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Sample records for anther culture response

  1. Low dose gamma ray effect on inhancer of anther culture response in some spring wheat genotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this investigation, the response of anther culture in three wheat genotypes (Tajan, Atila, R-12) after a treatment with a low dose of gamma ray was studied. Spikes of these genotypes were irradiated in doses of 2, 3 Gy, then cultured in the modified P4 medium, containing 200 mgl-1 Glutamine, 15% Ficol, 2 mgl-1 2,4-D, and 0.5 mgl-1 Kinitin. It was found that there is a significant difference between the genotypes, and also between the irradiated treatment levels and the non-irradiated treatment. All of the genotypes showed a low response to the anther culture meaning a decrease in the response with irradiation. 90% of Calli of Atila, 67% of R-12 and 46% of Tajan in control treatment produced plants. But the Calli of irradiated anthers did not produced any plant (green or albino). Generally by the gamma irradiation, we observed a low response in the Calli and plant let production

  2. EFFECT OF COLD PRETREATMENT ON IMPROVING ANTHER CULTURE RESPONSE OF RICE (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovelin Kaushal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Present study was designed to evaluate the effect of cold pretreatment temperatures (4, 8 and 12º C and durations of treatment (5, 9 and 13 d on anther culture efficiency among 13 genotypes. Anthers were cultured on N6 medium supplemented with 2, 4-D (2 mg/L and Kinetin (0.5 mg/L. Anther inoculated media petri dish were incubated in the dark at 25 ± 1° C for callus induction. When calli were 1-2 mm in diameter, they were transferred to MS regeneration medium supplemented with Kinetin (1 mg/L, NAA (1 mg/L and BAP (2.5 mg/L and were incubated at 25 ± 1° C under 16 h/8 h light/dark condition. The cold treatment at 12º C for 5 days was found to be the most effective in all experimental genotypes used for the study. Out of 13 genotypes evaluated, IR58025B (25eB was highly responsive for both callus induction as well as green plant regeneration.

  3. Response of anther culture in vitro to irradiation of spike and culturing with Al stress in barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spikes of two barley lines treated with 60Co γ-radiation as anther culture materials, the callus induction and green plant regeneration were investigated on the media containing Al. The results showed that the frequency of callus induction was dramatically decreased by irradiation treatment and green plant regeneration was failed at a dose of 10 Gy. The calli was obtained from anthers cultured with Al-medium, and also green plants were regenerated even in higher Al concentration. The frequency of callus induction was reduced in culturing with higher stress of Al, and the green plant regeneration was also decreased. (authors)

  4. A survey on the response of some wheat genotypes to haploid production through anther culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was carried out to investigate the response of five Iranian wheat cultivars (Tajan, Atila, Mahooti, red Bafghi and white Bafghi) and four segregating F 3 wheat lines compared to a tester genotype in another culture system for the purpose of haploid production. Anthers were planted in p 4 induction medium. Cold and gamma radiation pretreatments were also applied to study the stimulating effect on call i/plant lets production. Conventional growth conditions in the green house were not met du c to lack of mean; of controlling day temperature. None of the cultivars were produced call i in p 4 induction medium. The segregating F 3 lines increasing percentages of call i production belonged to lines 2044, 2208, and 2005, respectively. Cold pretreatment showed positive stimulating effect on call i production only in lines 2005, and 2097. The combined pretreatments of segregating lines before being plated in the induction medium had a significant effect in calc production regarding line 2005. In case of line 2044, however, only the gamma radiation dose of 2 Gy combined with the cold pretreatment was true. Line 2097 showed no positive effect of simulation in call i production because of the combined pretreatments. The highest plant let production percentage belonged to line 2005 and followed by lines 2208, and 2044. Considering that the conventional growth conditions for donor plants were not met in the greenhouse, the response to haploid production of wheat genotypes used in this experiment can not necessarily be true. The optimum donor plant growth conditions is one the principal conditions for obtaining satisfactory results from another culture system to be used in the breeding scheme

  5. Evaluation of effect of different gamma ray doses on anther culture response in two Iranian wheat landraces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat according to its importance as a source of food is the most important strategic agricultural product and has the highest level of under planting lands around the world. Double haploid induction methods are able to raise wheat breeding efficiency through decreasing length of breeding programming and increasing selection efficacy. In this experiment for determining the effect of gamma radiation of seeds on anther culture response of wheat, two recalcitrant Iranian wheat landraces, Graecum and Nigricum with no response to anther culture were chosen. Callus induction and plant regeneration traits from anther culture of these landraces and twenty of their random selected mutant genotypes which were produced through seed radiation with 100, 150, 200, 250Gy of gamma ray doses were evaluated. A factorial design based on completely randomized design with five replication was used to compare callus induction and plant regeneration percents of genotypes. Gamma ray doses levels and genotypes were two factors of this experiment which had a significant effect on both of callus induction and plant regeneration traits. An evaluation of the means revealed that the highest level of callus induction is noticed in 200Gy (12.5%) and that of plant induction is noticed in 150Gy (67.28%). the highest mean of callus induction (68.6%) was obtained in genotype L9.200.2 as a mutant of Nigricum landrace and The highest mean of plant induction (93.12%) was obtained in genotype L8.150.1 as a mutant of Graecum landrace. (author)

  6. Study of genotype, cold pre-treatment, low-dosage Gamma irradiation and 2,4-D concentration effects on wheat anther culture response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study. effects of genotype, cold pre-treatment. low dosage Gamma irradiation and 2, 4-D concentration on response of three wheat genotypes (Atrak, F3 2005 and F3 2104) to anther culture were investigated. Seeds of donor genotypes were grown under field condition in early spring. Anthers from donor plants were collected and plated on modified CHB medium containing 2,4-D (2 and 4 mgl-1), 0.5 mgl-1 Kinetin and gl-1 Sucrose. Number of calli formed in 100 anthers and number of planet produced from 100 calli were counted. Results indicated that genotypes. cold pre-treatments and 2,4-D concentrations had significant effects on response of wheat genotypes to anther production, while F3 2104 the lowest. It would be concluded that androgenic traits are controlled by genotype and environmental factors. Furthermore this traits are controlled independently

  7. Response of different genotypes of wheat, rice and black beans to anther, embryo and other tissue cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the basic studies we have been conducting in our laboratory is to establish callus induction and in vitro plant regeneration protocols starting with several tissues of Guatemalan varieties of wheat (Triticum aesticum L.), rice (Oryza sativa L.) and especially black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in order to obtain disease resistance, earliness, and dwarf plants. Wheat anthers and immature embryos of varieties Patzun, Comalapa, Chocoyo, and Xequijel cultured in N6, Potato II, and MS basal media supplemented with auxin and cytokinin gave the best responses in callus induction and plant regeneration. Anthers and mature embryos of indica rice varieties Precozicta and Virginai, when cultured in MS, B5, N6, and Potato II basal media with different hormonal combinations gave a good response in callus induction. However, a satisfactory response in plant regeneration was not obtained. With black beans, when hypocotyls and mature embryos of black bean varieties Quinack Che and Parramos were cultured in MS basal medium supplemented with different concentrations of NAA and kinetin, more than 60% callus induction was produced. When Quinack Che calli were transferred to MS basal medium supplemented with 1 mg/l NAA plus 0.5 mg/l BAP, green points of regeneration were visible in these calli. (author). 34 refs, 28 tabs

  8. Anther Culture in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Vega, Vernica; Segu-Simarro, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Anther culture is the most popular of the techniques used to induce microspore embryogenesis. This technique is well set up in a wide range of crops, including pepper. In this chapter, a protocol for anther culture in pepper is described. The protocol presented hereby includes the steps from the selection of buds from donor plants to the regeneration and acclimatization of doubled haploid plants derived from the embryos, as well as a description of how to analyze the ploidy level of the regenerated plants. PMID:26619881

  9. Anther Culture in Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotino, Giuseppe Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The technique of in vitro anther culture is the most favorite to incite the production of plants from microspore through direct embryogenesis or regeneration from callus. Anther culture has been employed since 1980s in eggplant to obtain double-haploid plants from microspore derived embryos. From that time it has been refined and widely applied both at commercial level for a fast generation double-haploid parental lines of F1 hybrids, as well as for experimental studies as the complete homozygosis of the microspore-derived plants make more simply the genetic analysis. In this chapter, a step-by-step procedure is reported, taking into consideration all the aspects of the technique, including the growth condition of the anther donor plant, the in vitro regeneration of the androgenetic plantlets, their ploidy analysis, and the colchicine treatment to double the chromosome number of the haploids. PMID:26619880

  10. Attempts to induce haploids in anther cultures of sugar, fodder and wild species of beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Rogozińska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, aimed at obtaining beet haploids from anthers, the effect of mineral media, potato and sugar beet extract and p-fluorophenylalanine (PFP in combination with growth substances was tested. Nutrient-starved plants as anther-donors, anther-starvation, cold treatment and photoperiod were also analysed. On all mineral media the anthers produced callus and roots; however, the percentage depended on the combination of growth substances used. The best medium for differentiation was that of Linsmaier and Skoog with 25 µM zeatin or 6-(3-methyl-2-butenylaminopurine with 5 µM naphthalene-l-acetic acid (25.5%. The addition of PFP caused an increase in the percentage of anther differentiation (41.6%. Besides callus and roots on one of the anthers (in ca. 140000 tested, vegetative buds were formed from which numerous plants were obtained (2n. Plant and anther nutrient starvation did not improve the anther response to differentiation, nor did it induce haploid development, similarly as cold treatment of inflorescences or isolated anthers. The anthers of wild species showed lower ability to differentiate than those of sugar or fodder beets. Cytological analyses showed formation of multicellular structures until ca. the 12-th day of anther culture; afterwards, they degenerated.

  11. Callus Production and Plant Regeneration from Anther Culture of Some Turkish Barley Cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    SAVAŞKAN, Çigdem

    1999-01-01

    Anther culture of four different barley cultivars ( Hordeum vulgareL. cvs. Anadolu, Cumhuriyet-50, Obruk-86 and Tokak-157/37) currently cultivated in Turkey has been investigated. Two different culture media (BAC3 and FHG) were used and the effect of a 21-day cold pretreatment was studied. Androgenesis on BAC3 medium was evaluated statistically in all genotypes and the percentage of anther response and the frequency of calli production were found significantly different (P

  12. Using Anther Culture Method for Flax Breeding Intensification

    OpenAIRE

    Miķelsone, Andra; Grauda, Dace; Stramkale, Veneranda; Ornicāns, Reinis; Rashal, Isaak

    2015-01-01

    Flax breeding is a long and complicated process based on hybridization and following selection of the best plants. Because of possible occasional cross-pollination the development of genetically stable homozygous lines could last more than 15 years. For more rapid creating of initial material for flax breeding anther culture methods for producing doubled haploid (DH) lines could be used successfully. The goal of this study was to develop the best anther culture protocol for producing DH lines...

  13. Anther and isolated microspore culture of wheat lines from northwestern and eastern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, I B; Olesen, A; Hansen, N J P; Andersen, S B

    1999-01-01

    the technique has been used successfully. On average, eastern European wheat lines produced 3.6 green plants per 111 anthers, while only 1.4 green plants per 111 anthers were obtained in north-western European lines. This difference was due to the high capacity for embryo formation among the eastern...... European lines, while the ability to regenerate green plants was widespread in both germplasm groups. Isolated wheat microspore culture performed on 85 of these wheat lines gave an average 3.7-fold increase in green plants per anther compared with the anther culture response. The increased recovery of...... green plants was due to improved plant regeneration and increased green plant percentage from embryos derived from isolated microspore culture....

  14. Combined effect of induced mutations and media for improving genetic architecture of brassica through anther culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation and media effect on the anther culture response of two brassica napus varieties (i.e. Pak cheen and Salam) were studied. It was observed that low doses of gamma radiation (100-250 rads) enhanced the anther callusing response of the varieties on both of the cultured media. Different genotypic response was observed in case of plant regeneration. In variety Salam Plant lets were regenerated from the calli treated up to the dose of 750 rads. However, in case of variety Pak-cheen the calli could not be differentiated beyond 100 rads. (author)

  15. Effect of the genotype and gamma irradiation on the anther cultures of a 10x10 diallel cross of wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anther culture responsiveness, irradiation effect and reciprocal effect were evaluated on ten genotypes (V1-V10) and a 101x0 diallel cross. Gamma irradiation dose of 100 Gy was applied to seeds of parents and F1 cross from which the donor plants were grown. Non-irradiated donor plants were also used for comparison. Anthers were plated on potato-2 callus induction medium and calli formed were transferred to MS medium supplemented with sucrose (3%), indolacetic acid (1.0 mg/L), kinetin (1.0 mg/L), inositol (100 mg/L) and solidified with agar (0.7%). Genotypes showed big differences for callus induction, plant regeneration and anther culturability rate. The most responsive materials were V2, V10 and V5 with 76.0, 27.4 and 10.8 green plants per 100 anthers respectively. No irradiation effect was found for the parents nor the F1 crosses on the pooled data. Mean anther culture response of specific genotypes showed that irradiation significantly increased anther culturability rate of V3 from 0.1 to 27.6 green plants per 100 anthers. No reciprocal effect was observed. (author)

  16. Studies on the androgenesis in cultured anthers of Atropa belladonna L.

    OpenAIRE

    E. Misiura; M. Zenkteler

    2015-01-01

    Embryological investigations were carried out on developing anthers of Atropa belladonna grown in natural conditions and on anthers which produced androgenic embryos in the in vitro culture. The anatomy of developing anthers was analized in details. Meiotic abnormalities were not detected and 36 bivalents were present at metaphase of meiosis I. About 90% of pollen grains were normally developed. Anthers inoculated at the tetrad or microspore stage and cultured on Linsmaier and Skoog medium wi...

  17. Improvement of bananas (Musa cvs.) through in vitro anther culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agricultural products play a great role in the Colombian economy, and the banana is one of the most important. Since 1981, one of the more serious problems effecting production of this crop is the fungus Mycosphaerella fijensis sp. difformis, that causes black sigatoka disease. Most of the recent efforts to control this disease have been directed towards the identification of clones tolerant or resistant to this disease. One alternative approach is the use of anther culture to obtain resistant haploid plants. Diploid clones (Musa - AA) have been used as a model in this study. The results presented here identify the most appropriate stage of anther development for callus induction and proliferation, and treatments that reduce tissue browning. (author). 12 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Callus induction and plant regeneration from anther culture of rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthers of five mutant lines of rice derived from the variety ICTA VIRGINIA and five derived from the variety PRECOZICTA as well as the two parental varieties (both varieties indica) containing uninucleate pollen grains, were cultured on a N6 agar medium with 5% sucrose concentration and supplemented with 3 mg/l NAA, 1 mg/l kinetin and 1 mg/l 2,4-D. The proportion of anthers that produced calli varied from 0% for the mutant lines 881 and 940 to 1.9% for the parental variety Precozicta. The calli were transferred to N6 medium with 3% sucrose concentration and supplemented with 0.5 mg/l NAA and 1 mg/l kinetin and plantlets developed in 2-5 weeks. A total of 153 green plantlets were obtained. (author). 9 refs, 2 tabs

  19. Obtaining barley haploid embryos and seedlings using anther culture technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of three barley genotypes (Igri, Arabi abiad, and Taqa 76), three irradiation doses (0, 5, and 10 Gy), and two media (FW, modified FW), on the number of formed embryos, and the ratio between regenerated embryos to green seedlings and albinos, were studied using anther culture. Also the study involved the compatibility between seedling morphology and chromosome number. results indicated significant differences among the genotypes, and media in callus and embryos formation and also in the ratio and albino seedlings. However, the effect of gamma rays dose was significant only on embryos regeneration. A high percentage of compatibility (90%) was obtained between the seedling morphology and chromosome number. (author)

  20. Cucumber mosaic virus resistant mutant from tobacco's anthers treated with γ ray through anther culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flower buds of Nicotiana tabacum cv. K326, NC89 and 8611, in which the microspore is in the phase of single nucleus and the nucleus is on the side, were irradiated with 60Co γ-ray. Plant lets from anther culture were transplanted and inoculated with poisonous fluid of CMV. The results showed that there was an orientation relation between the variation of disease resistance of plants of NC89, 8611 and the dose of 60Co γ-ray. The variation of leaves of plants was analogous to symptom of CMV when the dose was equal to or more than 4, which caused difficulty for selection. When dose was less than 2krad, there was no difference in disease resistance between the plants induced from irradiation of 60Co γ-ray and the control. However, when dose was equal to 2krad, the difference of disease resistance was at the level of significance. CMV-resistant mutants were selected from the population of haploid plant of NC89 and 8611 induced by 2.0 krad of 60Co γ ray

  1. Meiosis of anther culture regenerants in asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Galli

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Pollen mother cells obtained from regenerated plants of asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L., in a population composed exclusively of male plants, through the process of anther culture from the hybrid G27 X 22-8, were analyzed during meiosis. It was observed that, during theprocess of anther culture by organogenesis, the pollen mother cells of the regenerants had great genomic instability, as evidenced by disturbances in all the meiotic phases of the first and second division. Furthermore, structural chromosomal abnormalities, in addition to aneuploidy and polyploidy, were observed.Foi analisada a meiose em clulas me de plen de plantas de aspargo (Asparagus officinalis L. de uma populao composta exclusivamente de plantas masculinas, obtidas atravs do processo de cultura de anteras do hbrido G27 X 22-8. Foi observado que, durante o processo de cultura de anteras, via calognese, as clulas me de plen dos regenerantes apresentaram grande instabilidade genmica, evidenciada por irregularidades nas fases de diacinese, assim como de metfase, anfase, telfase da primeira e segunda diviso meitica. Alm disto, o processo originou anormalidades cromossmicas estruturais em adio s aneuploidias e poliploidias.

  2. Radiation effect in anther cultures of rice variety Krispo-38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeds of rice variety Krispo-38 were irradiated with 0, 100, 200, 300 and 400 Gy and sown in the greenhouse. Anthers from plants of each treatment containing uninucleate pollen grains were collected and cultured on an N6 agar medium with 5% sucrose concentration and supplemented with 3 mg/l NAA, 1 mg/l kinetin and 1 mg/l 2,4-D. The pollen grains were induced to develop calli. The proportion of anthers that produced calli varied from 0.8% for the 400 Gy treatment to 3.3% for the control. The calli were transferred to N6 medium with 3% sucrose concentration and supplemented with 0.5 mg/l NAA and 1 mg/l kinetin. The proportion of calli that produced green plants varied from 1.9% for the 300 Gy treatment to 10.5% for the 200 Gy one. Plants developed in 2-5 weeks, 101 plants were obtained. (author). 7 refs, 1 tab

  3. Cell wall formation in multinucleate pollen grains of Hordeum vulgare anthers cultured in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Idzikowska; Fortunat Młodzianowski

    2015-01-01

    Cell wall formation in several-nucleate pollen grains of Hordeum vulgare anthers cultured in vitro was initiated at the intine. The walls grew centripetally and branched, dividing pollen protoplast into a several-celled embryoid.

  4. Mutant in tobacco anther culture induced by 60Co ?-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tobacco anthers at uninucleate eccentric stage were irradiated by 60Co ?-rays for the purpose of inducing desirable mutants. The results showed that the induction frequency of plantlets increased following 1kR of 60Co ?-rays treatment. However, the time of plantlet induction was delayed and the percentage of responding anthers as well as the number of plantlets induced per anther significantly decreased after 3kR of 60Co ?-ray radiation which was considered as a semilethal exposure. The plantlet numbers induced per anther were extremely low following 6kR of 60Co ?-ray radiation. A white flower mutant appeared in the induced progenies. The tobacco leaf quality of this mutant were significantly improved as compared with its parental line. The mutant line has been tested and proved to have commercial value though the resistance to the black shank of tobacco slightly decreased as compared with the parental line

  5. Studies on the androgenesis in cultured anthers of Atropa belladonna L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Misiura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryological investigations were carried out on developing anthers of Atropa belladonna grown in natural conditions and on anthers which produced androgenic embryos in the in vitro culture. The anatomy of developing anthers was analized in details. Meiotic abnormalities were not detected and 36 bivalents were present at metaphase of meiosis I. About 90% of pollen grains were normally developed. Anthers inoculated at the tetrad or microspore stage and cultured on Linsmaier and Skoog medium with kinetin 4 mg/1 and IAA - 2 mg/1 produced androgenic embryos. Differences in the development of septum, in the morphology of pollen grains, formation of tapetum, development of proembryos and the occurrence of storage materials were recorded. The origin of autopoliploid plants from haploid cells is discussed.

  6. Improvement of rice anther culture and application of the technique in mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of callus formation and green plant regeneration was very different for different rice type and varieties in anther culture. The differentiation and regeneration of green plants were obviously improved when the rice anthers at about 30 d after culture on induction medium were irradiated with 20 Gy of γ-rays and calli were cultured on the differentiation medium containing 30 mg/L colchicines. The stimulation effect of γ-irradiation combined with colchicines was much better than that of their single use. Mutation frequency and selective efficiency in M2 were obviously increased by application of the technique

  7. Microspore Embryogenesis Through Anther Culture in Citrus clementina Hort. ex Tan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiancone, Benedetta; German, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Anther culture is a biotechnological method that allows to obtain, in one step, homozygous plants, very important to plant breeding, due to their numerous applications in mutation research, selection, genome sequencing, genetic analysis, and transformation. To induce the microspores, i.e., the immature male gametes, to switch from the normal gametophytic pathway to the sporophytic one, it is necessary to submit them to a type of stress, such as high or low temperature, starvation, or magnetic field. Stress can be applied to the donor plants and/or the floral buds or the anthers or the isolated microspores, before or during the culture. In this chapter, the protocol to induce gametic embryogenesis from anther culture of several cultivars of Citrus clementina Hort. ex Tan. is reported. PMID:26619882

  8. Androgenesis in chickpea: Anther culture and expressed sequence tags derived annotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panchangam, Sameera Sastry; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Gaur, Pooran M.; Suravajhala, Prashanth

    2014-01-01

    the application of multiple stress pre-treatments such as centrifugation and osmotic shock for genotypes of interest in chickpea for their direct use in breeding programs. Four genotypes, ICC 4958, WR315, ICCV 95423 and Arearti were tested for anther culture experiments. The yield was shown to be......Double haploid technique is not routinely used in legume breeding programs, though recent publications report haploid plants via anther culture in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). The focus of this study was to develop an efficient and reproducible protocol for the production of double haploids with...

  9. The early ontogeny of embryoids and callus from pollen and subsequent organogenesis in anther cultures of Datura metel and rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, R D; Raina, S K

    1972-06-01

    Haploidy induction through anther culture has been examined in Datura metel and rice with a view to tracing the precise sequence of development of the pollen, either directly or through an intervening callus, into an embryo and seedling. In D. metel, the vegetative cell of the young pollen grain assumes the major role in formation of embryos whereas the generative cell and its few derivatives degenerate. Embryos and seedlings arising directly from pollen without an intervening callus phase always proved to be haploids, whereas those differentiating from pollen-derived callus gave haploid, diploid and even triploid plants. Cytological analysis of callus tissue showed cells of various ploidy levels ranging from haploid to triploid, and in rare instances even with higher chromosome numbers.In rice anther cultures the embryoids arose from an initial callus phase. Of 15 different rice cultivars tried, only four produced a callus, and in only one, was there differentiation of plants, both haploid and diploid ones. Among other species tried, egg plant has also yielded plantlets through a callus phase whereas only callus production has been achieved in jute, tea and petunia. No response has been obtained in wheat, maize, cotton and coconut.Coconut milk (CM) appears to be the most important component of the medium for the initial induction of embryoids and callus in anther cultures of most of the species tried. However, further growth and differentiation of plants may require a simpler medium; in D. metel, continued culture on CM led to dedifferntiation. PMID:24481698

  10. The enhancement of anther culture efficiency in Brassica napus ssp. oleifera Metzg. (Sinsk.) using low doses of gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selected buds of Brassica napus ssp. oleifera Metzg. (Sinsk) cvs Ariana and Primor were treated with various doses of γ-irradiation. When the anthers were removed and cultured, it was shown that low doses of γ-irradiation greatly enhanced anther culture efficiency in both cultivars. When microspore culture techniques were used, however, embryogenesis was reduced by irradiation in all treatments. Some of the resulting embryoids developed directly into plantlets, whereas others developed abnormally and produced secondary embryoids. Plants were regenerated from both anther embryoids and secondary embryoids and, following diploidization, seed was obtained from these plants. (author)

  11. Comparison of rice lines derived through anther culture and the pedigree method in relation to blast (Pyricularia grisea Sacc.) resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, C P; Victoria, F C; Amézquita, M C; Tulande, E; Lema, G; Zeigler, R S

    1996-04-01

    Crosses were made between Fanny (highly susceptible to blast) and 11 cultivars differing in blast resistance. Using the pedigree method (PM) segregating generations were evaluated and selected for blast resistance. Via anther culture (AC), doubled-haploids were obtained from F1 plants and from F2 blast-susceptible plants. Pedigree and anther culture-derived lines were planted together and evaluated for blast resistance under rainfed conditions at the Santa Rosa Experiment Station, Villavicencio, Colombia. The principal objective was to compare PM and AC in terms of their efficiency in producing rice lines resistant to blast. Results of a stratified analysis showed an association between method and blast resistance. Results of the logit-model analysis showed that AC produced a significantly (P=0.0001) higher proportion of lines with initial blast resistance (leaf- and neck-blast reaction ≤4) than did PM across all cross types. Stable blast resistance was assessed based on field performance over 3 years. AC was superior to PM in generating stable resistance for only some cross types. Consequently, with a few exceptions, AC can be used as effectively as PM to develop rice cultivars resistant to blast, with savings in time and labor. Additionally, blast-resistant lines were obtained either by the pedigree method or by anther culture from crosses between blast-susceptible cultivars (Fanny/CICA4 and Fanny/Colombial). This excludes somaclonal variation as a possible mechanism responsible for this resistance and suggests that a recombination of minor genes could have occurred and was fixed through either method. However, the stability of the resistance was greater in pedigree-derived lines. The implications of these findings for rice blast-resistance breeding are discussed. PMID:24166327

  12. Development of a short duration upland rice mutant line through anther culture of gamma irradiated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experiment was conducted in the field and at the tissue culture laboratory of the Plant Physiology Division, CARI, Yezin from 1994 to 1997. Upland rice, Yar-2 was used as the test variety. Dried seeds (14% moisture content) were treated with gamma rays at doses of 0, 300, 350, 400 and 450 Gy respectively. These seeds were planted separately according to the gamma-ray treatment they received. At booting stage, tillers were cut. Anthers from the top and middle portion of the panicle were taken. The pollen, at developmental stage in each anther, was examined using Acetocarmine dye. Pollens at the uninucleate to early binucleare stage were selected. Tillers having pollens at the above-mentioned stage were placed in a dark room at 25() 1 C and 16 hours photoperiod. When plantlets were obtained from these media, well-developed green plantlets were selected and planted in Yoshida solution to attain vigorous root growth. Diploid and haploid plants were formed from the anther culture method. At the heading stage, haploid plants were treated with colchicines to promote development into diploid plants. At maturity, plants produced from materials treated with different gamma doses were harvested separately. These homozygous lines were planted in the field and the characters were compared with their parents grown at the same time. The highest callus induction rate was found in materials treated with 450 Gy of gamma rays, but the lowest green plant regeneration rate was also observed at this dose. Among the forty-five homozygous lines obtained of the above materials, 7 lines, all from the 450 Gy gamma rays treated material, flowered earlier than the parents. One of the 7 early flowering lines, mutant line No 18, matured 19 days earlier but had the same yield as the parent. All other lines had a lower yield than the parent. Comparisons of yield and yield components of mutant line 18 and Yar-2 (parent) and comparison of quality characters are shown in tables

  13. Microspores irradiation in anther culture: testing a new technique to obtain mutations immediatly detected and fixed (Application to Nicotiana tabacum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to consider the effects of microspores irradiation on embryo development, and in order to observe the morphological responses of haploid plantlets derived from androgenetic anthers to ionizing irradiation, 1000, 1500 and 2000r of gamma rays were delivered on anthers of Nicotiana tabacum (DL50 range calculated: 1500r). The cytological studies of embryo development revealed an apparent increase in irradiated microspores: cell division is stimulated but followed by an early mortality. A sharp rise in lethality effects was observed when gamma rays were applied beyond the seventh day of culture, when the proembryo contains an average of 4 cells. Morphological aberrations and colour changes in the Mo progeny derived from irradiated microspores are diverse. But after chromosome doubling and mutation checking out, all the plants were not recorded to have transmitted their aberrant characters. Thus, heritable character 'mutations) and not heritable character (variations) were obtained. The variations characters include dwarfing, excessive branching, fasciation and dichotomy of the stems, altered flower form, especially of petals. As to the leaves, they usually show induced changes in their colour (chlorotic areas, mosaic-colour changes, or an over-all colour changes), in their form (irregularity in outline) and in their texture (thickening, hairless leaf). Among the mutants, a monster tobacco, with excrescences on the leaves and the flowers is certainly the most conspicuous. But mutants also include altered leaf colour (over-all pale green) and altered flower colour, (dark red, clear pink, white)

  14. Stimulation effects of γ-irradiation combined with colchicine on callus formation and green plant regeneration in rice anther culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of callus formation and green plant regeneration was very different for various rice types and varieties in rice anther culture. It was quite effective that rice anthers were irradiated with 10-40 Gy of γ-rays after 30 d incubation on induction medium and calli were treated on differentiation medium contained 10-75 mg/L of colchicine for increase of callus formation and green plant regeneration. Among these treatments, 10 Gy of γ-rats was the best for callus formation, and 20 Gy of γ-rays or 30 mg/L of colchicine was the most favourable for green plant regeneration. The simulation effect of 20 Gy of γ-irradiation combined with 30 mg/L of colchicine on green plant regeneration was much better than that of their separate use in rice anther culture

  15. Molecular characterization of three anther tissue culture varieties of tobaco (Nicotiana tabacum L. using RAPD analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Azucena Fernández B.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPO analysis was used to characterize two new Flue Cured and one black tobacco type varieties derived from in vitro anther tissue culture technique. RAPOs are proposed as an appropriate complement of the morphoagronomic characteristics evaluations to fulfil international seed registration standards established for the identification of tobacco varieties. The identification of three tobacco varieties and their parents was carried out using the RAPO analysis with 64 random primers. Polymorphic products, 214 in number, were amplified only from 14 primers. Statistical analysis realized with the NTSYS program version 1.2 using the Jaccard similarity coefficient. The visual inspection revealed that five primers allowed the separation of the varieties in two groups, according to the type of tobacco: the Flue Cured and Black; while a group of nine primers separates each variety and establish its genetic relationship with their parents. The results obtained show that this technique is appropiated to establish genetic differences between tobacco varieties.

  16. Effects of gamma irradiation and other factors on the induction of calli and regeneration of greed plants in rice anther culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction of calli and regeneration of green plantlets in anther culture of rice variety, Taipei 309, were greatly affected by gamma irradiation and other factors. Callus formation from the anthers of mid-uninucleate stage pre-incubated at 7 degree C for 5 days were 0.4 and 0.6 times higher than those of the anthers of late uninucleate stage and non-treated control. However, the number of calli with green plantlets and the number of regenerated green plantlets per 100 anthers cultured were 3.1 and 4.1 times higher for the calli from the anthers at late-uninucleate stage than those from the anthers at mid-uninucleate stage; the calli with green plantlets increased with the time of anther incubation (35 days, 7.7%; 45 days, 10.6%; 55 days, 16.7%). However, the ability was lost for all calli 65 days after incubation. The highest ability of green plant regeneration for the calli transferred by 35 days after incubation and differentiated green plantlets at about 25th day after transfer to regeneration medium, which reached 443.6 plants per 100-anthers cultured and was much higher than that of the calli transferred and differentiated green plantlets later. 20 Gy of gamma irradiation at the time when about 5% anthers produced calli by 35 days after incubation has a great positive effects on induction of calli, differentiation and regeneration of green plantlets. The number of callus formation, calli with green plantlets and green plantlets regenerated per 100-anthers cultured were 0.5, 22 and 306 times higher than those of non-irradiated control respectively

  17. A comparison of RFLP maps based on anther culture derived, selfed, and hybrid progenies of Solanum chacoense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, S R; Cappadocia, M; Landry, B S

    1996-08-01

    Comparative RFLP linkage maps were constructed using five segregating populations derived from two self-incompatible lines (termed PI 230582 and PI 458314) of diploid tuber-bearing Solanum chacoense Bitt. The analysis was based on 84 RFLP loci identified by 73 different cDNA clones. Distortion of expected Mendelian segregation ratios was observed; less than 10% of the markers showed a skewed segregation in the gametes forming the F1, hybrid population compared with 30% in the selfed population and 46 and 70% in the two populations produced by anther culture. For the anther culture derived populations, most of the skewed loci were scattered throughout the genome, whereas in the populations derived from selfing, they were found primarily in linkage group 1, around the S locus. In this study, we also found that the rate of meiotic recombination could differ between the male and female gametes produced by our parental lines. Thus, male gametes of line PI 458314 showed significantly less recombination as assessed by the total length of the map (206 cM for male gametes vs. 375 cM for female gametes) and the phenomenon was genome-wide. In contrast, the maps from the gametes of PI 230582 had about the same length, but some linkage groups were longer in the female gametes, while others were longer in the male gametes. Key words : Solanum chacoense, RFLP, anther culture, skewed segregation, self-incompatibility, sex differences in recombination. PMID:18469920

  18. Breeding evaluation of pepper lines obtained by in vitro anther culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todorova Velichka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The comparative breeding evaluation was carried out with six advanced pepper lines (Capsicum annuum L. with androgenic origin and their initial pepper variety Hebar during the period 2008 - 2010 in field conditions at Plovdiv, Bulgaria. The genotypes were characterized by total and standard yield, plant height and fruit traits: length, width, wall thickness and weight. The response of two lines (4 and 6 and control variety to the Verticillium wilt was also investigated on artificial infected background. According to the results of the experimental work standard and total yield in all androgenic lines were higher compared to the initial variety but significant differences were established only for lines 1, 2, 4 and 6. Line 6 was characterized with the highest standard yield (4009 kg/da followed by line 2 (3829 kg/da. They exceeded variety Hebar with 42.26% and 35.89%, respectively. Line 2 formed the heaviest (61.31 g and longer (11.24 cm fruits than most studied genotypes. Anther-derived lines were also with a good uniformity by studied traits. In line 6 was registered lower index of infestation byVerticillium dahliae Kleb. than the control during the investigated period. These perspective lines will be included as valuable genetic resources for future pepper breeding programs for development of new varieties.

  19. Induction of plants from anthers of Beta vulgaris cultured in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Rogozińska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of growth substances, saccharose and yeast extract on the differentiation of monogerm sugar beet and polygerm fodder beet anthers is studied. Callus and roots were found to form on the anthers. After subculture, callus derived from a well determined combination of growth substances differentiated into buds, from which plantlets were obtained in unlimited numbers. After rooting, they were transfermed to the soil where they continued to grow. This suggests the possibility of an adaptation of this method in vegetative propagation of beets.

  20. Breeding of a new early season indica rice variety Ganzaoxian 56 by irradiation, anther culture and hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganzaoxian 56 is a new early season indica rice variety, which was bred in the College of Agronomy of Jiangxi Agricultural University by the integrative breeding techniques of radiation, anther culture and hybridization. Its main characteristics were as follows: super quality, high yield, high tolerance to heat-forced maturity, suitable maturity and high resistance to rice blast. It was registered by Crop Cultivar Registration Committee of Jiangxi Province on March 19, 2004. The breeding process of Ganzaoxian 56, main characteristics and the value of its exploitation and application were described in this paper. (authors)

  1. Callus and Green Spot Formation From Anther Culture of Chili Mutant Lines (Capsicum Annum.L) Using in-vitro Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callus and green spot formation from anther culture of chili mutant lines (Capsicum annum.L) were carried out using in-vitro culture. Two kinds of different media based on hormonal composition were used for callus induction. A half of an quantities were directly cultured on callus induction medium, while rest of them were treated with cold shock (4oC) for 3 and 6 days subsequently cultured on callus induction medium. The highest callus formation was observed in culture from Ac medium containing I mg/l 2,4-D and 0,1 mg/l kinetin and were obtained from 0 days cold shock with chili without irradiation (Kr 0) 30%, chili mutant lines with irradiation dose 20 Krad (Kr 20) 25% and chili mutant lines with irradiation dose 40 Krad (Kr 40) 30% respectively. While cold shock for 3 days increasing 15 % callus formation from Kr 40 mutant lines

  2. Production of Haploid Saccharum spontaneum L. - Comparison of Media for Cold Incubation of Panicle Branches and for Float Culture of Anthers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, M M; Moore, P H

    1984-12-01

    Means were sought to increase the frequency of haploid production from anther cultures of Saccharum spontaneum L. Excised preemerged panicle branches were incubated in modified Murashige-Skoog (MS), Nitsch (H), Gamborg (B5), and Chu (N6) media at 10 C for 4 to 10 weeks prior to removal of the anthers for culturing at 27 C. Anthers, either continuously cultured on liquid media or floated on liquid media 1 to 8 weeks prior to nurse culture, produced visible calli in 30 days. Nearly 1% of the anthers in one clone, SES 208, produced calli. The calli increased in mass on nurse medium containing 0.25 to 0.50 mg l(-1) picloram as the auxin source and differentiated into green calli when the picloram was reduced to 0.05 to 0.125 mg l(-1). The green calli developed into plants on lowered-picloram or picloram-free media. Calli and green plants were obtained from all three clones studied. Plants were regenerated from 100 out of 276 callus lines. Seventeen plant lines have been transferred to greenhouse culture. Four of seven plant lines checked for ploidy were haploid, two were diploid. A method utilizing stomate guard cell lengths was developed as a means to estimate ploidy level. The increased success in haploid callus and plant production is thought to be the result of long cold treatment of panicle branches, use of low salt media for panicle treatment in the cold, use of picloram in place of 2,4-D in the nurse culture, and use of a high nitrate/ammonium ratio in the liquid culture. PMID:23195613

  3. Anther development stage and gamma radiation effects on tomato anther-derived callus formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two experiments were carried (I) to determine tomato anther development stage influence on callus production; and (II) to investigate gamma radiation effects on anther culture. In the first experiment, anthers of a tomato hybrid (IPA 5 x Rotam 4-F1) were grown on three media. Although calli were induced at all stages of anther development, varying from prophase I to mono nucleate microspore, callus frequency decreased as anther development progressed and calli induction were not significantly affected by all media tested. Anthers containing prophase I meiocytes produced the highest calli frequency. Anther and flower bud length both were significantly correlated with anther development stage. In the second experiment, seed and floral buds of tomato hybrids IPA 5 x Rotam 4 (F2), IPA 6 x Rotam 4 (F2) and IPA 8 x 217.1 (F2) were submitted to gamma-ray and anthers were plated on two media described by Gresshoff and Doy (1972) supplemented with 2.0 mg L-1 NAA + 5.0 mg L-1 KIN and 2.0 mg L-1 NAA + 1.0 mg L-1 KIN. No significant differences for genotype and dosage testes were found for calli formation. (author)

  4. Segregation distortion in homozygous lines obtained via anther culture and maize doubled haploid methods in comparison to single seed descent in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Tadeusz, Adamski; Karolina, Krystkowiak; Anetta, Kuczynska; Krzysztof, Mikolajczak; Piotr, Ogrodowicz; Aleksandra, Ponitka; Maria, Surma; Aurelia, Slusarkiewicz-Jarzina.

    2014-01-15

    Full Text Available Background The quality of wheat grain depends on several characteristics, among which the composition of high molecular weight glutenin subunits, encoded by Glu-1 loci, are the most important. Application of biotechnological tools to accelerate the attainment of homozygous lines may influence the pr [...] oportion of segregated genotypes. The objective was to determine, whether the selection pressure generated by the methods based on in vitro cultures, may cause a loss of genotypes with desirable Glu-1 alleles. Results Homozygous lines were derived from six winter wheat crosses by pollination with maize (DH-MP), anther culture (DH-AC) and single seed descent (SSD) technique. Androgenetically-derived plants that originated from the same callus were examined before chromosome doubling using allele-specific and microsatellite markers. It was found that segregation distortion in SSD and DH-MP populations occurred only in one case, whereas in anther-derived lines they were observed in five out of six analyzed combinations. Conclusions Segregation distortion in DH-AC populations was caused by the development of more than one plant of the same genotype from one callus. This distortion was minimized if only one plant per callus was included in the population. Selection of haploid wheat plants before chromosome doubling based on allele-specific markers allows us to choose genotypes that possess desirable Glu-1 alleles and to reduce the number of plants in the next steps of DH production. The SSD technique appeared to be the most advantageous in terms of Mendelian segregation, thus the occurrence of residual heterozygosity can be minimized by continuous selfing beyond the F6 generation.

  5. RFLP analyses and segregation of molecular markers in plants produced by in vitro anther culture, selfing, and reciprocal crosses of two lines of self-incompatible Solanum chacoense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, S R; Saba-El-Leil, M K; Landry, B S; Cappadocia, M

    1994-10-01

    RFLP analyses were used to characterize several plant populations of Solanum chacoense Bitt. developed to investigate the generation of new S alleles at the self-incompatibility locus. The plant material consisted of two diploid parental lines, their anther culture derived (AC) progenies, their selfed progenies, and their reciprocal F1 hybrids. The RFLP analyses on the AC plants (121 individuals in total) permitted unambiguous identification of their origin. In particular, a distinction between plants originated from reduced (n) or unreduced (2n) microspores could be made. All the AC plants produced by gametic embryogenesis showed distinct RFLP patterns, whereas a number of clones (i.e., plants with identical RFLP patterns) were found among those regenerated via callus. The analyses conducted on the selfed progenies (69 plants) and the F1 hybrids (66 plants) showed only one case of accidental outcross. Segregation studies of the RFLP markers revealed significant deviations from expected Mendelian ratios in both AC-derived populations, as well as in the selfed progenies. Such deviations, however, were rare in the reciprocal F1 hybrids. These results are discussed in relation to the possible presence of genetic sieves operating during AC, illegitimate selfing, or during normal fertilization. PMID:18470121

  6. Influence of copper ions on growth, lipid peroxidation, and proline and polyamines content in carrot rosettes obtained from anther culture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szafrańska, K.; Cvikrová, Milena; Kowalska, U.; Górecka, K.; Górecky, R.; Martincová, Olga; Janas, K. M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2011), s. 851-859. ISSN 0137-5881 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC08013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Copper ions * Carrot culture * Lipid peroxidation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.639, year: 2011

  7. Culturally responsive literacy instruction

    CERN Document Server

    Algozzine, Bob; Obiakor, Festus E

    2008-01-01

    Improve reading achievement for students from diverse backgrounds with research-supported practices and culturally responsive interventions in phonemic awareness, phonics/decoding, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension.

  8. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Understanding Disability Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2013-01-01

    To be culturally responsive teachers, we must first have an understanding of other cultures and how students from these cultures differ from one another. As we consider the many cultures represented in our classrooms, we might also consider students with disabilities as a cultural group. Within any main culture are subgroups differentiated by…

  9. Culturally Responsive Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Darlean A.; Sia, Archibald P.

    The ethnic and cultural makeup of classrooms is changing rapidly, the percentage of school children of color is increasing, and the percentage of teachers of color is declining. This paper examines the challenge of preparing primarily white, middle-class teachers to create culturally responsive classrooms for all children. Teacher education

  10. Global Dynamic Transcriptome Programming of Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) Anther at Different Development Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanjie; Zhang, Peipei; Lv, Jinyang; Cheng, Yufeng; Cui, Jianmin; Zhao, Huixian; Hu, Shengwu

    2016-01-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is an important oil crop worldwide and exhibits significant heterosis. Effective pollination control systems, which are closely linked to anther development, are a prerequisite for utilizing heterosis. The anther, which is the male organ in flowering plants, undergoes many metabolic processes during development. Although the gene expression patterns underlying pollen development are well studied in model plant Arabidopsis, the regulatory networks of genome-wide gene expression during rapeseed anther development is poorly understood, especially regarding metabolic regulations. In this study, we systematically analyzed metabolic processes occurring during anther development in rapeseed using ultrastructural observation and global transcriptome analysis. Anther ultrastructure exhibited that numerous cellular organelles abundant with metabolic materials, such as elaioplast, tapetosomes, plastids (containing starch deposits) etc. appeared, accompanied with anther structural alterations during anther development, suggesting many metabolic processes occurring. Global transcriptome analysis revealed dynamic changes in gene expression during anther development that corresponded to dynamic functional alterations between early and late anther developmental stages. The early stage anthers preferentially expressed genes involved in lipid metabolism that are related to pollen extine formation as well as elaioplast and tapetosome biosynthesis, whereas the late stage anthers expressed genes associated with carbohydrate metabolism to form pollen intine and to accumulate starch in mature pollen grains. Finally, a predictive gene regulatory module responsible for early pollen extine formation was generated. Taken together, this analysis provides a comprehensive understanding of dynamic gene expression programming of metabolic processes in the rapeseed anther, especially with respect to lipid and carbohydrate metabolism during pollen development. PMID:27139433

  11. Analysis of the Maize dicer-like1 Mutant, fuzzy tassel, Implicates MicroRNAs in Anther Maturation and Dehiscence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Sterling; Thompson, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in plants requires development of haploid gametophytes from somatic tissues. Pollen is the male gametophyte and develops within the stamen; defects in the somatic tissues of the stamen and in the male gametophyte itself can result in male sterility. The maize fuzzy tassel (fzt) mutant has a mutation in dicer-like1 (dcl1), which encodes a key enzyme required for microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis. Many miRNAs are reduced in fzt, and fzt mutants exhibit a broad range of developmental defects, including male sterility. To gain further insight into the roles of miRNAs in maize stamen development, we conducted a detailed analysis of the male sterility defects in fzt mutants. Early development was normal in fzt mutant anthers, however fzt anthers arrested in late stages of anther maturation and did not dehisce. A minority of locules in fzt anthers also exhibited anther wall defects. At maturity, very little pollen in fzt anthers was viable or able to germinate. Normal pollen is tricellular at maturity; pollen from fzt anthers included a mixture of unicellular, bicellular, and tricellular pollen. Pollen from normal anthers is loaded with starch before dehiscence, however pollen from fzt anthers failed to accumulate starch. Our results indicate an absolute requirement for miRNAs in the final stages of anther and pollen maturation in maize. Anther wall defects also suggest that miRNAs have key roles earlier in anther development. We discuss candidate miRNAs and pathways that might underlie fzt anther defects, and also note that male sterility in fzt resembles water deficit-induced male sterility, highlighting a possible link between development and stress responses in plants. PMID:26745722

  12. Analysis of the Maize dicer-like1 Mutant, fuzzy tassel, Implicates MicroRNAs in Anther Maturation and Dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Sterling; Thompson, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in plants requires development of haploid gametophytes from somatic tissues. Pollen is the male gametophyte and develops within the stamen; defects in the somatic tissues of the stamen and in the male gametophyte itself can result in male sterility. The maize fuzzy tassel (fzt) mutant has a mutation in dicer-like1 (dcl1), which encodes a key enzyme required for microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis. Many miRNAs are reduced in fzt, and fzt mutants exhibit a broad range of developmental defects, including male sterility. To gain further insight into the roles of miRNAs in maize stamen development, we conducted a detailed analysis of the male sterility defects in fzt mutants. Early development was normal in fzt mutant anthers, however fzt anthers arrested in late stages of anther maturation and did not dehisce. A minority of locules in fzt anthers also exhibited anther wall defects. At maturity, very little pollen in fzt anthers was viable or able to germinate. Normal pollen is tricellular at maturity; pollen from fzt anthers included a mixture of unicellular, bicellular, and tricellular pollen. Pollen from normal anthers is loaded with starch before dehiscence, however pollen from fzt anthers failed to accumulate starch. Our results indicate an absolute requirement for miRNAs in the final stages of anther and pollen maturation in maize. Anther wall defects also suggest that miRNAs have key roles earlier in anther development. We discuss candidate miRNAs and pathways that might underlie fzt anther defects, and also note that male sterility in fzt resembles water deficit-induced male sterility, highlighting a possible link between development and stress responses in plants. PMID:26745722

  13. Analysis of Anther Cell Differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hong

    2015-01-19

    This grant supports research on genes that regulate Arabidopsis anther development. The proposed research largely concerns that functions of two key regulatory genes: SPL and DYT1, which encode two putative transcription factors, as well as genes that interact with these genes. Last year, we reported progress in preparation for ChIP analysis with SPL and DYT1, in dyt1 and ams microarray experiments and initial data analysis, in functional analysis of one of the DYT1 target gene, MYB35.

  14. Anther development stage and gamma radiation effects on tomato anther-derived callus formation; Efeitos do estadio de desenvolvimento da antera e da radiacao gama na formacao de calos derivados de anteras de tomate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasileiro, Ana Christina R.; Willadino, Lilia [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Lab. de Cultura de Tecidos Vegetais. E-mail: lilia@truenet.com.br; Guerra, Marcelo [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Botanica. Lab. de Citogenetica Vegetal; Colaco, Waldeciro [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Lab. de Radioagronomia; Meunier, Isabelle [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Florestal; Camara, Terezinha R. [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica. Lab. de Cultura de Tecidos Vegetais

    1999-12-01

    Two experiments were carried (I) to determine tomato anther development stage influence on callus production; and (II) to investigate gamma radiation effects on anther culture. In the first experiment, anthers of a tomato hybrid (IPA 5 x Rotam 4-F{sub 1}) were grown on three media. Although calli were induced at all stages of anther development, varying from prophase I to mono nucleate microspore, callus frequency decreased as anther development progressed and calli induction were not significantly affected by all media tested. Anthers containing prophase I meiocytes produced the highest calli frequency. Anther and flower bud length both were significantly correlated with anther development stage. In the second experiment, seed and floral buds of tomato hybrids IPA 5 x Rotam 4 (F{sub 2}), IPA 6 x Rotam 4 (F{sub 2}) and IPA 8 x 217.1 (F{sub 2}) were submitted to gamma-ray and anthers were plated on two media described by Gresshoff and Doy (1972) supplemented with 2.0 mg L{sup -1} NAA + 5.0 mg L{sup -1} KIN and 2.0 mg L{sup -1} NAA + 1.0 mg L{sup -1} KIN. No significant differences for genotype and dosage testes were found for calli formation. (author)

  15. Microarray and differential display identify genes involved in jasmonate-dependent anther development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandaokar, Ajin; Kumar, V Dinesh; Amway, Matt; Browse, John

    2003-07-01

    Jasmonate (JA) is a signaling compound essential for anther development and pollen fertility in Arabidopsis. Mutations that block the pathway of JA synthesis result into male sterility. To understand the processes of anther and pollen maturation, we used microarray and differential display approaches to compare gene expression pattern in anthers of wild-type Arabidopsis and the male-sterile mutant, opr3. Microarray experiment revealed 25 genes that were up-regulated more than 1.8-fold in wild-type anthers as compared to mutant anthers. Experiments based on differential display identified 13 additional genes up-regulated in wild-type anthers compared to opr3 for a total of 38 differentially expressed genes. Searches of the Arabidopsis and non-redundant databases disclosed known or likely functions for 28 of the 38 genes identified, while 10 genes encode proteins of unknown function. Northern blot analysis of eight representative clones as probes confirmed low expression in opr3 anthers compared with wild-type anthers. JA responsiveness of these same genes was also investigated by northern blot analysis of anther RNA isolated from wild-type and opr3 plants, In these experiments, four genes were induced in opr3 anthers within 0.5-1 h of JA treatment while the remaining genes were up-regulated only 1-8 h after JA application. None of these genes was induced by JA in anthers of the coil mutant that is deficient in JA responsiveness. The four early-induced genes in opr3 encode lipoxygenase, a putative bHLH transcription factor, epithiospecifier protein and an unknown protein. We propose that these and other early components may be involved in JA signaling and in the initiation of developmental processes. The four late genes encode an extensin-like protein, a peptide transporter and two unknown proteins, which may represent components required later in anther and pollen maturation. Transcript profiling has provided a successful approach to identify genes involved in anther and pollen maturation in Arabidopsis. PMID:13677466

  16. Efeitos de meios de cultura na formao de calos a partir de anteras de aspargo (Asparagus officinalis L. Effects of the culture media on the calli formation from Asparagus officinalis L. anthers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lcia Bobrowski

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available Tcnicas auxiliares, como a cultura de anteras, possibilitam melhor eficincia na obteno de novos gentipos de aspargo. Neste trabalho, foram utilizadas anteras contendo gros de plen, no estgio uninucleado, dos hbridos 56x22-8 e 47x22-8, em meio MS, semi-slido e lquido, com diferentes concentraes de reguladores de crescimento: meio A - 0,5 mg/l BAP + 0,1 mg/l ANA + 0,5 mg/l 2,4-D + 20 g/l sacarose + 20 g/l glicose; meio B - 0,5 mg/l 2,4-D + 30 g/l sacarose; meio C - 3,0 mg/l ANA + 0,5 mg/l Kin + 30 g/l sacarose e meio D - 2,0 mg/l ANA + 0,5 mg/l Kin + 30 g/l sacarose. A formao de calos variou com o gentipo e o meio. Os meios lquidos apresentaram melhor eficincia na induo de calos do que os meios semi-slidos. Para o hbrido 56x22-8 os melhores meios foram o A2 (lquido com 80,5% de induo de calos e dentre os meios semi-slidos, o meio D1 com 41,6% de calos formados. Para o hbrido 47x22-8, o mais eficiente foi o meio D2 (lquido, com 68,1% de calos formados e, dentre os meios semi-slidos, o D2, com 15,2%. No ocorreram diferenas significativas, estatisticamente, entre os meios lquidos nem entre os meios semi-slidos.Anther culture is an auxiliary technique to obtain new genotypes. In this work, anthers with pollen grains in the uninucleated stage of hybrids 56x22-8 and 47x22-8 were cultured in MS medium, semi-solid and liquid, with different concentrations of growth regulators: medium A - 0,5 mg/l BAP + 0,1 mg/l NAA + 0,5 mg/1 2,4-D + 20 g/l sucrose + 20 g/l glucose; medium B - 0,5 mg/1 2,4-D + 30 g/l sucrose; medium C - 3,0 mg/l NAA + 0,5 mg/l Kin + 30 g/l sucrose and medium D - 2,0 mg/l NAA + 0,5 mg/l Kin + 30 g/l sucrose. Callus formation varied with the genotype and the medium. Liquid media showed more efficiency in callus development than the semi-solids. For the hybrids 56x22-8 the best media were the liquid A2 with 80,5% of callus induction and among the semi-solids the D1, with 41,6%. For the hybrid 47x22-8 were liquid D2 with 68,1% and semi solid D1 with 15,2%. No significant differences were observed among the liquid media nor among the semi-solidones.

  17. The impact of Cu treatment on phenolic and polyamine levels in plant material regenerated from embryos obtained in anther culture of carrot

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Górecka, K.; Cvikrová, Milena; Kowalska, U.; Eder, Josef; Szafrańska, K.; Górecki, R.; Janas, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2007), s. 54-61. ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : carrot culture * copper ions * embryo regeneration Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding Impact factor: 1.669, year: 2007

  18. Embryogenesis in the anthers of different ornamental pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, P A; Rgo, M M; Rgo, E R; Soares, W S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to relate flower bud size with microspore developmental stages and the induction of embryos in the anthers of different ornamental pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) genotypes. Flower buds were randomly collected and visually divided into three classes based on both petal and sepal size. The length and diameter of the bud as well as the length of the petal, sepal, and anther were then measured. The microspore stage was also determined for each anther of the bud where it was found. The data were subjected to analysis of variance (P ? 0.01), and the means were separated by Tukey's test (P ? 0.01). The broad sense heritability, the CVg/CVe relation, and the Pearson correlation between characters were also determined. Anthers from 10 C. annuum genotypes were cultivated in four culture media types for the induction of embryos. The data were transformed by Arcsin (x) and subjected to analysis of variance (P ? 0.01), and the means were separated by Tukey's test (P ? 0.01). The majority of anthers in the second class had uninucleate microspores. No correlation was observed between bud size and the number of uninucleate microspores. Genotype 9 specimens grown in M2 medium induced the highest number of embryos (16) compared to the other treatments, which indicates a significant interaction effect between culture media and genotypes. PMID:26535649

  19. Ao do etileno em combinao com thidiazuron, nitrato de prata e cido acetilsaliclico na cultura de anteras de pimento Ethylene action in combination with Thidiazuron (TDZ, silver nitrate (AgNO3 and acetylsalicylic acid on sweet pepper anther culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Magno Q. Luz

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Verificou-se o efeito do etileno em combinao com o thidiazuron (TDZ, nitrato de prata (AgNO3 e cido acetilsaliclico (AAS, na induo e regenerao de embries em anteras de pimento, gentipos F1 (PIX21C12#35 x Agronmico 08, (PIX21C04#4 x Linha 004, (PIX22C#31 x Linha 004, (PIX21C15#45 x Ikeda e (PIX22C#21 x Ikeda. Os botes foram coletados quando spalas e ptalas tinham tamanhos aproximadamente iguais, correspondendo ao estdio de anteras com micrsporos uninucleados. As anteras foram inoculadas em placa de Petri contendo meio de cultura C adicionado de 4,5 mM de TDZ; meio C acrescido de 0,05 mM de 2,4-D, 0,05 mM de cinetina e 88,8 mM de AAS; meio C acrescido de 0,05 mM de 2,4-D, 0,05 mM de cinetina e 5,0 mg/L de AgNO3. Em seguida, foram colocadas em ambiente escuro a 35C durante oito dias e enriquecido com ethephon, por 0; 2; 4; 6 ou 8 dias num esquema fatorial com quatro repeties, sendo cada placa considerada uma parcela contendo 20 a 24 anteras.O perodo de permanncia de quatro dias, em ambiente enriquecido com ethephon, e os meios com TDZ e AgNO3, foram os mais favorveis induo de anteras. O TDZ tambm promoveu maior induo de calos embriognicos. As maiores taxas de necrose ocorreram no meio com AAS. S ocorreu regenerao direta em plntulas no meio C acrescido de 5 mg/L de AgNO3, sendo oito dias o melhor perodo. Os gentipos mais responsivos foram PIX22C#31 x linha 004 e PIX22C#21 x Ikeda. Observou-se a formao de plntulas haplides e diplides mediante anlise da ponta de raz. Considerando-se que a regenerao foi direta, sem passar por calos, supe-se que as plntulas diplides obtidas sejam provenientes dos micrsporos, devendo portanto ter ocorrido uma diploidizao in vitro.The influence of ethylene used in combination with Thidiazuron (TDZ, silver nitrate (AgNO3 and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA was evaluated on sweet pepper androgenesis of F1 genotypes (PIX21C12#35 x Agronmico 08, PIX21C04#4 x Line 004, PIX22C#31 x Line 004, PIX21C15#45 x Ikeda and PIX22C#21 x Ikeda. Floral buds were collected when sepals and petals were approximately of equal size, corresponding to the uninucleated stage of microspores. Anthers were placed in Petri dishes containing three mediums: C medium supplemented with TDZ (4.5mM; C medium plus 2,4-D (0,05mM, Kinetin (0.5mM and ASA (88,8mM or AgNO3 (5.0 mg/L. After inoculation, the anthers were kept in the environment with ethephon for 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8 days at 35C for eight days in the dark. The experiment was conducted in a factorial design with four replications. Each replicate consisted of one Petri dish containing 20-24 anthers. TDZ and AgNO3 were most effective for inducing somatic embryos after four days with Ethrel. The greatest rates of necrosis took place on the medium with AAS. Direct regeneration of plantlets occurred only on medium supplemented with 5 mg/L of AgNO3 after an eight-day treatment with Ethrel. The most responsive genotypes were PIX22C#31 x Line 004 and PIX22C#21 x Ikeda. Chromosome number of the seedlings was verified through the root tip analysis which indicated the presence of haploid and diploid chromosome number. Since regeneration was direct, ie without going through callus phase, it is hypothesized that the diploid seedlings came from in vitro diploidization.

  20. Effects of auxins and cytokinins on tomato callus from anthers

    OpenAIRE

    Janina H. Rogozińska; Leokadia Skutnik

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out on growth substance requirements of tomato callus derived from anthers for culture in vitro. Linsmaier and Skoog (1965) medium was used with various levels of auxins (IAA and NAA) and cytokinins (K and BAP). The results show that cytokinin is an absolute requirement for callus growth irrespective of the auxin level. The optimum concentration of auxin in combination with cytokinin was found to be 5 μM of NAA or 25 μM of IAA, with 5 μM of K or BAP. Callus growth...

  1. Culturally Responsive Educational Web Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillani, Bijan B.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the shortcomings of multicultural education; presents Vygotsky's sociocognitive theory as a model for multicultural education for the World Wide Web; and discusses the process of Web design as an appropriate technological tool to apply Vygotsky's theory to create culturally responsive educational environments. (Contains 9 references.)…

  2. Supervisor Cultural Responsiveness and Unresponsiveness in Cross-Cultural Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, Alan W.; Johnson, Adanna J.; Madson, Michael B.; Pruitt, Nathan T.; Contreras-Tadych, Deborah A.; Kozlowski, JoEllen M.; Hess, Shirley A.; Knox, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Thirteen supervisees' of color and 13 European American supervisees' experiences of culturally responsive and unresponsive cross-cultural supervision were studied using consensual qualitative research. In culturally responsive supervision, all supervisees felt supported for exploring cultural issues, which positively affected the supervisee, the

  3. Culturally Embedded Organizational Learning for Global Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Berthoin Antal, Ariane; Sobczak, Andr

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a multilevel model of Global Responsibility as a culturally embedded organizational learning process. The model enables an analysis of the way culture influences how responsibilities are defined and distributed in a culture at a given point in time, and how organizations learn to address new responsibilities in new ways when the context changes. The model starts at the organizational level and zooms in on the individual level as well as outward to the local, national, an...

  4. Culturally Responsive Training of Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, Mary Anne; Devereaux, Temma Harris

    2009-01-01

    Given that the numbers of culturally and/or linguistically diverse students being educated in U.S. public schools are growing immensely, teacher educators must take responsibility for preparing teacher candidates to work in today's diverse classrooms. This can be difficult, however, if teacher educators are not culturally responsive in their…

  5. Culturally Responsive Leadership: Graduate Program Egalitarianism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Tod Allen; Higham, J. Russell, III

    2007-01-01

    As American society becomes increasingly diverse, it is paramount that university graduate programs produce culturally responsive leaders capable of synergistically energizing an increasingly heterogeneous work force. Inherent in this charge is the egalitarian approach to graduate program design. Culturally responsive leadership development is…

  6. Network Culture, Performance & Corporate Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Silvio M. Brondoni

    2003-01-01

    The growth and sustainability of free market economies highlights the need to define rules more suited to the current condition of market globalisation and also encourages firms to adopt more transparent and accountable corporate responsibility (and corporate social responsibility, namely the relationship between the company, environment and social setting). From a managerial perspective, corporate responsibility is linked to ensure the lasting pursuit of the company mission, seeking increasi...

  7. Towards a Culturally Situated Reader Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wanda; Browne, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a theory of how culture enables literary interpretations of texts. We begin with a brief overview of the reader response field. From there, we introduce the theory and provide illustrative participant data examples. These data examples illustrate the four cultural positions middle grade students in our research assumed when

  8. Towards a Culturally Situated Reader Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wanda; Browne, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a theory of how culture enables literary interpretations of texts. We begin with a brief overview of the reader response field. From there, we introduce the theory and provide illustrative participant data examples. These data examples illustrate the four cultural positions middle grade students in our research assumed when…

  9. Culturally Responsive Instruction: Listening to Children

    OpenAIRE

    Beverly Kutsunai; Kathryn Au

    2013-01-01

    Culturally responsive instruction aims to promote the academic success of young children of diverse backgrounds, closing the achievement gap that typically exists between these children and their mainstream peers. Culturally responsive instruction is illustrated here through science lessons taught to young Hawaiian children around themes based on plants and the water cycle. Such place-based education provides a framework for building on the knowledge young children bring from the home and con...

  10. Culture and Listeners' Gaze Responses to Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Background: It is frequently observed that listeners demonstrate gaze aversion to stuttering. This response may have profound social/communicative implications for both fluent and stuttering individuals. However, there is a lack of empirical examination of listeners' eye gaze responses to stuttering, and it is unclear whether cultural background…

  11. Dealing with Difference: Building Culturally Responsive Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Burridge

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia continues to develop as a multicultural society with levels of immigration increasing significantly over recent years as a result of government policies. More recently, the new period of financial turmoil, continuing threats from terrorism and environmental concerns, have all exacerbated the challenges of dealing with difference in our society. In response, schools continue to face the challenges of the impact of a range of different cultures, languages and religions among their student and school communities. How effectively schools deal with difference and how well they are supported in their endeavours to build culturally response classrooms is a perennial issue for both teachers and educators. A major challenge for teachers is to at a minimum, understand cultural differences as they manifest in their particular school settings and to draw on approaches that support student learning in culturally appropriate ways so to assist them to better realise their full potential. In this paper we will consider cultural diversity in the context of recent school policies, highlight a number of frameworks for addressing cultural diversity in the classroom, in particular the approaches by Kalantzis and Cope’s (1999 and Hickling-Hudson (2003. We also draw on the findings from a recent qualitative study of representations of cultural diversity in a number of Sydney metropolitan schools to discuss the need for more greater resource and policy support for progressive teaching approaches that support the development of a more tolerant and inclusive multicultural society. Key words: cultural diversity, schools, teacher education, classroom practice, social inclusion

  12. DIAGNOSING THE CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Prutina, Žana

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary business environment places demands on companies to go beyond economic survival and self-interest and satisfy the needs of various stakeholders. Organizations embark on the path of responsibility and sustainability, but many argue that CSR becomes embedded in an organization when it permeates all aspects of organization, including the organizational culture. Existing organizational culture typologies only provide the framework for analysis within the traditional business para...

  13. Organizational culture during the accident response process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large volume of literature hypothesizes a direct relationship between organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Culture data have been collected by the authors and others at nuclear power plants (NPPs) and other organizations that demand high reliability. In this paper, the literature and data are used to explore a critical dimension of the accident response process in an NPP: the transition from an anticipatory strategy to an ad hoc strategy. In particular, the effect of organizational culture on the implementation of each of these strategies is examined

  14. Culture moderates children's responses to ostracism situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Harriet; Uskul, Ayse K

    2016-05-01

    Across a series of studies, we investigated cultural differences in children's responses to ostracism situations. Working with the children of farmers and herders, we focused on how painful children estimate ostracism to be. Study 1a showed that 4- to 8-year-old children from a socially interdependent farming community estimated ostracism to be less painful than did children from an independent herding community. Study 1b showed that this cultural difference was specific to social pain and did not apply to physical pain. Study 2 replicated the results of Study 1a and showed that individual differences in parents' level of social interdependence mediated the relationship between cultural group and how painful children estimate ostracism to be. Study 3 replicated this effect again and showed that children's tendency to recommend seeking social support following ostracism mediated the relationship between cultural group and the perceived pain of being excluded. Finally, Study 4 investigated cultural differences in moral responses to ostracism and showed that children from the farming community punished an individual who ostracized someone else less harshly than did children from the independent herding community. Thus different economic cultures are associated with striking differences in social interdependence and responses to ostracism from early in development. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27176774

  15. Culturally Responsive Instruction: Listening to Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly Kutsunai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Culturally responsive instruction aims to promote the academic success of young children of diverse backgrounds, closing the achievement gap that typically exists between these children and their mainstream peers. Culturally responsive instruction is illustrated here through science lessons taught to young Hawaiian children around themes based on plants and the water cycle. Such place-based education provides a framework for building on the knowledge young children bring from the home and connecting them to the ways of their ancestors. Teachers seek to introduce themes in an engaging manner, including hands-on activities with artifacts and the reading aloud of literature.

  16. Toward a More Culturally Responsive General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Carlos R.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to characterize culturally responsive teaching; consider how it differs from other pedagogical approaches in music education informed by culture, such as multicultural music education; and offer ideas for making the general music classroom more culturally responsive.

  17. Culturally Responsive Physics Teaching: Content or Conveyance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Taquan Seth

    2011-12-01

    This study, in response to the achievement gap in science and the lack of significant numbers of ethnic minorities in science fields, examined the effects of a Cultural Responsiveness Workshop and intervention on teacher practice, teacher discourse, and student perceptions and connectedness to physics. The sample was comprised of three high school physics teachers---2 teaching five 12th grade sections and one teaching five 9th grade sections of physics---in two separate urban schools in the same section of South Los Angeles. My research design was qualitative and examined eight culturally responsive indicators that, when applied, may increase student engagement and level of connectedness in urban high school physics classrooms: (1) proximity to students, (2) the ways in which they encouraged students, (3) positive reinforcement techniques, (4) modifications for individual learning types, (5) use of children's strengths, (6) scaffolding, (7) displaying an understanding of diverse cultures, and (8) displaying a personal regard for students of diverse cultures. When the study was completed and data was collected, I identified trends in the change in teacher discourse, behaviors, instructional practice, and perceptions of student engagement. My findings, discovered through classroom observations and focus groups, indicated a positive shift in each. Accompanying these shifts were positive shifts in level of student engagement and level of connectedness. There were also the unexpected findings of the need for teachers to receive feedback in a safe collaborative space and the use of culturally responsive teaching as a tool for behavioral management. My study found that there is a definite relationship between the use of the culturally responsive indicators observed, student engagement and student level of connectedness to physics when implemented in urban high school science classrooms.

  18. Effects of Cry1Ab-expressing corn anthers on the movement of monarch butterfly larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasifka, Patricia L; Hellmich, Richard L; Prasifka, Jarrad R; Lewis, Leslie C

    2007-02-01

    Decreased larval feeding and weight of the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus L., have been detected after 4 d of exposure in the laboratory to a high density of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-expressing anthers. One hypothesis is that larvae exposed to Bt anthers exhibit increased wandering, resulting in less feeding and lower weight gain. To test this hypothesis, 2-d-old monarch butterfly larvae exposed to milkweed leaf disks with no anthers, anthers that express Bt (Cry1Ab, event MON810), or other non-Bt anthers were observed using a video-tracking system. As had been shown in previous studies, larvae exposed to Bt anthers fed less and gained less weight than larvae exposed to non-Bt or no anthers, yet there was no evidence of feeding on anthers. Total distance moved, maximum displacement from release point, percentage of time spent moving or near anthers, or mean turn angle did not differ across treatments. However, larvae exposed to Bt anthers spent more time off milkweed leaf disks than those exposed to no anthers and were more likely to move off the leaf than larvae exposed to non-Bt anthers. Results suggest that larvae exposed to Bt anthers behave differently and that ingestion may not be the only way Bt can affect nontarget insects like the monarch butterfly. PMID:17349137

  19. Culturally divergent responses to mortality salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma-Kellams, Christine; Blascovich, Jim

    2011-08-01

    Two experiments compared the effects of death thoughts, or mortality salience, on European and Asian Americans. Research on terror management theory has demonstrated that in Western cultural groups, individuals typically employ self-protective strategies in the face of death-related thoughts. Given fundamental East-West differences in self-construal (i.e., the independent vs. interdependent self), we predicted that members of Eastern cultural groups would affirm other people, rather than defend and affirm the self, after encountering conditions of mortality salience. We primed European Americans and Asian Americans with either a death or a control prime and examined the effect of this manipulation on attitudes about a person who violates cultural norms (Study 1) and on attributions about the plight of an innocent victim (Study 2). Mortality salience promoted culturally divergent responses, leading European Americans to defend the self and Asian Americans to defend other people. PMID:21705518

  20. Cultural Fusion: International Teacher Responses to Multiculturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alban, David J.; Reeves, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly diverse classrooms require educators to examine the appropriateness of teaching practices for certain student subgroup populations. With high accountability for schools to account for student achievement inclusively, a growing interest in culturally responsive practices necessitates more investigation of learning and instruction…

  1. Cultural Fusion: International Teacher Responses to Multiculturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alban, David J.; Reeves, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly diverse classrooms require educators to examine the appropriateness of teaching practices for certain student subgroup populations. With high accountability for schools to account for student achievement inclusively, a growing interest in culturally responsive practices necessitates more investigation of learning and instruction

  2. Haplodiploid androgenetic breeding in oat: genotypic variation in anther size and microspore development stage Melhoramento por haplodiploidizao androgentica: variao genotpica no tamanho das anteras e no estgio de desenvolvimento dos micrsporos em aveia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taniela De Cesaro

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Oat (Avena spp. is poorly responsive to the haplodiploidization process, which leads to the production of homozygous lines in one step, increasing breeding efficiency. Androgenetic haploids in small grain cereal crops are obtained from microspores cultured at the mononucleate stage, which can be identified by the size of anthers. In order to identify the appropriate anther size for in vitro culture, microspore cytological analyses were made in Avena sativa cultivars UPF 7, UPF 18, UFRGS 14, Stout and Avena sterilis CAV 3361, cultivated in growth chamber under controlled light and temperature conditions. Variation was observed within and among genotypes for anther size at each microspore developmental stage and according to the position of spikelets in the panicle. Architecture variation in panicle shape and non-linear microsporogenesis maturation increased the challenge of identifying potentially androgenetic oat anthers. Cytological screening before culture is critical in identifying microspores at the right stage for oat androgenesis.A aveia (Avena spp. tem sido pouco responsiva haplodiploidizao, um processo que aumenta a eficincia da seleo no melhoramento por gerar, em uma etapa, linhas puras homozigticas. A fase mononucleada do micrsporo critica para o sucesso da andrognese in vitro nos cereais de inverno e, em geral, pode ser inferida pelo tamanho da antera. Foram medidas anteras e analisados citolgicamente micrsporos das cultivares de Avena sativa UPF 7, UPF 18, UFRGS 14, Stout e da linhagem CAV 3361 de Avena sterilis, cultivadas em cmaras de crescimento sob temperaturas dia-noite variando de 16C a 9C e 12 horas de intensidade luminosa de 300 mol m-2 s-1. O tamanho das anteras em cada fase de desenvolvimento dos micrsporos variou significativamente entre gentipos e de acordo com a regio de insero das espiguetas na pancula. A variao na arquitetura da pancula e a maturao no linear das espiguetas aumentam as dificuldades para a identificao das anteras potencialmente androgenticas e podem explicar, em parte, os baixos resultados da andrognese na aveia. Os dados mostram a necessidade de uma anlise citolgica prvia para auxiliar a determinar a fase ideal de desenvolvimento dos micrsporos potencialmente responsivos cultura de anteras, para o uso da androgenese na aveia.

  3. Transforming the Doping Culture : Whose responsibility, what responsibility?

    OpenAIRE

    Atry, Ashkan

    2013-01-01

    The doping culture represents an issue for sport and for society. Normative debates on doping have been mainly concerned with questions of the justifiability of doping. The practice of assigning responsibility for doping behaviour has chiefly been individual-based, focusing mainly on the individual athlete’s doping behaviour. The overarching aim of this thesis is to investigate the relevance and the importance of the ideas of responsibility in relation to ethical debates on doping. The more s...

  4. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-01-01

    This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and c...

  5. Dealing with Difference: Building Culturally Responsive Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Burridge; John Buchanan; Andrew Chodkiewicz

    2009-01-01

    Australia continues to develop as a multicultural society with levels of immigration increasing significantly over recent years as a result of government policies. More recently, the new period of financial turmoil, continuing threats from terrorism and environmental concerns, have all exacerbated the challenges of dealing with difference in our society. In response, schools continue to face the challenges of the impact of a range of different cultures, languages and religions among their stu...

  6. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  7. Corporate Social Responsibility and Managing Ethical Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeney Widya Prihatiningtias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues that the promotion of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and ethical business conduct is very important. CSR nowadays has become crucial issue as major companies are expected to demonstrate their commitment to society’s values through actions. The current article explains, evaluates, and applies to relevant examples of the narrow, broader socio-economic, as well as broad maximal view of CSR. It also critically describes how organizations can develop ethical cultures and corporate ethics programs for CSR.

  8. Organizational culture during the accident response process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of an organization to effectively move from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy may well depend on the organization having the ability to balance these two apparently dichotomous cultural styles. The organization which is most capable of making the necessary transition in an optimal manner may well exhibit some aspects of both cultural styles during normal operations. Data collected at one NPP does exhibit this pattern of results, with the organization exhibiting a clear hierarchical chain of command and perceived conventional behavioral expectations as well as exhibiting a more decentralized and collegial approach to decisionmaking, a team work orientation, and informal communications. Thus, it is expected that this organization possesses the capabilities to make a successful transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. Data collected at a second NPP more strongly exhibits the traditional style suggested as being important during the anticipatory strategy, with more formal communications and bureaucratically controlled decision-making. This organization may experience difficulty if faced with the need to make a transition from an anticipatory to an ad hoc strategy. These conclusions are further validated based on observation of Emergency Preparedness Exercise Inspections, which suggest that the more anticipatory types of behaviors actually inhibit successful performance during an ad hoc response. The final validation of these hypotheses needs to be demonstrated with cultural data collected during emergency simulations. The mechanism to obtain such data during these types of situations is an area for future research

  9. Expressed sequences tags of the anther smut fungus, Microbotryum violaceum, identify mating and pathogenicity genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devier Benjamin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The basidiomycete fungus Microbotryum violaceum is responsible for the anther-smut disease in many plants of the Caryophyllaceae family and is a model in genetics and evolutionary biology. Infection is initiated by dikaryotic hyphae produced after the conjugation of two haploid sporidia of opposite mating type. This study describes M. violaceum ESTs corresponding to nuclear genes expressed during conjugation and early hyphal production. Results A normalized cDNA library generated 24,128 sequences, which were assembled into 7,765 unique genes; 25.2% of them displayed significant similarity to annotated proteins from other organisms, 74.3% a weak similarity to the same set of known proteins, and 0.5% were orphans. We identified putative pheromone receptors and genes that in other fungi are involved in the mating process. We also identified many sequences similar to genes known to be involved in pathogenicity in other fungi. The M. violaceum EST database, MICROBASE, is available on the Web and provides access to the sequences, assembled contigs, annotations and programs to compare similarities against MICROBASE. Conclusion This study provides a basis for cloning the mating type locus, for further investigation of pathogenicity genes in the anther smut fungi, and for comparative genomics.

  10. El turismo cultural. ¿Un negocio responsable? Cultural Tourism. A Responsible Business?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Santana Talavera

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cuestiones como la degradación el medioambiente, la pérdida de la diversidad cultural y especialmente lo considerado como patrimonio cultural y la ecología, son actualmente aspectos consustanciales a la vida cotidiana, a la política, a la planificación y a los negocios. En la Cumbre de la Tierra (Río de Janeiro, 1992 se acuña el concepto Turismo Responsable en un intento de impulsar el respeto y la preservación, implicando en la tarea a todos los actores. Bajo el paraguas de la responsabilidad, uno de los productos con mayor crecimiento y demanda en la última década ha sido el turismo cultural, planteado ahora como una de las fórmulas para la consecución del desarrollo integral de los pueblos. En este artículo se repasa el turismo cultural como producto, su importancia en el nuevo orden turístico y su alcance, constatando como a través de él el sistema turístico ha tendido a implicarse en la gestión de la cultura y condicionarla por su rentabilidad.Environmental degradation, the loss of cultural diversity and especially what is considered cultural heritage and ecology, are actually the main issues of every day life, politics, planning and business. During the Rio Meeting (Rio de Janeiro, 1992 the concept of Responsible Tourism was born in an attempt to enhance respect and preservation with all actors involved. Under the umbrella of responsibility, cultural tourism was one product that showed the biggest growth under the premises of the formula of all-embracing development of society. This article presents a revision of cultural tourism as a product, its importance for the new tourist order and its range and establishing in which way the tourist system had a tendency to get involved in cultural management and therefore as conditioned its profitability.

  11. Activity of carbon dioxide fixation by anthers and leaves of cereal grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives a comparative evaluation of the photosynthetic activity of anthers and flag leaves in winter wheat, rye, and triticale. The content of chlorophylls in anthers and leaves was determined. The activity of 14CO2 fixation by anthers and leaf disks was determined by the radiometric method in a chamber floating on mercury under standard exposure conditions (0.1% concentration of 14CO2, illumination of 15,000 1x, temperature of 23 C). Analyses were conducted in three replications and the results of typical biological experiments are cited. Data show that chlorophyll is actively synthesized in the anthers of cereal grains

  12. Culturally Responsive Teaching for American Indian Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewewardy, Cornel D.

    Teachers in a multicultural society need to respect cultural differences, know the cultural resources their students bring to class, and be skilled at tapping into learners' cultural resources in the teaching-learning process. They must believe that all students are capable of learning, and they must implement an enriched curriculum for all…

  13. Culturally Responsive: Art Education in a Global Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Facing the era of globalization, culturally responsive art teachers must recognize that students' home culture, including local artistic expression, is inevitably influenced by global forces. They should strive to engage with students systems and issues of globalization and its impact on their community culture and art. In this article, the author…

  14. Culturally Responsive: Art Education in a Global Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Facing the era of globalization, culturally responsive art teachers must recognize that students' home culture, including local artistic expression, is inevitably influenced by global forces. They should strive to engage with students systems and issues of globalization and its impact on their community culture and art. In this article, the author

  15. Analysis of biochemical characteristics of maize anthers from male fertilizable plant and male sterile plant induced by space flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of soluble sugar, starch, protein and free praline in anthers were analyzed and compared between male fertilizable and male sterile induced by space flight at different developmental stages. The results showed that all contents were lower in male sterile anthers than in fertilisable ones. With anther developing, the contents of soluble starch, protein and free proline increased obviously in male fertilizable anthers, but not in sterile ones. (authors)

  16. Culturally Responsive Instruction: Promoting Literacy in Secondary Content Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Patricia Ruggiano

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how secondary teachers implement culturally responsive literacy instruction in their content areas. Culturally responsive instruction makes connections with students' backgrounds, interests, and experiences to teach the standards-based curriculum. Learning becomes more meaningful and relevant as teachers…

  17. The MADS box transcription factor ZmMADS2 is required for anther and pollen maturation in maize and accumulates in apoptotic bodies during anther dehiscence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Daniela N; Bantin, Jörg; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    The maize (Zea mays) late pollen gene ZmMADS2 belongs to the MIKC type of MADS box transcription factor genes. Here, we report that ZmMADS2, which forms a homodimer in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), is required for anther dehiscence and pollen maturation. Development of anthers and pollen was arrested at 1 d before dehiscence in transgenic plants expressing the ZmMADS2-cDNA in antisense orientation. Temporal and spatial expression analyses showed high amounts of ZmMADS2 transcripts in endothecium and connective tissues of the anther at 1 d before dehiscence and in mature pollen after dehiscence. Transient transformation of maize and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pollen with the luciferase reporter gene under the control of different ZmMADS2 promoter deletion constructs demonstrated the functionality and tissue specificity of the promoter. Transgenic maize plants expressing a ZmMADS2-green fluorescent protein fusion protein under control of the ZmMADS2 promoter were used to monitor protein localization during anther maturation and pollen tube growth. High amounts of the fusion protein accumulate in degenerating nuclei of endothecial and connective cells of the anther. A possible function of ZmMADS2 during anther dehiscence and pollen maturation and during pollen tube growth is discussed. PMID:15001699

  18. Cultural property protection: a clear responsability

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This article traces the authors involvement in cultural property protect since his role as archaeological advisor to the UK Ministry of Defence in 2003 with respect to the invasion of Iraq. It notes the failure of that work and the concerns raised by it within the archaeological community. The article notes the work of the Monuments Men in the Second World War and calls for closer collaboration between cultural property experts and the military in the future. The article also n...

  19. Culturally responsive instruction for english language learners with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosco, Michael John; O'Connor, Rollanda

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes the culturally responsive instruction of one special education teacher with Latino English language learners (ELLs) with learning disabilities in an urban elementary school setting. This study was situated in a social constructivist research based framework. In investigating this instruction with ELLs, this study focused on how one teacher's knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy affected her special education instruction. Findings resulted in three major themes that were aligned with the current literature in this area: Cultural Aspects of Teaching Reading, Culturally Relevant Skills-Based Instruction, and Collaborative Agency Time. The results indicated that the success of special education with ELLs at the elementary education level might be dependent on how well the special education teacher integrates culturally responsive instruction with ELLs' cultural and linguistic needs. PMID:23407658

  20. Callus induction and plant regeneration of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. IPA 5) via anther culture Indução de calos e regeneração de plantas a partir do cultivo in vitro de anteras de tomate (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. IPA 5)

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Christina Rabello Brasileiro; Lilia Willadino; Gianna Griz Carvalheira; Marcelo Guerra

    1999-01-01

    Different growth regulators combinations were tested on the production of anther callus in tomato cultivar IPA 5. Calli were induced on media supplemented with 1.0mgL-1 gibberellic acid (GA3), 0.05mgL-1 alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) plus 0.1mgL-1 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), or with 1.0mgL-1 BAP plus 1.0mgL-1 NAA. The medium containing 1.0mgL-1 BAP and 1.0mgL-1 NAA produced the highest calli frequency, and promoted plant regeneration by indirect organogenesis, when calli were transferred t...

  1. Culturally Responsive Marketing of Coach and Pepsi

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin Quinn; Renika Quinn

    2015-01-01

    This study will focus on the cultural aspects of China and how the brands Coach and Pepsi will target Chinese consumers. Information will be provided on the society, economical facets, marketing analysis and positive and normative perspectives of the study. China, like with many other countries has developed certain marketing techniques as a way of gaining the interest of their consumers.

  2. Practicing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Shawna; Sternod, Brandon M.

    2011-01-01

    As a result of continuous global immigration to the United States, several microcultures coexist within the country. Today's classroom should provide an interface where individuals from different cultural backgrounds have the potential for sharing a rich place of learning--a place where the teacher embraces and celebrates individual differences,…

  3. An Empirical Perspective on the Culture - Corporate Social Responsibility Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru ZAIȚ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Business competition and pressure of European directives put Romanian company in a position to find answers to issues related to long-term survival and development. In this context we believe it is necessary to analyze some of the most important components that should be taken into consideration at the strategic level: national and organizational culture. The results indicate that corporate social responsibility is supported by learning and change-oriented organizational culture, but also by a favorable cultural and national economic framework. Based on these theoretical considerations we intent to emphasize the relationships between national culture / corporate culture and corporate social responsibility (CSR, elaborating an empirical argument by analyzing the results provided by Global 100, an annual project initiated by Corporate Knights Inc. (Davos. Starting with 2005, it has the largest database in the world and an appropriate evaluation methodology that provides a ranking of the top 100 most responsible companies in the world.

  4. Cultured articular chondrocytes sheets for partial thickness cartilage defects utilizing temperature-responsive culture dishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kaneshiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of articular cartilage has several functions that are unique to joints. Although a technique for transplanting cultured chondrocytes has already been introduced, it is difficult to collect intact ECM when using enzymes to harvest samples. Temperature-responsive culture dishes have already been clinically applied in the fields of myocardial and corneal transplantation. Earlier studies have shown that a sheet of cultured cells with intact ECM and adhesive factors can be harvested using such culture dishes, which allow the surface properties of the dish to be reversibly altered by changing the temperature. Human chondrocytes were subjected to enzymatic digestion and then were seeded in temperature-responsive culture dishes. A sheet of chondrocytes was harvested by only reducing the temperature after the cultured cells reached confluency. A real-time PCR analysis of the chondrocyte sheets confirmed that type II collagen, aggrecan, and fibronectin were present. These results suggested that, although chondrocytes undergo dedifferentiation in a monolayer culture, multilayer chondrocyte sheets grown in a similar environment to that of three-dimensional culture may be able to maintain a normal phenotype. A histological examination suggested that multilayer chondrocyte sheets could thus prevent the loss of proteoglycans because the area covered by the sheets was well stained by safranin-O. The present experiments suggested that temperature-responsive culture dishes are useful for obtaining cultured chondrocytes, which may then be clinically employed as a substitute for periosteal patches because such sheets can be applied without a scaffold.

  5. Enhancing Core Reading Programs with Culturally Responsive Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppel, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Culturally responsive instruction uses, "cultural knowledge, prior experiences, frames of reference, and performance styles of ethnically diverse students to make learning encounters more relevant to and effective for them." Because approximately 75% of districts choose to use one of the various publisher-created reading programs, it is…

  6. Culturally Responsive Collegiate Mathematics Education: Implications for African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author utilizes the culturally congruent work of Gay (2010) and Ladson-Billings (2009) to highlight culturally responsive teaching as a viable option for African American students in higher education mathematics spaces. He offers translations of Gay and Ladson-Billings' work to Africana mathematics and argues that these…

  7. Designing for Culturally Responsive Science Education through Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie C.; Crippen, Kent J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational stakeholders across the globe are demanding science education reform that attends simultaneously to culturally diverse students' needs and promotes academic excellence. Although professional development programs can foster science teachers' growth as culturally responsive educators, effective supports to this end are not well…

  8. Culturally Responsive Dance Pedagogy in the Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Dance has an important place in multicultural education and the development of culturally responsive pedagogy. Through dance, children can explore and express their own and others' cultures and share their stories in ways other than the spoken and written word. This paper presents a case study concerning a professional development programme in…

  9. Culturally Responsive Dance Pedagogy in the Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Dance has an important place in multicultural education and the development of culturally responsive pedagogy. Through dance, children can explore and express their own and others' cultures and share their stories in ways other than the spoken and written word. This paper presents a case study concerning a professional development programme in

  10. The Skin That We Sing: Culturally Responsive Choral Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This article describes ways that music education can be made more culturally responsive, or congruent with the orientations of culturally diverse students. Music education in the United States has historically been based on Eurocentric frameworks that may no longer be applicable in an increasingly multicultural society. For the many teachers…

  11. Crisis and Man: Literary Responses Across Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnaswami, Mallika

    2012-01-01

    Myth of Sisyphus exemplifies the situation man finds himself in irrespective of his ethnic and geographical background. Art and cultural forms gave expression to this situation and the intensity of the expression depended upon the political and social dimensions. War or peace, man is always condemned to struggle with his problems, moral or otherwise. Post war English writers focused on the social problems the British society found itself in and its helplessness in dealing with them. It was th...

  12. Research on cotton anther development of three male-sterile lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollens of Sumian 22 were irradiated by 60Co γ-rays at a dose of 20Gy, then fertilized to pistil and harvested seed. Three male-sterile lines were selected from M1 plants, their anther observed by paraffin slice technique. Although there were some different characteristics during the abortion anther development, the abortion was consistent: the abortion stage from the development periods of pollen mother cells to microspore, pollen mother cells, tapetum, middle layer cells and the shape of anther were affected, the results contained micronucleus and double nucleus, cytoplasm expansion during the period of meiosis, tapetum and middle layer cells and so on were abnormal. (authors)

  13. Glacial refugia in pathogens: European genetic structure of anther smut pathogens on Silene latifolia and Silene dioica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercken, Elodie; Fontaine, Michael C; Gladieux, Pierre; Hood, Michael E; Jonot, Odile; Giraud, Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    Climate warming is predicted to increase the frequency of invasions by pathogens and to cause the large-scale redistribution of native host species, with dramatic consequences on the health of domesticated and wild populations of plants and animals. The study of historic range shifts in response to climate change, such as during interglacial cycles, can help in the prediction of the routes and dynamics of infectious diseases during the impending ecosystem changes. Here we studied the population structure in Europe of two Microbotryum species causing anther smut disease on the plants Silene latifolia and Silene dioica. Clustering analyses revealed the existence of genetically distinct groups for the pathogen on S. latifolia, providing a clear-cut example of European phylogeography reflecting recolonization from southern refugia after glaciation. The pathogen genetic structure was congruent with the genetic structure of its host species S. latifolia, suggesting dependence of the migration pathway of the anther smut fungus on its host. The fungus, however, appeared to have persisted in more numerous and smaller refugia than its host and to have experienced fewer events of large-scale dispersal. The anther smut pathogen on S. dioica also showed a strong phylogeographic structure that might be related to more northern glacial refugia. Differences in host ecology probably played a role in these differences in the pathogen population structure. Very high selfing rates were inferred in both fungal species, explaining the low levels of admixture between the genetic clusters. The systems studied here indicate that migration patterns caused by climate change can be expected to include pathogen invasions that follow the redistribution of their host species at continental scales, but also that the recolonization by pathogens is not simply a mirror of their hosts, even for obligate biotrophs, and that the ecology of hosts and pathogen mating systems likely affects recolonization patterns. PMID:21187901

  14. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Anther Transcriptome Profiles of Two Different Rice Male Sterile Lines Genotypes under Cold Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Bai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice is highly sensitive to cold stress during reproductive developmental stages, and little is known about the mechanisms of cold responses in rice anther. Using the HiSeq™ 2000 sequencing platform, the anther transcriptome of photo thermo sensitive genic male sterile lines (PTGMS rice Y58S and P64S (Pei’ai64S were analyzed at the fertility sensitive stage under cold stress. Approximately 243 million clean reads were obtained from four libraries and aligned against the oryza indica genome and 1497 and 5652 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified in P64S and Y58S, respectively. Both gene ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG analyses were conducted for these DEGs. Functional classification of DEGs was also carried out. The DEGs common to both genotypes were mainly involved in signal transduction, metabolism, transport, and transcriptional regulation. Most of the DEGs were unique for each comparison group. We observed that there were more differentially expressed MYB (Myeloblastosis and zinc finger family transcription factors and signal transduction components such as calmodulin/calcium dependent protein kinases in the Y58S comparison group. It was also found that ribosome-related DEGs may play key roles in cold stress signal transduction. These results presented here would be particularly useful for further studies on investigating the molecular mechanisms of rice responses to cold stress.

  16. Tribenuron-Methyl Induces Male Sterility through Anther-Specific Inhibition of Acetolactate Synthase Leading to Autophagic Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lun; Jing, Xue; Chen, Li; Liu, Yingjun; Su, Yanan; Liu, Tingting; Gao, Changbin; Yi, Bin; Wen, Jing; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Zou, Jitao; Fu, Tingdong; Shen, Jinxiong

    2015-12-01

    Tribenuron-methyl (TM) is a powerful sulfonylurea herbicide that inhibits branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) biosynthesis by targeting the catalytic subunit (CSR1) of acetolactate synthase (ALS). Selective induction of male sterility by foliar spraying of TM at low doses has been widely used for hybrid seed production in rapeseed (Brassica napus); however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here, we report greater TM accumulation and subsequent stronger ALS inhibition and BCAA starvation in anthers than in leaves and stems after TM application. Constitutive or anther-specific expression of csr1-1D (a CSR1 mutant) eliminated anther-selective ALS inhibition and reversed the TM-induced male sterile phenotype in both rapeseed and Arabidopsis. The results of TM daub-stem experiments, combined with the observations of little TM accumulation in anthers and reversion of TM-induced male sterility by targeted expression of the TM metabolism gene Bel in either the mesophyll or phloem, suggested that foliar-sprayed TM was polar-transported to anthers mainly through the mesophyll and phloem. Microscopy and immunoblotting revealed that autophagy, a bulk degradation process induced during cell death, was elevated in TM-induced male sterile anthers and by anther-specific knockdown of ALS. Moreover, TM-induced pollen abortion was significantly inhibited by the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. These data suggested that TM was polar-transported to anthers, resulting in BCAA starvation via anther-specific ALS inhibition and, ultimately, autophagic cell death in anthers. PMID:26362932

  17. A Comprehensive Cognitive Behavioral Program for Offenders: Responsible Adult Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Potter, GB; Gibbs, JC; Robbins, M.; Langdon, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    This book presents Responsible Adult Culture (RAC), a truly comprehensive program for helping offenders to think and act responsibly. It provides the tools of the program with great clarity. In addition to exploring the needs of all offenders, the book addresses the special needs of both female and dual-diagnosis offenders. Responsible thinking means habitually seeing others and situations accurately, rather than in self-serving and egocentrically distorted ways. Because self-centered thinkin...

  18. Faithfulness--Translator’s Responsibility in Cross-Cultural Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Feng; Xu, Xihua

    2014-01-01

    New trends in translation have led to a mistaken notion that faithfulness is obsolete. This article argues that faithfulness should be highlighted in cross-cultural communication to promote better understanding. As a result, a translator should cultivate a strong sense of responsibility, keeping in mind that faithfulness is the guarantee of successful cross-cultural communication. Erroneous translation, either because of incautious, incompetent translation ending in misinformation, or because...

  19. Investigating the impact of culture on evacuation response behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Galea, Edwin R.; Markus, Sauter; Deere, Steven J.; Filippidis, Lazaros

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether social culture impacts how people respond to an evacuation alarm. As part of this work four unannounced library evacuations were conducted in the Czech Republic, Turkey, Poland and the UK. In an attempt to isolate social culture as the primary independent variable across the trials, the key parameters that are known to influence Response Phase behaviour and performance e.g. population demographics, type of structure, alarm system, etc were contr...

  20. Faithfulness--Translator’s Responsibility in Cross-Cultural Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng WU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available New trends in translation have led to a mistaken notion that faithfulness is obsolete. This article argues that faithfulness should be highlighted in cross-cultural communication to promote better understanding. As a result, a translator should cultivate a strong sense of responsibility, keeping in mind that faithfulness is the guarantee of successful cross-cultural communication. Erroneous translation, either because of incautious, incompetent translation ending in misinformation, or because of deliberate reading into the source language text the translator’s own ideas, ending in disinformation, is detrimental to effective cross-cultural communication. Faithful translation can never be overemphasized.

  1. A culturally responsive counter-narrative of effective teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gist, Conra D.

    2014-12-01

    How do you recognize an effective teacher's sociocultural consciousness? Tamara Wallace's and Brenda Brand's argument that sociocultural consciousness is the "brain" of effective culturally responsive instruction for students of color comes at a time when the system of teacher evaluation is being overhauled nationwide. Teacher observation tools are being piloted to develop a common language of effective instruction but often there is little attention given to sociocultural consciousness in these frameworks. This article develops a culturally responsive counter-narrative to explore the complexity of a teacher's racial consciousness during a teaching episode.

  2. An Atropa belladonna hyoscyamine 6beta-hydroxylase gene is differentially expressed in the root pericycle and anthers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K; Yun, D J; Chen, X Y; Yamada, Y; Hashimoto, T

    1999-05-01

    The AbH6H gene for hyoscyamine 6beta-hydroxylase (H6H), which converts hyoscyamine to scopolamine, was isolated from Atropa belladonna. This plant also possesses a related sequence, Ab psiH6H, which appears to be a non-functional pseudo-gene. AbH6H RNA was detected in cultured root, native root and anther, but not in stem, leaf, pistil, petal, and sepal tissues. In situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and promoter::GUS transgene analysis showed that AbH6H is expressed specifically in root pericycle cells, and in tapetum and pollen mother cells. A 671 bp 5'-upstream region from AbH6H was sufficient for pericycle-specific expression in hairy roots of A. belladonna and Hyoscyamus niger, which both produce scopolamine, but cell-specific regulation was severely compromised in tobacco hairy roots, which do not produce scopolamine. PMID:10394953

  3. 75 FR 76997 - Public Consultation on Personnel Reliability and Culture of Responsibility Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Public Consultation on Personnel Reliability and Culture of... Guidance for Enhancing Personnel Reliability and Strengthening the Culture of Responsibility at the Local... culture of responsibility at facilities that conduct research with dangerous pathogens. The...

  4. Modeling and predicting community responses to events using cultural demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Hicklen, Michael L.

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes a novel capability for modeling and predicting community responses to events (specifically military operations) related to demographics. Demographics in the form of words and/or numbers are used. As an example, State of Alabama annual demographic data for retail sales, auto registration, wholesale trade, shopping goods, and population were used; from which we determined a ranked estimate of the sensitivity of the demographic parameters on the cultural group response. Our algorithm and results are summarized in this paper.

  5. Universities' Responses to Globalisation: The Influence of Organisational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Sally-Ann; Huisman, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to assess how and why some higher education institutions have responded to aspects of globalisation and, in particular how organisational culture influences universities' responses to globalisation. Using a predominantly qualitative, mixed-methods approach, empirical research was used to explore the impact of globalisation at…

  6. Universities' Responses to Globalisation: The Influence of Organisational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Sally-Ann; Huisman, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to assess how and why some higher education institutions have responded to aspects of globalisation and, in particular how organisational culture influences universities' responses to globalisation. Using a predominantly qualitative, mixed-methods approach, empirical research was used to explore the impact of globalisation at

  7. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Examining Teachers' Understandings and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, Michele; Kanahele-Mossman, Huihui; Kawakami, Alice

    2016-01-01

    This action research study examines a graduate level course on Ethnicity and Education. Eighteen teacher participants enrolled in a Master of Education program. Course instructors analyzed teacher participants' perceptions of culturally responsive teaching. A teaching plan, a post-course questionnaire, a focus group interview, and a follow up…

  8. Culturally Responsive Teaching for American Indian Students. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewewardy, Cornel; Hammer, Patricia Cahape

    Culturally responsive teaching cannot be approached as a recipe or series of steps that teachers can follow to become effective with American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students. Instead, it relies on the development of certain dispositions toward learners and a holistic approach to curriculum and instruction. This digest draws on a…

  9. A Systemic Approach to Culturally Responsive Assessment Practices and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slee, June

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier paper, Slee and Keenan demonstrated that it was possible for tertiary education institutions to design culturally responsive assessment procedures that complied with standardised assessment policy. The authors' paper described "Growing Our Own," an initiative between Charles Darwin University and Northern Territory Catholic

  10. Callus induction and plant regeneration of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. IPA 5 via anther culture Indução de calos e regeneração de plantas a partir do cultivo in vitro de anteras de tomate (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. IPA 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Christina Rabello Brasileiro

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Different growth regulators combinations were tested on the production of anther callus in tomato cultivar IPA 5. Calli were induced on media supplemented with 1.0mgL-1 gibberellic acid (GA3, 0.05mgL-1 alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA plus 0.1mgL-1 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP, or with 1.0mgL-1 BAP plus 1.0mgL-1 NAA. The medium containing 1.0mgL-1 BAP and 1.0mgL-1 NAA produced the highest calli frequency, and promoted plant regeneration by indirect organogenesis, when calli were transferred to 0.01mgL-1 BAP and 0.001mgL-1 NAA. Plants regenerated presented tetraploid cells and rare diploid cells. These tetraploid plants could be used as source for further obtainment of trisomic lines, for the purpose of genic localization studies and protein compounds analysis.Diferentes combinações de reguladores de crescimento foram testadas na produção de calos a partir do cultivo de anteras de tomate cultivar IPA 5. Calos foram induzidos no meio suplementado com 1,0mgL-1 de ácido giberélico (GA3 + 0,05mgL-1 de alfa-ácido naftalenoacético (ANA + 0,1mgL-1 de 6-benzilaminopurina (BAP, ou com 1,0mgL-1 de BAP + 1,0mgL-1 de ANA. O meio contendo 1,0mgL-1 de BAP e 1,0mgL-1 de ANA produziu a maior freqüência de calos e promoveu a regeneração de plantas através de organogênese indireta, quando os calos foram transferidos para 0,01mgL-1 de BAP e 0,001mgL-1 de ANA. As plantas regeneradas apresentaram células tetraplóides e, raramente, células diplóides. Estas plantas tetraplóides podem servir como fonte para posterior obtenção de linhagens trissômicas, para serem utilizadas em estudos de localização gênica e em análises de compostos protéicos.

  11. Geoethics and geological culture: awareness, responsibility and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Peppoloni

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The international debate in the field of geoethics focuses on some of the most important environmental emergencies, while highlighting the great responsibilities of geoscientists, whatever field they work in, and the important social, cultural and economic repercussions that their choices can have on society. The GeoItalia 2009 and 2011 conferences that were held in Rimini and Turin, respectively, and were organized by the Italian Federation of Earth Science, were two important moments for the promotion of geoethics in Italy. They were devoted to the highlighting of how, and with what tools and contents, can the geosciences contribute to the cultural renewal of society. They also covered the active roles of geoscientists in the dissemination of scientific information, contributing in this way to the correct construction of social knowledge. Geology is culture, and as such it can help to dispel misconceptions and cultural stereotypes that concern natural phenomena, disasters, resources, and land management. Geological culture consists of methods, goals, values, history, ways of thinking about nature, and specific sensitivity for approaching problems and their solutions. So geology has to fix referenced values, as indispensable prerequisites for geoethics. Together, geological culture and geoethics can strengthen the bond that joins people to their territory, and can help to find solutions and answers to some important challenges in the coming years regarding natural risks, resources, and climate change. Starting from these considerations, we stress the importance of establishing an ethical criterion for Earth scientists, to focus attention on the issue of the responsibility of geoscientists, and the need to more clearly define their scientific identity and the value of their specificities.

  12. Transcriptomes and proteomes define gene expression progression in pre-meiotic maize anthers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Egger, Rachel L; Kelliher, Timothy; Morrow, Darren; Fernandes, John; Nan, Guo-Ling; Walbot, Virginia

    2014-06-01

    Plants lack a germ line; consequently, during reproduction adult somatic cells within flowers must switch from mitotic proliferation to meiosis. In maize (Zea mays L.) anthers, hypoxic conditions in the developing tassel trigger pre-meiotic competence in the column of pluripotent progenitor cells in the center of anther lobes, and within 24 hr these newly specified germinal cells have patterned their surrounding neighbors to differentiate as the first somatic niche cells. Transcriptomes were analyzed by microarray hybridization in carefully staged whole anthers during initial specification events, after the separation of germinal and somatic lineages, during the subsequent rapid mitotic proliferation phase, and during final pre-meiotic germinal and somatic cell differentiation. Maize anthers exhibit a highly complex transcriptome constituting nearly three-quarters of annotated maize genes, and expression patterns are dynamic. Laser microdissection was applied to begin assigning transcripts to tissue and cell types and for comparison to transcriptomes of mutants defective in cell fate specification. Whole anther proteomes were analyzed at three developmental stages by mass spectrometric peptide sequencing using size-fractionated proteins to evaluate the timing of protein accumulation relative to transcript abundance. New insights include early and sustained expression of meiosis-associated genes (77.5% of well-annotated meiosis genes are constitutively active in 0.15 mm anthers), an extremely large change in transcript abundances and types a few days before meiosis (including a class of 1340 transcripts absent specifically at 0.4 mm), and the relative disparity between transcript abundance and protein abundance at any one developmental stage (based on 1303 protein-to-transcript comparisons). PMID:24939185

  13. Geoethics and geological culture: awareness, responsibility and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Peppoloni, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Di Capua, G.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia

    2012-01-01

    The international debate in the field of geoethics focuses on some of the most important environmental emergencies, while highlighting the great responsibilities of geoscientists, whatever field they work in, and the important social, cultural and economic repercussions that their choices can have on society. The GeoItalia 2009 and 2011 conferences that were held in Rimini and Turin, respectively, and were organized by the Italian Federation of Earth Science, were two important moments for th...

  14. Servicescape and Emotional Response: An Application in Cultural Public Services

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas, Berta Tubillejas; Garcia, Haydee Calderon; Taulet, Amparo Cervera

    2010-01-01

    According to services marketing theory, the servicescape modifies final consumer behaviour. This work proposes a conceptual model which analyses the relationship between servicescape and consumer emotions as a preliminary stage in consumer response to the purchase process. This study offers a new contribution by considering servicescape as an integrating concept in the model for the physical and social dimensions of the setting. The model is applied to cultural public services.

  15. Cell biological analyses of anther morphogenesis and pollen viability in Arabidopsis and rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fang; Zhang, Zaibao; Jin, Yue; Ma, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Major advances have been made in recent years in our understanding of anther development through a combination of genetic studies, cell biological technologies, biochemical analysis, microarray and high-throughput sequencing-based approaches. In this chapter, we summarize the widely used protocols for pollen viability staining; the investigation of anther morphogenesis by light microscopy of semi-thin sections; TUNEL assay for programmed tapetum cell death; and laser microdissection procedures to obtain specialized cells or cell layers for carrying out transcriptomics. PMID:24395258

  16. Rice improvement involving altered flower structure more suitable to cross-pollination, using in vitro culture in combination with mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anther and somatic tissue culture in combination with mutagenesis were carried out to evaluate the efficiency of different mutagenic treatments of various in vitro culture materials, and to obtain some promising variants for rice improvement. Results indicated that in japonica rice radiation treatment of dry seeds and young panicles influenced the percentage of green plantlets regeneration from anther culture. Both treatments increased significantly the percentage of regenerated green plant lets in comparison with the control

  17. My Name Is Not Michael: Strategies for Promoting Cultural Responsiveness in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Lisa L.; Hurt, Kara; Lindo, Natalya

    2014-01-01

    With the changing cultural demographics in U.S. classrooms, school counselors must develop innovative approaches to promote culturally responsive school climates and organizational change. A vision is offered of systemic cultural responsiveness and culturally relevant teaching practices that nurture and engage all learners. The role of the school…

  18. Response to Marie Paz Morales' ``Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-12-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript.

  19. Response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Achievement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-01-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript. [For "Influence of…

  20. Response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of Culture and Language Sensitive Physics on Science Attitude Achievement"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Mikel Walker

    2015-01-01

    This response to Marie Paz Morales' "Influence of culture and language sensitive physics on science attitude achievement" explores the ideas of culturally responsive pedagogy and critical literacy to examine some implications for culturally responsive science instruction implicit in the original manuscript. [For "Influence of

  1. The pea END1 promoter drives anther-specific gene expression in different plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, María D; Beltrán, José-Pío; Cañas, Luis A

    2004-10-01

    END1 was isolated by an immunosubtractive approach intended to identify specific proteins present in the different pea (Pisum sativum L.) floral organs and the genes encoding them. Following this strategy we obtained a monoclonal antibody (mAbA1) that specifically recognized a 26-kDa protein (END1) only detected in anther tissues. Northern blot assays showed that END1 is expressed specifically in the anther. In situ hybridization and immunolocalization assays corroborated the specific expression of END1 in the epidermis, connective, endothecium and middle layer cells during the different stages of anther development. END1 is the first anther-specific gene isolated from pea. The absence of a practicable pea transformation method together with the fact that no END1 homologue gene exists in Arabidopsis prevented us from carrying out END1 functional studies. However, we designed functional studies with the END1 promoter in different dicot species, as the specific spatial and temporal expression pattern of END1 suggested, among other things, the possibility of using its promoter region for biotechnological applications. Using different constructs to drive the uidA (beta-glucuronidase) gene controlled by the 2.7-kb isolated promoter sequence we have proven that the END1 promoter is fully functional in the anthers of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., Nicotiana tabacum L. (tobacco) and Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. (tomato) plants. The presence in the -330-bp region of the promoter sequence of three putative CArG boxes also suggests that END1 could be a target gene of MADS-box proteins and that, subsequently, it would be activated by genes controlling floral organ identity. PMID:15221384

  2. Autophagic response to cell culture stress in pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Siân; Swamy, Sushma; Hewitt, Zoe; Wood, Andrew; Weightman, Richard; Moore, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is an important conserved cellular process, both constitutively as a recycling pathway for long lived proteins and as an upregulated stress response. Recent findings suggest a fundamental role for autophagic processes in the maintenance of pluripotent stem cell function. In human embryonic stem cells (hESCS), autophagy was investigated by transfection of LC3-GFP to visualize autophagosomes and with an antibody to LC3B protein. The presence of the primary cilium (PC) in hESCs as the site of recruitment of autophagy-related proteins was also assessed. HESCs (mShef11) in vitro displayed basal autophagy which was upregulated in response to deprivation of culture medium replacement. Significantly higher levels of autophagy were exhibited on spontaneous differentiation of hESCs in vitro. The PC was confirmed to be present in hESCs and therefore may serve to coordinate autophagy function. PMID:26385182

  3. A Framework for Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Design of Response-to-Intervention Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Shernaz B.; Ortiz, Alba A.

    2008-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RTI) was encoded into the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, and is being adopted on a wide scale as an alternative approach to identification of students with learning disabilities. For RTI to be an effective mechanism for addressing disproportionate representation of culturally and…

  4. Differentiation of cultured epithelial cells: Response to toxic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, R.H.; LaMontagne, A.D.; Petito, C.T.; Rong, Xianhui (Charles A. Dana Laboratory of Toxicology, Boston, MA (USA))

    1989-03-01

    Cell culture systems are instrumental in elucidating regulation of normal function and mechanisms of its perturbation by toxic substances. To this end, three applications of epithelial cells cultured with 3T3 feeder layer support are described. First, treatment of the premalignant human epidermal keratinocyte line SCC-12F2 with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate suppressed cell growth and differentiation. This agent produced a biphasic growth response greatly inhibiting cell growth at 1 to 10 nM, but much less above 100 nM. Expression of the differentiated functions involucrin and transglutaminase was found to be inhibited markedly at concentrations above 10 nM. Second, 3-methylcholanthrene toxicity was surveyed in a variety of rat epithelial cell types. The two most sensitive to growth inhibition were epidermal and mammary epithelial cells, while those from bladder, prostate, thyroid, and endometrium were insensitive to growth inhibition. Finally, expression of estrogen receptors in rat endometrial cells was shown to be stimulated by the cAmP-elevating agent forskolin. Maximal stimulation of 3- to 6-fold occurred in 6 hr, compatible with a requirement for protein synthesis. Pursuit of such results will aid in understanding differences in response among cell types and species, in elucidating mechanisms of action of known toxic substances and, ultimately, in predicting toxicity of less well understood agents.

  5. Hemopoietic cell precursor responses to erythropoietin in plasma clot cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependence of the response of mouse bone marrow cells to erythropoietin (Ep) in vitro was studied. Experiments include studies on the Ep response of marrow cells from normal, plethoric, or bled mice. Results with normal marrow reveal: (1) Not all erythroid precursors (CFU-E) are alike in their response to Ep. A significant number of the precursors develop to a mature erythroid colony after very short Ep exposures, but they account for only approx. 13% of the total colonies generated when Ep is active for 48 hrs. If Ep is active more than 6 hrs, a second population of erythroid colonies emerges at a nearly constant rate until the end of the culture. Full erythroid colony production requires prolonged exposure to erythropoietin. (2) The longer erythropoietin is actively present, the larger the number of erythroid colonies that reach 17 cells or more. Two distinct populations of immediate erythroid precursors are also present in marrow from plethoric mice. In these mice, total colony numbers are equal to or below those obtained from normal mice. However, the population of fast-responding CFU-E is consistently decreased to 10 to 20% of that found in normal marrow. The remaining colonies are formed from plethoric marrow at a rate equal to normal marrow. With increasing Ep exposures, the number of large colonies produced increases. From the marrow of bled mice, total erythroid colony production is equal to or above that of normal marrow. Two populations of colony-forming cells are again evident, with the fast-responding CFU-E being below normal levels. The lack of colonies from this group was compensated in bled mice by rapid colony production in the second population. A real increase in numbers of precursors present in this pool increased the rate of colony production in culture to twice that of normal marrow. The number of large colonies obtained from bled mice was again increased as the Ep exposure was lengthened. (ERB)

  6. Calogênese in vitro em anteras de coffea arabica L. In vitro callogenesis in anthers of Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ednamar Gabriela Palú

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available O café é um dos mais importantes produtos do mercado internacional; porém, o tempo gasto e os recursos despendidos são fatores limitantes para o melhoramento do cafeeiro por meio de métodos convencionais. Contudo, a cultura de anteras surge como uma alternativa viável e de curto prazo para solução desses problemas. Com o presente trabalho, objetivou-se a produção de dihaplóides com a cultura de anteras do cafeeiro (androgênese indireta, buscando um protocolo para a fase de indução de calos. Para tanto, foi efetuada a assepsia dos botões florais e das anteras, que, em seguida, foram inoculadas em meio IC e mantidas no escuro por 8 semanas, sob temperatura de 25ºC ± 1. Para induzir a calogênese em anteras da cv. Acaiá Cerrado, foram testadas as concentrações de 2,4-D (0, 1, 2 e 4 mg.L-1 x cinetina (0, 2, 4 e 8 mg.L-1 e 2,4-D (0; 0,5; 1 e 2 mg.L-1 x AIB (0; 0,5; 1 e 2 mg.L-1 mais 2iP (2 mg.L-1 e, para a cv. Rubi, as concentrações de 2,4-D (0, 1, 2 e 4 mg.L-1 x cinetina (0, 2, 4 e 8 mg.L-1. Foi observado que a maior porcentagem de indução de calogênese em anteras na cv. Acaiá Cerrado ocorre com as combinações de 2,4-D (2 mg.L-1 + cinetina (1,9 mg.L-1 e 2,4-D (0,86 mg.L-1 + AIB (1 mg.L-1+ 2iP (2 mg.L-1; para cv. Rubi, a combinação de 2,4-D (1,9 mg.L-1 e cinetina (4 mg.L-1.The coffee is one of the most important products of the international market, however the time and money wasted in breeding programs are limiting factors for its improvement. However, the anther culture appears as a viable alternative for a short time period solution for this problem. This work aimed to obtain the double haploids production from anther cultures of the coffee plant (indirect androgenesis aiming to optimize a protocol calluse induction. For this purpose, asseptic conditions of the flower budsand anthers were accomplished, folowed by inoculationin IC medium and the tissue were kept for eight weeks at 25ºC ± 1 in the dark. To induce callogenesis in anthers of the 'Acaiá Cerrado' there were tested 2,4-D (0, 1, 2 and 4 mg.L-1 x kinetin (0, 2, 4 and 8 mg.L-1 and 2,4-D (0; 0,5; 1 and 2mg.L-1 x AIB (0; 0,5; 1 and 2mg.-1 plus 2 iP (2 mg.L-1 concentrations and for the 'Rubi' 2,4-D (0, 1, 2 and 4 mg.L-1 x kinetin (0, 2, 4 and 8 mg.L-1 concentrations. It was observed that the highest percentage of callogenesis induction in anthers of the 'Acaiá Cerrado' was provenient from 2,4-D (2 mg.L-1 + kinetin (1,9 mg.L-1 and 2,4-D (0,86 mg.L-1 + AIB (1 mg.L-1+ 2iP (2mg.L-1 combinations for 'Rubi' 2,4-D (1,9 mg.L-1 and kinetin (4 mg.L-1.

  7. Arabidopsis histidine-containing phosphotransfer factor 4 (AHP4) negatively regulates secondary wall thickening of the anther endothecium during flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwang Wook; Oh, Seung-Ick; Kim, Yun Young; Yoo, Kyoung Shin; Cui, Mei Hua; Shin, Jeong Sheop

    2008-04-30

    Cytokinins are essential hormones in plant development. Arabidopsis histidine-containing phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs) are mediators in a multistep phosphorelay pathway for cytokinin signaling. The exact role of AHP4 has not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated young flower-specific expression of AHP4, and compared AHP4-overexpressing (Ox) trangenic Arabidopsis lines and an ahp4 knock-out line. AHP4-Ox plants had reduced fertility due to a lack of secondary cell wall thickening in the anther endothecium and inhibition of IRREGURAR XYLEMs (IRXs) expression in young flowers. Conversely, ahp4 anthers had more lignified anther walls than the wild type, and increased IRXs expression. Our study indicates that AHP4 negatively regulates thickening of the secondary cell wall of the anther endothecium, and provides new insight into the role of cytokinins in formation of secondary cell walls via the action of AHP4. PMID:18413999

  8. Antioxidant responses of rice seedling to Ce?+ under hydroponic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiu-Man; Chen, Hong

    2011-09-01

    Since the 1980s, rare earth elements have been commonly used in China because of their enriched fertilizers. To understand the potential benefits or damages of Ce(4+) on rice, the antioxidant responses (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase activities, and ascorbate and glutathione contents) of rice seedling to Ce(4+) under hydroponic cultures were investigated. The results showed that Ce(4+) induced H(2)O(2) and O(2)(-) production of rice seedling. The inhibition studies with diphenylene iodonium suggested that the key enzyme responsible for oxidative bursts was primarily NADPH oxidase. Ce(4+) (0.02 mM) increased the antioxidant capacity of reduced ascorbate and glutathione and the levels of superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and catalase. However, antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant capacity of rice seedling were decreased by 0.2mM Ce(4+) treatment, indicating that higher content of Ce(4+) damaged the mechanism of defense responses and emerged the peroxidation of membrane lipids. These results will help us to understand the mechanism of Ce(4+) on rice and concern about its environmental impact in agriculture. PMID:21514673

  9. Modulation of insulin responses in cultured cells by calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main impetus of this work was to analyze the possible association of Ca++/calmodulin with the β subunit tyrosine kinase of the insulin receptor in whole cells, and to correlate this association to insulin dependent biological responses. Initial in vitro assays with IM-9 lymphocyte receptor preparations demonstrated that calmodulin augments insulin-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation in a calcium dependent manner. Furthermore, the specific calmodulin inhibitors calmidazolium and agent W-7 were effective at inhibiting insulin stimulated receptor autophosphorylation at concentrations reported to inhibit other calmodulin regulated systems. Utilizing the insulin-responsive cultured muscle cell line BC3H-1, we have investigated the effects of these calmodulin antagonists on insulin receptor autophosphorylation, insulin-stimulated DNA synthesis, and insulin-stimulated hexose uptake in intake in intact cells. Confluent BC3H-1 myocytes were assayed for responsiveness to insulin in the presence and absence of increasing concentrations of calmidazolium or W-7 at 37 degree C. Insulin-stimulated receptor tyrosine autophosphorylation of the 95 kDa β-subunit was inhibited by both agents with IC50 values for each of ∼30 μM. 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA was also inhibited with an IC50 value for each of 20-30 μM. Insulin-stimulated 3H-2-deoxyglucose uptake was not specifically affected by calmidazolium and demonstrated inhibition by W-7 only at concentrations indication that the effect is not modulated by a calmodulin dependent mechanism

  10. The Utility of Empathy for White Female Teachers' Culturally Responsive Interactions with Black Male Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Chezare A.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers aiming to become culturally responsive must be concerned with negotiating professional interactions that produce favorable outcomes for the culturally diverse students under their charge. Very few studies offer empirical evidence of empathy's utility in the culturally responsive classroom, especially when the teacher is culturally…

  11. Map-Based Cloning of Genes Important for Maize Anther Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Y.; Walbot, V.; Nan, G.

    2012-12-01

    Map-Based cloning for maize mutant MS13 . Scientists still do not understand what decides the fate of a cell in plants. Many maize genes are important for anther development and when they are disrupted, the anthers do not shed pollen, i.e. male sterile. Since the maize genome has been fully sequenced, we conduct map-based cloning using a bulk segregant analysis strategy. Using PCR (polymerase chain reaction), we look for biomarkers that are linked to our gene of interest, Male Sterile 13 (MS13). Recombinations occur more often if the biomarkers are further away from the gene, therefore we can estimate where the gene is and design more PCR primers to get closer to our gene. Genetic and molecular analysis will help distinguish the role of key genes in setting cell fates before meiosis and for being in charge of the switch from mitosis to meiosis.

  12. Various Spatiotemporal Expression Profiles of Anther-Expressed Genes in Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Hobo, Tokunori; Suwabe, Keita; Aya, Koichiro; Suzuki, Go; Yano, Kentaro; Ishimizu, Takeshi; FUJITA, MASAHIRO; Kikuchi, Shunsuke; Hamada, Kazuki; Miyano, Masumi; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Kaneko, Fumi; Kazama, Tomohiko; Mizuta, Yoko; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2008-01-01

    The male gametophyte and tapetum play different roles during anther development although they are differentiated from the same cell lineage, the L2 layer. Until now, it has not been possible to delineate their transcriptomes due to technical difficulties in separating the two cell types. In the present study, we characterized the separated transcriptomes of the rice microspore/pollen and tapetum using laser microdissection (LM)-mediated microarray. Spatiotemporal expression patterns of 28,141...

  13. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  14. Variation in resistance to multiple pathogen species: anther smuts of Silene uniflora

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Erin; Petit, Elsa; Antonovics, Janis; Pedersen, Amy B; Hood, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of multiple pathogen species on a shared host species is unexpected when they exploit the same micro-niche within the host individual. One explanation for such observations is the presence of pathogen-specific resistances segregating within the host population into sites that are differentially occupied by the competing pathogens. This study used experimental inoculations to test whether specific resistances may contribute to the maintenance of two species of anther-smut fungi,...

  15. Investigating the Relationship between Organization Culture and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)

    OpenAIRE

    Asghar Moshabaki; Vahab Khalili Shojaei

    2011-01-01

    Abstract   This research deals with the investigating the relationship between organization culture and corporate social responsibility (CSR). (Case Study: Energy Ministry). In this paper, the above-mentioned research split in two parts. First, issues regarding organization culture and organization culture management, then effects of organization culture’s stabilization on corporate social responsibility. The questionnaires list regarding organization culture derivated from Baron and Greenber...

  16. Differential Proteomic Analysis of Anthers between Cytoplasmic Male Sterile and Maintainer Lines in Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Wu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS, widely used in the production of hybrid seeds, is a maternally inherited trait resulting in a failure to produce functional pollen. In order to identify some specific proteins associated with CMS in pepper, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE was applied to proteomic analysis of anthers/buds between a CMS line (designated NA3 and its maintainer (designated NB3 in Capsicum annuum L. Thirty-three spots showed more than 1.5-fold in either CMS or its maintainer. Based on mass spectrometry, 27 spots representing 23 distinct proteins in these 33 spots were identified. Proteins down-regulated in CMS anthers/buds includes ATP synthase D chain, formate dehydrogenase, alpha-mannosidas, RuBisCO large subunit-binding protein subunit beta, chloroplast manganese stabilizing protein-II, glutathione S-transferase, adenosine kinase isoform 1T-like protein, putative DNA repair protein RAD23-4, putative caffeoyl-CoA 3-O-methyltransferase, glutamine synthetase (GS, annexin Cap32, glutelin, allene oxide cyclase, etc. In CMS anthers/buds, polyphenol oxidase, ATP synthase subunit beta, and actin are up-regulated. It was predicted that male sterility in NA3 might be related to energy metabolism turbulence, excessive ethylene synthesis, and suffocation of starch synthesis. The present study lays a foundation for future investigations of gene functions associated with pollen development and cytoplasmic male sterility, and explores the molecular mechanism of CMS in pepper.

  17. A Visibility Project: Learning to See How Preservice Teachers Take up Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gere, Anne Ruggles; Buehler, Jennifer; Dallavis, Christian; Haviland, Victoria Shaw

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes the ways in which raced consciousness inflects developing understandings of cultural responsiveness among preservice teachers whose preparation included responses to imaginative engagement with literary texts, interactions in an underresourced school, and exploration of key concepts of culturally responsive pedagogy. The…

  18. Socio-Cultural Norms for Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    Abstract – This paper considers the cultural resources for corporate action tied into stakeholder models, criticizes current stakeholder models, and develops a perspective based in ethics and the political model of the stakeholder. The purpose of this analysis is to lay out models which recognize...... the cultural challenges related to the blurring of the boundaries of the corporation and the needs of different cultural contexts....

  19. Characterization of a novel anther-specific gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat protein in petunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Y Z; Sun, J; Huang, X; Peng, H; Liu, G F; Hu, H R

    2014-01-01

    In Petunia x hybrida 'Fantasy Red', a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene referred to as PhLRR, was identified in a flower bud cDNA library. The open reading frame sequence of PhLRR was 1251 bp, encoding a putative 46.2-kDa protein of 416 amino acids. The PhLRR protein showed high similarity to members of polygalacturonase inhibitor proteins (PGIPs), contained 11 conserved LRR domains, and was an extracellular localization protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PhLRR belonged to the same PGIPs subfamily as SHY, indicating that PhLRR may be involved in the development of pollen-like SHY. Expression analysis revealed that PhLRR was abundantly expressed during early stages of flower bud and anther development, while it was not detected in any other examined organs, such as sepals, petals, pistils, roots, stems, leaves, or open flowers. Furthermore, many cis-acting elements (such as AGAAA and GTGA) related to anther-specific gene expression were identified in the PhLRR gene promoter region, indicating that the promoter is also anther-specific. These results suggested that PhLRR is a novel anther-specific gene that may be essential for the early development of anthers. PMID:25501199

  20. Applying Culturally Responsive Pedagogy to the Vocational Training of Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Training and learning are the personal process in which individuals interact with social and cultural contexts. Immigrant trainees bring their early educational and life experiences into training classrooms, and their learning is strongly affected by their prior socialization and socio-cultural experiences. Therefore, it is necessary to provide…

  1. Engaging and Educating Students with Culturally Responsive Performing Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixon, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    To provide meaningful and motivating connections between students and ensembles, teachers must realize that students' prior experience profoundly affects learning. Many of these experiences are inextricably linked to cultural affiliation. Cultural affiliation is a powerful context for prior experience, and the fundamental principle framing this…

  2. Culturable bacteria in Himalayan ice in response to atmospheric circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Only recently has specific attention been given to culturable bacteria in Tibetan glaciers, but their relation to atmospheric circulation is less understood yet. Here we investigate the seasonal variation of culturable bacteria preserved in a Himalayan ice core. High concentration of culturable bacteria in glacial ice deposited during the pre-monsoon season is attributed to the transportation of continental dust stirred up by the frequent dust storms in Northwest China during spring. This is also confirmed by the spatial distribution of culturable bacteria in Tibetan glaciers. Culturable bacteria deposited during monsoon season are more diverse than other seasons because they derive from both marine air masses and local or regional continental sources. We suggest that microorganisms in Himalayan ice can be used to reconstruct atmospheric circulation.

  3. Considering Culturally Responsive Teaching, Children, and Place in the Music Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Kimberly Friesen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author explores how culturally responsive teaching and the concept of children and place relate in the music room. The article begins with a brief explanation of both culturally responsive teaching and children and place. Through the use of anecdotes and ideas to consider, this article provides elementary music teachers with…

  4. Qualifying Sociopolitical Consciousness: Complicating Culturally Responsive Pedagogy for Faith-Based Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallavis, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the intersection of culturally responsive pedagogy and faith-based schooling. The author presents a portion of a larger ethnographic research project conducted at a Catholic elementary school that serves a predominantly Latino population in urban Chicago. This work contributes to theories of culturally responsive education by…

  5. Considering Culturally Responsive Teaching, Children, and Place in the Music Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Kimberly Friesen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author explores how culturally responsive teaching and the concept of children and place relate in the music room. The article begins with a brief explanation of both culturally responsive teaching and children and place. Through the use of anecdotes and ideas to consider, this article provides elementary music teachers with

  6. Culturally Responsive Teaching as an Ethics- and Care-Based Approach to Urban Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevalier, Rae; McKenzie, Barbara Ann

    2012-01-01

    Research shows culturally responsive teaching affects urban students positively. Current literature is an excellent resource for urban teacher preparation and provides definitions, models, and examples to help preservice teachers recognize the "how" and "what" of culturally responsive teaching. Missing, however, is an accessible, in-depth…

  7. Using Culturally Competent Responsive Services to Improve Student Achievement and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Rita; Grothaus, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates standards blending, the integration of core academic and school counseling standards, as a culturally alert responsive services strategy to assist in closing the achievement gap while also enhancing employability skills and culturally salient career competencies. The responsive services intervention described in this…

  8. Survey Response Styles, Acculturation, and Culture Among a Sample of Mexican American Adults

    OpenAIRE

    DAVIS, RACHEL E.; Resnicow, Ken; Couper, Mick P

    2011-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated use of extreme (ERS) and acquiescent (ARS) response styles across cultural groups. However, due to within-group heterogeneity, it is important to also examine use of response styles, acculturation, and endorsement of cultural variables at the individual level. This study explores relationships between acculturation, six Mexican cultural factors, ERS, and ARS among a sample of 288 Mexican American telephone survey respondents. Three aspects of acculturatio...

  9. "Because That's Who I Am": Extending Theories of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy to Consider Religious Identity, Belief, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallavis, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In this conceptual article the author explores the intersection of culturally responsive pedagogy and religious school contexts. He extends theories of culturally responsive pedagogy to consider how religion, a dimension of student culture that has largely been overlooked in the literature surrounding culturally responsive pedagogy, can inflect…

  10. Syria's world cultural heritage and individual criminal responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Lostal, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Recent reports have confirmed damage to five of the six Syrian world heritage sites during the current armed conflict as well as extensive looting of several of its archaeological sites on the Syrian Tentative List of world heritage. This article examines the role and fate of Syrian world cultural heritage from the beginning of the conflict, maps out the different cultural property obligations applicable to Syria while illustrating, where possible, how they may have been violated. Then, it as...

  11. Oviposition Attractancy of Bacterial Culture Filtrates: response of Culex quinquefasciatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Poonam

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Oviposition attractants could be used for monitoring as well as controlling mosquitoes by attracting them to lay eggs at chosen sites. In the present study, culture filtrates of seven bacterial species were tested for their attractancy against gravid females of Culex quinquefasciatus. When their oviposition active indices (OAI were studied, the culture filtrates of Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens exhibited oviposition attractancy (OAI = >0.3 at 100 ppm and the OAI were respectively 0.70 and 0.47. Culture filtrates of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis (wild type, B. t. var. israelensis (mutant and B. sphaericus showed attractancy at 2000 ppm with OAI of respectively 0.71, 0.59 and 0.68. However, the OAI of B. megaterium as well as Azospirillum brasilense was 0.13 (at 2000 ppm, which was less than 0.3 required to be considered them as attractants. When the oviposition attractancy of the bacterial culture filtrates were compared with that of a known oviposition attractant, p-cresol (at 10 ppm, the culture filtrates of B. t. var. israelensis (wild type and B. cereus were found to be more active than p-cresol, respectively with 64.2 and 54.3% oviposition.

  12. Cultural Democracy and Cultural Capital--Some Reflections on the Australian Case: A Response to Michael Clyne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dennis

    1997-01-01

    A response to an article on multiculturalism and the status of community languages in Australia focuses on three aspects of the article: (1) proposed links between global capitalism, nation-state development, migration, and language policy; (2) the meaning ascribed to "cultural democracy;" and (3) implications of language policy issues for

  13. The S-ribonuclease gene of Petunia hybrida is expressed in nonstylar tissue, including immature anthers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K R; Sims, T L

    1994-09-01

    To determine the ability of isolated S-locus promoter sequences to direct organ-specific gene expression, we used microprojectile bombardment to introduce chimeric S-allele/beta-glucuronidase genes into different tissues of Petunia hybrida for transient expression. Histochemical staining showed that S-locus/beta-glucuronidase fusions were expressed in pistil, ovary, and petal tissue. No expression of the chimeric genes was detected in leaves or in mature pollen, either by histochemical staining or by fluorescence assays. RNA blot hybridization confirmed that low levels of S-locus mRNA accumulate in petals and ovaries in vivo. Analysis of the expression pattern of S-locus promoter deletions showed that sequences in the immediate vicinity of the TATA box were sufficient to confer qualitatively correct organ-specific expression of beta-glucuronidase. To further investigate the potential for S-ribonuclease expression in pollen, we used the polymerase chain reaction to amplify RNA accumulated in developing anthers. These assays demonstrated that mRNA for the S-ribonuclease accumulates to low levels in developing anthers several days prior to corolla opening and pollen anthesis. We discuss these results in light of current models of self-incompatibility. PMID:7972517

  14. Influence of Microsperma Lentil Genotypes on Tissue Culture Responses

    OpenAIRE

    N. Altaf; Iqbal, J.; Ahmad, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    In vitro growth responses of various lentil genotypes varied. The best callussing response was noticed in variety ILL- 4605. The genotype AARI-L-89503 had a tendency for embryogenesis. The genotype AARI-L-86642 had the best rooting ability. This genotype also showed in vitro flowering response. Masoor-85 and Pant-L-406 had moderate morphogenic responses. Meristem multiplication, shoot development, shoot bud formation from callus and adventitious rooting from shoot cuttings was obtained under ...

  15. Cultural Context Moderates the Relationship Between Emotion Control Values and Cardiovascular Challenge Versus Threat Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Mauss, Iris B.; Butler, Emily A.

    2009-01-01

    Cultural context affects people's values regarding emotions, as well as their experiential and behavioral but not autonomic physiological responses to emotional situations. Little research, however, has examined how cultural context influences the relationships among values and emotional responding. Specifically, depending on their cultural context, individuals’ values about emotion control (ECV; the extent to which they value emotion control) may have differing meanings, and as such, be asso...

  16. The development of a model of culturally responsive science and mathematics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Cecilia M.; Morales, Amanda R.; Shroyer, M. Gail

    2013-12-01

    This qualitative theoretical study was conducted in response to the current need for an inclusive and comprehensive model to guide the preparation and assessment of teacher candidates for culturally responsive teaching. The process of developing a model of culturally responsive teaching involved three steps: a comprehensive review of the literature; a synthesis of the literature into thematic categories to capture the dispositions and behaviors of culturally responsive teaching; and the piloting of these thematic categories with teacher candidates to validate the usefulness of the categories and to generate specific exemplars of behavior to represent each category. The model of culturally responsive teaching contains five thematic categories: (1) content integration, (2) facilitating knowledge construction, (3) prejudice reduction, (4) social justice, and (5) academic development. The current model is a promising tool for comprehensively defining culturally responsive teaching in the context of teacher education as well as to guide curriculum and assessment changes aimed to increase candidates' culturally responsive knowledge and skills in science and mathematics teaching.

  17. The Benefits and Challenges of Culturally Responsive EFL Critical Literature Circles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredricks, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Though some research has shown what applying a culturally relevant framework entails in an American context, and occasionally in an EFL setting, there is still too little research on how students respond to critical, culturally responsive pedagogy. More insight is needed into the specific challenges and benefits of critical approaches in diverse

  18. The Relationship between Organizational Culture and the Implementation of Response to Intervention in One Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methner, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between organizational culture and the implementation of Response to Intervention in one elementary school. It examined issues corresponding to change within a system, with particular attention to those relating to school culture. An ethnographic approach was used to gather data, including the collection of

  19. The Cultural Responsiveness of Teacher Candidates Towards Roma Pupils in Serbia and Slovenia--Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecek, Mojca; Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica; Vujisic-Živkovic, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    In many countries, there is a growing need for teacher awareness and sensitivity to cultural differences, what is often called culturally responsive teaching. This is why teacher education institutions are making significant efforts to require student teachers to enrol in courses that focus on understanding, tolerance and acceptance of differences…

  20. The Relationship between Organizational Culture and the Implementation of Response to Intervention in One Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methner, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between organizational culture and the implementation of Response to Intervention in one elementary school. It examined issues corresponding to change within a system, with particular attention to those relating to school culture. An ethnographic approach was used to gather data, including the collection of…

  1. Culturally Responsive Teaching: The Harlem Renaissance in an Urban English Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs, Andrea J.

    2007-01-01

    Andrea J. Stairs advocates culturally responsive teaching, a practice that explicitly highlights "issues of race, ethnicity, and culture as central to teaching, learning, and schooling," and emphasizes the necessity of interrogating the themes of race, power, and privilege in the urban classroom. Stairs observes two student teachers as they…

  2. Effects of Culturally-Responsive Teaching Practices on First Grade Students' Reading Comprehension and Vocabulary Gains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Phyllis Swann

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating research reveals that children's reading comprehension is influenced by a reader's experiences, knowledge, language structure, and vocabulary. Thus, this researcher investigated the construct, culturally-responsive practice, as a way to provide effective learning opportunities for children from non-mainstream cultures, including…

  3. Literature and Lives: A Response-Based, Cultural Studies Approach to Teaching English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey-Webb, Allen

    Telling stories from secondary and college English classrooms, this book explores the new possibilities for teaching and learning generated by bringing together reader-response and cultural-studies approaches. The book connects William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, and other canonical figures to multicultural writers, popular culture,…

  4. Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Citizenship Education: Using African Proverbs as Tools for Teaching in Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Rachel A.; Asimeng-Boahene, Lewis

    2006-01-01

    Preparing today's children to be tomorrow's global citizens will require social educators who have knowledge of the histories, experiences, and cultural practices of the children they teach. This article offers culturally responsive pedagogy and the African proverb as frames for teaching African American students to become engaged local and global…

  5. Empowerment and responsibility of the culture of peace through education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Inés Sánchez Cardona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to highlight the possibilities of empowering the culture of peace in the society in general, so it is necessary a joint work of different actors and social institutions. In this perspective each individual must transcend commitment to the peace of the personal to the social, also the State specifically in the case of Colombia must be monitored for compliance with the legislation in story to the compulsory education for educational institutions peace through public policies. Similarly, we emphasize that when they achieve consistently develop the principles and methodologies of education for peace, in institutions both family, school and University, this facilitates the strengthening of the culture for peace in the country.

  6. "Social marketing, individual responsibility and the culture of intoxication"

    OpenAIRE

    Szmigin, Isabelle; Griffin, C.; Hackley, Chris; Bengry-Howell, A.; Mistral, W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Social marketing initiatives designed to address the UKs culture of unhealthy levels of drinking among young adults have achieved inconclusive results to date. The paper aims toinvestigate the gap between young peoples perceptions of alcohol consumption and those of government agencies who seek to influence their behaviour set within a contextualist framework. Design/methodology/approach The authors present empirical evidence from a major study that suggests that the ...

  7. Secondary English Learners: Strengthening Their Literacy Skills through Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo C.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    In high school English classrooms where English language learners may be at risk of academic failure, Culturally Responsive Teaching can help educators build an inclusive community in which all students can improve their literacy skills.

  8. The response rate in postal epidemiological studies in the context of national cultural behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelova, Radostina A.; Naydenov, Kiril; Hägerhed-Engman, Linda; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Popov, Todor A.; Stankov, Peter; Bornehag, Carl-Gustav

    2012-01-01

    obtained response rate was different: 78.8% in DBH and 34.5% in ALLHOME. The differences in the obtained response rate and the reasons for these differences were analyzed on the basis of the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions’ indexes, which clearly show the distinction in the national cultural behaviour of...... people in Sweden and Bulgaria. It was found that national culture could strongly influence the response behaviour of people in epidemiological studies and Hofstede’s indexes can be useful tool when designing and performing epidemiological studies, and in particular – questionnaire surveys.......The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of national cultural differences on the response rate, obtained in questionnaire based epidemiological studies on allergy and asthma, performed in Sweden (DBH) and Bulgaria (ALLHOME). The two studies used one and the same methodology, but the...

  9. Exploring dental students' perceptions of cultural competence and social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard W; Rustveld, Luis O; Weyant, Robert J; Close, John M

    2008-10-01

    The improvement of basic cultural competency skills and the creation of a greater community-minded spirit among dental students are important parts of dental education. The purpose of our study was to assess changes in dental students' attitudes and beliefs about community service and changes in cultural competencies after participation in a two-year program of non-dental community service (Student Community Outreach Program and Education, SCOPE). During 2003-07, two identical twenty-eight-item surveys were administered to SCOPE participants/completers. In the first, students reported on their attitudes after program completion. In the second, students reported retrospectively on their attitudes prior to starting the program. One hundred twenty-six post- and pre-intervention surveys were matched and assessed for changes in student attitudes after program participation. Based on factor analysis, four distinct scales were identified: 1) community service, 2) cultural competence, 3) communication, and 4) treatment perspective. Over time, statistically significant changes (pscales 1 (p=.017), 2 (p=.001), and 3 (borderline significance, p=.057). Scale 4 showed no significant difference (p=.108). These scales indicate main focus areas to help guide future dentists in acquiring relevant sociocultural competencies and enabling community-minded attitudes. Overall, this study provides support for the addition of a non-dental community service-learning program into the preclinical curriculum. PMID:18923090

  10. Population dynamics of the fusarium head blight biocontrol agent cryptococcus flavescens OH182.9 on wheat anthers and heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryptococcus flavescens OH 182.9 (NRRL Y-30216) reduces Fusarium head blight (FHB) incited by Fusarium graminearum and DON contamination of grain in greenhouse and field settings. Yet little is known about the population dynamics of OH 182.9 on wheat heads and anthers from the time of inoculating he...

  11. Defective Pollen Wall is Required for Anther and Microspore Development in Rice and Encodes a Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, J.; Shanklin, J.; Tan, H.; Yu, X.-H.; Liu, Y.; Liang, W.; Ranathunge, K.; Franke, R. B.; Schreiber, L.; Wang, Y.; Kai, G.; Ma, H.; Zhang, D.

    2011-06-01

    Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots.

  12. Analysis of the genetic composition of anther-derived potato by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and simple sequence repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, R E; Shen, L Y; Paz, M M

    1995-12-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) analyses were used to characterize the genetic composition of anther-derived plants of a diploid potato clone, CP2 (Solanum chacoense 80-1 x S. phureja 1-3). The ploidy of anther-derived plants was first determined by flow cytometry. A total of 44 decamer primers was screened for RAPD polymorphism. The loci that segregated were selected and scored. The monoploids had less than half as many loci carrying RAPD markers compared with the anther donor. Among 14 anther-derived diploids, 5 were identified as homozygous by marker frequency similar to monoploids and 9 as heterozygous. Five of seven SSRs obtained from published potato sequences were polymorphic in CP2. CP2 was found to be heterozygous with two alleles at four SSR loci (TC/TA, AAG, AGA, CTT) and three alleles at a ACTC locus. Primer pairs flanking each of the five polymorphic SSRs revealed that monoploids had only the allele contributed by S. chacoense 80-1. Homozygous diploids had only one band per SSR locus, whereas heterozygous diploids displayed more than one allele for at least one SSR locus. Results of the SSR analysis supported the findings based on RAPD markers; the same five diploid clones were characterized as homozygous by both SSR and RAPD markers. PMID:8654912

  13. Survey Response Styles, Acculturation, and Culture Among a Sample of Mexican American Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rachel E; Resnicow, Ken; Couper, Mick P

    2011-10-01

    A number of studies have investigated use of extreme (ERS) and acquiescent (ARS) response styles across cultural groups. However, due to within-group heterogeneity, it is important to also examine use of response styles, acculturation, and endorsement of cultural variables at the individual level. This study explores relationships between acculturation, six Mexican cultural factors, ERS, and ARS among a sample of 288 Mexican American telephone survey respondents. Three aspects of acculturation were assessed: Spanish use, the importance of preserving Mexican culture, and interaction with Mexican Americans versus Anglos. These variables were hypothesized to positively associate with ERS and ARS. Participants with higher Spanish use did utilize more ERS and ARS; however, value for preserving Mexican culture and interaction with Mexican Americans were not associated with response style use. In analyses of cultural factors, endorsement of familismo and simpatia were related to more frequent ERS and ARS, machismo was associated with lower ERS among men, and la mujer was related to higher ERS among women. Caballerismo was marginally associated with utilization of ERS among men. No association was found between la mujer abnegada and ERS among women. Relationships between male gender roles and ARS were nonsignificant. Relationships between female gender roles and ARS were mixed but trended in the positive direction. Overall, these findings suggest that Mexican American respondents vary in their use of response styles by acculturation and cultural factors. This usage may be specifically influenced by participants' valuing of and engagement with constructs directly associated with social behavior. PMID:21927503

  14. Digital Citizenship: Developing an Ethical and Responsible Online Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    Responsible and ethical use of the Internet is not something that teenagers, in particular, consider to be important, and serious consequences are beginning to emerge as a result of careless and offensive online behaviour. Teachers and teacher-librarians have a duty of care to make students aware of the potentially devastating effects of…

  15. The Culture of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the Academic Framework: Some Literary Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya Rao

    2011-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is swiftly emerging as an integral part of corporate culture and discourse. Associated with notions of responsibility, accountability and community involvement, it remains privileged with concerns that increasingly define the new millennium. Less developed, however, is the relevance of CSR ideas to academic…

  16. The Impact of Learning Culture on Worker Response to New Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to provide a framework to measure the response of blue-collar workers to new technology in manufacturing and to establish the relationship between learning culture and that response. Design/methodology/approach: The data were collected with a survey questionnaire from 12 manufacturing sites that were implementing

  17. The examination of Hevea brasiliensis plants produced by in vitro culture and mutagenesis by DNA fingerprinting techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plants derived from anther and ovule culture as well as gamma-irradiated plants were examined by several DNA marker techniques. These include restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), sequence tagged microsatellite sites (STMS), DNA amplification fingerprinting (DAF) and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). Compared to control plants produced by vegetative propagation (cutting and budding), plants produced by in vitro culture appeared to have a reduction in the number of rDNA loci. Two RAPD protocols were compared and found to be similar in amplification of the major DNA bands. After confirmation that the RAPD method adopted was reproducible, the technique was applied to the present studies. Eight out of the 60 primers screened were able to elicit polymorphisms between pooled DNA from in vitro culture plants. Variations in DNA patterns were observed between pooled DNA samples of anther-derived plants as well as between anther-derived and ovule-derived plants. Comparisons of RAPD patterns obtained between anther-derived plants exposed to increasing dosages of gamma-irradiation with non irradiated anther-derived plants revealed distinct DNA polymorphisms. The changes in DNA profiles did not appear to be correlated to the dosage of irradiation. Since somaclonal variation was detected, it was difficult to identify changes which were specifically caused by irradiation. Application of the STMS technique to tag micro satellite sequences (GA)n, (TA)n and (TTA)n in the hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase-1 (hmgr-1) gene failed to detect differences between plants derived from anther and ovule culture. Although restriction endonuclease digestions with methylation sensitive enzymes suggested that four in vitro culture plants examined exhibited similar digestion patterns as the controls, a change in cytosine methylation in one anther-derived plant was detected. Examination of individual in vitro culture plants by the DAF technique revealed genetic heterogeneity among these plants. Differences in DNA profiles between anther-derived and ovule-derived plants were also detected. In general, more somaclonal variations were detected in anther-derived than ovule-derived plants. When the DAF technique was applied to DNA obtained from leaves of irradiated budded stumps, DNA profiles were shown to be different from non irradiated controls. Whilst DNA patterns of samples irradiated at the same dosage displayed similar DNA patterns, these varied with increasing dosage. Examination of in vitro culture plants by AFLPs confirmed earlier results that somaclonal variations were present in Hevea. (author)

  18. Logo design: examining consumer response to figurativeness across cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Joana César; Vacas de Carvalho, Leonor; Torres, Anna; Velden, Michel; Costa, Patrício

    2014-01-01

    Literature concerned with logo strategy suggests that the aesthetic appeal of brand logo significantly influences consumer reactions. The main purpose of this research is to study the influence of the different categories of figurative logo designs on consumer response. Through two studies in three countries, this research sheds light on consumer logo preferences, by investigating the psychological properties of the figurativeness of logo design. Results showed that figurativeness is an essen...

  19. In vitro culture in barley breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most useful biotechnics for plant breeders is in vitro culture of anthers or miscropores to induce haploids and homozygous diploids. High frequency of microspore-derived diploid plants could be produced by culturing anthers on Ficoll medium. The segregation ratios of certain morphological characters were not random and could be shifted by culture conditions. It was reported by a number of authors that true breeding and highly productive genotypes were obtained from microspore-derived diploid plants and doubled haploids derived from bulbosom techniques. There is a great possibility that a selective system for desirable characters can be built in an in vitro culture system. Where haploids can be induced in crop plants, they provide the most rapid technique for producing homozygous lines. Since the genetically controlled factors in homozygous lines are fixed and will be identical in the future generations, it becomes possible for a plant breeder to evaluate quantitative characters such as yield and quality very early in the breeding program. There are two methods which have been used extensively for production of homozygous diploid barley plants. They are bulbosum techniques and anther culture methods. (author). 14 refs, 5 tabs

  20. Managing Responsible Competitiveness: Identity, Culture, Paradox and Narratives

    OpenAIRE

    Vilanova Pichot, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Aquest estudi empíric qualitatiu – de vuit empreses que han implementat una estratègia de competitivitat responsable – vol contribuir a la literatura de la gestió de la responsabilitat social centrant-se en com les empreses en aquest camp s’apropen i gestionen la RSE en la pràctica. L’estudi conclou que aquestes empreses generen un valor significatiu de les seves pràctiques socials i mediambientals, però que el grau i tipus d’impacte varia d’empresa a empresa. Cadascuna de les empreses sembla...

  1. The effects of corporate social responsibility on employees' affective commitment: a cross-cultural investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Karsten; Hattrup, Kate; Spiess, Sven-Oliver; Lin-Hi, Nick

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the moderating effects of several Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) cultural value dimensions on the relationship between employees' perceptions of their organization's social responsibility and their affective organizational commitment. Based on data from a sample of 1,084 employees from 17 countries, results showed that perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) was positively related to employees' affective commitment (AC), after controlling for individual job satisfaction and gender as well as for nation-level differences in unemployment rates. In addition, several GLOBE value dimensions moderated the effects of CSR on AC. In particular, perceptions of CSR were more positively related to AC in cultures higher in humane orientation, institutional collectivism, ingroup collectivism, and future orientation and in cultures lower in power distance. Implications for future CSR research and cross-cultural human resources management are discussed. PMID:23067337

  2. Temperament trait of sensory processing sensitivity moderates cultural differences in neural response

    OpenAIRE

    Aron, Arthur; Ketay, Sarah; Hedden, Trey; Aron, Elaine N.; Rose Markus, Hazel; Gabrieli, John D E

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on a possible temperament-by-culture interaction. Specifically, it explored whether a basic temperament/personality trait (sensory processing sensitivity; SPS), perhaps having a genetic component, might moderate a previously established cultural difference in neural responses when making context-dependent vs context-independent judgments of simple visual stimuli. SPS has been hypothesized to underlie what has been called inhibitedness or reactivity in infants, introversion ...

  3. Optimization of Lycopene Extraction from Tomato Cell Suspension Culture by Response Surface Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Chi-Hua; Engelmann, Nancy J.; Lila, Mary Ann; Erdman, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Radioisotope-labeled lycopene is an important tool for biomedical research but currently is not commercially available. A tomato cell suspension culture system for the production of radioisotope-labeled lycopene was previously developed in our laboratory. In the current study, the goal was to optimize the lycopene extraction efficiency from tomato cell cultures for preparatory high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation. We employed response surface methodology (RSM), which combi...

  4. Digital Repatriation: Constructing a Culturally Responsive Virtual Museum Tour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loriene Roy、Mark Christal

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available

    頁次:14-18

    This paper describe a project that involved educators and three Native American communities in the construction of a virtual tour now available on the Web site of the National Museum of the American Indian(http://www. conexus.si.edu/. In fall 1998, the Pueblo of Laguna Department of Education, the College of Education and Graduate School of Library and Information Science at The University of Texas at Austin, and the Smithsonians National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI began the first collaboration that brought Native American students, teachers, and cultural representatives to the NMAI George Gustav Heye Center in New York City. The virtual tour makes extensive use of QuickTime Virtual Reality (QTVR. The panoramas of the exhibition space serve as an interface for accessing the featured objects selected by the students. Clicking on a hot spot over the museum display of a featured object causes the QTVR object to load in a separate Webpage frame accompanied by an interpreted essay written by a student. Clickable floor plans of the exhibition- space offer another method of navigating the virtual tour and accessing the virtual objects.

  5. Ethical control and cultural change (in cultural dreams begin organizational responsibilities)

    OpenAIRE

    Magala, Slawomir

    2010-01-01

    Ethical control is based on transparent access to the accounts of responsible behaviour on the part of individual and organizational actors. It is usually linked to the idea of a checkpoint: where celibate rules, no sexual interaction can be allowed. However, organizing and managing climates in professional bureaucracies have always led towards the empowerment of the operatives (regional bishops and local parish priests in the case of the Catholic Church). History of the church is repeated by...

  6. Building a culture of responsibility as the basis for establishing a system of quality of education in schools

    OpenAIRE

    Andrey Ivenskikh; Irina Ivenskikh

    2011-01-01

    The authors state that it is necessary to create a new cultural paradigm in education based on responsibility as a core value and explore the specific mechanisms of formation of this culture in school environment.

  7. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130-170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems. PMID:26457705

  8. Children's altruistic behavior in context: The role of emotional responsiveness and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajhans, Purva; Altvater-Mackensen, Nicole; Vaish, Amrisha; Grossmann, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Altruistic behavior in humans is thought to have deep biological roots. Nonetheless, there is also evidence for considerable variation in altruistic behaviors among individuals and across cultures. Variability in altruistic behavior in adults has recently been related to individual differences in emotional responsiveness to fear in others. The current study examined the relation between emotional responsiveness (using eye-tracking) and altruistic behavior (using the Dictator Game) in 4 to 5-year-old children (N = 96) across cultures (India and Germany). The results revealed that increased altruistic behavior was associated with a greater responsiveness to fear faces (faster fixation), but not happy faces, in both cultures. This suggests that altruistic behavior is linked to our responsiveness to others in distress across cultures. Additionally, only among Indian children greater altruistic behavior was associated with greater sensitivity to context when responding to fearful faces. These findings further our understanding of the origins of altruism in humans by highlighting the importance of emotional processes and cultural context in the development of altruism. PMID:27137754

  9. Upregulation of the AT-hook DNA binding gene BoMF2 in OguCMS anthers of Brassica oleracea suggests that it encodes a transcriptional regulatory factor for anther development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jungen; Guo, Yingying; Chen, Yujuan; Li, Hailong; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility (OguCMS) is the most important CMS system used for F1 hybrid cabbage production worldwide. The anther abortion and defective pollen development exhibited in OguCMS are coordinately regulated by the mitochondrial male sterile gene orf138 and many nuclear transcriptional regulatory factors. AT-hook DNA binding proteins regulate cell-specific gene expression. In this study, we cloned the gene encoding the AT-hook DNA binding protein BoMF2 using the cDNA-AFLP TDF sequence, which was upregulated in OguCMS cabbage flower buds, as a querying probe. BoMF2 contains a 783-nt continuous complete open reading frame encoding a 260 amino-acid polypeptide. In vivo transient expression assays using GFP fusions showed that BoMF2 protein was located in the nucleus. BoMF2 was preferentially expressed in cabbage stamens, with a short expression window at anther development stage 7-8. However, in OguCMS flowers, BoMF2 expression continued into the mature pollen stage and was concomitant with the continued proliferation of tapetum cells exhibited in this mutant. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing BoMF2 showed significantly shorter siliques than the wild type, as well as decrease of pollen viability. These results suggest that BoMF2, a transcriptional regulatory factor, might regulate tapetum proliferation during anther development. PMID:24443226

  10. Materializing Culture - Culturizing Material. On the Status, Responsibilities and Function of Cultural Property Repositories within the Framework of a "Transformative Scholarship"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Hilgert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Certain theoretical streams in the cultural and social sciences that are occasionally subsumed under the term “New Materialism” 2 (see Witzgall, as well as recent social, political, cultural and media technology developments require a theoretical and research-political repositioning of academic object repositories. For it is obvious that under the influence of these multi-layered, partly interwoven processes, the status, responsibilities, as well as the function and spheres of activity of these object or cultural property repositories with research commitment (on the term see section 2 below are currently undergoing long-lasting change. For the respective institutions, these changes not only result in complex challenges regarding contents and structure, but also present extraordinary opportunities for the fulfillment of their academic, social and political responsibilities. The appropriate handling of these challenges and opportunities can substantially contribute to the sharpening of the academic and social profile of these institutions and increase their visibility on both a national and international level.

  11. Ultrastructural studies on the sporogenous tissue and anther wall of Leucojum aestivum (amaryllidaceae) in different developmental stages

    OpenAIRE

    Nuran Ekici; Feruzan Dane

    2012-01-01

    In this study, ultrastructures of anther wall and sporogenous tissue of Leucojum aestivum were investigated during different developmental stages. Cytomictic channels were seen between pollen mother cells during prophase I. Polar distribution was described in the organelle content of pollen mother cells and microspores in early phases of microsporogenesis and also in pollen mitosis. Active secretion was observed in tapetal cells. Previous reports about developmental stages of male gametophyte...

  12. Anther Cap Retention Prevents Self-pollination by Elaterid Beetles in the South African Orchid Eulophia foliosa

    OpenAIRE

    Peter, Craig I; Johnson, Steven D.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Pollination by insects that spend long periods visiting many flowers on a plant may impose a higher risk of facilitated self-pollination. Orchids and asclepiads are particularly at risk as their pollen is packaged as pollinia and so can be deposited on self-stigmas en masse. Many orchids and asclepiads have adaptations to limit self-deposition of pollinia, including gradual reconfiguration of pollinaria following removal. Here an unusual mechanism—anther cap retention—th...

  13. Exploring the influence of cultural familiarity and expertise on neurological responses to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Steven M; Morrison, Steven J

    2003-11-01

    Contemporary music education in many countries has begun to incorporate not only the dominant music of the culture, but also a variety of music from around the world. Although the desirability of such a broadened curriculum is virtually unquestioned, the specific function of these musical encounters and their potential role in children's cognitive development remain unclear. We do not know if studying a variety of world music traditions involves the acquisition of new skills or an extension and refinement of traditional skills long addressed by music teachers. Is a student's familiarity with a variety of musical traditions a manifestation of a single overarching "musicianship" or is knowledge of these various musical styles more similar to a collection of discrete skills much like learning a second language? Research on the comprehension of spoken language has disclosed a neurologically distinct response among subjects listening to their native language rather than an unfamiliar language. In a recent study comparing Western subjects' responses to music of their native culture and music of an unfamiliar culture, we found that subjects' activation did not differ on the basis of the cultural familiarity of the music, but on the basis of musical expertise. We discuss possible interpretations of these findings in relation to the concept of musical universals, cross-cultural stimulus characteristics, cross-cultural judgment tasks, and the influence of musical expertise. We conclude with suggestions for future research. PMID:14681123

  14. 3D culture broadly regulates tumor cell hypoxia response and angiogenesis via pro-inflammatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelNero, Peter; Lane, Maureen; Verbridge, Scott S; Kwee, Brian; Kermani, Pouneh; Hempstead, Barbara; Stroock, Abraham; Fischbach, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen status and tissue dimensionality are critical determinants of tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer and an enduring target for therapeutic intervention. However, it is unclear how these microenvironmental conditions interact to promote neovascularization, due in part to a lack of comprehensive, unbiased data sets describing tumor cell gene expression as a function of oxygen levels within three-dimensional (3D) culture. Here, we utilized alginate-based, oxygen-controlled 3D tumor models to study the interdependence of culture context and the hypoxia response. Microarray gene expression analysis of tumor cells cultured in 2D versus 3D under ambient or hypoxic conditions revealed striking interdependence between culture dimensionality and hypoxia response, which was mediated in part by pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. In particular, interleukin-8 (IL-8) emerged as a major player in the microenvironmental regulation of the hypoxia program. Notably, this interaction between dimensionality and oxygen status via IL-8 increased angiogenic sprouting in a 3D endothelial invasion assay. Taken together, our data suggest that pro-inflammatory pathways are critical regulators of tumor hypoxia response within 3D environments that ultimately impact tumor angiogenesis, potentially providing important therapeutic targets. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of pathologically relevant tissue culture models to study the complex physical and chemical processes by which the cancer microenvironment mediates new vessel formation. PMID:25934456

  15. Cultural context moderates the relationship between emotion control values and cardiovascular challenge versus threat responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauss, Iris B; Butler, Emily A

    2010-07-01

    Cultural context affects people's values regarding emotions, as well as their experiential and behavioral but not autonomic physiological responses to emotional situations. Little research, however, has examined how cultural context influences the relationships among values and emotional responding. Specifically, depending on their cultural context, individuals' values about emotion control (ECV; the extent to which they value emotion control) may have differing meanings, and as such, be associated with differing responses in emotional situations. We examined this possibility by testing the effect of two cultural contexts (28 female Asian-American (AA) versus 28 female European-American (EA) undergraduate students) on the associations between individuals' ECV and emotional responding (experiential, behavioral, and cardiovascular) to a relatively neutral film clip and a laboratory anger provocation. In the AA group, greater ECV were associated with reduced anger experience and behavior, and a challenge pattern of cardiovascular responding. In the EA group, greater ECV were associated with reduced anger behavior but not anger experience, and a threat pattern of cardiovascular responding. These results are consistent with the notion that individuals' values about emotion are associated with different meanings in different cultural contexts, and in turn, with different emotional and cardiovascular responses. PMID:19786064

  16. Effects of Culture and Gender on Judgments of Intent and Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaks, Jason E.; Fortune, Jennifer L.; Liang, Lindie H.; Robinson, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Do different cultures hold different views of intentionality? In four studies, participants read scenarios in which the actor’s distal intent (a focus on a broader goal) and proximal intent (a focus on the mechanics of the act) were manipulated. In Studies 1–2, when distal intent was more prominent in the actor’s mind, North Americans rated the actor more responsible than did Chinese and South Asian participants. When proximal intent was more prominent, Chinese and South Asian participants, if anything, rated the actor more responsible. In Studies 3–4, when distal intent was more prominent, male Americans rated the actor more responsible than did female Americans. When proximal intent was more prominent, females rated the actor more responsible. The authors discuss these findings in relation to the literatures on moral reasoning and cultural psychology. PMID:27123858

  17. Angiotensin II receptor in primary liver cell culture: correlation between binding and biological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiotensin II (AII) binding sites were characterized in intact hepatocytes using [3H]AII. Computer analysis of the saturation curve indicated the presence of only one class of binding sites with a Kd = 9.5 +/- 0.9 nM which did not change during culture up to 25 h. On the other hand, the B/sub max/ decreased from 80 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein on freshly isolated cells to 33 +/- 5 fmol/mg of protein at 5 h culture and to 2.8 +/- 0.7 fmol/mg of protein at 25 h culture. The calcium mobilization induced by AII was measured using the fluorescent indicator fura2. AII (10 nM) increased intracellular free calcium from 160 +/- 20 nM to 319 +/- 35 nM in fresh and 5 h-cultured cells, but was without effect at 24 h. The dose response curves showed a significant decrease in the efficacy of AII to mobilize Ca2+ in 5 h-cultured cells. These data indicate a reduction in the number and perhaps coupling efficiency of AII receptors during primary liver cell culture. Experiments are being conducted to determine whether culture also induces a change in AII inhibition of glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation

  18. Culturally Responsive Pedagogy for Teacher Candidates of Color in Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gist, Conra D.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation study uses culturally responsive pedagogy as a conceptual framework for exploring how teacher educators structure content, pedagogy, and classroom communities for teacher candidates of color at two model teacher education programs. Using multiple data sources including interviews, focus groups, classroom observations, faculty and…

  19. Aligning Cultural Responsiveness in Evaluation and Evaluation Capacity Building: A Needs Assessment with Family Support Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Natalie Ebony

    2016-01-01

    Family support programs serve vulnerable families by providing various forms of support, such as education, health services, financial assistance, and referrals to community resources. A major feature of evaluation involves assessing program effectiveness and learning from evaluation findings (Mertens and Wilson, 2012). Collaboration and cultural responsiveness are important topics in evaluation which remain largely distinct in the literature. However, evaluation capacity building provides a...

  20. The Intersectionality of Culturally Responsive Teaching and Performance Poetry: Validating Secondary Latino Youth and Their Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo C.; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors draw from culturally responsive teaching and multicultural education to describe performance poetry as an effective strategy for validating secondary aged Latino youths' lived experiences. Supported by teacher modeling and the incorporation of community poets, students created and shared their own powerful poems that…

  1. Responsividade materna: aspectos biolgicos e variaes culturais Maternal responsiveness: biological aspects and cultural variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ferreira Paes Ribas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivo discutir criticamente alguns aspectos biolgicos e variaes culturais relativos ao conceito de responsividade materna. Est subdividido em duas partes. A primeira delas trata da responsividade e seus aspectos biolgicos e variaes culturais. A segunda apresenta duas grandes tendncias de pesquisa sobre responsividade materna e variaes culturais. As consideraes finais sistematizam os argumentos crticos apresentados e destacam que as iniciativas de investigar este tema devem estar pautadas pelo reconhecimento de que a responsividade materna uma das caractersticas das interaes adulto-criana que tem origens e influncias mltiplas. Nesse sentido, a sua compreenso deve estar includa em um sistema amplo de referncia que envolva, por exemplo, variveis biolgicas, contextuais, da histria da dade e culturais.The purpose of this article was to critically discuss some biological aspects and cultural variations in maternal responsiveness. It consists of two parts. The first discusses responsiveness and its biological aspects and cultural variations. The second part presents two major research tendencies in the investigations of cultural variations in maternal responsiveness. Our conclusion presents a brief of the critical arguments and highlights the need to recognize that maternal responsiveness is one of the adult-child interaction characteristics that has multiple origins and influences, from which any investigation in this theme must be based on. As a consequence, those initiatives should be included in a wide reference system that involves, for example, biological, contextual, dyads previous history, and cultural variables.

  2. An Interpretative Phenomenological Study on Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in the Physical Education Practicum Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Jennifer Leary

    2013-01-01

    As the United States experiences a large demographic shift, current research demonstrates that effective educators implement culturally responsive strategies to support all students in achieving academic success with regards to race, ethnicity, language, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, religion and exceptionalities (Gollnick…

  3. Singapore Readers' Responses to U.S. Young Adult Fiction: Cross-Cultural Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Laina

    1990-01-01

    Examines reading interests and reading responses to American young adult fiction among students from the multiracial culture of Singapore. Finds that Singapore teenagers need little motivation in reading American young adult fiction because of their positive attitude towards language acquisition. Notes that the teenagers can be sidetracked by the

  4. Australian Readers' Responses to the Cross-Cultural, Folklore-Based Fantasy Novels of Patricia Wrightson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Barbara

    In the 1970s and 1980s the white Australian author Patricia Wrightson's cross-cultural fantasies concerning the conflict of White characters with Aboriginal folk spirits struck a chord with many adolescent and adult readers who judged these novels to be outstandingly successful. A classroom-based study examined the responses of a class of seventh…

  5. A Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices of Adult ESOL and EAP Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christy M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how frequently adult education English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) teachers in Florida used specific culturally responsive teaching practices and how important they believed those practices were to their teaching. Using Ginsberg and Wlodkowski's…

  6. Culturally Responsive Caring and Expectations for Academic Achievement in a Catholic School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallavis, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article draws from a larger dissertation study that applied ethnographic and historical research methods to explore the intersection of culturally responsive pedagogy and Catholic schooling in immigrant communities. In particular, this article presents qualitative data analysis to describe student achievement expectations at a contemporary

  7. Writing the Male Abuser in Cultural Responses to Domestic Violence in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsland, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    The article analyzes the portrayal of the male perpetrator of heterosexual domestic violence in a selection of contemporary Spanish texts (novel, drama, and autobiography) that form part of a clearly discernible cultural response to the issue of intimate partner violence in Spain today. It reads the figure of the abuser in conjunction with a range

  8. Measuring Early Childhood Teacher Candidates' Conceptualizations of a Culturally Responsive Classroom Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Belinda Bustos; Riojas-Cortez, Mari

    2009-01-01

    With the increase of Latino preschoolers, it is pressing that early childhood teachers are prepared to create a high quality environment in which all children can succeed. Using the frameworks of cultural responsiveness and classroom management, we developed the Early Childhood Ecology Scale (ECES) as an observational and reflective tool to

  9. Developing Sociopolitical Consciousness at Freedom Schools: Implications for Culturally Responsive Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tambra O.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the programmatic ways in which the Children's Defense Fund Freedom Schools[R] program develops culturally responsive teaching practices amongst its summer interns, particularly in the area of developing sociopolitical consciousness. This paper places specific focus on the role that historical knowledge, the acknowledgement…

  10. Teaching about Race in an Urban History Class: The Effects of Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Terrie; Mayorga, Edwin; Nelson, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of a culturally responsive teacher's pedagogy on urban low-income African American and Latino high school students' interpretations of racial diversity, racism, and individual and collective agency in U. S. history. The authors found that students incorporated instruction about the diversity and agency of people of…

  11. Developing Cultural Responsiveness in Environmental Design Students through Digital Storytelling and Photovoice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Debra Flanders; Love, Emily Wexler

    2013-01-01

    As the Latino population in the United States grows, it will become increasingly important for undergraduate students in environmental design and related disciplines to become more culturally responsive and learn how to understand and address challenges faced by population groups, such as Latino youth. To this end, we involved environmental…

  12. The Coconut Wireless Project: Sharing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy through the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Barber, Sharon; Trumbull, Elise; Wenn, Richard

    Beginning in the 1997-98 school year, WestEd staff, with the support of the Pacific Resources for Education and Learning (PREL), worked intensively with a group of five Chamorro teachers from Rota Elementary School (Hawaii) to develop culturally responsive, standards-based science units. The larger goal was to develop Web-based case examples of…

  13. (Re) Claiming Native Youth Knowledge: Engaging in Socio-Culturally Responsive Teaching and Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tiffany S.; Quijada Cerecer, Patricia D.

    2010-01-01

    This article reveals Native youth perspectives on socio-culturally responsive education. The authors draw on two studies conducted in the Southwest among Navajo and Pueblo students. Youth convey the importance of meaningful, reciprocal, and transformative learning experiences and relationships at school. The article ends with suggestions for

  14. Measuring Early Childhood Teacher Candidates' Conceptualizations of a Culturally Responsive Classroom Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Belinda Bustos; Riojas-Cortez, Mari

    2009-01-01

    With the increase of Latino preschoolers, it is pressing that early childhood teachers are prepared to create a high quality environment in which all children can succeed. Using the frameworks of cultural responsiveness and classroom management, we developed the Early Childhood Ecology Scale (ECES) as an observational and reflective tool to…

  15. Making String Education Culturally Responsive: The Musical Lives of African American Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Ebru Tuncer

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the violin experiences of African American students at an Elementary School in northern Florida to consider the potential for culturally-responsive string education. The hermeneutical approach was used to answer the research questions: (1) What are the personal musical worlds of these African American…

  16. Variation in resistance to multiple pathogen species: anther smuts of Silene uniflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Erin; Petit, Elsa; Antonovics, Janis; Pedersen, Amy B; Hood, Michael E

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence of multiple pathogen species on a shared host species is unexpected when they exploit the same micro-niche within the host individual. One explanation for such observations is the presence of pathogen-specific resistances segregating within the host population into sites that are differentially occupied by the competing pathogens. This study used experimental inoculations to test whether specific resistances may contribute to the maintenance of two species of anther-smut fungi, Microbotryum silenes-inflatae and Microbotryum lagerheimii, in natural populations of Silene uniflora in England and Wales. Overall, resistance to the two pathogens was strongly positively correlated among host populations and to a lesser degree among host families within populations. A few instances of specific resistance were also observed and confirmed by replicated inoculations. The results suggest that selection for resistance to one pathogen may protect the host from the emergence via host shifts of related pathogen species, and conversely that co-occurrence of two species of pathogens may be dependent on the presence of host genotypes susceptible to both. PMID:23139888

  17. Empowering Equity in Postsecondary Transition for Marginalized Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students with Disabilities by Implementing a Culturally Responsive Summary of Performance Teacher Training and Support Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jez, Rebekka Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Marginalized culturally and linguistically diverse students with special needs often struggle after high school. Many special educators are unaware of legal mandates and best practice in postsecondary transition, especially the intricate needs when working this group. The culturally responsive Summary of Performance (CRSOP) training and support…

  18. Endothelial invasive response in a co-culture model with physically-induced osteodifferentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traphagen, Samantha B; Titushkin, Igor; Sun, Shan; Wary, Kishore K; Cho, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Manipulation of stem cells using physicochemical stimuli has emerged as an important tool in regenerative medicine. While 2D substrates with tunable elasticity have been studied for control of stem cell differentiation, we recently developed a stratified co-culture model of angiogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) that differentiate on a tunable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate, thereby creating a physiologic context for elasticity-induced differentiation. Endothelial cells (EC) were cultured on top of the hMSC construct on a collagen gel to monitor network formation. Media composition influenced EC invasion due to the conditioning media, the reduction of serum and supplemental growth factors, and the addition of recombinant growth factors. Conditioned media, recombinant growth factors and direct co-culture were compared for endothelial cell invasive response using quantitative image analysis. As anticipated, use of recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induced the deepest EC invasions while direct co-culture caused shallow invasions compared to other conditions. However, endothelial cells displayed lumen-like morphology, suggesting that cell-cell interaction in the co-culture model could mimic sprouting behaviour. In summary, an engineered suitable biochemical and physical environment facilitated endothelial cells to form 3D vessel structures onto hMSCs. These structures were plated on a stiff surface known to induce osteodifferentiation of stem cells. This low cost co-culture system, with its minimal chemical supplementation and physically controllable matrix, could potentially model in vivo potential in engineered and pre-vascularized bone grafts. PMID:22696416

  19. Children's Everyday Learning by Assuming Responsibility for Others: Indigenous Practices as a Cultural Heritage Across Generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, David Lorente

    2015-01-01

    This chapter uses a comparative approach to examine the maintenance of Indigenous practices related with Learning by Observing and Pitching In in two generations--parent generation and current child generation--in a Central Mexican Nahua community. In spite of cultural changes and the increase of Western schooling experience, these practices persist, to different degrees, as a Nahua cultural heritage with close historical relations to the key value of cuidado (stewardship). The chapter explores how children learn the value of cuidado in a variety of everyday activities, which include assuming responsibility in many social situations, primarily in cultivating corn, raising and protecting domestic animals, health practices, and participating in family ceremonial life. The chapter focuses on three main points: (1) Cuidado (assuming responsibility for), in the Nahua socio-cultural context, refers to the concepts of protection and "raising" as well as fostering other beings, whether humans, plants, or animals, to reach their potential and fulfill their development. (2) Children learn cuidado by contributing to family endeavors: They develop attention and self-motivation; they are capable of responsible actions; and they are able to transform participation to achieve the status of a competent member of local society. (3) This collaborative participation allows children to continue the cultural tradition and to preserve a Nahua heritage at a deeper level in a community in which Nahuatl language and dress have disappeared, and people do not identify themselves as Indigenous. PMID:26955923

  20. On the Value of Traditional Confucian Culture And the Value of Modern Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhong Zhu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The core values of the Chinese Confucian Culture such as “humanity, righteousness, harmony, courtesy, honesty and cleanness” represent the soul of five-thousand-years Chinese traditional culture, which may represent the value of maintaining the balanced social benefits and harmonious development of the whole society from the prospective of a whole society, and which may also have some important uses for reference and roles of enlightenment for establishing the values of modern corporate social responsibility if it is effectively integrated into the practice of modern business management.

  1. Writing the male abuser in cultural responses to domestic violence in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsland, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    The article analyzes the portrayal of the male perpetrator of heterosexual domestic violence in a selection of contemporary Spanish texts (novel, drama, and autobiography) that form part of a clearly discernible cultural response to the issue of intimate partner violence in Spain today. It reads the figure of the abuser in conjunction with a range of primarily Spanish studies on domestic aggression, with the aim of showing how and why the chosen authors engage with bodies of theory that address battery. The study concludes that some cultural producers devise a strategy of eliding the male aggressor in an attempt to subvert the power he wields over the female victim. PMID:22834049

  2. Androgenic response of Capsicum interspecific hybrids and capsaicinoid characteristics of DH lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowaczyk Lubos?awa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the research on induced androgenesis, eight groups of plants, the progeny of interspecific hybrid of Capsicum frutescens L. x C. annuum L., were used. Half of them were standard hard-flesh forms, while the others have represented SS or Ss genotype conditioning the soft flesh of ripe fruit. Anthers from the plants of six groups produced mixoploid callus and the DNA content ranged from 1C to 16C. Three groups formed embryos which converted into plants. The total number of regenerants was 19, included both androgenic haploids (13 and diploids (6. The results did not allow to present the simple relationship between the physiological feature of soft-flesh and the effectiveness of androgenesis. Pungent, soft-flesh genotypes appeared as a poor responsive in anther culture. The R2 and R3 generation of two soft-flesh diploids, evaluated in two-year experiments, showed full phenotypic uniformity, proofing the androgenic origin of diploids. These DH lines were different with regard to capsaicinoid profiles. The content of capsaicinoids ranged from 0.056 to 2.170 and from 0.019 to 1.610 g*kg-1 for capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, respectively. The highest concentration of the compounds was observed in the placenta. Although the androgenic effectiveness was not fully satisfactory, the doubled haploid technology can be used for the rapid genetic stabilization of soft-flesh Capsicum spp. recombinants and the special attention should be paid to the spontaneous androdiploids.

  3. Going against the Grain in an Urban Arizona High School: Secondary Preservice Teachers Emerging as Culturally Responsive Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Pablo; Jimenez-Silva, Margarita; Boozer, April; Clark, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This one year study examines the journey of two preservice urban high-school teachers in Arizona as they enact Culturally Responsive Teaching in a year-long student teaching residency. Factors that influenced their Culturally Responsive Teaching practices are discussed along themes that emerged from interviews and classroom observations.…

  4. Investigation of urban science teachers' pedagogical engagements: Are urban science teachers culturally responsive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udokwu, Chukwudi John

    This study utilized mixed methodology of quantitative and qualitative research approach to explore the current pedagogical engagements of twenty middle school urban science teachers in the Midwest region of the United States. It qualitatively examined twelve of these teachers' knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy. The study investigated the following questions: What are the current pedagogical practices of urban middle school science teachers? To what extent are middle school science teachers' pedagogical practices in urban schools culturally responsive? What are urban students' perspectives of their teachers' current pedagogical engagements? The design of the study was qualitative and quantitative methods in order to investigate these teachers' pedagogical practices. Data collections were drawn from multiple sources such as lesson plans, students' sample works, district curriculum, surveys, observational and interview notes. Analysis of collected data was a mixed methodology that involved qualitative and quantitative methods using descriptive, interpretative, pattern codes, and statistical procedures respectively. Purposeful sampling was selected for this study. Thus, demographically there were twenty participants who quantitatively took part in this study. Among them were seven (35%) males and thirteen (65%) females, three (15%) African Americans and seventeen (85%) Caucasians. In determining to what extent urban science teachers' pedagogical practices were culturally responsive, eight questions were analyzed based on four cluster themes: (a) teachers' social disposition, (b) culturally responsive curriculum, (c) classroom interactions, and (d) power pedagogy. Study result revealed that only five (25%) of the participants were engaged in culturally responsive pedagogy while fifteen (75%) were engaged in what Haberman (1991) called the pedagogy of poverty. The goal was to investigate urban science teachers' pedagogical engagements and to examine urban students' perspective of their science teachers' pedagogical practices, and ensure that all students have a sense of ownership of their knowledge, a sense that is empowering and liberating. The implications of these findings were to promote urban students' achievements in science and see them employed in science and engineering. I hope this study helps in developing better professional development that will be culturally responsive and to ensure that all students have a sense of ownership of their knowledge.

  5. Plant response to heavy metals and organic pollutants in cell culture and at whole plant level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golan-Goldhirsh, A.; Barazani, O. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of The Negev, The Jacob Blaustein Inst. for Desert Research, Albert Katz Dept. of Dryland Biotechnologies, Desert Plant Biotechnology Lab., Sede Boqer Campus (Israel); Nepovim, A.; Soudek, P.; Vanek, T. [Inst. of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (Czech Republic); Smrcek, S.; Dufkova, L.; Krenkova, S. [Faculty of Natural Sciences, Charles Univ. (Czech Republic); Yrjala, K. [Univ. of Helsinki, Dept. of Biosciences, Div. of General Microbiology, Helsinki (Finland); Schroeder, P. [Inst. for Soil Ecology, GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Background. Increasing awareness in the last decade concerning environmental quality had prompted research into 'green solutions' for soil and water remediation, progressing from laboratory in vitro experiments to pot and field trials. In vitro cell culture experiments provide a convenient system to study basic biological processes, by which biochemical pathways, enzymatic activity and metabolites can be specifically studied. However, it is difficult to relate cell cultures, calli or even hydroponic experiments to the whole plant response to pollutant stress. In the field, plants are exposed to additional a-biotic and biotic factors, which complicate further plant response. Hence, we often see that in vitro selected species perform poorly under soil and field conditions. Soil physical and chemical properties, plant-mycorrhizal association and soil-microbial activity affect the process of contaminant degradation by plants and/or microorganisms, pointing to the importance of pot and field experiments. Objective. This paper is a joint effort of a group of scientists in COST action 837. It represents experimental work and an overview on plant response to environmental stress from in vitro tissue culture to whole plant experiments in soil. Results. Results obtained from in vitro plant tissue cultures and whole plant hydroponic experiments indicate the phytoremediation potential of different plant species and the biochemical mechanisms involved in plant tolerance. In pot experiments, several selected desert plant species, which accumulated heavy metal in hydroponic systems, succeeded in accumulating the heavy metal in soil conditions as well. Conclusions and recommendations. In vitro plant tissue cultures provide a useful experimental system for the study of the mechanisms involved in the detoxification of organic and heavy metal pollutants. However, whole plant experimental systems, as well as hydroponics followed by pot and field trials, are essential when determining plant potential to remediate polluted sites. Multidisciplinary research teams can therefore increase our knowledge and promote a practical application of phytoremediation. (orig.)

  6. Floral Transcriptomes in Woodland Strawberry Uncover Developing Receptacle and Anther Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollender, Courtney A; Kang, Chunying; Darwish, Omar; Geretz, Aviva; Matthews, Benjamin F; Slovin, Janet; Alkharouf, Nadim; Liu, Zhongchi

    2014-05-14

    Flowers are reproductive organs and precursors to fruits and seeds. While the basic tenets of the ABCE model of flower development are conserved in angiosperms, different flowering plants exhibit different and sometimes unique characteristics. A distinct feature of strawberry (Fragaria spp.) flowers is the development of several hundreds of individual apocarpous (unfused) carpels. These individual carpels are arranged in a spiral pattern on the subtending stem tip, the receptacle. Therefore, the receptacle is an integral part of the strawberry flower and is of significant agronomic importance, being the precursor to strawberry fruit. Taking advantage of next-generation sequencing and laser capture microdissection, we generated different tissue- and stage-transcriptomic profiling of woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) flower development. Using pairwise comparisons and weighted gene coexpression network analysis, we identified modules of coexpressed genes and hub genes of tissue-specific networks. Of particular importance is the discovery of a developing receptacle-specific module exhibiting similar molecular features to those of young floral meristems. The strawberry homologs of a number of meristem regulators, including LOST MERISTEM and WUSCHEL, are identified as hub genes operating in the developing receptacle network. Furthermore, almost 25% of the F-box genes in the genome are transiently induced in developing anthers at the meiosis stage, indicating active protein degradation. Together, this work provides important insights into the molecular networks underlying strawberry's unique reproductive developmental processes. This extensive floral transcriptome data set is publicly available and can be readily queried at the project Web site, serving as an important genomic resource for the plant biology research community. PMID:24828307

  7. Culture modulates the brain response to human expressions of emotion: electrophysiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pan; Rigoulot, Simon; Pell, Marc D

    2015-01-01

    To understand how culture modulates on-line neural responses to social information, this study compared how individuals from two distinct cultural groups, English-speaking North Americans and Chinese, process emotional meanings of multi-sensory stimuli as indexed by both behaviour (accuracy) and event-related potential (N400) measures. In an emotional Stroop-like task, participants were presented face-voice pairs expressing congruent or incongruent emotions in conditions where they judged the emotion of one modality while ignoring the other (face or voice focus task). Results indicated that while both groups were sensitive to emotional differences between channels (with lower accuracy and higher N400 amplitudes for incongruent face-voice pairs), there were marked group differences in how intruding facial or vocal cues affected accuracy and N400 amplitudes, with English participants showing greater interference from irrelevant faces than Chinese. Our data illuminate distinct biases in how adults from East Asian versus Western cultures process socio-emotional cues, supplying new evidence that cultural learning modulates not only behaviour, but the neurocognitive response to different features of multi-channel emotion expressions. PMID:25477081

  8. Enhanced chrysene degradation by a mixed culture Biorem-CGBD using response surface design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Bharti P; Ghevariya, Chirag M; Bhatt, Jwalant K; Dudhagara, Dushyant R; Rajpara, Rahul K

    2015-05-01

    Degradation of chrysene, a four ringed highly carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) has been demonstrated by bacterial mixed culture Biorem-CGBD comprising Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Pseudomonas sp. and Sphingomonas sp., isolated from crude oil polluted saline sites at Bhavnagar coast, Gujarat, India. A full factorial Central Composite Design (CCD) using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was applied to construct response surfaces, predicting 41.93% of maximum chrysene degradation with an experimental validation of 66.45% chrysene degradation on 15th day, using a combination of 0.175, 0.175 and 0.385 mL of OD600 = 1 inoculum of A. xylosoxidans, Pseudomonas sp. and Sphingomonas sp., respectively and a regression coefficient (R2) of 0.9485 indicating reproducibility of the experiment. It was observed that chrysene degradation can be successfully enhanced using RSM, making mixed culture Biorem-CGBD a potential bioremediation target for PAH contaminated saline sites. PMID:26040022

  9. Corporate Social Responsibility and Culture : A Study of European Multinational Corporations’ adaptation of Community Involvement Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Henriksson, Sebastian; Hodjikj, Armin; Ognyanova Dinkova, Evgeniya

    2012-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR), which has emerged as a global trend, has gained increased focus in the everyday media and among practitioners on the political agenda. CSR has also risen as an important research topic in the field of organization. This study investigates European multinational corporations’ tendencies to adapt CSR policies and practices, or more specifically corporate community involvement, to different national cultures. The paper explores if/how and why companies with...

  10. Inclusion and the relevance of culturally responsive teaching in U.K. Business schools

    OpenAIRE

    Jabbar, Abdul; Hardaker, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    Inequality, lack of learning, and poor academic achievement are firmly linked (Nieto 1999). Our research explores the British Muslim experience in the context of inclusive pedagogy practice in Business Schools. It is the aim of this paper to explore the relevance of culturally responsive teaching (Gay 2000) in supporting individual student learning differences in increasingly international Business Schools. Law (2004) argues that Universities are expected to be the interrogators of complex et...

  11. Cultivate in vitro of wheat Anthers (Triticum Aestivum L.) In the ICA-TENZA and PAV -76 varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present work consisted, in determining the cultivation conditions under which it was possible to induce through the technique of the cultivation of anthers, the callus formation and possible regeneration of green plants of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the varieties ICA-Tenza and Pav -76. With the purpose of identifying the but appropriate state of development of the grain of pollen for the inoculation of the anthers, a cytologic study was made in which was correlation among the moriolic parameters of the plant; (inter liguler distances, auricle-knot distances and longitude of the edges) and the state of development of the microspore; Of the parameters, it was recommended to keep in mind the longitude from the edges when harvesting the experimental material. The anthers of both genotypes were inoculated in the means bases Pope 4 and N6, with hormonal levels of ELL (naftalen acetic acid) of 0.0, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/I. the answers of the genotypes were evaluated before the means of basal cultivation, in connection with the induction of tripes and the plants regeneration. Of the two used genotypes, the Pav -76 it presented bigger capacity to induce the formation of tripes, while the ICA-Tenza genotype presented a bigger answer capacity in the regeneration of plants so much green as albino. The results obtained allowed to establish that a relationship exists between the means of cultivation and the capacity of the genotypes to regenerate as much tripes as plants. Due to the drop survival of the regenerated plants, it was not possible to settle down with clarity a relationship of the ploidia level

  12. Contrasting Nephropathic Responses to Oral Administration of Extract of Cultured Penicillium polonicum in Rat and Primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Fincham

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquid- or solid substrate-cultured Penicillium polonicum administered in feed to rats over several days evokes a histopathological response in kidney involving apoptosis and abnormal mitosis in proximal tubules. The amphoteric toxin is yet only partly characterized, but can be isolated from cultured sporulating biomass in a fraction that is soluble in water and ethanol, and exchangeable on either anion- or cation-exchange resins. After several weeks of treatment renal proximal tubule distortion became striking on account of karyocytomegaly, but even treatment for nearly two years remained asymptomatic. Extract from a batch of solid substrate fermentation of P. polonicum on shredded wheat was incorporated into feed for rats during four consecutive days, and also given as an aqueous solution by oral gavage to a vervet monkey daily for 10 days. Treatment was asymptomatic for both types of animal. Rat response was evident as the typical renal apoptosis and karyomegaly. In contrast there was no such response in the primate; and neither creatinine clearance nor any haematological characteristic or serum component concentration deviated from a control or from historical data for this primate. The contrast is discussed concerning other negative findings for P. polonicum in pigs and hamsters. Renal karyomegaly, as a common rat response to persistent exposure to ochratoxin A, is not known in humans suspected as being exposed to more than the usual trace amounts of dietary ochratoxin A. Therefore the present findings question assumptions that human response to ochratoxin A conforms to that in the rat.

  13. Dedifferentiation of intrinsic response properties of motoneurons in organotypic cultures of the spinal cord of the adult turtle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, J F; Noraberg, J; Simon, M; Hounsgaard, J

    2000-01-01

    Explant cultures from the spinal cord of adult turtles were established and used to study the sensitivity of the intrinsic response properties of motoneurons to the changes in connectivity and milieu imposed by isolation in culture. Transverse sections 700 microm thick were explanted on cover slips......+ channels disappeared during the first few days in culture. Our observations show that the phenotypical intrinsic response properties of mature spinal motoneurons are modified in explant cultures. The properties acquired resemble the properties in juvenile motoneurons in several species of terrestrial...

  14. In vitro androgenetic cultures of Hyoscyamus niger L., H. albus L. and alkaloid content assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wesołwska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In vitro cultures of Hyoscyamus niger L. and H. albus L. anthers were initiated which resulted in obtaining androgenectic plants and callus cultures. The leaves of these pants and the callus cultures were subjected to analysis (TLC, GC for the presence of alkaloids, derivatives of tropane. In the studied material, alkaloids of different qualitative and quantitative composition from that of ground-grown plants were found.

  15. ECHIDNA protein impacts on male fertility in Arabidopsis by mediating trans-Golgi network secretory trafficking during anther and pollen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinping; Yang, Caiyun; Klisch, Doris; Ferguson, Alison; Bhaellero, Rishi P; Niu, Xiwu; Wilson, Zoe A

    2014-03-01

    The trans-Golgi network (TGN) plays a central role in cellular secretion and has been implicated in sorting cargo destined for the plasma membrane. Previously, the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) echidna (ech) mutant was shown to exhibit a dwarf phenotype due to impaired cell expansion. However, ech also has a previously uncharacterized phenotype of reduced male fertility. This semisterility is due to decreased anther size and reduced amounts of pollen but also to decreased pollen viability, impaired anther opening, and pollen tube growth. An ECH translational fusion (ECHPro:ECH-yellow fluorescent protein) revealed developmentally regulated tissue-specific expression, with expression in the tapetum during early anther development and microspore release and subsequent expression in the pollen, pollen tube, and stylar tissues. Pollen viability and production, along with germination and pollen tube growth, were all impaired. The ech anther endothecium secondary wall thickening also appeared reduced and disorganized, resulting in incomplete anther opening. This did not appear to be due to anther secondary thickening regulatory genes but perhaps to altered secretion of wall materials through the TGN as a consequence of the absence of the ECH protein. ECH expression is critical for a variety of aspects of male reproduction, including the production of functional pollen grains, their effective release, germination, and tube formation. These stages of pollen development are fundamentally influenced by TGN trafficking of hormones and wall components. Overall, this suggests that the fertility defect is multifaceted, with the TGN trafficking playing a significant role in the process of both pollen formation and subsequent fertilization. PMID:24424320

  16. Nutritional lipid supply can control the heat shock response of B16 melanoma cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péter, Mária; Balogh, Gábor; Gombos, Imre; Liebisch, Gerhard; Horváth, Ibolya; Török, Zsolt; Nagy, Enikő; Maslyanko, Andriy; Benkő, Sándor; Schmitz, Gerd; Harwood, John L; Vígh, László

    2012-11-01

    The in vitro culture of cells offers an extremely valuable method for probing biochemical questions and many commonly-used protocols are available. For mammalian cells a source of lipid is usually provided in the serum component. In this study we examined the question as to whether the nature of the lipid could become limiting at high cell densities and, therefore, prospectively influence the metabolism and physiology of the cells themselves. When B16 mouse melanoma cells were cultured, we noted a marked decrease in the proportions of n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with increasing cell density. This was despite considerable quantities of these PUFAs still remaining in the culture medium and seemed to reflect the preferential uptake of unesterified PUFA rather than other lipid classes from the media. The reduction in B16 total PUFA was reflected in changes in about 70% of the molecular species of membrane phosphoglycerides which were analysed by mass spectrometry. The importance of this finding lies in the need for n-3 and n-6 PUFA in mammalian cells (which cannot synthesize their own). Although the cholesterol content of cells was unchanged the amount of cholesterol enrichment in membrane rafts (as assessed by fluorescence) was severely decreased, simultaneous with a reduced heat shock response following exposure to 42°C. These data emphasize the pivotal role of nutrient supply (in this case for PUFAs) in modifying responses to stress and highlight the need for the careful control of culture conditions when assessing cellular responses in vitro. PMID:22583025

  17. cultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Kreutz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Es un estudio cualitativo que adoptó como referencial teorico-motodológico la antropología y la etnografía. Presenta las experiencias vivenciadas por mujeres de una comunidad en el proceso salud-enfermedad, con el objetivo de comprender los determinantes sócio-culturales e históricos de las prácticas de prevención y tratamiento adoptados por el grupo cultural por medio de la entrevista semi-estructurada. Los temas que emergieron fueron: la relación entre la alimentación y lo proceso salud-enfermedad, las relaciones con el sistema de salud oficial y el proceso salud-enfermedad y lo sobrenatural. Los dados revelaron que los moradores de la comunidad investigada tienen un modo particular de explicar sus procedimientos terapéuticos. Consideramos que es papel de los profesionales de la salud en sus prácticas, la adopción de abordajes o enfoques que consideren al individuo en su dimensión sócio-cultural e histórica, considerando la enorme diversidad cultural en nuestro país.

  18. Studies in tissue culture of some indigenous rice (Oryza glaberrima Steud.) accessions in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted with the aim of developing separate protocols for callus induction and plant regeneration from different parts of three O. glaberrima accessions indigenous to Ghana. The three O. glaberrima accessions, Guame, N/4 and SARI 1 were assessed for their callus induction and plant regeneration ability from leaf segments, mature dehusked seeds and anthers on different concentrations of plant growth regulators, incorporated into Murashige and Skoog, (1962) (MS) basal medium. For leaf segments, callus was induced on MS supplemented with (0-10) mg/l 2,4-D. Callus induction frequency was significantly (p≤0.05) different among accessions, as well as among the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) levels tested. Highest callus induction frequency was exhibited at a concentration of 6 mg/l 2,4-D for all accessions tested. Callus obtained was sub-cultured on regeneration medium consisting of MS supplemented with (1:0-5) mg.l NAA:BAP. Plant regeneration was nil. Instead, prolific root formation was observed. For mature dehusked seeds, callus induction medium consisted of MS supplemented with (0-6) mg/l 2,4-D. All tested accessions exhibited highest callus frequency at 4 mg/l 2,4-D. Similarly callus induction frequency was significantly (p≤0.05) different among accessions, as well as among concentrations of 2,4-D tested. Calli obtained were sub-cultured on MS medium supplemented with (0-2.5) mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and exhibited the highest regeneration frequency on medium containing 2.0 mg/l BAP. However, callus induced on a concentration of 3 mg/l 2,4-D and sub-cultured on a concentration of 2 mg/l BAP gave the best response n terms of shoot proliferation, growth and root development and therefore were considered to be the optimum concentrations for callus induction and plant regeneration respectively. Plantlet regeneration was achieved only in accession N/4 while Guame and SARI 1 exhibited poor regeneration response. Among the three rice accessions evaluated, N/4 was the most promising accession in terms of callus induction frequency and regeneration ability. The three accessions of O. glaberrima were again studied for their response to anther culture in terms of callus induction and frequency of plant regeneration using N, Garfish and D oy, MS and Nis tch tissue culture media, and supplemented with 2,4-D (1:(0-5) mg/l) were used for callus induction. No response to callus formation was obtained after 16 weeks of culture and a conclusion was drawn that all three accessions were recalcitrant to anther culture. (au)

  19. A responsive evaluation of mental health treatment in Cambodia: Intentionally addressing poverty to increase cultural responsiveness in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seponski, Desiree M; Lewis, Denise C; Megginson, Maegan C

    2014-01-01

    Mental health issues are significant contributors to the global burden of disease with the highest incidence in resource poor countries; 90% of those in need of mental health treatment reside in low resource countries but receive only 10% of the world's resources. Cambodia, the eighth least developed country in the world, serves as one example of the need to address mental health concerns in low-income, resource poor countries. The current study utilises responsive evaluation methodology to explore how poverty-stricken Cambodian clients, therapists and supervisors experience Western models of therapy as culturally responsive to their unique needs. Quantitative and qualitative data were triangulated across multiple stakeholders using numerous methods including a focus group, interviews, surveys, case illustrations and live supervision observation and analysed using constant comparative analysis. Emerging findings suggest that poverty, material needs, therapy location and financial situations greatly impact the daily lives and mental health conditions of Cambodians and hinder clients' therapeutic progress. The local community needs and context of poverty greatly hinder clients' therapeutic progress in therapy treatment and when therapy does not directly address the culture of poverty, clients did not experience therapy as valuable despite some temporary decreases in mental health symptoms. PMID:25204750

  20. The nature of culturally responsive pedagogy in two urban African American middle school science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondima, Michelle Harris

    This ethnographic in nature study explores how two middle school science teachers who have classes populated by urban African Americans teach their students and how their students perceive their teaching. Since urban African American students continue to perform lower than desired on measures of science achievement, there is an urgent need to understand what pedagogical methodologies assist and hinder urban African American students in achieving higher levels of success in science. A pedagogical methodology that theorists posit assists subordinated school populations is culturally responsive pedagogy. Culturally responsive pedagogy is defined as a teaching methodology concerned with preparing students to question inequality, racism, and injustice. Teachers who use culturally responsive pedagogy respect the culture students bring to the class, and require that the teachers willingly do whatever is necessary to educate students (Nieto, 2000). The teacher participants were two female African Americans who were identified by their school supervisors as being highly effective with urban African American students. The researcher presented the teachers in separate case studies conducted over a data collection period of nine months. Data were collected by participant observation, interviews, and artifact collection. Data were analyzed by application of grounded theory techniques. Findings of the teachers' (and the students') beliefs about pedagogy that both assisted and hindered the students' performance in science were reported in a rich and nuanced storytelling manner based on multiple perspectives (teachers', students', and the researcher's). Pedagogical methodologies that the teachers used that assisted their students were the use of cultural metaphors and images in science and applications of motivational techniques that encouraged a nurturing relationship between the teacher and her students. Pedagogical methodologies that hindered students varied by teacher. Metaphorically, the teachers differed vividly. One was a nurturing mother, sister, and friend who assisted her students to cross the cultural line between the science classroom and their home and community. The other was a stern disciplinarian who painted a picture of order and hard work as keys for her students' success in school science. The researcher, who promotes a social justice ideology, made implications and recommendations for science teacher education and public policy.

  1. DNA double-strand break repair and radiation response in human tumour primary cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation and repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) were determined by neutral filter elution on 20 primary cultures obtained from ovarian cancer and malignant melanoma clinical specimens. The initial frequency of DNA dsbs after exposure to 50 Gy γ-irradiation varied greatly for the individual cultures. However, melanomas were generally more efficient than ovarian cancers in repairing these DNA lesions (mean percentage of DNA dsb rejoined after 2 h: 83 versus 62%). In 13 of 20 cultures radiosensitivity was also assessed by the Courtenay clonogenic assay. The mean ''+'' SD of the surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) was slightly higher for melanomas (0.56 ± 0.25) than for ovarian carcinomas (0.43 ± 0.23). No correlation was observed between SF2 and in vitro plating efficiencies or any biological characteristics of the tumour cell population, such as proliferative activity and DNA ploidy. Similarly, we failed to find any relation between the initial frequencies of DNA dsbs and SF2 in individual tumours. In contrast, a significant and direct relationship (r = 0.86, p 2 and the percentages of DNA dsbs rejoined after irradiation. In agreement with reported data on human tumour cell lines, our results indicate that the ability to repair DNA dsbs is an important determinant for radiation response even in primary cultures of clinical tumours. (author)

  2. Comparison of tumour age response to radiation for cells derived from tissue culture or solid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct comparison of the cell age response of 9L and KHT tumour cells derived either from tissue culture or solid tumours was achieved. Cells from dissociated KHT and 9L tumours (the latter implanted either subcutaneously or intracerebrally) and cells from tissue culture were separated into homogenous sized populations by centrifugal elutriation. In both tumour models these homogeneous sized populations correspond to populations enriched at different stages of the cell cycle. The survival of these elutriated cell populations was measured after a single dose of Cs-137 gamma rays. For cells isolated from 9L solid tumours, there was little variation in radiosensitivity throughout the cell cycle; however, a very small but significant increase in resistance was found in late G1 cells. This lack of a large variation in radiosensitivity through the cell cycle for 9L cells from solid tumours also was seen in 9L cells growing in monolayer tissue culture. When similar experiments were performed using the KHT sarcoma tumour model, the results showed that KHT cells in vitro exhibited a fairly conventional increase in radioresistance in both mid G1 and late S. However, the cell age response of KHT cells from solid tumours was different; particularly in the late S and G2 + M phases. (author)

  3. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Turek

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP, AtPNP-A (At2g18660 were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS. In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014 661 and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  4. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2015-06-30

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article “Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress” by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386.

  5. Increased synthesis of ajmalicine and catharanthine by cell suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus in response to fungal culture-filtrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCosmo, F; Quesnel, A; Misawa, M; Tallevi, S G

    1987-03-01

    The ammonium sulfate-precipitated fraction from mycelia and culture-filtrates and the crude, cell-free culture filtrates from the growth medium of the fungi Chrysosporium palmorum, Eurotium rubrum, Micromucor isabellina, and Pythium aphanidermatum when aseptically added to cell suspensions of Cantharanthus roseus caused a rapid and dramatic increase in indole alkaloid biosynthesis. Up to 400 micrograms/L ajmalicine and 600 micrograms/L catharanthine were detected in C. roseus cell suspension grown in the presence of the M. isabellina fungal culture filtrate for 3 d. Untreated cells produced only trace levels of ajmalicine and catharanthine per liter of cell suspension after 15 d of culture. PMID:3619437

  6. Chromosomal responses to ionizing radiation reminiscent of an adaptive response in cultured Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When Chinese hamster V79 cells were internally exposed to low level chronic β-rays from incorporated tritiated thymidine, they showed an 'adaptive' response to the induction of chromosomal damage by subsequent higher acute doses of γ-rays. The yield of sister-chromatid exchanges in the 3H-dThd pretreated cells was less than the yield induced by γ-rays alone, and the micronucleus frequency was less than the sum of the induced frequencies by 3H-dThd and γ-rays separately. No adaptation to the micronucleus induction by γ-rays was observed after the 3H-adapted cells had divided once and when 3-aminobenzamide was given before the challenge doses. The cross-resistance study revealed that the 3H-adapted cells were resistant to SCE induction but not to the micronucleus inductions by the challenge doses of reactor radiations. The results suggest that the SCE adaptation and the micronucleus adaptation or clastogenic adaptation are probably caused by different, inducible adaptive repair pathways. 46 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 table

  7. Responsiveness of fetal rat brain cells to glia maturation factor during neoplastic transformation in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, A; Laerum, O D; Bock, E

    1981-01-01

    The effect of partially purified extracts from adult pig brains containing a glia maturation protein factor (BE) has been investigated on neural cells during carcinogenesis. Pregnant BD IX-rats were given a single transplacental dose of the carcinogen ethylnitrosourea (EtNU) on the 18th day of...... gestation. The brains of the treated fetuses were transferred to cell culture and underwent neoplastic transformation with a characteristic sequence of phenotypic alterations which could be divided into five different stages. During the first 40 days after explantation (stage I & II) BE induced...... appreciable effect on GFA-content was seen any longer, although some few weakly GFA positive cells could be observed in all permanent cell lines. Fetal rat brain cells therefore seem to become less responsive to this differentiation inducer during neoplastic transformation in cell culture....

  8. An ethnographic study of cultural influences on the responses of college freshmen to contemporary Appalachian short stories

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, John C. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Previous research on the role that culture plays in reader response to literature generally has not been based on clear operational definitions of the term "culture." More often than not, researchers appear to be using the term synonymously with the reader's race, nationality, or social class, rather than including specific anthropological explanations. Moreover, there has been no research reported that isolates and then studies individual readers' cultural backgrounds as influences on their ...

  9. The Dilemma of Cultural Responsiveness and Professionalization: Listening Closer to Immigrant Teachers Who Teach Children of Recent Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Jennifer Keys; Tobin, Joseph; Arzubiaga, Angela E.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Many scholars in the fields of teacher education, multicultural education, and bilingual education have argued that children of recent immigrants are best served in classrooms that have teachers who understand the cultural background and the home language of their students. Culturally knowledgeable and responsive teachers are…

  10. Developing Culturally Responsive Surveys: Lessons in Development, Implementation, and Analysis from Brazil's African Descent Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Merle L.; Tillman, Ayesha S.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable empirical research, along with a growing body of conceptual and theoretical literature, exists on the role of culture and context in evaluation. Less scholarship has examined culturally responsive surveys in the context of international evaluation. In this article, the authors present lessons learned from the development,…

  11. Effect of genotype, Culture medium and cold pretreatment on another culture of wheat (T. aestivum L.) mutant lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research was conducted in Tissue Culture Laboratory of the Nuclear Research Center for Agriculture and Medicine in the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran in 1996-1997. The objective was to investigate the effect of genotype, culture medium and cold pretreatment in calli production from anthers. Anthers of four mutant lines obtained from three cvs, (Omid, Tabassi and Roshan) were produced in the Nuclear Agriculture Center and two check cvs, (Omid and Tabassi) were cultured in two media PII and modified C17. Some of the spikes before plating were kept in dark at 4-5 deg C for one week. The result indicated that the genotype of donar plants had a significant effect on the calli and plants formation. Cold pre-treatment and medium type had no effect on the calli formation, but interaction between the two factors was very significant, and the best result was obtained when anthers were cultured in modified C17 medium without cold pre-treatment

  12. Metonymic objects, cultural practices and narrative repair: Sri Lankan responses to the Indian Ocean tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Shemana; Stolte, Ottilie; Hodgetts, Darrin

    2015-07-01

    The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami resulted in a tragic loss of life and immense suffering. This article explores the ways in which a group of people from Sri Lanka worked to address the disruption to their life narratives caused by the loss of loved ones. We go beyond a focus on 'talk' in narrative research in health psychology to explore the importance of material objects in sustaining continued bonds with the deceased. This article provides an alternative to the tendency in mainstream psychology to pathologise grief and highlights the importance of culturally patterned responses to disaster. PMID:24155188

  13. The Generation X Librarian Essays on Leadership, Technology, Pop Culture, Social Responsibility and Professional Identity

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, Martin K,; Estep, Erik Sean

    2011-01-01

    Generation X includes individuals born roughly between 1961 and 1981. This generation has faced major advances in technology, environmental degradation, and widening economic injustice, all of which affect libraries and librarians. This collection of critical essays highlights the special challenges that face Generation X librarians. Topics covered include management and leadership, rapidly changing technology, social attitudes and stereotypes within popular culture, and how Generation X librarians have responded to or developed in response to those themes. This work fills many of the gaps pre

  14. Effects of field plot size on variation in white flower anther injury by tarnished plant bug for host plant resistance evaluations in Arkansas cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field trials conducted in 2008 and 2009 investigated whether field plot size affects incidence of white flower anther injury by tarnished plant bug (TPB) ((Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois)) in host plant resistance (HPR) evaluations. The three cotton lines evaluated in the trial included a su...

  15. Influence of Explant Source and Medium Ingredients on Culture Responses of Microsperma Lentil Cultivar Masoor-85

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Altaf

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Culture responses of 9 lentil explants were compared in various media having different ingredients. The most promising were the scrapped axillary portions of basal nodes for enhanced regeneration. The optimum size of the explant was also determined. The callogenesis response varied with the explant and ranged between 0.3 - 0.5 cm. Among the sugars tested, sucrose was the best for callussing. Auxin 2,4-D induced callussing but cytokinin enhanced formation of shoot primordia in explants. Both BA and K promoted multiple shoot formation but K and GA gave more shoot buds. Cytokinins with auxins gave callussing. Callus was also induced in explants when grown in K (10 mg/l + GA (1mg/l containing medium in the dark. When callus was shifted to light it started regeneration as green dots. The addition of seed extract to K and GA medium considerably enhanced regenerations.

  16. Timescale of silver nanoparticle transformation in neural cell cultures impacts measured cell response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, Stephanie L.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Rice, Katherine P.; Schwindt, Rani K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Applied Chemicals and Materials Division (United States); MacCuspie, Robert I. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Materials Measurement Science Division (United States); Jeerage, Kavita M., E-mail: jeerage@boulder.nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Applied Chemicals and Materials Division (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Both serum protein concentration and ionic strength are important factors in nanoparticle transformation within cell culture environments. However, silver nanoparticles are not routinely tracked at their working concentration in the specific medium used for in vitro toxicology studies. Here we evaluated the transformation of electrostatically stabilized citrate nanoparticles (C-AgNPs) and sterically stabilized polyvinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) in a low-serum (∼ 0.2 mg/mL bovine serum albumin) culture medium, while measuring the response of rat cortex neural progenitor cells, which differentiate in this culture environment. After 24 h, silver nanoparticles at concentrations up to 10 µg/mL did not affect adenosine triphosphate levels, whereas silver ions decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1.1 µg/mL or higher. After 240 h, both silver nanoparticles, as well as silver ion, unambiguously decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1 and 1.1 µg/mL, respectively, suggesting particle dissolution. Particle transformation was investigated in 1:10 diluted, 1:2 diluted, or undiluted differentiation medium, all having an identical protein concentration, to separate the effect of serum protein stabilization from ionic strength destabilization. Transmission electron microscopy images indicated that particles in 1:10 medium were not surrounded by proteins, whereas particles became clustered within a non-crystalline protein matrix after 24 h in 1:2 medium and at 0 h in undiluted medium. Despite evidence for a protein corona, particles were rapidly destabilized by high ionic strength media. Polyvinylpyrrolidone increased the stability of singly dispersed particles compared to citrate ligands; however, differences were negligible after 4 h in 1:2 medium or after 1 h in undiluted medium. Thus low-serum culture environments do not provide sufficient colloidal stability for long-term toxicology studies with citrate- or polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles.

  17. Timescale of silver nanoparticle transformation in neural cell cultures impacts measured cell response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both serum protein concentration and ionic strength are important factors in nanoparticle transformation within cell culture environments. However, silver nanoparticles are not routinely tracked at their working concentration in the specific medium used for in vitro toxicology studies. Here we evaluated the transformation of electrostatically stabilized citrate nanoparticles (C-AgNPs) and sterically stabilized polyvinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) in a low-serum (∼ 0.2 mg/mL bovine serum albumin) culture medium, while measuring the response of rat cortex neural progenitor cells, which differentiate in this culture environment. After 24 h, silver nanoparticles at concentrations up to 10 µg/mL did not affect adenosine triphosphate levels, whereas silver ions decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1.1 µg/mL or higher. After 240 h, both silver nanoparticles, as well as silver ion, unambiguously decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1 and 1.1 µg/mL, respectively, suggesting particle dissolution. Particle transformation was investigated in 1:10 diluted, 1:2 diluted, or undiluted differentiation medium, all having an identical protein concentration, to separate the effect of serum protein stabilization from ionic strength destabilization. Transmission electron microscopy images indicated that particles in 1:10 medium were not surrounded by proteins, whereas particles became clustered within a non-crystalline protein matrix after 24 h in 1:2 medium and at 0 h in undiluted medium. Despite evidence for a protein corona, particles were rapidly destabilized by high ionic strength media. Polyvinylpyrrolidone increased the stability of singly dispersed particles compared to citrate ligands; however, differences were negligible after 4 h in 1:2 medium or after 1 h in undiluted medium. Thus low-serum culture environments do not provide sufficient colloidal stability for long-term toxicology studies with citrate- or polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles

  18. Effect of yeast culture supplementation on carcass yield and humoral immune response of broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M M Fathi

    Full Text Available Aim: A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of supplemental yeast culture (Diamond V XPC Yeast Culture; YC in broiler diets on carcass characteristics and humoral immune response. Materials and Methods: A total of 240 one-day-old broiler chicks (Ross 308 were randomly assigned to four YC dietary treatments of 60 birds each. The dietary treatments were 0 (control, 1, 1.25 and 1.5 g YC/kg diet over 42 d. Results: The results revealed that the birds fed yeast cultures had statistically increased (P < 0.05 body weight from control birds only at 5-6 weeks of age. The highest inclusion level (1.5g/kg recorded the best weight. The broiler chicks fed a diet supplemented with 1.25g/kg had the lowest mortality rate over the whole period of the experiment. The birds given the highest level of yeast (1.5g/kg had significantly (P < 0.05 higher percentage of major and minor breast muscles compared with the others that fed a basal diet. A significantly (P < 0.01 increase in IgM titer was noticed in birds fed diet containing YC levels more than 1g/kg at 7 days post-injection with sheep red blood cells. Likewise, broilers fed a diet containing 1.25g/kg exhibited a higher level of antibody titer against Newcastle disease virus at latter age (on d 42 compared with the other groups. Conclusion: The data suggest improvement in growth performance, carcass yield and humoral immunity of broilers fed yeast culture supplementation diet. [Vet World 2012; 5(11.000: 651-657

  19. Induction of heme oxygenase: A general response to oxidant stress in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accumulation of heme oxygenase mRNA is strongly stimulated by treatment of cultured human skin fibroblasts with ultraviolet radiation, hydrogen peroxide, or the sulfhydryl reagent sodium arsenite. Since this will result in a transient reduction in the prooxidant state of cells, the phenomenon may represent an important inducible antioxidant defense mechanism. To examine the generality of the response, we have measured the accumulation of the specific mRNA in a variety of human and mammalian cell types after inducing treatments. Induction by sodium arsenite is observed in all additional human cell types tested. This includes primary epidermal keratinocytes and lung and colon fibroblasts as well as established cell lines such as HeLa, TK6 lymphoblastoid, and transformed fetal keratinocytes. Strong induction of heme oxygenase mRNA is also observed following sodium arsenite treatment of cell lines of rat, hamster, mouse, monkey, and marsupial origin. The agents which lead to induction in cultured human skin fibroblasts fall into two categories: (a) those which are oxidants or can generate active intermediates (ultraviolet A radiation, hydrogen peroxide, menadione, and the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate); (b) agents which are known to interact with or modify cellular glutathione levels (buthionine sulfoximine, sodium arsenite, iodoacetamide, diamide, and cadmium chloride). These observations strongly support the hypothesis that induction of the enzyme is a general response to oxidant stress in mammalian cells and are consistent with the possibility that the cellular redox state plays a key role

  20. A Letter of Apology Nearly 50 Years in the Making: How We've Failed to Solve the Cultural Bind of the American Male. Response to "The Cultural Bind of the American Male"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCandless, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's letter of apology as a response to "The Cultural Bind of the American Male". In the letter, the author offers his apologies because educators have failed to solve the cultural bind of the American male.

  1. Molecular analysis of chondrocytes cultured in agarose in response to dynamic compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallein-Gerin Frédéric

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage is exposed to high mechanical loads under normal physiological conditions and articular chondrocytes regulate the composition of cartilaginous matrix, in response to mechanical signals. However, the intracellular pathways involved in mechanotransduction are still being defined. Using the well-characterized chondrocyte/agarose model system and dynamic compression, we report protocols for preparing and characterizing constructs of murine chondrocytes and agarose, and analyzing the effect of compression on steady-state level of mRNA by RT-PCR, gene transcription by gene reporter assay, and phosphorylation state of signalling molecules by Western-blotting. The mouse model is of particular interest because of the availability of a large choice of bio-molecular tools suitable to study it, as well as genetically modified mice. Results Chondrocytes cultured in agarose for one week were surrounded by a newly synthesized pericellular matrix, as revealed by immunohistochemistry prior to compression experiments. This observation indicates that this model system is suitable to study the role of matrix molecules and trans-membrane receptors in cellular responsiveness to mechanical stress. The chondrocyte/agarose constructs were then submitted to dynamic compression with FX-4000C™ Flexercell® Compression Plus™ System (Flexcell. After clearing proteins off agarose, Western-blotting analysis showed transient activation of Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK in response to dynamic compression. After assessment by capillary electrophoresis of the quality of RNA extracted from agarose, steady-state levels of mRNA expression was measured by real time PCR. We observed an up-regulation of cFos and cJun mRNA levels as a response to compression, in accordance with the mechanosensitive character observed for these two genes in other studies using cartilage explants submitted to compression. To explore further the biological response of mouse chondrocytes to the dynamic compression at the transcriptional level, we also developed an approach for monitoring changes in gene transcription in agarose culture by using reporter promoter constructs. A decrease in promoter activity of the gene coding for type II procollagen, the most abundant protein in cartilage, was observed in response to dynamic loading. Conclusion The protocols developed here offer the possibility to perform an integrated analysis of the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction in chondrocytes, at the gene and protein level.

  2. Responses of cultured neural retinal cells to substratum-bound laminin and other extracellular matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R; Jerdan, J; Hewitt, A T

    1985-11-01

    The responses of cultured chick embryo retinal neurons to several extracellular matrix molecules are described. Retinal cell suspensions in serum-free medium containing the "N1" supplement (J. E. Bottenstein, S. D. Skaper, S. Varon, and J. Sato, 1980, Exp. Cell Res. 125, 183-190) were seeded on tissue culture plastic surfaces pretreated with polyornithine (PORN) and with one of the factors to be tested. Substantial cell survival could be observed after 72 hr in vitro on PORN pretreated with serum or laminin, whereas most cells appeared to be degenerating on untreated PORN, PORN-fibronectin, and PORN-chondronectin. Cell attachment, although quantitatively similar for all these substrata, was temperature-dependent on serum and laminin but not on fibronectin or untreated PORN. In a short-term bioassay, neurite development was abundant on laminin, scarce on serum and fibronectin, and absent on PORN. No positive correlation between cell spreading and neurite production could be seen: cell spreading was more extensive on PORN and fibronectin than on laminin or serum, while on laminin-treated dishes, spreading was similar for neurite-bearing and non-neurite-bearing cells. Laminin effects on retinal neurons were clearly substratum dependent. When bound to tissue culture plastic, laminin showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell attachment and did not stimulate neurite development. PORN-bound laminin, on the other hand, did not affect cell attachment but caused marked stimulation of neurite development, suggesting that laminin conformation and/or the spatial distribution of active sites play an important role in the neurite-promoting function of this extracellular matrix molecule. Investigation of the embryonic retina with ELISA and immunocytochemical methods showed that laminin is present in this organ during development. Therefore, in vivo and in vitro observations are consistent with the possibility that laminin might influence neuronal development in the retina. PMID:3902534

  3. Short-term cadmium exposure induces stress responses in frog (Pelophylax bergeri) skin organ culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncelli, Francesca; Belia, Silvia; Di Rosa, Ines; Paracucchi, Romina; Rossi, Roberta; La Porta, Gianandrea; Lucentini, Livia; Fagotti, Anna

    2015-12-01

    There have been a few studies on the negative effects of pollutants on amphibian skin, the first structural barrier that interacts with the environment and its potential contaminants. In this study an ex vivo skin organ culture from the amphibian Pelophylax bergeri was used to evaluate cell stress responses induced by short-term exposure to cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal known to be an environmental hazard to both humans and wildlife. Histopathological studies were carried out on skin explants using light microscopy and changes in the expression of stress proteins, such as Metallothionein (MT) and Heat shock proteins (HSPs), were investigated by Real-time RT-PCR. Results revealed that amphibian skin reacts to Cd-induced stress by activating biological responses such as morphological alterations and dose- and time-dependent induction of Mt and Hsp70 mRNA expression, suggesting their potential role as biomarkers of exposure to Cd. This work provides a basis for a better understanding of the tissue-specific responses of amphibian skin as a target organ to Cd exposure and its in vitro use for testing potentially harmful substances present in the environment. PMID:26277541

  4. Determination of dose- response relationship in cultured human by lymphocytes for biological dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: lymphocyte- dicentric assay is the most generally accepted method for biological dosimetry of overexposed individuals. In this study, the frequency of unstable chromosome aberration in blood lymphocytes was used to estimate radiation dose received by individuals. Evaluation of dose using a calibration curve produced elsewhere may have a significant uncertainty; therefore, experiments were performed to produce a dose-response curve using an established protocol of international atomic energy agency. Materials and methods: lymphocytes in whole peripheral blood obtained from healthy individuals, were exposed to various doses of gamma radiation (0.25-4 Gy). Then after 1 hour of incubation in 37digC , were cultured in complete RPMI-1640 medium. 500 mitoses were analyzed for the presence or absence of unstable chromosomal aberrations for each radiation dose after the standard metaphase preparation and staining slides. Results and conclusion: Intercellular distribution chromosomes at each radiation dose has been used to contrast a dose- response curve. It seems that dose-effect relationship follows with the linear-quadratic model. There is a good agreement between our dose- response curves with similar published studies by other laboratories

  5. Unfolded protein response in hypothalamic cultures of wild-type and ATF6?-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenjun; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Tochiya, Masayoshi; Azuma, Yoshinori; Suga, Hidetaka; Goto, Motomitsu; Banno, Ryoichi; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Oyadomari, Seiichi; Mori, Kazutoshi; Arima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-26

    Recent studies suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the hypothalamus could affect systemic homeostatic regulation in areas such as energy and water balance. Activating transcription factor 6? (ATF6?) is an ER stress transducer which increases the expression of ER chaperones and ER-associated degradation (ERAD) components under ER stress. In the present study, we examined the regulation of the unfolding protein response (UPR) in mouse hypothalamic cultures of wild-type (WT) and ATF6?(-/-) mice. Thapsigargin (TG), an ER stressor, significantly increased the mRNA expression of immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP), spliced X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and ERAD components, in hypothalamic cultures of WT mice with the same threshold (0.1?M) and similar time courses. On the other hand, TG-induced upregulation of BiP and CHOP as well as most ERAD-related genes, but not spliced XBP1 or ATF4, was attenuated in ATF6?(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. Our data suggest that all the UPR arms are activated similarly in the mouse hypothalamus under ER stress conditions, where ATF6? regulates the expression of ER chaperones, CHOP, and ERAD components. PMID:26708632

  6. Development of Growth Medium for Centella Asiatica Cell Culture Via Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Omar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of sucrose, Indole-3-Acetic Acid (IAA and 6-BenzylAminoPurine (BAP concentrations on cell growth of Centella asiatica cell suspension culture were studied. The concentrations were designed using Central-composite experimental design and regression analysis was carried out to obtain response surface model describing cell growth for prediction of optimum conditions. Only sucrose as a single factor was positively significant for cell growth. Increasing sucrose concentration from 3.32 to 6.68% (w/v resulted in an increase in dry cell weight from 16-27 g L-1. IAA and BAP as single factors and other possible interaction effect were insignificant. The optimum values predicted to be 6.68% (w/v sucrose, 0.84 mg L-1 IAA and 1.17 mg L-1 BAP yielding 27.4 g L-1 dry cell weight with 81.4% regression equation fitness of the experimental data.

  7. Facilitating a culture of responsible and effective sharing of cancer genome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Lillian L; Lawler, Mark; Haussler, David; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Lewin, Jeremy; Vis, Daniel J; Liao, Rachel G; Andre, Fabrice; Banks, Ian; Barrett, J Carl; Caldas, Carlos; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Mao, Mao; Mattison, John E; Pao, William; Sellers, William R; Sullivan, Patrick; Teh, Bin Tean; Ward, Robyn L; ZenKlusen, Jean Claude; Sawyers, Charles L; Voest, Emile E

    2016-05-01

    Rapid and affordable tumor molecular profiling has led to an explosion of clinical and genomic data poised to enhance the diagnosis, prognostication and treatment of cancer. A critical point has now been reached at which the analysis and storage of annotated clinical and genomic information in unconnected silos will stall the advancement of precision cancer care. Information systems must be harmonized to overcome the multiple technical and logistical barriers to data sharing. Against this backdrop, the Global Alliance for Genomic Health (GA4GH) was established in 2013 to create a common framework that enables responsible, voluntary and secure sharing of clinical and genomic data. This Perspective from the GA4GH Clinical Working Group Cancer Task Team highlights the data-aggregation challenges faced by the field, suggests potential collaborative solutions and describes how GA4GH can catalyze a harmonized data-sharing culture. PMID:27149219

  8. Introduction to "coping with environmental risk and uncertainty: individual and cultural responses".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ember, Carol R

    2013-03-01

    The papers in this special issue of Human Nature collectively consider societal and individual responses to a wide variety of environmental and social risks. The first paper considers societal level effects of pathogen risk on collectivism and conformity, avoidance of outsiders, and in-group loyalty in a worldwide cross-cultural sample. The second deals with societal-level effects of resource unpredictability on the nature and conduct of warfare in eastern Africa. The third deals with effects of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes and mediating factors on individual perceptions of risk in Mexico and Ecuador. The final paper deals with effects of various types of father absence on women's reproductive life histories in Bangladesh. PMID:23546771

  9. Functional and biochemical responses of cultured heart cells to angiotensin II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have utilized a cultured neonatal rat heart myocyte system to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the stimulation of heart cells by angiotensin II (AII). The intact cultured cells, and membranes from these cells, have specific, high affinity receptors for 125I-AII and for an AII antagonist, 125I-Sar1,Leu8-AII. Binding affinity was in the nanomolar range and was inhibited by guanine nucleotides. Functional studies on intact, beating cells revealed a maximal increase in contractile frequency of 50%, observed at 5 nM AII, with half maximal effects noted at around 1 nM. These responses were reversible and specific as the antagonist, Sar1, Ala8-AII, inhibited AII-induced chronotropic stimulation. AII (100 nM) had no effect on basal adenylate cyclase activity (20 pmoles cAMP/mg prot/min at 2.5mM Mg2+) in cell membranes. Further, in membranes where cyclase activity was stimulated with isoproterenol (290 pmoles cAMP/mg prot/min at 2.5mM Mg2+), addition of AII had no effect. The cyclase-inhibitory muscarinic agonist, carbachol, also failed to reduce isoproterenol-stimulated activity. In preliminary work with the intact cells, AII again did not alter basal cAMP levels (3-10 pmoles cAMP/mg prot). However, the hormone increased isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP levels by almost 50%. These cells are an excellent system for correlating AII receptor binding with functional and biochemical responses

  10. Response to Dengue virus infections altered by cytokine-like substances from mosquito cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laosutthipong Chaowanee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With both shrimp and commercial insects such as honey bees, it is known that stable, persistent viral infections characterized by absence of disease can sometimes shift to overt disease states as a result of various stress triggers and that this can result in serious economic losses. The main research interest of our group is to understand the dynamics of stable viral infections in shrimp and how they can be destabilized by stress. Since there are no continuous cell lines for crustaceans, we have used a C6/36 mosquito cell line infected with Dengue virus to test hypotheses regarding these interactions. As a result, we accidentally discovered two new cytokine-like substances in 5 kDa extracts from supernatant solutions of acutely and persistently infected mosquito cells. Results Nave C6/36 cells were exposed for 48 h to 5 kDa membrane filtrates prepared from the supernatant medium of stable C6/36 mosquito cell cultures persistently-infected with Dengue virus. Subsequent challenge of nave cells with a virulent stock of Dengue virus 2 (DEN-2 and analysis by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy using anti-DEN-2 antibody revealed a dramatic reduction in the percentage of DEN-2 infected cells when compared to control cells. Similar filtrates prepared from C6/36 cells with acute DEN-2 infections were used to treat stable C6/36 mosquito cell cultures persistently-infected with Dengue virus. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed destabilization in the form of an apoptosis-like response. Proteinase K treatment removed the cell-altering activities indicating that they were caused by small polypeptides similar to those previously reported from insects. Conclusions This is the first report of cytokine-like substances that can alter the responses of mosquito cells to Dengue virus. This simple model system allows detailed molecular studies on insect cytokine production and on cytokine activity in a standard insect cell line.

  11. Monitoring tumor response to anticancer drugs using stable three-dimensional culture in a recyclable microfluidic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenming; Xu, Juan; Li, Tianbao; Zhao, Lei; Ma, Chao; Shen, Shaofei; Wang, Jinyi

    2015-10-01

    The development and application of miniaturized platforms with the capability for microscale and dynamic control of biomimetic and high-throughput three-dimensional (3D) culture plays a crucial role in biological research. In this study, pneumatic microstructure-based microfluidics was used to systematically demonstrate 3D tumor culture under various culture conditions. We also demonstrated the reusability of the fabrication-optimized pneumatic device for high-throughput cell manipulation and 3D tumor culture. This microfluidic system provides remarkably long-term (over 1 month) and cyclic stability. Furthermore, temporal and high-throughput monitoring of tumor response to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of different chemotherapies, was achieved based on the robust culture. This advancement in microfluidics has potential applications in the fields of tissue engineering, tumor biology, and clinical medicine; it also provides new insight into the construction of high-performance and recyclable microplatforms for cancer research. PMID:26337449

  12. Thermo-responsive polymer aided spheroid culture in cryogel based platform for high throughput drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, J; Kumar, A

    2016-04-21

    In high throughput cell culture, the paradigm is now shifting from 2D to 3D systems. However, in 3D cell culture systems, it is important that the cells form spheroids with robust cell-cell interactions. We fabricated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-gelatin) cryogel scaffolds for cell culture and inserted them into open-ended 96-well plates that formed a drainage and leakage protected, easy to handle high throughput platform. This platform was used to screen for the optimal concentration of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) as an external aid to the formation of cellular spheroids. It was found that hepatic cells (Hep G2) seeded in the presence of 0.03% pNIPAAm formed better hepatic spheroids in terms of morphology (as assessed by microscopic analysis and formation of bile canaliculi-like structures) and functionality by day 5 of culture. An increase of 44.22%, 15.75%, 36.44%, 32.05% and 27.02% was observed in glucose consumption (1.925 mM per day per 10(4) cells), albumin synthesis (164.18 ng per day per 10(4) cells), CYP1A1 (304.92 pg per min per 10(4) cells), CYP2A6 (441.23 nM per min per 10(4) cells) and phase II metabolic activity (386.18 nM per min(-1) per 10(4) cells), respectively, upon using 0.03% pNIPAAm, as compared to the 3D control. The platform was tested with other cells such as breast and lung cancer cells and found to be compatible. The cell spheroids were subjected to drug toxicity screening in cryogel based open-ended platforms. It was observed that the spheroids were more resistant to anticancer drugs, as compared to 2D and 3D controls, with approximately 11%-67% increase in the IC50 values of tamoxifen and paclitaxel. The platform also showed dose dependent and reproducible responses to drugs. PMID:27027476

  13. Tissue culture-mediated biotechnological intervention in pomegranate: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Soumendra K; Chand, Pradeep K

    2011-05-01

    The past 30 years have witnessed a series of systematic biotechnological advances made in pomegranate. These encompass optimization and establishment of in vitro culture techniques including micropropagation, somatic embryogenesis, synthetic seed production, plant regeneration via callus-mediated shoot organogenesis, adventitious shoot regeneration, anther culture, tetraploid induction and genetic transformation. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive account on the tissue culture-mediated biotechnological interventions made in pomegranate aimed at complementing conventional programmes for improvement of this nutraceutically important fruit crop. PMID:21161233

  14. The presence of a culturally similar or dissimilar social partner affects neural responses to emotional stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate A. Woodcock

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotional responding is sensitive to social context; however, little emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms by which social context effects changes in emotional responding. Objective: We aimed to investigate the effects of social context on neural responses to emotional stimuli to inform on the mechanisms underpinning context-linked changes in emotional responding. Design: We measured event-related potential (ERP components known to index specific emotion processes and self-reports of explicit emotion regulation strategies and emotional arousal. Female Chinese university students observed positive, negative, and neutral photographs, whilst alone or accompanied by a culturally similar (Chinese or dissimilar researcher (British. Results: There was a reduction in the positive versus neutral differential N1 amplitude (indexing attentional capture by positive stimuli in the dissimilar relative to alone context. In this context, there was also a corresponding increase in amplitude of a frontal late positive potential (LPP component (indexing engagement of cognitive control resources. In the similar relative to alone context, these effects on differential N1 and frontal LPP amplitudes were less pronounced, but there was an additional decrease in the amplitude of a parietal LPP component (indexing motivational relevance in response to positive stimuli. In response to negative stimuli, the differential N1 component was increased in the similar relative to dissimilar and alone (trend context. Conclusion: These data suggest that neural processes engaged in response to emotional stimuli are modulated by social context. Possible mechanisms for the social-context-linked changes in attentional capture by emotional stimuli include a context-directed modulation of the focus of attention, or an altered interpretation of the emotional stimuli based on additional information proportioned by the context.

  15. Culture & Advertising : How masculinity or femininity of a culture is influencing the consumers’ responses on the gender appearance in advertisements?

    OpenAIRE

    Sadek-Endrawes, Marlin

    2008-01-01

    Everybody has seen advertisements in his/her life even if this person is never watching television or listening to radio. However, an average person watches television 1 to 4 hours per day. In these hours of watching television, there is a big probability that this person will see an advertisement. But how does he/she react to this advertisement? There are probabilities of reacting positively or negatively or indifferently. Culture is one of the significant aspects that can determine the reac...

  16. Adaptive Strategies in Response to the Economic Crisis: A Cross-Cultural Study in Austria and Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Sternad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study builds on prior research on culture-specific differences instrategic decision-making and strategic issue analysis, and extends it tothe field of strategic crisis adaptation. Taking an upper echelons perspective,it is investigated whether the cultural dimension of uncertaintyavoidance had an effect on strategic directions that managerschose in response to the 2008–2009 global financial and economic crisis.Building on a framework of strategic crisis responses and a quantitativesurvey conducted among 257 managers in Austria and Slovenia,the findings suggest that strategic issue interpretations of the economiccrisis as well as country differences influence whether firms are usingexternally versus internally-directed strategic responses, and pro-activeversus retrenchment strategies. The differences in strategy deploymentbetween the two countries, however, could not be consistently tracedto differences in the cultural dimension of uncertainty avoidance, thussuggesting that other country-specific factors like institutional or socialdifferences also play an important role.

  17. Expression Profile Analysis of the Low-Oxygen Response in Arabidopsis Root CulturesW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Erik Jan; Wilson, Iain W.; Wilson, Dale; Chapman, Scott C.; Ewing, Rob M.; Somerville, Shauna C.; Peacock, W. James; Dolferus, Rudy; Dennis, Elizabeth S.

    2002-01-01

    We used DNA microarray technology to identify genes involved in the low-oxygen response of Arabidopsis root cultures. A microarray containing 3500 cDNA clones was screened with cDNA samples taken at various times (0.5, 2, 4, and 20 h) after transfer to low-oxygen conditions. A package of statistical tools identified 210 differentially expressed genes over the four time points. Principal component analysis showed the 0.5-h response to contain a substantially different set of genes from those regulated differentially at the other three time points. The differentially expressed genes included the known anaerobic proteins as well as transcription factors, signal transduction components, and genes that encode enzymes of pathways not known previously to be involved in low-oxygen metabolism. We found that the regulatory regions of genes with a similar expression profile contained similar sequence motifs, suggesting the coordinated transcriptional control of groups of genes by common sets of regulatory factors. PMID:12368499

  18. An Investigation of a Culturally Responsive Approach to Science Education in a Summer Program for Marginalized Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Brittany A.

    There have been numerous calls and efforts made to provide states, school districts, and communities needed financial support to increase and enhance access to and opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) related disciplines for marginalized populations (Tyson, Lee, & Hanson, 2007; Caldwell & Siwatu, 2003). As the challenge to better educate students of color and poor students intensifies, the need to provide equitable science learning experiences for all students aimed at scientific literacy and STEM also becomes critical. Thus the need to provide summer science enrichment programs where students engage in scientific experimentation, investigation, and critical thinking are vital to helping students who have been traditionally marginalized achieve success in school science and enter the science career pipeline. This mixed methods study examined the impact of a culturally responsive approach on student attitudes, interests in science education and STEM careers, and basic science content knowledge before and after participation in an upward bound summer program. Quantitative results indicated using a culturally responsive approach to teach science in an informal learning space significantly increases student achievement. Students receiving culturally responsive science instruction exhibited statistically significant increases in their posttest science scores compared to pretest science scores, M = 0.376, 95% CI [0.266, 0.487], t (10) = 7.610, p < 0.001. Likewise, students receiving culturally responsive science instruction had a significantly higher interest in science (M = 1.740, SD = 0.548) and STEM careers, M = 0.597, 95% CI [0.276, 0.919], p = 0.001. The qualitative data obtained in this study sought to gain a more in-depth understanding of the impact of a culturally responsive approach on students' attitudes, interests in science and STEM careers. Findings suggest providing students the opportunity to do and learn science utilizing a culturally responsive approach was much more beneficial to their overall science knowledge, as it allowed students to experience, understand, and connect to and through their science learning. Likewise, culturally responsive science instruction helped students to foster a more positive interest in science and STEM careers as it provided students the opportunity to do science in a meaningful and relevant way. Moreover, results revealed students receiving culturally responsive science instruction were able to see themselves represented in the curriculum and recognized their own strengths; as a result they were more validated and affirmed in and transformed by, their learning.

  19. Dose–response analysis of phthalate effects on gene expression in rat whole embryo culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rat postimplantation whole embryo culture (WEC) model serves as a potential screening tool for developmental toxicity. In this model, cultured rat embryos are exposed during early embryogenesis and evaluated for morphological effects. The integration of molecular-based markers may lead to improved objectivity, sensitivity and predictability of WEC in assessing developmental toxic properties of compounds. In this study, we investigated the concentration-dependent effects of two phthalates differing in potency, mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and monomethyl phthalate (MMP, less toxic), on the transcriptome in WEC to examine gene expression in relation with dysmorphogenesis. MEHP was more potent than MMP in inducing gene expression changes as well as changes on morphology. MEHP induced significant enrichment of cholesterol/lipid/steroid (CLS) metabolism and apoptosis pathways which was associated with developmental toxicity. Regulation of genes within CLS metabolism pathways represented the most sensitive markers of MEHP exposure, more sensitive than classical morphological endpoints. As shown in direct comparisons with toxicogenomic in vivo studies, alterations in the regulation of CLS metabolism pathways has been previously identified to be associated with developmental toxicity due to phthalate exposure in utero. Our results support the application of WEC as a model to examine relative phthalate potency through gene expression and morphological responses. Additionally, our results further define the applicability domain of the WEC model for developmental toxicological investigations. -- Highlights: ► We examine the effect of two phthalates on gene expression and morphology in WEC. ► MEHP is more potent than MMP in inducing gene expression changes and dysmorphogenesis. ► MEHP significantly disrupts cholesterol metabolism pathways in a dose-dependent manner. ► Specific phthalate-related mechanisms in WEC are relevant to mechanisms in vivo.

  20. Dose–response analysis of phthalate effects on gene expression in rat whole embryo culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Joshua F. [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Verhoef, Aart; Beelen, Vincent A. van; Pennings, Jeroen L.A. [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H., E-mail: aldert.piersma@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    The rat postimplantation whole embryo culture (WEC) model serves as a potential screening tool for developmental toxicity. In this model, cultured rat embryos are exposed during early embryogenesis and evaluated for morphological effects. The integration of molecular-based markers may lead to improved objectivity, sensitivity and predictability of WEC in assessing developmental toxic properties of compounds. In this study, we investigated the concentration-dependent effects of two phthalates differing in potency, mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and monomethyl phthalate (MMP, less toxic), on the transcriptome in WEC to examine gene expression in relation with dysmorphogenesis. MEHP was more potent than MMP in inducing gene expression changes as well as changes on morphology. MEHP induced significant enrichment of cholesterol/lipid/steroid (CLS) metabolism and apoptosis pathways which was associated with developmental toxicity. Regulation of genes within CLS metabolism pathways represented the most sensitive markers of MEHP exposure, more sensitive than classical morphological endpoints. As shown in direct comparisons with toxicogenomic in vivo studies, alterations in the regulation of CLS metabolism pathways has been previously identified to be associated with developmental toxicity due to phthalate exposure in utero. Our results support the application of WEC as a model to examine relative phthalate potency through gene expression and morphological responses. Additionally, our results further define the applicability domain of the WEC model for developmental toxicological investigations. -- Highlights: ► We examine the effect of two phthalates on gene expression and morphology in WEC. ► MEHP is more potent than MMP in inducing gene expression changes and dysmorphogenesis. ► MEHP significantly disrupts cholesterol metabolism pathways in a dose-dependent manner. ► Specific phthalate-related mechanisms in WEC are relevant to mechanisms in vivo.

  1. Variability of in vitro culture response in wheat genotypes, genotype and environmental effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miti? Nevena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue culture response (TCR of immature embryos, evaluated according to callus formation, percentage of regenerative green-spotted calli and the number of plants per embryo, was investigated in 96 wheat genotypes of worldwide origins. Immature embryos were collected 12-15 DAP from field-grown plants during three successive years 2003, 2004 and 2005. Year 2003 was with high air temperatures and tropical days during a period of vegetation, while the environmental conditions were more favorable for plant growth in the next two years, 2004 and 2005. Embryos were cultured on standard MS medium containing 2 mg l-1 2, 4-D. In all genotypes calli were efficiently induced, ranging from 36.7 to 100% (2003, 68.4 to 100% (2004, and 94.3 to 100% (2005. The calli occasionally formed green spots, but frequencies markedly differed among genotypes that varied from 0 to 72.5% (2003, 0 to 97.9% (2004, and 0 to 94.0% (2005. Coefficient of variation was highest in term of percent of regenerative calli (66.7% following by a number of plants per embryo (35.6% and callus formation (5.1%. Components of phenotypic variance showed that factor year (71.4% had the highest impact on expression of callus formation, genetic factor (47,1% on percentage of regenerative green-spotted calli and interaction year/genotype (30.3% on number of plants per embryo. The results indicated factor genotype as the most important for determining regeneration potential in wheat.

  2. Assessing autistic traits: cross-cultural validation of the social responsiveness scale (SRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölte, Sven; Poustka, Fritz; Constantino, John N

    2008-12-01

    The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is a quantitative measure of autistic traits in 4- to 18-year-olds, which has been used in behavior-genetic, epidemiological and intervention studies. The US standardization demonstrated a single-factor structure and good to excellent psychometric properties. The cross-cultural validity of the German adaptation of the parent-report SRS in a sample of N=1,436 children and adolescents: 838 typically developing and 527 clinical participants (160 with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs)) was examined. Internal consistency (0.91-0.97), test-retest reliability (0.84-0.97), interrater reliability (0.76 and 0.95) and convergent validity with the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule as well as the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Social Communication Questionnaire (0.35-0.58) were satisfactory to good. The SRS total score discriminated between ASD and other mental disorders. SRS scores proved to be sufficiently independent of general psychopathology. Principal component analyses yielded single-factor solutions for the normative and clinical subsamples. In addition, construct validity was ensured by consistent correlations with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, the Child Behavior Checklist and the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory. Normative SRS total scores for girls and boys as well as values for ASD were lower in the German sample, while scores for conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity/conduct disorder combined were higher. Generally, cross-cultural validity of the SRS seems to be sufficiently assured for a large European sample. However, some discrepancies regarding SRS normative and clinical raw score distributions, reliability and validity findings are critically discussed. PMID:19360690

  3. Creation of Culturally Responsive Classrooms: Teachers' Conceptualization of a New Rationale for Cultural Responsiveness and Management of Diversity in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Ming-Tak; Kennedy, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, there are a growing number of ethnic minority students in Hong Kong schools. This article examines teachers' views of the cross-cultural experience of ethnic minority students, their influence on the performance of these students, and how the diverse learning needs of these students are being addressed. Qualitative data were collected

  4. Creation of Culturally Responsive Classrooms: Teachers' Conceptualization of a New Rationale for Cultural Responsiveness and Management of Diversity in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Ming-Tak; Kennedy, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    Presently, there are a growing number of ethnic minority students in Hong Kong schools. This article examines teachers' views of the cross-cultural experience of ethnic minority students, their influence on the performance of these students, and how the diverse learning needs of these students are being addressed. Qualitative data were collected…

  5. Heterogeneous response to X-ray and ultraviolet light irradiations of cultured skin fibroblasts in two families with Gardner's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heterogeneous response to X-ray and far UV (254 nm) light irradiations was found in cultured skin fibroblast lines from 2 separate families with Gardner's syndrome. When compared to 2 normal control cultures and cultures from 2 patients with nonfamilial colon cancer, cultures from 4 clinically affected members of family 1 showed increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of both X-ray and UV light irradiations. These cells also showed a delayed pattern of X-ray potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and absent UV PLDR. In contrast, cultures from 3 members of family 2 (2 of whom were clinically affected) showed a normal response of survival and PLDR to both X-ray and UV light irradiations. Thus increased sensitivity of cultured skin fibroblasts to X-ray and UV light irradiations was not a consistent in vitro finding in patients with Gardner's syndrome. However, in families with Gardner's syndrome who demonstrate in vitro radiosensitivity, additional studies are needed to assess the usefulness of these techniques in detecting affected individuals prior to the development of colon carcinoma and other manifestations

  6. Cyto-histological processes during the differentiation of the tapetal cells in the anthers of Anthemis tinctoria L., Erigeron annuus (L.) Pers. and E. canadensis L.

    OpenAIRE

    K. Bijok; B. Kre?ska; Pawlak, T.(Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, 00-661, Poland)

    2015-01-01

    Tapetal cells in the anthers of Anthemis tinctoria, Erigeron annus and E. canadensis were uninucleate in the premeiotic stage of the PMC's. Ta-petum differentiation with inhibited cytokinesis took place during the period of meiotic divisions. In E. canadensis both mitoses were normal, wheareas in A. tinctoria and E. canadensis after both first and second mitotic divisions as a result of numerous disturbances polyploid nuclei were formed.

  7. RESPONSE OF EMBRYOS OF SOME VARIETIES OF RICE FOR THEIR CALLUSING AND DIFFERENTIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P.SINGH

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice is the main food of most of the countries of the world. To cope with the population explosion, conventional method of rice production seems inadequate. Hense, for this purpose; tissue culture technology has been introduced. Before applying any advanced study, such as anther culture, protoplast culture or genetic engineering etc., it is essential to work on the rice varieties from its embryo level. In this perspective, four varieties of rice had been undertaken for the response of their embryos on different concentrations of 2,4D, for their callusing and upon different concentrations of IAA and KN for differentiation. Out of the four varieties of rice, Tulsi and Kanak embryos showed the best response for their callusing at the strength 6 mg/l of 2,4D - 40% and 22% respectively, which is followed by Pusa-Basmati and Birsa 101 embryos. Almost all the varieties showed their callusing more or less at all the strength of 2,4D taken into investigation. But the strength 6 mg/l was the best strength of 2,4D as upon this strength, all the varieties showed their callusing response. On the other hand, embryo derived callus when transferrred to differentiating medium MS + IAA (2 mg/l + KN(4mg/l gave the best result.

  8. Biography-Driven Strategies as the Great Equalizer: Universal Conditions that Promote K-12 Culturally Responsive Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanning, Cristina A.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The growing number of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD students entering our public school system demands a new pedagogical framework for teaching and learning. With its emphasis on all four dimensions of the CLD student biography (sociocultural, linguistic, cognitive, academic, biography-driven culturally responsive teaching (Herrera, 2010 addresses the limited attention currently devoted to second language learning issues in the literature and research related to culturally responsive pedagogy. This study investigates the use of biography-driven instructional (BDI strategies by 58 general education teachers at the elementary and secondary levels with CLD students in their classrooms using the Biography-Driven Performance Rubric, which measures enactment of teaching standards and educational best practices. Findings indicate that the use of BDI strategies can facilitate the practical actualization of culturallyresponsive teaching. Findings also suggest that implementation of BDI strategies can help teachers overcome challenges that are unique to secondary settings as they accommodate the assets and needs of CLD learners.

  9. Sharpening the lens of culturally responsive science teaching: a call for liberatory education for oppressed student groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codrington, Jamila

    2014-12-01

    Wallace and Brand's framing of culturally responsive science teaching through the lens of critical race theory honors the role of social justice in science education. In this article, I extend the discussion through reflections on the particular learning needs of students from oppressed cultural groups, specifically African Americans. Understanding the political nature of education, I explore the importance of transforming science education so that it has the capacity to provide African American students with tools for their own liberation. I discuss Wallace and Brand's research findings in relation to the goal of liberatory education, and offer ideas for how science educators might push forward this agenda as they strive for culturally responsive teaching with oppressed student groups.

  10. Assessing Autistic Traits in a Taiwan Preschool Population: Cross-Cultural Validation of the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jessica; Lee, Li-Ching; Chen, Ying-Sheue; Hsu, Ju-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The cross-cultural validity of the Mandarin-adaptation of the social responsiveness scale (SRS) was examined in a sample of N = 307 participants in Taiwan, 140 typically developing and 167 with clinically-diagnosed developmental disorders. This scale is an autism assessment tool that provides a quantitative rather than categorical measure of…

  11. Exploring the Relationship between Self-Awareness and Student Commitment and Understanding of Culturally Responsive Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Kimberly; Negi, Nalini; Fowler, Dawnovise N.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between self-awareness and social work students' commitment and understanding of culturally responsive social work practice. Data consisted of assigned papers (N = 23), submitted by graduate social work students, which asked them to describe their ethnic/racial background and ancestors' process of assimilation,…

  12. Developing Robust Forms of Pre-Service Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge through Culturally Responsive Mathematics Teaching Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Julia M.; Zavala, Maria del Rosario; Katanyoutanant, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    This study documents and describes efforts to develop robust forms of pre-service teachers' pedagogical content knowledge through a culturally responsive mathematics teaching approach. Embedded in a university K-8 mathematics methods course emphasising the connections among mathematics, children's mathematical thinking, and…

  13. Effects of Science Interest and Environmental Responsibility on Science Aspiration and Achievement: Gender Differences and Cultural Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mei-Shiu

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is twofold: (1) to investigate gender differences in the effects of science interest and environmental responsibility on science aspiration and achievement and (2) to explore the relations between cultural supports (macroeconomic and gender equality) and both boys' and girls' tendencies to integrate the aforementioned…

  14. Theory and Practice of Positive Feminist Therapy: A Culturally Responsive Approach to Divorce Therapy with Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzou, Jean Yuh-Jin; Kim, Eunha; Waldheim, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Positive Feminist Therapy (PFT) is a strength-based culturally responsive therapy model specifically designed for helping Chinese women facing marital conflicts and divorce, integrating Empowerment Feminist Therapy, systems theory, and positive psychology. To help clients become change agents, PFT uses clients' existing strengths to develop…

  15. The Growing Awareness Inventory: Building Capacity for Culturally Responsive Science and Mathematics with a Structured Observation Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Julie C.; Crippen, Kent J.

    2016-01-01

    This study represents a first iteration in the design process of the Growing Awareness Inventory (GAIn), a structured observation protocol for building the awareness of preservice teachers (PSTs) for resources in mathematics and science classrooms that can be used for culturally responsive pedagogy (CRP). The GAIn is designed to develop awareness…

  16. Theory and Practice of Positive Feminist Therapy: A Culturally Responsive Approach to Divorce Therapy with Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzou, Jean Yuh-Jin; Kim, Eunha; Waldheim, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Positive Feminist Therapy (PFT) is a strength-based culturally responsive therapy model specifically designed for helping Chinese women facing marital conflicts and divorce, integrating Empowerment Feminist Therapy, systems theory, and positive psychology. To help clients become change agents, PFT uses clients' existing strengths to develop

  17. Subcutaneous transplantation of autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets fabricated on temperature-responsive culture dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obokata, Haruko; Yamato, Masayuki; Yang, Joseph; Nishida, Kohji; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Okano, Teruo

    2008-09-15

    The oral mucosa is an attractive cell source for autologous transplantation in human patients who require regenerative therapies of various epithelia. However, the time-course of cellular changes in transplanted oral mucosal epithelia at ectopic sites remains poorly understood. By applying a rat model, we analyzed phenotypic changes in oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets after harvest from temperature-responsive culture dishes and subsequent autologous subcutaneous transplantation. We used monoclonal antibodies to identify epithelial-specific cytokeratins 4, 10, 13, and 14, the stem/progenitor cell marker p63, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, within the regenerated tissues. Transplanted oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets proliferated during the first week after grafting in conjunction with host inflammation, but then began to degenerate afterward with complete disappearance after 3 weeks. Our findings suggest that host subcutaneous tissues support proliferation and differentiation of the oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets, but are unable to promote maintenance of stem and progenitor cells and therefore cannot produce long-term survivability. PMID:18080297

  18. Growth response and survival of Heterobranchus longifilis cultured at different water levels in outdoor concrete tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A. Nlewadim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen-day-old hatchery-raised fry obtained from hormonally-induced spawns of mature African catfish H. longifilis brood stock were introduced to three different water levels (0.35, 0.50 and 0.65m in four replicates in 12 units of 2x2x1m3 outdoor concrete tanks. The fry were similarly stocked initially at 50 fry m-2 and later thinned down to 5 fish m-2 and cultured for 6 months. Fish were fed twice daily with commercial pellet feeds (Coppens while adjusting the feeding rate from 10 to 4% body weight and pellet size from 0.2 to 4.5 mm. The effects of pond water levels were evaluated in growth responses and survival. Water quality variables were similar (p > 0.05 in all compartments. Temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH were at the optimum level for fish. The results reveal significant (P H. longifilis from fry to sub-adult and from the grow-out/fattening of sub-adult to adult, respectively, in outdoor concrete tanks.

  19. Thinking on luxury or pragmatic brand products: Brain responses to different categories of culturally based brands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Michael; Rotte, Michael

    2007-08-24

    Culturally based brands have a high impact on people's economic actions. Here we aimed to examine whether socioeconomic information conveyed by certain classes of brands (prestigious versus pragmatic classes) differentially evoke brain response. We presented icons of brands while recording subject's brain activity during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session. After the experiment, we asked subjects to assess the brands according to different characteristics. Results revealed an active network of bilateral superior frontal gyri, hippocampus and posterior cingulate related to familiar brands in general. Brands of the category sports and luxury activated regions in medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and precuneus. In contrast, brands rated as value products activated the left superior frontal gyrus and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The results suggest an active cortical network related to cognitive control for value brands and a network known to be associated with self-relevant processing for prestigious brands. We discuss the results as differential engagement of the prefrontal cortex depending on the attributed characteristic of a brand. PMID:17655834

  20. Characterization and response of newly developed high-grade glioma cultures to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, Paula

    2012-03-10

    High-grade gliomas (HGG), are the most common aggressive brain tumours in adults. Inhibitors targeting growth factor signalling pathways in glioma have shown a low clinical response rate. To accurately evaluate response to targeted therapies further in vitro studies are necessary. Growth factor pathway expression using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant EGFR (EGFRvIII), platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), C-Kit and C-Abl together with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression and downstream activation of AKT and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P70S6K) was analysed in 26 primary glioma cultures treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib. Response to TKIs was assessed using 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)). Response for each culture was compared with the EGFR\\/PDGFR immunocytochemical pathway profile using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Erlotinib response was not strongly associated with high expression of the growth factor pathway components. PTEN expression did not correlate with response to any of the three TKIs. Increased EGFR expression was associated with gefitinib response; increased PDGFR-α expression was associated with imatinib response. The results of this in vitro study suggest gefitinib and imatinib may have therapeutic potential in HGG tumours with a corresponding growth factor receptor expression profile.

  1. Thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted hollow fiber membranes for osteoblasts culture and non-invasive harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Meiling; Liu, Tianqing; Song, Kedong; Ge, Dan; Li, Xiangqin

    2015-10-01

    Hollow fiber membrane (HFM) culture system is one of the most important bioreactors for the large-scale culture and expansion of therapeutic cells. However, enzymatic and mechanical treatments are traditionally applied to harvest the expanded cells from HFMs, which inevitably causes harm to the cells. In this study, thermo-responsive cellulose acetate HFMs for cell culture and non-invasive harvest were prepared for the first time via free radical polymerization in the presence of cerium (IV). ATR-FTIR and elemental analysis results indicated that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was covalently grafted on HFMs successfully. Dynamic contact angle measurements at different temperatures revealed that the magnitude of volume phase transition was decreased with increasing grafted amount of PNIPAAm. And the amount of serum protein adsorbed on HFMs surface also displayed the same pattern. Meanwhile osteoblasts adhered and spread well on the surface of PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs at 37 °C. And Calcein-AM/PI staining, AB assay, ALP activity and OCN protein expression level all showed that PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs had good cell compatibility. After incubation at 20 °C for 120 min, the adhering cells on PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs turned to be round and detached after being gently pipetted. These results suggest that thermo-responsive HFMs are attractive cell culture substrates which enable cell culture, expansion and the recovery without proteolytic enzyme treatment for the application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:26117772

  2. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pil Soo Sung; Eui-Cheol Shin; Seung Kew Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130–170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) systems has allowed us to understand h...

  3. Ultrastructural studies on the sporogenous tissue and anther wall of Leucojum aestivum (amaryllidaceae in different developmental stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuran Ekici

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ultrastructures of anther wall and sporogenous tissue of Leucojum aestivum were investigated during different developmental stages. Cytomictic channels were seen between pollen mother cells during prophase I. Polar distribution was described in the organelle content of pollen mother cells and microspores in early phases of microsporogenesis and also in pollen mitosis. Active secretion was observed in tapetal cells. Previous reports about developmental stages of male gametophyte were compared with the results of this study.Neste estudo, ultraestruturas da parede da antera e tecido esporogênico de Leucojum aestivumforam foram investigados durante diferentes estágios do desenvolvimento. Canais citomíticos foram vistos entre células - mãe de pólen durante a prófase I. Distribuição polar foi descrita no conteúdo da organela de células - mãe de pólen e em micrósporos nas fases iniciais da microesporogênese e também na mitose do pólen. Secreção ativa foi observada nas células tapetais. Registros prévios referentes aos estágios do desenvolvimento do gametófito masculino foram comparados com os resultados deste estudo.

  4. Making sense of climate change risks and responses at the community level: A cultural-political lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainka A. Granderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to better assess, communicate and respond to risks from climate change at the community level have emerged as key questions within climate risk management. Recent research to address these questions centres largely on psychological factors, exploring how cognition and emotion lead to biases in risk assessment. Yet, making sense of climate change and its responses at the community level demands attention to the cultural and political processes that shape how risk is conceived, prioritized and managed. I review the emergent literature on risk perceptions and responses to climate change using a cultural-political lens. This lens highlights how knowledge, meaning and power are produced and negotiated across multiple stakeholders at the community level. It draws attention to the different ways of constructing climate change risks and suggests an array of responses at the community level. It further illustrates how different constructions of risk intersect with agency and power to shape the capacity for response and collective action. What matters are whose constructions of risk, and whose responses, count in decision-making. I argue for greater engagement with the interpretive social sciences in research, practice and policy. The interpretive social sciences offer theories and tools for capturing and problematising the ways of knowing, sense-making and mobilising around risks from climate change. I also highlight the importance of participatory approaches in incorporating the multiplicity of interests at the community level into climate risk management in fair, transparent and culturally appropriate ways.

  5. A differential response to chemical elicitors in Catharanthus roseus in vitro cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Flota, Felipe; Hernández-Domínguez, Elizabeta; de Lourdes Miranda-Ham, Ma; Monforte-González, Miriam

    2009-04-01

    The effects of methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid and ethylene on alkaloid accumulation in in vitro cell suspension, hairy roots and rootless shoot cultures of Catharanthus roseus were analyzed. Ajmalicine, but not catharanthine, accumulation was promoted by jasmonate and ethylene treatments in cell suspensions. In hairy roots, jasmonate induced the accumulation of both alkaloids, whereas ethylene only induced catharanthine accumulation. In shoot cultures, positive effects of jasmonate and ethylene were recorded only in vindoline accumulation. Ethylene diminished catharanthine accumulation in these cultures. No effect of salicylic acid was observed in any of the studied in vitro culture systems. PMID:19030782

  6. Characterization and response of newly developed high-grade glioma cultures to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsella, Paula, E-mail: paula.kinsella@dcu.ie [National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Howley, Rachel, E-mail: rhowley@rcsi.ie [Department of Neuropathology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Doolan, Padraig, E-mail: padraig.doolan@dcu.ie [National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Clarke, Colin, E-mail: colin.clarke@dcu.ie [National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Madden, Stephen F., E-mail: maddens@dcu.ie [National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Clynes, Martin, E-mail: Martin.Clynes@dcu.ie [National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Farrell, Michael, E-mail: michaelfarrell@beaumont.ie [Department of Neuropathology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Amberger-Murphy, Verena, E-mail: Verena.Murphy@icorg.ie [National Institute for Cellular Biotechnology, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); All Ireland Co-operative, Oncology Research Group, 60 Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2012-03-10

    High-grade gliomas (HGG), are the most common aggressive brain tumours in adults. Inhibitors targeting growth factor signalling pathways in glioma have shown a low clinical response rate. To accurately evaluate response to targeted therapies further in vitro studies are necessary. Growth factor pathway expression using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant EGFR (EGFRvIII), platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), C-Kit and C-Abl together with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression and downstream activation of AKT and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P70S6K) was analysed in 26 primary glioma cultures treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib. Response to TKIs was assessed using 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC{sub 50}). Response for each culture was compared with the EGFR/PDGFR immunocytochemical pathway profile using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Erlotinib response was not strongly associated with high expression of the growth factor pathway components. PTEN expression did not correlate with response to any of the three TKIs. Increased EGFR expression was associated with gefitinib response; increased PDGFR-{alpha} expression was associated with imatinib response. The results of this in vitro study suggest gefitinib and imatinib may have therapeutic potential in HGG tumours with a corresponding growth factor receptor expression profile. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-responders had low EGFR expression, high PDGFR-{beta}, and a low proliferation rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN is not indicative of response to a TKI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Erlotinib response was not associated with expression of the proteins examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imatinib-response correlated with expression of PDGFR-{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gefitinib response correlated with increased expression of EGFR.

  7. Characterization and response of newly developed high-grade glioma cultures to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-grade gliomas (HGG), are the most common aggressive brain tumours in adults. Inhibitors targeting growth factor signalling pathways in glioma have shown a low clinical response rate. To accurately evaluate response to targeted therapies further in vitro studies are necessary. Growth factor pathway expression using epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant EGFR (EGFRvIII), platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), C-Kit and C-Abl together with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression and downstream activation of AKT and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P70S6K) was analysed in 26 primary glioma cultures treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib, gefitinib and imatinib. Response to TKIs was assessed using 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50). Response for each culture was compared with the EGFR/PDGFR immunocytochemical pathway profile using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Erlotinib response was not strongly associated with high expression of the growth factor pathway components. PTEN expression did not correlate with response to any of the three TKIs. Increased EGFR expression was associated with gefitinib response; increased PDGFR-α expression was associated with imatinib response. The results of this in vitro study suggest gefitinib and imatinib may have therapeutic potential in HGG tumours with a corresponding growth factor receptor expression profile. -- Highlights: ► Non-responders had low EGFR expression, high PDGFR-β, and a low proliferation rate. ► PTEN is not indicative of response to a TKI. ► Erlotinib response was not associated with expression of the proteins examined. ► Imatinib-response correlated with expression of PDGFR-α. ► Gefitinib response correlated with increased expression of EGFR.

  8. The extent to which Latina/o preservice teachers demonstrate culturally responsive teaching practices during science and mathematics instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Cecilia M.

    2011-12-01

    Complex social, racial, economic, and political issues involved in the practice of teaching today require beginning teachers to be informed, skilled, and culturally responsive when entering the classroom. Teacher educators must educate future teachers in ways that will help them teach all children regardless of language, cultural background, or prior knowledge. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) novice teachers described and demonstrated culturally responsive teaching strategies using their students' cultural and academic profiles to inform practice in science and mathematics instruction. This qualitative exploratory case study considered the culturally responsive teaching practices of 12, non-traditional, Latina/o students as they progressed through a distance-based collaborative teacher education program. Qualitative techniques used throughout this exploratory case study investigated cultural responsiveness of these student teachers as they demonstrated their abilities to: a) integrate content and facilitate knowledge construction; b) illustrate social justice and prejudice reduction; and c) develop students academically. In conclusion, student teachers participating in this study demonstrated their ability to integrate content by: (1) including content from other cultures, (2) building positive teacher-student relationships, and (3) holding high expectations for all students. They also demonstrated their ability to facilitate knowledge construction by building on what students knew. Since there is not sufficient data to support the student teachers' abilities to assist students in learning to be critical, independent thinkers who are open to other ways of knowing, no conclusions regarding this subcategory could be drawn. Student teachers in this study illustrated prejudice reduction by: (1) using native language support to assist students in learning and understanding science and math content, (2) fostering positive student-student interactions, and (3) creating a safe learning environment. Results also indicated that these student teachers demonstrated their ability to develop students academically by creating opportunities for learning in the classroom through their knowledge of students and by the use of research-based instructional strategies. However, based on the data collected as part of this study, the student teachers' abilities to illustrate or model social justice during science and math instruction were not demonstrated.

  9. Keeping up the Conversation on Culture: A Response to Robert Courchene and Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh-Marr, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Robert Courchene's 1996 article entitled "Teaching Canadian Culture: Teacher Preparation" sparked a conversation in the pages of the "TESL Canada Journal" that continues today. From advocating the teaching of significant historical events and icons to encouraging second-language learners to embrace cultural ambiguity, there is a wide spectrum of…

  10. C. P. Snow's "The Two Cultures": Michael Polanyi's Response and Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Struan

    2011-01-01

    C. P. Snow's "The Two Cultures" controversially contrasted science and literature, suggesting that neither scientists nor literary intellectuals have much in common with, and seldom bother speaking to, the other. Responding to Snow, Michael Polanyi argued that specialization has made modern culture, not twofold but manifold. In his major work,…

  11. VISION: A Model of Cultural Responsiveness for Speech-Language Pathologists Working in Family Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon-Harn, Monica L.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has established knowledge and skills needed for culturally competent service delivery by speech-language pathologists. Among these are skills needed to demonstrate sensitivity to cultural and linguistic differences. The purpose of this article is to describe a model, VISION, to assist in development…

  12. Thermotolerance and the heat shock response in normal human keratinocytes in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protective responses of normal human epidermal keratinocytes in culture, after exposure to elevated temperatures (heat shock), were examined. Cell viability, measured 24-48 h after a 20-min heat challenge at temperatures between 37 degrees C and 54 degrees C, declined sharply within a narrow 2 degrees-3 degrees C range. However, conditioning with a mild thermal pretreatment (40 degrees C or 42 degrees C for 1 h) protected the keratinocytes against a subsequent heat challenge. This induced thermotolerance was apparent when cells were challenged at 1, 3, and 6 h after the thermal pre-treatment, but disappeared by 24 h. Heating conditions that induce thermotolerance also stimulated the synthesis of heat-shock proteins (hsp) in these cells. Inductions of prominent 35S-methionine labeled bands at 70, 78, and 90 kDa were observed. However, the increases in synthesis of these heat-shock proteins did not correlate well with thermotolerance, because large increases were also observed at certain elevated temperatures that did not produce improved survival. Keratins observed in these cells (50 and 58 kDa classes) were not induced by heat shock. The development of thermotolerance, and the induction of hsp, were both completely blocked by 3'-deoxyadenosine (cordycepin), an inhibitor of newly synthesized messenger RNA, but not by adenosine, the normal analog. While heat-inducible mRNA apparently mediate some function important for the development of thermotolerance, the nature of that role remains speculative. Overall, our findings establish the existence of a functional thermal protective mechanism in human keratinocytes that appears to require the synthesis of new mRNA

  13. A Sensitive Sensor Cell Line for the Detection of Oxidative Stress Responses in Cultured Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Hofmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the progress of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, chemicals that cause the generation of reactive oxygen species trigger a heat shock response in keratinocytes. In this study, an optical sensor cell line based on cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of the stress-inducible HSP70B’ promoter were constructed. Exposure of HaCaT sensor cells to 25 µM cadmium, a model substance for oxidative stress induction, provoked a 1.7-fold increase in total glutathione and a ~300-fold induction of transcript level of the gene coding for heat shock protein HSP70B’. An extract of Arnica montana flowers resulted in a strong induction of the HSP70B’ gene and a pronounced decrease of total glutathione in keratinocytes. The HSP70B’ promoter-based sensor cells conveniently detected cadmium-induced stress using GFP fluorescence as read-out with a limit of detection of 6 µM cadmium. In addition the sensor cells responded to exposure of cells to A. montana extract with induction of GFP fluorescence. Thus, the HaCaT sensor cells provide a means for the automated detection of the compromised redox status of keratinocytes as an early indicator of the development of human skin disorders and could be applied for the prediction of skin irritation in more complex in vitro 3D human skin models and in the development of micro-total analysis systems (µTAS that may be utilized in dermatology, toxicology, pharmacology and drug screenings.

  14. A sensitive sensor cell line for the detection of oxidative stress responses in cultured human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ute; Priem, Melanie; Bartzsch, Christine; Winckler, Thomas; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    In the progress of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, chemicals that cause the generation of reactive oxygen species trigger a heat shock response in keratinocytes. In this study, an optical sensor cell line based on cultured human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the stress-inducible HSP70B' promoter were constructed. Exposure of HaCaT sensor cells to 25 M cadmium, a model substance for oxidative stress induction, provoked a 1.7-fold increase in total glutathione and a ~300-fold induction of transcript level of the gene coding for heat shock protein HSP70B'. An extract of Arnica montana flowers resulted in a strong induction of the HSP70B' gene and a pronounced decrease of total glutathione in keratinocytes. The HSP70B' promoter-based sensor cells conveniently detected cadmium-induced stress using GFP fluorescence as read-out with a limit of detection of 6 M cadmium. In addition the sensor cells responded to exposure of cells to A. montana extract with induction of GFP fluorescence. Thus, the HaCaT sensor cells provide a means for the automated detection of the compromised redox status of keratinocytes as an early indicator of the development of human skin disorders and could be applied for the prediction of skin irritation in more complex in vitro 3D human skin models and in the development of micro-total analysis systems (TAS) that may be utilized in dermatology, toxicology, pharmacology and drug screenings. PMID:24967604

  15. Dose-response relationship of cadmium or radiation-induced embryotoxicity in mouse whole embryo culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Kiyohito; Kawamata, Akitoshi; Matsuoka, Masato; Wakisaka, Takashi; Fujiki, Yoshishige (Asahi University School of Dentistry, Gifu (Japan))

    1988-12-01

    Mouse embryos of B6C3F/sub 1/ strain were exposed in vitro to 1.2 to 2.2 {mu}M cadmium chloride (Cd) or to 100 to 320 R x-rays, and the effects of the exposure on development were examined after 39 h of culture. Development of embryos was assessed from lethality, formation of the neural tube defect, diameter and protein of yolk sac, crown-rump and head lengths, embryonic protein, and number of somites. Incidence of the neural tube defect increased from 3.4 to 100% by 1.2 to 2.0 {mu}M Cd, while embryo deaths increased from 13.8 to 93.3% by 2.0 to 2.2 {mu}M Cd. Embryonic protein was significantly reduced at the teratogenic range, but the number of somites was only affected by 1.6 to 2.0 {mu}M Cd. X-irradiation at 100 to 320 R induced the neural tube defect in 2.9 to 72.7% of the embryos. An embryolethal effect was observed only at the 320 R dose. Crown-rump and head lengths and embryonic protein were significantly affected at the teratogenic range, but the diameter and protein of yolk sac and number of somites were hardly affected. Cadmium- or radiation-induced response data of both teratogenicity and endpoints indicating inhibition of embryonic development were acceptably fitted to a linear log-probit regression. These regressions suggest that as an estimation of interference in development of embryos, embryonic protein and head length are sensitive endpoints while the number of somites is an insensitive criterion. (author).

  16. Dose-response relationship of cadmium or radiation-induced embryotoxicity in mouse whole embryo culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouse embryos of B6C3F1 strain were exposed in vitro to 1.2 to 2.2 ?M cadmium chloride (Cd) or to 100 to 320 R x-rays, and the effects of the exposure on development were examined after 39 h of culture. Development of embryos was assessed from lethality, formation of the neural tube defect, diameter and protein of yolk sac, crown-rump and head lengths, embryonic protein, and number of somites. Incidence of the neural tube defect increased from 3.4 to 100% by 1.2 to 2.0 ?M Cd, while embryo deaths increased from 13.8 to 93.3% by 2.0 to 2.2 ?M Cd. Embryonic protein was significantly reduced at the teratogenic range, but the number of somites was only affected by 1.6 to 2.0 ?M Cd. X-irradiation at 100 to 320 R induced the neural tube defect in 2.9 to 72.7% of the embryos. An embryolethal effect was observed only at the 320 R dose. Crown-rump and head lengths and embryonic protein were significantly affected at the teratogenic range, but the diameter and protein of yolk sac and number of somites were hardly affected. Cadmium- or radiation-induced response data of both teratogenicity and endpoints indicating inhibition of embryonic development were acceptably fitted to a linear log-probit regression. These regressions suggest that as an estimation of interference in development of embryos, embryonic protein and head length are sensitive endpoints while the number of somites is an insensitive criterion. (author)

  17. Rice improvement, involving altered flower structure more suitable to cross-pollination, using in vitro culture in combination with mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anther and somatic tissue culture in combination with mutagenesis were carried out to evaluate the efficiency of different mutagenic treatments of various in vitro culture materials, and to obtain some promising variants for rice improvement. Results indicated that in japonica rice radiation treatment of dry seeds and young panicles influenced the percentage of green plantlets regeneration from anther culture. Both treatments increased significantly the percentage of regenerated green plantlets in comparison with the control. Irradiation with 30 Gy of rice callus increased also the percentage of regenerated green plantlets. For indica rice, the combination of the suitable dose of gamma rays irradiation on seeds and an improved medium, increased the percentage of callus induction. This approach made it possible to use anther culture in indica rice breeding. Somatic tissue cultures combined with radiation-induced mutagenesis led to the development of a number of promising mutants including some new cytoplasm-nucleus interacting male-sterile lines with almost 100% stigma exertion. Their development would be of practical significance for increasing the genetic diversity for production of hybrid rice. (author)

  18. Número de anteras por flor, grãos de pólen por antera e capacidade germinativa do pólen de diferentes cultivares de macieiras Number of anthers per flower, pollen grains per anther and pollen germination capacity of different cultivars of apple trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Lopes de Albuquerque Junior

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o número de anteras por flor, grãos de pólen por antera e capacidade germinativa do pólen de diferentes cultivares de macieiras. O trabalho foi executado no Laboratório de Fisiologia do Desenvolvimento e Genética Vegetal da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, e as coletas a campo foram realizadas na Epagri/Estação Experimental de Caçador-SC, em outubro de 2005. Foram utilizadas as seguintes cultivares comerciais de macieira desenvolvidas no Brasil: Primícia, Princesa, Fred Hough, Catarina, Baronesa, Lisgala, Suprema, Condessa, Daiane, Duquesa, Imperatriz e Joaquina. As cultivares de macieira Condessa, Princesa, Eva, Duquesa, Imperatriz, Gala, Fred Hough, Daiane, Baronesa e Suprema produzem pólen em quantidade suficiente e com boa capacidade germinativa. A cv. Condessa, embora apresente alta capacidade germinativa de pólen, produz menos anteras e grãos de pólen por antera que as demais. A cv. Princesa é a que apresenta o melhor perfil como polinizadora, por conjugar número de anteras/flor, número de grãos de pólen/antera e capacidade germinativa do pólen mais satisfatórios.The objective of this study was to evaluate the number of anthers per flower, the number of pollen grains per anther and the pollen germination capacity of different cultivars of apple trees. The study was performed at the Physiology and Plant Genetics Laboratory of Federal University of Santa Catarina. The field collecting were performed at Epagri / Caçador Experimental Station, in Santa Catarina State during October, 2005. It was used the following apple cultivars developed in Brazil: Primícia, Princesa, Fred Hough, Catarina, Baronesa, Lisgala, Suprema, Condessa, Daiane, Duquesa, Imperatriz and Joaquina. It was concluded that the apple cultivars Condessa, Princesa, Eva, Duquesa, Imperatriz, Gala, Fred Hough, Daiane, Baronesa and Suprema produce pollen grains of satisfactory quantity and of good germination capacity. The cv. Condessa, although having high pollen germination capacity, produces less anthers and less pollen grains per anther than the others. Princesa is the cultivar of best pattern as pollinizer, once it combines number of anthers/flower, number of pollen grains/anther and pollen germination capacity in a better satisfactory level.

  19. Extract of Ziziphus jujuba Fruit (Jujube) Stimulates Expression of Enzymes Responsible for Heme Recycle via Anti-oxidant Response Element in Cultured Murine Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianping; Lam, Candy T W; Li, Zhonggui; Yao, Ping; Lin, Huangquan; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K

    2016-02-01

    Jujube, the fruit of Ziziphus jujuba Mill., is a functional food and commonly used as a health supplement worldwide. To study the beneficial role of jujube in heme iron recycling during erythrophagocytosis, the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), biliverdin reductase A and B, and ferroportin were determined in jujube-treated cultured RAW 264.7 macrophages. Application of a chemically standardized jujube water extract in cultured RAW 264.7 cells for 24 h stimulated the expressions of HO-1, biliverdin reductase A, biliverdin reductase B, and ferroportin in a concentration-dependent manner, having the maximal responses from twofolds to threefolds. A plasmid containing anti-oxidant response element, a regulator for HO-1 transcription, was transfected into RAW 264.7 cells. Application of jujube water extract onto the transfected macrophages stimulated the anti-oxidant response element-mediated transcriptional activity by twofolds. These results supported the potential capacity of jujube by regulating expressions of heme iron recycling genes in cultured macrophages. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26646685

  20. The multi-dimensional model of M?ori identity and cultural engagement: item response theory analysis of scale properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Chris G; Houkamau, Carla A

    2013-01-01

    We argue that there is a need for culture-specific measures of identity that delineate the factors that most make sense for specific cultural groups. One such measure, recently developed specifically for M?ori peoples, is the Multi-Dimensional Model of M?ori Identity and Cultural Engagement (MMM-ICE). M?ori are the indigenous peoples of New Zealand. The MMM-ICE is a 6-factor measure that assesses the following aspects of identity and cultural engagement as M?ori: (a) group membership evaluation, (b) socio-political consciousness, (c) cultural efficacy and active identity engagement, (d) spirituality, (e) interdependent self-concept, and (f) authenticity beliefs. This article examines the scale properties of the MMM-ICE using item response theory (IRT) analysis in a sample of 492 M?ori. The MMM-ICE subscales showed reasonably even levels of measurement precision across the latent trait range. Analysis of age (cohort) effects further indicated that most aspects of M?ori identification tended to be higher among older M?ori, and these cohort effects were similar for both men and women. This study provides novel support for the reliability and measurement precision of the MMM-ICE. The study also provides a first step in exploring change and stability in M?ori identity across the life span. A copy of the scale, along with recommendations for scale scoring, is included. PMID:23356361

  1. Emerging HIV epidemics in Muslim countries: assessment of different cultural responses to harm reduction and implications for HIV control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Catherine S; Nassiramanesh, Bijan; Stanekzai, Mohammad Raza; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2007-12-01

    Harm reduction, including needle exchange and opioid substitution therapy, has been demonstrated to reduce high-risk behavior and HIV infection among injection drug users. An increasing number of countries in the Middle East, North Africa, and Asia, including those with Muslim majorities, have experienced or are at risk for HIV epidemics initiated by burgeoning injection drug use. Although use of intoxicants is expressly forbidden within Islam, the local culture impacts the interpretation of Islamic law and influences the response to drug misuse, whether punitive or therapeutic. Harm reduction programming has received varying acceptance within this global region, which may be reflected by national trends in HIV prevalence. The purpose of this paper is to examine cultural and religious response to injecting drug use and associated HIV prevalence trends in Malaysia and Iran, with possible application of lessons learned to an emerging situation in Afghanistan. PMID:18366945

  2. Education for Local and Global Ecological Responsibility: Arne Naess's Cross-Cultural, Ecophilosophy Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drengson, Alan

    2000-01-01

    Explains Arne Naess's approach to understanding contemporary grassroots movements, especially the long-range deep ecology movement. Stresses respect and appreciation for all forms of diversity, including personal, cultural, and ecological. (Contains 26 references.) (DDR)

  3. A high-throughput template for optimizing Drosophila organ culture with response-surface methods

    OpenAIRE

    Zartman, Jeremiah; Restrepo, Simon; Basler, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila wing imaginal disc is a key model organ for molecular developmental genetics. Wing disc studies are generally restricted to end-point analyses of fixed tissues. Recently several studies have relied on limited data from discs cultured in uncharacterized conditions. Systematic efforts towards developing Drosophila organ culture techniques are becoming crucial for further progress. Here, we have designed a multi-tiered, high-throughput pipeline that employs design-of-experiment me...

  4. Multiple response optimization of Bacillus subtilis EA-CB0015 culture and identification of antifungal metabolites

    OpenAIRE

    Ord??z, Sergio; Mosquera, Sandra; Gonz??lez Jaramillo, Lina Mar??a; Villegas Escobar, Valeska

    2014-01-01

    The low yields of biomass and antimicrobial metabolites obtained in fermentation processes are limiting factors for implementing biological control agents in the field -- In this context, optimization of the culture medium for the biological control agent Bacillus subtilis EA-CB0015 was conducted in submerged culture to maximize the biomass production and antifungal activity -- Additionally, the active metabolites against the phytopathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis produced under optimized con...

  5. On the Value of Traditional Confucian Culture And the Value of Modern Corporate Social Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Wenzhong Zhu; Yucheng Yao

    2009-01-01

    The core values of the Chinese Confucian Culture such as “humanity, righteousness, harmony, courtesy, honesty and cleanness” represent the soul of five-thousand-years Chinese traditional culture, which may represent the value of maintaining the balanced social benefits and harmonious development of the whole society from the prospective of a whole society, and which may also have some important uses for reference and roles of enlightenment for establishing the values of modern corporate socia...

  6. Effects of Culture and Education on Ethical Responses on Our Global Society

    OpenAIRE

    Comiskey, Christina Pryor; Schutte, Kelli J.; Scarfino, Deborah Reed; Campbell, Tanna White

    2012-01-01

    Two trends that affect communications are prevalent today: a focus on ethics in the U.S. business operations and an increasingly global society and marketplace. This research project brings together these trends to gain a more in-depth understanding of the impact of culture on ethical education. By surveying students in six countries around the globe, this study was able to get at the divergent cultural frameworks utilized in ethical decision making. The results offer a significant contributi...

  7. Consortia modulation of the stress response: proteomic analysis of single strain versus mixed culture

    OpenAIRE

    Fazzini, R.A.; Martins dos Santos, V. A. P.

    2010-01-01

    The high complexity of naturally occurring microbial communities is the major drawback limiting the study of these important biological systems. In this study, a comparison between pure cultures of Pseudomonas reinekei sp. strain MT1 and stable community cultures composed of MT1 plus the addition of Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain MT3 (in a steady-state proportion 9:1) was used as a model system to study bacterial interactions that take place under simultaneous chemical and oxidative stress...

  8. Involvement of salicylic acid signal transduction in aluminum-responsive oxidative burst in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    OpenAIRE

    Kunihiro, Shuta; Hiramatsu, Takuya; KAWANO, TOMONORI

    2011-01-01

    To date, a number of studies have documented the toxic impacts of Al ions in plant cells. One of the key factors required for Al cytotoxicity is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we observed that Al treatments of suspension-cultured Arabidopsis thaliana cells resulted in biphasic superoxide generation monitored with chemiluminescence. Among six respiratory burst oxidase homologs (Atrbohs) coding for plant NADPH oxidase, AtrbohD was shown to be the only gene responsive to A...

  9. Preparing culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math using the Geophysical Institute Framework for Professional Development in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry Bertram, Kathryn

    2011-12-01

    The Geophysical Institute (GI) Framework for Professional Development was designed to prepare culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Professional development programs based on the framework are created for rural Alaskan teachers who instruct diverse classrooms that include indigenous students. This dissertation was written in response to the question, "Under what circumstances is the GI Framework for Professional Development effective in preparing culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math?" Research was conducted on two professional development programs based on the GI Framework: the Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP) and the Science Teacher Education Program (STEP). Both programs were created by backward design to student learning goals aligned with Alaska standards and rooted in principles of indigenous ideology. Both were created with input from Alaska Native cultural knowledge bearers, Arctic scientists, education researchers, school administrators, and master teachers with extensive instructional experience. Both provide integrated instruction reflective of authentic Arctic research practices, and training in diverse methods shown to increase indigenous student STEM engagement. While based on the same framework, these programs were chosen for research because they offer distinctly different training venues for K-12 teachers. STEP offered two-week summer institutes on the UAF campus for more than 175 teachers from 33 Alaska school districts. By contrast, ACMP served 165 teachers from one rural Alaska school district along the Bering Strait. Due to challenges in making professional development opportunities accessible to all teachers in this geographically isolated district, ACMP offered a year-round mix of in-person, long-distance, online, and local training. Discussion centers on a comparison of the strategies used by each program to address GI Framework cornerstones, on methodologies used to conduct program research, and on findings obtained. Research indicates that in both situations the GI Framework for Professional Development was effective in preparing culturally responsive STEM teachers. Implications of these findings and recommendations for future research are discussed in the conclusion.

  10. The development of culturally responsive teaching in UK Higher Education Business Schools for students from an ethnically diverse background

    OpenAIRE

    Jabbar, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    As diversity in UK Higher Education Business Schools increases, the focus on ethnically diverse student achievement, experience, and attainment becomes prominent. This thesis investigates the role of Business School academics and Business School institutions in shaping a pedagogical process that is culturally responsive, to support the changing needs and expectations of ethnically diverse students. In order to achieve this the thesis introduces the five-pillar framework, which has been specif...

  11. Increased GFAP immunoreactivity by astrocytes in response to contact with dorsal root ganglia cells in a 3D culture model

    OpenAIRE

    East, Emma; Golding, Jon; Phillips, James

    2007-01-01

    Failure of repair mechanisms in the injured CNS is widely attributed to the inhibitory environment of the lesion site, most notably the formation of the glial scar which forms a physical and physiological barrier to axon regeneration. We developed an in vitro 3D cell culture model to investigate the response of astrocytes to cells found at the inhibitory interfaces formed following damage to the spinal cord. CellTrackerTM labelled dissociated DRGs were seeded onto astrocy...

  12. Engineering an Integrated Cellular Interface in Three-Dimensional Hydrogel Cultures Permits Monitoring of Reciprocal Astrocyte and Neuronal Responses*

    OpenAIRE

    East, Emma; Golding, Jon P.; Phillips, James B.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports a new type of three-dimensional (3D) tissue model for studying interactions between cell types in collagen hydrogels. The aim was to create a 3D cell culture model containing separate cell populations in close proximity without the presence of a mechanical barrier, and demonstrate its relevance to modeling the axon growth-inhibitory cellular interfaces that develop in the central nervous system (CNS) in response to damage. This provides a powerful new tool to determine whic...

  13. ATP and UTP responses of cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells revisited: dominance of P2Y2 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari, Rajendra; Goh, Gareth; Ng, Leong L; Boarder, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    It has previously been shown that ATP and UTP stimulate P2Y receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but the nature of these receptors, in particular the contribution of P2Y2 and P2Y4 subtypes, has not been firmly established. Here we undertake a further pharmacological analysis of [3H]inositol polyphosphate responses to nucleotides in cultured rat VSMCs.ATP generated a response that was partial compared to UTP, as reported earlier.In the presence of a creatine phosphokinase (CPK) s...

  14. Correlation between the radiation responses of fibroblasts cultured from individual patients and the risk of late reaction after breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuta, Otilia; Somaiah, Navita; Boyle, Sue; Chua, Melvin Lee Kiang; Gothard, Lone; Yarnold, John; Rothkamm, Kai; Herskind, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Late normal tissue toxicity varies widely between patients and limits breast radiotherapy dose. Here we aimed to determine its relationship to DNA damage responses of fibroblast cultures from individual patients. Thirty-five breast cancer patients, with minimal or marked breast changes after breast-conserving therapy consented to receive a 4 Gy test irradiation to a small skin field of the left buttock and have punch biopsies taken from irradiated and unirradiated skin. Early-passage fibroblast cultures were established by outgrowth and irradiated in vitro with 0 or 4 Gy. 53BP1 foci, p53 and p21/CDKN1A were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Residual 53BP1 foci counts 24 h after in vitro irradiation were significantly higher in fibroblasts from RT-sensitive versus RT-resistant patients. Furthermore, significantly larger fractions of p53- but not p21/CDKN1A-positive fibroblasts were found in cultures from RT-sensitive patients without in vitro irradiation, and 2 h and 6 d post-irradiation. Exploratory analysis showed a stronger p53 response 2 h after irradiation of fibroblasts established from patients with severe reaction. These results associate the radiation response of fibroblasts with late reaction of the breast after RT and suggest a correlation with severity. PMID:26944319

  15. Radiation-induced p53 protein response in the A549 cell line is culture growth-phase dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One role of the p53 tumor suppressor protein has been recently revealed. Kastan, M.B. reported that p53 protein accumulates in cells exposed to ionizing radiation. The accumulation of p53 protein is in response to DNA damage, most importantly double-strand breaks, that results from exposure to ionizing radiation. The rise in cellular p53 levels is necessary for an arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle to provide additional time for DNA repair. The p53 response has also been demonstrated to enhance PCNA-dependent repair. p53 is thus an important regulator of the cellular response to DNA-damaging radiation. From this data, it can be concluded that the magnitude of the p53 response is not dependent on the phase of culture growth

  16. Radiation-induced p53 protein response in the A549 cell line is culture growth-phase dependent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, N.F.; Gurule, D.M.; Carpenter, T.R.

    1995-12-01

    One role of the p53 tumor suppressor protein has been recently revealed. Kastan, M.B. reported that p53 protein accumulates in cells exposed to ionizing radiation. The accumulation of p53 protein is in response to DNA damage, most importantly double-strand breaks, that results from exposure to ionizing radiation. The rise in cellular p53 levels is necessary for an arrest in the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle to provide additional time for DNA repair. The p53 response has also been demonstrated to enhance PCNA-dependent repair. p53 is thus an important regulator of the cellular response to DNA-damaging radiation. From this data, it can be concluded that the magnitude of the p53 response is not dependent on the phase of culture growth.

  17. Thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted hollow fiber membranes for osteoblasts culture and non-invasive harvest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollow fiber membrane (HFM) culture system is one of the most important bioreactors for the large-scale culture and expansion of therapeutic cells. However, enzymatic and mechanical treatments are traditionally applied to harvest the expanded cells from HFMs, which inevitably causes harm to the cells. In this study, thermo-responsive cellulose acetate HFMs for cell culture and non-invasive harvest were prepared for the first time via free radical polymerization in the presence of cerium (IV). ATR-FTIR and elemental analysis results indicated that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was covalently grafted on HFMs successfully. Dynamic contact angle measurements at different temperatures revealed that the magnitude of volume phase transition was decreased with increasing grafted amount of PNIPAAm. And the amount of serum protein adsorbed on HFMs surface also displayed the same pattern. Meanwhile osteoblasts adhered and spread well on the surface of PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs at 37 °C. And Calcein-AM/PI staining, AB assay, ALP activity and OCN protein expression level all showed that PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs had good cell compatibility. After incubation at 20 °C for 120 min, the adhering cells on PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs turned to be round and detached after being gently pipetted. These results suggest that thermo-responsive HFMs are attractive cell culture substrates which enable cell culture, expansion and the recovery without proteolytic enzyme treatment for the application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs exhibited thermoresponsive characteristic. • The OB cells could adhere and spread well on the surface of PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs. • PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs do not significantly impact ALP activity and OCN protein expression level of OB cells. • Cell could be detached from PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs when temperature decreased from 37 °C to 20 °C

  18. Thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted hollow fiber membranes for osteoblasts culture and non-invasive harvest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Meiling, E-mail: zhuangmeiling2006@126.com; Liu, Tianqing, E-mail: liutq@dlut.edu.cn; Song, Kedong, E-mail: kedongsong@dlut.edu.cn; Ge, Dan, E-mail: gedan@dlut.edu.cn; Li, Xiangqin, E-mail: xiangqinli@163.com

    2015-10-01

    Hollow fiber membrane (HFM) culture system is one of the most important bioreactors for the large-scale culture and expansion of therapeutic cells. However, enzymatic and mechanical treatments are traditionally applied to harvest the expanded cells from HFMs, which inevitably causes harm to the cells. In this study, thermo-responsive cellulose acetate HFMs for cell culture and non-invasive harvest were prepared for the first time via free radical polymerization in the presence of cerium (IV). ATR-FTIR and elemental analysis results indicated that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was covalently grafted on HFMs successfully. Dynamic contact angle measurements at different temperatures revealed that the magnitude of volume phase transition was decreased with increasing grafted amount of PNIPAAm. And the amount of serum protein adsorbed on HFMs surface also displayed the same pattern. Meanwhile osteoblasts adhered and spread well on the surface of PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs at 37 °C. And Calcein-AM/PI staining, AB assay, ALP activity and OCN protein expression level all showed that PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs had good cell compatibility. After incubation at 20 °C for 120 min, the adhering cells on PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs turned to be round and detached after being gently pipetted. These results suggest that thermo-responsive HFMs are attractive cell culture substrates which enable cell culture, expansion and the recovery without proteolytic enzyme treatment for the application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs exhibited thermoresponsive characteristic. • The OB cells could adhere and spread well on the surface of PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs. • PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs do not significantly impact ALP activity and OCN protein expression level of OB cells. • Cell could be detached from PNIPAAm-grafted HFMs when temperature decreased from 37 °C to 20 °C.

  19. Trace concentrations of imazethapyr (IM) affect floral organs development and reproduction in Arabidopsis thaliana: IM-induced inhibition of key genes regulating anther and pollen biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Haifeng; Li, Yali; Sun, Chongchong; Lavoie, Michel; Xie, Jun; Bai, Xiaocui; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how herbicides affect plant reproduction and growth is critical to develop herbicide toxicity model and refine herbicide risk assessment. Although our knowledge of herbicides toxicity mechanisms at the physiological and molecular level in plant vegetative phase has increased substantially in the last decades, few studies have addressed the herbicide toxicity problematic on plant reproduction. Here, we determined the long-term (4-8weeks) effect of a chiral herbicide, imazethapyr (IM), which has been increasingly used in plant crops, on floral organ development and reproduction in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. More specifically, we followed the effect of two IM enantiomers (R- and S-IM) on floral organ structure, seed production, pollen viability and the transcription of key genes involved in anther and pollen development. The results showed that IM strongly inhibited the transcripts of genes regulating A. thaliana tapetum development (DYT1: DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM 1), tapetal differentiation and function (TDF1: TAPETAL DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION1), and pollen wall formation and developments (AMS: ABORTED MICROSPORES, MYB103: MYB DOMAIN PROTEIN 103, MS1: MALE STERILITY 1, MS2: MALE STERILITY 2). Since DYT1 positively regulates 33 genes involved in cell-wall modification (such as, TDF1, AMS, MYB103, MS1, MS2) that can catalyze the breakdown of polysaccharides to facilitate anther dehiscence, the consistent decrease in the transcription of these genes after IM exposure should hamper anther opening as observed under scanning electron microscopy. The toxicity of IM on anther opening further lead to a decrease in pollen production and pollen viability. Furthermore, long-term IM exposure increased the number of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) in the DNA of A. thaliana and also altered the DNA of A. thaliana offspring grown in IM-free soils. Toxicity of IM on floral organs development and reproduction was generally higher in the presence of the R-IM enantiomer than of the S-IM enantiomer. This study unraveled several IM toxicity targets and mechanisms at the molecular and structural level linked to the toxicity of IM trace concentrations on A.thaliana reproduction. PMID:25348600

  20. Reasoning about responsibilities and obligations in close relationships: a comparison across two cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, M; Edelstein, W; Schmid, C; Fang, F X; Fang, G

    1998-07-01

    The study compares sociomoral reasoning of children and adolescents in Iceland, longitudinally assessed at ages 7, 9, 12, and 15 years (N = 97), and in China, cross-sectionally assessed at corresponding ages (N = 350). Participants reasoned about choices, motives, and moral justifications of a protagonist in a sociomoral dilemma. The dilemma allows persons to focus on different concerns (e.g., promise keeping or close friendship vs. self-interest or altruism toward a 3rd person). Overall, Icelandic participants referred more often to self-interest and contractual concerns, whereas Chinese participants focused on altruistic and relationship concerns. However, some cultural differences remained stable over time, whereas others decreased. In adolescence, close friendship became an equally important value in both cultures. The results indicate a complex interaction of culture and development in sociomoral reasoning. PMID:9681265

  1. The response of human nasal and bronchial organotypic tissue cultures to repeated whole cigarette smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talikka, Marja; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Mathis, Carole; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Merg, Celine; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Florian; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is linked to the development of respiratory diseases, and there is a need to understand the mechanisms whereby CS causes damage. Although animal models have provided valuable insights into smoking-related respiratory tract damage, modern toxicity testing calls for reliable in vitro models as alternatives for animal experimentation. We report on a repeated whole mainstream CS exposure of nasal and bronchial organotypic tissue cultures that mimic the morphological, physiological, and molecular attributes of the human respiratory tract. Despite the similar cellular staining and cytokine secretion in both tissue types, the transcriptomic analyses in the context of biological network models identified similar and diverse biological processes that were impacted by CS-exposed nasal and bronchial cultures. Our results demonstrate that nasal and bronchial tissue cultures are appropriate in vitro models for the assessment of CS-induced adverse effects in the respiratory system and promising alternative to animal experimentation. PMID:25297719

  2. Effects of Culture and Education on Ethical Responses on Our Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comiskey, Christina Pryor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two trends that affect communications are prevalent today: a focus on ethics in the U.S. business operations and an increasingly global society and marketplace. This research project brings together these trends to gain a more in-depth understanding of the impact of culture on ethical education. By surveying students in six countries around the globe, this study was able to get at the divergent cultural frameworks utilized in ethical decision making. The results offer a significant contribution to our understanding of the cross-cultural implications on ethical values in the business context. This understanding provides unique insights into ethics education and the need for a contextual understanding of applied ethics.

  3. Concentration-dependent gene expression responses to flusilazole in embryonic stem cell differentiation cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The murine embryonic stem cell test (EST) is designed to evaluate developmental toxicity based on compound-induced inhibition of embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation into cardiomyocytes. The addition of transcriptomic evaluation within the EST may result in enhanced predictability and improved characterization of the applicability domain, therefore improving usage of the EST for regulatory testing strategies. Transcriptomic analyses assessing factors critical for risk assessment (i.e. dose) are needed to determine the value of transcriptomic evaluation in the EST. Here, using the developmentally toxic compound, flusilazole, we investigated the effect of compound concentration on gene expression regulation and toxicity prediction in ESC differentiation cultures. Cultures were exposed for 24 h to multiple concentrations of flusilazole (0.54-54 μM) and RNA was isolated. In addition, we sampled control cultures 0, 24, and 48 h to evaluate the transcriptomic status of the cultures across differentiation. Transcriptomic profiling identified a higher sensitivity of development-related processes as compared to cell division-related processes in flusilazole-exposed differentiation cultures. Furthermore, the sterol synthesis-related mode of action of flusilazole toxicity was detected. Principal component analysis using gene sets related to normal ESC differentiation was used to describe the dynamics of ESC differentiation, defined as the 'differentiation track'. The concentration-dependent effects on development were reflected in the significance of deviation of flusilazole-exposed cultures from this transcriptomic-based differentiation track. Thus, the detection of developmental toxicity in EST using transcriptomics was shown to be compound concentration-dependent. This study provides further insight into the possible application of transcriptomics in the EST as an improved alternative model system for developmental toxicity testing.

  4. Differential heat shock response of primary human cell cultures and established cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, W W; Issinger, O G

    1986-01-01

    The influence of hyperthermia on the cellular growth and protein synthesis pattern from primary human brain tumour cells and skin fibroblasts was compared with established and experimentally transformed tumour cell lines. Primary cell cultures did not show any visible morphological changes after 42...... degrees C treatment, whereas in immortalized cell lines usually 90% of the cells were found in suspension. Enhanced expression of the major heat shock protein (hsp 70) was found in all heat-treated cells. In contrast to the primary cell cultures, established and transformed cell lines synthesized a...

  5. Cellular responses in primary epidermal cultures from rainbow trout exposed to zinc chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Shúilleabháin, Sharon; Mothersill, Carmel; Sheehan, David; O'Brien, Nora M; O' Halloran, John; van Pelt, Frank N A M; Kilemade, Michael; Davoren, Maria

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of zinc chloride (ZnCl(2)) (0-200mg/L) on primary epidermal cultures from Oncorhynchus mykiss. Increases in the rate and amount of mucus released were detected post-exposure, as was a dose-dependent increase in the synthesis of acidic glycoproteins. The cytotoxicity of ZnCl(2) to the cultures was significantly increased (Pheavy metals on the integument. This model system may help to further elucidate the effects of ecotoxicants on the external innate immune system of fish. PMID:16223524

  6. Teacher Burnout: A Comparison of Two Cultures Using Confirmatory Factor and Item Response Models

    OpenAIRE

    Denton, Ellen-ge; Chaplin, William F.; Wall, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    The present study addresses teacher burnout and in particular cultural differences and similarities in burnout. We used the Maslach Burnout Inventory Education Survey (MBI-ES) as the starting point for developing a latent model of burnout in two cultures; Jamaica W.I. teachers (N= 150) and New York City teachers (N= 150). We confirm a latent 3 factor structure, using a subset of the items from the MBI-ES that adequately fit both samples. We tested different degrees of measurement invariance (...

  7. An in-vitro traumatic model to evaluate the response of myelinated cultures to sustained hydrostatic compression injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieboes, Laura R; Gupta, Ranjan

    2009-12-01

    While a variety of in-vitro models have been employed to investigate the response of load-bearing tissues to hydrostatic pressure, long-term studies are limited by the need to provide for adequate gas exchange during pressurization. Applying compression in vitro may alter the equilibrium of the system and thereby disrupt the gas exchange kinetics. To address this, several sophisticated compression chamber designs have been developed. However, these systems are limited in the magnitude of pressure that can be applied and may require frequent media changes, thereby eliminating critical autocrine and paracrine signaling factors. To better isolate the cellular response to long-term compression, we created a model that features continuous gas flow through the chamber during pressurization, and a negative feedback control system to rigorously control dissolved oxygen levels. Monitoring dissolved oxygen continuously during pressurization, we find that the ensuing response exhibits characteristics of a second- or higher-order system which can be mathematically modeled using a second-order differential equation. Finally, we use the system to model chronic nerve compression injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome and spinal nerve root stenosis, with myelinated neuron-Schwann cell co-cultures. Cell membrane integrity assay results show that co-cultures respond differently to hydrostatic pressure, depending on the magnitude and duration of stimulation. In addition, we find that myelinated Schwann cells proliferate in response to applied hydrostatic compression. PMID:19645529

  8. In vivo-like drug responses of human tumors growing in three-dimensional gel-supported primary culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in vitro test of cell sensitivity to drugs that indicates in vivo response is an important need in cancer therapy and cancer drug development. Toward this end, the authors previously developed a collagen gel-supported culture system for growth of human tumors. This three-dimensional culture system is general and grows tumors at high frequency directly from surgery or biopsy that maintain important in vivo properties in vitro, including tissue architecture. They report here that with autoradiographic techniques measuring cellular DNA synthesis the drug responses of individual cells within the tissue structure of in vitro-grown tumors can be determined. Twenty tumor classes, including all the major ones, have been measured in toto at >50% frequency. Quantitative and qualitative results show increasing cell kill with rising cytotoxic drug concentration, differential drug sensitivities of multiple cell types within individual cultured tumors, differential sensitivities of a series of tumors of the same histopathological classification to a single drug, differential sensitivities of individual tumors to a series of drugs, and sensitivity patterns of various tumor types similar to the sensitivities found in vivo. Therefore, the results indicate that potentially important therapeutic data can be obtained from tumor specimens growing in vitro for the individual cancer patient as well as for rational and relevant screening for new agents active against human solid tumors

  9. A noninvasive transfer system for polarized renal tubule epithelial cell sheets using temperature-responsive culture dishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushida A.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We used temperature-responsive culture dishes onto which the temperature-responsive polymer, poly(Nisopropylacrylamide, was covalently grafted for tissue engineering. Confluent cells harvested as intact sheets from these surfaces by simple temperature reduction can be transferred to various surfaces including additional culture dishes, other cell sheets, and tissues. In order to examine the maintenance of cell polarity, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and human primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells which had developed apical-basal cell polarity in culture, were subjected to cell sheet transfer. This functional and structural cell polarity, which is susceptible to treatment with trypsin, was examined by immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Using our cell-sheet method, the noninvasive transfer of these cell sheets retaining typical distributions of Na+/K+-ATPase, GLUT-1, SGLT-1, aquaporin-1, neutral endopeptidase and dipeptidylendopeptidase IV, could be achieved. The transferred cell sheets also developed numerous microvilli and tight junctions at the apical and lateral membranes, respectively. For biochemical analysis, immunoblotting of occludin, a transmembrane protein that composes tight junctions, was conducted and results confirmed that occludin remained intact after cell sheet transfer. This two-dimensional cell sheet manipulation method promises to be useful for tissue engineering as well as in the investigation of epithelial cell polarity.

  10. Transcriptional responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to preferred and nonpreferred nitrogen sources in glucose-limited chemostat cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boer, Viktor M; Tai, Siew Leng; Vuralhan, Zeynep; Arifin, Yalun; Walsh, Michael C; Piper, Matthew D W; de Winde, Johannes H; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2007-06-01

    Aerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown with six different nitrogen sources were subjected to transcriptome analysis. The use of chemostats enabled an analysis of nitrogen-source-dependent transcriptional regulation at a fixed specific growth rate. A selection of preferred (ammonium and asparagine) and nonpreferred (leucine, phenylalanine, methionine and proline) nitrogen sources was investigated. For each nitrogen source, distinct sets of genes were induced or repressed relative to the other five nitrogen sources. In total, 131 such 'signature transcripts' were identified in this study. In addition to signature transcripts, genes were identified that showed a transcriptional coresponse to two or more of the six nitrogen sources. For example, 33 genes were transcriptionally upregulated in leucine-grown, phenylalanine-grown and methionine-grown cultures; this was partly attributed to the involvement of common enzymes in the dissimilation of these amino acids. In addition to specific transcriptional responses elicited by individual nitrogen sources, their impact on global regulatory mechanisms such as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) were monitored. NCR-sensitive gene expression in the chemostat cultures showed that ammonium and asparagine were 'rich' nitrogen sources. By this criterion, leucine, proline and methionine were 'poor' nitrogen sources, and phenylalanine showed an 'intermediate' NCR response. PMID:17419774

  11. Engaging Students from the United Arab Emirates in Culturally Responsive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Sara Ashencaen

    2010-01-01

    The liberal arts education is one that is increasingly being adopted in regions far removed from the USA, such as the United Arab Emirates. The importing of this American educational model is, however, associated with the inexorable influences of dominant cultural forms through the effects of globalisation. However, at the same time international…

  12. Engaging Students from the United Arab Emirates in Culturally Responsive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Sara Ashencaen

    2010-01-01

    The liberal arts education is one that is increasingly being adopted in regions far removed from the USA, such as the United Arab Emirates. The importing of this American educational model is, however, associated with the inexorable influences of dominant cultural forms through the effects of globalisation. However, at the same time international

  13. Transformative Pedagogy: From High Stake Testing to Culturally Responsive Mathematic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Mathematics curriculums and pedagogy do not cater to minority students. This paper will concentrate on Latina/o students with the understanding of the battle of all minorities and the poor with insensitive curriculums and un-culturalized schooling. With the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) law, schools must perform according to standards and levels…

  14. Celebrating Musical Diversity: Training Culturally Responsive Music Educators in Multiracial Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    This article explores outcomes of research into the role and place of cultural diversity in primary music classes at five government schools in Singapore. The study highlights the ways in which a variety of factors such as specialist music training, government policy, curriculum documents, and professional development influence teacher practice.…

  15. Culturally Responsive Experimental Intervention Studies: The Development of a Rubric for Paradigm Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Aydin; Trainor, Audrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Neither legislative demand for evidence-based practices nor a focus on experimental designs for educational interventions has ameliorated the disparate educational opportunities and outcomes for youth from nondominant cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Recent initiatives to increase the rigor of intervention research in special education have…

  16. Bystander responses in three-dimensional cultures containing radiolabelled and unlabelled human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on the radiation-induced bystander effect has been carried out mainly in 2-D tissue culture systems. This study uses a 3-D model, wherein apparently normal human diploid fibroblasts (AG1522) are grown in a carbon scaffold, to investigate the induction of a G1 checkpoint in bystander cells present alongside radiolabelled cells. Cultures were simultaneously pulse-labelled with 3H-deoxycytidine (3HdC) to selectively irradiate a minor fraction of cells, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to identify the radiolabelled cells. After thorough washing of cultures, iododeoxyuridine (IdU) was administered to detect proliferating bystander cells. The cultures were harvested at various times thereafter, and cells were reacted with two monoclonal antibodies specific to IdU/BrdU or BrdU, respectively, stained with propidium iodide, and subjected to multi-parameter flow cytometry. Cell-cycle progression was followed in radiolabelled cells (BrdU+) that were chronically irradiated by low energy beta particles emitted by DNA-incorporated 3H, and in unlabelled bystander cells (BrdU-) by a flow cytometry based cumulative labelling index assay. As expected, radiolabelled cells were delayed, in a dose-dependent manner, in G2 and subsequently G1. No delay occurred in progression of bystander cells through G1, when the labelled cells were irradiated at dose rates up to 0.32 Gy h-1. (authors)

  17. These American Lives: Becoming a Culturally Responsive Teacher and the "Risks of Empathy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Char; Hecsh, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Do teacher candidates who identify as White and European American think about issues of difference in ways that vary distinctly from teacher candidates who identify as Latina/o or Hispanic? In this article, we engage with the literature on culturally relevant teaching that suggests teacher candidates of color are more likely to have some of the

  18. These American Lives: Becoming a Culturally Responsive Teacher and the "Risks of Empathy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Char; Hecsh, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Do teacher candidates who identify as White and European American think about issues of difference in ways that vary distinctly from teacher candidates who identify as Latina/o or Hispanic? In this article, we engage with the literature on culturally relevant teaching that suggests teacher candidates of color are more likely to have some of the…

  19. Towards Cultural Responsiveness in Music Instruction with Black Detained Youth: An Analytic Autoethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    There is an increased interest in music instruction and research with incarcerated populations. Amid this attention is a need to learn more about how music teachers develop competencies for working with juvenile offenders and navigate this unfamiliar context, how they come to learn more about culturally diverse music, and how they become aware of

  20. A Culturally Responsive Literacy Program for Hispanic Fathers and Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracho, Olivia N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined a language and cultural literacy program for Hispanic fathers to promote their children's literacy development. This study had two phases: (a) training the teachers and (b) educating the fathers. The results indicated that the fathers learned how to promote their Hispanic children's literacy development using their family's…

  1. Response to cadmium of Daucus carota hairy roots dual cultures with glomus intraradices or Gigaspora margarita

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janoušková, Martina; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 15, - (2005), s. 217-224. ISSN 0940-6360 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/02/0293 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * heavy metal * monoxenic culture Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.753, year: 2005

  2. Evolutionary Responses to a Constructed Niche: Ancient Mesoamericans as a Model of Gene-Culture Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnemeier, Tbita; Amorim, Carlos Eduardo Guerra; Azevedo, Soledad; Contini, Veronica; Acua-Alonzo, Vctor; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Mazires, Stephane; Barrantes, Ramiro; Villarreal-Molina, Mara Teresa; Paixo-Crtes, Vanessa Rodrigues; Salzano, Francisco M.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Bortolini, Maria Ctira

    2012-01-01

    Culture and genetics rely on two distinct but not isolated transmission systems. Cultural processes may change the human selective environment and thereby affect which individuals survive and reproduce. Here, we evaluated whether the modes of subsistence in Native American populations and the frequencies of the ABCA1*Arg230Cys polymorphism were correlated. Further, we examined whether the evolutionary consequences of the agriculturally constructed niche in Mesoamerica could be considered as a gene-culture coevolution model. For this purpose, we genotyped 229 individuals affiliated with 19 Native American populations and added data for 41 other Native American groups (n?=?1905) to the analysis. In combination with the SNP cluster of a neutral region, this dataset was then used to unravel the scenario involved in 230Cys evolutionary history. The estimated age of 230Cys is compatible with its origin occurring in the American continent. The correlation of its frequencies with the archeological data on Zea pollen in Mesoamerica/Central America, the neutral coalescent simulations, and the FST-based natural selection analysis suggest that maize domestication was the driving force in the increase in the frequencies of 230Cys in this region. These results may represent the first example of a gene-culture coevolution involving an autochthonous American allele. PMID:22768049

  3. Differential response of Streptococcus mutans towards friend and foe in mixed-species cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinman; Wu, Chenggang; Huang, I-Hsiu; Merritt, Justin; Qi, Fengxia

    2011-09-01

    In the oral biofilm, the 'mitis' streptococci are among the first group of organisms to colonize the tooth surface. Their proliferation is thought to be an important factor required for antagonizing the growth of cariogenic species such as Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we used a three-species mixed culture to demonstrate that another ubiquitous early colonizing species, Veillonella parvula, can greatly affect the outcome of the competition between a pair of antagonists such as S. mutans and Streptococcus gordonii. Transcriptome analysis further revealed that S. mutans responds differentially to its friend (V. parvula) and foe (S. gordonii). In the mixed culture with S. gordonii, all but one of the S. mutans sugar uptake and metabolic genes were downregulated, while genes for alternative energy source utilization and H?O? tolerance were upregulated, resulting in a slower but persistent growth. In contrast, when cultured with V. parvula, S. mutans grew equally well or better than in monoculture and exhibited relatively few changes within its transcriptome. When V. parvula was introduced into the mixed culture of S. mutans and S. gordonii, it rescued the growth inhibition of S. mutans. In this three-species environment, S. mutans increased the expression of genes required for the uptake and metabolism of minor sugars, while genes required for oxidative stress tolerance were downregulated. We conclude that the major factors that affect the competition between S. mutans and S. gordonii are carbohydrate utilization and H?O? resistance. The presence of V. parvula in the tri-species culture mitigates these two major factors and allows S. mutans to proliferate, despite the presence of S. gordonii. PMID:21565931

  4. Response of Syngonium podophyllum L. ‘White Butterfly’ shoot cultures to alternative media additives and gelling agents, and flow cytometric analysis of regenerants

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Teixeira da Silva JA. 2015. Response of Syngonium podophyllum L. ‘White Butterfly’ shoot cultures to alternative media additives and gelling agents, and flow cytometric analysis of regenerants. Nusantara Bioscience 7: 26-32. Syngonium podophyllum L. (arrowhead vine) is a popular leafy indoor pot plant whose tissue culture has been established, primarily through in vitro shoot culture, but several interesting aspects have not yet been explored. In this study, cv. ‘White Butterfly’ wa...

  5. Ex-Vivo Dynamic 3-D Culture of Human Tissues in the RCCS™ Bioreactor Allows the Study of Multiple Myeloma Biology and Response to Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrarini, Marina; Steimberg, Nathalie; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Belloni, Daniela; Berenzi, Angiola; Girlanda, Stefania; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Mazzoleni, Giovanna; Ferrero, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) culture models are emerging as invaluable tools in tumor biology, since they reproduce tissue-specific structural features and cell-cell interactions more accurately than conventional 2-D cultures. Multiple Myeloma, which depends on myeloma cell-Bone Marrow microenvironment interactions for development and response to drugs, may particularly benefit from such an approach. An innovative 3-D dynamic culture model based on the use of the RCCS™ Bioreactor was developed to ...

  6. Organisational Culture in Innovative Small to Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) : Leadership’s Responsibilities when Implementing Change as a Result of M&As

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Sara

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates what culturally related responsibilities leaders in innovative SMEs have when preparing employees prior to M&As in order to mitigate drawbacks due to culturally related discrepancies. The findings of this study especially confirm previous studies on culturally related difficulties in change management by emphasising the significant meaning of evaluating soft factors prior to change. The study was conducted by examining an innovative SME in the telecom industry that...

  7. The Investigation of the Relationship between Cultural Values and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Organizational Commitment (OC) and Personal Benefit (PB) in Accounting System of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Saeid Jabbarzadeh Kangarlouei; Morteza Motavassel

    2011-01-01

    This research aims to study the relationships between cultural values and ethical dimensions of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Organizational Commitment (OC) and Personal Benefit (PB) in accounting system of Iran. The cultural values criteria in this study include Power Distance Index (PDI), Uncertainty Avoidance Index (UAI), Individualism (IDV) and Masculinity (MAS). For measuring the cultural values, Hofstede questionnaire (1991) and in order to collect data for CSR, OC, and PB, Sin...

  8. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin Yavari, S; Chai, Y C; Böttger, A J; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20V anodizing time: 30min to 3h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500°C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500°C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. PMID:25842117

  9. Typical Responses in Giving Evaluation: An Analysis of High and Low Context Culture Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Ferany Arifin; Fikriasih Wigati; Zubaedah Lestari

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at discussing high and low context in responses given by the students to evaluate their friend’s impromptu speech performance. The study focuses on the characteristics of high and low context represented specifically on (1) direct-indirect (2) simple-complex response, and (3) relationship orientation. The study is based on the analysis of ten responses given by ten students with different sexes. Classroom observation followed by transcription analysis is used. The data were co...

  10. Drivers of Socially Responsible Purchasing Behavior: A Cross-Cultural Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Min-Young Lee; Scarlett C. Wesley

    2012-01-01

    Retailers and companies increasingly employ corporate social responsibility (CSR) as a global management strategy. They are motivated to act in a socially responsive manner to their global customers not only to fulfill their ethical obligations as a social entity but also due to the marketing and financial benefits resulting from consumer responses to CSR initiatives. Therefore, many retailers develop or participate in CSR activities and hope their actions can be recognized by others. Further...

  11. Utilizing Organizational Culture to Predict Responses to Planned Change in a Public School: A Test of the OC[superscript 3] Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Eric Christian

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to test the capability of the Organizational Change in Cultural Context (OC[superscript 3]) Model (Latta, 2009, 2011) to predict responses to change. According to Latta, predictions of resistance to or facilitation of change can be predicted by utilizing organizational culture and its alignment with the…

  12. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20 V anodizing time: 30 min to 3 h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500 °C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55 nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500 °C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. - Highlights: • Anodizing with different parameters results in highly variable nanotube patterns. • Apatite forming ability of anodized specimens remains negligible regardless of parameters. • In vitro cell culture response is improved both by anodizing and heat treatment. • Anodized and heat treated specimens perform better in vitro as compared to anodized specimens

  13. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin Yavari, S., E-mail: s.aminyavari@tudelft.nl [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Chai, Y.C. [Prometheus, Division of Skeletal Tissue Engineering, Bus 813, O& N1, Herestraat 49, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, Bus 813, O& N1, Herestraat 49, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Böttger, A.J. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Wauthle, R. [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Section Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation (PMA), Celestijnenlaan 300B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); 3D Systems — LayerWise NV, Grauwmeer 14, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schrooten, J. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 — PB2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Weinans, H. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Orthopedics and Dept. Rheumatology, UMC Utrecht, Heidelberglaan100, 3584CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Zadpoor, A.A. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20 V anodizing time: 30 min to 3 h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500 °C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55 nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500 °C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. - Highlights: • Anodizing with different parameters results in highly variable nanotube patterns. • Apatite forming ability of anodized specimens remains negligible regardless of parameters. • In vitro cell culture response is improved both by anodizing and heat treatment. • Anodized and heat treated specimens perform better in vitro as compared to anodized specimens.

  14. Structure, Ultrastructure of the Anther, Pollen Microsporogenesis and Morphology of Pollen Grains of Two Populations of Lygeum spartum L. in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Abdeddaim-Boughanmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Lygeum spartum L. represented by a single species occupies several regions of the Mediterranean basin. This plant plays an important ecological role in the fight against desertification and economic development in the manufacture of paper pulp. Approach: However, the cytogenetic studies in mitosis in this species revealed the existence of two ploidy levels: 2n = 40 among the population grows in the coastal region of Oran in the semi-arid climate and 2n = 16 in the high plateaus characterized by an arid climate. Results: The study of the anther, pollen grains and the meiotic division conducted on these two populations of Lygeum spartum L. growing in the two regions has confirmed these data in that the microscopic observations were used to determine the ultrastructure of the anther, the shape and size of pollen grains which morphometric data (L/W showed significant difference between the two populations. The microsporogenesis was followed on the mother cells of pollen grains in order to understand the formation of tetrads, then the enumeration of chromosomes was carried out in diakinesis (n = 20 for the coastal population of Oran and metaphase I (n = 8 for the population of the high plateaus. Conclusion/Recommendations: These results were consistent with what has been observed in mitosis, which suggested that the Lygeum spartum L. may submit two cytotypes to adapt to different geographical and climatic environments.

  15. Feeling follows function : gendered responses to the teaching of material culture

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Paul; Benincasa, Caterina

    2004-01-01

    In the academic year 2001/2002, the Department of Design at Huddersfield undertook a Review of its academic provision, including the delivery of Design History to support practice-based design courses. During consultation with the leaders of these courses it became apparent that some of them saw Design History as an unnecessary add-on having limited relevance to their course. Consequently, the decision was taken to move to teaching Material Culture rather than Design History, as its focus...

  16. Organizational Institutions and Their Responsible Behavioral-Cultural Gene Codes and A Measurement for Organizational Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Jason Jixuan

    2010-01-01

    This essay has two goals. The first is to classify two different types of organizational institutions from the four-dimensional system-thinking perspective, and to identify the relationship between such organizational institutions and their relevant behavioral-cultural gene codes embedded within their (P-)individuals. Unlike the popular belief that authoritarian or totalitarian institutions are caused by ideologies or created/dominated by tyrannical leaders, the author defines a concept of be...

  17. Differential response of Streptococcus mutans towards friend and foe in mixed-species cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jinman; Wu, Chenggang; Huang, I-Hsiu; Merritt, Justin; Qi, Fengxia

    2011-01-01

    In the oral biofilm, the mitis streptococci are among the first group of organisms to colonize the tooth surface. Their proliferation is thought to be an important factor required for antagonizing the growth of cariogenic species such as Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we used a three-species mixed culture to demonstrate that another ubiquitous early colonizing species, Veillonella parvula, can greatly affect the outcome of the competition between a pair of antagonists such as S. mutan...

  18. Social involvement and development as a response to the campus student culture

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, M.; Chau, AWL

    2011-01-01

    Given the widely accepted notion of whole person education in Confucian societies such as Hong Kong, Mainland China and Singapore, it is surprising that research literature originated in these societies pays little attention to how students learn and develop through out-of-class experiences at university. There is little research evidence on how the prevailing culture among student social communities (residential halls and student societies/clubs) influences students' social involvement and d...

  19. Bovine paratuberculosis II. A comparison of fecal culture and the antibody response.

    OpenAIRE

    de Lisle, G. W.; Samagh, B. S.; Duncan, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Fecal culture for Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and a complement fixing serological test using a carbohydrate antigen were compared for diagnostic efficiency in cattle naturally infected with M. paratuberculosis. Serological reactivity was associated with the persistent fecal shedding of large numbers of bacteria and in the absence of false positives in the population studied, was considered an efficient method for the identification of this segment of infected cattle. Minimally infected cat...

  20. Molecular technique identifies the pathogen responsible for culture negative infective endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    SHIN, G. Y.; Manuel, R J; Ghori, S; Brecker, S; Breathnach, A. S.

    2005-01-01

    A case of culture negative endocarditis complicated by immune complex glomerulonephritis and severe aortic regurgitation necessitated aortic valve replacement. Empirical treatment with penicillin and gentamicin according to UK guidelines was started. The pathogen, Streptococcus sanguis, was later identified by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA. This molecular technique is likely to be of increasing importance in determining the aetiology of ...

  1. Cultural differences in responses to real-life and hypothetical trolley problems

    OpenAIRE

    Natalie Gold; Andrew M. Colman; Briony D. Pulford

    2014-01-01

    Trolley problems have been used in the development of moral theory and the psychological study of moral judgments and behavior. Most of this research has focused on people from the West, with implicit assumptions that moral intuitions should generalize and that moral psychology is universal. However, cultural differences may be associated with differences in moral judgments and behavior. We operationalized a trolley problem in the laboratory, with economic incentives and ...

  2. Reflection cues on the cultural and social responsibility of the geologist in the third millennium

    OpenAIRE

    Peppoloni, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia

    2009-01-01

    Geoethics aims at discussing the problems involved in the relations between mankind and the geological environment. Its goals include encouraging critical analyses of the use of natural resources, stressing the immense value of the Geosphere and the need for protecting it, providing correct information about natural risks. In Italy the debate on the new cultural and social role that the researches in Earth Sciences have acquired in recent years, has concurred to fix some shared points on t...

  3. Investigating organizational culture adaptability of broadcasting firm in response to environmental changes

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Mohammad Reza Salehi; Naser Mirsepasi; Ali Akbar Farhangi

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to study the present status of organizational adaptability in Iranian broadcasting system against environmental changes and present possible suggestions to empower the organization to cope with future changes. The study uses the method developed by Denison (1990) [Denison, D. R. (1990). Corporate culture and organizational effectiveness. John Wiley & Sons.] to study the organizational changes. Using a sample of 354 randomly selected employees who worked ...

  4. Magneto-responsive liquid crystalline elastomer nanocomposites as potential candidates for dynamic cell culture substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Posada, Stephany; Mora-Navarro, Camilo; Ortiz-Bermudez, Patricia; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; McElhinny, Kyle M; Evans, Paul G; Calcagno, Barbara O; Acevedo, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    Recently, liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) have been proposed as active substrates for cell culture due to their potential to attach and orient cells, and impose dynamic mechanical signals through the application of external stimuli. In this report, the preparation of anisotropic and oriented nematic magnetic-sensitized LCEs with iron oxide nanoparticles, and the evaluation of the effect of particle addition at low concentrations on the resultant structural, thermal, thermo-mechanical, and mechanical properties is presented. Phase transformations produced by heating in alternating magnetic fields were investigated in LCEs in contact with air, water, and a common liquid cell culture medium was also evaluated. The inclusion of nanoparticles into the elastomers displaced the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition, without affecting the nematic structure as evidenced by similar values of the order parameter, while reducing the maximum thermomechanical deformations. Remote and reversible deformations of the magnetic LCEs were achieved through the application of alternating magnetic fields, which induces the nematic-isotropic phase transition through nanoparticle heat generation. Formulation parameters can be modified to allow for remote actuation at values closer to the human physiological temperature range and within the range of deformations that can affect the cellular behavior of fibroblasts. Finally, a collagen surface treatment was performed to improve compatibility with NIH-3T3 fibroblast cultures, which enabled the attachment and proliferation of fibroblasts on substrates with and without magnetic particles under quiescent conditions. The LCEs developed in this work, which are able to deform and experience stress changes by remote contact-less magnetic stimulation, may allow for further studies on the effect of substrate morphology changes and dynamic mechanical properties during in vitro cell culture. PMID:27157764

  5. Uranium uptake and stress responses of in vitro cultivated hairy root culture of Armoracia rusticana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soudek, Petr; Petrová, Šárka; Benešová, Dagmar; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2011), s. 15-28. ISSN 0002-1857 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09082; GA MŠk 2B06187 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Armoracia rusticana * hairy-root culture * phytoremediation Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 0.250, year: 2011 http://home.ueb.cas.cz/publikace/2011_Soudek_AGROCHIMICA_15.pdf

  6. Developing a Culturally Responsive Breast Cancer Screening Promotion with Native Hawaiian Women in Churches

    OpenAIRE

    Kaopua, Lana Sue

    2008-01-01

    This article presents findings from research to develop the promotional component of a breast cancer screening program for Native Hawaiian women associated with historically Hawaiian churches in medically underserved communities. The literature on adherence to health recommendations and health promotions marketing guided inquiry on screening influences. Focus groups and individual interviews patterned on the culturally familiar practice of talk story were conducted with 60 Hawaiian women recr...

  7. Response of an algal consortium to diesel under varying culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Anal; Mukherji, Suparna

    2010-03-01

    A diesel-tolerant sessile freshwater algal consortium obtained from the vicinity of Powai Lake (Mumbai, India) was cultured in the laboratory. The presence of diesel in batch cultures enhanced the maximum specific growth rate of the algal consortium. With decrease in light-dark (L:D) cycle from 20:4 to 4:20 h, the chlorophyll-a levels decreased; however, the removal of diesel was found to be maximum at L:D of 18:6 h with 37.6% degradation over and above controls. In addition to growth in the form of green clumps, white floating biomass was found surrounding the diesel droplets on the surface. This culture predominated at the least L:D ratio of 4:20 h. Studies confirmed the ability of the floating organisms to grow heterotrophically in the dark utilizing diesel as carbon source and also in the presence of light in a medium devoid of organic carbon sources. PMID:19253006

  8. Investigating the physiological response of Pichia (Komagataella) pastoris GS115 to the heterologous expression of misfolded proteins using chemostat cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Andrew R; Castrillo, Juan I; Sawyer, Trevor; Archer, David B; Oliver, Stephen G

    2013-09-11

    Pichia pastoris is widely used as a host system for heterologous protein expression in both academia and industry. Production is typically accomplished by a fed-batch induction process that is known to have negative impacts on cell physiology that impose limits on both protein yields and quality. We have analysed recombinant protein production in chemostat cultures to understand the physiological responses associated with methanol-induced production of two human lysozyme variants with different degrees of misfolding by P. pastoris. Confounding variables associated with nutrient stress or growth-rate are minimised during steady-state growth in chemostats. Comparison of transcriptome-level data obtained during the non-inducing and inducing steady states identified changes in expression of only about 1% of the genome during production of either an amyloidogenic human lysozyme variant prone to intracellular aggregation (I56T) or a misfolded but secretable variant (T70N), indicating near-complete acclimation to their production. A marked, but temporary, stress response involving both the unfolded protein response (UPR) and ER-associated degradation pathway was observed during the transient between steady states, particularly following induction of the T70N variant synthesis, and was accompanied by changes in expression of around 50 antisense transcripts. The results suggest that optimal heterologous protein production could best be achieved by a continuous process that minimises the number of methanol-induced transients experienced by the cultures. The processing of HAC1 mRNA required for the UPR was found to be constitutive in the culture conditions used, even in the absence of recombinant protein induction. PMID:24022610

  9. Identification and expression analysis of methyl jasmonate responsive ESTs in paclitaxel producing Taxus cuspidata suspension culture cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Sangram K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxol (paclitaxel promotes microtubule assembly and stabilization and therefore is a potent chemotherapeutic agent against wide range of cancers. Methyl jasmonate (MJ elicited Taxus cell cultures provide a sustainable option to meet the growing market demand for paclitaxel. Despite its increasing pharmaceutical importance, the molecular genetics of paclitaxel biosynthesis is not fully elucidated. This study focuses on identification of MJ responsive transcripts in cultured Taxus cells using PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH to identify genes involved in global pathway control. Results Six separate SSH cDNA libraries of paclitaxel-accumulating Taxus cuspidata P991 cell lines were constructed at three different post-elicitation time points (6h, 18h and 5 day to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in response to MJ. Sequencing of 576 differentially screened clones from the SSH libraries resulted in 331 unigenes. Functional annotation and Gene Ontology (GO analysis of up-regulated EST libraries showed enrichment of several known paclitaxel biosynthetic genes and novel transcripts that may be involved in MJ-signaling, taxane transport, or taxane degradation. Macroarray analysis of these identified genes unravelled global regulatory expression of these transcripts. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a set of 12 candidate genes further confirmed the MJ-induced gene expression in a high paclitaxel accumulating Taxus cuspidata P93AF cell line. Conclusions This study elucidates the global temporal expression kinetics of MJ responsive genes in Taxus suspension cell culture. Functional characterization of the novel genes identified in this study will further enhance the understanding of paclitaxel biosynthesis, taxane transport and degradation.

  10. Studies of the in vitro selection of novel disease resistant plants and mutagenesis of cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plants of Brassica napus ssp. oleifera cv Primor which had been regenerated from secondary embryoids were found to be more susceptible to Leptosphaeria maculans than those grown from seed, but were generally more resistant to Alternaria brassicicola. In vitro selection of secondary embryoids on medium containing toxic filtrates of A. brassicicola did not result in significantly higher levels of resistance to the pathogen, and in the case of L. maculans, the plants were found to be more susceptible after the selection steps. When tissues were challenged with pycnidiospores of L. maculans it was possible to define growth conditions in which differential reactions correlated with in vivo responses. Studies on in vitro mutagenesis revealed that low doses of gamma rays enhanced the production of anther embryoids, although, whereas both gamma and X-rays reduced the regeneration capacity of treated tissues, irradiation with UV did not. Increased resistance to A. brassicicola was detected in doubled haploid plants following a seed treatment with EMS and from microspore culture following UV irradiation. In vitro studies of Helianthus annuus and Macrophomina phaseolina, and Zea mays and Fusarium moniliforme are also reported. (author). 28 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  11. The Host Response to a Clinical MDR Mycobacterial Strain Cultured in a Detergent-Free Environment: A Global Transcriptomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisching, Gina; Pietersen, Ray-Dean; Mpongoshe, Vuyiseka; van Heerden, Carel; van Helden, Paul; Wiid, Ian; Baker, Bienyameen

    2016-01-01

    During Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection, the initial interactions between the pathogen and the host cell determines internalization and innate immune response events. It is established that detergents such as Tween alter the mycobacterial cell wall and solubilize various lipids and proteins. The implication of this is significant since induced changes on the cell wall affect macrophage uptake and the immune response to M.tb. Importantly, during transmission between hosts, aerosolized M.tb enters the host in its native form, i.e. in a detergent-free environment, thus in vitro and in vivo studies should mimic this as closely as possible. To this end, we have optimized a procedure for growing and processing detergent-free M.tb and assessed the response of murine macrophages (BMDM) infected with multi drug-resistant M.tb (R179 Beijing 220 clinical isolate) using RNAseq. We compared the effects of the host response to M.tb cultured under standard laboratory conditions (Tween 80 containing medium -R179T), or in detergent-free medium (R179NT). RNAseq comparisons reveal 2651 differentially expressed genes in BMDMs infected with R179T M.tb vs. BMDMs infected with R179NT M.tb. A range of differentially expressed genes involved in BMDM receptor interaction with M.tb (Mrc1, Ifngr1, Tlr9, Fpr1 and Itgax) and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines (Il6, Il1b, Tnf, Ccl5 and Cxcl14) were selected for analysis through qPCR. BMDMs infected with R179NT stimulate a robust inflammatory response. Interestingly, R179NT M.tb induce transcription of Fpr1, a receptor which detects bacterial formyl peptides and initiates a myriad of immune responses. Additionally we show that the host components Cxcl14, with an unknown role in M.tb infection, and Tlr9, an emerging role player, are only stimulated by infection with R179NT M.tb. Taken together, our results suggest that the host response differs significantly in response to Tween 80 cultured M.tb and should therefore not be used in infection experiments. PMID:27055235

  12. Investigating organizational culture adaptability of broadcasting firm in response to environmental changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Reza Salehi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this paper is to study the present status of organizational adaptability in Iranian broadcasting system against environmental changes and present possible suggestions to empower the organization to cope with future changes. The study uses the method developed by Denison (1990 [Denison, D. R. (1990. Corporate culture and organizational effectiveness. John Wiley & Sons.] to study the organizational changes. Using a sample of 354 randomly selected employees who worked for this organization, the study has determined that the level of organizational adaptability was less than desirable level and the firm needs to make necessary actions to better cope with environmental change.

  13. Increased Contractile Response to Noradrenaline Induced By Factors Associated with the Metabolic Syndrome in Cultured Small Mesenteric Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blædel, Martin; Sams, Anette; Boonen, Harrie C M; Sheykhzade, Majid

    UNLABELLED: This study investigated the effect of the metabolic syndrome associated risk factors hyperglycemia (glucose [Glc]), hyperinsulinemia (insulin [Ins]) and low-grade inflammation (tumor necrosis factor α [TNFα]) on the vasomotor responses of resistance arteries. Isolated small mesenteric...... arteries from 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats, were suspended for 21-23 h in tissue cultures containing either elevated Glc (30 mmol/l), Ins (100 nmol/l), TNFα (100 ng/ml) or combinations thereof. After incubation, the vascular response to noradrenaline (NA), phenylephrine, isoprenaline and NA in the...... presence of propranolol (10 µmol/l) was measured by wire myography. RESULTS: Arteries exposed only to combinations of the risk factors showed a significant 1.6-fold increase in the contractile NA sensitivity, which suggests that complex combinations of metabolic risk factors might lead to changes in...

  14. Effects of culture conditions on estrogen-mediated hepatic in vitro gene expression and correlation to in vivo responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refinement of in vitro systems for predictive toxicology is important in order to develop high-throughput early toxicity screening assays and to minimize animal testing studies. This study assesses the ability of mouse Hepa-1c1c7 hepatoma cell model under differing culture conditions to predict in vivo estrogen-induced hepatic gene expression changes. Custom mouse cDNA microarrays were used to compare Hepa-1c1c7 temporal gene expression profiles treated with 10 nM 17β-estradiol (E2) in serum-free and charcoal-stripped serum supplemented media at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. Stripped serum supplemented media increased the number gene expression changes and overall responsiveness likely due to the presence of serum factors supporting proliferation and mitochondrial activity. Data from both experiments were compared to a gene expression time course study examining the hepatic effects of 100 μg/kg 17α-ethynyl estradiol (EE) in C57BL/6 mice at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h. Only 18 genes overlapped between the serum-free and in vivo studies, whereas 238 genes were in common between Hepa-1c1c7 cells in stripped serum data and C57BL/6 liver samples. Stripped serum cultured cells exhibited E2-elicited gene expression changes associated with proliferation, cytoskeletal re-organization, cholesterol uptake and synthesis, increased fatty acid β-oxidation, and oxidative stress, which correlated with in vivo hepatic responses. These results demonstrate that E2 treatment of Hepa-1c1c7 cells in serum supplemented media modulate responses in selected pathways which appropriately model estrogen-elicited in vivo hepatic responses

  15. Differential metabolic responses of Beauveria bassiana cultured in pupae extracts, root exudates and its interactions with insect and plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feifei; Wang, Qian; Yin, Chunlin; Ge, Yinglu; Hu, Fenglin; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Hong; Bao, Guanhu; Wang, Bin; Lu, Ruili; Li, Zengzhi

    2015-09-01

    Beauveria bassiana is a kind of world-wide entomopathogenic fungus and can also colonize plant rhizosphere. Previous researches showed differential expression of genes when entomopathogenic fungi are cultured in insect or plant materials. However, so far there is no report on metabolic alterations of B. bassiana in the environments of insect or plant. The purpose of this paper is to address this problem. Herein, we first provide the metabolomic analysis of B. bassiana cultured in insect pupae extracts (derived from Euproctis pseudoconspersa and Bombyx mori, EPP and BMP), plant root exudates (derived from asparagus and carrot, ARE and CRE), distilled water and minimal media (MM), respectively. Principal components analysis (PCA) shows that mycelia cultured in pupae extracts and root exudates are evidently separated and individually separated from MM, which indicates that fungus accommodates to insect and plant environments by different metabolic regulation mechanisms. Subsequently, orthogonal projection on latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) identifies differential metabolites in fungus under three environments relative to MM. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) is performed to cluster compounds based on biochemical relationships, showing that sphingolipids are increased in BMP but are decreased in EPP. This observation further implies that sphingolipid metabolism may be involved in the adaptation of fungus to different hosts. In the meantime, sphingolipids are significantly decreased in root exudates but they are not decreased in distilled water, suggesting that some components of the root exudates can suppress sphingolipid to down-regulate sphingolipid metabolism. Pathway analysis finds that fatty acid metabolism is maintained at high level but non-ribosomal peptides (NRP) synthesis is unaffected in mycelia cultured in pupae extracts. In contrast, fatty acid metabolism is not changed but NRP synthesis is high in mycelia cultured in root exudates and distilled water. This indicates that fungal fatty acid metabolism is enhanced when contacting insect, but when in the absence of insect hosts NRP synthesis is increased. Ornithine, arginine and GABA are decreased in mycelia cultured in pupae extracts and root exudates but remain unchanged in distilled water, which suggests that they may be associated with fungal cross-talk with insects and plants. Trehalose and mannitol are decreased while adenine is increased in three conditions, signifying carbon shortage in cells. Together, these results unveil that B. bassiana has differential metabolic responses in pupae extracts and root exudates, and metabolic similarity in root exudates and distilled water is possibly due to the lack of insect components. PMID:25584432

  16. Growth and enzymatic responses of phytopathogenic fungi to glucose in culture media and soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz de Oliveira Costa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of inoculation of Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium verticillioides, and Penicillium sp. in Dystrophic Red Latosol (DRL and Eutroferric Red Latosol (ERL soils with or without glucose on the total carbohydrate content and the dehydrogenase and amylase activities was studied. The fungal growth and spore production in culture medium with and without glucose were also evaluated. A completely randomized design with factorial arrangement was used. The addition of glucose in the culture medium increased the growth rate of A. flavus and Penicillium sp. but not of F. verticillioides. The number of spores increased 1.2 for F. verticillioides and 8.2 times for A. flavus in the medium with glucose, but was reduced 3.5 times for Penicillium sp. The total carbohydrates contents reduced significantly according to first and second degree equations. The consumption of total carbohydrates by A. flavus and Penicillium sp. was higher than the control or soil inoculated with F. verticillioides. The addition of glucose to soils benefited the use of carbohydrates, probably due to the stimulation of fungal growth. Dehydrogenase activity increased between 1.5 to 1.8 times (p <0.05 in soils with glucose and inoculated with the fungi (except F. verticillioides, in relation to soil without glucose. Amylase activity increased 1.3 to 1.5 times due to the addition of glucose in the soil. Increased amylase activity was observed in the DRL soil with glucose and inoculated with A. flavus and Penicillium sp. when compared to control.

  17. The influence of exogenous eicosanoids on the radiation response of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioprotection by several eicosanoids was investigated in cultures of bovine aortic endothelial cells. One hour before irradiation (0-500 cGy, 137Cs gamma rays) 10 micrograms/ml of PGD2, PGE1, PGI2, misoprostol (PGE1-analog), 16,16-dimethyl PGE2, PGA2, or 1 microgram/ml LTC4 was added. Radiation decreased incorporation of [3H]thymidine at 4 h, cell number/culture at 24 h, and cell survival as measured by colony formation. Under these conditions the eicosanoids were not radioprotective. Two eicosanoids, PGD2 and PGA2, appeared to be toxic. Because receptors might mediate eicosanoid-induced radioprotection, radioligand binding of PGE2 and LTC4 and levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) were measured. Evidence for a receptor was equivocal; there was nonspecific binding and metabolism of LTC4. The level of cAMP was elevated by 16-16-dimethyl-PGE2 in the presence of isobutyl methylxanthine; however, this combination of the prostaglandin and the methylxanthine was not radioprotective. These investigations suggest that an elevated cAMP level alone does not lead to eicosanoid-induced radioprotection of bovine aortic endothelial cell monolayers in vitro

  18. The influence of exogenous eicosanoids on the radiation response of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Stone, A.M.; Walden, T.L. Jr.; Hanson, W.R. (Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke' s-Medical Center, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The radioprotection by several eicosanoids was investigated in cultures of bovine aortic endothelial cells. One hour before irradiation (0-500 cGy, 137Cs gamma rays) 10 micrograms/ml of PGD2, PGE1, PGI2, misoprostol (PGE1-analog), 16,16-dimethyl PGE2, PGA2, or 1 microgram/ml LTC4 was added. Radiation decreased incorporation of (3H)thymidine at 4 h, cell number/culture at 24 h, and cell survival as measured by colony formation. Under these conditions the eicosanoids were not radioprotective. Two eicosanoids, PGD2 and PGA2, appeared to be toxic. Because receptors might mediate eicosanoid-induced radioprotection, radioligand binding of PGE2 and LTC4 and levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) were measured. Evidence for a receptor was equivocal; there was nonspecific binding and metabolism of LTC4. The level of cAMP was elevated by 16-16-dimethyl-PGE2 in the presence of isobutyl methylxanthine; however, this combination of the prostaglandin and the methylxanthine was not radioprotective. These investigations suggest that an elevated cAMP level alone does not lead to eicosanoid-induced radioprotection of bovine aortic endothelial cell monolayers in vitro.

  19. Evaluation of specific humoral immune response in pigs vaccinated with cell culture adapted classical swine fever vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Mrinal K.; Sarma, D. K.; Das, B. C.; Deka, P.; Kalita, D.; Dutta, J. B.; Mahato, G.; Sarma, S.; Roychoudhury, P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To determine an efficient vaccination schedule on the basis of the humoral immune response of cell culture adapted live classical swine fever virus (CSFV) vaccinated pigs and maternally derived antibody (MDA) in piglets of vaccinated sows. Materials and Methods: A cell culture adapted live CSFV vaccine was subjected to different vaccination schedule in the present study. Serum samples were collected before vaccination (day 0) and 7, 14, 28, 42, 56, 180, 194, 208, 270, 284 and 298 days after vaccination and were analyzed by liquid phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, MDA titre was detected in the serum of piglets at 21 and 42 days of age after farrowing of the vaccinated sows. Results: On 28 days after vaccination, serum samples of 83.33% vaccinated pigs showed the desirable level of antibody titer (log10 1.50 at 1:32 dilution), whereas 100% animals showed log10 1.50 at 1:32 dilution after 42 days of vaccination. Animals received a booster dose at 28 and 180 days post vaccination showed stable high-level antibody titre till the end of the study period. Further, piglets born from pigs vaccinated 1 month after conception showed the desirable level of MDA up to 42 days of age. Conclusion: CSF causes major losses in pig industry. Lapinised vaccines against CSFV are used routinely in endemic countries. In the present study, a cell culture adapted live attenuated vaccine has been evaluated. Based on the level of humoral immune response of vaccinated pigs and MDA titer in piglets born from immunized sows, it may be concluded that the more effective vaccination schedule for prevention of CSF is primary vaccination at 2 months of age followed by booster vaccination at 28 and 180 days post primary vaccination and at 1 month of gestation.

  20. Dimethyl sulfoxide is a potent modulator of estrogen receptor isoforms and xenoestrogen biomarker responses in primary culture of salmon hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been frequently used as carrier solvent in toxicological experiments where the most compelling DMSO attributes are its exceptionally low toxicity and environmental impact. We were inspired by recent and consistent observations that ethanol and DMSO modulate endocrine-disruptor biomarker responses in both in vitro and in vivo studies in our laboratory, to take a critical evaluation of these effects. Quantitative (real-time) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method with specific primer pairs was used in this study to measure DMSO-induced time-dependent modulation of estrogen receptor (ER) isoforms, vitellogenin (Vtg) and zona radiata-protein (Zr-protein) gene expression patterns in primary culture of salmon hepatocytes. In addition, immunochemical analysis, using indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with monoclonal (Vtg) and polyclonal (Zr-proteins) antibodies was used to detect and measure Vtg and Zr-proteins secreted in culture media. Salmon hepatocytes were isolated by a two-step collagenase perfusion method and exposed to 0.1% or 10 μL/L of DMSO after 48 h pre-culture. Cells were harvested at 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after exposure and analysed for ERα, ERβ, Vtg and Zr-protein gene expression using real-time PCR method. Media samples were collected at similar time-intervals for protein analysis. Our data show that DMSO-induced significant increase in ERα, ERβ, Vtg and Zr-protein genes in a time-dependent manner. Indirect ELISA analysis showed a time-specific effect of DMSO. The use of DMSO as carrier solvent in fish endocrine disruption studies should be re-evaluated. We recommend more investigation, using other endocrine-disruptor biomarkers in order to validate the suitability of common carrier solvents used in toxicology with the aim of setting new maximum allowable concentrations. In particular, given the high sensitivity of genomic approaches in toxicology, these results may have serious consequences for the interpretation of biomarker responses

  1. Correlation of antigen-specific IFN-? responses of fresh blood samples from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected heifers with responses of day-old samples co-cultured with IL-12 or anti-IL-10 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Sren Saxmose; Jungersen, Gregers

    enhance IFN-? responses of cultures stimulated with Johnin purified protein derivative (PPDj). Here we examined the correlation of IFN-? production in response to PPDj and 15 recombinant antigens in day-old blood samples from heifers 1021 months of age from a MAP infected herd with addition of either...... recombinant bovine IL-12 or anti-bovine IL-10 antibody with IFN-? production in sample day samples. IFN-? responses of sample day samples showed high correlation with responses to some antigens in day-old samples with addition of IL-12 or anti-IL-10 antibodies to cultures, indicating that day-old protocols...... overnight with specific MAP antigens followed by quantification of IFN-? by ELISA. It is recommended that the time interval from sampling to culture does not exceed eight hours but addition of the co-stimulating cytokine interleukin 12 (IL-12) or anti-IL-10 antibodies to culture have been demonstrated to...

  2. Expression analyses of Brachiaria brizantha genes encoding ribosomal proteins BbrizRPS8, BbrizRPS15a, and BbrizRPL41 during development of ovaries and anthers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Ana Luiza Machado; Dusi, Diva Maria de Alencar; Alves, Elizangela Ribeiro; Rodrigues, Júlio Carlyle Macedo; Gomes, Ana Cristina Menezes Mendes; Carneiro, Vera Tavares de Campos

    2013-04-01

    Brachiaria brizantha is a forage grass of the Poaceae family. Introduced from Africa, it is largely used for beef cattle production in Brazil. Brachiaria reproduces sexually or asexually by apomixis, and development of biotechnological tools for gene transfer is being researched to support the breeding programs. The molecular bases of reproduction have not yet been fully elucidated; it is known that gametophyte formation and main reproductive events occur inside the anthers and ovaries. There is therefore much interest in identifying genes expressed in these organs and their corresponding upstream regulatory sequences. In this work we characterized three cDNA from ovaries of B. brizantha plants (CL 09, CL10, and CL21) which show similarity in databases with genes encoding ribosomal proteins S8, S15a, and L41 and were named BbrizRPS8, BbrizRPS15a, and BbrizRPL41, respectively. These clones show higher expression in ovaries, anthers and roots, mitotically active tissues, when compared to leaves of B. brizantha. Localization of transcripts of BbrizRPS8, BbrizRPS15a, and BbrizRPL41 was investigated in the reproductive organs, ovaries, and anthers, from the beginning of development up to maturity. Their activity was higher in early stages of anther development, while expression was detected in all developmental stages in the ovaries, except for BbrizS15a, which was detected only in synergids of apomictic plants. PMID:22833119

  3. Construção e avaliação de um protótipo de máquina coletora de anteras Construction and evaluation of an anther collector prototype machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Tonet

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Um protótipo de máquina coletora de anteras foi projetado e construído, e seu desempenho foi avaliado, comparando - se com o método de coleta manual, em flores rosáceas e campanuladas de pessegueiro (Prunus persica. O trabalho foi conduzido utilizando-se do delineamento experimental inteiramente ao acaso, arranjado em um esquema bifatorial (2 métodos de remoção x 2 formas florais, com 12 repetições de 30 balões florais. O protótipo apresentou maior velocidade de processamento, sem diminuir a qualidade do pólen, mesmo sendo armazenadas anteras com maior quantidade de filetes e descartado maior número de anteras do que o método manual.An anther collector prototype machine was projected and built. Its performance was evaluated by comparisons between the use of the prototype and the traditional manual method, both for showy and non-showy peach-tree flowers (Prunus persica. The study was accomplished in August 2011 using a completely randomized experimental design, arranged in a bi-factorial scheme (2 collection methods x 2 flower forms, with 12 repetitions, each consisted by 30 flowers. The prototype proved to be faster in the anther extraction time without losses in the pollen quality, even harvesting anthers with higher fillet amounts and discarding a higher quantity of anthers than the manual method.

  4. The biological effect of gamma radiation on in vitro culture in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiobiological effects of gamma radiation on different types of rice before or during in vitro culture, combined treatments of 137Cs γ-rays and NaN3 on mature embryo culture, and irradiation on growth of calli derived from anther in rice were studied. The dose-effects relations of callus induction rate and callus growth rate could be fitted according to the multi-target and single-hit model. Effect of somatic cultures of different types in rice was different. Increase in plant regeneration capacity was found with 100, 150 Gy gamma rays. Decrease of callus induction rate, callus growth rate and callus differentiation rate (especially in the 1st culture) were observed in combined treatments of γ-rays and NaN3. However, mutagenic effects of treatments with γ-rays were much higher than those of combined treatment of γ-rays and NaN3 in the 2nd and the 3rd culture. Combined treatments of 137Cs γ-rays with 200 Gy and 2 mmol NaN3 were suitable for explant in rice before culture. To irradiate the calli derived from anther in rice with 30 Gy gamma rays can rise plant regeneration capacity during continuing culture

  5. Metabolic response of lung cancer cells to radiation in a paper-based 3D cell culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Karen A; Mosadegh, Bobak; Minn, Kyaw Thu; Lockett, Matthew R; Mohammady, Marym R; Boucher, Diane M; Hall, Amy B; Hillier, Shawn M; Udagawa, Taturo; Eustace, Brenda K; Whitesides, George M

    2016-07-01

    This work demonstrates the application of a 3D culture system-Cells-in-Gels-in-Paper (CiGiP)-in evaluating the metabolic response of lung cancer cells to ionizing radiation. The 3D tissue-like construct-prepared by stacking multiple sheets of paper containing cell-embedded hydrogels-generates a gradient of oxygen and nutrients that decreases monotonically in the stack. Separating the layers of the stack after exposure enabled analysis of the cellular response to radiation as a function of oxygen and nutrient availability; this availability is dictated by the distance between the cells and the source of oxygenated medium. As the distance between the cells and source of oxygenated media increased, cells show increased levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, decreased proliferation, and reduced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Each of these cellular responses are characteristic of cancer cells observed in solid tumors. With this setup we were able to differentiate three isogenic variants of A549 cells based on their metabolic radiosensitivity; these three variants have known differences in their metastatic behavior in vivo. This system can, therefore, capture some aspects of radiosensitivity of populations of cancer cells related to mass-transport phenomenon, carry out systematic studies of radiation response in vitro that decouple effects from migration and proliferation of cells, and regulate the exposure of oxygen to subpopulations of cells in a tissue-like construct either before or after irradiation. PMID:27116031

  6. Tourism communication: the translator’s responsibility in the translation of cultural difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella Agorni

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tourist discourse can be considered as a specialised type of cross-cultural communication. The subject of this work is the degree of intervention translators are asked to exercise in order to achieve successful communication. Their task is not that of demonstrating their knowledge on specifi c subjects, as, rather, their capacity of mediating it, so as to make it available to a type of tourist who is necessarily different from that targeted by the original work. Hence, translators should learn to dose the amount of information tourists will be able to take in. Theoretical assumptions will be illustrated by means of a comparison between a tourist text in Italian and its translation into English. It will be demonstrated that translators’ decisions at linguistic and explanatory level allow a more or less substantial degree of reader involvement, and consequently affect the promotion of tourist destinations.

  7. A Mixed Methods Study of Culturally Responsive Teaching in Science and Math Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holocker, Angela Y.

    2010-01-01

    Through the dawn of education, student achievement has always been the primary focus of educators. The United States has not changed the structure of their educational institutions since the Industrial Revolution. With the achievement gap between mainstream and non-mainstream students continually growing, it is the responsibility of every educator

  8. A Cross-Cultural Examination of Preschool Teacher Cognitions and Responses to Child Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochtar, Randi; Del Vecchio, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The associations among preschool teachers' attributions about child responsibility, intentionality, knowledge, and the seriousness of hypothetical displays of children's aggressive behavior are examined in United States ("N"?=?82) and Vietnamese ("N"?=?91) preschool teachers. The results suggest cross-cultural…

  9. Probiotics cultures in animal feed: Effects on ruminal fermentation, immune responses, and resistance to infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the effects of probiotics included in dairy cattle and mice feed on ruminal fermentation, immune responses, and resistance to Johne’s disease. To unveil the underlying mechanisms, dairy cattle were either fed Bovamine (1.04 x 10**9 cfu of Lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 plus 2.04 x 10**...

  10. Typical Responses in Giving Evaluation: An Analysis of High and Low Context Culture Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferany Arifin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing high and low context in responses given by the students to evaluate their friend’s impromptu speech performance. The study focuses on the characteristics of high and low context represented specifically on (1 direct-indirect (2 simple-complex response, and (3 relationship orientation. The study is based on the analysis of ten responses given by ten students with different sexes. Classroom observation followed by transcription analysis is used. The data were collected naturally at undergraduate campus. The result shows that using indirect and complex responses can maintain harmonious relationship with others. The basic asumption is that the students tend to communicate in high level context. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk membahas konteks tinggi dan rendah dalam mengevaluasi performansi pidato tanpa persiapan temannya. Penelitian ini memusatkan perhatian pada ciri konteks tinggi dan rendah yang direpresentasikan oleh (1 tanggapan langsung-tak langsung (2 sederhana-kompleks, dan (3 orientasi hubungan. Penelitian ini didasarkan pada sepuluh tanggapan yang diberikan oleh sepuluh mahasiswa pria dan wanita. Pengamatan kelas yang diikuti dengan analisis transkripsi digunakan untuk pengumpulan data. Data dikumpulkan di kampus diploma. Analisis menunjukkan bahwa siswa cenderung menggunakan tanggapan kompleks dan tak langsung agar dapat menjaga keharmonisan hubungan dengan temannya. Oleh karena itu asumsi dasarnya adalah bahwa siswa cenderung berkomunikasi dalam konteks level tinggi.

  11. Educational Leadership in the Age of Diversity: A Case Study of Middle School Principals' Cultural Awareness and Influence in Relation to Teachers' Cultural Awareness and the Use of Culturally Responsive Curriculum and Pedagogy in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lynda Marie Cesare

    2010-01-01

    This embedded case study examined middle school principals' self-reported cultural awareness, teachers' self-reported cultural awareness, and principals' influence on cultural awareness in the school. In addition, the study focused on how principals influenced teachers' cultural awareness and implementation of multicultural education, and…

  12. Response of cultured 9L cells to spirohydantoin mustard and x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat brain tumor cells (9L) were treated in vitro for 1 hr with 2 μg/ml (approx. 30% survival) of spirohydantoin mustard (SHM) 4 and 24 hr before, during, and 4 and 24 hr after graded doses of radiation (0-20 Gy). The resulting survival curves generated from colony formation data and corrected for drug kill indicate that for all schedules SHM enhanced the radiation response, particularly for surviving fractions greater than 0.5. Analysis of the combination data using isobolograms indicates the effects of the separate agents were additive in producing either 1, 2, or 3 log cell kills. Therefore, the enhancement of the radiation response by SHM can be explained solely on the basis of the shapes of the single agent survival curves

  13. The presence of a culturally similar or dissimilar social partner affects neural responses to emotional stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Kate A. Woodcock; Dian Yu; Yi Liu; Shihui Han

    2013-01-01

    Background: Emotional responding is sensitive to social context; however, little emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms by which social context effects changes in emotional responding. Objective: We aimed to investigate the effects of social context on neural responses to emotional stimuli to inform on the mechanisms underpinning context-linked changes in emotional responding. Design: We measured event-related potential (ERP) components known to index specific emotion processes and self-r...

  14. Neuroglobin-overexpression Alters Hypoxic Response Gene Expression in Primary Neuron Culture Following Oxygen Glucose Deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Zhanyang; Liu, Jianxiang; Guo, Shuzhen; Xing, Changhong; Fan, Xiang; Ning, MingMing; Yuan, Juliet C.; Lo, Eng H.; Wang, Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a tissue globin specifically expressed in neurons. Our laboratory and others have shown that Ngb overexpression protects neurons against hypoxia/ischemia, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia/ischemia induces a multitude of spatially and temporally regulated responses in gene expression, and initial evidence suggested that Ngb might function in altering biological processes of gene expression. In this study, we as...

  15. Are you Charlie or Ahmed? Cultural pluralism in Charlie Hebdo response on Twitter

    OpenAIRE

    An, Jisun; Kwak, Haewoon; Mejova, Yelena; De Oger, Sonia Alonso Saenz; Fortes, Braulio Gomez

    2016-01-01

    We study the response to the Charlie Hebdo shootings of January 7, 2015 on Twitter across the globe. We ask whether the stances on the issue of freedom of speech can be modeled using established sociological theories, including Huntington's culturalist Clash of Civilizations, and those taking into consideration social context, including Density and Interdependence theories. We find support for Huntington's culturalist explanation, in that the established traditions and norms of one's "civiliz...

  16. Correlation of Cellular Immune Responses with Protection against Culture-Confirmed Influenza Virus in Young Children?

    OpenAIRE

    Forrest, Bruce D.; Pride, Michael W.; Dunning, Andrew J.; Capeding, Maria Rosario Z.; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; John S Tam; Rappaport, Ruth; Eldridge, John H.; Gruber, William C.

    2008-01-01

    The highly sensitive gamma interferon (IFN-?) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay permits the investigation of the role of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the protection of young children against influenza. Preliminary studies of young children confirmed that the IFN-? ELISPOT assay was a more sensitive measure of influenza memory immune responses than serum antibody and that among seronegative children aged 6 to

  17. The university as an encounter for deliberative communication - creating cultural citizenship and professional responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Englund

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available How can higher and professional education contribute to the development of responsible citizenship and professional responsibility? In recent discussions on the role of the educational system, the idea of deliberative communication has been brought into focus and stands for communication in which different opinions and values can be set against each other in educational settings. It implies an endeavour by each individual to develop his or her view by listening, deliberating, seeking arguments and valuing, coupled to a collective and cooperative endeavour to find values and norms which everyone can accept, at the same time as pluralism is acknowledged. Within higher education deliberative communication might explicitly be used to develop professional responsibility and analysing consequences of different ways of solving problems. To what extent are and can universities become public spaces for encounters dealing with controversial questions of how to solve different problems and analyse different ways of professional acting? Can universities recreate their selective traditions, institutionalize dissensus, and make the university a site of public debate through deliberative communication?

  18. Putting NIMBY in perspective: The cultural origins of public response to hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of public response to the siting of hazardous waste treatment facilities has found a natural home in the literature on localized reaction, the so-called NIMBY (not in my backyard) syndrome. This concern for dealing with NIMBY in practical terms has fallen short in two respects. First, NIMBY has become isolated from two other basic responses: generalized acceptance (open-quotes Yes, in my backyardclose quotes or YIMBY) and generated opposition (open-quotes Not in anybody's backyardclose quotes or NAMBY). Second, too narrow a focus on NIMBY neglects a potentially revealing explanatory analogy: the parallel between the controversy over hazardous waste facilities and other technical controversies, such as the decades-old debate over nuclear power. In this paper, we review three theories that have been developed to explain general attitudes toward risk-bearing technologies. Using data from a statewide random sample, we then look to see if variables that figure prominently in these theories help shape the NIMBY, YIMBY or NAMBY responses to hazardous waste facilities

  19. Hydrogen peroxide formation in cultured rose cells in response to UV-C radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suspension-cultured rose (Rosa damascena Mill. cv. Gloire de Guilan) cells irradiated with UV-C (254 nm. 558 J m−2) showed a transient production of H2O2 as measured by chemiluminescence of luminol in the presence of peroxidase (EC 1.1 1.1.7). The peak concentration of H2O2, which occurred at about 60–90 min after irradiation, was 8–9 μM. The time course for the appearance of H2O2 matched that for UV–induced K+ efflux. Treatments that inhibited the UV-induced efflux of K+, including heat and overnight incubation with cycloheximide and diethylmaleate, also inhibited the appearance of H2O2. The converse was not always true, since catalase (EC 1.11.1.6. and salicylhydroxamic acid, which inhibited luminescence, did not stop K+ efflux. We conclude that H2O2 synthesis depends on K+ efflux. Because H2O2 in the extracellular space is required for lignin synthesis in many plant tissues, we suggest that the UV–stimulated production of H2O2 is an integral part of a defensive lignin synthesis. (author)

  20. Cellular responses in primary epidermal cultures from oncorhynchus mykiss following the combined exposure of ionising radiation and a heavy metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanisms of toxicant action on biological systems are difficult to identify when more than one contaminant is involved due to potential synergistic and antagonistic effects. There is a general paucity of research into the effect of radiation exposure in tandem with common environmental contaminants due to the inherent difficulties involved. In vitro cell cultures are particularly suited to the study of toxic mechanisms due to their proximity to toxic modes of action and the absence of the multiple defence mechanisms present in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures are particularly beneficial in this area of research as they still maintain many of their tissue specific functions. The objective of this study was to distinguish different mechanisms of cell death (growth arrest, apoptosis, primary and secondary necrosis and proliferation), following combination exposure to ionising radiation and a heavy metal (ZnCl2). The model system employed was a primary cell culture of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) epidermal tissue which has been previously used to study the effects of various environmental agents in this laboratory. Apoptosis and necrosis were quantified morphologically while proliferation was assessed immuno-cyto-chemically using an anti PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) antibody. While radiation doses up to and including 10 Gy had no effect on growth, exposure to ZnCl2 produced a significant dose dependent reduction in growth (10, 50, 75, 100 and 200 ppm ZnCl2). Preliminary results indicate no significant effect on growth following a combined exposure of 5 Gy + 50 ppm ZnCl2. These results may have important implications for understanding the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to multiple contaminant exposures. (author)

  1. Dynamics of the transcriptome response of cultured human embryonic stem cells to ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the key consequences of exposure of human cells to genotoxic agents is the activation of DNA damage responses (DDR). While the mechanisms underpinning DDR in fully differentiated somatic human cells have been studied extensively, molecular signaling events and pathways involved in DDR in pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESC) remain largely unexplored. We studied changes in the human genome-wide transcriptome of H9 hESC line following exposures to 1 Gy of gamma-radiation at 2 h and 16 h post-irradiation. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to verify the expression data for a subset of genes. In parallel, the cell growth, DDR kinetics, and expression of pluripotency markers in irradiated hESC were monitored. The changes in gene expression in hESC after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) are substantially different from those observed in somatic human cell lines. Gene expression patterns at 2 h post-IR showed almost an exclusively p53-dependent, predominantly pro-apoptotic, signature with a total of only 30 up-regulated genes. In contrast, the gene expression patterns at 16 h post-IR showed 354 differentially expressed genes, mostly involved in pro-survival pathways, such as increased expression of metallothioneins, ubiquitin cycle, and general metabolism signaling. Cell growth data paralleled trends in gene expression changes. DDR in hESC followed the kinetics reported for human somatic differentiated cells. The expression of pluripotency markers characteristic of undifferentiated hESC was not affected by exposure to IR during the time course of our analysis. Our data on dynamics of transcriptome response of irradiated hESCs may provide a valuable tool to screen for markers of IR exposure of human cells in their most naive state; thus unmasking the key elements of DDR; at the same time, avoiding the complexity of interpreting distinct cell type-dependent genotoxic stress responses of terminally differentiated cells.

  2. Yield response of Bere, a Scottish barley landrace, to cultural practices and agricultural inputs

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Peter J.; Xianmin Chang; John Wishart

    2011-01-01

    There is very little documented about the response of cereal landraces to modern agricultural practices. Bere is a Scottish barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) landrace which is grown in Orkney to supply meal for baking. A recent research programme has improved yields and the security of the Bere harvest, making it possible to supply a new market for grain to produce specialist whiskies. At the start of this research, a survey of Orkney farmers who had grown Bere since the 1980s showed that most h...

  3. The Technology Transfer Dilemma. Preserving morally responsible education in a utilitarian entrepreneurial academic culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. Coppola

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available 'Research, teaching, and service' is growing to include business. With unbridled enthusiasm, academicians bring discoveries to market instead of having them sit fallow in the public domain. Dilemmas have emerged. Academic scientists underwrite their work with public funds and employ a utilitarian labor force, namely, students seeking an education. The benefits from a successful business are significantly higher than in academic ventures, so the temptation increases to abrogate professional responsibilities and loyalties in favor of personal gain. Safeguards are needed for the institution and its students while simultaneously permitting the development of scientifically, socially, and economically important discoveries.

  4. Growth Characteristics Modeling of Mixed Culture of Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus acidophilus using Response Surface Methodology and Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganga Sahay Meena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Different culture conditions viz. additional carbon and nitrogen content, inoculum size and age, temperature and pH of the mixed culture of Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus acidophilus were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM and artificial neural network (ANN. Kinetic growth models were fitted for the cultivations using a Fractional Factorial (FF design experiments for different variables. This novel concept of combining the optimization and modeling presented different optimal conditions for the mixture of B. bifidum and L. acidophilus growth from their one variable at-a-time (OVAT optimization study. Through these statistical tools, the product yield (cell mass of the mixture of B. bifidum and L. acidophilus was increased. Regression coefficients (R2 of both the statistical tools predicted that ANN was better than RSM and the regression equation was solved with the help of genetic algorithms (GA. The normalized percentage mean squared error obtained from the ANN and RSM models were 0.08 and 0.3%, respectively. The optimum conditions for the maximum biomass yield were at temperature 38°C, pH 6.5, inoculum volume 1.60 mL, inoculum age 30 h, carbon content 42.31% (w/v, and nitrogen content 14.20% (w/v. The results demonstrated a higher prediction accuracy of ANN compared to RSM.

  5. An infected chicken kidney cell co-culture ELISpot for enhanced detection of T cell responses to avian influenza and vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Peroval, Marylene; Boyd, Amy; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the immune responses of chickens to the influenza virus is essential for the development of new strategies of vaccination and control. We have developed a method incorporating infected chicken kidney cells (CKC) in culture with splenocytes in an IFNγ ELISpot assay to enumerate ex vivo responses against influenza virus antigens. Splenocytes from birds challenged with influenza showed specific responses to the influenza virus, with responding cells being mainly CD8 pos...

  6. Mutation in continuous cultures of Schizosaccharomyces pombe II. Effect of amino acid starvation on mutational response and DNA concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAthey, P; Kilbey, B

    1978-05-01

    In agreement with the results obtained in Escherichia coli by other workers and our own previous data, the kinetics with which spontaneous mutations to resistance to the 12,13-epoxytrichothecene trichodermin accumulate in a lysine auxotroph of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are dependent upon the nutrilite used to limit the growth of the population. Under conditions of glucose-limitation mutation accumulation is proportional to generation time, while under lysine-limitation it becomes proportional to chronological time. In contrast to observations made in bacterial system, however, no significant change in the DNA content per cell is noted in slow growing cultures grown under amino acid starvation. These findings help to eliminate some of the theories put forward to explain the differential mutational responses observed under different growth limiting regimes. PMID:651937

  7. ``Yo soy indígena'': identifying and using traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) to make the teaching of science culturally responsive for Maya girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Maria L.

    2013-12-01

    This study examines how traditional ecological knowledge—TEK—can be identified and utilized to create culturally responsive science learning opportunities for Maya girls from a community in the Guatemalan highlands. Maya girls are situated in a complex socio-historical and political context rooted in racism and sexism. This study contextualizes the current situation of Maya women and girls in Guatemala and emphasizes the important need for educators to create science-learning opportunities that are culturally congruent. The author posits that when considering how to make the teaching and learning of science culturally responsive for Maya girls, educators must begin with the scientific knowledge inherent within Maya communities. Indigenous communities have a wealth of TEK that can be used to contextualize science curricula that can be purposely designed to meet the nuanced cultural needs of traditional Maya girls within and outside Guatemala.

  8. Comparative study of predatory responses in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) produced in suspended long line cultures or collected from natural bottom mussel beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle Torp; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf; Tørring, Ditte Bruunshøj

    2011-01-01

    the availability of seed mussels collected with minimum impact on the benthic ecosystem. To examine whether mussels collected in suspended cultures can be used for bottom culture production and as tool in habitat improvement, the differences in predatory defence responses between suspended and bottom....... Suspended mussels had an active response in relation to the predator by developing a significantly firmer attachment to the substrate and a closer aggregated structure. Bottom mussels had a passive strategy by having a thicker shell and larger relative size of the adductor muscle. In a field experiment...... mussels originated from suspended cultures had a higher length increment and lower mortality when compared to bottom mussels. It is concluded that suspended mussels potentially are an alternative resource to bottom culture and can be used in habitat improvement of mussel beds, but that the use of...

  9. Comparative Tissue Culture Response of Wheat Cultivars and Evaluation of Regenerated Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Three wheat genotypes i.e. Bakhtawar-92, Punjab-96 and Inqilab-91 were tested for their response to callus induction frequency and their subsequent regeneration on a variety of media combinations. Bakhtawar-92 appeared to be the most responsive genotype to callus induction followed by Inqilab-91 and Punjab-96. It also produced significantly higher amount of callus as compared with other genotypes. However, the medium containing 2 mg l-1 2,4-D (2,4-dicholorophenoxy acetic acid was found to be optimum for callus induction irrespective of the genotypes studied. Regeneration frequency of Bakhtawar-92 was 40% on the medium containing 0.1 mg l-1 IAA (Indole acetic acid and 2.5 mg l-1 BAP (6-benzyl amino purine. Punjab-96 and Inqilab-91 showed regeneration of 25 and 33% on the medium supplemented with combination of 0.1 mg l-1 IAA and 0.5 mg l-1 BAP. Regenerated plants were evaluated for plant height, maturity and seed set. They had favourable significant differences from the control plants for the most important agronomic traits; plant height, days to maturity and kernels/spike etc.

  10. Thermo-responsive non-woven scaffolds for "smart" 3D cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossouw, Claire L; Chetty, Avashnee; Moolman, Francis Sean; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Hoppe, Heinrich; Mancama, Dalu T

    2012-08-01

    The thermo-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) has received widespread attention for its in vitro application in the non-invasive, non-destructive release of adherent cells on two dimensional surfaces. In this study, 3D non-woven scaffolds fabricated from poly(propylene) (PP), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and nylon that had been grafted with PNIPAAm were tested for their ability to support the proliferation and subsequent thermal release of HC04 and HepG2 hepatocytes. Hepatocyte viability and proliferation were estimated using the Alamar Blue assay and Hoechst 33258 total DNA quantification. The assays revealed that the pure and grafted non-woven scaffolds maintained the hepatocytes within the matrix and promoted 3D proliferation comparable to that of the commercially available Algimatrix alginate scaffold. Albumin production and selected cytochrome P450 genes expression was found to be superior in cells growing on pure and grafted non-woven PP scaffolds as compared to cells grown as a 2D monolayer. Two scaffolds, namely, PP-g-PNIPAAm-A and PP-g-PNIPAAm-B were identified as having far superior thermal release capabilities; releasing the majority of the cells from the matrices within 2 h. This is the first report for the development of 3D non-woven, thermo-responsive scaffolds able to release cells from the matrix without the use of any enzymatic assistance or scaffold degradation. PMID:22367720

  11. A qualitative investigation into key cultural factors that support abstinence or responsible drinking amongst some Pacific youth living in New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Suaalii-Sauni Tamasailau; Samu Kathleen; Dunbar Lucy; Pulford Justin; Wheeler Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Abstinence and responsible drinking are not typically associated with youth drinking culture. Amongst Pacific youth in New Zealand there are high numbers, compared to the general New Zealand population, who choose not to consume alcohol. The Pacific youth population is made up of several ethnic groups; their ethno-cultural values are largely Polynesian and heavily influenced by the socio-economic realities of living in New Zealand. This paper explores factors that support ...

  12. Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response to a previous publication by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) indicated a broad international interest in expanding the concept of Safety Culture in such a way that its effectiveness in particular cases may be judged. This report responds to that need. In its manifestation, Safety Culture has two major components: the framework determined by organizational policy and by managerial action, and the response of individuals in working within and benefiting by the framework. 1 fig

  13. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IN THE HOTEL INDUSTRY : A CROSS CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Nord, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Debatten om affärsetik och företagets sociala ansvar i globala sammanhang med olika naturliga, ekonomiska och kulturella förutsättningar har fått en mer framträdande roll i och med globalisering. Syftet med denna studie är att fastställa hur kulturella och lokala förutsättningar påverkar arbetet inom Corporate Social Responsibility genom att undersöka och jämföra CSR arbetet på hotell i kulturellt och geografiskt olikartade länder. Data för indikatorer för avfallsproduktion, vattenförbrukning...

  14. Differential Response of Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Roots and Leaves to Salinity in Soil and Hydroponic Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Duygu BAYRAM; Burcu SECKIN DINLER; Eda TASCI

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the response of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Volare) roots and leaves to salinity in different growth mediums (soil and hydroponic culture) through physiologic and biochemical analyses. The relative water content (RWC) and total chlorophyll (CHL) content decreased with 300 mM NaCl treatment in both cultures but did not change with 150 mM treatment in soil culture. Similarly, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content did not change with 150 mM treatment in ...

  15. Particles from wood smoke and traffic induce differential pro-inflammatory response patterns in co-cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inflammatory potential of particles from wood smoke and traffic has not been well elucidated. In this study, a contact co-culture of monocytes and pneumocytes was exposed to 10-40 μg/cm2 of particles from wood smoke and traffic for 12, 40 and 64 h to determine their influence on pro-inflammatory cytokine release (TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8) and viability. To investigate the role of organic constituents in cytokine release the response to particles, their organic extracts and the washed particles were compared. Antagonists were used to investigate source-dependent differences in intercellular signalling (TNF-α, IL-1). The cytotoxicity was low after exposure to particles from both sources. However, wood smoke, and to a lesser degree traffic-derived particles, induced a reduction in cell number, which was associated with the organic fraction. The release of pro-inflammatory cytokines was similar for both sources after 12 h, but traffic induced a greater release than wood smoke particles with increasing exposure time. The organic fraction accounted for the majority of the cytokine release induced by wood smoke, whereas the washed traffic particles induced a stronger response than the corresponding organic extract. TNF-α and IL-1 antagonists reduced the release of IL-8 induced by particles from both sources. In contrast, the IL-6 release was only reduced by the IL-1 antagonist during exposure to traffic-derived particles. In summary, particles from wood smoke and traffic induced differential pro-inflammatory response patterns with respect to cytokine release and cell number. Moreover, the influence of the organic particle fraction and intercellular signalling on the pro-inflammatory response seemed to be source-dependent

  16. Arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid generate oxidative stress response in human bladder cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenicals have commonly been seen to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can lead to DNA damage and oxidative stress. At low levels, arsenicals still induce the formation of ROS, leading to DNA damage and protein alterations. UROtsa cells, an immortalized human urothelial cell line, were used to study the effects of arsenicals on the human bladder, a site of arsenical bioconcentration and carcinogenesis. Biotransformation of As(III) by UROtsa cells has been shown to produce methylated species, namely monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)], which has been shown to be 20 times more cytotoxic. Confocal fluorescence images of UROtsa cells treated with arsenicals and the ROS sensing probe, DCFDA, showed an increase of intracellular ROS within five min after 1 ?M and 10 ?M As(III) treatments. In contrast, 50 and 500 nM MMA(III) required pretreatment for 30 min before inducing ROS. The increase in ROS was ameliorated by preincubation with either SOD or catalase. An interesting aspect of these ROS detection studies is the noticeable difference between concentrations of As(III) and MMA(III) used, further supporting the increased cytotoxicity of MMA(III), as well as the increased amount of time required for MMA(III) to cause oxidative stress. These arsenical-induced ROS produced oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by an increase in 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) with either 50 nM or 5 ?M MMA(III) exposure. These findings provide support that MMA(III) cause a genotoxic response upon generation of ROS. Both As(III) and MMA(III) were also able to induce Hsp70 and MT protein levels above control, showing that the cells recognize the ROS and respond. As(III) rapidly induces the formation of ROS, possibly through it oxidation to As(V) and further metabolism to MMA(III)/(V). These studies provide evidence for a different mechanism of MMA(III) toxicity, one that MMA(III) first interacts with cellular components before an ROS response is generated, taking longer to produce the effect, but with more substantial harm to the cell

  17. BAP, 2,4-D e ácido acetilsalicílico na indução e diferenciação de calos em anteras de Coffea arabica L BAP, 2,4-D and acetyl-salicylic acid on the callus induction and differentiation in Coffea arabica L. anthers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelaide Siqueira Silva

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available O melhoramento genético do cafeeiro por meio de métodos convencionais é um processo demorado para se obter uma nova cultivar. A redução desse tempo é possível através da produção de linhagens homozigóticas, oriundas de dihaplóides obtidas através da cultura de anteras. Objetivou-se aplicar a técnica da cultura de anteras em diferentes cvs. de Coffea arabica L. para induzir a formação de calos e regenerar plântulas di-haplóides, com uso de reguladores vegetais. Os experimentos foram conduzidos no laboratório de Biotecnologia Vegetal da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU. Anteras das cultivares Mundo Novo LCP-379-19 e Catuaí Vermelho H2077-2-5-44 foram inoculadas em meio MS suplementado com 2,0 mg L-1 de 2,4-D e AAS, nas concentrações de 0; 8; 16; 32 e 64 mg L-1. Calos de 'Catuaí Vermelho 44' foram subcultivados em meio MS acrescido de diferentes concentrações de BAP (0; 2; 4 e 8 mg L-1 e 2,4-D (0; 1; 2 e 4 mg L-1. Tanto para as cvs. Mundo Novo quanto para Catuaí Vermelho 44 o aumento das concentrações de AAS diminuiu a formação de próembrióides nos calos e somente o 2,4-D foi capaz de promover a formação de calos friáveis, porém o equilíbrio da auxina e da citocinina utilizadas no trabalho, favoreceram a produção de calos friáveis.Coffee plant breeding through conventional methods demands a long time to obtain new cultivars. The reduction of this period is possible through the production of homozygous lines, from dihaploids obtained via anther culture. The aim of this study was to apply the anther culture technique on different C. arabica L. cultivars to induce calli formation and to regenerate dihaploid seedlings with the use of plant growth regulators. The experiments were accomplished in the Plant Biotechnology laboratory at Uberlândia Federal University (UFU. Anthers of the cultivars Mundo Novo LCP-379-19 and Catuaí Vermelho H2077-2-5-44 were inoculated on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg L-1 2,4-D and ASA at 0, 8, 16, 32 or 64 mg L-1. 'Catuaí Vermelho 44' calli were subcultured on MS supplemented with different concentrations of BAP (0, 2, 4 or 8 mg L-1 and 2,4-D (0, 1, 2 or 4 mg L-1. The increase in ASA concentrations decreased the pro-embryoid formation on calli of both cultivars and only 2,4-D promoted the formation of friable calli. However, the balance of auxin and cytokinin used in this study favored the production of friable calli.

  18. Microbial succession in response to pollutants in batch-enrichment culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Shuo; Chen, Weimin; Wang, Entao; Wang, Junman; Liu, Zhenshan; Li, Yining; Wei, Gehong

    2016-01-01

    As a global problem, environmental pollution is an important factor to shape the microbial communities. The elucidation of the succession of microbial communities in response to pollutants is essential for developing bioremediation procedures. In the present study, ten batches of soil-enrichment subcultures were subjected to four treatments: phenanthrene, n-octadecane, phenanthrene + n-octadecane, or phenanthrene + n-octadecane + CdCl2. Forty pollutant-degrading consortia, corresponding to each batch of the four treatments were obtained. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the diversity, richness and evenness of the consortia decreased throughout the subculturing procedure. The well-known hydrocarbon degraders Acinetobacter, Gordonia, Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis, and Castellaniella and several other genera, including Niabella and Naxibacter, were detected in the enriched consortia. The predominant microbes varied and the microbial community in the consortia gradually changed during the successive subculturing depending on the treatment, indicating that the pollutants influenced the microbial successions. Comparison of the networks in the treatments indicated that organic pollutants and CdCl2 affected the co-occurrence patterns in enriched consortia. In conclusion, single environmental factors, such as the addition of nutrients or selection pressure, can shape microbial communities and partially explain the extensive differences in microbial community structures among diverse environments. PMID:26905741

  19. Seismic hazard and local response in the preservation of cultural heritage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a review of investigations aimed at assessing potential earthquake-induced ground motions in the city of Rome. The diffuse historical heritage and the presence of invaluable monuments to preserve required accurate studies of local geological conditions. This information is important to reach a more refined, site-dependent seismic input estimate where also the individual monument structure and its intrinsic vulnerability are properly taken into account. Many of the investigations dated back to the last decade of the past century when instrumental data from significant earthquakes where not yet available for the city of Rome. In those times, analysis methods were mostly based on geological inferences to reconstruct the local near surface structure and develop site response theoretical computations. The 6th April 2009, Mw6.3 L'Aquila earthquakes provided several important records of ground motion in the city for moderate magnitude earthquakes occurring in central Appennines where the largest magnitude earthquakes of interest for Rome are expected. These data are fundamental for a comparison of past ground motion predictions with real observations in rome, and confirm the validity of the methodologies used before the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake. The assessment of future destructive ground motions in Rome is now more feasible because it can be based on the scaling of the really experienced monument shaking at moderate magnitudes.

  20. Microbial succession in response to pollutants in batch-enrichment culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Shuo; Chen, Weimin; Wang, Entao; Wang, Junman; Liu, Zhenshan; Li, Yining; Wei, Gehong

    2016-01-01

    As a global problem, environmental pollution is an important factor to shape the microbial communities. The elucidation of the succession of microbial communities in response to pollutants is essential for developing bioremediation procedures. In the present study, ten batches of soil-enrichment subcultures were subjected to four treatments: phenanthrene, n-octadecane, phenanthrene + n-octadecane, or phenanthrene + n-octadecane + CdCl2. Forty pollutant-degrading consortia, corresponding to each batch of the four treatments were obtained. High-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the diversity, richness and evenness of the consortia decreased throughout the subculturing procedure. The well-known hydrocarbon degraders Acinetobacter, Gordonia, Sphingobium, Sphingopyxis, and Castellaniella and several other genera, including Niabella and Naxibacter, were detected in the enriched consortia. The predominant microbes varied and the microbial community in the consortia gradually changed during the successive subculturing depending on the treatment, indicating that the pollutants influenced the microbial successions. Comparison of the networks in the treatments indicated that organic pollutants and CdCl2 affected the co-occurrence patterns in enriched consortia. In conclusion, single environmental factors, such as the addition of nutrients or selection pressure, can shape microbial communities and partially explain the extensive differences in microbial community structures among diverse environments. PMID:26905741

  1. Response surface optimization of culture medium for enhanced docosahexaenoic acid production by a Malaysian thraustochytrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikan, Vidyah; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Hamid, Aidil Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) plays a vital role in the enhancement of human health, particularly for cognitive, neurological, and visual functions. Marine microalgae, such as members of the genus Aurantiochytrium, are rich in DHA and represent a promising source of omega-3 fatty acids. In this study, levels of glucose, yeast extract, sodium glutamate and sea salt were optimized for enhanced lipid and DHA production by a Malaysian isolate of thraustochytrid, Aurantiochytrium sp. SW1, using response surface methodology (RSM). The optimized medium contained 60 g/L glucose, 2 g/L yeast extract, 24 g/L sodium glutamate and 6 g/L sea salt. This combination produced 17.8 g/L biomass containing 53.9% lipid (9.6 g/L) which contained 44.07% DHA (4.23 g/L). The optimized medium was used in a scale-up run, where a 5 L bench-top bioreactor was employed to verify the applicability of the medium at larger scale. This produced 24.46 g/L biomass containing 38.43% lipid (9.4 g/L), of which 47.87% was DHA (4.5 g/L). The total amount of DHA produced was 25% higher than that produced in the original medium prior to optimization. This result suggests that Aurantiochytrium sp. SW1 could be developed for industrial application as a commercial DHA-producing microorganism. PMID:25721623

  2. Mouse preimplantation embryo responses to culture medium osmolarity include increased expression of CCM2 and p38 MAPK activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms that confer an ability to respond positively to environmental osmolarity are fundamental to ensuring embryo survival during the preimplantation period. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK occurs following exposure to hyperosmotic treatment. Recently, a novel scaffolding protein called Osmosensing Scaffold for MEKK3 (OSM was linked to p38 MAPK activation in response to sorbitol-induced hypertonicity. The human ortholog of OSM is cerebral cavernous malformation 2 (CCM2. The present study was conducted to investigate whether CCM2 is expressed during mouse preimplantation development and to determine whether this scaffolding protein is associated with p38 MAPK activation following exposure of preimplantation embryos to hyperosmotic environments. Results Our results indicate that Ccm2 along with upstream p38 MAPK pathway constituents (Map3k3, Map2k3, Map2k6, and Map2k4 are expressed throughout mouse preimplantation development. CCM2, MAP3K3 and the phosphorylated forms of MAP2K3/MAP2K6 and MAP2K4 were also detected throughout preimplantation development. Embryo culture in hyperosmotic media increased p38 MAPK activity in conjunction with elevated CCM2 levels. Conclusion These results define the expression of upstream activators of p38 MAPK during preimplantation development and indicate that embryo responses to hyperosmotic environments include elevation of CCM2 and activation of p38 MAPK.

  3. Secretion of cyclic GMP by cultured epithelial and fibroblast cell lines in response to nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M J; Wypij, D M; Rose, D A; Rimele, T J; Wiseman, J S

    1995-04-01

    LLC-PK1 epithelial cells and RFL-6 fibroblasts secreted both cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) when costimulated with forskolin and 3-morpholinosydnonimine (a chemical nitric oxide generator). Intracellular cAMP levels as high as 1100 and 12,000 pmol/10(6) cells were achieved for the two cell types, respectively. These levels were high enough to reach approximately 50% saturation of the cAMP transporter and inhibited transport of cGMP to an equal extent, suggesting that the two cyclic nucleotides compete for a common transport system. The rates of secretion of cGMP and cAMP from LLC-PK1 cells increased in proportion to their rates of synthesis as concentrations of stimulant were varied, but increased only 25% relative to intracellular concentrations in response to inhibition of phosphodiesterases by 3-isobutylmethylxanthine. It is proposed that secretion of cyclic nucleotides is not simply proportional to the total intracellular pool in these cells, but rather is coupled to synthesis. In support of this model, oxyhemoglobin was used to trap nitric oxide and block activity of guanylate cyclase in cells treated with 3-morpholinosydnonimine. As a result, secretion of cGMP ceased within 1 min, whereas intracellular levels decreased slowly over 60 min. Probenecid [p-(dipropylsulfamoyl)benzoic acid] is a nonselective antagonist of anion transport that inhibited secretion of cAMP in both cell types but, unexpectedly, blocked synthesis of cGMP, and this was reflected in direct inhibition of soluble guanylate cyclase in cell lysates. Two heat-stable, high molecular weight factors that confer sensitivity to probenecid were identified, and these factors increased the sensitivity of guanylate cyclase to nitric acid by an order of magnitude. PMID:7536242

  4. Yield response of Bere, a Scottish barley landrace, to cultural practices and agricultural inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Martin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available There is very little documented about the response of cereal landraces to modern agricultural practices. Bere is a Scottish barley (Hordeum vulgare L. landrace which is grown in Orkney to supply meal for baking. A recent research programme has improved yields and the security of the Bere harvest, making it possible to supply a new market for grain to produce specialist whiskies. At the start of this research, a survey of Orkney farmers who had grown Bere since the 1980s showed that most had planted it at the traditional time in mid-May, used few inputs and considered the main constraints of the crop to be low yield (2.8 to 3.8 t/ha and susceptibility to lodging. Three years of trials in Orkney between 2003 and 2005 showed very significant increases in grain yield (17-76% and thousand grain weight from planting Bere earlier, in the second half of April. This also had the advantage of an earlier and more secure harvest. Yields showed smaller, but often significant, increases (5-11% from applying mineral fertiliser, growth regulator or fungicide, while combinations of growth regulator and fungicide increased yields from 10- 22%. In spite of usually increasing grain yield, growth regulator did not always control lodging. Although the use of inputs often increased the gross margins of growing Bere, a trial in 2005 showed that early planting was a more cost effective single intervention than either the use of fungicide or growth regulator. By increasing grower profits and reducing harvesting risks, these results have made it viable for more farmers to grow Bere in its region of origin, providing growers and end-users with additional income and contributing to the in situ conservation of this landrace.

  5. Frequent biphasic cellular responses of permanent fish cell cultures to deoxynivalenol (DON)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of animal feed with mycotoxins is a major problem for fish feed mainly due to usage of contaminated ingredients for production and inappropriate storage of feed. The use of cereals for fish food production further increases the risk of a potential contamination. Potential contaminants include the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) which is synthesized by globally distributed fungi of the genus Fusarium. The toxicity of DON is well recognized in mammals. In this study, we confirm cytotoxic effects of DON in established permanent fish cell lines. We demonstrate that DON is capable of influencing the metabolic activity and cell viability in fish cells as determined by different assays to indicate possible cellular targets of this toxin. Evaluation of cell viability by measurement of membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and lysosomal function after 24 h of exposure of fish cell lines to DON at a concentration range of 0-3000 ng ml-1 shows a biphasic effect on cells although differences in sensitivity occur. The cell lines derived from rainbow trout are particularly sensitive to DON. The focus of this study lies, furthermore, on the effects of DON at different concentrations on production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the different fish cell lines. The results show that DON mainly reduces ROS production in all cell lines that were used. Thus, our comparative investigations reveal that the fish cell lines show distinct species-related endpoint sensitivities that also depend on the type of tissue from which the cells were derived and the severity of exposure. - Highlights: → DON uptake by cells is not extensive. → All fish cell lines are sensitive to DON. → DON is most cytotoxic to rainbow trout cells. → Biphasic cellular responses were frequently observed. → Our results are similar to studies on mammalian cell lines.

  6. Responses of primary cultured haemocytes from the marine gastropod Haliotis tuberculata under 10-day exposure to cadmium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among metals, cadmium, a non-essential element, is an important pollutant that is released into aquatic environments. Due to its persistence and bioaccumulation, this metal has been shown to exert immunological effects on organisms. The objective of the present study was to investigate the in vitro effects of cadmium chloride using a haemocyte primary culture from the European abalone, Haliotis tuberculata. Most studies have maintained viable haemocytes in vitro for periods ranging from several hours to several days during acute exposures. Few investigations have reported the effects of metals using longer in vitro exposures, which are more realistic with regard to mimicking environmental conditions. In this study, we exposed abalone haemocytes to concentrations from 0.5 to 50,000 ?g L?1 of CdCl2 for 10 days. The effects of cadmium chloride were reflected in a significant decrease in the number of viable cells and morphological modifications in a concentration-dependent manner beginning at a concentration of 500 ?g L?1 as well as in some physiological processes, such as phagocytotic activity and the number of lysosome-positive cells. In contrast, phenoloxidase (PO) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were increased beginning at a concentration of 5 ?g L?1, which is consistent with environmental concentrations in polluted sites. For PO activity and ROS production, maximally 9-fold and 130% inductions, respectively, were recorded under the highest dose. These results thus indicate that cadmium chloride alters immune parameters of abalone haemocytes and that the long-term (10 days) primary culture system used here represents a suitable, sensitive in vitro model for assessing cytotoxic responses.

  7. Responses of primary cultured haemocytes from the marine gastropod Haliotis tuberculata under 10-day exposure to cadmium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latire, Thomas; Le Pabic, Charles; Mottin, Elmina; Mottier, Antoine; Costil, Katherine; Koueta, Noussithe; Lebel, Jean-Marc [UMR 100 IFREMER ' Physiologie et Ecophysiologie des Mollusques Marins' - IFR 146 ICORE - IBFA - Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Campus 1, Science C, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen cedex (France); Serpentini, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.serpentini@unicaen.fr [UMR 100 IFREMER ' Physiologie et Ecophysiologie des Mollusques Marins' - IFR 146 ICORE - IBFA - Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, Campus 1, Science C, Esplanade de la Paix, 14032 Caen cedex (France)

    2012-03-15

    Among metals, cadmium, a non-essential element, is an important pollutant that is released into aquatic environments. Due to its persistence and bioaccumulation, this metal has been shown to exert immunological effects on organisms. The objective of the present study was to investigate the in vitro effects of cadmium chloride using a haemocyte primary culture from the European abalone, Haliotis tuberculata. Most studies have maintained viable haemocytes in vitro for periods ranging from several hours to several days during acute exposures. Few investigations have reported the effects of metals using longer in vitro exposures, which are more realistic with regard to mimicking environmental conditions. In this study, we exposed abalone haemocytes to concentrations from 0.5 to 50,000 {mu}g L{sup -1} of CdCl{sub 2} for 10 days. The effects of cadmium chloride were reflected in a significant decrease in the number of viable cells and morphological modifications in a concentration-dependent manner beginning at a concentration of 500 {mu}g L{sup -1} as well as in some physiological processes, such as phagocytotic activity and the number of lysosome-positive cells. In contrast, phenoloxidase (PO) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were increased beginning at a concentration of 5 {mu}g L{sup -1}, which is consistent with environmental concentrations in polluted sites. For PO activity and ROS production, maximally 9-fold and 130% inductions, respectively, were recorded under the highest dose. These results thus indicate that cadmium chloride alters immune parameters of abalone haemocytes and that the long-term (10 days) primary culture system used here represents a suitable, sensitive in vitro model for assessing cytotoxic responses.

  8. Culturally responsive engineering education: A case study of a pre-college introductory engineering course at Tibetan Children's Village School of Selakui

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Marisol Mercado

    Culturally responsive teaching has been argued to be effective in the education of Indigenous youth. This approach emphasizes the legitimacy of a group's cultural heritage, helps to associate abstract academic knowledge with the group's sociocultural context, seeks to incorporate a variety of strategies to engage students who have different learning styles, and strives to integrate multicultural information in the educational contents, among other considerations. In this work, I explore the outcomes of a culturally responsive introductory engineering short course that I developed and taught to Tibetan students at Tibetan Children's Village of Selakui (in Uttarakhand, India). Based on my ethnographic research in Tibetan communities in northern India, I examine two research questions: (a) What are the processes to develop and implement a pre-college culturally responsive introductory engineering course? and (b) How do Tibetan culture and Buddhism influence the engineering design and teamwork of the pre-college Tibetan students who took the course? I designed then taught the course that featured elementary lectures on sustainability, introductory engineering design, energy alternatives, and manufacturing engineering. The course also included a pre-college engineering design project through which Tibetan high school students investigated a problem at the school and designed a possible solution to it. Drawing from postcolonial studies, engineering studies, engineering and social justice, Buddhist studies, and Tibetan studies, I provide an analysis of my findings. Based on my findings, I conclude that my culturally responsive approach of teaching was an effective method to help students feel that their cultural background was respected and included in a pre-college engineering course; however, some students felt resistance toward the teaching approach. In addition, the culturally relevant content that connected with their ways of living in their school, Tibetan communities, and surroundings helped the students to relate to abstract concepts in familiar settings. Lastly, they appreciated that I brought to the course relevant information about technology and society in India (their host country), engineers' work in industry, technologies used in other contexts as well, and projects that show how engineers can help to alleviate poverty. The findings of my research can inform (a) educators who are interested in integrating culturally responsive activities in their teaching methods, (b) researchers or teachers in ethnic minority schools abroad, (c) educators interested in developing engineering activities or courses for underrepresented ethnic minorities, ethnic diasporas or refugee youth in the United States, and (d) facilitators at multicultural engineering summer camps in the United States.

  9. Increased production of azadirachtin from an improved method of androgenic cultures of a medicinal tree Azadirachta indica A. Juss

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Priyanka; Chaturvedi, Rakhi

    2011-01-01

    Present report is the first direct evidence of azadirachtin production in androgenic haploid cultures of Azadirachta indica, a woody medicinal tree. Anther cultures at early-late-uninucleate stage of microspores were established on MS medium with BAP (5 M), 2,4-D (1 M) and NAA (1 M) containing 12% sucrose. The calli, induced, were further multiplied on 2,4-D and Kinetin media. Shoots, differentiated on BAP (2.2 M) + NAA (0.05 M) medium, were elongated on MS + BAP (0.5 M) and multiplied ...

  10. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Novel Mechanistic Insight into Murine Biological Responses to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Lungs and Cultured Lung Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Poulsen, Sarah Ss; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Labib, Sarah; Wu, Dongmei; Husain, Mainul; Williams, Andrew; Bgelund, Jesper P.; Andersen, Ole; Kbler, Carsten; Mlhave, Kristian; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Saber, Anne T.; Wallin, Hkan; Yauk, Carole L.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    There is great interest in substituting animal work with in vitro experimentation in human health risk assessment; however, there are only few comparisons of in vitro and in vivo biological responses to engineered nanomaterials. We used high-content genomics tools to compare in vivo pulmonary responses of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) to those in vitro in cultured lung epithelial cells (FE1) at the global transcriptomic level. Primary size, surface area and other properties of MWCNT-XN...

  11. The Effects of an Integrated Reading Comprehension Strategy: A Culturally Responsive Teaching Approach for Fifth-Grade Students' Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Yvonne N.; Fagan, Yvette M.

    2013-01-01

    The study evaluated the effects of the Integrated Reading Comprehension Strategy on two levels. The Integrated Reading Comprehension Strategy integrated story grammar instruction and story maps, prior knowledge and prediction method, and word webs through a culturally responsive teaching framework; the Integrated Reading Comprehension Strategy…

  12. A Qualitative Examination of the Impact of Culturally Responsive Educational Practices on the Psychological Well-Being of Students of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewa, Blaire; Goodman, Rachael D.; West-Olatunji, Cirecie; Amatea, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have shown that educational experiences within the classroom may marginalize students of color which may result in psychological distress. However, the utilization of culturally responsive educational practices (CRE) can create environments in which marginalized students can thrive not only academically, but psychologically. The authors…

  13. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Novel Mechanistic Insight into Murine Biological Responses to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Lungs and Cultured Lung Epithelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Labib, Sarah; Wu, Dongmei; Husain, Mainul; Williams, Andrew; Bøgelund, Jesper P.; Andersen, Ole; Købler, Carsten; Mølhave, Kristian; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Saber, Anne T.; Wallin, Håkan; Yauk, Carole L.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Halappanavar, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    responses of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) to those in vitro in cultured lung epithelial cells (FE1) at the global transcriptomic level. Primary size, surface area and other properties of MWCNT-XNRI -7 (Mitsui7) were characterized using DLS, SEM and TEM. Mice were exposed via a single intratracheal...

  14. "Yo Soy Indígena": Identifying and Using Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) to Make the Teaching of Science Culturally Responsive for Maya Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Maria L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines how traditional ecological knowledge--TEK--can be identified and utilized to create culturally responsive science learning opportunities for Maya girls from a community in the Guatemalan highlands. Maya girls are situated in a complex socio-historical and political context rooted in racism and sexism. This study contextualizes…

  15. LPS from Porphyromonas gingivalis increases the sensitivity of contractile response mediated by endothelin-B (ET(B)) receptors in cultured endothelium-intact rat coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghorbani, Bahareh; Holmstrup, Palle; Edvinsson, Lars; Kristiansen, Kim A; Sheykhzade, Majid

    The purpose of our study was to examine if lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) modifies the vasomotor responses to Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and Sarafotoxin 6c (S6c) in rat coronary arteries. The arteries were studied directly or following organ culture for 24h in absence and ...

  16. CHANGES IN BETA-1, 3-GLUCANASE MRNA LEVELS IN PEACH IN RESPONSE TO TREATMENT WITH PATHOGEN CULTURE FILTRATES, WOUNDING, AND OTHER ELICITORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The response of three different peach, Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, genotypes to bacterial and fungal culture filtrates (Cfs), wounding, and sterile nutrient broth (NB) treatments were studied by evaluating B-1, 3-glucanase mRNA levels. Northern blot analysis was conducted using the 3' end of a peach...

  17. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Us3 Gene Deletion Influences Toll-like Receptor Responses in Cultured Monocytic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Matti

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toll-like receptors have a key role in innate immune response to microbial infection. The toll-like receptor (TLR family consists of ten identified human TLRs, of which TLR2 and TLR9 have been shown to initiate innate responses to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and TLR3 has been shown to be involved in defence against severe HSV-1 infections of the central nervous system. However, no significant activation of the TLR3 pathways has been observed in wild type HSV-1 infections. In this work, we have studied the TLR responses and effects on TLR gene expression by HSV-1 with Us3 and ICP4 gene deletions, which also subject infected cells to apoptosis in human monocytic (U937 cell cultures. Results U937 human monocytic cells were infected with the Us3 and ICP4 deletion herpes simplex virus (d120, its parental virus HSV-1 (KOS, the Us3 deletion virus (R7041, its rescue virus (R7306 or wild type HSV-1 (F. The mRNA expression of TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR9 and type I interferons (IFN were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The intracellular expression of TLR3 and type I IFN inducible myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA protein as well as the level of apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. We observed that the mRNA expression of TLR3 and type I IFNs were significantly increased in d120, R7041 and HSV-1 (F-infected U937 cells. Moreover, the intracellular expression of TLR3 and MxA were significantly increased in d120 and R7041-infected cells. We observed activation of IRF-3 in infections with d120 and R7041. The TLR4 mRNA expression level was significantly decreased in d120 and R7041-infected cells but increased in HSV-1 (KOS-infected cells in comparison with uninfected cells. No significant difference in TLR2 or TLR9 mRNA expression levels was seen. Both the R7041 and d120 viruses were able to induce apoptosis in U937 cell cultures. Conclusion The levels of TLR3 and type I IFN mRNA were increased in d120, R7041 and HSV-1 (F-infected cells when compared with uninfected cells. Also IRF-3 was activated in cells infected with the Us3 gene deletion viruses d120 and R7041. This is consistent with activation of TLR3 signaling in the cells. The intracellular TLR3 and type I IFN inducible MxA protein levels were increased in d120 and R7041-infected cells but not in cells infected with the corresponding parental or rescue viruses, suggesting that the HSV-1 Us3 gene is involved in control of TLR3 responses in U937 cells.

  18. Effects of complexation with in vivo enhancing monoclonal antibodies on activity of growth hormone in two responsive cell culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, J; Borromeo, V; Bramani, S; Secchi, C; Baumbach, W R; Mockridge, J

    1999-12-01

    We describe the properties of three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to ovine GH, two of which have previously been shown to enhance, in vivo, the biological activity of bovine and ovine growth hormone. We have examined the effects of these MAbs on GH activity in two appropriate GH-responsive cell culture systems, investigating both acute signalling effects (Janus-activated kinase (Jak)-2 tyrosine phosphorylation -5 min) and longer-term (MTT-formazan production -24 h) effects of hormone-antibody complexes. In the 3T3-F442A pre-adipocyte cell line (which has been demonstrated to be GH responsive), we show that complexation of recombinant bovine (rb) GH with either of the two enhancing anti-ovine GH MAbs (OA11 and OA15) and the non-enhancing MAb, OA14, attenuates the ability of GH to stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of Jak-2 at a 5-min time point. Using the mouse myeloid cell line, FDC-P1, stably transfected with the full-length ovine GH receptor (oGHR), we demonstrate that rbGH causes a dose-dependent increase in MTT-formazan production by these cells. Further, we demonstrate that OA11 and OA14, but not OA15, cause a decrease in this stimulatory activity of rbGH over a hormone concentration range of 5-50 ng/ml at both 24 and 48 h. We conclude that the different in vitro activities of the two in vivo enhancing MAbs are most probably related to the time-courses over which these two assays are performed, and also to the relative affinities between antibody, hormone and receptor. In addition, the in vitro inhibitory activity of the enhancing MAb OA11 in both short- and long-term bioassay lends further support to an exclusively in vivo model for MAb-mediated enhancement of GH action. PMID:10601976

  19. Altered gene expression in cultured microglia in response to simulated blast overpressure: possible role of pulse duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael J; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Francescutti, Dina M; Sykes, Catherine E; Briggs, Denise I; Leung, Lai Yee; VandeVord, Pamela J; Kuhn, Donald M

    2012-07-26

    Blast overpressure has long been known to cause barotrauma to air-filled organs such as lung and middle ear. However, experience in Iraq and Afghanistan is revealing that individuals exposed to explosive munitions can also suffer traumatic brain injury (TBI) even in the absence of obvious external injury. The interaction of a blast shock wave with the brain in the intact cranial vault is extremely complex making it difficult to conclude that a blast wave interacts in a direct manner with the brain to cause injury. In an attempt to "isolate" the shock wave and test its primary effects on cells, we exposed cultured microglia to simulated blast overpressure in a barochamber. Overpressures ranging from 15 to 45 psi did not change microglial Cox-2 levels or TNF-α secretion nor did they cause cell damage. Microarray analysis revealed increases in expression of a number of microglial genes relating to immune function and inflammatory responses to include Saa3, Irg1, Fas and CxCl10. All changes in gene expression were dependent on pulse duration and were independent of pressure. These results indicate that microglia are mildly activated by blast overpressure and uncover a heretofore undocumented role for pulse duration in this process. PMID:22698585

  20. Characteristics and mechanisms of the bystander response in monolayer cell cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When confluent cultures of mammalian cells are irradiated with very low fluences of alpha particles whereby only occasional cells receive any radiation exposure, genetic changes are observed in the non-irradiated ('bystander') cells. Upregulation of the p53 damage-response pathway as well as activation of proteins in the MAPK family occurred in bystander cells; p53 was phosphorylated on the serine 15 residue suggesting that the upregulation of p53 was a consequence of DNA damage. Damage signals were transmitted to bystander cells through gap junctions, as confirmed by the use of genetically manipulated cells including connexin43 knockouts. Expression of connexin43 was markedly enhanced by irradiation. A moderate bystander effect was observed for specific gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations. This effect was markedly enhanced in cells defective in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway. Finally, an upregulation of oxidative metabolism occurred in bystander cells; the increased levels of reactive oxygen species appeared to be derived from flavine-containing oxidase enzymes. We hypothesize that genetic effects observed in non-irradiated bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative base damage; >90% of mutations in bystander cells were point mutations. When bystander cells cannot repair DNA double strand breaks, they become much more sensitive to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and mutations, the latter consisting primarily of deletion mutants. While we propose that the genetic effects occurring in bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative stress, the nature of the signal that initiates this process remains to be determined

  1. Baby, You Light-Up My Face: Culture-General Physiological Responses to Infants and Culture-Specific Cognitive Judgements of Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, Gianluca; Nakazawa, Jun; Ogawa, Shota; Stival, Rita; Kawashima, Akiko; Putnick, Diane L; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2014-01-01

    Infants universally elicit in adults a set of solicitous behaviors that are evolutionarily important for the survival of the species. However, exposure, experience, and prejudice appear to govern adults' social choice and ingroup attitudes towards other adults. In the current study, physiological arousal and behavioral judgments were assessed while adults processed unfamiliar infant and adult faces of ingroup vs. outgroup members in two contrasting cultures, Japan and Italy. Physiological aro...

  2. Culture, Gender and Health Care Stigma: Practitioners Response to Facial Masking Experienced by People with Parkinsons Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Zebrowitz, Leslie A.; Ma, Hui-Ing

    2011-01-01

    Facial masking in Parkinsons disease is the reduction of automatic and controlled expressive movement of facial musculature, creating an appearance of apathy, social disengagement or compromised cognitive status. Research in western cultures demonstrates that practitioners form negatively biased impressions associated with patient masking. Socio-cultural norms about facial expressivity vary according to culture and gender, yet little research has studied the effect of these factors on practi...

  3. Effects of inhibitors of protein kinase C and NO-synthase on the radiation-induced cytogenetic adaptive response in Chinese hamster cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the serine-threonin kinase inhibitor - staurosporine and inhibitor of NO-synthase - L-NAME on the radiation-induced adaptive response were studied in fibroblasts of Chinese hamster in culture. It is shown that staurosporine and L-NAME inhibit cytogenetic adaptive response induced by β-particles in low doses. Inhibition is not connected with radiosensitizing effect of these agents. L-NAME decreases significantly the γ-rays-induced chromosome aberration yield also. Study confirms the role of protein kinase C in induction of the adaptive response and participation of NO-synthase in this process is noticed for the first time

  4. Prospective study on adaptive response induction by heavy-ion radiation in human lymphoblastoid cell lines and cultured mouse fetal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated radiation-induced response to X-rays and heavy-ions in lymphoblastoid cells. As pre-exposure to low priming dose of ionizing radiations decreases the biological effects of a subsequent higher challenging dose in a variety of models, we wondered whether adaptive response could be observed when using accelerated heavy ions radiation. For the first time, we demonstrated the existence of a mutagenic adaptive response to both low and high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in cultured human lymphoblastoid cells, which might be linked with a modulation of DNA repair. (author)

  5. Avaliao da deposio de calda em anteras de trigo, para o estudo do controle qumico de giberela (Gibberella zeae) / Spray deposition evaluation on wheat anthers to study the head blight (Gibberella zeae) chemical control

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Edivan, Panisson; Walter, Boller; Erlei M., Reis.

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A giberela, causada pelo fungo Gibberella zeae (Fusarium graminearum), uma importante doena de infeco floral do trigo. Para controlar essa doena, o fungicida deve ser aplicado durante a antese, de modo a proteger as anteras. Os objetivos do presente trabalho foram de construir uma barra de pul [...] verizao que permitiu utilizar bicos em diferentes arranjos e quantificar a presena de corante nas anteras quando aplicado com diferentes pontas de pulverizao, direes dos bicos na barra e com diferentes volumes de calda. Utilizaram-se pontas de jato plano (XR-11002), jato plano duplo (110DB2) e jato cnico vazio (JA-2), espaadas em 0,50 m, em uma barra tradicional e numa barra modificada. Na barra modificada, foram utilizados corpos duplos giratrios, posicionando-se os bicos na vertical, 30 ou 45 para frente e para trs em relao vertical. Os resultados mostraram que a utilizao de dois bicos no mesmo ponto da barra aumentou significativamente o nmero de anteras que receberam o fungicida. As trs pontas de pulverizao comportaram-se de maneira semelhante. Dois bicos formando ngulo de 30 em relao vertical proporcionaram a mesma quantidade de anteras cobertas com corante do que dois bicos posicionados na vertical. A angulao dos bicos em 45 com a vertical proporcionou maior nmero de anteras atingidas pela calda. Abstract in english The head blight caused by the fungus Gibberella zeae (Fusarium graminearum) is a major floral disease of wheat. The chemical control is efficient only if the fungicides are applied at the full anthesis to protect anthers. In this research, the main objective was to built such a spray boom to allow d [...] ifferent spray nozzles arrangements. The anther staining provided by color dyes applied with different spray nozzles, nozzle arrangements, and spray volumes was also assessed. Two spray booms were used, one with individual nozzles spaced at 0.50 m and another one mounted with adjustable sets, also spaced at 0.50 m, each one having one nozzle forward (30 or 45) and the other backward at an angle of 30 or 45. The nozzle types used were flat fan, twin flat fan, and hollow cone. A total of four experiments were carried out. The deposition of color dye was higher on loose than on trapped anthers. The double nozzle sets resulted in increased spray volumes (200 to 400 L ha-1) and higher numbers of fungicide sprayed anthers. The nozzle types did not differ from each other. The anther staining was improved by nozzles positioned at 45 (forward and backward) but not at 30.

  6. Non-native english speaking elementary ELL teachers' culturally responsive leadership profile in an ESL context / Perfil de liderazgo y sensibilidad cultural de maestros no nativos de ingles de primaria en un contexto de ingles como segunda lengua

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Valentin, Ekiaka Nzai; Patricia, Gmez; Concepcin, Reyna; Jen, Kang-Fan.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O ensino culturalmente sensvel foi sugerido como uma educao de qualidade (Edwards, 2003) para os estudantes cultural e linguisticamente diversos nos Estados Unidos da Amrica. Anlise de vrios programas de estudo de aprendizagem do Ingls (ELL), revelou que os enfoques sexocntrico (masculino-c [...] ntrico) e etnocntrico (Euro/Western-cntrico) estavam profundamente enraizados na maioria dos livros de texto. A inteno deste documento parcial de mtodos mistos, consistiu em explorar alguns falantes de Ingls no nativos (NNES) perfil dos professores de primria ELL liderana culturalmente sensvel com o fim de fomentar o debate sobre a forma de promover a transformao curricular multicultural nas salas de aula de primria e como efetivamente formar culturalmente os professores de prservio NNES e bsico ELL em um contexto especfico ESL. Anlise comparativa de dados sugeriram que no havia relao causal entre os estilos de liderana dos participantes com sensibilidade cultural e sua capacidade para realizar a transformao curricular multicultural. As implicaes para os professores NNES e bsico ELL pr-servio em formao dos professores se desde o ensino culturalmente sensvel e enfoques multiculturais de transformao curricular. Abstract in spanish La enseanza culturalmente sensible ha sido sugerido como una educacin de calidad (Edwards, 2003) para los estudiantes cultural y lingsticamente diversos en los Estados Unidos de Amrica. Anlisis de varios programas de estudio de aprendizaje del Ingls (ELL), revel que los enfoques sexo-cntric [...] o (masculino-cntrico) y etno-cntrico (Euro/Western-cntrico) estaban profundamente arraigados en la mayora de los libros de texto. La intencin de este documento parcial de mtodos mixtos consisti en explorar algunos hablantes de Ingls no nativos (NNES) perfil de los maestros de primaria ELL liderazgo culturalmente sensible con el fin de fomentar el debate sobre la forma de promover la transformacin curricular multicultural en las aulas de primaria y cmo efectivamente formar culturalmente a los profesores de pre-servicio NNES y bsico ELL en un contexto especfico ESL. Anlisis comparativo de datos sugirieron que no haba relacin causal entre los estilos de liderazgo de los participantes con sensibilidad cultural y su capacidad para llevar a cabo la transformacin curricular multicultural. Las implicaciones para los profesores NNES y bsico ELL pre-servicio en formacin de los profesores se enmarcan desde la enseanza culturalmente sensible y enfoques multiculturales de transformacin curricular. Abstract in english Culturally responsive instruction has been suggested as quality education (Edwards, 2003) for minority students in subtractive and additive bilingualism settings. However, analytical curriculum development of several official English programs revealed that the gender-centric (malecentric) and Ethno- [...] centric (Euro/Western-centric) approaches were deeply embedded in most English textbooks of curriculum development. The intent of partial mixed methods paper consisted of exploring some non-native English speaking teachers English teachers' culturally responsive leadership profile in order to further the discussion on not only how to promote English curriculum transformation in English as second language (ESL) and English as foreign language (EFL) settings, but also to effectively train culturally responsive non-native English speaking (NNES) English pre-service teachers. Comparative data analysis suggested that there were no causal relationship between NNES English teachers' culturally responsive leadership styles and their abilities to perform multicultural transformation of English curriculums. To be highly effective in transforming English curriculum, NNES English teachers needed to be systematically trained on how to do so. Implications for NNES English pre-service teacher education are framed from the culturally responsive and anti-oppressive e

  7. Surface modification of uniaxial cyclic strain cell culture platform with temperature-responsive polymer for cell sheet detachment†

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, E L; Bendre, H. H.; Kalmykov, A.; Wong, J Y

    2015-01-01

    Current cell sheet-based blood vessels lack biomimetic structure and require excessively long culture times that may compromise smooth muscle cell phenotype. We modified a commercially available product for uniaxial cell sheet conditioning with thermoresponsive copolymers. Thus, culture of detachable conditioned cell sheets is shortened while retaining structural integrity and contractility.

  8. Taking It to the Bone: The Cohort as Context for Novice Teachers Validating Culturally Responsive Beliefs and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canniff, Julie G.

    This study examined the experiences of a cohort of seven beginning high school teachers, all of whom were in their first year of teaching in schools where low performing students were at the greatest risk and where a culture of professional learning communities was rare. Teachers were struggling with what it meant to be a culturally responsive…

  9. Science and Mathematics Faculty Responses to a Policy-Based Initiative: Change Processes, Self-Efficacy Beliefs, and Department Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellett, Chad D.; Demir, Kadir; Monsaas, Judith

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine change processes, self-efficacy beliefs, and department culture and the roles these elements play in faculty engagement in working in K-12 schools. The development of three new web-based measures of faculty perceptions of change processes, self-efficacy beliefs, and department culture are described. The…

  10. Temporal change in culturable phenanthrene degraders in response to long-term exposure to phenanthrene in a soil column system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodour, Adria A; Wang, Jiann-Ming; Brusseau, Mark L; Maier, Raina M

    2003-10-01

    Widespread environmental contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) has led to increased interest in the use of natural attenuation as a clean-up strategy. However, few bioremediation studies have investigated the behaviour of the indigenous PAH-degrading community after long-term exposure to a PAH. In this study, a column packed with sandy loam soil was exposed to a solution saturated with phenanthrene ( approximately 1.2 mg l-1) for a 6-month period to examine the temporal response of the indigenous phenanthrene-degrading community. Initial soil, effluent, and final soil samples were collected and analysed for phenanthrene concentration and culturable phenanthrene degraders. Phenanthrene-degrading isolates were grouped by colony morphology. For each unique group, 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction was performed, and then sequencing analysis was used to identify the isolate at the genus level. Twenty-five phenanthrene-degrading isolates, potentially representing 19 genera, were obtained from this analysis. Of these, eight genera have not been reported previously to degrade phenanthrene, including Afipia, Janthinobacterium, Leptothrix, Massilia, Methylobacterium, Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium and Thiobacillus. Results indicate that the dominant phenanthrene-degrading population changed over the course of this 6-month experiment. Specifically, the isolates obtained initially from the soil were not subsequently found in either effluent samples or the soil at the end of the experiment. Furthermore, several isolates that were found in the soil at the end of the experiment were not observed in the soil initially or in the effluent samples. This study confirms earlier findings indicating that a diverse community participates in phenanthrene degradation in the environment, and also suggests that the composition of this community is temporally variable. PMID:14510842

  11. Respiration and protein synthesis in nongrowing cultured pear fruit cells in response to ethylene and modified atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The respiration of pear fruit (Pyrus communis L. Passe Crassane) cells was monitored after subculture into an auxin-free, mannitol-enriched medium in which the cells remained viable but did not grow. Respiration rates were affected by the presence or absence of sucrose in the medium even though the cells retained reserves of sucrose and starch. Provided the medium contained respirable carbohydrate, exposure to ethylene (1-10 microliters per liter) increased the respiration rate with some acceleration of cell death. In the range from 10 to 2% oxygen by volume, the respiration rate of the cells decreased with oxygen concentration resulting in some prolongation of cell life. Thus, in their responses to ethylene and modified atmospheres, the cells reflected the behavior of harvested fruits. Having defined conditions under which respiration rate could be varied without apparent influence on the quiescent state of the cells, they sought a connection between maintenance respiration and protein turnover. Relative rates of protein synthesis were assessed by measuring ribosome distribution between monosomes and polysomes. In general, the higher the respiration rate the higher the proportion of polysomes supporting the thesis that protein turnover is a variable component of maintenance metabolism. Protein turnover in cells incubated in the presence or absence of sucrose was measured as retained α-amino-3H following a pulse of 3H2O. Turnover was shown to be a quantitatively important component of the maintenance budget and to be more rapidly in cells in media supplemented with sucrose through the chase period. The experiments illustrate that cultured cells may be used to explore aspects of the maintenance metabolism of resting or senescent cells that are not amenable to study in bulky fruit tissues

  12. Use of Response Surface Methodology to Optimize Culture Conditions for Hydrogen Production by an Anaerobic Bacterial Strain from Soluble Starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieu, Hoa Thi Quynh; Nguyen, Yen Thi; Dang, Yen Thi; Nguyen, Binh Thanh

    2016-05-01

    Biohydrogen is a clean source of energy that produces no harmful byproducts during combustion, being a potential sustainable energy carrier for the future. Therefore, biohydrogen produced by anaerobic bacteria via dark fermentation has attracted attention worldwide as a renewable energy source. However, the hydrogen production capability of these bacteria depends on major factors such as substrate, iron-containing hydrogenase, reduction agent, pH, and temperature. In this study, the response surface methodology (RSM) with central composite design (CCD) was employed to improve the hydrogen production by an anaerobic bacterial strain isolated from animal waste in Phu Linh, Soc Son, Vietnam (PL strain). The hydrogen production process was investigated as a function of three critical factors: soluble starch concentration (8 g L-1 to 12 g L-1), ferrous iron concentration (100 mg L-1 to 200 mg L-1), and l-cysteine concentration (300 mg L-1 to 500 mg L-1). RSM analysis showed that all three factors significantly influenced hydrogen production. Among them, the ferrous iron concentration presented the greatest influence. The optimum hydrogen concentration of 1030 mL L-1 medium was obtained with 10 g L-1 soluble starch, 150 mg L-1 ferrous iron, and 400 mg L-1 l-cysteine after 48 h of anaerobic fermentation. The hydrogen concentration produced by the PL strain was doubled after using RSM. The obtained results indicate that RSM with CCD can be used as a technique to optimize culture conditions for enhancement of hydrogen production by the selected anaerobic bacterial strain. Hydrogen production from low-cost organic substrates such as soluble starch using anaerobic fermentation methods may be one of the most promising approaches.

  13. Security culture in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standing of the terms 'security' and 'culture' will be discussed. A brief overview about states and operators responsibilities linked to security culture will be given, and a definition of the term 'security culture' will be explained. The security culture in German nuclear facilities will be briefly discussed

  14. Planning and designing urban places in response to climate and local culture: A case study of Mussafah District in Abu Dhabi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajić-Brković Milica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with how climate and local culture specifics contribute to urban diversity, and how they affect the way urban spaces are being conceived, planned and designed. The authors argue that regardless of the globally accepted principles of sustainability which emphasize smart responses, diversity and culture as the prime drives in urban development of, cities around the world are continually experiencing the all-alike solutions, which often compromise their identity and character. Having taken the genuine stands of the philosophy as a starting point for examining the subject, the authors explore and present how the climate specifics, along with the uniqueness of local culture, lead toward the solutions which make a difference to their cities. The discussion is illustrated by the case study the authors were engaged in, the Mussafah District project in Abu Dhabi, a redevelopment proposal recently initiated and developed by International Society of Urban and Regional Planners -ISOCARP and Urban Planning Council of Abu Dhabi.

  15. Electroporation of cultured adult rat hepatocytes with the c-myc gene potentiates DNA synthesis in response to epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human c-myc gene was introduced and transiently expressed in adult rat hepatocyte cultures by the technique of electroporation and its effect on DNA synthesis was examined. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been found to stimulate a wave of DNA synthesis in electroporated rat hepatocytes. Hepatocyte cultures electroporated with the c-myc gene showed a potentiation of this EGF effect exhibiting rates of DNA synthesis up to 50% greater than those of control electroporated cultures, as determined by [3H]thymidine labeling of cell nuclei. This potentiation was dependent on the amount of c-myc DNA transfected. The potentiation was due neither to an alteration in the dose-response of the stimulatory effect of EGF nor to a change in the time course of the DNA synthesis wave

  16. Dehistoricized Cultural Identity and Cultural Othering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiguo, Qu

    2013-01-01

    The assumption that each culture has its own distinctive identity has been generally accepted in the discussion of cultural identities. Quite often identity formation is not perceived as a dynamic and interactive ongoing process that engages other cultures and involves change in its responses to different challenges at different times. I will…

  17. The Investigation of the Relationship between Cultural Values and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR, Organizational Commitment (OC and Personal Benefit (PB in Accounting System of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Jabbarzadeh Kangarlouei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the relationships between cultural values and ethical dimensions of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR, Organizational Commitment (OC and Personal Benefit (PB in accounting system of Iran. The cultural values criteria in this study include Power Distance Index (PDI, Uncertainty Avoidance Index (UAI, Individualism (IDV and Masculinity (MAS. For measuring the cultural values, Hofstede questionnaire (1991 and in order to collect data for CSR, OC, and PB, Singhapakdi et al. (1996, Hunt et al. (1989, and Clikeman and Henning standard questionnaire (2000 were used, respectively, because of their high validity and reliability. Research sample consists of 115 accepted companies in Tehran Stock Exchange (TSE during the period of 2004-2010. The regression models and econometric software EViews 6 are used to test the hypotheses. Research findings indicate that there is a weak correlation between cultural values and ethical dimensions of CRS, OC, and PB that results in the rejection of research hypotheses. In addition, among the variables of cultural values, UAI has the most and MAS index has the least impact on CSR.

  18. Shoot differentiation from protocorm callus cultures of Vanilla planifolia (Orchidaceae: proteomic and metabolic responses at early stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payet Bertrand

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vanilla planifolia is an important Orchid commercially cultivated for the production of natural vanilla flavour. Vanilla plants are conventionally propagated by stem cuttings and thus causing injury to the mother plants. Regeneration and in vitro mass multiplication are proposed as an alternative to minimize damage to mother plants. Because mass production of V. planifolia through indirect shoot differentiation from callus culture is rare and may be a successful use of in vitro techniques for producing somaclonal variants, we have established a novel protocol for the regeneration of vanilla plants and investigated the initial biochemical and molecular mechanisms that trigger shoot organogenesis from embryogenic/organogenic callus. Results For embryogenic callus induction, seeds obtained from 7-month-old green pods of V. planifolia were inoculated on MS basal medium (BM containing TDZ (0.5 mg l-1. Germination of unorganized mass callus such as protocorm -like structure (PLS arising from each seed has been observed. The primary embryogenic calli have been formed after transferring on BM containing IAA (0.5 mg l-1 and TDZ (0.5 mg l-1. These calli were maintained by subculturing on BM containing IAA (0.5 mg l-1 and TDZ (0.3 mg l-1 during 6 months and formed embryogenic/organogenic calli. Histological analysis showed that shoot organogenesis was induced between 15 and 20 days after embryogenic/organogenic calli were transferred onto MS basal medium with NAA (0.5 mg l-1. By associating proteomics and metabolomics analyses, the biochemical and molecular markers responsible for shoot induction have been studied in 15-day-old calli at the stage where no differentiating part was visible on organogenic calli. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight-tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS analysis revealed that 15 protein spots are significantly expressed (P Conclusion The subculture of embryogenic/organogenic calli onto shoot differentiation medium triggers the stimulation of cell metabolism principally at three levels namely (i initiation of photosynthesis, glycolysis and phenolic compounds synthesis; (ii amino acid - protein synthesis, and protein stabilization; (iii sugar degradation. These biochemical mechanisms associated with the initiation of shoot formation during protocorm - like body (PLB organogenesis could be coordinated by the removal of TDZ in callus maintenance medium. These results might contribute to elucidate the complex mechanism that leads to vanilla callus differentiation and subsequent shoot formation into PLB organogenesis. Moreover, our results highlight an early intermediate metabolic event in vanillin biosynthetic pathway with respect to secondary metabolism. Indeed, for the first time in vanilla tissue culture, phenolic compounds such as glucoside A and glucoside B were identified. The degradation of these compounds in specialized tissue (i.e. young green beans probably contributes to the biosynthesis of glucovanillin, the parent compound of vanillin.

  19. Response to artificial inoculation with Phytophthora infestans of potato clones insensitive to culture filtrate of the fungus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction of general resistance to Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary by in vitro culture has been reported for cvs. 'Bintje' and 'Kennebec'. In both cases, sporangia suspension of the fungus were used as selective agent. As reported for many host-pathogen interactions, culture filtrate or purified toxins may also contribute to the selection of resistant genotypes. Challenge of mutagenized buds of cv. 'Spunta' with culture filtrate of P. infestans allowed selection of insensitive clones. To verify the possible correlation between culture filtrate insensitivity and disease resistance, different inoculation technique were applied to these clones. Considering that general resistance to late blight is a complex trait, different tests were performed to evaluate the behaviour during various stages of pathogenesis, such as infection, invasion, mycelial growth and sporulation. 7 refs, 1 tab

  20. Cyclic AMP selectively enhances bradykinin receptor synthesis and expression in cultured arterial smooth muscle. Inhibition of angiotensin II and vasopressin response.

    OpenAIRE

    Dixon, B S

    1994-01-01

    Bradykinin receptors on vascular smooth muscle may play an important role in regulating the endogenous effects of the vascular kallikrein-kinin system. The present study examined the effect of cyclic nucleotides on bradykinin-stimulated responses in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells. Short term stimulation (1 min) with cyclic AMP produced a variable inhibition of bradykinin-stimulated calcium mobilization which was lost in later passaged cells. However, long-term stimulation (24 h) produc...