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1

Adolescent Sexual Activity and the Development of Delinquent Behavior: The Role of Relationship Context  

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Despite the well-established association between adolescent sexual activity and delinquent behavior, little research has examined the potential importance of relationship contexts in moderating this association. The current study used longitudinal, behavioral genetic data on 519 same-sex twin pairs (48.6% female) divided into two age cohorts…

Harden, K. Paige; Mendle, Jane

2011-01-01

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Frustration Potential of Delinquent Adolescents  

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Aims: To identify the magnitude of different modes and global frustration, to find out the effect of domicile on level of frustration of delinquent adolescents and normal adolescents. Study Design: Present one was a comparative study to assess frustration potential of delinquent adolescents and normal adolescents. Place and Duration of Study: Sample: Delinquent adolescents (Observation Homes at Bangalore, Mysore, Shimoga and Dharwad cities of Ka...

Shivakumara K.; Mane Sangeetha R.; Pal Ashok A.; Lamani Ravikanth B.

2014-01-01

3

Attachment bonding of delinquent adolescents  

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Full Text Available Main objective of this research is to define adolescence bonding as well as to identify their typical bonding type. The bonding was observed in two ways. The analysis was based on seven attachment dimensions that were defined by N. Hanak, as well as on the basis of Bartholomew’s four-style attachment model. The research was conducted at multiple sites: two secondary schools in Sombor, the Juvenile Correctional Institution in Kruševac and the Juvenile Correctional Facility in Niš. It included 524 persons, 421 adolescents and 103 delinquents. Adolescents are the second and the third grade students of the Secondary Technical School and the Second­ary School of Economics, while delinquents were testable juveniles. All of them are under correctional measures in the above mentioned institutions. All results are in accordance with the theoretical expectations. Delinquents attach in insecure way more frequently: 68, 9% delinquents from our sample showed insecure attachment. The fearful type of attachment appears to be typical of delinquents. Delinquents are facing difficulties in obtaining support of close persons, as well as in using significant persons they are related to as safe harbours in stressful situations. In addition, they would see themselves as not worthy of attention and love. There is a high level of painful feelings related to childhood and family, as well as ambivalent and nega­tive current family relations.

?a?i? Sandra

2013-01-01

4

Physical child abuse and adolescent violent delinquency: the mediating and moderating roles of personal relationships.  

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Adolescent personal relationships with parents and peers are studied for their mediating and moderating roles in the effect of preadolescent physical abuse on adolescent violent delinquency. One hundred physically abused preadolescents and 100 matched nonabused classmates were studied at 10 and 16 years. Adolescent attachment to parents and verbal and physical abuse in relationships with parents during adolescence mediated between preadolescent abuse and later violent delinquency. Friends' delinquency in adolescence and verbal and physical abuse with best friends in adolescence moderated the relationship between early abuse and later violent delinquency. Low levels of delinquency among friends significantly decreased risk for violent delinquent outcome for abused as contrasted to nonabused adolescents. Abusive behavior with best friends exacerbated risk for violent delinquent outcome more for abused than for nonabused adolescents. Attachment to friends was not found to play a significant role in the relationship between childhood abuse and adolescent violent delinquency. PMID:17631621

Salzinger, Suzanne; Rosario, Margaret; Feldman, Richard S

2007-08-01

5

QUALITY OF LIFE (QOL AMONG DELINQUENT ADOLESCENTS  

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Full Text Available The present study was aimed to investigate the quality of life (QOL among delinquent adolescents. This study was a descriptive study with ex-post facto design. Using a random sampling technique 287 (consists of 144 normal and 143 delinquent adolescents were selected for the purpose of this study. The Quality of life (QOL questionnaire (WHO-QOL-BRIEF developed by WHO (1996 and standardized in Iran by Usefy (2010 was used to collect the data. Result showed that comparing to normal adolescents; delinquents had obtained fewer score on four domain of quality of life (QOL including Physical health, Psychological status, Social relationships and, Environment (p< 0.001.

SEYED MORTEZA ESHAGHI

2013-03-01

6

The Prevention and Treatment of Delinquent/Anti-Social Behaviour in Children and Adolescence.  

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Presented are nine papers given at a New Zealand symposium on the prevention and treatment of delinquent/antisocial behavior in children and adolescents. Major theories such as the cultural deviance theory are noted in the introduction by D.R. Mitchell. J. E. Ritchie defines delinquency as law breaking, critiques delinquency research, and offers a…

Mitchell, D. R., Ed.

7

Brief Report: Do Delinquency and Community Violence Exposure Explain Internalizing Problems in Early Adolescent Gang Members?  

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Adolescent gang members are at higher risk for internalizing problems as well as exposure to community violence and delinquency. This study examined whether gang membership in early adolescence is associated with internalizing problems (depression, anxiety, and suicidal behavior) and whether these associations are mediated by delinquency and…

Madan, Anjana; Mrug, Sylvie; Windle, Michael

2011-01-01

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Predictors of Delinquency among Adolescents of Divorced Families  

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Although delinquency is universal, few studies examined it from an Asian perspective, and even fewer considered adolescents of divorced families in Iran. The current study examined whether correlates of delinquency among western adolescents are similarly effective for predicting delinquency among adolescents from divorced families in the Mashhad city in Iran. Post-divorce parental conflict, maternal distress, economic hardship and parent-child relationship were regressed against delinquency. ...

Nooshin Sabour Esmaeili; Siti Nor Yaacob; Rumaya Juhari

2013-01-01

9

The role of economic strain on adolescent delinquency: a microsocial process model.  

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The current study examines the role of economic strain as a moderator of the microsocial processes influencing younger siblings' delinquency (externalizing behavior and substance use) in a longitudinal design. The younger siblings (122 younger brothers and 122 younger sisters) were from 244 families with same-sex biological siblings. Structural equation modeling was utilized to examine a process model whereby mothers' harsh/inconsistent parenting and older sibling delinquency influence younger siblings' delinquent behavior via sibling aggression and delinquent peer affiliation. Findings suggest that indirect mechanisms vary as a function of economic strain, with sibling aggression having a stronger, more detrimental effect on adolescent delinquency in economically strained families. Data suggest that familial economic conditions contextualize the relative roles of parenting, sibling, and peer processes in the transmission of risk to adolescent delinquency. PMID:22709262

Low, Sabina; Sinclair, Ryan; Shortt, Joann Wu

2012-08-01

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Predictors of Delinquency among Adolescents of Divorced Families  

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Full Text Available Although delinquency is universal, few studies examined it from an Asian perspective, and even fewer considered adolescents of divorced families in Iran. The current study examined whether correlates of delinquency among western adolescents are similarly effective for predicting delinquency among adolescents from divorced families in the Mashhad city in Iran. Post-divorce parental conflict, maternal distress, economic hardship and parent-child relationship were regressed against delinquency. The parent-child relationship was the strongest significant predictor of self-reported delinquency.

Nooshin Sabour Esmaeili

2013-08-01

11

Parent and Peer Pathways to Adolescent Delinquency: Variations by Ethnicity and Neighborhood Context  

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Effects of ethnicity and neighborhood quality often are confounded in research on adolescent delinquent behavior. This study examined the pathways to delinquency among 2,277 African American and 5,973 European American youth residing in high-risk and low-risk neighborhoods. Using data from a national study of youth, a meditational model was tested…

Deutsch, Arielle R.; Crockett, Lisa J.; Wolff, Jennifer M.; Russell, Stephen T.

2012-01-01

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Delinquency and peer acceptance in adolescence: A within-person test of Moffitt's hypotheses.  

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We tested 2 hypotheses derived from Moffitt's (1993) taxonomic theory of antisocial behavior, both of which are central to her explanation for the rise in delinquency during adolescence. We tested whether persistently delinquent individuals become more accepted by their peers during adolescence and whether individuals who abstain from delinquent behavior become less accepted. Participants were 4,359 adolescents from 14 communities in the PROSPER study, which assessed friendship networks and delinquency from 6th (M = 11.8 years) to 9th (M = 15.3 years) grade. We operationalized peer acceptance as number of nominations received (indegree centrality), attractiveness as a friend (adjusted indegree centrality), and network bridging potential (betweenness centrality) and tested the hypotheses with multilevel modeling. Contrary to Moffitt's hypothesis, persistently delinquent youths did not become more accepted between early and middle adolescence, and although abstainers were less accepted in early adolescence, they became more accepted over time. Results were similar for boys and girls; when differences occurred, they provided no support for Moffitt's hypotheses for boys and were opposite of her hypotheses for girls. Sensitivity analyses in which alternative strategies and additional data were used to identify persistently delinquent adolescents produced similar results. We explore the implications of these results for Moffitt's assertions that social mimicry of persistently antisocial adolescents leads to increases in delinquency and that social isolation leads to abstention. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25243328

Rulison, Kelly L; Kreager, Derek A; Osgood, D Wayne

2014-11-01

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Comparison Between Family Power Structure and the Quality of Parent-Child Interaction Among the Delinquent and Non-Delinquent Adolescents  

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Background: Few studies indicate that most behavioral problems are due to family dysfunction and inappropriate family environment. It seems that the family of the delinquent adolescent is unbalanced in the power structure and parenting style. Objectives: The present study compares the family power structure and parent-child relationship quality in delinquent and non-delinquent young subjects in Tehran. Patients and Methods: Eighty students of secondary schools aged between 15 and 18 in Tehran were enrolled with cluster sampling method and 80 delinquent adolescents of the Correction and Rehabilitation Centers aged between 15 and 18 were chosen with a convenience sampling method. They responded to an instrument of family power structure (Child–parents relationship inventory). Data was compared between these two groups by utilizing the independent and dependent t-test and Levene’s test. Results: The findings indicated there is a significant difference between delinquent and non-delinquent adolescents in family power structure and its subscales (P parent-child relationship (P family has a significant effect on deviant behavior in adolescents. The fathers’ parenting is more strongly linked to their sons’ delinquency. So, family power structure and parent-child relationship can be considered in therapeutic interventions (prevention and treatment) for adolescentsdelinquency. PMID:25032158

Khodabakhshi Koolaee, Anahita; Shaghelani Lor, Hossein; Soleimani, Ali Akbar; Rahmatizadeh, Masoumeh

2014-01-01

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Sports Participation and Juvenile Delinquency: The Role of the Peer Context among Adolescent Boys and Girls with Varied Histories of Problem Behavior  

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In a study of 1,344 urban adolescents, the authors examined the relation between participation in organized sports and juvenile delinquency. They compared youth who participated in sports to those who only participated in nonathletic activities and to those who did not participate in any organized activities. They also examined the indirect…

Gardner, Margo; Roth, Jodie; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

2009-01-01

15

Delinquency as a Symptom of Adolescents' Orientation toward Status and Success.  

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Deviant behavior in adolescence was studied using 1,717 west German adolescent students (51 percent males) aged 12 to 16 years. Questionnaire data were analyzed. Results show that increased rate of delinquency occurs with difficulties connected with integration into the network of academic performance and problems with peer group recognition. (SLD)

Hurrelmann, Klaus; Engel, Uwe

1992-01-01

16

Reciprocal Effects between Parental Solicitation, Parental Control, Adolescent Disclosure, and Adolescent Delinquency  

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This two-wave multi-informant study examined the bidirectional associations of parental control and solicitation with adolescent disclosure and delinquency. Participants were 289 adolescents (150 females and 139 males, modal age 14) and both parents. Parental solicitation and control did not predict adolescent delinquency, but adolescents'…

Keijsers, Loes; Branje, Susan J. T.; VanderValk, Inge E.; Meeus, Wim

2010-01-01

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Post-Divorce Parental Conflict and AdolescentsDelinquency in Divorced Families  

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This study reviews several empirical researches which highlight the effect of post-divorce parental conflict as one of the most important factors on adolescentsdelinquency in divorced families. Research consistently shows that parental conflict affects parental relationship and this poor parental quality may transfer into poor parent-child relationship that may negatively influence adolescent functions and behaviors. Research showed that adolescents who are exposed to post-divorce pare...

Siti Nor Yaacob; nooshin sabour

2011-01-01

18

The Association between Romantic Relationships and Delinquency in Adolescence and Young Adulthood  

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This study examined the association between romantic relationships and delinquency in adolescence and young adulthood. Using a large, longitudinal, and nationally representative sample, results from negative binomial regressions showed a positive association between romantic involvement and delinquency in adolescence. Further, the cumulative number of romantic relationships from adolescence to young adulthood was positively related to delinquency in young adulthood even controlling for earlie...

Cui, Ming; Ueno, Koji; Fincham, Frank D.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Wickrama, K. A. S.

2012-01-01

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Parental Divorce and Adolescent Delinquency: Ruling out the Impact of Common Genes  

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Although the well-documented association between parental divorce and adolescent delinquency is generally assumed to be environmental (i.e., causal) in origin, genetic mediation is also possible. Namely, the behavior problems often found in children of divorce could derive from similar pathology in the parents, pathology that is both heritable and…

Burt, S. Alexandra; Barnes, Ashlee R.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

2008-01-01

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State and Trait Emotions in Delinquent Adolescents  

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Objective: To examine the structure of emotions and affective dysregulation in juvenile delinquents. Method: Fifty-six juvenile delinquents from a local juvenile hall and 169 subjects from a local high school were recruited for this study. All participants completed psychometric testing for trait emotions followed by measurements of state emotions…

Plattner, Belinda; Karnik, Niranjan; Jo, Booil; Hall, Rebecca E.; Schallauer, Astrid; Carrion, Victor; Feucht, Martha; Steiner, Hans

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
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Parental Divorce and Adolescent Delinquency: Ruling out the Impact of Common Genes  

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Although the well-documented association between parental divorce and adolescent delinquency is generally assumed to be environmental (i.e., causal) in origin, genetic mediation is also possible. Namely, the behavior problems often found in children of divorce could derive from similar pathology in the parents, pathology that is both heritable and increases the risk that the parent will experience divorce. To test these alternative hypotheses, we made use of a novel design that incorporated timing of divorce in a sample of 610 adoptive and biological families. We reasoned that if genes common to parent and child mediate this association, non-adopted youth should manifest increased delinquency in the presence of parental divorce even if the divorce preceded their birth (i.e., was from a prior parental relationship). However, should the association be environmental in origin, adolescents should manifest increased delinquency only in response to divorce exposure, and this association should not vary by adoption status. Results firmly supported the latter, suggesting that it is the experience of parental divorce, and not common genes, that drives the association between divorce and adolescent delinquency. PMID:18999329

Burt, S. Alexandra; Barnes, Ashlee R.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

2008-01-01

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Parental divorce and adolescent delinquency: ruling out the impact of common genes.  

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Although the well-documented association between parental divorce and adolescent delinquency is generally assumed to be environmental (i.e., causal) in origin, genetic mediation is also possible. Namely, the behavior problems often found in children of divorce could derive from similar pathology in the parents, pathology that is both heritable and increases the risk that the parent will experience divorce. To test these alternative hypotheses, the authors made use of a novel design that incorporated timing of divorce in a sample of 610 adoptive and biological families. They reasoned that if genes common to parent and child mediate this association, nonadopted youth should manifest increased delinquency in the presence of parental divorce even if the divorce preceded their birth (i.e., was from a prior parental relationship). However, should the association be environmental in origin, the authors reasoned that adolescents should manifest increased delinquency only in response to divorce exposure, and this association should not vary by adoption status. Results firmly supported the latter, suggesting that it is the experience of parental divorce, and not common genes, that drives the association between divorce and adolescent delinquency. PMID:18999329

Burt, S Alexandra; Barnes, Ashlee R; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

2008-11-01

23

Rock Music and Korean Adolescent's Antisocial Behavior.  

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The relationship between rock music preference and antisocial behavior among Korean adolescents was examined. The Korean versions of the Sensation Seeking Scale and the Antisocial Behavior Checklist were used to measure sensation seeking motivation and delinquency. Adolescents (N=1,079) were categorized as "rock/metal,""dance," or "ballad" based…

Kim, Inkyung; Kwak, Keumjoo; Chang, Geunyoung; Yang, Jinyoung

24

Delinquency in Male Adolescents: The Role of Alexithymia and Family Structure  

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The purpose of this study was to examine the linkages between alexithymia and delinquency in male adolescents (age ranging from 14 to 18 years), and to investigate whether alexithymia was a good discriminatory factor for juvenile delinquency. Thirty-six offender adolescents and 46 non-offender control adolescents participated in the study and…

Zimmermann, Gregoire

2006-01-01

25

Parental Divorce and Adolescent Delinquency: Ruling out the Impact of Common Genes  

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Although the well-documented association between parental divorce and adolescent delinquency is generally assumed to be environmental (i.e., causal) in origin, genetic mediation is also possible. Namely, the behavior problems often found in children of divorce could derive from similar pathology in the parents, pathology that is both heritable and increases the risk that the parent will experience divorce. To test these alternative hypotheses, we made use of a novel design that incorporated t...

Burt, S. Alexandra; Barnes, Ashlee R.; Mcgue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

2008-01-01

26

Peer rejection, affiliation with deviant peers, delinquency, and risky sexual behavior.  

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Risky sexual behavior poses significant health risks by increasing sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies. Previous research has documented many factors related to risky sexual behavior. This study adds to the literature by proposing a prospective, developmental model of peer factors related to risky sexual behavior. Developmental pathways to risky sexual behavior were examined in a sample of 517 individuals (51% female; 82% European American, 16% African American, 2% other) followed from age 5-27. Structural equation models examined direct and indirect effects of peer rejection (assessed via peer nominations at ages 5, 6, 7, and 8), affiliation with deviant peers (assessed via self-report at ages 11 and 12), and delinquency (assessed via maternal report at ages 10 and 16) on risky sexual behavior (assessed via self-report at age 27). More peer rejection during childhood, affiliation with deviant peers during pre- adolescence, and delinquency in childhood and adolescence predicted more risky sexual behavior through age 27, although delinquency at age 16 was the only risk factor that had a significant direct effect on risky sexual behavior through age 27 above and beyond the other risk factors. Peer rejection was related to subsequent risk factors for girls but not boys. Peer risk factors as early as age 5 shape developmental pathways through childhood and adolescence and have implications for risky sexual behavior into adulthood. PMID:25150986

Lansford, Jennifer E; Dodge, Kenneth A; Fontaine, Reid Griffith; Bates, John E; Pettit, Gregory S

2014-10-01

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Depressive symptoms, exposure to aggression and delinquency proneness in adolescence: Impact of two decades of war and political violence on adolescent mental health  

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Full Text Available Traumatic experiences in Serbia in the last two decades have caused significant psychological consequences in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive symptoms, exposure to aggression and delinquency proneness among high school and elementary school students in Belgrade, Serbia. The participants were 899 students (51.8% were female with no prior treatment for psychological problems, with a mean age of 16.70±1.95. All used instruments were taken from the modified Social and Health Assessment (SAHA. Our findings show that delinquent behavior or exposure to delinquency was significantly related to depressive symptoms. The strongest predictors of depression were variables concerning legal consequences, affiliation with delinquent peers, victimization by community violence and peer victimization. This study confirmed a strong correlation between depression and exposure to violence. Identifying adolescents with depressive symptoms is important for prevention of serious mental health consequences.

Pejovi?-Milovan?evi? Milica

2013-01-01

28

Problem Behavior and Heart Rate Reactivity in Adopted Adolescents: Longitudinal and Concurrent Relations  

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The present longitudinal study examined resting heart rate and heart rate variability and reactivity to a stressful gambling task in adopted adolescents with aggressive, delinquent, or internalizing behavior problems and adopted adolescents without behavior problems (total N=151). Early-onset delinquent adolescents showed heart rate…

Bimmel, Nicole; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Juffer, Femmie; De Geus, Eco J. C.

2008-01-01

29

Pubertal development, spare time activities, and adolescent delinquency: testing the contextual amplification hypothesis.  

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Extensive evidence supports associations between early pubertal timing and adolescent externalizing behavior, but how and under which conditions they are linked is not fully understood. In addition, pubertal development is also characterized by variations in the relative speed at which individuals mature, but studies linking pubertal 'tempo' and outcomes are scarce. This study examined the mediating and moderating roles of spare time activities in associations between pubertal development and later delinquency, using data from a large (4,327 girls, 4,250 boys) longitudinal UK cohort (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children). Self-reports of Tanner stage were available from ages 9 to 14, spare time activities at age 12 and delinquency at age 15. Pubertal development was examined using latent growth models. Spare time activities were categorized using factor analyses, yielding four types (hanging out at home, hanging out outside, consumerist behavior, and sports/games), which were examined as mediators and moderators. Earlier and faster maturation predicted delinquency in boys and girls. Spare time activities partially mediated these links such that early maturing girls more often engaged in hanging out outside, which placed them at greater risk for delinquency. In addition, compared to their later and slower maturing counterparts, boys who matured earlier and faster were less likely to engage in sports/games, a spare time activity type that is linked to lower delinquency risk. No moderation effects were found. The findings extend previous research on outcomes of early maturation and show how spare time activities act as proxies between pubertal development and delinquency. PMID:24323040

Kretschmer, Tina; Oliver, Bonamy R; Maughan, Barbara

2014-08-01

30

The Development of Delinquency and Perceived Friendship Quality in Adolescent Best Friendship Dyads  

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The present study examines both the unique and the combined role of best friends' delinquency and perceived friendship quality in the development of adolescent delinquency. Questionnaire data were gathered from 435 Dutch adolescent best friends (mean age at first wave = 12.97) over a period of 5 years with annual assessments. Results showed that…

Selfhout, Maarten H. W.; Branje, Susan J. T.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

2008-01-01

31

WISC-III and KAIT results in adolescent delinquent males.  

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The WISC-III and Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test (KAIT) were administered to 30 delinquents in a county youth center as part of their routine psychological assessment. The P > V discrepancy found in earlier studies of delinquent WISC-R IQs was not found with the WISC-III. However, the Fluid IQs on the Kaufmans' test averaged 11 IQ-points higher than the WISC-III IQs. There was a mean difference of 8.66 points between the KAIT Composite IQ and the WISC-III FSIQ, in favor of the former. These findings suggest KAIT IQs that are significantly higher than WISC-III scores (p < .001). The implications are discussed. PMID:8912113

Law, J G; Faison, L

1996-11-01

32

Internalizing Symptoms Linking Youths' Maltreatment and Delinquent Behavior  

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This study examines internalizing mental health symptoms (depression and posttraumatic stress disorder) as potential intervening factors in the relationship between maltreatment and delinquency using data from the National Survey for Child and Adolescent Well-Being (N = 1,179). Significant mediating effects indicated that youth at greater risk of…

Bender, Kimberly; Postlewait, Ariana W.; Thompson, Sanna J.; Springer, David W.

2011-01-01

33

Developmental Links of Adolescent Disclosure, Parental Solicitation, and Control with Delinquency: Moderation by Parental Support  

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This 4-wave study among 309 Dutch adolescents and their parents examined changes in adolescent disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control and their links with the development of delinquent activities. Annually, adolescents and both parents reported on adolescent disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control, and adolescents

Keijsers, Loes; Frijns, Tom; Branje, Susan J. T.; Meeus, Wim

2009-01-01

34

Inconsistent Self-Report of Delinquency by Adolescents and Young Adults with ADHD  

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The purpose of the current study was to test the ability of adolescents and young adults with childhood ADHD to reliably self-report delinquency history. Data were examined from the Pittsburgh ADHD Longitudinal Study (PALS), a follow-up study of children diagnosed with ADHD between 1987 and 1996. Self-report of lifetime delinquency history was…

Sibley, Margaret H.; Pelham, William E.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Babinski, Dara E.; Biswas, Aparajita

2010-01-01

35

A Cross-Lagged Longitudinal Study of Relations between Academic Achievement and Korean Adolescent Delinquency  

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Objective: Previous studies have shown that academic achievement has a significant effect on juvenile delinquency, with the reverse reported as well. This study, therefore, examined the reciprocal causal relationships between academic achievement and juvenile delinquency. Methods: The participants were 3449 Korean adolescents (mean age 13.2 years,…

Lee, Julie

2013-01-01

36

Further Validation of the Problem Inventory for Adolescent Girls: Comparing Caucasian and Black Delinquents and Nondelinquents.  

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A role-playing measure of teenage girls' problem-solving skills--the Problem Inventory for Adolescent Girls (PIAG)--was administered to groups of Caucasian and Black female delinquents and nondelinquents. The PIAG significantly differentiated between adjudicated delinquents and nondelinquents and between subjects reporting high and low levels of…

Ward, Christine I.; McFall, Richard M.

1986-01-01

37

Race and perceived pubertal transition effects on girls' depressive symptoms and delinquent behaviors.  

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Most past research on the effects of early pubertal timing on girls' depressive symptoms and delinquent behavior has focused on either age of menarche or has combined multiple indicators of development into a single index of puberty. Past research has rarely examined both the onset of puberty such as age of menarche, as well more psychologically mediated impressions of puberty (i.e., perceived pubertal timing) within the same study. This study extends past research on racial differences and pubertal related effects on girls' depressive symptoms and delinquent behavior by examining the independent influence of different indicators of puberty (age of menarche, development of breasts, and perceived pubertal timing). Two waves of data (100% females) were used from African Americans (N = 481) and European Americans (N = 1259) who were enrolled in seventh- and eighth-grade during the first wave of data collection in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Early age of menarche was associated with high levels of depressive symptoms at Wave 1. Additionally, both early and late perceived pubertal timing were associated with high levels of depressive symptoms and high delinquent behaviors at Wave 1. The structural relationships among these variables were similar for African Americans and European Americans. Age of menarche and perceived pubertal timing influenced depressive symptoms and delinquent behavior at Wave 2 through depressive symptoms and delinquent behavior reported at Wave 1. The implications of these findings are discussed with an emphasis on how the specific indicator used to assess puberty is important in efforts to understand pubertal timing effects. PMID:23275063

Carter, Rona; Silverman, Wendy K; Jaccard, James

2013-08-01

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Growth in Adolescent Delinquency and Alcohol Use in Relation to Young Adult Crime, Alcohol Use Disorders, and Risky Sex: A Comparison of Youth from Low- versus Middle-Income Backgrounds  

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Background: This study examined adolescent delinquency and alcohol use in relation to young adult crime, alcohol use disorders (AUDs), and risky sex. Analyses further examined the influences of late childhood involvement in these problem behavior outcomes, with mediation through teen delinquency and alcohol use, and examined differences in the…

Mason, W. Alex; Hitch, Julia E.; Kosterman, Rick; McCarty, Carolyn A.; Herrenkohl, Todd I.; Hawkins, J. David

2010-01-01

39

Delinquency as a symptom of adolescents' orientation toward status and success.  

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In this paper, we follow the premise that delinquency in adolescence is a by-product of struggles with developmental tasks. In an empirical analysis of a survey of 1717 West German adolescents aged between 12 and 16, we found evidence that delinquency was associated with adolescents' conformity to society's standards of prestige and success. Data are presented that show a relationship between delinquency and inability to succeed at school, on the one hand, and failure to achieve full recognition of status and prestige in the peer group, on the other hand. The findings provide evidence that difficulties and problems connected with the integration into the network of academic performance, as well as difficulties and problems connected with recognition within the peer group, are associated with delinquency. PMID:24263683

Hurrelmann, K; Engel, U

1992-02-01

40

Variation in the sustained effects of the communities that care prevention system on adolescent smoking, delinquency, and violence.  

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Communities That Care (CTC) is a universal, science-based community prevention system designed to reduce risk, enhance protection, and prevent adolescent health and behavior problems community wide. CTC has been found to have sustained effects on cigarette use and delinquent and violent behaviors in grade 10 in a panel of 4,407 students followed from fifth grade in a community randomized trial. It is important to test variation in the effects of this prevention system designed to be universal to understand for whom it is most effective and whether it fails to produce change or leads to iatrogenic effects for certain categories of individuals. The present study examined variation in the sustained effects of CTC on tenth-grade cigarette use and delinquent and violent behaviors. Interaction analyses suggest that the effect of CTC did not differ between those who had high levels of community-targeted risk factors at baseline or had already engaged in substance use, delinquency, or violence at baseline versus those who had not. Although CTC reduced the prevalence of both girls' and boys' problem behaviors, the effect on delinquency was marginally (p?=?0.08) larger for boys than for girls. PMID:23412948

Oesterle, Sabrina; Hawkins, J David; Fagan, Abigail A; Abbott, Robert D; Catalano, Richard F

2014-04-01

 
 
 
 
41

Examining the Moderating Role of Family Cohesion on the Relationship Between Witnessed Community Violence and Delinquency in a National Sample of Adolescents  

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Witnessed community violence has been linked to a number of internalizing and externalizing problems in adolescents. Guided by Cicchetti and Lynch’s (1993) ecological-transactional model, this study aimed to examine the impact that family-level factors had on negative outcomes associated with witnessed community violence. Using a nationally representative sample, we explored the moderational role of family cohesion in the relationship between witnessing community violence and delinquent behavior while taking demographic variables into account. Results from the investigation suggested that low levels of family cohesion were predictive of delinquency after controlling for race, gender, past delinquency, and direct trauma. In addition, the findings suggested that family cohesion moderated the impact of witnessed community violence on future delinquent behavior. Future directions for research and implications for practice were also discussed. PMID:21920873

Barr, Simone C.; Hanson, Rochelle; Begle, Angela M.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Saunders, Benjamin; Resnick, Heidi; Amstadter, Ananda

2014-01-01

42

The Influence of Familial Support and Dysfunctional Attitudes on Depression and Delinquency in an Adolescent Population  

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This study evaluates the role of familial support and dysfunctional attitudes in depression, delinquency and the concomitance of these disorders in an adolescent population from a middle-class community in the Trois-Rivieres area. The Beck Depression Inventory and the Mesure d'adaptation sociale et personnelle pour adolescents quebecois-MASPAQ…

Marcotte, Genevieve; Marcotte, Diane; Bouffard, Therese

2002-01-01

43

Self-Esteem and Delinquency in South Korean Adolescents: Latent Growth Modeling  

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This study examined the inter-related development of self-esteem and delinquency across three years. Participants were 3449 Korean high school adolescents (age M = 15.8, SD = 0.42, 1725 boys, 1724 girls) from Korea Youth Panel Study (KYPS), in 2005-2007, nationally representative of Korean adolescents. Latent growth modeling was employed for…

Lee, Kyungeun; Lee, Julie

2012-01-01

44

Are Teen Delinquency Abstainers Social Introverts?: A Test of Moffitt's Theory  

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Prior research has identified a small group of adolescents who completely refrain from delinquent behavior. Researchers have hypothesized that these adolescents may be excluded from normative peer activities and are thus insulated from delinquent peer role models. A central argument in Moffitt's account of delinquency abstention, for example, is…

Chen, Xiaojin; Adams, Michele

2010-01-01

45

Social Orientation: Problem Behavior and Motivations toward Interpersonal Problem Solving among High Risk Adolescents.  

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Examined a model of problematic adolescent behavior that expands current theories of social skill deficits in delinquent behavior to consider social skills and orientation toward the use of adaptive skills. Results from a sample of 113 male and female adolescents suggest that the usefulness of social skills theories of adolescent behavior can be…

Kuperminc, Gabriel P.; Allen, Joseph P.

2001-01-01

46

A Longitudinal Study of Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents with Learning Disabilities  

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Risk taking may be regarded as a normative behavior in adolescence. Risk-taking behaviors may include alcohol, smoking, drug use, delinquency, and acts of aggression. Many studies have explored the relationship between adolescents and risk-taking behavior; however, only a few studies have examined this link in adolescents with learning…

McNamara, John K.; Willoughby, Teena

2010-01-01

47

Emergence of mixed-sex friendship groups during adolescence: Developmental associations with substance use and delinquency.  

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Prospective longitudinal data from over 14,000 youth residing in 28 communities in the rural United States were analyzed to examine the emergence of mixed-sex friendship groups in early adolescence. Youth were surveyed on 5 occasions between fall of 6th grade and spring of 9th grade. At each assessment, youth reported the names of up to 7 same-grade friends and described patterns of alcohol use, cigarette use, and delinquency. Approximately 800-900 friendship groups (M = 10.5 members) were identified at each assessment and categorized in terms of gender composition (all-girl, mostly-girl, mixed-sex, mostly-boy, all-boy). The proportion of groups categorized as mixed-sex increased with grade level (10% in 6th grade, 22% in 9th grade), but gender-homogenous groups predominated at all grade levels (76% in 6th grade, 51% in 9th grade). Mixed-sex groups were slightly larger than all-girl groups but the same size as all-boy groups. All-girl groups had the highest levels of tight-knittedness (i.e., density, reciprocity, and transitivity), with mixed-sex groups having the lowest levels and all-boy groups having intermediate levels. After controlling for demographic factors, future mixed-sex group membership was predicted by lower popularity, higher levels of delinquency, and lower levels of alcohol use; mixed-sex friendship group membership was associated with increased likelihood of cigarette use. Results are partially consistent with Dunphy's (1969) classic account of the emergence of mixed-sex groups in adolescence, but suggest that in early adolescence, mixed-sex group affiliation is significantly associated with deviant behavior and peripheral social status, not with popularity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25221839

Molloy, Lauren E; Gest, Scott D; Feinberg, Mark E; Osgood, D Wayne

2014-11-01

48

Part II: Differences between Sexually Victimized and Nonsexually Victimized Male Adolescent Sexual Abusers and Delinquent Youth--Further Group Comparisons of Developmental Antecedents and Behavioral Challenges  

Science.gov (United States)

In a recent paper published in the "Journal of Child Sexual Abuse," we assessed the differences between sexually victimized and nonsexually victimized male adolescent sexual abusers (Burton, Duty, & Leibowitz, 2011). We found that the sexually victimized group had more severe developmental antecedents (e.g., trauma and early exposure to…

Leibowitz, George S.; Burton, David L.; Howard, Alan

2012-01-01

49

Late-Adolescent Delinquency: Risks and Resilience for Girls Differing in Risk at the Start of Adolescence  

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Based on resilience and feminist criminological theories, several individual, family, and community characteristics were hypothesized to predict late-adolescent delinquency for girls varying in early-adolescent risk. Girls aged 12 and 13 were interviewed each year as part of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Predictors of…

Stevens, Tia; Morash, Merry; Park, Suyeon

2011-01-01

50

Reputation Enhancement and School Delinquency: A Prospective Study Using the National Educational Longitudinal Survey [NELS:88  

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High school delinquency, adolescent behaviors ranging from repeated school misconduct to being arrested, is a critical concern in the United States. Though widely believed that reputation is related to adolescent behavior, few studies have addressed the relationship between adolescent reputation and delinquency. Using the National Educational…

Smith-Adcock, Sondra; Lee, Sang Min; Kerpelman, Jennifer; Majuta, Aaron; Young, Choi Bo

2013-01-01

51

Depression and Delinquency Covariation in an Accelerated Longitudinal Sample of Adolescents  

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Objectives: The current study tested opposing predictions stemming from the failure and acting out theories of depression-delinquency covariation. Method: Participants included a nationwide longitudinal sample of adolescents (N = 3,604) ages 12 to 17. Competing models were tested with cohort-sequential latent growth curve modeling to determine…

Kofler, Michael J.; McCart, Michael R.; Zajac, Kristyn; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Saunders, Benjamin E.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.

2011-01-01

52

Relationships between Discretionary Time Activities, Emotional Experiences, Delinquency and Depressive Symptoms among Urban African American Adolescents  

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Using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM), this cross-sectional study examined mediated and moderated associations between different types of discretionary time activities and depressive symptoms and delinquency among a sample of 246 (107 boys, 139 girls) fifth through eighth grade urban African American adolescents. More time spent in passive…

Bohnert, Amy M.; Richards, Maryse; Kohl, Krista; Randall, Edin

2009-01-01

53

Maternal and Paternal Parenting Styles: Unique and Combined Links to Adolescent and Early Adult Delinquency  

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The present study examines the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between fathers' and mothers' parenting styles and male and female delinquency using a sample of 330 Dutch families with a mid or late adolescent son or daughter (ages 14-22), followed across two measurement waves with a 5-year interval. Parenting styles of fathers and…

Hoeve, Machteld; Dubas, Judith Semon; Gerris, Jan R. M.; van der Laan, Peter H.; Smeenk, Wilma

2011-01-01

54

Unsafe at Any Age: Linking Childhood and Adolescent Maltreatment to Delinquency and Crime  

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Objectives: This study compares the effects of childhood maltreatment and adolescent maltreatment on delinquency and crime, including violent and nonviolent offending. Methods: Data were derived from the Chicago Longitudinal Study, a prospective investigation of 1,539 underprivileged, minority subjects. Results: Results confirmed that rates of…

Mersky, Joshua P.; Topitzes, James; Reynolds, Arthur J.

2012-01-01

55

The Effects of Family Therapies for Adolescent Delinquency and Substance Abuse: A Meta-Analysis  

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This meta-analysis summarizes results from k = 24 studies comparing either Brief Strategic Family Therapy, Functional Family Therapy, Multidimensional Family Therapy, or Multisystemic Therapy to either treatment-as-usual, an alternative therapy, or a control group in the treatment of adolescent substance abuse and delinquency. Additionally, the…

Baldwin, Scott A.; Christian, Sarah; Berkeljon, Arjan; Shadish, William R.

2012-01-01

56

Environmental Contributions to Adolescent Delinquency: A Fresh Look at the Shared Environment  

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Few genetically-informative studies have attempted to explicitly identify the "shared environmental" (i.e., those environmental influences that contribute to sibling similarity) factors now known to contribute to adolescent delinquency. The current study therefore examined whether the parent-child relationship served as one source of these shared…

Burt, S. Alexandra; McGue, Matt; Krueger, Robert F.; Iacono, William G.

2007-01-01

57

Protective and Compensatory Factors Mitigating the Influence of Deviant Friends on Delinquent Behaviours during Early Adolescence  

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This study examined factors that could moderate or compensate the link between exposure to deviant friends and delinquent behaviours in a sample of 265 early adolescents. The putative moderating or compensatory factors referred to the behavioural domain (i.e. novelty seeking, harm avoidance), the biological domain (i.e. physical maturation), the…

Fergusson, David M.; Vitaro, Frank; Wanner, Brigitte; Brendgen, Mara

2007-01-01

58

Exploration of the Pathways to Delinquency for Female Adolescents with Depression: Implications for Cross-Systems Collaboration and Counseling  

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This study found that lack of involvement in prosocial institutions, affiliation with other troubled youth, and indifference regarding personal safety partially mediate the relationship between depression and delinquency among justice-involved female adolescents. The results suggest that depression may not be the primary conduit to delinquency.…

Mellin, Elizabeth A.; Fang, Hong-Ning

2010-01-01

59

Adolescents’ Problem Behaviors and Parent-Adolescent Conflicts in Hmong Immigrant Families  

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Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to investigate whether Hmong adolescent problem behaviors and school difficulties influence parent-adolescent conflicts above and beyond the variables of adolescents’ embarrassment about their parents, the acculturation gap between parents and adolescents, and age of adolescents. The sample included 209 Hmong adolescents living in Minnesota. There were 123 males and 86 females, ages 12 to 25 years. A survey was administered in several community agencies to adolescents that included their perspectives on the frequency and intensity of parent-adolescent disagreements on 28 issues and the problem behaviors of delinquent peer affiliation, gang involvement, truancy, and school performance. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated the set of problem-behavior independent variables explained 26% of the variance in the frequency-intensity of father-adolescent conflicts and 21% of the variance in the frequency-intensity of mother-adolescent conflicts. Ideas for parent education in the Hmong community are discussed.

Zha Blong Xiong

2009-01-01

60

The Role of Life Satisfaction and Parenting Styles in Predicting Delinquent Behaviors among High School Students  

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The purpose of this study is to determine whether the parenting styles and life satisfaction predict delinquent behaviors frequently or not. Firstly the data were collected from 471 girls and 410 boys, a total of 881 high school students. Then the research was carried out with 502 students showing low (n = 262, 52.2%) and high level of delinquent

Onder, Fulya Cenkseven; Yilmaz, Yasin

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

Adolescent involvement in anti-social and delinquent behaviours: predicting future injury risk.  

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The purpose of this study was to challenge the broadly based focus of injury prevention strategies towards concern with the needs of young adolescents who engage in multiple anti-social and delinquent behaviours. Five hundred and forty 13-14-year olds reported on injuries and truancy, violence, illegal road behaviours, drug, and alcohol use. Engagement in these behaviours was found to contribute to the likelihood of an injury. Those engaging in the most anti-social and delinquent behaviours were around five times more likely to report medically-treated injuries in the past three months. Their likelihood of future injury was 1.8 times more likely when they were followed up three months later. The engagement in multiple delinquent and illegal behaviours thus significantly increased the likelihood of injury and identifies a particularly vulnerable group. The findings also suggest that reaching these young people represents a key target for change strategies in injury prevention programs. PMID:22664718

Buckley, Lisa; Chapman, Rebekah; Sheehan, Mary

2012-09-01

62

Witnessed Community and Parental Violence in Relation to Substance Use and Delinquency in a National Sample of Adolescents  

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This study examined whether witnessed community and parental violence represented risk factors for substance use and delinquency among adolescents, beyond the contribution of direct violence and other risk factors. We also examined the role of violence characteristics. Participants were a national sample of 3,614 adolescents. Structured telephone interviews assessed demographics, trauma history, witnessed violence, delinquency, and substance use. While accounting for trauma history and other ...

Zinzow, Heidi M.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Hanson, Rochelle F.; Smith, Daniel W.; Saunders, Benjamin E.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.

2009-01-01

63

Quit Now! A Psychoeducational Expressive Therapy Group Work Approach for At-Risk and Delinquent Adolescent Smokers in Singapore  

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In this article, we review the risk and protective factors for adolescent smoking, as well as current research on evidence-based practices. The relevance of structured expressive therapy in meeting the maturational and emotional needs of at-risk and delinquent adolescents, and the multicultural context of adolescents in Singapore's Asian society…

Kit, Phey Ling; Teo, Lan

2012-01-01

64

Low self-control and co-occurrence of gambling with substance use and delinquency among Chinese adolescents.  

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Relatively little is known about gambling co-morbidity in Asian youth populations. The role of trait self-control in co-morbidity also remains under-explored in the gambling literature. This study examined the association between gambling, substance use and delinquency among Chinese adolescents, and the extent to which these forms of risk behavior are commonly predicted by low self-control. Data from a cross-sectional questionnaire survey of a stratified, random sample of 4,734 high school students aged 12-23 years in Hong Kong were analyzed. The prevalence of gambling pathology, frequency and attitudes showed statistically significant, positive and consistent relationships with tobacco use, alcohol use, and delinquent acts at the p low self-control significantly (p culturally among young people in a Chinese context. It may also be cost-effective to increase intervention efforts to improve the self-control deficit in adolescents, as this should reduce their gambling and concurrent problem behavior. PMID:23224660

Cheung, Nicole W T

2014-03-01

65

Sexual behavior of adolescents  

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Introduction Numerous studies have shown that sexual behavior increases among adolescents. Disharmony between biological and psychosocial maturity among young people may cause risky behavior, and endanger psychophysical and reproductive health of young persons. Material and methods A questionnaire on sexual behavior was completed by 169 adolescents, 1st and 4th year high school students. Results Every 6th first grade and every 2nd forth grade adolescent is sexually active. Male adolescents be...

Mijatovi?-Jovanovi? Vesna; Ukropina Snežana; Kvrgi? Svetlana T.; Šurkovi?-Ni?iforovi? Olja

2004-01-01

66

Parallel Development of Risk Behaviors in Adolescence: Potential Pathways to Co-Occurrence  

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This study used data from 5,382 adolescents from the 1997 United States (US) National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) to investigate developmental pathways of alcohol use, marijuana use, sexual risk behaviors, and delinquency across ages 14 to 20; examine interrelationships among these risk behaviors across adolescence; and evaluate…

Huang, David Y. C.; Lanza, H. Isabella; Murphy, Debra A.; Hser, Yih-Ing

2012-01-01

67

Gender-specific expression of the DRD4 gene on adolescent delinquency, anger and thrill seeking  

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The present study investigated gender differences in the associations between the DRD4 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism and adolescent delinquency, short temper and thrill seeking. We also explored whether the gender-specific expression of the DRD4 can be explained by gender differences in the exposure to psychosocial risks, such as poor parent–child relationship. Participants were 263 14- to 17-year olds (50% males) living in Russia. DNA was extracted from saliva samples a...

Dmitrieva, Julia; Chen, Chuansheng; Greenberger, Ellen; Ogunseitan, Oladele; Ding, Yuan-chun

2011-01-01

68

Examining youth hopelessness as an independent risk correlate for adolescent delinquency and violence.  

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Prior research has identified a relationship between youth hopelessness and violence perpetration within specific groups of young people. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between youth hopelessness and violence perpetration in a population-based sample of adolescents. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of data from 136,549 students in the 6th, 9th, and 12th grades responding to the 2007 Minnesota Student Survey. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between hopelessness and youth violence perpetration, including comparison analyses for gender and race/ethnic subgroups as well as adjustment for a measure of poor-low affect. One in four youth (25.1%) reported levels of hopelessness at least enough to bother them in the previous month. Moderate-high levels of hopelessness exhibited a statistically significant independent relationship with a range of violence-related outcomes for youth subgroups: delinquent behavior, weapon carrying on school property, and all forms of self-directed violence. Relationships between hopelessness and interpersonal and intimate partner violence suggest a greater contribution by poor affective functioning for some groups. Interventions designed to reduce youth violence perpetration may benefit from increased strategies to address youth hopelessness as well as youth mental health in general. PMID:20012345

Duke, Naomi N; Borowsky, Iris W; Pettingell, Sandra L; McMorris, Barbara J

2011-01-01

69

Juvenile Delinquents, the Martial Arts, and Behavior Modification: An Experimental Study for Social Intervention.  

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Adolescents are particularly open to the influences of interventions that restructure their attitudes and self-concept. This study assesses the influence of martial arts training that incorporates a philosophy of life along with strict discipline. The hypothesis was that such training could positively influence juvenile delinquents and contribute…

Demoulin, Donald F.

70

Delinquency and Reputational Orientations of Adolescent At-Risk and Not-at-Risk Males and Females  

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This research investigated differences in delinquent activities and the reputational orientations of at-risk and not-at-risk male and female adolescents. Initially, we sought to establish that adolescent males and females differed in these respects. This was found to be the case: males (n = 722) scored significantly higher than females (n = 738)…

Carroll, Annemaree; Houghton, Steve; Khan, Umneea; Tan, Carol

2008-01-01

71

Child Maltreatment and Delinquency Onset among African American Adolescent Males  

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Child welfare and criminology research have increasingly sought to better understand factors that increase the likelihood that abused and neglected children will become involved in the juvenile justice system. However, few studies have addressed this relationship among African American male adolescents. The current study examines the relationship…

Williams, James Herbert; Van Dorn, Richard A.; Bright, Charlotte Lyn; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Nebbitt, Von E.

2010-01-01

72

Differential Parental Treatment, Sibling Relationships and Delinquency in Adolescence  

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The present study examined the moderating effect of the quality of the sibling relationship on the longitudinal association of parental treatment with theft, vandalism, and violence in adolescence. Participants were 416 sibling pairs which were studied over a one-year period. The younger siblings were aged 13 to 15, the older siblings 14 to 17 at…

Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; de Kemp, Raymond A. T.; Harakeh, Zeena; Overbeek, Geertjan

2007-01-01

73

The mediating effects of self-esteem and delinquency on the relationship between family social capital and adolescents’ educational achievement  

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Full Text Available Using a nationally representative data of rural adolescent boys and girls in 10th grade through 12th grade, this study explored the mediating effects of self-esteem and delinquency on the educational achievement of rural adolescents. Structural equation modeling analyses reveal that the combination of self-esteem and delinquency completely mediates the influence of family social capital on educational achievement. The findings of the models make a compelling case that the impact of family processes on educational achievement is indirect rather than direct.

Omolola Abiola Adedokun

2008-07-01

74

Serious Delinquent Behavior as Part of a Significantly Handicapping Condition: Cures and Supportive Environments.  

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Serious delinquent behavior may be part of a disabling and durable condition that consists of multiple antisocial and dysfunctional behaviors, often runs in families, and eludes effective short-term treatment. The socializing influence of long-term supportive family treatment is discussed as a therapeutic alternative. (Author/JW)

Wolf, Montrose M.; And Others

1987-01-01

75

Treatment for delinquent girls: The adolescent self-concept group.  

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A new program for treating acting-out adolescent girls is described. Program content is focused on subjects such as dress, make-up, etc., while selected female leaders provide role models, and discussion is like group therapy. Draw-a-Person tests and checklists show changes suggesting greater feminine identification, less hostility to authority, and greater openness to criticism after 12 weeks. A case history is included. PMID:24186692

James, S L; Osborn, F; Oetting, E R

1967-12-01

76

Sexual behavior of adolescents  

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Full Text Available Introduction Numerous studies have shown that sexual behavior increases among adolescents. Disharmony between biological and psychosocial maturity among young people may cause risky behavior, and endanger psychophysical and reproductive health of young persons. Material and methods A questionnaire on sexual behavior was completed by 169 adolescents, 1st and 4th year high school students. Results Every 6th first grade and every 2nd forth grade adolescent is sexually active. Male adolescents begin sexual activities significantly earlier (at the age of 15.6 than female adolescents (16.5. Also, young men have significantly more partners (3.6 than girls (1.3, and more parallel sexual relations than girls. Only 1/3 of sexually active adolescents always use some kind of contraception, more frequently boys (41.9% than girls (26.7%. Discussion Early commencement of sexual activity results with longer active period before realization of the reproductive function, which increases risk for reproductive health disorders. Unprotected sexual intercourse and large number of partners also present significant risk factors. Conclusion Sexual life of adolescents begins at the age of 16, on average, and only every third always uses contraceptive protection, which points to a need for better education on reproductive health by using contemporary methods. It is also necessary to increase availability of contraceptives (condoms at all places where adolescents spend time (in schools, bars, cinemas, disco clubs etc. in order to achieve responsible sexual behavior and protection of reproductive health among youth.

Mijatovi?-Jovanovi? Vesna

2004-01-01

77

Sexual Behavior in Adolescence  

Science.gov (United States)

Surveys conducted between the 1930's and 1970's on the sexual behavior of adolescents indicate the following: (1) older adolescents are more sexually experienced now than in earlier generations; (2) there has been a greater increase in incidence of premarital sex for females than males; and (3) there is a trend toward earlier sexual experience for…

Hopkins, J. Roy

1977-01-01

78

Suicidal Behavior, Negative Affect, Gender, and Self-Reported Delinquency in College Students  

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The associations among suicidal behavior, negative affect, and delinquency were assessed via an anonymous self-report survey administered to male and female college students ( N = 383). Contrary to our hypothesized results, there were no gender differences in rates of suicidal ideation and attempts. Confirming our hypotheses about gender…

Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Arata, Catalina; Bowers, David; O'Brien, Natalie; Morgan, Allen

2004-01-01

79

Using the Randomized Response Technique to Estimate the Extent of Delinquent Behavior in Schools.  

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The Randomized Response Technique (RRT) appears to have promise in future work which studies the relation of school variables to disruption or delinquent behavior. The RRT is especially useful in situations when it is difficult or undesirable directly to ask stigmatizing questions. The proportions of students in this study estimated to have used…

Gottfredson, Gary D.

80

Cocaine Use and Delinquent Behavior among High-Risk Youths: A Growth Model of Parallel Processes  

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We report the results of a parallel-process, latent growth model analysis examining the relationships between cocaine use and delinquent behavior among youths. The study examined a sample of 278 justice-involved juveniles completing at least one of three follow-up interviews as part of a National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded study. The results…

Dembo, Richard; Sullivan, Christopher

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
81

Coping Styles and Sex Differences in Depressive Symptoms and Delinquent Behavior  

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Building on research that links gender to differences in well-being and differences in stress exposure and vulnerability, the current study examines how coping styles are gendered in ways that may contribute to sex differences in depressive symptoms and delinquent behavior. The study disaggregates stress measures to reflect gender differences in…

Kort-Butler, Lisa A.

2009-01-01

82

Bias and Undermatching in Delinquent Boys' Verbal Behavior as a Function of Their Level of Deviance  

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Eighty-one 13- to 14-year-old boys at risk for delinquency (target boys) engaged in brief dyadic conversations with their peer friends. The target boys' verbal behavior was coded into two mutually exclusive content categories, rule-break talk and normative talk. Positive social responses from peer boys for each category of talk were also recorded,…

McDowell, J. J.; Caron, Marcia L.

2010-01-01

83

Delinquency and accidents in children  

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It is argued in this report that there is a need to integrateknowledgeondevelopmental processes in children and adolescents and to document the behavioral outcomes which are the result of these processes. The present study will attempt to contribute to the need for multidisciplinary research by bringing together in a single study, a conduct disorder, namely, delinquent behavior, and a health outcome, namely accidents. The study’s goal is, first, to investiga...

Junger, M.; West, R.; Maassen, G. H.; Train, H.; Pickering, A.; Taylor, E.

2004-01-01

84

Bias and Undermatching in Delinquent Boys' Verbal Behavior As a Function of Their Level of Deviance  

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Eighty-one 13- to 14-year-old boys at risk for delinquency (target boys) engaged in brief dyadic conversations with their peer friends. The target boys' verbal behavior was coded into two mutually exclusive content categories, rule-break talk and normative talk. Positive social responses from peer boys for each category of talk were also recorded, and were presumed to reinforce the target boys' verbal behavior. A measure of child deviance was available for each target boy. The generalized mat...

Mcdowell, J. J.; Caron, Marcia L.

2010-01-01

85

Risky behaviors in adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Knowledge about adolescent risk behavior has expanded in the past several decades. Risk behaviors, such as substance use, violent behavior and sexual risk behavior are behaviors that can directly or indirectly compromise well-being and health of young people. Studies showed that there are many risk factors leading to engage in risk behaviors. Studies also showed that risk behaviors can result in many negative outcomes or adverse consequences. However, there is great heterogeneity in the linkage between involvement in risk behaviors and the likelihood of adverse outcomes, and there is also great heterogeneity in the linkage between exposure to risk factors and the likelihood of involvement in risk behaviors as well. These facts lead the researchers to focus on the identification and assessment of protective factors and the concept of resilliency. Researches over the past decade also lead to changing of intervention programme strategies from risk reduction to healthy youth development. These strategies aim to provide all youth with the support, relationship, experiences, resources, and opportunities needed to become successful and competent adults. They are promising approaches for preventing or reducing a wide range of adolescent health-risk behaviors. In this article, we briefly review what we know about risk behaviors, their risk and protective factors and healthy youth development, and provide definitions of each of these concepts.

Müjgan Alika?ifo?lu

2009-03-01

86

The effects of rational stage directed imagery on self-concept and reduction of psychological stress in adolescent delinquent females.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the effect of four treatment conditions on self-concept and reduction of psychological stress in adolescent delinquent females. The treatments were Rational State Directed Imagery, a cognitive behavioral approach that utilized intensive muscle relaxation and vivid-emotive-imagery, a rational (cognitive) restructuring treatment, a placebo condition, and a no treatment control. Ss were assigned randomly to one of these treatment groups, which met 1 hour per week for 6 consecutive weeks, with in-vivo homework assignments also utilized. Statistically scale were noted for the RSDI group at the posttest and at a 2-month follow-up, which supports the therapeutic efficacy of this treatment. Support was found for the effectiveness of the rational (cognitive) restructuring approach immediately posttreatment; however these effects disappeared at the 2-month follow-up. The placebo and control groups showed no significant effects at either posttreatment or the follow-up. These results suggest that RSDI has potential for use as a short-term psychotherapeutic approach when self-concept modification is a primary goal. PMID:925164

Reardon, J P; Tosi, D J

1977-10-01

87

Learning Disabilities and Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents: A Comparison of Those with and without Comorbid Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder  

Science.gov (United States)

Risk-taking behavior includes alcohol and drug use, delinquency, acts of aggression, sexual activity, and so on. Many studies have explored the relationship between adolescents and risk-taking behavior; however, only a few studies have examined this link in adolescents with learning disabilities (LD) or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder…

McNamara, John; Vervaeke, Sherri-Leigh; Willoughby, Teena

2008-01-01

88

Contrasting deficits on executive functions in Chinese delinquent adolescents with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder symptoms and/or reading disability.  

Science.gov (United States)

Many studies reported high prevalence of reading disability (RD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among delinquent adolescents. Very few have examined their cognitive profile. The present study compared the executive functions (EFs) and severity of delinquency in delinquent adolescents with RD and/or ADHD symptoms (AS). Delinquents with AS (n=29), RD (n=24), comorbidity AS+RD (n=35) were recruited from juvenile institutions along with typically developing controls (n=29) from local schools; all completed EF assessments and self-report questionnaires on delinquency. Results showed that pure AS group exhibited impaired inhibition while the pure RD group was weak in processing speed and visual memory. The comorbidity group showed unique impairments in interference control and significantly higher delinquency severity. The present findings suggest that comorbidity AS+RD may influence delinquency severity. It also provides a more comprehensive picture of the unique EF deficits associated with different groups, allowing for better matching for future identification and intervention programme. PMID:25128789

Poon, Kean; Ho, Connie S-H

2014-11-01

89

Adolescents' Time Use: Effects on Substance Use, Delinquency and Sexual Activity  

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Using an integration of social control theory and the routine activity perspective, adolescent time use was examined for effects on problem behaviors. We examined a wide variety of time use categories, including homework, extracurricular activities, sports time, alone time, paid work, housework, television watching, as well as indices of family…

Barnes, Grace M.; Hoffman, Joseph H.; Welte, John W.; Farrell, Michael P.; Dintcheff, Barbara A.

2007-01-01

90

A Cohort-Sequential Multivariate Latent Growth Curve Analysis of Normative CBCL Aggressive and Delinquent Problem Behavior: Associations with Harsh Discipline and Gender  

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The aim of this study was to examine the normative developmental trajectories of aggressive and delinquent behavior in young children. Cohort-sequential univariate latent growth modeling (LGM) analyses were employed to conceptualize and analyze intraindividual changes in children's aggressive and delinquent behavior and interindividual differences…

Prinzie, P.; Onghena, P.; Hellinckx, W.

2006-01-01

91

A Review of Terminological, Conceptual, and Methodological Issues in the Developmental Risk Factor Literature for Antisocial and Delinquent Behavior  

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Background: The study of risk factors for antisocial and delinquent behavior has flourished in the past 20 years, as great strides have been made in understanding the developmental pathways that give rise to the onset, course, and desistance of the behavior. However, as a body of literature, risk factor research (RFR) is characterized by…

Day, David M.; Wanklyn, Sonya G.; Yessine, Annie K.

2014-01-01

92

Development of adolescent problem behavior.  

Science.gov (United States)

The developmental model of adolescent antisocial behavior advanced by Patterson and colleagues (e.g., Patterson, Reid, & Dishion, 1992) appears to generalize the development of a diverse set of problem behaviors. Structural equation modeling methods were applied to 18-month longitudinal data from 523 adolescents. The problem behavior construct included substance use, antisocial behavior, academic failure, and risky sexual behavior. Families with high levels of conflict were less likely to have high levels of parent-child involvement. Such family conditions resulted in less adequate parental monitoring of adolescent behavior, making associations with deviant peers more likely. Poor parental monitoring and associations with deviant peers were strong predictors of engagement in problem behavior. These constructs accounted for 46% of the variance in problem behavior. Although association with deviant peers was the most proximal social influence on problem behavior, parental monitoring and family factors (conflict and involvement) were key parenting practices that influenced this developmental process. PMID:10400060

Ary, D V; Duncan, T E; Biglan, A; Metzler, C W; Noell, J W; Smolkowski, K

1999-04-01

93

Joint Trajectories of Symptoms of Disruptive Behavior Problems and Depressive Symptoms during Early Adolescence and Adjustment Problems during Emerging Adulthood  

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The joint, longitudinal trajectories of symptoms of disruptive behavior problems and of depression were examined in a community sample drawn from neighborhoods with elevated rates of delinquency. Growth mixture modeling was applied to a 6 year transition period from childhood to adolescence, age 10 to 16 years, to identify latent classes of…

Reinke, Wendy M.; Eddy, J. Mark; Dishion, Thomas J.; Reid, John B.

2012-01-01

94

Trajectories and Risk Factors of Criminal Behavior among Females from Adolescence to Early Adulthood  

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Full Text Available Previous research suggests that social environmental and individual-level factors influence adolescent development and behavior over time. However, little attention has been devoted to examining how risk factors (i.e., parental support, peer delinquency, self-control affect trajectories of criminal behavior among female adolescents. Utilizing data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 5138 females and latent class analysis, three offending trajectories among females from late adolescence to early adulthood were identified: late escalators, late de-escalators, and stable low/abstainers. Next, the influence of social environmental and individual-level factors during adolescence (Wave 1 on these trajectories was assessed. Results identified key differences in the risk factors related to group placement. The implications of the findings for prevention and treatment services targeting adolescent females, and directions for future research, are discussed.

Julie M. Krupa

2014-09-01

95

Family structure and risk behaviors: the role of the family meal in assessing likelihood of adolescent risk behaviors  

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Samantha Goldfarb, Will L Tarver, Bisakha Sen Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Background: Previous literature has asserted that family meals are a key protective factor for certain adolescent risk behaviors. It is suggested that the frequency of eating with the family is associated with better psychological well-being and a lower risk of substance use and delinquency. However, it is unclear w...

Goldfarb S; Wl, Tarver; Sen B

2014-01-01

96

Television and Delinquency.  

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In the first part of this book, the nature and extent of social concern with television and its possible effects on delinquent behavior is examined, and research into the nature and causes of delinquency is reviewed. Some attention is given to mass communication research, particularly to research which has addressed itself directly to the media…

Halloran, J. D.; And Others

97

What Increases Risk and Protection for Delinquent Behaviors among American Indian Youth?: Findings from Three Tribal Communities  

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The primary purpose of this study was to compare the risk and protective factors for delinquent behaviors among American Indian youth in three distinct tribal communities. Focus group discussions were used to gather data from elders, parents, youth workers, and youth in each tribal community. Findings showed that the key source for increasing risk…

Mmari, Kristin N.; Blum, Robert Wm.; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette

2010-01-01

98

The Roles of Perceived Neighborhood Disorganization, Social Cohesion, and Social Control in Urban Thai Adolescents' Substance Use and Delinquency  

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Substance use and delinquency in Thai adolescents are growing public health concerns. Research has linked neighborhood characteristics to these outcomes, with explanations focused on neighborhood disorganization, social cohesion, and social control. This study examines the independent associations of these neighborhood constructs with Thai…

Byrnes, Hilary F.; Miller, Brenda A.; Chamratrithirong, Aphichat; Rhucharoenpornpanich, Orratai; Cupp, Pamela K.; Atwood, Katharine A.; Fongkaew, Warunee; Rosati, Michael J.; Chookhare, Warunee

2013-01-01

99

Prospective association of childhood receptive vocabulary and conduct problems with self-reported adolescent delinquency: tests of mediation and moderation in sibling-comparison analyses.  

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Associations among receptive vocabulary measured at 4-9 years, mother-reported childhood conduct problems at 4-9 years, and self-reported adolescent delinquency at 14-17 years were assessed using data from a prospective study of the offspring of a large U.S. nationally representative sample of women. A novel quasi-experimental strategy was used to rule out family-level confounding by estimating path-analytic associations within families in a sibling comparison design. This allowed simultaneous tests of the direct and indirect effects of receptive vocabulary and childhood conduct problems, and of their joint moderation, on adolescent delinquency without family-level environmental confounding. The significant association of receptive vocabulary with later adolescent delinquency was indirect, mediated by childhood conduct problems. Furthermore, a significant interaction between receptive vocabulary and childhood conduct problems reflected a steeper slope for the predictive association between childhood conduct problems and adolescent delinquency when receptive vocabulary scores were higher. These findings of significant indirect association were qualitatively identical in both population-level and within-family analyses, suggesting that they are not the result of family-level confounds. PMID:24736982

Lahey, Benjamin B; D'Onofrio, Brian M; Van Hulle, Carol A; Rathouz, Paul J

2014-11-01

100

Wilderness Therapy Programs for Juvenile Delinquents: A Meta-Analysis.  

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A study examining the effectiveness of wilderness therapy programs for rehabilitating delinquent adolescents analyzed 23 programs using meta-analysis. Moderate effect sizes in favor of wilderness therapy programs were found with respect to enhancing self-esteem/self-concept, improving interpersonal skills, and promoting behavior changes. A small…

Bedard, Rachel M.; Rosen, Lee A.; Vacha-Haase, Tami

2003-01-01

 
 
 
 
101

Bad Boys or Poor Parents: Relations to Female Juvenile Delinquency  

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This study examined the interrelations between parental relationships, romantic relationships, and antisocial behavior among female and male juvenile delinquents. Participants from a diverse sample of 1,354 adolescents (14-17 years) adjudicated of a serious (i.e. felony) offense were matched based on age, race, and committing offense, yielding a…

Cauffman, Elizabeth; Farruggia, Susan P.; Goldweber, Asha

2008-01-01

102

Testing Moffitt's Account of Delinquency Abstention  

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An established finding in criminology is that most adolescents engage in delinquency. Still, studies continue to identify a small group of individuals who refrain from delinquency even when it is normative for their same-age peers. Moffitt's developmental taxonomy provides some reasons for delinquency abstention, but research has been slow to…

Piquero, Alex R.; Brezina, Timothy; Turner, Michael G.

2005-01-01

103

Parenting Style Transitions and Delinquency  

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Parenting style has been extensively analyzed as a contributor to juvenile delinquency in the criminological literature, but no research to date has assessed the prevalence of parenting style changes during adolescence or the influence of such parenting style changes on juvenile delinquency. Drawing from the life course theory, the results show…

Schroeder, Ryan D.; Mowen, Thomas J.

2014-01-01

104

Suicidal Behavior among Early Adolescents.  

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There is a great deal of concern about teenage suicide. This study obtained a prevalence rate of suicidal behaviors among non-psychiatric early adolescents (ages 11-16) and investigated personal and family variables that may characterize the young teenagers who report varying degrees of suicidal behavior. A self-report questionnaire was…

Gover, F. Jill

105

Self Injurious Behavior in Adolescents  

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Full Text Available Self injury is a kind of behavior which begins in early adolescence and difficult to determine because remains suppressed. Most often forms are to cut and hit own. To be exposed to sexual abuse and stressfully life events are known as risk factors for self injurious behavior. High anxiety, depression and hostility levels, decrease of self esteem, suicidal attempts and thoughts are usually together with self injurious behavior and it may be mediating to emotional regulation. To explain the functions of self injurious behavior automatic and social support theories and social learning theories have suggested. The relation between suicidality and self injurious behavior is complex for adolescents. There is no enough knowledge if self injurious behavior aggravates the risk of completed suicide. Although it’s a frequent behavior there are limited randomized controlled studies which examine specific treatment approaches. Dialectic behavior treatment is the type of treatment which shown as most effective for adults. To determine the needs to stop the behavior, to manage emotional senses and urges and to learn more healthy ways for needs to youth are necessary in treatment of self injurious behavior. Treatment also includes determining suicidal risk and comorbid psychiatric disorders. In self injurious behavior medical treatment is useful for comorbid psychiatric disorders. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(2.000: 201-210

Evrim Aktepe

2011-04-01

106

Efficacy of brief strategic family therapy in modifying Hispanic adolescent behavior problems and substance use.  

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This study investigated the efficacy of brief strategic family therapy (BSFT) with Hispanic behavior problem and drug using youth, an underrepresented population in the family therapy research literature. One hundred twenty-six Hispanic families with a behavior problem adolescent were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions: BSFT or group treatment control (GC). Results showed that, compared to GC cases, BSFT cases showed significantly greater pre- to post-intervention improvement in parent reports of adolescent conduct problems and delinquency, adolescent reports of marijuana use, and observer ratings and self reports of family functioning. These results extend prior findings on the efficacy of family interventions to a difficult to treat Hispanic adolescent sample. PMID:12666468

Santisteban, Daniel A; Coatsworth, J Douglas; Perez-Vidal, Angel; Kurtines, William M; Schwartz, Seth J; LaPerriere, Arthur; Szapocznik, José

2003-03-01

107

Results present study support common social belief violent video game exposure contributes aggression violent behavior domestic terrorism. analyses evidence assertion playing violent video games useful predictor youth delinquency bullying behaviors  

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Search instead for Results present study support common social belief violent video game exposure contributes aggression violent behavior domestic terrorism. analyses evidence assertion playing violent video games useful predictor youth delinquency bullying behaviors ?

108

Adolescents' Attempted Influence on Parental Behaviors.  

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Eighty-four adolescents and their parents were surveyed on the extent to which adolescents attempt to influence their parents' everyday behaviors. Attempted influence correlated positively with adolescent autonomy need and negatively with father's dominance need. Variables of sex, family structure and authority style, and influenced behaviors are…

Baranowski, Marc D.

1978-01-01

109

Reciprocal relations between perceived parental knowledge and adolescent substance use and delinquency: The moderating role of parent-teen relationship quality.  

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The current study prospectively examined hypothesized short- and long-term reciprocal relations between perceived parental knowledge and adolescent heavy episodic drinking, marijuana use, and delinquency. Using the contextual model of parenting style (Darling & Steinberg, 1993), we examined the extent to which the bidirectional nature of associations between knowledge and adolescent outcomes is dependent on a facet of parenting style: the quality of the parent-child relationship. Data came from the first 4 waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1997. The sample for the current study consisted of 5,419 students between 12 and 14 years of age at baseline (52% male) surveyed annually for 4 years. Parallel process, autoregressive latent trajectory models were used to examine relations between initial levels and change over time in perceived parental knowledge and adolescent risk, and short-term cross-lagged paths were included to examine bidirectionality while accounting for long-term associations. Results showed significant short-term and long-term bidirectionality between perceived parental knowledge and adolescent outcomes, with parent effects on students and student effects on parents. Long-term associations across constructs were negative, whereas short-term associations were positive. These reciprocal associations were shown to differ across levels of parent-child relationship quality with regard to adolescent heavy episodic drinking and delinquency, providing support for the contextual model of parenting style. Implications for future work on parent-child bidirectional relationships and parent-based interventions are discussed. PMID:25046124

Abar, Caitlin C; Jackson, Kristina M; Wood, Mark

2014-09-01

110

Psychosocial correlates of adolescent cannabis use: data from the italian subsample of the second international self-reported delinquency study.  

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To provide a comprehensive picture of the whole spectrum of psychosocial factors potentially associated with adolescent cannabis use, bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess a variety of social, demographic, psychological, and behavioral correlates of last-month cannabis use and age of first use among 6,838 students. Results showed that only family problems, alcohol and/or other drug use/misuse, deviant behavior, and victimization were independently associated with either recent cannabis use or early onset of cannabis use when multiple, interacting factors were considered. Certain family and behavioral factors might be more important than other psychosocial correlates of adolescent cannabis use. PMID:25115199

Maniglio, Roberto; Innamorati, Marco

2014-01-01

111

Emotional and Behavioral Problems of Afghan Refugees and War-Zone Adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available "nObjective: Wars' stress and violence can have tremendous effects on children's and adolescents' health and general well being; it may result in patterns of bio-psychosocial problems. The goal of this study was to compare emotional and behavioral problems in Afghan refugees and war-zone adolescents. "n Method: One hundred and eighty high school students (90 students in the refugee group and 90 in the war-zone group in Harat were included in this research. All participants completed the Youth Self-Report (YSR. War zone and refugee adolescents were compared based on their scores on different scales of behavioral and emotional problems. "n Results: War-zone adolescents scored significantly higher on Anxious/Depression, Withdrawn, Somatic Complaints, Attention Problems, and Internalizing Problems scales than refugee adolescents. In this study, no significant difference was found between the two groups on Social Problems, Thought Problems, Delinquent Behavior, Aggressive Behavior, and Externalizing scales. "nConclusion: Findings revealed that although asylum is not an ideal condition for children's and adolescents' psychological development and prosperity, it can have a protective role in comparison with war zone's circumstances. Further investigation is needed, however, to elucidate the lack of significant differences in externalizing scales among war zone and refugee adolescents

Jalil Babapour-Kheiroddin

2009-02-01

112

Promoting Adolescents' Prosocial Behavior  

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Saying a kind word to a classmate, acknowledging other students' feelings, sharing books and advice, defending a victim of bullying--these are just a few of the prosocial behaviors that can enhance students' social and academic lives at school. Because children do not develop social values in a vacuum, educators, policymakers, and researchers are…

Kidron, Yael; Fleischman, Steve

2006-01-01

113

Trajectories of Delinquency and Parenting Styles  

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We investigated trajectories of adolescent delinquent development using data from the Pittsburgh Youth Study and examined the extent to which these different trajectories are differentially predicted by childhood parenting styles. Based on self-reported and official delinquency seriousness, covering ages 10–19, we identified five distinct delinquency trajectories differing in both level and change in seriousness over time: a nondelinquent, minor persisting, moderate desisting, serious persi...

Hoeve, Machteld; Dubas, Judith Semon; Loeber, Rolf; Gerris, Jan R. M.; Laan, Peter H.

2008-01-01

114

Understanding Violent Behavior in Children and Adolescents  

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... concluded that a complex interaction or combination of factors leads to an increased risk of violent behavior in children and adolescents. These factors include: Previous aggressive or violent behavior ...

115

Substance Abuse and Aggressive Behavior among Adolescents  

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Full Text Available Social workers, psychologists and psychopharmacologists have devoted little attention to study the direct relationship between drugs and adolescents’ aggression. The main objective of this study was therefore to determine the extent of the level of aggressive behavior among adolescents who underwent rehabilitation of drug abuse. This study also sought to find out the relationship between type of drugs used with aggressive behavior among adolescents. Respondents were 200 adolescents from three juvenile Henry Gurney schools in Malaysia who took part in this exploratory cross-sectional survey research design. A set of questionnaire was constructed by the researcher based on the Aggression Questionnaires (AQ scale. Results showed that the majority of adolescents (95 percent indicated an aggressive behavior of moderate to high level. The result of the study also found that adolescents who have been using heroin (r = 0.016, p <0.05 and morphine drugs (r = 0.181, p <0.05 showed significant correlation with aggressive behavior. The findings provided evidence for the significant role of the goverment to enhance rehabilitation modules for adolescents involved in drug abuse. Education on how to effectively deal with aggressive behavior among adolescents at risk should be emphasized for building positive behavior among adolescents in order to produce potential young generation in the future.

Fauziah I.

2012-06-01

116

Preventing the Link Between SES and High-Risk Behaviors: “Value-Added” Education, Drug Use and Delinquency in High-Risk, Urban Schools  

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We examined whether schools achieving better than expected educational outcomes for their students influence the risk of drug use and delinquency among urban, racial/ethnic minority youth. Adolescents (n=2,621), who were primarily African American and Hispanic and enrolled in Chicago public schools (n=61), completed surveys in 6th (aged 12) and 8th (aged 14) grades. Value-added education was derived from standardized residuals of regression equations predicting school-level academic achieveme...

Tobler, Al; Komro, Ka; Dabroski, A.; Aveyard, P.; Markham, Wa

2011-01-01

117

Predicting Hmong Male and Female Youth’s Delinquent Behavior: An Exploratory Study  

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Asian Americans have been viewed as a “model” minority by mainstream Americans for decades. Contrary to the model minority stereotype, however, Asian youth, especially Hmong and other Southeast Asians, are increasingly involved in crimes and delinquent activities. Yet, little research has focused on them, particularly Hmong youth. The present study addressed this gap in the literature by exploring the relative importance of individual, peer, family, and school factors in explaining Hmong ...

Zha Blong Xiong, Phd; Ju-Ping Huang

2011-01-01

118

Trajectories of Delinquency and Parenting Styles  

Science.gov (United States)

We investigated trajectories of adolescent delinquent development using data from the Pittsburgh Youth Study and examined the extent to which these different trajectories are differentially predicted by childhood parenting styles. Based on self-reported and official delinquency seriousness, covering ages 10-19, we identified five distinct…

Hoeve, Machteld; Blokland, Arjan; Dubas, Judith Semon; Loeber, Rolf; Gerris, Jan R. M.; van der Laan, Peter H.

2008-01-01

119

Cognitive behavioral therapy for adolescents with ADHD.  

Science.gov (United States)

Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often persists into adolescence and has the same functional impairments as were present during childhood. Medications lessen ADHD symptoms yet do not reliably affect functioning. Thus, there exists a great need for psychosocial treatments in adolescents with ADHD. Nonetheless, relative to the vast literature that has been reported on children with ADHD, much less data have been reported about psychosocial interventions for adolescents with ADHD. Cognitive behavioral therapy interventions that are being used with adolescents rely more on traditional behavioral principles than cognitive therapy tenets. PMID:25220089

Antshel, Kevin M; Olszewski, Amy K

2014-10-01

120

Family structure and risk behaviors: the role of the family meal in assessing likelihood of adolescent risk behaviors  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Samantha Goldfarb, Will L Tarver, Bisakha Sen Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Background: Previous literature has asserted that family meals are a key protective factor for certain adolescent risk behaviors. It is suggested that the frequency of eating with the family is associated with better psychological well-being and a lower risk of substance use and delinquency. However, it is unclear whether there is evidence of causal links between family meals and adolescent health-risk behaviors. Purpose: The purpose of this article is to review the empirical literature on family meals and adolescent health behaviors and outcomes in the US. Data sources: A search was conducted in four academic databases: Social Sciences Full Text, Sociological Abstracts, PsycINFO®, and PubMed/MEDLINE. Study selection: We included studies that quantitatively estimated the relationship between family meals and health-risk behaviors. Data extraction: Data were extracted on study sample, study design, family meal measurement, outcomes, empirical methods, findings, and major issues. Data synthesis: Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria for the review that measured the relationship between frequent family meals and various risk-behavior outcomes. The outcomes considered by most studies were alcohol use (n=10, tobacco use (n=9, and marijuana use (n=6. Other outcomes included sexual activity (n=2; depression, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts (n=4; violence and delinquency (n=4; school-related issues (n=2; and well-being (n=5. The associations between family meals and the outcomes of interest were most likely to be statistically significant in unadjusted models or models controlling for basic family characteristics. Associations were less likely to be statistically significant when other measures of family connectedness were included. Relatively few analyses used sophisticated empirical techniques available to control for confounders in secondary data. Conclusion: More research is required to establish whether or not the relationship between family dinners and risky adolescent behaviors is an artifact of underlying confounders. We recommend that researchers make more frequent use of sophisticated methods to reduce the problem of confounders in secondary data, and that the scope of adolescent problem behaviors also be further widened. Keywords: family meals, adolescents, risk behaviors, review, study design, confounders

Goldfarb S

2014-02-01

 
 
 
 
121

Distinguishing Personality Psychopathology Five (PSY-5) characteristics associated with violent and nonviolent juvenile delinquency.  

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This study examined the relationship between the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) Personality Psychopathology Five (PSY-5) scales and violent and nonviolent juvenile delinquency. Participants were 260 adolescent boys and girls in a forensic setting. Results indicated that Disconstraint (DISC), a marker of behavioral disinhibition and impulsivity, was associated with nonviolent delinquency, whereas Aggressiveness (AGGR), which is characterized by the use of instrumental aggression and interpersonal dominance, was specifically associated with violent delinquency. These findings are consistent with expectations based on empirical findings in the broader personality literature linking the construct of disinhibition with externalizing psychopathology as well as the literature identifying callous-unemotional aggression as a risk factor for violence. PMID:24134339

Veltri, Carlo O C; Sellbom, Martin; Graham, John R; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Forbey, Johnathan D; White, Robert S

2014-01-01

122

Misrecognition of facial expressions in delinquents  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports have suggested impairment in facial expression recognition in delinquents, but controversy remains with respect to how such recognition is impaired. To address this issue, we investigated facial expression recognition in delinquents in detail. Methods We tested 24 male adolescent/young adult delinquents incarcerated in correctional facilities. We compared their performances with those of 24 age- and gender-matched control participants. Using standard photographs of facial expressions illustrating six basic emotions, participants matched each emotional facial expression with an appropriate verbal label. Results Delinquents were less accurate in the recognition of facial expressions that conveyed disgust than were control participants. The delinquents misrecognized the facial expressions of disgust as anger more frequently than did controls. Conclusion These results suggest that one of the underpinnings of delinquency might be impaired recognition of emotional facial expressions, with a specific bias toward interpreting disgusted expressions as hostile angry expressions.

Matsuura Naomi

2009-09-01

123

Adolescent Work Experiences and Family Formation Behavior  

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A long-standing critique of adolescent employment is that it engenders a precocious maturity of more adult-like roles and behaviors, including school disengagement, substance use, sexual activity, inadequate sleep and exercise, and work-related stress. Though negative effects of high-intensity work on adolescent adjustment have been found, little…

Staff, Jeremy; VanEseltine, Matthew; Woolnough, April; Silver, Eric; Burrington, Lori

2012-01-01

124

Understanding Race and Gender Differences in Delinquent Acts and Alcohol and Marijuana Use: A Developmental Analysis of Initiation  

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Guided by social development constructs, this article investigates race and gender differences in the initiation of various types of delinquent behavior and alcohol and marijuana use among African American and Caucasian adolescents in grades 7 through 12. In addition, this study examined the potential direct or indirect effects of parental…

Williams, James Herbert; Van Dorn, Richard A.; Ayers, Charles D.; Bright, Charlotte L.; Abbott, Robert D.; Hawkins, J. David

2007-01-01

125

Temperament Alters Susceptibility to Negative Peer Influence in Early Adolescence  

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The role of deviant peers in adolescent antisocial behavior has been well documented, but less is known about individual differences in susceptibility to negative peer influence. This study examined whether specific temperament dimensions moderate the prospective relationship between peer deviance and delinquent behavior in early adolescence.…

Mrug, Sylvie; Madan, Anjana; Windle, Michael

2012-01-01

126

Understanding Desisting and Persisting Forms of Delinquency: The Unique Contributions of Disruptive Behavior Disorders and Interpersonal Callousness  

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Background: While associations between conduct disorder (CD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and interpersonal callousness (IC) symptoms and delinquency onset are well established, less is known about whether these characteristics differentiate desisting and persisting delinquency. The current…

Byrd, Amy L.; Loeber, Rolf; Pardini, Dustin A.

2012-01-01

127

A School-Level Analysis of Adolescent Extracurricular Activity, Delinquency, and Depression: The Importance of Situational Context  

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In this article we investigate the extent to which the relationship between extracurricular activities and youth development depends on situational contexts. Using a national sample including 13,466 youths in grades 7-12 across 120 schools, we conduct school-level analyses of the association between extracurricular activities, delinquency, and…

Guest, Andrew M.; McRee, Nick

2009-01-01

128

Parent-Child Acculturation Discrepancy, Perceived Parental Knowledge, Peer Deviance, and Adolescent Delinquency in Chinese Immigrant Families  

Science.gov (United States)

Parent-child acculturation discrepancy has been considered a risk factor for child maladjustment. The current study examined parent-child acculturation discrepancy as an ongoing risk factor for delinquency, through the mediating pathway of parental knowledge of the child's daily experiences relating to contact with deviant peers. Participants were…

Wang, Yijie; Kim, Su Yeong; Anderson, Edward R.; Chen, Angela Chia-Chen; Yan, Ni

2012-01-01

129

Serious, Minor, and Non-Delinquents in Early Adolescence: The Impact of Cumulative Risk and Promotive Factors. The TRAILS Study  

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This study uses a social-ecological approach to the development of delinquency. The authors emphasize that a balance between eliminating risk and enhancing protection across domains is essential in reducing problems and promoting competence. The cumulative risk and promotive effects of temperament, family and school factors in preadolescence were…

van der Laan, Andre M.; Veenstra, Rene; Bogaerts, Stefan; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ormel, Johan

2010-01-01

130

Protective factors in adolescent health behavior.  

Science.gov (United States)

The role of psychosocial protective factors in adolescent health-enhancing behaviors--healthy diet, regular exercise, adequate sleep, good dental hygiene, and seatbelt use--was investigated among 1,493 Hispanic, White, and Black high school students in a large, urban school district. Both proximal (health-related) and distal (conventionality-related) protective factors have significant positive relations with health-enhancing behavior and with the development of health-enhancing behavior. In addition, in cross-sectional analyses, protection was shown to moderate risk. Key proximal protective factors are value on health, perceived effects of health-compromising behavior, and parents who model health behavior. Key distal protective factors are positive orientation to school, friends who model conventional behavior, involvement in prosocial activities, and church attendance. The findings suggest the importance of individual differences on a dimension of conventionality-unconventionality. Strengthening both proximal and distal protective factors may help to promote healthful behaviors in adolescence. PMID:9781412

Jessor, R; Turbin, M S; Costa, F M

1998-09-01

131

Parents' Work Overload and Problem Behavior in Young Adolescents.  

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Examined the relationships among parents' stress, parents' work overload, and adolescent problem behavior. Adolescents in dual-earner families reported on parent-adolescent relations and their own problem behavior. Their parents provided reports of work overload, levels of stress, and parent-adolescent relations. Findings indicated…

Galambos, Nancy L.; And Others

1995-01-01

132

Treating Depression and Oppositional Behavior in Adolescents  

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Adolescents with depression and high levels of oppositionality often are particularly difficult to treat. Few studies, however, have examined treatment outcomes among youth with both externalizing and internalizing problems. This study examines the effect of fluoxetine, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), the combination of fluoxetine and CBT, and placebo on co-occurring oppositionality within a sample of depressed adolescents. All treatments resulted in decreased oppositionality at 12 weeks. A...

Jacobs, Rachel H.; Becker-weidman, Emily G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Jordan, Neil; Silva, Susan G.; Rohde, Paul; March, John S.

2010-01-01

133

Sport and delinquency: an examination of the deterrence hypothesis in a longitudinal study.  

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OBJECTIVE: To determine whether involvement in sporting activity in mid-adolescence would deter delinquent behaviour in late adolescence. METHODS: Members of a longitudinal cohort study were interviewed at ages 15 and 18 years and, among other topics, were asked questions relating to involvement in physical activity and delinquent behaviour. Logistic regression models were used to examine the relation between sports involvement and delinquency at age 15 years and delinquency at age 18. RESULT...

Begg, D. J.; Langley, J. D.; Moffitt, T.; Marshall, S. W.

1996-01-01

134

Unhealthy weight control behaviors among adolescents.  

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This article examined moderators of the association between BMI and unhealthy weight control behaviors suggested by the Dual Pathway Model among 4,529 adolescents from the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children survey. An obese classification was associated with unhealthy weight control behaviors for boys and girls. Low life satisfaction, high negative affect, and body size dissatisfaction were associated with unhealthy weight control behaviors among boys as was low life satisfaction for girls. Among girls, healthy weight classification, coupled with low negative affect or body size satisfaction, was protective against unhealthy weight control behaviors. Improved self-care may decrease obesity and unhealthy weight control behaviors. PMID:21652614

Vander Wal, Jillon S

2012-01-01

135

[Depression and risk behavior in adolescence].  

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Adolescence is a vulnerable period which is associated with a heightened risk for the development of depressive disorders. Risk-behaviors like alcohol or illicit drug abuse, excessive use of media, school absenteeism and lack of sleep are also frequently occurring during this period; it is often suggested that such behaviors may be associated with mental health problems. This article includes a selective overview of literature to investigate the relation between depression and risk-behavior in adolescence; these results are compared with the results from a representative sample of German pupils who were examined in the context of the European school study SEYLE. Data from a school-based sample of 1,434 pupils with a mean age of 14.7 years (SD = 0.8) was used. Most risk-behaviors tend to be associated with increased likelihood for the development of depression and are correlated with the severity of depressive symptomatology. In this sample, alcohol abuse, smoking, media use, lack of physical activity, risky sexual behavior, school absenteeism, and sleeping problems showed an impact on the level of depression which was consistent with previous research. Illicit drug abuse showed no significant impact on depressive symptoms of young people. Further longitudinal studies are necessary to elucidate the directional relationship between depression and risk behavior in adolescence. The potential value of adolescent risk-behavior as a possible warning sign for early detection of depressive symptoms also warrants further investigation. PMID:24707767

Heger, Johanna Pia; Brunner, Romuald; Parzer, Peter; Fischer, Gloria; Resch, Franz; Kaess, Michael

2014-01-01

136

Psychosocial predictors of sexual initiation and high-risk sexual behaviors in early adolescence  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background This longitudinal study examined psychosocial factors associated with risky sexual behavior in early adolescence. Methods Data were collected through a self-report survey, the Social and Health Assessment (SAHA, which was administered in three waves between 2001 and 2003 to a cohort of incoming sixth grade students in the public school system (149 classes at 17 middle and high schools, N = 1,175 of a small northeastern city in the United States. We first examined whether internalizing and externalizing problems in sixth grade, and the rate of change in these factors during middle school, were predictive of sexual initiation two years later, when most of the sample was in eighth grade. We then assessed whether internalizing and externalizing problems in sixth grade, and the rate of change in these factors during middle school, were predictive of engaging in high risk sexual behavior over the subsequent two years. Results Externalizing factors are more predictive of sexual risk in early adolescence than are internalizing factors. Specifically, substance use and violent delinquency over the course of middle school were associated with higher, while anxiety with lower, sexual initiation rates during middle school. Additionally, increased substance use over the course of middle school was associated with greater likelihood of engaging in high risk sexual behavior. Conclusion By identifying particular psychosocial risk factors among young adolescents, the findings of this study have implications for designing multi-dimensional programs aimed at preventing health-compromising sexual behavior among young teens.

Schwab-Stone Mary

2007-11-01

137

Adolescent Sexual Behavior and Identity Development  

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The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between adolescent sexual behavior, motivations, and identity status. A review of the literature indicated that deviant behaviors covary, and that drug use and abuse and the motivations for same are related to identity status . A questionnaire, including the Extended Objective Measure of Ego Identity Status(EOM-EIS) and a series of questions to gather information about sexual behaviors and motivations, was employed. The ...

King, Pamela Kay

1993-01-01

138

Effects of parent training on salivary cortisol in children and adolescents with disruptive behavior disorder  

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Full Text Available

  • BACKGROUND: Since adulthood antisocial, aggressive and delinquent behaviors often have their onset early in life, investigating the association between biological factors and disruptive behaviors in children and adolescents are important and are emphasized on in the recent years. Baseline cortisol level seems to be a valuable biological marker of individuals with Disruptive Behavior Disorder (DBD. This study examined the effect of parent training on salivary cortisol levels of children with DBD.
  • METHODS: Saliva samples were assayed to determine cortisol levels in nineteen clinic-referred children with DBD (aged 8 through 13 years before and after an eight-session parent training program. Children’s disruptive behaviors were assessed by Child Behavior Check List before and after the intervention.
  • RESULTS: Children’s salivary cortisol increased significantly after parent training sessions. Children with DBD who had lower basal cortisol levels had more severe disruptive behaviors and a better response to intervention by parent training as assessed by changes in cortisol levels and disruptive behaviour scores. However, post-interventional reduction of disruptive behaviors and increase in cortisol level was significant for all levels of baseline cortisol.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Parent training is an effective method for behavioral modification in DBD. Salivary cortisol may be considered a predictive factor for severity of the child or adolescent's disruptive behaviors and also for response of those behaviors to parent training.
  • KEY WORDS: Disruptive behavior, child, adolescent, parent training.

Masood Motamedi

2008-04-01

139

Adolescents' Peer Crowd Identification in the Netherlands: Structure and Associations with Problem Behaviors  

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The present paper examined the underlying structure of Dutch adolescents' peer crowd identification and its relations with delinquency, aggression, depression, and anxiety. Questionnaire data were gathered from 2,334 adolescents between ages 12 and 19. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed four clearly interpretable…

Delsing, Marc J. M. H.; ter Bogt, Tom F. M.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

2007-01-01

140

Adolescents Engaging in Risky Sexual Behavior: Sexual Activity and Associated Behavioral Risk Factors in Bolivian Adolescents  

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This study describes the prevalence of risky sexual activities among Bolivian adolescents within the context of other behavioral factors that contribute to compromised health outcomes, unintended pregnancies, and sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS. Data was collected from 576 adolescents, 13-18 years of age, from six schools in La…

Novilla, M. Lelinneth B.; Dearden, Kirk A.; Crookston, Benjamin T.; De La Cruz, Natalie; Hill, Susan; Torres, Scott B.

2006-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

High Intelligence and Severe Delinquency: Evidence Disputing the Connection.  

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This study examined the relationship between intelligence and delinquency in 157 youth convicted of serious crimes. Few of the delinquents obtained high scores on intelligence testing; most were of below average intelligence. Highly intelligent delinquents shared a history of troubled family backgrounds, school behavior problems, substance abuse,…

Cornell, Dewey G.

1992-01-01

142

SUICIDAL BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS  

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Full Text Available Objective: Suicide is a complex phenomenon associated with pyschological, biological and social factors. Suicide has been reported as the second or third most common cause of death in children and adolescents worldwide. Suicidal behaviour in children and adolescents will be discussed in the frame of motivational definition. Method: Published research studies and reviews on children and adolescent suicides have been reviewed. Furthermore, classical papers have been searched to obtain knowledge about suicide behavior. Results: It is reported that firearms have been the most important effect in adolescent suicide. Both fatal and nonfatal suicidal behaviors have been linked consistently to negative parent-child relationships, depression, substance use, overall number of life stressors, gender and impulsive behaviors. Discussion: Future efforts to investigate suicidal behavior should use new research methodologies that may lead to identification of the interactions between environmental factors and constitutional and biological factors that are associated with risk for suicidal behavior. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2005; 4(2.000: 88-97

Evrim AKTEPE

2005-04-01

143

Schools and Delinquency. Cambridge Criminology Series.  

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This book links theory and empirical evidence to derive implications for designing school-based delinquency prevention programs. It examines how school environment and behavior interact, discusses the multiple levels of influence in and around schools that combine with student characteristics to lead to delinquency, and addresses the malleability…

Gottfredson, Denise C.

144

A Case Study of Delinquency Devolution.  

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Offers a positive perspective on the devolution of delinquency. Examines life experiences involved in delinquency devolution of one former juvenile offender and argues for a less pathological perspective of human behavior. Presents an alternative approach, "Positive Outcomes Research." (Author/JAC)

Brown, Waln K.

1981-01-01

145

Parental Work Schedules and Adolescent Risky Behaviors  

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Using a large contemporary data set (the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement), the authors examined the effects of parental work schedules on adolescent risky behaviors at age 13 or 14 and the mechanisms that might explain them. Structural equation modeling suggests mothers who worked more often at night spent significantly less…

Han, Wen-Jui; Miller, Daniel P.; Waldfogel, Jane

2010-01-01

146

Treating Depression and Oppositional Behavior in Adolescents  

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Adolescents with depression and high levels of oppositionality often are particularly difficult to treat. Few studies, however, have examined treatment outcomes among youth with both externalizing and internalizing problems. This study examines the effect of fluoxetine, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), the combination of fluoxetine and CBT, and…

Jacobs, Rachel H.; Becker-Weidman, Emily G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Jordan, Neil; Silva, Susan G.; Rohde, Paul; March, John S.

2010-01-01

147

Adolescent Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors: A Developmental Perspective  

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Understanding adolescents' attitudes regarding sexual behavior is key to understanding why they choose to engage or not engage in sex, which sexual behavior(s) they initiate and continue, and the outcomes experienced during and following sexual behavior. This article briefly explores adolescent sexual behavior, positive and negative outcomes…

Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L.; Reznik, Yana

2009-01-01

148

Adolescents’ Problem Behaviors and Parent-Adolescent Conflicts in Hmong Immigrant Families  

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The purpose of the study was to investigate whether Hmong adolescent problem behaviors and school difficulties influence parent-adolescent conflicts above and beyond the variables of adolescents’ embarrassment about their parents, the acculturation gap between parents and adolescents, and age of adolescents. The sample included 209 Hmong adolescents living in Minnesota. There were 123 males and 86 females, ages 12 to 25 years. A survey was administered in several community agencies to adole...

Zha Blong Xiong; Arunya Tuicomepee; Rettig, Kathryn D.

2009-01-01

149

Self Esteem and Adolescent Sexual Attitudes and Behavior  

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This study was designed to determine; (1) if adolescent self esteem is related to premarital sexual attitudes and intercourse behavior; (2) if religious affiliation and church attendance affect the relationship between adolescent self esteem and premarital sexual attitudes and behavior. Approximately 2400 adolescents residing in California, New Mexico, and Utah comprised the sample. Adolescents who attended church services more often reported less sexually permissive attitudes and behavior...

Christensen, Roger B.

1985-01-01

150

Dialectical behavior therapy for suicidal adolescents with borderline personality disorder.  

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Although research to date on dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for adolescents has its limitations, growing evidence suggests that DBT is a promising treatment for adolescents with a range of problematic behaviors, including but not limited to suicidal and nonsuicidal self-injury. This article introduces dialectical behavior therapy's theoretical underpinnings, describes its adaptation for suicidal adolescents, and provides a brief review of the empirical literature evaluating DBT with adolescents. PMID:21440851

Klein, Dena A; Miller, Alec L

2011-04-01

151

General characteristics of adolescent sexual behavior: National survey  

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Introduction. Investigation of adolescent sexual behavior carried out on a large sample is primarily motivated by health and social problems which can occur when young people practice sex without protection and necessary information. There is no data that the national study on adolescent sexual behavior has been conducted in the Serbian speaking area. Objective. Monitoring and follow-up of trends in adolescent sexual behavior. Methods. The investigation sample comprised 1101 adolescents (472 ...

Stankovi? Miodrag; Miljkovi? Srbobran; Grbeša Grozdanko; Višnji? Aleksandar

2009-01-01

152

The Role of Family, Religiosity, and Behavior in Adolescent Gambling  

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Predictors of adolescent gambling behavior were examined in a sample of 436 males and females (ages 13-16). A biopsychosocial model was used to identify key variables that differentiate between non-gambling and gambling adolescents. Logistic regression found that, as compared to adolescent male non-gamblers, adolescent male gamblers were older,…

Casey, David M.; Williams, Robert J.; Mossiere, Annik M.; Schopflocher, Donald P.; el-Guebaly, Nady; Hodgins, David C.; Smith, Garry J.; Wood, Robert T.

2011-01-01

153

Adolescent sexual behavior in the eighties.  

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This paper summarizes what is known about adolescent sexual behavior in the 1980s. One study found that 85% of American teens have had a boyfriend or girlfriend. Overall, 43% of teens have participated in vaginal play and 40% have experienced penile manipulation. A significant number of teenagers report having participated in oral sex. Many adolescents also report that they masturbate. Surveys of American adolescents have found that, on the whole, average age at 1st intercourse ranges from 16 to 16.9 years, but some teenagers begin to have intercourse shortly after puberty. The proportion of sexually-experienced teens increases with age. Many adolescents see their 1st experience sexual intercourse as a conscious, personal choice. At all ages, males are more likely to report having had intercourse than are females. Many adolescents who have had intercourse report regular contraceptive use. More than 1/3 (33%-39%) report contraceptive use every time they engage in intercourse. However, a large number of sexually experienced teenagers use contraception irregularly. Teenagers who have had intercourse express a preference for birth control pills over condoms as their primary means of contraception. Inconsistent contraceptive use among teens is reflected in the number of adolescent pregnancies in the US each year. In 1984, there were 233 adolescent pregnancies/1000 sexually active 15-19-year-old females. A large share of adolescent pregnancies end in abortion. 1 in 7 teens contracts a sexually transmitted disease each year. Many believe that teens are at high risk of infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) because of poorly protected sexual experimentation and intravenous drug use. Healthy adult sexuality may depend a great deal on the earlier years of sexual development. PMID:12143748

Bigler, M O

1989-10-01

154

The influence of parental monitoring and parent-adolescent communication on Bahamian adolescent risk involvement: a three-year longitudinal examination.  

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The literature suggests that parental monitoring can best be conceptualized and measured through the domains of parental knowledge, youth disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control. Using longitudinal data on 913 grade-six Bahamian students followed over a period of three years, we examined the unique and independent roles of these domains of parental monitoring and parent-adolescent communication in relation to adolescent involvement in delinquency, substance use, and sexual risk behaviors. The results obtained with mixed-effects models indicate that parental knowledge, youth disclosure, and parental control are negatively associated with both delinquency and substance use. Open parent-adolescent communication was associated with decreased sexual risk behavior, whereas problematic parent-adolescent communication was associated with increased sexual risk behavior. The results obtained with path models indicate that youth disclosure is a significant longitudinal predictor of reduced adolescent delinquency and that parental control during early adolescence predicted reduced substance use in middle adolescence. The findings suggest that parental knowledge, youth disclosure and parental control differ in their impacts on substance use, delinquency and sexual risk behaviors. Problematic parent-adolescent communication is consistently associated with increases in all three types of adolescent risk behaviors. Future parental monitoring interventions should focus on enhancing parents' interpersonal communication skills and emphasize the differences in and importance of the unique components of parental monitoring. PMID:24161101

Wang, Bo; Stanton, Bonita; Li, Xiaoming; Cottrell, Lesley; Deveaux, Lynette; Kaljee, Linda

2013-11-01

155

Adolescent Suicide and Suicidal Behavior  

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This review examines the descriptive epidemiology, and risk and protective factors for youth suicide and suicidal behavior. A model of youth suicidal behavior is articulated, whereby suicidal behavior ensues as a result of an interaction of socio-cultural, developmental, psychiatric, psychological, and family-environmental factors. On the basis of…

Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Goldstein, Tina R.; Brent, David A.

2006-01-01

156

HIV/Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk Behaviors in Delinquent Youth with Psychiatric Disorders: A Longitudinal Study  

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The effect of psychiatric disorders on human immunodeficiency virus/sexually transmitted infection (HIV/STI) risk behaviors in juvenile justice youths is examined. Prevalence, persistence and prediction are addressed among four mutually exclusive diagnostic groups and results show a high prevalence rate of many HIV/STI sexual risk behaviors that…

Elkington, Katherine; Teplin, Linda A.; Mericle, Amy A.; Welty, Leah J.; Romero, Erin G.; Abram, Karen M.

2008-01-01

157

Compulsive buying and risky behavior among adolescents.  

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Using a scale designed to measure compulsive buying of adolescents, a survey was conducted to assess the relationships of compulsive buying with several risky behaviors among 111 adolescents between the ages of 12 to 19 years. The correlations suggest that self-report measures of cigarette smoking, alcohol use, drug use, and likelihood of engaging in premarital sex were all significantly associated (rs = .30 to .32) with compulsive buying among teenagers. Implications of the results are discussed, and directions for research are offered. PMID:10876324

Roberts, J A; Tanner, J F

2000-06-01

158

South African Adolescents: Pathways to Risky Sexual Behavior  

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This study tested a developmental model of pathways to risky sexual behavior among South African adolescents. Participants comprised 633 adolescents, 12-17 years old, recruited from households in Durban, South Africa. Data were collected using in-person interviews. Topics included adolescents' sexual behaviors, household poverty levels, vulnerable…

Brook, David W.; Morojele, Neo K.; Zhang, Chenshu; Brook, Judith S.

2006-01-01

159

Profiles of problematic behaviors across adolescence: covariations with indicators of positive youth development.  

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Previous analyses of data from the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development (PYD) have examined concurrent trajectories of positive development and risk/problem behaviors among adolescents, finding complex and not necessarily inverse relationships among them. In this article, we expand on prior research by employing a person-centered approach to modeling risk behaviors, assessing development from approximately 6th grade through 12th grade among 4,391 adolescents (59.9% female). Latent profiles involving the problematic behaviors of delinquency, depressive symptoms, substance use, sexual activity, disordered eating behaviors, and bullying were then assessed for concurrent relationships with the Five Cs of PYD: Competence, Confidence, Character, Caring, and Connection. We found six latent profiles, based primarily on mental health, aggression, and alcohol use, with significant differences in Confidence levels among many of the profiles, as well as some differences in the four other Cs. We discuss directions for future research and implications for application to youth policies and programs. PMID:24562425

Arbeit, Miriam R; Johnson, Sara K; Champine, Robey B; Greenman, Kathleen N; Lerner, Jacqueline V; Lerner, Richard M

2014-06-01

160

The Covariation of Antisocial Behavior and Substance Use in Adolescence: A Behavioral Genetic Perspective  

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Multivariate genetic studies have revealed genetic correlations between antisocial behavior (ASB) and substance use (SU). However, ASB is heterogeneous, and it remains unclear whether all forms are similarly related to SU. The present study examines links between cannabis use, alcohol consumption, and aggressive and delinquent forms of ASB using a…

McAdams, Tom; Rowe, Richard; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Maughan, Barbara; Eley, Thalia C.

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents  

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Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health…

Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

2013-01-01

162

Sex and Age Differences in the Risk Threshold for Delinquency  

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This study examines sex differences in the risk threshold for adolescent delinquency. Analyses were based on longitudinal data from the Pittsburgh Youth Study (n = 503) and the Pittsburgh Girls Study (n = 856). The study identified risk factors, promotive factors, and accumulated levels of risks as predictors of delinquency and nondelinquency,…

Wong, Thessa M. L.; Loeber, Rolf; Slotboom, Anne-Marie; Bijleveld, Catrien C. J. H.; Hipwell, Alison E.; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Koot, Hans M.

2013-01-01

163

Stability of antisocial behavior on the infancy-adolescence transition: a developmental perspective / Estabilidade do comportamento anti-social na transição da infância para a adolescência: uma perspectiva desenvolvimentista  

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Full Text Available The term antisocial is widely used in the literature to describe non-specific behavior problems such as delinquent behavior, aggressiveness, and oppositionist behavior. The aim of the present study was to describe and to discuss the concept of antisocial behavior as an indicator of specific mental disorders such as Attention-deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder, Conduct Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, and Antisocial Personality Disorder. Also, we discuss the factors that contribute to the stability of such behaviors in the transition from childhood to adolescence and the losses incurred throughout development. A recommendation is made to broaden conceptual discussions about mental disorders using wider categories such as antisocial behavior.

Janaína Pacheco

2005-01-01

164

From the macro to the micro: a geographic examination of the community context and early adolescent problem behaviors.  

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This study examined how multiple dimensions and levels of the community context associated with early adolescent problem behaviors in rural communities. Four thousand, five hundred and nine eighth-grade students in 28 rural and small town school districts in two states participated in surveys regarding substance use and delinquency in 2005. Locations of alcohol retailers, tobacco retailers, youth-serving organizations, and student residences were geocoded. Associations of the number of proximal alcohol and tobacco retailers, and youth-serving organizations with an early-adolescent problem behavior index were tested in Nonlinear Mixed Models that controlled for multiple district-level and individual characteristics. Multi-level model results demonstrated that the number of alcohol and tobacco retail locations within a one-mile radius of each adolescent's home positively associated with student-reported problem behaviors above and beyond the influence of school district and individual characteristics. Results suggest that the proximal community context added significantly to the district context when understanding the occurrence of early adolescent problem behaviors. Recognizing this variability in geographically determined risk within a community will likely enhance the effectiveness of community prevention activities. PMID:21336674

Chilenski, Sarah M

2011-12-01

165

Delinquent Attitudes and Self-Esteem  

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Article attempted to settle the question of whether or not the larger number of delinquents are accurately described as constituting a subculture. It also analyzes their behavior and attitudes. (Author/RK)

Rathus, Spencer A.; Siegel, Larry J.

1973-01-01

166

A Model of Family Background, Family Process, Youth Self-Control, and Delinquent Behavior in Two-Parent Families  

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Using data from a national sample of two-parent families with 11- and 12-year-old youths (N = 591), we tested a structural model of family background, family process (marital conflict and parenting), youth self-control, and delinquency four years later. Consistent with the conceptual model, marital conflict and youth self-control are directly…

Jeong, So-Hee; Eamon, Mary Keegan

2009-01-01

167

Gender Differences in Monitoring and Deviant Peers as Predictors of Delinquent Behavior among Low-Income Urban African American Youth  

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Juvenile delinquency is an ongoing social problem particularly among low-income urban youth who are regularly exposed to numerous risk factors. Although much research has been conducted in this area, the most at-risk youth have been largely neglected. This study examines the role of peer deviance in mediating the influence of adult monitoring on…

O'Donnell, Philip; Richards, Maryse; Pearce, Steven; Romero, Edna

2012-01-01

168

Juvenile Delinquency: An Introduction  

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Juvenile Delinquency is a term which is often inaccurately used. This article clarifies definitions, looks at prevalence, and explores the relationship between juvenile delinquency and mental health. Throughout, differences between males and females are explored. (Contains 1 table.)

Smith, Carolyn A.

2008-01-01

169

Dimensions of Impulsive Behavior in Adolescent Smokers and Nonsmokers  

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Robust associations have been identified between impulsive personality characteristics and cigarette smoking during adolescents, indicating that impulsive behavior may play an important role in the initiation of cigarette smoking. The present study extended this research by using laboratory behavioral assessments to explore relationships between three specific dimensions of impulsive behavior (impulsive decision-making, inattention and disinhibition) and adolescent cigarette smoking. Particip...

Fields, Sherecce; Collins, Christine; Leraas, Kristen; Reynolds, Brady

2009-01-01

170

Analysis of sexual behavior in adolescents.  

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The aim of this study was to describe some characteristics of vaginal, anal and oral sexual behavior in Spanish adolescents. It was a cross-sectional descriptive population study conducted using a probabilistic sample survey. The sample was composed of 4,612 male and female adolescents, of whom 1,686 reported having penetrative sexual experience. Sample size was established with a 97% confidence level and a 3% estimation error. Data collection took place in secondary education schools. Mean age of vaginal sex initiation was 15 years. Compared to females, males reported an earlier age of anal and oral sex initiation and a larger number of vaginal and anal sexual partners. Males also reported a higher frequency of penetrative sexual relations under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. A higher percentage of females than males reported not using a condom in their first anal sexual experience. This study provides a current overview of the sexual behavior of adolescents that can be useful for the design of future programs aimed at preventing HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). PMID:24476356

Teva, Inmaculada; Bermudez, M Paz; Ramiro, Maria T; Ramiro-Sanchez, Tamara

2013-10-01

171

Preschool Pretend Play Behaviors and Early Adolescent Creativity  

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Individual differences in creativity across the lifespan have been identified, but little research has focused on the development of creativity during early adolescence. This project examined individual differences on two measures of creativity in early adolescence as well as the predictability of adolescent creativity from pretend play behaviors

Mullineaux, Paula Y.; Dilalla, Lisabeth F.

2009-01-01

172

Adolescent Gambling: A Narrative Review of Behavior and Its Predictors  

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This narrative review summarizes current knowledge on adolescent gambling for the period 1990-2010, assesses adolescent gambling behavior and person and environment predictors, and suggests directions for future research. The review includes 99 studies that identified their subjects as adolescents, children, youth, and students, and discusses…

Ariyabuddhiphongs, Vanchai

2013-01-01

173

Gender, Age, and Behavior Differences in Early Adolescent Worry  

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Early adolescents in the United States are increasingly exposed to a culture of worrisome messages. A degree of adolescent worry is normal, but the likelihood of a young person being anxious or depressed increases with the perceived number of worries. This study examined the effect of age, gender, and worry behavior on frequency of 8 adolescent

Brown, Stephen L.; Teufel, James A.; Birch, David A.; Kancherla, Vijaya

2006-01-01

174

Parenting Practices as Predictors of Substance Use, Delinquency, and Aggression Among Urban Minority Youth: Moderating Effects of Family Structure and Gender  

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This study examined how parenting factors were associated with adolescent problem behaviors among urban minority youth and to what extent these relationships were moderated by family structure and gender. Sixth-grade students (N = 228) reported how often they use alcohol, smoke cigarettes, or engage in aggressive or delinquent behaviors; a parent or guardian reported their monitoring and other parenting practices. Findings indicated that boys and those from single-parent families engaged in the highest rates of problem behavior. More parental monitoring was associated with less delinquency overall, as well as less drinking in boys only. Eating family dinners together was associated with less aggression overall, as well as less delinquency in youth from single-parent families and in girls. Unsupervised time at home alone was associated with more smoking for girls only. Implications for prevention interventions are discussed. PMID:10860116

Griffin, Kenneth W.; Botvin, Gilbert J.; Scheier, Lawrence M.; Diaz, Tracy; Miller, Nicole L.

2014-01-01

175

Risky Sexual Behavior among Rural Female Adolescents in Malaysia: A Limited Role of Protective Factors  

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Full Text Available Purpose: This paper presents the findings of a cross-sectional survey on the risk and protective factors of premarital sexual behavior among rural female adolescents in Peninsular Malaysia. Methods: We investigated data on 770 female respondents aged 13-17 years in rural areas to identify predictive factors for premarital sexual intercourse. Data were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate regression. Specific socio-demographic factors, psychological and family domains, peer delinquency, and knowledge and attitudes about sexuality were considered in risky sexual behaviors in rural Malay girls. The effects of other covariates for premarital sexual intercourse were controlled by logistic regression model. Results: Of the 770 rural female students, about 3.2% of respondents reported experience of sexual intercourse in the past three months. Out of those sexually active girls, 36% were 17 years old and 20% stated having sexual intercourse with more than one partner, and 72% did not use contraception during the most recent sexual intercourse. Midnight activities, peer-sexual disorder, self-evaluation, and attitude toward sexual health were significant predictors of sexual intercourse in rural girls in Malaysia. Conclusion: The finding highlights the impact of psychological factors and peer group influences on the challenges of premarital sexual behavior among rural girls and the notion of school-based sexual health education for adolescents. This study triggers other researchers take into account a comprehensive view of protective factors operating in adolescents’ risky sexual behaviors in Asian culture seeing that family domain variables, unexpectedly, exerted no predicting influence on sexually active female teens in rural areas in Malaysia.

Maryam Ahmadian

2014-01-01

176

Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Depression in Adolescents  

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Full Text Available The goal of this article is to briefly review and summarize the rationale and research support for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT as a treatment for depressed adolescents. A primary focus of the paper is on our group CBT treatment for adolescent depression, entitled the Adolescent Coping With Depression Course. In addition, initial findings from a large, recently-completed study contrasting individual CBT to fluoxetine for depressed adolescents (Treatment of Adolescents with Depression Study are presented. Although the research support for CBT as a treatment for depressed adolescents is generally encouraging, we need to better understand which depressed adolescents benefit from CBT, how and when to incorporate medication and family-based interventions into CBT treatment, how to treat depressed adolescents with comorbid psychiatric conditions, and how CBT interventions fare with non-European-American depressed adolescents.

Paul Rohde

2005-01-01

177

Risk Factors Associated with Early Adolescent Sexual Values and Behaviors  

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adolescent sexual activity and subsequent pregnancy are ii an increasing dilemma facing American society . There appears to be an increase in the incidence of casual sexual activity among adolescents that leads to over 50% of students between grades 9 and 12 having been involved in sexual intercourse. This study examines changes in adolescent sexual attitudes, behaviors, and values in a select population over a 2-year time span. A survey of 548 families with adolescents was used to determine ...

Macbeth, David

1996-01-01

178

EARLY ONSET OF DELINQUENCY AND THE TRAJECTORY OF ALCOHOL-IMPAIRED DRIVING AMONG YOUNG MALES*  

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Building upon the literature in developmental and life-course criminology, the present study assesses the possible association of age onset of delinquency with the trajectory of alcohol-impaired driving using data collected from the three waves of the Buffalo Longitudinal Survey of Young Men (BLSYM). It is argued that as a unique form of delinquency, alcohol-impaired driving among adolescents may be better understood in a broad context of adolescent delinquency involvement. The study adopts t...

Zhang, Lening; Wieczorek, William F.; Welte, John W.

2011-01-01

179

Rethinking Timing of First Sex and Delinquency  

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The relation between timing of first sex and later delinquency was examined using a genetically informed sample of 534 same-sex twin pairs from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, who were assessed at three time points over a 7-year interval. Genetic and environmental differences between families were found to account for the…

Harden, K. Paige; Mendle, Jane; Hill, Jennifer E.; Turkheimer, Eric; Emery, Robert E.

2008-01-01

180

The Role of Ineffective Emotion Regulation in Problem Drinking Varies by Emotional Disposition, Delinquency, and Gender of South Korean Adolescents  

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This study examined the role of emotion regulation (ER) strategies and emotional disposition in problem drinking of adolescent offenders (n = 303) and non-offending peers (n = 287) from South Korea. The participants completed a questionnaire assessing problem drinking, positive and negative emotion, emotional intensity, and use of problem solving,…

Song, Sunmi; Graham, Jennifer E.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Sohn, Young-Woo

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
181

A University's Approach to Delinquency Prevention. The Adolescent Diversion Project, Urbana and Champaign, Illinois. An Exemplary Project.  

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The Urbana-Champaign Adolescent Diversion Project (ADP) involves children, parents, professors, graduate and under-graduate students, policemen, teachers, and community social service workers in a cooperative effort to divert youngsters in legal jeopardy from the juvenile justice system. Its three goals are: (1) to provide juveniles with an…

Ku, Richard; Blew, Carol H.

182

Peer Contagion in Child and Adolescent Social and Emotional Development  

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In this article, we examine the construct of peer contagion in childhood and adolescence and review studies of child and adolescent development that have identified peer contagion influences. Evidence suggests that children's interactions with peers are tied to increases in aggression in early and middle childhood and amplification of problem behaviors such as drug use, delinquency, and violence in early to late adolescence. Deviancy training is one mechanism that accounts for peer contagion ...

Dishion, Thomas J.; Tipsord, Jessica M.

2011-01-01

183

The social context for risky sexual behavior among adolescents.  

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This study supports a model of adolescents' risky sexual behavior in which this behavior is seen as a product of the same peer and family factors which influence a wide range of problem behaviors. The Patterson et al. (1992) model of peer and parental factors associated with adolescents' sexual risk-taking behavior was tested on three independent samples of adolescents, ages 14 through 18. Adolescents whose peers were reported to engage in diverse problem behaviors were more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior. Poor parental monitoring and parent-child coercive interactions were associated having deviant peers, and poor parental monitoring also had a direct relationship to risky sexual behavior. Family involvement was associated with fewer parent-child coercive interactions. Less availability of parental figures in the family was directly associated with risky sexual behavior and was also associated with poorer parental monitoring. PMID:7966262

Metzler, C W; Noell, J; Biglan, A; Ary, D; Smolkowski, K

1994-08-01

184

Emotional and Behavioral Effects of Romantic Relationships in Chinese Adolescents  

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Adolescents' romantic relationships have been associated with higher levels of depression, although their links with externalizing behavioral problems remain unclear. The present study examined the impact of adolescent romantic relationships on depression and externalizing behaviors in a large sample of 10,509 Chinese secondary school students…

Chen, Zhiyan; Guo, Fei; Yang, Xiaodong; Li, Xinying; Duan, Qing; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Xiaojia

2009-01-01

185

Informed-Consent Issues with Adolescent Health Behavior Research  

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Objective: To identify the informed-consent issues when conducting adolescent health behavior research. Methods: A literature review was conducted across diverse academic fields about the informed-consent issues that were relevant to adolescent health behavior research. Results: Issues included defining consent, assent and permission, minimal…

Olds, R. Scott

2003-01-01

186

The Role of a Parent's Incarceration in the Emotional Health and Problem Behaviors of At-Risk Adolescents  

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The impact of a parent's incarceration and adolescents' emotional health on their substance abuse and delinquency is described for a group of at-risk 10- to 14-year-old adolescents. Data were drawn from a two-wave longitudinal study from the federally funded Children at Risk program, ongoing in five states from 1993 to 1997. Results point to a…

Midgley, Erin Kathleen; Lo, Celia C.

2013-01-01

187

Juvenile delinquency in the Netherlands:  

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IntroductionThe Dutch juvenile justice system: an introduction - P.H. van der LaanPatterns in delinquent behavior - J. Junger-TasCausal factors: social control theory - J. Junger-TasSocial control theory versus differential association: a test on panel data - M. JungerAggression in a youth club: an observation study in a town in the west of Holland - C.H.D. Steinmetz The juvenile investigation unit: an observation study - E. van...

Junger-tas, J.; Block, R. L.

1988-01-01

188

Risky Business: Exploring Adolescent Risk-Taking Behavior  

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Ongoing behavioral research has documented the growing prevalence of adolescent health risk behaviors, such as tobacco use, sexual activity, alcohol and other substance use, nutritional behavior, physical inactivity, and intentional injury. Newer youth risk behaviors, such as pathological gambling, are emerging as threats to public health. Risk,…

Wyatt, Tammy Jordan; Peterson, Fred L.

2005-01-01

189

Impact of modeling on adolescent suicidal behavior.  

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The evidence to date suggests that suicide modeling is a real phenomenon, although of a smaller effect size than other psychiatric and psychosocial risk factors for adolescent suicide. Multiple lines of inquiry provide converging evidence, including studies on suicide clusters, media influence on suicide (particularly coverage of nonfictional suicides), and peer influence on suicidality. Despite variations in study setting and methodology, the body of literature is consistent with a modeling hypothesis. Although advances in documentation of suicide modeling have been made over the past decade, we are still confronted by unresolved issues regarding the underlying mechanisms. Prevention and postvention strategies can be optimized to avert modeling of suicidal behavior only once research addresses the complexities and uncertainties of this phenomenon. PMID:18439450

Insel, Beverly J; Gould, Madelyn S

2008-06-01

190

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorder  

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Currently, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) becomes one of the leading approaches in the psychotherapy. However,use of CBT in childhood psychotherapy is considerably novel. After 1990s, it has been understood that it is an effectivemethod for children and adolescents. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common problems in the field of childhoodand adolescent psychiatry. In the studies conducted, the effectiveness of CBT was demonstrated in anxiety disorders ofthe children and adolescents....

O?ztop, Didem Behice; Karakaya, Emel

2013-01-01

191

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescent depression and suicidality  

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CBT has emerged as a well-established treatment for depression in children and adolescents but treatment trials for adolescents with suicidality are few in number, and their efficacy to date is rather limited. Although a definitive treatment for adolescent suicide attempters has yet to be established, the limited literature suggests that suicidal thoughts and behavior should be directly addressed for optimal treatment outcome. This chapter reviews the rationale underlying the use of CBT for t...

Spirito, Anthony; Esposito-smythers, Christianne; Wolff, Jennifer; Uhl, Kristen

2011-01-01

192

Parenting practices and adolescent sexual behavior: A longitudinal study  

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The effects of parental attitudes, practices, and television mediation on adolescent sexual behaviors were investigated in a study of adolescent sexuality and media (N=887). Confirmatory factor analyses supported an eight-factor parenting model with television mediation factors as constructs distinct from general parenting practices. Logistic regressions indicated that adolescents reporting greater parental disapproval and limits on viewing at Wave 1 were less likely to initiate oral sex betw...

Bersamin, Melina; Todd, Michael; Fisher, Deborah A.; Hill, Douglas L.; Grube, Joel W.; Walker, Samantha

2008-01-01

193

Adolescents' Smoking Behavior and Attitudes: The Influence of Mothers' Smoking Communication, Behavior and Attitudes  

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This study investigated adolescents' and parents' perceptions regarding smoking behavior, attitudes toward smoking, and smoking communication. Instruments were developed to measure multidimensional smoking communication messages and smoking attitudes in 140 mother-adolescent dyads. The prediction of relevant adolescent smoking variables is…

Herbert, Diane F.; Schiaffino, Kathleen M.

2007-01-01

194

Gender Differences in Cambodian Delinquency: The Role of Ethnic Identity, Parental Discipline, and Peer Delinquency  

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Contrary to the model minority stereotype, Asian youth are increasingly becoming more involved in crime and delinquency. For instance, in the California Youth Authority, Southeast Asian adolescents are disproportionately represented, including Cambodian, Hmong, and Lao and Mien youth. However, few studies have focused on factors that are…

Go, Charles G.; Le, Thao N.

2005-01-01

195

Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Adolescents with Tourette Syndrome  

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Full Text Available Background: Patients with Tourette syndrome (TS are at risk of an array of behavioraland emotional problems, resulting in social, academic and vocational functionimpairments. This study intended to examine the nature and severity ofbehavioral and emotional problems in Taiwanese TS adolescents.Methods: Forty TS adolescents with normal IQ and thirty age- and gender-matchednormal controls were evaluated using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale(YGTSS and the Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL to understand theseverity of tic symptoms, and behavioral and emotional problems. The maincaretakers of these adolescents were interviewed using the Chinese versionof the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (CK-SADS toconfirm their comorbid psychiatric diagnoses.Results: Most TS adolescents in this study had mild tic severity. TS adolescentsshowed significantly higher scores than normal controls in all CBCL subscales.The ‘total most severe tics’ YGTSS score was positively correlatedwith internalization behavior problems, externalization behavior problemsand aggressive behavior subscales of the CBCL. As TS adolescents gotolder, their CBCL scores decreased significantly in internalization behaviorproblems, externalization behavior problems, and obsessive-compulsive andaggressive behavior subscales.Conclusion: Taiwanese TS adolescents with mild to moderate tic severity still demonstratedprominent behavior and emotional problems. Although the severity ofbehavior and emotional problems decreased with increasing age, we stillsuggest systematic inquiry regarding the psychological well-being and psychiatriccomorbidities of young TS patients.

Yuan-Pei Hsu

2008-04-01

196

Does Sex Education Affect Adolescent Sexual Behaviors and Health?  

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This study examines whether offering sex education to young teenagers affects several measures of adolescent sexual behavior and health: virginity status, contraceptive use, frequency of intercourse, likelihood of pregnancy, and probability of contracting a sexually transmitted disease. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent

Sabia, Joseph J.

2006-01-01

197

Developmental Trajectories of Childhood Obesity and Risk Behaviors in Adolescence  

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Using group-based trajectory modeling, this study examined 5156 adolescents from the child sample of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to identify developmental trajectories of obesity from ages 6-18 and evaluate associations of such trajectories with risk behaviors and psychosocial health in adolescence. Four distinctive obesity…

Huang, David Y. C.; Lanza, H. Isabella; Wright-Volel, Kynna; Anglin, M. Douglas

2013-01-01

198

Parenting Practices and Adolescent Sexual Behavior: A Longitudinal Study  

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The effects of parental attitudes, practices, and television mediation on adolescent sexual behaviors were investigated in a study of adolescent sexuality and media (N = 887). Confirmatory factor analyses supported an eight-factor parenting model with television mediation factors as constructs distinct from general parenting practices. Logistic…

Bersamin, Melina; Todd, Michael; Fisher, Deborah A.; Hill, Douglas L.; Grube, Joel W.; Walker, Samantha

2008-01-01

199

Factor Structure of the Adolescent Clinical Sexual Behavior Inventory  

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The primary goal of this study was to determine if the Adolescent Clinical Sexual Behavior Inventory-Self-Report conformed to the five-factor scale format that was initially used with a clinical sample that included adolescents referred for sexual abuse evaluations. Participants were 141 teenagers, ages 12-19 (M = 15.11, SD = 1.4), and their…

Wherry, Jeffrey N.; Berres, Ashley K.; Sim, Leslie; Friedrich, William N.

2009-01-01

200

Parent-Child Conflicts, School Troubles, and Differences in Delinquency across Immigration Generations  

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This study examines delinquent behavior among schoolchildren in a nationally representative sample from the United States and seeks an understanding of the factors contributing to variances in delinquency across immigration generations. Data analysis indicates that the levels of self-reported substance use, property delinquency, and violent…

Bui, Hoan N.

2009-01-01

 
 
 
 
201

A longitudinal examination of the relationship between adolescent problem behaviors and traffic crash involvement during young adulthood.  

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Previous research examining the relationship between adolescent problem behaviors and young adult traffic outcomes (crashes, convictions, risky driving) has produced differing results. Possible reasons for this may be the heterogeneity of the crash outcomes (from minor fender-benders to fatal crashes), the gender of the driver, and/or the age of the driver. The aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between adolescent problem behaviors and young adult crashes to determine the extent to which the above factors influenced this relationship. This study was part of the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study (DMHDS), which is a longitudinal study of a cohort (n = 1,037) born in Dunedin, New Zealand, from April 1972 to March 1973. This cohort has been followed up regularly since birth, and the data for the present research were obtained at the 18-, 21-, and 26-year-old follow-up interviews. The problem behaviors examined were those identified by Jessor in the theory of problem behavior, namely, tobacco smoking, marijuana use, alcohol use, delinquent behavior, and unsafe sexual behavior. Data for these measures were obtained in personal interviews when the cohort was aged 18 years. The self-reported crash data were obtained at the age 21 and age 26 follow-up interviews. Driving exposure, academic qualifications, employment, being a parent, and marital status were included as potential confounders. The results show that involvement in adolescent problem behaviors predicted crash involvement at age 21 for the females but not the males and at age 26 for the males but not the females. Possible explanations for these differences by age and gender are discussed. PMID:19058096

Begg, Dorothy J; Gulliver, Pauline

2008-12-01

202

Moral Orientation and Relationships in School and Adolescent Pro- and Antisocial Behaviors: A Multilevel Study  

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This multilevel study examined the relationships between moral climate factors and prosocial as well as antisocial behaviors inside and outside the school (school misconduct, delinquent behavior, and vandalism). The moral climate factors were punishment-and victim-based moral orientation, relationships among students, and teacher-student…

Wissink, Inge B.; Dekovic, Maja; Stams, Geert-Jan; Asscher, Jessica J.; Rutten, Esther; Zijlstra, Bonne J. H.

2014-01-01

203

Sexual behavior in Spanish adolescents of divorced parents.  

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Marital breakup has been associated with numerous behavioral problems in children, such as sexual risk behaviors. This research is the first to examine sexual behaviors of Spanish adolescents related to whether their parents were married or divorced. Participants were 342 boys and girls aged between 14 and 18 years. The sample provided confidential information about their sexual behavior and birth control methods. Significant differences were only found in percentages of adolescents who had engaged in mutual masturbation, intercourse, or oral sex, and who had practiced these sexual relations in the last six months, in both cases, they were higher when the parents had broken their marital relationship. Regarding adolescents of divorced parents, engaging in intercourse is more likely in older teenagers who live with a stepparent. Moreover, older adolescents who were younger when parents divorced and who live in a reconstituted family, have more sexual partners. These and other findings are discussed. PMID:22420347

Orgilés, Mireia; Espada, José P; Johnson, Blair T; Huedo-Medina, Tania B; Carratalá, Elena

2012-05-01

204

Mother-Adolescent Conflict as a Mediator Between Adolescent Problem Behaviors and Maternal Psychological Control  

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This study examined mother–adolescent conflict as a mediator of longitudinal reciprocal relations between adolescent aggression and depressive symptoms and maternal psychological control. Motivated by family systems theory and the transactions that occur between individual and dyadic levels of the family system, we examined the connections among these variables during a developmental period when children and parents experience significant psychosocial changes. Three years of self-report data were collected from 168 mother–adolescent dyads, beginning when the adolescents (55.4% girls) were in 6th grade. Models were tested using longitudinal path analysis. Results indicated that the connection between adolescent aggression (and depressive symptoms) and maternal psychological control was best characterized as adolescent-driven, indirect, and mediated by mother–adolescent conflict; there were no indications of parent-driven indirect effects. That is, prior adolescent aggression and depressive symptoms were associated with increased conflict. In turn, conflict was associated with increased psychological control. Within our mediation models, reciprocal direct effects between both problem behaviors and conflict and between conflict and psychological control were also found. Additionally, exploratory analyses regarding the role of adolescent gender as a moderator of variable relations were conducted. These analyses revealed no gender-related patterns of moderation, whether moderated mediation or specific path tests for moderation were considered. This study corroborates prior research finding support for child effects on parenting behaviors during early adolescence. PMID:22612432

Steeger, Christine M.; Gondoli, Dawn M.

2014-01-01

205

Precursors of Running Away during Adolescence: Do Peers Matter?  

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Although peer influence is a salient predictor of delinquency, how it operates in the etiology of runaway behavior is not fully understood. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this study demonstrates the importance of taking peers into account in understanding the etiology of running away. The findings suggest…

Chen, Xiaojin; Thrane, Lisa; Adams, Michele

2012-01-01

206

Forced Sexual Intercourse in Relation to Female Adolescents' Risky Sexual Behavior, Psychopathology, and Behavior Problems  

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During 1995, over 20,000 adolescents completed the in-home interview for The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). One question asked females if they had ever been forced to have sexual intercourse (FSI). In addition, they were asked about other sexual behavior, their psychological well-being, and behavior problems. The present study examines the associations between FSI and 26 outcome variables, comparing adolescent females who reported FSI with females who reported ...

Christensen, Mathew

1999-01-01

207

Systematic Review of Social Network Analysis in Adolescent Cigarette Smoking Behavior  

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Background: Social networks are important in adolescent smoking behavior. Previous research indicates that peer context is a major causal factor of adolescent smoking behavior. To date, however, little is known about the influence of peer group structure on adolescent smoking behavior. Methods: Studies that examined adolescent social networks with…

Seo, Dong-Chul; Huang, Yan

2012-01-01

208

Within-Family Conflict Behaviors as Predictors of Conflict in Adolescent Romantic Relations  

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Continuity in conflict behaviors from (a) adolescents' behavior with parents and their behavior with romantic partners and (b) from parents' marriage to adolescents' romantic relationships were examined in a sample of 58 mother-father-adolescent families and the adolescents' romantic partners. The social relations model was used to analyze…

Darling, Nancy; Cohan, Catherine L.; Burns, Andrew; Thompson, Louisa

2008-01-01

209

Adolescent Suicidal Behavior and Substance Use: Developmental Mechanisms  

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Full Text Available Adolescent suicidal behaviors and substance use are disturbingly common. Research suggests overlap of some of the etiological mechanisms for both adolescent suicidal behavior and substance use, yet clear understanding of the complex relations between these behaviors and their causal underpinnings is lacking. A growing body of evidence and a diathesis model (Mann et al. 1999; Mann, 2003 highlight the importance of impulse control as a proximal risk factor for adolescent suicidal and substance use behaviors. This literature review extends current theory on the relationships between adolescent suicidal behavior and substance use by: (1 examining how, when, and to what extent adolescent development is affected by poor impulse control, stressful life events, substance use behavior, and biological factors; (2 presenting proposed causal mechanisms by which these risk factors interact to increase risk for suicidal behaviors and substance use; and (3 proposing specific new hypotheses to extend the diathesis model to adolescents at risk for suicide and substance use. More specifically, new hypotheses are presented that predict bidirectional relationships between stressful life events and genetic markers of 5-HT dysregulation; substance use behavior and impulsivity; and substance use behavior and suicide attempts. The importance of distinguishing between different developmental trajectories of suicidal and substance use behaviors, and the effects of specific risk and protective mechanisms are discussed. Use of new statistical approaches that provide for the comparison of latent growth curves and latent class models is recommended to identify differences in developmental trajectories of suicidal behavior and substance use. Knowledge gained from these prospective longitudinal methods should lead to greater understanding on the timing, duration, and extent to which specific risk and protective factors influence the outcomes of suicidal behavior and substance use. In turn, findings from these studies should inform researchers who conduct future treatment and prevention studies.

Donald M. Dougherty

2008-01-01

210

Do Adolescents Engage in Delinquency to Attract the Social Attention of Peers? An Extension and Longitudinal Test of the Social Reinforcement Hypothesis  

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Although social-learning theory remains among the dominant perspectives in micro-level research concerning the causes of delinquency, research has yet to provide an adequate test of its social-reinforcement component using the methods required by the logic of operant psychology. The present article discusses the limits of existing attempts to test…

Rebellon, Cesar J.

2006-01-01

211

Parent perceptions of adolescent pain expression: The adolescent pain behavior questionnaire  

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Pain behaviors provide meaningful information about adolescents in chronic pain, enhancing their verbal report of pain intensity with information about the global pain experience. Caregivers likely consider these expressions when making judgments about their adolescents’ medical or emotional needs. Current validated measures of pain behavior target acute or procedural pain and young or non-verbal children, while observation systems may be too cumbersome for clinical practice. The objective ...

Lynch-jordan, Anne M.; Kashikar-zuck, Susmita; Goldschneider, Kenneth R.

2010-01-01

212

Social-cognitive correlates of risky adolescent cycling behavior  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Bicycle use entails high safety and health risks especially for adolescents. Most safety education programs aimed at adolescents focus on accident statistics and risk perceptions. This paper proposes the investigation of the social-cognitive correlates of risky cycling behaviors of adolescents prior to developing safety education programs. Method Secondary school students aged 13 to 18 years (n = 1446 filled out questionnaires regarding bicycle behavior, risky intentions, accident experience, and social-cognitive determinants as suggested by the theory of planned behavior. Results Regression analysis revealed that the proximal variables (i.e., self-efficacy, attitudes towards drunk driving, personal norm regarding safekeeping of self and others, and compared risk were able to predict 17% of the variance of risky behavior and 23% of the variance of risky intentions. The full model explained respectively 29% and 37% of the variance in risky behavior and risky intentions. Adolescents with positive attitudes towards risky behavior and low sense of responsibility report risky behavior, even when having been (close to an accident. Conclusions Adolescents realize whether they are risk takers or not. This implies that the focus of education programs should not be on risk perceptions, but on decreasing positive attitudes towards alcohol in traffic and increasing sense of responsibility instead. Cognitions regarding near accidents should be studied, the role of safe cycling self-efficacy is unclear.

Ruiter Robert AC

2010-07-01

213

Prevalence of bullying and aggressive behavior and their relationship to mental health problems among 12- to 15-year-old Norwegian adolescents.  

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The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between being bullied and aggressive behavior and self-reported mental health problems among young adolescents. A representative population sample of 2,464 young Norwegian adolescents (50.8% girls) aged 12-15 years was assessed. Being bullied was measured using three items concerning teasing, exclusion, and physical assault. Self-esteem was assessed by Harter's self-perception profile for adolescents. Emotional and behavioral problems were measured by the Moods and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ) and the youth self-report (YSR). Aggressive behavior was measured by four items from the YSR. One-tenth of the adolescents reported being bullied, and 5% reported having been aggressive toward others during the past 6 months. More of the students being bullied and students being aggressive toward others reported parental divorce, and they showed higher scores on all YSR subscales and on the MFQ questions, and lower scores on the global self-worth subscale (Harter) than students not being bullied or aggressive. A few differences emerged between the two groups being bullied or being aggressive toward others: those who were aggressive showed higher total YSR scores, higher aggression and delinquency scores, and lower social problems scores, and reported higher scores on the social acceptance subscale (Harter) than bullied students. However, because social problems were demonstrated in both the involved groups, interventions designed to improve social competence and interaction skills should be integrated in antibullying programs. PMID:20814707

Undheim, Anne Mari; Sund, Anne Mari

2010-11-01

214

Adolescent Health-Compromising Behaviors: Motivating School Counselors.  

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Investigated middle and high school counselors' perceptions of adolescent health-compromising behaviors and motivations to intervene. Data from a survey based on protection motivation theory showed differences in counselors' perceptions of the severity of risk-taking behaviors. Perceptions were highly correlated with intentions to seek out…

Nagel, Liza; Scherer, David G.; Lee, William

2000-01-01

215

Adolescent Female Athletes' Sexual Risk-Taking Behaviors.  

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Compared data for 7,839 female high school students with regard to risk-taking behavior related to sexuality to similar data for 141 high-performance female high school athletes. Findings suggest that participation in a high performance sports activity is positively associated with some reduced sexual risk-taking behaviors for adolescent females.…

Savage, Michael P.; Holcomb, Derek R.

1999-01-01

216

Adolescência e delinquência: variáveis significativas para a construção de um modelo explicativo / Adolescence and delinquency: significant variables for building an explanatory model  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Portugal | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Na Psicologia do Desenvolvimento existe amplo consenso relativamente à complexidade dos comportamentos anti-sociais, sobretudo durante a adolescência, estádio em que se verificam múltiplas e importantes mudanças. Assim, foi concebido um projecto de investigação com o intuito de dar resposta a alguma [...] s questões sobre o fenómeno anti-social que ainda carecem de esclarecimento, especialmente no que concerne a potenciais variáveis explicativas, como aptidões sociais, auto-conceito, personalidade, ambiente familiar e nível socioeconómico. Foi aplicado um protocolo de avaliação composto por um questionário sociodemográfico e as versões portuguesas do YSR (Fonseca & Monteiro, 1999); SSQ-Student Form (Mota, Matos, & Lemos, 2011); FES (Matos & Fontaine, 1992); PHCSCS-2 (Veiga, 2006), EPQ-J (Fonseca, 1989), e SPM-56 (Raven, Court & Raven, 1998) em cinco Centros Educativos numa amostra de 121 rapazes entre os 14 e os 20 anos de idade (M= 16,54). Os resultados revelaram peculiaridades na amostra, nomeadamente uma prevalência considerável de nível socioeconómico baixo e manifestações comportamentais tanto de cariz agressivo como de desobediência, sendo roubos e agressões as formas mais frequentemente reportadas de comportamentos anti-sociais. Ficou também claro o papel preditivo de algumas variáveis de personalidade, auto-conceito, percepção de ambiente familiar e auto-controlo na escala "Antisocial" e "Problemas de Atenção/Hiperactividade" do YSR. Com o projecto de investigação apresentado ficam, portanto, evidenciadas as particularidades dos jovens delinquentes enquanto grupo específico no que diz respeito às suas percepções e características individuais, sociais, comportamentais e familiares. Acreditamos que, se estas forem consideradas para o design de novos programas de prevenção e intervenção, poderão contribuir para a sua eficácia. Abstract in english Within Developmental Psychology there is a wide consensus on the complexity of antisocial behaviours, particularly during adolescence, a stage when multiple and important changes take place. Hence, we created a research project aimed at answering some questions about the antisocial phenomenon that s [...] till lack enlightening, especially regarding potential explaining variables such as social skills, self-concept, personality, family environment and socioeconomic status. We used a protocol including a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Portuguese versions of YSR (Fonseca & Monteiro, 1999); SSQ-Student Form (Mota, Matos, & Lemos, 2011); FES (Matos & Fontaine, 1992); PHCSCS-2 (Veiga, 2006), EPQ-J (Fonseca, 1989), e SPM-56 (Raven, Court & Raven, 1998). This was applied in five Educational Centres, to a sample of 121 boys between 14 and 20 years old (M=16.54). Results revealed some peculiarities in the sample, namely a strong prevalence of low socioeconomic status and of both overt and covert behavioural manifestations, with a higher frequency of theft and aggression. The predictive role of some personality, self-concept, family environment and self-control variables for the “Antisocial” and “Attention Problems/Hyperactivity” YSR scales was also evident. This research project makes evident that there are peculiarities in young delinquents as a specific group, that is, in what concerns their perceptions and individual, social, behavioural and familial characteristics. Therefore, we believe that considering our results for the design of new prevention and intervention programs may contribute for their efficacy.

Alice Murteira, Morgado; Maria da Luz, Vale-Dias.

2014-03-01

217

Adolescência e delinquência: variáveis significativas para a construção de um modelo explicativo / Adolescence and delinquency: significant variables for building an explanatory model  

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Full Text Available SciELO Portugal | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Na Psicologia do Desenvolvimento existe amplo consenso relativamente à complexidade dos comportamentos anti-sociais, sobretudo durante a adolescência, estádio em que se verificam múltiplas e importantes mudanças. Assim, foi concebido um projecto de investigação com o intuito de dar resposta a alguma [...] s questões sobre o fenómeno anti-social que ainda carecem de esclarecimento, especialmente no que concerne a potenciais variáveis explicativas, como aptidões sociais, auto-conceito, personalidade, ambiente familiar e nível socioeconómico. Foi aplicado um protocolo de avaliação composto por um questionário sociodemográfico e as versões portuguesas do YSR (Fonseca & Monteiro, 1999); SSQ-Student Form (Mota, Matos, & Lemos, 2011); FES (Matos & Fontaine, 1992); PHCSCS-2 (Veiga, 2006), EPQ-J (Fonseca, 1989), e SPM-56 (Raven, Court & Raven, 1998) em cinco Centros Educativos numa amostra de 121 rapazes entre os 14 e os 20 anos de idade (M= 16,54). Os resultados revelaram peculiaridades na amostra, nomeadamente uma prevalência considerável de nível socioeconómico baixo e manifestações comportamentais tanto de cariz agressivo como de desobediência, sendo roubos e agressões as formas mais frequentemente reportadas de comportamentos anti-sociais. Ficou também claro o papel preditivo de algumas variáveis de personalidade, auto-conceito, percepção de ambiente familiar e auto-controlo na escala "Antisocial" e "Problemas de Atenção/Hiperactividade" do YSR. Com o projecto de investigação apresentado ficam, portanto, evidenciadas as particularidades dos jovens delinquentes enquanto grupo específico no que diz respeito às suas percepções e características individuais, sociais, comportamentais e familiares. Acreditamos que, se estas forem consideradas para o design de novos programas de prevenção e intervenção, poderão contribuir para a sua eficácia. Abstract in english Within Developmental Psychology there is a wide consensus on the complexity of antisocial behaviours, particularly during adolescence, a stage when multiple and important changes take place. Hence, we created a research project aimed at answering some questions about the antisocial phenomenon that s [...] till lack enlightening, especially regarding potential explaining variables such as social skills, self-concept, personality, family environment and socioeconomic status. We used a protocol including a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Portuguese versions of YSR (Fonseca & Monteiro, 1999); SSQ-Student Form (Mota, Matos, & Lemos, 2011); FES (Matos & Fontaine, 1992); PHCSCS-2 (Veiga, 2006), EPQ-J (Fonseca, 1989), e SPM-56 (Raven, Court & Raven, 1998). This was applied in five Educational Centres, to a sample of 121 boys between 14 and 20 years old (M=16.54). Results revealed some peculiarities in the sample, namely a strong prevalence of low socioeconomic status and of both overt and covert behavioural manifestations, with a higher frequency of theft and aggression. The predictive role of some personality, self-concept, family environment and self-control variables for the “Antisocial” and “Attention Problems/Hyperactivity” YSR scales was also evident. This research project makes evident that there are peculiarities in young delinquents as a specific group, that is, in what concerns their perceptions and individual, social, behavioural and familial characteristics. Therefore, we believe that considering our results for the design of new prevention and intervention programs may contribute for their efficacy.

Alice Murteira, Morgado; Maria da Luz, Vale-Dias.

218

Family dysfunction in adolescents with suicidal behavior and in adolescents with conduct disorders  

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Full Text Available Introduction. The period of life known as adolescence generally refers to transition from childhood to adulthood. Adolescents' progress toward autonomy involves remaining connected with, as well as separated from parents. Young people and their parents usually have mixed feelings about adolescent autonomy and attachment. An estimated 50% of children born in the 80s have spent part of their developmental years in single-parent households. Divorce is almost always a stressful event in children's lives. Youthful suicide rate has increased dramatically and is the third leading cause of death among 15-19 year olds. Conduct disorder is one of the most frequently diagnosed conditions in adolescents. Suicidal adolescents and adolescents with conduct disorder are much more likely than their peers to have grown up in disrupted, disorganized homes with lack of attachment between parents and their children. Material and methods This prospective study was carried out during 2002, 2003, and 2004. The research included 60 adolescents treated at the Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Novi Sad, 30 with diagnosed conduct disorder and 30 with suicidal behavior. Results Along with other kinds of distress, suicidal adolescents have experienced an escalation of family problems a few months prior to attempted suicide. Discussion Divorce and life in single-parent households is almost always a stressful period in children's lives. Conduct disorder and suicidal behavior represent a desperate cry for help. Conclusion Most adolescents in both groups live in single-parent house­holds. These young people have frequently passed into adolescence with little reason to feel that they could rely on their parents for support, or on their home as a place of sanctuary. .

Ivanovi?-Kova?evi? Svetlana

2005-01-01

219

Adolescents eating behavior, body image and psychological well-being.  

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This study focuses on the middle school students in the Croatian region of Dalmatia. The survey was designed to examine adolescent eating behavior as it relates to body image and psychological well-being (self-esteem, life-satisfaction and stress) in relation to body mass index; BMI. Differences among participants in food intake were examined according to demographic variables and eating behavior (regular food intake or dieting) as well. Psychological variables were highly associated with dieting among adolescents of both genders. The adolescents who were dieting reported significantly lower self-esteem, lower life satisfaction and lower body-image satisfaction, higher rate of stress and higher rate of body mass index (BMI) when compared to non-dieters. This study confirms that a rather large percentage of adolescent girls of low socioeconomic status engage in dieting when trying to lose weight, which may seriously damage their developmental growth. PMID:19408627

Peternel, Lana; Sujoldzi?, Anita

2009-03-01

220

Behavioral characteristics of the offspring of adolescent rats  

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Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that, during adulthood, the offspring of adolescent rats differ in emotionality, learning and memory from the offspring of adult rats. The behavior of the offspring of adolescent (age, 50-55 days) and adult rats (age, 90-95 days) was tested in the ope [...] n field, activity cage, and passive and active avoidance apparatus. The latencies during training and testing in the passive avoidance apparatus of the offspring of adolescent parents were shorter than the latencies of control offspring (P

T., Zemunik; M., Peruzovic; V., Capkun; K., Milkovic.

 
 
 
 
221

Behavioral problems and tobacco use among adolescents in Chile  

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OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between behavioral problems and tobacco smoking among adolescent students in Chile. METHODS: Data were drawn from a study that included questionnaire surveys of 46 907 school-attending adolescents in all 13 of the administrative regions of Chile. Assessments were based on an adapted, Spanish-language version of the Drug Use Screening Inventory. The conditional form of the logistic regression model was used for analysis, with matching of students on indivi...

Caris Luis; Varas Marianela; Anthony Christopher B.; Anthony James C.

2003-01-01

222

SEXUAL HEALTH BEHAVIORS OF ADOLESCENTS IN POKHARA, NEPAL  

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Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adolescent (10–19 years is a transition of age during which hazardous sexual health behaviors may be adopted; increasing vulnerability to several kinds of behavioral disorders like drug use, unsafe sexual act leading to reproductive ill health. Objective of the study was to assess sexual health behaviors of adolescents in Pokhara, Nepal. METHODS: An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among 15–19 years adolescents studying in grades 11 and 12. Probability sampling techniques were applied. A structured, pretested, envelope sealed self administered questionnaire was distributed among all (1584 adolescents of the 11 and 12 grades of selected institutions. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (16 versions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied. RESULTS: About 19.37% adolescents had sexual contact and male participation was higher than females (P<0.05. Nearly one fifth of unmarried were found to be involved in sexual activities and most of them had first sex between 15-19 years age (median age 15.26 years. Of those who had sex, 6.91% had adopted all the three: vaginal, oral and anal sexes and majority had single followed by 2-5 sex partners in their sexual intercourse in the last one year and last month. About 13.93% adolescents were found to be indulged in group sex. Most of them had sex with regular partners and commercial sex workers. More than eight out of every ten who had sex had used contraceptive methods and condom was method of choice (94.77%. CONCLUSIONS: Premarital sexual involvement was prevalent among adolescents; sex with commercial sex workers and non commercial sex partners was perceived to be risk. Behavior change intervention strategies need to be formulated and implemented to promote adolescent reproductive and sexual health.

Shrestha Niranjan

2012-07-01

223

General and Specific Predictors of Behavioral and Emotional Problems Among Adolescents  

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Based on a sample of 1,218 students in the 10th and 11th grades, 14 variables measuring behavioral and emotional problems were modeled as four factors via confirmatory factor analysis. The factors were labeled Polydrug Use, Delinquency, Negative Affect, and Academic Orientation. A similar four-factor structure was supported 1 year later, and a…

Windle, M.; Mason, W. A.

2004-01-01

224

Adolescents’ posttraumatic stress reactions and behavior problems following Marmara earthquake  

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Full Text Available Background: Although most children and adolescents exhibit some kindof postdisaster reactions, their symptoms vary depending on the age, gender, parental social support, disaster and postdisaster contextual factors. Objective: This study examined adolescents’ postdisaster experiences, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms, and behavior problems 13 months after the 1999 Marmara earthquake in Turkey. Design: Participants included 695 adolescents aged 12-17 years, who resided in three districts of Izmit at varying distances from the epicenter (e.g., high (HI, medium (MI, and low impact (LI areas. Measures included demographics, earthquake exposure experiences, ChildPTSD Reaction Index, and Behavior Problems Index. Results: Findings revealed that 76% of the adolescents reported moderate to very severe levels of PTSD symptoms (82% HI, 70% MI, and 70% LI after the devastating earthquake. As expected, the HI group reported more symptoms than did members of MI and LI groups. Overall, 39% of the variance in adolescents’ PTSD symptoms was accounted for by the degree of exposure and gender. Analyses also indicated an increase in the frequency of adolescentsbehavior problems following the earthquake. Conclusions: The findings of this study have clinical implications for designing and implementing effective, developmentally appropriate, and culturally sensitive intervention programs for the victims of major disasters.

Aysun Dogan

2011-12-01

225

Adolescent School Experiences and Dropout, Adolescent Pregnancy, and Young Adult Deviant Behavior.  

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This study examined predictability of inappropriate behavior in a random sample of 452 adolescents. Behaviors examined included dropping out, teen pregnancy, criminal activities and conviction, antisocial personality disorder, and alcohol abuse. Found that academic achievement and aspirations, and learning-focused school settings related to…

Kasen, Stephanie; Cohen, Patricia; Brook, Judith S.

1998-01-01

226

Links between Antisocial Behavior and Depressed Mood: The Role of Life Events and Attributional Style  

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Comorbidity between antisocial behavior and depression in adolescence is widely recognized. This paper examines whether links with depressed mood differ among three subtypes of antisocial behavior: oppositionality, physical aggression and delinquency. In addition we examine two possible contributors to these links: negative life events that are…

Rowe, Richard; Maughan, Barbara; Eley, Thalia C.

2006-01-01

227

Dimensions of Impulsive Behavior in Adolescent Smokers and Nonsmokers  

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Robust associations have been identified between impulsive personality characteristics and cigarette smoking during adolescents, indicating that impulsive behavior may play an important role in the initiation of cigarette smoking. The present study extended this research by using laboratory behavioral assessments to explore relationships between three specific dimensions of impulsive behavior (impulsive decision-making, inattention and disinhibition) and adolescent cigarette smoking. Participants were male and female adolescent smokers (n = 50) and nonsmokers (n = 50). Adolescent smokers were more impulsive on a measure of decision-making; however, there were significant smoking status by gender interaction effects for impulsive inattention and disinhibition. Male smokers were most impulsive on the measure of inattention, but male smokers were least impulsive on the measure of disinhibition. Correlations between biomarkers of smoking and impulsive inattention and disinhibition were found for females but not males. The current findings, coupled with previous findings (Reynolds et al., 2007), indicate there may be robust gender difference in associations between certain types of impulsive behavior and cigarette smoking during adolescence. PMID:19803629

Fields, Sherecce; Collins, Christine; Leraas, Kristen; Reynolds, Brady

2011-01-01

228

Dimensions of impulsive behavior in adolescent smokers and nonsmokers.  

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Robust associations have been identified between impulsive personality characteristics and cigarette smoking during adolescents, indicating that impulsive behavior may play an important role in the initiation of cigarette smoking. The present study extended this research by using laboratory behavioral assessments to explore relationships between three specific dimensions of impulsive behavior (impulsive decision-making, inattention, and disinhibition) and adolescent cigarette smoking. Participants were male and female adolescent smokers (n = 50) and nonsmokers (n = 50). Adolescent smokers were more impulsive on a measure of decision-making; however, there were significant smoking status by gender interaction effects for impulsive inattention and disinhibition. Male smokers were most impulsive on the measure of inattention, but male smokers were least impulsive on the measure of disinhibition. Correlations between biomarkers of smoking and impulsive inattention and disinhibition were found for females but not males. The current findings, coupled with previous findings (Reynolds et al., 2007), indicate there may be robust gender difference in associations between certain types of impulsive behavior and cigarette smoking during adolescence. PMID:19803629

Fields, Sherecce; Collins, Christine; Leraas, Kristen; Reynolds, Brady

2009-10-01

229

Dimensions of impulsive behavior and treatment outcomes for adolescent smokers.  

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Adolescent cigarette smoking rates remain a significant public health concern, and as a result there is a continued need to understand factors that contribute to an adolescent's ability to reduce or quit smoking. Previous research suggests that impulsive behavior may be associated with treatment outcomes for smoking. The current research (N = 81) explored 3 dimensions of impulsive behavior as predictors of treatment response from a social-cognitive type program for adolescent smokers (i.e., Not On Tobacco; N-O-T). Measures included laboratory assessments of delay discounting, sustained attention, and behavioral disinhibition. A self-report measure of impulsivity was also included. Adolescent smokers who had better sustained attention were more likely to reduce or quit smoking by the end of treatment. No other measures of impulsivity were significantly associated with treatment response. From these findings, an adolescent smoker's ability to sustain attention appears to be an important behavioral attribute to consider when implementing smoking cessation programs such as N-O-T. PMID:24417209

Harris, Millie; Penfold, Robert B; Hawkins, Ariane; Maccombs, Jared; Wallace, Bryan; Reynolds, Brady

2014-02-01

230

The Role of Correctional Education in a Case History of Delinquency Devolution.  

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A description of one delinquent adolescent's background, the reformatory influences of a correctional school, and his reentry into public education demonstrates how correctional education can inspire self-worth and set the stage for future success. (SK)

Brown, Waln K.

1995-01-01

231

[Behavioral disorders and substance abuse in adolescents with mental retardation].  

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The percentage of people with mental retardation in the general population is estimated at about 2.3%, with adolescence (15-20 years) constituting the development period during which a peak in rates of mental retardation is observed. The increased prevalence of adolescence may be explained from the fact that the specified requirements of the school initially, and society later, inevitably lead to comparative evaluation of the teen with mental retardation in relation to peers, thus making mental retardation more apparent. Adolescents with mental retardation face a number of physical and psychological needs which are not often distinguishable and as a consequence undergo the deterioration of their already burdened quality of life. In particular, mental health problems occur 3 to 4 times more often in adolescents with mental retardation compared with adolescents of the general population. This review presents the most recent epidemiological findings regarding the correlation between behavioral disorders, substance use and the possible comorbidity in adolescents with intellectual disability, both at community level and residential care level. Epidemiological data indicate that behavioral disorders are among the most common types of psychopathology in mentally retarded adolescents with the severity and symptoms varying depending on the personal characteristics of each adolescent. Regarding substance use, the available data show that the rates of substance use (alcohol, smoking, illicit drugs) are lower in this specific population group but the differences over the last years tend to be eliminated. Finally, according to the few surveys that were examined referring to the comorbidity of behavioral disorders and substance use in adolescents with intellectual disability, the results were contradictory. Specifically, while behavioral disorders continued to be one of the most common types of psychopathology, the related substances disorders indicated lower rates compared to normal intelligence adolescents with behavioral disorders. Risk factors that increase the chances of developing either simple or more complicated types of psychopathology in adolescents with mental retardation have been found to be based on individual, family and social levels. On the other hand, the individual characteristics of adolescents (intellectual level, attention capacity, understandable linguistic expression, overall progress until adolescence), the existence of a supportive family environment and the presence of social support and awareness through the creation of special counseling, education and medical services, are the most important protective factors which contribute to the prevention of several forms of psychopathology in adolescents with mental retardation. For the writing of the literature review, the following electronic databases were used: PubMed, Scopus, Psycinfo, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Google Scholar. The key words used were: Intellectual Disability, Behavioral disorders, Adolescents, Mental Retardation, Learning disabilities, Developmental Disabilities, Disruptive behaviour disorders, Conduct disorder, Substance Abuse, Substance Misuse, Oppositional defiant disorder, Alcohol and illicit drug use, Smoking Use, Young people, Teenagers, Youths. PMID:25035183

Papachristou, Ec; Anagnostopoulos, Dk

2014-01-01

232

Emotional and behavioral problems among adolescent smokers and their help-seeking behavior.  

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We carried out a cross sectional study to detect emotional and behavioral problems among adolescents who smoke and their help-seeking behavior. This study was conducted in Sarawak, East Malaysia, between July and September 2006. Emotional and behavioral problems were measured using the Youth Self-Report (YSR/11-18) questionnaire; help seeking behavior was assessed using a help-seeking questionnaire. Three hundred ninety-nine students participated in the study; the smoking prevalence was 32.8%. The mean scores for emotional and behavioral problems were higher among smokers than non-smokers in all domains (internalizing, p = 0.028; externalizing, p = 0.001; other behavior, p = 0.001). The majority of students who smoked (94.7%) did not seek help from a primary health care provider for their emotional or behavioral problems. Common barriers to help-seeking were: the perception their problems were trivial (60.3%) and the preference to solve problems on their own (45.8%). Our findings suggest adolescent smokers in Sarawak, East Malaysia were more likely to break rules, exhibit aggressive behavior and have somatic complaints than non-smoking adolescents. Adolescent smokers preferred to seek help for their problems from informal sources. Physicians treating adolescents should inquire about smoking habits, emotional and behavioral problems and offer counseling if required. PMID:23431837

Muthupalaniappen, Leelavathi; Omar, Juslina; Omar, Khairani; Iryani, Tuti; Hamid, Siti Norain

2012-09-01

233

A Study of Firesetting and Animal Cruelty in Children: Family Influences and Adolescent Outcomes.  

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Objective: To investigate relationships among family risk factors, childhood firesetting and animal cruelty, and adolescent delinquency. Method: In 1990, mothers and children participating in a 10-year prospective study provided information about family risk factors and childhood problem behavior. Subsequent interviews with 86% of the sample in…

Becker, Kimberly D.; Stuewig, Jeffrey; Herrera, Veronica M.; McCloskey, Laura A.

2004-01-01

234

Responsiveness in Parent-Adolescent Relationships: Are Influences Conditional? Does the Reporter Matter?  

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This paper examines conditional and reporter effects of parental responsiveness using survey data from White 8th to 12th graders (N = 440) and their parents (N = 511). Adolescent reports of maternal and paternal responsiveness predicted higher GPAs, fewer delinquent behaviors, and less internal distress. Mothers' and fathers' reports of…

Bogenschneider, Karen; Pallock, Linda

2008-01-01

235

Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior in Adolescents with Intellectual Disability and Co-Occurring Somatic Chronic Diseases  

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Evidence on the association between somatic chronic diseases in ID-adolescents and the full range of pervasive developmental disorder behavior (PDD behavior) is scarce. The aim of the present study is to assess the association between somatic chronic diseases in ID-adolescents and mild PDD behavior. We obtained data on 1044 ID-adolescents, aged…

Oeseburg, B.; Groothoff, J. W.; Dijkstra, G. J.; Reijneveld, S. A.; Jansen, D. E. M. C.

2010-01-01

236

Moral Development and Parent Behavior Antecedents in Adolescent Psychopaths  

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Psychopaths, as against nonpsychopathic delinquents, saw their fathers as having been less nurturant toward them and as having given them less praise. The mothers of psychopaths were reported to have demanded less achievement of their sons than the mothers of nonpsychopathic delinquents. (Author)

Fodor, Eugene M.

1973-01-01

237

Developmental imaging genetics: linking dopamine function to adolescent behavior.  

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Adolescence is a period of development characterized by numerous neurobiological changes that significantly influence behavior and brain function. Adolescence is of particular interest due to the alarming statistics indicating that mortality rates increase two to three-fold during this time compared to childhood, due largely to a peak in risk-taking behaviors resulting from increased impulsivity and sensation seeking. Furthermore, there exists large unexplained variability in these behaviors that are in part mediated by biological factors. Recent advances in molecular genetics and functional neuroimaging have provided a unique and exciting opportunity to non-invasively study the influence of genetic factors on brain function in humans. While genes do not code for specific behaviors, they do determine the structure and function of proteins that are essential to the neuronal processes that underlie behavior. Therefore, studying the interaction of genotype with measures of brain function over development could shed light on critical time points when biologically mediated individual differences in complex behaviors emerge. Here we review animal and human literature examining the neurobiological basis of adolescent development related to dopamine neurotransmission. Dopamine is of critical importance because of (1) its role in cognitive and affective behaviors, (2) its role in the pathogenesis of major psychopathology, and (3) the protracted development of dopamine signaling pathways over adolescence. We will then focus on current research examining the role of dopamine-related genes on brain function. We propose the use of imaging genetics to examine the influence of genetically mediated dopamine variability on brain function during adolescence, keeping in mind the limitations of this approach. PMID:24139694

Padmanabhan, Aarthi; Luna, Beatriz

2014-08-01

238

Diet and behavioral problems at school in Norwegian adolescents  

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Full Text Available Background: Discussion about dietary factors in relation to behavioral problems in children and adolescents has been going on for a long time. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the cross-sectional relation between diet and self-reported behavioral problems at school in adolescents in the southern part of Norway. Design: In total, 475 ninth- and tenth-grade students (236 boys and 239 girls out of 625 eligible students from four different secondary schools in three different communities in Vest-Agder County, Norway, participated, giving a participation rate of 77%. The students filled in a questionnaire with food frequency questions of selected healthy (e.g. fruits, vegetables, and fish and unhealthy (e.g. sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, and crisps food items, questions of meal frequency, and four questions regarding behavioral problems at school. Results: Having breakfast regularly was significantly associated with decreased odds of behavioral problems (OR: 0.29 (0.15???0.55, p?0.001. A high intake of unhealthy foods, such as sugar-sweetened soft drinks (OR: 2.8 (1.06???7.42, p=0.03 and sweets (OR: 2.63 (1.39???4.98, p=0.003, was significantly associated with increased odds of behavioral problems. At the same time, a high intake of fruits was associated with decreased odds of behavioral problems in Norwegian adolescents (OR: 0.30 (0.10???0.87, p=0.03. All ORs are adjusted for sex and BMI. Conclusions: This study shows that having an optimal diet and not skipping meals are associated with decreased odds of behavioral problems at school in Norwegian adolescents. Hence, it is important to improve the dietary intake and meal pattern of Norwegian adolescents. The cross-sectional design of this study limits any causal interpretations of the results of the study.

Rune Høigaard

2012-06-01

239

The Impact of School Connectedness on Violent Behavior, Transport Risk-Taking Behavior, and Associated Injuries in Adolescence  

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Adolescents engage in many risk-taking behaviors that have the potential to lead to injury. The school environment has a significant role in shaping adolescent behavior, and this study aimed to provide additional information about the benefits associated with connectedness to school. Early adolescents aged 13 to 15 years (N=509, 49% boys) were…

Chapman, Rebekah L.; Buckley, Lisa; Sheehan, Mary C.; Shochet, Ian M.; Romaniuk, Madeline

2011-01-01

240

Adolescent Perceptions of Parental Behaviors, Adolescent Self-Esteem, and Adolescent Depressed Mood  

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Using symbolic interaction, we developed a research model that proposed adolescent perceptions of parental support and psychological control would be related to adolescent depressed mood directly and indirectly through self-esteem. We tested the model using self-report questionnaire data from 161 adolescents living with both of their biological…

Plunkett, Scott W.; Henry, Carolyn S.; Robinson, Linda C.; Behnke, Andrew; Falcon, Pedro C., III

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
241

Current perspectives: the impact of cyberbullying on adolescent health  

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Cyberbullying has become an international public health concern among adolescents, and as such, it deserves further study. This paper reviews the current literature related to the effects of cyberbullying on adolescent health across multiple studies worldwide and provides directions for future research. A review of the evidence suggests that cyberbullying poses a threat to adolescents’ health and well-being. A plethora of correlational studies have demonstrated a cogent relationship between adolescents’ involvement in cyberbullying and negative health indices. Adolescents who are targeted via cyberbullying report increased depressive affect, anxiety, loneliness, suicidal behavior, and somatic symptoms. Perpetrators of cyberbullying are more likely to report increased substance use, aggression, and delinquent behaviors. Mediating/moderating processes have been found to influence the relationship between cyberbullying and adolescent health. More longitudinal work is needed to increase our understanding of the effects of cyberbullying on adolescent health over time. Prevention and intervention efforts related to reducing cyberbullying and its associated harms are discussed.

Nixon, Charisse L

2014-01-01

242

Maternal drinking behavior and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in adolescents with criminal behavior in southern Brazil  

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Full Text Available Prenatal alcohol exposure can have serious and permanent adverse effects. The developing brain is the most vulnerable organ to the insults of prenatal alcohol exposure. A behavioral phenotype of prenatal alcohol exposure including conduct disorders is also described. This study on a sample of Brazilian adolescents convicted for criminal behavior aimed to evaluate possible clinical features of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS. These were compared to a control group of school adolescents, as well as tested for other environmental risk factors for antisocial behavior. A sample of 262 institutionalized male adolescents due to criminal behavior and 154 male students aged between 13 and 21 years comprised the study population. Maternal use of alcohol was admitted by 48.8% of the mothers of institutionalized adolescents and by 39.9% of the school students. In this sample of adolescents we could not identify -individual cases with a clear diagnosis of FAS, but signs suggestive of FASD were more common in the institutionalized adolescents. Social factors like domestic and family violence were frequent in the risk group, this also being associated to maternal drinking during pregnancy. The inference is that in our sample, criminal behavior is more related to complex interactions between environmental and social issues including prenatal alcohol exposure.

Wakana Momino

2012-01-01

243

Maternal drinking behavior and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in adolescents with criminal behavior in southern Brazil  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Prenatal alcohol exposure can have serious and permanent adverse effects. The developing brain is the most vulnerable organ to the insults of prenatal alcohol exposure. A behavioral phenotype of prenatal alcohol exposure including conduct disorders is also described. This study on a sample of Brazil [...] ian adolescents convicted for criminal behavior aimed to evaluate possible clinical features of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). These were compared to a control group of school adolescents, as well as tested for other environmental risk factors for antisocial behavior. A sample of 262 institutionalized male adolescents due to criminal behavior and 154 male students aged between 13 and 21 years comprised the study population. Maternal use of alcohol was admitted by 48.8% of the mothers of institutionalized adolescents and by 39.9% of the school students. In this sample of adolescents we could not identify -individual cases with a clear diagnosis of FAS, but signs suggestive of FASD were more common in the institutionalized adolescents. Social factors like domestic and family violence were frequent in the risk group, this also being associated to maternal drinking during pregnancy. The inference is that in our sample, criminal behavior is more related to complex interactions between environmental and social issues including prenatal alcohol exposure.

Wakana, Momino; Têmis Maria, Félix; Alberto Mantovani, Abeche; Denise Isabel, Zandoná; Gabriela Gayer, Scheibler; Christina, Chambers; Kenneth Lyons, Jones; Renato Zamora, Flores; Lavínia, Schüler-Faccini.

244

Adolescent Health Behavior, Contentment in School, and Academic Achievement  

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Objectives: To examine the association between health behavior indicators, school contentment, and academic achievement. Methods: Structural equation modeling with 5810 adolescents. Results: Our model explained 36% of the variance in academic achievement and 24% in school contentment. BMI and sedentary lifestyle were negatively related to school…

Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Allegrante, John P.; Helgason, Asgeir R.

2009-01-01

245

Assessing the Eating Behaviors of Low-Income, Urban Adolescents  

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Background: There is a need for instruments that can accurately determine the effectiveness of nutrition interventions targeting low-income, inner-city adolescents. Purpose: To examine the development of a valid and reliable eating behavior scale (EBS) for use in school-based nutrition interventions in urban, inner-city communities dominated by…

Fahlman, Mariane; McCaughtry, Nate; Martin, Jeffrey; Garn, Alex C.; Shen, Bo

2012-01-01

246

Heavy Metal Music and Reckless Behavior among Adolescents.  

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Fifty-four male and 30 female adolescents who like heavy metal music were compared on various outcome variables to 56 male and 105 female peers who do not like it. Those who like heavy metal report a wider range of reckless behavior than those who do not like it. (SLD)

Arnett, Jeffrey

1991-01-01

247

Father's and Mother's Psychological Violence and Adolescent Behavioral Adjustment  

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Maternal and paternal psychological violence were examined as potential risk factors for internalized and externalized behavior problems displayed by adolescents. Childhood family violence (physical and psychological parental violence), current extrafamily violence (bullying and dating violence), and family structure were taken into account. A…

Melancon, Claudiane; Gagne, Marie-Helene

2011-01-01

248

Adolescent Mental Health, Behavior Problems, and Academic Achievement  

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Prior research on the association of mental health and behavior problems with academic achievement is limited because it does not consider multiple problems simultaneously, take co-occurring problems into account, and control for academic aptitude. We addressed these limitations using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health…

McLeod, Jane D.; Uemura, Ryotaro; Rohrman, Shawna

2012-01-01

249

Family Structure, Community Context, and Adolescent Problem Behaviors  

Science.gov (United States)

A number of models have been proposed to explain the relationship between family structure and adolescent problem behaviors, including several that consider parent-child relations, family income, stress, and residential mobility. However, studies have not explored whether the different types of communities within which families reside affect the…

Hoffman, John P.

2006-01-01

250

Pain-Based Behavior with Children and Adolescents in Conflict  

Science.gov (United States)

Many actions of troubled children and adolescents can disguise and conceal their ever-present and deep-seated psycho-emotional pain. Adults living and working with these youth may overlook this pain in a strategy of avoidance. Labelling troubling behavior as "outbursts," "explosions," or "acting out," ignores the…

Anglin, James P.

2014-01-01

251

Civic Participation and the Development of Adolescent Behavior Problems  

Science.gov (United States)

This study assessed the links between civic participation and adolescent behavior problems (bullying, physical fighting, and alcohol and tobacco use), and whether civic engagement could be a moderator of the negative effects of parent/family detachment. Participants were 7,097 11-, 13-, and 15-year-olds (48.6% girls) in a region of Northern Italy.…

Vieno, Alessio; Nation, Maury; Perkins, Douglas D.; Santinello, Massimo

2007-01-01

252

Contextual Stress and Health Risk Behaviors among African American Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the longitudinal association between contextual stress and health risk behaviors and the role of protective factors in a community epidemiologically-defined sample of urban African American adolescents (N = 500; 46.4% female). Structural equation modeling was used to create a latent variable measuring contextual stress…

Copeland-Linder, Nikeea; Lambert, Sharon F.; Chen, Yi-Fu; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

2011-01-01

253

Executive Functions in Adolescence: Inferences from Brain and Behavior  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite the advances in understanding cognitive improvements in executive function in adolescence, much less is known about the influence of affective and social modulators on executive function and the biological underpinnings of these functions and sensitivities. Here, recent behavioral and neuroscientific studies are summarized that have used…

Crone, Eveline A.

2009-01-01

254

Tailoring Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Binge Eating in Adolescent Girls  

Science.gov (United States)

Whereas effective treatments exist for adults with recurrent binge eating, developmental factors specific to adolescents point to the need for a modified treatment approach for youth. We adapted an existing cognitive behavioral therapy treatment manual for adults with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder (Fairburn, 2008) for use with…

Yarborough, Bobbi Jo; DeBar, Lynn L.; Firemark, Alison; Leung, Sue; Clarke, Gregory N.; Wilson, G. Terence

2013-01-01

255

Attachment and Social Problem Solving in Juvenile Delinquents.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigates characteristics of juvenile delinquency and youth violence by examining attachment and social problem skills. Attachment theory integrates features of psychoanalytic theory, ethology, and cognitive psychology. Research on adolescent attachment suggests that parents continue to function as a secure base for their teenage…

Mathew, Saritha S.; And Others

256

Cigarette use by adolescents: attitude-behavior relationships.  

Science.gov (United States)

Structural equation models were used to test the effectiveness of various theories in predicting cigarette smoking among adolescents. Maximum-likelihood estimation, as implemented in LISREL for Windows 8.12, was used to compare the theory of reasoned action (TRA), the theory of planned behavior, and a modified version of the theory of reasoned action incorporating past behavior. Respondents consisted of 225 high school students who were questioned in 1994 about their attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, past behavior, intentions, and actual behavior relating to the use of cigarettes. Results indicated that the modification of the TRA incorporating past behavior provided a marginally better fit than the other models. For this group of high school students, attitudes toward smoking, past behavior in relation to smoking, and perceptions of what significant others think they should do were significant predictors of their intentions to smoke. Intentions, together with past behavior, predicted their actual behavior. The models used in the present research show that this behavior can be explained with reference to a small number of key variables which are useful for furthering our understanding of the structure of adolescent smoking. PMID:10082067

O'Callaghan, F V; Callan, V J; Baglioni, A

1999-02-01

257

Adolescent Risk-Taking: An Analysis of Problem Behaviors in Problem Children.  

Science.gov (United States)

Explored adolescent risk taking from Jessor's problem-behavior perspective; a decision-making perspective; and perspectives that view adolescent risk taking as normal and adaptive, and as a function of adolescent egocentrism. Argues that adolescent risk taking is a multidimensional phenomenon involving personality correlates and cognitive aspects…

Lavery, Barbara; And Others

1993-01-01

258

Risk behaviors for sexual transmitted disease in male adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: to describe the risk behaviors and vulnerability adopted by adolescents regarding STD/AIDS. Methodology: this is an ethnographic study, carried out at a public school of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. The population was composed of twenty male adolescents, from 12 to 18 years and that study in the fundamental and secondary education. The data collection happened through a semi-structured interview and simple observation. The content analysis followed Bardin's orientation. The survey was adopted by the Ethics in Research of the UFC, under protocol number 119/07 and after the informed consent of parents. Results: the data showed that among the risk conducts mentioned by the adolescents, the main one is sexual intercourse without preservative, and that there is fear and regret after the unprotected intercourse, and that the partner's age do influence in a negative way for protection. Conclusion: we considered necessary an approach on safe sex among teenagers, demanding the production of creative strategies that make sense in several socio-cultural contexts in which the adolescents are inserted. Descriptors: adolescent; sexual behavior; sexually transmitted diseases.

Agnes Caroline Souza Pinto, Patrícia Neyva da Costa Pinheiro

2010-10-01

259

Violent Behavior in Adolescence: Individual and Familial Factors  

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Full Text Available Objective: In this study, a group of violent male adolescents aged 12-15 years old, who were students of a primary school located in a district where families with low socioeconomic status (SES live was compared with a non-violent peer group in terms of self and family variables, in an aim to understand the risk factors related to adolescent violent behavior. Methods: Data were gathered about the family relations, presence of domestic violence, and other enviromental risk factors for a group of adolescents who show violent behavior at school (n: 22 and compared to their non-violent peers (n: 19 from the same school by getting information both from the adolescents themselves and their mothers. The Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents,Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale , Children’s Depression Inventory and the Connors’ Rating Scales were used to measure the relevant variables. Family characteristics were investigated by direct interviews with the mothers and by using the General Health Questionnaire and the Family Assessment Device for both mothers and fathers. Results: The results of this study showed that adolescents who were violent at school were similar to non-violent ones in terms of domestic violence and self-perception and self-esteem. The violent group perceived themselves as being worse in terms of academic performance and showed higher levels of attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms. Conclusion: The results suggest that the violent behaviour at school for some adolescents may be a way of proving themselves and being accepted by their peers. (Archives of Neuropsychiatry 2012; 49: 260-265

Emine Z?NNUR KILIÇ

2012-12-01

260

Non-Fatal Suicidal Behaviors in Adolescents  

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In the USA, suicide ranked as the third leading cause of death for adolescents in 1999. Non-fatal suicidal behaviours are suicidal thought, specific suicidal plan and suicide attempt. Prospective studies have emphasized the high subsequent suicide rates in clinically presenting suicide attempters. This study was planned to critically review the existing international literature on this area, and compare, if possible, with the Indian data. Both electronic and manual search for published and un...

Jena, S.; Sidhartha, T.

2004-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Risk Factors for Smoking Behaviors among Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

Many students in Korea begin to use tobacco and develop a regular smoking habit before they reach adulthood. Yet, little is known about various signs contributing to the transition of the student smoking behaviors. This study used a national sample to explore and compare risk factors for smoking behaviors. Three types of smoking behaviors were…

Chung, Sung Suk; Joung, Kyoung Hwa

2014-01-01

262

Adolescent-parent attachment as a mediator of relations between parenting and adolescent social behavior and wellbeing in China.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to examine links between parenting dimensions (authoritative parenting, psychological control, and parental authority) and adolescent wellbeing (self-esteem, autonomy, and peer attachments) as mediated by parent-teen attachment, among Chinese families. The sample included 298 Chinese adolescents, ages 15-18 years (M(age) = 16.36, SD = .68; 60% female). The mediation model was examined using path analyses (one model with parental authority as overprotection, and one with it as perceived behavioral control). To improve model fit a direct path was added from authoritative parenting to autonomy. Authoritative parenting was positively predictive of attachment, while psychological control and overprotection (but not behavioral control) were negative predictors. In turn, adolescent-parent attachment was positively related to the three outcomes. Lastly, the model paths did not differ by adolescent gender. These findings suggest that parenting behaviors may play a crucial role in adolescent social behaviors and wellbeing via adolescent-parent attachment. PMID:23509911

Cai, Mengfei; Hardy, Sam A; Olsen, Joseph A; Nelson, David A; Yamawaki, Niwako

2013-01-01

263

Risk behaviors for the health of adolescents from High School  

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Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the risk behaviors (smoking addiction, alcoholism, drug use and sexual risk behavior of adolescents from High School. Methods: It was an analytical and cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of 720 scholars (252 boys and 468 girls from the age group of 16 to 17 years-old, from three public schools in Florianopolis/SC. The data was collected through two types of self administrated questionnaires; one for the parents and another one for the students, from March to December, 2005. The studied variables were legal and illegal drug use and sexual risk behavior. The descriptive statistics and the chi- squared test were used to carry out the data analysis Results: The beginning of risk behaviors occurred between 14 and 15 years old, for both genders. It was observed that 26 (3.6% scholars drank alcohol regularly; 38 (5.3% smoked daily; 66 (9.2 % were drug users or had used drugs several times and 14 (2% were drug dependents. Concerning to sexual risk behavior, 318 (44.5% scholars had sexual risk behavior and from those, 97 (13.6% did not always use condom. From the studied sample, 545 (76.5% scholars did not present any risk behavior. Among risk behaviors, sexual risk prevailed (42.5%. Conclusion: The number of adolescents with risk behavior was not high. Nevertheless, there is a small proportion of adolescents that smoke, drink and do drugs and have sexual risk behavior. This points out to the need of a bigger supervision and guidance for these students.

José Henrique Ramos

2009-09-01

264

Heavy metal music and reckless behavior among adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

Adolescents who liked heavy metal music were compared to those who did not on a variety of outcome variables, particularly focusing on reckless behavior. Boys who liked heavy metal music reported a higher rate of a wide range of reckless behavior, including driving behavior, sexual behavior, and drug use. They were also less satisfied with their family relationships. Girls who liked heavy metal music were more reckless in the areas of shoplifting, vandalism, sexual behavior, and drug use, and reported lower self-esteem. Both boys and girls who liked heavy metal music were higher in sensation seeking and more self-assured with regard to sexuality and dating. In regression analyses, the relation between reckless behavior and liking heavy metal music was sustained for five out of twelve variables concerning reckless behavior, including three of four among girls, when sensation seeking and family relationships were entered into the equation before liking or not liking heavy metal music. PMID:24263613

Arnett, J

1991-12-01

265

Eating Behavior and Social Interactions from Adolescence to Adulthood  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This paper analyzes the importance of social ties for eating behavior of US youth. We propose a novel approach that addresses identi…cation of social endogenous e¤ects. We overcome the problem of measuring the separate impact of endogenous and contextual e¤ects on individual Body Mass Index (BMI) in a dynamic linear- in-means model, where individual- and group-speci…c unobservable e¤ects are controlled for. We show that the main drivers of eating behavior are habituation and imitation e¤ects. Imitation e¤ects explain most of the variation in BMI of individuals who were normal-weight and overweight during adolescence. Obese adolescents, instead, become future obese adults through wrong habits enforced by imitative behavior.

Corrado, Luisa; Distante, Roberta

2012-01-01

266

BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS IN ADOLESCENTS WITH MILD INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY  

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Full Text Available Adolescents with intellectual disabilities, due to deficits in their intellectual functioning, are exposed to even greater risk of developing various forms of behavioral disorders.Goal: to determine the risk of emergence of behavioral disorders in adolescents with mild intellectual disability.Respondents: adolescents (211 with mild intellectual disability, educational staff in special secondary schools (39 and members of the expert team (5.Methods: descriptive method, method of comparative analysisProcedures: survey and semi-structured interviews with the educational staff and expert team.Statistical data processing: Windows Tool R x C for contingency tables analysis and Fisher Exact Test, and as significant were considered the differences with significance level of p<0.05.Results: with the statistical data processing we came to the conclusion that the school achievements affect the emergence of undesired behavior (p<0.001. Conclusion: we came to the conclusion that different forms of behavioral disorders appear in students and they haven’t been sufficiently informed about the possible consequences and they rarely voluntarily initiate conversation in respect of the problem. The behavioral disorders in this category of students are conditioned by multiple factors by the type of housing, the duration of the period in a student home, the school achievements, the age and the sex.

Zoran KITKANJ

2013-09-01

267

Planned versus Unplanned Risks: Neurocognitive Predictors of Subtypes of Adolescents' Risk Behavior  

Science.gov (United States)

Risk behavior contributes to substantial morbidity and mortality during adolescence. This study examined neurocognitive predictors of proposed subtypes of adolescent risk behavior: planned (premeditated) versus unplanned (spontaneous). Adolescents (N = 69, 49% male, M = 15.1 [1.0] years) completed neurocognitive tasks (Iowa Gambling Task [IGT],…

Maslowsky, Julie; Keating, Daniel P.; Monk, Christopher S.; Schulenberg, John

2011-01-01

268

Ecstasy Use and Suicidal Behavior among Adolescents: Findings from a National Survey  

Science.gov (United States)

The relationship between ecstasy use and suicidal behavior among adolescents in the United States was examined. Data from the adolescent subsample (ages 12-17, N = 19,301) of the 2000 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse were used in the analyses. Information on adolescent substance use, suicidal behaviors, and related sociodemographic, family,…

Kim, Jueun; Fan, Bin; Liu, Xinhua; Kerner, Nancy; Wu, Ping

2011-01-01

269

Positive and negative reinforcement underlying risk behavior in early adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

The goal of the current study was to examine the combined influence of positive reinforcement processes using a behavioral task measuring risk taking propensity (RTP) and negative reinforcement processes using a behavioral task measuring deficits in distress tolerance (DT) on a range of risk taking behaviors among early adolescents. Participants included a community sample of 230 early adolescents (aged 9-13) who completed two behavioral tasks assessing reinforcement processes as well as reported on past year risk behavior involvement as assessed by items from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System at a baseline and a 1-year follow-up assessment. Data indicated that at the Wave 2 assessment, RTP was positively related to number of risk-taking behaviors in the past year but only for those with low DT, with this finding persisting after controlling for the significant influence of male gender and higher sensation seeking. Results of the present study highlight the importance of considering both positive and negative reinforcement processes in combination when investigating vulnerability factors for early risk behavior engagement in youth. PMID:20309633

MacPherson, Laura; Reynolds, Elizabeth K; Daughters, Stacey B; Wang, Frances; Cassidy, Jude; Mayes, Linda C; Lejuez, C W

2010-09-01

270

Do urban adolescents become desensitized to community violence? Data from a national survey.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored whether the response of urban adolescents to community violence exposure differs from their response to family violence and sexual assault. More specifically, the authors explored whether desensitization to community violence exposure was more common compared with desensitization to other violence-related stressors. Participants included 1,245 urban adolescents drawn from a national probability sample of 4,023 youth (aged 12-17 years) who were interviewed about their history of interpersonal violence exposure, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and delinquency. A negative curvilinear effect of community violence exposure on PTSD combined with a positive linear effect of exposure on delinquency was considered evidence for desensitization. Results provided minimal support for the desensitization hypothesis and revealed increasing levels of PTSD symptoms and delinquent behaviors among boys and girls exposed to higher levels of all three violence types. PMID:17696672

McCart, Michael R; Smith, Daniel W; Saunders, Benjamin E; Kilpatrick, Dean G; Resnick, Heidi; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

2007-07-01

271

Relationship between Adolescents' Nutritional and Physical Activity Behaviors with their Perceptions about Parents' Lifestyle Behaviors  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background & Aim: Obesity is increasing dramatically world-wide not only in adults, but also in children and adolescents. Nutritional and physical activity behaviors are related to the prevalence of obesity. Determining adolescents' behavioral patterns is important in preventing and adjusting this healthy problem. This study was carried out to assess lifestyle behaviors among girl adolescents and to determine the association between these behaviors and perceived parental lifestyle behaviors.Methods & Materials: In this cross-sectional study, 270 students were selected using multistage random sampling from girls' schools in the areas covered by Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Descriptive and analytical tests were used to analyze the data.Results: Results showed that the mean age was 13.3 (10.7-16 years. Most of the adolescents' had normal limits of BMI. Only 9.2% of adolescents had optimal dietary behavior and 4.3% were physically active. There was not significant relationship between their nutritional behavior and their perceptions about parents' lifestyle. BMI and parents economic status was related to nutritional behaviors significantly. Physical activity was statistically related to BMI and mothers' education. Conclusion: This study showed that the adolescents' nutritional and physical activity behaviors were not healthy. Some factors are related to the adolescents' healthy behavior. Teaching healthy behaviors and defining healthy behavioral patterns for adolescent are necessary.

Rezaeipour A

2007-10-01

272

Adolescent reproductive behavior: an international comparison of developed countries.  

Science.gov (United States)

A comparative study of adolescent reproductive behavior in the 1980s examined difference in pregnancy, birth, and abortion levels among teenagers in developed countries especially in the US, Canada, the UK, France, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Only 6 of 37 countries with total fertility rates 3.5 and per capita income US$2000/year, and at least 1 million people had adolescent birth rates higher than the US (Bulgaria, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Romania, Hungary, and Chile). The US had the highest abortion rate (42/1000) followed by Hungary (27/1000). Thus the US had the highest adolescent pregnancy rate (96/1000) as well as Hungary (96/1000). The 6 country analysis showed that reducing the level of sexual activity among teenagers is not necessarily needed to achieve lower pregnancy rates. For example, Sweden had the highest levels of sexual activity but its pregnancy rate were 33% as high as those of the US. The rates of sexual activity among teenagers in the Netherlands equaled those of the US, but its pregnancy rates were 14% as high as those of the US. All countries had earlier, more extensive, and better contraceptive use among sexually active teenagers than the US which accounted for their lower pregnancy rates. The more realistic acceptance of sexual activity among teenagers and provision of contraceptives in all the countries except the US differed from the societal ambivalence in the US. Thus ambivalence about sexuality and the appropriateness of contraceptive use results in lower contraceptive use and greater adolescent pregnancy rates. US adolescents constantly receive conflicting messages that sex is romantic, thrilling, and arousing but it is also immoral to have premarital sex. Thus adults need to be more candid about sexuality so they can clearly convey to adolescents their expectations for responsible behavior and to provide the information and services needed to make effective use of contraceptives when sexually active. PMID:12317626

Forrest, J D

1990-01-01

273

Impact of a Universal School-Based Violence Prevention Program on Violent Delinquency: Distinctive Benefits for Youth with Maltreatment Histories  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: Child maltreatment constitutes a strong risk factor for violent delinquency in adolescence, with cumulative experiences of maltreatment creating increasingly greater risk. Our previous work demonstrated that a universal school-based violence prevention program could provide a protective impact for youth at risk for violent delinquency

Crooks, Claire V.; Scott, Katreena; Ellis, Wendy; Wolfe, David A.

2011-01-01

274

Empathic capacity of delinquent convicted minors  

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Full Text Available The psychological approach to juvenile delinquency introduced in recent years postulates “empathy impairment” as one of the origins of youth criminal behaviour. This means that in order to be cruel, people need to be unable to imagine the pain their victims experience. To test that hypothesis, we compare a group of convicted juvenile offenders (N=43 with a control group of adolescents (N=47 on self-report and ability measures of cognitive empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index and Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test, respectively. Discriminant Analysis reveals a significant difference between the two groups, most notably in the dimensions of personal distress, RMET score, and perspective taking. However, after the control for age and education, only the differences in measures of cognitive empathy remain. Although delinquents perceive themselves as less capable of taking the vantage point of another person and, when tested, prove themselves to be inferior in perceiving emotions and facial expressions, there are no differences in self-report scores of the affective component of empathy. On the basis of these findings, we draw several practical implications concerning everyday work with delinquents. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179018 i br. 47011

Milojevi? Sonja

2014-01-01

275

Do DelinquentYoung Adults Have a High or a Low Level of Self-concept?  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study explored the levels of self-concept of delinquent young adults (n¼873). This question is of theoretical and practical importance, as therapeutic programs addressing the self-concept must be based on clear evidence. The present study demonstrated that self-concept is related to delinquent behavior and that men and women differ both in the strength and direction of the association. Furthermore, Bayesian latent class analysis revealed that both high-delinquent and non-...

Schoot, A. G. J.; Wong, T.

2011-01-01

276

Genetic Influences on Individual Differences in Exercise Behavior during Adolescence  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the degree to which genetic and environmental influences affect variation in adolescent exercise behavior. Data on regular leisure time exercise activities were analyzed in 8,355 adolescent twins, from three-age cohorts (13-14, 15-16, and 17–19 years. Exercise behavior was assessed with survey items about type of regular leisure time exercise, frequency, and duration of the activities. Participants were classified as sedentary, regular exercisers, or vigorous exercisers. The prevalence of moderate exercise behavior declined from age 13 to 19 years with a parallel increase in prevalence of sedentary behavior, whereas the prevalence of vigorous exercise behavior remained constant across age cohorts. Variation in exercise behavior was analyzed with genetic structural equation modeling employing a liability threshold model. Variation was largely accounted for by genetic factors (72% to 85% of the variance was explained by genetic factors, whereas shared environmental factors only accounted for a substantial part of the variation in girls aged 13-14 years (46%. We hypothesize that genetic effects on exercise ability may explain the high heritability of exercise behavior in this phase of life.

Meike Bartels

2010-01-01

277

Family - protective factor to prevent suicidal behavior in adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of our research was to establish a possible correlation between suicide risk in adolescents and a series ofintra-familial protective factors such as family harmony, intact families, increased family involvement in child education, empathy, ability toexpress emotions. Materials and Methods The study comprised the 1143 pupils, aged between 14 and 16 years from Cluj and Maramures counties,that participated in the SEYLE baseline evaluation. Results: Adolescents who have no problems with parents (p<0.001, being understoodby them (p<0.001 and having the belief that family is very important to them (p<0.001, are protected from the risk of committing suicide. Atthe same time, parents’ ability to listen children opinion (p<0.001 and help them take important decisions (p<0.001, the time spent discussingwith teens the problems they’re going through (p<0.001, and the fact that parents know what they do in their spare time (p=0.003 showsprotective factors of suicidal behavior with a statistically significant value in this study.Conclusion: The family is a psychosocial system witha major impact on adolescents’ personality formation. The attitude towards children, the parents availability to important moments for teens,the ability to be both subjective and objective towards their children initiatives, are factors of protection against adolescents’ suicidal behavior.

Ioana R. Rusu

2012-12-01

278

Preschool Behavioral and Social-Cognitive Problems as Predictors of (Pre)adolescent Disruptive Behavior  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This article describes preschool social understanding and difficult behaviors (hot temper, disobedience, bossiness and bullying) as predictors of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and aggressive conduct disorder (ACD) in a Dutch population sample of (pre)adolescents (N = 1943), measured at age 10–12 and at age 13–15. ODD and ACD were assessed by the Child Behavior Checklist and the Youth Self-Report, preschool behavior was evaluated by the parental questionnaire ‹How was your child ...

Emond, Alice; Ormel, Johan; Veenstra, Rene?; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

2007-01-01

279

Adolescent loneliness.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the phenomenon of loneliness in delinquent adolescents with regard to types of delinquency offenses committed, demographic characteristics, and personality characteristics in the areas of interpersonal needs for inclusion, control, and affection. The types of delinquency offenses were categorized as burglary, runaway, drugs, assault, and incorrigible. The demographic variables examined were age, sex, race, family rank or birth order, family structure in terms of parental presence, family income level, religion, and geographic locale. A sample of 98 adolescents was obtained from juvenile detention facilities in three metropolitan areas in the United States. Subjects ranged in age from 12 to 18. Subjects were asked to complete the Loneliness Questionnaire as a self-reported measure of loneliness. Subjects also provided information about themselves relative to demographic characteristics and completed the FIRO-B Questionnaire, which measured interpersonal needs for inclusion, control, and affection. The results revealed no significant differences with regard to any of the demographic variables when the effect of each was considered alone. However, there was a significant effect on loneliness by income when considered jointly with other demographic variables. Adolescents from the middle income group expressed more loneliness than those from the upper and lower income groups. No significant differences were observed with regard to personality characteristics related to interpersonal needs for inclusion and affection, but delinquent adolescents with medium to high needs for control indicated significantly more feelings of loneliness than delinquent adolescents with low needs for control. PMID:6858749

Williams, E G

1983-01-01

280

Modern theories of suicidal behavior in adolescents and young people  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We propose three current models, formulated over the last decade and not yet published in Russian, focused on teenage suicide: the development model of suicidal behavior in adolescents (J.A. Bridge, T.R. Goldstein, D.A. Brent; interpersonal model of (T.E. Joiner; some recent developments in the cognitive theory (A. Spirito, J.D. Matthews, A. Wenzel, A.T. Beck. Four groups of psychological aid targets for adolescents with suicidal tendencies are revealed: 1 targets of the current emotional state of a teenager (feelings of abandonment, self-perception as a burden to the loved ones, anxiety, hopelessness, heartache; 2 targets affecting personal predispositions (primitive defense mechanisms, impulsivity, aggression; 3 targets associated with cognitive functioning (cognitive rigidity, black-and-white thinking, thinking errors; and 4 targets reflecting a need to work with behavioral manifestations (narrow range of coping strategies used.

T.S. Pavlova

2014-08-01

 
 
 
 
281

Father's and mother's psychological violence and adolescent behavioral adjustment.  

Science.gov (United States)

Maternal and paternal psychological violence were examined as potential risk factors for internalized and externalized behavior problems displayed by adolescents. Childhood family violence (physical and psychological parental violence), current extrafamily violence (bullying and dating violence), and family structure were taken into account. A sample of 278 adolescents (mean age: 14.2) were recruited in three public schools located in low to high socioeconomic areas. Participants were in the 7th, 8th, and 9th grades, and each completed a self-administered questionnaire. Frequency of current psychological violence is about the same for each parental figure. The three most frequent and least frequent psychologically violent parental practices were also the same for both parental figures. Psychological violence of both parents was related to internalized and externalized behavior problems over and above family structure, childhood family violence, and current extrafamily violence. PMID:20460552

Melançon, Claudiane; Gagné, Marie-Hélène

2011-03-01

282

The role of the neighborhood, family and peers regarding Colombian adolescents' social context and aggressive behavior / Contexto social y comportamiento agresivo en adolescentes Colombianos: el rol del barrio, la familia y los amigos  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Public Health | Language: English Abstract in spanish Objetivo Evaluar la asociación entre las condiciones del barrio, las pautas de crianza y las relaciones con amigos con el comportamiento agresivo. Además analiza diferentes mecanismos por los cuales las condiciones del barrio pueden influir directa e indirectamente (vía su impacto sobre las pautas d [...] e crianza y las relaciones con amigos) dos tipos de comportamiento: agresión y delincuencia. Método Datos sobre comportamiento agresivo son tomados de una encuesta aplicada a 1 686 adolescentes residentes de 103 barrios de Medellín-Colombia. Datos sobre el barrio son tomados de bases de datos gubernamentales y de dos encuestas poblacionales. Para el análisis se utilizaron modelos multinivel y de ecuaciones estructurales. Resultados En Medellín, la probabilidad de agresión de un adolescente es del 7,0 % y de delincuencia de 0,3 %. Dichas probabilidades varían significativamente entre los barrios. Aunque ninguna de las características del barrio mostró un efecto directo sobre el comportamiento agresivo, las condiciones estructurales afectan indirectamente los adolescentes influyendo las pautas de crianza y la calidad de los amigos con quienes se relacionan. Conclusiones La pobreza en el barrio afecta el comportamiento agresivo de los adolescentes impactando las pautas de crianza y la calidad de las relaciones dentro del barrio. Intervenciones para controlar y prevenir el comportamiento agresivo deben desarrollarse en barrios con alta probabilidad de comportamiento agresivo y enfocarse no solamente en el mejoramiento físico de los barrios, sino en el fortalecimiento de las pautas de crianza y la calidad de los amigos de los adolescentes. Abstract in english Objective Examining neighborhood conditions, parenting and peer affiliations' association with adolescents' aggressive behavior. Testing various mechanisms through which neighborhood conditions influence two adolescent outcomes, both directly and indirectly (via their impact on parenting and peer-af [...] filiation): aggression and delinquency. Method Data regarding adolescents was taken from a self-reporting survey of 1,686 Colombian adolescents living in 103 neighborhoods of Medellin. Neighborhood-related data was taken from official government datasets, as well as two separate community surveys. Both multilevel modeling and multilevel structural equation modeling were used in the analysis. Results The probability of an adolescent engaging in aggression in Medellin was 7.0 % and becoming involved in delinquency 0.3 %. There was also significant variation for both forms of aggressive behavior at neighborhood-level (7.0 % aggression and 14 % regarding the delinquency scale). No neighborhood condition had a direct association with adolescents' aggressive behavior; however; the neighborhood exerted an indirect influence on adolescent behavior which was mainly transmitted through families and the quality of friends within a particular community. Conclusions Residing in disadvantaged neighborhoods did have an adverse effect on adolescents' aggressive behavior, mainly because of a lack of effective parenting strategies thereby facilitating affiliations being made with deviant peers. More efficient intervention for reducing adolescents' aggressive behavior should thus target areas having high odds of aggressive behavior and focus on improving community resources and, more importantly, on controlling adolescent peer groups, the lack of parental monitoring and inconsistent discipline.

Beatriz, Caicedo; Kelvyn, Jones.

2014-04-01

283

The role of the neighborhood, family and peers regarding Colombian adolescents' social context and aggressive behavior / Contexto social y comportamiento agresivo en adolescentes Colombianos: el rol del barrio, la familia y los amigos  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Colombia | Language: English Abstract in spanish Objetivo Evaluar la asociación entre las condiciones del barrio, las pautas de crianza y las relaciones con amigos con el comportamiento agresivo. Además analiza diferentes mecanismos por los cuales las condiciones del barrio pueden influir directa e indirectamente (vía su impacto sobre las pautas d [...] e crianza y las relaciones con amigos) dos tipos de comportamiento: agresión y delincuencia. Método Datos sobre comportamiento agresivo son tomados de una encuesta aplicada a 1 686 adolescentes residentes de 103 barrios de Medellín-Colombia. Datos sobre el barrio son tomados de bases de datos gubernamentales y de dos encuestas poblacionales. Para el análisis se utilizaron modelos multinivel y de ecuaciones estructurales. Resultados En Medellín, la probabilidad de agresión de un adolescente es del 7,0 % y de delincuencia de 0,3 %. Dichas probabilidades varían significativamente entre los barrios. Aunque ninguna de las características del barrio mostró un efecto directo sobre el comportamiento agresivo, las condiciones estructurales afectan indirectamente los adolescentes influyendo las pautas de crianza y la calidad de los amigos con quienes se relacionan. Conclusiones La pobreza en el barrio afecta el comportamiento agresivo de los adolescentes impactando las pautas de crianza y la calidad de las relaciones dentro del barrio. Intervenciones para controlar y prevenir el comportamiento agresivo deben desarrollarse en barrios con alta probabilidad de comportamiento agresivo y enfocarse no solamente en el mejoramiento físico de los barrios, sino en el fortalecimiento de las pautas de crianza y la calidad de los amigos de los adolescentes. Abstract in english Objective Examining neighborhood conditions, parenting and peer affiliations' association with adolescents' aggressive behavior. Testing various mechanisms through which neighborhood conditions influence two adolescent outcomes, both directly and indirectly (via their impact on parenting and peer-af [...] filiation): aggression and delinquency. Method Data regarding adolescents was taken from a self-reporting survey of 1,686 Colombian adolescents living in 103 neighborhoods of Medellin. Neighborhood-related data was taken from official government datasets, as well as two separate community surveys. Both multilevel modeling and multilevel structural equation modeling were used in the analysis. Results The probability of an adolescent engaging in aggression in Medellin was 7.0 % and becoming involved in delinquency 0.3 %. There was also significant variation for both forms of aggressive behavior at neighborhood-level (7.0 % aggression and 14 % regarding the delinquency scale). No neighborhood condition had a direct association with adolescents' aggressive behavior; however; the neighborhood exerted an indirect influence on adolescent behavior which was mainly transmitted through families and the quality of friends within a particular community. Conclusions Residing in disadvantaged neighborhoods did have an adverse effect on adolescents' aggressive behavior, mainly because of a lack of effective parenting strategies thereby facilitating affiliations being made with deviant peers. More efficient intervention for reducing adolescents' aggressive behavior should thus target areas having high odds of aggressive behavior and focus on improving community resources and, more importantly, on controlling adolescent peer groups, the lack of parental monitoring and inconsistent discipline.

Beatriz, Caicedo; Kelvyn, Jones.

2014-03-01

284

Determinants of juvenile delinquent behaviour in the family  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Children and adolescents are one of the most vulnerable social groups in the community. Copenhagen declaration has emphasized the fact that particular efforts should be devoted to children and adolescent protection with an aim for extension of social protection and decrease of easy vulnerability of humans. Children and adolescent behaviour is like a mirror which depicts the processes going on in the society, as well as the existing social and economic controversies. At present one can witness negative tendencies in children and adolescent behaviour in Latvia: they drop school early, lead a vagrant life, get used to drugs, violence grows, especially that of severe crimes. In the Resolution of the European Parliament of June 21, 2007 “On Juvenile Delinquency?–?Role of Women, Family and Community” it is also written, that children enter the world of crime much earlier. Certain emotional and behavioural peculiarities of children and adolescents can be taken as a norm at a definite age, however, there exist also such behavioural peculiarities, which essentially differ from the accepted norms. Causative factors of delinquent behaviour, as well as its consequences, are at a level of multiple systems. But, the first and the most significant in any person’s life is the family, and, consequently, it is important to learn and analyze what are the factors in the family which determine the formation of delinquent behaviour.

Razgale I.

2012-10-01

285

An integrative treatment approach to child and adolescent suicidal behavior.  

Science.gov (United States)

The suicide rate for adolescents has tripled during the last 30 years in North America and many Western countries. Although some high risk factors have been defined, the literature is weak on the prevention and treatment issues. This article defines an integrative treatment approach for self-destructive behavior. This model attempts to integrate the well-recognized theoretical and therapeutic approaches such as biologic, psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, self-directed, strategic, experiential, and systemic frameworks. In the integrative approach, the therapist integrates the use of drug therapy and child, group, milieu, and family therapy, depending on the needs of each child. After a brief presentation of the author's comprehensive, in-depth study with 139 suicidal children and adolescents, the commonly seen family reactions to suicidal behavior were described. Family stage reactions of shock and fear, panic and action, guilt, resentment, reparation, and partial recovery are defined with case examples. The complementary nature of the supportive and therapeutic work for the families of suicidal children and adolescents with other preventative and therapeutic interventions is highlighted. PMID:2602214

Turgay, A

1989-12-01

286

Detecting mortgage delinquencies  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Economic hardship is strongly reflected by the housing market. It is the concern of much research, but its analysis is often obstructed by insufficient lagged data. This paper evaluates search intensity for hardship letter from Google Insights to detect ensuing mortgage delinquencies. Such searches locate documents which assist to write a successful loan modification request. Other relevant searches for short sale, REO (as in Real Estate Owned) or FHA (as in Federal Housing Administration) ar...

Askitas, Nikos; Zimmermann, Klaus F.

2011-01-01

287

The Role of Traumatic Event History in Non-Medical Use of Prescription Drugs among a Nationally Representative Sample of US Adolescents  

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Background: Building on previous research with adolescents that examined demographic variables and other forms of substance abuse in relation to non-medical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD), the current study examined potentially traumatic events, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), other substance use, and delinquent behavior as…

McCauley, Jenna L.; Danielson, Carla Kmett; Amstadter, Ananda B.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Hanson, Rochelle F.; Smith, Daniel W.; Saunders, Benjamin E.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.

2010-01-01

288

A Multi-Study Examination of the Validity of a Risk and Protective Factor Model for Young Adolescent Drug and Alcohol Use  

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Issues associated with drug and alcohol use as well as other delinquent behaviors among adolescents are of utmost importance to those concerned with student success in middle grades settings. In order to target preventive interventions for these problems, research suggests that educators should examine the risk and protective factors associated…

Schmitt, Vicki L.; Frey, Bruce B.; Dunham, Michelle L.; Carman, Carol A.

2007-01-01

289

Mothers' and fathers' autonomy-relevant parenting: longitudinal links with adolescents' externalizing and internalizing behavior.  

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The goal of this study was to advance the understanding of separate and joint effects of mothers' and fathers' autonomy-relevant parenting during early and middle adolescence. In a sample of 518 families, adolescents (49 % female; 83 % European American, 16 % African American, 1 % other ethnic groups) reported on their mothers' and fathers' psychological control and knowledge about adolescents' whereabouts, friends, and activities at ages 13 and 16. Mothers and adolescents reported on adolescents' externalizing and internalizing behaviors at ages 12, 14, 15, and 17. Adolescents perceived their mothers as using more psychological control and having more knowledge than their fathers, but there was moderate concordance between adolescents' perceptions of their mothers and fathers. More parental psychological control predicted increases in boys' and girls' internalizing problems and girls' externalizing problems. More parental knowledge predicted decreases in boys' externalizing and internalizing problems. The perceived levels of behavior of mothers and fathers did not interact with one another in predicting adolescent adjustment. The results generalize across early and late adolescence and across mothers' and adolescents' reports of behavior problems. Autonomy-relevant mothering and fathering predict changes in behavior problems during early and late adolescence, but only autonomy-relevant fathering accounts for unique variance in adolescent behavior problems. PMID:24337705

Lansford, Jennifer E; Laird, Robert D; Pettit, Gregory S; Bates, John E; Dodge, Kenneth A

2014-11-01

290

Alcohol consumption among adolescents: attitudes, behaviors and associated factors.  

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The scope of this paper is to assess the attitudes and behaviors regarding alcohol use and analyze associated factors among schoolchildren in public schools of Campina Grande in the state of Paraíba. A cross-sectional study was carried out involving 574 adolescents, with the application of a semi-structured questionnaire. The chi-square test and Fisher's exact test were used (5% level of significance). Among the adolescents 54.5% had drunk alcohol and 6.7% of them were heavy drinkers. The majority of them drank alcohol between 11 and 14 years of age (42.8%); 26.3% of the adolescents purchased alcoholic beverages; and beer was the most drink most consumed (43.8%). The risk of alcohol drinking was higher between 16 and 19 years of age (OR = 4.44; p < 0.001), among those without religious affiliation (OR = 4.36; p = 0.002), among those who worked (OR = 2.13; p = 0.012) and among those who had a fair to poor relationship with their father (OR = 2.18; p = 0.010). The results of this study underscore the complexity of this issue and the need to pay particular attention to the adolescent population. Public policies alone are not sufficient. Support from family, school and society is essential to curtail early alcohol use and its consequences. PMID:24473598

Granville-Garcia, Ana Flávia; Clementino, Marayza Alves; Gomes, Monalisa da Nóbrega Cesarino; Firmino, Ramon Targino; Ribeiro, Gabriella Lima Arrais; Siqueira, Maria Betânia Lins Dantas

2014-01-01

291

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorder  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Currently, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT becomes one of the leading approaches in the psychotherapy. However,use of CBT in childhood psychotherapy is considerably novel. After 1990s, it has been understood that it is an effectivemethod for children and adolescents. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common problems in the field of childhoodand adolescent psychiatry. In the studies conducted, the effectiveness of CBT was demonstrated in anxiety disorders ofthe children and adolescents. Moreover, it was suggested that this effectiveness is permanent in some studies. Prioritygoal of CBT is to change inappropriate learning and thinking patterns in the children and adolescents. By “now and here”fashion, it is attempted to reveal the origin of current problems. During the process, the factors are considered, whichcause to maintain the symptoms. It is attempted to decrease signs caused to stress by improving coping skills duringtherapy. To this end, methods including observation, relaxation training, systematic desensitization, social skills training,cognitive restructuring and exposure therapy are applied in sessions by taking child’s problems into consideration. Scalesspecific to anxiety disorders are used in the assessment and follow-up. Age and development level of the child should beparticularly taken into account while using assessment tools and therapeutic modality.

Didem Behice ÖZTOP

2013-03-01

292

Parental Behaviors during Family Interactions Predict Changes in Depression and Anxiety Symptoms during Adolescence  

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This study investigated the prospective, longitudinal relations between parental behaviors observed during parent-adolescent interactions, and the development of depression and anxiety symptoms in a community-based sample of 194 adolescents. Positive and negative parental behaviors were examined, with negative behaviors operationalized to…

Schwartz, Orli S.; Dudgeon, Paul; Sheeber, Lisa B.; Yap, Marie B. H.; Simmons, Julian G.; Allen, Nicholas B.

2012-01-01

293

Brief Report: Risk-Taking Behaviors in a Non-Western Urban Adolescent Sample  

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This study analyzes the age and gender related risk-taking behaviors of Turkish adolescents in an urban sample. A self-report risk taking scale was administered to 280 adolescents between the ages of 12-21. Results revealed that both the type and the frequency of risk-taking behaviors were changed according to age and gender. All risky behaviors

Bayar, Nalan; Sayil, Melike

2005-01-01

294

Academic and Behavioral Trajectories for At-Risk Adolescents in Urban Schools  

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The purpose of this longitudinal study was twofold: (a) to investigate academic, behavioral, and emotional outcomes for adolescents who were followed longitudinally from middle through high school and (b) to determine if early assessment of achievement and behavior predicts academic and behavioral outcomes for adolescents who were identified as at…

Montague, Marjorie; Enders, Craig; Cavendish, Wendy; Castro, Marcelo

2011-01-01

295

Eating Behaviors among Female Adolescents in Kuantan District, Pahang, Malaysia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study examined eating behaviors among female adolescents. A total of 407 female students aged between 13-19 years were randomly selected from two secondary schools in Kuantan district, Pahang, Malaysia. All participants were required to complete a self-administered Eating Behaviors Questionnaire and their weight and height were measured by the researchers. A majority of the participants were Malays (65.3%, followed by Chinese (28.3% and Indians (6.4%. There were 5.9% underweight participants, 75.4% were normal-weight and 18.7% were overweight. About one third (35.9% never skipped any of the daily three meals, but another half (52.6% skipped at least one meal a day and the remaining (11.5% had even skipped all three meals in a day. The most frequently missed meals were breakfast (47.4%. Half (51.4% snacked between meals daily and three in four (76.9% had their meals with family members. No differences were found between the socio-demographic variables (age, household members, parent’s total year of schooling, parental monthly income and living arrangement and meal skipping behaviors. However, those who usually skipped meals were those who usually eat alone (Chi2 = 16.933, p < 0.0001, overweight (Chi2 = 15.943, p < 0.05 and were Malays (Chi2 = 33.827, p < 0.05. In conclusion, meal skipping, snacking and practicing various weight loss behaviors were some of the unhealthy eating behaviors depicted among adolescent girls. Focusing on promotion of healthy eating that stresses on the importance of regular intakes of main meals during adolescence is crucial for their current and future health and well-being.

Y.S. Chin

2009-01-01

296

ADOLESCENTS’ SEXUAL BEHAVIOR AND ACADEMIC ATTAINMENT*  

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High school students today have high ambitions but do not always make choices that maximize their likelihood of educational success. This is the motivation for investigating relationships between high school sexual behavior and two important academic attainment milestones: earning a high school diploma and enrollment in distinct postsecondary programs. Analysis of data from 7,915 National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988–1994 participants indicates that timing of sexual initiation, cont...

Frisco, Michelle L.

2008-01-01

297

Intrapersonal factors, social context and health-related behavior in adolescence  

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Patterns of health-compromising behaviors and their initiation and progression in adolescence are generally considered to be predictive of later involvement in such behaviors and exposure to their harmful consequences on health. Health-enhancing behaviors can be also traced back to childhood and adolescence. Empirical evidence supports the existence of several domains of determinants covering intrapersonal, interpersonal and socio-cultural areas of infl uence in adolescent healthrelated behav...

Veselska, Zuzana

2010-01-01

298

Co-morbid disorders and sexual risk behavior in Nigerian adolescents with bipolar disorder  

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Abstract Background Adolescent onset bipolar disorder often presents with co-morbid disorders of which psychoactive substance use disorders are notable. Mania symptoms and co-morbid psychoactive substance use disorders prone adolescents with bipolar disorder to impulsivity, impaired judgment, and risk taking behavior which often includes sexual risk behavior. There are dearth of information on pattern of co-morbid disorders and sexual risk behavior in adolescent onset bipolar...

Bakare Muideen O; Agomoh Ahamefule O; Ebigbo Peter O; Onyeama Gabriel M; Eaton Julian; Onwukwe Jojo U; Okonkwo Kevin O

2009-01-01

299

Longitudinal Effects of Health-Harming and Health-Protective Behaviors within Adolescent Romantic Dyads  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Most models exploring adolescent health behavior have focused on individual influences to understand behavior change. The goal of the current study was to assess the role of adolescent romantic partners on the expression of health behavior. Our sample utilized two waves of data from the US National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1994, 1996), which included 80 romantic dyads (160 individuals). A longitudinal multilevel analysis was conducted. We assessed individual and romantic partn...

Aalsma, Matthew C.; Carpentier, Melissa; Azzouz, Faouzi; Fortenberry, Dennis

2012-01-01

300

HIV/AIDS and Sexual-Risk Behaviors among Adolescents: Factors influencing the use of condoms in Burkina Faso  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

To facilitate the design of effective policies that can address adolescent’s reproductive health problems, it is necessary to gain a thorough understanding of patterns of adolescents’ sexual behavior, and the factors that affect them. Using a unique set of data collected in 2004 from a nationally-representative survey of adolescents, this study examines adolescents’ risky and protective sexual behavior in Burkina Faso. Findings show that 11% of adolescent males had sexual intercourse in...

Guiella, Georges; Madise, Nyovani Janet

2007-01-01

 
 
 
 
301

Disentangling the Relationship between Child Maltreatment and Violent Delinquency: Using a Nationally Representative Sample  

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This study uses the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescents (Add Health) data, a nationally representative sample of adolescents, to disentangle the relationship between child maltreatment and violent delinquency. Also examined are potential moderating effects of gender, socioeconomic status (SES), and religiosity on the association between…

Yun, Ilhong; Ball, Jeremy D.; Lim, Hyeyoung

2011-01-01

302

Youth Gangs, Delinquency and Drug Use: A Test of the Selection, Facilitation, and Enhancement Hypotheses  

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Background: Three different explanations have been given for the observation that adolescent gang members report more delinquent behaviour than their counterparts who do not affiliate with gangs: a) adolescents who commit more crimes join gangs (selection hypothesis); b) gang membership facilitates deviant behaviour (facilitation hypothesis); c)…

Gatti, Uberto; Tremblay, Richard E.; Vitaro, Frank; McDuff, Pierre

2005-01-01

303

Sociodemographic and behavioral factors associated with body adiposity in adolescents?  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: To identify sociodemographic and behavioral factors associated with abdominal obesity (AO) and high body fat percentage (high BF%) in adolescents from the city of Curitiba-PR. Methods: The sample consisted of 1,732 adolescents, aged 11 to 19 years, of both genders. The triceps and calf skinfolds were measured for the calculation of BF%, as well as the waist circumference. A questionnaire was completed by adolescents with the following type of residence, socioeconomic status, time spent watching TV on weekdays and weekends, and daily energy expenditure. Logistic regression was used to measure the association of sociodemographic and behavioral variables with abdominal obesity and high BF%. Results: Female were more likely to have high BF% (OR: 2.73; 95% CI: 2.32-3.33), but were less likely to have abdominal obesity (OR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.44-0.78). Older individuals (1619 have high BF% (OR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.02-1.83). The older age groups (13-15 years and 16-19 years) had an inverse association with abdominal obesity. Regarding daily energy expenditure, the less active individuals were more likely to present high BF% (OR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.07-1.71) and obesity (OR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.09-1.80). Conclusions: Interventions to increase physical activity levels in young people should be designed in order to combat excess body fat should designed to combat excess adiposity.

Bozza, Rodrigo; de Campos, Wagner; Bacil, Eliane Denise Araújo; Barbosa, Valter Cordeiro; Hardt, Jennifer Morozini; da Silva, Priscila Marques

2014-01-01

304

Adverse childhood experiences and suicidal behavior of adolescent psychiatric inpatients.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study examines the association of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to suicidal behavior and mortality in 508 Finnish adolescents (aged 12-17 years) who required acute psychiatric hospitalization between April 2001 and March 2006. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) and the European Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI) were used to obtain information about ACEs, adolescents' suicidal behavior and psychiatric diagnoses. The cases of death were obtained from Statistics Finland. The results of our study indicated that, among girls, exposure to sexual abuse statistically significantly increased the risk of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) (OR, 1.8; 95 % CI, 1.0-3.2) and suicide attempts (OR, 2.3; 95 % CI, 1.0-4.5). The cumulative number of ACEs was also associated with an increased risk of NSSI (OR, 1.2; 95 % CI, 1.0- 1.4) and suicide attempts (OR, 1.2; 95 % CI, 1.0-1.4) in girls. Among all deceased adolescents, ACEs were most notable among those who had died due to accidents and injuries. Gender differences in the types of ACEs were noted and discussed. PMID:22842795

Isohookana, Reetta; Riala, Kaisa; Hakko, Helinä; Räsänen, Pirkko

2013-01-01

305

Multiple Health Risk Behaviors in Adolescents: An Examination of Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Chronic disease risk factors tend to cooccur. Purpose: This study examined the cooccurrence of 8 negative health behaviors in a representative sample of urban adolescents to inform educational interventions. Methods: The prevalence, cooccurrence, and clustering of suicide attempt, lifetime history of sexual activity, tobacco use, cell…

Coleman, Casey; Wileyto, E. Paul; Lenhart, Clare M.; Patterson, Freda

2014-01-01

306

Preschool Behavioral and Social-Cognitive Problems as Predictors of (Pre)Adolescent Disruptive Behavior  

Science.gov (United States)

This article describes preschool social understanding and difficult behaviors (hot temper, disobedience, bossiness and bullying) as predictors of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and aggressive conduct disorder (ACD) in a Dutch population sample of (pre)adolescents (N = 1943), measured at age 10-12 and at age 13-15. ODD and ACD were assessed by…

Emond, Alice; Ormel, Johan; Veenstra, Rene; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

2007-01-01

307

A framework for estimating causal effects in latent class analysis: is there a causal link between early sex and subsequent profiles of delinquency?  

Science.gov (United States)

Prevention scientists use latent class analysis (LCA) with increasing frequency to characterize complex behavior patterns and profiles of risk. Often, the most important research questions in these studies involve establishing characteristics that predict membership in the latent classes, thus describing the composition of the subgroups and suggesting possible points of intervention. More recently, prevention scientists have begun to adopt modern methods for drawing causal inference from observational data because of the bias that can be introduced by confounders. This same issue of confounding exists in any analysis of observational data, including prediction of latent class membership. This study demonstrates a straightforward approach to causal inference in LCA that builds on propensity score methods. We demonstrate this approach by examining the causal effect of early sex on subsequent delinquency latent classes using data from 1,890 adolescents in 11th and 12th grade from wave I of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Prior to the statistical adjustment for potential confounders, early sex was significantly associated with delinquency latent class membership for both genders (p?=?0.02). However, the propensity score adjusted analysis indicated no evidence for a causal effect of early sex on delinquency class membership (p?=?0.76) for either gender. Sample R and SAS code is included in an Appendix in the ESM so that prevention scientists may adopt this approach to causal inference in LCA in their own work. PMID:23839479

Butera, Nicole M; Lanza, Stephanie T; Coffman, Donna L

2014-06-01

308

Adolescent Secretive Behavior: African American and Hmong Adolescents' Strategies and Justifications for Managing Parents' Knowledge about Peers  

Science.gov (United States)

Drawing upon the expectancy violation-realignment theory of autonomy development, this qualitative study examined African American and Hmong adolescent autonomy-seeking behaviors and parent-child communication about activities and relationships with peers. Twenty-two African American and 11 Hmong adolescents in grades 6-12 and 14 African American…

Bakken, Jeremy P.; Brown, B. Bradford

2010-01-01

309

Psychosocial Distress and Alcohol Use as Factors in Adolescent Sexual Behavior among Sub-Saharan African Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: This study examines the relationship between sexual behavior, alcohol use, and indicators of psychosocial distress (mental health) of adolescents in 6 sub-Saharan African countries using the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS). Methods: The sample consisted of 22,949 adolescents from Botswana, Kenya, Namibia, Uganda,…

Page, Randy M.; Hall, Cougar P.

2009-01-01

310

Adolescent Suicidal Behavior: Associations with Preadolescent Physical Abuse and Selected Risk and Protective Factors  

Science.gov (United States)

Objectives: To determine whether preadolescent physical abuse raises the risk of adolescent suicidal behavior, to examine potential mediators and moderators of the relationship between preadolescent abuse and adolescent suicidality, and to examine whether distal (preadolescent) risk factors add to proximal (adolescent) factors in predicting…

Salzinger, Suzanne; Rosario, Margaret; Feldman, Richard S.; Ng-Mak, Daisy S.

2007-01-01

311

Relationship between Eating Behavior, Breakfast Consumption, and Obesity among Finnish and Greek Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: To investigate the relationship between eating-related behaviors, particularly breakfast consumption, and weight status in Finnish and Greek adolescents. Methods: A total of 6,468 16-year-old Finnish adolescents and 2,842 17- and 18-year-old Greek adolescents, based on the latest follow-up of 2 population-based cohorts, were studied.…

Veltsista, Alexandra; Laitinen, Jaana; Sovio, Ulla; Roma, Eleftheria; Jarvelin, Marjo-Ritta; Bakoula, Chryssa

2010-01-01

312

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Anxious Adolescents: Developmental Influences on Treatment Design and Delivery  

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Anxiety disorders in adolescence are common and disruptive, pointing to a need for effective treatments for this age group. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is one of the most popular interventions for adolescent anxiety, and there is empirical support for its application. However, a significant proportion of adolescent clients continue to report…

Sauter, Floor M.; Heyne, David; Westenberg, P. Michiel

2009-01-01

313

The Immigrant Paradox in Sexual Risk Behavior among Latino Adolescents: Impact of Immigrant Generation and Gender  

Science.gov (United States)

This article contributes new evidence on the associations among immigrant generation, gender, and sexual risk behavior among Latino adolescents in the United States. Longitudinal data from 3,272 Latino adolescents (grades 7-12) who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) were examined for evidence of the…

Guarini, Tristan E.; Marks, Amy K.; Patton, Flannery; Coll, Cynthia Garcia

2011-01-01

314

Anxiety in Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome: Negative Thoughts, Behavioral Problems, and Life Interference  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined anxiety symptoms in 29 adolescents with Asperger syndrome (AS) aged 12 to 16 years, compared to 30 nonclinical (NC) adolescents and 34 adolescents with anxiety disorders (AD). Comorbidity between anxiety symptoms and negative thoughts, behavioral problems, and life interference was also examined. Self- and parental reports…

Farrugia, Sylvana; Hudson, Jennifer

2006-01-01

315

Longitudinal Investigation of the Associations between Adolescents' Popularity and Cyber Social Behaviors  

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As adolescents become increasingly immersed in electronic technologies, popular adolescents may act in similar ways online as they do offline. This longitudinal study employed peer nominations and self-reports to examine perceived popularity and social preference in relation to cyber social behaviors among 256 adolescents during the fall (T1) and…

Wright, Michelle F.

2014-01-01

316

Effects of Behavioral Weight Control Intervention on Binge Eating Symptoms among Overweight Adolescents  

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This study examined change in binge eating symptoms reported by moderately overweight adolescents following participation in a behavioral weight control intervention. A total of 194 adolescents across two randomized controlled trials participated. Adolescents in both study samples endorsed a mild level of binge eating symptoms at baseline. Results…

Mehlenbeck, Robyn S.; Jelalian, Elissa; Lloyd-Richardson, Elizabeth E.; Hart, Chantelle N.

2009-01-01

317

Altering the Trajectory to Delinquency.  

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A former client of the juvenile justice system argues that neither punitive attack nor passive inaction will cause delinquency to go away. Research suggests the use of early delinquency as an opportunity to alter the trajectory of a life headed toward crime. Rather than focusing on recidivism, researchers should focus on successful rehabilitation.…

Brown, Waln K.

1995-01-01

318

Indirect peer aggression in adolescence and reproductive behavior.  

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Evolutionary psychologists have suggested that indirect aggression during adolescence is a strategy to compete with same-sex peer rivals for resources, status, and mating opportunities. We collected survey data on 143 young adults to determine retrospectively, the amount of indirect aggressive behavior they perpetrated and the amount of indirect victimization they experienced in middle school and high school. We also collected information about reproductive opportunities such as age at first sexual intercourse and number of lifetime sex partners to determine whether aggression or victimization could be used to predict measures of reproductive opportunity. We performed a principal components analysis to develop factors from 16 aggression and victimization variables. Results indicate that females who reported indirect aggression toward peers had earlier ages at first sexual intercourse and females who were more victimized in adolescence experienced later ages at first sexual intercourse. We discuss these results in terms of intrasexual competition and evolutionary theory. PMID:22947779

White, Daniel D; Gallup, Andrew C; Gallup, Gordon G

2010-01-01

319

Does sex education affect adolescent sexual behaviors and health?  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines whether offering sex education to young teenagers affects several measures of adolescent sexual behavior and health: virginity status, contraceptive use, frequency of intercourse, likelihood of pregnancy, and probability of contracting a sexually transmitted disease. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, I find that while sex education is associated with adverse health outcomes, there is little evidence of a causal link after controlling for unobserved heterogeneity via fixed effects and instrumental variables. These findings suggest that those on each side of the ideological debate over sex education are, in a sense, both correct and mistaken. Opponents are correct in observing that sex education is associated with adverse health outcomes, but are generally incorrect in interpreting this relationship causally. Proponents are generally correct in claiming that sex education does not encourage risky sexual activity, but are incorrect in asserting that investments in typical school-based sex education programs produce measurable health benefits. PMID:16989033

Sabia, Joseph J

2006-01-01

320

Gestational iron deficiency is associated with pica behaviors in adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

A relation between pica (the craving and purposive consumption of nonfood items) during pregnancy and anemia is observed frequently. However, few studies related pica behaviors to biomarkers of iron status, and little is known about pica prevalence in U.S. pregnant adolescents. To address this, we undertook a longitudinal study examining iron status and pica behaviors among a group of 158 pregnant adolescents (aged ?18 y). Approximately two-thirds of the participants were African American and 25% were Hispanic. Maternal iron status indicators [hemoglobin, soluble transferrin receptor, serum ferritin (SF), total body iron (TBI), and serum hepcidin] were assessed during pregnancy (18.5-37.3 wk) and at delivery. Pica behavior was assessed up to 3 times across gestation. Among the 158 adolescents, 46% reported engaging in pica behavior. Substances ingested included ice (37%), starches (8%), powders (4%), and soap (3%). During pregnancy, mean SF [geometric mean: 13.6 ?g/L (95% CI: 11.0, 17.0 ?g/L)], TBI (mean ± SD: 2.5 ± 4.2 mg/kg), and hepcidin [geometric mean: 19.1 ?g/L (95% CI: 16.3, 22.2 ?g/L)] concentrations were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the pica group (n = 72) than values observed among the non-pica group [SF, geometric mean: 21.1 ?g/L (95% CI: 18.0, 25.0 ?g/L); TBI, mean ± SD: 4.3 ± 3.5 mg/kg; hepcidin, geometric mean: 27.1 ?g/L (95%: 23.1, 32.1 ?g/L); n = 86]. Although additional studies must address the etiology of these relations, this practice should be screened for, given its association with low iron status and because many of the substances ingested may be harmful. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01019902. PMID:25122650

Lumish, Rachel A; Young, Sera L; Lee, Sunmin; Cooper, Elizabeth; Pressman, Eva; Guillet, Ronnie; O'Brien, Kimberly O

2014-10-01

 
 
 
 
321

Adolescent boys and girls with behavioral disorders in residential homes: A camera-glasses study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Children and adolescents with behavioral disorders are often referred to residential homes. These homes cater and treat socially disadvantaged adolescents with a history of deviant behavior. This study investigated the environment of eight adolescents in these residential homes and four non-aggressive adolescents living with their families. The daily activities were recorded by using camera-glasses attached to the subject. These activities took place in school, leisure time, family and residential homes. Other additional methods were used to investigate the perception and experience of these adolescents. The results of this study indicate that the adolescents in residential homes have a smaller living space in contrast to the non-aggressive adolescents. They also have less close relationships and fewer interactions with their peers. Moreover they have more conflicts and show more often aggressive behavior and they are more often victims of aggression.

Alexander Wettstein

2013-03-01

322

Nutrition knowledge in adolescents: perception of parents and peers behavior and stimulus  

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It is well known the influence that parents and peers have in children and adolescent choices and behaviors, including eating habits and physical activity practice. No work has been done yet about parents and peers influence in nutrition knowledge. This work aims to study the relation between adolescents’ perception of parents and peers food habits, physical activity practice, stimulus to the adolescent to follow a healthy diet and be physically active and adolescents N...

Ferro-lebres, Vera; Ribeiro, Jose? Carlos; Moreira, Pedro; Silva, Gustavo Gonc?alves Da; Aires, Lui?sa

2010-01-01

323

Social, Behavioral, and Genetic Linkages from Adolescence Into Adulthood  

Science.gov (United States)

The influence of genetic factors on health and behavior is conditioned by social, cultural, institutional, and physical environments in which individuals live, work, and play. We encourage studies supporting multilevel integrative approaches to understanding these contributions to health, and describe the Add Health study as an exemplar. Add Health is a large sample of US adolescents in grades 7 to 12 in 1994–1995 followed into adulthood with 4 in-home interviews and biomarker collections, including DNA. In addition to sampling multiple environments and measuring diverse social and health behavior, Add Health features a fully articulated behavioral genetic sample (3000 pairs) and ongoing genotyping of 12?000 archived samples. We illustrate approaches to understanding health through investigation of the interplay among biological, psychosocial, and physical, contextual, or cultural experiences. PMID:23927505

Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Hussey, Jon; Whitsel, Eric A.; Tabor, Joyce; Elder, Glen; Hewitt, John; Shanahan, Michael; Williams, Redford; Siegler, Ilene; Smolen, Andrew

2013-01-01

324

Behavioral correlates of television viewing in young adolescents in Turkey.  

Science.gov (United States)

We evaluated the behavioral effects of television (TV) viewing in 860 young adolescents as reported by parents (n=581) on Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). The mean duration of TV viewing was 2.32 ± 1.77 hours/day according to parents and 2.08 ± 1.41 hours/day according to self report (r=0.37, P aggressive behavior score of CBCL (P=0.016) and parent reported TV viewing hours. Self reported TV viewing for more than 2 hours was significantly associated with social problem score (OR 1.17; 95% CI:1.016-1.349; P=0.030) and having a TV in bedroom (OR:1.706; 95% ;CI: 1.065-2.731, P=0.026). PMID:21169649

Ozmert, Elif N; Ince, Tolga; Pektas, Ayhan; Ozdemir, Ramazan; Uckardes, Yasemin

2011-03-01

325

Pubertal timing and adolescent sexual behavior in girls.  

Science.gov (United States)

Girls who experience earlier pubertal timing relative to peers also exhibit earlier timing of sexual intercourse and more unstable sexual relationships. Although pubertal development initiates feelings of physical desire, the transition into romantic and sexual relationships involves complex biological and social processes contributing both to physical maturation and to individual interpretations of pubertal experiences. Using a sample of female sibling pairs (n = 923 pairs) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the present study investigated associations among menarche and perceived pubertal timing, age of first sexual intercourse (AFI), and adolescent dating and sexual behavior using a behavioral genetic approach. Genetic factors influencing age at menarche and perceived pubertal timing predicted AFI through shared genetic pathways, whereas genetic factors related only to perceived pubertal timing predicted engagement in dating, romantic sex, and nonromantic sex in the previous 18 months. These results suggest that a girl's interpretation of her pubertal timing beyond objective timing is important to consider for the timing and the contexts of romantic and reproductive behavior. PMID:24588522

Moore, Sarah R; Harden, K Paige; Mendle, Jane

2014-06-01

326

Eventos estressores no desenvolvimento de meninas adolescentes cumprindo medidas sócio-educativas / stressful events on the development of delinquent adolescent girls  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese Este estudo investigou a ocorrência de eventos estressores no desenvolvimento de 50 adolescentes autoras de ato infracional, com idade entre 13 e 20 anos, que cumpriam medida sócio-educativa em órgão governamental. Os dados foram coletados através de entrevistas semi-estruturadas e de uma versão ada [...] ptada do Inventário de Eventos Estressores na Adolescência (IEEA). Foram identificados eventos estressores em diferentes domínios, como a ocorrência de maus-tratos, abuso sexual, uso de drogas, repetência escolar, desemprego e morte dos pais, que se constituem como fatores de risco no seu desenvolvimento. Estes aspectos revelam um ciclo de violência presente na trajetória destas adolescentes, no período anterior ao ato infracional. Abstract in english This study investigated stressful events present during the development of 50 adolescent girls who had problems with the law, aged 13 to 20 years old and who were in a governmental shelter. Data was collected using a semi-structured interview and an adapted version of the Adolescence Stressful Event [...] s Inventory (IEEA). Stressful events in different areas such as child maltreatment, sexual abuse, drugs, school failure, death and unemployed parents were identified, which are risk factors in their development. These aspects reveal the presence of a violence cycle during the adolescent's trajectory, before institutionalization.

Débora Dalbosco, Dell' Aglio; Sílvia Pereira da Cruz, Benetti; Luciana, Deretti; Daniela Bergesch, D' Incao; Joana Severo, Leon.

327

Eventos estressores no desenvolvimento de meninas adolescentes cumprindo medidas sócio-educativas stressful events on the development of delinquent adolescent girls  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Este estudo investigou a ocorrência de eventos estressores no desenvolvimento de 50 adolescentes autoras de ato infracional, com idade entre 13 e 20 anos, que cumpriam medida sócio-educativa em órgão governamental. Os dados foram coletados através de entrevistas semi-estruturadas e de uma versão adaptada do Inventário de Eventos Estressores na Adolescência (IEEA. Foram identificados eventos estressores em diferentes domínios, como a ocorrência de maus-tratos, abuso sexual, uso de drogas, repetência escolar, desemprego e morte dos pais, que se constituem como fatores de risco no seu desenvolvimento. Estes aspectos revelam um ciclo de violência presente na trajetória destas adolescentes, no período anterior ao ato infracional.This study investigated stressful events present during the development of 50 adolescent girls who had problems with the law, aged 13 to 20 years old and who were in a governmental shelter. Data was collected using a semi-structured interview and an adapted version of the Adolescence Stressful Events Inventory (IEEA. Stressful events in different areas such as child maltreatment, sexual abuse, drugs, school failure, death and unemployed parents were identified, which are risk factors in their development. These aspects reveal the presence of a violence cycle during the adolescent's trajectory, before institutionalization.

Débora Dalbosco Dell'Aglio

2005-04-01

328

The effects of sex education on adolescent behavior.  

Science.gov (United States)

By age 18, according to the 1982 National Survey of Family Growth, 68 percent of 15-19-year-old women have received formal instruction about pregnancy and contraceptive methods, 16 percent have had instruction about pregnancy only, and another 16 percent have received neither type of education. The age at which formal contraceptive education is first provided has been declining; among 15-year-olds, for example, 47 percent have had instruction by their 15th birthday, compared with 33 percent of 17-year-olds and 26 percent of 19-year-olds. Forty-six percent of adolescent women have had premarital intercourse. Exposure to formal sex education appears to have no consistent effect on the subsequent probability that a teenager will begin to have intercourse. Sex education does influence contraceptive knowledge and behavior, however. Sexually active teenagers who have had formal instruction report knowing how to use more methods than do adolescents who have had no instruction. The former group is also significantly more likely to have practiced contraception at some time. And among ever-users, those who have received pregnancy and contraceptive education before first coitus are significantly more likely to have used a method at first intercourse. Nearly one-third of premaritally sexually active adolescents have had at least one premarital pregnancy. The NSFG data reveal no significant relationship between exposure to sex education and the risk of premarital pregnancy among sexually active teenagers. PMID:3792529

Dawson, D A

1986-01-01

329

Association of Multiple Behavioral Risk Factors with Adolescents’ Willingness to Engage in eHealth Promotion  

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Objective?This study examines adolescents’ willingness to use the internet and other forms of technology for health promotion purposes (i.e., “eHealth promotion” willingness) and determines if a relationship exists between adolescentsbehavioral risks and their eHealth promotion willingness.?Methods?A total of 332 adolescents provided data at a routine medical check-up, including assessments of technology access, eHealth promotion willingness, and multiple behavioral risk facto...

Tercyak, Kenneth P.; Abraham, Anisha A.; Graham, Amanda L.; Wilson, Lara D.; Walker, Leslie R.

2009-01-01

330

Health Promotion for Adolescents: Preventive and Corrective Strategies against Problem Behavior.  

Science.gov (United States)

Reviews research on problem behavior in adolescence. Discusses implications of this research, distinguishing between different stages in the process by which problem behavior emerges and separates "preventive" from "corrective" forms of intervention. Discusses implications for social policy. (Author/ABL)

Hurrelmann, Klaus

1990-01-01

331

Caffeine triggers behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats.  

Science.gov (United States)

Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide but concerns arise about the growing intake of caffeine-containing drinks by adolescents since the effects of caffeine on cognitive functions and neurochemical aspects of late brain maturation during adolescence are poorly known. We now studied the behavioral impact in adolescent male rats of regular caffeine intake at low (0.1mg/mL), moderate (0.3mg/mL) and moderate/high (1.0mg/mL) doses only during their active period (from 7:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M.). All tested doses of caffeine were devoid of effects on locomotor activity, but triggered anxiogenic effects. Caffeine (0.3 and 1mg/mL) improved the performance in the object recognition task, but the higher dose of caffeine (1.0mg/mL) decreased the habituation to an open-field arena, suggesting impaired non-associative memory. All tested doses of caffeine decreased the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein and synaptosomal-associated protein-25, but failed to modify neuron-specific nuclear protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Caffeine (0.3-1mg/mL) increased the density of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and proBDNF density as well as adenosine A1 receptor density in the hippocampus, whereas the higher dose of caffeine (1mg/mL) increased the density of proBDNF and BDNF and decreased A1 receptor density in the cerebral cortex. These findings document an impact of caffeine consumption in adolescent rats with a dual impact on anxiety and recognition memory, associated with changes in BDNF levels and decreases of astrocytic and nerve terminal markers without overt neuronal damage in hippocampal and cortical regions. PMID:24726984

Ardais, A P; Borges, M F; Rocha, A S; Sallaberry, C; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

2014-06-13

332

Early Adolescent Pathways of Antisocial Behaviors in Poor, Inner-City Neighborhoods  

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The change and stability of antisocial behavior during adolescence has triggered interest in a number of social scientific disciplines. This article longitudinally examines pathways of antisocial behavior among predominantly African American adolescents residing in inner-city, poor neighborhoods. Data were collected from 354 youth (ages 12 through…

Park, Nan S.; Lee, Beom S.; Bolland, John M.; Vazsonyi, Alexander T.; Sun, Fei

2008-01-01

333

Therapist Strategies for Building Involvement in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined predictive relations between 9 therapist behaviors and client involvement in manual-guided, cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescent depression. Analyses included 42 adolescents who met criteria for a depressive disorder (major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, or adjustment disorder with depressed mood) and who were…

Jungbluth, Nathaniel J.; Shirk, Stephen R.

2009-01-01

334

Methamphetamine Use Is Independently Associated with Recent Risky Sexual Behaviors and Adolescent Pregnancy  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Lifetime methamphetamine use among adolescents is estimated to be between 5% and 10%. Youth substance use in general is known to be associated with risky sexual behaviors, but the effect of methamphetamine use on recent risky sexual behaviors and adolescent pregnancy has received little attention. The purpose of this analysis was to…

Zapata, Lauren B.; Hillis, Susan D.; Marchbanks; Polly A.; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Lowry, Richard

2008-01-01

335

Using the Integrative Model to Explain How Exposure to Sexual Media Content Influences Adolescent Sexual Behavior  

Science.gov (United States)

Published research demonstrates an association between exposure to media sexual content and a variety of sex-related outcomes for adolescents. What is not known is the mechanism through which sexual content produces this "media effect" on adolescent beliefs, attitudes, and behavior. Using the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction, this…

Bleakley, Amy; Hennessy, Michael; Fishbein, Martin; Jordan, Amy

2011-01-01

336

Gender and Grade-Level Comparisons in the Structure of Problem Behaviors among Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

Based on Jessor's theory (1987) the comparability of a second-order problem behavior model (SPBM) was investigated across gender and grade-level among adolescents. In addition, gender and grade-level differences in problem behavior engagement were addressed examining latent mean differences. Using a sample of 6504 adolescents drawn from the…

Chun, Heejung; Mobley, Michael

2010-01-01

337

Treatment Adherence, Competence, and Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the impact of treatment adherence and therapist competence on treatment outcome in a controlled trial of individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for adolescent substance use and related behavior problems. Participants included 136 adolescents (62 CBT, 74 MDFT) assessed at intake,…

Hogue, Aaron; Henderson, Craig E.; Dauber, Sarah; Barajas, Priscilla C.; Fried, Adam; Liddle, Howard A.

2008-01-01

338

Stress, Cortisol, and Externalizing Behavior in Adolescent Males: An Examination in the Context of Multisystemic Therapy  

Science.gov (United States)

Stress and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation have been associated with externalizing behavior in adolescence, but few studies have examined these factors in a treatment context. This study investigated the relationship between stress, cortisol, and externalizing behavior among 120 adolescent males (mean age = 15) receiving…

Schechter, Julia C.; Brennan, Patricia A.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Foster, Sharon L.; Whitmore, Elizabeth

2012-01-01

339

Family Sex Communication and the Sexual Desire, Attitudes, and Behavior of Late Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

Parental sex education might promote healthy sexual behavior among adolescents, but some parents assume that family communication about sex will lead to sexual activity. Family sex communication has been studied with a limited range of adolescent sexual behaviors but not sexual fantasy or desire. Two measures of family sex communication were…

Zamboni, Brian D.; Silver, Rachel

2009-01-01

340

Family-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Suicidal Adolescents and their Integration with Individual Treatment  

Science.gov (United States)

A considerable research base underscores the importance of family functioning in the risk for and treatment of adolescent suicidal thoughts and behaviors. This paper reviews the extant empirical literature documenting associations between features of the family context and adolescent suicidal thoughts and behaviors. A case example is provided to…

Wells, Karen C.; Heilbron, Nicole

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
341

[The parenting style as protective or risk factor for substance use and other behavior problems among Spanish adolescents].  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to analyze the parental socialization styles as a protective or a risk factor for substance use in a sample of 673 Spanish adolescents (51.7% were women) aged 14-17 (M = 15.49, SD = 1.06). All participants completed the Parental Socialization Scale (ESPA29) and a scale of substance use. Additionally, they also completed a scale of delinquency and another one of school misconduct. A multivariate (4×2×2) analysis of variance (MANOVA) was applied for substance use, delinquency and school misconduct with parenting style, sex and age. Results from this study showed that indulgent parenting style was a protective factor for substance use whereas authoritarian style was identified as a risk factor. Moreover, results from protective and risk parenting styles on delinquency and school misconduct were consistent with those obtained on substance use. These findings have important implications for the development of family-based substance use prevention programs among Spanish adolescents and other similar cultures where indulgent parenting style is currently displaying a beneficial impact. PMID:23880836

Martínez, Isabel; Fuentes, María C; García, Fernando; Madrid, Ignacio

2013-01-01

342

A friend request from dear old dad: associations between parent-child social networking and adolescent outcomes.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the relationship between parent-child social networking, connection, and outcomes for adolescents. Participants (491 adolescents and their parents) completed a number of questionnaires on social networking use, feelings of connection, and behavioral outcomes. Social networking with parents was associated with increased connection between parents and adolescents. Feelings of connection then mediated the relationship between social networking with parents and behavioral outcomes, including higher prosocial behavior and lower relational aggression and internalizing behavior. Conversely, adolescent social networking use without parents was associated with negative outcomes, such as increased relational aggression, internalizing behaviors, delinquency, and decreased feelings of connection. These results indicate that although high levels of social networking use may be problematic for some individuals, social networking with parents may potentially strengthen parent-child relationships and then lead to positive outcomes for adolescents. PMID:23845157

Coyne, Sarah M; Padilla-Walker, Laura M; Day, Randal D; Harper, James; Stockdale, Laura

2014-01-01

343

Truth or Consequences: The Intertemporal Consistency of Adolescent Self-report on the Youth Risk Behavior Survey  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Surveys are the primary information source about adolescents’ health risk behaviors, but adolescents may not report their behaviors accurately. Survey data are used for formulating adolescent health policy, and inaccurate data can cause mistakes in policy creation and evaluation. The author used test-retest data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (United States, 2000) to compare adolescents’ responses to 72 questions about their risk behaviors at a 2-week interval. Each question was eval...

Rosenbaum, Janet E.

2009-01-01

344

Association between socio-economic status and sexual behavior of adolescents  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Introduction: Numerous studies have emphasized the importance of contextual factors as determinants of sexual behavior of adolescents. It has been found that lower socioeconomic status is associated with risky sexual behavior. Sexual behavior is individual but develops under strong influence of cultural and other influences. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of family’s socioeconomic status and risky sexual behavior of adolescents in Belgrade. Method. Self-...

Vukovi? Dejana S.; Bjegovi?-Mikanovi? Vesna M.

2007-01-01

345

Family structure instability and mobility: The consequences for adolescents' problem behavior.  

Science.gov (United States)

Adolescents who experience changes in parents' union status are more likely than adolescents in stable family structures to engage in problem behavior. We ask whether the link between family structure transitions and problem behavior in adolescence may be explained in part by the residential and school mobility that co-occur with family structure change. Our analysis uses nationally-representative data from a two-generation study to assess the relative effects of family instability and mobility on the self-reported problem behavior of adolescents who were 12-17years old in 2006. Residential and school mobility only minimally attenuate the association of family structure changes with behavior problems for younger girls and older adolescents. Exposure to peer pressure has a larger attenuating effect. We conclude that although mobility often co-occurs with family structure change, it has independent effects on problem behavior. PMID:23146606

Fomby, Paula; Sennott, Christie A

2013-01-01

346

A systematic review of oral health behavior research in american adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

Despite improvements in prevention, oral diseases are a problem among adolescents, linked to poor health outcomes and poor school performance. Little is known about adolescent oral health behavior. This systematic review describes factors that influence oral health behavior in adolescents. Inclusion criteria for the literature search were American children aged 12-19 and research on oral health behavior. Articles (n = 353) were retrieved, eight met the inclusion criteria, and of these, six were descriptive and two were experimental studies. The matrix method, critical appraisal, and content analysis produced themes across the studies. Participants were primarily African Americans and Hispanics of both genders, of lower socioeconomic status, aged 12-19. Findings suggest that ethnicity, race, and gender may influence oral health behavior in adolescents and that interventions have an effect. Research is needed to explore what other factors may influence oral health behavior in adolescents, long-term health outcomes, and school performance. PMID:25063680

Calderon, Susana J; Mallory, Caroline

2014-12-01

347

Parent-child communication and adolescent sexual behavior.  

Science.gov (United States)

Data collected over a two-year period from more than 500 teenagers and their mothers indicate that neither parental attitudes toward premarital sex nor parent-child communication about sex and contraception appear to affect teenagers' subsequent sexual and contraceptive behavior. Teenagers are often ignorant of their parents' attitudes toward sex-related issues, and they and their parents often contradict one another in describing the kinds of sex-related conversations they have had. In only two cases was a significant relationship found between communication and adolescent behavior: Girls whose mothers reported that they had discussed sex with their daughters were less likely to subsequently initiate coitus; and girls who reported that their mothers had discussed birth control with them were more likely to use effective contraceptives. However, the former association disappeared when it was the daughters who reported the communication, and the latter disappeared when it was the mothers who reported it. PMID:3842808

Newcomer, S F; Udry, J R

1985-01-01

348

Investigation of Self-injurious Behavior in Adolescents in Terms of Risk-taking Behavior and Self-esteem  

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The purpose of this study is to examine self-injurious behavior (SIB) in terms of risk-taking behavior and self-esteem. The study group was composed of 329 female and 402 male high school students – 731 in total – who were randomly selected and studying in various high schools in Trabzon (in Turkey). 270 of 731 adolescents were identified to have SIB behavior. 182 of these adolescents were male, 88 of them were female. The Inventory of Statements About Self-injury, The Adolescent Risk-Tak...

Oktan, Vesile Karadeniz Teknik U?niversitesi

2014-01-01

349

Co-occurrence of risk behaviors among Spanish adolescents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This work examines the co-occurrence of risk behaviors among Spanish adolescents. The analyzed behaviors were sexual activity, the use of alcohol and other drugs, violent conduct and behaviors related to driving mopeds or scooters. The sample consisted of 4,091 adolescents between the ages of 13 to 18, all of them enrolled in one of the four compulsory years of secondary education, the approximate equivalents of the 7th to 10th grades in the US educational system. Cluster analysis indicates that there are four risk profiles, one of which is the profile with the greatest risk and the highest co-occurrence of risk behaviors. This group represents 13% of the sample and is noteworthy for using illegal drugs, driving under the influence of drugs and other activities carried out under the influence of alcohol. Differences have been found among the various profiles according to sociodemographic characteristics such as sex, grade, perception of the family’s economic situation and ethnicity. The findings are discussed and some suggestions are given for prevention intervention.

Este trabajo examina la concurrencia de comportamientos de riesgo en adolescentes españoles. Los comportamientos analizados fueron la actividad sexual, el consumo de alcohol y otras drogas, conductas violentas y comportamientos en la conducción de ciclomotores o motocicletas. La muestra incluye 4.091 adolescentes de 13 a 18 años, perteneciente a educación secundaria obligatoria. Los resultados obtenidos muestran cuatro perfiles de riesgo, siendo uno de ellos el perfil de más alto riesgo y concurrencia de comportamientos arriesgados. Este grupo supone el 13% en el que destacan las conductas de consumo de drogas lícitas, conducir bajo los efectos de droga y otras conductas realizadas bajo los efectos del alcohol. Se encuentran diferencias entre estos perfiles y las características sociodemográficas como el sexo, el curso, la percepción sobre la economía familiar y la etnicidad. Se discuten los resultados obtenidos y se ofrece algunas sugerencias para la prevención.

Meneses, Carmen

2012-09-01

350

Trajectories of Indonesian adolescents' religiosity, problem behavior, and friends' religiosity: covariation and sequences.  

Science.gov (United States)

Changes in religiosity, problem behavior, and their friends' religiosity over a 2-year period were assessed in a sample of five hundred and fifty-nine 15-year-old Indonesian Muslim adolescents. Adolescents self-reported their religiosity, problem behavior, and friendships; the religiosity of mutual friends came from friends' self-reports. A parallel process analysis of growth curves showed that adolescents' religiosity trajectories covaried with both problem behavior and friends' religiosity. Using a cross-lagged model in which prior levels were controlled, religiosity at 10th and 11th grades predicted friends' religiosity 1 year later, suggesting that adolescents select friends of similar religiosity. This study provides evidence that religion is intertwined with other aspects of adolescent development and illustrates the importance of contextualizing adolescent religiosity within an ecological framework. PMID:24673260

French, Doran C; Christ, Sharon; Lu, Ting; Purwono, Urip

2014-01-01

351

Early childhood television viewing and adolescent behavior: the recontact study.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this Monograph, we report the follow-up of 570 adolescents who had been studied as preschoolers in one of two separate investigations of television use. The primary goal of the study was to determine the long-term relations between preschool television viewing and adolescent achievement, behavior, and attitudes. Using a telephone interview and high school transcripts, we assessed adolescent media use; grades in English, science, and math; leisure reading; creativity; aggression; participation in extracurricular activities; use of alcohol and cigarettes; and self-image. In each domain, we tested theories emphasizing the causal role of television content (e.g., social learning, information processing) as contrasted with those theories positing effects of television as a medium, irrespective of content (e.g., time displacement, pacing, interference with language). The results provided much stronger support for content-based hypotheses than for theories emphasizing television as a medium; moreover, the patterns differed for boys and girls. Viewing educational programs as preschoolers was associated with higher grades, reading more books, placing more value on achievement, greater creativity, and less aggression. These associations were more consistent for boys than for girls. By contrast, the girls who were more frequent preschool viewers of violent programs had lower grades than those who were infrequent viewers. These associations held true after taking into account family background, other categories of preschool viewing, and adolescent media use. One hypothesis accounting for the sex differences is that early experiences, such as television viewing, have greater effects when they counteract normative developmental trends and predominant sex-typed socialization influences than when they reinforce them. Adolescents in the study used both television and print media to support ongoing interests. Television content (e.g., entertainment, sports, or world events) predicted extracurricular activities, role models, and body image. The only evidence for possible effects of television as a medium was the positive relation of total viewing to obesity for girls. The medium of television is not homogeneous or monolithic, and content viewed is more important than raw amount. The medium is not the message: The message is. PMID:11326591

Anderson, D R; Huston, A C; Schmitt, K L; Linebarger, D L; Wright, J C

2001-01-01

352

Cognitive-behavioral treatment for depression in adolescents  

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The goal of this article is to briefly review and summarize the rationale and research support for cognitivebehavioral therapy (CBT) as a treatment for depressed adolescents. A primary focus of the paper is on our group CBT treatment for adolescent depression, entitled “The Adolescent Coping with Depression Course”. In addition, initial findings from a large, recently-completed study contrasting individual CBT with fluoxetine for depressed adolescents (Treatment of Adolescents...

Paul Rohde

2005-01-01

353

Effects of voluntary alcohol intake on risk preference and behavioral flexibility during rat adolescence.  

Science.gov (United States)

Alcohol use is common in adolescence, with a large portion of intake occurring during episodes of binging. This pattern of alcohol consumption coincides with a critical period for neurocognitive development and may impact decision-making and reward processing. Prior studies have demonstrated alterations in adult decision-making following adolescent usage, but it remains to be seen if these alterations exist in adolescence, or are latent until adulthood. Here, using a translational model of voluntary binge alcohol consumption in adolescents, we assess the impact of alcohol intake on risk preference and behavioral flexibility during adolescence. During adolescence (postnatal day 30-50), rats were given 1-hour access to either a 10% alcohol gelatin mixture (EtOH) or a calorie equivalent gelatin (Control) at the onset of the dark cycle. EtOH consuming rats were classified as either High or Low consumers based on intake levels. Adolescent rats underwent behavioral testing once a day, with one group performing a risk preference task, and a second group performing a reversal-learning task during the 20-day period of gelatin access. EtOH-High rats showed increases in risk preference compared to Control rats, but not EtOH-Low animals. However, adolescent rats did a poor job of matching their behavior to optimize outcomes, suggesting that adolescents may adopt a response bias. In addition, adolescent ethanol exposure did not affect the animals' ability to flexibly adapt behavior to changing reward contingencies during reversal learning. These data support the view that adolescent alcohol consumption can have short-term detrimental effects on risk-taking when examined during adolescence, which does not seem to be attributable to an inability to flexibly encode reward contingencies on behavioral responses. PMID:25007338

McMurray, Matthew S; Amodeo, Leslie R; Roitman, Jamie D

2014-01-01

354

Opinions of Female Juvenile Delinquents on Communication, Learning and Violence  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to survey the opinions of female juvenile delinquents residing in a correctional center about the role of teachers and schools in serving students involved in violence. The term violence referred to behaviors and actions including threats or intentional harm to individuals or property (Van Hasselt & Hersen, 1999). A…

Sanger, Dixie; Spilker, Anna; Wiliiams, Nicole; Belau, Don

2007-01-01

355

Personal values and involvement in problem behaviors among Bahamian early adolescents: a cross-sectional study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies, particularly in developing countries, have explored the relationship between adolescents and parental values with adolescent problem behaviors. The objectives of the study are to (1 describe adolescents' personal values, their problem behaviors, and the relationships thereof according to gender and (2 examine the relationship between parental values, adolescent values, and adolescents' problem behaviors among sixth-grade students and one of their parents. Methods The data used in these analyses were from the baseline assessment of a school-based HIV risk reduction intervention being conducted and evaluated among sixth grade students and one of their parents across 9 elementary schools in The Bahamas. Personal values were measured by the Portrait Values Questionnaire (PVQ. Seven reported problem behaviors were queried from the students, which included physical fight with a friend, drank alcohol, beer, or wine, smoked a cigarette, pushed or carried any drugs, carried a gun, knife, screwdriver or cutlass to use as a weapon, had sex and used marijuana or other illicit drugs over the past 6 months. Multilevel modeling for binary data was performed to estimate the associations between adolescent and parental values and adolescent problem behaviors. Results Among 785 students, 47% of the students reported at least one problem behavior. More boys (54% reported having one or more problem behaviors than girls (41%, p Conclusion In designing interventions for reducing adolescents' problem behaviors, it may be important to understand the values associated with specific problem behaviors. Further exploration regarding lack of association between adolescent and parental values and problem behaviors is needed.

Li Xiaoming

2007-07-01

356

Inter-relationships between health risk behaviors in adolescents  

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Full Text Available The elevated proportion of adolescents with multiple risk factors for cardiovascular diseases suggests that there are strict relationships between several different types of health risk behavior that predispose towards the emergence of these factors. The objective of the present study was to analyze possible relationships between health risk behaviors in adolescent schoolchildren from the city of João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. The study sample comprised 2,768 adolescent secondary schoolchildren (1,222 boys and 1,546 girls, aged 14 to 18 years. The following factors were analyzed: i sociodemographic data: sex, age, economic class and parents’ educational level; ii health risk behaviors: physical inactivity ( ABSTRACT A elevada proporção de adolescentes com fatores de risco para as doenças cardiovasculares, de forma agregada, sugere uma relação estreita entre diversos comportamentos de risco à saúde que predispõem ao desencadeamento desses fatores. O objetivo do presente estudo foi analisar as possíveis associações entre comportamentos de risco à saúde em adolescentes escolares da cidade de João Pessoa - PB. A amostra consistiu de 2.768 adolescentes escolares do ensino médio (1.222 rapazes e 1.546 moças, de 14 a 18 anos de idade. Foram analisados os seguintes aspectos: i sociodemográfi cos: sexo, idade, classe econômica e escolaridade dos pais; ii comportamentos de risco à saúde: inatividade física (<37kcal/kg/dia, baixa freqüência de consumo de frutas e verduras (<5dias/semana, fumo e bebidas alcoólicas (?1vez/semana. A inatividade física se associou positivamente com a baixa freqüência de consumo de frutas (RP=1,10; IC95%=1,01-1,19 e verduras (RP=1,16; IC95%=1,07-1,26. A probabilidade de apresentar baixa freqüência de consumo de frutas foi aproximadamente duas vezes mais elevada (RP=1,89; IC95%=1,70-2,10 nos adolescentes que referiam consumir verduras <5dias/semana. Consumir bebidas alcoólicas aumentava em 15 vezes (RP=15,0; IC95%= 6,7-33,7 a chance de um adolescente ser fumante. Os comportamentos de risco à saúde se mostraram estreitamente associados, o que reforça a necessidade dos programas de promoção da saúde intervirem sobre diversos comportamentos de risco de forma simultânea.

Daniele Batista Martins Barbosa

2007-09-01

357

Gender-specific influence of health behaviors on academic performance in Spanish adolescents; the AFINOS study  

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Introduction: New paradigms based on the multifactorial etiology of chronic diseases and behavioral outcomes suggest that a combination of health behaviors may have more impact on the outcome of interest than any single factor. Objective: To examine the independent and combined influence of four health behaviors on school performance in Spanish adolescents. Methods: A total of 1825 Spanish adolescents reported their grades in Language and Literature (LL) and Math. Body mass index, family stru...

Marti?nez Go?mez, D.; Veiga, Oscar; Go?mez Marti?nez, Sonia; Zapatera, Bele?n; Marti?nez-herna?ndez, D.; Calle, M. E.; Marcos, Ascensio?n

2012-01-01

358

Fat Avoidance and Replacement Behaviors Predict Low-Fat Intake Among Urban, African American Adolescents  

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Using measures of behaviors shown to predict low-fat intake in previous research, this study examined whether the behaviors would predict low-fat intake among urban, African American adolescents. Recruited through youth services agencies in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, participants were 399 African American adolescents (67% female) with a mean age of 13.09 years (range, 10–15 years). Fat-related dietary behaviors were measured using items that were adapted from the Food Habits Questionnaire....

Noia, Jennifer Di; Contento, Isobel R.; Schinke, Steven P.

2008-01-01

359

Characteristics of Sexual Abuse in Childhood and Adolescence Influence Sexual Risk Behavior in Adulthood  

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Childhood and adolescent sexual abuse has been associated with subsequent (adult) sexual risk behavior, but the effects of force and type of sexual abuse on sexual behavior outcomes have been less well-studied. The present study investigated the associations between sexual abuse characteristics and later sexual risk behavior, and explored whether gender of the child/adolescent moderated these relations. Patients attending an STD clinic completed a computerized survey that assessed history of ...

Senn, Theresa E.; Carey, Michael P.; Vanable, Peter A.; Coury-doniger, Patricia; Urban, Marguerite

2007-01-01

360

Behavior and Adaptive Functioning in Adolescents with Down Syndrome: Specifying Targets for Intervention  

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Adolescents with Down syndrome can demonstrate increased behavior problems as compared with typical peers. Few studies have explored whether behavior impacts adaptive functioning. Caregiver report from the Behavioral Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition (BASC-2; Reynolds & Kamphaus, 2004) and the Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL;…

Jacola, Lisa M.; Hickey, Francis; Howe, Steven R.; Esbensen, Anna; Shear, Paula K.

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
361

Laboratory and self-report assessments of impulsive behavior in adolescent daily smokers and nonsmokers.  

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This research compared adolescent daily smokers (n=25) and nonsmokers (n=26) on different measures of impulsivity. Assessments included question-based measures of delay (DDQ) and probability (PDQ) discounting, a measure of behavioral disinhibition (go-stop task), and a self-report measure of impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-Adolescent). Adolescent smokers were more impulsive on the DDQ and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale--Adolescent but not on the PDQ or the go-stop task. However, there was a significant interaction between smoking status and gender on the go-stop task, with male smokers performing less impulsively on this measure than male nonsmokers--an effect not observed with the female adolescents. These findings indicate that adolescents who smoke cigarettes are more impulsive with respect to some, but not all, types of impulsivity than are adolescents who do not smoke. PMID:17563213

Reynolds, Brady; Patak, Michele; Shroff, Palak; Penfold, Robert B; Melanko, Shane; Duhig, Amy M

2007-06-01

362

Using classification trees to profile adolescent smoking behaviors.  

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The purpose of this study was to explore the interactive nature of various predictor variables in profiling adolescent smoking behaviors characterized by intention to smoke, current, situational, and established smoking using classification trees. The data (n = 3610) were obtained from cross-sectional telephone surveys of the Florida Anti-Tobacco Media Evaluation Program. Three classification trees were constructed, namely, intention versus no intention to smoke among non-smokers, current smokers versus non-smokers, and established versus situational smokers. The tree model for the intention model revealed that social and health risks are important in the context of peer smoking. Certain variables such as peer smoking and alcohol consumption retained their relative importance across the tree classifiers demonstrating that smoking intention may be predictable using some of the same variables as in current or more dependent smoking. PMID:16677775

Kitsantas, Panagiota; Moore, Trent W; Sly, David F

2007-01-01

363

Does behavioral intention predict physical activity behaviors related to adolescent obesity?  

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Full Text Available Objective: According to the Theory of Planned Behavior, the single best predictor of a person’s behavior is their intention to perform that behavior, Predictive factors of intention include attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control. The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which behavioral intention predicted physical activity (PA and sedentary behaviors linked to childhood obesity. Design: A convenience sample of 318 middle school students were administered a129-item valid and reliable instrument. Multiple regression was used to establish predictors for each behavior. Results: The mean BI scores for participating in less than two hours of screen time per day (M = 12.31, SD = 5.42 and at least 60 minutes of PA per day (M = 12.84, SD = 7.18 denoted a moderate intent to participate in the behavior. However, 25% and 33% of students indicated a weak intention to participate in the respective behaviors. Regression showed BI was predictive for screen time among overweight students, and for participation in PA among all students, (p < 0.05. Conclusion: BI was linked to PA and sedentary behaviors related to obesity prevention in adolescents. On average, students reported moderate intention for each of the behaviors; however, weak intentions existed in over 25% of students, and should be considered when evaluating overall likelihood of participating in the relevant behavior. Students who were overweight or obese had lower intentions to participate in less screen time or more PA, which is important to consider when framing behavior change messages for this population.

Melinda J. Ickes

2012-07-01

364

Helping Depressed Adolescents: A Menu of Cognitive-Behavioral Procedures for Primary Care  

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Depression among adolescents has received recognition as a significant psychiatric problem that requires prompt intervention. This article will help primary care providers to understand the significance of adolescent depression, recognize its prevalence in primary care, cite the evidence supporting cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) as a treatment for depressed adolescents, recognize the challenges of using CBT in primary care, and use 7 different CBT approaches with their patients. Psychiatr...

Clabby, John F.

2006-01-01

365

Physical activity and sedentary behavior among adolescents in rural South Africa : levels, patterns and correlates  

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Background: Physical inactivity is increasing among children and adolescents and may be contributing to the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity. This study examines physical activity and sedentary behavior patterns, and explores associations with individual, maternal, household, and community factors amongst rural South African adolescents. Methods: In 2009, 381 subjects, stratified by ages 11-12-years and 14-15-years, were randomly selected from 3511 children and adolescents who ...

Micklesfield, Lisa K.; Pedro, Titilola M.; Kahn, Kathleen; Kinsman, John; Pettifor, John M.; Tollman, Stephen; Norris, Shane A.

2014-01-01

366

Obesity-related behaviors of Malaysian adolescents: a sample from Kajang district of Selangor state  

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This study aims to determine the association between obesity-related behaviors (dietary practices, physical activity and body image) and body weight status among adolescents. A total of 382 adolescents (187 males and 195 females) aged 13 to 15 years in Kajang, Selangor participated in this study. Majority of the respondents were Malays (56.0%), followed by Chinese (30.1%) and Indians (13.9%). Dietary practices, physical activity and body image of the adolescents were assessed through the eati...

Rezali, Fara Wahida; Chin, Yit Siew; Mohd Yusof, Barakatun Nisak

2012-01-01

367

Adolescents' social status goals: relationships to social status insecurity, aggression, and prosocial behavior.  

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Peer status is an important aspect of adolescents' social lives and is pursued actively by them. Although extensive research has examined how social behaviors are related to peer status (e.g., social preference, popularity), little attention has been given to adolescents' social goals to obtain a desired peer status. Thus, this study examined two types of social status goals, popularity goal and social preference goal, and their relationships to social status insecurity and social behaviors among 405 ethnically diverse early adolescents (267 girls; M age = 12.92 years; age range = 11-15 years). After accounting for adolescents' attained peer statuses (popularity and social preference), both social status goals were related distinctly to aggressive and prosocial behaviors as measured by self reports and peer nominations. Specifically, higher endorsement of the popularity goal was related to more self-reported relational aggression, but less peer-nominated prosocial behavior. In contrast, higher endorsement of the social preference goal was linked to less self-reported overt and relational aggression, but more self-reported and peer-nominated prosocial behavior. In addition, this study reveals that adolescents' social status insecurity was related positively to both social status goals and had an indirect effect on adolescents' social behaviors through the mediation of popularity goal endorsement. There were variations in goal endorsement as shown by groups of adolescents endorsing different levels of each goal. The group comparison results on social behaviors were largely consistent with the correlational findings. This study provides new insights into adolescents' social cognitive processes about peer status and the implications of the two social status goals on adolescents' behavioral development. PMID:23526208

Li, Yan; Wright, Michelle F

2014-01-01

368

Does neighborhood social capital buffer the effects of maternal depression on adolescent behavior problems?  

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Neighborhood characteristics have been shown to impact child well-being. However, it remains unclear how these factors combine with family characteristics to influence child development. The current study helps develop that understanding by investigating how neighborhoods directly impact child and adolescent behavior problems as well as moderate the influence of family characteristics on behavior. Using multilevel linear models, we examined the relationship among neighborhood conditions (poverty and social capital) and maternal depression on child and adolescent behavior problems. The sample included 741 children, age 5–11, and 564 adolescents, age 12–17. Outcomes were internalizing (e.g. anxious/depressed) and externalizing (e.g. aggressive/hyperactive) behavior problems. Neighborhood poverty and maternal depression were both positively associated with behavior problems for children and adolescents. However, while neighborhood social capital was not directly associated with behavior problems, the interaction of social capital and maternal depression was significantly related to behavior problems for adolescents. This interaction showed that living in neighborhoods with higher levels of social capital attenuated the relationship between maternal depression and adolescent behavior problems and confirmed the expectation that raising healthy well-adjusted children depends not only on the family, but also the context in which the family lives. PMID:24659390

Delany-Brumsey, Ayesha; Mays, Vickie M; Cochran, Susan D

2014-06-01

369

Family Sources of Sexual Health Information, Primary Messages, and Sexual Behavior of At-Risk, Urban Adolescents  

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Background: Sources of sexual health information exert strong influence on adolescents' sexual behavior. Purpose: The current study was undertaken to understand how family serve as sexual information sources, the messages adolescents recall from family, and how family learning experiences affect sexual behavior among at-risk adolescents. Methods:…

Rosengard, Cynthia; Tannis, Candace; Dove, David C.; van den Berg, Jacob J.; Lopez, Rosalie; Stein, L. A. R.; Morrow, Kathleen M.

2012-01-01

370

Conducta suicida adolescencia y riesgo / Suicidal behavior, adolescent, and risk  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Introducción: en la actualidad el suicidio constituye la tercera causa de muerte a nivel mundial en los adolescentes entre 11 y 18 años y en Cuba ocupa la tercera causa de muerte en las edades de 10 a 19 años. Este evento ocurre con mayor frecuencia en los varones, sin distinción de color de la piel [...] ni clase social. Cuando un adolescente se suicida o intenta suicidarse, todo el mundo se ve afectado, familiares, amigos, compañeros, vecinos y a veces personas que ni siquiera conocían o conocen al adolescente. El adolescente que intenta suicidarse puede experimentar sentimientos de dolor, confusión y culpa. Objetivo: profundizar en la problemática de la conducta suicida en los adolescentes por ser una etapa de vulnerabilidad y riesgo. Método: se realizó una revisión bibliográfica donde se consultaron las bases de datos incluidas en los servicios LILACS, EBSCO e HINARI, y se alcanzó muy buena cobertura, tanto en Cuba, en Latinoamérica y el Caribe, como en el resto del mundo. Desarrollo: se exponen las características generales de los adolescentes sanos y factores de riesgo que los hacen vulnerables a tener una conducta suicida, lo cual permite una reflexión sobre el tema para contribuir a su prevención, especialmente desde el nivel primario de atención de salud. Conclusiones: la conducta suicida en los adolescentes constituye un serio problema de salud que debe ser afrontado por los diferentes elementos de la sociedad ya que intervienen factores individuales de la familia y de la comunidad. Abstract in english Introduction: nowadays suicide is the third leading cause of death worldwide among adolescents of 11 and 18 years of age. In Cuba, it occupies the third leading cause of death for ages 10 to 19. This event occurs most frequently in men, regardless of skin color or social class. When a teenager commi [...] ts suicide or attempts suicide, everyone is affected, relatives, friends, colleagues, neighbors, and sometimes even people who met or have met him or her. The teenager who attempts suicide may experience feelings of grief, confusion, and guilt. Objective: to deepen the problem of suicidal behavior in adolescents since it is a stage of vulnerability and risk. Method: a literature review was conducted in databases as LILACS, HINARI and EBSCO. Very good coverage was achieved, in Cuba, Latin America, the Caribbean, as in the rest of the world. Development: general characteristics of healthy adolescents and risk factors making them vulnerable of having suicidal behavior are discussed. These features allow reflection on the subject to contribute to prevention, especially from primary health care. Conclusions: suicidal behavior in adolescents is a serious health problem that must be addressed by the various elements of society, individual factors, involved family, and community.

Alba, Cortés Alfaro.

371

Conducta suicida adolescencia y riesgo / Suicidal behavior, adolescent, and risk  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Introducción: en la actualidad el suicidio constituye la tercera causa de muerte a nivel mundial en los adolescentes entre 11 y 18 años y en Cuba ocupa la tercera causa de muerte en las edades de 10 a 19 años. Este evento ocurre con mayor frecuencia en los varones, sin distinción de color de la piel [...] ni clase social. Cuando un adolescente se suicida o intenta suicidarse, todo el mundo se ve afectado, familiares, amigos, compañeros, vecinos y a veces personas que ni siquiera conocían o conocen al adolescente. El adolescente que intenta suicidarse puede experimentar sentimientos de dolor, confusión y culpa. Objetivo: profundizar en la problemática de la conducta suicida en los adolescentes por ser una etapa de vulnerabilidad y riesgo. Método: se realizó una revisión bibliográfica donde se consultaron las bases de datos incluidas en los servicios LILACS, EBSCO e HINARI, y se alcanzó muy buena cobertura, tanto en Cuba, en Latinoamérica y el Caribe, como en el resto del mundo. Desarrollo: se exponen las características generales de los adolescentes sanos y factores de riesgo que los hacen vulnerables a tener una conducta suicida, lo cual permite una reflexión sobre el tema para contribuir a su prevención, especialmente desde el nivel primario de atención de salud. Conclusiones: la conducta suicida en los adolescentes constituye un serio problema de salud que debe ser afrontado por los diferentes elementos de la sociedad ya que intervienen factores individuales de la familia y de la comunidad. Abstract in english Introduction: nowadays suicide is the third leading cause of death worldwide among adolescents of 11 and 18 years of age. In Cuba, it occupies the third leading cause of death for ages 10 to 19. This event occurs most frequently in men, regardless of skin color or social class. When a teenager commi [...] ts suicide or attempts suicide, everyone is affected, relatives, friends, colleagues, neighbors, and sometimes even people who met or have met him or her. The teenager who attempts suicide may experience feelings of grief, confusion, and guilt. Objective: to deepen the problem of suicidal behavior in adolescents since it is a stage of vulnerability and risk. Method: a literature review was conducted in databases as LILACS, HINARI and EBSCO. Very good coverage was achieved, in Cuba, Latin America, the Caribbean, as in the rest of the world. Development: general characteristics of healthy adolescents and risk factors making them vulnerable of having suicidal behavior are discussed. These features allow reflection on the subject to contribute to prevention, especially from primary health care. Conclusions: suicidal behavior in adolescents is a serious health problem that must be addressed by the various elements of society, individual factors, involved family, and community.

Alba, Cortés Alfaro.

2014-03-01

372

The Effects of Violent Video Game Habits on Adolescent Hostility, Aggressive Behaviors, and School Performance  

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Video games have become one of the favorite activities of American children. A growing body of research is linking violent video game play to aggressive cognitions, attitudes, and behaviors. The first goal of this study was to document the video games habits of adolescents and the level of parental monitoring of adolescent video game use. The…

Gentile, Douglas, A.; Lynch, Paul, J.; Linder, Jennifer Ruh; Walsh, David, A.

2004-01-01

373

Implementing Dialectical Behavior Therapy with Adolescents and Their Families in a Community Outpatient Clinic  

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Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an empirically supported treatment for adult women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD), has been increasingly adapted for use with adolescents across a variety of settings. This article describes a community-based application of DBT principles and strategies for adolescents and their families.…

Woodberry, Kristen A.; Popenoe, Ellen J.

2008-01-01

374

Participants' Experiences of an Early Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Adolescents with Symptoms of Depression  

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Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has been documented to be effective in treating depression in adolescence, but there is great variability in the clinical outcome of CBT trials. This may in part be due to variations in the content of, and emphasis on different CBT components. Moreover, little is known about adolescents' subjective experiences of…

Bru, Lene; Solholm, Roar; Idsoe, Thormod

2013-01-01

375

Specific Coping Behaviors in Relation to Adolescent Depression and Suicidal Ideation  

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The coping strategies used by adolescents to deal with stress may have implications for the development of depression and suicidal ideation. This study examined coping categories and specific coping behaviors used by adolescents to assess the relation of coping to depression and suicidal ideation. In hierarchical regression models, the specific…

Horwitz, Adam G.; Hill, Ryan M.; King, Cheryl A.

2011-01-01

376

The Relationship between Parent-Child Conflict and Adolescent Antisocial Behavior: Confirming Shared Environmental Mediation  

Science.gov (United States)

Prior studies have indicated that the relationship between parent-child conflict and adolescent antisocial behavior is at least partially shared environmental in origin. However, all available research on this topic (to our knowledge) relies exclusively on parent and/or adolescent informant-reports, both of which are subject to various forms of…

Klahr, Ashlea M.; Rueter, Martha A.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.; Burt, S. Alexandra

2011-01-01

377

A Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Sertraline, and Their Combination for Adolescent Depression  

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Objective: To evaluate cognitive-behavioral therapy, antidepressant medication alone, and combined CBT and antidepressant medication in the treatment of depressive disorders in adolescents. Method: Seventy-three adolescents (ages 12-18 years) with a primary diagnosis of DSM-IV major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, or depressive disorder…

Melvin, Glenn A.; Tonge, Bruce J.; King, Neville J.; Heyne, David; Gordon, Michael S.; Klimkeit, Ester

2006-01-01

378

From Early to Late Adolescence: American Indian Youths' Behavioral Trajectories and Their Major Influences  

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Objective: This article identifies behavioral trajectories of American Indian adolescents and examines their predictors. Method: A total of 401 urban and reservation American Indian adolescents were interviewed yearly from 2001 to 2004 (with 341 youths, or 85%, retained to 2004, and 385 completing at least two interviews). The Youth Self-Report…

Stiffman, Arlene Rubin; Alexander-Eitzman, Benjamin; Silmere, Hiie; Osborne, Victoria; Brown, Eddie

2007-01-01

379

Cyber Bullying and Physical Bullying in Adolescent Suicide: The Role of Violent Behavior and Substance Use  

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The impact of bullying in all forms on the mental health and safety of adolescents is of particular interest, especially in the wake of new methods of bullying that victimize youths through technology. The current study examined the relationship between victimization from both physical and cyber bullying and adolescent suicidal behavior. Violent…

Litwiller, Brett J.; Brausch, Amy M.

2013-01-01

380

The Effects of Family Conflict on Adolescents' Dating Behaviors and Attitudes toward Marriage: A Longitudinal Study.  

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This study examined the effects of past and concurrent family conflict on adolescents' attitudes toward marriage and behavior in dating relationships. Participants were 75 adolescents who were part of a 7-year project that began when they were in fifth grade. Over 95 percent of their families were of European-American origin, with diversity in…

VanNess-Knolls, Michelle L.; And Others

 
 
 
 
381

Alliance and Outcome in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression  

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This study examined predictive relations between therapeutic alliance and treatment outcomes in manual-guided, cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescent depression. Fifty-four adolescents met criteria for a depressive disorder and were treated in school-based clinics. Alliance was measured after the third session from both therapist and…

Shirk, Stephen R.; Gudmundsen, Gretchen; Kaplinski, Heather Crisp; McMakin, Dana L.

2008-01-01

382

Parent Attachment, School Commitment, and Problem Behavior Trajectories of Diverse Adolescents  

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The purpose of this study was to examine the growth trajectories from early to late adolescence of teacher ratings of students' behavior problems from 9th through 11th grade and student self-reports of alcohol use in a sample of predominately minority adolescents (n = 179, 90% African-American and/or Hispanic, 43% boys, 57% girls) in a large,…

Cavendish, Wendy; Nielsen, Amie L.; Montague, Marjorie

2012-01-01

383

Family Functioning, Identity, and Problem Behavior in Hispanic Immigrant Early Adolescents  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study investigated the role of identity in the relationship between family functioning and behavior problems in a sample of Hispanic immigrant early adolescents and their families. The sample consisted of 181 Hispanic immigrant adolescents (92 males, 89 females) and their participating caregivers (who were mostly mothers). Identity was…

Schwartz, Seth J.; Pantin, Hilda; Prado, Guillermo; Sullivan, Summer; Szapocznik, Jose

2005-01-01

384

Pilot Study of Community-Based Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Adolescents with Social Phobia.  

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Objective: A pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral group therapy program for adolescents with social phobia, simplified both in terms of time and labor intensity from a previously studied program (Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children and Adolescents) to be more appropriate for a community outpatient psychiatric…

Baer, Susan; Garland, E. Jane

2005-01-01

385

Race/Ethnic Differences in Effects of Family Instability on Adolescents' Risk Behavior  

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We used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 7,686) to determine whether racial and ethnic differences in socioeconomic stress and social protection explained group differences in the association between family structure instability and three risk behaviors for White, Black, and Mexican American adolescents:…

Fomby, Paula; Mollborn, Stefanie; Sennott, Christie A.

2010-01-01

386

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Pilot Study.  

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Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression in physically ill adolescents. Method: In an open trial, 11 adolescents (12-17 years) with inflammatory bowel disease and either major or minor depression underwent 12 sessions of a manual-based CBT enhanced by social skills, physical illness…

Szigethy, Eva; Whitton, Sarah W.; Levy-Warren, Anna; DeMaso, David Ray; Weisz, John; Beardslee, William R.

2004-01-01

387

School-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression: A Benchmarking Study  

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The current study evaluated cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for adolescent depression delivered in health clinics and counseling centers in four high schools. Outcomes were benchmarked to results from prior efficacy trials. Fifty adolescents diagnosed with depressive disorders were treated by eight doctoral-level psychologists who followed a…

Shirk, Stephen R.; Kaplinski, Heather; Gudmundsen, Gretchen

2009-01-01

388

Temperament Pathways to Childhood Disruptive Behavior and Adolescent Substance Abuse: Testing a Cascade Model  

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Temperament traits may increase risk for developmental psychopathology like Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and disruptive behaviors during childhood, as well as predisposing to substance abuse during adolescence. In the current study, a cascade model of trait pathways to adolescent substance abuse was examined. Component…

Martel, Michelle M.; Pierce, Laura; Nigg, Joel T.; Jester, Jennifer M.; Adams, Kenneth; Puttler, Leon I.; Buu, Anne; Fitzgerald, Hiram; Zucker, Robert A.

2009-01-01

389

Integrating Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Pharmacotherapy in the Treatment of Adolescent Depression  

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Recent evidence from the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) suggests that combining cognitive behavioral and pharmacological treatments holds the most promise for ameliorating depression among adolescents. This article describes lessons learned during the TADS trial about how to integrate these two treatments in the care of…

Ginsburg, Golda S.; Albano, Anne Marie; Findling, Robert L.; Kratochvil, Christopher; Walkup, John

2005-01-01

390

The Use of a Behavioral Parent Training Program for Parents of Adolescents  

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Adolescence can be a period of increased problem behavior, and parents often report this stage of development as being one of increased conflict with high levels of parenting-related stress and lower levels of confidence in parenting abilities. As a result, parents of adolescents seek out parenting information and support much more often than do…

Griffith, Annette K.

2010-01-01

391

A Longitudinal Analysis of Cumulative Risks, Cumulative Promotive Factors, and Adolescent Violent Behavior  

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This study examined the effects of cumulative risk and promotive factors on violent behavior across the high school years of adolescence in a sample of predominately African American urban adolescents (N = 750). Cumulative risk and promotive factor indices represented individual characteristics, and peer, parental, and familial influences. Using…

Stoddard, Sarah A.; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

2012-01-01

392

Developmental Trajectory of Sexual Risk Behaviors from Adolescence to Young Adulthood  

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This study examined the trajectories of sexual risk behaviors among adolescents from ages 15 to 23 and factors associated with those trajectories. The sample was 5,419 adolescents from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Using group-based trajectory modeling, five distinctive trajectory groups were identified. The High group had a high…

Huang, David Y. C.; Murphy, Debra A.; Hser, Yih-Ing

2012-01-01

393

Contextual and Intrapersonal Predictors of Adolescent Risky Sexual Behavior and Outcomes  

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The present study was designed to test a model of contextual and intrapersonal predictors of adolescent risky sexual behaviors and of sexually transmitted infection diagnoses. Using Waves I and II from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, the authors estimated a structural model in which intrapersonal factors such as…

Shneyderman, Yuliya; Schwartz, Seth J.

2013-01-01

394

Effects of Overweight on Risky Sexual Behavior of Adolescent Girls. NBER Working Paper No. 16172  

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We use data from The National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health to estimate effects of adolescent girls' overweight on their propensity to engage in risky sexual behavior. We estimate single equation, two-stage, and sibling fixed-effects models and find that overweight or obese teenage girls are more likely than their recommended-weight…

Averett, Susan; Corman, Hope; Reichman, Nancy

2010-01-01

395

The Developmental Association of Sexual Self-Concept with Sexual Behavior among Adolescent Women  

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Developing a sexual self-concept is an important developmental task of adolescence; however, little empirical evidence describes this development, nor how these changes are related to development in sexual behavior. Using longitudinal cohort data from adolescent women, we invoked latent growth curve analysis to: (1) examine reciprocal development…

Hensel, Devon J.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis; O'Sullivan, Lucia F.; Orr, Donald P.

2011-01-01

396

Adolescents' Perceptions of Parental Influences on Their Smoking Behavior: A Content Analysis  

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The purpose of this study was to describe adolescents' perceptions of parental influences on their smoking behavior. Thirty-five adolescents, 14 to 18 years old, provided narrative accounts of their smoking histories in semistructured interviews. Most of the participants recognized that their parents played an important role in shaping their…

Maggi, Stefania; Lovato, Chris Y.; Hill, Erin M.; Johnson, Joy L.; Ratner, Pamela A.; Shoveller, Jean A.

2014-01-01

397

Child Abuse and Aids-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior among Adolescents in Zambia  

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Objective: To research the correlation between physical and sexual abuse by family members and AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and behavior among urban and rural adolescents in Zambia. Sample: The sample comprises 3,360 adolescents, aged 10-19, from urban and rural Zambia; 2,160 of them attended school, while 1,200 of them did…

Slonim-Nevo, Vered; Mukuka, Lawrence

2007-01-01

398

Associations among Text Messaging, Academic Performance, and Sexual Behaviors of Adolescents  

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Background: Text messaging is an increasingly common mode of communication, especially among adolescents, and frequency of texting may be a measure of one's sociability. This study examined how text messaging ("texting") frequency and academic performance are associated with adolescent sexual behaviors. Methods: A cross-sectional…

Perry, Raymond C. W.; Braun, Rebecca A.; Cantu, Michelle; Dudovitz, Rebecca N.; Sheoran, Bhupendra; Chung, Paul J.

2014-01-01

399

Physical activity and sedentary behaviors associated factors in adolescents  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze factors associated with physical activity and sedentary behaviors in adolescents. The sample consisted of 1675 students (784 boys and 891 girls ranging in age from 11-17 years from Caxias do Sul, RS. A questionnaire was applied to identify physical activity level (PAL, 3-day recall andweekly hours of sedentary behavior. Low PAL was defined as energy expenditure less than 37 kcal/kg per day, and elevated sedentary behavior (ESB was defined as more than 14 h/week watching TV, playing video games or using a computer. Chi-square testresults indicated a higher prevalence of low PAL among girls (66.8%>43.2%, p84.0%, p=0.001. Using a Poisson hierarchical regression model, low PAL was associated with up to 4 persons living at home (PR=1.21, 95%CI: 1.00-1.46 and low maternal PAL (PR=1.23, 95%CI:1.00-1.53 among boys, and with age 15-17 years (PR=1.30, 95%CI: 1.18-1.44, up to 4 persons living at home (PR=1.17, 95%CI: 1.04-1.31, having a TV in the bedroom (PR=1.13, 95%CI: 1.02-1.25 and passive transport to school (PR=1.10, 95%CI: 1.00-1.22 among girls. In girls, ESB was associated with high parental educational level(PR=1.08, 95%CI: 1.01-1.16 and having a TV in the bedroom (PR=1.15, 95%CI: 1.08-1.22. The results suggest an association between socioeconomic measures and risk behaviors (low PAL and ESB. Knowledge about the factors associated with low PAL and ESB facilitates the implantation of more effective interventions in order to promote a more active lifestyle.

Daniel Giordani Vasques

2009-01-01

400

On early starters and late bloomers: the development of sexual behavior in adolescence across personality types.  

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Little is known about the relationship between personality and sexual development among mid-adolescents. In the current study, we used a person-centered approach to investigate the relation between personality types and the development of sexual behavior. We hypothesized that undercontrolling adolescents would engage in more advanced, casual, and risky sexual behavior compared to their resilient and overcontrolling peers. Data were used from 407 mid-adolescents (Mage = 14.5) followed across four measurement waves spanning 18 months. Results from latent class analyses (LCA) identified the three classical personality types: resilients, undercontrollers, and overcontrollers. Controlling for perceived pubertal timing and biological sex, latent growth curve analyses in Mplus showed that, at baseline, undercontrollers were more sexually experienced and engaged in more casual and risky sexual behavior than resilients and overcontrollers. Although initial levels of sexual behavior differed by personality types, over time increases in sexual behavior occurred at a similar rate across the types. Overall, the current study showed that undercontrolling adolescents are early sexual developers who engage in more advanced, casual, and risky sexual behavior than other adolescents. The implications of these findings for longer-term differences in sexual behavior between personality types in later adolescence are discussed. PMID:24007372

Baams, Laura; Overbeek, Geertjan; Dubas, Judith Semon; van Aken, Marcel A G

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
401

Association between socio-economic status and sexual behavior of adolescents  

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Full Text Available Introduction: Numerous studies have emphasized the importance of contextual factors as determinants of sexual behavior of adolescents. It has been found that lower socioeconomic status is associated with risky sexual behavior. Sexual behavior is individual but develops under strong influence of cultural and other influences. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of family’s socioeconomic status and risky sexual behavior of adolescents in Belgrade. Method. Self-administered questionnaire was used in secondary schools in Belgrade, and 1,782 adolescents attending first grade filled the questionnaire. For the analyses of predictors of risky sexual behavior, multiple logistic regression was used. Results. Parents’ occupations did not show significant association with any of analyzed behaviors. Adolescents who received weekly disposable money above average were 2.5 times more likely to ever have had sexual intercourse, and if sexually active were more likely to use contraception. Perceived family’s wealth was a significant predictor of ever having sex (OR=1.9; CI 1.2-2.8 and not using contraception (OR=4.3; CI 1.2-15.0. Conclusion. Socioeconomic status is associated with sexual behaviors of adolescents. Fifteen-year olds who perceive their families as wealthier are more likely to ever have had sex and not use any kind of contraception. Adolescents with higher weekly income are more likely to ever have had sex and use contraception than their counterpats with less weekly disposable money. .

Vukovi? Dejana S.

2007-01-01

402

Behavioral and neural correlates of loss aversion and risk avoidance in adolescents and adults.  

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Individuals are frequently faced with risky decisions involving the potential for both gain and loss. Exploring the role of both potential gains and potential losses in predicting risk taking is critical to understanding how adolescents and adults make the choice to engage in or avoid a real-life risk. This study aimed to examine the impact of potential losses as well as gains on adolescent decisions during risky choice in a laboratory task. Adolescent (n=18) and adult (n=16) participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a mixed gambles task, and completed questionnaires measuring real-world risk-taking behaviors. While potential loss had a significantly greater effect on choice than potential gain in both adolescents and adults and there were no behavioral group differences on the task, adolescents recruited significantly more frontostriatal circuitry than adults when choosing to reject a gamble. During risk-seeking behavior, adolescent activation in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) was negatively correlated with self-reported likelihood of risk taking. During risk-avoidant behavior, mPFC activation of in adults was negatively correlated with self-reported benefits of risk-taking. Taken together, these findings reflect different neural patterns during risk-taking and risk-avoidant behaviors in adolescents and adults. PMID:23245222

Barkley-Levenson, Emily E; Van Leijenhorst, Linda; Galván, Adriana

2013-01-01

403

Predicting adolescent perpetration in cyberbullying: an application of the theory of planned behavior.  

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This study aims to contribute to the research field on cyberbullying by offering a comprehensive theoretical framework that helps to predict adolescents' perpetration of cyberbullying. One thousand forty-two pupils from 12 to 18 years old in 30 different Belgian secondary schools participated in two surveys within a three-month interval. Structural equation modeling was used to test whether the overall model of theory of planned behavior (TPB) helps to predict adolescents' self-reported perpetration in cyberbullying. Overall, the present study provides strong support for the theoretical utility of the TPB in cyberbullying research. The model accounted for 44.8% of the variance in adolescents' behavioral intention to cyberbully and 33.2% of the variance in self-reported cyberbullying perpetration. We found a strong positive relationship between adolescents' attitude towards cyberbullying and their behavioral intention to perpetrate it. Perceived behavioral control and subjective norm, the other two TPB-constructs, were also significant albeit relatively less important predictors of adolescents' intention to cyberbully. The finding that adolescents' attitude is the most important predictor of perpetration, entails that prevention and intervention strategies should aim at reducing the perceived acceptability of cyberbullying among adolescents by converting neutral or positive attitudes towards this anti-social behavior into negative evaluations. PMID:23079360

Heirman, Wannes; Walrave, Michel

2012-11-01

404

A Multimodal Behavioral Intervention to Impact Adherence and Risk Behavior among Perinatally and Behaviorally HIV-Infected Youth: Description, Delivery, and Receptivity of Adolescent Impact  

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Secondary prevention programs are needed to help HIV-positive youth reduce risk behavior and improve adherence to HIV medications. This article provides an overview of Adolescent Impact, a secondary HIV prevention intervention, including its description, delivery, and receptivity among the two unique groups of participants. Adolescent Impact, a…

Chandwani, Sulachni; Abramowitz, Susan; Koenig, Linda J.; Barnes, William; D'Angelo, Lawrence

2011-01-01

405

The Impact of Multiple Types of Child Maltreatment on Subsequent Risk Behaviors among Women during the Transition from Adolescence to Young Adulthood  

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The purpose of this study was to investigate how different types of child maltreatment, independently and collectively, impact a wide range of risk behaviors that fall into three domains: sexual risk behaviors, delinquency, and suicidality. Cumulative classification and Expanded Hierarchical Type (EHT) classification approaches were used to…

Hahm, Hyeouk Chris; Lee, Yoona; Ozonoff, Al; Van Wert, Michael J.

2010-01-01

406

Using Theory of Planned Behavior to Predict Healthy Eating among Danish Adolescents  

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Purpose: The purpose of the study was to apply the theory of planned behavior to predict Danish adolescents' behavioral intention for healthy eating. Design/methodology/approach: A cluster sample survey of 410 students aged 11 to 16 years studying in Grade 6 to Grade 10 was conducted in Denmark. Findings: Perceived behavioral control followed by…

Gronhoj, Alice; Bech-Larsen, Tino; Chan, Kara; Tsang, Lennon

2013-01-01

407

Adolescent Risk Behaviors: Studying Typical and Atypical Individuals via Multidimensional Scaling Profile Analysis  

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Within the framework of problem behavior theory, the purpose of this study was to examine risk behavior profiles of typical and atypical adolescents and the differential outcomes of well-beings for these individuals in the United States. Based on the data from the survey of Health Behavior of School-Aged Children by World Health Organization,…

Dong, Yang; Ding, Cody

2012-01-01

408

Predictors of Adolescent Cigarette Smoking Behavior: A Sociological Case Study in Ankara, Turkey  

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This paper aims to discuss important predictors of adolescent cigarette smoking behavior, such as their sociodemographic characteristics (age, gender, socioeconomic status, mother's and father's educational level, and school type), health-promoting behavior (healthy nutrition, physical activities), risk behavior (cigarette smoking and alcohol…

Kasapoglu, Aytul; Ozerkmen, Necmettin

2008-01-01

409

Smoking behaviors of adolescents and youth in Chilinh, Haiduong, a province in the north of Vietnam : risk and protective factors  

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Tobacco use is very common among Vietnamese adolescents and youth. Despite the fact that tobacco is very harmful for health, the prevalence of current smokers among Vietnamese adolescents/youth is still high, especially in male adolescents and youth. In this thesis, I want to draw a brief over view about the current smoking behavior among adolescents/youth at CHILILAB - a research laboratory of Hanoi School of Public Health -and identify the risk/protective factors for smoking behavior. The s...

Dao, H. B.

2010-01-01

410

The smoking chain: friendship networks, education, social background and adolescent smoking behavior in the Netherlands  

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The scientific novelty of this study is that when controlling for network effects that might bias the friendship influence effect, an influence effect is found over social distance two for the smoking behavior of Dutch adolescents. These findings add to a growing body of literature emphasizing the relevance of accounting for complex network dynamics when investigating adolescent behavior. This study convincingly shows that institutions such as the Dutch educational system, social phenomena su...

Huisman, C.

2013-01-01

411

The association of sexual interest and sexual behaviors among adolescent women: A daily diary perspective  

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Theoretical and empirical linkages of adult women’s sexual interest and sexual behaviors are relatively well-established, but few data address similar issues in adolescent women. This paper reviews data from published reports of associations of adolescent women’s sexual interest and various sexual behaviors. All of the papers reported data collected from a single longitudinal cohort of young women. The primary source of data collection was daily diaries, allowing close temporal pairing of...

Fortenberry, J. Dennis; Hensel, Devon J.

2011-01-01

412

A practice of a cognitive behavioral oriented group psychotherapy in adolescents  

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Objective: Cognitive behavioral psychotherapy is one of the effective methods in the treatment of various psychiatric problems seen in adolescence. This paper is aimed to report on the cognitive behavioral oriented group therapy program which was conducted in Bak?rköy Prof. Dr. Mazhar Osman Training and Research Hospital for Psychiatric and Neurological Diseases, Adolescence and Young Adult Psychiatry Second Step Clinic. Method: This group therapy program was adopted from a cognitive behavi...

Ne?e Hatibo?lu; Do?an Y?lmaz; Ahmet Türkcan

2010-01-01

413

Identification of emotional facial expressions among behaviorally inhibited adolescents with lifetime anxiety disorders.  

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The current study examined differences in emotion expression identification between adolescents characterised with behavioural inhibition (BI) in childhood with and without a lifetime history of anxiety disorder. Participants were originally assessed for BI during toddlerhood and for social reticence during childhood. During adolescence, participants returned to the laboratory and completed a facial emotion identification task and a clinical psychiatric interview. Results revealed that behaviorally inhibited adolescents with a lifetime history of anxiety disorder displayed a lower threshold for identifying fear relative to anger emotion expressions compared to non-anxious behaviorally inhibited adolescents and non-inhibited adolescents with or without anxiety. These findings were specific to behaviorally inhibited adolescents with a lifetime history of social anxiety disorder. Thus, adolescents with a history of both BI and anxiety, specifically social anxiety, are more likely to differ from other adolescents in their identification of fearful facial expressions. This offers further evidence that perturbations in the processing of emotional stimuli may underlie the aetiology of anxiety disorders. PMID:24800906

Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C; Rankin Williams, Lela; Degnan, Kathryn A; Pérez-Edgar, Koraly; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Leibenluft, Ellen; Pine, Daniel S; Pollak, Seth D; Fox, Nathan A

2015-02-01

414

The relationship between parenting and the economic orientation and behavior of Norwegian adolescents.  

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Little is known about the economic socialization of children and adolescents and the role of parents in this process. The authors' purpose was to explore the role of parenting in the intergenerational transfer of economic orientation and economic behavior. More specifically, they studied the link between four parenting dimensions (parental warmth-responsiveness, behavioral control, psychological control, autonomy granting), three parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, and neglectful) and adolescents' conscientiousness, future time perspective, and present hedonistic orientation. The authors also studied the relationships between these dispositions and the adolescents' spending preferences and ability to control spending. They used data collected from 14-16-year-olds (n = 597) and their parents (n = 469) in Norway. Results showed that adolescents who perceived their parents as psychologically controlling were less future oriented and conscientious, and were more present hedonistic oriented than others, while adolescents who perceived their parents as responsive, autonomy granting, and controlling of behavior were more future orientated and conscientious than others. Adolescents' scores for conscientiousness and future orientation were negatively associated with preferences for spending and positively with the ability to control spending, while the opposite relationships were found with respect to a present hedonistic orientation. Parental style was also found to be important for the future educational plans of adolescents, and plans for higher education were more frequent among adolescents who characterized their parents as authoritative than among those who perceived their parents as neglectful. Implications of the findings for economic socialization are discussed. PMID:24303576

Nyhus, Ellen K; Webley, Paul

2013-01-01

415

Behavioral and neuroendocrine consequences of social subjugation across adolescence and adulthood  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Social subjugation is a very significant and natural stressor in the animal kingdom. Adult animals defeated and subjugated during establishment of dominance hierarchies or territorial encounters can be highly submissive in future agonistic interactions. While much is know about the biological and behavioral consequences of winning and losing fights in adulthood, little is known about adolescence; a developmental period noted for impulsivity and heightened agonistic behavior. The present studies were undertaken to determine if the behavioral and neuroendocrine consequences of social subjugation are comparable in adolescent versus adult Syrian golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus. Male siblings were studied from adolescence into adulthood following exposure to counterbalanced episodes of either a benign stressor, i.e., isolation in a novel cage, or the more severe stressor of social subjugation. Results As adults, hamsters with a history of social subjugation in adolescence show high levels of aggression toward intruders as compared to siblings subjugated in adulthood. Sibling controls subjugated in adulthood are highly submissive with little or no aggressive behavior. However, when subjugated in adulthood, hamsters with the earlier history of subjugation are no different than their sibling controls, i.e., adult subjugation promotes submissive behavior. Sexual motivation is high in adult hamsters with adolescent subjugation and testosterone levels remained stable over adulthood. In contrast, sibling controls subjugated in adulthood show lower levels of sexual motivation and reduced levels of testosterone. Release of cortisol during agonistic encounters is blunted in animals subjugated in adolescence but not adulthood. Measures of anxiety are reduced in hamsters with adolescent subjugation as compared to their sibling controls. Conclusion These data demonstrate a pronounced difference in behavior and neuroendocrinology between adolescent and adult hamsters in their response to social subjugation and suggest adolescence is a resilient period in development.

Sullivan Ross

2005-04-01

416

Counterconformity: an attribution model of adolescents' uniqueness-seeking behaviors in dressing.  

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This article explores how an attribution model will illustrate uniqueness-seeking behavior in dressing in the Taiwanese adolescent subculture. The study employed 443 senior high school students. Results show that the tendency of uniqueness-seeking behavior in dressing is moderate. However, using cluster analysis to segment the counterconformity behavior of the subjects, the study demonstrates that there are two conspicuous types of segmentation "markets": rubber stamp and self-determined. The attribution models investigate the susceptibilities to informational and normative influence which have different direction impacts and weights on the adolescents' counterconformity behavior. More interestingly, path analyses indicate that consumer self-confidence mediates the relationship between informational influence and counterconformity behavior only on the rubber stamp type. This study then discusses how the adolescent consumers' need for uniqueness could be used in better understanding consumer behavior and the role consumption plays in their expression of identity. PMID:19149151

Ling, I-Ling

2008-01-01

417

Hope and Its Relation to Suicidal Risk Behaviors among Malaysian Adolescents  

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Full Text Available Suicide is an epidemic issue worldwide and Asian countries are of no exception. In Malaysia, adolescent suicide constituted 10% of the overall reported suicide cases. Aforementioned, the current study examines Snyder’s theory of hope to understand suicidal risk among Malaysian adolescents. A total of 1441 adolescents were recruited using a multistage cluster sampling. Results showed significant relationship between both agency and pathway thinking with risk of suicidal behavior. Specifically, only agency thinking uniquely predicts adolescents’ suicidal risk in a regression model. Adolescents with higher motivation towards accomplishing a goal or plan have lower risk engaging in suicidal behaviors. Thus, suicide prevention focusing on increasing hope is significantly important. Limitations were discussed in the study.

Choon Min Wai

2014-05-01

418

Maternal Parenting Behavior and Child Behavior Problems in Families of Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder  

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Parents of a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face specific challenges in parenting, but concrete parenting behavior has never been properly investigated in these families. This exploratory questionnaire study compared parenting behaviors among mothers of children and adolescents with ASD (n = 552) and without ASD (n = 437) and examined…

Maljaars, Jarymke; Boonen, Hannah; Lambrechts, Greet; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Noens, Ilse

2014-01-01

419

False Consensus and Adolescent Peer Contagion: Examining Discrepancies between Perceptions and Actual Reported Levels of Friends' Deviant and Health Risk Behaviors.  

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Adolescents' perceptions of their friends' behavior strongly predict adolescents' own behavior, however, these perceptions often are erroneous. This study examined correlates of discrepancies between adolescents' perceptions and friends' reports of behavior. A total of 120 11th-grade adolescents provided data regarding their engagement in deviant…

Prinstein, Mitchell J.; Wang, Shirley S.

2005-01-01

420

Effects of Parental Monitoring and Peer Deviance on Substance Use and Delinquency  

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From socialization theory, it was hypothesized that parental support and monitoring as well as peer deviance would influence individual trajectories of alcohol misuse, other substance use, and delinquency. Six waves of data were analyzed using interviews with 506 adolescents in a general population sample. Results from multilevel modeling showed…

Barnes, Grace M.; Hoffman, Joseph H.; Welte, John W.; Farrell, Michael P.; Dintcheff, Barbara A.

2006-01-01

 
 
 
 
421

Self-Definitions of Gang Membership and Involvement in Delinquent Activities.  

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Examined the relationship between various methods of operationalizing gang membership and delinquency. Surveys of inner city adolescents indicated that teens reporting membership in organized gangs were far more likely to believe their gangs possessed characteristics typically associated with traditional street gangs. Teens who considered…

Bjerregaard, Beth

2002-01-01

422

DBT-Enhanced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Trichotillomania: An Adolescent Case Study  

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Results and a case study for a DBT-enhanced habit reversal treatment (HRT) for adult trichotillomania (TTM) (Keuthen & Sprich, 2012) is adapted for use with adolescents. Trichotillomania in adolescence is a very important but understudied problem. Onset often occurs in adolescence, and yet very little treatment research exists. DBT-enhanced habit…

Welch, Stacy Shaw; Kim, Junny

2012-01-01

423

The use of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of resistant depression in adolescents  

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Full Text Available Sarah Hamill-Skoch,1 Paul Hicks,2 Ximena Prieto-Hicks11Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ, USAAbstract: Major depressive disorder often begins in adolescence, is chronic and recurrent, and heightens an individual's risk for major depressive disorder in adulthood. Treatment-resistant depression is a problem for a significant minority of adolescents. Few studies have examined treatments for treatment-resistant depression among adolescents, and even fewer have examined the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy as a monotherapy or in combination with pharmacological treatments. Mental health professionals have a strong interest in understanding what treatments are appropriate for adolescents who are treatment resistant. Preliminary evidence from current published trials indicates that the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy in combination with antidepressant medication yields the best outcome for treatment-resistant depression in adolescents. Secondary analyses also suggest that the utility of cognitive behavioral therapy can be increased by ensuring adolescents receive a therapeutic dose of treatment sessions (more than nine sessions and the inclusion of two treatment components: social skills and problem solving training. Guidelines for clinicians as well as areas for future research are discussed.Keywords: cognitive behavior therapy, treatment-resistant depression, adolescent depression

Prieto-Hicks X

2012-09-01

424

Same-Sex versus Other-Sex Best Friendship in Early Adolescence: Longitudinal Predictors of Antisocial Behavior throughout Adolescence  

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This study examines the relationship between having other-sex versus same-sex best friends and antisocial behavior throughout early adolescence. Participants (N = 955) were recruited in 6th grade and followed longitudinally through 7th, 8th, and 11th grades. Participants were 58% ethnically diverse youth and 48% girls. Results indicate that the…

Arndorfer, Cara Lee; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.

2008-01-01

425

Unseen risks: HIV-related risk behaviors among ethnically diverse sexual minority adolescent females.  

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High rates of HIV-related sexual risk behaviors among lesbian and bisexual female adolescents have been documented. However, previous research has not adequately described racial/ethnic subgroup differences in risk behaviors within this population. We examined HIV-related sexual risk behaviors among an ethnically diverse sample of sexual minority girls (N = 244). Compared to their White peers, girls who identified their race/ethnicity as mixed had more than four times the odds of reporting both unprotected vaginal sex with a male and multiple male sex partners. All subgroups exhibited risk behaviors, indicating that sexual minority girls must be included in HIV-prevention efforts targeting adolescent females. PMID:24245599

Thoma, Brian C; Huebner, David M; Rullo, Jordan E

2013-12-01

426

Influence of oral health related behavior on oral health of adolescents in Belgrade  

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Full Text Available Introduction. Adolescence is a period of intensive physical, psychological and emotional changes that might affect existing oral health related habits and result in developing risky behaviors. The aim of the present study was to investigate oral health attitudes and behavior and their relation to dental caries experience in the group of adolescents from Belgrade. Material and Methods. This cross-sectional study included 404 high-school students grade one from Belgrade. Two trained and calibrated dentists conducted clinical examination in classrooms to determine oral health status of adolescents (DMFT index and visual signs of gingivitis. Modified Serbian version of Hiroshima University Dental Behavior Inventory (HU-DBI questionnaire with three additional questions was used to collect data on oral health behavior and attitudes. Results. Mean HU-DBI score was 6.22±1.45 for males and 6.28±1.45 for females (p<0.05. Dental visits at least once in a year reported 67.3% adolescents, more often girls (p<0.05. Only emergency dental visits reported 47.1% of adolescents. Majority of respondents reported brushing teeth twice a day or more (86.2%, girls more often than boys (p<0.001. Only 13.4% reported regular flossing and 30.3% daily use of mouth rinses. Mean DMFT score was 5.84±0.20 with 45% of untreated decayed tooth. Unfavorable oral health related attitudes and behavior were related to poorer oral health status of adolescents. Conclusion. Poor oral health of adolescents is influenced by their inadequate attitudes and habits. Program of oral health promotion for adolescents that would target knowledge, attitudes and skills development should be implemented to enhance adolescents’ oral self-care regime and oral health outcome.

Lali? Maja

2013-01-01

427

Preliminary data on the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in Brazilian male and female juvenile delinquents  

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The aim of the present investigation was to study the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in a sample of delinquent adolescents of both genders and to compare the prevalence between genders. A total of 116 adolescents (99 males and 17 females) aged 12 to 19 on parole in the State of Rio de Janeiro were interviewed using the screening interview based on the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children - Present and Lifetime (KSADS-PL). Data were collected between ...

Andrade R.C.; Silva V.A.; Assumpção Jr. F.B.

2004-01-01

428

Readiness to Change Smoking Behavior in Adolescents with Psychiatric Disorders  

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There has been recent increased interest in utilizing motivational interviewing (MI) to increase adolescents readiness to quit smoking, but attempts to impact quit rates have thus far been discouraging. A better understanding of factors associated with adolescent readiness to quit smoking prior to receiving any intervention may provide guidance when tailoring future MI interventions in order to increase their effectiveness with this population. Adolescent smokers (N = 191) who had been admitt...

Apodaca, Timothy R.; Strong, David R.; Ramsey, Susan E.; Brown, Richard A.

2007-01-01

429

Examining the Development and Sexual Behavior of Adolescent Males  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A careful examination of young men's sexuality by health professionals in pediatrics, primary care and reproductive health is foundational to adolescent male sexual health and healthy development. Through a review of existing literature, this article provides background and a developmental framework for sexual health services for adolescent boys. The article first defines and provides an overview of adolescent boys’ sexual health, and then discusses developmentally focused research on the f...

Ott, Mary A.

2010-01-01

430

Cyberbullying behavior and adolescents' use of media with antisocial content: a cyclic process model.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study examined the role of media use in adolescents' cyberbullying behavior. Following previous research, we propose a Cyclic Process Model of face-to-face victimization and cyberbullying through two mediating processes of anger/frustration and antisocial media content. This model was tested utilizing a cross-sectional design with adolescent participants (N=892). Exposure to antisocial media content was measured with a newly developed content-based scale (i.e., the C-ME), showing good psychometric qualities. Results of structural equation modeling showed that adolescents' exposure to antisocial media content was significantly associated with cyberbullying behavior, especially in adolescents who experienced anger and frustration due to face-to-face victimization. Goodness of fit indices demonstrated a good fit of the theoretical model to the data and indicated that exposure to antisocial media content acts as an amplifier in a cyclic process of victimization-related anger and cyberbullying behavior. PMID:24015985

den Hamer, Anouk; Konijn, Elly A; Keijer, Micha G

2014-02-01

431

Perceptions of adolescents' sexual behavior among mothers living with and without HIV: does dyadic sex communication matter?  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous studies suggest that mothers can help adolescents make responsible sexual decisions by talking with them about sexual health. Yet, it is not clear how and when mothers make decisions about talking with their adolescents about sex. We sought to determine: (1) the accuracy of mothers' and adolescents' predictions of adolescents' age of sexual debut; and (2) if mothers' beliefs about their adolescents' sexual behavior affected the frequency of mother-adolescent communication about sexual topics and, in turn, if mother-adolescent communication about sexual topics affected mothers' accuracy in predicting adolescents' current and future sexual behavior. Participants were 129 urban, ethnic minority HIV-negative youth (52% male and 48% female; ages 10-14 years at baseline; ages 13-19 years at follow-up) and their mothers; 47% of mothers were HIV-positive. Most mothers and adolescents predicted poorly when adolescents would sexually debut. At baseline, mothers' communication with their early adolescents about sexual topics was not significantly associated with mothers' assessments of their early adolescents' future sexual behavior. At follow-up, mothers were more likely to talk with their adolescents about HIV prevention and birth control if they believed that their adolescents had sexually debuted, though these effects were attenuated by baseline levels of communication. Only one effect was found for adolescents' gender: mothers reported greater communication about sex with daughters. Studies are needed to determine how mothers make decisions about talking with their adolescents about sex, as well as to examine to what extent and in what instances mothers can reduce their adolescents' sexual risk behavior by providing comprehensive, developmentally appropriate sex education well before adolescents are likely to debut. PMID:18188687

Marhefka, Stephanie L; Mellins, Claude Ann; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Dolezal, Curtis; Ehrhardt, Anke A

2009-10-01

432

Adolescents' risk-taking behavior is driven by tolerance to ambiguity.  

Science.gov (United States)

Adolescents engage in a wide range of risky behaviors that their older peers shun, and at an enormous cost. Despite being older, stronger, and healthier than children, adolescents face twice the risk of mortality and morbidity faced by their younger peers. Are adolescents really risk-seekers or does some richer underlying preference drive their love of the uncertain? To answer that question, we used standard experimental economic methods to assess the attitudes of 65 individuals ranging in age from 12 to 50 toward risk and ambiguity. Perhaps surprisingly, we found that adolescents were, if anything, more averse to clearly stated risks than their older peers. What distinguished adolescents was their willingness to accept ambiguous conditions--situations in which the likelihood of winning and losing is unknown. Though adults find ambiguous monetary lotteries undesirable, adolescents find them tolerable. This finding suggests that the higher level of risk-taking observed among adolescents may reflect a higher tolerance for the unknown. Biologically, such a tolerance may make sense, because it would allow young organisms to take better advantage of learning opportunities; it also suggests that policies that seek to inform adolescents of the risks, costs, and benefits of unexperienced dangerous behaviors may be effective and, when appropriate, could be used to complement policies that limit their experiences. PMID:23027965

Tymula, Agnieszka; Rosenberg Belmaker, Lior A; Roy, Amy K; Ruderman, Lital; Manson, Kirk; Glimcher, Paul W; Levy, Ifat

2012-10-16

433

Assessing causality in the relationship between adolescents' risky sexual online behavior and their perceptions of this behavior  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The main aim of this study was to investigate the causal nature of the relationship between adolescents' risky sexual behavior on the internet and their perceptions of this behavior. Engagement in the following online behaviors was assessed: searching online for someone to talk about sex, searching online for someone to have sex, sending intimate photos or videos to someone online, and sending one's telephone number and address to someone exclusively known online. The relationship between the...

2010-01-01

434

Assessing Causality in the Relationship Between Adolescents’ Risky Sexual Online Behavior and Their Perceptions of this Behavior  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The main aim of this study was to investigate the causal nature of the relationship between adolescents' risky sexual behavior on the internet and their perceptions of this behavior. Engagement in the following online behaviors was assessed: searching online for someone to talk about sex, searching online for someone to have sex, sending intimate photos or videos to someone online, and sending one's telephone number and address to someone exclusively known online. The relationship between the...

Baumgartner, S. E.; Valkenburg, P. M.; Peter, J.

2010-01-01

435

Early Risk Behaviors and Adolescent Injury in 25 European and North American Countries: A Cross-National Consistent Relationship  

Science.gov (United States)

Injury is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among adolescents in developed countries. Jessor and Jessor's Problem Behavior Theory suggests an association between risk behaviors (e.g., smoking, drunkenness, cannabis use, and sexual intercourse) and adolescent injury. The present study examined whether early engagement in risk behaviors

de Looze, Margaretha; Pickett, William; Raaijmakers, Quinten; Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Hublet, Anne; Nic Gabhainn, Saoirse; Bjarnason, Thoroddur; Molcho, Michal; Vollebergh, Wilma; ter Bogt, Tom

2012-01-01

436

Temperament of Juvenile Delinquents with History of Substance Abuse  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Background: The etiological factors and interrelations of juvenile delinquents, with psychiatricmorbidity and substance abuse have been continuously debated.Cloninger’s Tridimensional Theory of Temperament has been reported topredict patterns of substance abuse and comorbidity. In the current study, weaimed to examine the usability of the theory in predicting juvenile delinquencyand substance abuse.Methods: Sixty consecutive and newly incarcerated male delinquents with history ofsubstance abuse were recruited from a juvenile correctional facility in northwesternTaiwan from January 2002 through December 2003. All subjectswere assessed of their temperament, behavioral problems, and psychiatricdisorders on an individual base.Results: The juvenile delinquent subjects with childhood history of attention deficitand hyperactivity disorder (ADHD were significantly younger, consumedless betel nuts, and had more siblings with history of drug abuse.Conclusion: Consistent with the results of Cloninger’s studies, novelty seeking positivelycorrelated to the amount of substance abuse, while harm avoidance inverselycorrelated in juvenile delinquents. Endemic trend of choice of substanceabuse needs to be taken into consideration in future research projects.

Hsueh-Ling Chang

2007-02-01

437

Gender differences in adolescent coping behaviors and suicidal ideation: findings from a sample of 73,238 adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

Suicide among adolescents is an emerging global public health problem as well as a socioeconomic problem. Stress-coping strategies have been shown to be associated with suicidal ideation. We examined coping behaviors related to suicidal ideation and gender differences in adolescents using the data from the 2010 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey (ages 12-19 years; N = 73,238). Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate associations between suicidal ideation and specific coping behaviors while controlling for potentially confounding variables. In both male and female groups, the coping behavior "drinking alcoholic beverages" and "smoking cigarettes" were positively associated with suicidal ideation. "Watching TV," "playing online/mobile games," and "sleeping" were negatively associated with suicidal ideation in both groups. In males, "engaging in sports" was negatively related to suicidal ideation. In females, "venting by talking to others" and "eating" were negatively related to suicidal ideation. The results indicate that there are gender differences in the effects of coping behaviors on adolescent suicidal ideation, and that developing adaptive coping strategies may function to reduce suicidality. Future studies are needed to examine whether improving coping skills can reduce suicidal ideation in a gender-specific manner. PMID:24344782

Kim, Sun Mi; Han, Doug Hyun; Trksak, George H; Lee, Young Sik

2014-01-01

438

The Impact of Sleep on Learning and Behavior in Adolescents.  

Science.gov (United States)

Many adolescents experience sleep deprivation due to such factors as academic workload and social and employment opportunities. The ability to effectively interact with peers while learning and processing new information may be diminished in sleep deprived adolescents. Some school districts are changing school start times to allow students more…

Mitru, Georgios; Millrood, Daniel L.; Mateika, Jason H.

2002-01-01

439

The Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter, 1996.  

Science.gov (United States)

These 12 monthly newsletters from 1996 explore the many problems encountered by children and adolescents as they grow up. Regular departments in the newsletter issues include "Keep Your Eye On...," which briefly presents results of research into childhood and adolescent problems; "What's New in Research," summarizing research from recent…

Lipsitt, Lewis P., Ed.

1996-01-01

440

Adolescent Behavior: Normal? Sick? How Does One Tell?  

Science.gov (United States)

Adolescent turmoil has been investigated as a manifestation of normative crisis functioning. Anna Freud and Erikson look upon this as almost universal. Daniel and Judith Offer found this quality present in only 21% of their sample of male high school non-patient students. Masterson in his longterm study reported that adolescent turmoil was at most…

Slaff, Bertram