces with various interfacial bondings. Among six different bonding interfaces, we found that P-In(Ga) bonding interface showed the highest stability. Local density of states calculations was adopted to calculate the band offsets. Except for the metallic interface, we noticed that neither valence band offset nor conduction band offset depended on the interfacial bondings. For the most stable P-In(Ga) interface, we did not observe any gap states. Furthermore, we explored the P-In(Ga) interfaces with interfacial P-As exchange defects, which slightly modified the interface stability and the band offsets but did not produce any gap states. These findings provide solid evidence that InP could serve as a promising interfacial passivation layer between III–V material and high-κ oxide in the application of high mobility devices

  20. Narrow-band spectral features of structured silver surface with rectangular resonant cavities

    This paper is aimed to investigate spectral properties of structured silver surface with periodic rectangular hollow cavities. Numerical computation is conducted to obtain spectral distribution of surface absorptance with different structural parameters using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. By means of numerical examples, the effects of structural parameters, incident angle and azimuthal angle on the spectral features of the structured surface are discussed. It is found that the structured surface shows the characteristics of the peak absorption in the vicinity of resonant wavelength of rectangular cavity. For some special structure parameters, the peak absorptance of the incident plane wave can reach as high as above 80% due to the excitation of microcavity effect. The optimal narrow-band absorption can be achieved by the rational design of the structural parameters of rectangular cavity. The directional dependence of spectral absorptance is also analyzed and the results reveal that the absorption peak positions are incident-angle-independent. The results show that the microscaled rectangular cavities fabricated on the low-emissivity silver surface are very efficient for selective improvement of the radiative features, which provides guidance for the design of narrow-band infrared thermal emitters.

  1. Review and prospects of magnonic crystals and devices with reprogrammable band structure.

    Krawczyk, M; Grundler, D

    2014-03-26

    Research efforts addressing spin waves (magnons) in microand nanostructured ferromagnetic materials have increased tremendously in recent years. Corresponding experimental and theoretical work in magnonics faces significant challenges in that spinwave dispersion relations are highly anisotropic and different magnetic states might be realized via, for example, the magnetic field history. At the same time, these features offer novel opportunities for wave control in solids going beyond photonics and plasmonics. In this topical review we address materials with a periodic modulation of magnetic parameters that give rise to artificially tailored band structures and allow unprecedented control of spin waves. In particular, we discuss recent achievements and perspectives of reconfigurable magnonic devices for which band structures can be reprogrammed during operation. Such characteristics might be useful for multifunctional microwave and logic devices operating over a broad frequency regime on either the macroor nanoscale. PMID:24599025

  2. Band gap and chemically ordered domain structure of a graphene analogue BCN

    Venu, K.; Kanuri, S.; Raidongia, K.; Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Waghmare, U. V.; Datta, R.

    2010-12-01

    Chemically synthesized few layer graphene analogues of B xC yN z are characterized by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) to determine the local phase, electronic structure and band gap. HREELS band gap studies of a B xC yN z composition reveal absorption edges at 2.08, 3.43 and 6.01 eV, indicating that the B xC yN z structure may consist of domains of different compositions. The K-absorption edge energy position of the individual elements in B xC yN z is determined and compared with h-BN and graphite. An understanding of these experimental findings is developed with complementary first-principles based calculations of the various ordered configurations of B xC yN z.

  3. Deformed configurations, band structures and spectroscopic properties of = 50 Ge and Se nuclei

    S K Ghorui; C R Praharaj

    2014-04-01

    The deformed configurations and rotational band structures in =50 Ge and Se nuclei are studied by deformed Hartree–Fock with quadrupole constraint and angular momentum projection. Apart from the `almost’ spherical HF solution, a well-deformed configuration occurs at low excitation. A deformed well-mixed = 1/2+ neutron orbit comes down in energy (from the shell above = 50) to break the = 50 spherical shell closure. A = 7− isomer is predicted in 84Se at fairly low excitation energy. At higher excitation energies (8 MeV), a deformed band with = 7/2+–1/2− (based on $h_{11/2}$) neutron 1p–1h excitation, for 82Ge and 84Se, is shown in our calculation. Our study gives insight into possible deformed structures at spherical shell closure.

  4. Band structure of topological insulators from noise measurements in tunnel junctions

    The unique properties of spin-polarized surface or edge states in topological insulators (TIs) make these quantum coherent systems interesting from the point of view of both fundamental physics and their implementation in low power spintronic devices. Here we present such a study in TIs, through tunneling and noise spectroscopy utilizing TI/Al2O3/Co tunnel junctions with bottom TI electrodes of either Bi2Te3 or Bi2Se3. We demonstrate that features related to the band structure of the TI materials show up in the tunneling conductance and even more clearly through low frequency noise measurements. The bias dependence of 1/f noise reveals peaks at specific energies corresponding to band structure features of the TI. TI tunnel junctions could thus simplify the study of the properties of such quantum coherent systems that can further lead to the manipulation of their spin-polarized properties for technological purposes

  5. Enlarged omnidirectional band gap in one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with ternary Thue-Morse aperiodic structure

    In this paper, an omnidirectional photonic band gap (OBG) which originates from Bragg gap compared to zero-n-tilde gap or single negative (negative permittivity or negative permeability) gap, realized by one-dimensional (1D) plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) with ternary Thue-Morse aperiodic structure, which is composed of plasma and two kinds of homogeneous, isotropic dielectric is theoretically studied by the transfer matrix method (TMM) in detail. Such OBG is insensitive to the incident angle and the polarization of electromagnetic wave (EM wave). From the numerical results, the bandwidth and central frequency of OBG can be notably broadened by changing the thickness of plasma and dielectric layers but cease to change with increasing Thue-Morse order. The OBG also can be manipulated by plasma density. However, the plasma collision frequency has no effect on the bandwidth of OBG. These results may provide theoretical instructions to design the future optoelectronic devices based on plasma photonic crystals.

  6. Dipole Emission In Finite Photonic Band-Gap Structures an Exactly Solvable One-Dimensional Model

    Dowling, J P

    1999-01-01

    I consider an exact model of atomic spontaneous dipole emission and classical dipole radiation in a finite photonic band-gap structure. The full 3D or 2D problem is reduced to a finite 1D model, and then this is solved for analytically using algebraic matrix transfer techniques. The results give insight to the electromagnetic emission process in periodic dielectrics, quantitative predictions for emission in 1D dielectric stacks, and qualitative formulas for the 2D and 3D problem.

  7. Robust topology optimization of three-dimensional photonic-crystal band-gap structures

    Men, Han; Lee, Karen Y. K.; Freund, Robert M.; Peraire, Jaime; Johnson, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    We perform full 3D topology optimization (in which "every voxel" of the unit cell is a degree of freedom) of photonic-crystal structures in order to find optimal omnidirectional band gaps for various symmetry groups, including fcc (including diamond), bcc, and simple-cubic lattices. Even without imposing the constraints of any fabrication process, the resulting optimal gaps are only slightly larger than previous hand designs, suggesting that current photonic crystals are nearly optimal in thi...

  8. Theoretical analysis of electronic band structure of 2- to 3-nm Si nanocrystals

    Hapala, Prokop; Kůsová, Kateřina; Pelant, Ivan; Jelínek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 19 (2013), "195420-1"-"195420-13". ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD202/09/H041; GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Grant ostatní: AVČR(CZ) M100101207 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Si nanoparticles * electronic band structure * nanoparticles * luminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.664, year: 2013

  9. Transverse properties of entanged two-photon states generated in nonlinear photonic-band-gap structures

    Peřina ml., Jan; Centini, M.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Scalora, M.

    Washington : Optical Society of America, 2008 - (Bigelow, E.; Stroud, Jr., J.), s. 312-313 ISBN 978-1-55752-851-3. [Rochester Conference on Coherence on Quantum Optics /9./ (CQO9). Rochester (US), 10.06.2007-13.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : two-photon states * nonlinear photonic-band-gap structures Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  10. Band structures tunability of bulk 2D phononic crystals made of magneto-elastic materials

    J. O. Vasseur

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of contactless tunability of the band structure of two-dimensional phononic crystals is demonstrated by employing magnetostrictive materials and applying an external magnetic field. The influence of the amplitude and of the orientation with respect to the inclusion axis of the applied magnetic field are studied in details. Applications to tunable selective frequency filters with switching functionnality and to reconfigurable wave-guides and demultiplexing devices are then discussed.

  11. Band structure of thin films by the linear augmented-plane-wave method

    Jepsen, O.; Madsen, J.; Andersen, Ole Krogh

    1978-01-01

    We present a linear augmented-plane-wave method for solving the band-structure problem in thin crystalline films. The potential is separated into a muffin-tin potential inside the film, a potential depending exclusively on the normal coordinate outside the film, and corrections in both regions. The...... method is tested on (100) and (111) monolayers of Cu using a standard muffin-tin potential....

  12. Structure of superdeformed bands in the A ≅ 150 mass region

    The structure of superdeformed rotational bands recently discovered around 152Dy is discussed within the deformed shell model based on an average Woods-Saxon potential with a monopole pairing force. A comparison with available experimental data is provided and detailed predictions for yet unobserved cases are given. Pronounced variations in the observed rotational pattern are attributed to the angular momentum alignment of the high-N intruder (quasi)particles. (orig.)

  13. Band Structure Calculation of MnxCoyFe3-x-yO4

    Rosenson, A.; Tailhades, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    Electronic band structure of MnxCoyFe3-x-yO4 has been calculated in high symmetrical points and lines of the first Brillouin zone within the scope one-electron quasirelativistic pseudopotential approach. Atomic potential form-factors have been calculated in accordance with modified LCAO method. Dependence of energy gap Eg=Eg(x,y) against Mn, Co and Fe concentrations is calculated and presented.

  14. Three-dimensional structure of dilute pyroclastic density currents

    Andrews, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Unconfined experimental density currents dynamically similar to pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) suggest that cross-stream motions of the currents and air entrainment through currents' lateral margins strongly affects PDC behavior. Experiments are conducted within an air-filled tank 8.5 m long by 6.1 m wide by 2.6 m tall. Currents are generated by feeding heated powders down a chute into the tank at controlled rates to form dilute, particle-laden, turbulent gravity currents that are fed for 30 to 600 seconds. Powders include 5 μm aluminum oxide, 25 μm talc, 27 μm walnut, 76 μm glass beads and mixtures thereof. Experiments are scaled such that Froude, densimetric and thermal Richardson, particle Stokes and Settling numbers, and thermal to kinetic energy densities are all in agreement with dilute PDCs; experiments have lower Reynolds numbers that natural currents, but the experiments are fully turbulent, thus the large scale structures should be similar. The experiments are illuminated with 3 orthogonal laser sheets (650, 532, and 450 nm wavelengths) and recorded with an array of HD video cameras and a high speed camera (up to 3000 fps); this system provides synchronous observation of a vertical streamwise and cross-stream planes, and a horizontal plane. Ambient temperature currents tend to spread out radially from the source and have long run out distances, whereas warmer currents tend to focus along narrow sectors and have shorter run outs. In addition, when warm currents lift off to form buoyant plumes, lateral spreading ceases. The behavior of short duration currents are dominated by the current head; as eruption duration increases, current transport direction tends to oscillate back and forth (this is particularly true for ambient temperature currents). Turbulent structures in the horizontal plane show air entrainment and advection downstream. Eddies illuminated by the vertical cross-stream laser sheet often show vigorous mixing along the current margins

  15. Structural, optical and electrical characterization of nanostructured porous silicon: Effect of current density.

    Kulathuraan, K; Mohanraj, K; Natarajan, B

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an attempt has been made to fabricate porous silicon (PS) from p-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by using the electrochemical etching process at six different current densities (40, 60, 75, 100, 125 and 150mA/cm(2)) with constant time (30min). The influence of varying current density on morphological, structural, optical and electrical properties of PS samples were analyzed by using SEM, AFM, XRD, FT-IR, PL and electrical (I-V) techniques, respectively. Microstructural images clearly showed that the average pore diameter and thickness increase with increase current densities up to 100mA/cm(2) and decrease for 125mA/cm(2). It could be related to breaking of pore walls and exposing to the next layer of c-Si. Further increase the current density about 150mA/cm(2), the average pore diameter increase as in the case of first layer (40-100mA/cm(2)) of c-Si wafer. The result is reflected in PL emission band (at 708nm) and the intensity of the emission band shifted towards red region. The X-ray diffraction pattern confirm the formation of porous silicon as appeared as a broad peak at 2θ=69.3° belongs to (400) reflection. The FTIR study supports the X-ray diffraction analysis that shows the vibrational bands of S-H2 and Si-O-Si at 2109cm(-1), 915cm(-1) and 615cm(-1) and 1107cm(-1), respectively. The I-V characteristic of PS exhibited rectifying behavior with different values of ideality factor (η) and barrier height (ϕb). It is concluded from the experimental results that the formed pores developed up to 100mA/cm(2) in the top layer of c-Si and the formed pores exposed to the next layer of c-Si when increase the high electrochemical etching process (above 100mA/cm(2)). PMID:26186397

  16. Robust topology optimization of three-dimensional photonic-crystal band-gap structures.

    Men, H; Lee, K Y K; Freund, R M; Peraire, J; Johnson, S G

    2014-09-22

    We perform full 3D topology optimization (in which "every voxel" of the unit cell is a degree of freedom) of photonic-crystal structures in order to find optimal omnidirectional band gaps for various symmetry groups, including fcc (including diamond), bcc, and simple-cubic lattices. Even without imposing the constraints of any fabrication process, the resulting optimal gaps are only slightly larger than previous hand designs, suggesting that current photonic crystals are nearly optimal in this respect. However, optimization can discover new structures, e.g. a new fcc structure with the same symmetry but slightly larger gap than the well known inverse opal, which may offer new degrees of freedom to future fabrication technologies. Furthermore, our band-gap optimization is an illustration of a computational approach to 3D dispersion engineering which is applicable to many other problems in optics, based on a novel semidefinite-program formulation for nonconvex eigenvalue optimization combined with other techniques such as a simple approach to impose symmetry constraints. We also demonstrate a technique for robust topology optimization, in which some uncertainty is included in each voxel and we optimize the worst-case gap, and we show that the resulting band gaps have increased robustness to systematic fabrication errors. PMID:25321732

  17. The structure of plasma density irregularities in the interplanetary medium

    Observations of the scintillation of sources 3C273 and 3C279 at 2292 MHz are described. The interpretation of the scintillation in terms of the structure of the plasma-density irregularities in the interplanetary medium is discussed. Scintillation index measurements obtained during these observations are combined with similar measurements at other frequencies reported in the literature. The resulting variation of the scintillation-index and observing-frequency product with source elongation is interpreted in terms of irregularities with a spatial spectrum of electron density which is of power law form. This result is reinforced by an analysis of the spectra of the observed scintillations. Several tests are applied to both the Fourier and Bessel spectra which illustrate conclusively that the irregularity spatial spectrum is of power law form, rather than the Gaussian form suggested by some workers. The spectra also show that the irregularities are isotopic within 0.2 AU of the sun, while there is some evidence that a degree of elongation normal to the direction of the motion of the irregularities may develop at slightly greater solar distances. The irregularity velocities determined are consistent with solar wind velocities. (author)

  18. The density structure around quasars inferred from optical depth statistics

    Rollinde, E; Theuns, T; Petitjean, P; Chand, H

    2005-01-01

    We present a method for studying the proximity effect and use it to investigate the density structure around QSOs. It is based on the pixel optical depth probability distribution and its redshift evolution. We validate the method using mock spectra obtained from hydrodynamical simulations, and then apply it to a sample of 12 bright quasars at redshifts 2-3 observed with UVES at the VLT-UT2 Kueyen ESO telescope. These quasars do not show signatures of associated absorption and have a mean monochromatic luminosity of 5.4 10^31 ergs/s/Hz/h^2 at the Lyman limit. The distribution of optical depths changes considerably when the proper distance to the QSO is less than 10 Mpc/h. The size of this proximity region is small given that these QSOs are very bright, which suggests that the quasars are located in regions that are overdense by factors 2-10 on scales <= 10 Mpc/h.

  19. Advanced density matrix renormalization group method for nuclear structure calculations

    Legeza, Ö; Poves, A; Dukelsky, J

    2015-01-01

    We present an efficient implementation of the Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) algorithm that includes an optimal ordering of the proton and neutron orbitals and an efficient expansion of the active space utilizing various concepts of quantum information theory. We first show how this new DMRG methodology could solve a previous $400$ KeV discrepancy in the ground state energy of $^{56}$Ni. We then report the first DMRG results in the $pf+g9/2$ shell model space for the ground $0^+$ and first $2^+$ states of $^{64}$Ge which are benchmarked with reference data obtained from Monte Carlo shell model. The corresponding correlation structure among the proton and neutron orbitals is determined in terms of the two-orbital mutual information. Based on such correlation graphs we propose several further algorithmic improvement possibilities that can be utilized in a new generation of tensor network based algorithms.

  20. Temperature-dependent band structure of Hg1-xZnxTe-CdTe superlattices

    Manassès, J.; Guldner, Y.; Vieren, J. P.; Voos, M.; Faurie, J. P.

    1991-12-01

    We present transport and far-infrared magneto-optical measurements in narrow-band-gap n-type Hg1-xZnxTe-CdTe superlattices. Hall and conductivity data obtained over a broad temperature range (1.5-300 K) show that these superlattices are semimetallic at low temperature and are degenerate intrinsic semiconductors for T>100 K, which constitutes an interesting situation in semiconductor-superlattice physics. The analysis of the data gives the Fermi energy as well as the temperature-dependent band gap, in good agreement with the calculated band structure, which predicts a semimetal-semiconductor transition induced by temperature in these heterostructures. We have measured the electron cyclotron resonances as a function of temperature with the magnetic field B applied parallel and perpendicular to the growth axis. The observed magneto-optical intraband transitions are in very satisfactory agreement with the calculated Landau levels and the Fermi energy. We show that the semimetal-semiconductor transition is characterized by an important reduction of the cyclotron mass measured with B perpendicular to the superlattice growth axis. The large variation of the conduction-band anisotropy calculated near the transition accounts for this effect.

  1. Hyper-Temporal C-Band SAR for Baseline Woody Structural Assessments in Deciduous Savannas

    Russell Main

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Savanna ecosystems and their woody vegetation provide valuable resources and ecosystem services. Locally calibrated and cost effective estimates of these resources are required in order to satisfy commitments to monitor and manage change within them. Baseline maps of woody resources are important for analyzing change over time. Freely available, and highly repetitive, C-band data has the potential to be a viable alternative to high-resolution commercial SAR imagery (e.g., RADARSAT-2, ALOS2 in generating large-scale woody resources maps. Using airborne LiDAR as calibration, we investigated the relationships between hyper-temporal C-band ASAR data and woody structural parameters, namely total canopy cover (TCC and total canopy volume (TCV, in a deciduous savanna environment. Results showed that: the temporal filter reduced image variance; the random forest model out-performed the linear model; while the TCV metric consistently showed marginally higher accuracies than the TCC metric. Combinations of between 6 and 10 images could produce results comparable to high resolution commercial (C- & L-band SAR imagery. The approach showed promise for producing a regional scale, locally calibrated, baseline maps for the management of deciduous savanna resources, and lay a foundation for monitoring using time series of data from newer C-band SAR sensors (e.g., Sentinel1.

  2. Configurations, band structures and photocurrent responses of 4-(4-oxopyridin-1(4H)-yl)phthalic acid and its metal-organic frameworks

    Yan, Xingxiu; Qiu, Xiandeng; Yan, Zhishuo; Li, Hongjiang; Gong, Yun; Lin, Jianhua

    2016-05-01

    4-(4-oxopyridin-1(4 H)-yl)phthalic acid (H2L) and three H2L-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) formulated as ZnL(DPE)(H2O)·H2O (DPE=(E)-1, 2-di(pyridine -4-yl)ethene) (1), CdL(H2O)2 (2) and CdL (3) were synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The free H2L ligand shows an enol-form and the L2- ligand in the three MOFs exists as the keto-form. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate H2L and the three MOFs possess different band structures. Due to the existence of the N-donor, DPE in MOF 1, the conduction band (CB) minimum and band gap of MOF 1 are much lower than those of H2L. And MOF 1 yielded much larger photocurrent density than H2L upon visible light illumination. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) shows the interfacial charge transfer impedance in the presence of MOF 1 is lower than that in the presence of H2L. The hydrous MOF 2 and the anhydrous MOF 3 are both constructed by Cd(II) and L2-, and they can be reversibly transformed to each other. However, MOFs 2 and 3 possess different CB minimums and VB maximums, and their band gaps are much larger than that of MOF 1.

  3. Spectral ellipsometry study in the range of electronic excitations and band structure of [(CH3)2CHNH3]4Cd3Cl10 crystals

    Optical dielectric functions ε(E) of the (IPA)4Cd3Cl10 crystal were measured in the spectral range of fundamental electronic excitations 3.5–10 eV and in the temperature range of 310–400 K containing the phase transition point between the orthorhombic phases Cmce and Pbca. Measurements were performed by spectroscopic ellipsometry with using of synchrotron radiation. Electronic band structure, density of states and dielectric functions ε(E) of (IPA)4Cd3Cl10 were calculated and analyzed on the basis of the density functional theory. Top valence and bottom conduction bands were found to be formed mainly by the cadmium–chlorine complexes of the crystals. - Highlights: ► Spectral ellipsometry in the VUV range is used for study of (IPA)4Cd3Cl10 crystals. ► Band structure of (IPA)4Cd3Cl10 crystal has been calculated for the first time. ► Origin of the lowest energy spectral band of dielectric function is determined. ► Width of temperature dependency of dielectric permittivity is large (near 50 K). ► Maximum of temperature dependency of dielectric permittivity is small (near 2%)

  4. Weakly nonlinear dispersion and stop-band effects for periodic structures

    Sorokin, Vladislav; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    frequency band-gaps, i.e. frequency ranges in which elastic waves cannot propagate. Most existing analytical methods in the field are based on Floquet theory [1]; e.g. this holds for the classical Hill’s method of infinite determinants [1,2], and themethod of space-harmonics [3]. However, application of...... these methods for studying nonlinear problems isimpossible or cumbersome, since Floquet theory is applicable only for linear systems. Thus the nonlinear effects for periodic structures are not yet fully uncovered, while at the same time applications may demand effects of nonlinearity on structural...... response to be accounted for.The paper deals with analytically predicting dynamic response for nonlinear elastic structures with a continuous periodic variation in structural properties. Specifically, for a Bernoulli-Euler beam with aspatially continuous modulation of structural properties in the axial...

  5. Fabrication of the CERN/PSI/ST X-Band accelerating structures

    Dehler, Micha; Gudkov, Dmitry; Lebet, Serge; Riddone, Germana; Shi, Jiaru; Citterio, Alessandro; Zennaro, Riccardo; D'Auria, Gerardo; Serpico, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    In a collaboration between CERN, PSI and Sincrotrone Trieste (ST), a multi- purpose X-band accelerating structure has been designed and fabricated, used for high gradients tests in the CLIC structure testing program and in the FEL projects of PSI and ST. The structure has 72 cells with a phase advance of 5 pi/6 and includes upstream and down-stream wakefield monitors to measure the beam alignment. The SLAC mode launcher design is used to feed it with RF power. Following the CERN fabrication procedures for high-gradient structure, diffusion bonding and brazing in hydrogen atmosphere is used to assemble the cells. After tuning, a vacuum bakeout is required before the feedthroughs for the wake field monitors are welded in as a last step. We describe the experiences gained in finishing the first two structures out of a series of four and present the results from the RF tuning and low level RF tests.

  6. Electronic structures and large spectrum shifts in hydrogenated fullerenes: Density functional theory study

    Electronic structures and band gaps of hydrogenated fullerenes have been investigated by means of density functional theory method. The mechanism of hydrogen addition reaction to the fullerene (C60) surface was also investigated. Addition of one and two hydrogen atoms was examined in the calculations. The binding energies of the second hydrogen atom to C60H were widely distributed in the range 1.5–3.6 eV. It was found that the bonding energy is strongly dependent on the spin density of carbon atom of C60H. The second hydrogen atom preferentially binds to the neighbor site of the first addition site. The electronic states and excitation energies of C60-H were discussed on the basis of theoretical results. - Highlights: • Hydrogen atom addition to C60 was investigated. • First hydrogen atom addition proceeded with very low activation barrier. • Second hydrogen addition was dependent on the binding site. • Addition site of second atom was correlated with spin density

  7. Influence of the sequence on the ab initio band structures of single and double stranded DNA models

    The solid state physical approach is widely used for the characterization of electronic properties of DNA. In the simplest case the helical symmetry is explicitly utilized with a repeat unit containing only a single nucleotide or nucleotide pair. This model provides a band structure that is easily interpretable and reflects the main characteristic features of the single nucleotide or a nucleotide pair chain, respectively. The chemical variability of the different DNA chains is, however, almost completely neglected in this way. In the present work we have investigated the effect of the different sequences on the band structure of periodic DNA models. For this purpose we have applied the Hartree–Fock crystal orbital method for single and double stranded DNA chains with two different subsequent nucleotides in the repeat unit of former and two different nucleotide pairs in the latter case, respectively. These results are compared to simple helical models with uniform sequences. The valence and conduction bands related to the stacked nucleotide bases of single stranded DNA built up only from guanidine as well as of double stranded DNA built up only from guanidine–cytidine pairs showed special properties different from the other cases. Namely, they had higher conduction and lower valence band positions and this way larger band gaps and smaller widths of these bands. With the introduction of non-uniform guanidine containing sequences band structures became more similar to each other and to the band structures of other sequences without guanidine. The maximal bandwidths of the non-uniform sequences are considerably smaller than in the case of uniform sequences implying smaller charge carrier mobilities both in the conduction and valence bands. - Highlights: • HF Energy bands in DNA. • The role of aperiodicity in the DNA band structure. • Hole mobilities in quasi-periodic DNA with broader valence bands

  8. Quasiparticle band structure for the Hubbard systems: Application to. alpha. -CeAl sub 2

    Costa-Quintana, J.; Lopez-Aguilar, F. (Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, E-08193 Barcelona, Spain (ES)); Balle, S. (Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07071 Palma de Mallorca, Spain (ES)); Salvador, R. (Control Data Corporation, TALLAHASSEE, FL (USA) Supercomputer Computations Research Institute, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4052 (USA))

    1990-04-01

    A self-energy formalism for determining the quasiparticle band structure of the Hubbard systems is deduced. The self-energy is obtained from the dynamically screened Coulomb interaction whose bare value is the correlation energy {ital U}. A method for integrating the Schroedingerlike equation with the self-energy operator is given. The method is applied to the cubic Laves phase of {alpha}-CeAl{sub 2} because it is a clear Hubbard system with a very complex electronic structure and, moreover, this system provides us with sufficient experimental data for testing our method.

  9. Manifestation of Structure of Electron Bands in Double-Resonant Raman Spectra of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Stubrov, Yurii; Nikolenko, Andrii; Gubanov, Viktor; Strelchuk, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes in the range of two-phonon 2D bands are investigated in detail. The fine structure of two-phonon 2D bands in the low-temperature Raman spectra of the mixture and individual single-walled carbon nanotubes is considered as the reflection of structure of their π-electron zones. The dispersion behavior of 2D band fine structure components in the resonant Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotube mixture is studied depending on the energy of excitating photons. The role of incoming and outgoing electron-phonon resonances in the formation of 2D band fine structure in Raman spectra of single-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed. The similarity of dispersion behavior of 2D phonon bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes, one-layer graphene, and bulk graphite is discussed. PMID:26729220

  10. Structural Analysis of Char by Raman Spectroscopy: Improving Band Assignments through Computational Calculations from First Principles

    Smith, Matthew W.; Dallmeyer, Ian; Johnson, Timothy J.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Espinal, Juan F.; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the characterization of many carbon 27 species. The complex heterogeneous nature of chars and activated carbons has confounded 28 complete analysis due to the additional shoulders observed on the D-band and high intensity 29 valley between the D and G-bands. In this paper the effects of various vacancy and substitution 30 defects have been systematically analyzed via molecular modeling using density functional 31 theory (DFT) and how this is manifested in the calculated gas-phase Raman spectra. The 32 accuracy of these calculations was validated by comparison with (solid-phase) experimental 33 spectra, with a small correction factor being applied to improve the accuracy of frequency 34 predictions. The spectroscopic effects on the char species are best understood in terms of a 35 reduced symmetry as compared to a “parent” coronene molecule. Based upon the simulation 36 results, the shoulder observed in chars near 1200 cm-1 has been assigned to the totally symmetric 37 A1g vibrations of various small polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as well as those containing 38 rings of seven or more carbons. Intensity between 1400 cm-1 and 1450 cm-1 is assigned to A1g 39 type vibrations present in small PAHs and especially those containing cyclopentane rings. 40 Finally, band intensity between 1500 cm-1 and 1550 cm-1 is ascribed to predominately E2g 41 vibrational modes in strained PAH systems. A total of ten potential bands have been assigned 42 between 1000 cm-1 and 1800 cm-1. These fitting parameters have been used to deconvolute a 43 thermoseries of cellulose chars produced by pyrolysis at 300-700 °C. The results of the 44 deconvolution show consistent growth of PAH clusters with temperature, development of non-45 benzyl rings as temperature increases and loss of oxygenated features between 400 °C and 46 600 °C

  11. Demonstration of a 17-GHz, High-Gradient Accelerator with a Photonic-Band-Gap Structure

    We report the testing of a high gradient electron accelerator with a photonic-band-gap (PBG) structure. The photonic-band-gap structure confines a fundamental TM01-like accelerating mode, but does not support higher-order modes (HOM). The absence of HOM is a major advantage of the PBG accelerator, since it suppresses dangerous beam instabilities caused by wakefields. The PBG structure was designed as a triangular lattice of metal rods with a missing central rod forming a defect confining the TM01-like mode and allowing the electron beam to propagate along the axis. The design frequency of the six-cell structure was 17.14 GHz. The PBG structure was excited by 2 MW, 100 ns pulses. A 16.5 MeV electron beam was transmitted through the PBG accelerator. The observed electron beam energy gain of 1.4 MeV corresponds to an accelerating gradient of 35 MV/m, in excellent agreement with theory

  12. Band Gap Modulation of Bilayer MoS2 Under Strain Engineering and Electric Field: A Density Functional Theory

    Nguyen, Chuong V.; Hieu, Nguyen N.; Ilyasov, Victor V.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we investigate band-gap tuning in bilayer MoS2 by an external electric field and by applied biaxial strain. Our calculations show that the band gaps of bilayer MoS2 can be tuned by the perpendicular electric field or biaxial strain. The band gaps of bilayer MoS2 decrease with increasing applied electric field or biaxial strain. When the electric field was introduced, electronic levels are split due to the separation of the valence sub-band and the conduction sub-band states. Our calculations also show that the change in the band gap of bilayer MoS2 is due to the separation of electronic levels by electric field via the Stark effect. At the electric field E_{Field} = 5.5 V/nm or biaxial strain ɛ = 15%, bilayer MoS2 becomes metallic. The semiconductor-metal phase transition in bilayer MoS2 plays an important role in its application for nanodevices.

  13. Prediction model of band gap for inorganic compounds by combination of density functional theory calculations and machine learning techniques

    Lee, Joohwi; Seko, Atsuto; Shitara, Kazuki; Nakayama, Keita; Tanaka, Isao

    2016-03-01

    Machine learning techniques are applied to make prediction models of the G0W0 band gaps for 270 inorganic compounds using Kohn-Sham (KS) band gaps, cohesive energy, crystalline volume per atom, and other fundamental information of constituent elements as predictors. Ordinary least squares regression (OLSR), least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, and nonlinear support vector regression (SVR) methods are applied with two levels of predictor sets. When the KS band gap by generalized gradient approximation of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) or modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) is used as a single predictor, the OLSR model predicts the G0W0 band gap of randomly selected test data with the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 0.59 eV. When KS band gap by PBE and mBJ methods are used together with a set of predictors representing constituent elements and compounds, the RMSE decreases significantly. The best model by SVR yields the RMSE of 0.24 eV. Band gaps estimated in this way should be useful as predictors for virtual screening of a large set of materials.

  14. Band Gap Modulation of Bilayer MoS2 Under Strain Engineering and Electric Field: A Density Functional Theory

    Nguyen, Chuong V.; Hieu, Nguyen N.; Ilyasov, Victor V.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigate band-gap tuning in bilayer MoS2 by an external electric field and by applied biaxial strain. Our calculations show that the band gaps of bilayer MoS2 can be tuned by the perpendicular electric field or biaxial strain. The band gaps of bilayer MoS2 decrease with increasing applied electric field or biaxial strain. When the electric field was introduced, electronic levels are split due to the separation of the valence sub-band and the conduction sub-band states. Our calculations also show that the change in the band gap of bilayer MoS2 is due to the separation of electronic levels by electric field via the Stark effect. At the electric field E_{Field} = 5.5 V/nm or biaxial strain \\varepsilon = 15%, bilayer MoS2 becomes metallic. The semiconductor-metal phase transition in bilayer MoS2 plays an important role in its application for nanodevices.

  15. A novel band-pass filter based on a periodically drilled SIW structure

    Coves, A.; Torregrosa-Penalva, G.; San-Blas, A. A.; Sánchez-Soriano, M. A.; Martellosio, A.; Bronchalo, E.; Bozzi, M.

    2016-04-01

    The design and fabrication of a band-pass step impedance filter based on high and low dielectric constant sections has been realized on substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) technology. The overall process includes the design of the ideal band-pass prototype filter, where the implementation of the impedance inverters has been carried out by means of waveguide sections of lower permittivity. This can be practically achieved by implementing arrays of air holes along the waveguide. Several SIW structures with and without arrays of air holes have been simulated and fabricated in order to experimentally evaluate their relative permittivity. Additionally, the equivalent filter in SIW technology has been designed and optimized. Finally, a prototype of the designed filter has been fabricated and measured, showing a good agreement between measurements and simulations, which demonstrates the validity of the proposed design approach.

  16. Enhanced modeling of band nonparabolicity with application to a mid-IR quantum cascade laser structure

    We analyze the influence of conduction-band nonparabolicity on bound electronic states in the active region of a quantum cascade laser (QCL). Our model assumes expansion of the conduction-band dispersion relation up to a fourth order in wavevector and use of a suitable second boundary condition at the interface of two III-V semiconductor layers. Numerical results, obtained by the transfer matrix method, are presented for two mid-infrared GaAs/Al0.33Ga0.67As QCL active regions, and they are in very good agreement with experimental data found in the literature. Comparison with a different nonparabolicity model is presented for the example of a GaAs/Al0.38Ga0.62As-based mid-IR QCL. Calculations have also been carried out for one THz QCL structure to illustrate the possible application of the model in the terahertz part of the spectrum. (paper)

  17. The band structure of carbonmonoxide on 2-D Au islands on graphene

    Katsiev, Khabiboulakh

    2014-06-01

    The dispersion of the occupied molecular orbitals of carbon monoxide adsorbed on Au 2D islands, vapor-deposited on graphene/Ru(0 0 0 1), is seen to be wave vector dependent, as revealed by angle-resolved photoemission. The band dispersion is similar to CO monolayers adsorbed on many single crystal metal surfaces. Thus not only are the adsorbed gold islands on graphene flat and crystalline, as evident in the dispersion of the Au d-states, but the CO molecular adlayer is both molecular and ordered as well. The experimental angle-resolved photoemission combined with model calculations of the occupied CO band structure, suggest that, in spite of being a very weakly bound adsorbate, the CO adlayer on Au 2D islands on graphene is strongly hybridized to the Au layer. . © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impurity effects on the band structure of one-dimensional photonic crystals: experiment and theory

    We study the effects of single impurities on the transmission in microwave realizations of the photonic Kronig-Penney model, consisting of arrays of Teflon pieces alternating with air spacings in a microwave guide. As only the first propagating mode is considered, the system is essentially one-dimensional (1D) obeying the Helmholtz equation. We derive analytical closed form expressions from which the band structure, frequency of defect modes and band profiles can be determined. These agree very well with experimental data for all types of single defects considered (e.g. interstitial and substitutional) and show that our experimental set-up serves to explore some of the phenomena occurring in more sophisticated experiments. Conversely, based on the understanding provided by our formulae, information about the unknown impurity can be determined by simply observing certain features in the experimental data for the transmission. Further, our results are directly applicable to the closely related quantum 1D Kronig-Penney model

  19. Soret band porphyrin structure index via 3rd derivative UV/VIS spectroscopy

    This paper reports on Soret band wavelength which provides a porphyrin structure index which is useful to classify natural metalloporphyrin extracts. The approach involves rapid measurement by photodiode array spectrophotometry. The average value for a porphyrin mixture. λSoret ± 0.1 nm, is obtained by third derivative computation. A blue shift in λSoret implies an increasing etio to exocycle ratio. High ratios have been associated with catagenesis (Dydik, 1975, Baker, et al., 1978, 1983), and with predispositional generation (Baker and Louda (1984). As a reference, we measured the Soret band response to simulated maturation of a Woodford Shale (350 Ma) sample after hydrous pyrolysis (Lewan, 1981), as described in greater detail elsewhere at this meeting

  20. Impurity effects on the band structure of one-dimensional photonic crystals: Experiment and theory

    Luna-Acosta, G A; Kuhl, U; Stoeckmann, H -J

    2007-01-01

    We study the effects of single impurities on the transmission in microwave realizations of the photonic Kronig-Penney model, consisting of arrays of Teflon pieces alternating with air spacings in a microwave guide. As only the first propagating mode is considered, the system is essentially one dimensional obeying the Helmholtz equation. We derive analytical closed form expressions from which the band structure, frequency of defect modes, and band profiles can be determined. These agree very well with experimental data for all types of single defects considered (e. g. interstitial, substitutional) and shows that our experimental set-up serves to explore some of the phenomena occurring in more sophisticated experiments. Conversely, based on the understanding provided by our formulas, information about the unknown impurity can be determined by simply observing certain features in the experimental data for the transmission. Further, our results are directly applicable to the closely related quantum 1D Kronig-Penn...

  1. Strain-tunable band parameters of ZnO monolayer in graphene-like honeycomb structure

    Behera, Harihar; Mukhopadhyay, Gautam

    2012-10-01

    We present ab initio calculations which show that the direct-band-gap, effective masses and Fermi velocities of charge carriers in ZnO monolayer (ML-ZnO) in graphene-like honeycomb structure are all tunable by application of in-plane homogeneous biaxial strain. Within our simulated strain limit of ±10%, the band gap remains direct and shows a strong non-linear variation with strain. Moreover, the average Fermi velocity of electrons in unstrained ML-ZnO is of the same order of magnitude as that in graphene. The results promise potential applications of ML-ZnO in mechatronics/straintronics and other nano-devices such as the nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) and nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS).

  2. HOM-Free Linear Accelerating Structure for e+ e- Linear Collider at C-Band

    Kubo, K

    2003-01-01

    HOM-free linear acceleration structure using the choke mode cavity (damped cavity) is now under design for e sup + e sup - linear collider project at C-band frequency (5712 MHz). Since this structure shows powerful damping effect on most of all HOMs, there is no multibunch problem due to long range wakefields. The structure will be equipped with the microwave absorbers in each cells and also the in-line dummy load in the last few cells. The straightness tolerance for 1.8 m long structure is closer than 30 (micro)m for 25% emittance dilution limit, which can be achieved by standard machining and braising techniques. Since it has good vacuum pumping conductance through annular gaps in each cell, instabilities due to the interaction of beam with the residual-gas and ions can be minimized.

  3. Giant amplification in degenerate band edge slow-wave structures interacting with an electron beam

    Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Veysi, Mehdi; Figotin, Alexander; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new amplification regime based on a synchronous operation of four degenerate electromagnetic (EM) modes in a slow-wave structure and the electron beam, referred to as super synchronization. These four EM modes arise in a Fabry-Pérot cavity when degenerate band edge (DBE) condition is satisfied. The modes interact constructively with the electron beam resulting in superior amplification. In particular, much larger gains are achieved for smaller beam currents compared to conventional structures based on synchronization with only a single EM mode. We demonstrate giant gain scaling with respect to the length of the slow-wave structure compared to conventional Pierce type single mode traveling wave tube amplifiers. We construct a coupled transmission line model for a loaded waveguide slow-wave structure exhibiting a DBE, and investigate the phenomenon of giant gain via super synchronization using the Pierce model generalized to multimode interaction.

  4. Non-empirical energy density functional for the nuclear structure

    The energy density functional (EDF) formalism is the tool of choice for large-scale low-energy nuclear structure calculations both for stable experimentally known nuclei whose properties are accurately reproduced and systems that are only theoretically predicted. We highlight in the present dissertation the capability of EDF methods to tackle exotic phenomena appearing at the very limits of stability, that is the formation of nuclear halos. We devise a new quantitative and model-independent method that characterizes the existence and properties of halos in medium- to heavy-mass nuclei, and quantifies the impact of pairing correlations and the choice of the energy functional on the formation of such systems. These results are found to be limited by the predictive power of currently-used EDFs that rely on fitting to known experimental data. In the second part of this dissertation, we initiate the construction of non-empirical EDFs that make use of the new paradigm for vacuum nucleon-nucleon interactions set by so-called low-momentum interactions generated through the application of renormalization group techniques. These soft-core vacuum potentials are used as a step-stone of a long-term strategy which connects modern many-body techniques and EDF methods. We provide guidelines for designing several non-empirical models that include in-medium many-body effects at various levels of approximation, and can be handled in state-of-the art nuclear structure codes. In the present work, the first step is initiated through the adjustment of an operator representation of low-momentum vacuum interactions using a custom-designed parallel evolutionary algorithm. The first results highlight the possibility to grasp most of the relevant physics for low-energy nuclear structure using this numerically convenient Gaussian vertex. (author)

  5. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  6. $^{16}$O + $^{16}$O molecular structures of positive- and negative-parity superdeformed bands in $^{34}$S

    Taniguchi, Yasutaka

    2014-01-01

    The structures of excited states in $^{34}$S are investigated using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics and generator coordinate method (GCM). The GCM basis wave functions are calculated via energy variation with a constraint on the quadrupole deformation parameter $\\beta$. By applying the GCM after parity and angular momentum projections, the coexistence of two positive- and one negative-parity superdeformed (SD) bands are predicted, and low-lying states and other deformed bands are obtained. The SD bands have structures of $^{16}$O + $^{16}$O + two valence neutrons in molecular orbitals around the two $^{16}$O cores in a cluster picture. The configurations of the two valence neutrons are $\\delta^2$ and $\\pi^2$ for the positive-parity SD bands and $\\pi^1\\delta^1$ for the negative-parity SD band. The structural changes of the yrast states are also discussed.

  7. A Reconfigurable Triple-Notch-Band Antenna Integrated with Defected Microstrip Structure Band-Stop Filter for Ultra-Wideband Cognitive Radio Applications

    Yingsong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A printed reconfigurable ultra-wideband (UWB monopole antenna with triple narrow band-notched characteristics is proposed for cognitive radio applications in this paper. The triple narrow band-notched frequencies are obtained using a defected microstrip structure (DMS band stop filter (BSF embedded in the microstrip feed line and an inverted π-shaped slot etched in the rectangular radiation patch, respectively. Reconfigurable characteristics of the proposed cognitive radio antenna (CRA are achieved by means of four ideal switches integrated on the DMS-BSF and the inverted π-shaped slot. The proposed UWB CRA can work at eight modes by controlling switches ON and OFF. Moreover, impedance bandwidth, design procedures, and radiation patterns are presented for analysis and explanation of this antenna. The designed antenna operates over the frequency band between 3.1 GHz and 14 GHz (bandwidth of 127.5%, with three notched bands from 4.2 GHz to 6.2 GHz (38.5%, 6.6 GHz to 7.0 GHz (6%, and 12.2 GHz to 14 GHz (13.7%. The antenna is successfully simulated, fabricated, and measured. The results show that it has wide impedance bandwidth, multimodes characteristics, stable gain, and omnidirectional radiation patterns.

  8. A theoretical study of pressure-induced phase transitions and electronic band structure of anti-A-sesquioxide type {gamma}-Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}

    Paliwal, Uttam; Joshi, Kunj Bihari, E-mail: k_joshi@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313001 (India)

    2011-06-29

    Structural parameters and electronic band structure of anti-A-sesquioxide (aAs) type {gamma}-Be{sub 3}N{sub 2} are presented following the first-principles linear combination of atomic orbitals method within the framework of a posteriori density-functional theory implemented in the CRYSTAL code. Pressure-induced phase transitions among the four polymorphs {alpha}, {beta}, cubic-{gamma} and aAs-{gamma} of Be{sub 3}N{sub 2} are examined. Enthalpy-pressure curves do not show the possibility of pressure-induced structural phase transition to the cubic-{gamma} phase. However, {alpha} {yields} aAs-{gamma} and {beta} {yields} aAs-{gamma} structural phase transitions are observed at 139 GPa and 93 GPa, respectively. Band structure calculations predict that aAs-{gamma} Be{sub 3}N{sub 2} is an indirect semiconductor with 4.73 eV bandgap at L point. Variation of bandgap with pressure and deformation potentials are studied for the {alpha}, {beta} and aAs-{gamma} polymorphs. Pressure-dependent band structure calculations reveal that, within the low-pressure limit, bandgaps of {beta} and aAs-{gamma} increase with pressure unlike {alpha}-Be{sub 3}N{sub 2}.

  9. Unified description of rotational-, $\\gamma$-, and quasiparticle-band structures in neutron-rich mass $\\sim$ 110 region

    Bhat, G H; Sun, Y; Palit, R

    2015-01-01

    Band structures of the neutron-rich Mo- and Ru-isotopes around A $\\sim $ 110 are investigated using the triaxial projected shell model (TPSM) approach employing multi-quasiparticle configuration space. The mass region under investigation depicts a rich variety of band structures with well developed $\\gamma$- and $\\gamma\\gamma$-bands, and quasiparticle excitations based on them. It is demonstrated that TPSM provides a reasonable description of most of the observed properties, in particular, detailed structure variations observed in Mo-isotopes are well reproduced in the present work.

  10. 8-band and 14-band kp modeling of electronic band structure and material gain in Ga(In)AsBi quantum wells grown on GaAs and InP substrates

    The electronic band structure and material gain have been calculated for GaAsBi/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) with various bismuth concentrations (Bi ≤ 15%) within the 8-band and 14-band kp models. The 14-band kp model was obtained by extending the standard 8-band kp Hamiltonian by the valence band anticrossing (VBAC) Hamiltonian, which is widely used to describe Bi-related changes in the electronic band structure of dilute bismides. It has been shown that in the range of low carrier concentrations n < 5 × 1018 cm−3, material gain spectra calculated within 8- and 14-band kp Hamiltonians are similar. It means that the 8-band kp model can be used to calculate material gain in dilute bismides QWs. Therefore, it can be applied to analyze QWs containing new dilute bismides for which the VBAC parameters are unknown. Thus, the energy gap and electron effective mass for Bi-containing materials are used instead of VBAC parameters. The electronic band structure and material gain have been calculated for 8 nm wide GaInAsBi QWs on GaAs and InP substrates with various compositions. In these QWs, Bi concentration was varied from 0% to 5% and indium concentration was tuned in order to keep the same compressive strain (ε = 2%) in QW region. For GaInAsBi/GaAs QW with 5% Bi, gain peak was determined to be at about 1.5 μm. It means that it can be possible to achieve emission at telecommunication windows (i.e., 1.3 μm and 1.55 μm) for GaAs-based lasers containing GaInAsBi/GaAs QWs. For GaInAsBi/Ga0.47In0.53As/InP QWs with 5% Bi, gain peak is predicted to be at about 4.0 μm, i.e., at the wavelengths that are not available in current InP-based lasers

  11. Anticipatory Attentional Suppression of Visual Features Indexed by Oscillatory Alpha-Band Power Increases: A High-Density Electrical Mapping Study

    Snyder, Adam C.; John J Foxe

    2010-01-01

    Retinotopically specific increases in alpha-band (~10 Hz) oscillatory power have been strongly implicated in the suppression of processing for irrelevant parts of the visual field during the deployment of visuospatial attention. Here, we asked whether this alpha suppression mechanism also plays a role in the nonspatial anticipatory biasing of feature-based attention. Visual word cues informed subjects what the task-relevant feature of an upcoming visual stimulus (S2) was, while high-density e...

  12. Study of γ-vibrational band structures in 105Nb nucleus using triaxial projected shell model approach

    The study of band structures in terms of multiphonon gamma bands is an important topic in nuclear physics. The excitation at low spin region for proton rich nuclei is an important issue, but to understand the interaction of multiquasi particle excitation with gamma vibrational band, it is mandatory to study the high spin states. There are many important phenomena like nuclei with triaxially deformed (triaxial nuclei), shape coexistence are seems to be observed in this mass region. But with the increase in neutron number, the properties like triaxiality and the multiphonon γ vibrational bands are developed, as recently observed in neutron rich region i.e in Mo and Ru

  13. On the Design of Laser Structured Ka Band Multi-Chip Module

    Ghulam Mehdi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The rapid prototyping of millimeter wave (MMW multi-chip module (MCM on low-cost ceramic-polymer composite substrate using laser ablation process is presented. A Ka band MCM front-end receiver is designed, fabricated and tested. The complete front-end receiver module except the IF and power distribution sections is realized on the single prescribed substrate. The measured receiver gain, noise figure and image rejection is 37 dB, 4.25 dB and 40 dB respectively. However, it deduced from the experimental results of the two front-end modules that the complex permittivity characteristics of the substrate are altered after the laser ablation process. The effective permittivity alteration phenomenon is further validated through the characterization and comparison of various laser ablated and chemically etched Ka band parallel-coupled band-pass filters. A simple and experimentally verified method is worked out to utilize the laser ablation structuring process on the prescribed substrate. It is anticipated that the proposed method can be applied to other laminated substrates as well with the prescribed manufacturing process.

  14. Three-dimensional band structure of layered TiTe2: Photoemission final-state effects

    Three-dimensional band structure of unoccupied and occupied states of the prototype layered material TiTe2 is determined focusing on the ΓA line of the Brillouin zone. Dispersions and lifetimes of the unoccupied states, acting as the final states in the photoemission process, are determined from a very-low-energy electron diffraction experiment supported by first-principles calculations based on a Bloch waves treatment of multiple scattering. The experimental unoccupied states of TiTe2 feature dramatic non-free-electron effects such as multiband composition and nonparabolic dispersions. The valence band layer-perpendicular dispersions are then determined from a photoemission experiment consistently interpreted on the basis of the experimental final states to achieve control over the three-dimensional wave vector. The experimental results demonstrate the absence of the Te 4pz* Fermi surface pocket at the Γ point and significant self-energy renormalization of the valence band dispersions. Photoemission calculations based on a Bloch waves formalism within the one-step theory reveal limitations of understanding photoemission from layered materials such as TiTe2 in terms of direct transitions

  15. Dual Band-Notched Microstrip-Fed Vivaldi Antenna Utilizing Compact EBG Structures

    K. A. Alshamaileh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an ultra-wideband (UWB antipodal Vivaldi antenna (AVA with high-Q stopband characteristics based on compact electromagnetic bandgap (EBG structures. First, an AVA is designed and optimized to operate over an UWB spectrum. Then, two pairs of EBG cells are introduced along the antenna feed line to suppress the frequency components at 3.6–3.9 and 5.6–5.8 GHz (i.e., WiMAX and ISM bands, resp.. Simulated and measured results show a voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR below 2 for the entire 3.1–10.6 GHz band with high attenuation at the two selected subbands. This simple yet effective approach eliminates the need to deform the antenna radiators with slots/parasitic elements or comprise multilayer substrates. Furthermore, the flexibility it offers in terms of controlling both the number and locations of the band-reject frequencies is advantageous for antennas with nonuniform flares as in the AVA.

  16. Electronic structure tuning and band gap opening of graphene by hole/electron codoping

    A pathway to open the band gap of graphene by p-n codoping is presented according to the first principles study. Two models are used: Lithium adsorbed on Boron-doped graphene (BG) and Boron-Nitrogen (B/N) codoping into graphene. The stability of Lithium adsorbed on BG is firstly analyzed, showing that the hollow site is the most stable configuration, and there is no energy barrier from some metastable configurations to a stable one. After the p-n codoping, the electronic structures of graphene are modulated to open a band gap with width from 0.0 eV to 0.49 eV, depending on the codoping configurations. The intrinsic physical mechanism responsible for the gap opening is the combination of the Boron atom acting as hole doping and Nitrogen (Lithium) as electron doping. -- Highlights: → The combination of electron and hole doping is adopted to explain and modulate the band gap of graphene. → Li on B-doped graphene is more stable than B/N codoped configuration. → The opened gap can be from 0.0 to about 0.5 eV.

  17. [Band electronic structures and crystal packing forces: Progress report, July 1, 1989--December 13, 1991

    1991-12-31

    This report briefly summaries our research accomplishments made during the period of July 1, 1989 to December 13, 1991. A number of significant progresses were achieved in our studies of several different classes of low-dimensional solid state materials. On the basis of tight-binding band electronic structure calculations, we investigated the electronic properties of various organic conducting salts, cuprate superconductors, and transition-metal oxide and chalcogenide metals to find structure-property correlations governing of the physical properties of these low-dimensional materials. By employing a number of different quality basis sets, we also carried out extensive ab initio SCF-MO/MP2 calculations on model molecular systems to accurately describe the weak intermolecular contact interactions governing the structures of organic donor slats and molecular crystals. Our research efforts led to about 80 publications and two important computer programs.

  18. (Band electronic structures and crystal packing forces: Progress report, July 1, 1989--December 13, 1991)

    1991-01-01

    This report briefly summaries our research accomplishments made during the period of July 1, 1989 to December 13, 1991. A number of significant progresses were achieved in our studies of several different classes of low-dimensional solid state materials. On the basis of tight-binding band electronic structure calculations, we investigated the electronic properties of various organic conducting salts, cuprate superconductors, and transition-metal oxide and chalcogenide metals to find structure-property correlations governing of the physical properties of these low-dimensional materials. By employing a number of different quality basis sets, we also carried out extensive ab initio SCF-MO/MP2 calculations on model molecular systems to accurately describe the weak intermolecular contact interactions governing the structures of organic donor slats and molecular crystals. Our research efforts led to about 80 publications and two important computer programs.

  19. High Stability CFRP Support Structure for Ka Band Multi-Spot Cluster

    Yarza, A.; Cano, J.; Ozores, E.

    2012-07-01

    In the recent days, Ka band mission are being implemented for telecommunication satellites as emergent technology. EADS CASA Espacio (ASTRIUM) has been doing developments able to face up the demanding requirements associated to this frequency band where aspects such as in orbit stability o manufacturing accuracy are essential. Once it has been demonstrated the capability to offer excellent antenna reflectors with low mass, very low ohmic losses, excellent RF performances and very stable in orbit thermoelastic behaviour, improvements at feeder-chain level have been developed with the aim to cover the global antenna mission with excellent performances. This paper presents the product developed to accommodate a KA band multi-spot cluster to cover a telecommunication mission. It includes a description of the tasks carried out until the current development status, with the definition of the mechanical specification used as applicable and the solutions applied to meet the requirements. A CFRP structure is proposed with the aim to achieve a light mass concept, structurally speaking optimized and capable to assemble multiple feeder chain and make independent the thermomechanical behaviour of each one. Moreover, the design with CFRP leads to very stable thermoelastic behaviour of the assembly and the feeder-chain with the scope to guaranty the stability of the RF-beam for the correct electrical performances. The compatibility between the carbon fibre structure and the Aluminium feeder chain is solved by means of isostatic devices that are capable to absorb the thermal stresses coming from the different thermal expansion coefficients of the materials used. The proposed design is to be confirmed over a Qualification Model, already manufactured, with the scope to be implemented as flight hardware in a commercial spacecraft. The product is to be tested in a full qualification environmental test campaign where the capability to withstand the dynamic loads and the thermal

  20. Structural, elastic, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of MgAgSb investigated by density functional theory

    Wang, Jun-Fei; Fu, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Jun-Tao; Li, Xiao-Dong; Jiang, Zhen-Yi

    2016-08-01

    The structural, elastic, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of thermoelectric material MgAgSb in γ,β,α phases are studied with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The optimized lattice constants accord well with the experimental data. According to the calculated total energy of the three phases, the phase transition order is determined from α to γ phase with cooling, which is in agreement with the experimental result. The physical properties such as elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, and anisotropy factor are also discussed and analyzed, which indicates that the three structures are mechanically stable and each has a ductile feature. The Debye temperature is deduced from the elastic properties. The total density of states (TDOS) and partial density of states (PDOS) of the three phases are investigated. The TDOS results show that the γ phase is most stable with a pseudogap near the Fermi level, and the PDOS analysis indicates that the conduction band of the three phases is composed mostly of Mg-3s, Ag-4d, and Sb-5p. In addition, the changes of the free energy, entropy, specific heat, thermal expansion of γ-MgAgSb with temperature are obtained successfully. The obtained results above are important parameters for further experimental and theoretical tuning of doped MgAgSb as a thermoelectric material at high temperature. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11504088), the Fund from Henan University of Technology, China (Grant Nos. 2014YWQN08 and 2013JCYJ12), the Natural Science Fund from the Henan Provincial Education Department, China (Grant No. 16A140027), the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province of China (Grant Nos. 2013JQ1018 and 15JK1759), and the Science Foundation of Northwest University of China (Grant No. 14NW23).

  1. Design and RF Measurements of AN X-Band Accelerating Structure for the Sparc Project

    Alesini, D.; Bacci, A.; Falone, A.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palpini, F.; Palumbo, L.; Spataro, B.

    2007-09-01

    The paper presents the design of an X-band accelerating section for linearizing the longitudinal phase space in the Frascati Linac Coherent Light Source (SPARC). The nine cells structure, operating on the π standing wave mode, is fed by a central coupler and has been designed to obtain a 42 MV/m accelerating gradient. The 2D profile has been obtained using the electromagnetic codes Superfish and Oscar2D while the coupler has been designed using HFSS. Bead-pull measurements made on a copper prototype have been performed and the results are illustrated and compared with the numerical predictions.

  2. Staggering of the B(M1) value as a fingerprint of specific chiral bands structure

    Grodner, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear chirality has been intensively studdied for the last several years in the context of experimental as well as theoretical approach. Characteristic gamma selection rules have been predicted for the strong chiral symmetry breaking limit that has been observed in Cs isotopes. The presented analysis shows that the gamma selection rules cannot be attributed only to chiral symmetry breaking. The selection rules relate to structural composition of the chiral rotational bands, i.e. to odd particle configuration and the deformation of the core.

  3. Exceptional contours and band structure design in parity-time symmetric photonic crystals

    Cerjan, Alexander; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the properties of multidimensional parity-time symmetric periodic systems whose non-Hermitian periodicity is an integer multiple of the underlying Hermitian system's periodicity. This creates a natural set of degeneracies which can undergo thresholdless $\\mathcal{PT}$ transitions. We derive a $\\mathbf{k} \\cdot \\mathbf{p}$ perturbation theory suited to the continuous eigenvalues of such systems in terms of the modes of the underlying Hermitian system. In photonic crystals, such thresholdless $\\mathcal{PT}$ transitions are shown to yield significant control over the band structure of the system, and can result in all-angle supercollimation, a $\\mathcal{PT}$-superprism effect, and unidirectional behavior.

  4. Study on the energy band structure and photoelectrochemical performances of spinel Li4Ti5O12

    Highlights: • Spinel Li4Ti5O12 possesses more positive potential of valence band and wider band gap than TiO2. • Spinel Li4Ti5O12 displays typical n-type semiconductor characteristic and excellent UV-excitateded photocatalysis activity. • Our preliminary study will open new perspectives in investigation of other lithium-based compounds for new photocatalysts. - Abstract: Energy band structure, photoelectrochemical performances and photocatalysis activity of spinel Li4Ti5O12 are investigated for the first time in this paper. Li4Ti5O12 possesses more positive valence band potential and wider band gap than TiO2 due to its valence band consisting of Li1s and Ti3d orbitals mixed with O2p. Li4Ti5O12 shows typical photocatalysis material characteristics and excellent photocatlytic activity under UV irradiation

  5. The Development of Layered Photonic Band Gap Structures Using a Micro-Transfer Molding Technique

    Kevin Jerome Sutherland

    2001-06-27

    Over the last ten years, photonic band gap (PBG) theory and technology have become an important area of research because of the numerous possible applications ranging from high-efficiency laser diodes to optical circuitry. This research concentrates on reducing the length scale in the fabrication of layered photonic band gap structures and developing procedures to improve processing consistency. Various procedures and materials have been used in the fabrication of layered PBG structures. This research focused on an economical micro transfer molding approach to create the final PBG structure. A poly dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber mold was created from a silicon substrate. It was filled with epoxy and built layer-by-layer to create a 3-D epoxy structure. This structure was infiltrated with nanoparticle titania or a titania sol-gel, then fired to remove the polymer mold, leaving a monolithic ceramic inverse of the epoxy structure. The final result was a lattice of titania rolds that resembles a face-centered tetragonal structure. The original intent of this research was to miniaturize this process to a bar size small enough to create a photonic band gap for wavelengths of visible electro-magnetic radiation. The factor limiting progress was the absence of a silicon master mold of small enough dimensions. The Iowa State Microelectronics Research Center fabricated samples with periodicities of 2.5 and 1.0 microns with the existing technology, but a sample was needed on the order of 0.3 microns or less. A 0.4 micron sample was received from Sandia National Laboratory, which was made through an electron beam lithography process, but it contained several defects. The results of the work are primarily from the 2.5 and 1.0 micron samples. Most of the work focused on changing processing variables in order to optimize the infiltration procedure for the best results. Several critical parameters were identified, ranging from the ambient conditions to the specifics of the

  6. Band structure engineering for solar energy applications: Zinc oxide(1-x) selenium(x) films and devices

    Mayer, Marie Annette

    New technologies motivate the development of new semiconducting materials, for which structural, electrical and chemical properties are not well understood. In addition to new materials systems, there are huge opportunities for new applications, especially in solar energy conversion. In this dissertation I explore the role of band structure engineering of semiconducting oxides for solar energy. Due to the abundance and electrochemical stability of oxides, the appropriate modification could make them appealing for applications in both photovoltaics and photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. This dissertation describes the design, synthesis and evaluation of the alloy ZnO1-xSe x for these purposes. I review several methods of band structure engineering including strain, quantum confinement and alloying. A detailed description of the band anticrossing (BAC) model for highly mismatched alloys is provided, including the derivation of the BAC model as well as recent work and potential applications. Thin film ZnOxSe1-x samples are grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). I describe in detail the effect of growth conditions (temperature, pressure and laser fluence) on the chemistry, structure and optoelectronic properties of ZnOxSe1-x. The films are grown using different combinations of PLD conditions and characterized with a variety of techniques. Phase pure films with low roughness and high crystallinity were obtained at temperatures below 450¢ªC, pressures less than 10-4 Torr and laser fluences on the order of 1.5 J/cm 2. Electrical conduction was still observed despite heavy concentrations of grain boundaries. The band structure of ZnO1-xSex is then examined in detail. The bulk electron affinity of a ZnO thin film was measured to be 4.5 eV by pinning the Fermi level with native defects. This is explained in the framework of the amphoteric defect model. A shift in the ZnO1-xSe x valence band edge with x is observed using synchrotron x-ray absorption and emission

  7. Volume and surface photoemission from tungsten. I. Calculation of band structure and emission spectra

    Christensen, N. Egede; Feuerbacher, B.

    1974-01-01

    photoemission spectra from W single crystals. The nondirect as well as the direct models for bulk photoemission processes are investigated. The emission from the three low-index surfaces (100), (110), and (111) exhibits strong dependence on direction and acceptance cone. According to the present band model...... there should essentially be no emission normal to the (110) face for photon energies between 9.4 and 10.6 eV. Experimental observation of emission in this gap, however, implies effects not included in the simple bulk models. In particular, effects arising from surface emission have been considered, i.......e., emission of those electrons which are excited in a single-step process from initial states near the surface to final states outside the crystal. The electrons that are emitted from the surface in directions perpendicular to the crystal planes carry information on the one-dimensional surface density of...

  8. The electronic structure of Nb3Al/Nb3Sn, a new test case for flat/steep band model of superconductivity

    Yanlong Ding; Shuiquan Deng; Yong Zhao

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we choose Nb3Al/Nb3Sn as a new test case for flat/steep band model of superconductivity. Based on the density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation, the electronic structure of Nb3Al/Nb3Sn has been studied. The obtained results agree well with those of the earlier studies and show clearly flat bands around the Fermi level. The steep bands as characterized in this work locate around the M point in the first Brillouin zone. The obtained results reveal that Nb3Al/Nb3Sn fits more to the ‘‘Flat/steep’’ band model than to the van-Hove singularity scenario. The flat/steep band condition for superconductivity implies a different thermodynamic behavior of superconductors other than that predicted from the conventional BCS theory. This observation sets up an indicator for selecting a suitable superconductor when its large-scale industrial use is needed, for example, in superconducting maglev system or ITER project.

  9. 16O + 16O molecular structures of positive- and negative-parity superdeformed bands in 34S

    Taniguchi Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The structures of excited states in 34S are investigated using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics and generator coordinate method(GCM. The GCM basis wave functions are calculated via energy variation with a constraint on the quadrupole deformation parameter β. By applying the GCM after parity and angular momentum projections, the coexistence of two positive- and one negative-parity super de formed(SD bands are predicted, and low-lying states and other deformed bands are obtained. The SD bands have structures of 16O + 16O + two valence neutrons in molecular orbitals around the two 16O cores in a cluster picture. The configurations of the two valence neutrons are δ2 and π2 for the positive-parity SD bands and π1δ1 for the negative parity SD band.

  10. A Decade of Short-duration Gamma-ray Burst Broad-band Afterglows: Energetics, Circumburst Densities, and Jet Opening Angles

    Fong, Wen-fai; Margutti, Raffaella; Zauderer, B Ashley

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive catalog and analysis of broad-band afterglow observations for 103 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), comprised of all short GRBs from November 2004 to March 2015 with prompt follow-up observations in the X-ray, optical, near-infrared and/or radio bands. These afterglow observations have uncovered 71 X-ray detections, 30 optical/NIR detections, and 4 radio detections. Employing the standard afterglow synchrotron model, we perform joint probability analyses for a subset of 38 short GRBs with well-sampled light curves to infer the burst isotropic-equivalent energies and circumburst densities. For this subset, we find median isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of E_gamma,iso~2x10^51 erg, and E_K,iso~(1-3)x10^51 erg, respectively, depending on the values of the model input parameters. We further find that short GRBs occur in low-density environments, with a median density of n~(3-15)x10^-3 cm^-3, and that ~80-95% of bursts have densities of less than 1 cm^-3. We inve...

  11. Bohr Hamiltonian with different mass parameters applied to band structures of Eu isotopes built on Nilsson orbitals

    ERMAMATOV M J; YÉPEZ-MARTÍNEZ H; SRIVASTAVA P C

    2016-05-01

    The band structure of the proton-odd nuclei $^{153,155}$Eu, built on Nilsson orbitals, is investigated within the framework of a recently developed extended Bohr Hamiltonian model. The relative distance between spherical orbitals is taken into account by considering single-particle energies as a parameter which changes with increasing neutron number. Energy levels of each band and$B(E2)$ values inside the ground-state band are calculated and compared with the available experimental data. Thus, more comprehensive information on the structure of deformed nuclei can be obtained by studying the rotation–vibration spectra of odd nuclei built on Nilsson single-particle orbitals.

  12. Low-lying levels and high-spin band structures in sup 1 sup 0 sup 2 Rh

    Gizon, J; Timar, J; Cata-Danil, G; Nyakó, B M; Zolnai, L; Boston, A J; Joss, D T; Paul, E S; Semple, A T; O'Brien, N J; Parry, C M; Bucurescu, D; Brant, S; Paar, V

    1999-01-01

    Levels in sup 1 sup 0 sup 2 Rh have been populated in the reaction sup 7 sup 0 Zn+ sup 3 sup 6 S at 130 MeV. The level structure of sup 1 sup 0 sup 2 Rh has been investigated using the EUROGAM II array. Low-lying states and four high-spin bands have been identified. The configurations of low-lying levels and two-quasiparticle bands are interpreted in the frame of the interacting boson-fermion-fermion model. The four observed band structures are also compared with cranked shell model calculations using a modified oscillator potential.

  13. Analysis of the Band-Structure in (Ga, MnAs Epitaxial Layers by Optical Methods

    O. Yastrubchak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ternary III-V semiconductor (Ga, MnAs has recently drawn a lot of attention as the model diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor, combining semiconducting properties with magnetism. (Ga, MnAs layers are usually gown by the low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy (LT-MBE technique. Below a magnetic transition temperature, TC, substitutional Mn2+ ions are ferromagnetically ordered owing to interaction with spin-polarized holes. However, the character of electronic states near the Fermi energy and the electronic structure in ferromagnetic (Ga, MnAs are still a matter of controversy. The photoreflectance (PR spectroscopy was applied to study the band-structure evolution in (Ga, MnAs layers with increasing Mn content. We have investigated thick (800-700 nm and 230-300 nm (Ga, MnAs layers with Mn content in the wide range from 0.001 % to 6 % and, as a reference, undoped GaAs layer, grown by LT-MBE on semi-insulating (001 GaAs substrates. Our findings were interpreted in terms of the model, which assumes that the mobile holes residing in the valence band of ferromagnetic (Ga, MnAs and the Fermi level position determined by the concentration of valence-band holes. The ternary III-V semiconductor (Ga, MnAs has recently drawn a lot of attention as the model diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor, combining semiconducting properties with magnetism. (Ga, MnAs layers are usually gown by the low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy (LT-MBE technique. Below a magnetic transition temperature, TC, substitutional Mn2+ ions are ferromagnetically ordered owing to interaction with spin-polarized holes. However, the character of electronic states near the Fermi energy and the electronic structure in ferromagnetic (Ga, MnAs are still a matter of controversy. The photoreflectance (PR spectroscopy was applied to study the band-structure evolution in (Ga, MnAs layers with increasing Mn content. We have investigated thick (800-700 nm and 230-300 nm (Ga

  14. Relativistic Band Structure and Fermi Surface of PdTe2 by the LMTO Method

    Jan, J. P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1977-01-01

    The energy bands of the trigonal layer compound PdTe2 have been calculated, using the relativistic linear muffin-tin orbitals method. The bandstructure is separated into three distinct regions with low-lying Te 5s bands, conduction bands formed by Pd 4d and Te 5p states, and high-lying bands formed...

  15. Correlating structure and electronic band-edge properties in organolead halide perovskites nanoparticles.

    Zhu, Qiushi; Zheng, Kaibo; Abdellah, Mohamed; Generalov, Alexander; Haase, Dörthe; Carlson, Stefan; Niu, Yuran; Heimdal, Jimmy; Engdahl, Anders; Messing, Maria E; Pullerits, Tonu; Canton, Sophie E

    2016-06-01

    After having emerged as primary contenders in the race for highly efficient optoelectronics materials, organolead halide perovskites (OHLP) are now being investigated in the nanoscale regime as promising building blocks with unique properties. For example, unlike their bulk counterpart, quantum dots of OHLP are brightly luminescent, owing to large exciton binding energies that cannot be rationalized solely on the basis of quantum confinement. Here, we establish the direct correlation between the structure and the electronic band-edge properties of CH3NH3PbBr3 nanoparticles. Complementary structural and spectroscopic measurements probing long-range and local order reveal that lattice strain influences the nature of the valence band and modifies the subtle stereochemical activity of the Pb(2+) lone-pair. More generally, this work demonstrates that the stereochemical activity of the lone-pair at the metal site is a specific physicochemical parameter coupled to composition, size and strain, which can be employed to engineer novel functionalities in OHLP nanomaterials. PMID:27189431

  16. Band structure and transmission characteristics of complex phononic crystals by multi-level substructure scheme

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2015-10-01

    A fast scheme based on the multi-level substructure technique is proposed for the band structure and transmission characteristics calculation of phononic crystals uniformly. The main idea is that finite element models of phononic crystals are divided into several domains by a special multi-level decomposition. For the band structure calculation, the upscaling calculation is employed to condense the internal stiffness matrix of the unit cell into the Bloch boundary. Due to the internal stiffness matrix does not change along with reduced wave vectors in an iteration process, the scheme can reduce the computational scale and improve the efficiency greatly, meanwhile it does not introduce approximation into the traditional finite element model. For the transmission characteristics calculation, the unit cell of the phononic crystal is periodic which is taken as a substructure with the same coefficient matrix. Moreover, the downscaling calculation of internal displacements can be selected flexibly. Some closely watched examples of the three-dimensional locally resonant, defect state of Lamb wave and Bragg waveguide are analyzed. Numerical results indicate that the proposed scheme is efficient and accurate, which may widely be applicable and suitable for complex phononic crystal problems, and provides a reliable numerical tool to optimize and design crystal devices.

  17. Silicon carbide embedded in carbon nanofibres: structure and band gap determination.

    Minella, Anja Bonatto; Pohl, Darius; Täschner, Christine; Erni, Rolf; Ummethala, Raghu; Rümmeli, Mark H; Schultz, Ludwig; Rellinghaus, Bernd

    2014-11-28

    Materials drastically alter their electronic properties when being reduced to the nanoscale due to quantum effects. Concerning semiconductors, the band gap is expected to broaden as a result of the quantum confinement. In this study we report on the successful synthesis of wide bandgap SiC nanowires (with great potential for applications) and the local determination of their band gap. Their value was found to be higher with respect to bulk SiC. The nanowires are grown as a heterostructure, i.e. encapsulated in carbon nanofibres via dc hot-filament Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition on the Si/SiO2 substrate. The structure of the as-produced carbon nanofibres was characterized by means of aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Two different pure SiC polytypes, namely the 3C (cubic) and the 6H (hexagonal) as well as distorted structures are observed. The SiC nanowires have diameters in the range of 10-15 nm and lengths of several hundred nanometers. The formation of the SiC is a result of the substrate etching during the growth of the CNFs and a subsequent simultaneous diffusion of not only carbon, but also silicon through the catalyst particle. PMID:25307877

  18. Experimental Study Of X-band Dielectric-loaded Accelerating Structures

    Jing, C

    2005-01-01

    A joint Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)/Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) program is under way to investigate X- band dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures, using high-power 11.424GHz radiation from the NRL Magnicon facility. As an advanced accelerator concepts, the dielectric-loaded accelerator offers the potential for a simple, inexpensive alternative to high-gradient RF linear accelerators. In this thesis, a comprehensive account of X-band DLA structure design, including theoretical calculation, numerical simulation, fabrication and testing, is presented in detail. Two types of loading dielectrics, alumina and MgxCa1−xTiO 3 (MCT), are investigated. For alumina (with dielectric constant 9.4), no RF breakdown has been observed up to 5 MW of drive power (equivalent to 8MV/m accelerating gradient) in the high power RF testing at NRL, but multipactor was observed to absorb a large fraction of the incident microwave power. Experimental results on suppression of multipactor using TiN coating o...

  19. Momentum-Space Imaging of the Dirac Band Structure in Molecular Graphene via Quasiparticle Interference

    Stephenson, Anna; Gomes, Kenjiro K.; Ko, Wonhee; Mar, Warren; Manoharan, Hari C.

    2014-03-01

    Molecular graphene is a nanoscale artificial lattice composed of carbon monoxide molecules arranged one by one, realizing a dream of exploring exotic quantum materials by design. This assembly is done by atomic manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) on a Cu(111) surface. To directly probe the transformation of normal surface state electrons into massless Dirac fermions, we map the momentum space dispersion through the Fourier analysis of quasiparticle scattering maps acquired at different energies with the STM. The Fourier analysis not only bridges the real-space and momentum-space data but also reveals the chiral nature of those quasiparticles, through a set of selection rules of allowed scattering involving the pseudospin and valley degrees of freedom. The graphene-like band structure can be reshaped with simple alterations to the lattice, such as the addition of a strain. We analyze the effect on the momentum space band structure of multiple types of strain on our system. Supported by DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  20. Band structure of topological insulators from noise measurements in tunnel junctions

    Cascales, Juan Pedro, E-mail: juanpedro.cascales@uam.es; Martínez, Isidoro; Aliev, Farkhad G., E-mail: farkhad.aliev@uam.es [Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada C3, Instituto Nicolas Cabrera (INC), Condensed Matter Physics Institute (IFIMAC), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Katmis, Ferhat; Moodera, Jagadeesh S. [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Chang, Cui-Zu [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Guerrero, Rubén [Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia (IMDEA-Nanociencia), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-21

    The unique properties of spin-polarized surface or edge states in topological insulators (TIs) make these quantum coherent systems interesting from the point of view of both fundamental physics and their implementation in low power spintronic devices. Here we present such a study in TIs, through tunneling and noise spectroscopy utilizing TI/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Co tunnel junctions with bottom TI electrodes of either Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} or Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. We demonstrate that features related to the band structure of the TI materials show up in the tunneling conductance and even more clearly through low frequency noise measurements. The bias dependence of 1/f noise reveals peaks at specific energies corresponding to band structure features of the TI. TI tunnel junctions could thus simplify the study of the properties of such quantum coherent systems that can further lead to the manipulation of their spin-polarized properties for technological purposes.