WorldWideScience

Sample records for adjuvants anesthesia

  1. Intravenous dex medetomidine or propofol adjuvant to spinal anesthesia in total knee replacement surgery

    The purpose of this study was to compare effect of intravenous dex medetomidine with the intravenous propofol adjuvant to spinal intrathecal anesthesia on the duration of spinal anesthesia and hemodynamic parameters during total knee replacement surgery. Supplementation of spinal anesthesia with intravenous dexemedetomidine or propofol produces good sedation levels without significant clinical hemodynamic changes. Adding dex medetomidine produces significantly longer sensory and motor block than propofol . (authors).

  2. Tramadol as an adjuvant to intravenous regional anesthesia with lignocaine

    Objective was to assess the effect of different doses of tramadol when added to lignocaine during intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA). Sixty patients, scheduled for hand surgery under IVRA in King Fahd University Hospital, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia from January 2006 to January 2007 were randomly allocated into 3 groups (20 patients each) in a double blind controlled study. All patients received 0.5% lignocaine, 40ml plus 2ml of a study solution containing either isotonic saline (control group), or tramadol 50mg (group T50) or tramadol100mg (group T100). Hemodynamic changes, sensory and motor block onset and recovery time, tourniquet tolerance time, the quality of intraoperative anesthesia and the duration of postoperative analgesia were assessed. All patients 20 in each group completed the study period. Patients who received tramadol had earlier onset of sensory block (5.2+-1.2; 4.9+-1.2 min in the T50; and T100 groups) compared with the control group (7.6+-1.4 min). Patients who received 100mg of tramadol had better tolerance of tourniquet (p=0.011), and less intraoperative fentanyl supplementation (p=0.042). They had also a longer time to the first postoperative analgesic request (p=0.001) compared with the control group. Tramadol 100 mg is a beneficial additive to lignocaine for IVRA since it shortened the onset of sensory block, enhanced the tourniquet tolerance and improved the perioperative analgesia. (author)

  3. Anesthesia

    ... arm or leg. A common type is epidural anesthesia, which is often used during childbirth. General - makes ... afterwards. Sedation can be used with or without anesthesia. The type of anesthesia or sedation you get ...

  4. Clonidine as an adjuvant to hyperbaric bupivacaine for spinal anesthesia in elderly patients undergoing lower limb orthopedic surgeries

    Deepti Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In elderly patients, use of adjuvant with small doses of local anesthetics is a preferred technique for spinal anesthesia for lower limb surgeries. This study tested the hypothesis that addition of small doses of clonidine augments the spinal block levels produced by hyperbaric bupivacaine in elderly without affecting the side-effects if any of clonidine in these patients. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Above 60 years male patients were allocated to three equal groups. Group C received 9 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine without clonidine while Group C 15 and Group C 30 received 15 μg and 30 μg clonidine with hyperbaric bupivacaine respectively for spinal anesthesia. Effect of clonidine on sensory block levels was the primary study outcome measure. Motor blockade and hemodynamic parameters were also studied. Results: A significantly higher median block levels were achieved in Group C 15 (P < 0.001 and Group C 30 (P = 0.015 than Group C. Highest median sensory block level, the mean times for sensory regression to T 12 level and motor block regression were statistically significant between Groups C 15 and C and between Groups C 30 and C. On comparison of fall in systolic blood pressure trends, there was no significant difference in the clonidine groups as compared with the control group. Conclusions: In elderly patients, clonidine when used intrathecally in doses of 15 μg or 30 μg with bupivacaine, significantly potentiated the sensory block levels and duration of analgesia without affecting the trend of systolic blood pressure as compared to bupivacaine alone. Clonidine in doses of 30 μg however facilitated the ascent of sensory level block to unexpectedly higher dermatomes for a longer time.

  5. Anesthesia Awareness

    ... and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery Anesthesia Awareness Very rarely – in only one or two out ... become aware or conscious. The condition – called anesthesia awareness – means the patient can recall the surroundings or ...

  6. The influence of different adjuvant ventilation modes on CVP in patients during the general anesthesia induction%全麻诱导不同通气方式对中心静脉压的影响

    程芳; 林华赋; 周毅

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨全身麻醉诱导时低潮气量高频率辅助通气与高潮气量低频率辅助通气对中心静脉压的影响,选出对循环血流动力学影响较小的辅助通气方式.方法 选择2010年3月~2011年7月于江门市中心医院行全身麻醉的患者120例,随机分为两组,每组60例.Ⅰ组在全麻诱导准备插管前采用低潮气量高频率辅助通气,Ⅱ组在全麻诱导准备插管前采用高潮气量低频率辅助通气,全程监测心率、血氧饱和度、平均动脉压、中心静脉压,分别记录患者在全麻诱导前、全麻诱导时、气管插管后的中心静脉压值(CVP),比较两组CVP值的变化.结果 全麻诱导前及气管插管后两组CVP值差异无统计学意义(P > 0.05),全麻诱导时Ⅱ组CVP值明显比Ⅰ组低,差异有统计学意义(P < 0.05).结论 全麻诱导时低潮气量高频率辅助通气对CVP的影响小,较高潮气量低频率辅助通气对CVP的影响较大,但持续时间很短,在气管插管后,这种影响即消失.%Objective To discuss the influence of different adjuvant ventilation modes (low tidal volume with high respiratory rate and high tidal volume with low respiratory rate) on CVP in patients during general anesthesia induction. And to find out a adjuvant ventilation mode which had a less influence on CVP. Methods 120 patients practised general anesthesia in the central hospital of Jiangmen from March 2010 to July 2011 were enrolled for the study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Each group had 60 patients. The patients in group I were practised the adjuvant ventilation mode of low tidal volume with high respiratory rate during the general anesthesia induction, and the patients in group II were practised the adjuvant ventilation mode of high tidal volume with low respiratory rate. All of them were monitored HR, SpO2, MAP, CVP. The CVP of two groups were compared. Results Before general anesthesia and after tracheal intubation, CVP of two

  7. General anesthesia

    General anesthesia is treatment with certain medicines that puts you into a deep sleep so you do not feel ... doctor called an anesthesiologist will give you the anesthesia. Sometimes, a certified and registered nurse anesthetist will ...

  8. Spinal and epidural anesthesia

    Intraspinal anesthesia; Subarachnoid anesthesia; Epidural; Peridural anesthesia ... Spinal and epidural anesthesia have fewer side effects and risks than general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free). Patients usually recover their senses ...

  9. Seniors and Anesthesia

    ... Media Anesthesia 101 Patient Safety Stories Resources About Home » Patients » Preparing For Surgery » Seniors and Anesthesia Share this Page Preparing For Surgery Effects of Anesthesia Children and Anesthesia Pregnancy, Childbirth and Anesthesia Seniors and Anesthesia Surgery Risks Anesthesia ...

  10. Anesthesia Basics

    ... giving you anesthesia. CRNAs may work under the supervision of a anesthesiologist or on their own — it ... lot over the years, thanks to advances in technology and the extensive training anesthesiologists receive. The more ...

  11. Obesity and Anesthesia

    ... Apnea and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery Obesity and Anesthesia More than one-third of Americans ... Sleep Apnea, a chronic medical problem common with obesity, can present with serious breathing problems before, during, ...

  12. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ... 6620 | E-mail: info@sambahq.org Copyright | 2016 Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Home | Search | Terms | Privacy Policy | ...

  13. Anesthesia for fetoscopic intervention

    Jamil S Anwari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first case report on anesthesia for fetoscopy performed in Saudi Arabia. Epidural anesthesia was given to the mother in her late second trimester for the fetoscopic intervention. The anesthesia related issues such as physiological and anatomical changes in pregnancy, tocolytic medications and their interactions with anesthesia, anesthetizing/sedating the primary patient are discussed.

  14. 全麻诱导不同通气方式对冠心病患者中心静脉压的影响%Influence of different adjuvant ventilation modes on central venous pressure in patients with coronary heart disease during the general anesthesia induction

    程芳; 林华赋; 周毅; 元春梅

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence of different adjuvant ventilation modes (low tidal volume with high respiratory rate and high tidal volume with low respiratory rate) on central venous pressure (CVP) in patients with coronary heart disease during general anesthesia induction.And to find out an adjuvant ventilation mode which has a less influence on CVP.Methods 41 patients with coronary heart disease practised with general anesthesia in Jiangmen Central Hospital from March 2010 to July 2011 were enrolled for the study.They were randomly divided into two sets.The patients in set Ⅰ were practised the adjuvant ventilation mode of low tidal volume with high respiratory rate during the general anesthesia induction,and the patients in set Ⅱ were practised the adjuvant ventilation mode of high tidal volume with low respiratory rate.All of them were monitored HR,SpO2.MAP,CVP.The CVP of two sets were compared.Results Before general anesthesia,CVP of set Ⅰ was (8.98 ± 2.65) cmH2O,CVP of set Ⅱ was (8.86 ± 2.91) cmH2O.CVP of two sets had no significant difference (P> 0.05).During the general anesthesia induction,CVP of set Ⅰ was (7.45 ± 3.15) cmH2O、CVP of set Ⅱ was (5.86 ± 3.89) cmH2O.CVP of set Ⅱ was obviously lower than that of set Ⅰ( P< 0.05 ).After tracheal intubatiou,CVP of set Ⅰ was (7.99 ± 2.74) cmH2O,CVP of set Ⅱ was (6.09 ± 2.89) cmH2O.CVP of set Ⅱ was obviously lower than that of set Ⅰ( P< 0.05 ).Conclusion By comparing with two ventilation modes,the ventilation mode of high tidal volume with low respiratory rate has a larger influence on CVP.%目的 比较全身麻醉诱导时低潮气量高频率辅助通气与高潮气量低频率辅助通气对冠心病患者中心静脉压(CVP)的影响,选出对循环血流动力学影响较小的辅助通气方式.方法 选择2010年3月-2011年7月于我院行全身麻醉的41例冠心病患者随机分为两组,Ⅰ组在全麻诱导准备插管前低潮气量高频率辅助通气,Ⅱ

  15. Hand Surgery: Anesthesia

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Hand Surgery Anesthesia Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... in to name and customize your collection. DESCRIPTION Anesthesia is a way to control pain during a ...

  16. Topical anesthesia in phacoemulsification

    Saad Waheeb

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion : Topical anesthesia is a satisfactory and safe alternative to retrobulbar and peribulbar anesthesia for clear corneal phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in selected cataract patients in the hands of experienced cataract surgeon.

  17. Effects of Anesthesia

    ... Regional Anesthesia The potential side effects of regional anesthesia (such as an epidural or spinal block, in which an anesthetic is injected in ... days after the procedure if some of the spinal fluid leaks out. Minor back ... was injected. Serious but rare complications include: Pneumothorax – ...

  18. Orthopedic Anesthesia in Haiti

    Osteen, Kristie D.

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare practitioners from around the world responded almost immediately in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. This article reports on the efforts of an orthopedic trauma team in Haiti and its efforts in providing surgery without general anesthesia.

  19. Clonidine versus fentanyl as adjuvants to bupivacaine in peribulbar anesthesia

    Maha M.I. Youssef

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: The addition of either clonidine or fentanyl to the local anesthetic during peribulbar block results in a faster onset and longer duration of the block with a longer period of postoperative analgesia. The addition of clonidine was found to prolong the duration of the block more than fentanyl.

  20. NEURAXIAL ANESTHESIA and OBESITY

    Şahin, Aynur; Doğru, Hatice Yılmaz

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is one of the serious condition that commonly effects health in modern age. It was reported that obesity was three-fold increased in the last three decades. According to the statement by World Health Organisation in 2005, 700 million people will be estimated obese in 2015. While neuraxial anesthesia is a commonly used technique in the worldwide, the process may have difficulties in obese patients. In this review, the pathophysiological changes and challenges in neuraxial anesthesia ...

  1. Anesthesia for radiologic procedures

    Anesthetic techniques for neurodiagnostic studies and radiation therapy have been recently reviewed, but anesthetic involvement in thoracic and abdominal radiology has received little attention. Patient reactions to radiologic contrast media may be of concern to the anesthesiologist, who is often responsible for injecting these agents during diagnostic procedures, and thus is included in this discussion. Finally, the difficulties of administering anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are outlined, in an effort to help anesthesiologist to anticipate problems with this new technologic development. Although there are very few indications for the use of general anesthesia for diagnostic radiologic studies in adults, most procedures performed with children, the mentally retarded, or the combative adult require either heavy sedation or general anesthesia. In selecting an anesthetic technique for a specific procedure, both the patient's disease process and the requirements of the radiologist must be carefully balanced

  2. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine. PMID:22129866

  3. Regional Anesthesia in Trauma Medicine

    Loreto Lollo; Wu, Janice J.; Andreas Grabinsky

    2011-01-01

    Regional anesthesia is an established method to provide analgesia for patients in the operating room and during the postoperative phase. While regional anesthesia offers unique advantages, as shown by the recent military experience, it is not commonly utilized in the prehospital or emergency department setting. Most often, regional anesthesia techniques for traumatized patients are first utilized in the operating room for procedural anesthesia or for postoperative pain control. While infiltra...

  4. Anesthesia for interventional radiology

    We recognized that the complexity and surgical nature of many interventional radiology procedures dictate essential radiologic involvement into traditional anesthesiologic areas. They reviewed our experience with a variety of interventional procedures to document complications and problems related to anesthetic use (or misuse) and compile recommendations for rational monitoring and control for these procedures. In particular, the authors have studied complications of drug therapies and the treatment of these complications; use of complex anesthesia procedures (e.g., epidural anesthesia, succinylcholine blockage); reasons for choice of drugs (e.g., fentanyl vs meperidine vs morphine); and medico-legal aspects of radiologist performing traditional anesthesiology-type procedures

  5. ADJUVANTS IN MODERN VACCINOLOGY

    Belozersky V. I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A concept of adjuvants and their story of creation ischaracterized in the article. They’re presented thevarious types of non-specific stimulators of immunesysteme, thier excipients and classification. They’redescribed basic properties of adjuvant systems, their significant advantages and disadvantages. Particular attention is paid to the numerous antigen delivery systems, including alive vectors, nanoparticles, bacterial toxins, etc. They’re considered non-specific stimulators mechanisms of action on immune system and theirinteraction with antigens. They’re given examples of different adjuvants in licensed vaccines use.

  6. ADJUVANTS IN MODERN VACCINOLOGY

    Belozersky V. I; Zhdamarova L.A.; Yelyseyeva I. V; Babych Ye. M.; Isaenko Ye. Yu.; Kolpak S. A

    2013-01-01

    A concept of adjuvants and their story of creation ischaracterized in the article. They’re presented thevarious types of non-specific stimulators of immunesysteme, thier excipients and classification. They’redescribed basic properties of adjuvant systems, their significant advantages and disadvantages. Particular attention is paid to the numerous antigen delivery systems, including alive vectors, nanoparticles, bacterial toxins, etc. They’re considered non-specific stimulators mechanisms of a...

  7. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  8. Anesthesia and cor triatriatum

    Federica Scavonetto; Tze Yeng Yeoh; Tasha L Welch; Weingarten, Toby N.; Juraj Sprung

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Cor triatriatum sinistrum (CTS) and cor triatriatum dextrum (CTD) are rare congenital anomalies characterized by the presence of a perforated septum which divides the respective atrium into a proximal and distal chamber. This report reviews the perioperative course of patients with uncorrected cor triatriatum (CT) undergoing procedures requiring anesthesia. In addition, we performed a literature search that examines the experience of others regarding the peri-operative co...

  9. Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot

    Weiss, Markus; Vutskits, Laszlo; Hansen, Tom G;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The term 'safe use of anesthesia in children is ill-defined and requires definition of and focus on the 'safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia'. RECENT FINDINGS: The Safe Anesthesia For Every Tot initiative (www.safetots.org) has been set up during the last year to focus on the...... improvement of teaching, training, education and supervision of the safe conduct of pediatric anesthesia are the main goals of the safetots.org initiative. SUMMARY: This initiative addresses the well known perioperative risks in young children, perioperative causes for cerebral morbidity as well as gaps in...

  10. Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - adult

    ... that I am having? General anesthesia Spinal or epidural anesthesia Conscious sedation When do I need to stop ... to my stomach? If I have spinal or epidural anesthesia, will I have a headache afterwards? What if ...

  11. Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - child

    ... my child is having? General anesthesia Spinal or epidural anesthesia Conscious sedation When does my child need to ... upset stomach? If my child had spinal or epidural anesthesia, will my child have a headache afterwards? What ...

  12. Anesthesia for thoracoscopic surgery

    Conacher I

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesia for thoracoscopy is based on one lung ventilation. Lung separators in the airway are essential tools. An anatomical shunt as a result of the continued perfusion of a non-ventilated lung is the principal intraoperative concern. The combination of equipment, technique and process increase risks of hypoxia and dynamic hyperinflation, in turn, potential factors in the development of an unusual form of pulmonary edema. Analgesia management is modelled on that shown effective and therapeutic for thoracotomy. Perioperative management needs to reflect the concern for these complex, and complicating, processes to the morbidity of thoracoscopic surgery.

  13. Anesthesia for bronchoscopy.

    Abdelmalak, Basem B; Gildea, Thomas R; Doyle, D John

    2012-01-01

    Bronchoscopic procedures are at times intricate and the patients often very ill. These factors and an airway shared with the pulmonologist present a clear challenge to anesthesiologists. The key to success lies in the understanding of both the underlying pathology and procedure being performed combined with frequent two-way communication between the anesthesiologist and the pulmonologist. Above all, vigilance and preparedness are paramount. Topics discussed in this review include anesthesia for advanced diagnostic procedures as well as for interventional/ therapeutic procedures. The latter includes bronchoscopic tracheal balloon dilation, tracheobronchial stenting, endobronchial electrocautery, bronchoscopic cryotherapy and other techniques. Special situations, such as tracheoesophageal fistula and mediastinal masses, are also considered. PMID:22762465

  14. Paediatric Spinal Anesthesia

    Rakhee Goyal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric spinal anesthesia is not only a safe alternative to general anaesthesia but often the anaesthesia technique of choice in many lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries in children. The misconception regarding its safety and feasibility is broken and is now found to be even more cost-effective. It is a much preferred technique especially for the common daycase surgeries generally performed in the paediatric age group. There is no require-ment of any additional expensive equipment either and this procedure can be easily performed in peripheral centers. However, greater acceptance and experience is yet desired for this technique to become popular.

  15. ERM immersion vaccination and adjuvants

    Skov, J.; Chettri, J. K.; Jaafar, R. M.;

    2015-01-01

    Two candidate adjuvants were tested with a commercial ERM dip vaccine (AquaVac™ Relera, MSD Animal Health) for rainbow trout in an experimental design compatible with common vaccination practices at farm level, i.e. immersion of fish in vaccine (±adjuvant) for 30 s. The adjuvants were the...

  16. Anesthesia and cor triatriatum

    Federica Scavonetto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: Cor triatriatum sinistrum (CTS and cor triatriatum dextrum (CTD are rare congenital anomalies characterized by the presence of a perforated septum which divides the respective atrium into a proximal and distal chamber. This report reviews the perioperative course of patients with uncorrected cor triatriatum (CT undergoing procedures requiring anesthesia. In addition, we performed a literature search that examines the experience of others regarding the peri-operative course of patients with CT. Materials and Methods: A computerized search of a medical record database was conducted to identify patients with a clinical diagnosis of uncorrected CTD and CTS undergoing surgical procedures. Descriptive statistics were used. Results: We identified 12 adult patients with asymptomatic CTS (n = 7 and CTD (n = 5 who underwent 23 anesthetics. There were no perioperative complications which could be attributed directly to the anatomy of CT. Conclusions: Our observation and review of the literature suggest that patients with asymptomatic CT typically tolerate anesthesia and surgical procedures well.

  17. ROLE OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE IN ANESTHESIA AND CRITICAL CARE

    Baljit Singh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential uses of dexmedetomidine (DEX, a highly selective α2- adrenoceptor agonist are very diverse Although not orally active, DEX shows good bioavailability when administered via various other routes like intranasal, buccal, IM than intra-venous. DEX has similar pharmacokinetics in all age groups. Its side effects are predictable and easily treatable; hence it has found a place as a part of fast-tracking anesthesia regimens in children. DEX is the sedative of choice for peri-operative use in high- risk patients, since it is cardioprotective, neuroprotective and renoprotective. Premedication with DEX obtunds the autonomic pressor responses due to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation when used as an adjuvant to general anesthesia. DEX in high doses offers another approach to manage morbidly obese patients and patients with a compromised airway; without causing any cardiorespiratory depression. It is near ideal hypotensive agent used for controlled hypotension. Availability of an antidote (Atipamezole with similar elimination half-life is taking the drug into new frontiers .The aim of this review is to present the most recent topics regarding the advantages in using dexmedetomidine in clinical anesthesia and in critical care, while discussing the controversial issues of its harmful effects.

  18. Transverse myelitis following spinal anesthesia

    Jha Sanjeev

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal anesthesia is widely used during surgical procedures. It is generally safe and the frequency of severe, permanent neurological complications associated with it has been reported to be extremely low. We report a patient, who developed paraplegia following spinal anesthesia. A 29-year-old male was referred with acute, flaccid, sensory motor paraplegia, with bladder and bowel involvement. He developed this immediately after an operation for inguinal hernia under spinal anesthesia. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed hemorrhagic myelitis in the conus at D12. He was referred after he did not respond to intravenous methylprednisolone for 10 days. This case brings up the difficulty encountered in determination of the interspace used for spinal anesthesia and the potential for traumatic injury to the spinal cord. It also demonstrates the tragic outcome after a clinician violates some important, standard and established guidelines.

  19. Clinical relevance in anesthesia journals

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Møller, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles.......The purpose of this review is to present the latest knowledge and research on the definition and distribution of clinically relevant articles in anesthesia journals. It will also discuss the importance of the chosen methodology and outcome of articles....

  20. Consciousness fluctuation during general anesthesia: a theoretical approach to anesthesia awareness and memory modulation.

    Cascella, Marco; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Muzio, Maria Rosaria; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    With anesthesia awareness as a model of study we debate the both fascinating and dangerous phenomenon called consciousness fluctuation that takes place during surgical anesthesia. In accordance with current scientific knowledge this paradox is the consequence of our limits in both precise knowledge of anesthesia mechanisms and our inability to accurately assess the level of anesthesia with brain monitoring. We also focus on the relationships between memory and anesthesia, as well as the possibility of interfering with memory during general anesthesia. PMID:27046232

  1. Adjuvant Treatment for Ampullary Cancer

    Richard Kim; John Chabot; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2011-01-01

    Ampullary cancer is an uncommon tumor and tends to have a better prognosis than pancreatic cancer. However, one half of patients will die from recurrent disease suggesting the need for effective adjuvant therapy. Currently, there is lack of randomized trials to guide the use of adjuvant therapy in ampullary cancer. At the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, the largest trial (Abstract #4006) evaluating adjuvant treatment of ampullary cancer was presented.

  2. Adjuvant Treatment for Ampullary Cancer

    Richard Kim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ampullary cancer is an uncommon tumor and tends to have a better prognosis than pancreatic cancer. However, one half of patients will die from recurrent disease suggesting the need for effective adjuvant therapy. Currently, there is lack of randomized trials to guide the use of adjuvant therapy in ampullary cancer. At the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Annual Meeting, the largest trial (Abstract #4006 evaluating adjuvant treatment of ampullary cancer was presented.

  3. Adjuvant Therapy Trials.

    Ursem, Carling; Van Loon, Katherine; Venook, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, ramucirumab and TAS-102 became the 10th and 11th drugs approved by the Food and Drug administration for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, not counting leucovorin, and yet only 3 agents, 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin, have proven benefit in adjuvant treatment. In fact, there have been no additions (and 1 subtraction levamisole) to our arsenal of therapies for patients with stages II and III colon cancer for more than a decade. How did we get here? Are we stuck? And how do we move forward? PMID:27341598

  4. Adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer

    2007-01-01

    The management of colon and rectal cancer has changed dramatically over the last 25 years. The use of adjuvant therapies has become standard practice in locally advanced (stage Ⅲ and selected stage Ⅱ) colorectal cancer. Improved surgical techniques, chemotherapeutics and radiotherapy are resulting in higher cure rates and the development of agents targeting proliferative and angiogenic pathways offer further promise. Here we explore risk factors for local and distant recurrence after resection of colon and rectal cancer, and the role of adjuvant treatments. Discussion will focus on the evidence base for adjuvant therapies utilised in colorectal cancer, and the treatment of sub-groups such as the elderly and stage Ⅱ disease. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer in reduction of recurrence will be explored and the role and optimal methods for surveillance post-curative resection with or without adjuvant therapy will also be addressed.

  5. Stabilizing membrane domains antagonizes anesthesia

    Machta, Benjamin B; Nouri, Mariam; McCarthy, Nicola L C; Gray, Erin M; Miller, Ann L; Brooks, Nicholas J; Veatch, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Diverse molecules induce general anesthesia with potency strongly correlated both with their hydrophobicity and their effects on certain ion channels. We recently observed that several anesthetics inhibit heterogeneity in plasma membrane derived vesicles by lowering the critical temperature ($T_c$) for phase separation. Here we exploit conditions that stabilize membrane heterogeneity to test the correlation between the anesthetic potency of n-alcohols and effects on $T_c$. First we show that hexadecanol acts oppositely to anesthetics on membrane mixing and antagonizes ethanol induced anesthesia in a tadpole behavioral assay. Second, we show that two previously described `intoxication reversers' raise $T_c$ in vesicles and counter ethanol's effects in vesicles, mimicking the findings of previous electrophysiological measurements. Third, we find that hydrostatic pressure, long known to reverse anesthesia, also raises $T_c$ in vesicles with a magnitude that counters the effect of an anesthetic at relevant concen...

  6. Specialist training in pediatric anesthesia

    Hansen, Tom G

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society of...... Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine has coordinated an advanced Inter-Nordic educational program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care. The training program is managed by a Steering Committee. This program is intended for physicians who recently have received their specialist degree in anesthesiology...... and intensive care. The training period is 12 months of which 9 months are dedicated to pediatric anesthesia and 3 months to pediatric intensive care. During the 1-year training period, the candidates are designated a Scandinavian host clinic (at a tertiary pediatric center in Scandinavia approved by...

  7. Marsupial, insectivore, and chiropteran anesthesia.

    Pye, G W

    2001-01-01

    This article covers the manual restraint and anesthesia of marsupials, insectivores, and chiroptera. Marsupials commonly kept as pets in the U.S. [e.g., eastern gray kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus), and sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps)] are covered in detail. Marsupial species kept in zoological parks [e.g., Tasmanian devils, koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), and common wombats (Vombatus ursinus)] are covered in less detail. Of the insectivores, only the African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) and the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) are commonly kept as pets and, consequently, the insectivore section concentrates on discussing these two species. The section on chiropteran anesthesia is divided into two broad categories: the megachiropterans (flying foxes and fruit bats) and the microchiropterans (insectivorous bats). Most of the information on the species covered in this article is anecdotal, and this should be kept in mind when using the anesthesia protocols described. PMID:11217462

  8. Anesthesia for Children Having Eye Surgery

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anesthesia for Children Having Eye Surgery En Español Read in Chinese What kinds of anesthesia are available for children having eye surgery? There ...

  9. Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery En Español What kinds of anesthesia are available for adults having eye surgery? A “ ...

  10. Anesthesia Safe for Infants, Toddlers, Study Says

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159247.html Anesthesia Safe for Infants, Toddlers, Study Says No lingering ... 2016 TUESDAY, June 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- General anesthesia doesn't seem to harm young children's mental ...

  11. Back Pain and Neuraxial Anesthesia.

    Benzon, Honorio T; Asher, Yogen G; Hartrick, Craig T

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of back pain after neuraxial anesthesia in the adult population is not different from that after general anesthesia. The pain is usually mild, localized in the low back, rarely radiates to the lower extremities, and has a duration of only a few days. The risk factors for development of back pain include the lithotomy position, multiple attempts at block placement, duration of surgery longer than 2.5 hours, body mass index ≥32 kg/m, and a history of back pain. However, there is no permanent worsening of preexisting back pain after neuraxial anesthesia. The back pain has been attributed to tears in the ligaments, fascia, or bone with localized bleeding; immobility of the spine; relaxation of the paraspinal muscles under anesthesia; flattening of the normal lumbar convexity; and stretching and straining of the lumbosacral ligaments and joint capsules. The addition of an anti-inflammatory drug to the local anesthetic used for skin infiltration may decrease the incidence and severity of back pain. The use of spinal or epidural anesthesia in the adult, non-obstetric and obstetric populations should depend on the advantages offered by the technique and not on the occurrence of back pain after the procedure. Additional studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of epidural dexamethasone, or other steroids, or the addition of an anti-inflammatory drug to the local anesthetic infiltration for the prevention of back pain after neuraxial anesthesia. Future studies should involve a physician with expertise in the evaluation of chronic low back pain to help identify the cause of the back pain and institute appropriate treatment(s). PMID:27195644

  12. The thermodynamics of general anesthesia

    Heimburg, T; Heimburg, Thomas; Jackson, Andrew D.

    2006-01-01

    It is known that the action of general anesthetics is proportional to their partition coefficient in lipid membranes (Meyer-Overton rule). This solubility is, however, directly related to the depression of the temperature of the melting transition found close to body temperature in biomembranes. We propose a thermodynamic extension of the Meyer-Overton rule which is based on free energy changes in the system and thus automatically incorporates the effects of melting point depression. This model provides a quantitative explanation of the pressure reversal of anesthesia. Further, it explains why inflammation and the addition of divalent cations reduce the effectiveness of anesthesia.

  13. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  14. Anesthesia and the developing brain

    Davidson, Andrew J; Becke, Karin; de Graaff, Jurgen;

    2015-01-01

    It is now well established that many general anesthetics have a variety of effects on the developing brain in animal models. In contrast, human cohort studies show mixed evidence for any association between neurobehavioural outcome and anesthesia exposure in early childhood. In spite of large...

  15. Periocular Anesthesia in Aesthetic Surgery

    Skibell, Bentley C.; Soparkar, Charles N.S.; Tower, Robert N.; Patrinely, James R.

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the administration of anesthesia for periocular aesthetic procedures. Special emphasis is given to office-based procedures, most often without any systemic sedation, highlighting the importance of open communication with patients. Finally, attention is given to potential pitfalls including anesthetic systemic toxicity, ocular injuries, and orbicularis myotoxicity.

  16. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of 86Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with 141Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO2) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines

  17. History of anesthesia in Germany.

    Wawersik, J

    1991-01-01

    The first ether anesthetic was administered in Germany by J.F. Heyfelder (1798-1869) at the Erlangen University Hospital on January 24, 1847. Thereafter, famous discoveries occurred in the field of pharmacology. Albert Niemann isolated cocaine from the coca shrub in 1860; Emil Fischer synthesized the first barbiturate, Veronal, in 1902; and Helmut Weese promoted the first ultra-short-acting barbiturate, hexobarbital (Evipan), in 1932. The local anesthetic effect of cocaine was reported by Koller at the Congress of the German Society for Ophthalmology on September 15, 1884, in Heidelberg. Many new techniques were tried first in German hospitals. Friedrich Trendelenburg carried out, by tracheotomy, the first operation with endotracheal intubation in 1869, and Franz Kuhn promoted and clinically practiced endotracheal intubation in Heidelberg beginning in 1900. August Bier performed the first operation under spinal anesthesia at the Kiel University Hospital on August 16, 1898. Carl Ludwig Schleich (1859-1922) standardized the methods of infiltration anesthesia by using a cocaine solution in sufficient dilution. The development of anesthesia machines was greatly influenced by Heinrich Dräger (1847-1917) and his son Bernhard Dräger (1870-1928). The Dräger Company in Lübeck built the first anesthesia machine with a carbon dioxide (CO2) absorber and circle system in 1925. Paul Sudeck and Helmut Schmidt worked with this system at the Hamburg University Hospital and reported their results in 1926. The first Dräger anesthesia machine was produced in 1902 and introduced into clinical use by Otto Roth (1863-1944) in Lübeck. Before the Second World War, three universities in Germany carried out research in the field of anesthesia: the University of Freiburg with H. Killian, the University of Hamburg with P. Sudeck and H. Schmidt, and the University of Würzburg with C.G. Gauss. Killian and Gauss established the first journals, Der Schmerz and Narkose und Anaesthesie, in

  18. Innate immunity and adjuvants.

    Akira, Shizuo

    2011-10-12

    Innate immunity was for a long time considered to be non-specific because the major function of this system is to digest pathogens and present antigens to the cells involved in acquired immunity. However, recent studies have shown that innate immunity is not non-specific, but is instead sufficiently specific to discriminate self from pathogens through evolutionarily conserved receptors, designated Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Indeed, innate immunity has a crucial role in early host defence against invading pathogens. Furthermore, TLRs were found to act as adjuvant receptors that create a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity, and to have important roles in the induction of adaptive immunity. This paradigm shift is now changing our thinking on the pathogenesis and treatment of infectious, immune and allergic diseases, as well as cancers. Besides TLRs, recent findings have revealed the presence of a cytosolic detector system for invading pathogens. I will review the mechanisms of pathogen recognition by TLRs and cytoplasmic receptors, and then discuss the roles of these receptors in the development of adaptive immunity in response to viral infection. PMID:21893536

  19. Psychological aspects of pediatric anesthesia

    Drašković Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery and anesthesia cause a significant emotional stress in both parents and children. Since the consequences of this stress develop immediately after surgery and can last even when the hospital treatment is over, the role of the anesthesiologist is to ensure psychological as well as physiological well-being of the patient. In order to reduce emotional stress induced by anesthesia and operation, the anesthesiologist has to understand certain developmental phases that children go through and to identify situations which a child could potentially see as a danger or a threat. This can usually be achieved by careful preoperative assessment and by administering preoperative sedation. During the preoperative visit to the patient, the anesthesiologist can evaluate the levels of anxiety of both parents and children as well as assess the child’s medical condition.

  20. The elderly and general anesthesia

    Steinmetz, J; Rasmussen, L S

    2010-01-01

    Due to the aging population, the number of elderly patients taking advantage of healthcare services is increasing. A general physical decline of all organ systems and a high frequency of chronic disease accompanying aging.Comorbidity and polypharmacy are therefore common in the elderly. Hence, the...... administration of general anesthesia to the elderly can be a very challenging task. This paper aims to highlight some of the important issues presented to the elderly undergoing surgery and to suggest some strategies for management....

  1. SPLIT SKIN GRAFT HARVESTING UNDER LOCAL ANESTHESIA INFILTRATION VERSUS TOPICAL LOCAL ANESTHESIA

    Shahi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of topical local anesthesia using PRILOX cream versus local anesthesia infiltration using lignocaine and adrenaline in harvesting split skin graft. METHODS: A prospective study of 58 patients requiring split skin graft was carried. One group comprising 29 patients underwent harvesting of split skin graft under topical local anesthesia using PRILOX cream while the other group had local anesthesia infiltration using lignocaine and adrenaline. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of operating time, per operative pain, post-operative pain and post-operative requirement of analgesia. There was significant difference in time and pain during administration of local anesthesia and patient’s acceptability/ satisfaction with method of anesthesia. CONCLUSION: Topical local anesthesia using PRILOX cream can be used effectively for harvesting of split skin graft and is good alternative to local anesthesia infiltration.

  2. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Lansdown AK; McHardy PG; Patel SC; Nix CM; McCartney CJL

    2013-01-01

    Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship ...

  3. Hypotensive Anesthesia versus Normotensive Anesthesia during Major Maxillofacial Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    2015-01-01

    Steady blood pressure within normal limits during surgery is one of the markers of the ideal and skillful anesthesia. Yet, reduced blood pressure is advantageous in some settings because it can contribute to a reduction in overall blood loss and improve the surgical field conditions. Controlled hypotension during anesthesia or hypotensive anesthesia is often used in major maxillofacial operations. Since hypotensive anesthesia carries the risk of hypoperfusion to important organs and tissues, ...

  4. General anesthesia plus ilioinguinal nerve block versus spinal anesthesia for ambulatory inguinal herniorrhapy

    Lucía Vizcaíno-Martínez; Manuel Ángel Gómez-Ríos; Beatriz López-Calviño

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate general anesthesia (GA) plus ilioinguinal nerve block (IIB) versus spinal anesthesia (SA) in patients scheduled for ambulatory inguinal hernia repair regarding pain management, anesthesia recovery and reducing potential complications. Materials and Methods: A double-blind, prospective, randomized, controlled study in patients American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III randomized into two groups: GA plus IIB group, induction of anesthesia with propofol, main...

  5. Adjuvant chemotherapy and cancer cure

    The use of chemotherapy as an adjuvant to surgery and/or radiotherapy is well founded in experimental tumor systems and appears to be effective in patients in some circumstances. It is clear from both clinical and experimental studies that (1) the dose is important, (2) the earlier chemotherapy is started after primary therapy the better, and (3) combination chemotherapy may be more effective than single-agent treatment. The better the estimation of risk of recurrence, the better the assessment of the risk-benefit ratio with adjuvant therapy. Salvage therapy as well as relative risk of recurrence are considerations in the choice of patients to be treated. Finally, some evidence is presented to indicate that alkylating agents may not be necessary in combination regimens for adjuvant therapy if effective antimetabolite combinations are available

  6. Adjuvant Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Chakra P Chaulagain

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There is no clear consensus on what type of adjuvant therapy should be used for patients with pancreatic cancer. Chemoradiation is the favored treatment modality by many in the United States while gemcitabine based chemotherapy is favored in Europe. Both of these approaches have been shown by large prospective, randomized trials to improve disease free intervals and in some studies overall survival. This year at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium, the randomized phase III study presented by Uesaka et al. from Japan (Abstract #145 represents a newer paradigm of oral adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy in place of the traditional standard of care intravenous gemcitabine in terms of prolonging patients’ survival. Another study by Fan et al. (Abstract #269 examined the value of targeted therapy using erlotinib with adjuvant chemoradiation and chemotherapy. We present the summary of these two studies and discuss the potential impact on our clinical practice on this highly lethal cancer.

  7. Assessing pain responses during general anesthesia.

    Stomberg, M W; Sjöström, B; Haljamäe, H

    2001-06-01

    Major technical and pharmacological achievements in recent years have greatly influenced the practice of anesthesia. Clinical signs related to the main aspects of anesthesia, i.e., hypnosis, analgesia, and muscular relaxation, are increasingly obtainable from variables supplied by the monitoring equipment. It is not known, however, to what extent more indirect, patient-associated clinical signs of pain/depth of anesthesia are still considered of importance and relied on in the intraoperative management of surgical patients. The aims of the present study were to assess what clinical signs, indirect as well as monitor-derived, are considered indicative of intraoperative pain or depth of anesthesia by nurse anesthetists during general anesthesia. In connection with anesthetic management of surgical patients, Swedish nurse anesthetists (N = 40) were interviewed about clinical signs that they routinely assessed and were asked if the observed signs were considered indicative mainly of intraoperative pain or depth of anesthesia. It was found that skin-associated responses (temperature, color, moisture/stickiness) were commonly considered to indicate intraoperative pain rather than depth of anesthesia. Respiratory movements, eye reactions, and circulatory responses were considered to be indicative of either pain or insufficient depth of anesthesia. The present data indicate that indirect physiological signs are still considered of major importance by anesthesia nurses during the anesthetic management of surgical patients. PMID:11759565

  8. Muramyl dipeptide-induced adjuvant arthritis.

    Nagao, S.; Tanaka, A.

    1980-01-01

    Muramyl dipeptide, N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine, induced adjuvant arthritis in WKA rats when injected in a water-in-oil emulsion prepared with Freund incomplete adjuvant (Difco), but not when emulsified with Drackeol and Arlacel A.

  9. A Review and Prospect on Herbicide Adjuvants

    2005-01-01

    The history, present status and future prospects of adjuvants application in herbicides were briefly reviewed. Adjuvants can be separated into two groups, activator adjuvants and utility adjuvants. The former directly enhances the efficacy of a herbicide through increasement of herbicide absorption, spreading, cuticular penetration, rainfastness and retention enhancement, and photodegradation of the herbicide can also be decreased. And the latter is utilized for improving application characteristics, behaviors and physical properties of herbicides and reducing or minimizing unwanted side effects on application.

  10. Neonatal anesthesia with limited resources.

    Bösenberg, Adrian T

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are the most vulnerable age group in terms of anesthetic risk and perioperative mortality, especially in the developing world. Prematurity, malnutrition, delays in presentation, and sepsis contribute to this risk. Lack of healthcare workers, poorly maintained equipment, limited drug supplies, absence of postoperative intensive care, unreliable water supplies, or electricity are further contributory factors. Trained anesthesiologists with the skills required for pediatric and neonatal anesthesia as well as basic monitoring equipment such as pulse oximetry will go a long way to improve the unacceptably high anesthetic mortality. PMID:24251423

  11. Local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technique and feasibility of prostate brachytherapy performed with local anesthesia only. Methods and Materials: A 5 by 5 cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 cc of 1% lidocaine with epinephrine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 cc lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1.0-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and peri-apical lidocaine injections, the patient is brought to the simulator suite and placed in leg stirrups. The transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6.0-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn, for a total volume of 15 cc. The implants are done with a Mick Applicator, inserting and loading groups of two to four needles, so that a maximum of only about four needles are in the patient at any one time. During the implant procedure, an additional 1 cc of lidocaine solution is injected into one or more needle tracks if the patient experiences substantial discomfort. The total dose of lidocaine is generally limited to 500 mg (50 ml of 1% solution). Results: To date, we have implanted approximately 50 patients in our simulator suite, using local anesthesia. Patients' heart rate and diastolic blood pressure usually showed moderate changes, consistent with some discomfort. The time from first subcutaneous injection and completion of the source insertion ranged from 35 to 90 minutes. Serum lidocaine levels were below or at the low range of therapeutic. There has been only one instance of acute urinary retention in the

  12. Adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer

    Paula Ghaneh; John Slavin; Robert Sutton; Mark Hartley; John P Neoptolemos

    2001-01-01

    The outlook for patients with pancreatic cancer has been grim. There have been major advances in the surgical treatment of pancreatic csncer, leading to a drsmatic reduction in post-operative mortality from the development of high volume specialized centres. This stimulated the study of adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments in pancreatic cancer including chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy. Initial protocols have been based on the original but rather small GITSG study first reported in 1985. There have been two large European trials totalling over 600 patients (EORTC and ESPAC-1) that do not support the use of chemoradiation as adjuvant therapy. A second major finding from the ESPAC-1 trial (541 patients randomized) was some but not conclusive evidence for a survival benefit associated with chemotherapy. A third major finding from the ESPAC-1 trial was that the quality of life was not affected by the use of adjuvant treatments compared to surgery alone.The ESPAC-3 trial aims to assess the definitive use of adjuvant chemotherapy in a randomized controlled trial of 990 patients.

  13. [Voluntary interruption of pregnancy: anesthesia or sophrology].

    Ferragut, E

    1979-10-01

    General anesthesia during induced abortion has the great advantage of eliminating any physical pain; it does not do anything, however, for anxiety, guilt feeling, emotional upheaval, and postoperative depression. This study investigate sophrology, a form of anesthesia without medication, which diminishes psychic tension through comforting and sympathetic words, and corporal tension through relaxation. At the beginning of the study, which observed 7547 patients, general anesthesia was routinely used for all induced abortion patients; after 4 years of observation, general anesthesia was used on about 1.9% of patients. Judging from a questionnaire given to patients after intervention 75% of patients were completely satisfied from an emotional point of view; the same percentage judged the procedure a bit painful, but bearable; only 3.5% of patients regretted not to have opted for general anesthesia. PMID:12158285

  14. Improving vaccine delivery using novel adjuvant systems.

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    Adjuvants have been common additions to vaccines to help facilitate vaccine delivery. With advancements in vaccine technology, several adjuvants which activate immune specific responses have emerged. Available data show these adjuvants elicit important immune responses in both healthy and immunocompromised populations, as well as the elderly. Guidelines for the use and licensure of vaccine adjuvants remain under discussion. However, there is a greater understanding of the innate and adaptive immune response, and the realization of the need for immune specific adjuvants appears to be growing. This is a focused review of four adjuvants currently in clinical trial development: ASO4, ASO2A, CPG 7907, and GM-CSF. The vaccines including these adjuvants are highly relevant today, and are expected to reduce the disease burden of cervical cancer, hepatitis B and malaria. PMID:18398303

  15. Anesthesia

    ... of external growths. Although alcohol, opium or other botanicals sometimes helped alleviate the agony, most surgical patients ... of the population, such as the elderly or cancer survivors, will reveal whether certain anesthetics are better ...

  16. Local Anesthetic Adjuvants Providing the Longest Duration of Analgesia for Single- Injection Peripheral Nerve Blocks in Orthopedic Surgery: A Literature Review.

    Patacsil, Jason A; McAuliffe, Maura S; Feyh, Leah S; Sigmon, Lorie L

    2016-04-01

    Inadequate pain relief after surgery may delay surgical recovery, decrease patient satisfaction, increase length of stay, raise the risk of hospital readmissions, and increase overall healthcare costs. One way to decrease postoperative pain for patients undergoing orthopedic surgery is through the use of peripheral nerve blocks. Anesthesia providers can add many adjuvants to local anesthetics to improve quality and prolong duration of analgesia. The purpose of this literature review is to evaluate local anesthetic adjuvants to peripheral nerve blocks. A review of published studies using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Cochrane search engines was performed using predefined data fields. Based on this literature review, recommendations for practice are provided. PMID:27311150

  17. Adjuvant Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Chakra P Chaulagain; Muhammad Wasif Saif; Goodman, Martin D.; John Ng

    2011-01-01

    There is no clear consensus on what type of adjuvant therapy should be used for patients with pancreatic cancer. Chemoradiation is the favored treatment modality by many in the United States while gemcitabine based chemotherapy is favored in Europe. Both of these approaches have been shown by large prospective, randomized trials to improve disease free intervals and in some studies overall survival. This year at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposiu...

  18. Effect of general anesthesia and orthopedic surgery on serum tryptase

    Garvey, Lene H; Bech, Birgitte Louise; Mosbech, Holger; Krøigaard, Mogens; Belhage, Bo; Husum, Bent; Poulsen, Lars K

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell tryptase is used clinically in the evaluation of anaphylaxis during anesthesia, because symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis are often masked by the effect of anesthesia. No larger studies have examined whether surgery and anesthesia affect serum tryptase. The aim of this study was to...... investigate the effect of anesthesia and surgery on serum tryptase in the absence of anaphylaxis....

  19. Supplemental pulpal anesthesia for mandibular teeth

    Thangavel Boopathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical pulpal anesthesia is dependent on the interaction of three major factors. (1 the dentist (2 the patient and (3 local anesthesia. Many patients fear endodontic treatment due to a concern about pain. Although pain treatment is well managed in many endodontic patients, there exists a group of patients who do not receive adequate local anesthesia. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the possible reasons for pulpal anesthetic failures and also to focus on the measures for developing effective approaches for the same.

  20. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma

    Sebastiano Buti; Melissa Bersanelli; Maddalena Donini; Andrea Ardizzoni

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to d...

  1. Comparative Study of Intrathecal Dexamethasone with Epinephrine as Adjuvants to Lidocaine in Cesarean Section

    Fereshteh Naziri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different additives have been used with local anesthetics to provide prolonged duration of sensory block in spinal anesthesia. The aim of present study was to evaluate the onset and duration of sensory block of intrathecal dexamethasone and epinephrine as adjuvants to lidocaine in patients who were candidate for cesarean section. Materials and Methods: This double-blind clinical trial research was conducted on 90 pregnant women candidate for cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated to receive intrathecally either 75 mg hyperbaric lidocaine plus 100 μg epinephrine or 75 mg hyperbaric lidocaine plus 4 mg dexamethasone or 75 mg hyperbaric lidocaine. The onset and duration of sensory block as well as postoperative analgesia were assessed. Results: The time to reach the peak sensory block in lidocaine group was shorter than that of other two groups (p<0.001. Duration of sensory block in the control group, dexamethasone group, and epinephrine group were 64.16±7.99 min, 74.79±12.78 min, and 99.30±10.93 min, respectively (p<0.001. Conclusion: The present research shows that intrathecal dexamethasone and intrathecal epinephrine as adjuvant to lidocaine increases sensory block duration in the women candidate for cesarean section.

  2. Anesthesia Approach in Endovascular Aortic Reconstruction

    Ayşin Alagöl

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We have analyzed our initial results of our anesthesia techniques in our new-onset endovascular aortic reconstruction cases.Patients and Methods: The perioperative data of 15 elective and emergent endovascular aortic reconstruction cases that were operated in 2010-2011 were collected in a database. The choice of anesthesia was made by the risk factors, surgical team’s preferences, type and location of the aortic pathology and by the predicted operation duration. The data of local and general anesthesia cases were compared.Results: Thirteen (86.7% cases were male and 2 (13.3% female. Eleven patients were in ASA Class III. The demographic parameters, ASA classifications, concurrent diseases were similar in both groups. Thirteen (86.7% cases had infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and 2 (13.3% had Type III aortic dissection. The diastolic arterial pressures were lower in general anesthesia group in 20th and 40th minutes’ measurements just like the mean arterial pressure measurements at the 40th, 100th minutes and during the deployment of the graft. Postoperative mortality occurred in 3 (20.0% patients and they all had general anesthesia and they were operated on emergency basis. Postoperative morbidity occurred in four patients that had general anesthesia (acute renal failure, multi-organ failure and pneumonia. The other patient had atrial fibrillation on the 1st postoperative day and was converted to sinus rhythm with amiodarone infusion.Conclusion: Edovascular aortic reconstruction procedures can safely be performed with both general and local anesthesia less invasively compared to open surgery. General anesthesia may be preferred for the better hemodynamic control.

  3. Acupuncture assisted local anesthesia for penile surgeries

    Hsu, Geng-Long; Zaid, Uwais X.; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Huang, Sheng-Jean

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanism of acupuncture for analgesia is not fully elucidated, a combination of acupuncture and several methods of topical blocks for local anesthesia has been effective to patients with indications for penile surgeries on ambulatory basis. We sought to review this unique clinical application since 1998. To summarize practice-based medical literature contingent this unique application and, in contrast, the commonly agreed either general or spinal anesthesia concerning those surg...

  4. Methylphenidate Actively Induces Emergence from General Anesthesia

    Solt, Ken; Cotten, Joseph F.; Cimenser, Aylin; Wong, Kin F.K.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although accumulating evidence suggests that arousal pathways in the brain play important roles in emergence from general anesthesia, the roles of monoaminergic arousal circuits are unclear. In this study, the authors tested the hypothesis that methylphenidate (an inhibitor of dopamine and norepinephrine transporters) induces emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. Methods: Using adult rats, the authors tested the effect of intravenous methylphenidate on time to emergence...

  5. Anesthesia related Complications in Pediatric GI Endoscopy

    A Sabzevari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elective upper and lower GI endoscopy is usually performed in children on an outpatient basis with the child under sedation or general anesthesia (GA. The objective of this study was to describe Anesthesia related complications in   children undergoing elective GI endoscopy.   Materials and Methods: The study design was descriptive on 1388 patients undergoing elective GI endoscopy in Sheikh Hospital from 2009 to 2013. All patient received propofol or standard inhalational anesthesia. We examined patients’ demographic data  ,  location of GI endoscopy ,  perioperative vital singe ,  recovery time , respiratory and cardiac complications , post operative nausea and vomiting , agitation , diagnosis and outcome   Results: Pediatric patients aged 2 to 17 years. 29 % of elective GI endoscopy was upper GI endoscopy and 70.3 % was lower GI endoscopy and 0.7 was both of them. 47.7 % of Pediatric patients were female and 52.3 % was male. We haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related respiratory and cardiac complications (no apnea, no cardiac arrest. 8 patients (0.5% have transient bradicardia in post operative care Unit. 83 patients (5.9% have post operative nausea and vomiting controlled by medication.  6 patients (0.4% have post operative agitation controlled by medication.   Conclusions: General anesthesia and deep sedation in children undergoing elective GI endoscopy haven’t significant or fatal anesthesia related complications. We suggest Anesthesia for infants, young children, children with neurologic impairment, and some anxious older children undergoing elective GI endoscopy. Keyword: Anesthesia, Complication, Endoscopy, Pediatric.

  6. Anaphylaxis due to thiopental sodium anesthesia.

    Dolovich, J; Evans, S.; Rosenbloom, D; Goodacre, R; Rafajac, F O

    1980-01-01

    Anaphylaxis due to an anesthetic is one type of cardiovascular emergency that can occur during general anesthesia. Anaphylactic reactions to muscle relaxants have been documented. Barbiturates, used as sedatives, are well known to produce cutaneous reactions, but anaphylaxis after their ingestion seems to be rare. Generalized allergic reactions to thiopental sodium during anesthesia are mentioned in the product monograph for Penthothal sodium, and rare case reports of anaphylactic reactions t...

  7. Epidural anesthesia in repeated cesarean section.

    Rolando T. Espín González

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A spectacular development has been experimented in the Anesthesiology branch in the last few years in the different areas of its competence in which the attendance activity on obstetric patients as well as every aspect related with its adequate practice is of a great importance. Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of epidural anesthesia in repetitive cesarean. Methods: a descriptive retrospective study of a series of cases (112in which epidural anesthesia in repetitive cesarean was applied from January 2001 to December 2001 in the surgical unit of the Gynecological obstetric service at the University Hospital ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ in Cienfuegos city, Cuba. Some variables such as fixation time of the anesthesia, its duration, transurgical and postsurgical hemodynamic behavior, complications related with the anesthesia, evaluation of the new born baby and, the level of satisfaction of the patients were analyzed. Results: The immediate transurgical and postsurgical hemodynamic behavior was stable predominating normotension and the normal cardiac frequency. The complications related to anesthesia were minimal. The level of satisfaction of the patients was elevated. No alterations in new born babies were presented. As a conclusion, it may be stated that epidural anesthesia in repetitive cesarean is a safety and reliable anesthetic method.

  8. General anesthesia versus segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar spinal anesthesia for patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Yousef, Gamal T.; Lasheen, Ahmed E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy became the standard surgery for gallstone disease because of causing less postoperative pain, respiratory compromise and early ambulation. Objective: This study was designed to compare spinal anesthesia, (segmental thoracic or conventional lumbar) vs the gold standard general anesthesia as three anesthetic techniques for healthy patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, evaluating intraoperative parameters, postoperative recovery an...

  9. Reductions in anesthesia direct costs is not the right way for racionalization of anesthesia costs

    Majstorović Branislava M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Anesthesia management is characterized by salary limiting and pressure for decreasing anesthetics and other drug budget. The aim of this paper is to determine the possibility of reducing the direct costs in anesthesia. Materials and methods. This paper is a part of a five-year (2005-2009, academic, pharmaco-economic retrospective- prospective study (phase IV. The study was done according to European Union Directive for Clinical Research. We retrospectively calculated and analyzed all anesthesia direct costs (personnel costs, anesthetics and other drug costs, materials, laboratory analyses, and machines at the Institute For Ane- sthesia and Reanimation, Clinical Center of Serbia in relation to the costs refunded by National Health Insurance in all patients who underwent anesthesia in 2006. Results. Out of 70 195 anesthesia services rendered to 32 267 patients in one-year period, 47% were general anesthesia, 23% were local anesthesia, and 30% were anesthetic procedures. Our results of highly significant association between personnel costs (r = 0.980, p = 0.000 and consumption of anesthetics and drugs (r = 0.885, p = 0.000 with the direct costs do not provide an opportunity for further cost reduction due to disassociation of direct costs and the ”unit price” of National Health Insurance issued in terms of the restricted maximum budget for health. Conclusion. There is no space for direct cost reduction in anesthesia.

  10. Novel Adjuvants and Immunomodulators for Veterinary Vaccines

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Fang, Yongxiang; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants are crucial for efficacy of vaccines, especially subunit and recombinant vaccines. Rational vaccine design, including knowledge-based and molecularly defined adjuvants tailored for directing and potentiating specific types of host immune responses towards the antigens included in the va...

  11. Adjuvants: Classification, Modus Operandi, and Licensing

    Apostólico, Juliana de Souza

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most efficient strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases. Although safer, subunit vaccines are poorly immunogenic and for this reason the use of adjuvants is strongly recommended. Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20th century, adjuvants have been used to improve immune responses that ultimately lead to protection against disease. The choice of the adjuvant is of utmost importance as it can stimulate protective immunity. Their mechanisms of action have now been revealed. Our increasing understanding of the immune system, and of correlates of protection, is helping in the development of new vaccine formulations for global infections. Nevertheless, few adjuvants are licensed for human vaccines and several formulations are now being evaluated in clinical trials. In this review, we briefly describe the most well known adjuvants used in experimental and clinical settings based on their main mechanisms of action and also highlight the requirements for licensing new vaccine formulations.

  12. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy under local anesthesia

    Ö Karahan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: More than 85% of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT cases are due to solitary, benign parathyroid adenomas. Recently, the success rate of Tc99m sestamibi scintigraphy in localization has made minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP more prominent. MIP is as effective as conventional bilateral neck exploration. Moreover, it offers lower morbidity, cost effectiveness, and better cosmetics effects. Aim: We aimed to evaluate the success of MIP, which happens only under local anesthesia, in this study. Materials and Methods: Total of 63 patients were operated for PHPT, of which 54 had solitary adenoma. Five patients underwent bilateral neck exploration under general anesthesia for thyroid nodules or unlocalizated adenomas. A total of 49 patients underwent MIP under local anesthesia without any sedation. During MIP, gamma probe was used for all patients. The patients were followed for parathyroid functions. Results: The mean age of 49 patients with MIP (5 male, 44 female was 59 years. The mean follow-up time was 16.4 (±10.1 months (range: 2-36 months. Of the 49 patients, 47 (96% were totally cured. In 2 patients, the procedure was switched to conventional bilateral neck exploration. Temporary hypocalcaemia was noted in 4 patients. Conclusions: If the adenoma is localizated, MIP under only local anesthesia can be performed with a high success rate. Gamma probe-guided MIP under local anesthesia is an effective and safe method. It has the advantage of being minimally invasive and, therefore, it should be preferred over the conventional method.

  13. [Rapid opiate detoxification under anesthesia (RODA)].

    Dubols, N; Hallet, C; Luppens, D; Ansseau, M; Charlier, C

    2013-01-01

    Rapid Opiate Detoxification under Anesthesia (RODA) involves the use of opiate antagonists combined with anesthesia and pharmacotherapy to reduce withdrawal symptoms. The aim of our study was to measure the plasma concentrations of heroin metabolites and methadone during anesthesia and patient stay at the hospital in order to assess the amount of active substances at each protocol step. Plasma concentrations of antagonists were also quantified and compared to the recommended target values. Blood samples were drawn in 10 patients undergoing RODA at different times of the procedure (during anesthesia, in post-anesthesia care unit and in psychiatry unit). The plasma concentrations of heroin metabolites, methadone and antagonists were measured using a previously described method. Heroin active metabolites were no longer detected in the patient blood when helshe left the hospital; by contrast, methadone was still present at significant concentrations 3 days after the beginning of the detoxification procedure. Naltrexone analysis allowed us to adjust doses to insure opiate receptor blockade during acute withdrawal, which is a critical period. PMID:23888580

  14. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  15. Pediatric regional anesthesia- A comparison between pediatric spinal and caudal anesthesia

    Charu Pandya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional anesthesia in children was first studied by August Bier in 1899. Since then, spinal anesthesia was known to be practiced for several years with a series of cases published as early as in 1909-1910. (1 In 1900, Bainbridge reported a case of strangulated hernia repair under spinal anesthesia in an infant of three months(2. Thereafter, Tyrell Gray, a British surgeon published a series of 200 cases of lower abdominal surgeries in infants and children under spinal anesthesia in 1909-1910. The appearance of neuromuscular blocking agents and the development of volatile anesthetics in the forties shifted the techniques toward general anesthesia. However, spinal pediatric anesthesia did not disappear. In 1901, Sicard and Cathelin introduced independently the caudal approach in the anesthetic practice. The first publication that mentions this technique in children was written by Campbell in 1933 and the second one by Leigh and Belton in 1951. Subsequently, Fortuna (1963 in Brazil, Melman(10 (1973 in Mexico, Takasaki (1977 in Japan, Ecoffey(7 (1985 in France, and Rash (1995 in USA, introduced these techniques in their countries. The caudal technique is extensively described by Key in 1994. When regional anesthesia is given to older children, some variables such as the intervention site, age, and presence of chronic disease, cooperativeness and parental preferences should be considered. In present study we compared caudal block with spinal block in pediatric patients.

  16. Transient Neurological Symptoms after Spinal Anesthesia

    Zehra Hatipoglu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine has been used for more than 50 years for spinal anesthesia and has a remarkable safety record. In 1993, a new adverse effect, transient neurologic toxicity was described in patients recovering from spinal anesthesia with lidocaine. Transient neurological symptoms have been defined as pain in the lower extremities (buttocks, thighs and legs after an uncomplicated spinal anesthesia and after an initial full recovery during the immediate postoperative period (less than 24 h. The incidence of transient neurological symptoms reported in prospective, randomized trials varies from 4% to 37%. The etiology of transient neurological symptoms remains unkonwn. Despite the transient nature of this syndrome, it has proven to be difficult to treat effectively. Drug or some interventional therapy may be necessary. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 33-44

  17. After Anesthesia: The Patient's Active Role Assists in Recovery

    ... after—an anesthetic is given. Before anesthesia, a preoperative interview with your anesthesia professional supplies valuable information ... to your mental state as well. Moreover, the anxiety that frequently accompanies important decisions is to be ...

  18. Are Anesthesia Providers Ready for Hypnosis? Anesthesia Providers' Attitudes Toward Hypnotherapy.

    Stone, Alexander B; Sheinberg, Rosanne; Bertram, Amanda; Seymour, Anastasia Rowland

    2016-04-01

    This study sought to measure current attitudes toward hypnosis among anesthesia providers using an in-person survey distributed at a single grand rounds at a single academic teaching hospital. One hundred twenty-six anesthesia providers (anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists) were included in this study. A 10-question Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved questionnaire was developed. One hundred twenty-six (73% of providers at the meeting) anesthesia providers completed the survey. Of the respondents, 54 (43%) were anesthesiologists, 42 (33%) were trainees (interns/residents/fellows) in anesthesia, and 30 (24%) were nurse anesthetists. Over 70% of providers, at each level of training, rated their knowledge of hypnosis as either below average or having no knowledge. Fifty-two (42%) providers agreed or strongly agreed that hypnotherapy has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia, while 103 (83%) believed that positive suggestion has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia (p hypnosis were that it is too time consuming (41%) and requires special training (34%). Only three respondents (2%) believed that there were no reasons for using hypnosis in their practice. These data suggest that there is a self-reported lack of knowledge about hypnosis among anesthesia providers, although many anesthesia providers are open to the use of hypnosis in their clinical practice. Anesthesia providers are more likely to support the use of positive suggestion in their practice than hypnosis. Practical concerns should be addressed if hypnosis and therapeutic verbal techniques are to gain more widespread use. PMID:27003489

  19. Convulsions during cataract surgery under peribulbar anesthesia: a case report

    Bensghir, Mustapha; Badou, Najlae; Houba, Abdelhafid; Balkhi, Hicham; Haimeur, Charki; Azendour, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Locoregional anesthesia techniques are increasingly used for cataract surgery. From these techniques, peribulbar anesthesia has been very successful over the retrobulbar anesthesia seen its effectiveness and safety. However, peribulbar anesthesia is not without risk. Case presentation A 70-year-old African man was scheduled for cataract surgery and lens implant for his right eye. His medical history included hypertension, diabetes mellitus and gall bladder surgery. There were no ...

  20. Phrenic nerve blocage with spinal anesthesia for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication

    Murat Dursun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case, we describe a patient having laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF under spinal anesthesia with phrenic nerve blockade. It’s emphasized that in this type of operations, spinal anesthesia may be an alternative method rather the general anesthesia and the resulting shoulder pain in laparoscopic surgery performed under spinal anesthesia can be prevented by phrenic nerve blockade. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (2: 186-188

  1. Anesthesia for pediatric external beam radiation therapy

    Background: For very young patients, anesthesia is often required for radiotherapy. This results in multiple exposures to anesthetic agents over a short period of time. We report a consecutive series of children anesthetized for external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods: Five hundred twelve children ≤ 16 years old received EBRT from January 1983 to February 1996. Patient demographics, diagnosis, anesthesia techniques, monitoring, airway management, complications, and outcome were recorded for the patients requiring anesthesia. Results: One hundred twenty-three of the 512 children (24%) required 141 courses of EBRT with anesthesia. Anesthetized patients ranged in age from 20 days to 11 years (mean 2.6 ± 1.8 ). The frequency of a child receiving EBRT and requiring anesthesia by age cohort was: ≤ 1 year (96%), 1-2 years (93%), 2-3 years (80%), 3-4 years (51%), 4-5 years (36%), 5-6 years (13%), 6-7 years (11%), and 7-16 years (0.7%). Diagnoses included: primary CNS tumor (28%), retinoblastoma (27%), neuroblastoma (20%), acute leukemia (9%), rhabdomyosarcoma (6%), and Wilms' tumor (4%). Sixty-three percent of the patients had been exposed to chemotherapy prior to EBRT. The mean number of anesthesia sessions per patient was 22 ± 16. Seventy-eight percent of the treatment courses were once daily and 22% were twice daily. Anesthesia techniques included: short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (21%), inhalation only (20%), ketamine (19%), propofol only (12%), propofol induction + inhalation maintenance (7%), ketamine induction + inhalation maintenance (6%), ketamine or short-acting barbiturate induction + inhalation maintenance (6%). Monitoring techniques included: EKG (95%), O2 saturation (93%), fraction of inspired O2 (57%), and end-tidal CO2 (55%). Sixty-four percent of patients had central venous access. Eleven of the 74 children with a central line developed sepsis (15%): 6 of the 11 were anesthetized with propofol (55%), 4 with a short

  2. Glucocorticosteroids: as Adjuvant Therapy for Bacterial Infections

    WONDIM MELKAM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs, synthetic analogues of the natural steroid hormones, are well known for their antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive properties in the periphery. They are widely and successfully used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, and transplant rejection. Nowadays, GCs are claimed to have a beneficial role being as adjunct therapy in various infections. Different studies have been conducted to investigate their use as adjuvant therapy for different bacterial infection. This review, therefore, summarizes various bacterial infections for which glucocorticoids are reported to be used as adjuvant therapy, strategies for administration of glucocorticoids, and challenges of using glucocorticoids as adjuvant therapy.

  3. Effect of general anesthesia and orthopedic surgery on serum tryptase

    Garvey, Lene H; Bech, Birgitte Louise; Mosbech, Holger;

    2010-01-01

    Mast cell tryptase is used clinically in the evaluation of anaphylaxis during anesthesia, because symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis are often masked by the effect of anesthesia. No larger studies have examined whether surgery and anesthesia affect serum tryptase. The aim of this study was to inve...

  4. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5240 - Anesthesia breathing circuit.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia breathing circuit. 868.5240 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5240 Anesthesia breathing circuit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia breathing circuit is a device that is intended to administer medical gases to...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5170 - Laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator. 868... topical anesthesia applicator. (a) Identification. A laryngotracheal topical anesthesia applicator is a device used to apply topical anesthetics to a patient's laryngotracheal area. (b) Classification....

  7. Nurse Anesthetists' Perceptions Regarding Utilization of Anesthesia Support Personnel

    Ford, Mary Bryant

    2010-01-01

    Anesthesia support personnel (ASP) provide direct support to health care providers administering anesthesia (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists [CRNAs] and anesthesiologists). Because these anesthesia providers are caring for a patient whom they cannot legally or ethically leave unattended, ASP are employed to bring them extra supplies or…

  8. 21 CFR 868.5140 - Anesthesia conduction kit.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction kit. 868.5140 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5140 Anesthesia conduction kit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction kit is a device used to administer to a patient conduction, regional,...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5130 - Anesthesia conduction filter.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction filter. 868.5130 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5130 Anesthesia conduction filter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction filter is a microporous filter used while administering to a...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5150 - Anesthesia conduction needle.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction needle. 868.5150 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5150 Anesthesia conduction needle. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction needle is a device used to inject local anesthetics into a patient...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  12. [Comparative assessment of inhalation anesthesia with sevofluran and intravenous anesthesia with propofol for carotid endarterectomy].

    Neĭmark, M I; Shmelev, V V; Simagin, V Iu

    2009-01-01

    Total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and inhalation sevofluran was assessed in 130 patients with carotid endarterectomy. The parameters of brain blood circulation, brain damage markers were studied. It was shown that sevofluran anesthesia caused less depression of the hemodynamic parameters, supported more optimum level of brain blood flow that limited ischemic and reperfusion damage of the brain and was accompanied by a fewer number of postoperative complications. PMID:20209996

  13. Adjuvant Bisphosphonates for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

    A summary of a meta-analysis of randomized trials of bisphosphonates as adjuvant therapy for women with early-stage breast cancer that shows the drugs can reduce the rate of disease recurrence in bone.

  14. Update on complications in pediatric anesthesia

    Giovanni de Francisci

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Complications in pediatric anesthesia can happen, even in our modern hospitals with the most advanced equipment and skilled anesthesiologists. It is important, albeit in a tranquil and reassuring way, to inform parents of the possibility of complications and, in general, of the anesthetic risks. This is especially imperative when speaking to the parents of children who will be operated on for minor procedures: in our experience, they tend to think that the anesthesia will be a light anesthesia without risks. Often the surgeons tell them that the operation is very simple without stressing the fact that it will be done under general anesthesia which is identical to the one we give for major operations. Different is the scenario for the parents of children who are affected by malignant neoplasms: in these cases they already know that the illness is serious. They have this tremendous burden and we choose not to add another one by discussing anesthetic risks, so we usually go along with the examination of the child without bringing up the possibility of complications, unless there is some specific problem such as a mediastinal mass.

  15. [Anesthesia in the Signal Processing Methods].

    Gu, Jiajun; Huang, Yan; Ye, Jilun; Wang, Kaijun; Zhang, Meimei

    2015-09-01

    Anesthesia plays an essential role in clinical operations. Guiding anesthesia by EEG signals is one of the most promising methods at present and it has obtained good results. The analysis and process of the EEG signals in anesthesia can provide clean signal for further research. This paper used variance threshold method to remove the mutation fast and large interfering signals; and used notch filter to remove frequency interference, smoothing filter to remove baseline drift and Butterworth low-pass filter to remove high frequency noise at the same time. In addition to this, the translation invariant wavelet method to remove interference noise on the signals which was after the classical filter and retained non-stationary characteristics was used to evaluate parameter calculation. By comparing the calculated parameters from treated signal using this paper's methods and untreated signal and standard signal, the standard deviation and correlation has been improved, particularly the major parameters BetaR, which provides better signal for integration of multi-parameter to evaluate depth of anesthesia index for the latter. PMID:26904870

  16. Regional anesthesia techniques for ambulatory orthopedic surgery.

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to present advances in the use of regional anesthetic techniques in ambulatory orthopedic surgery. New findings regarding the use of both neuraxial anesthesia and peripheral nerve block are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuraxial anesthesia: The use of short-acting local anesthetic agents such as mepivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and articaine permits rapid onset intrathecal anesthesia with early recovery profiles. Advantages and limitations of these agents are discussed.Peripheral nerve block: Peripheral nerve blocks in limb surgery have the potential to transform this patient cohort into a truly ambulatory, self-caring group. Recent trends and evidence regarding the benefits of regional anesthesia techniques are presented.Continuous perineural catheters permit extension of improved perioperative analgesia into the ambulatory home setting. The role and reported safety of continuous catheters are discussed. SUMMARY: In summary, shorter acting, neuraxial, local anesthetic agents, specific to the expected duration of surgery, may provide superior recovery profiles in the ambulatory setting. A trend towards more peripheral and selective nerve blocks exists. The infrapatellar block is a promising technique to provide analgesia following knee arthroscopy. Improved analgesia seen in the perioperative period can be safely and effectively extended to the postoperative period with the use of perineural catheters.

  17. Respiratory Monitoring for Anesthesia and Sedation

    Anderson, Jay A.

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the theory and practice of routine respiratory monitoring during anesthesia and sedation. Oxygen monitoring and capnography methods are reviewed. The current ventilation monitoring system of choice is considered a combination of the pulse oximeter and capnography. Guidelines are provided for monitoring standards.

  18. General anesthesia for horses with specific problems

    We have discussed anesthetic techniques, special considerations, and expected complications involved in anesthetizing horses for abdominal, orthopedic, and head and neck surgery, and myelography and have described expected physiologic dysfunction that may require changes in anesthetic technique or supportive measures. The objective is high-quality patient care and reduction in anesthesia-related morbidity and death

  19. The Biochemical Impact of Surgery and Anesthesia

    J.W. Hol (Jaap Willem)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ General anesthesia has been considered by some medical historians as one of the most important contributions to modern medicine second to perhaps the concept of antiseptic medicine and hygiene. The first historical mention of a deep unnatural sleep so that surgery can t

  20. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING...

  1. Testing haptic sensations for spinal anesthesia.

    2011-01-01

    Having identified key determinants of teaching and learning spinal anesthesia, it was necessary to characterize and render the haptic sensations (feeling of touch) associated with needle insertion in the lower back. The approach used is to match recreated sensations (eg, "pop" through skin or dura mater) with experts\\' perceptions of the equivalent clinical events.

  2. Anesthesia for the patient with dementia

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    With a growing aging population, more patients suffering from dementia are expected to undergo surgery, thus being exposed to either general or regional anesthesia. This calls for specific attention ranging from the legal aspects of obtaining informed consent in demented patients to deciding on the...

  3. Anesthesia for the patient with dementia

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    With a growing aging population, more patients suffering from dementia are expected to undergo surgery, thus being exposed to either general or regional anesthesia. This calls for specific attention ranging from the legal aspects of obtaining informed consent in demented patients to deciding on the...

  4. A Wavelet Transform Based Method to Determine Depth of Anesthesia to Prevent Awareness during General Anesthesia

    Seyed Mortaza Mousavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Awareness during general anesthesia for its serious psychological effects on patients and some juristically problems for anesthetists has been an important challenge during past decades. Monitoring depth of anesthesia is a fundamental solution to this problem. The induction of anesthesia alters frequency and mean of amplitudes of the electroencephalogram (EEG, and its phase couplings. We analyzed EEG changes for phase coupling between delta and alpha subbands using a new algorithm for depth of general anesthesia measurement based on complex wavelet transform (CWT in patients anesthetized by Propofol. Entropy and histogram of modulated signals were calculated by taking bispectral index (BIS values as reference. Entropies corresponding to different BIS intervals using Mann-Whitney U test showed that they had different continuous distributions. The results demonstrated that there is a phase coupling between 3 and 4 Hz in delta and 8-9 Hz in alpha subbands and these changes are shown better at the channel T7 of EEG. Moreover, when BIS values increase, the entropy value of modulated signal also increases and vice versa. In addition, measuring phase coupling between delta and alpha subbands of EEG signals through continuous CWT analysis reveals the depth of anesthesia level. As a result, awareness during anesthesia can be prevented.

  5. Comparison of Anesthesia Quality for Arthroscopic Knee Surgery: Combined Sciatic Femoral Block and Unilateral Spinal Anesthesia

    Sinem Sarı

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to evaluate the quality of anesthesia of combined sciatic and femoral 3-in-1 nerve blocks (CSFB and unilateral spinal anesthesia technique with low-dose levobupivacaine in outpatients undergoing knee arthroscopy surgery. Materials and Methods: Forty American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status I-II patients were randomly allocated into two groups and unilateral spinal anesthesia with low-dose levobupivacaine (group S, n=20 or CSFB (group B, n=20 was performed. Besides the quality of anesthesia, anesthetic effectiveness, hemodynamic values, duration of the technique application, maximum motor and sensorial block levels and durations, the first analgesics need, and total analgesic consumptions during postoperative 24 hours and determined complications were compared between the two groups. Results: The quality of anesthesia was better in group S, no patient received either sedation or analgesic intraoperatively while first analgesic need and number of patient was higher (p=0.014, p<0.001, p=0.032 respectively. The duration of technical application was shorter while maximum motor and sensorial block levels were higher in group S (p<0.0001, p=0.008, p<0.001 respectively. Motor block duration was significantly longer in group B (p<0.0001. Conclusion: We concluded that CSFB practice is an effective anesthetic alternative for unilateral spinal anesthesia. Introduction

  6. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  7. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  8. Role of intraseptal anesthesia for pain-free dental treatment

    G Gazal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain control during the dental procedure is essentials and challenging. A complete efficacious pulp anesthesia has not been attained yet. The regional anesthesia such as inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB only does not guarantee the effective anesthesia with patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis. This main aim of this review was to discuss various aspects of intraseptal dental anesthesia and its role significance in pain-free treatment in the dental office. In addition, reasons of failure and limitations of this technique have been highlighted. Literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published in English language in last 30 years. Search words such as dental anesthesia, pain control, intraseptal, and nerve block were entered using a web of knowledge and Google scholar databases. Various dental local anesthesia techniques were reviewed. A combination of block anesthesia, buccal infiltration and intraligamentary injection resulted in deep anesthesia (P = 0.003, and higher success rate compared to IANB. For pain-free management of conditions such as irreversible pulpitis, buccal infiltration (4% articaine, and intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine are better than intraligamentary and IANB injections. Similarly, nerve block is not always effective for pain-free root canal treatment hence, needing supplemental anesthesia. Intraseptal anesthesia is an efficient and effective technique that can be used in maxillary and mandibular adult dentition. This technique is also beneficial when used in conjunction to the regional block or local dental anesthesia.

  9. Role of intraseptal anesthesia for pain-free dental treatment.

    Gazal, G; Fareed, W M; Zafar, M S

    2016-01-01

    Pain control during the dental procedure is essentials and challenging. A complete efficacious pulp anesthesia has not been attained yet. The regional anesthesia such as inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) only does not guarantee the effective anesthesia with patients suffering from irreversible pulpitis. This main aim of this review was to discuss various aspects of intraseptal dental anesthesia and its role significance in pain-free treatment in the dental office. In addition, reasons of failure and limitations of this technique have been highlighted. Literature search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published in English language in last 30 years. Search words such as dental anesthesia, pain control, intraseptal, and nerve block were entered using a web of knowledge and Google scholar databases. Various dental local anesthesia techniques were reviewed. A combination of block anesthesia, buccal infiltration and intraligamentary injection resulted in deep anesthesia (P = 0.003), and higher success rate compared to IANB. For pain-free management of conditions such as irreversible pulpitis, buccal infiltration (4% articaine), and intraosseous injection (2% lidocaine) are better than intraligamentary and IANB injections. Similarly, nerve block is not always effective for pain-free root canal treatment hence, needing supplemental anesthesia. Intraseptal anesthesia is an efficient and effective technique that can be used in maxillary and mandibular adult dentition. This technique is also beneficial when used in conjunction to the regional block or local dental anesthesia. PMID:26955316

  10. Adjuvant interferon treatment for melanoma.

    Agarwala, S S; Kirkwood, J M

    1998-08-01

    After decades of research, the adjuvant therapy of patients with melanoma has recently shown significant survival and relapse-free interval benefit for the intravenous and subcutaneous administration of maximally tolerable dosages of recombinant IFN alpha 2b in a trial conducted by the ECOG (E1684). Despite the toxicity of this therapy, retrospective analyses of its impact upon quality-of-life using Q-TWiST methods and cost-efficacy analyses all argue for the benefit and utility of this intervention, especially for node-positive patients with resectable melanoma at highest risk of relapse. A confirmatory trial has been completed and will mature in the spring of 1998. The impact of lower dosages of IFN, apparent transiently during and for a period of time following treatment has not been sustained with longer follow-up in a number of trials. Current approaches in Europe and North America focus upon refinement of dose and duration of treatment with IFN and their potential interactions with, and comparison with, active specific immunotherapy with vaccines. A recently emerging area of research is the patient with stage IIA melanoma and the potential role of an abbreviated high-dose regimen of IFN alpha in this patient subset. PMID:9759581

  11. COMPARISON OF INTRAVENOUS MAGNESIUM AND PLACEBO ADMINISTRATION ON POSTOPERATIVE PAIN AND ANALGESIC CONSUMPTION DURING SPINAL ANESTHESIA FOR INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

    Olapour A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that magnesium may be a useful adjuvant to postoperative analgesia. We investigated efficacy of intravenous infusion of magnesium sulfate during spinal anesthesia to reduce post-operative pain and opioid consumption in patients undergoing inguinal hernia surgery.We randomly divided one hundred patients’ age 18-55 years old and ASA class I-II undergoing inguinal surgery into two groups. The magnesium group (Group M received magnesium sulfate 50 mg/kg in 100 ml normal saline intravenously within 10 minutes and 15 mg/kg/h by continuous infusion during the operation in one hour. The control group (Group S received the same amount of normal saline without magnesium sulfate. All patients received spinal anesthesia. Postoperative pain scores, meperidine consumption, and motor block were evaluated during 24 hours after surgery.Postoperative pain scores were significantly lower in Group M at 2, 3, 4 and 6 hours after surgery (P<0.05. Motor block was longer in Group M (P<0.05. Cumulative postoperative meperidine consumptions were also significantly lower in Group M at 24 h after surgery (P<0.05. 12% nausea and 26% flashing have been reported in Group M. A bolus and intravenous infusion of magnesium sulfate administration during spinal anesthesia improves postoperative analgesia. IRCT201201088645N1.

  12. Review: Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses

    RAJPUT Zahid Iqbal; HU Song-hua; XIAO Chen-wen; ARIJO Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines,ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund's complete adjuvant, Freund's incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc.,are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed.

  13. Anesthesia for cesarean section in pregnancies complicated by placenta previa

    Objective was to evaluate the factors affecting the choice of anesthetic technique for cesarean section in women with placenta previa. In this retrospective study, the records of the labor Ward Theatre of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria were examined from January 2000 to December 2004 to identify all the women who had cesarean section for placenta previa. The patient's socio-demographic characteristics, type of placenta previa, anesthesia technique, estimated blood loss, maternal and fetal outcomes were recorded. One hundred and twenty-six patients had cesarean section for placenta previa, however, only 81 patients 64.3% were available for analysis. General anesthesia was administered to 52/81 patients 64.2% and 29/81 patients 35.8% received spinal anesthesia. A history of antepartum bleeding was recorded in 61.7% n=50. Of 31 patients without antepartum hemorrhage APH, 15/31 had general anesthesia and 16/31 had spinal anesthesia. The patients who had APH, 37/50 had general anesthesia and 1/50 had spinal anesthesia. There was an increased chance of using general anesthesia and if APH were present p=0.03, odds ratio=3.1, 95% confidence interval=1.2-7.7. Spinal anesthesia may useful in patients with placenta previa. The presence of APH may encourage the use of general anesthesia for cesarean delivery. (author)

  14. The comparison of anesthesia effect of lung surgery through video-assisted thoracic surgery: A meta-analysis

    Jing-Dong Ke

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results indicated that epidural anesthesia can save operating time and postoperative hospital stay time. But epidural anesthesia and general anesthesia have the same effect on complications.

  15. General anesthesia plus ilioinguinal nerve block versus spinal anesthesia for ambulatory inguinal herniorrhapy

    Lucía Vizcaíno-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to evaluate general anesthesia (GA plus ilioinguinal nerve block (IIB versus spinal anesthesia (SA in patients scheduled for ambulatory inguinal hernia repair regarding pain management, anesthesia recovery and reducing potential complications. Materials and Methods: A double-blind, prospective, randomized, controlled study in patients American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III randomized into two groups: GA plus IIB group, induction of anesthesia with propofol, maintenance with sevoflurane, airway management with laryngeal mask allowing spontaneous ventilation and ultrasound-guided IIB; SA group, patients who underwent spinal block with 2% mepivacaine. The study variables were pain intensity, assessed by visual analog scale, analgesic requirements until hospital discharge, time to ambulation and discharge, postoperative complications-related to both techniques and satisfaction experienced. Results: Thirty-two patients were enrolled; 16 patients in each group. The differences regarding pain were statistically significant at 2 h of admission (P < 0.001 and at discharge (P < 0.001 in favor of the GA plus ilioinguinal block group. In addition in this group, analgesic requirements were lower than SA group (P < 0.001, with times of ambulation and discharge significantly shorter. The SA group had a higher tendency to develop complications and less satisfaction. Conclusion: General anesthesia plus IIB is better than SA regarding postoperative analgesia, time to mobilization and discharge, side-effect profile and satisfaction experienced by the patients.

  16. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    Buti, Sebastiano; Bersanelli, Melissa; Donini, Maddalena; Ardizzoni, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC. PMID:25992216

  17. Systemic adjuvant therapies in renal cell carcinoma

    Sebastiano Buti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is one of the ten most frequent solid tumors worldwide. Recent innovations in the treatment of metastatic disease have led to new therapeutic approaches being investigated in the adjuvant setting. Observation is the only current standard of care after radical nephrectomy, although there is evidence of efficacy of adjuvant use of vaccine among all the strategies used. This article aims to collect published experiences with systemic adjuvant approaches in RCC and to describe the results of past and ongoing phase III clinical trials in this field. We explored all the systemic treatments, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted drugs while alternative approaches have also been described. Appropriate selection of patients who would benefit from adjuvant therapies remains a crucial dilemma. Although the international guidelines do not actually recommend any adjuvant treatment after radical surgery for RCC, no conclusions have yet been drawn pending the results of the promising ongoing clinical trials with the target therapies. The significant changes that these new drugs have made on advanced disease outcome could represent the key to innovation in terms of preventing recurrence, delaying relapse and prolonging survival after radical surgery for RCC.

  18. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines. PMID:26928033

  19. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  20. Acupuncture in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Norheim AJ; Liodden I; Alræk T

    2015-01-01

    Arne Johan Norheim,1 Ingrid Liodden,1 Terje Alræk1,2 1National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM), Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 2The Norwegian School of Health Sciences, Institute of Acupuncture, Kristiania University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: Post-anesthetic morbidities remain challenging in our daily practice of anesthesia. Meta-an...

  1. Assessment of propofol anesthesia in the rabbit

    Campos, Sónia Patrícia Seabra

    2010-01-01

    The growing interests in propofol as an intravenous anesthetic agent and in particular to its use in rabbits were the motivation for this work. The rabbit is the third most common pet, and is also used as a biomedical research model in a wide range of science branches such as pharmacology, toxicology, anesthesiology and surgery. The main goal of this study was to explore the effects of Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol in rabbits. Different infusion rates were administrated...

  2. Human factors research in anesthesia patient safety.

    Weinger, M.B.; Slagle, J.

    2001-01-01

    Patient safety has become a major public concern. Human factors research in other high-risk fields has demonstrated how rigorous study of factors that affect job performance can lead to improved outcome and reduced errors after evidence-based redesign of tasks or systems. These techniques have increasingly been applied to the anesthesia work environment. This paper describes data obtained recently using task analysis and workload assessment during actual patient care and the use of cognitive ...

  3. A Computerized Record System for Anesthesia Services

    Chase, Christopher R.; Merz, Barbara A.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed a computerized record system, the CAPE system, which supports patient management, administrative and research applications for anesthesia services in our hospital, the Medical Center Hospital of Vermont. In this paper we briefly describe the CAPE system and, as an example of its use in our hospital, we describe the development and implementation of a preoperative screening program used to identify patients at high risk to postoperative respiratory complications.

  4. The National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry.

    Liau, Adrian; Havidich, Jeana E; Onega, Tracy; Dutton, Richard P

    2015-12-01

    The Anesthesia Quality Institute (AQI) was chartered in 2008 by the American Society of Anesthesiologists to develop the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR). In this Technical Communication, we will describe how data enter NACOR, how they are authenticated, and how they are analyzed and reported. NACOR accepts case-level administrative, clinical, and quality capture data from voluntarily participating anesthesia practices and health care facilities in the United States. All data are transmitted to the AQI in summary electronic files generated by billing, quality capture, and electronic health care record software, typically on a monthly basis. All data elements are mapped to fields in the NACOR schema in accordance with a publicly available data dictionary. Incoming data are loaded into NACOR by AQI technologists and are subject to both manual and automated review to identify systematically missing elements, miscoding, and inadvertent corruption. Data are deidentified in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations. The database server of AQI, which houses the NACOR database, is protected by 2 firewalls within the American Society of Anesthesiologists' network infrastructure; this system has not been breached. The NACOR Participant User File, a deidentified case-level dataset of information from NACOR, is available to researchers at participating institutions. NACOR architecture and the nature of the Participant User File include both strengths and weaknesses. PMID:26579661

  5. [Chronic pain and regional anesthesia in children].

    Dadure, C; Marec, P; Veyckemans, F; Beloeil, H

    2013-10-01

    Chronic pain is usually underestimated in children, due to lack of knowledge and its specific signs. In addition to suffering, chronic pain causes a physical, psychological, emotional, social, and financial burden for the child and his family. Practitioners may find themselves in a situation of failure with depletion of medical resources. Some types of chronic pain are refractory to conventional systemic treatment and may require the use of regional anesthesia. Cancer pain is common in children and its medical management is sometimes insufficient. It is accessible to neuroaxial or peripheral techniques of regional anesthesia if it is limited to an area accessible to one of these techniques and no contraindications (e.g., thrombopenia) are present. Complex regional pain syndrome 1 is not rare in children and adolescents, but it often goes undiagnosed. Regional anesthesia may contribute to the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome 1, mainly in case of recurrence, because it provides rapid effective analgesia and allows rapid implementation of intensive physiotherapy. These techniques have also shown interest in phantom limb pain after limb amputation, but they remain controversial for erythromelalgia pain or chronic abdominopelvic pain. Finally, the treatment of postdural puncture headache due to cerebrospinal fluid leak can be treated by performing an epidural injection of the patient's blood, called a blood-patch. Finally, the management of children with chronic pain should be multidisciplinary (pediatrician, physiotherapist, psychologist, surgeon, anesthesiologist) to support the child and her problem in its entirety. PMID:23953871

  6. General versus epidural anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy.

    Ulutas, Murat; Secer, Mehmet; Taskapilioglu, Ozgur; Karadas, Soner; Akyilmaz, Ahmet Aykut; Baydilek, Yunus; Kocamer, Betul; Ozboz, Ayse; Boyaci, Suat

    2015-08-01

    This study was a retrospective analysis of 850 lumbar microdiscectomy (LMD) under epidural anesthesia (EA; n=573) or general anesthesia (GA; n=277) performed by the same surgeon and paid by invoice to the Social Security Institution of the Turkish Republic between April 2003 and May 2013. Although GA is the most frequently used method of anesthesia during LMD, the choice of regional anesthetia (epidural, spinal or a combination of these) differs between surgeons and anesthetists. Studies have reported that EA in surgery for lumbar disc herniation may be more reliable than GA, as it enables the surgeon to communicate with the patient during surgery, but few studies have compared the costs of these two anesthetic methods in LMD. We found that EA patient costs were significantly lower than GA patient costs (p0.05). The anesthetic method used during LMD affected the complication rate, cost and efficiency of operating room use. We suggest that EA is an anesthetic method that can contribute to health care cost savings and enable LMD to be completed with less nerve root manipulation and more comfort, efficacy, reliability and cost efficiency without affecting the success rate of the surgical procedure. PMID:26067543

  7. Does lipophilicity per se induce adjuvant effects?

    Hansen, Jitka Stilund; Larsen, Søren Thor; Poulsen, Lars K.;

    2007-01-01

    ) or on lung function parameters. Thus, MP did not possess irritant or inflammatory properties, which may be a precursive stimulus for adjuvant effects. Second, mice were exposed to aerosols of MP, 6 or 323 mg/m3, for 1 h followed by a 20-min low-dose ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. OVA only and OVA + Al......Anthopogenically introduced substances and pollutants are suspected to promote sensitization and development of allergic airway diseases, that is, acting as adjuvants. Lipophilicity may serve as an immunological warning signal, promoting adjuvant effects. Whether the lipophilicity of an inhaled...... compound induces immunomodulatory effects was investigated in a murine inhalation model with the highly lipophilic methyl palmitate (MP) as model substance. First, studies of acute effects following a 1-h exposure of up to 348 mg/m3 MP showed no effects on cell composition in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL...

  8. Mycophenolate mofetil as adjuvant in pemphigus vulgaris

    Sarma Nilendu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is a life threatening autoimmune blistering disease of skin and mucous membranes. Advent of systemic steroids has greatly reduced the mortality rate. However, steroids and adjuvant immunosuppressive therapy are nowadays frequent contributory agents of morbidity and mortality of PV. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF has been reported to be an effective adjuvant to systemic steroids. It helps in increasing the immunosuppressive effect and minimizing the toxicities by steroid sparing effect. However, its efficacy in refractory cases of PV is not well documented. The lowest possible dose with satisfactory therapeutic efficacy and least side effects is known. We used MMF 1 g/day and systemic steroids in 3 Indian patients with pemphigus vulgaris who were resistant to systemic steroid monotherapy or combination treatment with azathioprine. In our experience, MMF offers an effective adjuvant with minimal side-effects in the treatment of resistant PV.

  9. A Comparative study of intrathecal dexmedetomidine and fentanyl as adjuvants to Bupivacaine

    Rajni Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various adjuvants have been used with local anesthetics in spinal anesthesia to avoid intraoperative visceral and somatic pain and to provide prolonged postoperative analgesia. Dexmedetomidine, the new highly selective α2-agonist drug, is now being used as a neuraxial adjuvant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the onset and duration of sensory and motor block, hemodynamic effect, postoperative analgesia, and adverse effects of dexmedetomidine or fentanyl given intrathecally with hyperbaric 0.5% bupivacaine. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients classified in American Society of Anesthesiologists classes I and II scheduled for lower abdominal surgeries were studied. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine plus 5 μg dexmedetomidine (group D, n=30 or 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine plus 25 μg fentanyl (group F, n=30 intrathecal. Results: Patients in dexmedetomidine group (D had a significantly longer sensory and motor block time than patients in fentanyl group (F. The mean time of sensory regression to S1 was 476±23 min in group D and 187±12 min in group F (P<0.001. The regression time of motor block to reach modified Bromage 0 was 421±21 min in group D and 149±18 min in group F (P<0.001. Conclusions: Intrathecal dexmedetomidine is associated with prolonged motor and sensory block, hemodynamic stability, and reduced demand for rescue analgesics in 24 h as compared to fentanyl.

  10. Dental treatment of handicapped patients using endotracheal anesthesia.

    Pohl, Y.; A. Filippi; GEIGER, G.; Kirschner, H; Boll, M.

    1996-01-01

    Dental treatment using endotracheal anesthesia is indicated where acute odontogenic infections, accidental injuries, or multiple caries and periodontitis marginalis require surgical and/or restorative treatment. It is also indicated where it is not possible to use psychological support during local anesthesia or during premedication or analgosedation. Dental treatment of handicapped patients using endotracheal anesthesia is described, along with indication and frequency of such treatment. The...

  11. 25 gauge vitrectomy under topical anesthesia: A pilot study

    Raju Biju; Raju NSD; Raju Anju

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transconjunctival 25 gauge vitrectomy under topical anesthesia. Settings and Design: A pilot study of consecutive cases which underwent 25 gauge vitrectomy under topical anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Seven eyes of 7 patients underwent 25 gauge vitrectomy under topical anesthesia with a pledget soaked in anesthetic, for vitreous hemorrhage (2 eyes), retained cortex (1 eye) and postoperative endophthalmitis (4 eyes). Subjective pain and dis...

  12. Modeling the dynamical effects of anesthesia on brain circuits

    Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N

    2014-01-01

    General anesthesia is a neurophysiological state that consists of unconsciousness, amnesia, analgesia, and immobility along with maintenance of physiological stability. General anesthesia has been used in the United States for more than 167 years. Now, using systems neuroscience paradigms how anesthetics act in the brain and central nervous system to create the states of general anesthesia is being understood. Propofol is one of the most widely used and the most widely studied anesthetics. Wh...

  13. [Adjuvant chemotherapy of adults soft tissue sarcomas].

    Bui-Nguyen, B; Italiano, A; Delva, F; Toulmond, M

    2010-06-01

    The main progress in the management of soft tissue sarcomas have been obtained in the field of local control. Although the main evolutive, vital, risk of these diseases is metastatic dissemination, efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy remains a controversial issue. Thus, adjuvant chemotherapy cannot be considered as a standard for any situation. The last results of clinical trials, meta-analysis and population studies are presented and discussed in this article. New therapeutic strategies are to be developed to prevent metastases in soft tissue sarcomas. This needs a better understanding of the biology of those tumors, of metastases risk factors and of the determinants of systemic therapies efficacy in these tumors. PMID:20547481

  14. Effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine on hyperbaric bupivacaine spinal anesthesia: A randomized study

    Chilkunda N Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine on spinal anesthesia with 0.5% of hyperbaric bupivacaine. Materials and Methods: One hundred American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status I/II patients undergoing elective surgeries under spinal anesthesia were randomized into two groups of 50 each. Immediately after subarachnoid block with 3 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine, patients in group D received a loading dose of 1 μg/kg of dexmedetomidine intravenously by infusion pump over 10 min followed by a maintenance dose of 0.5 μg/kg/h till the end of surgery, whereas patients in group C received an equivalent quantity of normal saline. Results: The time taken for regression of motor blockade to modified Bromage scale 0 was significantly prolonged in group D (220.7 ± 16.5 min compared to group C (131 ± 10.5 min (P < 0.001. The level of sensory block was higher in group D (T 6.88 ± 1.1 than group C (T 7.66 ± 0.8 (P < 0.001. The duration for two-dermatomal regression of sensory blockade (137.4 ± 10.9 min vs. 102.8 ± 14.8 min and the duration of sensory block (269.8 ± 20.7 min vs. 169.2 ± 12.1 min were significantly prolonged in group D compared to group C (P < 0.001. Intraoperative Ramsay sedation scores were higher in group D (4.4 ± 0.7 compared to group C (2 ± 0.1 (P < 0.001. Higher proportion of patients in group D had bradycardia (33% vs. 4% (P < 0.001, as compared to group C. The 24-h mean analgesic requirement was less and the time to first request for postoperative analgesic was prolonged in group D than in group C (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Intravenous dexmedetomidine significantly prolongs the duration of sensory and motor block of bupivacaine spinal anesthesia. The incidence of bradycardia is significantly higher when intravenous dexmedetomidine is used as an adjuvant to bupivacaine spinal anesthesia. Dexmedetomidine provides excellent intraoperative

  15. The application of sacral block anesthesia in pediatric interventional therapy

    Objective: To discuss the management and feasibility of sacral block anesthesia in pediatric interventional therapy. Methods: A total of 80 pediatric patients were randomly and equally divided into two groups. Patients in group A received sacral block anesthesia together with basic anesthesia with propofol, while patients in group B received intravenous anesthesia with propofol. Small amount of ketamine as maintaining dose was used in both groups when needed. Results: The interventional management was successfully completed in all patients. A marked decrease in blood pressure occurred in three patients of group A receiving sacral block anesthesia. In group B receiving intravenous anesthesia, a decrease of SpO2 to below 90 percent was seen in 8 cases, and obvious bradycardia developed in 12 cases. All these patients were treated with intravenous medication or by reducing the dose of propofol. Additional small dose of ketamine was needed in 4 patients during the procedure. Conclusion: Sacral block anesthesia combined with intravenous anesthesia is one of the effective anesthesia management schemes for pediatric interventional therapy. (authors)

  16. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. (author)

  17. 21 CFR 582.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    2010-04-01

    ... § 582.99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001(c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 582.99...

  18. 21 CFR 182.99 - Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals.

    2010-04-01

    ....99 Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. Adjuvants, identified and used in accordance with 40 CFR 180.1001 (c) and (d), which are added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or applicator prior to... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Adjuvants for pesticide chemicals. 182.99...

  19. Effectiveness of spray adjuvants on reduction of spray drift

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Five new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  20. Effects of Isoflurane Anesthesia on Post-Anesthetic Sleep-Wake Architectures in Rats

    Jang, Hwan-Soo; Jung, Ji-Young; Jang, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Maan-Gee

    2010-01-01

    The sleep homeostatic response significantly affects the state of anesthesia. In addition, sleep recovery may occur during anesthesia, either via a natural sleep-like process to occur or via a direct restorative effect. Little is known about the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on sleep homeostasis. We investigated whether 1) isoflurane anesthesia could provide a sleep-like process, and 2) the depth of anesthesia could differently affect the post-anesthesia sleep response. Nine rats were trea...

  1. Advax-Adjuvanted Recombinant Protective Antigen Provides Protection against Inhalational Anthrax That Is Further Enhanced by Addition of Murabutide Adjuvant

    Feinen, Brandon; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Verma, Anita; Tod J Merkel

    2014-01-01

    Subunit vaccines against anthrax based on recombinant protective antigen (PA) potentially offer more consistent and less reactogenic anthrax vaccines but require adjuvants to achieve optimal immunogenicity. This study sought to determine in a murine model of pulmonary anthrax infection whether the polysaccharide adjuvant Advax or the innate immune adjuvant murabutide alone or together could enhance PA immunogenicity by comparison to an alum adjuvant. A single immunization with PA plus Advax a...

  2. Comparison of Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA with Inhalation Anesthesia in Pediatric Bronchoscopy

    Majid Razavi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Because of airway stimulations during the bronchoscopy and lack of direct access to the airway, preferred method of anesthesia for rigid bronchoscopy is already controversial. In this study we compared inhalation anesthesia with total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA for rigid bronchoscopy. Method and Materials: 30 patients aged 2-6 years were chosen divided on two same groups. Anesthesia in group I maintained with halothane and in group II maintained with remifentanil and propofol. Oxygenation, heart rate, respiratory rate, coughing, bucking, laryngospasm, bronchospasm were evaluated during and after surgery. Also Operation success and surgeon’s satisfaction were recorded as well.Results: Demographic findings were the same in both groups. Oxygenation and heart rate were more stable in group II (P=0.047 and P=0.026 respectively but there was no significant difference in respiratory rate between two groups (P=1. Success rate was also similar in both groups but surgeon’s satisfaction was significantly higher in TIVA (P=0.003. There was not any significant different between complications in two groups. Conclusion: We suggest TIVA for rigid bronchoscopy because of better oxygenation, more homodynamic stability, surgeon’s satisfaction, lack of air pollution and less interference with surgeon’s visual field.

  3. Updates of Topical and Local Anesthesia Agents.

    Boyce, Ricardo A; Kirpalani, Tarun; Mohan, Naveen

    2016-04-01

    As described in this article, there are many advances in topical and local anesthesia. Topical and local anesthetics have played a great role in dentistry in alleviating the fears of patients, eliminating pain, and providing pain control. Many invasive procedures would not be performed without the use and advances of topical/local anesthetics. The modern-day dentist has the responsibility of knowing the variety of products on the market and should have at least references to access before, during, and after treatment. This practice ensures proper care with topical and local anesthetics for the masses of patients entering dental offices worldwide. PMID:27040295

  4. Anesthesia for tracheostomy for huge maxillofacial tumor

    Abeer A Arab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing sedation for patients with compromised upper airway is challenging. A 19-year-old female patient with huge maxillofacial tumor invading the whole pharynx scheduled for elective tracheostomy under local anesthesia due to compromised airway. The patient had gastrostomy tube for feeding. Venous cannulation was totally refused by the patient after repeated trials for exhausted sclerosed veins. Pre-operative mixture of dexmedetomidine with ketamine was administered through the gastrostomy tube with eutectic mixture of local anesthetics cream application over the planned tracheostomy site. The patient was sedated with eye opening to command. Local infiltration followed by tracheostomy was performed without patient complaints or recall of operative events.

  5. SURVEILLANCE OF BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF ANESTHESIA MACHINE AND PERIPHERAL INTRAVENOUS CANNULA DURING GENERAL ANESTHESIA

    Ch. Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the expanding role of the anesthesiologist as the “total perioperative physician,” the increasing number of invasive procedures performed by anesthesiologists, and the increase in the prevalence of emerging diseases, stringent attention to infection control practices is paramount. AIM : To find out the bacterial contamination of anesthesia machine and internal lumen of the injection port of peri pheral intravenous cannula, and evaluation of its risk factors during general anesthesia procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 50 general anaesthesia procedures were selected randomly after the approval of ethics committee and informed consent from the patien t. Samples were taken for bacterial culture on 2 sites in anesthesia machine (Adjustable pressure limiting valve {APL} and agent concentration dial of inhaled anesthetics{AD} and internal lumen of the injection port of peripheral intravenous cannula befor e starting and after completion of procedures. Bacteria and colony count were identified according to standard laboratory methods . RESULTS : Adjustable pressure limiting valve area was contaminated with bacteria in 12% (6/50 before starting procedure and 34% (17/50 after completion of procedures. Agent concentration dial of inhaled anesthetic site was contaminated with bacteria in 10% (5/50 before starting procedure and 28% (14/50 after completion of procedures. Bacterial contamination occurred in the i nternal lumen of the injection port of peripheral intravenous cannula in 16% (8/50 during general anesthesia. Isolated bacteria in anesthesia machine and peripheral intra venous cannula sites are STAPHYLO COCCI, STREPTOCOCCI, MICRO COCCI, ENTERO COCCI, E. COLI, and PSEUDOMONAS . CONCLUSION: Bacterial contamination is significantly associated with procedure order in a day (bacterial contamination rate is increased from first procedure to fifth procedure in a day. It is significantly associated with surgical s pecialty highest in

  6. The Effect of Neuraxial Anesthesia on Maternal Cerebral Hemodynamics

    Postma, Ineke R.; van Veen, Teelkien R.; Mears, Scott L.; Zeeman, Gerda G.; Haeri, Sina; Belfort, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neuraxial anesthesia is known to reduce sympathetic tone and mean arterial pressure. Effects on cerebral hemodynamics in pregnancy are not well known. We hypothesize that cerebral hemodynamic parameters will change with respect to baseline following regional analgesia/anesthesia. Study Des

  7. Simulation of electroencephalographic signals for depth of anesthesia assessment

    Panichev, Oleg; Popov, Anton; Bodilovskyi, Oleg; Tkachenko, Valerii

    2011-10-01

    The problem of simulating electroencephalographic (EEG) signals for different stages of anesthesia is considered. Review of existing techniques for EEG simulation is made and the new technique for simulating the EEG using only preliminary definition of magnitudes of harmonic components for every frequency ranges is presented. During experimental part EEG signals for four stages of ether anesthesia were simulated.

  8. Awareness during general anesthesia: new technology for an old problem.

    Halliburton, J R

    1998-05-01

    The possibility of awareness during general anesthesia causes apprehension for the patient and the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA). The goals of general anesthesia are to prevent the sensation of pain and produce a state of sedation, hypnosis, and unconsciousness so the patient will not remember the surgical procedure. An inadequate level of anesthesia can result in patient awareness during surgery. The current practice of anesthesia relies on indirect hemodynamic measurements such as blood pressure and heart rate to monitor the sedative hypnotic state of the patient's brain during general anesthesia. Hemodynamic responses are not reliable for predicting awareness just as blood pressure and heart rate are not indicative of consciousness. Electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms are known to be affected by anesthetics. Characteristic EEG waveforms are a direct indication of the patient's level of consciousness. Unprocessed and computer-processed EEG recordings have been used in an attempt to monitor the patient's level of consciousness during general anesthesia. A raw or unprocessed EEG recording to monitor the level of consciousness during general anesthesia is problematic. The EEG signal is complex, affected by artifact, and it requires a dedicated interpreter. Conventional processed EEG monitoring systems are problematic because of the complexity of the equipment and technical difficulty of reading the EEG recording. The purpose of this article is to describe the history of awareness during anesthesia and introduce a new processed EEG monitor, the Bispectral Index (BIS) (Aspect Medical Systems, Inc., Natick, MA) with implications for future clinical use and research. PMID:9726194

  9. General anesthesia suppresses normal heart rate variability in humans

    Matchett, Gerald; Wood, Philip

    2014-06-01

    The human heart normally exhibits robust beat-to-beat heart rate variability (HRV). The loss of this variability is associated with pathology, including disease states such as congestive heart failure (CHF). The effect of general anesthesia on intrinsic HRV is unknown. In this prospective, observational study we enrolled 100 human subjects having elective major surgical procedures under general anesthesia. We recorded continuous heart rate data via continuous electrocardiogram before, during, and after anesthesia, and we assessed HRV of the R-R intervals. We assessed HRV using several common metrics including Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), Multifractal Analysis, and Multiscale Entropy Analysis. Each of these analyses was done in each of the four clinical phases for each study subject over the course of 24 h: Before anesthesia, during anesthesia, early recovery, and late recovery. On average, we observed a loss of variability on the aforementioned metrics that appeared to correspond to the state of general anesthesia. Following the conclusion of anesthesia, most study subjects appeared to regain their normal HRV, although this did not occur immediately. The resumption of normal HRV was especially delayed on DFA. Qualitatively, the reduction in HRV under anesthesia appears similar to the reduction in HRV observed in CHF. These observations will need to be validated in future studies, and the broader clinical implications of these observations, if any, are unknown.

  10. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under epidural anesthesia: A feasibility study

    Ranendra Hajong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC is normally performed under general anesthesia. But of late this operation has been tried under regional anesthesia successfully without any added complications like epidural anesthesia. Aims: The aim of the study was to study the feasibility of performing LC under epidural anesthesia in normal patients so that the benefits could be extended to those high-risk patients having symptomatic gallstone disease and compromised cardio-pulmonary status where general anesthesia is contraindicated. Materials and Methods: In all, 20 patients with the American Society of Anesthesiologist′s class I or II were enrolled in the study. The level of epidural block and satisfaction score, both for the patient and the surgeon, were noted in the study. Results: The LC was performed successfully under epidural anesthesia in all but two patients who had severe shoulder pain in spite of giving adequate analgesia and were converted to general anesthesia. Conclusions: The LC can be performed safely under epidural anesthesia with understanding between patient and surgeon. However, careful assessment of complications in the patients should be done to make the procedure safer.

  11. New generation adjuvants--from empiricism to rational design.

    O'Hagan, Derek T; Fox, Christopher B

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvants are an essential component of modern vaccine development. Despite many decades of development, only a few types of adjuvants are currently included in vaccines approved for human use. In order to better understand the reasons that development of some adjuvants succeeded while many others failed, we discuss some of the common attributes of successful first generation adjuvants. Next, we evaluate current trends in the development of second generation adjuvants, including the potential advantages of rationally designed synthetic immune potentiators appropriately formulated. Finally, we discuss desirable attributes of next generation adjuvants. Throughout, we emphasize that the importance of formulation and analytical characterization in all aspects of vaccine adjuvant development is often underappreciated. We highlight the formulation factors that must be evaluated in order to optimize interactions between vaccine antigens, immune potentiators, and particulate formulations, and the resulting effects on safety, biological activity, manufacturability, and stability. PMID:26022561

  12. Improving Patient Safety in Anesthesia: A Success Story?

    Anesthesia is necessary for surgery; however, it does not deliver any direct therapeutic benefit. The risks of anesthesia must therefore be as low as possible. Anesthesiology has been identified as a leader in improving patient safety. Anesthetic mortality has decreased, and in healthy patients can be as low as 1:250,000. Trends in anesthetic morbidity have not been as well defined, but it appears that the risk of injury is decreasing. Studies of error during anesthesia and Closed Claims studies have identified sources of risk and methods to reduce the risks associated with anesthesia. These include changes in technology, such as anesthetic delivery systems and monitors, the application of human factors, the use of simulation, and the establishment of reporting systems. A review of the important events in the past 50 years illustrates the many steps that have contributed to the improvements in anesthesia safety

  13. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  14. General anesthesia for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    The core of the MAGNETOM diagnostic device is a liquid helium-cooled cryogenic magnet, having the shape of a hollow cylinder about 2 m long, 50 to 60 cm i.d. Its inner space is designed to accommodate a bench with the patient, whose part examined, usually the head, is enclosed in a smaller coil and is located roughly in the center of the magnet. The examination takes 4 to 20 minutes, during which the patient must be fixed to prevent any motion. Inhalation anesthesia with spontaneous ventilation using the Jackson-Rees or Bain's system and a laryngeal mask is considered the safest way where no special equipment is employed. If artificial ventilation is necessary, balanced anesthesia with either manual ventilation using Bain's system or a fluidic type ventilator seems to be the best choice. The preparation of the patient prior to the examination, the premedication, and the monitoring equipment are described. (J.B.). 1 tab., 5 figs., 11 refs

  15. Anesthesia considerations in the obese gravida.

    Tan, Terry

    2011-12-01

    Obesity is associated with serious morbidity during pregnancy, and obese women also are at a high risk of developing complications during labor, leading to an increased risk for instrumental and Cesarean deliveries. The engagement of the obstetrical anesthetist in the management of this group of high-risk patients should be performed antenatally so that an appropriate management strategy can be planned in advance to prevent an adverse outcome. Good communication between all care providers is essential. The obese patient in labor should be encouraged to have a functioning epidural catheter placed early in labor. Apart from providing analgesia and alleviating physiological derangements during labor, the presence of a functioning epidural catheter can also be used to induce anesthesia quickly in the event of an emergency cesarean section, thus avoiding a general anesthesia, which has exceedingly high risks in the obese parturient. Successful management of the obese patient necessitates a comprehensive strategy that encompasses a multidisciplinary and holistic approach from all care-providers.

  16. The history of the nurse anesthesia profession.

    Ray, William T; Desai, Sukumar P

    2016-05-01

    Despite the fact that anesthesia was discovered in the United States, we believe that both physicians and nurses are largely unaware of many aspects of the development of the nurse anesthetist profession. A shortage of suitable anesthetists and the reluctance of physicians to provide anesthetics in the second half of the 19th century encouraged nurses to take on this role. We trace the origins of the nurse anesthetist profession and provide biographical information about its pioneers, including Catherine Lawrence, Sister Mary Bernard Sheridan, Alice Magaw, Agatha Cobourg Hodgins, and Helen Lamb. We comment on the role of the nuns and the effect of the support and encouragement of senior surgeons on the development of the specialty. We note the major effect of World Wars I and II on the training and recruitment of nurse anesthetists. We provide information on difficulties faced by nurse anesthetists and how these were overcome. Next, we examine how members of the profession organized, developed training programs, and formalized credentialing and licensing procedures. We conclude by examining the current state of nurse anesthesia practice in the United States. PMID:27041264

  17. Simulation in teaching regional anesthesia: current perspectives

    Udani AD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ankeet D Udani,1 T Edward Kim,2,3 Steven K Howard,2,3 Edward R Mariano2,3On behalf of the ADAPT (Anesthesiology-Directed Advanced Procedural Training Research Group1Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Anesthesiology and Perioperative Care Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USAAbstract: The emerging subspecialty of regional anesthesiology and acute pain medicine represents an opportunity to evaluate critically the current methods of teaching regional anesthesia techniques and the practice of acute pain medicine. To date, there have been a wide variety of simulation applications in this field, and efficacy has largely been assumed. However, a thorough review of the literature reveals that effective teaching strategies, including simulation, in regional anesthesiology and acute pain medicine are not established completely yet. Future research should be directed toward comparative-effectiveness of simulation versus other accepted teaching methods, exploring the combination of procedural training with realistic clinical scenarios, and the application of simulation-based teaching curricula to a wider range of learner, from the student to the practicing physician.Keywords: regional anesthesia, simulation, medical education, ultrasound, nerve block, simulator

  18. Anesthesia for subglottic stenosis in pediatrics

    Eid Essam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Any site in the upper airway can get obstructed and cause noisy breathing as well as dyspnea. These include nasal causes such as choanal atresia or nasal stenosis; pharyngeal causes including lingual thyroid; laryngeal causes such as laryngomalacia; tracheobronchial causes such as tracheal stenosis; and subglottic stenosis. Lesions in the oropharynx may cause stertor, while lesions in the laryngotracheal tree will cause stridor. Subglottic stenosis is the third leading cause of congenital stridors in the neonate. Subglottic Stenosis presents challenges to the anesthesiologist. Therefore, It is imperative to perform a detailed history, physical examination, and characterization of the extent and severity of stenosis. Rigid endoscopy is essential for the preoperative planning of any of the surgical procedures that can be used for correction. Choice of operation is dependent on the surgeon′s comfort, postoperative capabilities, and severity of disease. For high-grade stenosis, single-stage laryngotracheal resection or cricotracheal resection are the best options. It has to be borne in mind that the goal of surgery is to allow for an adequate airway for normal activity without the need for tracheostomy. Anesthesia for airway surgery could be conducted safely with either sevofl uraneor propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia.

  19. Anesthesia during and Immediately after Spaceflight

    Seubert, Christoph N.; Price, Catherine; Janelle, Gregory M.

    2006-01-01

    The increasing presence of humans in space and long-duration manned missions to the Moon or Mars pose novel challenges to the delivery of medical care. Even now, cumulative person-days in space exceed 80 years and preparations for a return to the Moon are actively underway. Medical care after an emergent de-orbit or an accident during a non-nominal landing must not only address the specific disease or injuries but also the challenges posed by physiologic adaptations to microgravity. In the highly autonomous situation of a long-term space mission the situation is even more complex, because personnel, equipment, specific training, and clinical experience are by definition limited. To summarize our current knowledge specifically for anesthetic care during and immediately after spaceflight, we will review physiologic adaptations to microgravity with particular emphasis on the resulting anesthetic risks, discuss veterinary experiences with anesthesia in weightlessness or in animals adapted to microgravity, describe current research that pertains to anesthesia and spaceflight and point out unresolved questions for future investigation.

  20. Respiratory diagnostic possibilities during closed circuit anesthesia.

    Verkaaik, A P; Erdmann, W

    1990-01-01

    An automatic feed back controlled totally closed circuit system (Physioflex) has been developed for quantitative practice of inhalation anesthesia and ventilation. In the circuit system the gas is moved unidirectionally around by a blower at 70 l/min. In the system four membrane chambers are integrated for ventilation. Besides end-expiratory feed back control of inhalation anesthetics, and inspiratory closed loop control of oxygen, the system offers on-line registration of flow, volume and respiratory pressures as well as a capnogram and oxygen consumption. Alveolar ventilation and static compliance can easily be derived. On-line registration of oxygen consumption has proven to be of value for determination of any impairment of tissue oxygen supply when the oxygen delivery has dropped to critical values. Obstruction of the upper or lower airways are immediately detected and differentiated. Disregulations of metabolism, e.g. in malignant hyperthermia, are seen in a pre-crisis phase (increase of oxygen consumption and of CO2 production), and therapy can be started extremely early and before a disastrous condition has developed. Registration of compliance is only one of the continuously available parameters that guarantee a better and adequate control of lung function (e.g. atalectasis is early detected). The newly developed sophisticated anesthesia device enlarges tremendously the monitoring and respiratory diagnostic possibilities of artificial ventilation, gives new insights in the (patho)physiology and detects disturbances of respiratory parameters and metabolism in an early stage. PMID:2260424

  1. Isoflurane anesthesia is a valuable alternative for alpha-chloralose anesthesia in the forepaw stimulation model in rats.

    Sommers, M.G.J.; Egmond, J. van; Booij, L.H.D.J.; Heerschap, A.

    2009-01-01

    Isoflurane (ISO) can be a valuable alternative for alpha-chloralose (ACL) anesthesia in functional MRI (fMRI) studies. Therefore, we compared the efficacy of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) effect in fMRI studies during ISO and ACL anesthesia sequentially in the same animals. After non-invas

  2. Comparison of the Effect of Lidocaine Adding Dexketoprofen and Paracetamol in Intravenous Regional Anesthesia

    Ali Akdogan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Comparison of dexketoprofen and paracetamol added to the lidocaine in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia in terms of hemodynamic effects, motor and sensorial block onset times, intraoperative VAS values, and analgesia requirements. Method. The files of 73 patients between 18 and 65 years old in the ASA I-II risk group who underwent hand and forearm surgery were analyzed and 60 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Group D (n=20, 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 50 mg/2 mL dexketoprofen trometamol; Group P (n=20, 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 3 mg/kg paracetamol; Group K (n=20, 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine. Demographic data, motor and sensorial block times, heart rate, mean blood pressure, VAS values, and intraoperative and postoperative analgesia requirements were recorded. Results. Sensorial and motor block onset durations of Group K were significantly longer than other groups. Motor block termination duration was found to be significantly longer in Group D than in Group K. VAS values of Group K were found higher than other groups. There was no significant difference in VAS values between Group D and Group P. Analgesia requirement was found to be significantly more in Group K than in Group P. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of heart rates and mean arterial pressures. Conclusion. We concluded that the addition of 3 mg/kg paracetamol and 50 mg dexketoprofen to lidocaine as adjuvant in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia applied for hand and/or forearm surgery created a significant difference clinically.

  3. Dexmedetomidine versus propofol for sedation in patients undergoing vitreoretinal surgery under sub-Tenon′s anesthesia

    Ashraf Ghali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hemodynamic, respiratory effects, the recovery profile, surgeons, and patients satisfaction with dexmedetomidine sedation compared with those of propofol sedation in patients undergoing vitreoretinal surgery under sub-Tenon′s anesthesia. Methods: Sixty patients were enrolled in this prospective, single-blind, randomized study. The patients were divided into two groups to receive either dexmedetomidine (group D or propofol (group P. Sedation level was titrated to a Ramsay sedation scale (RSS of 3. Hemodynamic and respiratory effects, postoperative recovery time, analgesic effects, surgeons and patients satisfaction were assessed. Results: Both groups provided a similar significant reduction in heart rate and mean arterial pressure compared with baseline values. The respiratory rate values of the dexmedetomidine group were significantly higher than those in the propofol group. The oxygen saturation values of the dexmedetomidine group were significantly higher than those of the propofol group. The expired CO 2 was similar in both groups. Postoperatively, the time to achieve an Aldrete score of 10 was similar in both groups. Dexmedetomidine patients have significantly lower visual analog scale for pain than propofol patients. The surgeon satisfaction with patients′ sedation was similar for both groups. The patients′ satisfaction was higher in the dexmedetomidine group. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine at similar sedation levels with propofol was associated with equivalent hemodynamic effects, maintaining an adequate respiratory function, similar time of discharge from PACU, better analgesic properties, similar surgeon′s satisfaction, and higher patient′s satisfaction. Thus, dexmedetomidine may prove to be a valuable adjuvant for sedation in patients undergoing vitreoretinal surgery under sub-Tenon′s anesthesia.

  4. The adjuvancy of silicones: dependency on compartmentalization.

    Klykken, P C; White, K L

    1996-01-01

    Studies have been conducted in mice (B6C3F1) and rats (Sprague Dawley, Fischer 344) to investigate the adjuvancy potential of silicone mammary gel and the low molecular weight silicone fluid, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4). Dependent on the experimental conditions employed, a divergent data profile emerges. If the antigen (bovine serum albumin, BSA) is emulsified with either the gel or the D4 prior to intramuscular immunization, an amplified anti-BSA IgG antibody response, as measured by multipoint ELISA methodology, is noted over the 8 week measurement period. In parallel studies, a variety of non-silicone personal care ingredients (lanolin, white mineral oil, isopropyl palmitate) were also capable of amplifying this humoral response relative to the non-adjuvant phosphate buffered saline control. These observations are consistent with the empirical knowledge that hydrophobic substances tend to augment immune responses. However, under conditions in which the antigen is not blended with the silicone prior to immunization, normal immune responses are noted. In short (10 day) and long (180 day) term gel implant studies, the optimal IgM and IgG antibody responses, as determined in the antibody forming cell assay, were equivalent between the gel implanted and control animals. Moreover, under similar exposure conditions, no adjuvancy was noted in the three Host Resistance models (B16F10 Melanoma, Listeria monocytogenes, and Streptococcus pneumoniae) tested. Antibody forming cell studies conducted after 28 days of oral or inhalation exposure to D4 have also yielded responses similar to the non-silicone exposed vehicle controls. Collectively, these data suggest that in the absence of premixing the antigen with the silicone test material, there does not appear to be any silicone induced adjuvant response. PMID:8565549

  5. Nonanalgesic benefits of combined thoracic epidural analgesia with general anesthesia in high risk elderly off pump coronary artery bypass patients

    Bhanu Prakash Zawar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Epidural anesthesia is a central neuraxial block technique with many applications. It is a versatile anesthetic technique, with applications in surgery, obstetrics and pain control. Its versatility means it can be used as an anesthetic, as an analgesic adjuvant to general anesthesia, and for postoperative analgesia. Off pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB surgery triggers a systemic stress response as seen in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA, combined with general anesthesia (GA attenuates the stress response to CABG. There is Reduction in levels of Plasma epinephrine, Cortisol and catecholamine surge, tumor necrosis factor-Alpha( TNF ά, interleukin-6 and leucocyte count. Design: A prospective randomised non blind study. Setting: A clinical study in a multi specialty hospital. Participants: Eighty six patients. Material and Methods/intervention: The study was approved by hospital research ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients were randomised to receive either GA plus epidural (study group or GA only (control group. Inclusion Criteria (for participants were -Age ≥ 70 years, Patient posted for OPCAB surgery, and patient with comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, renal dysfunction. Serum concentration of Interlukin: - 6, TNF ά, cortisol, Troponin - I, CK-MB, and HsCRP (highly sensitive C reactive protein, was compared for both the group and venous blood samples were collected and compared just after induction, at day 2, and day 5 postoperatively. Time to mobilization, extubation, total intensive care unit stay and hospital stay were noted and compared. Independent t test was used for statistical analysis. Primary Outcomes: Postoperative complications, total intensive care unit stay and hospital stay. Secondary Outcome: Stress response. Result: Study group

  6. Acupuncture in ambulatory anesthesia: a review

    Norheim AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arne Johan Norheim,1 Ingrid Liodden,1 Terje Alræk1,2 1National Research Center in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NAFKAM, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, 2The Norwegian School of Health Sciences, Institute of Acupuncture, Kristiania University College, Oslo, NorwayBackground: Post-anesthetic morbidities remain challenging in our daily practice of anesthesia. Meta-analyses and reviews of acupuncture and related techniques for postoperative nausea and vomiting (POVN and postoperative vomiting (POV show promising results while many clinicians remain skeptical of the value of acupuncture. Given the interest in finding safe non-pharmacological approaches toward postoperative care, this body of knowledge needs to be considered. This review critically appraises and summarizes the research on acupuncture and acupressure in ambulatory anesthesia during the last 15 years.Methods: Articles were identified through searches of Medline, PubMed, and Embase using the search terms “acupuncture” or “acupuncture therapy” in combination with “ambulatory anesthesia” or “ambulatory surgery” or “day surgery” or “postoperative”. A corresponding search was done using “acupressure” and “wristbands”. The searches generated a total of 104, 118, and 122 references, respectively.Results: Sixteen studies were included; eight studies reported on acupuncture and eight on acupressure. Nine studies found acupuncture or acupressure effective on primary endpoints including postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative pain, sore throat, and emergence agitation. Four studies found acupuncture had a similar effect to antiemetic medication.Conclusion: Overall, the studies were of fairly good quality. A large proportion of the reviewed papers highlights an effect of acupuncture or acupressure on postoperative morbidities in an ambulatory setting

  7. Impact of adjuvant chemotherapy for gliomatosis cerebri

    Gliomatosis cerebri (GC) is characterized by a diffuse infiltration of tumor cells throughout CNS, however, few details are available about the chemotherapeutic effect on GC. The aim of this study was to investigate its clinical course and to determine the efficacy of chemotherapy for GC. Between Jan. 1999 and Dec. 2004, 37 GC patients were diagnosed by biopsy and treated with radiotherapy in a single institution. To determine the efficacy of chemotherapy for GC, we retrospectively reviewed their clinical courses. The study cohort was divided into 2 groups, those with and without receiving post-radiotherapy adjuvant chemotherapy such as temozolomide or nitrosourea-based chemotherapy. Nineteen patients with adjuvant chemotherapy were assigned to the chemotreatment group and 18 with radiotherapy alone were assigned to the control group. Mean survival for chemotreatment group and control group were 24.2 and 13.1 months, respectively (p = 0.045). Time to progression for these groups were 16.0 and 6.0 months, respectively (p = 0.007). Overall review of the clinical course of patients with GC provided that early appearance of new contrast-enhancing lesions within 6 months from the initial diagnosis and higher histological grade were closely associated with poor survival (p < 0.001 and p = 0.008). Adjuvant chemotherapy following radiotherapy could prolong the survival in patients with GC. In addition, newly developed contrast-enhanced lesions on the follow-up MR images indicate the progression of GC

  8. Adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in pancreatic cancer

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Elizabeth Hijona; Angel Cosme; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human malignancies,ranking 4th among causes for cancer-related death in the Western world including the United States.Surgical resection offers the only chance of cure,but only 15 to 20 percent of cases are potentially resectable at presentation.Different studies demonstrate and confirm that advanced pancreatic cancer is among the most complex cancers to treat and that these tumors are relatively resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.Currently there is no consensus around the world on what constitutes "standard"adjuvant therapy for pancreatic cancer.This controversy derives from several studies,each fraught with its own limitations.Standards of care also vary somewhat with regard to geography and economy,for instance chemo-radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy or vice versa is considered the optimal therapy in North America while chemotherapy alone is the current standard in Europe.Regardless of the efforts in adjuvant and neoadjuvant improved therapy,the major goal to combat pancreatic cancer is to find diagnostic markers,identifying the disease in a pre-metastatic stage and making a curative treatment accessible to more patients.In this review,authors examined the different therapy options for advanced pancreatic patients in recent years and the future directions in adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments for these patients.

  9. Chitosan as an adjuvant for poliovaccine.

    Ghendon, Y; Markushin, S; Akopova, I; Koptiaeva, I; Krivtsov, G

    2011-05-01

    The use of inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine is very important for eradicating poliomyelitis. However, this vaccine is not available readily in underdeveloped countries due to the high cost. Adjuvants can improve the immunogenicity of a vaccine and reduce the antigen dose required for vaccination, thus lowering the cost of the vaccine. Chitosan glutamate solution and a chitosan sulfate micro/nanoparticle suspension were tested as adjuvants for Imovax-inactivated poliovaccine and for inactivated monovalent poliovirus type 1, 2, and 3 vaccines obtained by inactivation of the attenuated Sabin poliovirus strains. Inactivated vaccines admixed with either chitosan glutamate or chitosan sulfate micro/nanoparticles and administered to mice showed significantly enhanced immunogenicity to poliovirus type 1, 2, and 3 strains compared to the respective vaccines administered without chitosan. Chitosan preparations increased the immunogenicity of 1:2 and 1:4 diluted inactivated Sabin strain preparations in mice 8- to 16-fold, so that the neutralizing antibody titers after vaccination with adjuvanted diluted vaccine were equal to those obtained after vaccination with undiluted vaccine administered without chitosan. Neutralizing antibodies could be detected in sera of rats vaccinated with undiluted, 1:10, and 1:100 diluted Imovax vaccine admixed with chitosan sulfate micro/nanoparticles, although in the control group, vaccination only with the undiluted vaccine resulted in antibody production. These results show that the chitosan glutamate solution and chitosan sulfate micro/nanoparticle suspension can significantly improve the immunogenicity of various poliovaccines, and reduce the effective antigen dose. PMID:21412793

  10. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SPINAL ANESTHESIA AND GENERAL ANESTHESIA IN CHILDREN UNDERGOING SURGERIES BELOW UMBILICUS

    Ashish

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Aim of our study to compare the spinal anaesthesia and general anaesthesia in children undergoing surgeries below umbilicus. OBJECTIVE: to assess the patient comfort in pt. with GA and pt. with spinal anaesthesia, the adequate surgical condition, assess the hemodynamic change, assess the post op analgesia and to assess the post op complication. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 60 ASA grade I & II children of either sex, aged 5-12 yrs undergoing elective surgeries for the lower abdominal, perineal and lower limb surgeries were taken. After taking a detailed history, thorough general physical examination, all pertinent investigation were carried out to exclude any systemic disease. Patients were classified randomly into 2 groups (30 patients in each group. Group A: General anesthesia was given. Group P: subarachnoid block was given. Intraoperative monitoring consisted of SPO2, PR, NIBP, RR and assessment of duration of post-operative analgesia. P-value <0.05 consider significant. RESULT: Analysis revealed that there were no significant differences between the patients with respect to age, sex, duration and type of surgery In SAB since less general anaesthetic drug including parental opioid are used the risk and postoperative respiratory depression is minimal. The stress response to surgery is also limited and recovery is fast. Postoperatively complications like sore throat, laryngeal irritation, cough etc. was also less associated with it. CONCLUSION pediatric spinal anesthesia is not only a safe alternative to general anesthesia but often the anesthesia technique of choice in many lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries in children. The misconception regarding its safety and flexibility is broken and is now found to be even more cost effective. It is much preferred technique special for common day case surgeries generally performed in the pediatric age group.

  11. Tissue microcirculation measured by vascular occlusion test during anesthesia induction.

    Kim, Tae Kyong; Cho, Youn Joung; Min, Jeong Jin; Murkin, John M; Bahk, Jae-Hyon; Hong, Deok Man; Jeon, Yunseok

    2016-02-01

    Tissue microcirculation measured by vascular occlusion test is impaired during septic shock. However, it has not been investigated extensively during anesthesia induction. The aim of the study is to evaluate tissue microcirculation during anesthesia induction. We hypothesized that during anesthesia induction, tissue microcirculation measured by vascular occlusion test might be enhanced with peripheral vasodilation during anesthesia induction. We conducted a prospective observational study of 50 adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. During anesthesia induction, we measured and analyzed tissue oxygen saturation, vascular occlusion test, cerebral oximetry, forearm-minus-fingertip skin temperature gradients and hemodynamic data in order to evaluate microcirculation as related to alterations in peripheral vasodilation as reflected by increased Tforearm-finger thermal gradients. During anesthesia induction, recovery slope during vascular occlusion test and cerebral oxygen saturation increased from 4.0 (1.5) to 4.7 (1.3) % s(-1) (p = 0.02) and 64.0 (10.2) to 74.2 (9.2) % (p Forearm-minus-fingertip skin temperature gradients decreased from 1.9 (2.9) to -1.4 (2.2) °C (p blood pressure and forearm-minus-fingertip skin temperature gradients decrease while cerebral oximetry and vascular occlusion test recovery slope increase. These findings suggest that anesthesia induction increases tissue microcirculation with peripheral vasodilation. PMID:25750016

  12. [Rocuronium anesthesia induced anaphylactic shock: a case report].

    Qiu, Min; Zong, Ya-nan; Lu, Jian; Ma, Lu-lin; Zheng, Qing; Guo, Xiang-yang

    2015-10-18

    Anaphylaxis is an acute and fatal systemic allergic reaction to an allergen, and it could be an unpredictable and life-threatening cause during anesthesia. The main purpose of this paper is to report a case of anaphylactic shock during the anesthesia induction and to review the prophylaxis and treatment of anaphylactic reactions and anaphylactoid reactions during the anesthesia period. A 63-year-old man, with a mass on his adrenal, was scheduled to a laparoscopic adrenal tumor excision. During the anesthesia induction period, after administrated sulfentanil, propofol and rocuronium, the blood pressure was decreased and the heart rate was increased. Then, the patient had rash on his whole body and developed an anaphylactic shock. After being treated with the anti-allergic agents and norepinephrine, the rash disappeared and the vital sign become stable. The patient felt nothing uncomfortable during the two weeks'follow-up. Anaphylactic reactions and anaphylactoid reactions are not rare during the anesthesia period. The most common inducements are muscle relaxant, latex and antibiotics. Anaphylactic reactions in the perioperative period are often serious and potentially life-threatening conditions, involving multiple organ systems in which the clinical manifestations are the consequence of the release of preformed mediators from mast cells and basophils. Before anesthesia, we should acquire the allergic history. During the anesthesia period, the vital sign and the skin should be observed carefully. PMID:26474637

  13. General Anesthesia for a Patient With Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease.

    Kamekura, Nobuhito; Nitta, Yukie; Takuma, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the successful management of general anesthesia for a patient with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). PMD is one of a group of progressive, degenerative disorders of the cerebral white matter. The typical clinical manifestations of PMD include psychomotor retardation, nystagmus, abnormal muscle tone, seizures, and cognitive impairment. General anesthesia for a patient with PMD may be difficult mainly because of seizures and airway complications related to poor pharyngeal muscle control. In addition, the possibility of exacerbation of spasticity should be considered. A 20-year-old man with PMD required removal of impacted wisdom teeth under general anesthesia. General anesthesia was induced with thiamylal, fentanyl, and desflurane. Anesthesia was maintained with desflurane and continuous intravenous remifentanil under bispectral index and train-of-4 monitoring. Anesthesia lasted 1 hour 20 minutes and was completed uneventfully. Airway complications, seizures, and exacerbation of spasticity did not occur postoperatively. Preoperatively, our patient had no history of epilepsy attacks or aspiration pneumonia, and no clinical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Therefore, exacerbation of spasticity was one of the most likely potential complications. Identification of these associated conditions and evaluation of risk factors during preoperative examination is important for performing safe anesthesia in these patients. PMID:27269667

  14. The effect of hypernatremic state on anesthesia: male Wistar rat

    Heydarpour F, Rostami A, Alipour M, Amini B, Heydarpour P

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The function of internal systems can be influenced significantly by hypernatremia, even anesthesia may be affected by this electrolyte imbalance. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a single anesthetic dose of ketamine in an experimental rat model of chronic hypernatremia. "n"nMethods: Sixty male Wistar rats, weighing 300(±20g, were allocated randomly to three groups: the control group received drinking water and test groups 1 and 2 received 1% and 2% NaCl, respectively, for 144 hours. We measured the parameters of sensitivity to the ketamine injection (125mg/kg including length of times to the inhibition of the righting reflex, inhibition of the response to painful stimulus and the times to the reappearance of the response to painful stimulus and recovery from anesthesia. We also determined the mortality rates during anesthesia. "n"nResults: The times for inhibition of the righting reflex and response to painful stimulus for group 2 were significantly shorter than those for group 1 and the control group. The times for the reappearance of response to painful stimulus and full recovery from anesthesia in group 2 were significantly longer than those of group 1 and the control group. "n"nConclusions: Hypernatremia affects ketamine anesthesia in the rat, increasing the speed of passing through the different steps of anesthesia. The duration of ketamine efficacy increases, while recovery from anesthesia is significantly delayed.

  15. Total spinal anesthesia in an achondroplasic patient: case report

    Amiri H R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Total spinal anesthesia is a complication of lumbar epidural anesthesia following undiagnosed subarachnoid or subdural injection of local anesthetic. Although many achondroplastic dwarfs have a normal spine, catheter insertion may be more problematic with a narrow epidural space making a subarachnoid tap more probable.  Other malformations associated with achondroplasia, such as prolapsed intervertebral discs, reduced interpedicular distance, shortened pedicles, and osteophyte formation, combined with a narrow epidural space may make identification of the space difficult and increases the risk of dural puncture. Furthermore, subarachnoid tap or dural puncture may be hard to recognize if a free flow of CSF is difficult to achieve due spinal stenosis. Yet, for those who meet the criteria, epidural regional anesthesia is frequently preferred over other forms, which often have more or more dangerous side effects in this type of patient.Case report: A 22-year-old achondroplastic male dwarf patient was scheduled for pelvic mass resection and was considered a candidate for continuous epidural anesthesia. The anesthesia became complicated by total spinal anesthesia, which was reversed following supportive management for about two hours.Conclusion: There is significant debate over the composition and volume of the test dose, especially for patients with achondroplasia. We nevertheless recommend repeated test-doses during the accomplishment of epidural anesthesia to exclude unintended intravascular, intrathecal or subdural injection, keeping in mind that a test dose of local anesthetic does not completely prevent complications.

  16. Behavior Assessment in Children Following Hospital-Based General Anesthesia versus Office-Based General Anesthesia

    LaQuia A. Vinson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in behavior exist following dental treatment under hospital-based general anesthesia (HBGA or office-based general anesthesia (OBGA in the percentage of patients exhibiting positive behavior and in the mean Frankl scores at recall visits. This retrospective study examined records of a pediatric dental office over a 4 year period. Patients presenting before 48 months of age for an initial exam who were diagnosed with early childhood caries were included in the study. Following an initial exam, patients were treated under HBGA or OBGA. Patients were followed to determine their behavior at 6-, 12- and 18-month recall appointments. Fifty-four patients received treatment under HBGA and 26 were treated under OBGA. OBGA patients were significantly more likely to exhibit positive behavior at the 6- and 12-month recall visits p = 0.038 & p = 0.029. Clinicians should consider future behavior when determining general anesthesia treatment modalities in children with early childhood caries presenting to their office.

  17. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    2010-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent anesthesia services...

  18. 42 CFR 414.46 - Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services.

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.46 Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services. (a... each anesthesia code that reflects all activities other than anesthesia time. These activities...

  19. Lack of effect of spinal anesthesia on drug metabolism

    The effect of spinal anesthesia on drug disposition was determined in six dogs with chronically implanted vascular catheters using propranolol as a model compound. On the first study day, 40 mg of unlabeled propranolol and 200 microCi of [3H]propranolol were injected into the portal and femoral veins respectively. Arterial blood samples were taken for 4 hr for measurement of plasma concentrations of labeled and unlabeled propranolol by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and of [3H]propranolol by liquid scintillation counting of the HPLC eluant corresponding to each propranolol peak. Twenty-four hr later, spinal anesthesia was induced with tetracaine (mean dose 20.7 +/- 0.6 mg) with low sacral to midthoracic levels and the propranolol infusions and sampling were then repeated. Spinal anesthesia had no significant effect on either the intrinsic clearance of propranolol (2.01 +/- 0.75 L/min before and 1.9 +/- 0.7 L/min during spinal anesthesia), or on mean hepatic plasma flow (2.01 +/- 0.5 L/min before and 1.93 +/- 0.5 L/min during spinal anesthesia). The systemic clearance and elimination half-life of propranolol were also unchanged by spinal anesthesia (0.9 +/- 0.23 L/min on the first day, 0.7 +/- 0.1 L/min during spinal anesthesia; and 101 +/- 21 min on the first day, 115 +/- 16 min during spinal anesthesia, respectively). The volume of distribution (Vd) of propranolol was similarly unaffected by spinal anesthesia

  20. Propofol alternatives in gastrointestinal endoscopy anesthesia

    Basavana Gouda Goudra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although propofol has been the backbone for sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy, both anesthesiologists and endoscopists are faced with situations where an alternative is needed. Recent national shortages forced many physicians to explore these options. A midazolam and fentanyl combination is the mainstay in this area. However, there are other options. The aim of this review is to explore these options. The future would be, invariably, to move away from propofol. The reason is not in any way related to the drawbacks of propofol as a sedative. The mandate that requires an anesthesia provider to administer propofol has been a setback in many countries. New sedative drugs like Remimazolam might fill this void in the future. In the meantime, it is important to keep an open eye to the existing alternatives.

  1. AAHA anesthesia guidelines for dogs and cats.

    Bednarski, Richard; Grimm, Kurt; Harvey, Ralph; Lukasik, Victoria M; Penn, W Sean; Sargent, Brett; Spelts, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Safe and effective anesthesia of dogs and cats rely on preanesthetic patient assessment and preparation. Patients should be premedicated with drugs that provide sedation and analgesia prior to anesthetic induction with drugs that allow endotracheal intubation. Maintenance is typically with a volatile anesthetic such as isoflurane or sevoflurane delivered via an endotracheal tube. In addition, local anesthetic nerve blocks; epidural administration of opioids; and constant rate infusions of lidocaine, ketamine, and opioids are useful to enhance analgesia. Cardiovascular, respiratory, and central nervous system functions are continuously monitored so that anesthetic depth can be modified as needed. Emergency drugs and equipment, as well as an action plan for their use, should be available throughout the perianesthetic period. Additionally, intravenous access and crystalloid or colloids are administered to maintain circulating blood volume. Someone trained in the detection of recovery abnormalities should monitor patients throughout recovery. Postoperatively attention is given to body temperature, level of sedation, and appropriate analgesia. PMID:22058343

  2. TONSILLECTOMY UNDER LOCAL ANESTHESIA IN MALI

    SACKO HB

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The objective of this study was to analyze a series of tonsillectomies performed in the ENT Reference CentreoftheHealth, DistrictIVBAMAKOMALI PATIENTS and METHODS The study was conducted between June 2003 and May 2013 focused on 166 patients. Patients with chronic tonsillitis, obstructive hypertrophy of the Palatine tonsils, caseous tonsillitis were included in the study. The method of dissection of the tonsils in sitting position (home position was the technique used. RESULTS A predominance of female 114 (68.70% were observed. The average age of the patients was 25 years with extremes from 12 to 54 years. Tonsillectomy was bilateral in all patients of the study. The main indications were: chronic tonsillitis 101 (60.84%. There was no major complication during the postoperative period. CONCLUSION Tonsillectomy under local anesthesia is well tolerated by patients in a tropical environment. Its cost is less.

  3. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF LIGNOCAINE, LIGNOCAINE PLUS PARACETAMOL, LIGNOCAINE PLUS TRAMADOL IN INTRAVENOUS REGIONAL ANESTHESIA

    Amar Parkash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Intravenous regional anesthesia is simple, effective technique for upper limb orthopedic surgeries however adjuncts are required to improve its efficacy. AIMS : To compare the effects of adding paracetamol and tramadol as adjunct to lignocaine in intravenous regional anesthesia on onset and regression of sensory and motor blockage, analgesic requirements, duration of analgesia and side effects. PATIENTS AND METHOD : A randomized study was carried out on ninety patients who were undergoing upper limb orthopedic surgery, divided in to three groups: group I (L received 3mg/kg lignocaine 0.5% diluted up to 40 ml with normal saline, group II (LP received 3mg/kg lignocaine 0.5% with 300mg paracetamol diluted up to 40 ml with normal saline, group III (LT received 3mg/kg lignocaine 0.5% with tramadol 100mg diluted up to 40 ml with normal saline. Sensory and motor block onset, regression time, intraoperatively and postoperatively VAS score, duration of analgesia, total analgesic consumption in first 24 hr and side effects noted . Analysis of data based on chi square test and post hoc test. P value < 0.05 considered significant. RESULTS: A total of ninety patients were included in study. The mean age of patients in group I was 32.60±14.8 years, in group II was41.67±16.6 years while in group III was 38.73±13.3 years. Tramadol with lignocaine was found to be significantly better as compared to paracetamol and lignocaine alone had early onset and delayed offset of sensory and motor block. The tramadol group required significantly less number of rescue analgesics i n first 24 hours as compared to the other two groups. CONCLUSION : We concluded that as adjuvant tramadol group was accompanied by more rapid onset, longer duration of analgesia provides better quality of anesthesia and lesser number of patients require rescue analgesia intraoperatively as well as postoperatively without any significant side effects.

  4. Effects of leucovorin and methylcobalamin with N2O anesthesia

    Results of the deoxyuridine suppression test, a good marker for defining biochemical megaloblastosis caused by deficiency of folate and vitamin B12, became abnormal (> 10%) after 6 hours of administration of nitrous oxide anesthesia. 5-Formyltetrahydrofolate and methylcobalamin administration during nitrous oxide anesthesia have no remarkable effect on the correction of deoxyuridine suppression test values. On the other hand, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate and methylcobalamin administrated at the end of nitrous oxide anesthesia corrected the abnormal deoxyuridine suppression test values nearly to normal range within 1 hour. 19 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  5. Effect of Tramadol on Medetomidine and Ketamine Anesthesia in Dogs

    W. Choi, H. S. Jang, S. H. Yun, J. S. Park, Y. S. Kwon and K. H. Jang*

    2011-01-01

    The analgesic effects of three different doses of tramadol as a preanesthetic in medetomidine-ketamine anesthesia in dogs were compared. Twenty-eight healthy adult mongrel dogs were used. The dogs were divided into four groups at random; 1 ml kg-1 of normal saline, 1, 2 or 4mg kg-1 of tramadol premedication (group Control, TRA1, TRA2 and TRA4) was then administered intravenously followed by medetomidine and ketamine anesthesia. The behavioral changes, the duration of surgical anesthesia, bloo...

  6. Effect of Epidural Block under General Anesthesia on Pulse Transit Time

    Epidural block under general anesthesia has been widely used to control postoperative pain. In this anesthetic state many hemodynamic parameters are changed. Moreover pulse transit time is influenced by this memodynamic change. PPT change in the finger and the toe due to relaxation of arterial wall muscle after general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia. This study, in the both general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia, ΔPTT of the toe and of the finger are measured. In addition, ΔPTT(toe-finger) of the epidural block under general anesthesia and of the general anesthesia were compared

  7. Effect of Epidural Block under General Anesthesia on Pulse Transit Time

    Choi, Byeong Cheol [Choonhae College of Health Sciences, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Min [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Dong Keun; Kim, Gi Ryon [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, He Jeong; Jeon, Gye Rock [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-08-15

    Epidural block under general anesthesia has been widely used to control postoperative pain. In this anesthetic state many hemodynamic parameters are changed. Moreover pulse transit time is influenced by this memodynamic change. PPT change in the finger and the toe due to relaxation of arterial wall muscle after general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia. This study, in the both general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia, {Delta}PTT of the toe and of the finger are measured. In addition, {Delta}PTT(toe-finger) of the epidural block under general anesthesia and of the general anesthesia were compared

  8. The comparison of Alfentanil and Remifentanil infusion during anesthesia on post-anesthesia recovery

    Masood Entezariasl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: With consideration the daily increased development of outpatient surgeries and high rate of these surgeries in elderly patients, rapid and safe recovery of patients is necessary. In this clinical trial study, recovery time and nausea and vomiting after the use of two rapid-onset narcotics, Alfentanil and Remifentanil, in elderly patients were evaluated. Methods: In this double-blind prospective clinical trial, 40 elderly patients (age above 65 years candidate to cataract surgery with general anesthesia were studied. The patients were divided randomly into two groups and for first group, 10 μg/kg of Alfentanil was injected and for second group Remifentanil 0.5 μg/kg was injected intravenously during 30 seconds one minute before induction. Both two groups were under general anesthesia with same method and during the anesthesia, first group took infusion of Alfentanil 1 μg/kg/min and second group took Remifentanil 0.1 μg/kg/min. In the end of surgery, the time intervals between end of anesthesia drug administration and spontaneous respiration, eyes opening with stimulation, verbal response and discharge of recovery room, also the incidence of complications related to narcotic drugs, especially nausea and vomiting, was recorded. The data were analyzed in SPSS software using descriptive and analytical statistics such as T-test and chi square test. Results: The time of spontaneous respiration in Alfentanil group was 2 minutes and in Remifentanil group was 3.3 minutes, the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.08. The time of eyes opening with stimulation, verbal response, and discharge of recovery room were not significantly different. During recovery, incidence of nausea and vomiting in Remifentanil group (30% of patients was significantly more than Alfentanil group (5% of patients (P=0.045. Conclusions: Recovery time between Alfentanil and Remifentanil group was not significantly different, but incidence of

  9. Adjuvant Therapy of Colon Cancer: Current Status and Future Developments

    Morse, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Options for the adjuvant therapy of resected stage III colon cancer have expanded beyond the previously well-accepted standard of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combined with leucovorin. The Xeloda in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Therapy (X-ACT) study confirmed that capecitabine (Xeloda) is at least as effective and is less toxic than a bolus 5-FU and leucovorin regimen for patients with stage III colon cancer. This study, in addition to National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) C-06, which...

  10. Obesity Is Independently Associated with Spinal Anesthesia Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Won Ho; Lim, Hyung Woo; Kim, Jie Ae; Kim, Duk-Kyung; Shin, Byung Seop; Sim, Woo Seog; Hahm, Tae Soo; Kim, Chung Su; Lee, Sangmin M.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of body-mass index (BMI) on spinal anesthesia is still controversial, with discrepant results reported in previous studies. To compare spinal anesthesia in obese and non-obese subjects, the anesthesia profiles in patients who underwent spinal anesthesia using intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine were compared. A total of 209 patients undergoing elective total knee replacement arthroplasty (TKRA) surgery under spinal anesthesia were divided into an NO (non-obese) group (BMI < 30 kg...

  11. [Recent advance in adjuvant therapy for breast cancer].

    Shimizu, Chikako; Watanabe, Toru

    2002-12-01

    Adjuvant systemic therapy has contributed to a significant improvement of disease-free and overall survival in addition to surgery and irradiation to the local disease. The adjuvant therapy to a patient is determined integrating the information on estimated risk of recurrence, benefit and harm of the therapy and the patient's value. In this review, the state of the art of adjuvant therapy is discussed from several aspects, such as interpretation and evaluation of risk, the best available evidences on adjuvant systemic therapy, the future direction of primary therapy for breast cancer, and patient-oriented decision making. PMID:12506467

  12. [Development of an anesthesia ledger using relational database].

    Hayashi, I; Mizoguchi, H; Fujiwara, M; Kato, H; Kawamura, J; Odashiro, M

    1993-08-01

    An anesthesia ledger was developed using relational database KIRI Ver3. This anesthesia database includes 33 items for input, for example patient's name, patient's I.D. number, data of operation, diagnosis, operative procedure, name of surgeon, name of anesthesiologists and so on. One can select data from displayed menu cards only by rolling down or rolling up the cursor at 19 items and can input numbers by keyboard at twelve items. Even a computer beginner can easily operate it after a minimal training. Only patient's name must be input by text style. We can construct this anesthesia database only by use of functions of KIRI Ver3 without programming. One can use this anesthesia ledger at any operative facilities by changing a part of database and a file of doctor's name. PMID:8366569

  13. PNEUMOTHORAX AFTER MODIFIED RADICAL MASTECTOMY UNDER GENERAL ANESTHESIA

    Amminikutty

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A 67 yrs old lady who underwent modified Radical mastectomy under General Anesthesia developed pneumothorax in the immediate post-operative period. She was treated with chest tube insertion and was discharged from hospital 8 days later

  14. Do Patients Fear Undergoing General Anesthesia for Oral Surgery?

    Elmore, Jasmine R.; Priest, James H.; Laskin, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients undergoing major surgery have more fear of the general anesthesia than the procedure. This appears to be reversed with oral surgery. Therefore, patients need to be as well informed about this aspect as the surgical operation.

  15. Administration of Anesthesia in a Patient with Allgrove Syndrome

    Ayse B. Ozer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to report the anesthesia administration to a patient who was planned to undergo Heller myotomy for achalasia. There wasnot property in the patient whom allgrove syndrome was excepted any steroid treatment in preoperative period. The night before the operation 18 mg of prednisolone was administered intravenously. Induction of anesthesia was performed with thiopental sodium, vecuronium and fentanyl and the patient received endotracheal intubation. Eyes were taped closed and protected with ointment during surgery. Maintenance of anesthesia was achieved with 2% sevoflurane concentration in 50% O2-50% N2O. 25 mg of prednisolone was infused preoperatively, and intervention with insulin treatment was initiated when blood glucose level rose to 18 mmol/L at 2 hours. Safe anesthesia can be achieved by observing the preoperative development of tracheal aspiration, adrenal insufficiency and, autonomic dysfunction carefully and maintaining eye protection.

  16. Mass-spectrometric monitoring of the stress reaction during anesthesia

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Levshankov, A. I.; Faizov, I. I.; Shchegolev, A. V.

    2013-10-01

    Clinical testing data for a mass-spectrometric method of estimating the patient's stress reaction to an injury done during anesthesia are presented. The essence of the method is monitoring the respiratory coefficient, which is defined as ratio N of the expiratory mass concentration of CO2 to the inspiratory mass concentration of O2 at each breathing cycle. For on-line monitoring of N, an electron ionization mass spectrometer connected to the breathing circuit of an inhalational anesthesia machine is used. Estimates of the anesthesia adequacy obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the method that analyzes induced acoustic encephalographic potentials. It is shown that the method suggested is more sensitive to the level of the patient's stress reaction during anesthesia than the induced potential method.

  17. Nursing intervention in gynecologic brachytherapy under general anesthesia

    We reconsidered our nursing intervention in gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy as general anesthesia was introduced. We recognized that safety, comfort, privacy protection and relief of anxiety of the patients were important points for nursing with corporation of other medical staffs. (author)

  18. Epidural anesthesia, hypotension, and changes in intravascular volume

    Holte, Kathrine; Foss, Nicolai B; Svensén, Christer;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The most common side effect of epidural or spinal anesthesia is hypotension with functional hypovolemia prompting fluid infusions or administration of vasopressors. Short-term studies (20 min) in patients undergoing lumbar epidural anesthesia suggest that plasma volume may increase when...... hypotension is present, which may have implications for the choice of treatment of hypotension. However, no long-term information or measurements of plasma volumes with or without hypotension after epidural anesthesia are available. METHODS: In 12 healthy volunteers, the authors assessed plasma (125I...... volunteers receiving hydroxyethyl starch. RESULTS: Plasma volume did not change per se after thoracic epidural anesthesia despite a decrease in blood pressure. Plasma volume increased with fluid administration but remained unchanged with vasopressors despite that both treatments had similar hemodynamic...

  19. [Demand for cleanliness of anesthesia machines and apparatus].

    Kasuda, Haruyuki; Ozawa, Yoshiko; Miyake, Satoshi; Ohkubo, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    (1) Outer surface of anesthesia machines and patient monitors, and breathing bags are exposed to the contaminated anesthetists' hands and fingers. Disinfection by wiping surface of anesthesia machines with alcohol, and disinfecting hands and fingers with rubbing-type, alcohol-based antiseptics are encouraged. (2) Anesthesia equipments' breathing circuit part is contaminated by patients' breath and respiratory secretions. It is necessary to set rules for exchange of breathing circuit tubes and breathing bags, periodical cleansing and disinfection of canisters as well as inhalation and exhalation valves, and usage of bacteria filters. (3) Anesthesia apparatus (laryngoscope, tracheal tube and suction tube) contact with patients' oral cavity and airway, and thus they are categorized as semi-critical items that require high-level disinfection. PMID:20486566

  20. 42 CFR 482.52 - Condition of participation: Anesthesia services.

    2010-10-01

    ... qualified doctor of medicine or osteopathy. The service is responsible for all anesthesia administered in... anesthesiologist; (2) A doctor of medicine or osteopathy (other than an anesthesiologist); (3) A dentist,...

  1. Linking sleep and general anesthesia mechanisms: this is no walkover.

    Bonhomme, V; Boveroux, P; Vanhaudenhuyse, A; Hans, P; Brichant, J F; Jaquet, O; Boly, M; Laureys, S

    2011-01-01

    This review aims at defining the link between physiological sleep and general anesthesia. Despite common behavioral and electrophysiological characteristics between both states, current literature suggests that the transition process between waking and sleep or anesthesia-induced alteration of consciousness is not driven by the same sequence of events. On the one hand, sleep originates in sub-cortical structures with subsequent repercussions on thalamo-cortical interactions and cortical activity. On the other hand, anesthesia seems to primarily affect the cortex with subsequent repercussions on the activity of sub-cortical networks. This discrepancy has yet to be confirmed by further functional brain imaging and electrophysiological experiments. The relationship between the observed functional modifications of brain activity during anesthesia and the known biochemical targets of hypnotic anesthetic agents also remains to be determined. PMID:22145259

  2. Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation Session 6: Vaccine & Adjuvant Formulation & Production 15-17 May 2013, Lausanne, Switzerland

    Fox, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    The Modern Vaccines/Adjuvants Formulation meeting aims to fill a critical gap in current vaccine development efforts by bringing together formulation scientists and immunologists to emphasize the importance of rational formulation design in order to optimize vaccine and adjuvant bioactivity, safety, and manufacturability. Session 6 on Vaccine and Adjuvant Formulation and Production provided three examples of this theme, with speakers emphasizing the need for extensive physicochemical characte...

  3. CpG ODN and ISCOMATRIX Adjuvant: A Synergistic Adjuvant Combination Inducing Strong T-Cell IFN-γ Responses

    Michael J. McCluskie; Weeratna, Risini D.; Evans, Dana M.; Shawn Makinen; Debbie Drane; Heather L. Davis

    2013-01-01

    For the induction of robust humoral and cellular immune responses, a strong rationale exists to use vaccine-adjuvant combinations possessing both immune modulatory and enhanced delivery capabilities. Herein, we evaluated the combination of 2 different adjuvants, a TLR9 agonist, composed of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs (CpG), and ISCOMATRIX adjuvant (ISCOMATRIX), composed of saponin, phospholipid, and cholesterol, which possesses both immunostim...

  4. Simultaneous Bilateral Cataract Surgery in General Anesthesia Patients

    Tien-En Huang; Hsi-Kung Kuo; Sue-Ann Lin; Po-Chiung Fang; Pei-Chang Wu; Yi-Hao Chen; Yung-Jen Chen

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the indications, safety, benefits, disadvantagesand advantages, and the visual outcomes for simultaneous bilateralcataract surgery (SBCS) under general anesthesia.Methods: This retrospective case review pertained to a period spanning from June1998 through June 2005 inclusively, and comprised of 27 consecutivepatients (54 eyes) that underwent simultaneous bilateral cataract surgeryunder general anesthesia at the Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Ho...

  5. Can Local Anesthesia Prevent the Injury of Brachial Plexus?

    Alaattin Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurilemmomas) are benign tumors arising from peripheral nerve sheaths. They can be seen all over the body, but approximately half of the cases occur in the head and neck region. The schwannoma arising from brachial plexus is a rare cause of neck masses. They are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. The risk of nerve damage after excision is high under general anesthesia. In this article, a case of brachial plexus schwannoma was presented and the excision with local anesthesia was sh...

  6. Active Emergence from Propofol General Anesthesia Is Induced by Methylphenidate

    Chemali, Jessica J.; Van Dort, Christa J.; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Background: A recent study showed that methylphenidate induces emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. Isoflurane and propofol are general anesthetics that may have distinct molecular mechanisms of action. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that methylphenidate actively induces emergence from propofol general anesthesia. Methods: Using adult rats, the effect of methylphenidate on time to emergence after a single bolus of propofol was determined. The ability of met...

  7. Effect of Tramadol on Medetomidine and Ketamine Anesthesia in Dogs

    W. Choi, H. S. Jang, S. H. Yun, J. S. Park, Y. S. Kwon and K. H. Jang*

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The analgesic effects of three different doses of tramadol as a preanesthetic in medetomidine-ketamine anesthesia in dogs were compared. Twenty-eight healthy adult mongrel dogs were used. The dogs were divided into four groups at random; 1 ml kg-1 of normal saline, 1, 2 or 4mg kg-1 of tramadol premedication (group Control, TRA1, TRA2 and TRA4 was then administered intravenously followed by medetomidine and ketamine anesthesia. The behavioral changes, the duration of surgical anesthesia, blood gas parameters (pH, pO2, and pCO2, heart rate, and systolic/diastolic pressure were observed. Tramadol (4mg kg-1 pretreatment significantly increased the degree of sedation when compared with the control, TRA1 and TRA2 groups at 15 min after tramadol administration (P<0.05. The duration of surgical anesthesia was significantly increased by tramadol (4mg kg-1 pretreatment when compared with that of the control group (P<0.05. There were no significant differences in behavioral changes, blood gas parameters (pH, pO2 and pCO2, heart rate, and arterial pressure among the groups. Tramadol at 4mg kg-1 did not affect the cardiovascular system and recovery of anesthesia, but significantly increased the duration of surgical anesthesia with medetomidine and ketamine. This result suggests that intravenous tramadol at 4mg kg-1 is a useful preanesthetic agent for extending the surgical level of anesthesia in medetomidine-ketamine anesthesia in dogs.

  8. Monitoring of propofol and its metabolite during total intravenous anesthesia

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Ershov, T. D.; Levshankov, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    Intravenous hypnotic propofol and its metabolite are detected in real time during total intravenous anesthesia by an electron ionization mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer is connected directly to the breathing circuit of an apparatus for inhalational anesthesia. Ratios between the propofol concentrations in expired air and blood serum are measured. It is concluded that real-time noninvasive monitoring of the propofol concentration in blood using electron ionization mass spectrometry is feasible.

  9. Mass spectrometer for real-time metabolism monitoring during anesthesia

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Levshankov, A. I.

    2012-06-01

    Mass-spectrometric monitoring of metabolism (CO2/O2) in the inspiration-expiration regime is used to estimate the anesthetic protection of the patient against surgical stimulation during combined anesthesia. A correlation between the anesthetic protection of the patient and the metabolic rate is demonstrated, and the periodic variation of the metabolic rate with time is found. The sevoflurane metabolism products and intravenous analgesic fentanyl are found in the blowing air of the patient during anesthesia.

  10. Cholecystectomy with local anesthesia as a resource in the elderly

    In the case of a patient presenting with acute cholescystectomy ideally is to remove the gallbladder. Sometimes there are special situations in malnourished elderlies with deterioration of its general status in whom a lengthy anesthesia intervention, even using not much invasive means as the videosurgery, put at risk the life of patient. In such cases the cholescystectomy with local anesthesia is an alternative that must to be taken into account. (author)

  11. Repetitive Pediatric Anesthesia in a Non-Hospital Setting

    Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers

  12. Tapia's Syndrome after Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery under General Anesthesia

    Park, Chang Kyu; Lee, Dong Chan; Park, Chan Joo; Hwang, Jang Hoe

    2013-01-01

    We present a case report to remind surgeons of this unusual complication that can occur in any surgery, even posterior cervical spine surgery under general anesthesia and discuss its causes, treatment methods, and the follow-up results in the literature. The peripheral Tapia's syndrome is a rare complication of anesthetic airway management. Main symptoms are hoarseness of voice and difficulty of tongue movement. Tapia's syndrome after endotracheal general anesthesia is believed to be due to p...

  13. The Advantages of Continuous Epidural Anesthesia in Spinal Deformity Surgery

    Ezhevskaya А.А.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to assess the efficacy of epidural anesthesia and analgesia during the integrated anesthetic management in spinal deformity surgery. Materials and Methods. The prospective randomized study involved 350 patients aged from 15 to 65 years, divided into two groups: group 1 (n=205 were given combined anesthesia — epidural and endotracheal anesthesia with sevoflurane and continuous epidural analgesia with ropivacaine, fentanyl and epinephrine after surgery; group 2 (n=145 had general anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl, and systemic administration of opioids after surgery. We assessed systemic hemodynamics parameters (a non-invasive method, pain at rest and activities, parameters of hemostasis and fibrinolysis, plasma levels of stress hormones, cytokine levels at seven stages of the study (before, during and three days after surgery. Results. Patients in group 1 with epidural anesthesia had significantly less pain both at rest and motion. The most blood saving effect (up to 60% of blood loss was also found in group 1. Hemodynamic monitoring demonstrated epidural anesthesia not to lead to the life-threatening events of myocardial contractility, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance and critical increasing of extravascular lung water. The impact of epidural anesthesia on hemostasis encompassed the activation of both coagulation and fibrinolysis. Furthermore, patients in group 1 compared to group 2 had significantly lower plasma levels of glucose, lactate, С-reactive protein, cortisol, and interleukins IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10. Conclusion. Comprehensive anesthetic protection in spinal deformity surgery based on epidural anesthesia provides adequate antinociceptive effects, inhibition of endocrine and metabolic stress response and correction of hemostasis problems.

  14. An essential role for orexins in emergence from general anesthesia

    Kelz, Max B.; Sun, Yi; Chen, Jingqiu; Cheng Meng, Qing; Moore, Jason T.; Veasey, Sigrid C.; Dixon, Shelley; Thornton, Marcus; Funato, Hiromasa; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2008-01-01

    The neural mechanisms through which the state of anesthesia arises and dissipates remain unknown. One common belief is that emergence from anesthesia is the inverse process of induction, brought about by elimination of anesthetic drugs from their CNS site(s) of action. Anesthetic-induced unconsciousness may result from specific interactions of anesthetics with the neural circuits regulating sleep and wakefulness. Orexinergic agonists and antagonists have the potential to alter the stability o...

  15. Issues of critical airway management (Which anesthesia; which surgical airway?)

    Fabrizio Giuseppe Bonanno

    2012-01-01

    Which anesthesia for patients with critical airway? Safe and effective analgesia and anesthesia in critical airway is a skilled task especially after severe maxillofacial injury combined with head injury and hemorrhagic shock. If on one side sedation is wanted, on the other hand it may worsen the airway and hemodynamic situation to a point where hypoventilation and decrease of blood pressure, common side-effect of many opioids, may prejudice the patient′s level of consciousness and hemodynami...

  16. A survey of user acceptance of electronic patient anesthesia records

    Jin, Hyun Seung; Kim, Myung Hee; Lee, Suk Young; Jeong, Hui Yeon; Choi, Soo Joo; Lee, Hye Won

    2012-01-01

    Background An anesthesia information management system (AIMS), although not widely used in Korea, will eventually replace handwritten records. This hospital began using AIMS in April 2010. The purpose of this study was to evaluate users' attitudes concerning AIMS and to compare them with manual documentation in the operating room (OR). Methods A structured questionnaire focused on satisfaction with electronic anesthetic records and comparison with handwritten anesthesia records was administer...

  17. High Satisfaction with Problem-Based Learning for Anesthesia.

    Chia-Hung Chang; Ching-Yue Yang; Lai-Chu See; Ping-Wing Lui

    2004-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare students' satisfaction between problem-based learning (PBL) and lecture-based traditional teaching of anesthesia.Methods: One hundred and thirty-seven fifth-year medical students were enrolled in acourse which used a hybrid curriculum for teaching about anesthesia. Thehybrid curriculum included 9 essential lectures and 3 related PBL case discussions.A Linkert 5-point scale was used for to assess students' satisfactionlevels between PBL and lect...

  18. Electroencephalographic Variation during End Maintenance and Emergence from Surgical Anesthesia

    Divya Chander; García, Paul S.; MacColl, Jono N.; Sam Illing; Sleigh, Jamie W

    2014-01-01

    The re-establishment of conscious awareness after discontinuing general anesthesia has often been assumed to be the inverse of loss of consciousness. This is despite the obvious asymmetry in the initiation and termination of natural sleep. In order to characterize the restoration of consciousness after surgery, we recorded frontal electroencephalograph (EEG) from 100 patients in the operating room during maintenance and emergence from general anesthesia. We have defined, for the first time, 4...

  19. Oral transmucosal fentanyl pretreatment for outpatient general anesthesia.

    Moore, P. A.; Cuddy, M. A.; Magera, J. A.; Caputo, A. C.; A.H. Chen; Wilkinson, L. A.

    2000-01-01

    The oral transmucosal formulation of fentanyl citrate (OTFC) has been reported to be an effective sedative, providing convenient and atraumatic sedation for children prior to general anesthesia or painful diagnostic procedures. Thirty-three young children (24-60 months of age) scheduled for outpatient general anesthesia for treatment of dental caries were enrolled in this randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial. To determine the effectiveness of the OTFC premedication, patient behavior w...

  20. Safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To analyze the safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. Methods: This was a prospective nonrandomized comparative study of 60 eyes of 60 patients treated with or without concurrent oral warfarin anticoagulant therapy, referred for cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. The sample included a treatment (n=30) and a control (n=30) group. Results: There were no records of intraoperative or postoperative intracameral bleeding complications ...

  1. Neuropeptide alterations in the tree shrew hypothalamus during volatile anesthesia

    Fouillen, Laetitia; Petruzziello, Filomena; Veit, Julia; Bhattacharyya, Anwesha; Kretz, Robert; Rainer, Gregor; Zhang, Xiaozhe

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptides are critical signaling molecules, involved in the regulation of diverse physiological processes including energy metabolism, pain perception and brain cognitive state. Prolonged general anesthesia has an impact on many of these processes, but the regulation of peptides by general anesthetics is poorly understood. In this study, we present an in-depth characterization of the hypothalamic neuropeptides of the tree shrew during volatile isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia administe...

  2. Succinylcholine Use in Adult Anesthesia – A Multinational Questionnaire Survey

    Karanović, Nenad; CAREV, MLADEN; Kardum, Goran; Tomanović, Nikac; Stuth, Eckehard; Gal, Janos; Tonković-Capin, Mislav; Đogaš, Varja; Račić, Goran; Đogaš, Zoran

    2011-01-01

    There are no definitive evidence based standards regarding use of succinylcholine (SCh) for anesthesia induction. However, there is a global trend toward eliminating SCh not only in elective, but also in emergency surgery in adults. The aim of the study was to survey the use of SCh in adult elective and emergency anesthesia practice in several European countries and the United States by questionnaire. One hundred and seventy anesthesiologists out of 201 possible, from six institutions in five...

  3. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    Mahmoud, Mohamed [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Towe, Christopher [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Fleck, Robert J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  4. CT chest under general anesthesia: pulmonary, anesthetic and radiologic dilemmas

    Today's practice of medicine involves ever more complex patients whose care is coordinated with multidisciplinary teams. Caring for these patients can challenge all members of the health care team. Sedation/anesthesia in infants/toddlers as well as uncooperative or intellectually or emotionally impaired children who require imaging studies of the chest are ongoing challenges. High-quality computed tomography (CT) chest imaging studies in children under general anesthesia are extremely important for accurate interpretation and subsequent medical decision-making. Anesthesia-induced atelectasis may obscure or mimic true pathology creating a significant quality issue. Obtaining a high-quality, motion-free chest imaging study in infants and children under general anesthesia remains a difficult task in many institutions. Meticulous attention to anesthesia and imaging techniques and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies. In this commentary, we discuss the continuous struggle to obtain high-quality CT chest imaging under general anesthesia. We will also discuss the major concerns of the anesthesiologist, radiologist and pulmonologist and why cooperation and coordination among these providers are critical for an optimal quality study.

  5. Review of pharmacokinetic models for target controlled infusions in anesthesia

    Subash Kennedy Sivasubramaniam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous injection of anesthetic drugs dates back to the 17th Century when opium and chloral hydrate have been injected intravenously. It was not until the 1930s intravenous anesthesia became popular with the invention of barbiturates.Early intravenous anesthetic agents such as barbiturates were ideal for induction of anesthesia, but not suitable for maintenance of anesthesia. Most of these drugs accumulated significantly with increasing durations of infusion and also resulted in cardiorespiratory depression. The invention of propofol and shorter acting opioid analgesics such as remifentanil and alfentanil have revolutionized intravenous anesthesia. The rapid onset and offset of these drugs lends itself to being suitable agents for maintenance of anesthesia over prolonged periods of time. Detailed understanding of the pharmacokinetics of propofol and remifentanil, combined with technological advances in intravenous pumps capable of accurate delivery of drugs have resulted in great development of the field of total intravenous anesthesia and target controlled infusions. I would like to discuss, in this article, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic models behind these intravenous infusion pumps. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(3.000: 417-423

  6. Combining isoflurane anesthesia with midazolam and butorphanol in rats.

    Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Uchida, Kaho; Maesato, Shizuka; Sato, Reiichiro; Kanai, Eiichi; Inomata, Tomo

    2016-07-29

    Representative inhalant anesthetic agent, isoflurane is commonly used during surgery in rats. However, isoflurane mediates relatively strong respiratory depression. In human and veterinary medicine, sedatives and analgesics are co-administered to complement the anesthetic action of inhalant anesthesia. The present study aimed to establish the novel balanced anesthesia that combines midazolam and butorphanol with isoflurane (MBI) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 2 groups, and administered either isoflurane monoanesthesia or isoflurane with midazolam (2.5 mg/kg, ip) and butorphanol (2.0 mg/kg, ip). The minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in each group was evaluated. Induction and recovery times were measured in each group. Adverse reactions during induction were also recorded. In each group, vital signs were assessed for 1 h under 1.5×MAC of isoflurane. Instability of vital signs was assessed under each anesthesia by calculating coefficient of variance. Compared with isoflurane monoanesthesia, MBI anesthesia caused 32% MAC reduction (isoflurane monoanesthesia: 1.30 ± 0.09%, MBI 0.87 ± 0.08%, PMBI anesthesia resulted in a relatively stable respiratory rate without decreases in SPO2 during the anesthetic period. In summary, MB premedication is effective for attenuating respiratory depression induced by isoflurane, and achieving smooth induction. This anesthetic protocol serves as a novel option for appropriate anesthesia in rats. PMID:26876437

  7. Electroencephalographic variation during end maintenance and emergence from surgical anesthesia.

    Chander, Divya; García, Paul S; MacColl, Jono N; Illing, Sam; Sleigh, Jamie W

    2014-01-01

    The re-establishment of conscious awareness after discontinuing general anesthesia has often been assumed to be the inverse of loss of consciousness. This is despite the obvious asymmetry in the initiation and termination of natural sleep. In order to characterize the restoration of consciousness after surgery, we recorded frontal electroencephalograph (EEG) from 100 patients in the operating room during maintenance and emergence from general anesthesia. We have defined, for the first time, 4 steady-state patterns of anesthetic maintenance based on the relative EEG power in the slow-wave (awareness after drug discontinuation. Moreover, these emergence patterns could be broadly grouped according to the duration and rapidity of transitions amongst these slow-wave dominated brain states that precede awakening. Most patients progressed gradually from a pattern characterized by strong peaks of delta (0.5-4 Hz) and alpha/spindle (8-14 Hz) power ('Slow-Wave Anesthesia') to a state marked by low delta-spindle power ('Non Slow-Wave Anesthesia') before awakening. However, 31% of patients transitioned abruptly from Slow-Wave Anesthesia to waking; they were also more likely to express pain in the post-operative period. Our results, based on sleep-staging classification, provide the first systematized nomenclature for tracking brain states under general anesthesia from maintenance to emergence, and suggest that these transitions may correlate with post-operative outcomes such as pain. PMID:25264892

  8. Comparison of acceptance, preference and efficacy between pressure anesthesia and classical needle infiltration anesthesia for dental restorative procedures in adult patients

    Chetana Sachin Makade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraoral local anesthesia is essential for delivering dental care. Needless devices have been developed to provide anesthesia without injections. Little controlled research is available on its use in dental restorative procedures in adult patients. The aims of this study were to compare adult patients acceptability and preference for needleless jet injection with classical local infiltration as well as to evaluate the efficacy of the needleless anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Twenty non fearful adults with no previous experience of dental anesthesia were studied using split-mouth design. The first procedure was performed with classical needle infiltration anesthesia. The same amount of anesthetic solution was administered using MADA jet needleless device in a second session one week later, during which a second dental restorative procedure was performed. Patients acceptance was assessed using Universal pain assessment tool while effectiveness was recorded using soft tissue anesthesia and pulpal anesthesia. Patients reported their preference for the anesthetic method at the third visit. The data was evaluated using chi square test and student′s t-test. Results: Pressure anesthesia was more accepted and preferred by 70% of the patients than traditional needle anesthesia (20%. Both needle and pressure anesthesia was equally effective for carrying out the dental procedures. Conclusion: Patients experienced significantly less pain and fear (p<0.01 during anesthetic procedure with pressure anesthesia. However, for more invasive procedures needle anesthesia will be more effective.

  9. MAGNESIUM SULPHATE VS CLONIDINE AS AN ADJUVANT TO 0.5% BUPIVACAINE IN EPIDURAL ANAESTHESIA FOR PATIENTS UNDERGOING LOWER LIMB SURGERIES: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Anand Masih

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidural anesthesia is a safe and inexpensive technique with the advantage of providing surgical anesthesia and prolonged postoperative pain relief. To address the problems of limited duration of action and to improve the quality of analgesia intra - operatively and postoperatively, various adjuvants have been added to bupivacaine. The present study is designed to evaluate the effect of magnesium sulphate vs clonidine as an adjunct to 0.5% Bupivacaine in epidural anesthesia for patients undergoing lower limb surgeries in terms of onset, duration and degree of sensory and motor block, sedation and pain. 90 patients of age group 18 - 60 years of ASA grade I & II of either sex undergoing lower limb surgeries were included in this prospective study who were randomly allocated into three groups . Group A received bupivacaine 0.5%(19ml +normal saline 0.9% (1.0ml, Group B received bupivacaine 0.5%(19ml+magnesium sulphate 50mg dissolved in 0.9% normal saline (1.0ml and Group C received bupivacaine 0.5%(19ml +clonidine 150μgm(1.0ml. Assessments of sensory block were performed at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 min and then every 10 min until the return of normal sensation. . Assessment of motor block were performed immediately after the assessment of sensory block until the return of normal motor function. The onset and end of all degrees of motor blocks were assessed bilaterally according to the Modified Bromage scale. Duration of analgesia, patient’s satisfaction, duration of motor block and adverse effects were assessed and recorded. We concluded that co - administration of epidural magnesium sulphate 50 MG with bupivacaine 0.5% produces predictable rapid onset of surgical anesthesia without any side - effects, and addi tion of clonidine 150μgmto epidural bupivacaine 0.5% produces prolonged duration of anesthesia with sedation. The results of our study suggest that magnesium may be a useful alternative as an adjuvant to epidural bupivacaine as clonidine .

  10. Usefulness of Intravenous Anesthesia Using a Target-controlled Infusion System with Local Anesthesia in Submuscular Breast Augmentation Surgery

    Kyu-Jin Chung; Kyu-Ho Cha; Jun-Ho Lee; Yong-Ha Kim; Tae-Gon Kim; Il-Guk Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients have anxiety and fear of complications due to general anesthesia. Through new instruments and local anesthetic drugs, a variety of anesthetic methods have been introduced. These methods keep hospital costs down and save time for patients. In particular, the target-controlled infusion (TCI) system maintains a relatively accurate level of plasma concentration, so the depth of anesthesia can be adjusted more easily. We conducted this study to examine whether intravenous anest...