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1

Possible impact of rising sea levels on vector-borne infectious diseases  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Vector-borne infectious diseases are a significant cause of human and animal mortality and morbidity. Modeling studies predict that changes in climate that accompany global warming will alter the transmission risk of many vector-borne infectious diseases in different parts of the world. Global warming will also raise sea levels, which will lead to an increase in saline and brackish water bodies in coastal areas. The potential impact of rising sea levels, a...

Ramasamy Ranjan; Surendran Sinnathamby N

2011-01-01

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Disentangling Vector-Borne Transmission Networks: A Universal DNA Barcoding Method to Identify Vertebrate Hosts from Arthropod Bloodmeals  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Emerging infectious diseases represent a challenge for global economies and public health. About one fourth of the last pandemics have been originated by the spread of vector-borne pathogens. In this sense, the advent of modern molecular techniques has enhanced our capabilities to understand vector-host interactions and disease ecology. However, host identification protocols have poorly profited of international DNA barcoding initiatives and/or have focused exclusively on a limited array of v...

Alcaide, Miguel; Rico, Ciro; Ruiz, Santiago; Soriguer, Ramo?n C.; Mun?oz, Joaqui?n; Figuerola, Jordi

2009-01-01

3

[Important vector-borne infectious diseases among humans in Germany : Epidemiological aspects].  

Science.gov (United States)

Vector-borne infections pathogenic to humans play an important role in Germany. The relevant zoonotic pathogens are either endemic throughout Germany (e.g. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu latu) or only in specific regions, e.g. tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus and hantavirus. They cause a substantial burden of disease. Prevention and control largely rely on public advice and the application of personal protective measures (e.g. TBE virus vaccination and protection against vectors). High quality surveillance and targeted epidemiological studies are fundamental for the evaluation of temporal and spatial risks of infection and the effectiveness of preventive measures. Aside from endemic pathogens, vector-borne infections acquired abroad, mostly transmitted by mosquitoes, have to be systematically and intensively monitored as well, to assess the risk of infection for German residents traveling abroad and to adequately evaluate the risk of autochthonous transmission. Related issues, such as invasive species of mosquitoes in Germany and climate change, have to be taken into consideration. Such pathogens include West Nile, dengue and chikungunya viruses, as well as malaria parasites (Plasmodium species). The article presents an overview of the epidemiological situation of selected relevant vector-borne infections in Germany. PMID:24781913

Frank, C; Faber, M; Hellenbrand, W; Wilking, H; Stark, K

2014-05-01

4

Transmission parameters of vector-borne infections.  

Science.gov (United States)

Vector-borne infections are those for which the agent (virus, bacteria, or parasite) is transmitted from an infected host (animal or human) to another by a hematophagous arthropod (mosquito, tick, lice, and flea). Two parameters quantify the dynamics of a vector-borne infection: (1) the basic reproductive number (R(0)) that is the mean number of secondary infections transmitted from an infectious host by the bite of the vector and (2) the generation interval that explores the speed of occurrence of secondary cases transmitted by the vector from an infectious case. In a population in which some individuals are immune, the parameter of interest is the net reproduction number (R) function of R(0) and the proportion of those immune. For vector-borne infectious agents, R(0) is determined by the number of vectors in contact with a given individual (m), the number of a given vector bites/day on individuals (a), the daily survival rate of the vector (p), the duration of the pathogenic agent's development cycle in the vector (n), the proportion of infected vectors that are really infectious (vector competence) (b), the probability of agent transmission from a viremic individual to the vector for one bite (c) and the host's infectiousness clearance rate (r) with R(0)=(m. a(2). p(n)/-lnp). b. c/r. These parameters are related to geographic and climatic conditions and cannot, therefore, be extrapolated from one situation to another. PMID:21993137

Desenclos, J-C

2011-11-01

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Malaria and other vector-borne infection surveillance in the U.S. Department of Defense Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center-Global Emerging Infections Surveillance program: review of 2009 accomplishments  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Vector-borne infections (VBI) are defined as infectious diseases transmitted by the bite or mechanical transfer of arthropod vectors. They constitute a significant proportion of the global infectious disease burden. United States (U.S.) Department of Defense (DoD) personnel are especially vulnerable to VBIs due to occupational contact with arthropod vectors, immunological naiveté to previously unencountered pathogens, and limited diagnostic and treatment options available ...

Fukuda Mark M; Klein Terry A; Kochel Tadeusz; Quandelacy Talia M; Smith Bryan L; Villinski Jeff; Bethell Delia; Tyner Stuart; Se Youry; Lon Chanthap; Saunders David; Johnson Jacob; Wagar Eric; Walsh Douglas; Kasper Matthew

2011-01-01

6

VECTOR BORNE TRANSMISSIBLE ZOONOSES IN MONTENEGRO  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Vector borne transmissible zoonoses are becoming more and more important in the group of emerging and re-emerging infections. We present the characteristics and actuality of this group of infectious diseases in Montenegro for the period 1998 - 2011. In examinations, standard epidemiological, clinical, serological, pathohistological diagnostic methods are employed. Natural conditions in Montenegro make it an important endemic area for more vector borne transmissible zoonoses. The changes of ecological characteristics, the vectors and infective agents, present the accidence for expansion and increasing importance of these infections in national pathology. According to the fact that it is an international port of nautical, continental and air traffic, Montenegro has responsibility for control and management of diseases belonging to the group of the travel and tropical diseases.

Gordana Mijovic

2012-02-01

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The past and present threat of vector-borne diseases in deployed troops.  

Science.gov (United States)

From time immemorial, vector-borne diseases have severely reduced the fighting capacity of armies and caused suspension or cancellation of military operations. Since World War I, infectious diseases have no longer been the main causes of morbidity and mortality among soldiers. However, most recent conflicts involving Western armies have occurred overseas, increasing the risk of vector-borne disease for the soldiers and for the displaced populations. The threat of vector-borne disease has changed with the progress in hygiene and disease control within the military: some diseases have lost their military significance (e.g. plague, yellow fever, and epidemic typhus); others remain of concern (e.g. malaria and dengue fever); and new potential threats have appeared (e.g. West Nile encephalitis and chikungunya fever). For this reason, vector control and personal protection strategies are always major requirements in ensuring the operational readiness of armed forces. Scientific progress has allowed a reduction in the impact of arthropod-borne diseases on military forces, but the threat is always present, and a failure in the context of vector control or in the application of personal protection measures could allow these diseases to have the same devastating impact on human health and military readiness as they did in the past. PMID:20222896

Pages, F; Faulde, M; Orlandi-Pradines, E; Parola, P

2010-03-01

8

Canine vector-borne diseases in Brazil  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs are highly prevalent in Brazil and represent a challenge to veterinarians and public health workers, since some diseases are of great zoonotic potential. Dogs are affected by many protozoa (e.g., Babesia vogeli, Leishmania infantum, and Trypanosoma cruzi, bacteria (e.g., Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis, and helminths (e.g., Dirofilaria immitis and Dipylidium caninum that are transmitted by a diverse range of arthropod vectors, including ticks, fleas, lice, triatomines, mosquitoes, tabanids, and phlebotomine sand flies. This article focuses on several aspects (etiology, transmission, distribution, prevalence, risk factors, diagnosis, control, prevention, and public health significance of CVBDs in Brazil and discusses research gaps to be addressed in future studies.

Dantas-Torres Filipe

2008-08-01

9

Genetic manipulation of endosymbionts to control vector and vector borne diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Vector borne diseases (VBD are on the rise because of failure of the existing methods of control of vector and vector borne diseases and the climate change. A steep rise of VBDs are due to several factors like selection of insecticide resistant vector population, drug resistant parasite population and lack of effective vaccines against the VBDs. Environmental pollution, public health hazard and insecticide resistant vector population indicate that the insecticides are no longer a sustainable control method of vector and vector-borne diseases. Amongst the various alternative control strategies, symbiont based approach utilizing endosymbionts of arthropod vectors could be explored to control the vector and vector borne diseases. The endosymbiont population of arthropod vectors could be exploited in different ways viz., as a chemotherapeutic target, vaccine target for the control of vectors. Expression of molecules with antiparasitic activity by genetically transformed symbiotic bacteria of disease-transmitting arthropods may serve as a powerful approach to control certain arthropod-borne diseases. Genetic transformation of symbiotic bacteria of the arthropod vector to alter the vector’s ability to transmit pathogen is an alternative means of blocking the transmission of VBDs. In Indian scenario, where dengue, chikungunya, malaria and filariosis are prevalent, paratransgenic based approach can be used effectively. [Vet World 2012; 5(9.000: 571-576

Jay Prakash Gupta

10

Zoonoses and vector-borne diseases in Croatia - a multidisciplinary approach  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases create constant and serious concerns for public health. The majority of emerging infectious diseases (EID are wildlife zoonotic diseases and vector-borne diseases. Croatia has a long tradition in the control, management and research of EID zoonotic diseases and vector-borne diseases. There has also been a long and advantageous tradition in the collaboration of different experts and professionals in EID research in Croatia involving physician clinicians in infectious diseases, microbiologists, pathologists, veterinarians and animal scientists, ecologists, forestry experts, wildlife scientists, public health specialists and epidemiologists and laboratory scientists. The University Hospital for Infectious Diseases in Zagreb established the Centre for Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases in liaison with national and international partners from Europe and the United States. This Centre is working in line with the ‘One Health initiative’ which recognises the inter-relationships between human, animal and environmental health.

Josip Margaleti?, PhD

2009-03-01

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Canine vector-borne diseases in Brazil  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs) are highly prevalent in Brazil and represent a challenge to veterinarians and public health workers, since some diseases are of great zoonotic potential. Dogs are affected by many protozoa (e.g., Babesia vogeli, Leishmania infantum, and Trypanosoma cruzi), bacteria (e.g., Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis), and helminths (e.g., Dirofilaria immitis and Dipylidium caninum) t...

Dantas-Torres Filipe

2008-01-01

12

Risk based surveillance for vector borne diseases  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Increased temperatures and changes in rainfall pattern are likely to facilitate the spread and establishment of new vector borne diseases in the Baltic See Region. There are a large number of potential vector borne threats to the area. Existing endemic vector borne diseases are likely to increase and new exotic diseases like Usutu and West Nile Virus may lead to outbreaks in the region. In the worst case the combined effect of climate change and globalization may potentially lead to European outbreaks of important zoonotic mosquito borne infections like Rift Valley Fever in cattle and Japanese Encephalitis in swine. Being able to model the impact of climate and environmental change on the transmission intensity of vector borne diseases is potentially a powerful tool to both monitor and prevent outbreaks in a cost effective way. The recent unexpected outbreaks of bluetongue and Schmallenberg virus in ruminants have been attributed an increase in European temperatures. Mathematical models clearly demonstratethe potential for increased virus transmission at elevated temperatures. however there is little evidence to support the idea that the spread of these tropical viruses in northern Europe is the direct result of climate change. The potential for virus transmission by biting midges was here modeled monthly for the Baltic See Region and the rest of Europe. The results showed that Baltic See Region has a lower transmission potential than most other areas in Europe. And the model identified an increasing trend in transmission potential over the last 25 years. However the model suggested that the climate in the Baltic See Region has always permitted transmission of these diseases. The model therefore suggests that a presently unknown factor until recently prevented introduction and spread in Northern Europe. This model approach may be used as a basis for risk based surveillance. In risk based surveillance limited resources for surveillance are targeted at geographical areas most at risk and only when the risk is high. This makes risk based surveillance a cost effective alternative to the present surveillance strategies based on random samples. We still donâ??t understand the mechanisms underlying the recent outbreaks of bluetongue, Schmallenberg, Usutu virus, tick borne encephalitis or dirofilarial worms in the Baltic See Region. It is therefore not possible to use mathematical models to pinpoint the next outbreak of an exotic vector borne disease. A new outbreak will most likely be detected by a veterinarian deciding to submit a sample based on a subjective clinical suspicion. But the question is how far the epidemic will progress before a veterinarian decides to submit this crucial sample to a diagnostic laboratory. Risk based surveillance models may reduce this delay. An important feature of risk based surveillance models is their ability to continuously communicate the level of risk to veterinarians and hence increase awareness when risk is high. This is essential for submission of samples and hence early detection of outbreaks. Models for vector borne diseases in Denmark have demonstrated dramatic variation in outbreak risk during the season and between years. The Danish VetMap project aims to make these risk based surveillance estimates available on the veterinarians smart phones, thus allowing easy access to risk estimates when in the field. Knowing when and where the potential risk for transmission of a specific vector borne disease is high is likely to help veterinarians decide when and when not to submit a sample to a diagnostic laboratory. This may both increase sensitivity of national surveillance and reduce the cost.

Bødker, Rene

13

Web-based GIS: the vector-borne disease airline importation risk (VBD-AIR tool  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past century, the size and complexity of the air travel network has increased dramatically. Nowadays, there are 29.6 million scheduled flights per year and around 2.7 billion passengers are transported annually. The rapid expansion of the network increasingly connects regions of endemic vector-borne disease with the rest of the world, resulting in challenges to health systems worldwide in terms of vector-borne pathogen importation and disease vector invasion events. Here we describe the development of a user-friendly Web-based GIS tool: the Vector-Borne Disease Airline Importation Risk Tool (VBD-AIR, to help better define the roles of airports and airlines in the transmission and spread of vector-borne diseases. Methods Spatial datasets on modeled global disease and vector distributions, as well as climatic and air network traffic data were assembled. These were combined to derive relative risk metrics via air travel for imported infections, imported vectors and onward transmission, and incorporated into a three-tier server architecture in a Model-View-Controller framework with distributed GIS components. A user-friendly web-portal was built that enables dynamic querying of the spatial databases to provide relevant information. Results The VBD-AIR tool constructed enables the user to explore the interrelationships among modeled global distributions of vector-borne infectious diseases (malaria. dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya and international air service routes to quantify seasonally changing risks of vector and vector-borne disease importation and spread by air travel, forming an evidence base to help plan mitigation strategies. The VBD-AIR tool is available at http://www.vbd-air.com. Conclusions VBD-AIR supports a data flow that generates analytical results from disparate but complementary datasets into an organized cartographical presentation on a web map for the assessment of vector-borne disease movements on the air travel network. The framework built provides a flexible and robust informatics infrastructure by separating the modules of functionality through an ontological model for vector-borne disease. The VBD?AIR tool is designed as an evidence base for visualizing the risks of vector-borne disease by air travel for a wide range of users, including planners and decisions makers based in state and local government, and in particular, those at international and domestic airports tasked with planning for health risks and allocating limited resources.

Huang Zhuojie

2012-08-01

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[Climate- and vector-borne diseases  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The predicted changes in climate have raised concerns that vector-borne diseases may emerge or expand in tempered regions. Malaria, leishmaniasis and tick-borne illnesses are discussed in terms of climate change and their endemic potential, especially in Denmark. While climate may play an important role in disease patterns, it is evident that transmission potential is governed by a complex of factors, including socio-economy, health-care capacity and ecology. In Denmark, malaria and leishmaniasis are unlikely to become public health problems, whereas the potential for tick-borne illnesses may increase Udgivelsesdato: 2009/10/26

Bygbjerg, I.C.; Schioler, K.L.

2009-01-01

15

Canine and feline vector-borne diseases in Italy: current situation and perspectives  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract In Italy, dogs and cats are at risk of becoming infected by different vector-borne pathogens, including protozoa, bacteria, and helminths. Ticks, fleas, phlebotomine sand flies, and mosquitoes are recognized vectors of pathogens affecting cats and dogs, some of which (e.g., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Dipylidium caninum, Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria immitis, and Dirofilaria repens are of zoonotic concern. Recent studies have highlighted the potential of fleas as vectors of pathogens of zoonotic relevance (e.g., Rickettsia felis in this country. While some arthropod vectors (e.g., ticks and fleas are present in certain Italian regions throughout the year, others (e.g., phlebotomine sand flies are most active during the summer season. Accordingly, control strategies, such as those relying on the systematic use of acaricides and insecticides, should be planned on the basis of the ecology of both vectors and pathogens in different geographical areas in order to improve their effectiveness in reducing the risk of infection by vector-borne pathogens. This article reviews the current situation and perspectives of canine and feline vector-borne diseases in Italy.

Dantas-Torres Filipe

2010-01-01

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Host population persistence in the face of introduced vector-borne diseases: Hawaii amakihi and avian malaria  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The past quarter century has seen an unprecedented increase in the number of new and emerging infectious diseases throughout the world, with serious implications for human and wildlife populations. We examined host persistence in the face of introduced vector-borne diseases in Hawaii, where introduced avian malaria and introduced vectors have had a negative impact on most populations of Hawaiian forest birds for nearly a century. We studied birds, parasites, and vectors in nine study areas fr...

Woodworth, Bethany L.; Atkinson, Carter T.; Lapointe, Dennis A.; Hart, Patrick J.; Spiegel, Caleb S.; Tweed, Erik J.; Henneman, Carlene; Lebrun, Jaymi; Denette, Tami; Demots, Rachel; Kozar, Kelly L.; Triglia, Dennis; Lease, Dan; Gregor, Aaron; Smith, Tom

2005-01-01

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Vector-borne helminths of dogs and humans in Europe  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Presently, 45% of the total human population of Europe, as well as their domestic and companion animals, are exposed to the risk of vector-borne helminths (VBH) causing diseases. A plethora of intrinsic biological and extrinsic factors affect the relationship among helminths, vectors and animal hosts, in a constantly changing environment. Although canine dirofilarioses by Dirofilaria immitis and Dirofilaria repens are key examples of the success of VBH spreading into non-endemic areas, anothe...

Otranto, Domenico; Dantas-torres, Filipe; Brianti, Emanuele; Traversa, Donato; Petric?, Dusan; Genchi, Claudio; Capelli, Gioia

2013-01-01

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Vector-borne helminths of dogs and humans in Europe  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Presently, 45% of the total human population of Europe, as well as their domestic and companion animals, are exposed to the risk of vector-borne helminths (VBH) causing diseases. A plethora of intrinsic biological and extrinsic factors affect the relationship among helminths, vectors and animal hosts, in a constantly changing environment. Although canine dirofilarioses by Dirofilaria immitis and Dirofilaria repens are key examples of the success of VBH spr...

2013-01-01

19

Therapy of vector-borne protozoan infections in nonendemic settings  

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Vector-borne protozoan infections are responsible for a wide variety of illnesses (mainly malaria, trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis) affecting tropical and subtropical areas, but increasingly diagnosed in nonendemic settings. This article summarizes the therapeutic developments for these conditions during the past decade and focuses specifically on treatment recommendations for returning travelers and migrants. The treatment of malaria has known the most spectacular improvements. Progress in...

Bottieau, E.; Vekemans, M.; Gompel, A.

2011-01-01

20

Canine babesiosis in northern Portugal and molecular characterization of vector-borne co-infections  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Protozoa and bacteria transmitted by arthropods, including ticks and phlebotomine sand flies, may cause a wide range of canine vector-borne diseases. Dogs can be simultaneously or sequentially infected with multiple pathogens. Canine babesiosis caused by Babesia canis canis and Babesia canis vogeli is known to occur in Portugal. This study assessed, by means of blood smear examination, PCR and DNA nucleotide sequencing, the presence of Babesia spp. and co-infecting agents Leishmania, Anaplasma/Ehrlichia and Hepatozoon in 45 dogs from northern Portugal clinically suspected of babesiosis. Results Forty-four dogs (98% had infection with B. canis canis and one with B. canis vogeli. Co-infections were detected in nine animals (20%. Eight dogs were found infected with two vector-borne agents: six with B. canis canis and Leishmania infantum; one with B. canis canis and Ehrlichia canis; and one with B. canis canis and Hepatozoon canis. Another dog was infected with three vector-borne pathogens: B. canis vogeli, E. canis and L. infantum. Overall, L. infantum was found in seven (16%, E. canis in two (4%, and H. canis in one (2% out of the 45 dogs with babesiosis. Almost 90% of the 45 cases of canine babesiosis were diagnosed in the colder months of October (18%, November (27%, December (20%, February (13% and March (9%. Co-infections were detected in February, March, April, May, October and November. Twenty-two (50% out of 44 dogs infected with B. canis were found infested by ticks including Dermacentor spp., Ixodes spp. and Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Mortality (9% included two co-infected dogs that died spontaneously and two with single infections that were euthanized. Conclusions Babesia canis canis is the main etiological agent of canine babesiosis in northern Portugal. A higher sensitivity of Babesia spp. detection was obtained with PCR assays, compared to the observation of blood smears. Twenty percent of the dogs were co-infected with L. infantum, E. canis or H. canis. Furthermore, this is the first molecular identification of H. canis in dogs from northern Portugal.

Machado João

2010-04-01

 
 
 
 
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Urbanization, land tenure security and vector-borne Chagas disease.  

Science.gov (United States)

Modern cities represent one of the fastest growing ecosystems on the planet. Urbanization occurs in stages; each stage characterized by a distinct habitat that may be more or less susceptible to the establishment of disease vector populations and the transmission of vector-borne pathogens. We performed longitudinal entomological and epidemiological surveys in households along a 1900 × 125 m transect of Arequipa, Peru, a major city of nearly one million inhabitants, in which the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, by the insect vector Triatoma infestans, is an ongoing problem. The transect spans a cline of urban development from established communities to land invasions. We find that the vector is tracking the development of the city, and the parasite, in turn, is tracking the dispersal of the vector. New urbanizations are free of vector infestation for decades. T. cruzi transmission is very recent and concentrated in more established communities. The increase in land tenure security during the course of urbanization, if not accompanied by reasonable and enforceable zoning codes, initiates an influx of construction materials, people and animals that creates fertile conditions for epidemics of some vector-borne diseases. PMID:24990681

Levy, Michael Z; Barbu, Corentin M; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Escalante-Mejia, Patricia; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Niemierko, Malwina; Mabud, Tarub S; Behrman, Jere R; Naquira-Velarde, Cesar

2014-08-22

22

Population response to the risk of vector-borne diseases: lessons learned from socio-behavioural research during large-scale outbreaks  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Vector-borne infectious diseases, such as malaria, dengue, chikungunya, and West Nile fevers are increasingly identified as major global human health threats in developing and developed countries. The success or failure of vector control rests mainly on the nature and scale of the behavioural response of exposed populations. Large-scale adoption of recommended protective behaviour represents a critical challenge that cannot be addressed without a better understanding of how individua...

2009-01-01

23

Vector-borne helminths of dogs and humans in Europe.  

Science.gov (United States)

Presently, 45% of the total human population of Europe, as well as their domestic and companion animals, are exposed to the risk of vector-borne helminths (VBH) causing diseases. A plethora of intrinsic biological and extrinsic factors affect the relationship among helminths, vectors and animal hosts, in a constantly changing environment. Although canine dirofilarioses by Dirofilaria immitis and Dirofilaria repens are key examples of the success of VBH spreading into non-endemic areas, another example is represented by Thelazia callipaeda eyeworm, an emergent pathogen of dogs, cats and humans in several regions of Europe. The recent finding of Onchocerca lupi causing canine and human infestation in Europe and overseas renders the picture of VBH even more complicated. Similarly, tick-transmitted filarioids of the genus Cercopithifilaria infesting the skin of dogs were recently shown to be widespread in Europe. Although for most of the VBH above there is an increasing accumulation of research data on their distribution at national level, the overall impact of the diseases they cause in dogs and humans is not fully recognised in many aspects. This review investigates the reasons underlying the increasing trend in distribution of VBH in Europe and discusses the diagnostic and control strategies currently available. In addition, this article provides the authors' opinion on some topics related to VBH that would deserve further scientific investigation. PMID:23324440

Otranto, Domenico; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Brianti, Emanuele; Traversa, Donato; Petri?, Dusan; Genchi, Claudio; Capelli, Gioia

2013-01-01

24

Vector-borne helminths of dogs and humans in Europe  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Presently, 45% of the total human population of Europe, as well as their domestic and companion animals, are exposed to the risk of vector-borne helminths (VBH causing diseases. A plethora of intrinsic biological and extrinsic factors affect the relationship among helminths, vectors and animal hosts, in a constantly changing environment. Although canine dirofilarioses by Dirofilaria immitis and Dirofilaria repens are key examples of the success of VBH spreading into non-endemic areas, another example is represented by Thelazia callipaeda eyeworm, an emergent pathogen of dogs, cats and humans in several regions of Europe. The recent finding of Onchocerca lupi causing canine and human infestation in Europe and overseas renders the picture of VBH even more complicated. Similarly, tick-transmitted filarioids of the genus Cercopithifilaria infesting the skin of dogs were recently shown to be widespread in Europe. Although for most of the VBH above there is an increasing accumulation of research data on their distribution at national level, the overall impact of the diseases they cause in dogs and humans is not fully recognised in many aspects. This review investigates the reasons underlying the increasing trend in distribution of VBH in Europe and discusses the diagnostic and control strategies currently available. In addition, this article provides the authors’ opinion on some topics related to VBH that would deserve further scientific investigation.

Otranto Domenico

2013-01-01

25

Taking the Bite Out of Vector-Borne Diseases  

Science.gov (United States)

... the survival of embryos from infected females only. Ecology and Evolution "Aside from stimulating the imagination, Wolbachia ... as a tool for studying the evolution and ecology of infectious diseases," notes Eckstrand, who co-manages ...

26

Using the Gravity Model to Estimate the Spatial Spread of Vector-Borne Diseases  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The gravity models are commonly used spatial interaction models. They have been widely applied in a large set of domains dealing with interactions amongst spatial entities. The spread of vector-borne diseases is also related to the intensity of interaction between spatial entities, namely, the physical habitat of pathogens’ vectors and/or hosts, and urban areas, thus humans. This study implements the concept behind gravity models in the spatial spread of two vector-borne diseases, nephropat...

Barrios, Jose? Miguel; Verstraeten, Willem W.; Maes, Piet; Aerts, Jean-marie; Farifteh, Jamshid; Coppin, Pol

2012-01-01

27

Web-based GIS: the vector-borne disease airline importation risk (VBD-AIR) tool  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Over the past century, the size and complexity of the air travel network has increased dramatically. Nowadays, there are 29.6 million scheduled flights per year and around 2.7 billion passengers are transported annually. The rapid expansion of the network increasingly connects regions of endemic vector-borne disease with the rest of the world, resulting in challenges to health systems worldwide in terms of vector-borne pathogen importation and disease vect...

2012-01-01

28

Spatially explicit multi-criteria decision analysis for managing vector-borne diseases  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract The complex epidemiology of vector-borne diseases creates significant challenges in the design and delivery of prevention and control strategies, especially in light of rapid social and environmental changes. Spatial models for predicting disease risk based on environmental factors such as climate and landscape have been developed for a number of important vector-borne diseases. The resulting risk maps have proven value for highlighting areas for targeting public health pro...

Hongoh Valerie; Hoen Anne; Aenishaenslin Cécile; Waaub Jean-Philippe; Bélanger Denise; Michel Pascal

2011-01-01

29

Reducing vector-borne disease by empowering farmers in integrated vector management  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

PROBLEM: Irrigated agriculture exposes rural people to health risks associated with vector-borne diseases and pesticides used in agriculture and for public health protection. Most developing countries lack collaboration between the agricultural and health sectors to jointly address these problems. APPROACH: We present an evaluation of a project that uses the "farmer field school" method to teach farmers how to manage vector-borne diseases and how to improve rice yields. Teaching farmers about...

Berg, H.; Hildebrand, A.; Ragunathan, V.; Das, P. K.

2007-01-01

30

[Public health pests : Arthropods and rodents as causative disease agents as well as reservoirs and vectors of pathogens].  

Science.gov (United States)

Globally, infectious diseases pose the most important cause of death. Among known human pathogenic diseases, approximately 50?% are zoonoses. When considering emerging infectious diseases separately 73?% currently belong to the group of zoonoses. In Central Europe, hard ticks show by far the biggest potential as vectors of agents of human disease. Lyme borreliosis, showing an estimated annual incidence between 60,000 and 214,000 cases is by far the most frequent tick-borne disease in Germany. Continually, formerly unknown disease agents could be discovered in endemic vector species. Additionally, introduction of new arthropod vectors and/or agents of disease occur constantly. Recently, five mosquito species of the genus Aedes have been newly introduced to Europe where they are currently spreading in different regions. Uncommon autochthonous transmission of dengue and chikungunya fever viruses in Southern Europe could be directly linked to these vector species and of these Ae. albopictus and Ae. japonicus are currently reported to occur in Germany. The German Protection against Infection Act only covers the control of public health pests which are either active hematophagous vectors or mechanical transmitters of agents of diseases. Use of officially recommended biocidal products aiming to interrupt transmission cycles of vector-borne diseases, is confined to infested buildings only, including sewage systems in the case of Norway rat control. Outdoor vectors, such as hard ticks and mosquitoes, are currently not taken into consideration. Additionally, adjustments of national public health regulations, detailed arthropod vector and rodent reservoir mapping, including surveillance of vector-borne disease agents, are necessary in order to mitigate future disease risks. PMID:24781905

Faulde, M; Freise, J

2014-05-01

31

Imported and travelling dogs as carriers of canine vector-borne pathogens in Germany  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background With the import of pets and pets taken abroad, arthropod-borne diseases have increased in frequency in German veterinary practices. This is reflected by 4,681 dogs that have been either travelled to or relocated from endemic areas to Germany. The case history of these dogs and the laboratory findings have been compared with samples collected from 331 dogs living in an endemic area in Portugal. The various pathogens and the seroprevalences were examined to determine the occurrence of, and thus infection risk, for vector-borne pathogens in popular travel destinations. Results 4,681 dogs were examined serological for Leishmania infantum, Babesia canis and Ehrlichia canis. Buffy coats were detected for Hepatozoon canis and blood samples were examined for microfilariae via the Knott's test. The samples were sent in from animal welfare organizations or private persons via veterinary clinics. Upon individual requests, dogs were additionally examined serological for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi and Rickettsia conorii. Overall B. canis was the most prevalent pathogen detected by antibody titers (23.4%, followed by L. infantum (12.2% and E. canis (10.1%. Microfilariae were detected in 7.7% and H. canis in 2.7% of the examined dogs. In 332/1862 dogs A. phagocytophilum, in 64/212 B. burgdorferi and in 20/58 R. conorii was detected. Of the 4,681 dogs, in total 4,226 were imported to Germany from endemic areas. Eighty seven dogs joined their owners for a vacation abroad. In comparison to the laboratory data from Germany, we examined 331 dogs from Portugal. The prevalence of antibodies/pathogens we detected was: 62.8% to R. conorii, 58% to B. canis, 30.5% to A. phagocytophilum, 24.8% to E. canis, 21.1% to H. canis (via PCR, 9.1% to L. infantum and 5.3% to microfilariae. Conclusions The examination of 4,681 dogs living in Germany showed pathogens like L. infantum that are non-endemic in Germany. Furthermore, the German data are similar in terms of multiple pathogen infection to the data recorded for dogs from Portugal. Based on these findings the importation of dogs from endemic predominantly Mediterranean regions to Germany as well as travelling with dogs to these regions carries a significant risk of acquiring an infection. Thus we would conclude that pet owners seek advice of the veterinarians prior to importing a dog from an endemic area or travel to such areas. In general, it might be advisable to have a European recording system for translocation of dogs.

Lorentz Susanne

2010-04-01

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Seropositivity rates for agents of canine vector-borne diseases in Spain: a multicentre study  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Controlling canine vector-borne diseases (CVBD) is a major concern, since some of these diseases are serious zoonoses. This study was designed to determine seropositivity rates in Spain for agents causing the following five CVBD: leishmaniosis (Leishmania infantum: Li), heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis: Di), ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis: Ec), anaplasmosis (Anaplasma phagocytophilum/Anaplasma platys: An) and Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi: Bb). Methods Anti-An, -Bb, and -Ec antibodies and the Di antigen were determined using the 4DX SNAP® Test (IDEXX Laboratories) and anti-L. infantum (Li) antibodies using the Leishmania SNAP® Test (IDEXX Laboratories) in blood and/or serum samples. Results Among 1100 dogs examined, overall seropositivity rates were: Li (15.7%), Ec (5%), An (3.1%), Di (1.25%) and Bb (0.4%). While seropositivity towards Bb and Di was similar in all geographic regions, rates were significantly higher in the east of Spain (8.3%) for An, significantly higher in the north (20%) for Ec, and significantly higher in the Southeast (46.6%) and South (27.4%), and significantly lower in the north (0%) for Li. No statistical associations were observed between sex and the CVBD analyzed (p???0.05) while the following associations with other variables were detected: a higher seropositivity to Ec (40%) and Bb (6.7%) in dogs under one year of age compared with adults (p?arthropod vectors. Public health authorities also need to become more involved in the problem, since some of the CVBD examined here also affect humans.

2013-01-01

33

New infectious etiologies for posterior uveitis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Emergent and resurgent arthropod vector-borne diseases are major causes of systemic morbidity and death and expanding worldwide. Among them, viral and bacterial agents including West Nile virus, Dengue fever, Chikungunya, Rift Valley fever, and rickettsioses have been recently associated with an array of ocular manifestations. These include anterior uveitis, retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis and optic nerve involvement. Proper clinical diagnosis of any of these infectious diseases is based on epidemiological data, history, systemic symptoms and signs, and the pattern of ocular involvement. The diagnosis is usually confirmed by the detection of a specific antibody in serum. Ocular involvement associated with emergent infections usually has a self-limited course, but it can result in persistent visual impairment. There is currently no proven specific treatment for arboviral diseases, and therapy is mostly supportive. Vaccination for humans against these viruses is still in the research phase. Doxycycline is the treatment of choice for rickettsial diseases. Prevention, including public measures to reduce the number of mosquitoes and personal protection, remains the mainstay for arthropod vector disease control. Influenza A (H1N1) virus was responsible for a pandemic human influenza in 2009, and was recently associated with various posterior segment changes. PMID:23258387

Khairallah, Moncef; Kahloun, Rim; Ben Yahia, Salim; Jelliti, Bechir; Messaoud, Riadh

2013-01-01

34

New Zealand as a model for vector borne disease emergence : Effects of social and environmental factors on dengue  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The geographic distribution of dengue fever has increased worldwide in recent years and is at present the most widespread vector borne viral disease in the world (Halstead 2002). Because of its rapid spread and increasing seriousness of its complications it is considered to be the most troubling vector borne disease (Wilcox and Colwell 2005, Phillips 2008). Dengue fever is the one vector borne disease that poses the greatest threat to New Zealand. Imported cases are being reported in ever inc...

Nordwall, Malin

2009-01-01

35

IJERPH | Free Full-Text | Using the Gravity Model to Estimate the Spatial Spread of Vector-Borne Diseases  

...Using the Gravity Model to Estimate the Spatial Spread of Vector-Borne Diseases The gravity models are commonly used spatial interaction models. They have ... This study implements the concept behind gravity models in the spatial spread of two vector-borne diseases, nephropathia epidemica and Lyme borreliosis, ... The overall results point at the compatibility of the gravity model concept and the spatial spread of vector-borne diseases. Using the Gravity ...Model to Estimate the Spatial Spread of Vector-Borne Diseases The gravity models are commonly used spatial interaction models. They have been widely applied ...

36

Canine and feline vector-borne diseases in Italy: current situation and perspectives  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract In Italy, dogs and cats are at risk of becoming infected by different vector-borne pathogens, including protozoa, bacteria, and helminths. Ticks, fleas, phlebotomine sand flies, and mosquitoes are recognized vectors of pathogens affecting cats and dogs, some of which (e.g., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Dipylidium caninum, Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria immitis, and Dirofilaria repens) are of zoonoti...

2010-01-01

37

A novel tool for classification of epidemiological data of vector-borne diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this article we present a novel tool that renders efficient classification of epidemiological data of vector-borne diseases. This algorithm has been applied on the data of the Filariasis disease and the results are compared with the well-known k-nearest neighbor algorithm.

Vadrevu Sree Hari

2010-01-01

38

Remote Sensing Proxies for Vector-borne Disease Risk Assessment (Invited)  

Science.gov (United States)

The spread of re-emerging vector-borne diseases such Rift Valley fever (RVF) and Chikungunya (CHIK) is a major issue of global public health concern. This combined with a variable climate regime has opened an avenue for satellite remote sensing to contribute towards a comprehensive understanding of some of the drivers influencing such vector-borne disease outbreaks. Satellite derived measurements such as vegetation indices, rainfall estimates, and land-surface temperature; can be used to infer the complex mosaic of factors that influence ecology and habitat suitability, emergence and population dynamics of disease vectors. However, there are still some gaps in application including appropriate temporal resolution of remote sensing measurements, the complexity of the virus-vector-disease-ecology system and human components that contribute to disease risk that need to be addressed. Geographic Distribution of Recent Rift Valley fever oubreaks

Anyamba, A.

2010-12-01

39

Changing distribution patterns of canine vector borne diseases in Italy: leishmaniosis vs. dirofilariosis  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Ecological and climatic changes, human and animal population dynamics are among the several factors that have favoured the spread or the (re)introduction and establishment of "novel" vector species and pathogens they transmit in previously disease-free geographical areas. As key examples of the changing pattern of distribution of canine vector borne diseases (CVBDs), the current distribution of canine leishmaniosis (CanL) by Leishmania infantum and dirofilariosis by Dirofilaria immiti...

Otranto, Domenico; Capelli, Gioia; Genchi, Claudio

2009-01-01

40

Canine and feline vector-borne diseases in Italy: current situation and perspectives  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In Italy, dogs and cats are at risk of becoming infected by different vector-borne pathogens, including protozoa, bacteria, and helminths. Ticks, fleas, phlebotomine sand flies, and mosquitoes are recognized vectors of pathogens affecting cats and dogs, some of which (e.g., Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Dipylidium caninum, Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria immitis, and Dirofilaria repens) are of zoonotic concern. Recent studies have highlighted the potential of fleas as vect...

Otranto, Domenico; Dantas-torres, Filipe

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
41

Vector-borne diseases and the basic reproduction number: a case study of African horse sickness  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The basic reproduction number, R0, can be used to determine factors important in the ability of a disease to invade or persist. We show how this number can be derived or estimated for vector-borne diseases with different complicating factors. African horse sickness is a viral disease transmitted mainly by the midge Culicoides imicola. We use this as an example of such a vector-transmitted disease where latent periods, seasonality in vector populations, and multiple host types may be important...

1996-01-01

42

Seropositivity rates for agents of canine vector-borne diseases in Spain : a multicentre study  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background: Controlling canine vector-borne diseases (CVBD) is a major concern, since some of these diseases are serious zoonoses. This study was designed to determine seropositivity rates in Spain for agents causing the following five CVBD: leishmaniosis (Leishmania infantum: Li), heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis: Di), ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis: Ec), anaplasmosis (Anaplasma phagocytophilum/Anaplasma platys: An) and Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi: Bb). Methods: Anti-An, -Bb, and -Ec ant...

Miro?, Guadalupe

2013-01-01

43

Vector-borne disease problems in rapid urbanization: new approaches to vector control.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Owing to population growth, poor levels of hygiene, and increasing urban poverty, the urban environment in many developing countries is rapidly deteriorating. Densely packed housing in shanty towns or slums and inadequate drinking-water supplies, garbage collection services, and surface-water drainage systems combine to create favourable habitats for the proliferation of vectors and reservoirs of communicable diseases. As a consequence, vector-borne diseases such as malaria, lymphatic filaria...

Knudsen, A. B.; Slooff, R.

1992-01-01

44

Biology-based mapping of vector-borne parasites by geographic information systems and remote sensing.  

Science.gov (United States)

Application of growing degree day-water budget analysis and satellite climatology to vector-borne parasites will be reviewed to demonstrate the value of using the unique thermal-hydrological preferences and limits of tolerance of individual parasite-vector systems to define the environmental niche of disease agents in the landscape by modern geospatial analysis methods. Applications of geospatial modeling will be illustrated by examples on fascioliasis, malaria, leprosy and leishmaniasis. PMID:16881402

Malone, J B; Nieto, P; Tadesse, A

2006-06-01

45

Dynamical behavior of an epidemic model for a vector-borne disease with direct transmission  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

An epidemic model of a vector-borne disease with direct transmission is investigated. The reproduction number (R0) of the model is obtained. Rigorous qualitative analysis of the model reveals the presence of the phenomenon of backward bifurcation (where the stable disease-free equilibrium (DFE) coexists with a stable endemic equilibrium when the reproduction number of the disease is less than unity) in the standard incidence model. The phenomenon shows that the classical epidemiological requirement of having the reproduction number less than unity is no longer sufficient, although necessary, for effectively controlling the spread of some vector-borne diseases in a community. The backward bifurcation phenomenon can be removed by substituting the standard incidence with a bilinear mass action incidence. By using Lyapunov function theory and LaSalle invariance principle, it is shown that the unique endemic equilibrium for the model with a mass action incidence is globally stable if the reproduction number Rmass is greater than one in feasible region. This suggests that the use of standard incidence in modelling some vector-borne diseases with direct transmission results in the presence of backward bifurcation. Numerical simulations analyze the effect of the direct transmission and the disease-induced death rate on dynamics of the disease transmission, and also verify our analyzed results.

2013-01-01

46

MosquitoMap and the Mal-area calculator: new web tools to relate mosquito species distribution with vector borne disease  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Mosquitoes are important vectors of diseases but, in spite of various mosquito faunistic surveys globally, there is a need for a spatial online database of mosquito collection data and distribution summaries. Such a resource could provide entomologists with the results of previous mosquito surveys, and vector disease control workers, preventative medicine practitioners, and health planners with information relating mosquito distribution to vector-borne disease risk. Results A web application called MosquitoMap was constructed comprising mosquito collection point data stored in an ArcGIS 9.3 Server/SQL geodatabase that includes administrative area and vector species x country lookup tables. In addition to the layer containing mosquito collection points, other map layers were made available including environmental, and vector and pathogen/disease distribution layers. An application within MosquitoMap called the Mal-area calculator (MAC was constructed to quantify the area of overlap, for any area of interest, of vector, human, and disease distribution models. Data standards for mosquito records were developed for MosquitoMap. Conclusion MosquitoMap is a public domain web resource that maps and compares georeferenced mosquito collection points to other spatial information, in a geographical information system setting. The MAC quantifies the Mal-area, i.e. the area where it is theoretically possible for vector-borne disease transmission to occur, thus providing a useful decision tool where other disease information is limited. The Mal-area approach emphasizes the independent but cumulative contribution to disease risk of the vector species predicted present. MosquitoMap adds value to, and makes accessible, the results of past collecting efforts, as well as providing a template for other arthropod spatial databases.

Christensen Jamie

2010-02-01

47

Population response to the risk of vector-borne diseases: lessons learned from socio-behavioural research during large-scale outbreaks  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

Vector-borne infectious diseases, such as malaria, dengue, chikungunya, and West Nile fevers are increasingly identified as major global human health threats in developing and developed countries. The success or failure of vector control rests mainly on the nature and scale of the behavioural response of exposed populations. Large-scale adoption of recommended protective behaviour represents a critical challenge that cannot be addressed without a better understanding of how individuals perceive and react to the risk of infection. Recently, French overseas territories faced large-scale outbreaks: an epidemic of chikungunya fever in La R|[eacute]|union and Mayotte (2005|[ndash]|2006 and four successive outbreaks of dengue fever in one Caribbean island, Martinique (1995|[ndash]|2007. To assess how these populations perceived and responded to the risk, and how the nature and scale of protection affected their clinical status, socio-epidemiological surveys were conducted on each island during the outbreaks. These surveys address three crucial and interconnected questions relevant to the period after persons infected by the virus were identified: which factors shape the risk of acquiring disease? Which socio-demographic characteristics and living conditions induce a higher likelihood of infection? What is the impact of risk perception on protective behaviours adopted against mosquito bites? Grounded on the results of these surveys, a general framework is proposed to help draw out the knowledge needed to reveal the factors associated with higher probability of infection as an outbreak emerges. The lessons learnt can inform health authorities|[rsquo]| efforts to improve risk communication programmes, both in terms of the target and content of messages, so as to explore new strategies for ensuring sustainable protective behaviour. The authors compare three epidemics of vector-borne diseases to elucidate psychosocial factors that determine how populations perceive and respond to the risk of infectious disease.

M Setbon

2009-01-01

48

Spatial distribution of vector borne disease agents in dogs in Aegean region, Turkey  

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Full Text Available Objective. Assess the spatial distribution of seroprevalence of infection with or exposure to 4 vector-borne pathogens Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi and Dirofilaria immitis, across the coastal states of the Aegean region with special reference to clinical signs and haematological variances related to disease condition. Materials and methods. A convenience sample, targeting blood from at least 10 pet dogs from ?zmir, Aydin, Denizli, Mugla and Manisa cities involved was evaluated using a canine point-of-care ELISA kit. Results. Out of 307 dogs tested the overall seroprevalence was highest for E. canis (24.42%, followed by E. canis + A. phagocytophilum co-infection (10.42%, A. phagocytophilum (7.49% and D. immitis (2.28%. Only 2 cases were seropositive to B. burgdorferi albeit 10 dogs were co-infected with more than 2 agents. For both dogs infected with E. canis and co-infected with E. canis and A. phagocytophilum, anemia, thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis, were more commonly detected, whereas thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis were significant finding in dogs infected with A. phagocytophilum or D. immitis, respectively. Variance analysis showed significant differences for mean RBC, Hb, PCV and PLT values (p<0.01 among control group and other groups. Conclusions. Seropositivity for vector-borne pathogens other than B. burgdorferi, is moderately to widely distributed in dogs residing in the Aegean region in Turkey.

Kerem Ural

2014-06-01

49

An Environmental Data Set for Vector-Borne Disease Modeling and Epidemiology  

Science.gov (United States)

Understanding the environmental conditions of disease transmission is important in the study of vector-borne diseases. Low- and middle-income countries bear a significant portion of the disease burden; but data about weather conditions in those countries can be sparse and difficult to reconstruct. Here, we describe methods to assemble high-resolution gridded time series data sets of air temperature, relative humidity, land temperature, and rainfall for such areas; and we test these methods on the island of Madagascar. Air temperature and relative humidity were constructed using statistical interpolation of weather station measurements; the resulting median 95th percentile absolute errors were 2.75°C and 16.6%. Missing pixels from the MODIS11 remote sensing land temperature product were estimated using Fourier decomposition and time-series analysis; thus providing an alternative to the 8-day and 30-day aggregated products. The RFE 2.0 remote sensing rainfall estimator was characterized by comparing it with multiple interpolated rainfall products, and we observed significant differences in temporal and spatial heterogeneity relevant to vector-borne disease modeling.

Chabot-Couture, Guillaume; Nigmatulina, Karima; Eckhoff, Philip

2014-01-01

50

Arthropod origins  

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Full Text Available Reconsideration of the position of trilobite-like arthropods leads to an idea of the last shared ancestor of known (euarthropods. The ancestry and morphological evolution is traced back from this form to a hypothetical ciliated and pseudosegmented slug-like ancestor. Evolution logically passed through a lobopodian stage. Extant onychophorans, Cambrian xenusians, and perhaps anomalocaridids with their kin (the Dinocaridida may represent probable offshoots on the way. As such, these groups are highly derived and not ancestral to the arthropods. Results of molecular studies indicate a relationship to moulting worms, which at first could seem to be in conflict with what was just said. However, if this is correct, the arthropod and moulting worm lineages must have diverged when some 'coelomate' features such as specific vascular and neural systems were still present. The moulting worms would therefore have lost such characters, either only once or several times.

Bergström J

2003-12-01

51

Climate change and the distribution of vector borne diseases with special reference to African horse sickness virus  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In the context of climate change, those components of climate that are likely to have major effects upon distribution, seasonal incidence and prevalence of vector borne diseases are described. On the basis of a predicted, mean temperature increase of the order of 1 to 3.5 deg. C., examples are given of the sort of changes that are to be expected by using a range of internationally important human and animal pathogens. Recent dramatic alterations in the epidemiology of the OIE List ''A'' disease, African horse sickness, are drawn upon to put forward the proposition that climate change may already be having a major effect upon some vector borne diseases. (author)

1997-04-07

52

First report of Babesia gibsoni in Central America and survey for vector-borne infections in dogs from Nicaragua  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Although many vector-borne diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in dogs in tropical areas and potential zoonoses, there is little information on these conditions in Central America. Methods Seven qPCRs for vector-borne pathogens were performed on a Roche LightCycler PCR Instrument to investigate their prevalence in a convenience sample of whole blood samples from apparently healthy dogs in Nicaragua. Also, a qPCR targeting the canine hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) gene was used as an endogenous internal control and verified the quality and quantity of DNA in the samples was appropriate for the study. Results We found DNA of Rickettsia felis (5%), Babesia spp. (26%), Hepatozoon canis (51%), Anaplasma platys (13%) and Ehrlichia canis (56%) in the 39 dogs studied. The qPCRs for Coxiella burnetii and Dirofilaria immitis were negative. Of the 30 (80%) dogs that were positive by qPCR, 12 (31%) were positive for one agent, 11 (28%) for two, 3 (8%) for three, and 4 (10%) for four agents. Conclusions This is the first report of B. gibsoni in dogs from Central America and the first recording of vector-borne agents in dogs from Nicaragua. Dogs in Nicaragua are commonly infected with a variety of vector-borne pathogens, some of which may also infect people.

2014-01-01

53

Socio-economic factors influencing control of vector-borne diseases in the pastoralist system of south western Uganda.  

Science.gov (United States)

Research in control of tick-borne diseases and trypanosomosis, and their vectors, namely, ticks and tsetse flies respectively, has been on going for decades. However, very little attention has been paid to the socio-economic factors that are likely to influence the outcome of the interventions in the control of these diseases. Thus, this study was designed to investigate these factors, mainly the intra-household factors influencing decision-making in the control of Vector-borne diseases in the pastoralist areas of Uganda. These factors included: indigenous technical knowledge, household economic factors, and gender. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used in the collection and analysis of data. The tools used for data collection included among others, participatory learning and action (PLA), and Case studies. The findings included the following: In pastoralist households, a big proportion of the household budget was allocated to vector-borne diseases control. In the male-headed households, men dominated decision-making on vector-borne diseases control, although the goals and priorities of men and women in these households were not the same. Also, vector-borne disease control was predominantly by use of modern veterinary drugs, and pastoralists treated sick cattle by themselves even in situations where there were veterinary personnel. PMID:18557192

Mugisha, Anthony; McLeod, Anni; Percy, Rachel; Kyewalabye, Elizabeth

2008-05-01

54

Improving the diagnosis and control of trypanosomiasis and other vector-borne diseases of African livestock using immunoassay methods  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This publication contains the results presented by the participants of the Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on improving the diagnosis and control of trypanosomiasis and other vector-borne diseases of African livestock using immunoassay methods. The CRP lasted from 1987 until 1992. The individual contributions have been indexed separately. Refs, figs and tabs

1993-01-01

55

Bifurcation Analysis in Models for Vector-Borne Diseases with Logistic Growth  

Science.gov (United States)

We establish and study vector-borne models with logistic and exponential growth of vector and host populations, respectively. We discuss and analyses the existence and stability of equilibria. The model has backward bifurcation and may have no, one, or two positive equilibria when the basic reproduction number R0 is less than one and one, two, or three endemic equilibria when R0 is greater than one under different conditions. Furthermore, we prove that the disease-free equilibrium is stable if R0 is less than 1, it is unstable otherwise. At last, by numerical simulation, we find rich dynamical behaviors in the model. By taking the natural death rate of host population as a bifurcation parameter, we find that the system may undergo a backward bifurcation, saddle-node bifurcation, Hopf bifurcation, Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation, and cusp bifurcation with the saturation parameter varying. The natural death rate of host population is a crucial parameter. If the natural death rate is higher, then the host population and the disease will die out. If it is smaller, then the host and vector population will coexist. If it is middle, the period solution will occur. Thus, with the parameter varying, the disease will spread, occur periodically, and finally become extinct.

Li, Guihua; Jin, Zhen

2014-01-01

56

Recent weather extremes and impacts on agricultural production and vector-borne disease outbreak patterns.  

Science.gov (United States)

We document significant worldwide weather anomalies that affected agriculture and vector-borne disease outbreaks during the 2010-2012 period. We utilized 2000-2012 vegetation index and land surface temperature data from NASA's satellite-based Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to map the magnitude and extent of these anomalies for diverse regions including the continental United States, Russia, East Africa, Southern Africa, and Australia. We demonstrate that shifts in temperature and/or precipitation have significant impacts on vegetation patterns with attendant consequences for agriculture and public health. Weather extremes resulted in excessive rainfall and flooding as well as severe drought, which caused ?10 to 80% variation in major agricultural commodity production (including wheat, corn, cotton, sorghum) and created exceptional conditions for extensive mosquito-borne disease outbreaks of dengue, Rift Valley fever, Murray Valley encephalitis, and West Nile virus disease. Analysis of MODIS data provided a standardized method for quantifying the extreme weather anomalies observed during this period. Assessments of land surface conditions from satellite-based systems such as MODIS can be a valuable tool in national, regional, and global weather impact determinations. PMID:24658301

Anyamba, Assaf; Small, Jennifer L; Britch, Seth C; Tucker, Compton J; Pak, Edwin W; Reynolds, Curt A; Crutchfield, James; Linthicum, Kenneth J

2014-01-01

57

Common, emerging, vector-borne and infrequent abortogenic virus infections of cattle.  

Science.gov (United States)

This review deals with the aetiology and the diagnosis of bovine viral abortion. While the abortion rates on beef and dairy cattle farms usually do not exceed 10%, significant economic losses because of abortion storms may be encountered. Determining the cause of abortions is usually a challenge, and it generally remains obscure in more than 50% of the necropsy submitted foetuses. Bovine viral diarrhoea virus and bovine herpesvirus-1 are the most common viruses causally associated with bovine abortions in farmed cattle globally. Rift Valley fever virus and bluetongue virus are important insect-transmitted abortogenic viruses. The geographic distribution of these two viruses is primarily dependent on the distribution of the insect vector, but direct transmission is possible. Recent global warming and subsequent insect vector expansion, coupled with the increase in international trade of animals and animal products, have been important factors in recent geographic advances of those two viruses. Bovine herpesviruses-4 and 5 in cattle, as well as other less frequent vector-borne viruses including epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus, Aino virus, Wesselsbron virus and lumpy skin disease virus, are discussed. PMID:21733134

Ali, H; Ali, A A; Atta, M S; Cepica, A

2012-02-01

58

Local context drives infection of grasses by vector-borne generalist viruses.  

Science.gov (United States)

Host characteristics commonly determine infection risk, but infection can also be mediated by regional- or local-scale variation in the biotic and abiotic environment. Experiments can clarify the relative importance of these factors. We quantified drivers of infection by barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses (B/CYDV), a group of generalist, vector-borne grass pathogens, at hierarchically nested spatial scales (10(5)-1 m) by planting individuals of six common grass species into five Pacific Coast grassland sites spanning 7 degrees of latitude (> 5000 total hosts) and applying a factorial combination of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer. Infection differed most among experimental blocks (10(2)-10(3) m scale), suggesting that local factors control infection risk; infection increased with cover of long-lived hosts and phosphorus, but not nitrogen, fertilization. For B/CYDV, local context more strongly predicts infection risk than host species traits or regional context; such spatially nested experiments can clarify the factors underlying variation in infection risk. PMID:20482583

Borer, Elizabeth T; Seabloom, Eric W; Mitchell, Charles E; Power, Alison G

2010-07-01

59

Transmission dynamics for vector-borne diseases in a patchy environment.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper, a mathematical model is derived to describe the transmission and spread of vector-borne diseases over a patchy environment. The model incorporates into the classic Ross-MacDonald model two factors: disease latencies in both hosts and vectors, and dispersal of hosts between patches. The basic reproduction number R(0) is identified by the theory of the next generation operator for structured disease models. The dynamics of the model is investigated in terms of R(0). It is shown that the disease free equilibrium is asymptotically stable if R(0) > 1, and it is unstable if R(0) > 1; in the latter case, the disease is endemic in the sense that the variables for the infected compartments are uniformly persistent. For the case of two patches, more explicit formulas for R(0) are derived by which, impacts of the dispersal rates on disease dynamics are also explored. Some numerical computations for R(0) in terms of dispersal rates are performed which show visually that the impacts could be very complicated: in certain range of the parameters, R(0) is increasing with respect to a dispersal rate while in some other range, it can be decreasing with respect to the same dispersal rate. The results can be useful to health organizations at various levels for setting guidelines or making policies for travels, as far as malaria epidemics is concerned. PMID:23732558

Xiao, Yanyu; Zou, Xingfu

2014-07-01

60

Bifurcation analysis in models for vector-borne diseases with logistic growth.  

Science.gov (United States)

We establish and study vector-borne models with logistic and exponential growth of vector and host populations, respectively. We discuss and analyses the existence and stability of equilibria. The model has backward bifurcation and may have no, one, or two positive equilibria when the basic reproduction number R 0 is less than one and one, two, or three endemic equilibria when R 0 is greater than one under different conditions. Furthermore, we prove that the disease-free equilibrium is stable if R 0 is less than 1, it is unstable otherwise. At last, by numerical simulation, we find rich dynamical behaviors in the model. By taking the natural death rate of host population as a bifurcation parameter, we find that the system may undergo a backward bifurcation, saddle-node bifurcation, Hopf bifurcation, Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation, and cusp bifurcation with the saturation parameter varying. The natural death rate of host population is a crucial parameter. If the natural death rate is higher, then the host population and the disease will die out. If it is smaller, then the host and vector population will coexist. If it is middle, the period solution will occur. Thus, with the parameter varying, the disease will spread, occur periodically, and finally become extinct. PMID:24790552

Li, Guihua; Jin, Zhen

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

The emergence and maintenance of vector-borne diseases in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province (KPK and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA of Pakistan  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Human populations throughout much of the world are experiencing unprecedented changes in their relationship to the environment and their interactions with the animals with which so many humans are intimately dependent upon. These changes result not only from human induced changes in the climate, but also from population demographic changes due to wars, social unrest, behavioral changes resulting from cultural mixing, and large changes in land-use practices. Each of these social shifts can affect the maintenance and emergence of arthropod vectors disease or the pathogenic organisms themselves. A good example is the country of Pakistan, with a large rural population and developing urban economy, it also maintains a wide diversity of entomological disease vectors, including biting flies, mosquitoes, and ticks. Pathogens endemic to the region include the agents of piroplasmosis, rickettsiosis, spirocheteosis, and viral hemorrhagic fevers and encephalitis. The northwestern region of the country, including the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province (KPK, formerly the North-West Frontier Provence (NWFP, and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA are mountainous regions with a high degree of habitat diversity that has recently undergone a massive increase in human population density due to an immigrating refugee population from neighboring war-torn Afghanistan. Vector-borne diseases in people and livestock are common in KPK and FATA regions due to the limited use of vector control measures and access to livestock vaccines. The vast majority of people in this region live in abject poverty with >70% of the population living directly from production gained in animal husbandry. In many instances whole families live directly alongside their animal counterparts. In addition, there is little to no awareness of the threat posed by ticks and transmission of either zoonotic or veterinary pathogens. Recent emergence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in rural populations, outbrea

NathanChristopherNieto

2012-07-01

62

Canine vector-borne diseases in India: a review of the literature and identification of existing knowledge gaps  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Despite the combination of favourable climate for parasites and vectors, and large populations of stray dogs, information concerning the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of canine vector-borne diseases in India is limited. However, with the country's expanding economy and adaptation to western culture, higher expectations and demands are being placed on veterinary surgeons for improved knowledge of diseases and control. This review aims to provide an overview of the current state of kno...

Megat Abd Rani, Puteri Azaziah; Irwin, Peter J.; Gatne, Mukulesh; Coleman, Glen T.; Traub, Rebecca J.

2010-01-01

63

Seroprevalence of some vector-borne infections of dogs in hungary.  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract The first comprehensive study on the prevalence of canine vector-borne pathogens (Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Ehrlichia canis, and Dirofilaria immitis) was carried in Hungary because, except for babesiosis and dirofilariosis caused by Dirofilaria repens, there were no data on their regional distribution and prevalence. In 2011 and 2012, 1305 blood samples were collected from randomly selected, apparently healthy pet dogs in 167 localities of 19 counties of Hungary. All sera samples from dogs were screened for simultaneous qualitative detection of circulating antibodies to E. canis and B. burgdorferi sensu lato and A. phagocytophilum and D. immitis antigen using SNAP(®) 4Dx (IDEXX Laboratories). Overall, 170 dogs (13.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 11-15) were serologically positive to one or more of the tested pathogens. A. phagocytophilum was the most prevalent pathogen detected in 102 dogs by antibody titers (7.9%, 95% CI 6.5-9.5), followed by D. immitis (2.4%, 95% CI 1.0-4.0, n=64) and B. burgdorferi (0.4%, 95% CI 0.0-1.1, n=11) out of 1305 tested dogs. The least prevalent infection was with E. canis, with only two positive dogs (0.16%, 95% CI 0.03-0.6). Co-infection was found in eight dogs (0.61%, 95% CI 0.29-1.21), of which seven were seropositive to two pathogens (five with A. phagocytophilum and D. immitis, two with A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi). One dog was serologically positive to three pathogens (A. phagocytophilum, B. burgdorferi, and D. immitis). Purebred and crossbred animals did not show significantly different levels of seropositivity. There was no significant association between the gender and the results of diagnostic testing. Logistic regression analysis showed a higher chance of seropositivity in the older dogs. PMID:24689833

Farkas, Robert; Gyurkovszky, Mónika; Lukács, Zoltán; Aladics, Balázs; Solymosi, Norbert

2014-04-01

64

The ecological dimensions of vector-borne disease research and control Dimensões ecológicas do controle e gerenciamento de doenças transmitidas por vetores  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Alarming trends in the resurgence of vector-borne diseases are anticipated to continue unless more effective action is taken to address the variety of underlying causes. Social factors, anthropogenic environmental modifications and/or ecological changes appear to be the primary drivers. The ecological dimension of vector-borne disease research and management is a pervasive element because this issue is essentially an ecological problem with biophysical, social, and economic dimensions. Howeve...

Ellis, Brett R.; Wilcox, Bruce A.

2009-01-01

65

Vector-borne pathogens in ticks and EDTA-blood samples collected from client-owned dogs, Kiev, Ukraine.  

Science.gov (United States)

Due to the availability of adequate habitats in urban environments, e.g. city parks and recreational green areas, ticks from such settings may also carry pathogens of veterinary and public health concern. Thus, tick-borne infections may readily be identified in companion animals residing in urbanised areas. To investigate the presence of vector-borne pathogens in Kiev, Ukraine, 52 engorged adult ticks, 33 Dermacentor reticulatus and 19 Ixodes ricinus, were collected from 15 dogs in the spring of 2010, and further 23 canine EDTA-blood samples were obtained in the spring of 2011 from client-owned patients presented in a veterinary clinic in Kiev. DNA of 9 pathogens was detected by PCR in ticks and canine EDTA-blood samples: Babesia canis canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Rickettsia helvetica, Ri. monacensis, Ri. raoultii, and Dirofilaria repens (by proxy) were identified in engorged ticks and B. c. canis, Hepatozoon canis, Di. immitis, Di. repens, and Mycoplasma haemocanis in canine EDTA-blood samples. This is the first description of Ri. raoultii in the Ukraine. This study adds information on the occurrence of vector-borne pathogens of veterinary and public health importance in Kiev, Ukraine. PMID:23069260

Hamel, Dietmar; Silaghi, Cornelia; Zapadynska, Svitlana; Kudrin, Anton; Pfister, Kurt

2013-02-01

66

Strategies, effectiveness and rationale of vector-borne disease control in the pastoralist system of south-western Uganda.  

Science.gov (United States)

In Uganda, control of vector-borne diseases is mainly in form of vector control, and chemotherapy. There have been reports that acaricides are being misused in the pastoralist systems in Uganda. This is because of the belief by scientists that intensive application of acaricide is uneconomical and unsustainable particularly in the indigenous cattle. The objective of this study was to investigate the strategies, rationale and effectiveness of vector-borne disease control by pastoralists. To systematically carry out these investigations, a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods was used, in both the collection and the analysis of data. Cattle keepers were found to control tick-borne diseases (TBDs) mainly through spraying, in contrast with the control of trypanosomosis for which the main method of control was by chemotherapy. The majority of herders applied acaricides weekly and used an acaricide of lower strength than recommended by the manufacturers. They used very little acaricide wash, and spraying was preferred to dipping. Furthermore, pastoralists either treated sick animals themselves or did nothing at all, rather than using veterinary personnel. Oxytetracycline (OTC) was the drug commonly used in the treatment of TBDs. Nevertheless, although pastoralists may not have been following recommended practices in their control of ticks and tick-borne diseases, they were neither wasteful nor uneconomical and their methods appeared to be effective. Trypanosomosis was not a problem either in Sembabule or Mbarara district. Those who used trypanocides were found to use more drugs than were necessary. PMID:16248219

Mugisha, A; McLeod, A; Percy, R; Kyewalabye, E

2005-08-01

67

Predicting and Mitigating Outbreaks of Vector-Borne Disease Utilizing Satellite Remote Sensing Technology and Models  

Science.gov (United States)

The Public Health application area focuses on Earth science applications to public health and safety, particularly regarding infectious disease, emergency preparedness and response, and environmental health issues. The application explores issues of toxic and pathogenic exposure, as well as natural and man-made hazards and their effects, for risk characterization/mitigation and improvements to health and safety. The program elements of the NASA Applied Sciences Program are: Agricultural Efficiency, Air Quality, Climate, Disaster Management, Ecological Forecasting, Water Resources, Weather, and Public Health.

Estes, Sue M.

2009-01-01

68

Vector-borne disease surveillance in puerto rico: pathogen prevalence rates in canines ? Implications for public health and the u.s. Military ? Applying the one health concept.  

Science.gov (United States)

Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) make up a large number of emerging infectious and zoonotic diseases. Vectors such as ticks, fleas, and mosquitoes parasitize dogs, thus making canine populations adequate reservoirs for infectious disease and zoonoses. The U.S. military deploys its personnel and Military Working Dogs (MWDs) throughout the world with possible risk of exposure to VBDs. Canine VBDs continue to have veterinary and public health significance for the host nations as well as for deployed U.S. personnel and MWDs. Thus, ongoing and consistent disease surveillance is an essential component to preserve health. The purpose of this study was to survey dogs from multiple cities and varying regions throughout Puerto Rico to determine the prevalence of ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis), anaplasmosis (Anaplasma phagocytophilum), Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi), and heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis) from May to July 2012. Canine blood samples (1?3 ml) from the cities of San Juan (n = 629), Guaynabo (n = 50), Ponce (n = 20) and Vieques Island (n = 53) were obtained and tested on-site using an IDEXX SNAP? 4Dx? (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) test kit. Prevalence for single or multiple disease status was calculated for each site. The overall period prevalence of VBD in Puerto Rico in the shelter population was 57.7% (71/123). In Guaynabo, the VBD prevalence was 30% (15/50); 2 (13%) of these positive dogs had VBD co-infection. In the coastal port city of Ponce, it was 60% (12/20); 6 (50%) dogs were infected by two or more VBDs. On Vieques Island, it was 83% (44/53); 27 (61%) dogs were coinfected. Conversely, samples collected at the Fort Buchanan Veterinary Clinic in the capitol city of San Juan resulted in a VBD prevalence of 8.9% (56/629). Lyme disease was not detected in any sample. This study showed the presence of D. immitis, E. canis, and A. phagocytophilum in all four sites of Puerto Rico, emphasizing the value of surveillance for VBDs to determine disease prevalence, complete risk assessments, and impleme t timely preventive medicine and other preventive measures. The lower VBD prevalence rate in the canine samples from Fort Buchanan demonstrates the value of responsible pet ownership and importance of preventive medicine and public health. PMID:23817880

McCown, Michael E; Opel, Taylor; Grzeszak, Benjamin

2013-01-01

69

Impact of climate change upon vector born diseases in Europe and Africa using ENSEMBLES Regional Climate Models  

Science.gov (United States)

Climate variability is an important component in determining the incidence of a number of diseases with significant human/animal health and socioeconomic impacts. The most important diseases affecting health are vector-borne, such as malaria, Rift Valley Fever and including those that are tick borne, with over 3 billion of the world population at risk. Malaria alone is responsible for at least one million deaths annually, with 80% of malaria deaths occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. The climate has a large impact upon the incidence of vector-borne diseases; directly via the development rates and survival of both the pathogen and the vector, and indirectly through changes in the environmental conditions. A large ensemble of regional climate model simulations has been produced within the ENSEMBLES project framework for both the European and African continent. This work will present recent progress in human and animal disease modelling, based on high resolution climate observations and regional climate simulations. Preliminary results will be given as an illustration, including the impact of climate change upon bluetongue (disease affecting the cattle) over Europe and upon malaria and Rift Valley Fever over Africa. Malaria scenarios based on RCM ensemble simulations have been produced for West Africa. These simulations have been carried out using the Liverpool Malaria Model. Future projections highlight that the malaria incidence decreases at the northern edge of the Sahel and that the epidemic belt is shifted southward in autumn. This could lead to significant public health problems in the future as the demography is expected to dramatically rise over Africa for the 21st century.

Caminade, Cyril; Morse, Andy

2010-05-01

70

Epidemiology and control of malaria and other arthropod born diseases  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Malaria and other arthropod born diseases remain a serious public health problem affecting the lives and health of certain social groups when the two basic strategies to control fail due to : (1) the lack of effective chemoprophylaxis/chemotherapy or the rapid development of drug resistance of the infectious agents and (2) the ineffectiveness of pesticides or the arthropod vectors develop resistance to them. These situations enhances the need for the design and implementation of other alterna...

Lo?pez-antun?ano, F. J.

1992-01-01

71

Environmental monitoring to enhance comprehension and control of infectious diseases†  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In a world of emerging and resurging infectious diseases, dominated by zoonoses, environmental monitoring plays a vital role in our understanding their dynamics and their spillover to humans. Here, we critically review the ecology, epidemiology and need for monitoring of a variety of directly transmitted (Sin Nombre virus, Avian Influenza) and vector-borne (Ross River virus, West Nile virus, Lyme disease, anaplasmosis and babesiosis) zoonoses. We focus on the valuable role that existing monit...

Carver, Scott; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Kuenzi, Amy; Douglass, Richard; Ostfeld, Richard S.; Weinstein, Philip

2010-01-01

72

How human practices have affected vector-borne diseases in the past: a study of malaria transmission in Alpine valleys  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria was endemic in the Rhône-Alpes area of eastern France in the 19th century and life expectancy was particularly shortened in Alpine valleys. This study was designed to determine how the disease affected people in the area and to identify the factors influencing malaria transmission. Methods Demographic data of the 19th century were collected from death registers of eight villages of the flood-plain of the river Isère. Correlations were performed between these demographic data and reconstructed meteorological data. Archive documents from medical practitioners gave information on symptoms of ill people. Engineer reports provided information on the hydraulic project developments in the Isère valley. Results Description of fevers was highly suggestive of endemic malaria transmission in the parishes neighbouring the river Isère. The current status of anopheline mosquitoes in the area supports this hypothesis. Mean temperature and precipitation were poorly correlated with demographic data, whereas the chronology of hydrological events correlated with fluctuations in death rates in the parishes. Conclusion Nowadays, most of the river development projects involve the creation of wet areas, enabling controlled flooding events. Flood-flow risk and the re-emergence of vector-borne diseases would probably be influenced by the climate change. The message is not to forget that human disturbance of any functioning hydrosystem has often been linked to malaria transmission in the past.

Lemperière Guy

2007-08-01

73

Arthropod cuticles in coal  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An abundance of scorpion cuticles from Westphalian (Upper Carboniferous) coals of Yorkshire is described, and other records of arthropod cuticles in coals are reviewed. The absence of cuticles assignable to arthropod groups other than scorpions is thought to be due to preferential preservation of the unique exocuticle of scorpions; it alone is preserved and appears to retain an organic nature. The cuticle is recovered from all the lithotypes of humic bituminous coals although it is most common in coals rich in inertinite macerals. From the present study it is uncertain whether the scorpions were aquatic or terrestrial. The recognition of arthropod cuticle as a coal maceral could aid environmental interpretations. The abundance of arthropod cuticle in the coals studied indicates its potential use in correlation and in determining the thermal maturity of sediments. 37 refs., 1 fig.

Bartram, K.M.; Jeram, A.J.; Selden, P.A.

1987-05-01

74

Status of pesticide management in the practice of vector control: a global survey in countries at risk of malaria or other major vector-borne diseases  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background: It is critical that vector control pesticides are used for their acceptable purpose without causing adverse effects on health and the environment. This paper provides a global overview of the current status of pesticides management in the practice of vector control. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to WHO member states and completed either by the director of the vector-borne disease control programme or by the national manager for vector control. In all, 113 countries resp...

Berg, H.; Hii, J.; Soares, A.; Mnzava, A.; Ameneshewa, B.; Dash, A. P.; Ejov, M.; Tan, S. H.; Matthews, G.; Yadav, R. S.; Zaim, M.

2011-01-01

75

Influence of vectors' risk-spreading strategies and environmental stochasticity on the epidemiology and evolution of vector-borne diseases: the example of chagas' disease.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Insects are known to display strategies that spread the risk of encountering unfavorable conditions, thereby decreasing the extinction probability of genetic lineages in unpredictable environments. To what extent these strategies influence the epidemiology and evolution of vector-borne diseases in stochastic environments is largely unknown. In triatomines, the vectors of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, juvenile development time varies between individu...

Pelosse, Perrine; Kribs-zaleta, Christopher M.; Ginoux, Marine; Rabinovich, Jorge E.; Gourbie?re, Se?bastien; Menu, Fre?de?ric

2013-01-01

76

Perspectivas de controle de doenças transmitidas por vetores no Brasil / Perspectives of vector borne diseases control in Brazil  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese A análise do controle de doenças transmitidas por vetores no Brasil necessita considerar três aspectos: a urbanização da população, a transformação do caráter eminentemente rural dessas doenças em concomitante transmissão urbana ou peri-urbana e a descentralização do controle para municípios. A imen [...] sa maioria da população está vivendo nas cidades. Algumas doenças passaram a ser transmitidas em áreas peri-urbanas ou urbanas, graças à emergência ou re-emergência de seus vetores nessas áreas, como dengue, leishmaniose visceral e malária. Há dificuldades para o controle: as atividades em áreas rurais são operacionalmente mais efetivas, pois atingem coberturas mais elevadas; são mais bem aceitas pela população do que as exercidas em áreas urbanas. A descentralização do controle para os estados e municípios está em implementação e há também dificuldades, pois o controle vetorial não fazia parte da prática desses entes federativos. Para um controle mais efetivo, há necessidade de determinação política, ações multi-setoriais e uso racional de inseticida. Abstract in english The analysis of vector borne disease control in Brazil should consider three aspects: the urbanization of the population, change from a rural pattern to concomitant urban or peri-urban transmission and decentralization of control to municipalities. The great majority of the population now lives in u [...] rban areas. Some diseases are being transmitted in urban areas, due to the emergence or reemergence of their vectors, such as dengue, malaria and visceral leishmaniasis. Difficulties in control occur, as it is easier to apply control measures in rural areas, because there is more population adherence than in urban areas and so the coverage is higher and disease control is better. The decentralization of control activities to states and municipalities is being implemented and difficulties occur as these levels of government have insufficient accumulated experience in control. For more effective control, political commitment, multi-sector articulation and rational use of insecticide are required.

Pedro Luiz, Tauil.

77

Perspectivas de controle de doenças transmitidas por vetores no Brasil Perspectives of vector borne diseases control in Brazil  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A análise do controle de doenças transmitidas por vetores no Brasil necessita considerar três aspectos: a urbanização da população, a transformação do caráter eminentemente rural dessas doenças em concomitante transmissão urbana ou peri-urbana e a descentralização do controle para municípios. A imensa maioria da população está vivendo nas cidades. Algumas doenças passaram a ser transmitidas em áreas peri-urbanas ou urbanas, graças à emergência ou re-emergência de seus vetores nessas áreas, como dengue, leishmaniose visceral e malária. Há dificuldades para o controle: as atividades em áreas rurais são operacionalmente mais efetivas, pois atingem coberturas mais elevadas; são mais bem aceitas pela população do que as exercidas em áreas urbanas. A descentralização do controle para os estados e municípios está em implementação e há também dificuldades, pois o controle vetorial não fazia parte da prática desses entes federativos. Para um controle mais efetivo, há necessidade de determinação política, ações multi-setoriais e uso racional de inseticida.The analysis of vector borne disease control in Brazil should consider three aspects: the urbanization of the population, change from a rural pattern to concomitant urban or peri-urban transmission and decentralization of control to municipalities. The great majority of the population now lives in urban areas. Some diseases are being transmitted in urban areas, due to the emergence or reemergence of their vectors, such as dengue, malaria and visceral leishmaniasis. Difficulties in control occur, as it is easier to apply control measures in rural areas, because there is more population adherence than in urban areas and so the coverage is higher and disease control is better. The decentralization of control activities to states and municipalities is being implemented and difficulties occur as these levels of government have insufficient accumulated experience in control. For more effective control, political commitment, multi-sector articulation and rational use of insecticide are required.

Pedro Luiz Tauil

2006-06-01

78

Arthropod (Insect) Bite or Sting  

Science.gov (United States)

... or Sting Information for adults A A A Insect (arthropod) bites are typically pink or red and ... round in shape. Overview Bites or stings from insects (arthropods) are very common. Most reactions are mild ...

79

Spatial Analysis of West Nile Virus: Predictive Risk Modeling of a Vector-borne Infectious Disease in Illinois by Means of NASA Earth Observation Systems  

Science.gov (United States)

West Nile Virus is a mosquito-borne virus of the family Flaviviridae. It infects birds and various mammals, including humans, and can cause encephalitis that may prove fatal, notably among vulnerable populations. Since its identification in New York City in 1999, WNV has become established in a broad range of ecological settings throughout North America, infecting more than 25,300 people and killing 1133 as of 2008 (CDC,2009). WNV is transmitted by mosquitoes that feed on infected birds. As a result, the degree of human infection depends on local ecology and human exposure. This study hypothesizes that remote sensing and GIS can be used to analyze environmental determinants of WNV transmission, such as climate, elevation, land cover, and vegetation densities, to map areas of WNV risk for surveillance and intervention.

Renneboog, Nathan; Gathings, David; Hemmings, Sarah; Makasa, Emmanuel; Omer, Wigdan; Tipre, Meghan; Wright, Catherine; McAllister, Marilyn; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

2009-01-01

80

Control of multiple arthropod vector infestations with subolesin/akirin vaccines.  

Science.gov (United States)

Diseases transmitted by arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks and sand flies greatly impact human and animal health and thus their control is important for the eradication of vector-borne diseases (VBD). Vaccination is an environmentally friendly alternative for vector control that allows control of several VBD by targeting their common vector. Recent results have suggested that subolesin/akirin (SUB/AKR) is good candidate antigens for the control of arthropod vector infestations. Here we describe the comparative effect of vaccination with SUB, AKR and Q38 and Q41 chimeras containing SUB/AKR conserved protective epitopes on tick, mosquitoes and sand flies vector mortality, molting, oviposition and/or fertility. We demonstrated that SUB vaccination had the highest efficacy (E) across all vector species (54-92%), Q41 vaccination had the highest vaccine E in mosquitoes (99%) by reducing female survival and fertility, and Q38 vaccination had the highest effect on reducing mosquito (28%) and sand fly (26%) oviposition. The effect of vaccination on different developmental processes in several important arthropod vectors encourages the development of SUB/AKR universal vaccines for the control of multiple vector infestations and reduction of VBD. PMID:23291476

Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; Villar, Margarita; Jiménez, Maribel; Pinal, Rocío; Estrada-Peña, Agustín; Molina, Ricardo; Lucientes, Javier; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

2013-02-01

 
 
 
 
81

An application of remotely derived climatological fields for risk assessment of vector-borne diseases : a spatial study of filariasis prevalence in the Nile Delta, Egypt.  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper applies a relatively straightforward remote sensing method that is commonly used to derive climatological variables. Measurements of surface reflectance and surface radiant temperature derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper data were used to create maps of fractional vegetation and surface soil moisture availability for the southern Nile delta in Egypt. These climatological variables were subsequently used to investigate the spatial distribution of the vector borne disease Bancroftian filariasis in the Nile delta where it is focally endemic and a growing problem. Averaged surface soil moisture values, computed for a 5-km border area around affected villages, were compared to filariasis prevalence rates. Prevalence rates were found to be negligible below a critical soil moisture value of 0.2, presumably because of a lack of appropriate breeding sites for the Culex Pipiens mosquito species. With appropriate modifications to account for local conditions and vector species, this approach should be useful as a means to map, predict, and control insect vector-borne diseases that critically depend on wet areas for propagation. This type of analysis may help governments and health agencies that are involved in filariasis control to better focus limited resources to identifiable high-risk areas.

Crombie, M. K.; Gillies, R. R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Brookmeyer, P.; Weil, G. J.; Sultan, M.; Harb, M.; Environmental Research; Washington Univ.; Utah State Univ.; Egyptian Ministry of Health

1999-12-01

82

Dengue Fever: An Emerging Infectious Disease in The Bahamas  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Dengue fever is an emerging infectious disease that is increasing in prevalence in many geographic regions, including the Caribbean. It is the most common arboviral (vector-borne) disease in the world, and infects more that 50 million people annually worldwide. The etiological agent of dengue fever is one of four serotypes of the Dengue virus (DENV1 – DENV4). The infection is transmitted via a human-mosquito-human route, when one or more species of the Aedes mosquito takes a blood meal from...

2011-01-01

83

Arthropod viruses and small RNAs.  

Science.gov (United States)

The recently characterized small RNAs provide a new paradigm for physiological studies. These molecules have been shown to be integral players in processes as diverse as development and innate immunity against bacteria and viruses in eukaryotes. Several of the well-characterized small RNAs including small interfering RNAs, microRNAs and PIWI-interacting RNAs are emerging as important players in mediating arthropod host-virus interactions. Understanding the role of small RNAs in arthropod host-virus molecular interactions will facilitate manipulation of these pathways for both management of arthropod pests of agricultural and medical importance, and for protection of beneficial arthropods such as honey bees and shrimp. This review highlights recent research on the role of small RNAs in arthropod host-virus interactions with reference to other host-pathogen systems. PMID:23932976

Vijayendran, Diveena; Airs, Paul M; Dolezal, Kelly; Bonning, Bryony C

2013-10-01

84

A confusing case of canine vector-borne disease: clinical signs and progression in a dog co-infected with Ehrlichia canis and Bartonella vinsonii ssp. berkhoffii  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Bartonella spp. are important pathogens in human and veterinary medicine, and bartonellosis is considered as an emerging zoonosis that is being reported with increasing frequency. Of 22 known species and subspecies of Bartonella, seven have been isolated from dogs, causing disease manifestations similar to those seen in human beings. The wide variety of clinical signs and the possible chronic progression of disease manifestations are illustrated in the case of an infected Labrador retriever. Here, the authors discuss the seemingly diverse spectrum of disease manifestations, the co-infections of Bartonella spp. with other vector-borne pathogens (mainly Ehrlichia spp. or Babesia spp. and the difficulties in microbiological confirmation of an active Bartonella infection, all of which make the disease pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis more problematic.

Maggi Ricardo G

2009-03-01

85

Evaluation of a Continuous Indicator for Syndromic Surveillance through Simulation. Application to Vector Borne Disease Emergence Detection in Cattle Using Milk Yield  

Science.gov (United States)

Two vector borne diseases, caused by the Bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses respectively, have emerged in the European ruminant populations since 2006. Several diseases are transmitted by the same vectors and could emerge in the future. Syndromic surveillance, which consists in the routine monitoring of indicators for the detection of adverse health events, may allow an early detection. Milk yield is routinely measured in a large proportion of dairy herds and could be incorporated as an indicator in a surveillance system. However, few studies have evaluated continuous indicators for syndromic surveillance. The aim of this study was to develop a framework for the quantification of both disease characteristics and model predictive abilities that are important for a continuous indicator to be sensitive, timely and specific for the detection of a vector-borne disease emergence. Emergences with a range of spread characteristics and effects on milk production were simulated. Milk yields collected monthly in 48 713 French dairy herds were used to simulate 576 disease emergence scenarios. First, the effect of disease characteristics on the sensitivity and timeliness of detection were assessed: Spatio-temporal clusters of low milk production were detected with a scan statistic using the difference between observed and simulated milk yields as input. In a second step, the system specificity was evaluated by running the scan statistic on the difference between observed and predicted milk yields, in the absence of simulated emergence. The timeliness of detection depended mostly on how easily the disease spread between and within herds. The time and location of the emergence or adding random noise to the simulated effects had a limited impact on the timeliness of detection. The main limitation of the system was the low specificity i.e. the high number of clusters detected from the difference between observed and predicted productions, in the absence of disease.

Madouasse, Aurelien; Marceau, Alexis; Lehebel, Anne; Brouwer-Middelesch, Henriette; van Schaik, Gerdien; Van der Stede, Yves; Fourichon, Christine

2013-01-01

86

Infectious Diseases  

Science.gov (United States)

Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living ... to live NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

87

Virtual globes and geospatial health: the potential of new tools in the management and control of vector-borne diseases.  

Science.gov (United States)

The rapidly growing field of three-dimensional software modeling of the Earth holds promise for applications in the geospatial health sciences. Easy-to-use, intuitive virtual globe technologies such as Google Earth enable scientists around the world to share their data and research results in a visually attractive and readily understandable fashion without the need for highly sophisticated geographical information systems (GIS) or much technical assistance. This paper discusses the utility of the rapid and simultaneous visualization of how the agents of parasitic diseases are distributed, as well as that of their vectors and/or intermediate hosts together with other spatially-explicit information. The resulting better understanding of the epidemiology of infectious diseases, and the multidimensional environment in which they occur, are highlighted. In particular, the value of Google Earth, and its web-based pendant Google Maps, are reviewed from a public health view point, combining results from literature searches and experiences gained thus far from a multidisciplinary project aimed at optimizing schistosomiasis control and transmission surveillance in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the basic analytical capabilities of virtual globe applications are limited, we conclude that they have considerable potential in the support and promotion of the geospatial health sciences as a userfriendly, straightforward GIS tool for the improvement of data collation, visualization and exploration. The potential of these systems for data sharing and broad dissemination of scientific research and results is emphasized. PMID:19440958

Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Saarnak, Christopher F L; Utzinger, Jürg; Vounatsou, Penelope; Simoonga, Christopher; Mushinge, Gabriel; Rahbek, Carsten; Møhlenberg, Flemming; Kristensen, Thomas K

2009-05-01

88

Status of pesticide management in the practice of vector control: a global survey in countries at risk of malaria or other major vector-borne diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background It is critical that vector control pesticides are used for their acceptable purpose without causing adverse effects on health and the environment. This paper provides a global overview of the current status of pesticides management in the practice of vector control. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to WHO member states and completed either by the director of the vector-borne disease control programme or by the national manager for vector control. In all, 113 countries responded to the questionnaire (80% response rate, representing 94% of the total population of the countries targeted. Results Major gaps were evident in countries in pesticide procurement practices, training on vector control decision making, certification and quality control of pesticide application, monitoring of worker safety, public awareness programmes, and safe disposal of pesticide-related waste. Nevertheless, basic conditions of policy and coordination have been established in many countries through which the management of vector control pesticides could potentially be improved. Most countries responded that they have adopted relevant recommendations by the WHO. Conclusions Given the deficiencies identified in this first global survey on public health pesticide management and the recent rise in pesticide use for malaria control, the effectiveness and safety of pesticide use are being compromised. This highlights the urgent need for countries to strengthen their capacity on pesticide management and evidence-based decision making within the context of an integrated vector management approach.

Tan Soo

2011-05-01

89

Epidemiology and control of malaria and other arthropod born diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Malaria and other arthropod born diseases remain a serious public health problem affecting the lives and health of certain social groups when the two basic strategies to control fail due to : (1 the lack of effective chemoprophylaxis/chemotherapy or the rapid development of drug resistance of the infectious agents and (2 the ineffectiveness of pesticides or the arthropod vectors develop resistance to them. These situations enhances the need for the design and implementation of other alternatives for sustainable health programmes. The application of the epidemiological methods is essential not only for analyzing the relevant data for the understanding of the biological characteristics of the infectious agents, their reservoirs and vectors and the methods for their control, but also for the assessment of the human behaviour, the environmental, social and economic factors involved in disease transmission and the capacity of the health systems to implement interventions for both changes in human behaviour and environmental management to purpose guaranteed prevention and control of malaria and other arthropod born diseases with efficiency, efficacy and equity. This paper discuss the evolution of the malaria arthropod diseases programmes in the American Region and the perspectives for their integration into health promotion programs and emphasis is made in the need to establish solid basis in the decision-making process for the selection of intervention strategies to remove the risk factors determining the probability to get sick or die from ABDs. The implications of the general planning and the polices to be adopted in an area should be analyzed in the light of programme feasibility at the local level, in the multisectoral context specific social groups and taking in consideration the principles of stratification and equity

F. J. López-Antuñano

1992-01-01

90

Infectious Diseases and Their Outbreaks in Asia-Pacific: Biodiversity and Its Regulation Loss Matter  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite increasing control measures, numerous parasitic and infectious diseases are emerging, re-emerging or causing recurrent outbreaks particularly in Asia and the Pacific region, a hot spot of both infectious disease emergence and biodiversity at risk. We investigate how biodiversity affects the distribution of infectious diseases and their outbreaks in this region, taking into account socio-economics (population size, GDP, public health expenditure), geography (latitude and nation size), climate (precipitation, temperature) and biodiversity (bird and mammal species richness, forest cover, mammal and bird species at threat). We show, among countries, that the overall richness of infectious diseases is positively correlated with the richness of birds and mammals, but the number of zoonotic disease outbreaks is positively correlated with the number of threatened mammal and bird species and the number of vector-borne disease outbreaks is negatively correlated with forest cover. These results suggest that, among countries, biodiversity is a source of pathogens, but also that the loss of biodiversity or its regulation, as measured by forest cover or threatened species, seems to be associated with an increase in zoonotic and vector-borne disease outbreaks.

Morand, Serge; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Abdullah, Mohd Tajuddin; Huan, Tan Boon

2014-01-01

91

Francisella tularensis: an arthropod-borne pathogen  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Arthropod transmission of tularemia occurs throughout the northern hemisphere. Few pathogens show the adaptability of Francisella tularensis to such a wide array of arthropod vectors. Nonetheless, arthropod transmission of F. tularensis was last actively investigated in the first half of the 20th century. This review will focus on arthropod transmission to humans with respect to vector species, modes of transmission, geographic differences and F. tularensis subspecies and clades.

Petersen, Jeannine M.; Mead, Paul S.; Schriefer, Martin E.

2009-01-01

92

Spiroplasmas: infectious agents of plants, arthropods and vertebrates.  

Science.gov (United States)

The spiroplasmas are mollicutes characterized by motility and helical morphology. They were discovered through studies on corn stunt and citrus stubborn diseases. The stubborn agent was the first mollicute of plant origin to be obtained in culture and the first cultured mollicute to possess a helical morphology. The citrus pathogen has been known as Spiroplasma citri since 1973. The corn stunt agent was cultured in 1975 and fully characterized as Spiroplasma kunkelii by 1986. The third and only other phytopathogenic spiroplasma is Spiroplasma phoeniceum, cultured from naturally infected periwinkle plants in Syria and described in 1986. These three spiroplasmas are restricted to the phloem sievetubes of the infected plants and are transmitted from plant by various phloem feeding leafhopper vectors in which the spiroplasmas multiply. Following the pioneering work on S. citri and S. kunkelii, close to fifty other spiroplasma species or proposed species have been discovered. All spiroplasmas have been isolated from insects, ticks and plants. Insects are particularly rich sources of spiroplasmas. Some insect-derived spiroplasmas are entomopathogens. S. melliferum and S. apis are honey bee pathogens. They cross the insect-gut barrier and reach the hemolymph, where they multiply abundantly and kill the bee. Spiroplasma floricola is the agent of lethargy disease of Melolontha melolontha (cockchafer). Spiroplasma poulsonii infects the neotropical species of Drosophila, is transmitted transovarially and kills the male progeny of an infected female fly, hence the name sex ratio spiroplasma. Some insect-derived spiroplasmas are also found on plant (flower) surfaces. For instance, S. apis was cultured from the surfaces of flowers growing in the vicinity of affected beehives. This suggests that the plant surface spiroplasmas are deposited on these surfaces by contaminated insects. Many insect spiroplasmas are not pathogenic, are often restricted to the gut and may be regarded as mutualists or incidental commensals. Of the three known tick spiroplasmas, only Spiroplasma mirum obtained from rabbit ticks is pathogenic to the vertebrate animal (chick embryo, new-born rodents, adult rabbit), but only upon experimental inoculation of the spiroplasma. Strain SMCA induces high incidence of cataracts in new born rodents. With strain GT-48 no cataracts are observed, but fatal encephalitis occurs. Spiral membranous inclusions resembling spiroplasmas have been seen in brain biopsies taken from patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, failure to detect spiroplasmas by serology and culture points to the absence of spiroplasmal involvement in spongiform encephalopathies. Transposon Tn 4001 mutagenesis has been applied for the first time to Spiroplasma citri, and pathogenicity can now be studied at the genetic level. One Tn 4001 mutant does not multiply in the leafhoppers and is, therefore, not transmitted to the plant. Another mutant multiplies well in the plant and is transmitted to the plant, where it reaches high titers, but without inducing symptoms in the plant. In this non-phytopathogenic mutant, Tn 4001 is inserted in the spiroplasmal fructose operon, and the mutant is unable to use fructose. Finally, to study involvement of spiroplasmal motility in pathogenicity, a non-motile mutant has been obtained. Motility was restored by complementation with the wild type genes. This is the first time that successful complementation has been reported, not only in the spiroplasmas but in the mollicutes in general. Undoubtedly, studies on pathogenicity have entered a new era. PMID:9286068

Bové, J M

1997-08-01

93

Arthropod Diversity in a Tropical Forest  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Most eukaryotic organisms are arthropods. Yet, their diversity in rich terrestrial ecosystems is still unknown. Here we produce tangible estimates of the total species richness of arthropods in a tropical rainforest. Using a comprehensive range of structured protocols, we sampled the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa from the soil to the forest canopy in the San Lorenzo forest, Panama. We collected 6144 arthropod species from 0.48 hectare and extrapolated total species richness to larger areas on the basis of competing models. The whole 6000-hectare forest reserve most likely sustains 25,000 arthropod species. Notably, just 1 hectare of rainforest yields >60% of the arthropod biodiversity held in the wider landscape. Models based on plant diversity fitted the accumulated species richness of both herbivore and nonherbivore taxa exceptionally well. This lends credence to global estimates of arthropod biodiversity developed from plant models.

Basset, Yves; Cizek, Lukas

2012-01-01

94

Epidemiology and control of malaria and other arthropod born diseases  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Malaria and other arthropod born diseases remain a serious public health problem affecting the lives and health of certain social groups when the two basic strategies to control fail due to : (1) the lack of effective chemoprophylaxis/chemotherapy or the rapid development of drug resistance of the i [...] nfectious agents and (2) the ineffectiveness of pesticides or the arthropod vectors develop resistance to them. These situations enhances the need for the design and implementation of other alternatives for sustainable health programmes. The application of the epidemiological methods is essential not only for analyzing the relevant data for the understanding of the biological characteristics of the infectious agents, their reservoirs and vectors and the methods for their control, but also for the assessment of the human behaviour, the environmental, social and economic factors involved in disease transmission and the capacity of the health systems to implement interventions for both changes in human behaviour and environmental management to purpose guaranteed prevention and control of malaria and other arthropod born diseases with efficiency, efficacy and equity. This paper discuss the evolution of the malaria arthropod diseases programmes in the American Region and the perspectives for their integration into health promotion programs and emphasis is made in the need to establish solid basis in the decision-making process for the selection of intervention strategies to remove the risk factors determining the probability to get sick or die from ABDs. The implications of the general planning and the polices to be adopted in an area should be analyzed in the light of programme feasibility at the local level, in the multisectoral context specific social groups and taking in consideration the principles of stratification and equity

F. J., López-Antuñano.

95

Arthropod communities in bat guano  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Data are presented on the taxonomic composition of arthropod fauna of bat guano in 6 limestone caves of southern Thailand, extracted by Berlese's funnel type trap. There were 2 sampling periods: the first from 29 April to 7 May 1996 and the second from 1 to 4 August 1996. Combined samples of bat guano comprised 4,430 individuals of 32 families of the following: 13 orders(2 classes; Arachnida and Hexapoda) Araneae, Acari, Pseudoscorpiones, Collembola, Blattaria, Hemiptera, Thysanoptera, Psocop...

2001-01-01

96

Evolving specialization of the arthropod nervous system  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The diverse array of body plans possessed by arthropods is created by generating variations upon a design of repeated segments formed during development, using a relatively small “toolbox” of conserved patterning genes. These attributes make the arthropod body plan a valuable model for elucidating how changes in development create diversity of form. As increasingly specialized segments and appendages evolved in arthropods, the nervous systems of these animals also evolved to control the f...

Jarvis, Erin; Bruce, Heather S.; Patel, Nipam H.

2012-01-01

97

Factors Influencing Arthropod Diversity on Green Roofs  

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Full Text Available Green roofs have potential for providing substantial habitat to plants, birds, and arthropod species that are not well supported by other urban habitats. Whereas the plants on a typical green roof are chosen and planted by people, the arthropods that colonize it can serve as an indicator of the ability of this novel habitat to support a diverse community of organisms. The goal of this observational study was to determine which physical characteristics of a roof or characteristics of its vegetation correlate with arthropod diversity on the roof. We intensively sampled the number of insect families on one roof with pitfall traps and also measured the soil arthropod species richness on six green roofs in the Boston, MA area. We found that the number of arthropod species in soil, and arthropod families in pitfall traps, was positively correlated with living vegetation cover. The number of arthropod species was not significantly correlated with plant diversity, green roof size, distance from the ground, or distance to the nearest vegetated habitat from the roof. Our results suggest that vegetation cover may be more important than vegetation diversity for roof arthropod diversity, at least for the first few years after establishment. Additionally, we found that even green roofs that are small and isolated can support a community of arthropods that include important functional groups of the soil food web.

Bracha Y. Schindler

2011-01-01

98

Infectious Arthritis  

Science.gov (United States)

... Some more common causes of infectious arthritis include: Lyme Disease Lyme disease is caused by bacteria that live in ... goes unnoticed and the rash may be overlooked, Lyme disease is not always diagnosed immediately. When the ...

99

Infectious Arthritis  

Science.gov (United States)

Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

100

Immunological responses to parasitic arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

Parasitic arthropods are responsible for enormous economic losses to livestock producers throughout the world. These production losses may range from simple irritation caused by biting and non-biting flies to deaths and/or damage to carcass, fleece, or skin resulting from attack by myiasis flies. The estimated costs of these losses are colossal but even these usually include only direct losses and ignore those associated with pesticide application. In the USA alone (in 1976), these losses were conservatively estimated at more than 650 million US dollars. The long term use of chemical control measures for these pests has resulted in many serious problems including residues in meat and milk products, rapid development of insecticide resistance, the destruction of non-target organisms, environmental pollution, and mortality and morbidity of livestock. These concerns have prompted researchers to seek alternative methods of arthropod control, including the artificial induction of immunity. In this review, R. W. Baron and J. Weintraub discuss several examples of ectoparasites that can induce immunological resistance in the host, including Sarcoptes and Demodex mites, the sheep ked (Melophagus ovinus), Anopluran lice and myiasis-causing flies such as Hypoderma. PMID:15462916

Baron, R W; Weintraub, J

1987-03-01

 
 
 
 
101

Noninsect Arthropods in Popular Music  

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Full Text Available The occurrence of noninsect arthropods in popular music was examined in order to explore human attitudes toward these species, especially as compared to insects. Crustaceans were the most commonly referenced taxonomic group in artist names, album titles and cover art, followed by spiders and scorpions. The surprising prevalence of crustaceans may be related to the palatability of many of the species. Spiders and scorpions were primarily used for shock value, as well as totemic qualities of strength and ferocity. Spiders were the most abundant group among song titles, perhaps because of their familiarity to the general public. Three noninsect arthropod album titles were found from the early 1970s, then none appear until 1990. Older albums are difficult to find unless they are quite popular, and the resurgence of albums coincides with the rise of the internet. After 1990, issuance of such albums increased approximately linearly. Giant and chimeric album covers were the most common of themes, indicating the use of these animals to inspire fear and surprise. The lyrics of select songs are presented to illustrate the diversity of sentiments present, from camp spookiness to edibility.

Joseph R. Coelho

2011-05-01

102

The risk of vector-borne infections in sled dogs associated with existing and new endemic areas in Poland: Part 1: A population study on sled dogs during the racing season.  

Science.gov (United States)

The achievements of sled dogs in competitions depend both on their training and on their health. Vector-borne infections may lead to anaemia, affect joints or heart muscle or even cause death. Between December 2009 and October 2010, one hundred and twenty six individual blood samples were collected from 26 sled dog kennels situated in different regions of Poland. The majority of samples were taken during the racing season (winter 2009/10). The prevalences of 3 vector-borne infections- including 2 'old pathogens' Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia canis, and 'new pathogen' Hepatozoon canis-were estimated in sled dogs using PCR and nested PCR. Additionally, 25 serum samples originating from a subset of 3 kennels situated in a tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) endemic area (Mazowiecki region), were tested for antibodies against the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV). Because of the recently reported occurrence of Dirofilaria repens in Central Poland and that of fatal cases of unknown aetiology in two of the kennels, blood samples collected from dogs at these kennels in 2010 and in February-May 2013 and from two unaffected kennels were checked for evidence of presence of this parasite. Babesia canis DNA was detected in 11 sled dogs (4 with clinical babesiosis, 7 asymptomatic; 8.7%) inhabiting mainly endemic regions of Poland (9/11 cases). Three serum samples originating from one location tested positive for TBEV antibodies (total seroprevalence: 3/25=12%, local seroprevalence: 3/12=25%). The risk of TBEV infection was associated with previous B. canis infections. Dirofilaria repens DNA was detected in 15 dogs (44%). Prevalence was especially high in two sled dog kennels situated near Grodzisk Mazowiecki (50-57%). No blood samples tested positive for A. phagocytophilum or H. canis DNA. The present study has established that the prevalence of vector-borne pathogens in working sled dogs is significant in the endemic regions and has justified the important role of surveillance of reservoir hosts in the epidemiology of TBE. Our results emphasize the need for regular monitoring for the presence of D. repens. PMID:24491396

Bajer, Anna; Mierzejewska, Ewa J; Rodo, Anna; Bednarska, Malgorzata; Kowalec, Maciej; Welc-Fal?ciak, Renata

2014-05-28

103

Vector-borne pathogens in dogs from Costa Rica: first molecular description of Babesia vogeli and Hepatozoon canis infections with a high prevalence of monocytic ehrlichiosis and the manifestations of co-infection.  

Science.gov (United States)

Infection with canine vector-borne pathogens was evaluated in dogs from four different regions of Costa Rica by PCR. Demographic data, clinical signs, packed cell volume values, and the presence of tick infestation were recorded for each dog. Forty seven percent (69/146) of the dogs were infected with at least one pathogen and 12% were co-infected with two pathogens. Ehrlichia canis was detected in 34%, Anaplasma platys in 10%, Babesia vogeli in 8%, and Hepatozoon canis in 7.5% of the blood samples. No infection was detected with Leishmania spp. in blood, skin scrapings or conjunctival swabs. Thirty percent of the dogs presented at least one clinical sign compatible with vector-borne disease, and of those, 66% were infected with a pathogen. Subclinical infections were determined in 58% of the infected dogs including 82% (9/11), 58% (29/50), 42% (5/12) and 36% (5/14) of the dogs with H. canis, E. canis, B. vogeli and A. platys infections, respectively. A distinct relationship was found between infection and anemia. The mean PCV values were 34.4% in dogs with no infection, 31.5% in those who had a single infection and 23% in those with co-infection. Co-infected dogs had significantly lower PCV values compared to non-infected and single-infected dogs (pRhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato and 18% with Amblyomma ovale. Dogs infected with A. platys, B. vogeli, or E. canis were significantly associated with R. sanguineus s.l. infestation (p<0.029). This is the first description of infections with B. vogeli and H. canis in Costa Rica as well as in Central America. The results of this study indicate that multiple vector-borne pathogens responsible for severe diseases infect dogs in Costa Rica and therefore, increased owner and veterinarian awareness are needed. Moreover, prevention of tick infestation is recommended to decrease the threat of these diseases to the canine population. PMID:24315693

Rojas, Alicia; Rojas, Diana; Montenegro, Víctor; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Yasur-Landau, Daniel; Baneth, Gad

2014-01-31

104

Arthropods (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/online-version.asp  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Arthropods ISSN 2224-4255 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/rss.xml E-mail: arthropods@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope ARTHROPODS (ISSN 2224-4255 is an international journal devoted to the publication of articles on various aspects of arthropods, e.g., ecology, biogeography, systematics, biodiversity (species diversity, genetic diversity, et al., conservation, control, etc. The journal provides a forum for examining the importance of arthropods in biosphere (both terrestrial and marine ecosystems and human life in such fields as agriculture, forestry, fishery, environmental management and human health. The scope of Arthropods is wide and embraces all arthropods-insects, arachnids, crustaceans, centipedes, millipedes, and other arthropods. Articles/short communications on new taxa (species, genus, families, orders, etc. and new records of arthropods are particularly welcome. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, arthropods@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal. Authors are asked to read Author Guidelines before submitting manuscripts. In addition to free submissions from authors around the world, special issues are also accepted. The organizer of a special issue can collect submissions (yielded from a research project, a research group, etc. on a specific research topic, or submissions of a scientific conference for publication of special issue.

arthropods@iaees.org

105

Role of Arthropods in Maintaining Soil Fertility  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In terms of species richness, arthropods may represent as much as 85% of the soil fauna. They comprise a large proportion of the meso- and macrofauna of the soil. Within the litter/soil system, five groups are chiefly represented: Isopoda, Myriapoda, Insecta, Acari, and Collembola, the latter two being by far the most abundant and diverse. Arthropods function on two of the three broad levels of organization of the soil food web: they are plant litter transformers or ecosystem engineers. Litte...

Culliney, Thomas W.

2013-01-01

106

Arthropods in amber from the Triassic Period  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The occurrence of arthropods in amber exclusively from the Cretaceous and Cenozoic is widely regarded to be a result of the production and preservation of large amounts of tree resin beginning ca. 130 million years (Ma) ago. Abundant 230 million-year-old amber from the Late Triassic (Carnian) of northeastern Italy has previously yielded myriad microorganisms, but we report here that it also preserves arthropods some 100 Ma older than the earliest prior records in amber. The Triassic specim...

Schmidt, Alexander R.; Jancke, Saskia; Lindquist, Evert E.; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Roghi, Guido; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Schmidt, Kerstin; Wappler, Torsten; Grimaldi, David A.

2012-01-01

107

Key to marine arthropod larvae  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The scope of this key is restricted to the larvae of marine arthropods. The key is based solely on their morphology, patterns of body segmentation, numbers of appendages, and mode of locomotion. An effort has been made to treat all traditionally named larval forms, both planktonic and benthic. It is intended that this key be useful for a researcher working with archived museum specimens and therefore, does not include habitat information as a identifying trait, even though this information is usually available in the archived records. Within the phylum Arthropoda there are two sub-phyla and eleven classes having larval stages in the marineenvironment. Where feasible the original names of the various larval types have been used. Because this nomenclature is less commonly used today compared to the past, the more recent taxonomic affinities are included in parentheses after the original larval name. The key includes the following thirty-four larvae: Branchhiopoda nauplii; Cephalocarida nauplii; Mystacocarida nauplii; trilobite larva; protonymphon; hexapod larvae; Remipedia nauplii; nauplius - Y larvae; Cirripedia nauplii; Ascothoracida nauplii; Ostracoda nauplii; Euphausiacea nauplii; Penaeidea nauplii; Cyclopoida nauplii; Calanoida nauplii; Harpacticoida nauplii;Polyarthra nauplii; cypris larva; eryonecius larva; cypris-Y larva; elapthocaris larvae; mysis larvae; lucifer zoea; acetes zoea; acanthosoma larva; phyllosoma; antizoea larva; anomuran zoea; brachyuran zoea; calyptopis larvae; furcilia larva; crytopia larva; puerulus larva; alima larva.

John A. Fornshell

2012-03-01

108

Activity and biological effects of neem products against arthropods of medical and veterinary importance.  

Science.gov (United States)

Botanical insecticides are relatively safe and degradable, and are readily available sources of biopesticides. The most prominent phytochemical pesticides in recent years are those derived from neem trees, which have been studied extensively in the fields of entomology and phytochemistry, and have uses for medicinal and cosmetic purposes. The neem products have been obtained from several species of neem trees in the family Meliaceae. Six species in this family have been the subject of botanical pesticide research. They are Azadirachta indica A. Juss, Azadirachta excelsa Jack, Azadirachta siamens Valeton, Melia azedarach L., Melia toosendan Sieb. and Zucc., and Melia volkensii Gürke. The Meliaceae, especially A. indica (Indian neem tree), contains at least 35 biologically active principles. Azadirachtin is the predominant insecticidal active ingredient in the seed, leaves, and other parts of the neem tree. Azadirachtin and other compounds in neem products exhibit various modes of action against insects such as antifeedancy, growth regulation, fecundity suppression and sterilization, oviposition repellency or attractancy, changes in biological fitness, and blocking development of vector-borne pathogens. Some of these bioactivity parameters of neem products have been investigated at least in some species of insects of medical and veterinary importance, such as mosquitoes, flies, triatomines, cockroaches, fleas, lice, and others. Here we review, synthesize, and analyze published information on the activity, modes of action, and other biological effects of neem products against arthropods of medical and veterinary importance. The amount of information on the activity, use, and application of neem products for the control of disease vectors and human and animal pests is limited. Additional research is needed to determine the potential usefulness of neem products in vector control programs. PMID:10412110

Mulla, M S; Su, T

1999-06-01

109

Night and crepuscular mosquitoes and risk of vector-borne diseases in areas of piassaba extraction in the middle Negro River basin, state of Amazonas, Brazil.  

Science.gov (United States)

A study of crepuscular and night-biting mosquitoes was conducted at remote settlements along the Padauiri River, middle Negro River, state of Amazonas, Brazil. Collections were performed with human bait and a CDC-light trap on three consecutive days per month from June 2003-May 2004. In total, 1,203 h of collection were performed, of which 384 were outside and 819 were inside houses. At total of 11,612 specimens were captured, and Anophelinae (6.01%) were much less frequent than Culicinae (93.94%). Anopheles darlingi was the most frequent Anophelinae collected. Among the culicines, 2,666 Culex (Ae.) clastrieri Casal & Garcia, 2,394 Culex. (Mel.) vomerifer Komp, and 1,252 Culex (Mel.) eastor Dyar were the most frequent species collected. The diversity of insects found reveals the receptivity of the area towards a variety of diseases facilitated by the presence of vectors involved in the transmission of Plasmodium, arboviruses and other infectious agents. PMID:19274370

Suárez-Mutis, Martha Cecília; Fé, Nelson Ferreira; Alecrim, Wilson; Coura, José Rodrigues

2009-02-01

110

Night and crepuscular mosquitoes and risk of vector-borne diseases in areas of piassaba extraction in the middle Negro River basin, state of Amazonas, Brazil  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english A study of crepuscular and night-biting mosquitoes was conducted at remote settlements along the Padauiri River, middle Negro River, state of Amazonas, Brazil. Collections were performed with human bait and a CDC-light trap on three consecutive days per month from June 2003-May 2004. In total, 1,203 [...] h of collection were performed, of which 384 were outside and 819 were inside houses. At total of 11,612 specimens were captured, and Anophelinae (6.01%) were much less frequent than Culicinae (93.94%). Anopheles darlingi was the most frequent Anophelinae collected. Among the culicines, 2,666 Culex (Ae.) clastrieri Casal & Garcia, 2,394 Culex. (Mel.) vomerifer Komp, and 1,252 Culex (Mel.) eastor Dyar were the most frequent species collected. The diversity of insects found reveals the receptivity of the area towards a variety of diseases facilitated by the presence of vectors involved in the transmission of Plasmodium, arboviruses and other infectious agents.

Martha Cecília, Suárez-Mutis; Nelson Ferreira, Fé; Wilson, Alecrim; José Rodrigues, Coura.

111

Night and crepuscular mosquitoes and risk of vector-borne diseases in areas of piassaba extraction in the middle Negro River basin, state of Amazonas, Brazil  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A study of crepuscular and night-biting mosquitoes was conducted at remote settlements along the Padauiri River, middle Negro River, state of Amazonas, Brazil. Collections were performed with human bait and a CDC-light trap on three consecutive days per month from June 2003-May 2004. In total, 1,203 h of collection were performed, of which 384 were outside and 819 were inside houses. At total of 11,612 specimens were captured, and Anophelinae (6.01% were much less frequent than Culicinae (93.94%. Anopheles darlingi was the most frequent Anophelinae collected. Among the culicines, 2,666 Culex (Ae. clastrieri Casal & Garcia, 2,394 Culex. (Mel. vomerifer Komp, and 1,252 Culex (Mel. eastor Dyar were the most frequent species collected. The diversity of insects found reveals the receptivity of the area towards a variety of diseases facilitated by the presence of vectors involved in the transmission of Plasmodium, arboviruses and other infectious agents.

Martha Cecília Suárez-Mutis

2009-02-01

112

Evolving specialization of the arthropod nervous system  

Science.gov (United States)

The diverse array of body plans possessed by arthropods is created by generating variations upon a design of repeated segments formed during development, using a relatively small “toolbox” of conserved patterning genes. These attributes make the arthropod body plan a valuable model for elucidating how changes in development create diversity of form. As increasingly specialized segments and appendages evolved in arthropods, the nervous systems of these animals also evolved to control the function of these structures. Although there is a remarkable degree of conservation in neural development both between individual segments in any given species and between the nervous systems of different arthropod groups, the differences that do exist are informative for inferring general principles about the holistic evolution of body plans. This review describes developmental processes controlling neural segmentation and regionalization, highlighting segmentation mechanisms that create both ectodermal and neural segments, as well as recent studies of the role of Hox genes in generating regional specification within the central nervous system. We argue that this system generates a modular design that allows the nervous system to evolve in concert with the body segments and their associated appendages. This information will be useful in future studies of macroevolutionary changes in arthropod body plans, especially in understanding how these transformations can be made in a way that retains the function of appendages during evolutionary transitions in morphology.

Jarvis, Erin; Bruce, Heather S.; Patel, Nipam H.

2012-01-01

113

Vertical stratification in arthropod spatial distribution research.  

Science.gov (United States)

Spatial heterogeneity within individual host trees is often overlooked in surveys of phytophagous arthropod abundance and distribution. The armored scale Aulacaspis yasumatsui is controlled by the predator Rhyzobius lophanthae to a greater degree on leaves at 75-cm height than on leaves at ground level within its host tree Cycas micronesica. The direct influence of elevation on the predator indirectly generates vertical heterogeneity of the scale insect. Arthropod sampling schemes that fail to include all strata within the vertical profile of the host tree species may generate misleading outcomes. Results indicate that sub-meter increments can reveal significant differences in vertical distribution of phytophagous insects, and that inclusion of observations on other organisms that interact with the target arthropod may illuminate determinants of vertical heterogeneity. PMID:24567772

Marler, Thomas E

2013-11-01

114

Conclusion: arthropods, canopies and interpretable patterns.  

Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2003 - (Basset, Y.; Novotný, V.; Miller, S.; Kitching, R.), s. 394-405 ISBN 0-521-82000-6Výzkumný zám?r: CEZ:AV0Z5007907Klí?ová slova: ArthropodsKód oboru RIV: EG - Zoologie

Basset, Y.; Novotný, Vojt?ch; Miller, S. E.; Kitching, R. L.

115

Trilobites and the origin of arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

While the question of whether the Arthropoda represent more than one phylum of animals is debatable, the jointed exoskeleton, a fundamental feature of arthropods, evolved independently in two groups that shared a worm-like common ancestor. The two major branches of Arthropoda, the primitively marine TCC and the primitively terrestrial (with one exception) Uniramia, independently arrived at arthropodization as the solution to the same problems of adaptation of the body mechanical system. New discoveries on trilobite anatomy show the unity of TCC as a group that shared a trilobite-like ancestor near the beginning of the Cambrian. With change in the constituency of Arthropoda through geologic time, the ways in which it would be categorized as a taxonomic group have also changed. The seeming isolation of the major modern arthropod groups is in large part an artifact of extinction of primitive intermediate forms such as trilobites which, in the Early Paleozoic, made the Arthropoda more diverse in basic modes of body organization than the group is at present. The appearance of fossilizable hard parts in arthropods resulted from shift in supporting function from the body cavity, primitively a hydrostatic skeleton, to the cuticle, which came to be strengthened in becoming an exoskeleton. Energetic efficiency, more than protection from predators or evolutionary size increase in itself, was probably the impetus behind the transition. On the scale provided by the general evolutionary trend toward progressive specialization of segments, TCC became arthropodized at earlier stages than did Uniramia. Among TCC, the shift may have been driven by the evolution of locomotory and feeding mechanisms that were exclusively geared to an aqueous medium. PMID:17818086

Cisne, J L

1974-10-01

116

Role of Arthropods in Maintaining Soil Fertility  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In terms of species richness, arthropods may represent as much as 85% of the soil fauna. They comprise a large proportion of the meso- and macrofauna of the soil. Within the litter/soil system, five groups are chiefly represented: Isopoda, Myriapoda, Insecta, Acari, and Collembola, the latter two being by far the most abundant and diverse. Arthropods function on two of the three broad levels of organization of the soil food web: they are plant litter transformers or ecosystem engineers. Litter transformers fragment, or comminute, and humidify ingested plant debris, which is deposited in feces for further decomposition by micro-organisms, and foster the growth and dispersal of microbial populations. Large quantities of annual litter input may be processed (e.g., up to 60% by termites. The comminuted plant matter in feces presents an increased surface area to attack by micro-organisms, which, through the process of mineralization, convert its organic nutrients into simpler, inorganic compounds available to plants. Ecosystem engineers alter soil structure, mineral and organic matter composition, and hydrology. The burrowing by arthropods, particularly the subterranean network of tunnels and galleries that comprise termite and ant nests, improves soil porosity to provide adequate aeration and water-holding capacity below ground, facilitate root penetration, and prevent surface crusting and erosion of topsoil. Also, the movement of particles from lower horizons to the surface by ants and termites aids in mixing the organic and mineral fractions of the soil. The feces of arthropods are the basis for the formation of soil aggregates and humus, which physically stabilize the soil and increase its capacity to store nutrients.

Thomas W. Culliney

2013-09-01

117

Arthropods in amber from the Triassic Period.  

Science.gov (United States)

The occurrence of arthropods in amber exclusively from the Cretaceous and Cenozoic is widely regarded to be a result of the production and preservation of large amounts of tree resin beginning ca. 130 million years (Ma) ago. Abundant 230 million-year-old amber from the Late Triassic (Carnian) of northeastern Italy has previously yielded myriad microorganisms, but we report here that it also preserves arthropods some 100 Ma older than the earliest prior records in amber. The Triassic specimens are a nematoceran fly (Diptera) and two disparate species of mites, Triasacarus fedelei gen. et sp. nov., and Ampezzoa triassica gen. et sp. nov. These mites are the oldest definitive fossils of a group, the Eriophyoidea, which includes the gall mites and comprises at least 3,500 Recent species, 97% of which feed on angiosperms and represents one of the most specialized lineages of phytophagous arthropods. Antiquity of the gall mites in much their extant form was unexpected, particularly with the Triassic species already having many of their present-day features (such as only two pairs of legs); further, it establishes conifer feeding as an ancestral trait. Feeding by the fossil mites may have contributed to the formation of the amber droplets, but we find that the abundance of amber during the Carnian (ca. 230 Ma) is globally anomalous for the pre-Cretaceous and may, alternatively, be related to paleoclimate. Further recovery of arthropods in Carnian-aged amber is promising and will have profound implications for understanding the evolution of terrestrial members of the most diverse phylum of organisms. PMID:22927387

Schmidt, Alexander R; Jancke, Saskia; Lindquist, Evert E; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Roghi, Guido; Nascimbene, Paul C; Schmidt, Kerstin; Wappler, Torsten; Grimaldi, David A

2012-09-11

118

The risk of vector-borne infections in sled dogs associated with existing and new endemic areas in Poland. Part 2: Occurrence and control of babesiosis in a sled dog kennel during a 13-year-long period.  

Science.gov (United States)

The achievements of sled dogs in competitions depend both on their training and on their health. Vector-borne infections may lead to anemia, affect joints or heart muscles or even cause death. Canine babesiosis is an emerging, quickly spreading tick-borne disease in Central Europe. Over a 13-year period (2000-2012) the occurrence of babesiosis cases was analyzed in one sled dog kennel situated in Kury, a village near T?uszcz (N 52°24'56.78?, E 21°30'37.55?) in Central Poland. Twenty cases/episodes of babesiosis were noted among the 10-12 dogs living in the kennel. In 2000-2004, no cases of babesiosis were noted; the first two cases were noted in April 2005. Since that time, only one dog remained uninfected; 6 dogs were infected once, 3 dogs demonstrated symptoms of babesiosis twice, one dog was infected three times and one dog had it five times. Babesiosis appeared in Spring and Autumn, despite the application of anti-tick treatment. No fatal cases were recorded, but in one case a splenectomy was performed due to splenomegaly and spleen rupture. Additionally, the abundance of the main Babesia canis vector, the Dermacentor reticulatus tick, was estimated and monitored during a 4-year period (2008-2012) close to the dog kennel. The abundance of questing ticks was high in 2008 and 2009, but dropped by 10-fold between 2010 and 2012, when the abandoned meadow was cut and used as horse pasture by the local farmer. The regular occurrence, typical seasonal pattern and identification of B. canis DNA in questing tick from this locality confirmed the establishment of a new hyper enzootic region for canine babesiosis. The effectiveness and schedule of applied preventive measures were discussed. PMID:24612743

Bajer, Anna; Mierzejewska, Ewa J; Rodo, Anna; Welc-Fal?ciak, Renata

2014-05-28

119

Dengue Fever: An Emerging Infectious Disease in The Bahamas  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Dengue fever is an emerging infectious disease that is increasing in prevalence in many geographic regions, including the Caribbean. It is the most common arboviral (vector-borne disease in the world, and infects more that 50 million people annually worldwide. The etiological agent of dengue fever is one of four serotypes of the Dengue virus (DENV1 – DENV4. The infection is transmitted via a human-mosquito-human route, when one or more species of the Aedes mosquito takes a blood meal from an infected host and then feeds on a person who is uninfected. There is no vaccine or cure for dengue fever. Dengue fever is a growing cause for concern in The Bahamas. This year the incidence of dengue fever reached epidemic proportions in The Bahamas. This article will explore the etiology and epidemiology of dengue fever, and offer some insight into how future the Bahamas can begin to develop strategies for the eradication of dengue fever.

Bain, Sherrie Valarie

2011-10-01

120

Arthropod diversity in peas with normal or reduced waxy bloom  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Crop traits can alter economically important interactions between plants, pests, and biological control agents. For example, a reduced waxy bloom on the surface of pea plants alters interactions between pea aphids and their natural enemies. In this study, we assess whether the effect of wax reduction extends beyond the 2 or 3 arthropod species closely associated with the plants and into the structure of the broader arthropod community of over 200 taxa at our site. We sampled arthropods on lin...

Chang, Gary C.; Rutledge, Claire E.; Biggam, Russell C.; Eigenbrode, Sanford D.

2004-01-01

 
 
 
 
121

What are the Connections Between Plants and Arthropods? Abridged  

Science.gov (United States)

After charting the relationships they've observed in their plots, students predict which arthropods they'll find there and go in search of them. The unit is designed to be completed in four to seven sessions. The unit addresses the following two target questions. What kinds of relationships exist among plants, arthropods, and abiotic factors? Can the presence of a plant species predict the presence of an arthropod species, and visa versa?

122

Skimming the surface with Burgess Shale arthropod locomotion  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The first arthropod trackways are described from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale Formation of Canada. Trace fossils, including trackways, provide a rich source of biological and ecological information, including direct evidence of behaviour not commonly available from body fossils alone. The discovery of large arthropod trackways is unique for Burgess Shale-type deposits. Trackway dimensions and the requisite number of limbs are matched with the body plan of a tegopeltid arthropod. Tegopelt...

Minter, Nicholas J.; Ma?ngano, M. Gabriela; Caron, Jean-bernard

2012-01-01

123

Ecology of Infectious Diseases (EID)  

Science.gov (United States)

... of Infectious Diseases (EID) Synopsis of Program: The Ecology of Infectious Diseases special ... on particular infectious agents, individual diseases, or groups of diseases, and might involve one ...

124

Infectious mononucleosis #3 (image)  

Science.gov (United States)

Infectious mononucleosis is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. It is a viral infection causing high temperature, sore throat, and swollen lymph glands. Infectious mononucleosis can be contagious if the infected person comes ...

125

Plutonium concentrations in arthropods at a nuclear facility  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Arthropods were collected for 239 240Pu (239Pu) and 238Pu analysis from three study plots in close proximity to the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant and from a site 110 km N-NE of the plant. Mean 239Pu concentrations in arthropods were 265, 16, 0.7 and 0.5 dis/min g-1 at the three Rocky Flats study plots and at the control site, respectively. Arthropod 239Pu concentration data were statistically analyzed by season of collection, taxonomic group, and sampling site. Only the collection site differences were significant (? = 0.01) and these were correlated with 239Pu concentrations in soil. The mean activity ratio of 239Pu to 238Pu in arthropods was 52, similar to the value of 51 obtained for soil. The mean ratio of 239Pu in arthropods to 239Pu in 0-3 cm soil at Rocky Flats was 9 x 10-3. Arthropod biomass and Pu concentration data indicated that only about 10-8 of the total plutonium inventory is in the arthropod component of the ecosystem. Leafhoppers, grasshoppers and spiders accounted for roughly 80% of the arthropod inventory of 239Pu. (author)

1979-01-01

126

Arthropod Borne Diseases in Imposed War during 1980-88  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: Personnel of military forces have close contact with natural habitat and usually encounter with bite of arthropods and prone to be infected with arthropod borne diseases. The imposed war against Iran was one of the most important and the longest war in the Middle East and even in the world and military people faced various diseases. The aim of this study was to review prevalence of arthropod borne diseases and to collect relevant information and valuable experiences during the imposed war. Methods: The present survey is a historical research and cross-sectional study, focused on arthropod fauna, situation of different arthropod borne diseases and also the ways which military personnel used to protect themselves against them. The information was adopted from valid military health files and also interviewing people who participated in the war. Results: Scabies, cutaneous leishmaniasis, sandfly fever and pediculosis were more prevalent among other arthropod -borne diseases in Iran-Iraq war. Measures to control arthropods and diseases at wartime mainly included: scheduled spraying of pesticides, leishmanization and treatment of patients. Conclusion: Although measures used during the war to control arthropods were proper, however, due to needs and importance of military forces to new equipment and technologies, it is recommended to use deltamethrin-impreg­nated bed net, permethrin treated military uniforms and various insect repellents in future.

M Khoobdel

2008-08-01

127

Soil arthropods as test organisms for ecotoxicology  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The importance of arthropods - organisms which usually grow in masses - for soil biology depends on their capacity to participate in the continuous transformation of organic substances within the relevant biocenosis and thus to take part in the maintenance of the ecological balance. In ecotoxicology, i.e. the science of substances having a detrimental effect on the natural balance of ecosystems, we try to find ways to evaluate risk of substances hazardous to the environment. In principle, biocenoses would offer themselves in their entirety as appropriate test objects for ecotoxicological evaluation of chemicals. Since it will not yet be possible in the near future to carry out this kind of studies, individual organisms proved as representatives of terrestial biotopes have to be chosen for these purposes. Primarily, Collembola, Coleoptera, and Diptera (larvae) are part of the meso- and macrofauna of soil arthropods or soil insects according to the experience made up to now in respect of their importance for soil biology. Representatives of such organisms should be used to develop test procedures to indicate damage even of a subacute, chronic nature or the impairment of their functional performance the maintance of which is a prerequisite for the ecological balance.

Iglisch, I.

1981-02-01

128

A Silurian short-great-appendage arthropod.  

Science.gov (United States)

A new arthropod, Enalikter aphson gen. et sp. nov., is described from the Silurian (Wenlock Series) Herefordshire Lagerstätte of the UK. It belongs to the Megacheira (=short-great-appendage group), which is recognized here, for the first time, in strata younger than mid-Cambrian age. Discovery of this new Silurian taxon allows us to identify a Devonian megacheiran representative, Bundenbachiellus giganteus from the Hunsrück Slate of Germany. The phylogenetic position of megacheirans is controversial: they have been interpreted as stem chelicerates, or stem euarthropods, but when Enalikter and Bundenbachiellus are added to the most comprehensive morphological database available, a stem euarthropod position is supported. Enalikter represents the only fully three-dimensionally preserved stem-group euarthropod, it falls in the sister clade to the crown-group euarthropods, and it provides new insights surrounding the origin and early evolution of the euarthropods. Recognition of Enalikter and Bundenbachiellus as megacheirans indicates that this major arthropod group survived for nearly 100 Myr beyond the mid-Cambrian. PMID:24452026

Siveter, Derek J; Briggs, Derek E G; Siveter, David J; Sutton, Mark D; Legg, David; Joomun, Sarah

2014-03-01

129

Selenium hyperaccumulation reduces plant arthropod loads in the field.  

Science.gov (United States)

The elemental defense hypothesis proposes that some plants hyperaccumulate toxic elements as a defense mechanism. In this study the effectiveness of selenium (Se) as an arthropod deterrent was investigated under field conditions. Arthropod loads were measured over two growing seasons in Se hyperaccumulator habitats in Colorado, USA, comparing Se hyperaccumulator species (Astragalus bisulcatus and Stanleya pinnata) with nonhyperaccumulators (Camelina microcarpa, Astragalus americanus, Descurainia pinnata, Medicago sativa, and Helianthus pumilus). The Se hyperaccumulating plant species, which contained 1000-14 000 microg Se g(-1) DW, harbored significantly fewer arthropods (c. twofold) and fewer arthropod species (c. 1.5-fold) compared with nonhyperaccumulator species that contained 10-fold lower Se concentrations than their hyperaccumulator hosts. Several arthropod species contained > 100 microg Se g(-1) DW, indicating Se tolerance and perhaps feeding specialization. These results support the elemental defense hypothesis and suggest that invertebrate herbivory may have contributed to the evolution of Se hyperaccumulation. PMID:18028291

Galeas, Miriam L; Klamper, Erin M; Bennett, Lindsay E; Freeman, John L; Kondratieff, Boris C; Quinn, Colin F; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

2008-01-01

130

[New infectious diseases in Finland--caused by climate change?].  

Science.gov (United States)

Although the appearance and spreading of most new infectious diseases are likely to be due to globalization or socio-economic changes, the occurrence of tick-, insect- and rodent-borne infections is at least partially dependent on climate variability and change. Climate influences the distribution and life cycle of vectors of arthropod-borne viruses as well as viral evolution and efficacy of transmission. The natural circulation of many pathogens and the development of epidemics are dependent on complex ecological factors, such as biodiversity and predator-prey cycles that in turn are indirectly linked to climate. PMID:22880374

Vapalahti, Olli; Ruuhela, Reija; Henttonen, Heikki

2012-01-01

131

Sarotrocercus oblitus - Small arthropod with great impact on the understanding of arthropod evolution?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Sarotrocercus oblitus is a small arthropod from the Cambrian Burgess Shale. It was originally described with a short head with only two appendage-bearing segments (the first appendage being limb-shaped), a short trunk of nine segments and lamellate trunk limbs. This rather “unusual” morphology inspired various authors to propose evolutionary scenarios concerning segmentation and appendages. The head of S. oblitus served also for scenarios about the ev...

Haug J T; Maas A; Haug C; Waloszek D

2011-01-01

132

Nonaneurysmal infectious aortitis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Infectious aortitis is a rare disease in the antibiotic era. Only a small number of cases of nonaneurysmal infectious aortitis are discussed in literature, and its true incidence and natural history are not well defined. We present here a case of typical nonaneurysmal infectious aortitis with literature review of 19 cases of aortic infection in which the aorta is initially normal in caliber. PMID:24333198

Cho, Seong-Joon; Park, Sung-Min; Ryu, Se-Min; Jin, Eun-Sun; Lee, Kang-Hoon

2014-07-01

133

Arthropod diversity in a tropical rainforest.  

Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

. Ro?. 338, ?. 6113 (2012), s. 1481-1484. ISSN 0036-8075Grant CEP: GA ?R GA206/09/0115; GA ?R GAP504/12/1952Grant ostatní: European Social Fund(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0064; U.S. National Science Foundation(US) DEB-0841885; University of Canterbury and Royal Scoiety of New Zealand(NZ) PNX0011-2009; Australian Research Council Future Fellowship(AU) FT100100040; Ciencia e a Tecnologia(PT) PTDC/AAC-AMB/098163/2008; U.S. National Science Foundation(US) DEB-0516311; U.S. National Science Foundation(US) DEB-0949790Institucionální podpora: RVO:60077344Klí?ová slova: arthropod diversityKód oboru RIV: EH - Ekologie - spole?enstvaImpakt faktor: 31.027, rok: 2012http://www.sciencemag.org/content/338/6113/1481.full

Basset, Y.; ?ížek, Lukáš; Cuénoud, P.; Didham, R. K.; Guilhaumon, F.; Missa, O.; Novotný, Vojt?ch; Odegaard, F.; Roslin, T.; Schmidl, J.; Tishechkin, A. K.; Winchester, N. N.; Roubik, D. W.; Aberlenc, H.-P.; Bail, J.; Barrios, H.; Bridle, J. R.; Castano-Meneses, G.; Corbara, B.; Curletti, G.; Duarte da Rocha, W.; De Bakker, D.; Delabie, J. H. C.; Dejean, A.; Fagan, L. L.; Florean, A.; Kitching, R. L.; Medianero, E.; Miller, S. E.; Gama de Oliveira, E.; Orivel, J.; Pollet, M.; Rapp, M.; Riberio, S. P.; Roisin, Y.; Schmidt, J. B.; Sorensen, L.; Leponce, M.

134

Influence of Agricultural Activities on Grassland Arthropods in Inner Mongolia  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Arthropod pest outbreaks are becoming more common in the grasslands of Inner Mongolia, China, most likely due to the expansion of agriculture. The area of cropland has increased from 43,300 km2 in 1949 to 76,300 km2 in 2005. To understand the effects of agricultural activities on arthropod distribution, sweep net sampling was conducted in a natural grassland. We collected 1287 individuals belonging to 23 families and 9 orders of arthropod...

Kiyan Sorgog; Masayuki Saito; Yutaka Hironaka; Yasutomo Higashiura; Hiroyuki Matsuda

2012-01-01

135

An ancestral regulatory network for posterior development in arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

A number of recent studies have investigated posterior development in several different arthropods. As previously found in spiders, it has been discovered that Delta-Notch signaling is required for the development of posterior segments in an insect, the cockroach Periplaneta americana. Furthermore analysis of Wnt8 function in the spider Achaearanea tepidariorum and the beetle Tribolium castaneum demonstrates that this Wnt ligand is required for the establishment of the growth zone and development of posterior segments in both these arthropods. Taken together these studies provide an interesting insight into the architecture of the genetic network that regulated posterior development in the common ancestor of the arthropods. PMID:19513274

McGregor, Alistair P; Pechmann, Matthias; Schwager, Evelyn E; Damen, Wim Gm

2009-01-01

136

Phylogenetic Relationships of the Wolbachia of Nematodes and Arthropods  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Wolbachia are well known as bacterial symbionts of arthropods, where they are reproductive parasites, but have also been described from nematode hosts, where the symbiotic interaction has features of mutualism. The majority of arthropod Wolbachia belong to clades A and B, while nematode Wolbachia mostly belong to clades C and D, but these relationships have been based on analysis of a small number of genes. To investigate the evolution and relationships of Wolbachia symbionts we have sequence...

Fenn, Katelyn; Conlon, Claire; Jones, Martin; Quail, Michael A.; Holroyd, Nancy E.; Parkhill, Julian; Blaxter, Mark

2006-01-01

137

Evolution, Discovery, and Interpretations of Arthropod Mushroom Bodies  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Mushroom bodies are prominent neuropils found in annelids and in all arthropod groups except crustaceans. First explicitly identified in 1850, the mushroom bodies differ in size and complexity between taxa, as well as between different castes of a single species of social insect. These differences led some early biologists to suggest that the mushroom bodies endow an arthropod with intelligence or the ability to execute voluntary actions, as opposed to innate behaviors. Recent physiological s...

1998-01-01

138

The organic preservation of fossil arthropods: an experimental study  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Modern arthropod cuticles consist of chitin fibres in a protein matrix, but those of fossil arthropods with an organic exoskeleton, particularly older than Tertiary, contain a dominant aliphatic component. This apparent contradiction was examined by subjecting modern cockroach, scorpion and shrimp cuticle to artificial maturation (350?°C/700?bars/24?h) following various chemical treatments, and analysing the products with pyrolysis–gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py–GC/MS). A...

2006-01-01

139

Arthropod diversity in peas with normal or reduced waxy bloom  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Crop traits can alter economically important interactions between plants, pests, and biological control agents. For example, a reduced waxy bloom on the surface of pea plants alters interactions between pea aphids and their natural enemies. In this study, we assess whether the effect of wax reduction extends beyond the 2 or 3 arthropod species closely associated with the plants and into the structure of the broader arthropod community of over 200 taxa at our site. We sampled arthropods on lines of peas with normal and reduced wax in Latah Co., Idaho using pitfall traps within randomly assigned pairs of 5 × 5 meter plots. During the 1998 and 1999 growing seasons, we collected 12,113 individual arthropods from 221 unambiguously identified morphospecies. The number of individuals collected from each morphospecies responded idiosyncratically to the reduced wax peas. To test whether arthropod community structure differed between the collections from plots having peas with normal or reduced wax, we performed a randomization test. The collection from peas with reduced wax had higher species evenness and thus higher community diversity despite having lower species richness. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single plant trait, epicuticular wax, to affect a community of arthropods. Two pests of peas had opposite responses to peas with reduced wax. The number of pea aphids collected was greater from peas with normal wax peas than those with reduced wax. In contrast, the number of pea leaf weevils collected was greater from peas with reduced wax.

Gary C. Chang

2004-05-01

140

Sarotrocercus oblitus - Small arthropod with great impact on the understanding of arthropod evolution?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Sarotrocercus oblitus is a small arthropod from the Cambrian Burgess Shale. It was originally described with a short head with only two appendage-bearing segments (the first appendage being limb-shaped, a short trunk of nine segments and lamellate trunk limbs. This rather “unusual” morphology inspired various authors to propose evolutionary scenarios concerning segmentation and appendages. The head of S. oblitus served also for scenarios about the evolution of the arthropod head, because it seemed to document the evolutionary step between the level of Arthropoda sensu stricto (head with one appendage-bearing segment and that of Euarthropoda (head comprising four appendage-bearing segments. Here we report that the morphology of S. oblitus differs in several significant aspects from its original description, e.g., in the composition of the head, number of trunk segments, and appendage morphology. In consequence, many earlier assumptions based on the original description must be rejected. Although the material consists of only seven individuals, ontogenetic variation of the number of trunk segments was observed, pointing to, at least, two developmental stages. Therefore, S. oblitus is morphologically less different from other Cambrian arthropods than previously thought, but possesses a head with three appendage-bearing segments and lacks a prominent antenn(ula. These characters point to a position of S. oblitus inside Arthropoda s. str., deriving from the lineage towards Euarthropoda. The morphology also indicates a special life style, e.g., by the presence of large, stalked eyes, apparently in convergence to one of the Cambrian “Orsten” crustacean stem-lineage derivatives, Henningsmoenicaris scutula.

Waloszek D

2011-11-01

 
 
 
 
141

Infectious abortions in swine  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abortions in pigs can be caused by infectious or non-infectious factors About 38% of all diagnosed abortions in pigs were caused by infectious agents. Consequences of infection can be early embryonal deaths or abortions which occur after the 40th day following conception. Causes of abortions include different species of viruses (parvoviruses, enteroviruses pseudorabies viruses, PRRS or bacteria (Brucella, Leptospira, and others. A precise diagnosis is imperative for therapy and prevention of abortions in pigs, and it is necessary to apply measures to prevent reproductive disorders in pigs.

Vakanjac Slobodanka

2003-01-01

142

Microspectrophotometry of arthropod visual screening pigments.  

Science.gov (United States)

Absorption spectra of visual screening pigments obtained in vitro with a microspectrophotometer using frozen sections are given for the insects Musca domestica, Phormia regina, Libellula luctuosa, Apis mellifera (worker honeybee only), Drosophila melanogaster (wild type only) and the arachnids Lycosa baltimoriana and Lycosa miami. The spectral range covered is 260-700 nm for Lycosa and Drosophila and 310-700 nm for the remainder of the arthropods. A complete description of the instrumentation is given. For the flies, Phormia and Musca, light absorption by the yellow and red pigments is high from 310 to about 610 nm. This implies that for these insects there should be no wavelength shift in electroretinogram (ERG) results due to light leakage among neighboring ommatidia for this wavelength range. The same comment applies to Calliphora erythrocephala, which is known to have similar screening pigments. For some of the insects studied a close correspondence is noted between screening pigment absorption spectra and spectral sensitivity curves for individual photoreceptors, available in the literature. In some cases the screening pigment absorption spectra can be related to chemical extraction results, with the general observation that some of the in vitro absorption peaks are shifted to the red. The Lycosa, Apis, and Libellula dark red pigments absorb strongly over a wide spectral range and therefore prevent chemical identification. PMID:4623852

Strother, G K; Casella, A J

1972-05-01

143

Estimating the Magnitude and Direction of Altered Arbovirus Transmission Due to Viral Phenotype  

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Vectorial capacity is a measure of the transmission potential of a vector borne pathogen within a susceptible population. Vector competence, a component of the vectorial capacity equation, is the ability of an arthropod to transmit an infectious agent following exposure to that agent. Comparisons of arbovirus strain-specific vector competence estimates have been used to support observed or hypothesized differences in transmission capability. Typically, such comparisons are made at a single ti...

Christofferson, Rebecca C.; Mores, Christopher N.

2011-01-01

144

Survey of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum, haemotropic mycoplasmas and other arthropod-borne pathogens in cats from Albania  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Albania is a country on the western part of the Balkan Peninsula. The Mediterranean climate is favourable for the stable development of many arthropod species, which are incriminated as vectors for various agents. Recently, several papers have reported on epidemiological aspects of parasitic diseases including vector-borne disease agents of dogs with zoonotic characteristics in Albania. However, data on the epidemiology of feline parasitic and bacterial agents in Albania is scarce. Methods Serum and EDTA-blood samples collected from 146 domestic cats from Tirana during 2008 through 2010 were examined for exposure to Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Leishmania infantum, and Anaplasma spp. with IFAT, for infection with L. infantum, A. phagocytophilum, Bartonella spp. and haemotropic mycoplasmas with conventional PCR and real-time PCR and for Dirofilaria immitis with antigen ELISA. Additionally blood smear microscopy was carried out for detection of blood-borne pathogens. Results Antibodies to T. gondii (titre ?1:100) were demonstrated in 91 cats (62.3%). Antibodies to N. caninum (titre ?1:100), L. infantum (titre ?1:64) and Anaplasma spp. (titre ?1:100) were found in the serum of 15 (10.3%), 1 (0.7%) or 3 (2.1%) cats, respectively. DNA of haemotropic mycoplasmas was detected in the blood of 45 cats (30.8%), namely Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum (21.9%), Mycoplasma haemofelis (10.3%), and Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis (5.5%), with ten cats harbouring co-infections of two mycoplasmas each; blood from one cat was PCR positive for Bartonella henselae. No DNA of Leishmania spp. and A. phagocytophilum or circulating D. immitis antigen was detected in any cat sample. The overall prevalence of haemotropic mycoplasmas was significantly higher in male compared to female cats (40.6% vs. 24.1%, p?=?0.0444); and age was associated positively with the prevalence of antibodies to T. gondii (p?=?0.0008) and the percentage of haemotropic mycoplasma infection (p?=?0.0454). Conclusions With the broad screening panel including direct and indirect methods applied in the present study, a wide spectrum of exposure to or infection with parasitic or bacterial agents was detected.

2014-01-01

145

The arthropod fauna of Quebec vineyards with particular reference to phytophagous arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

A 3-yr study using different sampling and trapping techniques showed that the arthropod pest fauna in two commercial vineyards in southwestern Quebec was qualitatively and quantitatively different than that of Ontario, Canada, and New York state. We hypothesize that a colder winter climate in addition to the agronomic activity of earthing up around the vines in autumn to protect the roots from freezing in winter contributed to low numbers of pests, such as the grape berry moth, Endopiza viteana Clemens (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae). Once in 3 yr, the density of this pest approached, in one of the vineyards, the action threshold recommended for New York. Therefore, it should be monitored on an annual basis. Another phytophagous arthropod that has the potential to cause sporadic economic damage is the potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris). The Asiatic garden beetle, Maladera (= Autoserica) castanea (Arrow), was reported for the first time in Canada. The tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), was also captured by sampling. However, its status as a pest has yet to be clarified. PMID:14503594

Bostanian, Noubar J; Vincent, Charles; Goulet, Henri; Lesage, Laurent; Lasnier, Jacques; Bellemare, Julie; Mauffette, Yves

2003-08-01

146

Infectious Diseases Gateway  

Science.gov (United States)

BioMedNet (BMN) presents the Infectious Diseases Gateway "featuring expertly selected content from the leading publications in infectious diseases." Users will find research articles, reviews, and other resources from the Elsevier family of journals and books; all freely available to any reader (free registration required). The Web site also offers related BMN news features, links to other BMN Gateways, and a special supplement to the upcoming Interscience Conference of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

147

Ecology of Infectious Diseases  

Science.gov (United States)

A joint National Science Foundation (NSF) and National Institutes of Health program, Ecology of Infectious Diseases (EID), allows scientists to study how large-scale environmental eventsâsuch as habitat destruction, invasions of non-native species and pollutionâalter the risks of emergence of viral, parasitic and bacterial diseases in humans and animals. Specific infectious diseases being studied include hantavirus, Lyme Disease, and Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).

148

Epigeic soil arthropod abundance under different agricultural land uses  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The study of soil arthropods can provide valuable information how ecosystems respond to different management practices. The objective was to assess the total abundance, richness, and composition of epiedaphic arthropods in different agrosystems from southwestern Spain. Six sites with different agricultural uses were selected: olive grove, vineyards, olive grove with vineyards, wheat fields, fallows (150-300 m long), and abandoned vineyards. Crops were managed in extensive. Field margins were used as reference habitats. At the seven sites a total of 30 pitfall traps were arranged in a 10 × 3 grid. Traps were arranged to short (SD, 1 m), medium (MD, 6 m) and large (LD, 11 m) distance to the field margins in the middle of selected plots. Pitfall traps captured a total of 11,992 edaphic arthropods belonging to 11 different taxa. Soil fauna was numerically dominated by Formicidae (26.60%), Coleoptera (19.77%), and Aranae (16.76%). The higher number of soil arthropods were captured in the field margins followed by the abandoned vineyard. Significant differences were found between sites for total abundance, and zones. However, no significant differences for total abundance were found between months (April-July). Richness and diversity was highest in field margins and abandoned vineyards. Significant differences were found for these variables between sites. Our results suggest that agricultural intensification affects soil arthropods in Tierra de Barros area, a taxonomic group with an important role in the functioning of agricultural ecosystems. (Author) 32 refs.

Perez-Bote, J. L.; Romero, A. J.

2012-11-01

149

Combined effects of arthropod herbivores and phytopathogens on plant performance  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

1. Many plants are simultaneously attacked by arthropod herbivores and phytopathogens. These may affect each other directly and indirectly, enhancing or reducing the amount of plant resources they each consume. Ultimately, this may reduce or enhance plant performance relative to what should be expected from the added impacts of herbivore and pathogen when they attack alone. 2. Previous studies have suggested synergistic and antagonistic impacts on plant performance from certain combinations of arthropods and pathogens, for example, synergistic impacts from necrotrophic pathogens together with wounding arthropods because of facilitated infection and antagonistic impacts from induction of pathogen resistance by sucking herbivores. 3. We compiled published studies on the impact of plantâ??herbivoreâ??pathogen interactions on plant performance and used meta-analysis to search for consistent patterns of impacts among plant, herbivore and pathogen characteristics and experimental conditions, and to test the suggested hypotheses on synergistic or antagonistic impacts. 4. None of the hypotheses based on proximate interactions between arthropods and pathogens were supported by our analysis; in contrast, the patterns we found were related to plant traits and experimental conditions. 5. Our results suggest that immediate loss of resources from interactions between arthropod herbivores and pathogens is generally moderated by compensation to an extent where there are no interactive effects on plant performance. However, as interactive impacts also differed among environments and parasite manipulation methods, this suggests that the ability of plants to compensate such losses may depend on environmental conditions and probably also overall infection load.

Hauser, Thure Pavlo; Christensen, Stina

2013-01-01

150

High levels of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA determined by qPCR and infectiousness to Triatoma infestans support dogs and cats are major sources of parasites for domestic transmission.  

Science.gov (United States)

The competence of reservoir hosts of vector-borne pathogens is directly linked to its capacity to infect the vector. Domestic dogs and cats are major domestic reservoir hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi, and exhibit a much higher infectiousness to triatomines than seropositive humans. We quantified the concentration of T. cruzi DNA in the peripheral blood of naturally-infected dogs and cats (a surrogate of intensity of parasitemia), and evaluated its association with infectiousness to the vector in a high-risk area of the Argentinean Chaco. To measure infectiousness, 44 infected dogs and 15 infected cats were each exposed to xenodiagnosis with 10-20 uninfected, laboratory-reared Triatoma infestans that blood-fed to repletion and were later individually examined for infection by optical microscopy. Parasite DNA concentration (expressed as equivalent amounts of parasite DNA per mL, Pe/mL) was estimated by real-time PCR amplification of the nuclear satellite DNA. Infectiousness increased steeply with parasite DNA concentration both in dogs and cats. Neither the median parasite load nor the mean infectiousness differed significantly between dogs (8.1Pe/mL and 48%) and cats (9.7Pe/mL and 44%), respectively. The infectiousness of dogs was positively and significantly associated with parasite load and an index of the host's body condition, but not with dog's age, parasite discrete typing unit and exposure to infected bugs in a random-effects multiple logistic regression model. Real-time PCR was more sensitive and less time-consuming than xenodiagnosis, and in conjunction with the body condition index, may be used to identify highly infectious hosts and implement novel control strategies. PMID:24732410

Enriquez, G F; Bua, J; Orozco, M M; Wirth, S; Schijman, A G; Gürtler, R E; Cardinal, M V

2014-07-01

151

Arthropod-borne diseases in homeless.  

Science.gov (United States)

Homeless people are particularly exposed to ectoparasite. The living conditions and the crowded shelters provide ideal conditions for the spread of lice, fleas, ticks, and mites. Body lice have long been recognized as human parasites and although typically prevalent in rural communities in upland areas of countries close to the equator, it is now increasingly encountered in developed countries especially in homeless people or inner city economically deprived population. Fleas are widespread but are not adapted to a specific host and may occasionally bite humans. Most common fleas that parasite humans are the cat, the rat, and the human fleas, Ctenocephalides felis, Xenopsylla cheopis, and Pulex irritans, respectively. Ticks belonging to the family Ixodidae, in particular, the genera Dermacentor, Rhipicephalus, and Ixodes, are frequent parasites in humans. Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis is a mite (Arachnida class) responsible for scabies. It is an obligate parasite of human skin. The hematophagic-biting mite, Liponyssoides sanguineus, is a mite of the rat, mouse, and other domestic rodents but can also bite humans. Finally, the incidence of skin disease secondary to infestation with the human bedbug, Cimex lectularius, has increased recently. Bacteria, such as Wolbacchia spp. have been detected in bedbug. The threat posed by the ectoparasite in homeless is not the ectoparasite themselves but the associated infectious diseases that they may transmit to humans. Except for scabies all these ectoparasites are potential vectors for infectious agents. Three louse-borne diseases are known at this time. Trench fever caused by Bartonella quintana (B. quintana), epidemic typhus caused by Rickettsia prowazekii, and relapsing fever caused by the spirochete Borrelia recurrentis. Fleas transmit plague (Xenopsylla cheopis and Pulex irritans), murine typhus (Xenopsylla cheopis), flea-borne spotted rickettsiosis on account of the recently described species Rickettsia felis (C. felis), and occasionally cat scratch disease on account of Bartonella henselae (C. felis). The role of fleas as potential vector of B. quintana has recently been suggested. Among the hematophagic-biting mites, L. sanguineus, is responsible for the transmission of Rickettsia akari, the etiologic agent of rickettsialpox. Virtually, no data are available on tick-borne disease in this population. This article will deal with epidemiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of these ectoparasite and the infectious diseases they transmit to the homeless people. PMID:17114713

Brouqui, Philippe; Raoult, Didier

2006-10-01

152

Study of the climatic change impact on vector-borne diseases in West Africa: the case of tick-borne borreliosis and malaria; Etude de l'impact du changement climatique sur les maladies a transmission vectorielle en Afrique de l'Ouest: le cas de la borreliose a tiques et du paludisme  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Malaria and tick-borne borreliosis are the two first causes of morbidity due to vector-borne diseases in a large part of Sudan-sahelian West Africa. They are also the two tropical diseases which have been the most affected by climatic change in recent years. In the case of tick-borne borreliosis it has been shown in Senegal that the persistence of drought since the years 70 has been associated with a considerable extension of the geographic range of diseases and the vector tick A-sonrai, a species that was in the past limited to the Sahara and Sahel. In the case of malaria, drought has strongly reduced in these same regions of Africa the distribution, abundance and infection rate of Anopheline mosquitoes, but without any significant reduction of the burden of malaria for most populations concerned. The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to antimalarial drugs only explain part of this phenomenon. (A.L.B.)

Trape, J.F

2005-04-15

153

[Children arthropod bites protective measures: insecticides and repellents].  

Science.gov (United States)

Vector transmitted diseases are often a serious threat for child health, especially for children traveller in tropical regions. Few arthropod borne diseases are preventable by immunization or chimioprophylaxis. Prevention of most of them is based on personal protection against arthropod bites. The evidence of its efficacy has been established by the use of impregnated bed nets, impregnated clothes with permethrin or mosquito repellent which reduced significantly child malaria morbidity and mortality in endemic countries. These personal protective measures are able to minimize arthropod bites and prevent Chikungunya infection, dengue fever and Lyme disease. The choice of a repellent among the commercialised products need to be efficacy and safety evidence based. This article propose to raise this issue and to give pragmatic recommendations, with a focus to children below 30 months who are at a high toxicological risk. Severity of these diseases allowed to use potentially toxic repellents if misused. PMID:17942289

Sorge, F; Imbert, P; Laurent, C; Minodier, P; Banerjee, A; Khelfaoui, F; Guérin, N; Gendrel, D

2007-12-01

154

Selected infectious disease disasters for nursing staff training at Egyptian Eastern Border.  

Science.gov (United States)

Infectious disease disasters are events that involve a biological agent, disease and that result in mass casualties, such as a bioterrorism attack, an emerging outbreak of infectious disease; all disasters pose a risk of infection transmission. But, infectious disease disasters pose the great-risk to illness or death from an infectious disease. This study raised the awareness and improved knowledge by educational program for Military Nursing Staff on selected infectious disease disasters acquired at Egyptian Eastern Border. The selected arthropod-borne diseases were Anthrax, Tick borne relapsing, Louse borne replasing fever and liver fluke; Clonorchis sinensis. An interventional study was used, for 125 staff nurse who accepted to participate. The tools dealt with four questionnaires: (1) Some sociodemographic characteristics data (2) Educational needs assessment a structured questionnaire. (3) Knowledge test (pre/post-test) and (4) Participants' reactions questionnaire. The results showed that educational intervention significantly improvements the nursing staff knowledge, which were achieved at the immediate post intervention phase, and retained via three months post-test phase. In the service training programs about infectious disease disasters at Egyptian Eastern Border must be established and continued on regular basis. This would improve their knowledge about the epidemiology of these infectious disease disasters. PMID:24961011

El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Labib, Nargis Albert; Abdel-Fattah, Magda Abdel Hameed; Ibrahim, Abeer Mohammad Abdallah; Morsy, Tosson A

2014-04-01

155

Perspectives in the control of infectious diseases by transgenic mosquitoes in the post-genomic era: a review  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Arthropod-borne diseases caused by a variety of microorganisms such as dengue virus and malaria parasites afflict billions of people worldwide imposing major economic and social burdens. Despite many efforts, vaccines against diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, with the exception of yellow fever, ar [...] e not available. Control of such infectious pathogens is mainly performed by vector management and treatment of affected individuals with drugs. However, the numbers of insecticide-resistant insects and drug-resistant parasites are increasing. Therefore, inspired in recent years by a lot of new data produced by genomics and post-genomics research, several scientific groups have been working on different strategies to control infectious arthropod-borne diseases. This review focuses on recent advances and perspectives towards construction of transgenic mosquitoes refractory to malaria parasites and dengue virus transmission.

Márcia Aparecida, Sperança; Margareth Lara, Capurro.

156

Abundance and Diversity of Soil Arthropods in the Olive Grove Ecosystem  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Arthropods are part of important functional groups in soil food webs. Recognizing these arthropods and understanding their function in the ecosystem as well as when they are active is essential to understanding their roles. In the present work, the abundance and diversity of soil arthropods is examined in olive groves in the northeast region of Portugal during the spring. Five classes of arthropods were found: Chilopoda, Malacostraca, Entognatha, Insecta, and Arachnida. Captures were numerica...

Gonc?alves, Maria Fa?tima; Pereira, Jose? Alberto

2012-01-01

157

Infectious Salmon Anaemia  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This leaflet gives information on infectious salmon anaemia (ISA). ISA is caused by a single stranded RNA virus of the family Orthomyxoviridae. ISA is listed as a non-exotic disease under EU Directive 2006/88/EC, and is notifiable in Ireland, according to S.I. No. 261 of 2008.

Institute, Marine

2011-01-01

158

Dynamics of infectious diseases  

Science.gov (United States)

Modern infectious disease epidemiology has a strong history of using mathematics both for prediction and to gain a deeper understanding. However the study of infectious diseases is a highly interdisciplinary subject requiring insights from multiple disciplines, in particular a biological knowledge of the pathogen, a statistical description of the available data and a mathematical framework for prediction. Here we begin with the basic building blocks of infectious disease epidemiology—the SIS and SIR type models—before considering the progress that has been made over the recent decades and the challenges that lie ahead. Throughout we focus on the understanding that can be developed from relatively simple models, although accurate prediction will inevitably require far greater complexity beyond the scope of this review. In particular, we focus on three critical aspects of infectious disease models that we feel fundamentally shape their dynamics: heterogeneously structured populations, stochasticity and spatial structure. Throughout we relate the mathematical models and their results to a variety of real-world problems.

Rock, Kat; Brand, Sam; Moir, Jo; Keeling, Matt J.

2014-02-01

159

Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases  

Science.gov (United States)

... more information on enabling JavaScript. Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Top Banner Content Area Skip Content Marketing Share ... diagnose, treat, and prevent a wide range of infectious diseases, whether those diseases emerge naturally or are deliberately ...

160

National Foundation for Infectious Diseases  

Science.gov (United States)

... November 7-9, 2014 Houston, TX Help Prevent Infectious Diseases Support NFID programs with your donation and help ... Game NFID Partners with Amazon National Foundation for Infectious Diseases 7201 Wisconsin Avenue Suite 750 Bethesda, MD 20814 ...

 
 
 
 
161

Influence of crop management practices on bean foliage arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

Crop management practices can affect the population of phytophagous pest species and beneficial arthropods with consequences for integrated pest management. In this study, we determined the effect of no-tillage and crop residue management on the arthropod community associated with the canopy of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Abundance and species composition of herbivorous, detritivorous, predaceous and parasitoid arthropods were recorded during the growing seasons of 2003 and 2004 in Coimbra County, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Arthropod diversity and guild composition were similar among crop management systems, but their abundance was higher under no-tillage relative to conventional cultivation and where residues from the preceding crop were maintained in the field. Thirty-four arthropod species were recorded, and those most representative of the impact of the crop management practices were Hypogastrura springtails, Empoasca kraemeri and Circulifer leafhoppers, and Solenopsis ants. The infestation levels of major insect-pests, especially leafhoppers (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), was on average seven-fold lower under no-tillage with retention of crop residues relative to the conventional system with removal of residues, whereas the abundance of predatory ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and springtails (Collembola: Hypogastruridae) were, respectively, about seven- and 15-fold higher in that treatment. Importantly, a significant trophic interaction among crop residues, detritivores, predators and herbivores was observed. Plots managed with no-tillage and retention of crop residues had the highest bean yield, while those with conventional cultivation and removal of the crop residues yielded significantly less beans. This research shows that cropping systems that include zero tillage and crop residue retention can reduce infestation by foliar insect-pests and increase abundance of predators and detritivores, thus having direct consequences for insect pest management. PMID:20504384

Pereira, J L; Picanço, M C; Pereira, E J G; Silva, A A; Jakelaitis, A; Pereira, R R; Xavier, V M

2010-12-01

162

Chronic infectious mononucleosis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction Chronic infectious mononucleosis is a clinical entity recognized 15 years ago with clearly defined serological criteria: high titres of IgG Epstein-Barr virus (EBV virus capsid antigen (VCA, IgG EBV early antigen without IgG Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA antibodies. Material and methods This follow-up study lasted for 2 years and included 100 acute infectious mononucleosis patients who were investigated every 6 months. Apart from physical examination we evaluated history, complete blood count and liver function together with 5 commercial ELISA tests: IgM EBV VCA, IgG EBV VCA, IgG EB NA, IgG EBV EA and IgA EBV EA. Results Although malaise and fatigue with cervical lymphadenopathy were the most frequent symptoms, their statistical significance was not established. All laboratory analyses were completely normal during the follow-up period, but there were four patients with acute hepatitis due to hepatitis A virus and adenoviruses. After 6 months of acute illness, two patients without IgG EB NA antibodies who were candidates for chronic disease, presented no other serological findings for chronic disease. It was confirmed that they had delayed serological response due to EBV infection, because one year later they had a completely normal immune status on EBV infection. Conclusion Chronic infectious mononucleosis seems to be an extraordinary event after acute disease. This conclusion corresponds with literature reports of sporadic cases of this disease.

Brki? Snežana V.

2003-01-01

163

Reducing vector-borne disease by empowering farmers in integrated vector management / Responsabilisation des agriculteurs dans le cadre de la lutte intégrée contre les vecteurs pour faire reculer les maladies à transmission vectorielle / Reducir las enfermedades transmitidas por vectores empoderando a los agricultores en la lucha antivectorial integrada  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Public Health | Language: English Abstract in spanish PROBLEMA: La agricultura de regadío expone a la población rural a riesgos sanitarios asociados a las enfermedades de transmisión vectorial y a los plaguicidas utilizados en la agricultura y para proteger la salud pública. En la mayoría de los países en desarrollo se da una falta de colaboración entr [...] e los sectores agrícola y sanitario para abordar conjuntamente estos problemas. MÉTODOS: Presentamos una evaluación de un proyecto que utiliza el método de la «escuela de campo para agricultores» para enseñar a los campesinos la manera de controlar las enfermedades de transmisión vectorial y mejorar la producción de arroz. El adiestramiento simultáneo de los agricultores en esos dos ámbitos es lo que se conoce como «control integrado de plagas y vectores». CONTEXTO LOCAL: Un proyecto intersectorial centrado en los sistemas de riego de plantaciones de arroz en Sri Lanka. CAMBIOS DESTACABLES: Los asociados del proyecto desarrollaron un nuevo programa de estudios para la escuela de campo que incluía un componente de control de las enfermedades de transmisión vectorial. Los cultivadores de arroz de las aldeas de intervención salidos de la escuela de campo tomaron medidas de lucha antivectorial y de mejora tanto del saneamiento ambiental como de su protección personal contra la transmisión de enfermedades. Además redujeron su utilización de plaguicidas agrícolas, especialmente de insecticidas. ENSEÑANZAS EXTRAÍDAS: La intervención motivó a la población rural y le permitió participar en las actividades de control de los vectores y reducir varios riesgos para la salud ambiental. Es posible ampliar el programa de estudios para incluir información sobre los efectos perjudiciales de los plaguicidas en la salud humana y abordar otros aspectos preocupantes para la salud pública. Los beneficios de este enfoque para los programas de salud comunitarios todavía no se han evaluado de manera óptima. Además, es necesario ampliar la base institucional del control integrado para que puedan participar personas de una más amplia variedad de organizaciones, y hay que establecer un sistema de seguimiento y evaluación para medir el desempeño de las iniciativas de control integrado. Abstract in english PROBLEM: Irrigated agriculture exposes rural people to health risks associated with vector-borne diseases and pesticides used in agriculture and for public health protection. Most developing countries lack collaboration between the agricultural and health sectors to jointly address these problems. A [...] PPROACH: We present an evaluation of a project that uses the "farmer field school" method to teach farmers how to manage vector-borne diseases and how to improve rice yields. Teaching farmers about these two concepts together is known as "integrated pest and vector management". LOCAL SETTING: An intersectoral project targeting rice irrigation systems in Sri Lanka. RELEVANT CHANGES: Project partners developed a new curriculum for the field school that included a component on vector-borne diseases. Rice farmers in intervention villages who graduated from the field school took vector-control actions as well as improving environmental sanitation and their personal protection measures against disease transmission. They also reduced their use of agricultural pesticides, especially insecticides. LESSONS LEARNED: The intervention motivated and enabled rural people to take part in vector-management activities and to reduce several environmental health risks. There is scope for expanding the curriculum to include information on the harmful effects of pesticides on human health and to address other public health concerns. Benefits of this approach for community-based health programmes have not yet been optimally assessed. Also, the institutional basis of the integrated management approach needs to be broadened so that people from a wider range of organizations take part. A monitoring and evaluation system needs to be established to measu

Henk, van den Berg; Alexander, von Hildebrand; Vaithilingam, Ragunathan; Pradeep K, Das.

164

Ecology and management of arthropod pests of poultry.  

Science.gov (United States)

The worldwide spread of modern, high-density confined poultry production systems under the direction of integrators has intensified the importance of a select number of arthropod ectoparasites and habitat pests. This concentrated production of poultry provides artificial ecosystems that are sometimes ideal for the development of large populations of arthropod pests. At the same time the systems are amenable to integrated pest management involving a multipest and multimethod approach to reducing or eliminating arthropod pests. Since rodents are major pests, they should be included in an integrated pest management program to make the program most cost-effective and attractive to the integrators and producers (5). Quantitative data are scarce on economic effects, and the concept of economic thresholds is difficult to apply either to ectoparasites or to habitat pests. The risk of transporting ectoparasites among flocks is difficult to evaluate and necessitates treatment after early detection of the arthropods. Flies and litter beetles present a threat of disease transmission and the potential for lawsuits from neighbors or public health agencies that are factors not subject to easy cost estimates. The monetary losses of a flock devastated by disease or a farm forced to close are so great that the risks are unacceptable. Production losses from lowered feed conversion ratios and insulation damage are likely to be detected by the sophisticated record-keeping of the integrators. Minimal use of pesticides and other chemicals on poultry and in poultry housing is an objective of the integrators and, consequently, an integrated pest management (IPM) approach that reduces the need for pesticides is attractive. The key to further development of effective arthropod management programs for poultry is the implementation of pest and disease monitoring programs for the complete system. Improvements in arthropod sampling methods and more attention to monitoring the biosecurity systems to minimize ectoparasite dispersal are needed. The integrators have servicemen who regularly visit the production facilities and can be trained to perform monitoring functions and to instigate and supervise integrated pest management measures. With the increasing use of computers by the integrators, the prospects for utilizing the monitoring data in predictive computer simulation models for pest management decision-making justify more efforts to develop such tools (64, 102, 168). Future poultry pest management programs must be based on sound data, which presently is too limited, and must be flexible enough to adjust rapidly to evolving pest problems in rapidly changing production systems. PMID:2405769

Axtell, R C; Arends, J J

1990-01-01

165

Trilobite body patterning and the evolution of arthropod tagmosis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Preservation permitting patterns of developmental evolution can be reconstructed within long extinct clades, and the rich fossil record of trilobite ontogeny and phylogeny provides an unparalleled opportunity for doing so. Furthermore, knowledge of Hox gene expression patterns among living arthropods permit inferences about possible Hox gene deployment in trilobites. The trilobite anteroposterior body plan is consistent with recent suggestions that basal euarthropods had a relatively low degree of tagmosis among cephalic limbs, possibly related to overlapping expression domains of cephalic Hox genes. Trilobite trunk segments appeared sequentially at a subterminal generative zone, and were exchanged between regions of fused and freely articulating segments during growth. Homonomous trunk segment shape and gradual size transition were apparently phylogenetically basal conditions and suggest a single trunk tagma. Several derived clades independently evolved functionally distinct tagmata within the trunk, apparently exchanging flexible segment numbers for greater regionally autonomy. The trilobite trunk chronicles how different aspects of arthropod segmentation coevolved as the degree of tagmosis increased. PMID:12655645

Hughes, Nigel C

2003-04-01

166

Evidence for a clade of nematodes, arthropods and other moulting animals.  

Science.gov (United States)

The arthropods constitute the most diverse animal group, but, despite their rich fossil record and a century of study, their phylogenetic relationships remain unclear. Taxa previously proposed to be sister groups to the arthropods include Annelida, Onychophora, Tardigrada and others, but hypotheses of phylogenetic relationships have been conflicting. For example, onychophorans, like arthropods, moult periodically, have an arthropod arrangement of haemocoel, and have been related to arthropods in morphological and mitochondrial DNA sequence analyses. Like annelids, they possess segmental nephridia and muscles that are a combination of smooth and obliquely striated fibres. Our phylogenetic analysis of 18S ribosomal DNA sequences indicates a close relationship between arthropods, nematodes and all other moulting phyla. The results suggest that ecdysis (moulting) arose once and support the idea of a new clade, Ecdysozoa, containing moulting animals: arthropods, tardigrades, onychophorans, nematodes, nematomorphs, kinorhynchs and priapulids. No support is found for a clade of segmented animals, the Articulata, uniting annelids with arthropods. The hypothesis that nematodes are related to arthropods has important implications for developmental genetic studies using as model systems the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the arthropod Drosophila melanogaster, which are generally held to be phylogenetically distant from each other. PMID:9168109

Aguinaldo, A M; Turbeville, J M; Linford, L S; Rivera, M C; Garey, J R; Raff, R A; Lake, J A

1997-05-29

167

Ad-Hoc vs. Standardized and Optimized Arthropod Diversity Sampling  

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The use of standardized and optimized protocols has been recently advocated for different arthropod taxa instead of ad-hoc sampling or sampling with protocols defined on a case-by-case basis. We present a comparison of both sampling approaches applied for spiders in a natural area of Portugal. Tests were made to their efficiency, over-collection of common species, singletons proportions, species abundance distributions, average specimen size, average taxonomic distinctness and behavior of ric...

Pedro Cardoso; Crespo, Lui?s C.; Rui Carvalho; Rufino, Ana C.; Henriques, Se?rgio S.

2009-01-01

168

The Tripartite Associations between Bacteriophage, Wolbachia, and Arthropods  

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By manipulating arthropod reproduction worldwide, the heritable endosymbiont Wolbachia has spread to pandemic levels. Little is known about the microbial basis of cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) except that bacterial densities and percentages of infected sperm cysts associate with incompatibility strength. The recent discovery of a temperate bacteriophage (WO-B) of Wolbachia containing ankyrin-encoding genes and virulence factors has led to intensifying debate that bacteriophage WO-B induces...

Bordenstein, Seth R.; Marshall, Michelle L.; Fry, Adam J.; Kim, Ulandt; Wernegreen, Jennifer J.

2006-01-01

169

Impact of alien terrestrial arthropods in Europe. Chapter 5  

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This chapter reviews the effects of alien terrestrial arthropods on the economy, society and environment in Europe. Many alien insect and mite species cause serious socio-economic hazards as pests of agriculture, horticulture, stored products and forestry. They may also affect human or animal health. Interestingly, there is relatively little information available on the exact yield and financial losses due to alien agricultural and forestry pests in Europe, particularly at continental scale. ...

2010-01-01

170

Egocentric path integration models and their application to desert arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

Path integration enables desert arthropods to find back to their nest on the shortest track from any position. To perform path integration successfully, speeds and turning angles along the preceding outbound path have to be measured continuously and combined to determine an internal global vector leading back home at any time. A number of experiments have given an idea how arthropods might use allothetic or idiothetic signals to perceive their orientation and moving speed. We systematically review the four possible model descriptions of mathematically precise path integration, whereby we favour and elaborate the hitherto not used variant of egocentric cartesian coordinates. Its simple and intuitive structure is demonstrated in comparison to the other models. Measuring two speeds, the forward moving speed and the angular turning rate, and implementing them into a linear system of differential equations provides the necessary information during outbound route, reorientation process and return path. In addition, we propose several possible types of systematic errors that can cause deviations from the correct homeward course. Deviations have been observed for several species of desert arthropods in different experiments, but their origin is still under debate. Using our egocentric path integration model we propose simple error indices depending on path geometry that will allow future experiments to rule out or corroborate certain error types. PMID:16300795

Merkle, Tobias; Rost, Martin; Alt, Wolfgang

2006-06-01

171

Association of climatic factors with infectious diseases in the Arctic and subarctic region - a systematic review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: The Arctic and subarctic area are likely to be highly affected by climate change, with possible impacts on human health due to effects on food security and infectious diseases. Objectives: To investigate the evidence for an association between climatic factors and infectious diseases, and to identify the most climate-sensitive diseases and vulnerable populations in the Arctic and subarctic region. Methods: A systematic review was conducted. A search was made in PubMed, with the last update in May 2013. Inclusion criteria included human cases of infectious disease as outcome, climate or weather factor as exposure, and Arctic or subarctic areas as study origin. Narrative reviews, case reports, and projection studies were excluded. Abstracts and selected full texts were read and evaluated by two independent readers. A data collection sheet and an adjusted version of the SIGN methodology checklist were used to assess the quality grade of each article. Results: In total, 1953 abstracts were initially found, of which finally 29 articles were included. Almost half of the studies were carried out in Canada (n=14), the rest from Sweden (n=6), Finland (n=4), Norway (n=2), Russia (n=2), and Alaska, US (n=1). Articles were analyzed by disease group: food- and waterborne diseases, vector-borne diseases, airborne viral- and airborne bacterial diseases. Strong evidence was found in our review for an association between climatic factors and food- and waterborne diseases. The scientific evidence for a link between climate and specific vector- and rodent-borne diseases was weak due to that only a few diseases being addressed in more than one publication, although several articles were of very high quality. Air temperature and humidity seem to be important climatic factors to investigate further for viral- and bacterial airborne diseases, but from our results no conclusion about a causal relationship could be drawn. Conclusions: More studies of high quality are needed to investigate the adverse health impacts of weather and climatic factors in the Arctic and subarctic region. No studies from Greenland or Iceland were found, and only a few from Siberia and Alaska. Disease and syndromic surveillance should be part of climate change adaptation measures in the Arctic and subarctic regions, with monitoring of extreme weather events known to pose a risk for certain infectious diseases implemented at the community level. PMID:24990685

Hedlund, Christina; Blomstedt, Yulia; Schumann, Barbara

2014-01-01

172

Association of climatic factors with infectious diseases in the Arctic and subarctic region – a systematic review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: The Arctic and subarctic area are likely to be highly affected by climate change, with possible impacts on human health due to effects on food security and infectious diseases. Objectives: To investigate the evidence for an association between climatic factors and infectious diseases, and to identify the most climate-sensitive diseases and vulnerable populations in the Arctic and subarctic region. Methods: A systematic review was conducted. A search was made in PubMed, with the last update in May 2013. Inclusion criteria included human cases of infectious disease as outcome, climate or weather factor as exposure, and Arctic or subarctic areas as study origin. Narrative reviews, case reports, and projection studies were excluded. Abstracts and selected full texts were read and evaluated by two independent readers. A data collection sheet and an adjusted version of the SIGN methodology checklist were used to assess the quality grade of each article. Results: In total, 1953 abstracts were initially found, of which finally 29 articles were included. Almost half of the studies were carried out in Canada (n=14, the rest from Sweden (n=6, Finland (n=4, Norway (n=2, Russia (n=2, and Alaska, US (n=1. Articles were analyzed by disease group: food- and waterborne diseases, vector-borne diseases, airborne viral- and airborne bacterial diseases. Strong evidence was found in our review for an association between climatic factors and food- and waterborne diseases. The scientific evidence for a link between climate and specific vector- and rodent-borne diseases was weak due to that only a few diseases being addressed in more than one publication, although several articles were of very high quality. Air temperature and humidity seem to be important climatic factors to investigate further for viral- and bacterial airborne diseases, but from our results no conclusion about a causal relationship could be drawn. Conclusions: More studies of high quality are needed to investigate the adverse health impacts of weather and climatic factors in the Arctic and subarctic region. No studies from Greenland or Iceland were found, and only a few from Siberia and Alaska. Disease and syndromic surveillance should be part of climate change adaptation measures in the Arctic and subarctic regions, with monitoring of extreme weather events known to pose a risk for certain infectious diseases implemented at the community level.

Christina Hedlund

2014-07-01

173

Quarantine arthropod invasions in Europe: the role of climate, hosts and propagule pressure  

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Aim: To quantify the relative importance of propagule pressure, climate-matching and host availability for the invasion of agricultural pest arthropods in Europe and to forecast newly emerging pest species and European areas with the highest risk of arthropod invasion under current climate and a future climate scenario (A1F1).Location: Europe.Methods: We quantified propagule pressure, climate-matching and host availability by aggregating large global databases for trade, European arthropod in...

Bacon, Steven J.; Aebi, Alexandre; Calanca, Pierluigi; Bacher, Sven

2013-01-01

174

Richness and Composition of Gall-inducing Arthropods at Coiba National Park, Panama.  

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[EN] Interest in studying galls and their arthropods inducers has been growing rapidly in the last two decades. However, the Neotropical region is probably the least studied region for gall-inducing arthropods. A study of the richness and composition of gall-inducing arthropods was carried out at Coiba National Park in the Republic of Panama. Field data come from samples obtained between August 1997 and September 1999, with three (two-week long) more intensive samplings. Seventee...

Nieves-aldrey, J. L.; Iban?ez, Alicia; Medianero, E.

2008-01-01

175

Plant Genotypic Diversity and Environmental Stress Interact to Negatively Affect Arthropod Community Diversity  

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Many studies have found positive relationships between plant diversity and arthropod communities, but the interactive effects of plant genetic diversity and environmental stress on arthropods are not well documented. In this study, we investigated the consequences of plant genotypic diversity, watering treatment, and its interaction for the ground-dwelling arthropod community in an experimental common garden of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.). We found th...

2009-01-01

176

Vertical T-maze Choice Assay for Arthropod Response to Odorants  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Given the economic importance of insects and arachnids as pests of agricultural crops, urban environments or as vectors of plant and human diseases, various technologies are being developed as control tools. A subset of these tools focuses on modifying the behavior of arthropods by attraction or repulsion. Therefore, arthropods are often the focus of behavioral investigations. Various tools have been developed to measure arthropod behavior, including wind tunnels, flight mills, servospheres, ...

Stelinski, Lukasz; Tiwari, Siddharth

2013-01-01

177

Terrestrial arthropods from tree canopies in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil  

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Terrestrial arthropods from tree canopies in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso, Brazil. This study represents a contribution to the knowledge of the diversity of arthropods associated to the canopy of Vochysia divergens Pohl (Vochysiaceae). Three trees individuals were sampled during two seasonal periods in this region: a) by spraying one tree canopy during high water (February); b) by fogging two tree canopies during low water (September/October). The 15,744 arthropods (183.2±38.9 individuals/m²...

Marinêz Isaac Marques; Joachim Adis; Geane Brizzola dos Santos; Leandro Dênis Battirola

2006-01-01

178

A checklist of arthropods associated with rat carrion in a montane locality of northern Venezuela  

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This is the first report of arthropods associated with carrion in Venezuela, using laboratory bred rats (Rattus norvegicus). Rat carcasses were exposed to colonization by arthropods in neighboring montane savanna and cloud forest habitats in the state of Miranda. The taxonomic composition of the arthropods varied between both ecosystems. Scarabaeidae, Silphidae, Micropezidae, Phoridae, Vespidae and one species of ant, were collected only in the cloud forest. Dermestes maculatus, Chrysomya ...

Vela?squez Zambrano, Yelitza

2007-01-01

179

A revision of brain composition in Onychophora (velvet worms) suggests that the tritocerebrum evolved in arthropods  

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Abstract Background The composition of the arthropod head is one of the most contentious issues in animal evolution. In particular, controversy surrounds the homology and innervation of segmental cephalic appendages by the brain. Onychophora (velvet worms) play a crucial role in understanding the evolution of the arthropod brain, because they are close relatives of arthropods and have apparently changed little since the Early Cambrian. However, the segmental origins of their ...

Mayer Georg; Whitington Paul M; Sunnucks Paul; Pflüger Hans-Joachim

2010-01-01

180

RSS (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/rss.xml  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Arthropods ISSN 2224-4255 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/rss.xml E-mail: arthropods@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope ARTHROPODS (ISSN 2224-4255 is an international journal devoted to the publication of articles on various aspects of arthropods, e.g., ecology, biogeography, systematics, biodiversity (species diversity, genetic diversity, et al., conservation, control, etc. The journal provides a forum for examining the importance of arthropods in biosphere (both terrestrial and marine ecosystems and human life in such fields as agriculture, forestry, fishery, environmental management and human health. The scope of Arthropods is wide and embraces all arthropods-insects, arachnids, crustaceans, centipedes, millipedes, and other arthropods. Articles/short communications on new taxa (species, genus, families, orders, etc. and new records of arthropods are particularly welcome. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, arthropods@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal. Authors are asked to read Author Guidelines before submitting manuscripts. In addition to free submissions from authors around the world, special issues are also accepted. The organizer of a special issue can collect submissions (yielded from a research project, a research group, etc. on a specific research topic, or submissions of a scientific conference for publication of special issue.

Arthropods (ISSN 2224-4255

 
 
 
 
181

Notch-mediated segmentation of the appendages is a molecular phylotypic trait of the arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

Arthropod limbs are arguably the most diverse organs in the animal kingdom. Morphological diversity of the limbs is largely based on their segmentation, because this divides the limbs into modules that can evolve separately for new morphologies and functions. Limb segmentation also distinguishes the arthropods from related phyla (e.g. onychophorans) and thus forms an important evolutionary innovation in arthropods. Understanding the genetic basis of limb segmentation in arthropods can thus shed light onto the mechanisms of macroevolution and the origin of a character (articulated limbs) that defines a new phylum (arthropods). In the fly Drosophila limb segmentation and limb growth are controlled by the Notch signaling pathway. Here we show that the Notch pathway also controls limb segmentation and growth in the spider Cupiennius salei, a representative of the most basally branching arthropod group Chelicerata, and thus this function must trace from the last common ancestor of all arthropods. The similarities of Notch and Serrate function between Drosophila and Cupiennius are extensive and also extend to target genes like odd-skipped, nubbin, AP-2 and hairy related genes. Our data confirm that the jointed appendages, which are a morphological phylotypic trait of the arthropods and the basis for naming the phylum, have a common developmental genetic basis. Notch-mediated limb segmentation is thus a molecular phylotypic trait of the arthropods. PMID:19046962

Prpic, Nikola-Michael; Damen, Wim G M

2009-02-01

182

Wetlands and infectious diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available There is a historical association between wetlands and infectious disease that has led to the modification of wetlands to prevent disease. At the same time there has been the development of water resources projects that increase the risk of disease. The demand for more water development projects and the increased pressure to make natural wetlands economically beneficial creates the need for an ecological approach to wetland management and health assessment. The environmental and health interactions are many. There is a need to take into account the landscape, spatial boundaries, and cross-boundary interactions in water development projects as well as alternative methods to provide water for human needs. The research challenges that need to be addressed are discussed.

Zimmerman Robert H.

2001-01-01

183

BORDER INFECTIOUS DISEASES SURVEILLANCE PROJECT  

Science.gov (United States)

In 1997, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Mexican Secretariat of Health, and border health officials began the development of the Border Infectious Disease Surveillance (BIDS) project, a surveillance system for infectious diseases along the U.S.-Mexico border. ...

184

Influence of Agricultural Activities on Grassland Arthropods in Inner Mongolia  

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Full Text Available Arthropod pest outbreaks are becoming more common in the grasslands of Inner Mongolia, China, most likely due to the expansion of agriculture. The area of cropland has increased from 43,300 km2 in 1949 to 76,300 km2 in 2005. To understand the effects of agricultural activities on arthropod distribution, sweep net sampling was conducted in a natural grassland. We collected 1287 individuals belonging to 23 families and 9 orders of arthropods from 41 sites. We divided these samples into two guild types (predator and herbivore and analyzed six groups (grasshoppers, herbivorous Coleoptera, herbivorous Hemiptera, Cicaddidae, Araneae, predatory Coleoptera of them. Using a negative binomial regression analysis we analyzed the relationships between each group’s sampled population size and measured environmental factors including pesticide application and mean temperature of the previous year, agricultural site, and vegetation condition. The best model for each group was determined using Akaike’s information criterion. Grasshoppers showed a significant positive response to pesticide application and degraded vegetation, whereas spider (natural enemies of some insect pests showed a negative response to these factors. The population of grasshoppers increased at sites where pesticides were applied, vegetation was degraded, and spider numbers were reduced. Other groups were not significantly correlated with pesticide application and degraded vegetation. Some of the environmental factors we studied promoted pests the following year. Our results also suggest that the current use of pesticides may not be effective for pest control and that alternative options should be considered in the grasslands of Inner Mongolia.

Kiyan Sorgog

2012-10-01

185

cuticleDB: a relational database of Arthropod cuticular proteins  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background The insect exoskeleton or cuticle is a bi-partite composite of proteins and chitin that provides protective, skeletal and structural functions. Little information is available about the molecular structure of this important complex that exhibits a helicoidal architecture. Scores of sequences of cuticular proteins have been obtained from direct protein sequencing, from cDNAs, and from genomic analyses. Most of these cuticular protein sequences contain motifs found only in arthropod proteins. Description cuticleDB is a relational database containing all structural proteins of Arthropod cuticle identified to date. Many come from direct sequencing of proteins isolated from cuticle and from sequences from cDNAs that share common features with these authentic cuticular proteins. It also includes proteins from the Drosophila melanogaster and the Anopheles gambiae genomes, that have been predicted to be cuticular proteins, based on a Pfam motif (PF00379 responsible for chitin binding in Arthropod cuticle. The total number of the database entries is 445: 370 derive from insects, 60 from Crustacea and 15 from Chelicerata. The database can be accessed from our web server at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/cuticleDB. Conclusions CuticleDB was primarily designed to contain correct and full annotation of cuticular protein data. The database will be of help to future genome annotators. Users will be able to test hypotheses for the existence of known and also of yet unknown motifs in cuticular proteins. An analysis of motifs may contribute to understanding how proteins contribute to the physical properties of cuticle as well as to the precise nature of their interaction with chitin.

Willis Judith H

2004-09-01

186

Emerging and Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases  

Science.gov (United States)

... information on enabling JavaScript. Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ... emerging infectious diseases. Understanding Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases Anthrax Antimicrobial ... including MERS ...

187

Pesticides and Arthropods: Sublethal Effects and Demographic Toxicology  

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Full Text Available Insecticides and acaricides designed to control primary harmful insects and mites may also variously affect some other arthopods present in an (agroecosystem (e.g. secondary pests, predators, parasitoids, saprophytes, bioindicators, pollinators. Apart from insecticides and acaricides, arthropods may also be affected by the activity of other pesticides (fungicides, herbicides, etc.. Regardless of whether they are deemed desirable or not, the effects that pesticides have on arthopods need to be quantified as closely as possible through appropriate experimental procedures. Data acquired in tests designed to determined LD50/LC50 values are inadequate for evaluation of pesticide effectiveness in the field as pesticidesalso cause various sublethal effects, generally disregarded in such investigations. The sublethal effects of pesticides refer to any altered behaviour and/or physiology of individuals that have survived exposure to pesticides at doses/concentrations that can be lethal(within range causing mortality in an experimental population that exceeds mortality in an untreated population or sublethal (below that range. Pesticides affect locomotion and mobility, stimulate dispersion of arthropods from treated areas, complicate or prevent their navigation, orientation and ability to locate hosts, and cause changes in their feeding, mating and egg-laying patterns. Sublethal pesticide effects on arthropod physiology reflect on the life span, rate of development, fecundity and/or fertility, sex ratio and immunity of surviving individuals. Different parameters are being used in arthropod bioassays to determine sublethal effects (ED50/EC50, LOEC, NOEC, total effect index. Compared to acute toxicity tests, these parameters improve the quality of evaluation and create a more accurate view of the effects of a pesticide. However, such approach covers mainly fecundity/fertility alone, while all other sublethal effects remain unaccounted for. Besides, it refers to an evaluation of individuals, rather than populations, and it is the latter that are required for a more reliable evaluation of effectiveness of pesticides in real life. A demographic-toxicologicalapproach has been proposed therefore as a way of integrating the effects that a toxicant may cause at population level, which includes the construction of life tables and computation of population growth parameters, including intrinsic rate of increase (rm as a crucialparameter. Compared to other laboratory toxicity tests, the demographic-toxicological bioassay has been found superior in terms of a capacity to evaluate overall effects of pesticides, and such approach in evaluating pesticide effects is crucial for environmentally-based programmes of integrated plant protection and a competent evaluation of ecotoxicological risks of pesticide applications.

Dejan Mar?i?

2007-01-01

188

Optically active arthropod repellents for use against disease vectors.  

Science.gov (United States)

Optically inactive 1-[3-cyclohexen-1-ylcarbonyl] piperidine and 1-[3-cyclohexen-1-ylcarbonyl]-2-methylpiperidine are repellents against blood-feeding arthropods. Pure stereoisomers of these compounds were synthesized and characterized for use in bioassays. Initial laboratory tests with the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi Liston showed that this species was repelled differentially by the stereoisomers of 1-[3-cyclohexen-1-ylcarbonyl]-2-methylpiperidine. Two stereoisomers were twice as repellent as the other stereoisomers. These results indicate that stereoisomerism influences repellent efficacy in this class of compounds. PMID:15218925

Klun, J A; Ma, D; Gupta, R

2000-01-01

189

Ad-Hoc vs. Standardized and Optimized Arthropod Diversity Sampling  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The use of standardized and optimized protocols has been recently advocated for different arthropod taxa instead of ad-hoc sampling or sampling with protocols defined on a case-by-case basis. We present a comparison of both sampling approaches applied for spiders in a natural area of Portugal. Tests were made to their efficiency, over-collection of common species, singletons proportions, species abundance distributions, average specimen size, average taxonomic distinctness and behavior of richness estimators. The standardized protocol revealed three main advantages: (1 higher efficiency; (2 more reliable estimations of true richness; and (3 meaningful comparisons between undersampled areas.

Pedro Cardoso

2009-09-01

190

Low-cost wind tunnel for micro-arthropods.  

Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

. Wageningen : Noldus Information Technology bv, 2008 - (Spink, A.; Ballintijn, M.; Bogers, N.; Grieco, F.; Loijens, L.; Noldus, L.; Smit, G.; Zimmerman, P.), s. 263-264 ISBN 978-90-74821-81-0.[International Conference on Methods and Techniques in Behavioral Research /6./. Maastricht (NL), 26.08.2008-29.08.2008]Grant CEP: GA MŠk 2B06005Výzkumný zám?r: CEZ:AV0Z50070508Klí?ová slova: micro-arthropodsKód oboru RIV: EH - Ekologie - spole?enstva

Zemek, Rostislav; Reindl, František

191

Molecular Basis of the Bohr Effect in Arthropod Hemocyanin  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Flash photolysis and K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used to investigate the functional and structural effects of pH on the oxygen affinity of three homologous arthropod hemocyanins (Hcs). Flash photolysis measurements showed that the well-characterized pH dependence of oxygen affinity (Bohr effect) is attributable to changes in the oxygen binding rate constant, kon, rather than changes in koff. In parallel, coordination geometry of copper in Hc was evaluated as a function of pH by XAS. It was found that the geometry of copper in the oxygenated protein is unchanged at all pH values investigated, while significant changes were observed for the deoxygenated protein as a function of pH. The interpretation of these changes was based on previously described correlations between spectral lineshape and coordination geometry obtained for model compounds of known structure A pH-dependent change in the geometry of cuprous copper in the active site of deoxyHc, from pseudotetrahedral toward trigonal was assigned from the observed intensity dependence of the 1s ? 4pz transition in x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra. The structural alteration correlated well with increase in oxygen affinity at alkaline pH determined in flash photolysis experiments. These results suggest that the oxygen binding rate in deoxyHc depends on the coordination geometry of Cu(I) and suggest a structural origin for the Bohr effect in arthropod Hcs.

Hirota, S.; Kawahara, T; Beltramini, M; Di Muro, P; Magliozzo, R; Peisach, J; Powers, L; Tanaka, N; Nagao, S; Bubacco, L

2008-01-01

192

Chelicerate Hox genes and the homology of arthropod segments.  

Science.gov (United States)

Genes of the homeotic complex (HOM-C) in insects and vertebrates are required for the specification of segments along the antero-posterior axis. Multiple paralogues of the Hox genes in the horseshoe crab Limulus poliphemus have been used as evidence for HOM-C duplications in the Chelicerata. We addressed this possibility through a limited PCR survey to sample the homeoboxes of two spider species, Steatoda triangulosa and Achaearanea tepidariorum. The survey did not provide evidence for multiple Hox clusters although we have found apparent duplicate copies of proboscipedia (pb) and Deformed (Dfd). In addition, we have cloned larger cDNA fragments of pb, zerknullt (zen/Hox3) and Dfd. These fragments allowed the determination of mRNA distribution by in situ hybridization. Our results are similar to the previously published expression patterns of Hox genes from another spider and an oribatid mite. Previous studies compared spider/mite Hox gene expression patterns with those of insects and argued for a pattern of segmental homology based on the assumption that the co-linear anterior boundaries of the Hox domains can be used as markers. To test this assumption we performed a comparative analysis of the expression patterns for UBX/ABD-A in chelicerates, myriapods, crustaceans, and insects. We conclude that the anterior boundary can be and is changed considerably during arthropod evolution and, therefore, Hox expression patterns should not be used as the sole criterion for identifying homology in different classes of arthropods. PMID:11324031

Abzhanov, A; Popadic, A; Kaufman, T C

1999-01-01

193

Hardness in arthropod exoskeletons in the absence of transition metals.  

Science.gov (United States)

The arthropod cuticle is a remarkable and versatile biological material commonly composed of chitin and proteins. Lessons can be learned from the way it is adapted to fit its functions. The larval jewel beetle, Pseudotaenia frenchi, demonstrates hardness in the cutting edge of the mandibles in excess of the mineralized carapace of stone crabs and compares favourably with some stainless steels. Yet this is a form of cuticle which is devoid of transition metals or mineralization. In seeming contradiction, the similarly dark coloured adult beetle mandibles contain the transition metal manganese, but are significantly softer. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis and infrared spectroscopy have been used to investigate the differences in composition of mandible cuticle of the adult and larval beetles. PMID:20152944

Cribb, B W; Lin, C-L; Rintoul, L; Rasch, R; Hasenpusch, J; Huang, H

2010-08-01

194

Transient behavior of cadmium in a grassland arthropod food chain  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Biological assimilation and transport of cadmium were determined for an arthropod food chain in an east Tennessee grassland community. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that there were no significant differences (P greater than 0.05) in assimilation rates (17 percent assimilation per day) or biological half-lives (7 days) of 109Cd either as soluble nitrate or insoluble oxide in crickets under identical conditions. Field experiments demonstrated that primary consumers (crickets) accumulated 109Cd much more rapidly (uptake rate = 0.55 day-1) than did the spider predators (uptake rate = 0.08 day-1). Equilibrium concentrations in crickets were obtained in 9 days (0.04 ppM cadmium), while equilibrium was not reached in spiders during the 30-day study. Food-chain concentration of cadmium did not occur as crickets accumulated levels of cadmium 60 percent of that in their vegetation food sources and spiders accumulated only 70 percent of the cadmium present in the cricket tissues

1975-01-01

195

Aerial arthropod communities of native and invaded forests, Robinson Crusoe Island, Chile.  

Science.gov (United States)

Invasive species significantly contribute to biological change and threaten biodiversity, with a growing body of evidence that plant invasions affect higher trophic levels. We explored the relative importance of plant invasion and forest structure on aerial arthropod abundance, diversity, and composition on Robinson Crusoe Island, Chile. We used flight intercept traps to sample aerial arthropods within distinct canopy strata of native and invaded forests over 3-mo periods in 2006 and 2007. Arthropod abundance and diversity were higher in native than invaded forest, and arthropod communities were distinct between forest types. In both forest types, arthropod abundance was highest in the lower canopy, and canopy strata exhibited some differences in arthropod community composition. Several morphospecies were distinctly associated with each forest type. The strong differences in aerial arthropod communities associated with the invasion of native forest by non-native plants may affect other trophic levels, such as insectivorous birds. Steps to stop invasive plant spread and to restore native forest composition and structure are needed to safeguard the integrity of native communities, from plants to higher-level consumers. PMID:22127166

Hagen, Erin N; Bakker, Jonathan D; Gara, Robert I

2010-08-01

196

Arthropod assemblages on native and nonnative plant species of a coastal reserve in California.  

Science.gov (United States)

Biological invasions by nonnative plant species are a widespread phenomenon. Many studies have shown strong ecological impacts of plant invasions on native plant communities and ecosystem processes. Far fewer studies have examined effects on associated animal communities. From the perspective of a reserve's land management, I addressed the question of whether arthropod assemblages on two nonnative plant species of concern were impoverished compared with those assemblages associated with two predominant native plant species of that reserve. If the nonnative plant species, Conium maculatum L., and Phalaris aquatica L., supported highly depauperate arthropod assemblages compared with the native plant species, Baccharis pilularis De Candolle and Leymus triticoides (Buckley) Pilger, this finding would provide additional support for prioritizing removal of nonnatives and restoration of natives. I assessed invertebrate assemblages at the taxonomic levels of arthropod orders, Coleoptera families, and Formicidae species, using univariate analyses to examine community attributes (richness and abundance) and multivariate techniques to assess arthropod assemblage community composition differences among plant species. Arthropod richness estimates by taxonomic level between native and nonnative vegetation showed varying results. Overall, arthropod richness of the selected nonnative plants, examined at higher taxonomic resolution, was not necessarily less diverse than two of common native plants found on the reserve, although differences were found among plant species. Impacts of certain nonnative plant species on arthropod assemblages may be more difficult to elucidate than those impacts shown on native plants and ecosystem processes. PMID:20550788

Fork, Susanne K

2010-06-01

197

New insights on arthropod toxins that potentiate erectile function.  

Science.gov (United States)

The use of natural substances for the treatment of diseases or injuries is an ancient practice of many cultures. According to folklore, natural aphrodisiacs may help to raise libido and increase desire. The supposed aphrodisiacs mainly include a plethora of preparations of plants, among other substances. However, the real boundary between myth and reality has not been established yet in most cases and such boundaries must be drawn by scientific methods. A growing interest of the scientific community has been focused on animal venoms, especially those from arthropods, i.e. spiders and scorpions, which cause priapism, a prolonged and painful erection. This review highlights the studies that have been performed with venoms and toxins from arthropods known to cause priapism, among other toxic symptoms, pointing out some pharmacological approaches for better understanding this effect. To date, the venom of some spiders, mainly Phoneutria nigriventer, and scorpions, such as the yellow South American scorpion Tityus serrulatus, among others, have been known to cause priapism. Since erectile dysfunction (ED) is a growing health problem in the world, more common in patients with vascular diseases as diabetes and hypertension, the use of animal venoms and toxins as pharmacological tools could not only shed light to the mechanisms involved in erectile function, but also represent a possible model for new drugs to treat ED. Unfortunately, attempts to correlate the structure of those priapism-related toxins were unfruitful. Such difficulties lie firstly on the poor data concerning purified priapism-related toxins, instead of whole venoms and/or semi-purified fractions, and secondly, on the scarce available primary sequences and structural data, mainly from spider toxins. It has been shown that all these toxins modify the sodium (Na(+)) channel activity, mostly slowing down its inactivation current. Improving the knowledge on the tertiary structure of these toxins could provide a key in the search of a new drug for ED treatment. PMID:23583324

Nunes, Kenia P; Torres, Fernanda S; Borges, Marcia H; Matavel, Alessandra; Pimenta, Adriano M C; De Lima, Maria E

2013-07-01

198

Characterization of infectious molecular clones of equine infectious anaemia virus.  

Science.gov (United States)

We have recovered five infectious molecular clones of the lentivirus equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV). The clones were recovered from fetal equine kidney (FEK) cells infected with a virulent, cell culture-adapted virus stock (designated PV) and have been characterized at a molecular level. Each clone has unique envelope and long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences. We further investigated LTR sequence variation in the PV stock using PCR amplification to obtain additional LTR clones from infected FEK cells and from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from animals experimentally infected with PV. Sequence analysis of resulting clones indicates a selection for different LTR populations in pony PBMCs compared to FEK cells. Finally, we observed that the cloned EIAV proviruses did not remain infectious when maintained in a derivative of pBR322. However, two proviruses have been stably maintained in a low copy number vector (pLG338-SPORT). PMID:8113766

Payne, S L; Rausch, J; Rushlow, K; Montelaro, R C; Issel, C; Flaherty, M; Perry, S; Sellon, D; Fuller, F

1994-02-01

199

Immunochemical studies of infectious mononucleosis  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The coated-tube method of solid-phase radioimmunoassay has been adapted to the detection of heterophile antibodies and antigens of infectious mononucleosis. Disposable plastic hemagglutination trays were coated with purified glycoprotein from horse erythrocytes and the subsequent uptake of antibody from test sera was detected by radio-iodinated horse erythrocyte glycoprotein. In a preliminary survey of sera from patients with infectious mononucleosis and sera from controls, the assay proved highly sensitive and specific. The test system was also useful in a competitive binding assay for immunochemical studies of glycoproteins from other heterophile antigen-positive species

1977-01-01

200

Risks associated with indoor infectious aerosols  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Infectious disease has long been associated with indoor environments. However, little note has been made of the relative risk of infectious disease compared to other indoor air pollutants. The Philadelphia outbreak of Legionnaires disease served to bring the possibility of environmental reservoirs for infectious disease to the attention of both the lay and scientific communities, and has generated renewed interest in infectious illness associated with the indoor environment. This brief review is intended as an introduction to the overall role of infectious agents in diseases associated with the indoor environment, and to stimulate discussion on the potential for environmental control of infectious disease.

Burge, H.A. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

1990-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

Equine infectious anaemia in urban area horses of Monte Mor municipality, Campinas metropolitan area, São Paulo State, Brazil  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA is a chronic viral disease, caused by a Lentivirus from Retroviridae family. It is primarily transmitted by arthropod vectors during bloodfeeding. It is an infectious, incurable and difficult to control disease, being considered an important obstacle to horse breeding in Brazil. As part of the municipal equine health program of Monte Mor county, a total of 64 animals were evaluated through serology for the presence of antibodies against EIA virus, using agar gel immunodiffusion test. Three animals were serologically reagent resulting in a local occurrence of 4.7%. Due to the significant use of horses as working and recreational animals in urban areas, it is mandatory that public authorities set up policies of responsible ownership and zoonoses control involving equine populations, aiming both animal welfare improvement and human health protection.

André Antonio Cutolo

2014-06-01

202

A systematic review of arthropod community diversity in association with invasive plants  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Invasive plants represent a significant financial burden for land managers and also have the potential to severely degrade ecosystems. Arthropods interact strongly with plants, relying on them for food, shelter, and as nurseries for their young. For these reasons, the impacts of plant invasions are likely strongly reflected by arthropod community dynamics including diversity and abundances. A systematic review was conducted to ascertain the state of the literature with respect to plant invade...

Spafford, Ryan D.; Lortie, Christopher J.; Butterfield, Bradley J.

2013-01-01

203

Complex responses to invasive grass litter by ground arthropods in a Mediterranean scrub ecosystem  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Plant invasions have tremendous potential to alter food webs by changing basal resources. Recent studies document how plant invasions may contribute to increased arthropod abundances in detritus-based food webs. An obvious mechanism for this phenomenon—a bottom-up effect resulting from elevated levels of detritus from the invasive plant litter—has not been explicitly studied. We examined the effects of an annual grass invasion on ground arthropod assemblages in the coastal sage scrub (CSS...

Wolkovich, Elizabeth Mary; Bolger, Douglas T.; Holway, David A.

2009-01-01

204

Mid-Cretaceous charred fossil flowers reveal direct observation of arthropod feeding strategies  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Although plant–arthropod relationships underpin the dramatic rise in diversity and ecological dominance of flowering plants and their associated arthropods, direct observations of such interactions in the fossil record are rare, as these ephemeral moments are difficult to preserve. Three-dimensionally preserved charred remains of Chloranthistemon flowers from the Late Albian to Early Cenomanian of Germany preserve scales of mosquitoes and an oribatid mite with mouthparts inserted into the p...

Hartkopf-fro?der, Christoph; Rust, Jes; Wappler, Torsten; Friis, Else Marie; Viehofen, Agnes

2012-01-01

205

Ecological significance of the arthropod fauna from the Jurassic (Callovian) La Voulte Lagerstätte.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The La Voulte Lagerstätte is remarkable for its unique soft-bodied fauna (e.g., worms, coleoid squids) and its exceptionally preserved arthropods mainly found in small sideritic concretions. This arthropod fauna includes 30 different species assigned to the crustaceans, the thylacocephalans and the pycnogonids. Crustaceans are the most diversified group with 23 species distributed in a dozen families. Quantitative analyses based on 388 nodules reveals four dominant groups: (i) the enigmatic ...

Charbonnier, Sylvain; Vannier, Jean; Hantzpergue, Pierre; Gaillard, Christian

2010-01-01

206

Assessing risks of releasing exotic biological control agents of arthropod pests  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract More than 5000 introductions of about 2000 species of exotic arthropod agents for control of arthropod pests in 196 countries or islands during the past 120 years rarely have resulted in negative environmental effects. Yet, risks of environmental effects caused by releases of exotics are of growing concern. Twenty countries have implemented regulations for release of biological control agents. Soon, the International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures (ISPM3) will become the standa...

Lenteren, J. C.; Bale, J. S.; Bigler, F.; Hokkanen, H. M. T.; Loomans, A. J. M.

2006-01-01

207

Nematode and arthropod genomes provide new insights into the evolution of class 2 B1 GPCRs.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nematodes and arthropods are the most speciose animal groups and possess Class 2 B1 G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Existing models of invertebrate Class 2 B1 GPCR evolution are mainly centered on Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster and a few other nematode and arthropod representatives. The present study reevaluates the evolution of metazoan Class 2 B1 GPCRs and orthologues by exploring the receptors in several nematode and arthropod genomes and comparing them to the human receptors. Three novel receptor phylogenetic clusters were identified and designated cluster A, cluster B and PDF-R-related cluster. Clusters A and B were identified in several nematode and arthropod genomes but were absent from D. melanogaster and Culicidae genomes, whereas the majority of the members of the PDF-R-related cluster were from nematodes. Cluster A receptors were nematode and arthropod-specific but shared a conserved gene environment with human receptor loci. Cluster B members were orthologous to human GCGR, PTHR and Secretin members with which they probably shared a common origin. PDF-R and PDF-R related clusters were present in representatives of both nematodes and arthropods. The results of comparative analysis of GPCR evolution and diversity in protostomes confirm previous notions that C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes are not good representatives of nematode and arthropod phyla. We hypothesize that at least four ancestral Class 2 B1 genes emerged early in the metazoan radiation, which after the protostome-deuterostome split underwent distinct selective pressures that resulted in duplication and deletion events that originated the current Class 2 B1 GPCRs in nematode and arthropod genomes. PMID:24651821

Cardoso, João C R; Félix, Rute C; Power, Deborah M

2014-01-01

208

Dynamics of the Leaf-Litter Arthropod Fauna Following Fire in a Neotropical Woodland Savanna  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Fire is an important agent of disturbance in tropical savannas, but relatively few studies have analyzed how soil-and-litter dwelling arthropods respond to fire disturbance despite the critical role these organisms play in nutrient cycling and other biogeochemical processes. Following the incursion of a fire into a woodland savanna ecological reserve in Central Brazil, we monitored the dynamics of litter-arthropod populations for nearly two years in one burned and one unburned area of the res...

Vasconcelos, Heraldo L.; Pacheco, Renata; Silva, Raphael C.; Vasconcelos, Pedro B.; Lopes, Caue? T.; Costa, Alan N.; Bruna, Emilio M.

2009-01-01

209

Mixed blends of herbivore-induced plant volatiles and foraging succes of carnivorous arthropods  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Food webs are overlaid with infochemical webs that mediate direct and indirect interactions. Behavioural ecologists have extensively documented that carnivorous arthropods exploit herbivore-induced plant volatiles during foraging for herbivorous arthropods. Most studies on the role of infochemicals in multitrophic interactions have been conducted against an odour-free background, although field studies show that carnivores also use herbivore-induced plant volatiles under more complex conditio...

Dicke, M.; Boer, J. G.; Ho?fte, M.; Rocha-granados, C.

2003-01-01

210

Efficient sampling of ground-dwelling arthropods using pitfall traps in arid steppes  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Pitfall trapping is probably the most frequently used method for sampling grounddwelling arthropods. While the capture of specimens in pitfall traps largely depends on the number of individuals in the sampled area, trap design and trapping effort for a given environment, can also affect sampling success. The aim of this study was to determine the best pitfall trapping design for collecting ground-dwelling arthropods in the wind-blown and cold arid steppe areas of Patagonia. We tested four des...

Cheli, Germa?n H.; Corley, Juan C.

2010-01-01

211

Nematode and Arthropod Genomes Provide New Insights into the Evolution of Class 2 B1 GPCRs  

Science.gov (United States)

Nematodes and arthropods are the most speciose animal groups and possess Class 2 B1 G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Existing models of invertebrate Class 2 B1 GPCR evolution are mainly centered on Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster and a few other nematode and arthropod representatives. The present study reevaluates the evolution of metazoan Class 2 B1 GPCRs and orthologues by exploring the receptors in several nematode and arthropod genomes and comparing them to the human receptors. Three novel receptor phylogenetic clusters were identified and designated cluster A, cluster B and PDF-R-related cluster. Clusters A and B were identified in several nematode and arthropod genomes but were absent from D. melanogaster and Culicidae genomes, whereas the majority of the members of the PDF-R-related cluster were from nematodes. Cluster A receptors were nematode and arthropod-specific but shared a conserved gene environment with human receptor loci. Cluster B members were orthologous to human GCGR, PTHR and Secretin members with which they probably shared a common origin. PDF-R and PDF-R related clusters were present in representatives of both nematodes and arthropods. The results of comparative analysis of GPCR evolution and diversity in protostomes confirm previous notions that C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes are not good representatives of nematode and arthropod phyla. We hypothesize that at least four ancestral Class 2 B1 genes emerged early in the metazoan radiation, which after the protostome-deuterostome split underwent distinct selective pressures that resulted in duplication and deletion events that originated the current Class 2 B1 GPCRs in nematode and arthropod genomes.

Cardoso, Joao C. R.; Felix, Rute C.; Power, Deborah M.

2014-01-01

212

Indicators of conservation value of Azorean caves based on its arthropod fauna  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

All Azorean lava-tubes and volcanic pits with fauna were evaluated for species diversity and rarity based on arthropods. To produce an unbiased multiple-criteria index (importance value for conservation, IV-C) incorporating arthropod species diversity based indices and indices qualifying geological and management features (e.g. diversity of geological structures, threats, accessibility, etc.), an iterative partial multiple regression analysis was performed. In addition, the complementarity me...

2008-01-01

213

Arthropods of Burgess Shale type from the Middle Cambrian of Bohemia (Czech Republic)  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Rare non-trilobite arthropods, mostly with affinities with the Burgess Shale fauna, are described from the Middle Cambrian Jince Formation of the Barrandian area, Central Bohemia (Czech Republic): Tuzoia sp., another large Tuzoia-like arthropod (probably a new genus), Proboscicaris hospes sp. n., Helmetia? fastigata sp. n., and Forfexicaris? sp. The status of Pilocystites primitius

Chlupá? I; Kordule V

2002-01-01

214

Parasegmental appendage allocation in annelids and arthropods and the homology of parapodia and arthropodia  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract The new animal phylogeny disrupts the traditional taxon Articulata (uniting arthropods and annelids) and thus calls into question the homology of the body segments and appendages in the two groups. Recent work in the annelid Platynereis dumerilii has shown that although the set of genes involved in body segmentation is similar in the two groups, the body units of annelids correspond to arthropod parasegments not segments. This challenges traditional ideas about the...

Prpic Nikola-Michael

2008-01-01

215

Bartonella and Rickettsia in arthropods from the Lao PDR and from Borneo, Malaysia?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Rickettsioses and bartonelloses are arthropod-borne diseases of mammals with widespread geographical distributions. Yet their occurrence in specific regions, their association with different vectors and hosts and the infection rate of arthropod-vectors with these agents remain poorly studied in South-east Asia. We conducted entomological field surveys in the Lao PDR (Laos) and Borneo, Malaysia by surveying fleas, ticks, and lice from domestic dogs and collected additional samples from domesti...

Kernif, T.; Socolovschi, C.; Wells, K.; Lakim, Mb; Inthalad, S.; Slesak, G.; Boudebouch, N.; Beaucournu, J-c; Newton, Pn; Raoult, D.; Parola, P.

2012-01-01

216

Detection of Infectious Poxvirus Particles  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

To enable rapid and reliable detection of poxviruses in clinical and environmental specimens, a diagnostic approach was developed to detect <3 PFU of infectious poxvirus particles in <5 hours. This approach involved virus culture combined with real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction detection of 2 viral genes expressed immediately after infection.

2006-01-01

217

21 CFR 866.5640 - Infectious mononucleosis immunological test system.  

Science.gov (United States)

...2009-04-01 false Infectious mononucleosis immunological test system...Systems § 866.5640 Infectious mononucleosis immunological test system...Identification. An infectious mononucleosis immunological test...

2009-04-01

218

Rickettsial pathogens and arthropod vectors of medical and veterinary significance on Kwajalein Atoll and Wake Island  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Modern surveys of ectoparasites and potential vector-borne pathogens in the Republic of the Marshall Islands and Wake Island are poorly documented. We report on field surveys of ectoparasites from 2010 with collections from dogs, cats, and rats. Five ectoparasites were identified: the cat flea Ctenocephalides felis, a sucking louse Hoplopleura pacifica, the mites Laelaps nuttalli and Radfordia ensifera, and the brown dog tickRhipicephalus sanguineus. Ectoparasites were screened for rickettsial pathogens. DNA from Anaplasma platys, a Coxiella symbiont of Rhipicephalus sanguineus, anda Rickettsia sp. were identified by PCR and DNA sequencing from ticks and fleas on Kwajalein Atoll. An unidentified spotted fever group Rickettsia was detected in a pool of Laelaps nuttalli and Hoplopleura pacifica from Wake Island. The records of Hoplopleura pacifica, Laelaps nuttalli, and Radfordia ensifera and the pathogens are new for Kwajalein Atoll and Wake Island.

Durden, L.

2012-05-01

219

Fluctuations in Availability of Arthropods Correlated with Microchiropteran and Avian Predator Activities  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aerial arthropods were sampled by driving a standard transect along the riparian forest of the Luvuvhu River, South Africa, to assess hourly and seasonal variations in available biomass. Sampling, with an air-plankton net mounted on a vehicle, was conducted hourly over 48-hour periods during the fullest phase of the moon for each of eight months during 1986/87. Seasonal variation in availability of terrestrial arthropods was assessed by means of six pitfall traps set in the riparian forest. On a daily basis, the available biomass of aerial arthropods was found to increase markedly at and during the two hours following sunset, with a slight peak at or in the two hours preceding dawn. Highest monthly availability was found to correspond with the warm summer rainy season, with a marked increase after the first rains. The peak for terrestrial arthropods was found to occur later in the summer than for aerial arthropods. These patterns of arthropod availability correlate well with the daily activity rhythms and seasonal reproduc- tion of microchiropteran bats and their avian predators.

C.H. Scholtz

1988-10-01

220

Study of Arthropod Communities in A Virginia Tobacco Agro-Ecosystem  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The cultivation of tobacco is one of users of agro-chemical substances such as insecticides, herbi-cides, defoliants, and fertilizers among other food crops and plants with high economical value. The use of these chemicals may bring negative effects regarding the richness and abundance of arthropods. The study of arthropod community in the Virginia tobacco ecosystem was carried out in Central Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara Province, during the 2010 plantation year. It was aimed at finding the composition, structure, and dynamic of the arthropod diversity around the tobacco field. Samples were obtained by using trapping techniques (pitfall traps, yellow-pan traps, and sweep net. The number of arthropods found in Virginia tobacco field are 69, consisting of 65 species of insects (belonging to 46 families and 8 orders and 4 species of spiders (belonging to 4 families. The majority of insects found was Hymenoptera, dominated by bees. Based on the ecological functions, the major group of arthro-pods documented was phytophagous (20 species, mostly Coleoptera and Orthoptera. Yet, the number of predators was relatively more abundant than that of the phytophagous. The number of kinds of ar-thropods commonly interacting around the field fluctuated during the growing period, while in the cul-tivation period the number decreased. The diversity of the species (H’ and the ratio of abundance of the natural enemies and phytophagous in the field was high.

Ruth Stella Thei

2013-05-01

 
 
 
 
221

The ubiquity of intraguild predation among predatory arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

Intraguild predation (IGP) occurs when one predator species attacks another predator species with which it competes for a shared prey species. Despite the apparent omnipresence of intraguild interactions in natural and managed ecosystems, very few studies have quantified rates of IGP in various taxa under field conditions. We used molecular analyses of gut contents to assess the nature and incidence of IGP among four species of coccinellid predators in soybean fields. Over half of the 368 predator individuals collected in soybean contained the DNA of other coccinellid species indicating that IGP was very common at our field site. Furthermore, 13.2% of the sampled individuals contained two and even three other coccinellid species in their gut. The interaction was reciprocal, as each of the four coccinellid species has the capacity to feed on the others. To our knowledge, this study represents the most convincing field evidence of a high prevalence of IGP among predatory arthropods. The finding has important implications for conservation biology and biological control. PMID:22132211

Gagnon, Annie-Ève; Heimpel, George E; Brodeur, Jacques

2011-01-01

222

Meeting the challenges of on-host and off-host water balance in blood-feeding arthropods  

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In this review, we describe water balance requirements of blood-feeding arthropods, particularly contrasting dehydration tolerance during the unfed, off-host state and the challenges of excess water that accompany receipt of the bloodmeal. Most basic water balance characteristics during the off-host stage are applicable to other terrestrial arthropods, as well. A well-coordinated suite of responses enable arthropods to conserve water resources, enhance their desiccation tolerance, and increas...

Benoit, Joshua B.; Denlinger, David L.

2010-01-01

223

Recommendations for the design of laboratory studies on non-target arthropods for risk assessment of genetically engineered plants  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper provides recommendations on experimental design for early-tier laboratory studies used in risk assessments to evaluate potential adverse impacts of arthropod-resistant genetically engineered (GE) plants on non-target arthropods (NTAs). While we rely heavily on the currently used proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in this discussion, the concepts apply to other arthropod-active proteins. A risk may exist if the newly acquired trait of the GE plant has adverse effects on NTAs ...

2011-01-01

224

Infectious diseases and social stigma  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Stigma creates a barrier between the sick and the rest of society that prevents them from acting on their instinctive desire to seek curative treatment that will enable them to reenter into their every day social activity. For these ailing persons, the cost of being stigmatized far outweighs the desire to rehabilitate their lifestyle. Further, social stigma associated with infectious disease undermines the overall health of society, and the effectiveness of community efforts to offer unabridged healthcare services to treat and prevent the spread of communicable disease. In the wake of the latest pandemic influenza outbreak, the global community witnessed how under the stress H1N1, communities, regions, and countries can suffer socially and economically. Our research finds a statistically significant relationship between infectious disease and social stigma. We also identify the role the media plays in exacerbating this issue, and address preliminary policy implications to mitigate these issues in the future.

Joan L. Williams

2011-04-01

225

Infectious mononucleosis: observations on transmission.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Epsten-Barr virus oropharyngeal shedding has been demonstrated in infectious mononucleosis patients many months after acute illness and long after the disease hallmarks, atypical lymphocytes and heterophile antibody, have disappeared. Extracellular virus is present more frequently in saliva than in other oropharyngeal samples. Prolonged excretion of EBV in asymptomatic carriers explains the difficulty in tracing case-to-case spread and increased transmissibility in age groups in which salivar...

Niederman, J. C.

1982-01-01

226

Epidemiology of infectious diseases / Infeksjonsepidemiologi  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Deskriptiv infeksjonsepidemiologi:

Anne Eskild, Innledning
Preben Aavitsland, Description and use of the Norwegian notification system for infectious diseases
Einar Heldal, Underrapportering av tuberkulose
Anne Eskild og Helvi Holm Samdal, T-celle lymfotropt virus type II (HTLV-II) infeksjon blant HIV-smittede intravanøse staffmisbrukere
&...

-- --

2009-01-01

227

Infectious causes of chronic diarrhoea.  

Science.gov (United States)

Infections are an uncommon cause of chronic diarrhoea. Parasites are most likely, including protozoa like giardia, cryptosporidia and cyclospora. Bacteria are unlikely to cause chronic diarrhoea in immunocompetent individuals with the possible exception of Yersinia, Plesiomonas and Aeromonas. Infectious diarrhoea can trigger other causes of chronic diarrhoea, including inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and "Brainerd-type" diarrhoea. A thorough evaluation should detect most infections causing chronic diarrhoea. PMID:23384802

Kaiser, Lisa; Surawicz, Christina M

2012-10-01

228

CT evaluation of infectious colitis  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Computed tomography (CT) is useful for evaluating the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, such as infectious colitis, in patients with severe pain and bloody diarrhea. During the 7 years between November 1993 and October 2000, 34 patients with infectious colitis (18 male, 16 female; mean age 42±19 yrs), received emergency CT and colonoscopy because of severe abdominal pain and dysentery. The following organisms were isolated: pathogenic Escherichia coli (12), 6 of which were O157: H7 (O-157), Salmonella species (11), Campylobacter species (5), Vibrio parahaemolyticus (3), Yersinia enterocolotica (2) and Shigella species (1). Thickening of the intestinal wall greater than 10 mm was seen in the ascending colon in the 6 cases with E. coli O157, in 5/11 cases with Salmonella, 4/5 with Campylobacter and 1/6 with non-O157 pathogenic E. Coli. marked intestinal wall thickening, greater than 20 mm, was seen in the ascending colon of the 4 of the patients with an O-157 infection. In all patients with O-157 colitis, slight ascites was noted in the pelvic space. In additions, ascites was also seen in 3/13 patients with Salmonella and 1/5 patients with Campylobacter colitis. The CT findings, in the patients with infectious colitis, are non-specific but knowledge and recognition of the findings will help in patient evaluation and proper treatment. (author)

2002-08-01

229

The infectious burden in atherothrombosis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis involves multiple mechanisms, including imbalanced lipid metabolism, disturbed equilibrium of the immune response, and chronic inflammation of the artery wall. Several reports have shown a relationship between the development of atherosclerosis and the presence of infectious diseases, widely occurring in the general population, often chronic and/or asymptomatic. Beyond Chlamydia pneumoniae, a large number of infectious agents have been linked with an increased risk of vascular disease, with variable strength of supporting data: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Helicobacter pylori, influenza A virus, herpes virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus, and human immunodeficiency virus. Infections may contribute to atherosclerosis either via direct infection of vascular cells or via the indirect effects of cytokines or acute phase proteins induced by infection at "nonvascular" sites. More recently, investigators reported that the aggregate burden ("infectious burden") of these chronic infections, rather than the effects of a single organism, might contribute to atherosclerosis and its thrombotic complications. However, the role of infection, as a proinflammatory cause of atherosclerosis, is still debated in the literature. This article will review available data suggesting a relationship between different infective pathogens and atherothrombosis, the hypothesized mechanisms, and the potential role for antimicrobial treatment. PMID:22660918

Tufano, Antonella; Di Capua, Mirko; Coppola, Antonio; Conca, Paolo; Cimino, Ernesto; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Giovanni

2012-07-01

230

Surviving in a frozen desert: environmental stress physiology of terrestrial Antarctic arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

Abiotic stress is one of the primary constraints limiting the range and success of arthropods, and nowhere is this more apparent than Antarctica. Antarctic arthropods have evolved a suite of adaptations to cope with extremes in temperature and water availability. Here, we review the current state of knowledge regarding the environmental physiology of terrestrial arthropods in Antarctica. To survive low temperatures, mites and Collembola are freeze-intolerant and rely on deep supercooling, in some cases supercooling below -30°C. Also, some of these microarthropods are capable of cryoprotective dehydration to extend their supercooling capacity and reduce the risk of freezing. In contrast, the two best-studied Antarctic insects, the midges Belgica antarctica and Eretmoptera murphyi, are freeze-tolerant year-round and rely on both seasonal and rapid cold-hardening to cope with decreases in temperature. A common theme among Antarctic arthropods is extreme tolerance of dehydration; some accomplish this by cuticular mechanisms to minimize water loss across their cuticle, while a majority have highly permeable cuticles but tolerate upwards of 50-70% loss of body water. Molecular studies of Antarctic arthropod stress physiology are still in their infancy, but several recent studies are beginning to shed light on the underlying mechanisms that govern extreme stress tolerance. Some common themes that are emerging include the importance of cuticular and cytoskeletal rearrangements, heat shock proteins, metabolic restructuring and cell recycling pathways as key mediators of cold and water stress in the Antarctic. PMID:24353207

Teets, Nicholas M; Denlinger, David L

2014-01-01

231

A revision of brain composition in Onychophora (velvet worms suggests that the tritocerebrum evolved in arthropods  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The composition of the arthropod head is one of the most contentious issues in animal evolution. In particular, controversy surrounds the homology and innervation of segmental cephalic appendages by the brain. Onychophora (velvet worms play a crucial role in understanding the evolution of the arthropod brain, because they are close relatives of arthropods and have apparently changed little since the Early Cambrian. However, the segmental origins of their brain neuropils and the number of cephalic appendages innervated by the brain - key issues in clarifying brain composition in the last common ancestor of Onychophora and Arthropoda - remain unclear. Results Using immunolabelling and neuronal tracing techniques in the developing and adult onychophoran brain, we found that the major brain neuropils arise from only the anterior-most body segment, and that two pairs of segmental appendages are innervated by the brain. The region of the central nervous system corresponding to the arthropod tritocerebrum is not differentiated as part of the onychophoran brain but instead belongs to the ventral nerve cords. Conclusions Our results contradict the assumptions of a tripartite (three-segmented brain in Onychophora and instead confirm the hypothesis of bipartite (two-segmented brain composition. They suggest that the last common ancestor of Onychophora and Arthropoda possessed a brain consisting of protocerebrum and deutocerebrum whereas the tritocerebrum evolved in arthropods.

Mayer Georg

2010-08-01

232

Arthropods of Burgess Shale type from the Middle Cambrian of Bohemia (Czech Republic  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Rare non-trilobite arthropods, mostly with affinities with the Burgess Shale fauna, are described from the Middle Cambrian Jince Formation of the Barrandian area, Central Bohemia (Czech Republic: Tuzoia sp., another large Tuzoia-like arthropod (probably a new genus, Proboscicaris hospes sp. n., Helmetia? fastigata sp. n., and Forfexicaris? sp. The status of Pilocystites primitius Barrande, 1887, formerly ranged with echinoderms but here recognized as a Tuzoia fragment, is discussed. Most of described arthropods (except Forfexicaris? sp. are thought to be nektobenthic animals of a shallow-water environment, possibly tolerant to some salinity fluctuations. Relationships, particularly to North American faunas, indicate open migration possibilities between Laurentia and peri-Gondwana regions during the Middle Cambrian.

Chlupá? I

2002-09-01

233

Investigative modalities in infectious keratitis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Standard recommended guidelines for diagnosis of infectious keratitis do exist. Based on an extensive Medline literature search, the various investigative modalities available for aiding the diagnosis of microbial keratitis have been reviewed and described briefly. Preferred practice patterns have been outlined and the importance of routine pre-treatment cultures in the primary management of infectious keratitis has been highlighted. Corneal scraping, tear samples and corneal biopsy are few of the specimens needed to carry out the investigative procedures for diagnosis and for initiating therapy in cases of microbial keratitis. In bacterial, fungal and amoebic keratitis, microscopic examination of smears is essential for rapid diagnosis. Potassium hydroxide (KOH wet mount, Gram?s stain and Giemsa stain are widely used and are important for clinicians to start empirical therapy before microbial culture results are available. The usefulness of performing corneal cultures in all cases of suspected infectious keratitis has been well established. In cases of suspected viral keratitis, therapy can be initiated on clinical judgment alone. If a viral culture is needed, scrapings should directly be inoculated into the viral transport media. In vivo confocal microscopy is a useful adjunct to slit lamp bio-microscopy for supplementing diagnosis in most cases and establishing early diagnosis in many cases of non-responding fungal and amoebic keratitis. This is a non-invasive, high resolution technique which allows rapid detection of Acanthamoeba cysts and trophozoites and fungal hyphae in the cornea long before laboratory cultures give conclusive results. Other new modalities for detection of microbial keratitis include molecular diagnostic techniques like polymerase chain reaction, and genetic finger printing by pulsed field gel electrophoresis.

Gupta Noopur

2008-01-01

234

Functional richness and ecosystem services: bird predation on arthropods in tropical agroecosystems.  

Science.gov (United States)

In agroecosystems, biodiversity correlates with ecosystem function, yet mechanisms driving these relationships are often unknown. Examining traits and functional classifications of organisms providing ecosystem functions may provide insight into the mechanisms. Birds are important predators of insects, including pests. However, biological simplification of agroforests may decrease provisioning of this pest removal service by reducing bird taxonomic and functional diversity. A recent meta-analysis of bird exclosure studies from a range of agroecosystems in Central America concluded that higher bird richness is associated with significantly greater arthropod removal, yet the mechanism remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis of the same data to examine whether birds demonstrate functional complementarity in tropical agroforests. We classified birds according to relevant traits (body mass, foraging strategy, foraging Strata, and diet) and then examined how design of functional classification, including trait selection, classification methods, and the functional diversity metric used affect the suitability of different classifications as predictors of ecosystem services. We determined that vegetation characteristics are not likely drivers of arthropod removal by birds. For some functional classifications, functional richness positively correlated with arthropod removal, indicating that species complementarity may be an important mechanism behind this ecosystem function. The predictive ability of functional classifications increased with the number of traits included in the classification. For the two best classifications examined, functional group richness was a better predictor of arthropod reduction than other metrics of functional diversity (FD and Rao's Q). However, no functional classification predicted arthropod removal better than simple species richness; thus other factors may be important. Our analysis indicates that the sampling effect may also play a role, as one species and two functional groups were responsible for disproportionate effects of arthropod removal. PMID:19831075

Philpott, Stacy M; Soong, Oliver; Lowenstein, Jacob H; Pulido, Astrid Luz; Lopez, Diego Tobar; Flynn, Dan F B; DeClerck, Fabrice

2009-10-01

235

Feeding and the rhodopsin family G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs in nematodes and arthropods  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In vertebrates, receptors of the rhodopsin G-protein coupled superfamily (GPCRs play an important role in the regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis and are activated by peptide hormones produced in the brain-gut axis. These peptides regulate appetite and energy expenditure by promoting or inhibiting food intake. Sequence and function homologues of human GPCRs involved in feeding exist in the nematode roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans and the arthropod fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster, suggesting that the mechanisms that regulate food intake emerged early and have been conserved during metazoan radiation. Nematodes and arthropods are the most diverse and successful animal phyla on Earth. They can survive in a vast diversity of environments and have acquired distinct life styles and feeding strategies. The aim of the present review is to investigate if this diversity has affected the evolution of invertebrate GPCRs. Homologues of the C. elegans and D. melanogaster rhodopsin receptors were characterized in the genome of other nematodes and arthropods and receptor evolution compared. With the exception of bombesin receptors (BBR that are absent from nematodes, a similar gene complement was found. In arthropods, rhodopsin GPCR evolution is characterized by species-specific gene duplications and deletions and in nematodes by gene expansions in species with a free-living stage and gene deletions in representatives of obligate parasitic taxa. Based upon variation in GPCR gene number and potentially divergent functions within phyla we hypothesize that life style and feeding diversity practiced by nematodes and arthropods was one factor that contributed to rhodopsin GPCR gene evolution. Understanding how the regulation of food intake has evolved in invertebrates will contribute to the development of novel drugs to control nematodes and arthropods and the pests and diseases that use them as vectors.

JoaoCarlos dos ReisCardoso

2012-12-01

236

Production of arthropod pests and vectors in coal strip mine ponds. Program report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The objective of this study was to determine what species of medically important arthropods, particularly mosquitoes, are breeding in coal strip mine ponds, to what extent, and whether these breeding sites will serve as a focus of annoyance or a potential outbreak center of arthropod-borne diseases to surrounding communities. Pond age was compared with physical and chemical characteristics of the water and associated vegetation communities. Various sampling techniques were used to determine the composition and density of all life stages of the aquatic insect fauna.

Pickard, E.

1981-06-01

237

Differences in soil arthropod communities along a high altitude gradient at Shergyla Mountain, Tibet, China  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This is the first time that the soil arthropod communitycomposition along a high-altitude gradient (3,837, 4,105, and5,050 m a.s.l.) has been investigated in eastern Tibet, China.Five soil samples of 50 cm super(2) were taken from each site andextracted for 7 days in Berlese/Tullgren funnels without heating.Acari was the dominant group of arthropods at all three elevations(79%, 53%, and 54%, respectively, from the lower site to the uppersite). Prostigmata and Oribatida were more abundant than...

2005-01-01

238

[Alpha and beta arthropods diversity from the different environments of Parque Nacional Los Cardones, Salta, Argentina].  

Science.gov (United States)

The essential role of the National Parks is to protect nature, in order to prevent the deterioration and loss of the ecosystem under protection. Very few records about the diversity of arthropods are known from Los Cardones National Park, where three eco-regions are protected: Puna and Monte eco-regions and the High Andean Grassland of the Yungas. Here, we aimed to compare the alpha and beta diversity of arthropods in these eco-regions, and to prove if sites from the same ecoregion, show greater similarity between them in their assemblages, than with sites of the other eco-regions. We also identified arthropod orders with higher species richness, and indicated the families that contribute the most to the registered beta diversity. Three sampling sites were established on each eco-region and the arthropods were sampled using pitfall traps and suction samples. We evaluated the obtained inventory through nonparametric estimators of species richness, and compared diversity among eco-regions through "diversity profiles" and "effective number of species". Beta diversity was assessed by different methods such as the Morisita Index, nonmetric multidimentional scaling analysis, a multiple permutation procedure, and a Similarity Percentage analysis. We recorded 469 spp/morphospecies and recognized three arthropod orders (spiders, dipterans and hymenopterans) that are diverse and abundant in the Park. Besides, the diversity in Los Cardones National Park was found to be high, but it was observed higher in the High Andean Grassland of the Yungas, and lower in the Puna. The inventory obtained was good, reached up to the 81% of the species richness estimated by nonparametric estimators. Each eco-region of the park showed a very particular arthropod community that was tested by a multi-response permutation procedure. The species turnover between eco-regions was high, so that the different environments of the protected area are contributing to the maintenance of the regional diversity of arthropods in the park. The assemblages of arthropods belonging to the same eco-region sites showed greater similarity among themselves than with those of more distant sites. This represents the first attempt for biodiversity studies in these areas, but more evaluations are required to detail on the possible climate change and human impacts in the ecosystem. PMID:24432534

Belén Cava, Maria; Antonio Corronca, José; José Echeverría, Alejandro

2013-12-01

239

Infectious Diseases and the Immune System  

Science.gov (United States)

The lesson is design to explain the basic functions of the human immune system, including specific and nonspecific immune response, vaccines, and antibiotics. Primarily, it focuses on infectious diseases and how the immune system defend the body against infectious diseases. The lesson uses the 5E model as an approach for students to become engage, analytical and inquisitive in learning about infectious diseases and the immune system.

Cruz, Arnel D.

2012-06-28

240

Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: a review.  

Science.gov (United States)

The economic impact of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) warrants continued investigation of the mechanisms by which Moraxella bovis survives on and colonizes the corneal surface. Virulent strains of M bovis produce hemolysin and exhibit different plasmid profiles than nonvirulent strains. Interactions among host, environment, vector, season, and concurrent infection influence the prevalence of IBK. Mycoplasma sp. or infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus may enhance or hasten the disease process. The manifestations of IBK may range from mild conjunctivitis to severe ulceration, corneal perforation, and blindness. Treatment of IBK is dictated by economic considerations, intended animal use, and feasibility of administration. Antibiotic therapy is aimed at achieving drug concentrations in tears to meet or exceed the minimum inhibitory concentration for prolonged periods. At present, IBK is not a preventable disease. Affected animals must be separated from the herd and vector control vigorously instituted. Carrier animals must be identified and removed from the herd. Vaccination trials have been unsuccessful because of pili antigen cross-reactivity, variable strains, and uncontrolled environmental factors. Recent investigations have determined that M bovis may utilize host iron sources via iron-repressible outer membrane proteins and siderophores for growth. Elucidation of normal defense mechanisms of the bovine eye may lead to new strategies to enhance the immune response against M bovis. PMID:9686385

Brown, M H; Brightman, A H; Fenwick, B W; Rider, M A

1998-01-01

 
 
 
 
241

Cardiac imaging in infectious endocarditis  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Infectious endocarditis remains both a diagnostic and a treatment challenge. A positive outcome depends on a rapid diagnosis, accurate risk stratification, and a thorough follow-up. Imaging plays a key role in each of these steps and echocardiography remains the cornerstone of the methods in use. The technique of both transthoracic echocardiography and transoesophageal echocardiography has been markedly improved across the last decades and most recently three-dimensional real-time echocardiography has been introduced in the management of endocarditis patients. Echocardiography depicts structural changes and abnormalities in the heart, but it does not uncover the underlying pathophysiological processes at the cellular or molecular level. This problem is addressed with introduction of new molecular imaging methods as (18)F-fluorodesoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET-CT and single photon emission computed tomography fused with conventional CT (SPECT/CT). Of these methods, (18)F-FDG PET-CT carries the best promise for a future role in endocarditis. But there are distinct limitations with both SPECT/CT and (18)F-FDG PET-CT which should not be neglected. MRI and spiral CT are methods primarily used in the search for extra cardial infectious foci. A flowchart for the use of imaging in both left-sided and right-sided endocarditis is suggested.

Bruun, Niels Eske; Habib, Gilbert

2014-01-01

242

What Is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist?  

Science.gov (United States)

... on Twitter Growth Charts Immunization Schedules Newsletters Safety Checklists Symptom ... > Health Management - Medical Home > Pediatric Specialists > What is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist? ...

243

Interference of infectious bursal disease virus on antibody production against Newcastle disease and infectious bronchitis virus  

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This work has the objective of verifying the interference of infectious bursal disease virus in the antibody production against Newcastle disease virus and infectious bronchitis virus. The experiment was carried out with 640 day-old-chicks from a 42 weeks old hen flock. The birds were separated into eight experimental groups (n=80/group) and were submitted to different combinations of vaccinations, with live vaccines, to Newcastle disease, avian infectious bronchitis, and infectious bursal di...

2006-01-01

244

77 FR 76296 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Meetings  

Science.gov (United States)

...Allergy and Infectious Diseases Council: Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Subcommittee...Allergy and Infectious Diseases Council: Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Subcommittee...Allergy and Infectious Diseases Council: Microbiology and Infectious Diseases...

2012-12-27

245

Therapeutic vaccines against infectious diseases.  

Science.gov (United States)

Therapeutic vaccines against chronic infectious diseases aim at eliciting broad humoral and cellular immune responses against multiple target antigens. Importantly, the development of such vaccines will help to establish surrogate markers of protection in humans and thus will augment the subsequent development of efficient prophylactic vaccines. A combination of synthetic small-molecule drugs and immunotherapeutics is likely to represent a powerful means of controlling chronic infections in the future. Challenges faced in developing therapeutic vaccines include the following: first, overcoming the potential impairment of immune responses due to established infection; second, optimizing schedules of vaccine administration in combination with standard of care chemotherapy; and third, defining what biological and immunological read-outs should be used to infer vaccine efficacy. PMID:14572538

Moingeon, Philippe; Almond, Jeffrey; de Wilde, Michel

2003-10-01

246

Nonnative grass litter enhances grazing arthropod assemblages by increasing native shrub growth.  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent theory and research have highlighted how the brown (detritus-based) world may control the trophic structure of the green (grazing) world. Detritus can alter bottom-up control of green webs by affecting autotroph biomass and quality through its ability to alter ecosystem properties, including soil moisture and nutrient cycling. Additionally, the role of detritus as the food resource base of brown webs may subsidize omnivorous predators that can provide top-down control of green webs. Brown-green connections may be especially important following plant invasions, which often lead to increased detritus and altered food webs. I combine field experiments, observational data, and path analysis to understand how nonnative grasses impact native arthropod communities in a semiarid shrub system. Theory and correlative evidence predict that decreased shrub growth and nutritional quality, and increased feeding of detrital predators on the grazing web, would decrease the abundance of shrub arthropods. In contrast, I found nonnative litter increased shrub growth via increased soil moisture and produced a strong bottom-up increase of the grazing arthropod web; effects of detrital predators and plant quality were comparatively unimportant. I link these findings to the apparent lack of overlapping predators between the brown and green webs, and to the important abiotic role of litter in this xeric system, which increased native plants and the abundance and richness of arthropods on them. PMID:20426334

Wolkovich, Elizabeth M

2010-03-01

247

Cross-species transmission of honey bee viruses in associated arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

There are a number of RNA virus pathogens that represent a serious threat to the health of managed honey bees (Apis mellifera). That some of these viruses are also found in the broader pollinator community suggests the wider environmental spread of these viruses, with the potential for a broader impact on ecosystems. Studies on the ecology and evolution of these viruses in the arthropod community as a whole may therefore provide important insights into these potential impacts. We examined managed A. mellifera colonies, nearby non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators, and other associated arthropods for the presence of five commonly occurring picorna-like RNA viruses of honey bees - black queen cell virus, deformed wing virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus and sacbrood virus. Notably, we observed their presence in several arthropod species. Additionally, detection of negative-strand RNA using strand-specific RT-PCR assays for deformed wing virus and Israeli acute paralysis virus suggests active replication of deformed wing virus in at least six non-Apis species and active replication of Israeli acute paralysis virus in one non-Apis species. Phylogenetic analysis of deformed wing virus also revealed that this virus is freely disseminating across the species sampled in this study. In sum, our study indicates that these viruses are not specific to the pollinator community and that other arthropod species have the potential to be involved in disease transmission in pollinator populations. PMID:23845302

Levitt, Abby L; Singh, Rajwinder; Cox-Foster, Diana L; Rajotte, Edwin; Hoover, Kelli; Ostiguy, Nancy; Holmes, Edward C

2013-09-01

248

Responses of arthropod fauna assemblages to goat grazing management in northern Spanish heathlands.  

Science.gov (United States)

Changes in arthropod fauna assemblages after different goat grazing treatments (breeds and stocking rates) and responses to grazing cessation were studied in a heath-gorse shrubland located in northern Spain. Three treatments (low grazing pressure and high grazing pressure with Cashmere breed and high grazing pressure with local Celtiberic breed) with three replicates were randomly allocated to nine plots. Fauna data were collected three times per year during 3 grazing yr (2003, 2004, and 2005) and three times during 2007, i.e., 2 yr after grazing cessation. Arthropods were collected by 12 pitfall traps per plot, whereas vegetation cover and height were estimated by 100 random contacts per plot. Arthropod community composition was mostly affected by sampling year during the grazing period (between 2003 and 2005) but also between 2005 and 2007 (after cessation). Species composition differed between treatments, although the differences were not attributed to the stocking rates or to the goat breeds along those periods. Differences between treatments remained constant from 2003 to 2005 and between 2005 and 2007. Heather height explained most of the variance in arthropod species data during the last grazing year (2005), whereas heather cover was the most explanatory environmental variable 2 yr after grazing cessation (2007). Grazing effects still remained on both vegetation and fauna 2 yr after grazing cessation. PMID:19689876

Rosa García, Rocío; Jáuregui, Berta M; García, Urcesino; Osoro, Koldo; Celaya, Rafael

2009-08-01

249

Arthropod recolonization in the restoration of a semideciduous forest in southeastern Brazil  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The use of arthropods for monitoring habitat changes has grown widely in the last decades. In Brazil, however, most of the studies in restored areas have involved only vegetation changes. The present study aimed at investigating recolonization patterns of epigeic arthropods in recently restored site [...] s of semideciduous forests in southeastern Brazil. We compared the community structure of adjoining sites 5, 17, 29 and 36 months old with that at a nearby forest remnant (reference site). We also determined the most abundant species and looked for ecological indicator species of each site age. Arthropods were sampled using pitfall traps, and their assemblages were described and compared with multi- and univariate statistical methods. Species abundance and richness equivalent to the reference site were reached at five months after planting, however species composition was very distinctive not only in relation to the reference site, but also among restored sites. Some of the main species found in this restoration stage are common in agroecosystems or cerrado vegetation. Nevertheless, there was a clear trend of arthropod fauna in restored sites moving toward the fauna in the forest remnant over time. Our results also highlighted ants and termites because of their abundance and ants because of their high value as ecological indicators of restoration age.

Pais, Mara P; Varanda, Elenice M.

250

Expression of arthropod distal limb-patterning genes in the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis.  

Science.gov (United States)

A current hypothesis states that the ancestral limb of arthropods is composed of only two segments. The proximal segment represents the main part of the modern leg, and the distal segment represents the tarsus and claw of the modern leg. If the distal part of the limb is an ancestral feature, one would expect conserved regulatory gene networks acting in distal limb development in all arthropods and possibly even their sister group, the onychophorans. We investigated the expression patterns of six genes known to function during insect distal limb development in the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis, i.e., clawless (cll), aristaless (al), spineless (ss), zinc finger homeodomain 2 (zfh2), rotund (rn), and Lim1. We find that all investigated genes are expressed in at least some of the onychophoran limbs. The expression patterns of most of these genes, however, display crucial differences to the known insect patterns. The results of this study question the hypothesis of conserved distal limb evolution in arthropods and highlight the need for further studies on arthropod limb development. PMID:24519327

Oliveira, Marta Bastos; Liedholm, Simon Eckerström; Lopez, Jordi Estefa; Lochte, Annalena A; Pazio, Magdalena; Martin, Jesus Pena; Mörch, Patrik Rödin; Salakka, Seela; York, Julia; Yoshimoto, Andrew; Janssen, Ralf

2014-03-01

251

Arthropods, plants, and transmission lines in Arizona: secondary succession in a Sonoran Desert habitat  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Overall arthropod densities were low at this site, but the arthropod densities on the disturbed areas appeared to be enhanced after several years. No taxa were found to be statistically different in density between control and disturbed plots. Diversity decreased on the disturbed area after construction. Arthropod community similarity (C) was lower after construction, but C values appear to be related to presence or absence of annual herbs and grasses and not to total cover. Except for globe mallow, there were no pioneer plant species on the experimental plot. Effects of powerline construction on the experimental plant community were a brief reduction in total cover and a slight increase in cover of herbs and annual grasses. The 1976 and 1977 samples exhibit comparable cover values of these plants on both experimental and control plots. The dominant arthropod taxa on the experimental area (especially Thysanoptera, Cicadellidae, Coccinellidae, and Melyridae) appear to be responding numerically to the annual herbs and grasses which are becoming established on the plot.

Johnson, C.D.; Ditsworth, T.M.; Beley, J.R.

1981-09-01

252

Positional specification in the segmental growth pattern of an early arthropod.  

Science.gov (United States)

In many arthropods, there is a change in relative segment size during post-embryonic development, but how segment differential growth is produced is little known. A new dataset of the highest quality specimens of the 429 Myr old trilobite Aulacopleura koninckii provides an unparalleled opportunity to investigate segment growth dynamics and its control in an early arthropod. Morphometric analysis across nine post-embryonic stages revealed a growth gradient in the trunk of A. koninckii. We contrastively tested different growth models referable to two distinct hypotheses of growth control for the developing trunk: (i) a segment-specific control, with individual segments having differential autonomous growth progression, and (ii) a regional control, with segment growth depending on their relative position along the main axis. We show that the trunk growth pattern of A. koninckii was consistent with a regional growth control producing a continuous growth gradient that was stable across all developmental stages investigated. The specific posterior-to-anterior decaying shape of the growth gradient suggests it deriving from the linear transduction of a graded signal, similar to those commonly provided by morphogens. A growth control depending on a form of positional specification, possibly realized through the linear interpretation of a graded signal, may represent the primitive condition for arthropod differential growth along the main body axis, from which the diverse and generally more complex forms of growth control in subsequent arthropods have evolved. PMID:24573851

Fusco, Giuseppe; Hong, Paul S; Hughes, Nigel C

2014-04-22

253

Weeds as viable habitat for arthropod species in croplands of central Punjab  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Weeds are considered a limiting factor of crop production. Simultaneously, these non-crop plants are a portion of the agricultural ecosystem and play an essential role as viable habitat for many organisms, including bio-control agents. Utilizing the quadrate method, sugarcane, fodder, wheat and mustard croplands were sampled for one year to determine the weed flora and arthropods living among it. Twenty weed species and eight major arthropod orders were found to be present. The majority of the weed plants were broad-leaved, while some were grass-like. A review of literature on Central Punjab weeds uncovered depicted a considerable change in the weed flora over few decades. This could be related to the intensive and extensive farming in the area, which has this increased over the few decades along with the construction of an extensive irrigation canal system. These alterations may have caused drastic changes in the soil structure and climate of the region. Most of the phytophagous arthropod species used weed plants as food. In turn, these were fed upon by a few zoophagous arthropod species that also utilized the weeds for shelter and oviposition. Thus, weeds have a specific role within the agro-ecosystem by supporting local biodiversity. (author)

2011-01-01

254

Selected examples of dispersal of arthropods associated with agricultural crop and animal production  

Science.gov (United States)

The economic importance of arthropods in agricultural production systems and the possibilities of using dispersal behavior to develop and manipulate control are examined. Examples of long and short distance dispersal of economic insect pests and beneficial species from cool season host reservoirs and overwintering sites are presented. Significant dispersal of these species often occurring during crop and animal production is discussed.

Henneberry, T. J.

1979-01-01

255

Relationships between dead wood and arthropods in the Southeastern United States.  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The importance of dead wood to maintaining forest diversity is now widely recognized. However, the habitat associations and sensitivities of many species associated with dead wood remain unknown, making it difficult to develop conservation plans for managed forests. The purpose of this research, conducted on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina, was to better understand the relationships between dead wood and arthropods in the southeastern United States. In a comparison of forest types, more beetle species emerged from logs collected in upland pine-dominated stands than in bottomland hardwood forests. This difference was most pronounced for Quercus nigra L., a species of tree uncommon in upland forests. In a comparison of wood postures, more beetle species emerged from logs than from snags, but a number of species appear to be dependent on snags including several canopy specialists. In a study of saproxylic beetle succession, species richness peaked within the first year of death and declined steadily thereafter. However, a number of species appear to be dependent on highly decayed logs, underscoring the importance of protecting wood at all stages of decay. In a study comparing litter-dwelling arthropod abundance at different distances from dead wood, arthropods were more abundant near dead wood than away from it. In another study, grounddwelling arthropods and saproxylic beetles were little affected by large-scale manipulations of dead wood in upland pine-dominated forests, possibly due to the suitability of the forests surrounding the plots.

Ulyshen, Michael, Darragh

2009-05-01

256

Isolation of Bartonella schoenbuchensis from Lipoptena cervi, a Blood-Sucking Arthropod Causing Deer Ked Dermatitis  

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Bartonella schoenbuchensis, which commonly causes bacteremia in ruminants, was isolated from the deer ked Lipoptena cervi and was shown to localize to the midgut of this blood-sucking arthropod, causing deer ked dermatitis in humans. The role of B. schoenbuchensis in the etiology of deer ked dermatitis should be further investigated.

Dehio, Christoph; Sauder, Ursula; Hiestand, Rosemarie

2004-01-01

257

Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.  

Science.gov (United States)

We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. PMID:25024856

To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

2014-01-01

258

Solving the problems of infectious waste disposal  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Lawmakers are increasing pressures to ensure safe, appropriate disposal of infectious waste. This article discusses the problems, the regulatory climate, innovative approaches, and how to pay for them. The paper discusses the regulatory definition of infectious waste, federal and state regulations, and project finance.

Hoffman, S.L.; Cabral, N.J. (Nixon, Hargrave, Devans and Doyle, Washington, DC (USA))

1989-06-01

259

The colonization of land by animals: molecular phylogeny and divergence times among arthropods  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The earliest fossil evidence of terrestrial animal activity is from the Ordovician, ~450 million years ago (Ma. However, there are earlier animal fossils, and most molecular clocks suggest a deep origin of animal phyla in the Precambrian, leaving open the possibility that animals colonized land much earlier than the Ordovician. To further investigate the time of colonization of land by animals, we sequenced two nuclear genes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and enolase, in representative arthropods and conducted phylogenetic and molecular clock analyses of those and other available DNA and protein sequence data. To assess the robustness of animal molecular clocks, we estimated the deuterostome-arthropod divergence using the arthropod fossil record for calibration and tunicate instead of vertebrate sequences to represent Deuterostomia. Nine nuclear and 15 mitochondrial genes were used in phylogenetic analyses and 61 genes were used in molecular clock analyses. Results Significant support was found for the unconventional pairing of myriapods (millipedes and centipedes with chelicerates (spiders, scorpions, horseshoe crabs, etc. using nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Our estimated time for the divergence of millipedes (Diplopoda and centipedes (Chilopoda was 442 ± 50 Ma, and the divergence of insects and crustaceans was estimated as 666 ± 58 Ma. Our results also agree with previous studies suggesting a deep divergence (~1100 – 900 Ma for arthropods and deuterostomes, considerably predating the Cambrian Explosion seen in the animal fossil record. Conclusions The consistent support for a close relationship between myriapods and chelicerates, using mitochondrial and nuclear genes and different methods of analysis, suggests that this unexpected result is not an artefact of analysis. We propose the name Myriochelata for this group of animals, which includes many that immobilize prey with venom. Our molecular clock analyses using arthropod fossil calibrations support earlier studies using vertebrate calibrations in finding that deuterostomes and arthropods diverged hundreds of millions of years before the Cambrian explosion. However, our molecular time estimate for the divergence of millipedes and centipedes is close to the divergence time inferred from fossils. This suggests that arthropods may have adapted to the terrestrial environment relatively late in their evolutionary history.

Lyons-Weiler Maureen

2004-01-01

260

Complex responses to invasive grass litter by ground arthropods in a Mediterranean scrub ecosystem.  

Science.gov (United States)

Plant invasions have tremendous potential to alter food webs by changing basal resources. Recent studies document how plant invasions may contribute to increased arthropod abundances in detritus-based food webs. An obvious mechanism for this phenomenon-a bottom-up effect resulting from elevated levels of detritus from the invasive plant litter-has not been explicitly studied. We examined the effects of an annual grass invasion on ground arthropod assemblages in the coastal sage scrub (CSS) of southern California. Bottom-up food web theory predicts that the addition of detritus would increase generalist-feeding arthropods at all trophic levels; accordingly, we expected increases in fungi, Collembola, and common predators such as mites and spiders. For the common ant taxa, habitat alteration may also be important for predicting responses. Thus we expected that Forelius mccooki and Pheidole vistana, the most common ant species, would decline because of changes in soil temperature (F. mccooki) and habitat structure (P. vistana) associated with litter. We studied trends observationally and conducted a 3-year experiment in which we manipulated litter quantity. In contrast to other published studies, most detritus-based arthropod taxa declined in areas of high grass invasion, and, within trophic levels, responses often varied idiosyncratically. For the two most common taxa, a native ant (F. mccooki), and predatory mites in the Anystidae, we experimentally linked declines in abundance to increased levels of invasive grass litter. Such declines, especially those exhibited by the most common ant taxa, could have cascading effects on the CSS ecosystem, where ants are numerically dominant and thus may have broad influences on food web and ecosystem properties. Our results highlight that accurately predicting arthropod responses to invasive plant litter requires careful consideration of the structural and food resources provided by detritus to each particular food web. PMID:19669165

Wolkovich, Elizabeth Mary; Bolger, Douglas T; Holway, David A

2009-10-01

 
 
 
 
261

Interference of infectious bursal disease virus on antibody production against Newcastle disease and infectious bronchitis virus  

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Full Text Available This work has the objective of verifying the interference of infectious bursal disease virus in the antibody production against Newcastle disease virus and infectious bronchitis virus. The experiment was carried out with 640 day-old-chicks from a 42 weeks old hen flock. The birds were separated into eight experimental groups (n=80/group and were submitted to different combinations of vaccinations, with live vaccines, to Newcastle disease, avian infectious bronchitis, and infectious bursal disease with diverse combinations of days of vaccination. We verified that the utilization of polyvalent vaccinal programs have a different efficacy comparing to monovalent vaccinations when Newcastle disease, infectious bronchitis, and infectious bursal disease vaccinations are applied. This way, the use of vaccinations to infectious bursal disease in polyvalent vaccinal programs is desirable due to improvement of NDV response with the presence of IBV by the probable reduction of interference of IBV under NDV.

WM Cardoso

2006-09-01

262

Interference of infectious bursal disease virus on antibody production against Newcastle disease and infectious bronchitis virus  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english This work has the objective of verifying the interference of infectious bursal disease virus in the antibody production against Newcastle disease virus and infectious bronchitis virus. The experiment was carried out with 640 day-old-chicks from a 42 weeks old hen flock. The birds were separated into [...] eight experimental groups (n=80/group) and were submitted to different combinations of vaccinations, with live vaccines, to Newcastle disease, avian infectious bronchitis, and infectious bursal disease with diverse combinations of days of vaccination. We verified that the utilization of polyvalent vaccinal programs have a different efficacy comparing to monovalent vaccinations when Newcastle disease, infectious bronchitis, and infectious bursal disease vaccinations are applied. This way, the use of vaccinations to infectious bursal disease in polyvalent vaccinal programs is desirable due to improvement of NDV response with the presence of IBV by the probable reduction of interference of IBV under NDV.

WM, Cardoso; JLC, Aguiar Filho; JM, Romão; RPR, Salles; SR, Câmara; AA, Siqueira; WF, Oliveira; MHNR, Sobral; RSC, Texeira.

263

DMPD: LPS, TLR4 and infectious disease diversity.  

Full Text Available 15608698 LPS, TLR4 and infectious disease diversity. Miller SI, Ernst RK, Bader MW. Nat Rev Micr nd infectious disease diversity. PubmedID 15608698 Title LPS, TLR4 and infectious disease diversity. Author

264

Transmission Dynamics of Borrelia turicatae from the Arthropod Vector  

Science.gov (United States)

Background With the global distribution, morbidity, and mortality associated with tick and louse-borne relapsing fever spirochetes, it is important to understand the dynamics of vector colonization by the bacteria and transmission to the host. Tick-borne relapsing fever spirochetes are blood-borne pathogens transmitted through the saliva of soft ticks, yet little is known about the transmission capability of these pathogens during the relatively short bloodmeal. This study was therefore initiated to understand the transmission dynamics of the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia turicatae from the vector Ornithodoros turicata, and the subsequent dissemination of the bacteria upon entry into murine blood. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the minimum number of ticks required to transmit spirochetes, one to three infected O. turicata were allowed to feed to repletion on individual mice. Murine infection and dissemination of the spirochetes was evaluated by dark field microscopy of blood, quantitative PCR, and immunoblotting against B. turicatae protein lysates and a recombinant antigen, the Borrelia immunogenic protein A. Transmission frequencies were also determined by interrupting the bloodmeal 15 seconds after tick attachment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed on infected salivary glands to detect spirochetes within acini lumen and excretory ducts. Furthermore, spirochete colonization and dissemination from the bite site was investigated by feeding infected O. turicata on the ears of mice, removing the attachment site after engorment, and evaluating murine infection. Conclusion/Significance Our findings demonstrated that three ticks provided a sufficient infectious dose to infect nearly all animals, and B. turicatae was transmitted within seconds of tick attachment. Spirochetes were also detected in acini lumen of salivary glands by SEM. Upon host entry, B. turicatae did not require colonization of the bite site to establish murine infection. These results suggest that once B. turicatae colonizes the salivary glands the spirochetes are preadapted for rapid entry into the mammal.

Boyle, William K.; Wilder, Hannah K.; Lawrence, Amanda M.; Lopez, Job E.

2014-01-01

265

Infectious mononucleosis in Turkish children.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to analyze the demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics and prognoses of children diagnosed with infectious mononucleosis (IM). The demographic features, referral complaints, clinical and laboratory findings, follow-up, and prognoses of 44 patients diagnosed with IM between January 2000 and June 2006 at the Infectious Diseases Department of Hacettepe University Ihsan Do?ramaci Children's Hospital were analyzed retrospectively. The children suspected of IM based on clinical findings and whose diagnoses were proven by serological tests were enrolled in the study. In addition, the patients were divided into four groups -namely, age 0-4, age 5-8, age 9-12 and age 13-16, and the differences among groups were investigated in terms of their clinical and laboratory findings. The patients were aged between 3 months and 16 years. The median age was 4, and 56.8% of patients were below age 5. The male/female ratio was 1.6. No statistically significant variation was observed in the seasonal distribution of patients (p = 0.131). The most common referral complaints were swollen cervical lymph nodes or swollen neck (68.1%), followed by fever (43.1%) and sore throat (25%). Lymphadenopathy (79.5%), tonsillopharyngitis (72.7%), splenomegaly (34%), and hepatomegaly (25%) were the most common physical examination findings. Leukocyte count was normal in 68.3% of the cases. Leukocytosis was detected in 29.5% of the patients, and leukopenia in 2.2%. Lymphocytosis was detected in 44.7% of patients. Downey cell was detected in the peripheral blood smear of 23.6% of patients, and thrombocytopenia in 11.3%. Elevated alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were detected in 61.9% and 90.4% of patients who were investigated for these parameters, respectively. The clinical, hematological and biochemical findings of patients did not vary significantly among age groups (p > 0.05). Only one complication (hemophagocytic syndrome) was observed in one patient. PMID:20718181

Cengiz, Ali Bülent; Cultu-Kantaro?lu, Oge; Seçmeer, Gülten; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Kara, Ate?; Gürgey, Aytemiz

2010-01-01

266

Characteristics of Hodgkin's lymphoma after infectious mononucleosis.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has been associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma in young adults. Whether the association is causal remains unclear. METHODS: We compared the incidence rates of Hodgkin's lymphoma in two population-based Danish cohorts of patients who were tested for infectious mononucleosis: 17,045 with serologic evidence of having had acute EBV infection, and 24,614 with no such evidence. We combined the cohort of patients who had serologically verified infectious mononucleosis with a cohort of 21,510 Swedish patients with infectious mononucleosis (combined total, 38,555). Biopsy specimens of Hodgkin's lymphomas occurring during follow-up in this combined cohort were tested serologically for the presence of EBV. Using this information, we modeled the relative risk of EBV-negative and EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma in different periods after the diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis and estimated the median incubation time for mononucleosis-related EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma. RESULTS: Only serologically confirmed infectious mononucleosis was associated with a persistently increased risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma. Sixteen of 29 tumors (55 percent), obtained from patients with infectious mononucleosis, had evidence of EBV. There was no evidence of an increased risk of EBV-negative Hodgkin's lymphoma after infectious mononucleosis. In contrast, the risk of EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma was significantly increased (relative risk, 4.0; 95 percent confidence interval, 3.4 to 4.5). The estimated median incubation time from mononucleosis to EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma was 4.1 years (95 percent confidence interval, 1.8 to 8.3). CONCLUSIONS: A causal association between infectious mononucleosis-related EBV infection and the EBV-positive subgroup of Hodgkin's lymphomas is likely in young adults. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Oct-2

Hjalgrim, Henrik; Askling, Johan

2003-01-01

267

Infectious Disease Transmission during Transfusion and Transplantation  

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

Dr. Matthew Kuehnert, Director of the Office of Blood, Organ, and Other Tissue Safety, discusses infections in transplants.  Created: 8/13/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/15/2012.

2012-08-13

268

Infectious mononucleosis presenting as bilateral acute dacryocystitis.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A case of infectious mononucleosis presenting as bilateral acute dacryocystitis in a 7-year-old girl is reported. Acute dacryocystitis is uncommon in this age group, and an underlying systemic illness should be suspected particularly when it is bilateral.

Atkinson, P. L.; Ansons, A. M.; Patterson, A.

1990-01-01

269

Infectious Mononucleosis: Recognition and Management in Athletes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Infectious mononucleosis strikes many young athletes. Considered here are its epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, natural course, complications, and management. The focus is on concerns of athletes with a perspective on personality, convalescence, and chronic fatigue. (Author/MT)

Eichner, Edward R.

1987-01-01

270

Characteristics of Hodgkin's lymphoma after infectious mononucleosis  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Infectious mononucleosis-related Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has been associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma in young adults. Whether the association is causal remains unclear.

Hjalgrim, Henrik; Askling, Johan

2003-01-01

271

Infectious Agents Associated with Cylindrical Bronchiectasis.  

Science.gov (United States)

In view of a relatively high incidence of cylindrical bronchiectasis as a complication of bronchopneumonias in Naval recuits, a study was undertaken on the infectious agents associated with this form of bronchiectasis. Isolation data from specimens obtain...

M. W. Rytel G. H. Conners C. C. Welch W. H. Kraybill E. A. Edwards

1964-01-01

272

Infectious diseases and interpersonal trust: international evidence  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate the relationship between infectious disease and trust, hypothesizing a negative relationship. In- terpersonal trust is defined as the aggregate response that fellow citizens are trustworthy. We explore stigma as a channel in the relationship. We apply cross-country regression analysis on a sample of 54 countries. We test our hypothesis using data on selected infectious diseases from the World Health Statistics (WHS published by the World Health Organization (WHO and data on trust from the World Values Surveys (WVS. We create an index of infectious disease using factor analysis. The OLS regression equation includes control variables of income inequality, per capita income and human capital. The empirical results are considerably robust showing that higher cases of infectious diseases are negatively associated with trust when controlling for macroeconomic and social variables.

Diego Gonzalez-Medina

2011-04-01

273

Appendage development and early Distal-less regulation in arthropods: A study of the chelicerate Tetranychus urticae (Acarida)  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A major goal of evolutionary developmental biology is to explore mechanisms and events underlying evolution of the myriad body plan morphologies expressed both genetically and phenotypically within the animal kingdom. Arthropods exhibit an astounding array of morphological diversity both within and between representative sub-phyla, thus providing an ideal phylum through which to address questions of body plan innovation and diversification. Major arthropod groups are recognised and defined by...

Cyrus-kent, Chloe?

2007-01-01

274

Monitoring arthropods in a tropical landscape : relative effects of sampling methods and habitat types on trap catches  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

To discuss the challenge of monitoring multi-species responses of tropical arthropods to disturbance, we considered a large dataset (4 × 105 individuals; 1,682 morphospecies representing 22 focal taxa) based on the work of parataxonomists to examine the effects of anthropogenic disturbance on arthropods at Gamba, Gabon. Replication included three sites in each of four different stages of forest succession and land use after logging, surveyed during a whole year with four sampling methods: pi...

Missa, Olivier; Basset, Yves; Alonso, Alfonso; Miller, Scott E.; Curletti, Gianfranco; Meyer, Marc; Eardley, Connal; Mansell, Mervyn W.; Wagner, Thomas

2008-01-01

275

A conserved mode of head segmentation in arthropods revealed by the expression pattern of Hox genes in a spider  

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Chelicerates constitute a basic arthropod group with fossil representatives from as early as the Cambrian period. Embryonic development and the subdivision of the segmented body region into a prosoma and an opisthosoma are very similar in all extant chelicerates. The mode of head segmentation, however, has long been controversial. Although all other arthropod groups show a subdivision of the head region into six segments, the chelicerates are thought to have the first antennal segment missing...

Damen, Wim G. M.; Hausdorf, Monika; Seyfarth, Ernst-august; Tautz, Diethard

1998-01-01

276

Diagnosing Infectious Mononucleosis: Avoiding the Pitfalls  

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Infectious mononucleosis may be diagnosed with confidence only when Hoagland's diagnostic criteria have been met. The illness must be compatible with the known clinical features of infectious mononucleosis; there should be absolute and relative lymphocytosis on differential white cell count; there should be more than 20% atypical lymphocytes and serological tests should be positive—either a Paul-Bunnell Davidsohn or a rapid slide test for heterophil antibody. Failure to diagnose this common...

Mcsherry, J. A.

1985-01-01

277

Infectious agents are associated with psychiatric diseases  

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There are several infectious agents in the environment that can cause persistent infections in the host. They usually cause their symptoms shortly after first infection and later persist as silent viruses and bacteria within the body. However, these chronic infections may play an important role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and Tourette’s syndrome (TS). We investigated the distribution of different neurotrophic infectious agents in TS, schizophrenia and controls. A total of 93 indivi...

Daniela Lydia Krause; Elif Weidinger; Judith Matz; Agnes Wildenauer; Jenny Katharina Wagner; Michael Obermeier; Michael Riedel; Hans-Jürgen Möller; Norbert Müller

2012-01-01

278

Infectious complications of dialysis access devices.  

Science.gov (United States)

Infectious complications remain a major source of morbidity and mortality for patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis. The majority of these complications are related to dialysis access devices, and as such represent a potentially modifiable risk factor. This article reviews the important infectious complications associated with dialysis access, including both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. The discussion highlights the epidemiology, management, and prevention of dialysis access infections. PMID:22284380

Bagdasarian, Natasha; Heung, Michael; Malani, Preeti N

2012-03-01

279

INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA  

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Infectious complications have been known to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CLL patients who are predisposed to infections because of both the humoral immunodepression inherent to hematologic disease, which is related to stage and duration of CLL, and to further immunosuppression related to therapy. The majority of infections in CLL patients treated with alkilating agents is of bacterial origin. The immunodeficiency and natural infectious history of alkylator-resistant...

AnnaMaria Nosari

2012-01-01

280

Non-structural proteins of arthropod-borne bunyaviruses: roles and functions.  

Science.gov (United States)

Viruses within the Bunyaviridae family are tri-segmented, negative-stranded RNA viruses. The family includes several emerging and re-emerging viruses of humans, animals and plants, such as Rift Valley fever virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, La Crosse virus, Schmallenberg virus and tomato spotted wilt virus. Many bunyaviruses are arthropod-borne, so-called arboviruses. Depending on the genus, bunyaviruses encode, in addition to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and the different structural proteins, one or several non-structural proteins. These non-structural proteins are not always essential for virus growth and replication but can play an important role in viral pathogenesis through their interaction with the host innate immune system. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge and understanding of insect-borne bunyavirus non-structural protein function(s) in vertebrate, plant and arthropod. PMID:24100888

Eifan, Saleh; Schnettler, Esther; Dietrich, Isabelle; Kohl, Alain; Blomström, Anne-Lie

2013-10-01

 
 
 
 
281

Non-Structural Proteins of Arthropod-Borne Bunyaviruses: Roles and Functions  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Viruses within the Bunyaviridae family are tri-segmented, negative-stranded RNA viruses. The family includes several emerging and re-emerging viruses of humans, animals and plants, such as Rift Valley fever virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, La Crosse virus, Schmallenberg virus and tomato spotted wilt virus. Many bunyaviruses are arthropod-borne, so-called arboviruses. Depending on the genus, bunyaviruses encode, in addition to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and the different structural proteins, one or several non-structural proteins. These non-structural proteins are not always essential for virus growth and replication but can play an important role in viral pathogenesis through their interaction with the host innate immune system. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge and understanding of insect-borne bunyavirus non-structural protein function(s in vertebrate, plant and arthropod.

Alain Kohl

2013-10-01

282

Cysteine-Free Proteins in the Immunobiology of Arthropod-Borne Diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available One approach to identify epitopes that could be used in the design of vaccines to control several arthropod-borne diseases simultaneously is to look for common structural features in the secretome of the pathogens that cause them. Using a novel bioinformatics technique, cysteine-abundance and distribution analysis, we found that many different proteins secreted by several arthropod-borne pathogens, including Plasmodium falciparum, Borrelia burgdorferi, and eight species of Proteobacteria, are devoid of cysteine residues. The identification of three cysteine-abundance and distribution patterns in several families of proteins secreted by pathogenic and nonpathogenic Proteobacteria, and not found when the amino acid analyzed was tryptophan, provides evidence of forces restricting the content of cysteine residues in microbial proteins during evolution. We discuss these findings in the context of protein structure and function, antigenicity and immunogenicity, and host-parasite relationships.

J. Santiago Mejia

2010-01-01

283

The Increase of Arthropods Biodiversity in Paddy Field Ecosystem Managed by Using Integrated Pest Management at South Borneo  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We have studied the arthropods biodiversity in two paddy field ecosystems, namely, paddy field ecosystem using Integrated Pest Management (IPM system and non-IPM paddy field ecosystem. This study was conducted from April 2011 – November 2011 in three locations, that is, Pasar Kamis village and Sungai Rangas village in Banjar regency, and Guntung Payung village in Banjarbaru city, South Borneo Province. In this study, we used insect nets, yellow sticky traps, light trap and pitfall trap to get the sample or catch the arthropods in one period of planting season. The arthropods caught were then classified into some classes: pest (herbivore, natural enemy (parasitoid and predator, and other arthropods. After that, the Species Diversity Index was determined using its Shannon-Wiener Index (H’, Evenness (e, Species Richness (R, and Species Similarity Index (IS. The sum of arthropods which have the characteristic of pest and parasitoid were higher in the IPM paddy fields than in the non-IPM paddy fields, and the sum of other arthropods were the same. The highest H’ and e values were in the IPM paddy field in Pasar Kamis village. The IS value for each three locations were 77.5% in Pasar Kamis village, 93.42% in Guntung Payung village, and 78.76% in Sungai Rangas village.

Samharinto

2012-12-01

284

Diversity and Community Structure of Aquatic Arthropods in an Irrigated Rice Ecosystem of Tamil Nadu, India  

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Inventory, diversity and community structure of aquatic arthropods between weeded and partially weeded rice ecosystems were studied in a field experiment under irrigated condition during Rabi, 2000. The research revealed that a total of 12, 2, 6 and 3 species of Odonata, Ephemeroptera, Hemiptera and Coleoptera aquatic insects were recorded, respectively. Agriocnemis femina femina Brauer of damselfly, Pantala flavescens (Fabricius), Crocothemis servilia (Drury) and Dipl...

Kandibane, M.; Raguraman, S.; Mahadevan, N. R.

2007-01-01

285

DNA barcoding for effective biodiversity assessment of a hyperdiverse arthropod group: the ants of Madagascar  

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The role of DNA barcoding as a tool to accelerate the inventory and analysis of diversity for hyperdiverse arthropods is tested using ants in Madagascar. We demonstrate how DNA barcoding helps address the failure of current inventory methods to rapidly respond to pressing biodiversity needs, specifically in the assessment of richness and turnover across landscapes with hyperdiverse taxa. In a comparison of inventories at four localities in northern Madagascar, patterns of richness were not si...

2005-01-01

286

Arthropod gut symbionts from the Balearic Islands: Majorca and Cabrera. Diversity and biogeography  

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This study includes a catalogue with all the current data concerning the presence of trichomycetes (sensu lato) in Majorca and Cabrera, as well as information on the biology, ecology and biogeographic implications of the insularity for each taxon of these arthropod-gut symbionts. Of the 13 species here reported, 10 are new for the Balearic Islands, including 4 Mesomycetozoan, of which 3 Eccrinales (Astreptonema gammari, Eccrinidus flexilis, Parataeniella dilatata&l...

Gua?rdia Valle, Laia; Santamaria, Sergi

2009-01-01

287

Estimating ecotoxicological effects of pesticide drift on nontarget arthropods in field hedgerows.  

Science.gov (United States)

When hedgerows grow in orchards where pesticides are applied, they can play a double role: Providing a barrier for chemical spray drift and as a refuge for beneficial arthropods such as pollinators and predators. Effectiveness of hedgerows as barriers to drift depends mainly on canopy density (that can be estimated through optical porosity) and wind speed. When optical porosity is low, the hedgerow can intercept a significant amount of spray drift and act as an effective barrier, but the intercepted pesticide can negatively affect the beneficial arthropods living there. A drift model was used to simulate drift in a hedgerow- vineyard system, and a deposition distribution model was used to calculate the pesticide spatial pattern distribution on a hedgerow with different optical porosity and wind speed conditions. The possible ecotoxicological effects were estimated for 28 active ingredients with different median lethal rates for two nontarget arthropods, Aphidius rhopalosiphi and Typhlodromus pyri. A spatialized risk assessment for a hedgerow is suggested to improve procedures based on application rate, standard drift, and vegetation distribution values, as in the hazard quotient approach. An alternative method for calculation of the exposure is also proposed, with a step-by-step example of a toxicity/exposure ratio calculation. The results highlighted the importance of the spatial pattern of drift and proved that a hedgerow can be an effective barrier against spray drift. Analysis of the toxicity/exposure ratio values showed that a hedgerow can continue its shelter and feeding function for nontarget arthropods when low-toxicity pesticides are used, there is no significant wind interference, or both. PMID:19391688

Otto, Stefan; Lazzaro, Luca; Finizio, Antonio; Zanin, Giuseppe

2009-04-01

288

Structure and mechanism in salivary proteins from blood-feeding arthropods  

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The saliva of blood-feeding arthropods contains rich mixtures of ligand binding proteins targeted at inhibiting hemostasis and inflammation in the host. Since blood feeding has evolved many times, different taxonomic groups utilize completely different families of proteins to perform similar tasks. Structural studies performed on a number of these proteins have revealed biologically novel and sophisticated mechanisms used to perform their functions. Here, the results of these structural and m...

Andersen, John F.

2010-01-01

289

Effects of Vegetated Field Borders on Arthropods in Cotton Fields in Eastern North Carolina  

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The influence, if any, of 5m wide, feral, herbaceous field borders on pest and beneficial arthropods in commercial cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (L.) (Malvales: Malvaceae), fields was measured through a variety of sampling techniques over three years. In each year, 5 fields with managed, feral vegetation borders and five fields without such borders were examined. Sampling was stratified from the field border or edge in each field in an attempt to elucidate any edge effects that might have occurr...

Outward, Randy; Sorenson, Clyde E.; Bradley, J. R.

2008-01-01

290

Avirulence Effector Discovery in a Plant Galling and Plant Parasitic Arthropod, the Hessian Fly (Mayetiola destructor)  

Science.gov (United States)

Highly specialized obligate plant-parasites exist within several groups of arthropods (insects and mites). Many of these are important pests, but the molecular basis of their parasitism and its evolution are poorly understood. One hypothesis is that plant parasitic arthropods use effector proteins to defeat basal plant immunity and modulate plant growth. Because avirulence (Avr) gene discovery is a reliable method of effector identification, we tested this hypothesis using high-resolution molecular genetic mapping of an Avr gene (vH13) in the Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor), an important gall midge pest of wheat (Triticum spp.). Chromosome walking resolved the position of vH13, and revealed alleles that determine whether HF larvae are virulent (survive) or avirulent (die) on wheat seedlings carrying the wheat H13 resistance gene. Association mapping found three independent insertions in vH13 that appear to be responsible for H13-virulence in field populations. We observed vH13 transcription in H13-avirulent larvae and the salivary glands of H13-avirulent larvae, but not in H13-virulent larvae. RNA-interference-knockdown of vH13 transcripts allowed some H13-avirulent larvae to escape H13-directed resistance. vH13 is the first Avr gene identified in an arthropod. It encodes a small modular protein with no sequence similarities to other proteins in GenBank. These data clearly support the hypothesis that an effector-based strategy has evolved in multiple lineages of plant parasites, including arthropods.

Aggarwal, Rajat; Subramanyam, Subhashree; Zhao, Chaoyang; Chen, Ming-Shun; Harris, Marion O.; Stuart, Jeff J.

2014-01-01

291

Non-structural proteins of arthropod-borne bunyaviruses: roles and functions  

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Viruses within the Bunyaviridae family are tri-segmented, negative-stranded RNA viruses. The family includes several emerging and re-emerging viruses of humans, animals and plants, such as Rift Valley fever virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, La Crosse virus, Schmallenberg virus and tomato spotted wilt virus. Many bunyaviruses are arthropod-borne, so-called arboviruses. Depending on the genus, bunyaviruses encode, in addition to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and the different str...

2013-01-01

292

Non-Structural Proteins of Arthropod-Borne Bunyaviruses: Roles and Functions  

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Viruses within the Bunyaviridae family are tri-segmented, negative-stranded RNA viruses. The family includes several emerging and re-emerging viruses of humans, animals and plants, such as Rift Valley fever virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, La Crosse virus, Schmallenberg virus and tomato spotted wilt virus. Many bunyaviruses are arthropod-borne, so-called arboviruses. Depending on the genus, bunyaviruses encode, in addition to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and the different str...

2013-01-01

293

Correlating Traits of Gene Retention, Sequence Divergence, Duplicability and Essentiality in Vertebrates, Arthropods, and Fungi  

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Delineating ancestral gene relations among a large set of sequenced eukaryotic genomes allowed us to rigorously examine links between evolutionary and functional traits. We classified 86% of over 1.36 million protein-coding genes from 40 vertebrates, 23 arthropods, and 32 fungi into orthologous groups and linked over 90% of them to Gene Ontology or InterPro annotations. Quantifying properties of ortholog phyletic retention, copy-number variation, and sequence conservation, we examined correla...

Waterhouse, Robert M.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Kriventseva, Evgenia V.

2011-01-01

294

Alp, an Arthropod-Associated Outer Membrane Protein of Borrelia Species That Cause Relapsing Fever  

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Borrelia hermsii and other relapsing fever (RF) species are noted for their highly polymorphic surface antigens, the variable major proteins (VMP). Less is known about other surface proteins of these pathogens in either their vertebrate reservoirs or arthropod vectors. To further characterize these proteins, we elicited antibodies against VMP-less cells, noted antibody reactions against whole cells and cell components, and then subjected selected antigens to mass spectroscopy for amino acid s...

Marcsisin, Renee A.; Campeau, Shelley A.; Lopez, Job E.; Barbour, Alan G.

2012-01-01

295

Effects of nickel hyperaccumulation in Alyssum pintodasilvae on model arthropods representatives of two trophic levels  

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Abstract An experimental assessment of the defence hypothesis of nickel (Ni) hyperaccumulation in Alyssum was lacking. Also, to date no study had investigated the effects of hyperaccumulator litter on a detritivore species. We performed several experiments with model arthropods representatives of two trophic levels: Tribolium castaneum (herbivore) and Porcellio dilatatus (detritivore). In no-choice trials using artificial food disks with different Ni concentrations, T. castaneum fed signific...

Gonc?alves, M.; Gonc?alves, Susana; Portugal, Anto?nio; Silva, Sandra; Sousa, Jose?; Freitas, Helena

2007-01-01

296

Observations on medically important arthropods in Brazil Algumas considerações sobre artrópodes de interesse clínico no Brasil  

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A brief review of some medically important arthropods in Brazil is presented. It is sufficient to show that we must expand our training of biologists in this field if endemic diseases are to be controlled in the next decade.O autor faz uma breve revisão de alguns artrópodes de interesse clínico no Brasil. É suficiente demonstrar que é necessário expandir os programas de capacitação de biólogos nesse campo para poder controlar as doenças endêmicas durante a próxima década.

Marsden, Philip D.

1993-01-01

297

Single-minded and the evolution of the ventral midline in arthropods.  

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In insects and crustaceans, ventral midline cells are present that subdivide the CNS into bilateral symmetric halves. In both arthropod groups unpaired midline neurons and glial cells have been identified that contribute to the embryonic patterning mechanisms. In the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, for example, the midline cells are involved in neural cell fate specification along the dorso-ventral axis but also in axonal pathfinding and organisation of the axonal scaffold. Both in insects and malacostracan crustaceans, the bHLH-PAS transcription factor single-minded is the master regulator of ventral midline development and homology has been suggested for individual midline precursors in these groups. The conserved arrangement of the axonal scaffold as well as the regular pattern of neural precursors in all euarthropod groups raises the question whether the ventral midline system is conserved in this phylum. In the remaining euarthropod groups, the chelicerates and myriapods, a single-minded homologue has been identified in the spider Achaearanea tepidariorum (chelicerate), however, the gene is not expressed in the ventral midline but in the median area of the ventral neuroectoderm. Here we show that At-sim is not required for ventral midline development. Furthermore, we identify sim homologues in representatives of arthropods that have not yet been analysed: the myriapod Strigamia maritima and a representative of an outgroup to the euarthropods, the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis. We compare the expression patterns to the A. tepidariorum sim homologue expression and furthermore analyse the nature of the arthropod midline cells. Our data suggest that in arthropods unpaired midline precursors evolved from the bilateral median domain of the ventral neuroectoderm in the last common ancestor of Mandibulata (insects, crustaceans, myriapods). We hypothesize that sim was expressed in this domain and recruited to ventral midline development. Subsequently, sim function has evolved in parallel to the evolution of midline cell function in the individual Mandibulata lineages. PMID:22306923

Linne, Viktoria; Eriksson, Bo Joakim; Stollewerk, Angelika

2012-04-01

298

Impact of Pesticide Treatment on an Arthropod Community in the Korean Rice Ecosystem  

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An arthropod community in a rice ecosystem was surveyed to determine the impact of twoinsecticides frequently used in Korean rice ecosystems: carbofuran 3GR, which targets the rice water weevil,Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the early season and fenobucarb EC, whichtargets the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) in the mid- and lateseasons, respectively. Overall, the application of the insecticides reduced density of total a...

2009-01-01

299

A new arthropod from the Silurian Konservat-Lagerstätte of Herefordshire, UK.  

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A small, non-biomineralized, macrophagous arthropod with chelicerate affinities, Offacolus kingi gen. et sp. nov., from the Silurian (Wenlock Series) of Herefordshire, UK, is described. The dorsal exoskeleton comprises an arch-like cephalic shield, a thorax of three free tergites and a triangular posterior tagma of five fused tergites, the last with a stout postero-dorsally directed medial spine. Seven pairs of appendages beneath the cephalic shield surround a postero-medially sited oral cavi...

2000-01-01

300

Response of Green Peach Aphids and Other Arthropods to Garlic Intercropped with Tobacco  

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The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), is an insect pest that causes extensive damage to tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) in China. Field trials were conducted in 2008 and 2009 at Longyan in the Fujian Province (China) to evaluate the effects of garlic (Allium sativum L.) as a deterrent to green peach aphids and other arthropods when intercropped in flue-cured tobacco fields. This study demonstrated that green peach aphids were affected by intercropping garlic in tobacco fields during ...

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

Ballooning dispersal in arthropod taxa with convergent behaviours: dynamic properties of ballooning silk in turbulent flows  

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We present a new model of ballooning behaviour in arthropods in which draglines are regarded as being extendible and completely flexible. Our numerical simulations reveal that silk draglines within turbulent flows can become twisted and stretched into highly contorted shapes. Ballooners are therefore predicted to have little control over their aerodynamic drag and their dispersal within the atmospheric boundary layer. Dragline length is crucial only at lift-off. This prediction runs counter t...

Reynolds, A. M.; Bohan, D. A.; Bell, J. R.

2006-01-01

302

Disturbance and Recovery of Salt Marsh Arthropod Communities following BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill  

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Oil spills represent a major environmental threat to coastal wetlands, which provide a variety of critical ecosystem services to humanity. The U.S. Gulf of Mexico is a hub of oil and gas exploration activities that historically have impacted intertidal habitats such as salt marsh. Following the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, we sampled the terrestrial arthropod community and marine invertebrates found in stands of Spartina alterniflora, the most abundant plant in coastal salt marshes. Sampli...

Mccall, Brittany D.; Pennings, Steven C.

2012-01-01

303

Subdivision of arthropod cap-n-collar expression domains is restricted to Mandibulata  

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Background: The monophyly of Mandibulata - the division of arthropods uniting pancrustaceans and myriapods - is consistent with several morphological characters, such as the presence of sensory appendages called antennae and the eponymous biting appendage, the mandible. Functional studies have demonstrated that the patterning of the mandible requires the activity of the Hox gene Deformed and the transcription factor cap-n-collar (cnc) in at least two holometabolous insects: the fruit fly Dros...

Sharma, Prashant P.; Gupta, Tripti; Schwager, Evelyn E.; Wheeler, Ward C.; Extavour, Cassandra G.

2014-01-01

304

Dual infection by chikungunya virus and other imported infectious agent in a traveller returning from India.  

Science.gov (United States)

Chikungunya virus infection is a vector-borne self-limiting disease. Recent outbreaks in the Indian Ocean islands have drawn attention to the condition. Nevertheless, only a few reports of co-infection with other communicable agents have been reported. The case described now is of a traveller returning from India with concomitant documented chikungunya virus infection associated with systemic amoebiasis. This report highlights the multifaceted pathology that can be encountered with tropical infections. PMID:18486073

Ezzedine, Khaled; Cazanave, Charles; Pistone, Thierry; Receveur, Marie-Catherine; Neau, Didier; Ragnaud, Jean-Marie; Malvy, Denis

2008-05-01

305

Effects of land management strategies on the dispersal pattern of a beneficial arthropod  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Several arthropods are known to be highly beneficial to agricultural production. Consequently it is of great relevance to study the importance of land management and land composition for the conservation of beneficial aphid-predator arthropod species in agricultural areas. Therefore our study focusing on the beneficial arthropod Bembidion lampros had two main purposes: I) identifying the physical barriers to the species' dispersal in the agricultural landscape, and II) assessing the effect of different land management strategies (i.e. use of pesticides and intensiveness) on the dispersal patterns. The study was conducted using genetic analysis (microsatellite markers) applied to samples from two agricultural areas (in Denmark) with different agricultural intensity. Land management effects on dispersal patterns were investigated with particular focus on: physical barriers, use of pesticide and intensity of cultivation. The results showed that Bembidion lampros disperse preferably through hedges rather than fields, which act as physical barriers to gene flow. Moreover the results support the hypothesis that organic fields act as reservoirs for the re-colonization of conventional fields, but only when cultivation intensity is low. These results show the importance of non-cultivated areas and of low intensity organic managed areas within the agricultural landscape as corridors for dispersal (also for a species typically found within fields). Hence, the hypothesis that pesticide use cannot be used as the sole predictor of agriculture's effect on wild species is supported as land structure and agricultural intensity can be just as important.

Marchi, Chiara; Andersen, Liselotte Wesley

2013-01-01

306

Exploring developmental modes in a fossil arthropod: growth and trunk segmentation of the trilobite Aulacopleura konincki.  

Science.gov (United States)

Trilobites offer the opportunity to explore postembryonic development within the fossil record of arthropod evolution. In contrast to most trilobites, the Silurian proetid Aulacopleura konincki from the Czech Republic exhibits marked variation in the mature number of thoracic segments, with five morphs with 18-22 thoracic segments. The combination of abundant articulated specimens available from a narrow stratigraphic interval and segmental intraspecific variation makes this trilobite singularly useful for studying postembryonic growth and segmentation. Trunk segmentation followed a hemianamorphic pattern, as seen in other arthropods and as characteristic of the Trilobita; during a first anamorphic phase, segments were accreted, while in the subsequent epimorphic phase, segmentation did not proceed further despite continued growth. Size increment during the anamorphic phase was targeted and followed Dyar's rule, a geometric progression typical of many arthropods. We consider alternative hypotheses for the control of the switch from anamorphic to epimorphic phases of development. Our analysis favors a scenario in which the mature number of thoracic segments was determined quite early in development rather than at a late stage in association with a critical size threshold. This study demonstrates that hypotheses concerning developmental pattern and control can be tested in organisms belonging to an extinct clade. PMID:14970920

Fusco, Giuseppe; Hughes, Nigel C; Webster, Mark; Minelli, Alessandro

2004-02-01

307

Short communication. Incidence of the OLIPE mass-trapping on olive non-target arthropods  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Due to the widespread of mass-trapping systems for Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin) (Diptera: Tephritidae) control in organic olive cropping, an assessment of the impact on arthropods of the olive agroecosystem was undertaken for the OLIPE trap type. The sampling was carried out in Los Pedroches valley (Cordoba, southern Spain) in three different organic orchard sites. Six OLIPE traps baited with diammonium phosphate were collected from each site (18 in total) from July to November 2002 every 15 days on average. Additionally, in the latest sampling dates, half the traps were reinforced with pheromone to assess its impact on non-target arthropods. From an average of 43.0 catches per trap (cpt) of non-target arthropods during the whole sampling period, the highest number of captures corresponds to the Order Diptera (that represents a 68.5%), followed distantly by the family Formicidae (12.9%) and the Order Lepidoptera (10.4%). Besides the impact on ant populations, other beneficial groups were recorded such as parasitoids (Other Hymenoptera: 2.6%) and predators (Araneae: 1.0%; Neuroptera s.l.: 0.4%). Concerning the temporal distribution of catches, total captures peaked on July and had a slight increase at the beginning of autumn. No significant differences were observed between traps with and without pheromone. The results evidence that a considerable amount of non-specific captures could be prevented by improving the temporal planning of the mass-trapping system. (Author) 25 refs.

Porcel, M.; Ruano, F.; Sanllorente, O.; Caballero, J. A.; Campos, M.

2009-07-01

308

Discontinuous gas exchange in a tracheate arthropod, the pseudoscorpion Garypus californicus: Occurrence, characteristics and temperature dependence  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The discontinuous gas exchange cycle of the pseudoscorpion Garypus californicus, mean mass 5.9 mg, is rudimentary and is characterized by bursts of CO2 at frequencies ranging from 3.6 mHz at 15 °C to 13.3 mHz at 35 °C. The mean volume of CO2 emitted per burst is 3.6 µl g-1 at 25 °C, about a tenth of the amount emitted by tracheate arthropods with a well developed discontinuous gas exchange cycle. Interburst CO2 emission is high and increases with temperature, reaching near 45% of total CO2 production rate at 35 °C. No fluttering spiracle phase is evident. The metabolic rate of G. californicus at 25 °C (8.4 µW is typical of other arthropods. We infer from the high rate of interburst CO2 emission in G. californicus that trans-spiracular O2 partial pressure gradients are small and that spiracular conductance is correspondingly high, which may lead to high rates of respiratory water loss relative to arthropods with more stringent spiracular control and higher CO2 buffering capacity. The typical moist, hypogeal environments and small body sizes of pseudoscorpions correlate well with their respiratory physiology

John R.B. Lighton

2002-11-01

309

Importance of terrestrial arthropods as subsidies in lowland Neotropical rain forest stream ecosystems  

Science.gov (United States)

The importance of terrestrial arthropods has been documented in temperate stream ecosystems, but little is known about the magnitude of these inputs in tropical streams. Terrestrial arthropods falling from the canopy of tropical forests may be an important subsidy to tropical stream food webs and could also represent an important flux of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in nutrient-poor headwater streams. We quantified input rates of terrestrial insects in eight streams draining lowland tropical wet forest in Costa Rica. In two focal headwater streams, we also measured capture efficiency by the fish assemblage and quantified terrestrially derived N- and P-excretion relative to stream nutrient uptake rates. Average input rates of terrestrial insects ranged from 5 to 41 mg dry mass/m2/d, exceeding previous measurements of aquatic invertebrate secondary production in these study streams, and were relatively consistent year-round, in contrast to values reported in temperate streams. Terrestrial insects accounted for half of the diet of the dominant fish species, Priapicthys annectens. Although terrestrially derived fish excretion was found to be a small flux relative to measured nutrient uptake rates in the focal streams, the efficient capture and processing of terrestrial arthropods by fish made these nutrients available to the local stream ecosystem. This aquatic-terrestrial linkage is likely being decoupled by deforestation in many tropical regions, with largely unknown but potentially important ecological consequences.

Small, Gaston E.; Torres, Pedro J.; Schwizer, Lauren M.; Duff, John H.; Pringle, Catherine M.

2013-01-01

310

Does species-level resolution matter? Taxonomic sufficiency in terrestrial arthropod biodiversity studies  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

1. Taxonomic sufficiency, or the suitability of higher level taxonomic designation in questions related to community ecology is important in biodiversity studies from practical and fundamental perspectives. While there are many studies of taxonomic sufficiency in aquatic systems, there are few studies with terrestrial arthropods that examine the effects of taxonomic resolution on the interpretation of multivariate community data. 2. We re-analyzed datasets from three major arthropod orders (Araneae, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera), using multivariate methods to determine whether altering the level of taxonomic resolution (species, genus, or family) affected patterns in community composition and beta diversity under various forest disturbance treatments. 3. Overall patterns of community composition and beta diversity did not differ across taxonomic levels; however, patterns in group structure and significance of treatment effects were often stronger at species and/or genus level. 4. The relationship between multivariate analyses at different levels of taxonomic resolution was related to within-group taxonomic ratios; results were less consistent across levels of taxonomic resolution in groups with higher taxonomic ratios (i.e., more species per genus). 5. We conclude that higher levels of taxonomic resolution will be sufficient in some studies of terrestrial arthropod biodiversity, although this does not negate the necessity and importance of species-level identifications under certain conditions.

Timms, Laura; Bowden, Joseph James

2013-01-01

311

75 FR 76475 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Meetings  

Science.gov (United States)

...Allergy and Infectious Diseases Council; Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Subcommittee...Allergy and Infectious Diseases Council; Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Subcommittee...Transplantation Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases...

2010-12-08

312

Travel and migration associated infectious diseases morbidity in Europe, 2008  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Europeans represent the majority of international travellers and clinicians encountering returned patients have an essential role in recognizing, and communicating travel-associated public health risks. Methods To investigate the morbidity of travel associated infectious diseases in European travellers, we analysed diagnoses with demographic, clinical and travel-related predictors of disease, in 6957 ill returned travellers who presented in 2008 to EuroTravNet centres with a presumed travel associated condition. Results Gastro-intestinal (GI diseases accounted for 33% of illnesses, followed by febrile systemic illnesses (20%, dermatological conditions (12% and respiratory illnesses (8%. There were 3 deaths recorded; a sepsis caused by Escherichia coli pyelonephritis, a dengue shock syndrome and a Plasmodium falciparum malaria. GI conditions included bacterial acute diarrhea (6.9%, as well as giardiasis and amebasis (2.3%. Among febrile systemic illnesses with identified pathogens, malaria (5.4% accounted for most cases followed by dengue (1.9% and others including chikungunya, rickettsial diseases, leptospirosis, brucellosis, Epstein Barr virus infections, tick-borne encephalitis (TBE and viral hepatitis. Dermatological conditions were dominated by bacterial infections, arthropod bites, cutaneous larva migrans and animal bites requiring rabies post-exposure prophylaxis and also leishmaniasis, myasis, tungiasis and one case of leprosy. Respiratory illness included 112 cases of tuberculosis including cases of multi-drug resistant or extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, 104 cases of influenza like illness, and 5 cases of Legionnaires disease. Sexually transmitted infections (STI accounted for 0.6% of total diagnoses and included HIV infection and syphilis. A total of 165 cases of potentially vaccine preventable diseases were reported. Purpose of travel and destination specific risk factors was identified for several diagnoses such as Chagas disease in immigrant travellers from South America and P. falciparum malaria in immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa. Travel within Europe was also associated with health risks with distinctive profiles for Eastern and Western Europe. Conclusions In 2008, a broad spectrum of travel associated diseases were diagnosed at EuroTravNet core sites. Diagnoses varied according to regions visited by ill travellers. The spectrum of travel associated morbidity also shows that there is a need to dispel the misconception that travel, close to home, in Europe, is without significant health risk.

Lopez-Velez Rogelio

2010-11-01

313

Visualizing Non Infectious and Infectious Anopheles gambiae Blood Feedings in Naive and Saliva-Immunized Mice.  

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BACKGROUND: Anopheles gambiae is a major vector of malaria and lymphatic filariasis. The arthropod-host interactions occurring at the skin interface are complex and dynamic. We used a global approach to describe the interaction between the mosquito (infected or uninfected) and the skin of mammals during blood feeding. METHODS: Intravital video microscopy was used to characterize several features during blood feeding. The deposition and movement of Plasmodium berghei sporozoites in the dermis ...

Choumet, Valerie; Attout, Tarik; Chartier, Loi?c; Khun, Huot; Sautereau, Jean; Robbe-vincent, Annie; Brey, Paul; Huerre, Michel; Bain, Odile

2012-01-01

314

Extended studies on the diversity of arthropod-pathogenic fungi in Austria and Poland  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Results of studies on diversity of arthropod-pathogenic fungi in selected habitats in Austria and Poland carried out in the years 2006-2007 and 2009-2010 are discussed. In total 47 species of entomopathogenic fungi were found as pathogens of different arthropods in Austria. Twenty six entomophthoralean species from different insects and one species from mites were identified and 16 of them are recorded as new to Austria. From among 21 species of anamorphic Hypocreales (Ascomycota affecting arthropods in Austria, 13 species so far have not been known from this country. In total 51 species of fungi affecting different arthropods in Poland were recorded, among them 28 species of Entomophthorales and 23 anamorphic Hypocreales (Ascomycota were separated. The most frequent species of the entomopathogenic fungi both in agricultural and afforested areas in Austria were the common and usually worldwide distributed cordycipitaceous anamorphs Beauveria bassiana, Isaria fumosorosea and in areas of this study less numerous I. farinosa. The most frequent pathogens occurring in mite communities on plants and in wood infested by insects were Hirsutella species. Several entomophthoralean species developed epizootics that caused high reduction in host populations of different arthropods in both countries. Especially interesting is the first record of mycoses (up to 60% mortality, caused by Zoophthora spp. on Phyllobius beetles in a mixed forest near Bia?owie?a. During our joint research, we found the first time in Poland and Europe, the presence of the fungus Furia cf. shandongensis on earwigs and Hirsutella entomophila on Ips typographus adults in forest habitats. From the feeding sites of the latter bark beetle and other subcortical species in oak bark (mostly Dryocoetes villosus and D. alni in black alder over a dozen of various Lecanicillium strains - including few of the features not allowing to classify them to any of so far known species – were isolated both from the scolytids and from accompanying them mites, but these materials have now been successively elaborated. From the commonly occurring in these materials acaropathogenic species Hirsutella cf. brownorum, H. minnesotensis, H. nodulosa and H. rostrata, the two latter infected also adult bark beetles, whereas from the larvae and pupae some supposed nematophagous anamorphs were isolated, among them Harposporium janus and Haptocillium sp.

Cezary Tkaczyk

2011-12-01

315

Effect of some environmental factors on arthropod communities in bat guano  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Data are presented on the taxonomic composition of arthropod fauna found in bat guano in 6 limestone caves of southern Thailand, collected by Berlese's funnel type trap. There were 2 sampling periods; the first from 29 April to 7 May 1996 and the second from 1 to 4 August 1996. Combined samples of bat guano comprised 4,430 individuals of 32 families of the following : 13 orders (2 classes ; Arachnida and Hexapoda Araneae, Acari, Pseudoscorpiones, Collembola, Blattaria, Hemiptera, Thysanoptera, Psocoptera, Neuroptera, Diptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera. The relationships between arthropods and physical factors such as cave temperature, relative humi-dity of the cave, moisture in guano, pH of guano, total nitrogen in guano and organic matters in guano were explored. The results showed that the number of individuals of Leptonetidae (P<0.05, Araneae (P<0.05 and Psocoptera (P<0.05 positively correlated with total nitrogen in guano but numbers of Blattellidae (P<0.05 and Blattaria (P<0.05 negatively correlated with total nitrogen in guano. The total numbers of families of arthropods (P<0.05 and the number of individuals of Leptonetidae (P<0.05, Sphaeropsocidae (P<0.05, Liposcelidae (P<0.05, Alleculidae (P<0.01, Chironomidae (P<0.05, Formicidae (P<0.05, Araneae (P<0.05, Psocoptera (P<0.01 and Hymenoptera (P<0.05 positively correlated with organic matters in guano. None of all arthropods correlated with cave temperature, relative humidity of the cave, moisture in guano and pH of guano. Study on the effect of type of bat guano (insectivore or frugivore bat guano and the light factor (light or dark zone on arthropods showed that type of bat guano has an effect on total numbers of families (P<0.05 and the number of individuals of Leptonetidae (P<0.01, Laelapidae (P<0.05, Blattellidae (P<0.05, Sphaeropsocidae (P<0.01, Liposcelidae (P<0.05, Dermestidae (P<0.01, Staphylinidae (P<0.01, Tineidae (P<0.05, Araneae (P<0.01, Blattaria (P<0.05, Psocoptera (P<0.01, Coleoptera (P<0.01, Lepidoptera (P<0.05 and Diptera (P<0.05. The light factor has an effect on the number of individuals of Carabidae (P<0.05 and Psocoptera (P<0.05. Interaction between type of bat guano and light affects only the number of individuals of Psocoptera (P<0.05. This study concludes that at least one of these physical factors is important in determining the number of families and the number of individuals in each family, particularly the scavenger or detritivore arthropods, and that bat guano is the food source and larva nursery for arthropods in tropical limestone caves.

Watanasit, S.

2002-01-01

316

Patterns in the occurrence of saprophytic fungi carried by arthropods caught in traps baited with rotted wood and dung.  

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Fungi from approximately 1700 individual arthropods that had been captured in traps set in aspen-dominated woodland in western Canada and baited with coyote dung, moose dung, white-rotted wood, brown-rotted wood and fiberglass were isolated in pure culture and identified. These data were analysed with principal components analysis (PCA) to determine whether different types of substrate attracted specific arthropods and whether these animals carried unique assemblages of fungi with known proclivities for the new habitat. Mycobiotic agar was used to restrict the numbers of fungi isolated and resulted in the recovery of 1687 isolates representing 65 species across 12 orders. Isolates of cosmopolitan fungal taxa such as species of Cladosporium, Penicillium, and Beauveria were the most numerous. Taxa with predilections for specific substrates, such as Myxotrichum and Cryptendoxyla that are known inhabitants of cellulose-rich materials (i.e. rotted wood), and various representatives of the keratinophilic Onygenales were recovered from arthropods attracted respectively to baits rich in cellulose and keratin. When traps were analysed according to the identity and numbers of arthropods captured, there was considerable overlap among clusters representing specific bait types, with traps baited with coyote dung being the most divergent partly because they captured significantly more arthropods than those baited with moose dung or rotted wood. When bait type was examined according to the identity and numbers of fungi on trapped arthropods the degree of overlap was also high although a few trends could be discerned. In particular traps baited with brown-rotted wood and coyote dung diverged slightly indicating that arthropods visiting these bait types were carrying somewhat different suites of fungi. PMID:17663118

Greif, M D; Currah, R S

2007-01-01

317

Imaging methods for detection of infectious foci  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Several tracers can be used for imaging infection. None is a worthwhile agent for all infectious foci, but each one has preferential applications, depending on its uptake mechanism by the infectious and/or inflammatory focus. Autologous leucocytes labeled in vitro with indium-111 (In-111) or with technetium-99-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (Tc-99m HMPAO) were applied with success in the detection of peripheral bone infection, focal vascular graft infection and inflammatory bowel disease. Labeling with In-111 is of interest in chronic bone infection, while labeling with Tc-99m HMPAO gets the advantage of a better dosimetry and imaging. The interest of in vivo labeled leucocytes with a Tc-99m labeled monoclonal antigranulocyte antibody anti-NCA 95 (BW 250/183) was proved in the same principal type of infectious foci than in vitro labeled leucocytes. Sites of chronic infection in the spine and the pelvis, whether active or healed, appear as photopenic defects on both in vitro labeled leucocytes and Tc-99m monoclonal antigranulocyte antibody (BW 250/183) scintigraphies. With gallium-67 results showed a high sensitivity with a low specificity. This tracer demonstrated good performance to delineate foci of infectious spondylitis. In-111 and Tc-99m labeled polyclonal human immunoglobulin (HIG) was applied with success in the assessment of various infectious foci, particularly in chronic sepsis. As labeled leucocytes, labeled HIG showed cold defects in infectious sepsis of the spine. Research in nuclear medicine is very active in the development of more specific tracers of infection, mainly involved in Tc-99m or In-111 labeled chemotactic peptides, antigranulocyte antibody fragments, antibiotic derivatives and interleukins. (authors). 70 refs

1993-01-01

318

Infectious salmon anaemia - pathogenesis and tropism.  

Science.gov (United States)

Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) is a serious disease of farmed Atlantic salmon caused by the aquatic orthomyxovirus infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV). ISA was first detected in Norway in 1984 and was characterized by severe anaemia and circulatory disturbances. This review elucidates factors related to the pathogenesis of ISA in Atlantic salmon, the dissemination of the virus in the host and the general distribution of the 4-O-acetylated sialic acids ISAV receptor. The knowledge contributes to the understanding of this disease, and why, almost 30 years after the first detection, it is still causing problems for the aquaculture industry. PMID:24475971

Aamelfot, M; Dale, O B; Falk, K

2014-04-01

319

Bone scan in diagnosis of infectious osteoarthritis  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Bone scan with Technetium 99m is harmless method of evaluation of skeletal lesions. It is safe in pediatrics age group and it can be used in early diagnosis of infectious osteo-arthritis. Bone scan differentiate osteomyelitis from cellulitis, and also it may help in diagnosis of subclinical involvement of rheumatoid arthritis, benign and malignant bone tumors, stress fractures and periostitis. We report results of bone scan in 30 pediatric patients as follows: osteomyelitis 9 cases, cellulitis 4 cases, infectious arthritis 4 cases, tuberculous osteoarthritis 2 cases, rheumatoid arthritis 2 cases and other different diseases 9 cases

1980-05-08

320

Bone scan in diagnosis of infectious osteoarthritis  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Bone scan with Technetium 99m is harmless method of evaluation of skeletal lesions. It is safe in pediatrics age group and it can be used in early diagnosis of infectious osteoarthritis. Bone scan differentiate osteomyelitis from cellulitis, and also it may help in diagnosis of subclinical involvement of rheumatoid arthritis, benign and malignant bone tumors, stress fractures and periostitis. We report results of bone scan in 30 pediatrics patients as follow: osteomyelitis 9 cases, cellulitis 4 cases, infectious arthritis 7 cases, tuberculous osteoarthritis 2 cases, rheumatoid arthritis 2 cases, and other different diseases 9 cases

1979-01-01

 
 
 
 
321

Method for early detection of infectious mononucleosis  

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Early detection of infectious mononucleosis is carried out using a sample of human blood by isolating and identifying the presence of Inmono proteins in the sample from a two-dimensional protein map with the proteins being characterized by having isoelectric banding as measured in urea of about -16 to -17 with respect to certain isoelectric point standards and molecular mass of about 70 to 75 K daltons as measured in the presence of sodium dodecylsulfate containing polyacrylamide gels, the presence of the Inmono proteins being correlated with the existence of infectious mononucleosis.

Willard, K.E.

1982-08-10

322

Drinking water vaccination against infectious laryngotracheitis.  

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Chickens varying in age from ten days to five years were vaccinated with 10(1.3), 10(2.3) and 10(3.3) EID50 per bird of a commercial infectious laryngotracheitis drinking water vaccine. The vaccine gave no adverse reaction in the dose range tested. Five weeks after administration of 10(3.3) EID50 per bird 70% were protected against the intratracheal challenge with virulent infectious laryngotracheitis virus. Doses of 10(1.3) and 10(2.3) EID50 per bird did not give protection. No serological r...

1981-01-01

323

[Dynamics of soil arthropod community structure and its responses to forest fragmentation during the decomposition of Castanopsis eyrei leaf litter].  

Science.gov (United States)

Five evergreen broad-leaved forests (one continuous forest and four fragmented forests) in the mountain areas in the juncture of Zhejiang, Fujian, and Jiangxi Provinces, East China were selected as test objects to study the dynamics of soil arthropod community structure and its responses to forest fragmentation during the decomposition of dominant tree species Castanopsis eyrei leaf litter. A total of 899 soil arthropods were collected, belonging to 9 classes and 25 orders. Lepidoptera was the dominant taxon, accounting for 10% of the individual, while Hymenoptera, Collembola, Diptera, Prostigmata, and Geophilomorpha were the common taxa. The decomposition rate of C. eyrei leaf litter was the highest in August and lower in April-June and December, which was in accordance with the seasonal dynamics of the taxa number and individual number of soil arthropods. Meanwhile, the taxa number, individual number, and species diversity of soil arthropods differed between continuous forest and fragmented forests, suggesting that both area effect and edge effect affected the dynamics of soil arthropod community structure during the decomposition of C. eyrei leaf litter. PMID:21812309

Luo, Yuan-Yuan; Yuan, Jin-Feng; Shen, Guo-Chun; Zhao, Gu-Feng; Yu, Ming-Jian

2011-05-01

324

Breeding Westland petrels as providers of detrital carbon and nitrogen for soil arthropods : a stable isotope study  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Seabirds deposit large quantities of marine detritus on land, but little is known of the soil arthropods processing this material. Burrow-nesting seabirds concentrate their activities within their burrows, so we tested the hypothesis that burrow arthropod fauna is more marine-like in its isotopic enrichment (13C/12C, 15N/14N); expressed as ?13C and ?15N) than the arthropods on the adjacent forest floor. Results from a Westland petrel (Procellaria westlandica) colony on the South Island of New Zealand did not support the hypothesis. Instead, ?15N was universally marine (13-22 per mil). While ?13C separated into two clusters, the distribution was not according to arthropod provenance. Most taxa had a terrestrial ?13C; only two taxa (a leiodid beetle and the mesostigmatic mite Ayersacarus woodi) incorporated marine C. The leiodid beetle occurs both in burrows and on the forest floor; beetles from both habitats had a marine ?13C. Ayersacarus woodi is found only in burrows. We conclude that, in this system, marine and terrestrial detrital C is processed separately, and that marine detrital C enters the terrestrial ecosystem through a very few arthropod taxa. (author). 33 refs., 1 fig.

2013-03-01

325

Maternal transfer of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in aquatic and terrestrial arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

The transfer of mercury from females to their offspring plays an important role in mercury accumulation and toxicity during early development. To quantify the transfer of inorganic mercury and methylmercury from female arthropods to their eggs, the authors collected and analyzed brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana), wolf spiders (Alopecosa spp.), and their attached eggs from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA. Essentially all of the mercury in both the female brine shrimp and their eggs was methylmercury (94?±?17% and 90?±?21%, respectively). The brine shrimp eggs had methylmercury concentrations that were 84?±?2% lower than in the females, reflecting the fact that females transferred 45?±?4% of their total body mass but only 11?±?3% of their methylmercury burden to their eggs. As a result of this sequestration, the concentration of methylmercury in the female brine shrimp increased by 62?±?8% during egg formation. The percentage of the total mercury that was methylmercury in female wolf spiders (77?±?21%) was similar to that in their egg masses (81?±?19%), indicating similar maternal transfer efficiencies for inorganic mercury and methylmercury in these invertebrates. The concentration of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in the female spiders was the same as in their eggs. These arachnids transferred 48?±?9% of their total body mass, 55?±?13% of their inorganic mercury, and 50?±?9% of their methylmercury to their egg masses. Thus, female wolf spiders do not have the ability to reduce the transfer of methylmercury to their eggs, nor does this process represent an important pathway for the depuration of mercury. The present study demonstrates that although some arthropods have mechanisms to minimize the transfer of methylmercury to their eggs and reduce the potential for mercury toxicity during early development, other arthropods do not. PMID:23939924

Saxton, Heidi J; Goodman, James R; Collins, Jeffrey N; Black, Frank J

2013-11-01

326

Effect of location and season on the arthropod prey of Nycteris grandis (Chiroptera: Nycteridae)  

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Analysis of culled arthropod prey parts collected from beneath four feeding perches was used to assess prey taken by

Sarah Bayefsky-Anand

2011-01-01

327

A new arthropod from the lower Cambrian Sirius Passet Fossil-Lagerstätte of North Greenland  

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Aaveqaspis inesoni gen. et sp. nov., is described from the lower Cambrian Sirius Passet Fossil-Lagerstätte of Peary Land, North Greenland. It has a semicircular head shield and a thorax with 5 tergites. The tail shield carries 2 pairs of spines, the most anterior of which is enormous and dominates the trunk. A. inesoni lacks any preserved trace of eyes, as is also the case with several other Sirius Passet arthropods, suggesting that the fossils accumulat...

Peel J S; Stein M

2009-01-01

328

Speculations on biting midges and other bloodsucking arthropods as alternative vectors of Leishmania  

Science.gov (United States)

Sand flies remain the only proven vectors of Leishmania spp. but recent implementation of PCR techniques has led to increasing speculation about "alternative vectors", including biting midges. Here, we summarize that PCR has considerable limits for studing the role of bloodsucking arthropods in the epidemiology of leishmaniasis. The Leishmania life cycle in the sand fly includes a complex series of interactions which are in many cases species-specific, the early phase of the infection is, however, non-specific to sand flies. These facts should be considered in detection of Leishmania in ,"alternative" or "new" vectors to avoid mistaken speculation about their vector competence.

2014-01-01

329

Effect of commercially available plant-derived essential oil products on arthropod pests.  

Science.gov (United States)

Plant-derived essential oil products, in general, are considered minimum-risk pesticides and are exempt from Environmental Protection Agency registration under section 25(b) of the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. However, many of the plant-derived essential products available to consumers (homeowners) have not been judiciously evaluated for both efficacy and plant safety. In fact, numerous plant-derived essential oil products labeled for control of arthropod pests have not been subject to rigorous evaluation, and there is minimal scientific information or supporting data associated with efficacy against arthropod pests. We conducted a series of greenhouse experiments to determine the efficacy and phytotoxicity of an array of plant-derived essential oil products available to consumers on arthropod pests including the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Risso); western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande); twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch; sweetpotato whitefly B-biotype, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius); and green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer). Although the products Flower Pharm (cottonseed, cinnamon, and rosemary oil) and Indoor Pharm (soybean, rosemary, and lavender oil) provided > 90% mortality of citrus mealybug, they were also the most phytotoxic to the coleus, Solenostemon scutellarioides (L.) Codd, plants. Both GC-Mite (cottonseed, clove, and garlic oil) and Bugzyme (citric acid) were most effective against the twospotted spider mite (> or = 90% mortality). However, SMC (canola, coriander oil, and triethanolamine), neem (clarified hydrophobic extract of neem oil), and Bug Assassin (eugenol, sodium lauryl sulfate, peppermint, and citronella oil) provided > 80% mortality. Monterey Garden Insect Spray, which contained 0.5% spinosad, was most effective against western flower thrips with 100% mortality. All the other products evaluated failed to provide sufficient control of western flower thrips with or = 4.5 of 5) among all the products. None of the plant-derived essential oil products provided sufficient control of sweetpotato whitefly B-biotype or green peach aphid 7, 14, and 21 d after application. Furthermore, the products Bug Assassin (eugenol, sodium lauryl sulfate, peppermint, and citronella oil) and Sharpshooter (sodium lauryl sulfate and clove oil) were phytotoxic to the poinsettia, Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch, plants. This study is one of the first to quantitatively demonstrate that commercially available plant-derived essential oil products vary in their effectiveness against certain arthropod pests stated on the label and are phytotoxic. PMID:19736770

Cloyd, Raymond A; Galle, Cindy L; Keith, Stephen R; Kalscheur, Nanette A; Kemp, Kenneth E

2009-08-01

330

Neutropenic enterocolitis (typhlitis) associated with infectious mononucleosis  

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Neutropenic enterocolitis (typhlitis) is an unusual acute complication of neutropenia, most often associated with leukaemia and lymphoma and characterized by segmental caecal and ascending colonic ulceration that may progress to necrosis, perforation, and septicaemia. We present a unique case of an 8-year-old girl with recently diagnosed infectious mononucleosis having findings consistent with typhlitis on abdominal CT. (orig.)

Sigirci, Ahmet [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Turgut Ozal Medical Centre, Malatya (Turkey); Akinci, Aysehan; Oezgen, Uensal; Oezen, Metehan [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, Turgut Ozal Medical Centre, Malatya (Turkey)

2006-02-01

331

Acute cerebellar ataxia and infectious mononucleosis.  

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A 28-year-old man, who presented with acute cerebellar ataxia, was found to have haematological features of infectious mononucleosis. There was serological evidence of recent infection with Epstein-Barr virus. It is speculated that cerebellar dysfunction results from virus-induced inflammatory changes within the central nervous system.

Wadhwa, N. K.; Ghose, R. R.

1983-01-01

332

Method for Early Detection of Infectious Mononucleosis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Early detection of infectious mononucleosis is carried out using a sample of human blood by isolating and identifying the presence of Inmono proteins in the sample from a two-dimensional protein map with the proteins being characterized by having isoelect...

K. E. Willard

1982-01-01

333

In vitro synthesis of infectious retroviral RNA.  

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A plasmid was constructed in which a T7 RNA polymerase promoter was placed upstream of a recombinant amphotropic retrovirus genome containing a selectable neomycin resistance gene. To test the infectivity of the RNA produced by T7 RNA polymerase in vitro, the RNA was microinjected into the nuclei of psi 2 packaging cells. Infectious particles conferring G418 resistance were released.

1988-01-01

334

[Infectious endocarditis in intensive care patients].  

Science.gov (United States)

Infectious endocarditis is a rare disease with high mortality. Epidemiological changes in recent years, the emergence of new risk factors, and the increasing use of intravasal prosthetic materials has led to changes in not only the clinical appearance of this disease but also in its diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis of infectious endocarditis is crucial. However, the often unspecific symptoms and the changes in its epidemiologic profile pose a challenge for the treating physician. This is especially true since the incidence of hospital-acquired, "nosocomial" cases of infectious endocarditis is increasing and often affects severely ill patients in intensive care units (ICU). There are diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms to guide the physician from an early diagnosis to an adequate treatment of the disease. In some critically ill patients, only surgery in combination with antimicrobial treatment may lead to complete eradication of the infectious disease. This review aims to subsume the guidelines, paying special attention to aspects that are important for intensive care and emergency doctors. PMID:22349477

Dietz, S; Lemm, H; Raaz, U; Werdan, K; Buerke, M

2012-02-01

335

Infectious causes of reproductive loss in camelids.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reproductive losses in camelids are due to infertility, pregnancy loss, udder diseases and neonatal mortality caused by a variety of infectious diseases. Uterine infection and abortion represent the major complaint in camelid veterinary practice. The major infectious organisms in endometritis and metritis are E. coli and Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus. Abortion rates due to infectious diseases vary from 10% to more than 70% in some areas. Leptospirosis, toxoplasmosis and chlamydiosis have been diagnosed as the major causes of abortion in llamas and alpacas. In camels, brucellosis and trypanosomiasis represent the major causes of infectious abortion in the Middle East and Africa. Mastitis is rare in South American camelids. The prevalence of subclinical udder infection in camels can reach very high proportions in dairy camels. Udder infections are primarily due to Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus. Neonatal mortality is primarily due to diarrhea following failure of passive transfer and exposure to E. coli, rotavirus, coronavirus, Coccidia and Salmonella. This paper reviews the etio-pathogenesis of these causes of reproductive losses, as well as the major risk factors and strategies to prevent their occurrence. PMID:16697037

Tibary, A; Fite, C; Anouassi, A; Sghiri, A

2006-08-01

336

Infectious agents are associated with psychiatric diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available There are several infectious agents in the environment that can cause persistent infections in the host. They usually cause their symptoms shortly after first infection and later persist as silent viruses and bacteria within the body. However, these chronic infections may play an important role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and Tourette’s syndrome (TS. We investigated the distribution of different neurotrophic infectious agents in TS, schizophrenia and controls. A total of 93 individuals were included (schizophrenic patients, Tourette patients and controls. We evaluated antibodies against cytomegalovirus (CMV, herpes-simplex virus (HSV, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma, Mycoplasma and Chlamydia trachomatis/pneumoniae. By comparing schizophrenia and TS, we found a higher prevalence of HSV (P=0.017 and CMV (P=0.017 antibodies in schizophrenic patients. Considering the relationship between schizophrenia, TS and healthy controls, we showed that there are associations for Chlamydia trachomatis (P=0.007, HSV (P=0.027 and CMV (P=0.029. When all measured viruses, bacteria and protozoa were combined, schizophrenic patients had a higher rate of antibodies to infectious agents than TS patients (P=0.049. Tourette and schizophrenic patients show a different vulnerability to infectious agents. Schizophrenic patients were found to have a higher susceptibility to viral infections than individuals with TS. This finding might point to a modification in special immune parameters in these diseases.

Daniela Lydia Krause

2012-01-01

337

Complicated infectious coryza outbreaks in Argentina.  

Science.gov (United States)

Seventeen complicated outbreaks of infectious coryza in layer, broiler-breeder, and broiler flocks were studied. In the layer flock outbreaks, drops in egg production of up to 35% were seen. In the broiler flocks and several of the layer flocks, losses due to persistent mortality and/or culling varied between 2 and 5%. Signs of infectious coryza in both layers and broiler-breeders were typical; in broilers, however, swollen head-like syndrome was seen. Except in one flock, no viral diseases were clinically or serologically detected. Excluding broiler-breeders, birds from most other flocks were serologically positive for Mycoplasma gallisepticum, and some were also positive for M. synoviae. Haemophilus paragallinarum was isolated from all of the outbreaks, but only as a pure culture in three outbreaks. Isolation of H. paragallinarum from sites such as liver, kidney, and particularly tarsal arthritis and ocular globes appears to be reported for the first time. Serovar A was isolated in eight outbreaks, serovar B in six, serovar C in one, and untypable serovars in two. The severity of these infectious coryza outbreaks may have been increased by concurrent salmonellosis, pasteurellosis, and mycoplasmosis, although under certain conditions H. paragallinarum is able to cause septicemia. Ten of the outbreaks occurred in birds vaccinated against infectious coryza; this may be due to the use of vaccines that do not provide protection against the types of H. paragallinarum that affect poultry in the region. PMID:7832727

Sandoval, V E; Terzolo, H R; Blackall, P J

1994-01-01

338

77 FR 29676 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting  

Science.gov (United States)

...personal privacy. Name of Committee: Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and AIDS Initial Review Group; Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research...Transplantation Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases...

2012-05-18

339

75 FR 26760 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting  

Science.gov (United States)

...personal privacy. Name of Committee: Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and AIDS Initial Review Group; Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research...Transplantation Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases...

2010-05-12

340

78 FR 3011 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting  

Science.gov (United States)

...personal privacy. Name of Committee: Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and AIDS Initial Review Group; Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research...Transplantation Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases...

2013-01-15

 
 
 
 
341

76 FR 55074 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting  

Science.gov (United States)

...personal privacy. Name of Committee: Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and AIDS Initial Review Group, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research...Transplantation Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases...

2011-09-06

342

75 FR 81631 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting  

Science.gov (United States)

...personal privacy. Name of Committee: Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and AIDS Initial Review Group. Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research...Transplantation Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases...

2010-12-28

343

75 FR 49502 - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting  

Science.gov (United States)

...personal privacy. Name of Committee: Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and AIDS Initial Review Group; Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research...Transplantation Research; 93.856, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases...

2010-08-13

344

Opsins in onychophora (velvet worms) suggest a single origin and subsequent diversification of visual pigments in arthropods.  

Science.gov (United States)

Multiple visual pigments, prerequisites for color vision, are found in arthropods, but the evolutionary origin of their diversity remains obscure. In this study, we explore the opsin genes in five distantly related species of Onychophora, using deep transcriptome sequencing and screening approaches. Surprisingly, our data reveal the presence of only one opsin gene (onychopsin) in each onychophoran species, and our behavioral experiments indicate a maximum sensitivity of onychopsin to blue-green light. In our phylogenetic analyses, the onychopsins represent the sister group to the monophyletic clade of visual r-opsins of arthropods. These results concur with phylogenomic support for the sister-group status of the Onychophora and Arthropoda and provide evidence for monochromatic vision in velvet worms and in the last common ancestor of Onychophora and Arthropoda. We conclude that the diversification of visual pigments and color vision evolved in arthropods, along with the evolution of compound eyes-one of the most sophisticated visual systems known. PMID:22683812

Hering, Lars; Henze, Miriam J; Kohler, Martin; Kelber, Almut; Bleidorn, Christoph; Leschke, Maren; Nickel, Birgit; Meyer, Matthias; Kircher, Martin; Sunnucks, Paul; Mayer, Georg

2012-11-01

345

Does biodiversity protect humans against infectious disease?  

Science.gov (United States)

Control of human infectious disease has been promoted as a valuable ecosystem service arising from the conservation of biodiversity. There are two commonly discussed mechanisms by which biodiversity loss could increase rates of infectious disease in a landscape. First, loss of competitors or predators could facilitate an increase in the abundance of competent reservoir hosts. Second, biodiversity loss could disproportionately affect non-competent, or less competent reservoir hosts, which would otherwise interfere with pathogen transmission to human populations by, for example, wasting the bites of infected vectors. A negative association between biodiversity and disease risk, sometimes called the "dilution effect hypothesis," has been supported for a few disease agents, suggests an exciting win-win outcome for the environment and society, and has become a pervasive topic in the disease ecology literature. Case studies have been assembled to argue that the dilution effect is general across disease agents. Less touted are examples in which elevated biodiversity does not affect or increases infectious disease risk for pathogens of public health concern. In order to assess the likely generality of the dilution effect, we review the association between biodiversity and public health across a broad variety of human disease agents. Overall, we hypothesize that conditions for the dilution effect are unlikely to be met for most important diseases of humans. Biodiversity probably has little net effect on most human infectious diseases but, when it does have an effect, observation and basic logic suggest that biodiversity will be more likely to increase than to decrease infectious disease risk. PMID:24933803

Wood, Chelsea L; Lafferty, Kevin D; DeLeo, Giulio; Young, Hillary S; Hudson, Peter J; Kuris, Armand M

2014-04-01

346

U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases  

Science.gov (United States)

... in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). The dedicated members of the USAMRIID staff ... military personnel and civilians from the threat of infectious diseases. We participate in support of emerging disease investigations, ...

347

Secondary succession of arthropods and plants in the Arizona Sonoran Desert in response to transmission-line construction  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

At a site about 16 km south of Black Canyon City, Arizona, density of arthropods on an undisturbed plot after an access road was built for powerline construction was much greater than on a disturbed plot. Mites, springtails, leafhoppers, scale insects, ants and thrips were significantly reduced on the disturbed area. Diversity increased on the disturbed plot after construction, but density decreased. A slight increase in similarity (H', Clambda) of the arthropod communities of the two plots appears to be related to the modest increase in cover on the disturbed area. Globe-mallow, goosefoot and a four-o'clock were pioneer species and occurred only on the disturbed area. There was a significant reduction in cover of all plant species on the disturbed plot after construction, but there was a steady increase of annual forbs at the end of the study. The results indicate that restoration of numbers of arthropods on the disturbed area is dependent on the total plant cover on the plot, apparently regardless of the composition of the plant species involved. It is obvious in this area that the plant communities will remain dissimilar, with the pioneering herbaceous plants on the disturbed plot dominating. Construction of a powerline apparently has had little impact on the structure of the arthropod community on the disturbed area, as proportions of three trophic categories of arthropods have not been radically altered. The results of this study, when compared to other studies in the Sonoran Desert and in desert grasslands disturbed by powerline construction, indicate that lengthy secondary succession does occur in the Sonoran Desert. Early arthropod invaders were found to be mainly herbivores, with few parasites or predators, and an equilibrium was eventually reached between colonizers and space requirements. 35 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

Johnson, C.D.; Beley, J.R.; Ditsworth, T.M.; Butt, S.M.

1983-03-01

348

Comparative diversity of arthropods on Bt maize and non-Bt maize in two different cropping systems in South Africa.  

Science.gov (United States)

The biodiversity of an agroecosystem is not only important for its intrinsic value but also because it influences ecological functions that are vital for crop production in sustainable agricultural systems and the surrounding environment. A concern about genetically modified (GM) crops is the potential negative impact that such crops could have on diversity and abundance of nontarget organisms, and subsequently on ecosystem functions. Therefore, it is essential to assess the potential environmental risk of the release of a GM crop and to study its effect on species assemblages within that ecosystem. Assessment of the impact of Bt maize on the environment is hampered by the lack of basic checklists of species present in maize agroecosystems. The aims of the study were to compile a checklist of arthropods that occur on maize in South Africa and to compare the diversity and abundance of arthropods and functional groups on Bt maize and non-Bt maize. Collections of arthropods were carried out during two growing seasons on Bt maize and non-Bt maize plants at two localities. Three maize fields were sampled per locality during each season. Twenty plants, each of Bt maize and non-Bt maize, were randomly selected from the fields at each site. The arthropods collected during this study were classified to morphospecies level and grouped into the following functional groups: detritivores, herbivores, predators, and parasitoids. Based on feeding strategy, herbivores and predators were further divided into sucking herbivores or predators (piercing-sucking mouthparts) and chewing herbivores or predators (chewing mouthparts). A total of 8,771 arthropod individuals, comprising 288 morphospecies and presenting 20 orders, were collected. Results from this short-term study indicated that abundance and diversity of arthropods in maize and the different functional guilds were not significantly affected by Bt maize, either in terms of diversity or abundance. PMID:24472209

Truter, J; Van Hamburg, H; Van Den Berg, J

2014-02-01

349

Risk of Hodgkin's disease and other cancers after infectious mononucleosis  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Infectious mononucleosis, which is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, has been associated with an increased risk for Hodgkin's disease. Little is known, however, about how infectious mononucleosis affects long-term risk of Hodgkin's disease, how this risk varies with age at infectious mononucleosis diagnosis, or how the risk for Hodgkin's disease varies in different age groups. In addition, the general cancer profile among patients who have had infectious mononucleosis has been sparsely studied.

Hjalgrim, H; Askling, J

2000-01-01

350

Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Final Reclaimed Effluent  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Water samples collected throughout several reclamation facilities were analyzed for the presence of infectious Cryptosporidium parvum by the focus detection method-most-probable-number cell culture technique. Results revealed the presence of infectious C. parvum oocysts in 40% of the final disinfected effluent samples. Sampled effluent contained on average seven infectious oocysts per 100 liters. Thus, reclaimed water is not pathogen free but contains infectious C. parvum.

Gennaccaro, Angela L.; Mclaughlin, Molly R.; Quintero-betancourt, Walter; Huffman, Debra E.; Rose, Joan B.

2003-01-01

351

Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in final reclaimed effluent  

Science.gov (United States)

Water samples collected throughout several reclamation facilities were analyzed for the presence of infectious Cryptosporidium parvum by the focus detection method-most-probable-number cell culture technique. Results revealed the presence of infectious C. parvum oocysts in 40% of the final disinfected effluent samples. Sampled effluent contained on average seven infectious oocysts per 100 liters. Thus, reclaimed water is not pathogen free but contains infectious C. parvum.

Gennaccaro, A. L.; McLaughlin, M. R.; Quintero-Betancourt, W.; Huffman, D. E.; Rose, J. B.

2003-01-01

352

Subclinical infectious bursal disease in commercial broiler flocks in Saskatchewan.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Five commercial broiler flocks, not vaccinated for infectious bursal disease virus, derived from infectious bursal disease virus-vaccinated breeder flocks were surveyed for evidence of bursal damage and infectious bursal disease virus infection. They were compared with two groups of birds raised in isolation. Serum samples from one day old chicks contained maternal anti-infectious bursal disease virus antibodies which declined to undetectable levels by four weeks of age. Serum antibody levels...

1981-01-01

353

Mineral cycling in soil and litter arthropod food chains. Annual progress report, February 1, 1983-January 31, 1984  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This annual report describes progress in research on the influence of soil fauna on the general process of terrestrial decomposition. The major goal is to investigate the regulation of decomposition by soil arthropods. Methods have included radioactive tracer measurements of food chain dynamics, rates of nutrient or mineral element flow during decomposition, and simulation modeling. This year's report describes significant progress in defining the influence of soil arthropods in stimulating microbial immobilization of nutrients. Preliminary efforts to define the importance of the soil-litter macroarthropods are also reported

1983-01-01

354

Arthropod and filarioid parasites associated with wild rodents in the northeast marshes of Buenos Aires, Argentina  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available During 1995, 16 species of arthropods and 2 species of filarioids, totaling 1 287 specimens were collected from 64 wild rodents captured in the Hudson Natural Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Infestation parameters and indexes were analyzed. Host specific richness was S = 6, diversity H = 1.48, and relative density RDI = 40%. High values of parasite species richness and diversity were found on Oligoryzomys delticola (S = 9; H = 1.40, Oxymycterus rufus (S = 9; H = 1.37, and Oligoryzomys flavescens (S = 9; H = 1.28, followed by Scapteromys aquaticus (S = 6; H = 0.17, and Akodon azarae (S = 4; H = 1.20. Deltamys kempi was infested only by Androlaelaps rotundus. O. delticola and O. flavescens showed the highest similarity index (O = 74.19%, followed by O. flavescens with S. aquaticus, as a result of historical processes and shared microhabitats. Considering arthropods-filarioids associations, significant affinity was observed in Litomosoides bonaerensis with Hoplopleura travassosi, Laelaps paulistanensis, and Gigantolaelaps wolffsohni.

Lareschi Marcela

2003-01-01

355

Arthropod and filarioid parasites associated with wild rodents in the northeast marshes of Buenos Aires, Argentina  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english During 1995, 16 species of arthropods and 2 species of filarioids, totaling 1 287 specimens were collected from 64 wild rodents captured in the Hudson Natural Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Infestation parameters and indexes were analyzed. Host specific richness was S = 6, diversity H = 1.48, and [...] relative density RDI = 40%. High values of parasite species richness and diversity were found on Oligoryzomys delticola (S = 9; H = 1.40), Oxymycterus rufus (S = 9; H = 1.37), and Oligoryzomys flavescens (S = 9; H = 1.28), followed by Scapteromys aquaticus (S = 6; H = 0.17), and Akodon azarae (S = 4; H = 1.20). Deltamys kempi was infested only by Androlaelaps rotundus. O. delticola and O. flavescens showed the highest similarity index (O = 74.19%), followed by O. flavescens with S. aquaticus, as a result of historical processes and shared microhabitats. Considering arthropods-filarioids associations, significant affinity was observed in Litomosoides bonaerensis with Hoplopleura travassosi, Laelaps paulistanensis, and Gigantolaelaps wolffsohni.

Lareschi, Marcela; Notarnicola, Juliana; Navone, Graciela; Linardi, Pedro Marcos.

356

Impact of Pesticide Treatment on an Arthropod Community in the Korean Rice Ecosystem  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available An arthropod community in a rice ecosystem was surveyed to determine the impact of twoinsecticides frequently used in Korean rice ecosystems: carbofuran 3GR, which targets the rice water weevil,Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in the early season and fenobucarb EC, whichtargets the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål (Hemiptera: Delphacidae in the mid- and lateseasons, respectively. Overall, the application of the insecticides reduced density of total arthropods by 48.4%compared to the untreated field, but their impact on each functional group were different. Carbofuran GRtreatment on 1 June reduced the L. oryzophilus population significantly until mid-season. The population of filterfeedingchironomids was also reduced by 50%, whereas the spider population was less disturbed. FenobucarbEC treatment on 16 August significantly reduced N. lugens and detrivorous entomobryid populationsuntil the late season. Both web-building and wandering spiders were also significantly disturbed by fenobucarbEC although the impact differed according to their behavioral differences. While the population of web-buildingspiders significantly decreased over time, that of wandering spiders recovered from the disturbance a fewweeks later.

Park, Hong-Hyun

2009-02-01

357

ARTHROPODS AND HELMINTHS ASSEMBLAGE IN SIGMODONTINE RODENTS FROM WETLANDS OF THE RIO DE LA PLATA, ARGENTINA  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The assemblage of arthropods and helminths, present in sigmodontine rodents (Cricetidae from a broad wetland area of the Río de la Plata, Argentina, was studied. A total of 250 sigmodontines were captured during a two-year sampling period: Scapteromys aquaticus and Oxymycterus rufus were the most abundant hosts, followed by Oligoryzomys nigripes, Akodon azarae, Oligoryzomys flavescens, and Deltamys kempi. There were 33102 parasites collected, corresponding with Rhopalopsyllidae fleas (Siphonaptera, Hoplopleuridae lice (Phtiraptera, Laelapidae and Macronyssidae mites, Ixodidae ticks, and Trombiculidae chiggers (Acari, the trematodes Echinostomidae, Microphallidae, and Dicrocoelidae, the flatworm Ciclophyllidea, the nematods Trichuridae, Spiruridae, Onchocercidae, Physalopteridae, Aspidoderidae, Oxyuridae, and Nippostrongylinae, and the thorny-headed worm Acanthocephala. A list of arthropods and helminths species associated with each rodent species was given, as well as the prevalence and mean abundance. New host and geographic records were provided. The phenogram of the relationships of the parasite assemblages showed a high value of similarity between both species of Oligoryzomys, and between S. aquaticus and O. rufus. Variation of the values observed in the prevalence and the mean abundance of the host-parasite association suggests that there could be environmental barriers between the rodent populations, or that differential behavior of the host species (i.e. use of microhabitats, tropics behaviors may influence these indexes. This knowledge may be used to determine targets for biological conservation and ecological impact of parasitism in the area.

Marcela Lareschi

2009-01-01

358

RNAi in Arthropods: Insight into the Machinery and Applications for Understanding the Pathogen-Vector Interface  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The availability of genome sequencing data in combination with knowledge of expressed genes via transcriptome and proteome data has greatly advanced our understanding of arthropod vectors of disease. Not only have we gained insight into vector biology, but also into their respective vector-pathogen interactions. By combining the strengths of postgenomic databases and reverse genetic approaches such as RNAi, the numbers of available drug and vaccine targets, as well as number of transgenes for subsequent transgenic or paratransgenic approaches, have expanded. These are now paving the way for in-field control strategies of vectors and their pathogens. Basic scientific questions, such as understanding the basic components of the vector RNAi machinery, is vital, as this allows for the transfer of basic RNAi machinery components into RNAi-deficient vectors, thereby expanding the genetic toolbox of these RNAi-deficient vectors and pathogens. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge of arthropod vector RNAi machinery and the impact of RNAi on understanding vector biology and vector-pathogen interactions for which vector genomic data is available on VectorBase.

Christian Stutzer

2012-11-01

359

A gene horizontally transferred from bacteria protects arthropods from host plant cyanide poisoning.  

Science.gov (United States)

Cyanogenic glucosides are among the most widespread defense chemicals of plants. Upon plant tissue disruption, these glucosides are hydrolyzed to a reactive hydroxynitrile that releases toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Yet many mite and lepidopteran species can thrive on plants defended by cyanogenic glucosides. The nature of the enzyme known to detoxify HCN to ?-cyanoalanine in arthropods has remained enigmatic. Here we identify this enzyme by transcriptome analysis and functional expression. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the gene is a member of the cysteine synthase family horizontally transferred from bacteria to phytophagous mites and Lepidoptera. The recombinant mite enzyme had both ?-cyanoalanine synthase and cysteine synthase activity but enzyme kinetics showed that cyanide detoxification activity was strongly favored. Our results therefore suggest that an ancient horizontal transfer of a gene originally involved in sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in bacteria was co-opted by herbivorous arthropods to detoxify plant produced cyanide.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02365.001. PMID:24843024

Wybouw, Nicky; Dermauw, Wannes; Tirry, Luc; Stevens, Christian; Grbi?, Miodrag; Feyereisen, René; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

2014-01-01

360

Phylogeography of the Cactophilic Drosophila and Other Arthropods Associated with Cactus Necroses in the Sonoran Desert  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Studies on the population genetics, phylogenetic relationships, systematics and evolution of arthropods that inhabit necrotic tissue of cacti in the Sonoran Desert of North America are reviewed. These studies have focused upon several species of insects (orders Diptera and Coleoptera and arachnids (order Pseudoscorpiones. For most taxa studied, little genetic structure and high dispersal ability are found in populations inhabiting the mainland and Baja California peninsula regions of the Sonoran Desert, consistent with the availability of the rotting cactus microhabitat which is patchily distributed and ephemeral. There is evidence, however, that the Gulf of California, which bisects the Sonoran Desert, has played a role in limiting gene flow and promoting speciation in several taxa, including histerid beetles, whereas other taxa, especially Drosophila nigrospiracula and D. mettleri, apparently are able to freely cross the Gulf, probably by taking advantage of the Midriff Islands in the northern Gulf as dispersal “stepping stones”. Genetic evidence has also been found for historical population expansions dating to the Pleistocene and late Pliocene in several taxa. Overall, these studies have provided important insights into how arthropods with different life history traits, but generally restricted to a necrotic cactus microhabitat, have evolved in an environmentally harsh and tectonically active region. In addition, they suggest some taxa for further, and more detailed, hypothesis driven studies of speciation.

Therese A. Markow

2011-05-01

 
 
 
 
361

Application of satellite remote sensing for tracking of arthropod vectors of diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background and Aim: Arthropod-borne diseases are one of the major causes of human mortality. Since launch of the first meteorological satellites in 1960s, remote sensing has been increasingly implicated in the field of human health research and the data from satellites and their sensors with different spatial and temporal resolutions opened a new field of research in human health for scientists. Material and Methods: Search engines and national/international scientific databanks were used to search keywords of remote sensing, satellite, tick, mosquito and sand fly and obtained articles were analyzed.   Results: Some ecological indices were used more in remote sensing of arthropod-borne diseases, including NDVI, SST, LST and CCD. Conclusion: Data of environmental factors such as temperature, relative humidity, land use/ land cover help us to detect the habitats of vectors of diseases regard to their ecology. However, the scope of applications, beyond theoretical large potentialities, appears limited both by their technical nature and the related models developed. The main problem for application of remote sensing in health science and epidemiology of diseases, is the costs of satellite images as well as the availability in the studied times to monitor a specific subject like vector or agent of the disease. Although the majority of health studies and diseases monitoring need to application of high spatial resolution images.

Ahmad Ali Hanafi bojd

2013-03-01

362

Effects of pyriproxyfen spray, powder, and oral bait treatments on the relative abundance of nontarget arthropods of black-tailed prairie dog (Rodentia: Sciuridae) towns.  

Science.gov (United States)

Separate black-tailed prairie dog, Cynomys ludovicianus (Ord), towns on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado, were treated with technical pyriproxyfen (Nylar) spray, powder, and oral bait. The treatments were applied to reduce relative abundance of the plague vector Oropsylla hirsuta (Baker). Because pyriproxyfen is a juvenile hormone analog, we were also concerned with the effects of the treatments on nontarget arthropods, which is the focus of this study. Pitfall traps and sweep net sampling were used to measure relative abundance of arthropod populations pre- and posttreatment. Nontarget arthropod sampling produced a large number of statistical comparisons that indicated significant declines (P effects. Because arthropod populations appeared to fluctuate randomly, we only made inferences about highly significant (P effect. Only Homoptera at the pyriproxyfen powder site exhibited highly significant reductions that appeared to be attributed to the treatments. Pyriproxyfen spray treatments did not significantly reduce relative arthropod abundance. PMID:10916304

Karhu, R R; Anderson, S H

2000-07-01

363

Arthropod bites.  

Science.gov (United States)

The phylum Arthropoda includes arachnids and insects. Although their bites typically cause only local reactions, some species are venomous or transmit disease. The two medically important spiders in the United States are widow spiders (Latrodectus), the bite of which causes intense muscle spasms, and the brown recluse (Loxosceles), which may cause skin necrosis. Widow bites usually respond to narcotics, benzodiazepines, or, when necessary, antivenom. Most recluse bites resolve uneventfully without aggressive therapy and require only wound care and minor debridement. Tick bites can transmit diseases only after prolonged attachment to the host. Treatment of clothing with permethrin and proper tick removal greatly reduce the risk of infection. Ticks of medical importance in the United States include the black-legged tick, the Lone Star tick, and the American dog tick. The prophylactic use of a single dose of doxycycline for Lyme disease may be justified in high-risk areas of the country when an attached, engorged black-legged tick is removed. Bites from fleas, bedbugs, biting flies, and mosquitoes present as nonspecific pruritic pink papules, but the history and location of the bite can assist with diagnosis. Flea bites are usually on ankles, whereas mosquito bites are on exposed skin, and chigger bites tend to be along the sock and belt lines. Antihistamines are usually the only treatment required for insect bites; however, severe mosquito reactions (skeeter syndrome) may require prednisone. Applying insect repellent containing diethyltoluamide (DEET) 10% to 35% or picaridin 20% is the best method for preventing bites. PMID:24364549

Juckett, Gregory

2013-12-15

364

Rediscovering Biology - Unit 5: Emerging Infectious Diseases  

Science.gov (United States)

This page is the jumping-off point for an educational unit on emerging infectious diseases. There are links to a course outline and classroom activity worksheets, a 30-minute video, an online textbook chapter, a collection of relevant images and animations that supplement the chapter, transcripts of interviews with five experts featured in the video, and a glossary and bibliography. The video and textbook chapter cover two main phenomena of emerging diseases - evolution of antibiotic resistance, and mutation of disease organisms due to novel environmental pressures. There are detailed explanations of microbial evolution by mutation and acquisition of new genetic material, as well as case studies of infectious diseases spread by animals. The course outline provides a structure for incorporating the video, the textbook chapter, and five classroom activities into a 2.5hr session appropriate for high school or undergraduate students.

Learner.org, Annenberg M.

365

An overview of infectious bursal disease.  

Science.gov (United States)

Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is a viral immunosuppressive disease of chickens attacking mainly an important lymphoid organ in birds [the bursa of Fabricius (BF)]. The emergence of new variant strains of the causative agent [infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV)] has made it more urgent to develop new vaccination strategies against IBD. One of these strategies is the use of recombinant vaccines (DNA and viral-vectored vaccines). Several studies have investigated the host immune response towards IBDV. This review will present a detailed background on the disease and its causative agent, accompanied by a summary of the most recent findings regarding the host immune response to IBDV infection and the use of recombinant vaccines against IBD. PMID:22707044

Mahgoub, Hebata Allah; Bailey, Michael; Kaiser, Pete

2012-11-01

366

[Myocardial insufficiency in infectious-allergic myocarditis].  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors analyze the results of histologic and electron-microscopic studies of 58 endomyocardial biopsy specimens, obtained from patients with infectious allergic myocarditis aged 20 to 52. Morphologic examinations have been parallelled by studies of arrhythmias in these patients. The major parameters of hemodynamics at rest and dosed exercise have been examined by the radionuclide technique. Cardiac rhythm and conductivity disorders in infectious allergic myocarditis often aggravate the course of the disease, disturb the hemodynamics, and are prognostically unfavourable signs. These disorders result from changes in the myocardial membranes, and one of the mechanisms responsible for the membranous injuries are the dystrophic processes in the nerve fibres, terminals, and receptors of the myocardium. PMID:2799518

Paleev, N R; Odinokova, V A; Smirnov, V B; Gurevich, M A

1989-01-01

367

Emerging Ranaviral Infectious Diseases and Amphibian Decline  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Infectious diseases caused by ranaviruses (RV, family Iridoviridae) not only affect wild amphibian populations but also agriculture and international animal trade. Although, the prevalence of RV infections and die offs has markedly increased over the last decade, it is still unclear whether these viruses are direct causal agents of extinction or rather are the resulting (secondary) consequences of weakened health of amphibian populations leading to increased susceptibility to viral pathogens....

Jacques Robert

2010-01-01

368

Global climate change and infectious diseases.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The effects of global climate change on infectious diseases are hypothetical until more is known about the degree of change in temperature and humidity that will occur. Diseases most likely to increase in their distribution and severity have three-factor (agent, vector, and human being) and four-factor (plus vertebrate reservoir host) ecology. Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes may move northward and have more rapid metamorphosis with global warming. These mosquitoes transmit dengu...

Shope, R.

1991-01-01

369

CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The connection between the severity of clinical manifestations and immune response features in patients with acute infectious mononucleosis (IM was studied. It was established, that in IM patients with minor disease severity dominated the cellular-mediated response. In IM patients with mild disease severity the humoral-oriented immune response predominated. The described above findings suggest the need of differential approach of immune modulators application in IM therapy, depending on the level of disease severity

Kolyada T.I.

2008-05-01

370

Airway management in acute infectious croup syndromes  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The article presents the author’s experience with airway management of 500 children with acute infectious croup and epiglottitis over a 7-year period in a teaching hospital setup. A policy of early elective protective intubation under controlled condition for children with severe croup and epiglottitis, in a multidisciplinary intensive care setting resulted in a satisfactory outcome. Recent developments in the field are discussed; these include non-invasive monitoring, medical treatment opt...

Benjamin, B.

1997-01-01

371

Structural proteins of equine infectious anemia virus.  

Science.gov (United States)

Equine infectious anemia virus was found to be comprised of fourteen polypeptides of molecular weight ranging from 10,000 to 79,000. Eighty percent of the virion protein was accounted for by five polypeptides, including two non-glycosylated components (p29 and p13) comprising one-half of the virion protein and three glycoproteins (gp77/79, gp64, and gp40). PMID:215790

Cheevers, W P; Ackley, C M; Crawford, T B

1978-12-01

372

Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in feces  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Infectious prion diseases 1 – scrapie of sheep 2 and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer family 3,4 – are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals 5–8, the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prion...

Tamgu?ney, Gu?ltekin; Miller, Michael W.; Wolfe, Lisa L.; Sirochman, Tracey M.; Glidden, David V.; Palmer, Christina; Lemus, Azucena; Dearmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

2009-01-01

373

Global capacity for emerging infectious disease detection  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The increasing number of emerging infectious disease events that have spread internationally, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the 2009 pandemic A/H1N1, highlight the need for improvements in global outbreak surveillance. It is expected that the proliferation of Internet-based reports has resulted in greater communication and improved surveillance and reporting frameworks, especially with the revision of the World Health Organization's (WHO) International Health Regulation...

Chan, Emily H.; Brewer, Timothy F.; Madoff, Lawrence C.; Pollack, Marjorie P.; Sonricker, Amy L.; Keller, Mikaela; Freifeld, Clark C.; Blench, Michael; Mawudeku, Abla; Brownstein, John S.

2010-01-01

374

Detection of Infectious Tobamoviruses in Forest Soils  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Our objectives were to evaluate elution and bait plant methods to detect infectious tobamoviruses in forest soils in New York State. Soils were collected from two forest sites: Whiteface Mountain (WF) and Heiberg Forest (HF). The effectiveness of four buffers to elute tomato mosaic tobamovirus (ToMV) from organic and mineral fractions of WF soil amended with ToMV was tested, and virus content was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The effectiveness of Chenopodium quinoa (W...

Fillhart, Ronald C.; Bachand, George D.; Castello, John D.

1998-01-01

375

Infectious arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Eleven cases of infectious arthritis occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in eight patients. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus agalactiae in one patient each, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 days in patients with pyogenic arthritis. The diagnosis of joint infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was especially delayed (57 days). Four pat...

1992-01-01

376

Interdisciplinarity "in the making": modelling infectious diseases  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The main contribution of this paper to current philosophical and sociological studies on modelling is to analyse modelling as an object-oriented interdisciplinary activity and thus to bring new insights into the wide, heterogeneous discourse on tools, forms and organisation of interdisciplinary research. A detailed analysis of interdisciplinarity in the making of models is presented, focusing on long-standing interdisciplinary collaboration between specialists in infectious diseases, mathemat...

Mattila, Erika

2005-01-01

377

Intracellular Interference of Infectious Bursal Disease Virus  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A search for dominant-negative mutant polypeptides hampering infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replication has been undertaken. We have found that expression of a mutant version of the VP3 structural polypeptide known as VP3/M3, partially lacking the domain responsible for the interaction with the virus-encoded RNA polymerase, efficiently interferes with the IBDV replication cycle. Transformed cells stably expressing VP3/M3 show a significant reduction (up to 96%) in their ability to sup...

2005-01-01

378

Infectious Diseases and Vaccine Sciences: Strategic Directions  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Despite substantial progress, infectious diseases remain important causes of ill-health and premature deaths in Bangladesh. Bangladesh has experienced a >90% reduction in the incidence of deaths due to childhood diarrhoea over the last 25 years. Further reductions can be achieved through the introduction of effective vaccines against rotavirus and improvements in home hygiene, quality of drinking-water, and clinical case management, including appropriate use of oral rehydration solution and z...

Luby, Stephen P.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Zaman, K.; Hossain, Shahed; Ahmed, Tahmeed

2008-01-01

379

Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous myositis, magnetic resonance imaging findings and clinical manifestations may help in this respect.=20.

Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

1998-09-01

380

Sex differences in pediatric infectious diseases.  

Science.gov (United States)

The success of the immune response is finely balanced between, on the one hand, the need to engage vigorously with, and clear, certain pathogens; and, on the other, the requirement to minimize immunopathology and autoimmunity. Distinct immune strategies to achieve this balance have evolved in females and males and also in infancy through to adulthood. Sex differences in outcome from a range of infectious diseases can be identified from as early as fetal life, such as in congenital cytomegalovirus infection. The impact of sex hormones on the T-helper 1/T-helper 2 cytokine balance has been proposed to explain the higher severity of most infectious diseases in males. In the minority where greater morbidity and mortality is observed in females, this is hypothesized to arise because of greater immunopathology and/or autoimmunity. However, a number of unexplained exceptions to this rule are described. Studies that have actually measured the sex differences in children in the immune responses to infectious diseases and that would further test these hypotheses, are relatively scarce. PMID:24966192

Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Goulder, Philip J R

2014-07-15

 
 
 
 
381

Challenges of infectious diseases in the USA.  

Science.gov (United States)

In the USA, infectious diseases continue to exact a substantial toll on health and health-care resources. Endemic diseases such as chronic hepatitis, HIV, and other sexually transmitted infections affect millions of individuals and widen health disparities. Additional concerns include health-care-associated and foodborne infections--both of which have been targets of broad prevention efforts, with success in some areas, yet major challenges remain. Although substantial progress in reduction of the burden of vaccine-preventable diseases has been made, continued cases and outbreaks of these diseases persist, driven by various contributing factors. Worldwide, emerging and reemerging infections continue to challenge prevention and control strategies while the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance needs urgent action. An important priority for control of infectious disease is to ensure that scientific and technological advances in molecular diagnostics and bioinformatics are well integrated into public health. Broad and diverse partnerships across governments, health care, academia, and industry, and with the public, are essential to effectively reduce the burden of infectious diseases. PMID:24996590

Khabbaz, Rima F; Moseley, Robin R; Steiner, Riley J; Levitt, Alexandra M; Bell, Beth P

2014-07-01

382

Infectious diseases in Greenlanders of Upernavik  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

During one year, 1979-80, all the contacts between the 836 inhabitants of Upernavik town and the local medical officers were recorded. In the 737 native Greenlanders 1006 contacts (41%) were caused by infectious diseases, representing 705 episodes of disease. The number of contacts per episode of disease was similar in all age groups. Of these contacts 26% were caused by acute upper respiratory tract infections, 8% by other acute respiratory infections, 10% by chronic respiratory infections, 24% by non-traumatic skin infections, 7% by post-traumatic skin infections, 8% by sexually transmitted diseases, and 17% by other infections. Skin infections were most common in males, whereas all other infections were most common in females. The patterns of age specific contact rates were similar in males and females, except regarding "other infections". A peak of respiratory infections in July and of skin infections during winter was noted. The contact rate for all infectious diseases together was slightly higher than in Danish general practice, and infectious diseases also accounted for a larger proportion of all registered contacts. Contacts due to chronic respiratory infections, skin infections and sexually transmitted diseases were notably more frequent in Upernavik.

Bjerregaard, P

1985-01-01

383

Infectious granulomatous dermatitis: A clinico pathological study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Granulomatous dermatitis frequently presents a diagnostic challenge to dermatopathologists as an identical histologic picture is produced by several causes. Present study aims at classifying infectious granulomatous dermatitis based on etiology and morphology of granulomas, and to highlight significance of clinical correlation in making a specific diagnosis. A retrospective analysis of skin biopsies was done and cases of infectious granulomatous dermatitis diagnosed on histopathological examination were retrieved. A total of 586 cases of granulomatous dermatitis were retrieved; out of these, on the basis of clinico-pathological findings, 515 cases (87.8% were categorized as infectious granulomatous dermatitis. The age of the patients ranged from 7-80 years with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1. Majority of the cases were of leprosy (373 cases, 72.4% which were further classified into sub-groups according to Ridley and Jopling. Second largest group was of cutaneous tuberculosis including tuberculids (119 cases, 23.1%. Fungal dermatitis was diagnosed in 17 cases (3.3% and 6 cases (1.16% were diagnosed as post kala-azar dermal leishmaniaisis based on the lympho-histiocytic and plasma cell inflitrate. Infections form an important cause of granulomatous dermatitis with leprosy and tuberculosis as the leading causes. Adequate clinical data and workup in combination with pathological resources can help in elucidation of specific etiology and good clinicopathologic correlation.

Bal Amanjit

2006-01-01

384

Short-term effects of different genetically modified maize varieties on arthropod food web properties: an experimental field assessment.  

Science.gov (United States)

There is concern that genetically modified (GM) plants may have adverse affects on the arthropod biodiversity comprising agricultural landscapes. The present study report on a two year field experimental test of whether four different genotypic lines, some are novel with no previous field tests, of GM maize hybrids alter the structure of arthropod food webs that they harbour, relative to non-GM maize (control) that is widely used in agriculture. The different GM genotypes produced either Bt toxins, conferred glyphosate tolerance or a combination of the two traits. Quantitative food web analysis, based on short-term assessment assigning a total of 243,896 arthropod individuals collected from the treatments to their positions in food webs, revealed that complex and stable food webs persisted in each maize treatment. Moreover, food web structure remained relatively unchanged by the GM-genotype. The results suggest that at least in short-term period these particular GM maize genotypes will not have adverse effects on arthropod biota of agricultural landscapes. PMID:24937207

Szénási, Agnes; Pálinkás, Zoltán; Zalai, Mihály; Schmitz, Oswald J; Balog, Adalbert

2014-01-01

385

Mineral cycling in soil and litter arthropod food chains. Three-year progress report, November 1, 1980-January 31, 1984  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report summarizes our analysis of trophic dynamics in soil fauna including their impact on the decomposition process, investigation of relationships between soil fauna and microflora, development and testing of models describing these processes, and documentation of rates of movement of nutrients along soil arthropod food chains

1984-01-01

386

Subdivision of arthropod cap-n-collar expression domains is restricted to Mandibulata  

Science.gov (United States)

Background The monophyly of Mandibulata - the division of arthropods uniting pancrustaceans and myriapods - is consistent with several morphological characters, such as the presence of sensory appendages called antennae and the eponymous biting appendage, the mandible. Functional studies have demonstrated that the patterning of the mandible requires the activity of the Hox gene Deformed and the transcription factor cap-n-collar (cnc) in at least two holometabolous insects: the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the beetle Tribolium castaneum. Expression patterns of cnc from two non-holometabolous insects and a millipede have suggested conservation of the labral and mandibular domains within Mandibulata. However, the activity of cnc is unknown in crustaceans and chelicerates, precluding understanding of a complete scenario for the evolution of patterning of this appendage within arthropods. To redress these lacunae, here we investigate the gene expression of the ortholog of cnc in Parhyale hawaiensis, a malacostracan crustacean, and two chelicerates: the harvestman Phalangium opilio, and the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus. Results In the crustacean P. hawaiensis, the segmental expression of Ph-cnc is the same as that reported previously in hexapods and myriapods, with two distinct head domains in the labrum and the mandibular segment. In contrast, Po-cnc and Cs-cnc expression is not enriched in the labrum of either chelicerate, but instead is expressed at comparable levels in all appendages. In further contrast to mandibulate orthologs, the expression domain of Po-cnc posterior to the labrum is not confined within the expression domain of Po-Dfd. Conclusions Expression data from two chelicerate outgroup taxa suggest that the signature two-domain head expression pattern of cnc evolved at the base of Mandibulata. The observation of the archetypal labral and mandibular segment domains in a crustacean exemplar supports the synapomorphic nature of mandibulate cnc expression. The broader expression of Po-cnc with respect to Po-Dfd in chelicerates further suggests that the regulation of cnc by Dfd was also acquired at the base of Mandibulata. To test this hypothesis, future studies examining panarthropod cnc evolution should investigate expression of the cnc ortholog in arthropod outgroups, such as Onychophora and Tardigrada.

2014-01-01

387

Mormon Cricket Control in Utah's West Desert - Evaluation of Impacts of the Pesticide Diflubenzuron on Nontarget Arthropod Communities  

Science.gov (United States)

Grasshopper and Mormon cricket (Orthoptera) populations periodically build to extremely high numbers and can cause significant economic damage in rangelands and agricultural fields of the Great Plains and Intermountain West. A variety of insecticides have been applied to control population outbreaks, with recent efforts directed at minimizing impacts to nontarget fauna in treated ecosystems. A relatively new insecticide for control of Orthoptera is diflubenzuron, which acts to inhibit chitin production, ultimately causing death during the molt following ingestion of the insecticide. All arthropods, including insects, mites, and crustaceans, use chitin to build their exoskeletons and will die if they are unable to produce it during the next molt. Diflubenzuron is not taxon specific - it affects all arthropods that ingest it, except adult insects, which do not molt. Consequently, application of this pesticide has the potential to significantly reduce not only target populations but all terrestrial and aquatic arthropods within treatment zones. Some research has been done in the Great Plains on the impact of diflubenzuron on nontarget arthropods in the context of grasshopper-control programs, but no work has been done in the Great Basin in Mormon cricket-control areas. This study was instigated in anticipation of the need for extensive control of Orthoptera outbreaks in Utah's west desert during 2005, and it was designed to sample terrestrial and aquatic arthropod communities in both treated and untreated zones. Three areas were sampled: Grouse Creek, Ibapah, and Vernon. High mortality of Mormon cricket eggs in the wet, cool spring of 2005 restricted the need to control Mormon crickets to Grouse Creek. Diflubenzuron was applied (aerial reduced agent-area treatment) in May 2005. Terrestrial and aquatic arthropod communities were sampled before and after application of diflubenzuron in the Grouse Creek area of northwestern Utah in May and June of 2005. In July 2005, U.S. Geological Survey scientists sampled areas in Ibapah and Vernon that had been treated with diflubenzuron in 2004, along with adjacent untreated areas. Pitfall traps at four treated and four untreated sites were used to collect ground-dwelling terrestrial arthropods. Semiquantitative sweep surveys of aquatic habitats were made before treatment, 2 weeks after treatment, and 4 months after treatment (after leaf fall) at Grouse Creek. One-year post-treatment samples were collected by using the same methods for terrestrial and aquatic arthropods at Ibapah and Vernon in July 2005 (treatments applied in June 2004). More than 124,000 terrestrial arthropods were collected from the three study areas, and more than 200,000 aquatic invertebrates were collected in the aquatic samples. Direct effects of diflubenzuron on aquatic and terrestrial arthropod communities were not apparent in our data from Grouse Creek. The treatment was designed to avoid spraying pesticide on water bodies, and no measurable effects on aquatic communities from either springs or streams were observed, with the exception of the reduction of taxa richness at Vernon (a result confounded by elevational differences in the treatment and nontreatment zones). Some trends indicate diflubenzuron may affect some terrestrial taxa. Ant communities showed some differences, with possible lag effects at Ibapah and Vernon. Forelius was more abundant, while Tapinoma and, perhaps, Formica declined in treated zones in these two study areas. Solenopsis also was more numerous at treated Ibapah sites but varied without pattern at Vernon. Scorpions were abundant at Grouse Creek and Ibapah but rare at Vernon. Numbers did not change during several weeks at Grouse Creek, but at Ibapah, numbers at treated sites were much lower than at untreated sites. The Lygaeidae (in the order Hemiptera) were more abundant in the untreated zones at Ibapah and Vernon, although significantly so only at Ibapah. Lygaeidae were absent from th

Graham, Tim B.; Brasher, Anne M. D.; Close, Rebecca N.

2008-01-01

388

Cross-neutralization studies with group A arthropod-borne viruses.  

Science.gov (United States)

In an extension of recent work on the antigenic interrelationships of arthropod-borne viruses, the plaque-inhibition test has been applied to the study of 15 Group A strains. Middelburg and eastern equine encephalomyelitis viruses show no relationship to any other virus in the group. Sindbis and western equine encephalomyelitis viruses show a one-way relationship only. The remaining viruses all share some antigenic components which react with hyperimmune rabbit sera prepared against Semliki Forest virus. However, using single-dose rabbit sera, or more specific mouse-immune sera, four distinct subgroups can be defined. One includes Semliki Forest virus strains; another Chikungunya virus and its substrains, Vereeniging and TH 35 viruses; the third contains O'nyong-nyong virus; and the fourth Mayaro and Uruma viruses.This paper also demonstrates how the plaque-inhibition technique may be used for the rapid identification of new virus isolates. PMID:13737288

PORTERFIELD, J S

1961-01-01

389

Iberian Odonata distribution: data of the BOS Arthropod Collection (University of Oviedo, Spain).  

Science.gov (United States)

Odonata are represented from the Iberian Peninsula by 79 species. However, there exists a significant gap in accessible knowledge about these species,especially regarding their distribution. This data paper describes the specimen-based Odonata data of the Arthropod Collection of the Department of Biología de Organismos y Sistemas (BOS), University of Oviedo, Spain. The specimens were mainly collected from the Iberian Peninsula (98.63% of the data records), especially the northern region. The earliest specimen deposited in the collection dates back to 1950, while the 1980's and 2000's are the best-represented time periods. Between 1950 and 2009, 16, 604 Odonata specimens were deposited and are documented in the dataset. Approximately 20% of the specimens belong to the families Coenagrionidae and Calopterygidae. Specimens include the holotype and paratypes of the Iberian subspecies Calopteryx haemorrhoidalis asturica Ocharan, 1983 and Sympetrum vulgatum ibericum Ocharan, 1985. The complete dataset is also provided in Darwin Core Archive format. PMID:23794917

Torralba-Burrial, Antonio; Ocharan, Francisco J

2013-01-01

390

The towering orogeny of New Guinea as a trigger for arthropod megadiversity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Early studies on Melanesian mountain systems provided insights for fundamental evolutionary and ecological concepts. These island-like systems are thought to provide opportunities in the form of newly formed, competition-free niches. Here we show that a hyperdiverse radiation of freshwater arthropods originated in the emerging central New Guinea orogen, out of Australia, about 10 million years ago. Further diversification was mainly allopatric, with repeated more recent colonization of lowlands as they emerged in the form of colliding oceanic island arcs, continental fragments and the Papuan Peninsula, as well as recolonization of the central orogen. We unveil a constant and ongoing process of lineage accumulation while the carrying capacity of the island is about to be reached, suggesting that lineage diversification speed now exceeds that of landmass/new ecological opportunity formation. Therefore, the central orogeny of New Guinea acts as a motor of diversification for the entire region. PMID:24874774

Toussaint, Emmanuel F A; Hall, Robert; Monaghan, Michael T; Sagata, Katayo; Ibalim, Sentiko; Shaverdo, Helena V; Vogler, Alfried P; Pons, Joan; Balke, Michael

2014-01-01

391

An arthropod defensin expressed by the hemocytes of the American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Acari: Ixodidae).  

Science.gov (United States)

Both soluble and cell-mediated components are involved in the innate immune response of arthropods. Injection of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease agent, results in the secretion of defensin into the hemolymph of the ixodid tick, Dermacentor variabilis. The presence of the peptide is observed as early as 15 min post-challenge and remains present through 18 h post-challenge. As observed in insects and soft ticks, the transcript for defensin is detected as early as 1 h post-challenge in D. variabilis. RT-PCR resulted in an amplicon of 624 bp with a 225 bp region that translates to a 74 amino acid preprodefensin. The defensin encoding region was amplified, cloned and sequenced from the hemocytes. It appears as though defensin is stored in the granulocytes of the hemolymph and secreted into the hemolymph upon bacterial insult. The role of defensin as a contributing factor in determining vector competency is discussed. PMID:14563361

Ceraul, Shane M; Sonenshine, Daniel E; Ratzlaff, Robert E; Hynes, Wayne L

2003-11-01

392

[Species-area and species-abundance relationships of arthropod community in various vegetation restoration areas in Zhifanggou watershed, Shaanxi province of Northwest China].  

Science.gov (United States)

Taking the Zhifanggou watershed in Ansai, Shaanxi Province of Northwest China as a study unit, an investigation on the arthropods in 8 forest stands was conducted from 2006 to 2008, with the species-area and species-abundance relationships of the arthropods in these stands analyzed by various mathematical models. In these forest stands, the species-area relationship of the arthropods accorded with the formula S= CAm With the increase of investigation area, the species number approached to a constant, and the corresponding smallest investigation area was in the order of natural bush > natural forest > Populus davidiana+Robinia pseudoacacia forest > Hippaphae rhamnoides +Caragana mocrophylla forest> Periploca sepium forest > Hippaphae rhamnoides forest > Robinia pseudoacacia forest > Caragana mocrophylla forest, indicating that the more complex the stands, the larger the minimum area needed to be investigated. Based on sampling investigation, the species-abundance models of the arthropods in various stands were established. Lognormal distribution model (LN) was most suitable to fit the arthropod community in natural recovery stands, suggesting that in the arthropod community, there were more species with medial individual amount and fewer abundant species and rare species, and no obvious dominant species. LogCauchy distribution model (LC) was most suitable to fit the arthropod community in mixed and pure stands. As compared with natural recovery stand, mixed and pure stands had more abundant and rare species, and more dominant species. PMID:23705399

Zhang, Feng; Hong, Bo; Li, Ying-Mei; Chen, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Shu-Lian; Zhao, Hui-Yan

2013-02-01

393

Modern optics in exceptionally preserved eyes of Early Cambrian arthropods from Australia  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite the status of the eye as an ``organ of extreme perfection'', theory suggests that complex eyes can evolve very rapidly. The fossil record has, until now, been inadequate in providing insight into the early evolution of eyes during the initial radiation of many animal groups known as the Cambrian explosion. This is surprising because Cambrian Burgess-Shale-type deposits are replete with exquisitely preserved animals, especially arthropods, that possess eyes. However, with the exception of biomineralized trilobite eyes, virtually nothing is known about the details of their optical design. Here we report exceptionally preserved fossil eyes from the Early Cambrian (~515 million years ago) Emu Bay Shale of South Australia, revealing that some of the earliest arthropods possessed highly advanced compound eyes, each with over 3,000 large ommatidial lenses and a specialized `bright zone'. These are the oldest non-biomineralized eyes known in such detail, with preservation quality exceeding that found in the Burgess Shale and Chengjiang deposits. Non-biomineralized eyes of similar complexity are otherwise unknown until about 85 million years later. The arrangement and size of the lenses indicate that these eyes belonged to an active predator that was capable of seeing in low light. The eyes are more complex than those known from contemporaneous trilobites and are as advanced as those of many living forms. They provide further evidence that the Cambrian explosion involved rapid innovation in fine-scale anatomy as well as gross morphology, and are consistent with the concept that the development of advanced vision helped to drive this great evolutionary event.

Lee, Michael S. Y.; Jago, James B.; García-Bellido, Diego C.; Edgecombe, Gregory D.; Gehling, James G.; Paterson, John R.

2011-06-01

394

Artrópodes associados ao excremento de aves poedeiras / Associated arthropodes in the laying hen excrement  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Realizou-se um estudo sobre a fauna de artrópodes associados a fezes de aves poedeiras em granja do estado de São Paulo, de janeiro de 2001 a dezembro de 2002. O objetivo foi verificar a freqüência de dípteros e coleópteros coletados por meio do funil de Berlese e pelo método de flutuação, além de c [...] orrelacionar os métodos de coletas e a possível sazonalidade dos mesmos ao longo das estações. Das setenta e cinco coletas realizadas, capturaram-se 29.499 artrópodes, sendo 16.702 Diptera (seis famílias) e 12.797 Coleoptera (quatro famílias). Algumas espécies de artrópodes apresentaram relação direta entre o método de coleta, as estações do ano e a precipitação pluvial, com aumento significativo do número de insetos coletados em determinadas épocas do ano. Abstract in english A research about arthropode fauna in laying hen excrement was carried out in a poultry house in the State of São Paulo, from January 2001 to December 2002. The objective was to verify the frequency of Diptera and Coleoptera collected by Berlese funil and flutuation methods, and to show correlation b [...] etween the collect methods and sazonality possible in the currents seasons. A total of 29,499 insects were collected from seventy five collects, being 16,702 Diptera (six families) and 12,797 Coleoptera (four families). Some arthropodes presented direct relation with the collect method, the seasons of the years and the rainfall precipitation, with significant increase in the number of insects collected in certain periods of the year.

Lopes, Welber D.Z.; Costa, Fábio H. da; Lopes, Wilton C.Z.; Balieiro, Júlio C. de C.; Soares, Vando E.; Prado, Ângelo P. do.

395

The challenge of developing and utilizing transgenic arthropods in the Caribbean  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

To date transgenic arthropods are not being utilized within the Caribbean to control agricultural pests. Bio-control in the region is largely focused on the control of the Pink mealybug since infestations of this pest in any region can result in restrictions being placed on the export of fresh produce into non-infected countries. Other pests controlled by use of conventional bio-control agents include citrus blackfly, citrus leafminer, sugarcane stemborer, coffee berry borer and coconut whitefly. Control of these economic pests is of great importance as crops such as sugarcane, coffee and citrus are major foreign exchange earners in some countries. Applications for the importation, movement and release of these organisms are done through the Pesticide Control Board of the Ministry of Agriculture. Generally guidelines of the FAO code of conduct for the import and release of bio-control agents are used. It is almost inevitable that with the need to increase productivity in the agri-food sector, combined with the need to reduce negative impacts of agri-chemical use, regional research and development efforts will be focused on developing cost effective means of controlling pests common to the region. Such research and development efforts must combine conventional control with genetic engineering methods. Several countries in the Caribbean region are currently examining their regulatory mechanisms to address the trans-boundary movement and environmental release of genetically modified organisms specifically for agricultural purposes. Although most attention has been focused on crop and food regulations some attention will be placed on developing regulations for the use of transgenic arthropods used to control common economic pests. (author)

2006-03-01

396

Estimating global arthropod species richness: refining probabilistic models using probability bounds analysis.  

Science.gov (United States)

A key challenge in the estimation of tropical arthropod species richness is the appropriate management of the large uncertainties associated with any model. Such uncertainties had largely been ignored until recently, when we attempted to account for uncertainty associated with model variables, using Monte Carlo analysis. This model is restricted by various assumptions. Here, we use a technique known as probability bounds analysis to assess the influence of assumptions about (1) distributional form and (2) dependencies between variables, and to construct probability bounds around the original model prediction distribution. The original Monte Carlo model yielded a median estimate of 6.1 million species, with a 90 % confidence interval of [3.6, 11.4]. Here we found that the probability bounds (p-bounds) surrounding this cumulative distribution were very broad, owing to uncertainties in distributional form and dependencies between variables. Replacing the implicit assumption of pure statistical independence between variables in the model with no dependency assumptions resulted in lower and upper p-bounds at 0.5 cumulative probability (i.e., at the median estimate) of 2.9-12.7 million. From here, replacing probability distributions with probability boxes, which represent classes of distributions, led to even wider bounds (2.4-20.0 million at 0.5 cumulative probability). Even the 100th percentile of the uppermost bound produced (i.e., the absolutely most conservative scenario) did not encompass the well-known hyper-estimate of 30 million species of tropical arthropods. This supports the lower estimates made by several authors over the last two decades. PMID:22968292

Hamilton, Andrew J; Novotný, Vojtech; Waters, Edward K; Basset, Yves; Benke, Kurt K; Grimbacher, Peter S; Miller, Scott E; Samuelson, G Allan; Weiblen, George D; Yen, Jian D L; Stork, Nigel E

2013-02-01

397

Initial study of arthropod succession on pig carrion in a central European urban habitat.  

Science.gov (United States)

We conducted a carrion succession study within a restricted urban backyard in the city of Vienna, Austria (16 degrees 22'E, 48 degrees 12'N) from May to November 2001 to analyze sequence and composition of the local carrion visiting fauna. Two medium sized clothed domestic pig carcasses (Sus scrofa Linnaeus), were used as surrogate human models. In total, 42 arthropod species from the families Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Sepsidae, Piophilidae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, Sphaeroceridae, Phoridae, Drosophilidae, Anthomyiidae, and Lauxaniidae (Diptera), Formicidae, Braconidae, Pteromalidae, and Vespidae (Hymenoptera), Silphidae, Staphylinidae, Histeridae, Cleridae, and Dermestidae (Coleoptera), as well as species from the orders Isopoda and Acari were collected during the decomposition of these carcasses. A significant feature in this study was the high abundance of Calliphora vomitoria (L.) and Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann). In the experiment conducted May to June, larvae and adults of C. vomitoria outnumbered all other blow fly species, followed by Protophormia terraenovae (Robineau-Desvoidy), C. vicina Robineau-Desvoidy, and Lucilia sericata (Meigen). C. vomitoria is generally considered to be rural in distribution, where it prefers shaded locations. The presence of this species in rural as well as in urban habitats in Austria precludes this species as biogeographic indicator. In the study beginning in August large numbers of female adults of the nonindigeous blow fly C. albiceps began oviposition at day 3 after placement of the cadaver. The predatory second and third instars of C. albiceps larvae subsequently almost monopolized the cadaver. C. albiceps is generally described as tropical and subtropical species. The observed northward expansion of its range beyond southern Europe obviously decreases the value of C. albiceps in estimating place of death, in that it is no longer exclusive to southern regions. Our results clearly show, that caution must be used when drawing conclusions from succession data generated in different geographic areas. Moreover, this study demonstrates, that arthropod mediated decomposition of a 44 kg exposed pig carcass in a central European urban habitat can be completed within 3 wk. PMID:15185958

Grassberger, M; Frank, C

2004-05-01

398

Independent origins of vectored plant pathogenic bacteria from arthropod-associated Arsenophonus endosymbionts.  

Science.gov (United States)

The genus Arsenophonus (Gammaproteobacteria) is comprised of intracellular symbiotic bacteria that are widespread across the arthropods. These bacteria can significantly influence the ecology and life history of their hosts. For instance, Arsenophonus nasoniae causes an excess of females in the progeny of parasitoid wasps by selectively killing the male embryos. Other Arsenophonus bacteria have been suspected to protect insect hosts from parasitoid wasps or to expand the host plant range of phytophagous sap-sucking insects. In addition, a few reports have also documented some Arsenophonus bacteria as plant pathogens. The adaptation to a plant pathogenic lifestyle seems to be promoted by the infection of sap-sucking insects in the family Cixiidae, which then transmit these bacteria to plants during the feeding process. In this study, we define the specific localization of an Arsenophonus bacterium pathogenic to sugar beet and strawberry plants within the plant hosts and the insect vector, Pentastiridius leporinus (Hemiptera: Cixiidae), using fluorescence in situ hybridization assays. Phylogenetic analysis on 16S rRNA and nucleotide coding sequences, using both maximum likelihood and Bayesian criteria, revealed that this bacterium is not a sister taxon to "Candidatus Phlomobacter fragariae," a previously characterized Arsenophonus bacterium pathogenic to strawberry plants in France and Japan. Ancestral state reconstruction analysis indicated that the adaptation to a plant pathogenic lifestyle likely evolved from an arthropod-associated lifestyle and showed that within the genus Arsenophonus, the plant pathogenic lifestyle arose independently at least twice. We also propose a novel Candidatus status, "Candidatus Arsenophonus phytopathogenicus" novel species, for the bacterium associated with sugar beet and strawberry diseases and transmitted by the planthopper P. leporinus. PMID:21892672

Bressan, Alberto; Terlizzi, Federica; Credi, Rino

2012-04-01

399

Peculiarities of infectious diseases course accompanied by quinsy syndrome in children (data from children infectious hospital  

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Full Text Available The research goal is to study morbidity dynamics for the period of 15 years and to determine clinical signs that accompany quinsy syndrome (diphtheria, infectious mononucleosis, scarlet fever, quinsy. Retrospective study analysis of annual reports and case-histories was carried out. 323 cases of infectious diseases accompanied by quinsy syndrome were examined. Clinical and epidemic signs of diseases were determined during the period of morbidity raise. The current clinical course of diseases was characterized in detail. The significant percentage of renal complications in case of pharyngonasal cavity lesion was shown

Ovchinnikova T.A.

2011-03-01

400

Selected emerging infectious diseases of squamata.  

Science.gov (United States)

It is important that reptile clinicians have an appreciation for the epidemiology, clinical signs, pathology, diagnostic options, and prognostic parameters for novel and emerging infectious diseases in squamates. This article provides an update on emerging squamate diseases reported in the primary literature within the past decade. Updates on adenovirus, iridovirus, rhabdovirus, arenavirus, and paramyxovirus epidemiology, divergence, and host fidelity are presented. A new emerging bacterial disease of Uromastyx species, Devriesea agamarum, is reviewed. Chrysosporium ophiodiicola-associated mortality in North American snakes is discussed. Cryptosporidium and pentastomid infections in squamates are highlighted among emerging parasitic infections. PMID:23642865

Latney, La'toya V; Wellehan, James

2013-05-01